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Sample records for 1d nanophotonic waveguides

  1. High efficiency and broad bandwidth grating coupler between nanophotonic waveguide and fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu; Xu, Xue-Jun; Li, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Liang; Han, Wei-Hua; Fan, Zhong-Chao; Yu, Yu-De; Yu, Jin-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    A high efficiency and broad bandwidth grating coupler between a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanophotonic waveguide and fibre is designed and fabricated. Coupling efficiencies of 46% and 25% at a wavelength of 1.55 μm are achieved by simulation and experiment, respectively. An optical 3 dB bandwidth of 45 nm from 1530 nm to 1575 nm is also obtained in experiment. Numerical calculation shows that a tolerance to fabrication error of 10 nm in etch depth is achievable. The measurement results indicate that the alignment error of ±2 μm results in less than 1 dB additional coupling loss.

  2. Efficient photon triplet generation in integrated nanophotonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Moebius, Michael G; Herrera, Felipe; Griesse-Nascimento, Sarah; Reshef, Orad; Evans, Christopher C; Guerreschi, Gian Giacomo; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Mazur, Eric

    2016-05-02

    Generation of entangled photons in nonlinear media constitutes a basic building block of modern photonic quantum technology. Current optical materials are severely limited in their ability to produce three or more entangled photons in a single event due to weak nonlinearities and challenges achieving phase-matching. We use integrated nanophotonics to enhance nonlinear interactions and develop protocols to design multimode waveguides that enable sustained phase-matching for third-order spontaneous parametric down-conversion (TOSPDC). We predict a generation efficiency of 0.13 triplets/s/mW of pump power in TiO2-based integrated waveguides, an order of magnitude higher than previous theoretical and experimental demonstrations. We experimentally verify our device design methods in TiO2 waveguides using third-harmonic generation (THG), the reverse process of TOSPDC that is subject to the same phase-matching constraints. We finally discuss the effect of finite detector bandwidth and photon losses on the energy-time coherence properties of the expected TOSPDC source.

  3. Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Paras N.

    2004-03-01

    The only comprehensive treatment of nanophotonics currently available Photonics is an all-encompassing optical science and technology which has impacted a diverse range of fields, from information technology to health care. Nanophotonics is photonic science and technology that utilizes light-matter interactions on the nanoscale, where researchers are discovering new phenomena and developing technologies that go well beyond what is possible with conventional photonics and electronics. These new technologies could include efficient solar power generation, high-bandwidth and high-speed communications, high-capacity data storage, and flexible- and high-contrast displays. In addition, nanophotonics will continue to impact biomedical technologies by providing new and powerful diagnostic techniques, as well as light-guided and activated therapies. Nanophotonics provides the only available comprehensive treatment of this exciting, multidisciplinary field, offering a wide range of topics covering: * Foundations * Materials * Applications * Theory * Fabrication Nanophotonics introduces students to important and timely concepts and provides scientists and engineers with a cutting-edge reference. The book is intended for anyone who wishes to learn about light-matter interactions on the nanoscale, as well as applications of photonics for nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology. Written by an acknowledged leader in the field, this text provides an essential resource for those interested in the future of materials science and engineering, nanotechnology, and photonics.

  4. Metal slit array Fresnel lens for wavelength-scale optical coupling to nanophotonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Jin; Park, Dongwon; Koo, Sukmo; Yu, Sunkyu; Park, Namkyoo

    2009-10-12

    We propose a novel metal slit array Fresnel lens for wavelength-scale optical coupling into a nanophotonic waveguide. Using the plasmonic waveguide structure in Fresnel lens form, a much wider beam acceptance angle and wavelength-scale working distance of the lens was realized compared to a conventional dielectric Fresnel lens. By applying the plasmon waveguide dispersion relation to a phased antenna array model, we also develop and analyze design rules and parameters for the suggested metal slit Fresnel lens. Numerical assessment of the suggested structure shows excellent coupling efficiency (up to 59%) of the 10 mum free-space Gaussian beam to the 0.36 mum Si waveguide within a working distance of a few mum.

  5. Chirality of nanophotonic waveguide with embedded quantum emitter for unidirectional spin transfer

    PubMed Central

    Coles, R. J.; Price, D. M.; Dixon, J. E.; Royall, B.; Clarke, E.; Kok, P.; Skolnick, M. S.; Fox, A. M.; Makhonin, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Scalable quantum technologies may be achieved by faithful conversion between matter qubits and photonic qubits in integrated circuit geometries. Within this context, quantum dots possess well-defined spin states (matter qubits), which couple efficiently to photons. By embedding them in nanophotonic waveguides, they provide a promising platform for quantum technology implementations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the naturally occurring electromagnetic field chirality that arises in nanobeam waveguides leads to unidirectional photon emission from quantum dot spin states, with resultant in-plane transfer of matter-qubit information. The chiral behaviour occurs despite the non-chiral geometry and material of the waveguides. Using dot registration techniques, we achieve a quantum emitter deterministically positioned at a chiral point and realize spin-path conversion by design. We further show that the chiral phenomena are much more tolerant to dot position than in standard photonic crystal waveguides, exhibit spin-path readout up to 95±5% and have potential to serve as the basis of spin-logic and network implementations. PMID:27029961

  6. An octave-spanning mid-infrared frequency comb generated in a silicon nanophotonic wire waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Kuyken, Bart; Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Van Campenhout, Joris; Verheyen, Peter; Coen, Stéphane; Leo, Francois; Baets, Roel; Roelkens, Gunther; Picqué, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Laser frequency combs, sources with a spectrum consisting of hundred thousands evenly spaced narrow lines, have an exhilarating potential for new approaches to molecular spectroscopy and sensing in the mid-infrared region. The generation of such broadband coherent sources is presently under active exploration. Technical challenges have slowed down such developments. Identifying a versatile highly nonlinear medium for significantly broadening a mid-infrared comb spectrum remains challenging. Here we take a different approach to spectral broadening of mid-infrared frequency combs and investigate CMOS-compatible highly nonlinear dispersion-engineered silicon nanophotonic waveguides on a silicon-on-insulator chip. We record octave-spanning (1,500–3,300 nm) spectra with a coupled input pulse energy as low as 16 pJ. We demonstrate phase-coherent comb spectra broadened on a room-temperature-operating CMOS-compatible chip. PMID:25697764

  7. An octave-spanning mid-infrared frequency comb generated in a silicon nanophotonic wire waveguide.

    PubMed

    Kuyken, Bart; Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W; Van Campenhout, Joris; Verheyen, Peter; Coen, Stéphane; Leo, Francois; Baets, Roel; Roelkens, Gunther; Picqué, Nathalie

    2015-02-20

    Laser frequency combs, sources with a spectrum consisting of hundred thousands evenly spaced narrow lines, have an exhilarating potential for new approaches to molecular spectroscopy and sensing in the mid-infrared region. The generation of such broadband coherent sources is presently under active exploration. Technical challenges have slowed down such developments. Identifying a versatile highly nonlinear medium for significantly broadening a mid-infrared comb spectrum remains challenging. Here we take a different approach to spectral broadening of mid-infrared frequency combs and investigate CMOS-compatible highly nonlinear dispersion-engineered silicon nanophotonic waveguides on a silicon-on-insulator chip. We record octave-spanning (1,500-3,300 nm) spectra with a coupled input pulse energy as low as 16 pJ. We demonstrate phase-coherent comb spectra broadened on a room-temperature-operating CMOS-compatible chip.

  8. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; de Rossi, Alfredo; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-04-01

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing the free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrödinger equation model. These results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides.

  9. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; De Rossi, Alfredo; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-01-01

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing the free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrödinger equation model. These results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides. PMID:27079683

  10. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; De Rossi, Alfredo; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-04-15

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing the free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrodinger equation model. Finally, these results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides.

  11. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides

    DOE PAGES

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; ...

    2016-04-15

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing themore » free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrodinger equation model. Finally, these results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides.« less

  12. Photon transport in a one-dimensional nanophotonic waveguide QED system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Zeng, Xiaodong; Nha, Hyunchul; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-06-01

    The waveguide quantum electrodynamics (QED) system may have important applications in quantum device and quantum information technology. In this article we review the methods being proposed to calculate photon transport in a one-dimensional (1D) waveguide coupled to quantum emitters. We first introduce the Bethe ansatz approach and the input-output formalism to calculate the stationary results of a single photon transport. Then we present a dynamical time-dependent theory to calculate the real-time evolution of the waveguide QED system. In the longtime limit, both the stationary theory and the dynamical calculation give the same results. Finally, we also briefly discuss the calculations of the multiphoton transport problems.

  13. Objective-first design of high-efficiency, small-footprint couplers between arbitrary nanophotonic waveguide modes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jesse; Vučković, Jelena

    2012-03-26

    We present an algorithm for designing high efficiency (∼98%), small-footprint (1.5-4 square vacuum wavelengths) couplers between arbitrary nanophotonic waveguide modes in two dimensions. Our "objective-first" method is computationally fast (15 minutes on a single-core personal computer), requires no trial-and-error, and does not require guessing a good starting design. We demonstrate designs for various coupling problems which suggest that our method allows for the design of any single-mode, linear optical device.

  14. Single-photon transport through an atomic chain coupled to a one-dimensional nanophotonic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Zeng, Xiaodong; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2015-08-01

    We study the dynamics of a single-photon pulse traveling through a linear atomic chain coupled to a one-dimensional (1D) single mode photonic waveguide. We derive a time-dependent dynamical theory for this collective many-body system which allows us to study the real time evolution of the photon transport and the atomic excitations. Our analytical result is consistent with previous numerical calculations when there is only one atom. For an atomic chain, the collective interaction between the atoms mediated by the waveguide mode can significantly change the dynamics of the system. The reflectivity of a photon can be tuned by changing the ratio of coupling strength and the photon linewidth or by changing the number of atoms in the chain. The reflectivity of a single-photon pulse with finite bandwidth can even approach 100 % . The spectrum of the reflected and transmitted photon can also be significantly different from the single-atom case. Many interesting physical phenomena can occur in this system such as the photonic band-gap effects, quantum entanglement generation, Fano-like interference, and superradiant effects. For engineering, this system may serve as a single-photon frequency filter, single-photon modulation, and may find important applications in quantum information.

  15. Evanescent excitation and collection of spontaneous Raman spectra using silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Ashim; Subramanian, Ananth Z; Wuytens, Pieter; Peyskens, Frédéric; Le Thomas, Nicolas; Baets, Roel

    2014-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the use of high contrast, CMOS-compatible integrated photonic waveguides for Raman spectroscopy. We also derive the dependence of collected Raman power with the waveguide parameters and experimentally verify the derived relations. Isopropyl alcohol (IPA) is evanescently excited and detected using single-mode silicon-nitride strip waveguides. We analyze the measured signal strength of pure IPA corresponding to an 819  cm⁻¹ Raman peak due to in-phase C-C-O stretch vibration for several waveguide lengths and deduce a pump power to Raman signal conversion efficiency on the waveguide to be at least 10⁻¹¹  per cm.

  16. Broadband nanophotonic waveguides and resonators based on epitaxial GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bruch, Alexander W.; Xiong, Chi; Leung, Benjamin; Poot, Menno; Han, Jung; Tang, Hong X.

    2015-10-05

    We demonstrate broadband, low loss optical waveguiding in single crystalline GaN grown epitaxially on c-plane sapphire wafers through a buffered metal-organic chemical vapor phase deposition process. High Q optical microring resonators are realized in near infrared, infrared, and near visible regimes with intrinsic quality factors exceeding 50 000 at all the wavelengths we studied. TEM analysis of etched waveguide reveals growth and etch-induced defects. Reduction of these defects through improved material and device processing could lead to even lower optical losses and enable a wideband photonic platform based on GaN-on-sapphire material system.

  17. Large-area binary blazed grating coupler between nanophotonic waveguide and LED.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongqiang; Zhou, Wenqian; Zhang, Meiling; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Enbang; Miao, Changyun; Tang, Chunxiao

    2014-01-01

    A large-area binary blazed grating coupler for the arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) demodulation integrated microsystem on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) was designed for the first time. Through the coupler, light can be coupled into the SOI waveguide from the InP-based C-band LED for the AWG demodulation integrated microsystem to function. Both the length and width of the grating coupler are 360 μm, as large as the InP-based C-band LED light emitting area in the system. The coupler was designed and optimized based on the finite difference time domain method. When the incident angle of the light source is 0°, the coupling efficiency of the binary blazed grating is 40.92%, and the 3 dB bandwidth is 72 nm at a wavelength of 1550 nm.

  18. Path-dependent initialization of a single quantum dot exciton spin in a nanophotonic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, R. J.; Price, D. M.; Royall, B.; Clarke, E.; Skolnick, M. S.; Fox, A. M.; Makhonin, M. N.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a scheme for in-plane initialization of a single exciton spin in an InGaAs quantum dot (QD) coupled to a GaAs nanobeam waveguide. The chiral coupling of the QD and the optical mode of the nanobeam enables spin initialization fidelity approaching unity in magnetic field B =1 T and >0.9 without the field. We further show that this in-plane excitation scheme is independent of the incident excitation laser polarization and depends solely on the excitation direction. This scheme provides a robust in-plane spin excitation basis for a photon-mediated spin network for quantum information applications.

  19. Scattering of a cross-polarized linear wave by a soliton at an optical event horizon in a birefringent nanophotonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ciret, Charles; Gorza, Simon-Pierre

    2016-06-15

    The scattering of a linear wave on an optical event horizon, induced by a cross-polarized soliton, is experimentally and numerically investigated in integrated structures. The experiments are performed in a dispersion-engineered birefringent silicon nanophotonic waveguide. In stark contrast with copolarized waves, the large difference between the group velocity of the two cross-polarized waves enables a frequency conversion almost independent of the soliton wavelength. It is shown that the generated idler is only shifted by 10 nm around 1550 nm over a pump tuning range of 350 nm. Simulations using two coupled full vectorial nonlinear Schrödinger equations fully support the experimental results.

  20. Enhancing single-molecule fluorescence with nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Acuna, Guillermo; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-10-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has become an important research tool in the life sciences but a number of limitations hinder the widespread use as a standard technique. The limited dynamic concentration range is one of the major hurdles. Recent developments in the nanophotonic field promise to alleviate these restrictions to an extent that even low affinity biomolecular interactions can be studied. After motivating the need for nanophotonics we introduce the basic concepts of nanophotonic devices such as zero mode waveguides and nanoantennas. We highlight current applications and the future potential of nanophotonic approaches when combined with biological systems and single-molecule spectroscopy.

  1. Injection and waveguiding properties in SU8 nanotubes for sub-wavelength regime propagation and nanophotonics integration.

    PubMed

    Bigeon, John; Huby, Nolwenn; Duvail, Jean-Luc; Bêche, Bruno

    2014-05-21

    We report photonic concepts related to injection and sub-wavelength propagation in nanotubes, an unusual but promising geometry for highly integrated photonic devices. Theoretical simulation by the finite domain time-dependent (FDTD) method was first used to determine the features of the direct light injection and sub-wavelength propagation regime within nanotubes. Then, the injection into nanotubes of SU8, a photoresist used for integrated photonics, was successfully achieved by using polymer microlensed fibers with a sub-micronic radius of curvature, as theoretically expected from FDTD simulations. The propagation losses in a single SU8 nanotube were determined by using a comprehensive set-up and a protocol for optical characterization. The attenuation coefficient has been evaluated at 1.25 dB mm(-1) by a cut-back method transposed to such nanostructures. The mechanisms responsible for losses in nanotubes were identified with FDTD theoretical support. Both injection and cut-back methods developed here are compatible with any sub-micronic structures. This work on SU8 nanotubes suggests broader perspectives for future nanophotonics.

  2. Analysis of nonlinear frequency mixing in 1D waveguides with a breathing crack using the spectral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2015-11-01

    A breathing crack, due to its bilinear stiffness characteristics, modifies the frequency spectrum of a propagating dual-frequency elastic wave, and gives rise to sidebands around the probing frequency. This paper presents an analytical-numerical method to investigate such nonlinear frequency mixing resulting from the modulation effects induced by a breathing crack in 1D waveguides, such as axial rods and the Euler-Bernoulli beams. A transverse edge-crack is assumed to be present in both the waveguides, and the local flexibility caused by the crack is modeled using an equivalent spring approach. A simultaneous treatment of both the waveguides, in the framework of the Fourier transform based spectral finite element method, is presented for analyzing their response to a dual frequency excitation applied in the form of a tone-burst signal. The intermittent contact between the crack surfaces is accounted for by introducing bilinear contact forces acting at the nodes of the damage spectral element. Subsequently, an iterative approach is outlined for solving the resulting system of nonlinear simultaneous equations. Applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated by considering several test cases. The existence of sidebands and the higher order harmonics is confirmed in the frequency domain response of both the waveguides under investigation. A qualitative comparison with the previous experimental observations accentuates the utility of the proposed solution method. Additionally, the influence of the two constituent frequencies in the dual frequency excitation is assessed by varying the relative strengths of their amplitudes. A brief parametric study is performed for bringing out the effects of the relative crack depth and crack location on the degree of modulation, which is quantified in terms of the modulation parameter. Results of the present investigation can find their potential use in providing an analytical-numerical support to the studies geared towards the

  3. Nano-composite insert in 1D waveguides for control of elastic power flow.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, P S; Mitra, Mira; Gopalakrishnan, S

    2007-01-24

    In this paper, carbon nanotube embedded polymer composite/nano-composites are used to regulate power flow from its source to other parts of the structure. This is done by inserting nano-composite strips in the waveguides which are modelled here as isotropic Euler-Bernoulli beams with axial, transverse and rotational degrees of freedom. The power flow is due to wave propagation resulting from a high frequency broadband impulse load. The underlying concept is that the high stiffness of the insert reduces the wave transmission between different parts of the structures. The simulations are done using a wavelet based spectral finite element (WSFE) technique which is specially tailored for such high frequency wave propagation analysis. Numerical experiments are performed to illustrate the use of inserts in maintaining the power flow in a certain region of the structure below a given threshold value which may be specified depending on various applications. The effects of parameters such as the volume fraction of carbon nanotube (CNT) in the polymer, and the length and position of the inserts are also studied. These studies help in defining the optimal volume fraction of CNT and length of the insert for a specified structural configuration.

  4. Nonlinear analysis of flexural wave propagation through 1D waveguides with a breathing crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2015-05-01

    An analytical-numerical approach is presented to investigate the flexural wave propagation through a slender semi-infinite beam with a breathing edge-crack. A Fourier transform based spectral finite element method is employed in an iterative manner to analyze the nonlinear response of the cracked beam subjected to a transverse tone burst excitation. Results obtained using the spectral finite element method are corroborated using 1D finite element analysis that involves the formulation and solution of a linear complementarity problem at every time step. In both the methods, an equivalent rotational spring is used to model the local flexibility caused by an open crack and the respective damaged beam element is formulated. The effect of crack-breathing is accounted for by an intermittent contact force acting at the nodes of the damaged beam element. A parallel study involving the open crack model is performed in the same setting to facilitate a comparison between the open and the breathing crack model. An illustrative case study reveals clearly the existence of higher order harmonics originating from the crack-breathing phenomenon which are absent if the crack is assumed to remain open throughout. A thorough investigation of the wrap-around effect associated with spectral finite element method reveals that the relative strengths of the higher order harmonics are not influenced by the wrap-around effect. A brief parametric study involving the variation of crack depth is presented at the end which suggests that the magnitudes of the higher harmonic peaks increase with increasing levels of crack severity. The present study can be potentially useful in the efforts geared toward the development of damage detection/localization strategies based on the nonlinear wave-damage interaction.

  5. Reprint of : Connection between wave transport through disordered 1D waveguides and energy density inside the sample: A maximum-entropy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Pier A.; Shi, Zhou; Genack, Azriel Z.

    2016-08-01

    We study the average energy - or particle - density of waves inside disordered 1D multiply-scattering media. We extend the transfer-matrix technique that was used in the past for the calculation of the intensity beyond the sample to study the intensity in the interior of the sample by considering the transfer matrices of the two segments that form the entire waveguide. The statistical properties of the two disordered segments are found using a maximum-entropy ansatz subject to appropriate constraints. The theoretical expressions are shown to be in excellent agreement with 1D transfer-matrix simulations.

  6. Waveguide arrangements based on adiabatic elimination

    SciTech Connect

    Suchowski, Haim; Mrejen, Michael; Wu, Chihhui; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-09-13

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to nanophotonics. In one aspect, an arrangement of waveguides includes a substrate and three waveguides. Each of the three waveguides may be a linear waveguide. A second waveguide is positioned between a first waveguide and a third waveguide. The dimensions and positions of the first, the second, and the third waveguides are specified to substantially eliminate coupling between the first waveguide and the third waveguide over a distance of about 1 millimeter to 2 millimeters along lengths of the first waveguide, the second waveguide, and the third waveguide.

  7. Engineered atom-light interactions in 1D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael J.; Hung, Chen-Lung; Yu, Su-Peng; Goban, Akihisa; Muniz, Juan A.; Hood, Jonathan D.; Norte, Richard; McClung, Andrew C.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Lee, Jae Hoon; Peng, Lucas; Painter, Oskar; Kimble, H. Jeff

    2014-05-01

    Nano- and microscale optical systems offer efficient and scalable quantum interfaces through enhanced atom-field coupling in both resonators and continuous waveguides. Beyond these conventional topologies, new opportunities emerge from the integration of ultracold atomic systems with nanoscale photonic crystals. One-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides can be engineered for both stable trapping configurations and strong atom-photon interactions, enabling novel cavity QED and quantum many-body systems, as well as distributed quantum networks. We present the experimental realization of such a nanophotonic quantum interface based on a nanoscale photonic crystal waveguide, demonstrating a fractional waveguide coupling of Γ1 D /Γ' of 0 . 32 +/- 0 . 08 , where Γ1 D (Γ') is the atomic emission rate into the guided (all other) mode(s). We also discuss progress towards intra-waveguide trapping of ultracold Cs. This work was supported by the IQIM, an NSF Physics Frontiers Center with support from the Moore Foundation, the DARPA ORCHID program, the AFOSR QuMPASS MURI, the DoD NSSEFF program, NSF, and the Kavli Nanoscience Institute (KNI) at Caltech.

  8. waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauters, Jared F.; Adleman, James R.; Heck, Martijn J. R.; Bowers, John E.

    2014-08-01

    Planar waveguides with ultra-low propagation loss are necessary for integrating optoelectronic systems that require long optical time delay or narrowband optical filters. In this paper, we review an ultra-low loss planar waveguide platform that uses thin (<150 nm) Si3N4 cores and thick (>8 μm) SiO2 cladding layers. In particular, we discuss the performance of arrayed waveguide gratings (AWGs) fabricated with the platform. We propose the use of a practical design method that takes the statistical nature of worst-case crosstalk into account. We also demonstrate the measurement of amplitude and phase error distributions in an AWG using an optical backscatter reflectometer. We show that the waveguides have phase errors small enough to achieve AWG crosstalk below -30 dB, while crosstalk below -40 dB should also be possible with optimization of the component design.

  9. Nanophotonic Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin; Hu, Xin; Wen, Long; Yu, Yan; Cumming, David R S

    2016-09-01

    The increasing miniaturization and resolution of image sensors bring challenges to conventional optical elements such as spectral filters and polarizers, the properties of which are determined mainly by the materials used, including dye polymers. Recent developments in spectral filtering and optical manipulating techniques based on nanophotonics have opened up the possibility of an alternative method to control light spectrally and spatially. By integrating these technologies into image sensors, it will become possible to achieve high compactness, improved process compatibility, robust stability and tunable functionality. In this Review, recent representative achievements on nanophotonic image sensors are presented and analyzed including image sensors with nanophotonic color filters and polarizers, metamaterial-based THz image sensors, filter-free nanowire image sensors and nanostructured-based multispectral image sensors. This novel combination of cutting edge photonics research and well-developed commercial products may not only lead to an important application of nanophotonics but also offer great potential for next generation image sensors beyond Moore's Law expectations.

  10. Waferscale nanophotonic circuits made from diamond-on-insulator substrates.

    PubMed

    Rath, P; Gruhler, N; Khasminskaya, S; Nebel, C; Wild, C; Pernice, W H P

    2013-05-06

    Wide bandgap dielectrics are attractive materials for the fabrication of photonic devices because they allow broadband optical operation and do not suffer from free-carrier absorption. Here we show that polycrystalline diamond thin films deposited by chemical vapor deposition provide a promising platform for the realization of large scale integrated photonic circuits. We present a full suite of photonic components required for the investigation of on-chip devices, including input grating couplers, millimeter long nanophotonic waveguides and microcavities. In microring resonators we measure loaded optical quality factors up to 11,000. Corresponding propagation loss of 5 dB/mm is also confirmed by measuring transmission through long waveguides.

  11. From molecular design and materials construction to organic nanophotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuang; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yong Sheng; Yao, Jiannian

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Nanophotonics has recently received broad research interest, since it may provide an alternative opportunity to overcome the fundamental limitations in electronic circuits. Diverse optical materials down to the wavelength scale are required to develop nanophotonic devices, including functional components for light emission, transmission, and detection. During the past decade, the chemists have made their own contributions to this interdisciplinary field, especially from the controlled fabrication of nanophotonic molecules and materials. In this context, organic micro- or nanocrystals have been developed as a very promising kind of building block in the construction of novel units for integrated nanophotonics, mainly due to the great versatility in organic molecular structures and their flexibility for the subsequent processing. Following the pioneering works on organic nanolasers and optical waveguides, the organic nanophotonic materials and devices have attracted increasing interest and developed rapidly during the past few years. In this Account, we review our research on the photonic performance of molecular micro- or nanostructures and the latest breakthroughs toward organic nanophotonic devices. Overall, the versatile features of organic materials are highlighted, because they brings tunable optical properties based on molecular design, size-dependent light confinement in low-dimensional structures, and various device geometries for nanophotonic integration. The molecular diversity enables abundant optical transitions in conjugated π-electron systems, and thus brings specific photonic functions into molecular aggregates. The morphology of these micro- or nanostructures can be further controlled based on the weak intermolecular interactions during molecular assembly process, making the aggregates show photon confinement or light guiding properties as nanophotonic materials. By adoption of some active processes in the composite of two or more

  12. Multiscaffold DNA Origami Nanoparticle Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami templated self-assembly has shown its potential in creating rationally designed nanophotonic devices in a parallel and repeatable manner. In this investigation, we employ a multiscaffold DNA origami approach to fabricate linear waveguides of 10 nm diameter gold nanoparticles. This approach provides independent control over nanoparticle separation and spatial arrangement. The waveguides were characterized using atomic force microscopy and far-field polarization spectroscopy. This work provides a path toward large-scale plasmonic circuitry. PMID:23841957

  13. Dielectric resonator antenna for applications in nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Malheiros-Silveira, Gilliard N; Wiederhecker, Gustavo S; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2013-01-14

    Optical nanoantennas, especially of the dipole type, have been theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by many research groups. Likewise, the plasmonic waveguides and optical circuits have experienced significant advances. In radio frequencies and microwaves a category of antenna known as dielectric resonator antenna (DRA), whose radiant element is a dielectric resonator (DR), has been designed for several applications, including satellite and radar systems. In this letter, we explore the possibilities and advantages to design nano DRAs (NDRAs), i. e., DRAs for nanophotonics applications. Numerical demonstrations showing the fundamental antenna parameters for a circular cylindrical NDRA type have been carried out for the short (S), conventional (C), and long (L) bands of the optical communication spectrum.

  14. Special issue on graphene nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. Yu; Maier, S. A.; Martin-Moreno, L.

    2013-11-01

    , although it cannot be considered as the proceedings of that workshop, was conceived there. Several topics at the cutting edge of research into graphene nanophotonics are covered in this publication. The papers by Polyushkin et al [3] and Thackray et al [4] consider structures where graphene is placed in close proximity to metallic plasmonic resonators. There graphene is used either as a substrate for metallic nanoparticles [3] or as a top layer covering metallic stripes [4]. Both studies find that the plasmonic response of metallic nanoparticles is notably modified by the presence of a graphene. The papers of Nefedov et al [5] and Bludov et al [6] analyze how a metamaterial based on a stack of graphene layers can provide unusually high absorption and reflection. These findings suggest that dynamical tuning of the reflectance and absorbance is possible at specific frequencies. The theory of the transverse current response for graphene within the random phase approximation is presented, from a general standpoint, in the paper by Gutiérrez-Rubio et al [7], which considers non-local effects, as well as the dependence of both temperature and surrounding dielectric media. Forati et al [8] present a study on conductivity and current distributions in a graphene sheet located over a ridge-perturbed ground plane, showing how the resulting plasmonic waveguide is more sensitive to the bias voltage than to the geometric ridge parameters. Effective analytical methods to address the electromagnetic resonances related to the excitation of graphene plasmons in different structures are presented in the papers by Balaban et al [9] (devoted to individual graphene discs and stripes) and Slipchenko et al [10] (which considers periodic graphene gratings). Popov et al [11] predict lasing of terahertz radiation in graphene due to the stimulated generation of plasmons. Their paper demonstrates that the dynamic and frequency ranges, as well as the energy conversion efficiency, of the terahertz

  15. All-nanophotonic NEMS biosensor on a chip

    PubMed Central

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu.; Stebunov, Yury V.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated chemical and biological sensors give advantages in cost, size and weight reduction and open new prospects for parallel monitoring and analysis. Biosensors based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are the most attractive candidates for the integrated platform. However, actuation and transduction techniques (e.g. electrostatic, magnetomotive, thermal or piezoelectric) limit their operation to laboratory conditions. All-optical approach gives the possibility to overcome this problem, nevertheless, the existing schemes are either fundamentally macroscopic or excessively complicated and expensive in mass production. Here we propose a novel scheme of extremely compact NEMS biosensor monolithically integrated on a chip with all-nanophotonic transduction and actuation. It consists of the nanophotonic waveguide and the nanobeam cantilever placed above the waveguide, both fabricated in the same CMOS-compatible process. Being in the near field of the strongly confined photonic or plasmonic mode, cantilever is efficiently actuated and its response is directly read out using the same waveguide, which results in a very high sensitivity and capability of single-molecule detection even in atmosphere. PMID:26043287

  16. Nanophotonics: materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Uriel; Tsai, Chia-Ho; Nezhad, M.; Nakagawa, Wataru; Chen, C.-H.; Tetz, Kevin A.; Pang, L.; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2004-07-01

    Optical technology plays an increasingly important role in numerous applications areas, including communications, information processing, and data storage. However, as optical technology develops, it is evident that there is a growing need to develop reliable photonic integration technologies. This will include the development of passive as well as active optical components that can be integrated into functional optical circuits and systems, including filters, switching fabrics that can be controlled either electrically or optically, optical sources, detectors, amplifiers, etc. We explore the unique capabilities and advantages of nanotechnology in developing next generation integrated photonic chips. Our long-range goal is to develop a range of photonic nanostructures including artificially birefringent and resonant devices, photonic crystals, and photonic crystals with defects to tailor spectral filters, and nanostructures for spatial field localization to enhance optical nonlinearities, to facilitate on-chip system integration through compatible materials and fabrication processes. The design of artificial nanostructured materials, PCs and integrated photonic systems is one of the most challenging tasks as it not only involves the accurate solution of electromagnetic optics equations, but also the need to incorporate the material and quantum physics equations. Near-field interactions in artificial nanostructured materials provide a variety of functionalities useful for optical systems integration. Furthermore, near-field optical devices facilitate miniaturization, and simultaneously enhance multifunctionality, greatly increasing the functional complexity per unit volume of the photonic system. Finally and most importantly, nanophotonics may enable easier integration with other nanotechnologies: electronics, magnetics, mechanics, chemistry, and biology.

  17. Nanophotonics for information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhad, M.; Abashin, M.; Ikeda, K.; Pang, L.; Kim, H. C.; Levy, U.; Tetz, K.; Rokitski, R.; Fainman, Y.

    2007-02-01

    Optical technology plays an increasingly important role in numerous applications areas, including communications, information processing, and data storage. However, as optical technology develops, it is evident that there is a growing need to develop reliable photonic integration technologies. This will include the development of passive as well as active optical components that can be integrated into functional optical circuits and systems, including filters, switching fabrics that can be controlled either electrically or optically, optical sources, detectors, amplifiers, etc. We explore the unique capabilities and advantages of nanotechnology in developing next generation integrated photonic chips. Our long-range goal is to develop a range of photonic nanostructures including artificially birefringent and resonant devices, photonic crystals, and photonic crystals with defects to tailor spectral filters, and nanostructures for spatial field localization to enhance optical nonlinearities, to facilitate on-chip system integration through compatible materials and fabrication processes. The design of artificial nanostructured materials, PCs and integrated photonic systems is one of the most challenging tasks as it not only involves the accurate solution of electromagnetic optics equations, but also the need to incorporate the material and quantum physics equations. Near-field interactions in artificial nanostructured materials provide a variety of functionalities useful for optical systems integration. Recently, the inclusion of surface plasmon photonics in this area has opened up a host of new possibilities Finally and most importantly, nanophotonics may enable easier integration with other nanotechnologies: electronics, magnetics, mechanics, chemistry, and biology. We will address some of these areas in this paper.

  18. Successful commercialization of nanophotonic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Supriya L.; Clarke, Roger B. M.; Hyde, Sam C. W.

    2006-08-01

    The exploitation of nanotechnology from proof of principle to realizable commercial applications encounters considerable challenges in regards to high volume, large scale, low cost manufacturability and social ethics. This has led to concerns over converting powerful intellectual property into realizable, industry attractive technologies. At The Technology Partnership we specifically address the issue of successful integration of nanophotonics into industry in markets such as biomedical, ophthalmic, energy, telecommunications, and packaging. In this paper we draw on a few examples where we have either developed industrial scale nanophotonic technology or engineering platforms which may be used to fortify nano/microphotonic technologies and enhance their commercial viability.

  19. Information physics fundamentals of nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Makoto; Tate, Naoya; Aono, Masashi; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2013-05-01

    Nanophotonics has been extensively studied with the aim of unveiling and exploiting light-matter interactions that occur at a scale below the diffraction limit of light, and recent progress made in experimental technologies--both in nanomaterial fabrication and characterization--is driving further advancements in the field. From the viewpoint of information, on the other hand, novel architectures, design and analysis principles, and even novel computing paradigms should be considered so that we can fully benefit from the potential of nanophotonics. This paper examines the information physics aspects of nanophotonics. More specifically, we present some fundamental and emergent information properties that stem from optical excitation transfer mediated by optical near-field interactions and the hierarchical properties inherent in optical near-fields. We theoretically and experimentally investigate aspects such as unidirectional signal transfer, energy efficiency and networking effects, among others, and we present their basic theoretical formalisms and describe demonstrations of practical applications. A stochastic analysis of light-assisted material formation is also presented, where an information-based approach provides a deeper understanding of the phenomena involved, such as self-organization. Furthermore, the spatio-temporal dynamics of optical excitation transfer and its inherent stochastic attributes are utilized for solution searching, paving the way to a novel computing paradigm that exploits coherent and dissipative processes in nanophotonics.

  20. Integrated nanophotonic devices for optical interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yidong; Feng, Xue; Cui, Kaiyu; Li, Yongzhuo; Wang, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Nanostructure is an effective solution for realizing optoelectronic devices with compact size and high performances simultaneously. This paper reports our research progress on integrated nanophotonic devices for optical interconnections. We proposed a parent-sub micro ring structure for optical add-drop multiplexer (OADM) with compact footprint, large free spectral range, and uniform channel spacing. All eight channels can be multiplexed and de-multiplexed with 2.6 dB drop loss, 0.36 nm bandwidth (>40 GHz), -20 dB channel crosstalk, and high thermal tuning efficiency of 0.15 nm/mW. A novel principle of optical switch was proposed and demonstrated based on the coupling of the defect modes in photonic crystal waveguide. Switching functionality with bandwidth up to 24 nm and extinction ratio in excess of 15 dB over the entire bandwidth was achieved, while the footprint was only 8 μm×17.6 μm. We proposed an optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) coding and decoding method to increase the data-carrying capacity of wireless optical interconnect. An integrated OAM emitter, where the topological charge can be continuously varied from -4 to 4 was realized. Also we studied ultrafast modulated nLED as the integrated light source for optical interconnections using a nanobeam cavity with stagger holes.

  1. Disorder improves nanophotonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paetzold, U. W. Smeets, M.; Meier, M.; Bittkau, K.; Merdzhanova, T.; Smirnov, V.; Carius, R.; Rau, U.; Michaelis, D.; Waechter, C.

    2014-03-31

    We present a systematic experimental study on the impact of disorder in advanced nanophotonic light-trapping concepts of thin-film solar cells. Thin-film solar cells made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon were prepared on imprint-textured glass superstrates. For periodically textured superstrates of periods below 500 nm, the nanophotonic light-trapping effect is already superior to state-of-the-art randomly textured front contacts. The nanophotonic light-trapping effect can be associated to light coupling to leaky waveguide modes causing resonances in the external quantum efficiency of only a few nanometer widths for wavelengths longer than 500 nm. With increasing disorder of the nanotextured front contact, these resonances broaden and their relative altitude decreases. Moreover, overall the external quantum efficiency, i.e., the light-trapping effect, increases incrementally with increasing disorder. Thereby, our study is a systematic experimental proof that disorder is conceptually an advantage for nanophotonic light-trapping concepts employing grating couplers in thin-film solar cells. The result is relevant for the large field of research on nanophotonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells which currently investigates and prototypes a number of new concepts including disordered periodic and quasi periodic textures.

  2. Disorder improves nanophotonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzold, U. W.; Smeets, M.; Meier, M.; Bittkau, K.; Merdzhanova, T.; Smirnov, V.; Michaelis, D.; Waechter, C.; Carius, R.; Rau, U.

    2014-03-01

    We present a systematic experimental study on the impact of disorder in advanced nanophotonic light-trapping concepts of thin-film solar cells. Thin-film solar cells made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon were prepared on imprint-textured glass superstrates. For periodically textured superstrates of periods below 500 nm, the nanophotonic light-trapping effect is already superior to state-of-the-art randomly textured front contacts. The nanophotonic light-trapping effect can be associated to light coupling to leaky waveguide modes causing resonances in the external quantum efficiency of only a few nanometer widths for wavelengths longer than 500 nm. With increasing disorder of the nanotextured front contact, these resonances broaden and their relative altitude decreases. Moreover, overall the external quantum efficiency, i.e., the light-trapping effect, increases incrementally with increasing disorder. Thereby, our study is a systematic experimental proof that disorder is conceptually an advantage for nanophotonic light-trapping concepts employing grating couplers in thin-film solar cells. The result is relevant for the large field of research on nanophotonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells which currently investigates and prototypes a number of new concepts including disordered periodic and quasi periodic textures.

  3. Multipolar interference effects in nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2017-03-28

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves by an arbitrary nanoscale object can be characterized by a multipole decomposition of the electromagnetic field that allows one to describe the scattering intensity and radiation pattern through interferences of dominating multipole modes excited. In modern nanophotonics, both generation and interference of multipole modes start to play an indispensable role, and they enable nanoscale manipulation of light with many related applications. Here, we review the multipolar interference effects in metallic, metal-dielectric and dielectric nanostructures, and suggest a comprehensive view on many phenomena involving the interferences of electric, magnetic and toroidal multipoles, which drive a number of recently discussed effects in nanophotonics such as unidirectional scattering, effective optical antiferromagnetism, generalized Kerker scattering with controlled angular patterns, generalized Brewster angle, and non-radiating optical anapoles. We further discuss other types of possible multipolar interference effects not yet exploited in the literature and envisage the prospect of achieving more flexible and advanced nanoscale control of light relying on the concepts of multipolar interference through full phase and amplitude engineering.This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  4. Metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Monticone, Francesco; Alù, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    The field of metamaterials has opened landscapes of possibilities in basic science, and a paradigm shift in the way we think about and design emergent material properties. In many scenarios, metamaterial concepts have helped overcome long-held scientific challenges, such as the absence of optical magnetism and the limits imposed by diffraction in optical imaging. As the potential of metamaterials, as well as their limitations, become clearer, these advances in basic science have started to make an impact on several applications in different areas, with far-reaching implications for many scientific and engineering fields. At optical frequencies, the alliance of metamaterials with the fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics can further advance the possibility of controlling light propagation, radiation, localization and scattering in unprecedented ways. In this review article, we discuss the recent progress in the field of metamaterials, with particular focus on how fundamental advances in this field are enabling a new generation of metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices. Relevant examples include optical nanocircuits and nanoantennas, invisibility cloaks, superscatterers and superabsorbers, metasurfaces for wavefront shaping and wave-based analog computing, as well as active, nonreciprocal and topological devices. Throughout the paper, we highlight the fundamental limitations and practical challenges associated with the realization of advanced functionalities, and we suggest potential directions to go beyond these limits. Over the next few years, as new scientific breakthroughs are translated into technological advances, the fields of metamaterials, plasmonics and nanophotonics are expected to have a broad impact on a variety of applications in areas of scientific, industrial and societal significance.

  5. Metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monticone, Francesco; Alù, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    The field of metamaterials has opened landscapes of possibilities in basic science, and a paradigm shift in the way we think about and design emergent material properties. In many scenarios, metamaterial concepts have helped overcome long-held scientific challenges, such as the absence of optical magnetism and the limits imposed by diffraction in optical imaging. As the potential of metamaterials, as well as their limitations, become clearer, these advances in basic science have started to make an impact on several applications in different areas, with far-reaching implications for many scientific and engineering fields. At optical frequencies, the alliance of metamaterials with the fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics can further advance the possibility of controlling light propagation, radiation, localization and scattering in unprecedented ways. In this review article, we discuss the recent progress in the field of metamaterials, with particular focus on how fundamental advances in this field are enabling a new generation of metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices. Relevant examples include optical nanocircuits and nanoantennas, invisibility cloaks, superscatterers and superabsorbers, metasurfaces for wavefront shaping and wave-based analog computing, as well as active, nonreciprocal and topological devices. Throughout the paper, we highlight the fundamental limitations and practical challenges associated with the realization of advanced functionalities, and we suggest potential directions to go beyond these limits. Over the next few years, as new scientific breakthroughs are translated into technological advances, the fields of metamaterials, plasmonics and nanophotonics are expected to have a broad impact on a variety of applications in areas of scientific, industrial and societal significance.

  6. New Perspectives in Silicon Micro and Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, M.; Coppola, G.; De Stefano, L.; Calio, A.; Rea, I.; Mocella, V.; Dardano, P.; Romano, S.; Rao, S.; Rendina, I.

    2015-05-01

    In the last two decades, there has been growing interest in silicon-based photonic devices for many optical applications: telecommunications, interconnects and biosensors. In this work, an advance overview of our results in this field is presented. Proposed devices allow overcoming silicon intrinsic drawbacks limiting its application as a photonic substrate. Taking advantages of both non-linear and linear effects, size reduction at nanometric scale and new two-dimensional emerging materials, we have obtained a progressive increase in device performance along the last years. In this work we show that a suitable design of a thin photonic crystal slab realized in silicon nitride can exhibit a very strong field enhancement. This result is very promising for all photonic silicon devices based on nonlinear phenomena. Moreover we report on the fabrication and characterization of silicon photodetectors working at near-infrared wavelengths based on the internal photoemission absorption in a Schottky junction. We show as an increase in device performance can be obtained by coupling light into both micro-resonant cavity and waveguiding structures. In addition, replacing metal with graphene in a Schottky junction, a further improve in PD performance can be achieved. Finally, silicon-based microarray for biomedical applications, are reported. Microarray of porous silicon Bragg reflectors on a crystalline silicon substrate have been realized using a technological process based on standard photolithography and electrochemical anodization of the silicon. Our insights show that silicon is a promising platform for the integration of various optical functionalities on the same chip opening new frontiers in the field of low-cost silicon micro and nanophotonics.

  7. Fundamental Scaling Laws in Nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Sun, Shuai; Majumdar, Arka; Sorger, Volker J.

    2016-01-01

    The success of information technology has clearly demonstrated that miniaturization often leads to unprecedented performance, and unanticipated applications. This hypothesis of “smaller-is-better” has motivated optical engineers to build various nanophotonic devices, although an understanding leading to fundamental scaling behavior for this new class of devices is missing. Here we analyze scaling laws for optoelectronic devices operating at micro and nanometer length-scale. We show that optoelectronic device performance scales non-monotonically with device length due to the various device tradeoffs, and analyze how both optical and electrical constrains influence device power consumption and operating speed. Specifically, we investigate the direct influence of scaling on the performance of four classes of photonic devices, namely laser sources, electro-optic modulators, photodetectors, and all-optical switches based on three types of optical resonators; microring, Fabry-Perot cavity, and plasmonic metal nanoparticle. Results show that while microrings and Fabry-Perot cavities can outperform plasmonic cavities at larger length-scales, they stop working when the device length drops below 100 nanometers, due to insufficient functionality such as feedback (laser), index-modulation (modulator), absorption (detector) or field density (optical switch). Our results provide a detailed understanding of the limits of nanophotonics, towards establishing an opto-electronics roadmap, akin to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. PMID:27869159

  8. Fundamental Scaling Laws in Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ke; Sun, Shuai; Majumdar, Arka; Sorger, Volker J.

    2016-11-01

    The success of information technology has clearly demonstrated that miniaturization often leads to unprecedented performance, and unanticipated applications. This hypothesis of “smaller-is-better” has motivated optical engineers to build various nanophotonic devices, although an understanding leading to fundamental scaling behavior for this new class of devices is missing. Here we analyze scaling laws for optoelectronic devices operating at micro and nanometer length-scale. We show that optoelectronic device performance scales non-monotonically with device length due to the various device tradeoffs, and analyze how both optical and electrical constrains influence device power consumption and operating speed. Specifically, we investigate the direct influence of scaling on the performance of four classes of photonic devices, namely laser sources, electro-optic modulators, photodetectors, and all-optical switches based on three types of optical resonators; microring, Fabry-Perot cavity, and plasmonic metal nanoparticle. Results show that while microrings and Fabry-Perot cavities can outperform plasmonic cavities at larger length-scales, they stop working when the device length drops below 100 nanometers, due to insufficient functionality such as feedback (laser), index-modulation (modulator), absorption (detector) or field density (optical switch). Our results provide a detailed understanding of the limits of nanophotonics, towards establishing an opto-electronics roadmap, akin to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  9. Fundamental Scaling Laws in Nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Sun, Shuai; Majumdar, Arka; Sorger, Volker J

    2016-11-21

    The success of information technology has clearly demonstrated that miniaturization often leads to unprecedented performance, and unanticipated applications. This hypothesis of "smaller-is-better" has motivated optical engineers to build various nanophotonic devices, although an understanding leading to fundamental scaling behavior for this new class of devices is missing. Here we analyze scaling laws for optoelectronic devices operating at micro and nanometer length-scale. We show that optoelectronic device performance scales non-monotonically with device length due to the various device tradeoffs, and analyze how both optical and electrical constrains influence device power consumption and operating speed. Specifically, we investigate the direct influence of scaling on the performance of four classes of photonic devices, namely laser sources, electro-optic modulators, photodetectors, and all-optical switches based on three types of optical resonators; microring, Fabry-Perot cavity, and plasmonic metal nanoparticle. Results show that while microrings and Fabry-Perot cavities can outperform plasmonic cavities at larger length-scales, they stop working when the device length drops below 100 nanometers, due to insufficient functionality such as feedback (laser), index-modulation (modulator), absorption (detector) or field density (optical switch). Our results provide a detailed understanding of the limits of nanophotonics, towards establishing an opto-electronics roadmap, akin to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  10. High-Performance Doped Silver Films: Overcoming Fundamental Material Limits for Nanophotonic Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Chen, Long; Ji, Chengang; Xu, Mingjie; Ferrera, Marcello; Pan, Xiaoqing; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Guo, L Jay

    2017-03-20

    The field of nanophotonics has ushered in a new paradigm of light manipulation by enabling deep subdiffraction confinement assisted by metallic nanostructures. However, a key limitation which has stunted a full development of high-performance nanophotonic devices is the typical large losses associated with the constituent metals. Although silver has long been known as the highest quality plasmonic material for visible and near infrared applications, its usage has been limited due to practical issues of continuous thin film formation, stability, adhesion, and surface roughness. Recently, a solution is proposed to the above issues by doping a proper amount of aluminum during silver deposition. In this work, the potential of doped silver for nanophotonic applications is presented by demonstrating several high-performance key nanophotonic devices. First, long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguides show propagation distances of a few centimeters. Second, hyperbolic metamaterials consisting of ultrathin Al-doped Ag films are attained having a homogeneous and low-loss response, and supporting a broad range of high-k modes. Finally, transparent conductors based on Al-doped Ag possess both a high and flat transmittance over the visible and near-IR range.

  11. Butterfly scales as bionic templates for complex ordered nanophotonic materials: A pathway to biomimetic plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, Zoran; Pantelić, Dejan; Sarajlić, Milija; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Matović, Jovan; Jelenković, Branislav; Vasiljević-Radović, Dana; Ćurčić, Srećko; Vuković, Slobodan; Pavlović, Vladimir; Buha, Jelena; Lačković, Vesna; Labudović-Borović, Milica; Ćurčić, Božidar

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we propose a possible use of butterfly scales as templates for ordered 2D or 3D nanophotonic materials, with complexity not easily reproducible by conventional micro/nanofabrication methods. Functionalization through laminar nanocompositing is utilized to impart novel properties to the biological scaffold. An extremely wide variability of butterfly scale forms, shapes, sizes and fine structures is observed in nature, many of them already possessing peculiar optical properties. Their nanophotonic functionalization ensures a large choice of forms and functions, including enhanced light localization, light and plasmon waveguiding and general metamaterial behavior, to mention a few. We show that one is able to achieve a combination of plasmonics and bionics, resulting in functionalities seldom if ever met in nature. As an illustration we have analyzed the photonic properties of the nanostructured scales on the wings of Purple Emperor butterflies Apatura ilia, Apatura iris and Sasakia charonda. Their intricate nanometer-sized structures produce remarkable ultraviolet-blue iridescence, spectrally and directionally narrow. We present our analysis of their plasmonic/nanophotonic functionalization including preliminary calculations and initial experimental results. As a simple example, we used radiofrequent sputtering to produce nanoaperture-based plasmonic structures at a fraction of the cost and necessary engineering efforts compared to the conventional top-down methods. We conclude that the described pathway to biomimetic plasmonics offers potentials for significant expansion of the nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic material toolbox.

  12. Increasing the density of passive photonic-integrated circuits via nanophotonic cloaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bing; Polson, Randy; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-11-01

    Photonic-integrated devices need to be adequately spaced apart to prevent signal cross-talk. This fundamentally limits their packing density. Here we report the use of nanophotonic cloaking to render neighbouring devices invisible to one another, which allows them to be placed closer together than is otherwise feasible. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrated waveguides that are spaced by a distance of ~λ0/2 and designed waveguides with centre-to-centre spacing as small as 600 nm (<λ0/2.5). Our experiments show a transmission efficiency >-2 dB and an extinction ratio >15 dB over a bandwidth larger than 60 nm. This performance can be improved with better design algorithms and industry-standard lithography. The nanophotonic cloak relies on multiple guided-mode resonances, which render such devices very robust to fabrication errors. Our devices are broadly complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, have a minimum pitch of 200 nm and can be fabricated with a single lithography step. The nanophotonic cloaks can be generally applied to all passive integrated photonics.

  13. Increasing the density of passive photonic-integrated circuits via nanophotonic cloaking.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bing; Polson, Randy; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-11-09

    Photonic-integrated devices need to be adequately spaced apart to prevent signal cross-talk. This fundamentally limits their packing density. Here we report the use of nanophotonic cloaking to render neighbouring devices invisible to one another, which allows them to be placed closer together than is otherwise feasible. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrated waveguides that are spaced by a distance of ∼λ0/2 and designed waveguides with centre-to-centre spacing as small as 600 nm (<λ0/2.5). Our experiments show a transmission efficiency >-2 dB and an extinction ratio >15 dB over a bandwidth larger than 60 nm. This performance can be improved with better design algorithms and industry-standard lithography. The nanophotonic cloak relies on multiple guided-mode resonances, which render such devices very robust to fabrication errors. Our devices are broadly complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, have a minimum pitch of 200 nm and can be fabricated with a single lithography step. The nanophotonic cloaks can be generally applied to all passive integrated photonics.

  14. Increasing the density of passive photonic-integrated circuits via nanophotonic cloaking

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bing; Polson, Randy; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Photonic-integrated devices need to be adequately spaced apart to prevent signal cross-talk. This fundamentally limits their packing density. Here we report the use of nanophotonic cloaking to render neighbouring devices invisible to one another, which allows them to be placed closer together than is otherwise feasible. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrated waveguides that are spaced by a distance of ∼λ0/2 and designed waveguides with centre-to-centre spacing as small as 600 nm (<λ0/2.5). Our experiments show a transmission efficiency >−2 dB and an extinction ratio >15 dB over a bandwidth larger than 60 nm. This performance can be improved with better design algorithms and industry-standard lithography. The nanophotonic cloak relies on multiple guided-mode resonances, which render such devices very robust to fabrication errors. Our devices are broadly complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, have a minimum pitch of 200 nm and can be fabricated with a single lithography step. The nanophotonic cloaks can be generally applied to all passive integrated photonics. PMID:27827391

  15. Nanophotonic Design for Broadband Light Management

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, Emily; Callahan, Dennis; Horowitz, Kelsey; Pala, Ragip; Atwater, Harry

    2014-10-13

    We describe nanophotonic design approaches for broadband light management including i) crossed-trapezoidal Si structures ii) Si photonic crystal superlattices, and iii) tapered and inhomogeneous diameter III-V/Si nanowire arrays.

  16. Nanophotonic graphene-based racetrack-resonator add/drop filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth L., A.; da Silva, M. G.; Neves, D. M. C.; Sombra, A. S. B.

    2016-05-01

    We are presenting and analyzing a graphene-based nanophotonic device to operate as a resonator-add/drop filter, whose control is obtained by varying the graphene chemical potential. That device consists of graphene-based waveguides, two directional couplers and a racetrack resonator with 90° bends. Since the graphene chemical potential provides the achievement of the necessary parameters, the resonance and filtering of the signals are obtained by applying the correct value of the graphene chemical potential in the graphene nanoribbons. The results of this study should help in the development of new graphene-based nanophotonic devices operating in the terahertz and infrared range (including in the C-band of the International Telecommunication Union - ITU), for use in future communications networks.

  17. Mode Conversion of Propagating Surface Plasmons in Nanophotonic Networks Induced by Structural Symmetry Breaking

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Deng; Wei, Hong; Jia, Zhili; Xu, Hongxing

    2014-01-01

    Nanophotonic plasmon circuits may play important roles in next-generation information technology as semiconductor-based electronics is approaching the physical limit. The functions of such circuits rely on the rigorous control of plasmon propagation. One important aspect of such control is controlling the conversion of different plasmon modes for designed plasmon routing in complex nanophotonic networks. Here, for the first time, we experimentally prove that the conversion of plasmon modes occurs widely in metallic nanowire waveguides, the basic components of plasmonic circuits, by introducing local structural symmetry breaking. In further simulations for the structure of a nanowire with a particle in its proximity, it is shown that the mode conversions originate from the redistribution of electric field on the wave front which is caused by the scattering of localized modes in the nanogap and on the nanoparticle. This mode conversion effect can be applied to flexibly control the plasmon propagation behavior in plasmonic nanowire networks.

  18. DNA nanotechnology for nanophotonic applications.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Anirban; Banerjee, Saswata; Liu, Yan

    2015-02-14

    DNA nanotechnology has touched the epitome of miniaturization by integrating various nanometer size particles with nanometer precision. This enticing bottom-up approach has employed small DNA tiles, large multi-dimensional polymeric structures or more recently DNA origami to organize nanoparticles of different inorganic materials, small organic molecules or macro-biomolecules like proteins, and RNAs into fascinating patterns that are difficult to achieve by other conventional methods. Here, we are especially interested in the self-assembly of nanomaterials that are potentially attractive elements in the burgeoning field of nanophotonics. These materials include plasmonic nanoparticles, quantum dots, fluorescent organic dyes, etc. DNA based self-assembly allows excellent control over distance, orientation and stoichiometry of these nano-elements that helps to engineer intelligent systems that can potentially pave the path for future technology. Many outstanding structures have been fabricated that are capable of fine tuning optical properties, such as fluorescence intensity and lifetime modulation, enhancement of Raman scattering and emergence of circular dichroism responses. Within the limited scope of this review we have tried to give a glimpse of the development of this still nascent but highly promising field to its current status as well as the existing challenges before us.

  19. DNA nanotechnology for nanophotonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Anirban; Banerjee, Saswata; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology has touched the epitome of miniaturization by integrating various nanometer size particles with nanometer precision. This enticing bottom-up approach has employed small DNA tiles, large multi-dimensional polymeric structures or more recently DNA origami to organize nanoparticles of different inorganic materials, small organic molecules or macro-biomolecules like proteins, and RNAs into fascinating patterns that are difficult to achieve by other conventional methods. Here, we are especially interested in the self-assembly of nanomaterials that are potentially attractive elements in the burgeoning field of nanophotonics. These materials include plasmonic nanoparticles, quantum dots, fluorescent organic dyes, etc. DNA based self-assembly allows excellent control over distance, orientation and stoichiometry of these nano-elements that helps to engineer intelligent systems that can potentially pave the path for future technology. Many outstanding structures have been fabricated that are capable of fine tuning optical properties, such as fluorescence intensity and lifetime modulation, enhancement of Raman scattering and emergence of circular dichroism responses. Within the limited scope of this review we have tried to give a glimpse of the development of this still nascent but highly promising field to its current status as well as the existing challenges before us.

  20. Alternative materials lead to practical nanophotonic components (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, Nathaniel; Ferrera, Marcello; DeVault, Clayton; Kim, Jongbum; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2015-09-01

    Recently, there has been a flurry of research in the field of alternative plasmonic materials, but for telecommunication applications, CMOS compatible materials titanium nitride and doped zinc oxides are among the most promising materials currently available. TiN is a gold-like ceramic with a permittivity cross-over near 500nm. In addition, TiN can attain ultra-thin, ultra-smooth epitaxial films on substrates such as c-sapphire, MgO, and silicon. Partnering TiN with CMOS compatible silicon nitride enables a fully solid state waveguide which is able to achieve a propagation length greater than 1cm for a ~8μm mode size at 1.55μm. Utilizing doped zinc oxide films as a dynamic material, high performance modulators can also be realized due to the low-loss achieved by the TiN/Si3N4 waveguide. Simply by placing a thin layer of aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) on top of the waveguide structure, a modulator with very low insertion loss is achieved. Our recent work has investigated optical tuning of AZO films by the pump-probe method, demonstrating a change in the refractive index of -0.17+0.25i at 1.3μm with an ultrafast response of 1ps. Assuming this change in the refractive index for the AZO film, a modulation of ~0.7dB/μm is possible in the structure with ~0.5dB insertion loss and an operational speed of 1THz. Further optimization of the design is expected to lead to an increased modulation depth without sacrificing insertion loss or speed. Consequently, nanophotonic technologies are reaching a critical point where many applications including telecom, medicine, and quantum science can see practical systems which provide new functionalities.

  1. A nanophotonic solar thermophotovoltaic device.

    PubMed

    Lenert, Andrej; Bierman, David M; Nam, Youngsuk; Chan, Walker R; Celanović, Ivan; Soljačić, Marin; Wang, Evelyn N

    2014-02-01

    The most common approaches to generating power from sunlight are either photovoltaic, in which sunlight directly excites electron-hole pairs in a semiconductor, or solar-thermal, in which sunlight drives a mechanical heat engine. Photovoltaic power generation is intermittent and typically only exploits a portion of the solar spectrum efficiently, whereas the intrinsic irreversibilities of small heat engines make the solar-thermal approach best suited for utility-scale power plants. There is, therefore, an increasing need for hybrid technologies for solar power generation. By converting sunlight into thermal emission tuned to energies directly above the photovoltaic bandgap using a hot absorber-emitter, solar thermophotovoltaics promise to leverage the benefits of both approaches: high efficiency, by harnessing the entire solar spectrum; scalability and compactness, because of their solid-state nature; and dispatchablility, owing to the ability to store energy using thermal or chemical means. However, efficient collection of sunlight in the absorber and spectral control in the emitter are particularly challenging at high operating temperatures. This drawback has limited previous experimental demonstrations of this approach to conversion efficiencies around or below 1% (refs 9, 10, 11). Here, we report on a full solar thermophotovoltaic device, which, thanks to the nanophotonic properties of the absorber-emitter surface, reaches experimental efficiencies of 3.2%. The device integrates a multiwalled carbon nanotube absorber and a one-dimensional Si/SiO2 photonic-crystal emitter on the same substrate, with the absorber-emitter areas optimized to tune the energy balance of the device. Our device is planar and compact and could become a viable option for high-performance solar thermophotovoltaic energy conversion.

  2. Angular dependence of light trapping in nanophotonic thin-film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Michael; Smirnov, Vladimir; Bittkau, Karsten; Meier, Matthias; Carius, Reinhard; Rau, Uwe; Paetzold, Ulrich W

    2015-11-30

    The angular dependence of light-trapping in nanophotonic thin-film solar cells is inherent due to the wavelength-scale dimensions of the periodic nanopatterns. In this paper, we experimentally investigate the dependence of light coupling to waveguide modes for light trapping in a-Si:H solar cells deposited on nanopatterned back contacts. First, we accurately determine the spectral positions of individual waveguide modes in thin-film solar cells in external quantum efficiency and absorptance. Second, we demonstrate the strong angular dependence of this spectral position for our solar cells. Third, a moderate level of disorder is introduced to the initially periodic nanopattern of the back contacts. As a result, the angular dependence is reduced. Last, we experimentally compare this dependence on the angle of incidence for randomly textured, 2D periodically nanopatterned and 2D disordered back contacts in external quantum efficiency and short-circuit current density.

  3. Mixed-Mode Operation of Hybrid Phase-Change Nanophotonic Circuits.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yegang; Stegmaier, Matthias; Nukala, Pavan; Giambra, Marco A; Ferrari, Simone; Busacca, Alessandro; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-01-11

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are highly attractive for nonvolatile electrical and all-optical memory applications because of unique features such as ultrafast and reversible phase transitions, long-term endurance, and high scalability to nanoscale dimensions. Understanding their transient characteristics upon phase transition in both the electrical and the optical domains is essential for using PCMs in future multifunctional optoelectronic circuits. Here, we use a PCM nanowire embedded into a nanophotonic circuit to study switching dynamics in mixed-mode operation. Evanescent coupling between light traveling along waveguides and a phase-change nanowire enables reversible phase transition between amorphous and crystalline states. We perform time-resolved measurements of the transient change in both the optical transmission and resistance of the nanowire and show reversible switching operations in both the optical and the electrical domains. Our results pave the way toward on-chip multifunctional optoelectronic integrated devices, waveguide integrated memories, and hybrid processing applications.

  4. Colloidal nanophotonics: the emerging technology platform.

    PubMed

    Gaponenko, Sergey; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Seassal, Christian; Woggon, Ulrike

    2016-01-25

    Dating back to decades or even centuries ago, colloidal nanophotonics during the last ten years rapidly extends towards light emitting devices, lasers, sensors and photonic circuitry to manifest itself as an emerging technology platform rather than an entirely academic research field.

  5. Robust and Complex on-Chip Nanophotonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-17

    AFOSR). III. Program  Objective The objective of this MURI is to achieve fundamental advances for understanding, designing, optimizing and...theoretical and experimental approaches. In the computational efforts, we develop advanced nanophotonics simulation capabilities that achieve orders-of...organized along three thrusts: Thrust 1: Advances in Simulations, Optimizations and Theory Thrust 2: Application Drivers and Experimentations

  6. Two-dimensional array self-assembled quantum dot sub-diffraction waveguides with low loss and low crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Jean; Parviz, Babak A; Lin, Lih Y

    2008-07-23

    We model and demonstrate the behavior of two-dimensional (2D) self-assembled quantum dot (QD) sub-diffraction waveguides. By pumping the gain-enabled semiconductor nanoparticles and introducing a signal light, energy coupling of stimulated photons from the QDs enables light transmission along the waveguide. Monte Carlo simulation with randomized inter-dot separation reveals that the optical gain necessary for unity transfer is 3.1 × 10(7) m(-1) for a 2D (2 µm length by 500 nm width) array compared to 11.6 × 10(7) m(-1) for a 1D (2 µm length) given 8 nm diameter quantum dots. The theoretical results are borne out in experiments on 2D arrays by measurement of negligible crosstalk component with as little as 200 nm waveguide separation and is indicative of near-field optical coupling behavior. The transmission loss for 500 nm wide structures is determined to be close to 3 dB/4 µm, whereas that for 100 nm width is 3 dB/2.3 µm. Accordingly, higher pump power and gain would be necessary on the narrower device to create similar throughput. Considering existing nanoscale propagation methods, which commonly use negative dielectric materials, our waveguide shows an improved loss characteristic with comparable or smaller dimensions. Thus, the application of QDs to nanophotonic waveguiding represents a promising path towards ultra-high density photonic integrated circuits.

  7. Nanophotonic structures for coupling to quantum emitters in the visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Jennifer Tze-Heng

    This thesis is about the design, fabrication, and characterization of nanophotonic elements in the visible that can enhance light-matter interaction for single quantum emitters. We focus on two material systems: single photon sources based on the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond with improved spontaneous emission rates and collection efficiencies, and passive TiO 2 devices that comprise a potentially broadband (from the visible to the infrared), low loss photonics platform and that are suitable for probing and manipulating single colloidal quantum dots. We first discuss the requirements for using color center emission in bulk diamond crystals for potential applications in quantum information processing, and provide examples of using nanowire structures and planar resonators made in diamond for engineering the NV center's pump and collection efficiencies, and spontaneous emission rates, respectively. We also describe the integration of diamond with plasmonic structures. We have designed and implemented diamond-silver apertures for broadband enhancements of the spontaneous emission rates of NV centers. We show that shallow-implanted NV centers in diamond nanoposts provide a good system for controlling the NV center spontaneous emission rates, allowing for quenched emission with long lifetimes in the bare case, and enhanced emission with fast decay rates (corresponding to a Purcell factor of around 6) when coated with silver. We add plasmonic gratings around the diamond-silver apertures to improve the collection efficiency of the system, and observe over two-fold improvement in collection. We demonstrate the fabrication of chip-scale linear optical elements such as waveguides and racetrack resonators in low-loss TiO2 thin films. The fabricated waveguides operate over a wide bandwidth with propagation losses from 30 dB/cm in the visible to 4 dB/cm in the IR, while racetrack resonators can critically couple to waveguides and have quality factors as high as

  8. Low-power nanophotonics: material and device technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thylén, Lars; Holmstrom, Petter; Wosinski, Lech; Lourdudoss, Sebastian

    2013-05-01

    Development in photonics for communications and interconnects pose increasing requirements on reduction of footprint, power dissipation and cost, as well as increased bandwidth. Nanophotonics integrated photonics has been viewed as a solution to this, capitalizing on development in nanotechnology and an increased understanding of light matter interaction on the nanoscale. The latter can be exemplified by plasmonics and low dimensional semiconductors such as quantum dots (QDs). In this scenario the development of improved electrooptic materials is of great importance, the electrooptic polymers being an example, since they potentially offer superior properties for optical phase modulators in terms of power and integratability. Phase modulators are essential for e.g. the rapidly developing advanced modulation formats, since phase modulation basically can generate any type of modulation. The electrooptic polymers, in combination with plasmonics nanoparticle array waveguides or nanostructured hybrid plasmonic media can give extremely compact and low power dissipation modulators. Low-dimensional semiconductors, e.g. in the shape of QDs, can be employed for modulation or switching functions, offering possibilities for scaling to 2 or 3 dimensions for advanced switching functions. In both the high field confinement plasmonics and QDs, the nanosizing is due to nearfield interactions, albeit being of different physical origin in the two cases. Epitaxial integration of III-V structures on Si plays an important role in developing high-performance light sources on silicon, eventually integrated with silicon electronics. A brief remark on all-optical vs. electronically controlled optical switching systems is also given.

  9. Reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversion for nanophotonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Luong, Dinh Hoa; Kim, Min Su; Jin, Youngjo; Kim, Hyun; Yun, Seokjoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-11-28

    The recent challenges for improving the operation speed of nanoelectronics have motivated research on manipulating light in on-chip integrated circuits. Hybrid plasmonic waveguides with low-dimensional semiconductors, including quantum dots and quantum wells, are a promising platform for realizing sub-diffraction limited optical components. Meanwhile, two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have received broad interest in optoelectronics owing to tightly bound excitons at room temperature, strong light-matter and exciton-plasmon interactions, available top-down wafer-scale integration, and band-gap tunability. Here, we demonstrate principal functionalities for on-chip optical communications via reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversions in ∼200-nm-diameter Ag-nanowires overlapping onto TMD transistors. By varying device configurations for each operation purpose, three active components for optical communications are realized: field-effect exciton transistors with a channel length of ∼32 μm, field-effect exciton multiplexers transmitting multiple signals through a single NW and electrical detectors of propagating plasmons with a high On/Off ratio of∼190. Our results illustrate the unique merits of two-dimensional semiconductors for constructing reconfigurable device architectures in integrated nanophotonic circuits.

  10. Reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversion for nanophotonic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Luong, Dinh Hoa; Kim, Min Su; Jin, Youngjo; Kim, Hyun; Yun, Seokjoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    The recent challenges for improving the operation speed of nanoelectronics have motivated research on manipulating light in on-chip integrated circuits. Hybrid plasmonic waveguides with low-dimensional semiconductors, including quantum dots and quantum wells, are a promising platform for realizing sub-diffraction limited optical components. Meanwhile, two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have received broad interest in optoelectronics owing to tightly bound excitons at room temperature, strong light-matter and exciton-plasmon interactions, available top-down wafer-scale integration, and band-gap tunability. Here, we demonstrate principal functionalities for on-chip optical communications via reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversions in ∼200-nm-diameter Ag-nanowires overlapping onto TMD transistors. By varying device configurations for each operation purpose, three active components for optical communications are realized: field-effect exciton transistors with a channel length of ∼32 μm, field-effect exciton multiplexers transmitting multiple signals through a single NW and electrical detectors of propagating plasmons with a high On/Off ratio of∼190. Our results illustrate the unique merits of two-dimensional semiconductors for constructing reconfigurable device architectures in integrated nanophotonic circuits. PMID:27892463

  11. Reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversion for nanophotonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Luong, Dinh Hoa; Kim, Min Su; Jin, Youngjo; Kim, Hyun; Yun, Seokjoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-11-01

    The recent challenges for improving the operation speed of nanoelectronics have motivated research on manipulating light in on-chip integrated circuits. Hybrid plasmonic waveguides with low-dimensional semiconductors, including quantum dots and quantum wells, are a promising platform for realizing sub-diffraction limited optical components. Meanwhile, two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have received broad interest in optoelectronics owing to tightly bound excitons at room temperature, strong light-matter and exciton-plasmon interactions, available top-down wafer-scale integration, and band-gap tunability. Here, we demonstrate principal functionalities for on-chip optical communications via reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversions in ~200-nm-diameter Ag-nanowires overlapping onto TMD transistors. By varying device configurations for each operation purpose, three active components for optical communications are realized: field-effect exciton transistors with a channel length of ~32 μm, field-effect exciton multiplexers transmitting multiple signals through a single NW and electrical detectors of propagating plasmons with a high On/Off ratio of~190. Our results illustrate the unique merits of two-dimensional semiconductors for constructing reconfigurable device architectures in integrated nanophotonic circuits.

  12. Nanophotonic interactions between organic excitons and plasmonic metasurfaces (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, Deirdre M.

    2016-09-01

    Thin-film organic semiconductor materials are emerging as energy-efficient, versatile alternatives to inorganic semiconductors for display and solid-state lighting applications. Additionally, thin-film organic laser and photovoltaic technologies, while not yet competitive with inorganic semiconductor-based analogues, can exhibit small device embodied energies (due to comparatively low temperature and low energy-use fabrication processes) which is of interest for reducing overall device cost. To improve energy conversion efficiency in thin-film organic optoelectronics, light management using nanophotonic structures is necessary. Here, our recent work on improving light trapping and light extraction in organic semiconductor thin films using nanostructured silver plasmonic metasurfaces will be presented [1,2]. Numerous optical phenomena, such as absorption induced scattering, out-of-plane waveguiding and morphology-dependent surface plasmon outcoupling, are identified due to exciton-plasmon coupling between the organic semiconductor and the metasurface. Interactions between localized and propagating surface plasmon polaritons and the excitonic transitions of a variety of organic conjugated polymer materials will be discussed and ways in which these interactions may be optimized for particular optoelectronic applications will be presented. [1] C. E. Petoukhoff, D. M. O'Carroll, Absorption-Induced Scattering and Surface Plasmon Out-Coupling from Absorber-Coated Plasmonic Metasurfaces. Nat. Commun. 6, 7899-1-13 (2015). [2] Z. Shen, D. M. O'Carroll, Nanoporous Silver Thin Films: Multifunctional Platforms for Influencing Chain Morphology and Optical Properties of Conjugated Polymers. Adv. Funct. Mater. 25, 3302-3313 (2015).

  13. Quantum-dot supercrystals for future nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2013-01-01

    The study of supercrystals made of periodically arranged semiconductor quantum dots is essential for the advancement of emerging nanophotonics technologies. By combining the strong spatial confinement of elementary excitations inside quantum dots and exceptional design flexibility, quantum-dot supercrystals provide broad opportunities for engineering desired optical responses and developing superior light manipulation techniques on the nanoscale. Here we suggest tailoring the energy spectrum and wave functions of the supercrystals' collective excitations through the variation of different structural and material parameters. In particular, by calculating the excitonic spectra of quantum dots assembled in two-dimensional Bravais lattices we demonstrate a wide variety of spectrum transformation scenarios upon alterations in the quantum dot arrangement. This feature offers unprecedented control over the supercrystal's electromagnetic properties and enables the development of new nanophotonics materials and devices.

  14. Influence of symmetry breaking degrees on surface plasmon polaritons propagation in branched silver nanowire waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jiaojiao; Wu, Fan; Xu, Zhongfeng; Wang, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs)-based nanowire (NW) waveguides demonstrate promising potentials in the integrated nanophotonic circuits and devices. The realization of controlling SPPs propagation in NWs is significant for the performance of nanophotonic devices when employed for special function. In this work, we report the effect of symmetry breaking degrees on SPPs propagation behavior in manually fabricated branched silver NW structures. The symmetry breaking degree can be tuned by the angle between main NW and branch NW, which influences the emissions at the junction and the main NW terminal in a large extent. Our results illustrate the significance of symmetry breaking degree on SPPs propagation in NW-based waveguides which is crucial for designing the future nanophotonic circuits. PMID:27677403

  15. Influence of symmetry breaking degrees on surface plasmon polaritons propagation in branched silver nanowire waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Jiaojiao; Wu, Fan; Xu, Zhongfeng; Wang, Wenhui

    2016-09-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs)-based nanowire (NW) waveguides demonstrate promising potentials in the integrated nanophotonic circuits and devices. The realization of controlling SPPs propagation in NWs is significant for the performance of nanophotonic devices when employed for special function. In this work, we report the effect of symmetry breaking degrees on SPPs propagation behavior in manually fabricated branched silver NW structures. The symmetry breaking degree can be tuned by the angle between main NW and branch NW, which influences the emissions at the junction and the main NW terminal in a large extent. Our results illustrate the significance of symmetry breaking degree on SPPs propagation in NW-based waveguides which is crucial for designing the future nanophotonic circuits.

  16. Development and Applications of Nanowire Nanophotonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-23

    Nanowire Nanophotonics G F49620-03-1-0063 6. AUTHOR(S) Charles. M. Lieber 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Release; distribution is unlimited. 13, ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) The controlled and predictable synthesis of nanowires and nanowire heterostrucrures...nitride based nanowire materials, including radial nanowire heterostructures in which the composition and/or doping was modulated perpendicular to the

  17. Engineering metallic nanostructures for plasmonics and nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Nathan C; Nagpal, Prashant; McPeak, Kevin M; Norris, David J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Metallic nanostructures now play an important role in many applications. In particular, for the emerging fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics, the ability to engineer metals on nanometric scales allows the development of new devices and the study of exciting physics. This review focuses on top-down nanofabrication techniques for engineering metallic nanostructures, along with computational and experimental characterization techniques. A variety of current and emerging applications are also covered. PMID:22790420

  18. Precision tuning of silicon nanophotonic devices through post-fabrication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Charlton J.

    In recent years, silicon photonics has begun to transition from research to commercialization. Decades of relentless advances in the field of computing have led to fundamental bottlenecks in the design of computers, especially in interconnect bandwidth density. For IBM, silicon photonics has become a potential technological solution for enabling the future of server systems and cutting-edge supercomputers. For Intel, silicon photonics has become a cost-effective solution for supplying the necessary bandwidth needed by future generations of consumer computing products. While the field of silicon photonics is now advancing at a rapid pace there is still a great deal of research to be done. This thesis investigates ways of improving the performance of fundamental silicon nanophotonic devices through post-fabrication processes. These devices include numerous optical resonator designs as well as slow-light waveguides. Optical resonators are used to confine photons both spatially and temporally. In recent years, there has been much research, both theoretical and experimental, into improving the design of optical resonators. Improving these devices through fabrication processes has generally been less studied. Optical waveguides are used to guide the flow of photons over chip-level distances. Slow-light waveguides have also been studied by many research groups in recent years and can be applied to an increasingly wide-range of applications. The work can be divided into several parts: Chapter 1 is an introduction to the field of silicon photonics as well as an overview of the fabrication, experimental and computational techniques used throughout this work. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 describe our investigations into the precision tuning of nanophotonic devices using laser-assisted thermal oxidation and atomic layer deposition. Chapters 5 and 6 describe our investigations into improving the sidewall roughness of silicon photonic devices using hydrogen annealing and excimer laser

  19. Phase-sensitive amplification in silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanbing; Husko, Chad; Schröder, Jochen; Lefrancois, Simon; Rey, Isabella H; Krauss, Thomas F; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2014-01-15

    We experimentally demonstrate phase-sensitive amplification in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide based on pump-degenerate four-wave mixing. An 11 dB phase-extinction ratio is obtained in a record compact 196 μm nanophotonic device due to broadband slow light, in spite of the presence of two-photon absorption and free carriers. Numerical calculations show good agreement with the experimental results.

  20. Resonant photonic States in coupled heterostructure photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jd; Sabarinathan, J; Singh, Mr

    2010-02-09

    In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors.

  1. Hybrid Silicon Nanophotonic Devices: Enhancing Light Emission, Modulation, and Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Ryan Morrow

    Silicon has become an increasingly important photonic material for communications, information processing, and sensing applications. Silicon is inexpensive compared to compound semiconductors, and it is well suited for confining and guiding light at standard telecommunication wavelengths due to its large refractive index and minimal intrinsic absorption. Furthermore, silicon-based optical devices can be fabricated alongside microelectronics while taking advantage of advanced silicon processing technologies. In order to realize complete chip-based photonic systems, certain critical components must continue to be developed and refined on the silicon platform, including compact light sources, modulators, routers, and sensing elements. However, bulk silicon is not necessarily an ideal material for many active devices because of its meager light emission characteristics, limited refractive index tunability, and fundamental limitations in confining light beyond the diffraction limit. In this thesis, we present three examples of hybrid devices that use different materials to bring additional optical functionality to silicon photonics. First, we analyze high-index-contrast silicon slot waveguides and their integration with light-emitting erbium-doped glass materials. Theoretical and experimental results show significant enhancement of spontaneous emission rates in slot structures. We then demonstrate the integration of vanadium dioxide, a thermochromic phase-change material, with silicon waveguides to form micron-scale absorption modulators. It is shown experimentally that a 2-mum long waveguide-integrated device exhibits broadband modulation of more than 6.5 dB at wavelengths near 1550 nm. Finally, we demonstrate polymer-on-gold dielectric-loaded surface-plasmon waveguides and ring resonators coupled to silicon waveguides with 1.0+/-0.1 dB insertion loss. The plasmonic waveguides are shown to support a single surface mode at telecommunication wavelengths, with strong

  2. Large-scale nanophotonic phased array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Timurdogan, Erman; Yaacobi, Ami; Hosseini, Ehsan Shah; Watts, Michael R

    2013-01-10

    Electromagnetic phased arrays at radio frequencies are well known and have enabled applications ranging from communications to radar, broadcasting and astronomy. The ability to generate arbitrary radiation patterns with large-scale phased arrays has long been pursued. Although it is extremely expensive and cumbersome to deploy large-scale radiofrequency phased arrays, optical phased arrays have a unique advantage in that the much shorter optical wavelength holds promise for large-scale integration. However, the short optical wavelength also imposes stringent requirements on fabrication. As a consequence, although optical phased arrays have been studied with various platforms and recently with chip-scale nanophotonics, all of the demonstrations so far are restricted to one-dimensional or small-scale two-dimensional arrays. Here we report the demonstration of a large-scale two-dimensional nanophotonic phased array (NPA), in which 64 × 64 (4,096) optical nanoantennas are densely integrated on a silicon chip within a footprint of 576 μm × 576 μm with all of the nanoantennas precisely balanced in power and aligned in phase to generate a designed, sophisticated radiation pattern in the far field. We also show that active phase tunability can be realized in the proposed NPA by demonstrating dynamic beam steering and shaping with an 8 × 8 array. This work demonstrates that a robust design, together with state-of-the-art complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, allows large-scale NPAs to be implemented on compact and inexpensive nanophotonic chips. In turn, this enables arbitrary radiation pattern generation using NPAs and therefore extends the functionalities of phased arrays beyond conventional beam focusing and steering, opening up possibilities for large-scale deployment in applications such as communication, laser detection and ranging, three-dimensional holography and biomedical sciences, to name just a few.

  3. Long-range hybrid ridge and trench plasmonic waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Yusheng; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-06-23

    We report a class of long-range hybrid plasmon polariton waveguides capable of simultaneously achieving low propagation loss and tight field localization at telecommunication wavelength. The symmetric (quasi-symmetric) hybrid configurations featuring high-refractive-index-contrast near the non-uniform metallic nanostructures enable significantly improved optical performance over conventional hybrid waveguides, exhibiting considerably longer propagation distances and dramatically enhanced figure of merits for similar degrees of confinement. Compared to their traditional long-range plasmonic counterparts, the proposed hybrid waveguides put much less stringent requirements on index-matching conditions, demonstrating nice performance under a wide range of physical dimensions and robust characteristics against certain fabrication imperfections. Studies concerning crosstalk between adjacent identical waveguides further reveal their potential for photonic integrations. In addition, alternative configurations with comparable guiding properties to the structures in our case studies are also proposed, which can potentially serve as attractive prototypes for numerous high-performance nanophotonic components.

  4. Bulk plasmon-polaritons in hyperbolic nanorod metamaterial waveguides.

    PubMed

    Vasilantonakis, Nikolaos; Nasir, Mazhar E; Dickson, Wayne; Wurtz, Gregory A; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2015-05-01

    Hyperbolic metamaterials comprised of an array of plasmonic nanorods provide a unique platform for designing optical sensors and integrating nonlinear and active nanophotonic functionalities. In this work, the waveguiding properties and mode structure of planar anisotropic metamaterial waveguides are characterized experimentally and theoretically. While ordinary modes are the typical guided modes of the highly anisotropic waveguides, extraordinary modes, below the effective plasma frequency, exist in a hyperbolic metamaterial slab in the form of bulk plasmon-polaritons, in analogy to planar-cavity exciton-polaritons in semiconductors. They may have very low or negative group velocity with high effective refractive indices (up to 10) and have an unusual cut-off from the high-frequency side, providing deep-subwavelength (λ0/6-λ0/8 waveguide thickness) single-mode guiding. These properties, dictated by the hyperbolic anisotropy of the metamaterial, may be tuned by altering the geometrical parameters of the nanorod composite.

  5. Highly integrated planar lightwave circuits based on plasmonic and Si nano-waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Sailing; Han, Zhanghua; Liu, Liu; Dai, Daoxin

    2006-09-01

    Planar lightwave circuits (PLC) based on nanophotonic waveguides are becoming more and more attractive because of their ultrasmall sizes and possibility for realizing large scale monolithic integration with a very high integration density. In this paper we discuss two attractive types of nanophotonic waveguides based on dielectrics or metals. For the dielectric type, a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) strip waveguide is considered, and ultra-compact photonic integrated devices such as polarization-insensitive arrayed waveguide grating (de)multiplexers are obtained. Based on the fact that light can be confined tightly in a single interface between a metal and dielectric, a surface plasmon (SP) waveguide can offer a tight confinement for the light field. The cross-sectional size of an SP waveguide could be pushed down to tens of nanometers, i.e. beyond the diffraction limit. An accurate anaylysis for an SP waveguide formed by a dielectric nano-trench in a metal is presented. A novel subwavelength index-guided multimode plasmonic waveguide is introduced and an ultra-compact MMI power splitter is designed.

  6. Local and nonlocal optically induced transparency effects in graphene-silicon hybrid nanophotonic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Yu, Longhai; Zheng, Jiajiu; Xu, Yang; Dai, Daoxin; He, Sailing

    2014-11-25

    Graphene is well-known as a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms arrayed in a honeycomb structure. It has some unique and fascinating properties, which are useful for realizing many optoelectronic devices and applications, including transistors, photodetectors, solar cells, and modulators. To enhance light-graphene interactions and take advantage of its properties, a promising approach is to combine a graphene sheet with optical waveguides, such as silicon nanophotonic wires considered in this paper. Here we report local and nonlocal optically induced transparency (OIT) effects in graphene-silicon hybrid nanophotonic integrated circuits. A low-power, continuous-wave laser is used as the pump light, and the power required for producing the OIT effect is as low as ∼0.1 mW. The corresponding power density is several orders lower than that needed for the previously reported saturated absorption effect in graphene, which implies a mechanism involving light absorption by the silicon and photocarrier transport through the silicon-graphene junction. The present OIT effect enables low power, all-optical, broadband control and sensing, modulation and switching locally and nonlocally.

  7. Scalable Fabrication of Integrated Nanophotonic Circuits on Arrays of Thin Single Crystal Diamond Membrane Windows.

    PubMed

    Piracha, Afaq H; Rath, Patrik; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Kühn, Stefan; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Prawer, Steven

    2016-05-11

    Diamond has emerged as a promising platform for nanophotonic, optical, and quantum technologies. High-quality, single crystalline substrates of acceptable size are a prerequisite to meet the demanding requirements on low-level impurities and low absorption loss when targeting large photonic circuits. Here, we describe a scalable fabrication method for single crystal diamond membrane windows that achieves three major goals with one fabrication method: providing high quality diamond, as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy; achieving homogeneously thin membranes, enabled by ion implantation; and providing compatibility with established planar fabrication via lithography and vertical etching. On such suspended diamond membranes we demonstrate a suite of photonic components as building blocks for nanophotonic circuits. Monolithic grating couplers are used to efficiently couple light between photonic circuits and optical fibers. In waveguide coupled optical ring resonators, we find loaded quality factors up to 66 000 at a wavelength of 1560 nm, corresponding to propagation loss below 7.2 dB/cm. Our approach holds promise for the scalable implementation of future diamond quantum photonic technologies and all-diamond photonic metrology tools.

  8. Compact models for nanophotonic structures and on-chip interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mehboob

    Over the last few years, scaling in deep submicron technologies has shifted the paradigm from device-dominated to interconnect-dominated design methodology. Consequently, there is an increasing interest towards the miniaturization of the guiding medium in nanoscale integrated circuits by exploring plasmon-based waveguides to alleviate the scaling issues associated with today's copper interconnect. In this thesis, we seek short and long-term solutions of on-chip interconnect by developing accurate compact models of on-chip interconnects and impedance characterization of nanophotonic structures. The developed system models are compact and accurate over the operating frequency range and the adopted approach have provided many critical insights and produced many important results. This thesis first presents a new modeling strategy that represents the nanostructure by its equivalent impedance. By applying either quasistatic approximation or separately solving for voltage and current for dominant mode, we reduce the field problem to a circuit problem. The impedance expressed in terms of circuit components is dependent on the material constant as well as the operating frequency. The modeling methodology is successfully applied to nanoparticles and oscillating nanosphere. The proposed model characterizes plasmon resonance in these nanostructures, thereby providing basic building block to develop spice models of complex plasmon-based waveguide for sub-wavelength propagation. We also presented several techniques to develop compact models of on-chip interconnects and passive components for accurate estimation of power, noise and delay of high speed integrated circuits. The automated method generates reduced order models that are accurate across either a narrow or a wide-range of frequencies. The proposed methods are based on Krylov subspace method with interpolation points dynamically selected using either spline based algorithm or discrete wavelet transform. Narrow and

  9. Grating-assisted coupling to nanophotonic circuits in microcrystalline diamond thin films.

    PubMed

    Rath, Patrik; Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Nebel, Christoph; Wild, Christoph; Pernice, Wolfram Hp

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic diamond films can be prepared on a waferscale by using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on suitable substrates such as silicon or silicon dioxide. While such films find a wealth of applications in thermal management, in X-ray and terahertz window design, and in gyrotron tubes and microwave transmission lines, their use for nanoscale optical components remains largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate that CVD diamond provides a high-quality template for realizing nanophotonic integrated optical circuits. Using efficient grating coupling devices prepared from partially etched diamond thin films, we investigate millimetre-sized optical circuits and achieve single-mode waveguiding at telecoms wavelengths. Our results pave the way towards broadband optical applications for sensing in harsh environments and visible photonic devices.

  10. Metallic waveguide mirrors in polymer film waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, S.; Giehl, A. R.; Renno, M.; Fouckhardt, H.

    2001-10-01

    A technology for the fabrication of metallic waveguide mirrors is developed. Plane and curved waveguide mirrors, the latter acting in the same way as cylindrical lenses, are realized in benzocyclobutene (BCB) film waveguides. The waveguide mirror structure is dry-etched into the BCB film waveguide. To enhance the reflectivity of the waveguide mirrors, the waveguide edge is metallized. The BCB film waveguide mirrors are characterized with respect to waveguide attenuation and mirror reflectivity. The waveguide attenuation of the processed BCB waveguide is 0.5 dB/cm. Ag-coated BCB waveguide mirrors show a reflectivity of 71%. The efficiency of total internal reflection (TIR, i.e. in the case without metallization) at the dry-etched waveguide edge is 74%. As an application of the BCB waveguide mirrors a hybrid integrated optical module for Fourier-optical transverse mode selection in broad area lasers (BAL) is proposed.

  11. Nano-photonics: past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold

    2010-04-01

    Nanotech is at the scale of 10-9 meters, located at the mesocopic transition phase, which can take both classical mechanics (CM) and quantum mechanics (QM) descriptions bridging ten orders of magnitude phenomena, between the microscopic world of a single atom at 10-10 meters with the macroscopic world at meters. However, QM principles aid the understanding of any unusual property at the nanotech level. The other major difference between nano-photonics and other forms of optics is that the nano-scale is not very 'hands on'. For the most part, we will not be able to see the components with our naked eyes, but will be required to use some nanotech imaging tools, as follows:

  12. LOADED WAVEGUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Mullett, L.B.; Loach, B.G.; Adams, G.L.

    1958-06-24

    >Loaded waveguides are described for the propagation of electromagnetic waves with reduced phase velocities. A rectangular waveguide is dimensioned so as to cut-off the simple H/sub 01/ mode at the operating frequency. The waveguide is capacitance loaded, so as to reduce the phase velocity of the transmitted wave, by connecting an electrical conductor between directly opposite points in the major median plane on the narrower pair of waveguide walls. This conductor may take a corrugated shape or be an aperature member, the important factor being that the electrical length of the conductor is greater than one-half wavelength at the operating frequency. Prepared for the Second U.N. International ConferThe importance of nuclear standards is duscussed. A brief review of the international callaboration in this field is given. The proposal is made to let the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) coordinate the efforts from other groups. (W.D.M.)

  13. Sub-nanosecond light-pulse generation with waveguide-coupled carbon nanotube transducers

    PubMed Central

    Kovalyuk, Vadim; Hennrich, Frank; Kappes, Manfred M; Goltsman, Gregory N; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Krupke, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been integrated into optical waveguides and operated as electrically-driven light emitters under constant electrical bias. Such devices are of interest for the conversion of fast electrical signals into optical ones within a nanophotonic circuit. Here, we demonstrate that waveguide-integrated single-walled CNTs are promising high-speed transducers for light-pulse generation in the gigahertz range. Using a scalable fabrication approach we realize hybrid CNT-based nanophotonic devices, which generate optical pulse trains in the range from 200 kHz to 2 GHz with decay times below 80 ps. Our results illustrate the potential of CNTs for hybrid optoelectronic systems and nanoscale on-chip light sources. PMID:28144563

  14. Tailorable stimulated Brillouin scattering in nanoscale silicon waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Heedeuk; Qiu, Wenjun; Jarecki, Robert; Cox, Jonathan A.; Olsson, Roy H.; Starbuck, Andrew; Wang, Zheng; Rakich, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale modal confinement is known to radically enhance the effect of intrinsic Kerr and Raman nonlinearities within nanophotonic silicon waveguides. By contrast, stimulated Brillouin-scattering nonlinearities, which involve coherent coupling between guided photon and phonon modes, are stifled in conventional nanophotonics, preventing the realization of a host of Brillouin-based signal-processing technologies in silicon. Here we demonstrate stimulated Brillouin scattering in silicon waveguides, for the first time, through a new class of hybrid photonic–phononic waveguides. Tailorable travelling-wave forward-stimulated Brillouin scattering is realized—with over 1,000 times larger nonlinearity than reported in previous systems—yielding strong Brillouin coupling to phonons from 1 to 18 GHz. Experiments show that radiation pressures, produced by subwavelength modal confinement, yield enhancement of Brillouin nonlinearity beyond those of material nonlinearity alone. In addition, such enhanced and wideband coherent phonon emission paves the way towards the hybridization of silicon photonics, microelectromechanical systems and CMOS signal-processing technologies on chip. PMID:23739586

  15. Free-standing nanomechanical and nanophotonic structures in single-crystal diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burek, Michael John

    Realizing complex three-dimensional structures in a range of material systems is critical to a variety of emerging nanotechnologies. This is particularly true of nanomechanical and nanophotonic systems, both relying on free-standing small-scale components. In the case of nanomechanics, necessary mechanical degrees of freedom require physically isolated structures, such as suspended beams, cantilevers, and membranes. For nanophotonics, elements like waveguides and photonic crystal cavities rely on light confinement provided by total internal reflection or distributed Bragg reflection, both of which require refractive index contrast between the device and surrounding medium (often air). Such suspended nanostructures are typically fabricated in a heterolayer structure, comprising of device (top) and sacrificial (middle) layers supported by a substrate (bottom), using standard surface nanomachining techniques. A selective, isotropic etch is then used to remove the sacrificial layer, resulting in free-standing devices. While high-quality, crystalline, thin film heterolayer structures are readily available for silicon (as silicon-on-insulator (SOI)) or III-V semiconductors (i.e. GaAs/AlGaAs), there remains an extensive list of materials with attractive electro-optic, piezoelectric, quantum optical, and other properties for which high quality single-crystal thin film heterolayer structures are not available. These include complex metal oxides like lithium niobate (LiNbO3), silicon-based compounds such as silicon carbide (SiC), III-V nitrides including gallium nitride (GaN), and inert single-crystals such as diamond. Diamond is especially attractive for a variety of nanoscale technologies due to its exceptional physical and chemical properties, including high mechanical hardness, stiffness, and thermal conductivity. Optically, it is transparent over a wide wavelength range (from 220 nm to the far infrared), has a high refractive index (n ~ 2.4), and is host to a vast

  16. Diamond electro-optomechanical resonators integrated in nanophotonic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, P.; Ummethala, S.; Pernice, W. H. P.; Diewald, S.; Lewes-Malandrakis, G.; Brink, D.; Heidrich, N.; Nebel, C.

    2014-12-22

    Diamond integrated photonic devices are promising candidates for emerging applications in nanophotonics and quantum optics. Here, we demonstrate active modulation of diamond nanophotonic circuits by exploiting mechanical degrees of freedom in free-standing diamond electro-optomechanical resonators. We obtain high quality factors up to 9600, allowing us to read out the driven nanomechanical response with integrated optical interferometers with high sensitivity. We are able to excite higher order mechanical modes up to 115 MHz and observe the nanomechanical response also under ambient conditions.

  17. Nanophotonic quantum computer based on atomic quantum transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, S N; Moiseev, S A

    2015-10-31

    We propose a scheme of a quantum computer based on nanophotonic elements: two buses in the form of nanowaveguide resonators, two nanosized units of multiatom multiqubit quantum memory and a set of nanoprocessors in the form of photonic quantum transistors, each containing a pair of nanowaveguide ring resonators coupled via a quantum dot. The operation modes of nanoprocessor photonic quantum transistors are theoretically studied and the execution of main logical operations by means of them is demonstrated. We also discuss the prospects of the proposed nanophotonic quantum computer for operating in high-speed optical fibre networks. (quantum computations)

  18. Nanophotonic Devices in Silicon for Nonlinear Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-15

    Leuthold, W. Freude , J.-M. Brosi, R. Baets, P. Dumon, I. Biaggio, M. L. Scimeca, F. Diederich, B. Frank, and C. Koos, “Silicon Organic Hybrid Technology...2010. [24] L. Alloatti, D. Korn, D. Hillerkuss, T. Vallaitis, J. Li,R. Bonk, R. Palmer, T. Schellinger, C. Koos,W. Freude , J. Leuthold, A. Barklund, R...T. Michinobu, F. Diederich, W. Freude , and J. Leuthold, “All-optical high-speed signal processing with silicon–organic hybrid slot waveguides

  19. Coupled metal gap waveguides as plasmonic wavelength sorters.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhiwen; Wang, Guo Ping

    2008-05-26

    We propose a coupled metal gap waveguide structure for realizing plasmonic wavelength sorters. Theoretical analysis from the coupled-wave theory reveals that wavelength dependent coupling length of guided surface plasmon polaritons contributes to the routing of different wavelengths to different output ports with reasonable high extinction ratio. The analytical results are confirmed by the finite-difference time-domain numerical simulations. Our result may provide an alternative way to construct nanoscale frequency multiplexers, routers, and sorters for nanophotonic integration and optical communication.

  20. Spontaneous emission in cavity QED with a terminated waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Matthew; Shen, Jung-Tsung

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the effects of a nanophotonic boundary on the spontaneous emission properties of an excited two-level atom in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) geometry. We show that a boundary provides temporally delayed interference, which can be either constructive or destructive. Consequently, the decay of the atomic excitation can be either increased or greatly inhibited. As a concrete example, we investigate the spontaneous emission process in cavity QED with a terminated line-defect waveguide, and show the rich behavior of the atomic response due to the boundary. We also show that the output photonic wave form is strongly influenced by the boundary.

  1. Waveguide Transition for Submillimeter-Wave MMICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, Kevin M.; Deal, William R.; Radisic, Vesna; Mei, Xiaobing; Uyeda, Jansen; Lai, Richard; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd C.

    2009-01-01

    An integrated waveguide-to-MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) chip operating in the 300-GHz range is designed to operate well on high-permittivity semiconductor substrates typical for an MMIC amplifier, and allows a wider MMIC substrate to be used, enabling integration with larger MMICs (power amplifiers). The waveguide-to- CBCPW (conductor-backed coplanar waveguide) transition topology is based on an integrated dipole placed in the E-plane of the waveguide module. It demonstrates low loss and good impedance matching. Measurement and simulation demonstrate that the loss of the transition and waveguide loss is less than 1-dB over a 340-to-380-GHz bandwidth. A transition is inserted along the propagation direction of the waveguide. This transition uses a planar dipole aligned with the maximum E-field of the TE10 waveguide mode as an inter face between the waveguide and the MMIC. Mode conversion between the coplanar striplines (CPS) that feed the dipole and the CBCPW transmission line is accomplished using a simple air-bridge structure. The bottom side ground plane is truncated at the same reference as the top-side ground plane, leaving the end of the MMIC suspended in air.

  2. Observation of an optical event horizon in a silicon-on-insulator photonic wire waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ciret, Charles; Leo, François; Kuyken, Bart; Roelkens, Gunther; Gorza, Simon-Pierre

    2016-01-11

    We report on the first experimental observation of an optical analogue of an event horizon in integrated nanophotonic waveguides, through the reflection of a continuous wave on an intense pulse. The experiment is performed in a dispersion-engineered silicon-on-insulator waveguide. In this medium, solitons do not suffer from Raman induced self-frequency shift as in silica fibers, a feature that is interesting for potential applications of optical event horizons. As shown by simulations, this also allows the observation of multiple reflections at the same time on fundamental solitons ejected by soliton fission.

  3. Nanophotonics of biomaterials and inorganic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrik, P.; Agocs, E.; Kalas, B.; Fodor, B.; Lohner, T.; Nador, J.; Saftics, A.; Kurunczi, S.; Novotny, T.; Perez-Feró, E.; Nagy, R.; Hamori, A.; Horvath, R.; Hózer, Z.; Fried, M.

    2017-01-01

    Optical methods have been used for the sensitive characterization of surfaces and thin films for more than a century. The first ellipsometric measurement was conducted on metal surfaces by Paul Drude in 1889. The word ‘ellipsometer’ was first used by Rothen in a study of antigen-antibody interactions on polished metal surfaces in 1945. The ‘bible’ of ellipsometry has been published in the second half of the ‘70s. The publications in the topic of ellipsometry started to increase rapidly by the end of the ‘80s, together with concepts like surface plasmon resonance, later new topics like photonic crystals emerged. These techniques find applications in many fields, including sensorics or photovoltaics. In optical sensorics, the highest sensitivities were achieved by waveguide interferometry and plasmon resonance configurations. The instrumentation of ellipsometry is also being developed intensively towards higher sensitivity and performance by combinations with plasmonics, scatterometry, imaging or waveguide methods, utilizing the high sensitivity, high speed, non-destructive nature and mapping capabilities. Not only the instrumentation but also the methods of evaluation show a significant development, which leads to the characterization of structures with increasing complexity, including photonic, porous or metal surfaces. This article discusses a selection of interesting applications of photonics in the Centre for Energy Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

  4. High-quality Si3N4 circuits as a platform for graphene-based nanophotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Gruhler, N; Benz, C; Jang, H; Ahn, J-H; Danneau, R; Pernice, W H P

    2013-12-16

    Hybrid circuits combining traditional nanophotonic components with carbon-based materials are emerging as a promising platform for optoelectronic devices. We demonstrate such circuits by integrating single-layer graphene films with silicon nitride waveguides as a new architecture for broadband optical operation. Using high-quality microring resonators and Mach-Zehnder interferometers with extinction ratios beyond 40 dB we realize flexible circuits for phase-sensitive detection on chip. Hybrid graphene-photonic devices are fabricated via mechanical transfer and lithographic structuring, allowing for prolonged light-matter interactions. Our approach holds promise for studying optical processes in low-dimensional physical systems and for realizing electrically tunable photonic circuits.

  5. Laser fabrication of crystalline silicon nanoresonators from an amorphous film for low-loss all-dielectric nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, P A; Makarov, S V; Milichko, V A; Mukhin, I S; Gudovskikh, A S; Sitnikova, A A; Samusev, A K; Krasnok, A E; Belov, P A

    2016-03-07

    The concept of high refractive index subwavelength dielectric nanoresonators, supporting electric and magnetic optical resonance, is a promising platform for waveguiding, sensing, and nonlinear nanophotonic devices. However, high concentration of defects in the nanoresonators diminishes their resonant properties, which are crucially dependent on their internal losses. Therefore, it seems to be inevitable to use initially crystalline materials for fabrication of the nanoresonators. Here, we show that the fabrication of crystalline (low-loss) resonant silicon nanoparticles by femtosecond laser ablation of amorphous (high-loss) silicon thin films is possible. We apply two conceptually different approaches: recently proposed laser-induced transfer and a novel laser writing technique for large-scale fabrication of the crystalline nanoparticles. The crystallinity of the fabricated nanoparticles is proven by Raman spectroscopy and electron transmission microscopy, whereas optical resonant properties of the nanoparticles are studied using dark-field optical spectroscopy and full-wave electromagnetic simulations.

  6. High-speed and high-efficiency travelling wave single-photon detectors embedded in nanophotonic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Pernice, W.H.P.; Schuck, C.; Minaeva, O.; Li, M.; Goltsman, G.N.; Sergienko, A.V.; Tang, H.X.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast, high-efficiency single-photon detectors are among the most sought-after elements in modern quantum optics and quantum communication. However, imperfect modal matching and finite photon absorption rates have usually limited their maximum attainable detection efficiency. Here we demonstrate superconducting nanowire detectors atop nanophotonic waveguides, which enable a drastic increase of the absorption length for incoming photons. This allows us to achieve high on-chip single-photon detection efficiency up to 91% at telecom wavelengths, repeatable across several fabricated chips. We also observe remarkably low dark count rates without significant compromise of the on-chip detection efficiency. The detectors are fully embedded in scalable silicon photonic circuits and provide ultrashort timing jitter of 18 ps. Exploiting this high temporal resolution, we demonstrate ballistic photon transport in silicon ring resonators. Our direct implementation of a high-performance single-photon detector on chip overcomes a major barrier in integrated quantum photonics. PMID:23271658

  7. Laser fabrication of crystalline silicon nanoresonators from an amorphous film for low-loss all-dielectric nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, P. A.; Makarov, S. V.; Milichko, V. A.; Mukhin, I. S.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Samusev, A. K.; Krasnok, A. E.; Belov, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    The concept of high refractive index subwavelength dielectric nanoresonators, supporting electric and magnetic optical resonance, is a promising platform for waveguiding, sensing, and nonlinear nanophotonic devices. However, high concentration of defects in the nanoresonators diminishes their resonant properties, which are crucially dependent on their internal losses. Therefore, it seems to be inevitable to use initially crystalline materials for fabrication of the nanoresonators. Here, we show that the fabrication of crystalline (low-loss) resonant silicon nanoparticles by femtosecond laser ablation of amorphous (high-loss) silicon thin films is possible. We apply two conceptually different approaches: recently proposed laser-induced transfer and a novel laser writing technique for large-scale fabrication of the crystalline nanoparticles. The crystallinity of the fabricated nanoparticles is proven by Raman spectroscopy and electron transmission microscopy, whereas optical resonant properties of the nanoparticles are studied using dark-field optical spectroscopy and full-wave electromagnetic simulations.

  8. Deterministic composite nanophotonic lattices in large area for broadband applications

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Jolly; Probst, Jürgen; Becker, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Exotic manipulation of the flow of photons in nanoengineered materials with an aperiodic distribution of nanostructures plays a key role in efficiency-enhanced broadband photonic and plasmonic technologies for spectrally tailorable integrated biosensing, nanostructured thin film solarcells, white light emitting diodes, novel plasmonic ensembles etc. Through a generic deterministic nanotechnological route here we show subwavelength-scale silicon (Si) nanostructures on nanoimprinted glass substrate in large area (4 cm2) with advanced functional features of aperiodic composite nanophotonic lattices. These nanophotonic aperiodic lattices have easily tailorable supercell tiles with well-defined and discrete lattice basis elements and they show rich Fourier spectra. The presented nanophotonic lattices are designed functionally akin to two-dimensional aperiodic composite lattices with unconventional flexibility- comprising periodic photonic crystals and/or in-plane photonic quasicrystals as pattern design subsystems. The fabricated composite lattice-structured Si nanostructures are comparatively analyzed with a range of nanophotonic structures with conventional lattice geometries of periodic, disordered random as well as in-plane quasicrystalline photonic lattices with comparable lattice parameters. As a proof of concept of compatibility with advanced bottom-up liquid phase crystallized (LPC) Si thin film fabrication, the experimental structural analysis is further extended to double-side-textured deterministic aperiodic lattice-structured 10 μm thick large area LPC Si film on nanoimprinted substrates. PMID:27941869

  9. Deterministic composite nanophotonic lattices in large area for broadband applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, Jolly; Probst, Jürgen; Becker, Christiane

    2016-12-01

    Exotic manipulation of the flow of photons in nanoengineered materials with an aperiodic distribution of nanostructures plays a key role in efficiency-enhanced broadband photonic and plasmonic technologies for spectrally tailorable integrated biosensing, nanostructured thin film solarcells, white light emitting diodes, novel plasmonic ensembles etc. Through a generic deterministic nanotechnological route here we show subwavelength-scale silicon (Si) nanostructures on nanoimprinted glass substrate in large area (4 cm2) with advanced functional features of aperiodic composite nanophotonic lattices. These nanophotonic aperiodic lattices have easily tailorable supercell tiles with well-defined and discrete lattice basis elements and they show rich Fourier spectra. The presented nanophotonic lattices are designed functionally akin to two-dimensional aperiodic composite lattices with unconventional flexibility- comprising periodic photonic crystals and/or in-plane photonic quasicrystals as pattern design subsystems. The fabricated composite lattice-structured Si nanostructures are comparatively analyzed with a range of nanophotonic structures with conventional lattice geometries of periodic, disordered random as well as in-plane quasicrystalline photonic lattices with comparable lattice parameters. As a proof of concept of compatibility with advanced bottom-up liquid phase crystallized (LPC) Si thin film fabrication, the experimental structural analysis is further extended to double-side-textured deterministic aperiodic lattice-structured 10 μm thick large area LPC Si film on nanoimprinted substrates.

  10. Deterministic composite nanophotonic lattices in large area for broadband applications.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Jolly; Probst, Jürgen; Becker, Christiane

    2016-12-12

    Exotic manipulation of the flow of photons in nanoengineered materials with an aperiodic distribution of nanostructures plays a key role in efficiency-enhanced broadband photonic and plasmonic technologies for spectrally tailorable integrated biosensing, nanostructured thin film solarcells, white light emitting diodes, novel plasmonic ensembles etc. Through a generic deterministic nanotechnological route here we show subwavelength-scale silicon (Si) nanostructures on nanoimprinted glass substrate in large area (4 cm(2)) with advanced functional features of aperiodic composite nanophotonic lattices. These nanophotonic aperiodic lattices have easily tailorable supercell tiles with well-defined and discrete lattice basis elements and they show rich Fourier spectra. The presented nanophotonic lattices are designed functionally akin to two-dimensional aperiodic composite lattices with unconventional flexibility- comprising periodic photonic crystals and/or in-plane photonic quasicrystals as pattern design subsystems. The fabricated composite lattice-structured Si nanostructures are comparatively analyzed with a range of nanophotonic structures with conventional lattice geometries of periodic, disordered random as well as in-plane quasicrystalline photonic lattices with comparable lattice parameters. As a proof of concept of compatibility with advanced bottom-up liquid phase crystallized (LPC) Si thin film fabrication, the experimental structural analysis is further extended to double-side-textured deterministic aperiodic lattice-structured 10 μm thick large area LPC Si film on nanoimprinted substrates.

  11. Nanophotonic control of circular dipole emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Feber, B.; Rotenberg, N.; Kuipers, L.

    2015-04-01

    Controlling photon emission by single emitters with nanostructures is crucial for scalable on-chip information processing. Nowadays, nanoresonators can affect the lifetime of linear dipole emitters, while nanoantennas can steer the emission direction. Expanding this control to the emission of orbital angular momentum-changing transitions would enable a future coupling between solid state and photonic qubits. As these transitions are associated with circular dipoles, such control requires knowledge of the interaction of a complex dipole with optical eigenstates containing local helicity. We experimentally map the coupling of classical, circular dipoles to photonic modes in a photonic crystal waveguide. We show that, depending on the combination of the local helicity of the mode and the dipole helicity, circular dipoles can couple to left- or rightwards propagating modes with a near-unity directionality. The experimental maps are in excellent agreement with calculations. Our measurements, therefore, demonstrate the possibility of coupling the spin to photonic pathway.

  12. Light transmission loss in liquid crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, Edward; Walczak, Andrzej; Kiezun, Aleksander; Jaroszewicz, Leszek R.

    1998-02-01

    The investigation results of the propagation loss due to light scattering in electrically induced channel in planar waveguides are presented. The channel structure was obtained by means of electric driven stripe electrode made by photolithographic process. Planar waveguiding cell has been fabricated using ITO/SiO2/polyimide-coated glass plates and LC film 20 micrometers thick. A nematic liquid crystal layer with 90 degrees-twisted nematic orientation was studied. The He-Ne light beam was endfire coupled into an input edge of a waveguide using an objective lens. The propagation loss have been evaluated from the spatial variation intensity of light scattered out perpendicularly to the waveguide surface along the light propagation direction measured with CCD camera. Loss measurements have been made in room temperature. Waveguiding channel effect has been observed above 2.5 Vrms of applied voltage with the loss of about 17 +/- 1 dB. Increased driving voltage up to 100 Vrms reduces the loss to minimum value of 12 +/- 1 dB/cm. As a result of the experiments one may conclude that transmission loss in thick nematic waveguide have bulk character caused by imperfection of molecular alignment.

  13. Silicone polymer waveguide bridge for Si to glass optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Kevin L.; Riegel, Nicholas J.; Middlebrook, Christopher T.

    2015-03-01

    Multimode step index polymer waveguides achieve high-speed, (<10 Gb/s) low bit-error-rates for onboard and embedded circuit applications. Using several multimode waveguides in parallel enables overall capacity to reach beyond 100 Gb/s, but the intrinsic bandwidth limitations due to intermodal dispersion limit the data transmission rates within multimode waveguides. Single mode waveguides, where intermodal dispersion is not present, have the potential to further improve data transmission rates. Single mode waveguide size is significantly less than their multimode counterparts allowing for greater density of channels leading to higher bandwidth capacity per layer. Challenges in implementation of embedded single mode waveguides within printed circuit boards involves mass production fabrication techniques to create precision dimensional waveguides, precision alignment tolerances necessary to launch a mode, and effective coupling between adjoining waveguides and devices. An emerging need in which single mode waveguides can be utilized is providing low loss fan out techniques and coupling between on-chip transceiver devices containing Si waveguide structures to traditional single mode optical fiber. A polymer waveguide bridge for Si to glass optical fibers can be implemented using silicone polymers at 1310 nm. Fabricated and measured prototype devices with modeling and simulation analysis are reported for a 12 member 1-D tapered PWG. Recommendations and designs are generated with performance factors such as numerical aperture and alignment tolerances.

  14. VTT's micron-scale silicon rib+strip waveguide platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, Timo; Harjanne, Mikko; Cherchi, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    Silicon rib waveguides enable single-mode (SM) operation even with the combination of multi-micron core dimensions and high refractive index contrast. In such large waveguides the optical mode field is almost completely confined inside the Si core, which leads to small propagation losses and small polarization dependency. The unique SM condition of the rib waveguide also enables the use of an ultra-wide wavelength range, for example from 1.2 to <1.7 μm, without sacrificing either SM operation or low propagation loss. This makes micron-scale Si waveguides particularly well-suited for spectroscopy and extensive wavelength division multiplexing. However, rib waveguides require large bending radii, which lead to large circuit sizes. There are two solutions for this. So-called Euler bends in Si strip waveguides enable low-loss bends down to 1 μm bending radius with less than 0.1 dB/90° loss for both polarizations. Another alternative is a total-internal reflection mirror that can have loss as low as 0.1 dB for both polarizations in either strip or rib waveguides. The excitation of higher order modes in large strip waveguides is avoided by using adiabatic rib-strip converters and low-loss components. With rib and strip waveguides it is possible to reach a unique combination of low loss, extremely small footprint, small polarization dependency, ultra-wide bandwidth and tolerance to high optical powers.

  15. Hollow glass waveguides: New variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Daniel Joseph

    dielectric materials with disparate refractive indices without a metal layer. A stack-of-plates co-extrusion method was developed to create a multilayered all-dielectric hollow preform structure to be drawn into a hollow fiber with a 1-D PBG. Hollow and solid prototype preforms were fabricated using various chalcogenide glasses and amorphous polymers.

  16. Characterization of bending loss in hollow flexible terahertz waveguides.

    PubMed

    Doradla, Pallavi; Joseph, Cecil S; Kumar, Jayant; Giles, Robert H

    2012-08-13

    Attenuation characteristics of hollow, flexible, metal and metal/dielectric coated polycarbonate waveguides were investigated using an optically pumped far infrared (FIR) laser at 215 µm. The bending loss of silver coated polycarbonate waveguides were measured as a function of various bending angles, bending radii, and bore diameters. Minimal propagation losses of 1.77, 0.96 dB/m were achieved by coupling the lowest loss TE11 mode into the silver or gold coated waveguide, and HE11 mode into the silver/polystyrene coated waveguides respectively. The maximal bending loss was found to be less than 1 dB/m for waveguides of 2 to 4.1 mm bore diameters, with a 6.4 cm bend radius, and up to 150° bending angle. The investigation shows the preservation of single laser mode in smaller bore waveguides even at greater bending angles.

  17. Simulation and optimization of 1-D periodic dielectric nanostructures for light-trapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Menon, Rajesh

    2012-01-16

    Light-trapping is essential to improve the performance of thin-film solar cells. In this paper, we perform a parametric optimization of 1-D square and sinusoidal grating structures that act as nanophotonic scatterers to increase light absorption in ultra-thin (10nm) solar cells. Our optimization reveals that the short-circuit current density in a device of active-layer thickness 10nm can be improved by a factor of ~5 in the presence of the scattering structure. More complex geometries allow for increased degrees of design freedom and potentially high enhancement of light absorption.

  18. Low-loss CMOS copper plasmonic waveguides at the nanoscale (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Y.; Yakubovsky, Dmitry I.; Kirtaev, Roman V.; Volkov, Valentyn S.

    2016-05-01

    Implementation of optical components in microprocessors can increase their performance by orders of magnitude. However, the size of optical elements is fundamentally limited by diffraction, while miniaturization is one of the essential concepts in the development of high-speed and energy-efficient electronic chips. Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are widely considered to be promising candidates for the next generation of chip-scale technology thanks to the ability to break down the fundamental diffraction limit and manipulate optical signals at the truly nometer scale. In the past years, a variety of deep-subwavelength plasmonic structures have been proposed and investigated, including dielectric-loaded SPP waveguides, V-groove waveguides, hybrid plasmonic waveguides and metal nanowires. At the same time, for practical application, such waveguide structures must be integrated on a silicon chip and be fabricated using CMOS fabrication process. However, to date, acceptable characteristics have been demonstrated only with noble metals (gold and silver), which are not compatible with industry-standard manufacturing technologies. On the other hand, alternative materials introduce enormous propagation losses due absorption in the metal. This prevents plasmonic components from implementation in on-chip nanophotonic circuits. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time that copper plasmonic waveguides fabricated in a CMOS compatible process can outperform gold waveguides showing the same level of mode confinement and lower propagation losses. At telecommunication wavelengths, the fabricated ultralow-loss deep-subwavelength hybrid plasmonic waveguides ensure a relatively long propagation length of more than 50 um along with strong mode confinement with the mode size down to lambda^2/70, which is confirmed by direct scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) measurements. These results create the backbone for design and development of high

  19. Resonant Nanophotonic Spectrum Splitting for Ultrathin Multijunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Mann, Sander A; Garnett, Erik C

    2015-07-15

    We present an approach to spectrum splitting for photovoltaics that utilizes the resonant optical properties of nanostructures for simultaneous voltage enhancement and spatial separation of different colors of light. Using metal-insulator-metal resonators commonly used in broadband metamaterial absorbers we show theoretically that output voltages can be enhanced significantly compared to single-junction devices. However, the approach is general and works for any type of resonator with a large absorption cross section. Due to its resonant nature, the spectrum splitting occurs within only a fraction of the wavelength, as opposed to traditional spectrum splitting methods, where many wavelengths are required. Combining nanophotonic spectrum splitting with other nanophotonic approaches to voltage enhancements, such as angle restriction and concentration, may lead to highly efficient but deeply subwavelength photovoltaic devices.

  20. Resonant Nanophotonic Spectrum Splitting for Ultrathin Multijunction Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach to spectrum splitting for photovoltaics that utilizes the resonant optical properties of nanostructures for simultaneous voltage enhancement and spatial separation of different colors of light. Using metal–insulator–metal resonators commonly used in broadband metamaterial absorbers we show theoretically that output voltages can be enhanced significantly compared to single-junction devices. However, the approach is general and works for any type of resonator with a large absorption cross section. Due to its resonant nature, the spectrum splitting occurs within only a fraction of the wavelength, as opposed to traditional spectrum splitting methods, where many wavelengths are required. Combining nanophotonic spectrum splitting with other nanophotonic approaches to voltage enhancements, such as angle restriction and concentration, may lead to highly efficient but deeply subwavelength photovoltaic devices. PMID:26322319

  1. Breaking reciprocity in nanophotonics: optomechanical interactions (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alù, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Lorentz reciprocity refers to a fundamental symmetry relation that governs several physical systems. In this talk, we will discuss our recent theoretical, design, experimental, and commercialization efforts in the area of non-reciprocal photonics, using temporal modulation of metamaterial elements to realize isolation for guided waves in nanophotonic systems and radio-frequency circuits, and for propagating waves in free-space, as well as to break the symmetry between emission and absorption in optical and radio-frequency open systems.

  2. Silicon Nanophotonics for Many-Core On-Chip Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Moustafa

    Number of cores in many-core architectures are scaling to unprecedented levels requiring ever increasing communication capacity. Traditionally, architects follow the path of higher throughput at the expense of latency. This trend has evolved into being problematic for performance in many-core architectures. Moreover, the trends of power consumption is increasing with system scaling mandating nontraditional solutions. Nanophotonics can address these problems, offering benefits in the three frontiers of many-core processor design: Latency, bandwidth, and power. Nanophotonics leverage circuit-switching flow control allowing low latency; in addition, the power consumption of optical links is significantly lower compared to their electrical counterparts at intermediate and long links. Finally, through wave division multiplexing, we can keep the high bandwidth trends without sacrificing the throughput. This thesis focuses on realizing nanophotonics for communication in many-core architectures at different design levels considering reliability challenges that our fabrication and measurements reveal. First, we study how to design on-chip networks for low latency, low power, and high bandwidth by exploiting the full potential of nanophotonics. The design process considers device level limitations and capabilities on one hand, and system level demands in terms of power and performance on the other hand. The design involves the choice of devices, designing the optical link, the topology, the arbitration technique, and the routing mechanism. Next, we address the problem of reliability in on-chip networks. Reliability not only degrades performance but can block communication. Hence, we propose a reliability-aware design flow and present a reliability management technique based on this flow to address reliability in the system. In the proposed flow reliability is modeled and analyzed for at the device, architecture, and system level. Our reliability management technique is

  3. Design of nanophotonic circuits for autonomous subsystem quantum error correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerckhoff, J.; Pavlichin, D. S.; Chalabi, H.; Mabuchi, H.

    2011-05-01

    We reapply our approach to designing nanophotonic quantum memories in order to formulate an optical network that autonomously protects a single logical qubit against arbitrary single-qubit errors. Emulating the nine-qubit Bacon-Shor subsystem code, the network replaces the traditionally discrete syndrome measurement and correction steps by continuous, time-independent optical interactions and coherent feedback of unitarily processed optical fields.

  4. Quantifying losses and thermodynamic limits in nanophotonic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Mann, Sander A; Oener, Sebastian Z; Cavalli, Alessandro; Haverkort, Jos E M; Bakkers, Erik P A M; Garnett, Erik C

    2016-12-01

    Nanophotonic engineering shows great potential for photovoltaics: the record conversion efficiencies of nanowire solar cells are increasing rapidly and the record open-circuit voltages are becoming comparable to the records for planar equivalents. Furthermore, it has been suggested that certain nanophotonic effects can reduce costs and increase efficiencies with respect to planar solar cells. These effects are particularly pronounced in single-nanowire devices, where two out of the three dimensions are subwavelength. Single-nanowire devices thus provide an ideal platform to study how nanophotonics affects photovoltaics. However, for these devices the standard definition of power conversion efficiency no longer applies, because the nanowire can absorb light from an area much larger than its own size. Additionally, the thermodynamic limit on the photovoltage is unknown a priori and may be very different from that of a planar solar cell. This complicates the characterization and optimization of these devices. Here, we analyse an InP single-nanowire solar cell using intrinsic metrics to place its performance on an absolute thermodynamic scale and pinpoint performance loss mechanisms. To determine these metrics we have developed an integrating sphere microscopy set-up that enables simultaneous and spatially resolved quantitative absorption, internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) measurements. For our record single-nanowire solar cell, we measure a photocurrent collection efficiency of >90% and an open-circuit voltage of 850 mV, which is 73% of the thermodynamic limit (1.16 V).

  5. Quantifying losses and thermodynamic limits in nanophotonic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Sander A.; Oener, Sebastian Z.; Cavalli, Alessandro; Haverkort, Jos E. M.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.; Garnett, Erik C.

    2016-12-01

    Nanophotonic engineering shows great potential for photovoltaics: the record conversion efficiencies of nanowire solar cells are increasing rapidly and the record open-circuit voltages are becoming comparable to the records for planar equivalents. Furthermore, it has been suggested that certain nanophotonic effects can reduce costs and increase efficiencies with respect to planar solar cells. These effects are particularly pronounced in single-nanowire devices, where two out of the three dimensions are subwavelength. Single-nanowire devices thus provide an ideal platform to study how nanophotonics affects photovoltaics. However, for these devices the standard definition of power conversion efficiency no longer applies, because the nanowire can absorb light from an area much larger than its own size. Additionally, the thermodynamic limit on the photovoltage is unknown a priori and may be very different from that of a planar solar cell. This complicates the characterization and optimization of these devices. Here, we analyse an InP single-nanowire solar cell using intrinsic metrics to place its performance on an absolute thermodynamic scale and pinpoint performance loss mechanisms. To determine these metrics we have developed an integrating sphere microscopy set-up that enables simultaneous and spatially resolved quantitative absorption, internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) measurements. For our record single-nanowire solar cell, we measure a photocurrent collection efficiency of >90% and an open-circuit voltage of 850 mV, which is 73% of the thermodynamic limit (1.16 V).

  6. Compact waveguide circular polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-08-16

    A multi-port waveguide is provided having a rectangular waveguide that includes a Y-shape structure with first top arm having a first rectangular waveguide port, a second top arm with second rectangular waveguide port, and a base arm with a third rectangular waveguide port for supporting a TE.sub.10 mode and a TE.sub.20 mode, where the end of the third rectangular waveguide port includes rounded edges that are parallel to a z-axis of the waveguide, a circular waveguide having a circular waveguide port for supporting a left hand and a right hand circular polarization TE.sub.11 mode and is coupled to a base arm broad wall, and a matching feature disposed on the base arm broad wall opposite of the circular waveguide for terminating the third rectangular waveguide port, where the first rectangular waveguide port, the second rectangular waveguide port and the circular waveguide port are capable of supporting 4-modes of operation.

  7. Dyadic green functions and their applications in classical and quantum nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Vlack, Cole P.

    strength of finite-difference time-domain techniques is demonstrated in a number of cases for the calculation of regularized Green functions in lossy inhomogeneous media. This thesis presents a comprehensive study of Green function approaches to model classical and quantum light-matter interactions in arbitrary nanophotonic structures, including quantum dots, semiconductor microcavities, negative index waveguides, metallic half-spaces and metallic nanoparticles.

  8. Nano-photonic Light Trapping In Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Dennis M., Jr.

    Over the last several decades there have been significant advances in the study and understanding of light behavior in nanoscale geometries. Entire fields such as those based on photonic crystals, plasmonics and metamaterials have been developed, accelerating the growth of knowledge related to nanoscale light manipulation. Coupled with recent interest in cheap, reliable renewable energy, a new field has blossomed, that of nanophotonic solar cells. In this thesis, we examine important properties of thin-film solar cells from a nanophotonics perspective. We identify key differences between nanophotonic devices and traditional, thick solar cells. We propose a new way of understanding and describing limits to light trapping and show that certain nanophotonic solar cell designs can have light trapping limits above the so called ray-optic or ergodic limit. We propose that a necessary requisite to exceed the traditional light trapping limit is that the active region of the solar cell must possess a local density of optical states (LDOS) higher than that of the corresponding, bulk material. Additionally, we show that in addition to having an increased density of states, the absorber must have an appropriate incoupling mechanism to transfer light from free space into the optical modes of the device. We outline a portfolio of new solar cell designs that have potential to exceed the traditional light trapping limit and numerically validate our predictions for select cases. We emphasize the importance of thinking about light trapping in terms of maximizing the optical modes of the device and efficiently coupling light into them from free space. To further explore these two concepts, we optimize patterns of superlattices of air holes in thin slabs of Si and show that by adding a roughened incoupling layer the total absorbed current can be increased synergistically. We suggest that the addition of a random scattering surface to a periodic patterning can increase incoupling by

  9. Design of wide-angle broadband Luneburg lens based optical couplers for plasmonic slot nano-waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arigong, Bayaner; Ding, Jun; Ren, Han; Zhou, Rongguo; Kim, HyoungSoo; Lin, Yuankun; Zhang, Hualiang

    2013-10-01

    Gradient index (GRIN) structures have attracted great interests since their invention. Especially, the recent advance in the fields of transformation optics, plasmonics, and nanofabrication techniques has opened new directions for the applications of GRIN structures in nano-photonic devices. In this paper, we apply Luneburg lens and its transformed counterpart to realize efficient coupling to plasmonic nano-waveguides. We first briefly present the general structures of Luneburg lens and generalized Luneburg lens, as well as the design process of flattened Luneburg lens applying quasi-conformal mapping techniques. After that, we study the performance of these lenses for coupling electromagnetic signals to nano-waveguides (the metal-insulator-metal nano-waveguide). Different coupling schemes are investigated. It is found that the proposed Luneburg lens based optical couplers can be used to provide broadband light couplings to plasmonic nano-waveguides under wide incident angles.

  10. Adiabatic elimination-based coupling control in densely packed subwavelength waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Mrejen, Michael; Suchowski, Haim; Hatakeyama, Taiki; Wu, Chihhui; Feng, Liang; O'Brien, Kevin; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control light propagation in photonic integrated circuits is at the foundation of modern light-based communication. However, the inherent crosstalk in densely packed waveguides and the lack of robust control of the coupling are a major roadblock toward ultra-high density photonic integrated circuits. As a result, the diffraction limit is often considered as the lower bound for ultra-dense silicon photonics circuits. Here we experimentally demonstrate an active control of the coupling between two closely packed waveguides via the interaction with a decoupled waveguide. This control scheme is analogous to the adiabatic elimination, a well-known procedure in atomic physics. This approach offers an attractive solution for ultra-dense integrated nanophotonics for light-based communications and integrated quantum computing. PMID:26113179

  11. Size-dependent waveguide dispersion in nanowire optical cavities: slowed light and dispersionless guiding.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, Lambert K; Zhang, Bin; Piccione, Brian; Spector, Arthur A; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2009-04-01

    Fundamental understanding of the size dependence of nanoscale optical confinement in semiconductor nanowire waveguides, as expressed by changes in the dispersion of light, is crucial for the optimal design of nanophotonic devices. Measurements of the dispersion are particularly challenging for nanoscale cavities due to difficulties associated with the in- and out-coupling of light resulting from diffraction effects. We report the strong size dependence of optical dispersion and associated group velocities in subwavelength width ZnSe nanowire waveguide cavities, using a technique based on Fabry-Perot resonator modes as probes over a wide energy range. Furthermore, we observed subwavelength (lambda/9) dispersionless waveguiding and significant slowing of the propagating light by 90% (c/8). These results, in addition to providing insights into nanoscale optical transport, will facilitate the rational design of nanowire photonic devices with tailored dispersion and group velocities.

  12. Small slot waveguide rings for on-chip quantum optical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, Nir; Türschmann, Pierre; Haakh, Harald R.; Martin-Cano, Diego; Götzinger, Stephan; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2017-03-01

    Nanophotonic interfaces between single emitters and light promise to enable new quantum optical technologies. Here, we use a combination of finite element simulations and analytic quantum theory to investigate the interaction of various quantum emitters with slot-waveguide rings. We predict that for rings with radii as small as 1.44 $\\mu$m (Q = 27,900), near-unity emitter-waveguide coupling efficiencies and emission enhancements on the order of 1300 can be achieved. By tuning the ring geometry or introducing losses, we show that realistic emitter-ring systems can be made to be either weakly or strongly coupled, so that we can observe Rabi oscillations in the decay dynamics even for micron-sized rings. Moreover, we demonstrate that slot waveguide rings can be used to directionally couple emission, again with near-unity efficiency. Our results pave the way for integrated solid-state quantum circuits involving various emitters.

  13. Towards nanoscale multiplexing with parity-time-symmetric plasmonic coaxial waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaeian, Hadiseh; Baum, Brian; Jankovic, Vladan; Lawrence, Mark; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically investigate a nanoscale mode-division multiplexing scheme based on parity-time- (PT ) symmetric coaxial plasmonic waveguides. Coaxial waveguides support paired degenerate modes corresponding to distinct orbital angular momentum states. PT -symmetric inclusions of gain and loss break the degeneracy of the paired modes and create new hybrid modes without definite orbital angular momentum. This process can be made thresholdless by matching the mode order with the number of gain and loss sections within the coaxial ring. Using both a Hamiltonian formulation and degenerate perturbation theory, we show how the wave vectors and fields evolve with increased loss/gain and derive sufficient conditions for thresholdless transitions. As a multiplexing filter, this PT -symmetric coaxial waveguide could help double density rates in on-chip nanophotonic networks.

  14. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  15. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W.

    1981-04-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  16. Enabling high-temperature nanophotonics for energy applications

    PubMed Central

    Yeng, Yi Xiang; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Bermel, Peter; Chan, Walker R.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The nascent field of high-temperature nanophotonics could potentially enable many important solid-state energy conversion applications, such as thermophotovoltaic energy generation, selective solar absorption, and selective emission of light. However, special challenges arise when trying to design nanophotonic materials with precisely tailored optical properties that can operate at high-temperatures (> 1,100 K). These include proper material selection and purity to prevent melting, evaporation, or chemical reactions; severe minimization of any material interfaces to prevent thermomechanical problems such as delamination; robust performance in the presence of surface diffusion; and long-range geometric precision over large areas with severe minimization of very small feature sizes to maintain structural stability. Here we report an approach for high-temperature nanophotonics that surmounts all of these difficulties. It consists of an analytical and computationally guided design involving high-purity tungsten in a precisely fabricated photonic crystal slab geometry (specifically chosen to eliminate interfaces arising from layer-by-layer fabrication) optimized for high performance and robustness in the presence of roughness, fabrication errors, and surface diffusion. It offers near-ultimate short-wavelength emittance and low, ultra-broadband long-wavelength emittance, along with a sharp cutoff offering 4∶1 emittance contrast over 10% wavelength separation. This is achieved via Q-matching, whereby the absorptive and radiative rates of the photonic crystal’s cavity resonances are matched. Strong angular emission selectivity is also observed, with short-wavelength emission suppressed by 50% at 75° compared to normal incidence. Finally, a precise high-temperature measurement technique is developed to confirm that emission at 1,225 K can be primarily confined to wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength. PMID:22308448

  17. Offset Waveguide Transmission Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravey, Robin

    1997-01-01

    This report describes measurements to determine transmission losses in S-band (2.60-3.95 GHz) waveguide sections due to misalignment of the sections relative to each other. The experiments were performed in support of the Hydrostar program to determine the feasibility of using deployable waveguide sections in a large space radiometer. The waveguide sections would possibly be hinged and folded for launch, then deployed in space to form long sections of waveguide. Since very low losses are required for radiometer applications, the effects of potential misalignment after deployment of the waveguide sections may be significant. These measurements were performed in the Electromagnetic Properties Measurement Laboratory in the Electromagnetics Research Branch.

  18. Highly dispersive slot waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yue, Yang; Xiao-Li, Yinying; Beausoleil, Raymond G; Willner, Alan E

    2009-04-27

    We propose a slot-waveguide with high dispersion, in which a slot waveguide is coupled to a strip waveguide. A negative dispersion of up to -181520 ps/nm/km is obtained due to a strong interaction of the slot and strip modes. A flat and large dispersion is achievable by cascading the dispersive slot-waveguides with varied waveguide thickness or width for dispersion compensation and signal processing applications. We show - 31300 ps/nm/km dispersion over 147-nm bandwidth with <1% variance.

  19. Hybrid quantum nanophotonic devices for coupling to rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazono, Evan; Hartz, Alex; Zhong, Tian; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    With an assortment of narrow line-width transitions spanning the visible and IR spectrum and long spin coherence times, rare-earth doped crystals are the leading material system for solid-state quantum memories. Integrating these materials in an on-chip optical platform would create opportunities for highly integrated light-matter interfaces for quantum communication and quantum computing. Nano-photonic resonators with high quality factors and small mode volumes are required for efficient on-chip coupling to the small dipole moment of rare-earth ion transitions. However, direct fabrication of optical cavities in these crystals with current nanofabrication techniques is difficult and unparallelized, as either exotic etch chemistries or physical milling processes are required. We fabricated hybrid devices by mechanically transferring a nanoscale membrane of gallium arsenide (GaAs) onto a neodymium-doped yttrium silicon oxide (Y2SiO5) crystal and then using electron beam lithography and standard III-V dry etching to pattern nanobeam photonic crystal cavities and ring resonator cavities, a technique that is easily adapted to other frequency ranges for arbitrary dopants in any rare earth host system. Single crystalline GaAs was chosen for its low loss and high refractive index at the transition wavelength. We demonstrated the potential to evanescently couple between the cavity field and the 883 nm 4I9/2- 4F3/2 transition of nearby neodymium impurities in the host crystal by examining transmission spectra through a waveguide coupled to the resonator with a custom-built confocal microscope. The prospects and requirements for using this system for scalable quantum networks are discussed.

  20. Metabolic Differences in Microbial Cell Populations Revealed by Nanophotonic Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Bennett; Antonakos, Cory; Retterer, Scott T; Vertes, Akos

    2013-01-01

    ellular differences are linked to cell differentiation, the proliferation of cancer and to the development of drug resistance in microbial infections. Due to sensitivity limitations, however, large- scale metabolic analysis at the single cell level is only available for cells significantly larger in volume than Saccharomyces cerevisiae (~30 fL). Here we demonstrate that by a nanophotonic ionization platform and mass spectrometry, over one hundred up to 108 metabolites, or up to 18% of the known S. cerevisiae metabolome, can be identified in very small cell populations (n < 100). Under ideal conditions, r Relative quantitation of up to 4% of the metabolites is achieved at the single cell level.

  1. Integrated nanophotonics of parity-time symmetry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetry is a fundamental notion in quantum field theories and opens a new paradigm of non-Hermitian photonics. Instead of counteracting optical losses in integrated photonics, we start from an opposite viewpoint to strategically manipulate optical losses by the concept of PT symmetry. In this talk, I will discuss harnessing PT symmetry using the state-of-the-art integrated nanophotonics technology for novel optoelectronic functionalities. I will present unidirectional reflectionless light transport and coherent light control on a passive silicon platform and effective control of cavity resonant modes for stable lasing actions on an active III-V semiconductor platform.

  2. Second-harmonic generation in single-mode integrated waveguides based on mode-shape modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ashutosh; Chiles, Jeff; Khan, Saeed; Toroghi, Seyfollah; Malinowski, Marcin; Camacho-González, Guillermo Fernando; Fathpour, Sasan

    2017-03-01

    Second-harmonic generation is demonstrated using grating-assisted quasi-phase matching, based on waveguide-width modulation or mode-shape modulation. Applicable to any thin-film integrated second-order nonlinear waveguide, the technique is demonstrated in compact lithium niobate ridge waveguides. Fabricated devices are characterized with pulsed-pumping in the near-infrared, showing second-harmonic generation at a signal wavelength of 784 nm and propagation loss of 1 dB/cm.

  3. Second harmonic generation in a low-loss orientation-patterned GaAs waveguide.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, K A; McRobbie, A D; Sokolovskii, G S; Schunemann, P G; Rafailov, E U

    2013-07-15

    The technology of low-loss orientation-patterned gallium arsenide (OP-GaAs) waveguided crystals was developed and realized by reduction of diffraction scattering on the waveguide pattern. The propagation losses in the OP-GaAs waveguide were estimated to be as low as 2.1 dB/cm, thus demonstrating the efficient second harmonic generation at 1621 nm under an external pumping.

  4. Metallic-nanowire-loaded silicon-on-insulator structures: a route to low-loss plasmon waveguiding on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yusheng; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-03-14

    The simultaneous realization of nanoscale field localization and low transmission loss remains one of the major challenges in nanophotonics. Metal nanowire waveguides can fulfill this goal to a certain extent by confining light within subwavelength space, yet their optical performances are still restricted by the tradeoff between confinement and loss, which results in quite limited propagation distances when their mode sizes are reduced down to the nanometer scale. Here we introduce a class of low-loss guiding schemes by integrating silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides with plasmon nanowire structures. The closely spaced silicon and metal configurations allow efficient light squeezing within the nanometer, low-index silica gaps between them, enabling deep-subwavelength light transmission with low modal attenuation. Optimizations of key structural parameters unravel the wide-range existence of the high-performance hybrid nanowire plasmon mode, which demonstrates improved guiding properties compared to the conventional hybrid and nanowire plasmon polaritons. The excitation strategy of the guided mode and the feasibility of the waveguide for compact photonic integration as well as active components are also discussed to lay the foundation for its practical implementation. The remarkable properties of these metallic-nanowire-loaded SOI waveguides potentially lend themselves to the implementation of high performance nanophotonic components, and open up promising opportunities for a variety of intriguing applications on the nanoscale.

  5. Interconnect Between a Waveguide and a Dielectric Waveguide Comprising an Impedance Matched Dielectric Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decrossas, Emmanuel (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Chahat, Nacer (Inventor); Tang, Adrian J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A lens for interconnecting a metallic waveguide with a dielectric waveguide is provided. The lens may be coupled a metallic waveguide and a dielectric waveguide, and minimize a signal loss between the metallic waveguide and the dielectric waveguide.

  6. Modeling of Aperiodic Fractal Waveguide Structures for Multifrequency Light Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Marianne; Dal Negro, Luca; Feng, Ning-Ning; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Michel, Jurgen

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we present the design of a novel waveguide structure capable of multifrequency transmission bands with strongly enhanced electric field states. The concept of the structure is based on aperiodic and quasi-periodic fractal ordering of scattering subunits combined within a traditional channel-waveguide scheme. The resulting 3-D fractal waveguides are characterized by complex transmission spectra and sustain quasi-localized field modes with strong enhancement effects due to the lack of translational symmetry. In this paper, we will describe how it is possible to accurately model these complex waveguide structures within a simple 1-D model. We will explore the formation of photonic band gaps and the character of the quasi-localized states in fractal waveguide structures generated according to different deterministic rules, such as Fibonacci, Thue Morse, and Rudin Shapiro sequences. Furthermore, we will qualitatively compare the characteristics of the optical gaps and field states in periodic, fractal, and aperiodic waveguides. The results of our comparative study will show that fractal waveguides based on aperiodic order exhibit the richest transmission spectra with field-enhancement effects occurring at multiple frequencies. The proposed fractal waveguide design can provide an attractive route toward the fabrication of optically active devices for multiwavelength operation.

  7. Waveguide disturbance detection method

    DOEpatents

    Korneev, Valeri A.; Nihei, Kurt T.; Myer, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detection of a disturbance in a waveguide comprising transmitting a wavefield having symmetric and antisymmetric components from a horizontally and/or vertically polarized source and/or pressure source disposed symmetrically with respect to the longitudinal central axis of the waveguide at one end of the waveguide, recording the horizontal and/or vertical component or a pressure of the wavefield with a vertical array of receivers disposed at the opposite end of the waveguide, separating the wavenumber transform of the wavefield into the symmetric and antisymmetric components, integrating the symmetric and antisymmetric components over a broad frequency range, and comparing the magnitude of the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components to an expected magnitude for the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components for a waveguide of uniform thickness and properties thereby determining whether or not a disturbance is present inside the waveguide.

  8. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goldman, Don S.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  9. Lasing in silicon-organic hybrid waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Dietmar; Lauermann, Matthias; Koeber, Sebastian; Appel, Patrick; Alloatti, Luca; Palmer, Robert; Dumon, Pieter; Freude, Wolfgang; Leuthold, Juerg; Koos, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Silicon photonics enables large-scale photonic-electronic integration by leveraging highly developed fabrication processes from the microelectronics industry. However, while a rich portfolio of devices has already been demonstrated on the silicon platform, on-chip light sources still remain a key challenge since the indirect bandgap of the material inhibits efficient photon emission and thus impedes lasing. Here we demonstrate a class of infrared lasers that can be fabricated on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integration platform. The lasers are based on the silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) integration concept and combine nanophotonic SOI waveguides with dye-doped organic cladding materials that provide optical gain. We demonstrate pulsed room-temperature lasing with on-chip peak output powers of up to 1.1 W at a wavelength of 1,310 nm. The SOH approach enables efficient mass-production of silicon photonic light sources emitting in the near infrared and offers the possibility of tuning the emission wavelength over a wide range by proper choice of dye materials and resonator geometry.

  10. Lasing in silicon–organic hybrid waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Dietmar; Lauermann, Matthias; Koeber, Sebastian; Appel, Patrick; Alloatti, Luca; Palmer, Robert; Dumon, Pieter; Freude, Wolfgang; Leuthold, Juerg; Koos, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photonics enables large-scale photonic–electronic integration by leveraging highly developed fabrication processes from the microelectronics industry. However, while a rich portfolio of devices has already been demonstrated on the silicon platform, on-chip light sources still remain a key challenge since the indirect bandgap of the material inhibits efficient photon emission and thus impedes lasing. Here we demonstrate a class of infrared lasers that can be fabricated on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integration platform. The lasers are based on the silicon–organic hybrid (SOH) integration concept and combine nanophotonic SOI waveguides with dye-doped organic cladding materials that provide optical gain. We demonstrate pulsed room-temperature lasing with on-chip peak output powers of up to 1.1 W at a wavelength of 1,310 nm. The SOH approach enables efficient mass-production of silicon photonic light sources emitting in the near infrared and offers the possibility of tuning the emission wavelength over a wide range by proper choice of dye materials and resonator geometry. PMID:26949229

  11. Low band gap frequencies and multiplexing properties in 1D and 2D mass spring structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Arafa H.; Mehaney, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    This study reports on the propagation of elastic waves in 1D and 2D mass spring structures. An analytical and computation model is presented for the 1D and 2D mass spring systems with different examples. An enhancement in the band gap values was obtained by modeling the structures to obtain low frequency band gaps at small dimensions. Additionally, the evolution of the band gap as a function of mass value is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the local resonance property in frequency ranges within the gaps in the band structure for the corresponding infinite periodic lattice in the 1D and 2D mass spring system. A linear defect formed of a row of specific masses produces an elastic waveguide that transmits at the narrow pass band frequency. The frequency of the waveguides can be selected by adjusting the mass and stiffness coefficients of the materials constituting the waveguide. Moreover, we pay more attention to analyze the wave multiplexer and DE-multiplexer in the 2D mass spring system. We show that two of these tunable waveguides with alternating materials can be employed to filter and separate specific frequencies from a broad band input signal. The presented simulation data is validated through comparison with the published research, and can be extended in the development of resonators and MEMS verification.

  12. Photonic Crystals from Order to Disorder: Perturbative Methods in Nanophotonics

    ScienceCinema

    Johnson, Steven G. [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2016-07-12

    Photonic crystals are periodic dielectric structures in which light can behave much differently than in a homogeneous medium. This talk gives an overview of some of the interesting properties and applications of these media, from switching in subwavelength microcavities to slow-light devices, to guiding light in air. However, some of the most interesting and challenging problems occur when the periodicity is disturbed, either by design or by inevitable fabrication imperfections. The talk focuses especially on small perturbations that have important effects, from slow-light tapers to surface roughness disorder, and will show that many classic perturbative approaches must be rethought for high-contrast nanophotonics. The combination of strong periodicity with large field discontinuities at interfaces causes standard methods to fail, but succumbs to new generalizations, while some problems remain open.

  13. Controlled mode tuning in 1-D 'RIM' plasmonic crystal trench cavities probed with coupled optical emitters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tsung-li; Russell, Kasey J; Cui, Shanying; Hu, Evelyn L

    2013-12-02

    We present a design of plasmonic cavities that consists of two sets of 1-D plasmonic crystal reflectors on a plasmonic trench waveguide. A 'reverse image mold' (RIM) technique was developed to pattern high-resolution silver trenches and to embed emitters at the cavity field maximum, and FDTD simulations were performed to analyze the frequency response of the fabricated devices. Distinct cavity modes were observed from the photoluminescence spectra of the organic dye embedded within these cavities. The cavity geometry facilitates tuning of the modes through a change in cavity dimensions. Both the design and the fabrication technique presented could be extended to making trench waveguide-based plasmonic devices and circuits.

  14. Birefringent corrugated waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Moeller, Charles P.

    1990-01-01

    A corrugated waveguide having a circular bore and noncircularly symmetric corrugations, and preferably elliptical corrugations, provides birefringence for rotation of polarization in the HE.sub.11 mode. The corrugated waveguide may be fabricated by cutting circular grooves on a lathe in a cylindrical tube or rod of aluminum of a diameter suitable for the bore of the waveguide, and then cutting an approximation to ellipses for the corrugations using a cutting radius R.sub.0 from the bore axis that is greater than the bore radius, and then making two circular cuts using a radius R.sub.1 less than R.sub.0 at centers +b and -b from the axis of the waveguide bore. Alternatively, stock for the mandrel may be formed with an elliptical transverse cross section, and then only the circular grooves need be cut on a lathe, leaving elliptical corrugations between the grooves. In either case, the mandrel is first electroplated and then dissolved leaving a corrugated waveguide with noncircularly symmetric corrugations. A transition waveguide is used that gradually varies from circular to elliptical corrugations to couple a circularly corrugated waveguide to an elliptically corrugated waveguide.

  15. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Low-loss slot waveguides with silicon (111) surfaces realized using anisotropic wet etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Kapil; Khokhar, Ali; Boden, Stuart; Arimoto, Hideo; Oo, Swe; Chong, Harold; Reed, Graham; Saito, Shinichi

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate low-loss slot waveguides on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. Waveguides oriented along the (11-2) direction on the Si (110) plane were first fabricated by a standard e-beam lithography and dry etching process. A TMAH based anisotropic wet etching technique was then used to remove any residual side wall roughness. Using this fabrication technique propagation loss as low as 3.7dB/cm was realized in silicon slot waveguide for wavelengths near 1550nm. We also realized low propagation loss of 1dB/cm for silicon strip waveguides.

  17. Waveguide silicon nitride grating coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvik, Jan; Dolnak, Ivan; Dado, Milan

    2016-12-01

    Grating couplers are one of the most used elements for coupling of light between optical fibers and photonic integrated components. Silicon-on-insulator platform provides strong confinement of light and allows high integration. In this work, using simulations we have designed a broadband silicon nitride surface grating coupler. The Fourier-eigenmode expansion and finite difference time domain methods are utilized in design optimization of grating coupler structure. The fully, single etch step grating coupler is based on a standard silicon-on-insulator wafer with 0.55 μm waveguide Si3N4 layer. The optimized structure at 1550 nm wavelength yields a peak coupling efficiency -2.6635 dB (54.16%) with a 1-dB bandwidth up to 80 nm. It is promising way for low-cost fabrication using complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor fabrication process.

  18. Nanocrystal waveguide (NOW) laser

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Withrow, Stephen P.; White, Clark W.; Jaiswal, Supriya L.

    2005-02-08

    A solid state laser includes an optical waveguide and a laser cavity including at least one subwavelength mirror disposed in or on the optical waveguide. A plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals are disposed in the laser cavity. The reflective subwavelength mirror can be a pair of subwavelength resonant gratings (SWG), a pair of photonic crystal structures (PC), or a distributed feedback structure. In the case of a pair of mirrors, a PC which is substantially transmissive at an operating wavelength of the laser can be disposed in the laser cavity between the subwavelength mirrors to improve the mode structure, coherence and overall efficiency of the laser. A method for forming a solid state laser includes the steps of providing an optical waveguide, creating a laser cavity in the optical waveguide by disposing at least one subwavelength mirror on or in the waveguide, and positioning a plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals in the laser cavity.

  19. Zero-mode waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Levene, Michael J.; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Stephen W.; Craighead, Harold G.; Webb, Watt W.

    2007-02-20

    The present invention is directed to a method and an apparatus for analysis of an analyte. The method involves providing a zero-mode waveguide which includes a cladding surrounding a core where the cladding is configured to preclude propagation of electromagnetic energy of a frequency less than a cutoff frequency longitudinally through the core of the zero-mode waveguide. The analyte is positioned in the core of the zero-mode waveguide and is then subjected, in the core of the zero-mode waveguide, to activating electromagnetic radiation of a frequency less than the cut-off frequency under conditions effective to permit analysis of the analyte in an effective observation volume which is more compact than if the analysis were carried out in the absence of the zero-mode waveguide.

  20. Demonstration of acoustic waveguiding and tight bending in phononic crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Ghasemi Baboly, M.; Raza, A.; Brady, J.; ...

    2016-10-31

    The systematic design, fabrication, and characterization of an isolated, single-mode, 90° bend phononic crystal (PnC) waveguide are presented. A PnC consisting of a 2D square array of circular air holes in an aluminum substrate is used, and waveguides are created by introducing a line defect in the PnC lattice. A high transmission coefficient is observed (–1 dB) for the straight sections of the waveguide, and an overall 2.3 dB transmission loss is observed (a transmission coefficient of 76%) for the 90° bend. Further optimization of the structure may yield higher transmission efficiencies. Lastly, this manuscript shows the complete design processmore » for an engineered 90° bend PnC waveguide from inception to experimental demonstration.« less

  1. Demonstration of acoustic waveguiding and tight bending in phononic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi Baboly, M.; Raza, A.; Brady, J.; Reinke, C. M.; Leseman, Z. C.; El-Kady, I.

    2016-10-31

    The systematic design, fabrication, and characterization of an isolated, single-mode, 90° bend phononic crystal (PnC) waveguide are presented. A PnC consisting of a 2D square array of circular air holes in an aluminum substrate is used, and waveguides are created by introducing a line defect in the PnC lattice. A high transmission coefficient is observed (–1 dB) for the straight sections of the waveguide, and an overall 2.3 dB transmission loss is observed (a transmission coefficient of 76%) for the 90° bend. Further optimization of the structure may yield higher transmission efficiencies. Lastly, this manuscript shows the complete design process for an engineered 90° bend PnC waveguide from inception to experimental demonstration.

  2. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  3. Microfabricated bragg waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Hadley, G. Ronald

    2004-10-19

    A microfabricated Bragg waveguide of semiconductor-compatible material having a hollow core and a multilayer dielectric cladding can be fabricated by integrated circuit technologies. The microfabricated Bragg waveguide can comprise a hollow channel waveguide or a hollow fiber. The Bragg fiber can be fabricated by coating a sacrificial mandrel or mold with alternating layers of high- and low-refractive-index dielectric materials and then removing the mandrel or mold to leave a hollow tube with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The Bragg channel waveguide can be fabricated by forming a trench embedded in a substrate and coating the inner wall of the trench with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The thicknesses of the alternating layers can be selected to satisfy the condition for minimum radiation loss of the guided wave.

  4. Omnidirectional optical waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2016-08-02

    In one embodiment, a system includes a scintillator material; a detector coupled to the scintillator material; and an omnidirectional waveguide coupled to the scintillator material, the omnidirectional waveguide comprising: a plurality of first layers comprising one or more materials having a refractive index in a first range; and a plurality of second layers comprising one or more materials having a refractive index in a second range, the second range being lower than the first range, a plurality of interfaces being defined between alternating ones of the first and second layers. In another embodiment, a method includes depositing alternating layers of a material having a relatively high refractive index and a material having a relatively low refractive index on a substrate to form an omnidirectional waveguide; and coupling the omnidirectional waveguide to at least one surface of a scintillator material.

  5. Calculate waveguide aperture susceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.-K.; Ishii, T. K.

    1982-12-01

    A method is developed for calculating aperture susceptance which makes use of the distribution of an aperture's local fields. This method can be applied to the computation of the aperture susceptance of irises, as well as the calculation of the susceptances of waveguide filters, aperture antennas, waveguide cavity coupling, waveguide junctions, and heterogeneous boundaries such as inputs to ferrite or dielectric loaded waveguides. This method assumes a local field determined by transverse components of the incident wave in the local surface of the cross section in the discontinuity plane which lies at the aperture. The aperture susceptance is calculated by the use of the local fields, the law of energy conservation, and the principles of continuity of the fields. This method requires that the thickness of the aperture structure be zero, but this does not limit the practical usefulness of this local-field method.

  6. Axially Modulated Plasma Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Layer, B. D.; York, A. G.; Varma, S.; Chen, Y.-H.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2009-01-22

    We demonstrate two techniques for making periodically modulated plasma waveguides-one with sharp, stable voids as short as 50 {mu}m with a period as small as 200 {mu}m, and another which modulates the waveguide diameter with a corrugation period as short as 35 {mu}m[1]. These features persist as the plasma expands for the full lifetime of the waveguide (>6 ns). The waveguides were made using the hydrodynamic shock method in a cluster jet using hydrogen, nitrogen, and argon. We demonstrate guided propagation at intensities up to 2x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, limited by our laser energy currently available. This technique is useful for quasi-phase matching to allow efficient coupling of laser energy to acceleration of relativistic electrons or generation of coherent electromagnetic radiation at selected frequencies.

  7. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, J.R.; Ruzic, D.N.; Moore, R.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Manos, D.M.

    1982-06-16

    A method is described for treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1..mu.. to 5..mu.. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  8. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, John R.; Ruzic, David N.; Moore, Richard L.; Cohen, Samuel A.; Manos, Dennis M.

    1983-01-01

    A method of treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1.mu. to 5.mu. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  9. Imaging nanophotonic modes of microresonators using a focused ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twedt, Kevin A.; Zou, Jie; Davanco, Marcelo; Srinivasan, Kartik; McClelland, Jabez J.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.

    2016-01-01

    Optical microresonators have proven powerful in a wide range of applications, including cavity quantum electrodynamics, biosensing, microfludics, cavity optomechanics and optical frequency combs. Their performance depends critically on the exact distribution of optical energy, confined and shaped by the nanoscale device geometry. Near-field optical probes can image this distribution, but the physical probe necessarily perturbs the near field, which is particularly problematic for sensitive high-quality-factor resonances. We present a new approach to mapping nanophotonic modes that uses a controllably small and local optomechanical perturbation introduced by a focused lithium ion beam. An ion beam (radius of ≈50 nm) induces a picometre-scale deformation of the resonator surface, which we detect through shifts in the optical resonance wavelengths. We map five modes of a silicon microdisk resonator (Q ≥ 20,000) with high spatial and spectral resolution. Our technique also enables in situ observation of ion implantation damage and relaxation dynamics in a silicon lattice.

  10. Guided-mode resonance nanophotonics: fundamentals and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, Robert; Ko, Yeong Hwan

    2016-09-01

    We review principles and applications of nanophotonic devices based on electromagnetic resonance effects in thin periodic films. We discuss the fundamental resonance dynamics that are based on lateral Bloch modes excited by evanescent diffraction orders in these subwavelength devices. Theoretical and experimental results for selected example devices are furnished. Ultra-sparse nanogrids with duty cycle less than 10% are shown to provide substantially wide reflection bands and operate as effective polarizers. Narrow-passband resonant filters with extensive low sidebands are presented with focus on the zero-contrast grating architecture. This study is extended to long-wave operation in the THz region. Examples of fabricated guided-mode resonance devices with outstanding performance are given. This includes an unpolarized wideband reflector using serial single-layer reflectors, an ultra-sparse silicon nanowire grid as wideband reflector and polarizer, resonant bandpass filter with wide low sidebands, and a spatial/spectral filter permitting compact nonfocusing spatial filtering. The guided-mode resonance concept applies in all spectral regions, from the visible band to the microwave domain, with available low-loss materials.

  11. Resolving nanophotonic spectra with quasi-normal modes (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Many nanophotonic systems are strongly coupled to radiating waves, or suffer significant dissipative losses. Furthermore, they may have complex shapes which are not amenable to closed form calculations. This makes it challenging to determine their modes without resorting to quasi-static or point dipole approximations. To solve this problem, the quasi-normal modes (QNMs) are found from an integral equation model of the particle. These give complex frequencies where excitation can be supported without any incident field. The corresponding eigenvectors yield the modal distributions, which are non-orthogonal due to the non-Hermitian nature of the system. The model based on quasi-normal modes is applied to plasmonic and dielectric particles, and compared with a spherical multipole decomposition. Only with the QNMs is it possible to resolve all features of the extinction spectrum, as each peak in the spectrum can be attributed to a particular mode. In contrast, many of the multipole coefficient have multiple peaks and dips. Furthermore, by performing a multipolar decomposition of each QNM, the spectrum of multipole coefficients is explained in terms of destructive interference between modes of the same multipole order.

  12. Photon-based and classical descriptions in nanophotonics: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The centrality of the photon concept in modern physics is strongly evident in wide spheres of photonics and nanophotonics. Despite the resilience and persistence of earlier classical representations, there are numerous optical features and phenomena that only truly photon-based descriptions of theory can properly address. It is crucial to cast theory in terms of observables, and in this respect the quantum theory of light engages most directly and pragmatically with experiment. No other theory adequately reconciles the discreteness in energy of optical quanta, with their characteristic quantum mechanical delocalization in space. Examples of the distinctiveness of a photonic representation are to be found in nonclassical optical correlations; intensity fluctuations and phase; polarization, spin, and information content; measures of optical chirality; near-field interactions; and plasmonics. Increasingly, links between these fundamental properties and features are proving significant in the context of nanoscale interactions. Yet, even as new technologies are being built on the framework of modern photonics, a number of difficult questions surrounding the nature of the photon still remain. Both in its flourishing applications and in matters of fundamental entity, the photon is still a subject very much at the heart of current research.

  13. Nanophotonic quantum phase switch with a single atom.

    PubMed

    Tiecke, T G; Thompson, J D; de Leon, N P; Liu, L R; Vuletić, V; Lukin, M D

    2014-04-10

    By analogy to transistors in classical electronic circuits, quantum optical switches are important elements of quantum circuits and quantum networks. Operated at the fundamental limit where a single quantum of light or matter controls another field or material system, such a switch may enable applications such as long-distance quantum communication, distributed quantum information processing and metrology, and the exploration of novel quantum states of matter. Here, by strongly coupling a photon to a single atom trapped in the near field of a nanoscale photonic crystal cavity, we realize a system in which a single atom switches the phase of a photon and a single photon modifies the atom's phase. We experimentally demonstrate an atom-induced optical phase shift that is nonlinear at the two-photon level, a photon number router that separates individual photons and photon pairs into different output modes, and a single-photon switch in which a single 'gate' photon controls the propagation of a subsequent probe field. These techniques pave the way to integrated quantum nanophotonic networks involving multiple atomic nodes connected by guided light.

  14. True stopping of light: a new regime for nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakmakidis, Kosmas L.; Zhang, Xiang; Hess, Ortwin

    2014-09-01

    The extremely large speed of light is a tremendous asset but also makes it challenging to control, store or shrink beyond its wavelength. Particularly, reducing the speed of light down to zero is of fundamental scientific interest that could usher in a host of important photonic applications, some of which are hitherto fundamentally inaccessible. These include cavity-free, low-threshold nanolasers, novel solar-cell designs for efficient harvesting of light, nanoscale quantum information processing (owing to the enhanced density of states), as well as enhanced biomolecular sensing. We shall here present nanoplasmonic-based schemes where timedependent sources excite "complex-frequency" modes in uniform (plasmonic) heterostructures, enabling complete and dispersion-free stopping of light pulses, resilient to realistic levels of dissipative, radiative and surface-roughness losses. Our theoretical and computational results demonstrate extraordinary large lightdeceleration factors (of the order of 15,000,000) in integrated nanophotonic media, comparable only to those attainable with ultracold atomic vapours or with quantum coherence effects, such as coherent population oscillations, in ruby crystals.

  15. Plasmonic antennas as design elements for coherent ultrafast nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Brinks, Daan; Castro-Lopez, Marta; Hildner, Richard; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2013-01-01

    Broadband excitation of plasmons allows control of light-matter interaction with nanometric precision at femtosecond timescales. Research in the field has spiked in the past decade in an effort to turn ultrafast plasmonics into a diagnostic, microscopy, computational, and engineering tool for this novel nanometric–femtosecond regime. Despite great developments, this goal has yet to materialize. Previous work failed to provide the ability to engineer and control the ultrafast response of a plasmonic system at will, needed to fully realize the potential of ultrafast nanophotonics in physical, biological, and chemical applications. Here, we perform systematic measurements of the coherent response of plasmonic nanoantennas at femtosecond timescales and use them as building blocks in ultrafast plasmonic structures. We determine the coherent response of individual nanoantennas to femtosecond excitation. By mixing localized resonances of characterized antennas, we design coupled plasmonic structures to achieve well-defined ultrafast and phase-stable field dynamics in a predetermined nanoscale hotspot. We present two examples of the application of such structures: control of the spectral amplitude and phase of a pulse in the near field, and ultrafast switching of mutually coherent hotspots. This simple, reproducible and scalable approach transforms ultrafast plasmonics into a straightforward tool for use in fields as diverse as room temperature quantum optics, nanoscale solid-state physics, and quantum biology. PMID:24163355

  16. Nanophotonics-enabled smart windows, buildings and wearables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoff; Gentle, Angus; Arnold, Matthew; Cortie, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Design and production of spectrally smart windows, walls, roofs and fabrics has a long history, which includes early examples of applied nanophotonics. Evolving nanoscience has a special role to play as it provides the means to improve the functionality of these everyday materials. Improvement in the quality of human experience in any location at any time of year is the goal. Energy savings, thermal and visual comfort indoors and outdoors, visual experience, air quality and better health are all made possible by materials, whose "smartness" is aimed at designed responses to environmental energy flows. The spectral and angle of incidence responses of these nanomaterials must thus take account of the spectral and directional aspects of solar energy and of atmospheric thermal radiation plus the visible and color sensitivity of the human eye. The structures required may use resonant absorption, multilayer stacks, optical anisotropy and scattering to achieve their functionality. These structures are, in turn, constructed out of particles, columns, ultrathin layers, voids, wires, pure and doped oxides, metals, polymers or transparent conductors (TCs). The need to cater for wavelengths stretching from 0.3 to 35 μm including ultraviolet-visible, near-infrared (IR) and thermal or Planck radiation, with a spectrally and directionally complex atmosphere, and both being dynamic, means that hierarchical and graded nanostructures often feature. Nature has evolved to deal with the same energy flows, so biomimicry is sometimes a useful guide.

  17. Metallic-nanowire-loaded silicon-on-insulator structures: a route to low-loss plasmon waveguiding on the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yusheng; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-02-01

    The simultaneous realization of nanoscale field localization and low transmission loss remains one of the major challenges in nanophotonics. Metal nanowire waveguides can fulfill this goal to a certain extent by confining light within subwavelength space, yet their optical performances are still restricted by the tradeoff between confinement and loss, which results in quite limited propagation distances when their mode sizes are reduced down to the nanometer scale. Here we introduce a class of low-loss guiding schemes by integrating silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides with plasmon nanowire structures. The closely spaced silicon and metal configurations allow efficient light squeezing within the nanometer, low-index silica gaps between them, enabling deep-subwavelength light transmission with low modal attenuation. Optimizations of key structural parameters unravel the wide-range existence of the high-performance hybrid nanowire plasmon mode, which demonstrates improved guiding properties compared to the conventional hybrid and nanowire plasmon polaritons. The excitation strategy of the guided mode and the feasibility of the waveguide for compact photonic integration as well as active components are also discussed to lay the foundation for its practical implementation. The remarkable properties of these metallic-nanowire-loaded SOI waveguides potentially lend themselves to the implementation of high performance nanophotonic components, and open up promising opportunities for a variety of intriguing applications on the nanoscale.The simultaneous realization of nanoscale field localization and low transmission loss remains one of the major challenges in nanophotonics. Metal nanowire waveguides can fulfill this goal to a certain extent by confining light within subwavelength space, yet their optical performances are still restricted by the tradeoff between confinement and loss, which results in quite limited propagation distances when their mode sizes are reduced

  18. Correlations in light propagation in one-dimensional waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanainen, Juha; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2016-05-01

    We study light propagation between atoms in a one-dimensional waveguide both analytically and using numerical simulations. We employ classical electrodynamics, but in the limit of low light intensity the results are essentially exact also for quantum mechanics. We characterize the cooperative interactions between the atoms mediated by the electromagnetic field. The focus is on resonance shifts for various statistics of the positions of the atoms, such as statistically independent positions or atoms in a regular lattice. These shifts, potentially important if 1D waveguides are to be used in metrology, are different from the usual resonance shifts found in three spatial dimensions.

  19. Low-loss segmented joint structure between a slab waveguide and arrayed waveguides designed by simple optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, K.; Idris, N. A.; Asakura, H.; Tsuda, H.

    2015-02-01

    Arrayed-waveguide gratings (AWG) are key devices in optical communication systems using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), and it is essential that these AWGs are low-loss. In this paper, we propose low-loss segmented joint structures between the slab waveguide and the waveguide array in an AWG. The effectiveness of these structures is confirmed by the measurement results. In addition, improvements in the loss uniformity can be obtained by utilizing mode converting segmented structures between the waveguide array and the slab waveguide on the output side. Moreover, the passband can be flattened by employing such a structure between the input and slab waveguides. These structures were designed using the same simple calculation and optimization method. Using these optimized structures, the transmittance was improved by 17%, the largest difference in insertion loss was reduced by 1.93 dB, and the 1-dB bandwidth was extended by 20%. These structures can be fabricated with ordinary planar lightwave circuit (PLC) technologies without the need for special fabrication processes.

  20. Bound and scattering properties in waveguides around free-space Feshbach resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaoren; Giannakeas, Panogiotis; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The two-body bound and scattering properties in an one-dimensional (1D) harmonic waveguide in the vicinity of free-space magnetic Feshbach resonances are investigated based on the local frame transformation approach. The multichannel characteristics of the interatomic interaction is taken into account. We examine the crossing between the bound state in the waveguide and the ground level of the transverse confinement, i.e. when the bound state crosses the scattering threshold in the waveguide and turns into a continuum state. For s-wave collision, the crossing occurs at the magnetic field where the effective 1D interaction strength g1 D vanishes, and the effective 1D scattering length a1 D diverges. This observation indicates that the molecular formation or atom loss signal in a harmonic waveguide is expected at the magnetic field where a1 D is infinite. Molecule formation is absent at position of the confinement induced resonance which is characterized by the divergence of g1 D . Financial support from Alexander von Humboldt Foundation is acknowledged.

  1. A Simple Optical Waveguide Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, J.; Sambles, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a thin film rectangular dielectric waveguide and its laboratory use. Discusses the theory of uniaxial thin film waveguides with mathematical expressions and the laboratory procedures for a classroom experiment with diagrams. (Author/YP)

  2. Integrated Nanophotonic Silicon Devices for Next Generation Computing Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, Stevan

    Development of the computing platform of the future depends largely on high bandwidth interconnects at intra-die level. Silicon photonics, as an innately CMOS compatible technology, is a promising candidate for delivering terabit per second bandwidths through the use of wavelength division multiplex (WDM) signaling. Silicon photonic interconnects offer unmatched bandwidth, density, energy efficiency, latency and reach, compared with the electrical interconnects. WDM silicon photonic links are viewed today as a promising solution for resolving the inter/intra-chip communication bottlenecks for high performance computing systems. Towards its maturity, silicon photonic technology has to resolve the issues of waveguide propagation loss, density of device integration, thermal stability of resonant devices, heterogeneous integration of various materials and many other problems. This dissertation describes the development of integrated photonic technology on silicon and silicon nitride platforms in the increased order of device complexity, from the fabrication process of low loss waveguides and efficient off-chip coupling devices, to the die-size reconfigurable lattice filters for optical signal processing. Particular emphasis of the dissertation is on the demonstration of CMOS-compatible, athermal silicon ring modulators that potentially hold the key to solving the thermal problem of silicon photonic devices. The development of high quality amorphous titanium dioxide films with negative thermo-optic coefficient enabled the fabrication of gigahertz-bandwidth silicon ring modulators that can be made insensitive to ambient temperature changes.

  3. Actively coupled optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeeva, N. V.; Barashenkov, I. V.; Rayanov, K.; Flach, S.

    2014-01-01

    We consider light propagation through a pair of nonlinear optical waveguides with absorption, placed in a medium with power gain. The active medium boosts the in-phase component of the overlapping evanescent fields of the guides, while the nonlinearity of the guides couples it to the damped out-of-phase component creating a feedback loop. As a result, the structure exhibits stable stationary and oscillatory regimes in a wide range of gain-loss ratios. We show that the pair of actively coupled (AC) waveguides can act as a stationary or integrate-and-fire comparator sensitive to tiny differences in their input powers.

  4. Optical analogue of relativistic Dirac solitons in binary waveguide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Truong X.; Longhi, Stefano; Biancalana, Fabio

    2014-01-15

    We study analytically and numerically an optical analogue of Dirac solitons in binary waveguide arrays in the presence of Kerr nonlinearity. Pseudo-relativistic soliton solutions of the coupled-mode equations describing dynamics in the array are analytically derived. We demonstrate that with the found soliton solutions, the coupled mode equations can be converted into the nonlinear relativistic 1D Dirac equation. This paves the way for using binary waveguide arrays as a classical simulator of quantum nonlinear effects arising from the Dirac equation, something that is thought to be impossible to achieve in conventional (i.e. linear) quantum field theory. -- Highlights: •An optical analogue of Dirac solitons in nonlinear binary waveguide arrays is suggested. •Analytical solutions to pseudo-relativistic solitons are presented. •A correspondence of optical coupled-mode equations with the nonlinear relativistic Dirac equation is established.

  5. Low loss coupling to sub-micron thick rib and nanowire waveguides by vertical tapering.

    PubMed

    Madden, S; Jin, Z; Choi, D; Debbarma, S; Bulla, D; Luther-Davies, B

    2013-02-11

    Highly nonlinear planar glass waveguides have been shown to be useful for all optical signal processing. However, the typical SMF-28 fiber to waveguide coupling loss of ~5dB/end remains a barrier to practical implementation. Low loss coupling to a fiber using vertical tapering of the waveguide film is analyzed for rib and nanowire waveguides and experimentally demonstrated for ribs showing polarization and wavelength independence over >300nm bandwidth. Tapers with essentially zero excess loss led to total losses from the waveguide to fiber core of 1.1dB per facet comprising only material absorption (0.75dB) and mode overlap loss (0.36dB), both of which can be eliminated with improvements to processing and materials.

  6. Nonlinear diffusion model for annealed proton-exchanged waveguides in zirconium-doped lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Langrock, Carsten; Roussev, Rostislav V; Nava, Giovanni; Minzioni, Paolo; Argiolas, Nicola; Sada, Cinzia; Fejer, Martin M

    2016-08-20

    Photorefractive-damage- (PRD) resistant zirconium-oxide-doped lithium niobate is investigated as a substrate for the realization of annealed proton-exchanged (APE) waveguides. Its advantages are a favorable distribution coefficient, PRD resistance comparable to magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate, and a proton-diffusion behavior resembling congruent lithium niobate. A 1D model for APE waveguides was developed based on a previous model for congruently melting lithium niobate. Evidence for a nonlinear index dependence on concentration was found.

  7. Control on Surface Plasmon Polaritons Propagation Properties by Continuously Moving a Nanoparticle along a Silver Nanowire Waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Wang, Wenhui; Hua, Jiaojiao; Xu, Zhongfeng; Li, Fuli

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs)-based nanowire waveguides possess potential applications for nanophotonic circuits. Precise control on the propagation of SPPs in metal nanowires is thus of significant importance. In this work, we report the control on SPPs propagation properties by moving a silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) along a silver nanowire (Ag NW). The emission intensity at NP can be attenuated to about 25% of the maximum emission value with increasing the distance between excitation end and NP. When NP is gradually moved away from excitation end, the intensity of emission light at Ag NP shows an exponential decay with a superposition of wavy appearance, while the emission at NW end is almost a constant value. It is found that the former is related to the local SPPs field distribution in NW, and the latter is dependent on the distance between excitation end and NW terminal. Moreover, the propagation loss in Ag NP-NW structure has been investigated. Our experiments demonstrate the important role of NP location in NW-based waveguides and provide an effective method of tuning scattering light in NW, which is instructive to design the future specialized function of SPPs-based nanophotonic circuits and devices. PMID:27874049

  8. Control on Surface Plasmon Polaritons Propagation Properties by Continuously Moving a Nanoparticle along a Silver Nanowire Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fan; Wang, Wenhui; Hua, Jiaojiao; Xu, Zhongfeng; Li, Fuli

    2016-11-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs)-based nanowire waveguides possess potential applications for nanophotonic circuits. Precise control on the propagation of SPPs in metal nanowires is thus of significant importance. In this work, we report the control on SPPs propagation properties by moving a silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) along a silver nanowire (Ag NW). The emission intensity at NP can be attenuated to about 25% of the maximum emission value with increasing the distance between excitation end and NP. When NP is gradually moved away from excitation end, the intensity of emission light at Ag NP shows an exponential decay with a superposition of wavy appearance, while the emission at NW end is almost a constant value. It is found that the former is related to the local SPPs field distribution in NW, and the latter is dependent on the distance between excitation end and NW terminal. Moreover, the propagation loss in Ag NP-NW structure has been investigated. Our experiments demonstrate the important role of NP location in NW-based waveguides and provide an effective method of tuning scattering light in NW, which is instructive to design the future specialized function of SPPs-based nanophotonic circuits and devices.

  9. Periodically structured plasmonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saj, W. M.; Foteinopoulou, S.; Kafesaki, M.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Economou, E. N.

    2008-04-01

    We study surface plasmon polariton (SPP) guiding structures, which are a modification of the Metal-Insulator-Metal (MIM) waveguide. The designs are constructed by introducing a periodic modulation in a MIM waveguide, with a glass core and silver claddings. This periodic modulation is created either by causing periodic indentations in the silver slabs encompassing the glass core, or by increasing the glass spacer material in certain periodic locations. Our objective is to achieve long range sub-wavelength waveguiding with vast dispersion engineering capabilities. We employ the Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD) with the Auxiliary Differential Equation method (ADE) for the calculation of the dispersion relation of the guided modes, as well as the real time propagation suggests that the guiding mechnism in the examined structures is based on the electromagnetic (EM) couping between the slit plasmon modes. These - depending on the design - exist in the grooves between the silver plates or in the larger areas of the glass core spacer. Put it different, the guiding mechanism in the examined SPP waveguide designs is analogous to the EM energy transfer along metallic nanoparticle chains.

  10. Gratings in polymeric waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishakov, G.; Sokolov, V.; Kocabas, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2007-04-01

    Laser-induced formation of polymer Bragg grating filters for Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) applications is discussed. Acrylate monomers halogenated with both fluorine and chlorine, which possess absorption losses less than 0.25 dB/cm and wide choice of refractive indices (from 1.3 to 1.5) in the 1.5 μm telecom wavelength region were used. The monomers are highly intermixable thus permitting to adjust the refractive index of the composition within +/-0.0001. Moreover they are photocurable under UV exposure and exhibit high contrast in polymerization. These properties make halogenated acrylates very promising for fabricating polymeric waveguides and photonic circuits. Single-mode polymer waveguides were fabricated on silicon wafers using resistless contact lithography. Submicron index gratings have been written in polymer waveguides using holographic exposure with He-Cd laser beam (325 nm) through a phase mask. Both uniform and apodized gratings have been fabricated. The gratings are stable and are not erased by uniform UV exposure. The waveguide gratings possess narrowband reflection spectra in the 1.5 μm wavelength region of 0.4 nm width, nearly rectangular shape of the stopband and reflectivity R > 99%. The fabricated Bragg grating filters can be used for multiplexing/demultiplexing optical signals in high-speed DWDM optical fiber networks.

  11. Single MoO3 nanoribbon waveguides: good building blocks as elements and interconnects for nanophotonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Guoqing; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2015-11-01

    Exploring new nanowaveguide materials and structures is of great scientific interest and technological significance for optical and photonic applications. In this work, high-quality single-crystal MoO3 nanoribbons (NRs) are synthesized and used for optical guiding. External light sources are efficiently launched into the single MoO3 NRs using silica fiber tapers. It is found that single MoO3 NRs are as good nanowaveguides with loss optical losses (typically less than 0.1 dB/μm) and broadband optical guiding in the visible/near-infrared region. Single MoO3 NRs have good Raman gains that are comparable to those of semiconductor nanowaveguides, but the second harmonic generation efficiencies are about 4 orders less than those of semiconductor nanowaveguides. And also no any third-order nonlinear optical effects are observed at high pump power. A hybrid Fabry-Pérot cavity containing an active CdSe nanowire and a passive MoO3 NR is also demonstrated, and the ability of coupling light from other active nanostructures and fluorescent liquid solutions has been further demonstrated. These optical properties make single MoO3 NRs attractive building blocks as elements and interconnects in miniaturized photonic circuitries and devices.

  12. Single MoO3 nanoribbon waveguides: good building blocks as elements and interconnects for nanophotonic applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Guoqing; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Exploring new nanowaveguide materials and structures is of great scientific interest and technological significance for optical and photonic applications. In this work, high-quality single-crystal MoO3 nanoribbons (NRs) are synthesized and used for optical guiding. External light sources are efficiently launched into the single MoO3 NRs using silica fiber tapers. It is found that single MoO3 NRs are as good nanowaveguides with loss optical losses (typically less than 0.1 dB/μm) and broadband optical guiding in the visible/near-infrared region. Single MoO3 NRs have good Raman gains that are comparable to those of semiconductor nanowaveguides, but the second harmonic generation efficiencies are about 4 orders less than those of semiconductor nanowaveguides. And also no any third-order nonlinear optical effects are observed at high pump power. A hybrid Fabry-Pérot cavity containing an active CdSe nanowire and a passive MoO3 NR is also demonstrated, and the ability of coupling light from other active nanostructures and fluorescent liquid solutions has been further demonstrated. These optical properties make single MoO3 NRs attractive building blocks as elements and interconnects in miniaturized photonic circuitries and devices. PMID:26611855

  13. Channelized-Coplanar-Waveguide PIN-Diode Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G. E.; Simons, R. N.

    1992-01-01

    Three positive/intrinsic/negative (PIN-diode) reflective CPW (coplanar waveguide) switches demonstrated. First includes series-mounted diode to bridge gap in center strip conductor of CPW. Second includes pair of diodes to short center strip conductor to ground planes. Third includes diode to switch between band-pass filter and notch filter. Isolation exceeds 20 dB, while insertion loss is less than 1 dB.

  14. Experimental investigation of plasmofluidic waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Bonwoo; Kwon, Min-Suk; Shin, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-16

    Plasmofluidic waveguides are based on guiding light which is strongly confined in fluid with the assistance of a surface plasmon polariton. To realize plasmofluidic waveguides, metal-insulator-silicon-insulator-metal (MISIM) waveguides, which are hybrid plasmonic waveguides fabricated using standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, are employed. The insulator of the MISIM waveguide is removed to form 30-nm-wide channels, and they are filled with fluid. The plasmofluidic waveguide has a subwavelength-scale mode area since its mode is strongly confined in the fluid. The waveguides are experimentally characterized for different fluids. When the refractive index of the fluid is 1.440, the plasmofluidic waveguide with 190-nm-wide silicon has propagation loss of 0.46 dB/μm; the coupling loss between it and an ordinary silicon photonic waveguide is 1.79 dB. The propagation and coupling losses may be reduced if a few fabrication-induced imperfections are removed. The plasmofluidic waveguide may pave the way to a dynamically phase-tunable ultracompact device.

  15. Gap plasmon excitation in plasmonic waveguide using Si waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Koji; Kamada, Shun; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Haraguchi, Masanobu

    2016-08-01

    Plasmonic waveguides have attracted considerable attention for application in highly integrated optical circuits since they can confine light to areas smaller than the diffraction limit. In this context, in order to realize a highly integrated optical circuit, we fabricate and evaluate the optical characteristics of a poly(methyl methacrylate) junction positioned between Si and plasmonic waveguides. For the plasmonic waveguide, we employ a gap plasmonic waveguide in which the energy of the plasmonic wave can be confined in order to reduce the scattering loss at the junction. By experimental measurement, we determine the coupling efficiency between the Si and gap plasmonic waveguides and the propagation length at the gap plasmonic waveguide to be 52.4% and 11.1 µm, respectively. These values agree with those obtained by the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulation. We believe that our findings can significantly contribute to the development of highly integrated optical circuits.

  16. Transmission of photonic quantum polarization entanglement in a nanoscale hybrid plasmonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Zou, Chang-Ling; Ren, Xi-Feng; Xiong, Xiao; Cai, Yong-Jing; Guo, Guo-Ping; Tong, Li-Min; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-04-08

    Photonic quantum technologies have been extensively studied in quantum information science, owing to the high-speed transmission and outstanding low-noise properties of photons. However, applications based on photonic entanglement are restricted due to the diffraction limit. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the maintaining of quantum polarization entanglement in a nanoscale hybrid plasmonic waveguide composed of a fiber taper and a silver nanowire. The transmitted state throughout the waveguide has a fidelity of 0.932 with the maximally polarization entangled state Φ(+). Furthermore, the Clauser, Horne, Shimony, and Holt (CHSH) inequality test performed, resulting in value of 2.495 ± 0.147 > 2, demonstrates the violation of the hidden variable model. Because the plasmonic waveguide confines the effective mode area to subwavelength scale, it can bridge nanophotonics and quantum optics and may be used as near-field quantum probe in a quantum near-field micro/nanoscope, which can realize high spatial resolution, ultrasensitive, fiber-integrated, and plasmon-enhanced detection.

  17. Diodelike asymmetric transmission in hybrid plasmonic waveguides via breaking polarization symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heran; Zhang, Fengchun; Liang, Yao; Huang, Xu-Guang; Jia, Baohua

    2017-04-01

    The ability to control the asymmetric propagation of light in nanophotonic waveguides is of fundamental importance to optical communications and on-chip signal processing. However, in most studies so far, the design of such structures has been based on asymmetric mode conversion where multi-mode waveguides are involved. Here we propose a hybrid plasmonic structure that performs optical diode behavior via breaking polarization symmetry in single mode waveguides. The exploited physical mechanism is based on the combination of polarization rotation and selection. The whole device is ultra-compact with a footprint of 2.95  ×  14.18 µm2, and whose dimension is much smaller than the device previously proposed for a similar function. The extinction ratio is greater than 11.8 dB for both forward and backward propagation at λ  =  1550 nm (19.43 dB for forward propagation and 11.8 dB for the backward one). The operation bandwidth of the device is as great as 70 nm (form 1510 to 1580 nm) for extinction  >10 dB. These results may find important applications in the integrated devices where polarization handling or unidirectional propagation is required.

  18. Statistics of scattered photons from a driven three-level emitter in 1D open space

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Dibyendu; Bondyopadhaya, Nilanjan

    2014-01-07

    We derive the statistics of scattered photons from a Λ- or ladder-type three-level emitter (3LE) embedded in a 1D open waveguide. The weak probe photons in the waveguide are coupled to one of the two allowed transitions of the 3LE, and the other transition is driven by a control beam. This system shows electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) which is accompanied with the Autler-Townes splitting (ATS) at a strong driving by the control beam, and some of these effects have been observed recently. We show that the nature of second-order coherence of the transmitted probe photons near two-photon resonance changes from bunching to antibunching to constant as strength of the control beam is ramped up from zero to a higher value where the ATS appears.

  19. Plasmonic and nanophotonics sensors from visible to terahertz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Alireza

    The global research objective of this thesis is to demonstrate design of novel compact and ultra-sensitive plasmonic sensors operating anywhere from the visible to the THz spectral ranges. The enabling technologies for such sensors are photonic bandgap and microstructured waveguides and fibers containing metallic inclusions. We achieve the stated global objective by systematically addressing several smaller problems. Firstly, this thesis demonstrates plasmonic excitation in metalized microstructured fibers in the context of bio-chemical sensing with enhanced microfluidics for visible and IR ranges. Furthemore, this basic design concept is generalized for the use with photonic bandgap fibers and waveguides; major advantages of using photonic bandgap waveguides in place of Total Internal Reflection (TIR) fibers for plasmonic sensing are discovered. In the first chapter, we discuss the theory of surface plasmons, surface plasmon excitation and sensing methodologies. In the second chapter we show that using microstructured fibers one can solve much easier the problem of phase matching between the surface plasmon wave and fiber core mode, which is common when standard TIR fibers are used. Moreover, the use of microstructured fibers enables integration of the microfluidics and optics during drawing step thus simplifying considerably the sensor fabrication and operation. Furthermore, the different shapes of the metalized surface to enhance the plasmonic excitation were explored with an aim to enhance sensitivity. In the third chapter, the design of photonic crystal waveguide-based surface plasmon resonance sensor is proposed. By judicious design of a photonic crystal waveguide, the effective refractive index of a core mode can be made considerably smaller than that of the core material, thus enabling efficient phase matching with a plasmon, high sensitivity, and high coupling efficiency from an external Gaussian source, at any wavelength of choice from the visible to near

  20. Coupling of Surface Plasmons and Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Nanophotonics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanti, Sriharsha V.

    The goal of this thesis is to engineer the interaction between surface plasmons and semiconductor nanocrystals for nanophotonic applications. Plasmonic metals support surface plasmon polaritons, hybrid photon and electron waves that propagate along a metal-dielectric interface. Unlike photons, surface plasmons can be confined in sub-diffraction geometries. This has two important consequences: 1) optical devices can be designed at the nanoscale, and 2) the high density of electromagnetic fields allows study of enhanced light-matter interactions. Surface plasmons have been exploited to demonstrate components of optoelectronic circuits, optical antennas, surface enhanced spectroscopy, enhanced fluorescence from fluorophores, and nanolasers. Despite the advances, surface plasmon losses limit their propagation lengths to tens of micrometers in the visible wavelengths, hindering many applications. Recently, the template-stripping approach was shown to fabricate metal films that exhibit larger grains and smoother surface, reducing the grain boundary and roughness scattering. To further improve the plasmonic properties, we investigate the importance of deposition conditions in the template-stripping approach. We provide insight and recipes to enhance the plasmonic performance of the most commonly used metals in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared. We also explore the potential of low temperatures to improve the performance of metal films, where the electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering should be reduced. This sets a limit on the minimum loss metals can exhibit. Using this knowledge, we study the optical properties of quantum-confined semiconductor nanocrystals near metal structures. Semiconductor nanocrystals have many attractive characteristics that make them suitable for solid-state lighting and solar cells among others. Specifically, CdSe nanocrystals have been heavily studied for their large absorption and emission cross-sections, size dependent

  1. Luminescent Properties of Arylpolyene Organic Dyes and Cross-Conjugated Ketones Promising for Quantum Optics and Nanophotonics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumova, N. L.; Vasilyeva, I. A.

    2015-09-01

    The spectral-luminescent properties of some dyes of substituted arylpolyenes and cross-conjugated ketones class in Shpolsky matrices, promising for using in solving quantum optics and nanophotonics, were studied.

  2. Phonon waveguides for electromechanical circuits.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, D; Mahboob, I; Onomitsu, K; Yamaguchi, H

    2014-07-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), utilizing localized mechanical vibrations, have found application in sensors, signal processors and in the study of macroscopic quantum mechanics. The integration of multiple mechanical elements via electrical or optical means remains a challenge in the realization of NEMS circuits. Here, we develop a phonon waveguide using a one-dimensional array of suspended membranes that offers purely mechanical means to integrate isolated NEMS resonators. We demonstrate that the phonon waveguide can support and guide mechanical vibrations and that the periodic membrane arrangement also creates a phonon bandgap that enables control of the phonon propagation velocity. Furthermore, embedding a phonon cavity into the phonon waveguide allows mobile mechanical vibrations to be dynamically switched or transferred from the waveguide to the cavity, thereby illustrating the viability of waveguide-resonator coupling. These highly functional traits of the phonon waveguide architecture exhibit all the components necessary to permit the realization of all-phononic NEMS circuits.

  3. Photonic integration using asymmetric twin-waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenkov, Pavel V.

    A novel approach to fabrication of monolithic photonic integrated circuits based on the asymmetric twin- waveguide (ATG) structure is proposed and demonstrated. In contrast to the conventional integration methods relying on semiconductor regrowth, the ATG approach requires only one epitaxy step, while the integrated devices are defined by post-growth patterning. The ATG structure contains two evanescently coupled waveguide layers separated by a cladding layer. The upper layer provides optical gain for the active devices such as lasers and semiconductor optical amplifiers. The transparent lower layer is used to make waveguides and optical interconnects on the chip. Thus the ATG represents a versatile integration platform for cost- effective fabrication of photonic integrated circuits, similar in some respects to the electronic CMOS platform. Light propagation and coupling in the ATG structure are analyzed using the beam propagation method to optimize the layer design. It is shown that the asymmetric refractive index profile eliminates undesirable optical coupling between the waveguide layers. At the interfaces between the active and passive devices, lateral tapers are used to induce vertical coupling of light with a coupling loss of typically <1 dB. Therefore various integrated devices can be separately optimized to achieve performance close to that of the conventional discrete components. The design of taper couplers is described in detail, and their performance is experimentally verified. Using the ATG approach, several integrated devices were fabricated in the InGaAsP/InP material system for λ = 1.55 μm wavelength operation. Lasers and semiconductor optical amplifiers with integrated waveguides were characterized to test the integration approach. Single-frequency, distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers achieved output power of 11 mW with a 40 dB side-mode suppression ratio. A DBR laser with integrated electroabsorption modulator had a 24 dB extinction ratio

  4. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors with high internal quantum efficiency at telecom wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Oliver; Ferrari, Simone; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Goltsman, Gregory N.; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) provide high efficiency for detecting individual photons while keeping dark counts and timing jitter minimal. Besides superior detection performance over a broad optical bandwidth, compatibility with an integrated optical platform is a crucial requirement for applications in emerging quantum photonic technologies. Here we present SNSPDs embedded in nanophotonic integrated circuits which achieve internal quantum efficiencies close to unity at 1550 nm wavelength. This allows for the SNSPDs to be operated at bias currents far below the critical current where unwanted dark count events reach milli-Hz levels while on-chip detection efficiencies above 70% are maintained. The measured dark count rates correspond to noise-equivalent powers in the 10−19 W/Hz−1/2 range and the timing jitter is as low as 35 ps. Our detectors are fully scalable and interface directly with waveguide-based optical platforms. PMID:26061283

  5. Microwave waveguide manifold and method

    DOEpatents

    Staehlin, John H.

    1987-12-01

    A controllably electrically coupled, physically intersecting plural waveguide manifold assembly wherein the intersecting waveguide elements are fabricated in integral unitary relationship from a single piece of metal in order to avoid the inaccuracies and difficult-to-control fabrication steps associated with uniting separate waveguide elements into a unitary structure. An X-band aluminum airborne radar manifold example is disclosed, along with a fabrication sequence for the manifold and the electrical energy communicating apertures joining the manifold elements.

  6. Microwave waveguide manifold and method

    DOEpatents

    Staehlin, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A controllably electrically coupled, physically intersecting plural waveguide manifold assembly wherein the intersecting waveguide elements are fabricated in integral unitary relationship from a single piece of metal in order to avoid the inaccuracies and difficult-to-control fabrication steps associated with uniting separate waveguide elements into a unitary structure. An X-band aluminum airborne radar manifold example is disclosed, along with a fabrication sequence for the manifold and the electrical energy communicating apertures joining the manifold elements.

  7. EMODEL_1D v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, David F.

    2016-07-06

    Program EMODEL_1D is an electromagnetic earth model construction utility designed to generate a three-dimensional (3D) uniformly-gridded representation of one-dimensional (1D) layered earth model. Each layer is characterized by the isotropic EM properties electric permittivity ?, magnetic permeability ?, and current conductivity ?. Moreover, individual layers of the model may possess a linear increase/decrease of any or all of these properties with depth.

  8. Analysis of Helical Waveguide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-23

    tube Efficiency Helix structure Backward wave oscillation Gain 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identofy by block number) The...4,vailabilitY CCdes -vai aidIorDist spec a ." iii "- -. .5- S.. . ANALYSIS OF HELICAL WAVEGUIDE I. INTRODUCTION High power (- 10 kW) and broadband ...sys- tems. The frequency range of interest is 60-100 GHz. In this frequency range, the conventional slow wave circuits such as klystrons and TWTs have

  9. Investigation of Truncated Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lourie, Nathan P.; Chuss, David T.; Henry, Ross M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and performance of truncated circular and square waveguide cross-sections are presented. An emphasis is placed upon numerical and experimental validation of simple analytical formulae that describe the propagation properties of these structures. A test component, a 90-degree phase shifter, was fabricated and tested at 30 GHz. The concepts explored can be directly applied in the design, synthesis and optimization of components in the microwave to sub-millimeter wavebands.

  10. Photonic Waveguide Choke Joint with Absorptive Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor); U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Chuss, David T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A photonic waveguide choke includes a first waveguide flange member having periodic metal tiling pillars, a dissipative dielectric material positioned within an area between the periodic metal tiling pillars and a second waveguide flange member disposed to be coupled with the first waveguide flange member and in spaced-apart relationship separated by a gap. The first waveguide flange member has a substantially smooth surface, and the second waveguide flange member has an array of two-dimensional pillar structures formed therein.

  11. Guided-mode resonance nanophotonics in materially sparse architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, Robert; Niraula, Manoj; Yoon, Jae W.; Ko, Yeong H.; Lee, Kyu J.

    2016-03-01

    The guided-mode resonance (GMR) concept refers to lateral quasi-guided waveguide modes induced in periodic layers. Whereas these effects have been known for a long time, new attributes and innovations continue to appear. Here, we review some recent progress in this field with emphasis on sparse, or minimal, device embodiments. We discuss properties of wideband resonant reflectors designed with gratings in which the grating ridges are matched to an identical material to eliminate local reflections and phase changes. This critical interface therefore possesses zero refractive-index contrast; hence we call them "zero-contrast gratings." Applying this architecture, we present single-layer, wideband reflectors that are robust under experimentally realistic parametric variations. We introduce a new class of reflectors and polarizers fashioned with dielectric nanowire grids that are mostly empty space. Computed results predict high reflection and attendant polarization extinction for these sparse lattices. Experimental verification with Si nanowire grids yields ~200-nm-wide band of high reflection for one polarization state and free transmission of the orthogonal state. Finally, we present bandpass filters using all-dielectric resonant gratings. We design, fabricate, and test nanostructured single layer filters exhibiting high efficiency and sub-nanometer-wide passbands surrounded by 100-nm-wide stopbands.

  12. Folded waveguide coupler

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-03-01

    A resonant cavity waveguide coupler for ICRH of a magnetically confined plasma. The coupler consists of a series of inter-leaved metallic vanes disposed withn an enclosure analogous to a very wide, simple rectangular waveguide that has been "folded" several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a polarizing plate is provided which has coupling apertures aligned with selected folds of the waveguide through which rf waves are launched with magnetic fields of the waves aligned in parallel with the magnetic fields confining the plasma being heated to provide coupling to the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma in the frequency usage of from about 50-200 mHz. A shorting plate terminates the back of the cavity at a distance approximately equal to one-half the guide wavelength from the mouth of the coupler to ensure that the electric field of the waves launched through the polarizing plate apertures are small while the magnetic field is near a maximum. Power is fed into the coupler folded cavity by means of an input coaxial line feed arrangement at a point which provides an impedance match between the cavity and the coaxial input line.

  13. Cup Cylindrical Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Darby, William G.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Breen, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    The cup cylindrical waveguide antenna (CCWA) is a short backfire microwave antenna capable of simultaneously supporting the transmission or reception of two distinct signals having opposite circular polarizations. Short backfire antennas are widely used in mobile/satellite communications, tracking, telemetry, and wireless local area networks because of their compactness and excellent radiation characteristics. A typical prior short backfire antenna contains a half-wavelength dipole excitation element for linear polarization or crossed half-wavelength dipole elements for circular polarization. In order to achieve simultaneous dual circular polarization, it would be necessary to integrate, into the antenna feed structure, a network of hybrid components, which would introduce significant losses. The CCWA embodies an alternate approach that entails relatively low losses and affords the additional advantage of compactness. The CCWA includes a circular cylindrical cup, a circular disk subreflector, and a circular waveguide that serves as the excitation element. The components that make it possible to obtain simultaneous dual circular polarization are integrated into the circular waveguide. These components are a sixpost polarizer and an orthomode transducer (OMT) with two orthogonal coaxial ports. The overall length of the OMT and polarizer (for the nominal middle design frequency of 2.25 GHz) is about 11 in. (approximately equal to 28 cm), whereas the length of a commercially available OMT and polarizer for the same frequency is about 32 in. (approximately equal to 81 cm).

  14. Waveguide mutually pumped phase conjugators.

    PubMed

    James, S W; Youden, K E; Jeffrey, P M; Eason, R W; Chandler, P J; Zhang, L; Townsend, P D

    1993-09-20

    The operation of the bridge mutually pumped phase conjugator is reported in a planar waveguide structure in photorefractive BaTiO(3). The waveguide was fabricated by the technique of ion implantation, using 1.5-MeVH(+) ions at a dose of 10(16) ions/cm(2). An order of magnitude decrease in response time is observed in the waveguide as compared with typical values obtained in bulk crystals, probably as a result of a combination of the optical confinement within the waveguide and possible modification of the charge-transport properties induced by the implantation process.

  15. Laterally tapered undercut active waveguide fabricated by simple wet etching method for vertical waveguide directional coupler.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang-Zheng; Chiu, Yi-Jen; Tsai, Shun-An; Wu, Tsu-Hsiu

    2008-05-26

    A novel structure, namely a laterally tapered undercut active-waveguide (LTUAWG) for an optical spot-size converter (SSC) is proposed and demonstrated in this paper. Using a selectively undercut-etching-active-region (UEAR) on a laterally tapered ridge to define a LTUAWG, a vertical waveguide directional coupler (VWGDC) can be fabricated simply by a wet etching-based technique. The VWGDC comprises a top LTUAWG and a bottom passive waveguide (PWG). An electroabsorption modulator (EAM) is monolithically integrated with a LTUAWG-VWGDC serving as the connecting active waveguide (AWG) and the optical transmission testing device. Through a loss budget analysis on an EAM-integrated VWGDC, an optical mode transfer loss of -1.6 dB is observed between the PWG and the AWG. By comparing the reverse directions of optical excitation, the identical optical transmission relations with bias are observed, further verifying the high efficiency properties in a SSC. Optical misalignment tolerance is employed to test the two transferred optical modes. 1dB misalignment tolerance of +/-2.9 microm (horizontal) and +/-2.2 microm (vertical) is obtained from the PWG, which is better than the value of +/-1.9 microm (horizontal) and +/-1.6 microm (vertical) from the AWG. Far-field angle measurement shows 6.0 degrees (horizontal) 9.3 degrees (vertical) and 11 degrees (horizontal) x 20 degrees (vertical) for the PWG and the AWG, respectively, exhibiting the capability of a mode transformer. All of these measurements are also examined by a 3D beam propagation method (BPM) showing quite consistent results. In this wet etching technique, no regrowth is needed during processing. Furthermore, UEAR processing controlled by in situ monitoring can lead to a simple way for submicron-size processing, showing that a highly reliable processing technique can thus be expected. A low cost of fabrication can also be realized, indicating that this method can be potentially used in optoelectronic integration.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of III-nitride nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Rajendra Prasad

    III-nitride photonic devices such as photodetectors (PDs), light emitting diode (LEDs), solar cells and optical waveguide amplifiers were designed, fabricated and characterized. High quality AlN epilayers were grown on sapphire and n-SiC substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and utilized as active deep UV (DUV) photonic materials for the demonstration of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) detectors, Schottky barrier detectors, and avalanche photodetectors (APDs). AlN DUV PDs exhibited peak responsivity at 200 nm with a very sharp cutoff wavelength at 207 nm and extremely low dark current (<10 fA), very high breakdown voltages, high responsivity, and more than four orders of DUV to UV/visible rejection ratio. AlN Schottky PDs grown on n-SiC substrates exhibited high zero bias responsivity and a thermal energy limited detectivity of about 1.0 x 1015 cm Hz 1/2 W-1. The linear mode operation of AlN APDs with the shortest cutoff wavelength (210 nm) and a photocurrent multiplication of 1200 was demonstrated. A linear relationship between device size and breakdown field was observed for AlN APDs. Photovoltaic operation of InGaN solar cells in wavelengths longer than that of previous attainments was demonstrated by utilizing In xGa1-xN/GaN MQWs as the active layer. InxGa1-xN/GaN MQWs solar cells with x =0.3 exhibited open circuit voltage of about 2 V, a fill factor of about 60% and external quantum efficiency of 40% at 420 nm and 10% at 450 nm. The performance of InxGa1-xN/GaN MQWs solar cell was found to be highly correlated with the crystalline quality of the InxGa 1-xN active layer. The possible causes of poorer PV characteristics for higher In content in InGaN active layer were explained. Photoluminescence excitation studies of GaN:Er and In0.06Ga 0.94N:Er epilayers showed that Er emission intensity at 1.54 mum increases significantly as the excitation energy is tuned from below to above the energy bandgap of these epilayers. Current-injected 1.54 mum LEDs

  17. Mid-IR to THz polaritonics: realizing novel materials for nanophotonics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Joshua D.

    2016-09-01

    The field of nanophotonics is based on the ability to confine light to sub-diffractional dimensions. Up until recently, research in this field has been primarily focused on the use of plasmonic metals. However, the high optical losses inherent in such metal-based surface plasmon materials has led to an ever-expanding effort to identify, low-loss alternative materials capable of supporting sub-diffractional confinement. Beyond this, the limited availability of high efficiency optical sources, refractive and compact optics in the mid-infrared to THz spectral regions make nanophotonic advancements imperative. One highly promising alternative are polar dielectric crystals whereby sub-diffraction confinement of light can be achieved through the stimulation of surface phonon polaritons within an all-dielectric, and thus low loss material system. Due to the wide array of high quality crystalline species and varied crystal structures, a wealth of unanticipated optical properties have recently been reported. However, these materials also have some limitations, primarily in the limited spectral bandwidth of operation for any given material. This talk will discuss recent advancements to improve the material lifetime and to induce additional functionality through isotopic enrichment and hybridization of polaritonic modes for realizing low-loss, actively tunable/modulated nanophotonic materials.

  18. Observation of optically induced transparency effect in silicon nanophotonic wires with graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Longhai; Zheng, Jiajiu; Dai, Daoxin; He, Sailing

    2014-03-01

    Graphene, a well-known two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms in a honeycomb structure, has many unique and fascinating properties in optoelectronics and photonics. Integration of graphene on silicon nanophotonic wires is a promising approach to enhance light-graphene interactions. In this paper, we demonstrate on-chip silicon nanophotonic wires covered by graphene with CMOS-compatible fabrication processes. Under the illumination of pump light on the graphene sheet, a loss reduction of silicon nanophotonic wires, which is called optically induced transparency (OIT) effect, is observed over a broad wavelength range for the first time. The pump power required to generate the OIT effect is as low as ~0.1mW and the corresponding power density is about 2×103mW/cm2, which is significantly different from the saturated absorption effect of graphene reported previously. The extremely low power density implies a new mechanism for the present OIT effect, which will be beneficial to realize silicon on-chip all-optical controlling in the future. It also suggests a new and efficient approach to tune the carrier concentration (doping level) in graphene optically.

  19. Heat Capacity of 1D Molecular Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatskii, M. I.; Barabashko, M. S.; Sumarokov, V. V.; Jeżowski, A.; Stachowiak, P.

    2017-04-01

    The heat capacity of 1D chains of nitrogen and methane molecules (adsorbed in the outer grooves of bundles of closed-cap single-walled carbon nanotubes) has been studied in the temperature ranges 2-40 and 2-60 K, respectively. The temperature dependence of the heat capacity of 1D chains of nitrogen molecules below 3 K is close to a linear. It was found that the rotational heat capacity of methane molecules is a significant part of the total heat capacity of the chains throughout the whole investigated temperature range, whereas in the case of nitrogen, the librations are significant only above 15 K. The dependence of the heat capacity for methane below 10 K indicates the presence of a Schottky anomaly caused by the tunneling between the lowest energy levels of the CH4 molecule rotational spectra. Characteristic features observed in the temperature dependence of the heat capacity of 1D methane crystals are also discussed.

  20. Upstream Design and 1D-CAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroyuki

    Recently, engineering design environment of Japan is changing variously. Manufacturing companies are being challenged to design and bring out products that meet the diverse demands of customers and are competitive against those produced by rising countries(1). In order to keep and strengthen the competitiveness of Japanese companies, it is necessary to create new added values as well as conventional ones. It is well known that design at the early stages has a great influence on the final design solution. Therefore, design support tools for the upstream design is necessary for creating new added values. We have established a research society for 1D-CAE (1 Dimensional Computer Aided Engineering)(2), which is a general term for idea, methodology and tools applicable for the upstream design support, and discuss the concept and definition of 1D-CAE. This paper reports our discussion about 1D-CAE.

  1. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  2. A compact five-port waveguide structure and its application as a three-way power divider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Letian; Li, Jiawei; Ba, Tao; Huang, Wenhua; Shao, Hao

    2016-11-01

    A compact five-port waveguide structure consisting of three rectangular ports, one coaxial port, and one circular waveguide port is proposed. The three rectangular waveguides are uniformly distributed in space at angles of 120°, and the coaxial and circular waveguides are located at the top and bottom, respectively, of the rectangular waveguides. The ideal scattering matrix is derived from the symmetry properties of the structure. If the circular and coaxial ports are matched, then the entire five-port waveguide structure is automatically matched. Two connected inserted coaxial probes, a frustum, and a coaxial transition are used to match the five-port waveguide structure with a relatively wide bandwidth. The theoretical and experimental results are generally consistent with each other. With the circular port connected to the load, the five-port waveguide structure becomes a reciprocal TEM mode-to-three-way TE10 mode power divider. Measurements indicate that from 8 to 9.6 GHz, the return losses at the three rectangular ports and the coaxial port are greater than 20 dB and 17 dB, respectively. The isolation among the three rectangular ports is higher than 20 dB. The amplitude and phase imbalances in the division of power are less than 0.1 dB and 2°, respectively. The volume of the five-port waveguide structure is as small as 1.5 λ × 1.5λ × λ.

  3. Helical Floquet Channels in 1D Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budich, Jan Carl; Hu, Ying; Zoller, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We show how dispersionless channels exhibiting perfect spin-momentum locking can arise in a 1D lattice model. While such spectra are forbidden by fermion doubling in static 1D systems, here we demonstrate their appearance in the stroboscopic dynamics of a periodically driven system. Remarkably, this phenomenon does not rely on any adiabatic assumptions, in contrast to the well known Thouless pump and related models of adiabatic spin pumps. The proposed setup is shown to be experimentally feasible with state-of-the-art techniques used to control ultracold alkaline earth atoms in optical lattices.

  4. Highly efficient CW parametric conversion at 1550 nm in SOI waveguides by reverse biased p-i-n junction.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Andrzej; Zimmermann, Lars; Jazayerifar, Mahmoud; Winzer, Georg; Tian, Hui; Elschner, Robert; Richter, Thomas; Schubert, Colja; Tillack, Bernd; Petermann, Klaus

    2012-06-04

    In this paper we present four-wave mixing (FWM) based parametric conversion experiments in p-i-n diode assisted silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nano-rib waveguides using continuous-wave (CW) light around 1550 nm wavelength. Using a reverse biased p-i-n waveguide diode we observe an increase of the wavelength conversion efficiency of more than 4.5 dB compared to low loss nano-rib waveguides without p-i-n junction, achieving a peak efficiency of -1 dB. Conversion efficiency improves also by more than 7 dB compared to previously reported experiments deploying 1.5 µm SOI waveguides with p-i-n structure. To the best of our knowledge, the observed peak conversion efficiency of -1dB is the highest CW efficiency in SOI reported so far.

  5. Seismic Waveguide of Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Das, Mukunda P.

    We developed a new method of an earthquake-resistant design to support conventional aseismic system using acoustic metamaterials. The device is an attenuator of a seismic wave that reduces the amplitude of the wave exponentially. Constructing a cylindrical shell-type waveguide composed of many Helmholtz resonators that creates a stop-band for the seismic frequency range, we convert the seismic wave into an attenuated one without touching the building that we want to protect. It is a mechanical way to convert the seismic energy into sound and heat.

  6. Interacting single atoms with nanophotonics for chip-integrated quantum networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, Daniel James

    Underlying matter and light are their building blocks of tiny atoms and photons. The ability to control and utilize matter-light interactions down to the elementary single atom and photon level at the nano-scale opens up exciting studies at the frontiers of science with applications in medicine, energy, and information technology. Of these, an intriguing front is the development of quantum networks where N ≫ 1 single-atom nodes are coherently linked by single photons, forming a collective quantum entity potentially capable of performing quantum computations and simulations. Here, a promising approach is to use optical cavities within the setting of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). However, since its first realization in 1992 by Kimble et al., current proof-of-principle experiments have involved just one or two conventional cavities. To move beyond to N ≫ 1 nodes, in this thesis we investigate a platform born from the marriage of cavity QED and nanophotonics, where single atoms at ˜100 nm near the surfaces of lithographically fabricated dielectric photonic devices can strongly interact with single photons, on a chip. Particularly, we experimentally investigate three main types of devices: microtoroidal optical cavities, optical nanofibers, and nanophotonic crystal based structures. With a microtoroidal cavity, we realized a robust and efficient photon router where single photons are extracted from an incident coherent state of light and redirected to a separate output with high efficiency. We achieved strong single atom-photon coupling with atoms located ~100 nm near the surface of a microtoroid, which revealed important aspects in the atom dynamics and QED of these systems including atom-surface interaction effects. We present a method to achieve state-insensitive atom trapping near optical nanofibers, critical in nanophotonic systems where electromagnetic fields are tightly confined. We developed a system that fabricates high quality nanofibers with high

  7. Low-crosstalk Si arrayed waveguide grating with parabolic tapers.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tong; Fu, Yunfei; Qiao, Lei; Chu, Tao

    2014-12-29

    A silicon arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) with low channel crosstalk was demonstrated by using ultra-short parabolic tapers to connect the AWG's free propagation regions and single-mode waveguides. The tapers satisfied the requirements of low-loss mode conversion and lower channel crosstalk from the coupling of neighboring waveguides in the AWGs. In this work, three different tapers, including parabolic tapers, linear tapers, and exponential tapers, were theoretically analyzed and experimentally investigated for a comparison of their effects when implemented in AWGs. The experimental results showed that the AWG with parabolic tapers had a crosstalk improvement up to 7.1 dB compared with the others. Based on the advantages of parabolic tapers, a 400-GHz 8 × 8 cyclic AWG with 2.4 dB on-chip loss and -17.6~-25.1 dB crosstalk was fabricated using a simple one-step etching process. Its performance was comparable with that of existing AWGs with bi-level tapers, which require complicated two-step etching fabrication processes.

  8. Integrated optic waveguide devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramer, O. G.

    1980-01-01

    Integrated optic waveguide circuits with a phase bias and modulator on the same chip were designed, fabricated, and tested for use in a fiber-optic rotation sensor (gyro) under development. Single mode fiber-optic pigtails were permanently coupled to the four ports of the chip. The switch format was based on coherent coupling between waveguides formed in Z-cut LiNbO3. The control of the coupling was achieved by electro-optically varying the phase propagation constants of each guide. Fiber-to-chip interfacing required the development of appropriate fixturing and manipulation techniques to achieve the close tolerance needed for high coupling efficiency between a fiber with an approximately 5 micron m core and a channel guide with a roughly 2 micron m by 5 micron m cross section. Switch and chip performance at 0.85 micron m is discussed as well as potential improvements related to insertion loss reduction, switching voltages, and suppression of Li2O out-diffusion.

  9. Calibration of a 1D/1D urban flood model using 1D/2D model results in the absence of field data.

    PubMed

    Leandro, J; Djordjević, S; Chen, A S; Savić, D A; Stanić, M

    2011-01-01

    Recently increased flood events have been prompting researchers to improve existing coupled flood-models such as one-dimensional (1D)/1D and 1D/two-dimensional (2D) models. While 1D/1D models simulate sewer and surface networks using a one-dimensional approach, 1D/2D models represent the surface network by a two-dimensional surface grid. However their application raises two issues to urban flood modellers: (1) stormwater systems planning/emergency or risk analysis demands for fast models, and the 1D/2D computational time is prohibitive, (2) and the recognized lack of field data (e.g. Hunter et al. (2008)) causes difficulties for the calibration/validation of 1D/1D models. In this paper we propose to overcome these issues by calibrating a 1D/1D model with the results of a 1D/2D model. The flood-inundation results show that: (1) 1D/2D results can be used to calibrate faster 1D/1D models, (2) the 1D/1D model is able to map the 1D/2D flood maximum extent well, and the flooding limits satisfactorily in each time-step, (3) the 1D/1D model major differences are the instantaneous flow propagation and overestimation of the flood-depths within surface-ponds, (4) the agreement in the volume surcharged by both models is a necessary condition for the 1D surface-network validation and (5) the agreement of the manholes discharge shapes measures the fitness of the calibrated 1D surface-network.

  10. Dielectric THz waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Alexandre

    In this thesis we have explored a wide variety of dielectric waveguides that rely on many different waveguiding mechanisms to guide THz (far-infrared) radiation. We have explored both theoretically and experimentally a large number of waveguide designs with the aim of reducing propagation and bending losses. The different waveguides can be classified into two fundamentally different strategies for reducing the propagation loss: small-core single-mode evanescent-field fibers or large hollow-core multi-mode tubes. Our focus was first set on exploring the small-core evanescent-field fiber strategy for reducing propagation losses. Following initial theoretical work in our group, much effort was spent on the fabrication and measurement of evanescent porous subwavelength diameter plastic fibers, in an attempt to further reduce the propagation losses. The fabrication of such fibers is a challenge and many novel techniques were devised to enable fiber drawing without hole collapse. The first method sealed the holes of an assembly of polymer tubes and lead to fibers of relatively low porosity (˜25% air within the core) due to reduction in hole size during fiber drawing. The second method was a novel sacrificial polymer technique whereby drawing a completely solid fiber prevented any hole collapse and the subsequent dissolution of the sacrificial polymer revealed the holes in the fiber. The third method was a combination of preform casting using glass molds and drawing with pressurized air within the holes. This led to fibers of record porosity (86% air). The measurement of these porous fibers began with a collaboration with a group from the university of Sherbrooke. At the time, the only available detector was a frequency integrating liquid-helium-cooled bolometer (powermeter). A novel directional coupler method for measuring the losses of subwavelength fibers was developed whereby an evanescent coupler is formed by bringing a probe fiber in proximity to the sample fiber

  11. Optical properties of CdS nanocrystallites embedded in (Si 0.2Ti 0.8)O 2 sol-gel waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juodkazis, S.; Bernstein, E.; Plenet, J. C.; Bovier, C.; Dumas, J.; Mugnier, J.; Vaitkus, J. V.

    1998-03-01

    We report on the implementation of a two-grating coupler technique for measurement of repopulation of deep traps in CdS nanocrystallites embedded in a (Si 0.2Ti 0.8)O 2 waveguiding glass layer of high refractive index. A sol-gel process is used to produce this waveguide. The low attenuation (˜1 dB/cm) of the waveguide allows to in- and out-couple light by surface relief gratings embossed on the top layer of the waveguide. The spectral region of waveguiding (≈700 nm) that was studied corresponds to the deep trap spectral position in CdS. The waveguiding beam is used as a probe beam and we used the third harmonics of a YLF:Nd laser (347 nm) as a pump. The influence of bimolecular recombination on repopulation of deep traps is demonstrated. The linear recombination time as well as bimolecular and Auger coefficients are determined.

  12. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder; Paul L.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  13. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  14. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  15. Glass-based 1-D dielectric microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiasera, Alessandro; Scotognella, Francesco; Valligatla, Sreeramulu; Varas, Stefano; Jasieniak, Jacek; Criante, Luigino; Lukowiak, Anna; Ristic, Davor; Gonçalves, Rogeria Rocha; Taccheo, Stefano; Ivanda, Mile; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ramponi, Roberta; Martucci, Alessandro; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a reliable RF sputtering techniques allowing to fabricate glass-based one dimensional microcavities, with high quality factor. This property is strongly related to the modification of the density of states due to the confinement of the gain medium in a photonic band gap structure. In this short review we present some of the more recent results obtained by our team exploiting these 1D microcavities. In particular we present: (1) Er3+ luminescence enhancement of the 4I13/2 → 4I15/2 transition; (2) broad band filters based on disordered 1-D photonic structures; (3) threshold defect-mode lasing action in a hybrid structure.

  16. Prospective for Gallium Nitride-Based Optical Waveguide Modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, Arnaud; Considine, Laurence; Dogheche, Elhadj; Decoster, Didier; Pavlidis, Dimitris

    A complete analysis of GaN-based structures with very promising characteristics for future optical waveguide devices, such as modulators, is presented. First the material growth was optimized for low dislocation density and surface roughness. Optical measurements demonstrate excellent waveguide properties in terms of index and temperature dependence while planar propagation losses are below 1dB/cm. Bias was applied on both sides of the epitaxially grown films to evaluate the refractive index dependence on reverse voltage and a variation of 2.10-3 was found for 30V. These results support the possibility of using structures of this type for the fabrication of modulator devices such as Mach-Zehnder interferometers.

  17. Centrosome Positioning in 1D Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlerz, Katrina; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    During cell migration, the positioning of the centrosome and nucleus define a cell's polarity. For a cell migrating on a two-dimensional substrate the centrosome is positioned in front of the nucleus. Under one-dimensional confinement, however, the centrosome is positioned behind the nucleus in 60% of cells. It is known that the centrosome is positioned by CDC42 and dynein for cells moving on a 2D substrate in a wound-healing assay. It is currently unknown, however, if this is also true for cells moving under 1D confinement, where the centrosome position is often reversed. Therefore, centrosome positioning was studied in cells migrating under 1D confinement, which mimics cells migrating through 3D matrices. 3 to 5 μm fibronectin lines were stamped onto a glass substrate and cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei and centrosomes migrated on the lines. Our results show that when a cell changes directions the centrosome position is maintained. That is, when the centrosome is between the nucleus and the cell's trailing edge and the cell changes direction, the centrosome will be translocated across the nucleus to the back of the cell again. A dynein inhibitor did have an influence on centrosome positioning in 1D migration and change of directions.

  18. Complete power concentration into a single waveguide in large-scale waveguide array lenses

    PubMed Central

    Catrysse, Peter B.; Liu, Victor; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    Waveguide array lenses are waveguide arrays that focus light incident on all waveguides at the input side into a small number of waveguides at the output side. Ideal waveguide array lenses provide complete (100%) power concentration of incident light into a single waveguide. While of great interest for several applications, ideal waveguide array lenses have not been demonstrated for practical arrays with large numbers of waveguides. The only waveguide arrays that have sufficient degrees of freedom to allow for the design of an ideal waveguide array lens are those where both the propagation constants of the individual waveguides and the coupling constants between the waveguides vary as a function of space. Here, we use state-of-the-art numerical methods to demonstrate complete power transfer into a single waveguide for waveguide array lenses with large numbers of waveguides. We verify this capability for more than a thousand waveguides using a spatial coupled mode theory. We hereby extend the state-of-art by more than two orders of magnitude. We also demonstrate for the first time a physical design for an ideal waveguide array lens. The design is based on an aperiodic metallic waveguide array and focuses ~100% of the incident light into a deep-subwavelength focal spot. PMID:25319203

  19. Coplanar waveguide supercomponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Mike

    The application of coplanar-waveguide (CPWG) technology to develop rugged compact high-performance electronic components for use in military receivers and similar equipment is described and illustrated with diagrams and photographs of typical CPWG implementations. The operating principles and characteristics of CPWGs are reviewed; the advantages and limitations of stripline, microstrip, and CPWG technologies are listed in a table and compared; and the inherently good isolation, the ease of making series and shunt connections, and the flexibility of ground-plane spacing of CPWGs are emphasized. The CPWG-based components shown include a Ku-band dual downconverter with 17 different functional circuits, an antenna switching unit with switches, driver, couplers, and ferrite devices; and two mixed-media multifunction hybrid components.

  20. Whispering-mode waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnit, N. A.

    Properties of a relatively new type of waveguide structure of potential use of confining infrared radiation to a small mode volume over long path lengths are reviewed. A single guiding surface with curvature radius rho and band radius R allows propagation of a near-grazing incidence whispering mode of transverse width approximately (lambda square root of rho R/pi) sup 1/2 and radial width approximately 1/2 (sq lambda R)/sup 1/3. For sufficiently large rho, the loss per revolution for TE mode propagation is approximately pi A/sub N/, where A/sub N/ is the normal-incidence reflection loss. Results on a number of prototype structures in general agreement with these considerations are described.

  1. Nonlinear Waves in Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leble, Sergei B.

    S.B. Leble's book deals with nonlinear waves and their propagation in metallic and dielectric waveguides and media with stratification. The underlying nonlinear evolution equations (NEEs) are derived giving also their solutions for specific situations. The reader will find new elements to the traditional approach. Various dispersion and relaxation laws for different guides are considered as well as the explicit form of projection operators, NEEs, quasi-solitons and of Darboux transforms. Special points relate to: 1. the development of a universal asymptotic method of deriving NEEs for guide propagation; 2. applications to the cases of stratified liquids, gases, solids and plasmas with various nonlinearities and dispersion laws; 3. connections between the basic problem and soliton- like solutions of the corresponding NEEs; 4. discussion of details of simple solutions in higher- order nonsingular perturbation theory.

  2. Waveguides for performing enzymatic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Levene; Michael J. , Korlach; Jonas , Turner; Stephen W. , Craighead; Harold G. , Webb; Watt W.

    2007-11-06

    The present invention is directed to a method and an apparatus for analysis of an analyte. The method involves providing a zero-mode waveguide which includes a cladding surrounding a core where the cladding is configured to preclude propagation of electromagnetic energy of a frequency less than a cutoff frequency longitudinally through the core of the zero-mode waveguide. The analyte is positioned in the core of the zero-mode waveguide and is then subjected, in the core of the zero-mode wave guide, to activating electromagnetic radiation of a frequency less than the cut-off frequency under conditions effective to permit analysis of the analyte in an effective observation volume which is more compact than if the analysis were carried out in the absence of the zero-mode waveguide.

  3. Temporal waveguides for optical pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plansinis, Brent W.; Donaldson, William R.; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2016-05-12

    Here we discuss, temporal total internal reflection (TIR), in analogy to the conventional TIR of an optical beam at a dielectric interface, is the total reflection of an optical pulse inside a dispersive medium at a temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes. A pair of such boundaries separated in time acts as the temporal analog of planar dielectric waveguides. We study the propagation of optical pulses inside such temporal waveguides, both analytically and numerically, and show that the waveguide supports a finite number of temporal modes. We also discuss how a single-mode temporal waveguide can be created in practice. In contrast with the spatial case, the confinement can occur even when the central region has a lower refractive index.

  4. Temporal waveguides for optical pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Plansinis, Brent W.; Donaldson, William R.; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2016-05-12

    Here we discuss, temporal total internal reflection (TIR), in analogy to the conventional TIR of an optical beam at a dielectric interface, is the total reflection of an optical pulse inside a dispersive medium at a temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes. A pair of such boundaries separated in time acts as the temporal analog of planar dielectric waveguides. We study the propagation of optical pulses inside such temporal waveguides, both analytically and numerically, and show that the waveguide supports a finite number of temporal modes. We also discuss how a single-mode temporal waveguide can be created inmore » practice. In contrast with the spatial case, the confinement can occur even when the central region has a lower refractive index.« less

  5. Linear and nonlinear optical waveguiding in bio-inspired peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Turko, Nir; Rosenman, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Unique linear and nonlinear optical properties of bioinspired peptide nanostructures such as wideband transparency and high second-order nonlinear optical response, combined with elongated tubular shape of variable size and rapid self-assembly fabrication process, make them promising for diverse bio-nano-photonic applications. This new generation of nanomaterials of biological origin possess physical properties similar to those of biological structures. Here, we focus on new specific functionality of ultrashort peptide nanotubes to guide light at fundamental and second-harmonic generation (SHG) frequency in horizontal and vertical peptide nanotubes configurations. Conducted simulations and experimental data show that these self-assembled linear and nonlinear optical bio-waveguides provide strong optical power confinement factor, demonstrate pronounced directionality of SHG and high conversion efficiency of SHG ∼10(-5). Our study gives new insight on physics of light propagation in nanostructures of biological origin and opens the avenue towards new and unexpected applications of these waveguiding effects in bio-nanomaterials both for biomedical nonlinear microscopy imaging recognition and development of novel integrated nanophotonic devices.

  6. Optical Waveguide Scattering Reduction. II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    FAD-AOAR 815 BATTELLEWCOLUMBUS LABS ON F/S 20/6 OPTICAL WAVEGUIDE SCATTER ING REDUC TION. II.(U) 7 DEC 80 0 W VAHEY, N F HARTMAN, R C SHERMAN F3361... OPTICAL WAVEGUIDE SCATTERING REDUCTION II M BATTELLE COLUMBUS LABORATORIES 505 KING AVENUE COLUMBUS, OHIO 43201 DTIC ELECTEf MAY 12 198111 December...reviewed and is approved for publication. DOUGLAS AWIWILLE, Project Engineer KENNETH R. HUTCHINSON, Chief Electro- Optics Techniques and Electro- Optics

  7. MHD waveguides in space plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, N. G.; Fedorov, E. N.; Pilipenko, V. A.

    2010-07-15

    The waveguide properties of two characteristic formations in the Earth's magnetotail-the plasma sheet and the current (neutral) sheet-are considered. The question of how the domains of existence of different types of MHD waveguide modes (fast and slow, body and surface) in the (k, {omega}) plane and their dispersion properties depend on the waveguide parameters is studied. Investigation of the dispersion relation in a number of particular (limiting) cases makes it possible to obtain a fairly complete qualitative pattern of all the branches of the dispersion curve. Accounting for the finite size of perturbations across the wave propagation direction reveals new additional effects such as a change in the critical waveguide frequencies, the excitation of longitudinal current at the boundaries of the sheets, and a change in the symmetry of the fundamental mode. Knowledge of the waveguide properties of the plasma and current sheets can explain the occurrence of preferred frequencies in the low-frequency fluctuation spectra in the magnetotail. In satellite observations, the type of waveguide mode can be determined from the spectral properties, as well as from the phase relationships between plasma oscillations and magnetic field oscillations that are presented in this paper.

  8. Broadband nanophotonic wireless links and networks using on-chip integrated plasmonic antennas

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuanqing; Li, Qiang; Qiu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their high capacity and flexibility, broadband wireless communications have been widely employed in radio and microwave regimes, playing indispensable roles in our daily life. Their optical analogs, however, have not been demonstrated at the nanoscale. In this paper, by exploiting plasmonic nanoantennas, we demonstrate the complete design of broadband wireless links and networks in the realm of nanophotonics. With a 100-fold enhancement in power transfer superior to previous designs as well as an ultrawide bandwidth that covers the entire telecommunication wavelength range, such broadband nanolinks and networks are expected to pave the way for future optical integrated nanocircuits. PMID:26783033

  9. Nanophotonics Based on Semiconductor-Photonic Crystal/Quantum Dot and Metal-/Semiconductor-Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Kiyoshi; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Ikeda, Naoki; Tsuya, Daiju; Koide, Yasuo; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Ozaki, Nobuhiko; Ohkouchi, Shunsuke; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Inoue, Daisuke; Matsui, Takayuki; Miura, Atsushi; Fujikawa, Hisayoshi; Sato, Kazuo

    This paper reviews our recent activities on nanophotonics based on a photonic crystal (PC)/quantum dot (QD)-combined structure for an all-optical device and a metal/semiconductor composite structure using surface plasmon (SP) and negative refractive index material (NIM). The former structure contributes to an ultrafast signal processing component by virtue of new PC design and QD selective-area-growth technologies, while the latter provides a new RGB color filter with a high precision and optical beam-steering device with a wide steering angle.

  10. A novel nano-photonics biosensor concept for rapid molecular diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klunder, Dion J. W.; van Herpen, Maarten M. J. W.; Kolesnychenko, Aleksey; Hornix, Eefje; Kahya, Nicoletta; de Boer, Ruth; Stapert, Henk

    2008-04-01

    We present a novel nano-photonics biosensor concept that offers an ultra-high surface specificity and excellent suppression of background signals due to the sample fluid on top of the biosensor. In our contribution, we will briefly discuss the operation principle and fabrication of the biosensor, followed by a more detailed discussion on the experimentally determined performance parameters. Recent results on detection of fluorescently labeled molecules in a highly fluorescent background will be shown, and we will give an outlook on real-time detection of bio-molecules such as proteins and nucleic acids.

  11. Biocompatible silk step-index optical waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Applegate, Matthew B.; Perotto, Giovanni; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2015-01-01

    Biocompatible optical waveguides were constructed entirely of silk fibroin. A silk film (n=1.54) was encapsulated within a silk hydrogel (n=1.34) to form a robust and biocompatible waveguide. Such waveguides were made using only biologically and environmentally friendly materials without the use of harsh solvents. Light was coupled into the silk waveguides by direct incorporation of a glass optical fiber. These waveguides are extremely flexible, and strong enough to survive handling and manipulation. Cutback measurements showed propagation losses of approximately 2 dB/cm. The silk waveguides were found to be capable of guiding light through biological tissue. PMID:26600988

  12. Waveguide harmonic damper for klystron amplifier.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.

    1998-10-27

    A waveguide harmonic damper was designed for removing the harmonic frequency power from the klystron amplifiers of the APS linac. Straight coaxial probe antennas are used in a rectangular waveguide to form a damper. A linear array of the probe antennas is used on a narrow wall of the rectangular waveguide for damping klystron harmonics while decoupling the fundamental frequency in dominent TE{sub 01} mode. The klystron harmonics can exist in the waveguide as waveguide higher-order modes above cutoff. Computer simulations are made to investigate the waveguide harmonic damping characteristics of the damper.

  13. Surface normal coupling to multiple-slot and cover-slotted silicon nanocrystalline waveguides and ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, John; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-03-01

    Grating couplers are ideal for coupling into the tightly confined propagation modes of semiconductor waveguides. In addition, nonlinear optics has benefited from the sub-diffraction limit confinement of horizontal slot waveguides. By combining these two advancements, slot-based nonlinear optics with mode areas less than 0.02 μm2 can become as routine as twisting fiber connectors together. Surface normal fiber alignment to a chip is also highly desirable from time, cost, and manufacturing considerations. To meet these considerable design challenges, a custom genetic algorithm is created which, starting from purely random designs, creates a unique four stage grating coupler for two novel horizontal slot waveguide platforms. For horizontal multiple-slot waveguides filled with silicon nanocrystal, a theoretical fiber-towaveguide coupling efficiency of 68% is obtained. For thin silicon waveguides clad with optically active silicon nanocrystal, known as cover-slot waveguides, a theoretical fiber-to-waveguide coupling efficiency of 47% is obtained, and 1 dB and 3 dB theoretical bandwidths of 70 nm and 150 nm are obtained, respectively. Both waveguide platforms are fabricated from scratch, and their respective on-chip grating couplers are experimentally measured from a standard single mode fiber array that is mounted surface normally. The horizontal multiple-slot grating coupler achieved an experimental 60% coupling efficiency, and the horizontal cover-slot grating coupler achieved an experimental 38.7% coupling efficiency, with an extrapolated 1 dB bandwidth of 66 nm. This report demonstrates the promise of genetic algorithm-based design by reducing to practice the first large bandwidth vertical grating coupler to a novel silicon nanocrystal horizontal cover-slot waveguide.

  14. Flexible circular waveguides at millimeter wavelengths from metallized Teflon tubing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrzut, J.; Goldsmith, P. F.

    1990-03-01

    Flexible waveguides for use at millimeter wavelengths have been fabricated by deposition of metallic film onto the composite-modified inside surface of Teflon tubing. The attenuation characteristics in the range 80 to 115 GHz show losses on the order of 0.1 dB/cm. Bending, twisting, and rotating to the limit of plastic mechanical stability (curvature radius typically greater than 8 cm) have a negligible effect on the attenuation, and bend angles less than 45 deg produce relatively small changes in the insertion phase.

  15. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  16. Waveguide design and fabrication of trench for hybrid integrated optic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Suntae; Song, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Kyoung-Youm; Oh, Yunkyung

    2005-03-01

    The hybrid integration of passive and optoelectronic devices has been widely researched. One of the main applications of this technique is for the fiber to the home (FTTH) network. In bi-directional transceivers, integrated WDM filters have been used to separate or combine the optical signals. Thin film filter (TFF) embedded waveguide type is effective for an application requiring wide bandwidth and low loss. Although the insertion loss of TFF itself is quite low, significant loss occurs at the trench and it depends on the geometrical structure and fabrication errors of the trench waveguide. The conventional sawing method and deep reactive ion etching technique were used for trench fabrication. In the case of using DRIE process, fabrication error was reduced and position error of the trench was controlled within 1um. This method could also enhance the platform design flexibility. To reduce the coupling loss between input and reflection waveguides with high tolerance of filter position, a few mode waveguide and horn waveguide were proposed. The insertion losses of transmission and reflection were less than 0.5dB and 0.7dB respectively. The 1dB tolerance of filter position was improved to be nearly twice than that of the conventional waveguide.

  17. Femtosecond laser-written lithium niobate waveguide laser operating at 1085 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yang; de Aldana, Javier R. Vázquez; Chen, Feng

    2014-10-01

    We report on the channel waveguide lasers at 1085 nm in femtosecond laser written Type II waveguides in an Nd:MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. The waveguide was constructed in a typical dual-line approach. In the geometry, we found that four vicinal regions of the track pair could guide light propagation. In addition, these guiding cores support polarization-dependent-guided modes. The propagation losses of the waveguides were measured to be as low as 1 dB/cm. Under an optical pump at 808 nm, the continuous-wave waveguide lasing at 1085 nm was generated, reaching a slope efficiency of 27% and maximum output power of 8 mW. The lasing threshold was 71 mW. Our results show that with the femtosecond laser written Nd:MgO:LiNbO3 waveguide as the miniature light source, it was possible to construct all-LiNbO3-based integrated devices for diverse photonic applications.

  18. Simplified flangeless unisex waveguide coupler assembly

    DOEpatents

    Michelangelo, Dimartino; Moeller, Charles P.

    1993-01-01

    A unisex coupler assembly is disclosed capable of providing a leak tight coupling for waveguides with axial alignment of the waveguides and rotational capability. The sealing means of the coupler assembly are not exposed to RF energy, and the coupler assembly does not require the provision of external flanges on the waveguides. In a preferred embodiment, O ring seals are not used and the coupler assembly is, therefore, bakeable at a temperature up to about 150.degree. C. The coupler assembly comprises a split collar which clamps around the waveguides and a second collar which fastens to the split collar. The split collar contains an inner annular groove. Each of the waveguides is provided with an external annular groove which receives a retaining ring. The split collar is clamped around one of the waveguides with the inner annular groove of the split collar engaging the retaining ring carried in the external annular groove in the waveguide. The second collar is then slipped over the second waveguide behind the annular groove and retaining ring therein and the second collar is coaxially secured by fastening means to the split collar to draw the respective waveguides together by coaxial force exerted by the second collar against the retaining ring on the second waveguide. A sealing ring is placed against an external sealing surface at a reduced external diameter end formed on one waveguide to sealingly engage a corresponding sealing surface on the other waveguide as the waveguides are urged toward each other.

  19. Simplified flangeless unisex waveguide coupler assembly

    DOEpatents

    Michelangelo, D.; Moeller, C.P.

    1993-05-04

    A unisex coupler assembly is disclosed capable of providing a leak tight coupling for waveguides with axial alignment of the waveguides and rotational capability. The sealing means of the coupler assembly are not exposed to RF energy, and the coupler assembly does not require the provision of external flanges on the waveguides. In a preferred embodiment, O ring seals are not used and the coupler assembly is, therefore, bakeable at a temperature up to about 150 C. The coupler assembly comprises a split collar which clamps around the waveguides and a second collar which fastens to the split collar. The split collar contains an inner annular groove. Each of the waveguides is provided with an external annular groove which receives a retaining ring. The split collar is clamped around one of the waveguides with the inner annular groove of the split collar engaging the retaining ring carried in the external annular groove in the waveguide. The second collar is then slipped over the second waveguide behind the annular groove and retaining ring therein and the second collar is coaxially secured by fastening means to the split collar to draw the respective waveguides together by coaxial force exerted by the second collar against the retaining ring on the second waveguide. A sealing ring is placed against an external sealing surface at a reduced external diameter end formed on one waveguide to sealingly engage a corresponding sealing surface on the other waveguide as the waveguides are urged toward each other.

  20. Exceptional points and asymmetric mode conversion in quasi-guided dual-mode optical waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, S. N.; Chong, Y. D.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hermitian systems host unconventional physical effects that be used to design new optical devices. We study a non-Hermitian system consisting of 1D planar optical waveguides with suitable amount of simultaneous gain and loss. The parameter space contains an exceptional point, which can be accessed by varying the transverse gain and loss profile. When light propagates through the waveguide structure, the output mode is independent of the choice of input mode. This “asymmetric mode conversion” phenomenon can be explained by the swapping of mode identities in the vicinity of the exceptional point, together with the failure of adiabatic evolution in non-Hermitian systems. PMID:27101933

  1. Reactive ion etching of tellurite and chalcogenide waveguides using hydrogen, methane, and argon

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, K. T.; Madden, S. J.

    2011-01-15

    The authors report in detail on the reactive plasma etching properties of tellurium and demonstrate a high quality etching process using hydrogen, methane, and argon. Very low loss planar ridge waveguides are demonstrated. Optical losses in tellurium dioxide waveguides below 0.1 dB/cm in most of the near infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum and at 1550 nm have been achieved--the lowest ever reported by more than an order of magnitude and clearly suitable for planar integrated devices. The etch process is also shown to be suitable for chalcogenide glasses which may be of importance in applications such as phase change memory devices and nonlinear integrated optics.

  2. Integration of a waveguide self-electrooptic effect device and a vertically coupled interconnect waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2008-02-26

    A self-electrooptic effect device ("SEED") is integrated with waveguide interconnects through the use of vertical directional couplers. Light initially propagating in the interconnect waveguide is vertically coupled to the active waveguide layer of the SEED and, if the SEED is in the transparent state, the light is coupled back to the interconnect waveguide.

  3. Atomic-scale photonic hybrids for mid-infrared and terahertz nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Joshua D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Tischler, Joseph G.; Glembocki, Orest J.; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.; Reinecke, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The field of nanophotonics focuses on the ability to confine light to nanoscale dimensions, typically much smaller than the wavelength of light. The goal is to develop light-based technologies that are impossible with traditional optics. Subdiffractional confinement can be achieved using either surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) or surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs). SPPs can provide a gate-tunable, broad-bandwidth response, but suffer from high optical losses; whereas SPhPs offer a relatively low-loss, crystal-dependent optical response, but only over a narrow spectral range, with limited opportunities for active tunability. Here, motivated by the recent results from monolayer graphene and multilayer hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures, we discuss the potential of electromagnetic hybrids -- materials incorporating mixtures of SPPs and SPhPs -- for overcoming the limitations of the individual polaritons. Furthermore, we also propose a new type of atomic-scale hybrid the crystalline hybrid -- where mixtures of two or more atomic-scale (~3 nm or less) polar dielectric materials lead to the creation of a new material resulting from hybridized optic phonon behaviour of the constituents, potentially allowing direct control over the dielectric function. These atomic-scale hybrids expand the toolkit of materials for mid-infrared to terahertz nanophotonics and could enable the creation of novel actively tunable, yet low-loss optics at the nanoscale.

  4. Phased waveguide array with fixed tuning elements

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.; Bernabei, S.; Hooke, W.M.; Paoloni, F.J.

    1980-04-01

    The waveguide grill excites both penetrating lower hybrid waves and surface plasma waves. Quarter wavelength tuning elements attached to the sides of a twin waveguide are shown to reduce the surface wave component by a factor of approx. 3..

  5. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels were considered to serve as a filling for millimeter-wave waveguides. While these waveguides present a slightly higher loss than hollow waveguides, they have less losses than Duroid substrate integrated waveguides (less than 0.15 dB at Ka-band, in a 20 mm section), and exhibit an order of magnitude of mass reduction when compared to commercial waveguides. A Ka-band slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array was designed, which provided the same gain (9 dBi) as its standard waveguide counterpart, and a slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array using folded-slots was designed for comparison, obtaining a gain of 9 dB and a bandwidth of 590 MHz.

  6. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOEpatents

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-11-20

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  7. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOEpatents

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-03-06

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  8. 1D-VAR Retrieval Using Superchannels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel; Larar, Allen; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter; Mango, Stephen; SaintGermain, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Since modern ultra-spectral remote sensors have thousands of channels, it is difficult to include all of them in a 1D-var retrieval system. We will describe a physical inversion algorithm, which includes all available channels for the atmospheric temperature, moisture, cloud, and surface parameter retrievals. Both the forward model and the inversion algorithm compress the channel radiances into super channels. These super channels are obtained by projecting the radiance spectra onto a set of pre-calculated eigenvectors. The forward model provides both super channel properties and jacobian in EOF space directly. For ultra-spectral sensors such as Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed Interferometer (NAST), a compression ratio of more than 80 can be achieved, leading to a significant reduction in computations involved in an inversion process. Results will be shown applying the algorithm to real IASI and NAST data.

  9. Recess integration of micro-cleaved laser diode platelets with dielectric waveguides on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonstad, Clifton G., Jr.; Rumpler, Joseph J.; Barkley, Edward R.; Perkins, James M.; Famenini, Shaya

    2008-02-01

    Ongoing research directed at integrating 1.55 μm III-V ridge waveguide gain elements (i.e. diode lasers and semiconductor optical amplifiers) co-axially aligned with, and coupled to, silicon oxy-nitride waveguides on silicon substrates is presented. The integration techniques used are highly modular and consistent with fabricating waveguides on Si-CMOS wafers and doing the integration of the III-V gain elements after all standard front- and back-end Si processing has been completed. A novel micro-cleaving technique is used to produce active ridge waveguide platelets on the order of 6 µm thick and 100 μm wide, with precisely controlled lengths, in the current work 300 +/- 1 μm, and cleaved end facets. Typical ridge guide micro-cleaved platelet lasers have thresholds under 30 mA. Micro-cleaved platelets are bonded within dielectric recesses etched through the oxy-nitride (SiO xN y) waveguides on a wafer so the ridge and SiO xN y waveguides are co-axially aligned. Transmission measurements indicate coupling losses are as low as 5 db with air filling the gaps between the waveguide ends, and measurements made through filled gaps indicate that the coupling losses can be reduced to below 1.5 dB with a high index (n = 2.2) dielectric fill. Simulations indicate that with further optimization of the mode profile in the III-V waveguide the loss can be reduced to below 1 dB. The paper concludes with a discussion of device design and optimization for co-axial recess integration, and with a comparison of co-axial coupling with the hybrid evanescent vertical coupling III-V/Si integration approach recently introduced by researchers at UCSB and Intel.

  10. Planar waveguide sensor of ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogoziński, Roman; Tyszkiewicz, Cuma; Karasiński, Paweł; Izydorczyk, Weronika

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the concept of forming ammonia sensor based on a planar waveguide structure. It is an amplitude sensor produced on the basis of the multimode waveguide. The technological base for this kind of structure is the ion exchange method and the sol-gel method. The planar multimode waveguide of channel type is produced in glass substrate (soda-lime glass of Menzel-Glaser company) by the selective Ag+↔Na+ ion exchange. On the surface of the glass substrate a porous (~40%) silica layer is produced by the sol-gel method. This layer is sensitized to the presence of ammonia in the surrounding atmosphere by impregnation with Bromocresol Purple (BCP) dye. Therefore it constitutes a sensor layer. Spectrophotometric tests carried out showed about 50% reduction of cross-transmission changes of such sensor layer for a wave λ=593 nm caused by the presence of 25% ammonia water vapor in its ambience. The radiation source used in this type of sensor structure is a light emitting diode LED. The gradient channel waveguide is designed for frontal connection (optical glue) with a standard multimode telecommunications waveguide 62.5/125μm.

  11. Loop coupled resonator optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Song, Junfeng; Luo, Lian-Wee; Luo, Xianshu; Zhou, Haifeng; Tu, Xiaoguang; Jia, Lianxi; Fang, Qing; Lo, Guo-Qiang

    2014-10-06

    We propose a novel coupled resonator optical waveguide (CROW) structure that is made up of a waveguide loop. We theoretically investigate the forbidden band and conduction band conditions in an infinite periodic lattice. We also discuss the reflection- and transmission- spectra, group delay in finite periodic structures. Light has a larger group delay at the band edge in a periodic structure. The flat band pass filter and flat-top group delay can be realized in a non-periodic structure. Scattering matrix method is used to calculate the effects of waveguide loss on the optical characteristics of these structures. We also introduce a tunable coupling loop waveguide to compensate for the fabrication variations since the coupling coefficient of the directional coupler in the loop waveguide is a critical factor in determining the characteristics of a loop CROW. The loop CROW structure is suitable for a wide range of applications such as band pass filters, high Q microcavity, and optical buffers and so on.

  12. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation discussed the potential advantages of developing Slotted Waveguide Arrays using polyimide aerogels. Polyimide (PI) aerogels offer great promise as an enabling technology for lightweight aerospace antenna systems. PI aerogels are highly porous solids possessing low density and low dielectric permittivity combined with good mechanical properties. For slotted waveguide array applications, there are significant advantages in mass that more than compensate for the slightly higher loss of the aerogel filled waveguide when compared to state of practice commercial waveguide.

  13. Bending loss of terahertz pipe waveguides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jen-Tang; Hsueh, Yu-Chun; Huang, Yu-Ru; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2010-12-06

    We present an experimental study on the bending loss of terahertz (THz) pipe waveguide. Bending loss of pipe waveguides is investigated for various frequencies, polarizations, core diameters, cladding thicknesses, and cladding materials. Our results indicate that the pipe waveguides with lower guiding loss suffer lower bending loss due to stronger mode confinement. The unexpected low bending loss in the investigated simple leaky waveguide structure promises variety of flexible applications.

  14. Investigation of semiconductor clad optical waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchman, T. E.; Carson, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of techniques have been proposed for fabricating integrated optical devices using semiconductors, lithium niobate, and glasses as waveguides and substrates. The use of glass waveguides and their interaction with thin semiconductor cladding layers was studied. Though the interactions of these multilayer waveguide structures have been analyzed here using glass, they may be applicable to other types of materials as well. The primary reason for using glass is that it provides a simple, inexpensive way to construct waveguides and devices.

  15. Dispersion compensation in slot photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plastun, Alexander; Konyukhov, Andrey

    2015-03-01

    Dispersion tailoring using photonic crystal cladding for slot waveguide is proposed. Numerical modeling based on the Maxwell equation for Te and TM modes of the photonic crystal is performed. Slot waveguide provide high intencity at the central area. Photonic crystal cladding of the slot waveguide allow us to compensate high values of the host glass dispersion.

  16. Reflectively coupled waveguide photodetector for high speed optical interconnection.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang

    2010-01-01

    To fully utilize GaAs high drift mobility, techniques to monolithically integrate In0.53Ga0.47As p-i-n photodetectors with GaAs based optical waveguides using total internal reflection coupling are reviewed. Metal coplanar waveguides, deposited on top of the polyimide layer for the photodetector's planarization and passivation, were then uniquely connected as a bridge between the photonics and electronics to illustrate the high-speed monitoring function. The photodetectors were efficiently implemented and imposed on the echelle grating circle for wavelength division multiplexing monitoring. In optical filtering performance, the monolithically integrated photodetector channel spacing was 2 nm over the 1,520-1,550 nm wavelength range and the pass band was 1 nm at the -1 dB level. For high-speed applications the full-width half-maximum of the temporal response and 3-dB bandwidth for the reflectively coupled waveguide photodetectors were demonstrated to be 30 ps and 11 GHz, respectively. The bit error rate performance of this integrated photodetector at 10 Gbit/s with 2(7)-1 long pseudo-random bit sequence non-return to zero input data also showed error-free operation.

  17. Reflectively Coupled Waveguide Photodetector for High Speed Optical Interconnection

    PubMed Central

    Hsu*, Shih-Hsiang

    2010-01-01

    To fully utilize GaAs high drift mobility, techniques to monolithically integrate In0.53Ga0.47As p-i-n photodetectors with GaAs based optical waveguides using total internal reflection coupling are reviewed. Metal coplanar waveguides, deposited on top of the polyimide layer for the photodetector’s planarization and passivation, were then uniquely connected as a bridge between the photonics and electronics to illustrate the high-speed monitoring function. The photodetectors were efficiently implemented and imposed on the echelle grating circle for wavelength division multiplexing monitoring. In optical filtering performance, the monolithically integrated photodetector channel spacing was 2 nm over the 1,520–1,550 nm wavelength range and the pass band was 1 nm at the −1 dB level. For high-speed applications the full-width half-maximum of the temporal response and 3-dB bandwidth for the reflectively coupled waveguide photodetectors were demonstrated to be 30 ps and 11 GHz, respectively. The bit error rate performance of this integrated photodetector at 10 Gbit/s with 27-1 long pseudo-random bit sequence non-return to zero input data also showed error-free operation. PMID:22163502

  18. 75 FR 27411 - Airworthiness Directives; Turbomeca Arriel 1B, 1D, 1D1, and 1S1 Turboshaft Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... (that incorporate Turbomeca Modification (mod) TU 148), Arriel 1D, 1D1, and 1S1 turboshaft engines that do not incorporate mod TU 347. That AD also requires initial and repetitive replacements of 2nd stage... incorporate mod TU 148), 1D, 1D1, and 1S1 turboshaft engines that do not incorporate mod TU 347. We...

  19. A general waveguide circuit theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Roger B.; Williams, Dylan F.

    1992-10-01

    This work generalizes and extends the classical circuit theory of electromagnetic waveguides. Unlike the conventional theory, the present formulation applies to all waveguides composed of linear, isotropic material, even those involving lossy conductors and hybrid mode fields, in a fully rigorous way. Special attention is given to distinguishing the traveling waves, constructed with respect to a well-defined characteristic impedance, from a set of pseudo-waves, defined with respect to an arbitrary reference impedance. Matrices characterizing a linear circuit are defined, and relationships among them, some newly discovered, are derived. New ramifications of reciprocity are developed. Measurement of various network parameters is given extensive treatment.

  20. Waveguide Four-Wave Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    PL-TR--91-1045 /’--"PL-TR-- AD-A243 555 91-1045 WAVEGUIDE FOUR -WAVE MIXING Thomas B. Simpson Jia-ming Liu JAYCOR San Diego, CA 92186-5154 October...Final Report; May 88 - Mar 91 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS WAVEGUIDE FOUR -WAVE MIXING C: F29601-88-C-0023 PE: 62601F PR: 3326 6. AUTHOR(S...for public release; distribution unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) This program has investigated four -wave mixing (4-win) in non- linear

  1. Polymer optical waveguide composed of europium-aluminum-acrylate composite core for compact optical amplifier and laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitani, Marina; Yamashita, Kenichi; Fukui, Toshimi; Ishigure, Takaaki

    2015-02-01

    We successfully fabricate polymer waveguides with Europium-Aluminum (Eu-Al) polymer composite core using the Mosquito method that utilizes a microdispenser for realizing a compact waveguide optical amplifiers and lasers. Rareearth (RE) ions are widely used as the gain medium for fiber lasers and optical fiber amplifiers. However, high concentration doping of rare-earth-ion leads to the concentration quenching resulting in observing less gain in optical amplification. For addressing the concentration quenching problem, a rare-earth metal (RE-M) polymer composite has been proposed by KRI, Inc. to be a waveguide core material. Actually, 10-wt% RE doping into organic polymer materials was already achieved. Hence, realization of compact and high-efficiency waveguide amplifiers and lasers have been anticipated using the RE-M polymer composite. In this paper, a microdispenser is adopted to fabricate a Eu-doped polymer waveguide. Then, it is experimentally confirmed that the low-loss waveguides are fabricated with a high reproducibility. Optical gain is estimated by measuring the amplified spontaneous emission using the variable stripe length method. The fabricated waveguide exhibits an optical gain as high as 7.1 dB/cm at 616-nm wavelength.

  2. Extruded channel waveguides in a neodymium-doped lead-silicate glass for integrated optic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairaj, Arshad K.; Feng, Xian; Hewak, Daniel W.

    2003-10-01

    We report on the development of channel waveguides in a lead-silicate glass through the extrusion technique. An extruded glass slab with four imbedded fibers each with core size of 8 by 2.5 μm in the horizontal and vertical directions was manufactured. These neodymium-doped channel waveguides were in single-mode operation at 808 nm and had attenuation of 0.1 dB cm-1 at 1.06 μm. The measured 4F3/2 lifetime of 488 μs and emission cross section of 2.5×10-20 cm2 were in good agreement with reported values. The integration of multiple glass variants into a single compact platform is presented as a manufacturing route for complex integrated optical waveguides.

  3. Vapor-Redissolution Technique for Reduction of POLYMER/Si Arrayed Waveguide Grating Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiming; Zhang, Daming; Qin, Zhenkun; Ma, Chunsheng

    An efficient vapor-redissolution technique is used to greatly reduce sidewall scattering loss in the polymer arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) fabricated on a silicon substrate. Smoother sidewalls are achieved and verified by scanning electron microscopy. Reduction of sidewall scattering loss is further measured for the loss measurement of both straight waveguides and AWG devices. The sidewall loss in straight polymer waveguide is decreased by 2.1 dB/cm, the insertion loss of our AWG device is reduced by about 5.5 dB for the central channel and 6.7 dB for the edge channels, the crosstalk is reduced by 2.5 dB, and 3-dB bandwidth is narrowed by 0.05 nm after the vapor-redissoluton treatment.

  4. Controllable scattering of photons in a one-dimensional resonator waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C. P.; Zhou, L.; Gong, Z. R.; Liu, Y. X.; Nori, F.

    2009-03-01

    We analyze the coherent transport of a single photon, which propagates in a one-dimensional coupled-resonator waveguide and is scattered by a controllable two-level system located inside one of the resonators of this waveguide. Our approach, which uses discrete coordinates, unifies low and high energy effective theories for single-photon scattering. We show that the controllable two-level system can behave as a quantum switch for the coherent transport of a single photon. This study may inspire new electro-optical single-photon quantum devices. We also suggest an experimental setup based on superconducting transmission line resonators and qubits. [4pt] L. Zhou, Z.R. Gong, Y.X. Liu, C.P. Sun, F. Nori, Controllable scattering of photons in a 1D resonator waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 100501 (2008). URL: http://link.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v101/e100501

  5. Deepening Insights of Charge Transfer and Photophysics in a Novel Donor-Acceptor Cocrystal for Waveguide Couplers and Photonic Logic Computation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weigang; Zhu, Lingyun; Zou, Ye; Wu, Yishi; Zhen, Yonggang; Dong, Huanli; Fu, Hongbing; Wei, Zhixiang; Shi, Qiang; Hu, Wenping

    2016-07-01

    The charge transfer and photophysics in a new light-emitting cocrystal with ribbon-like morphology are revealed in-depth. These cocrystals can serve as an efficient 1D optical waveguide, and the cocrystal waveguide couplers fabricated by a probe-assisted crystal-moving technique exhibit interfacial white emission and can function as basic photonic logic gates, showing potential for future integrated photonics.

  6. Oxides in plasmonics and nanophotonics: materials and dynamic devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Cleirci, Matteo; Ferrera, Marcello; Kim, Jongbum; DeVault, Clayton; Shaltout, Amr M.; Faccio, Daniele; Shalaev, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) have long been used in optics and electronics for their unique combination of both high transmission and high electrical conductivity. In recent years, the impact of such TCOs has been felt in the subgenre of nanophotonics and plasmonics.1-3 Specifically, the TCOs provide plasmonic response in the near infrared and infrared region,4 epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) properties in the telecom band, tunable static optical properties through deposition/annealing control,5 and the potential for dynamic control of their properties under electrical or optical biasing.6-8 Due to the combination of these interesting properties, TCOs such as In:SnO (ITO), Al:ZnO (AZO), and Ga:ZnO (GZO) have become leaders in the drive to produce high-performance dynamic and alternative nanophotonic devices and metamaterials. In our work, we have studied the potential for optical control of AZO thin films using both above bandgap and below bandgap excitation, noting strong changes in reflection/transmission with enhancement due to the ENZ as well as ultrafast response times less than 1 ps. Using a photo-modified carrier density and recombination to model above bandgap excitation, we demonstrated 40%/30% change in the reflection/transmission of a 350 nm AZO film with an 88 fs recombination time, corresponding to a modification of the carrier density by 10%.6 Below bandgap excitation has experimentally shown the potential for similar variations in the reflection and transmission under increased fluences with a factor of 8x increase in the normalized ΔR at ENZ. Current efforts are focused to model the material response as well as to investigate electrical modulation of AZO films. In summary, our work has demonstrated the potential for optical control of AZO films both above and below bandgap on an ultrafast timescale which can be enhanced through ENZ. Combining this with traditional nanophotonic and metamaterial devices opens a broad range of high impact studies such

  7. Polymeric slot waveguide for photonics sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chovan, J.; Uherek, F.

    2016-12-01

    Polymeric slot waveguide for photonics sensing was designed, simulated and studied in this work. The polymeric slot waveguide was designed on commercial Ormocer polymer platform and operates at visible 632.8 nm wavelength. Designed polymeric slot waveguide detects the refractive index change of the ambient material by evanescent field label-free techniques. The motivation for the reported work was to design a low-cost polymeric slot waveguide for sensing arms of integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometer optical sensor with reduced temperature dependency. The minimal dimensions of advanced sensing slot waveguide structure were designed for researcher direct laser writing fabrication by nonlinear two-photon polymerization. The normalized effective refractive index changes of TE and TM fundamental modes in polymeric slot waveguide and slab waveguides were compared. The sensitivity of the normalized effective refractive index changes of TE and TM fundamental modes on refractive index changes of the ambient material was investigated by glucose-water solutions.

  8. Optofluidic waveguides: II. Fabrication and structures

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Holger

    2011-01-01

    We review fabrication methods and common structures for optofluidic waveguides, defined as structures capable of optical confinement and transmission through fluid filled cores. Cited structures include those based on total internal reflection, metallic coatings, and interference based confinement. Configurations include optical fibers and waveguides fabricated on flat substrates (integrated waveguides). Some examples of optofluidic waveguides that are included in this review are Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs) and two-dimensional photonic crystal arrays, Bragg fibers and waveguides, and Anti Resonant Reflecting Optical Waveguides (ARROWs). An emphasis is placed on integrated ARROWs fabricated using a thin-film deposition process, which illustrates how optofluidic waveguides can be combined with other microfluidic elements in the creation of lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:21603122

  9. Optical waveguides for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Lloyd W.

    1992-07-01

    Possibilities of employing thin film optical waveguides for chemical analysis are reviewed. Particular attention is given to the use of integrated or planar optical elements in sensors which may be applied to continuous or in situ monitoring in biomedical, environmental, and chemical processes.

  10. Birefringence compensated arrayed waveguide grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun; Xia, Xiang; Lang, Tingting; He, Jian-Jun

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we review our work on birefringence compensated arrayed waveguide grating. We elaborate on a birefringence compensation technique based on angled star couplers in arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) and discuss several demonstrations both in low-index-contrast and high-index-contrast material systems. A 16-channel AWG with 100GHz channel spacing for DWDM application is designed and fabricated in silica-based low-index-contrast waveguide. The experimental results confirm that the polarization-dependent wavelength shift (PDλ) can be tuned by varying the incident/diffraction angle at the star couplers and a birefringence-free property can be achieved without additional fabrication process as compared to conventional AWG. A further validation of this technique is demonstrated in high-index-contrast silicon-on-insulator waveguide, in combination with different diffraction orders for TE and TM polarizations. A birefringence compensated silicon nanowire AWG for CWDM optical interconnects is designed and fabricated. The theoretical and experimental results show that the PDλ can be reduced from 380-420nm to 0.5-3.5 nm, below 25% of the 3 dB bandwidth of the channel response in the wavelength range of 1500 to 1600nm.

  11. Polymer Waveguides for Quantum Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    design, fabrication and testing of slab waveguides made of EO polymer and covers the initial phase of installation, testing and use of the spin ... coating system to make a few simple slabs with the anticipation of testing those for coupling and other processes.

  12. High-Aspect-Ratio Nanophotonic Components Fabricated by Cl(2) RIBE

    SciTech Connect

    Zubrzycki, W.J.; Vawter, G.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1999-07-08

    We describe highly anisotropic reactive ion beam etching of nanophotonic structures in AlGaAs based on the ion beam divergence angle and chamber pressure. The divergence angle is shown to influence the shape of the upper portion of the etch while the chamber pressure controls the shape of the lower portion. This predictable region of parameter space resulted in highly anisotropic nanostructures. Deeply etched distributed Bragg reflectors are etched to an aspect ratio of 8:1 with 100 nm trench widths. The profile of the grating etch is straight with smooth sidewalls, flat bottoms, and squared corners. Two-dimensional photonic crystal post arrays are fabricated with smooth and vertical sidewalls, with structures as small as 180 nm in diameter and 2.0 {micro}m in height.

  13. Geometrical shape design of nanophotonic surfaces for thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, W I; Yoo, Y J; Song, Y M

    2016-07-11

    We present the effect of geometrical parameters, particularly shape, on optical absorption enhancement for thin film solar cells based on crystalline silicon (c-Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs) using a rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) method. It is discovered that the "sweet spot" that maximizes efficiency of solar cells exists for the design of nanophotonic surfaces. For the case of ultrathin, rod array is practical due to the effective optical resonances resulted from the optimum geometry whereas parabola array is viable for relatively thicker cells owing to the effective graded index profile. A specific value of thickness, which is the median value of other two devices tailored by rod and paraboloid, is optimized by truncated shape structure. It is therefore worth scanning the optimum shape of nanostructures in a given thickness in order to achieve high performance.

  14. High resolution direct measurement of temperature distribution in silicon nanophotonics devices.

    PubMed

    Tzur, Mor; Desiatov, Boris; Goykhman, Ilya; Grajower, Meir; Levy, Uriel

    2013-12-02

    Following the miniaturization of photonic devices and the increase in data rates, the issues of self heating and heat removal in active nanophotonic devices should be considered and studied in more details. In this paper we use the approach of Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) to obtain an image of the temperature field of a silicon micro ring resonator with sub-micron spatial resolution. The temperature rise in the device is a result of self heating which is caused by free carrier absorption in the doped silicon. The temperature is measured locally and directly using a temperature sensitive AFM probe. We show that this local temperature measurement is feasible in the photonic device despite the perturbation that is introduced by the probe. Using the above method we observed a significant self heating of about 10 degrees within the device.

  15. Microwave platform as a valuable tool for characterization of nanophotonic devices

    PubMed Central

    Shishkin, Ivan; Baranov, Dmitry; Slobozhanyuk, Alexey; Filonov, Dmitry; Lukashenko, Stanislav; Samusev, Anton; Belov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The rich potential of the microwave experiments for characterization and optimization of optical devices is discussed. While the control of the light fields together with their spatial mapping at the nanoscale is still laborious and not always clear, the microwave setup allows to measure both amplitude and phase of initially determined magnetic and electric field components without significant perturbation of the near-field. As an example, the electromagnetic properties of an add-drop filter, which became a well-known workhorse of the photonics, is experimentally studied with the aid of transmission spectroscopy measurements in optical and microwave ranges and through direct mapping of the near fields at microwave frequencies. We demonstrate that the microwave experiments provide a unique platform for the comprehensive studies of electromagnetic properties of micro- and nanophotonic devices, and allow to obtain data which are hardly acquirable by conventional optical methods. PMID:27759058

  16. Cavity-QED models of switches for attojoule-scale nanophotonic logic

    SciTech Connect

    Mabuchi, Hideo

    2009-10-15

    Quantum optical input-output models are described for a class of optical switches based on cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) with a single multilevel atom (or comparable bound system of charges) coupled simultaneously to several resonant field modes. A recent limit theorem for quantum stochastic differential equations is used to show that such models converge to a simple scattering matrix in a type of strong-coupling limit that seems natural for nanophotonic systems. Numerical integration is used to show that the behavior of the prelimit model approximates that of the simple scattering matrix in a realistic regime for the physical parameters and that it is possible in the proposed cavity-QED configuration for low-power optical signals to switch higher-power signals at attojoule energy scales.

  17. Spoked-ring microcavities: enabling seamless integration of nanophotonics in unmodified advanced CMOS microelectronics chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Mark T.; Shainline, Jeffrey M.; Orcutt, Jason S.; Ram, Rajeev J.; Stojanovic, Vladimir; Popovic, Milos A.

    2014-03-01

    We present the spoked-ring microcavity, a nanophotonic building block enabling energy-efficient, active photonics in unmodified, advanced CMOS microelectronics processes. The cavity is realized in the IBM 45nm SOI CMOS process - the same process used to make many commercially available microprocessors including the IBM Power7 and Sony Playstation 3 processors. In advanced SOI CMOS processes, no partial etch steps and no vertical junctions are available, which limits the types of optical cavities that can be used for active nanophotonics. To enable efficient active devices with no process modifications, we designed a novel spoked-ring microcavity which is fully compatible with the constraints of the process. As a modulator, the device leverages the sub-100nm lithography resolution of the process to create radially extending p-n junctions, providing high optical fill factor depletion-mode modulation and thereby eliminating the need for a vertical junction. The device is made entirely in the transistor active layer, low-loss crystalline silicon, which eliminates the need for a partial etch commonly used to create ridge cavities. In this work, we present the full optical and electrical design of the cavity including rigorous mode solver and FDTD simulations to design the Qlimiting electrical contacts and the coupling/excitation. We address the layout of active photonics within the mask set of a standard advanced CMOS process and show that high-performance photonic devices can be seamlessly monolithically integrated alongside electronics on the same chip. The present designs enable monolithically integrated optoelectronic transceivers on a single advanced CMOS chip, without requiring any process changes, enabling the penetration of photonics into the microprocessor.

  18. 1D-1D Coulomb drag in a 6 Million Mobility Bi-layer Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilodeau, Simon; Laroche, Dominique; Xia, Jian-Sheng; Lilly, Mike; Reno, John; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Gervais, Guillaume

    We report Coulomb drag measurements in vertically-coupled quantum wires. The wires are fabricated in GaAs/AlGaAs bilayer heterostructures grown from two different MBE chambers: one at Sandia National Laboratories (1.2M mobility), and the other at Princeton University (6M mobility). The previously observed positive and negative drag signals are seen in both types of devices, demonstrating the robustness of the result. However, attempts to determine the temperature dependence of the drag signal in the 1D regime proved challenging in the higher mobility heterostructure (Princeton), in part because of difficulties in aligning the wires within the same transverse subband configuration. Nevertheless, this work, performed at the Microkelvin laboratory of the University of Florida, is an important proof-of-concept for future investigations of the temperature dependence of the 1D-1D drag signal down to a few mK. Such an experiment could confirm the Luttinger charge density wave interlocking predicted to occur in the wires. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  19. Low loss SiGe graded index waveguides for mid-IR applications.

    PubMed

    Brun, Mickael; Labeye, Pierre; Grand, Gilles; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Boulila, Fahem; Carras, Mathieu; Nicoletti, Sergio

    2014-01-13

    In the last few years Mid InfraRed (MIR) photonics has received renewed interest for a variety of commercial, scientific and military applications. This paper reports the design, the fabrication and the characterization of SiGe/Si based graded index waveguides and photonics integrated devices. The thickness and the Ge concentration of the core layer were optimized to cover the full [3 - 8 µm] band. The developed SiGe/Si stack has been used to fabricate straight waveguides and basic optical functions such as Y-junction, crossings and couplers. Straight waveguides showed losses as low as 1 dB/cm at λ = 4.5 µm and 2 dB/cm at 7.4 µm. Likewise straight waveguides, basic functions exhibit nearly theoretical behavior with losses compatible with the implementation of more complex functions in integrated photonics circuits. To the best of our knowledge, the performances of those Mid-IR waveguides significantly exceed the state of the art, confirming the feasibility of using graded SiGe/Si devices in a wide range of wavelengths. These results represent a capital breakthrough to develop a photonic platform working in the Mid-IR range.

  20. Guided wave modulators in Ti ion implanted LiNbO/sub 3/ waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, P.R. ); Chang, W.S.C. . Dept. of Computer Engineering); Buchal, C.J.; Thomas, D.K. )

    1989-05-01

    The authors describe electrooptic modulators designed, fabricated and tested in Ti ion implanted LiNbO3 waveguides. Low loss (<1 dB/cm) planar and channel waveguides were fabricated and compared to indiffused waveguides. Higher {Delta}n values were obtained allowing smaller waveguide geometries and tighter mode confinement. Wavelengths of 0.85 and 1.3 {mu}m were used. The small mode profiles resulting from the Ti doses up to 4 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ resulted in V-L products of 8.8 V-mm at 0.85 {mu}m and 20 V-mm at 1.3 {mu}m. These values are lower than any known reported for a Mach-Zehnder modulator using a buffer layer. Comparison of diffused and implanted waveguide modulators indicates that modulator efficiency can be optimized by electrode gap spacing and enhanced with smaller mode profiles achievable in implanted guides.

  1. Study and simulation for the sharp-corner of silicon-on-insulator waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, De-Gui; Li, Xiaoqi; Wong, Dongxia; Hall, Trevor

    2008-04-01

    The semiconductor industry appears to be encouraging the photonic industry to make highly integrated low-cost optical systems. Planar lightwave circuit (PLC) technology is widely accepted for manufacturing photonic components and Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides have attracted much research for implementing the highly integrated PLC-based devices. In this work, starting with the guided-mode conversion process and the principle of transportation waves, we mathematically model the structure of corner mirrors of SOI waveguides with a model of effective reflecting interface (ERI). Then we simulate the transfer efficiencies with FDTD method and testify the simulation results with commercial FDTD software tool. Further, we analyze the simulation results and conclude that the conversion efficiency of a corner mirror is determined by several parameters including the geometrical structure, the index-difference of waveguide-reflector materials and the roughness of waveguide-reflector interface. For the corner structure from 90-120°, the optimal transfer efficiency can be achieved more than 98% and the access loss is less than 0.1 dB if the scattering loss of waveguide is not taken into account, but they become 95% and 0.2 dB if the scattering loss is taken into account. For some important PLC components, the deflection angle of 90-120° is good enough for implementing the compact design of highly integrated PLC-based devices.

  2. Photonic nanowires: from subwavelength waveguides to optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Ying, Yibin; Tong, Limin

    2014-02-18

    Nanowires are one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with comparatively large aspect ratios, which can be useful in manipulating electrons, photons, plasmons, phonons, and atoms for numerous technologies. Among various nanostructures for low-dimensional photonics, the 1D nanowire is of great importance owing to its ability to route tightly confined light fields in single-mode with lowest space and material requirements, minimized optical path, and high mechanical flexibilities. In recent years, nanowire photonics have increasingly been attracting scientists' interests for both fundamental studies and technological applications because 1D nanowires have more favorable properties than many other structures, such as 0D quantum dots (QDs) and 2D films. As subwavelength waveguides, free-standing nanowires fabricated by either chemical growth or physical drawing techniques surpass nanowaveguides fabricated by almost all other means in terms of sidewall smoothness and diameter uniformity. This conveys their low waveguiding losses. With high index contrast (typically higher than 0.5) between the core and the surrounding or with surface plasmon resonance, a nanowire can guide light with tight optical confinement. For example, the effective mode area is less than λ(2)/10 for a dielectric nanowire or less than λ(2)/100 for a metal nanowire, where λ is the vacuum wavelength of the light. As we increase the wavelength-to-diameter ratio (WDR) of a nanowire, we can enlarge the fractional power of the evanescent fields in the guiding modes to over 80% while maintaining a small effective mode area, which may enable highly localized near-field interaction between the guided fields and the surrounding media. These favorable properties have opened great opportunities for optical sensing on the single-nanowire scale. However, several questions arise with ongoing research. With a deep-subwavelength cross-section, how can we efficiently couple light into a single nanowire? How can we

  3. Waveguide ring coupling design of MOG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiang; Li, Zi-li; Chen, Yuan-you; Qin, Xiao-hu; Lv, Xin

    2010-10-01

    The key technology of micro optic gyroscopes (MOGs) is to fabricate low-loss waveguide and use coupling technology to form reciprocal structure. The main topic in this paper is to study the coupling structure of MOG's spiral-ring waveguide. Using for the reference of fiber's low-loss character, the fiber-preform project is chosen as optimization means. According to the singlemode conditions, the width and thickness of rectangle waveguide can be calculated. The bend loss waveguide can decrease by means of introducing an offset at the junction of two waveguides and etching groove at the outside of bend waveguide. In this article intersection waveguide is designed to reduce the difficulty of coupling processing. Light in-and-out port coupled at opposite side is choosen for machining easiness in experiment.What's more, the edge-coupling technology being put forward to keep light transmit along the same rotary direction. An efficient means is introduced, which uses angle 45°to reflect the light to couple two waveguide at inside-end or outside-end, and outside-end coupling is chosen for processing convenience in the design. In experiment, the waveguide be fabricated by thick photoresist AZ4620, etched by RIE, When the angle of wafer and ion is set 85°, the angle of one sidewall can be etched almost 45°. It's benefit to design the coupling structure of MOG's spiral-ring waveguide.

  4. Electooptic Fresnel lens-scanner with an array of channel waveguides.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, K

    1983-08-15

    A new type of beam scanner is discussed based on a 1-D Fresnel zone plate consisting of titanium-diffused channel waveguides on LiNbO3. By electrooptically controlling the guided-wave phase, both beam scanning and 1-D focusing are achieved without a condensing lens. It was experimentally confirmed using the scanner with twenty-one Fresnel zones that the beam spot with a diameter of approximately 50 microm at half-power level of diffraction pattern is scanned over a distance of +/-70 microm in the focal plane with an applied voltage of +/-40 V at 633 nm.

  5. Integrated nanophotonic frequency shifter on the silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) platform for laser vibrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lauermann, M.; Weimann, C.; Palmer, R.; Schindler, P. C.; Koeber, S.; Freude, W. Koos, C.; Rembe, C.

    2014-05-27

    We demonstrate a waveguide-based frequency shifter on the silicon photonic platform, enabling frequency shifts up to 10 GHz. The device is realized by silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) integration. Temporal shaping of the drive signal allows the suppression of spurious side-modes by more than 23 dB.

  6. Wideband unbalanced waveguide power dividers and combiners

    SciTech Connect

    Halligan, Matthew; McDonald, Jacob Jeremiah; Strassner, II, Bernd H.

    2016-05-17

    The various technologies presented herein relate to waveguide dividers and waveguide combiners for application in radar systems, wireless communications, etc. Waveguide dividers-combiners can be manufactured in accordance with custom dimensions, as well as in accordance with waveguide standards such that the input and output ports are of a defined dimension and have a common impedance. Various embodiments are presented which can incorporate one or more septum(s), one or more pairs of septums, an iris, an input matching region, a notch located on the input waveguide arm, waveguide arms having stepped transformer regions, etc. The various divider configurations presented herein can be utilized in high fractional bandwidth applications, e.g., a fractional bandwidth of about 30%, and RF applications in the Ka frequency band (e.g., 26.5-40 GHz).

  7. Flattened dispersion in silicon slot waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yue, Yang; Beausoleil, Raymond G; Willner, Alan E

    2010-09-13

    We propose a silicon strip/slot hybrid waveguide that produces flattened dispersion of 0 ± 16 ps/(nm∙km), over a 553-nm wavelength range, which is 20 times flatter than previous results. Different from previously reported slot waveguides, the strip/slot hybrid waveguide employs the mode transition from a strip mode to a slot mode to introduce unique waveguide dispersion. The flat dispersion profile is featured by three zero-dispersion wavelengths, which is obtained for the first time in on-chip silicon waveguides, to the best of our knowledge. The waveguide exhibits flattened dispersion from 1562-nm to 2115-nm wavelength, which is potentially useful for both telecom and mid-infrared applications.

  8. Plasmonic coaxial waveguide-cavity devices.

    PubMed

    Mahigir, Amirreza; Dastmalchi, Pouya; Shin, Wonseok; Fan, Shanhui; Veronis, Georgios

    2015-08-10

    We theoretically investigate three-dimensional plasmonic waveguide-cavity structures, built by side-coupling stub resonators that consist of plasmonic coaxial waveguides of finite length, to a plasmonic coaxial waveguide. The resonators are terminated either in a short or an open circuit. We show that the properties of these waveguide-cavity systems can be accurately described using a single-mode scattering matrix theory. We also show that, with proper choice of their design parameters, three-dimensional plasmonic coaxial waveguide-cavity devices and two-dimensional metal-dielectric-metal devices can have nearly identical transmission spectra. Thus, three-dimensional plasmonic coaxial waveguides offer a platform for practical implementation of two-dimensional metal-dielectric-metal device designs.

  9. Digital waveguide adiabatic passage part 1: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkus, Jesse A.; Steel, M. J.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial adiabatic passage represents a new way to design integrated photonic devices. In conventional adiabatic passage designs require smoothly varying waveguide separations. Here we show modelling of adiabatic passage devices where the waveguide separation is varied digitally. Despite digitisation, our designs show robustness against variations in the input wavelength and refractive index contrast of the waveguides relative to the cladding. This approach to spatial adiabatic passage opens new design strategies and hence the potential for new photonics devices.

  10. Shift multiplexing by planar waveguide referencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tao; Zhang, Jiasen; Yan, Lifen; Gong, Qihuang

    2005-09-01

    We present a new method with which to implement shift multiplexing by planar waveguide referencing. In this method, a planar waveguide is used to steer the reference beam, and we implement shift multiplexing by shifting the recording medium. A spatial selectivity as high as 1.1 μm is obtained. By using waveguide referencing we can make a compact and simple holographic system.

  11. Dispersion Characteristics of a Dielectric Loaded Waveguide,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-30

    NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANOAODS-1963-A ., ’I A NSWC TR 84-338 00 In ’DISPERSION CHARACTERISTICS OF A SDIELECTRIC LOADED WAVEGUIDE By H. CROSBY J. CHOE Y...4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED DISPERSION CHARACTERISTICS OF A DIELECTRIC LOADED WAVEGUIDE S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES S. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse aide it necessary and Identify by block number) Dielectric Loaded Waveguide ) " Resonant Cavity) a

  12. Optical fiber having wave-guiding rings

    DOEpatents

    Messerly, Michael J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Beach, Raymond J.; Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2011-03-15

    A waveguide includes a cladding region that has a refractive index that is substantially uniform and surrounds a wave-guiding region that has an average index that is close to the index of the cladding. The wave-guiding region also contains a thin ring or series of rings that have an index or indices that differ significantly from the index of the cladding. The ring or rings enable the structure to guide light.

  13. Constitutive Parameter Measurement Using Double Ridge Waveguide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    CONSTITUTIVE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE THESIS Nathan J. Lehman, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENG-13-M-30 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE...copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENG-13-M-30 CONSTITUTIVE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE THESIS Presented to the Faculty...PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE Nathan J. Lehman, B.S.E.E. Captain, USAF Approved: Michael Havrilla, PhD (Chairman) Maj Milo Hyde, PhD

  14. Analysis of piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers attached to waveguides using waveguide finite elements.

    PubMed

    Loveday, Philip W

    2007-10-01

    A finite-element modeling procedure for computing the frequency response of piezoelectric transducers attached to infinite constant cross-section waveguides, as encountered in guided wave ultrasonic inspection, is presented. Two-dimensional waveguide finite elements are used to model the waveguide. Conventional three-dimensional finite elements are used to model the piezoelectric transducer. The harmonic forced response of the waveguide is used to obtain a dynamic stiffness matrix (complex and frequency dependent), which represents the waveguide in the transducer model. The electrical and mechanical frequency response of the transducer, attached to the waveguide, can then be computed. The forces applied to the waveguide are calculated and are used to determine the amplitude of each mode excited in the waveguide. The method is highly efficient compared to time integration of a conventional finite-element model of a length of waveguide. In addition, the method provides information about each mode that is excited in the waveguide. The method is demonstrated by modeling a sandwich piezoelectric transducer exciting a waveguide of rectangular cross section, although it could be applied to more complex situations. It is expected that the modeling method will be useful during the optimization of piezoelectric transducers for exciting specific wave propagation modes in waveguides.

  15. Ground-slot waveguide laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chenausky, P.; Drinkwater, E.H.; Laughman, L.M.

    1985-03-18

    A method of fabricating CO/sub 2/ waveguide-type lasers of the type comprising a slot formed in a broad surface of a hard ceramic material, comprising grinding the slot in a conventional surface grinding machine in two steps. The first step utilizes a coarse grinding wheel and the second a finer grinding wheel. The resultant laser cavity can produce high optical-power output when provided with RF excitation.

  16. Fluorescent immunosensors using planar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herron, James N.; Caldwell, Karin D.; Christensen, Douglas A.; Dyer, Shellee; Hlady, Vladimir; Huang, P.; Janatova, V.; Wang, Hiabo K.; Wei, A. P.

    1993-05-01

    The goal of our research program is to develop competitive and sandwich fluoroimmunoassays with high sensitivity and fast response time, that do not require external reagents. Our approach to this problem is to employ an optical immunoassay based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). Specifically, monoclonal antibodies are immobilized on a planar waveguide. Total internal reflection of light in the planar waveguide sets up an evanescent field which extends about 2000 angstroms from the interface. In the competitive immunoassay, a fluorescent label is coupled to a small synthetic antigen which is packaged with the antibody. In the absence of analyte, the fluorescently labeled antigen binds to the antibody and is excited by the evanescent field. Upon the addition of analyte, the fluorescently labeled antigen molecules are displaced by unlabeled antigen molecules and diffuse out of the evanescent field. In the sandwich assay, a primary or `capture' antibody is immobilized on the planar waveguide, and a secondary or `tracer' antibody (which is labeled with a fluorescent dye) is added to the bulk solution. In the absence of analyte, the tracer antibody remains in solution and very little fluorescence is observed. However, upon addition of analyte, a `molecular sandwich' is formed on the waveguide, composed of: (1) the capture antibody; (2) the analyte; and (3) the tracer antibody. Once this sandwich forms, the tracer antibody is within the evanescent field and fluoresces. Fluorescence emission is detected by a charged- coupled device (CCD). Using this approach, we have developed a prototype immunosensor for the detection of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). This device meets our design goals and exhibits a sensitivity of 0.1 - 1 pmolar.

  17. RF window assembly comprising a ceramic disk disposed within a cylindrical waveguide which is connected to rectangular waveguides through elliptical joints

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Yeremian, Anahid D.

    2016-03-15

    A high-power microwave RF window is provided that includes a cylindrical waveguide, where the cylindrical waveguide includes a ceramic disk concentrically housed in a central region of the cylindrical waveguide, a first rectangular waveguide, where the first rectangular waveguide is connected by a first elliptical joint to a proximal end of the cylindrical waveguide, and a second rectangular waveguide, where the second rectangular waveguide is connected by a second elliptical joint to a distal end of the cylindrical waveguide.

  18. Interacting Photons in Waveguide-QED and Applications in Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huaixiu

    Strong coupling between light and matter has been demonstrated both in classical cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) systems and in more recent circuit-QED experiments. This enables the generation of strong nonlinear photon-photon interactions at the single-photon level, which is of great interest for the observation of quantum nonlinear optical phenomena, the control of light quanta in quantum information protocols such as quantum networking, as well as the study of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems using light. Recently, strong coupling has also been realized in a variety of one-dimensional (1D) waveguide- QED experimental systems, which in turn makes them promising candidates for quantum information processing. Compared to cavity-QED systems, there are two new features in waveguide-QED: the existence of a continuum of states and the restricted 1D phase space, which together bring in new physical effects, such as the bound-state effects. This thesis consists of two parts: 1) understanding the fundamental interaction between local quantum objects, such as two-level systems and four-level systems, and photons confined in the waveguide; 2) exploring its implications in quantum information processing, in particular photonic quantum computation and quantum key distribution. First, we demonstrate that by coupling a two-level system (TLS) or three/four-level system to a 1D continuum, strongly-correlated photons can be generated inside the waveguide. Photon-photon bound states, which decay exponentially as a function of the relative coordinates of photons, appear in multiphoton scattering processes. As a result, photon bunching and antibunching can be observed in the photon-photon correlation function, and nonclassical light source can be generated on demand. In the case of an N-type four-level system, we show that the effective photon-photon interaction mediated by the four-level system, gives rise to a variety of nonlinear optical phenomena, including

  19. Facile synthesis of single-crystalline microwires based on anthracene derivative and their efficient optical waveguides and linearly polarized emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hong-Dan; Wang, Juan-Ye; Liu, Zheng-Hui; Pan, Ge-Bo

    2016-05-01

    The well-defined single-crystalline microwires of a solid-emissive organic functional molecule, 2-(anthracen-9-yl)-4, 5-diphenyl-1H-imidozole (ADPI) were successfully prepared by a facile solution process without the use of surfactant or additional templates. In addition, the optical loss coefficient is as low as 0.1 dB μm-1 for the as-prepared ADPI microwires, which is lower than most previous reported organic optical waveguides. Meanwhile, these microwires also show optically uniaxial properties as demonstrated by the linearly polarized emission, providing potentially orientation-sensitive applications as optical waveguides with low optical loss.

  20. Toward large-area roll-to-roll printed nanophotonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karioja, Pentti; Hiltunen, Jussi; Aikio, Sanna M.; Alajoki, Teemu; Tuominen, Jarkko; Hiltunen, Marianne; Siitonen, Samuli; Kontturi, Ville; Böhlen, Karl; Hauser, Rene; Charlton, Martin; Boersma, Arjen; Lieberzeit, Peter; Felder, Thorsten; Eustace, David; Haskal, Eliav

    2014-05-01

    Polymers have become an important material group in fabricating discrete photonic components and integrated optical devices. This is due to their good properties: high optical transmittance, versatile processability at relative low temperatures and potential for low-cost production. Recently, nanoimprinting or nanoimprint lithography (NIL) has obtained a plenty of research interest. In NIL, a mould is pressed against a substrate coated with a moldable material. After deformation of the material, the mold is separated and a replica of the mold is formed. Compared with conventional lithographic methods, imprinting is simple to carry out, requires less-complicated equipment and can provide high-resolution with high throughput. Nanoimprint lithography has shown potential to become a method for low-cost and high-throughput fabrication of nanostructures. We show the development process of nano-structured, large-area multi-parameter sensors using Photonic Crystal (PC) and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) methodologies for environmental and pharmaceutical applications. We address these challenges by developing roll-to-roll (R2R) UV-nanoimprint fabrication methods. Our development steps are the following: Firstly, the proof of concept structures are fabricated by the use of wafer-level processes in Si-based materials. Secondly, the master molds of successful designs are fabricated, and they are used to transfer the nanophotonic structures into polymer materials using sheet-level UV-nanoimprinting. Thirdly, the sheet-level nanoimprinting processes are transferred to roll-to-roll fabrication. In order to enhance roll-to-roll manufacturing capabilities, silicone-based polymer material development was carried out. In the different development phases, Photonic Crystal and SERS sensor structures with increasing complexities were fabricated using polymer materials in order to enhance sheet-level and roll-to-roll manufacturing processes. In addition, chemical and molecular

  1. Waveguide based compact silicon Schottky photodetector with enhanced responsivity in the telecom spectral band.

    PubMed

    Goykhman, Ilya; Desiatov, Boris; Khurgin, Jacob; Shappir, Joseph; Levy, Uriel

    2012-12-17

    We experimentally demonstrate an on-chip compact and simple to fabricate silicon Schottky photodetector for telecom wavelengths operating on the basis of internal photoemission process. The device is realized using CMOS compatible approach of local-oxidation of silicon, which enables the realization of the photodetector and low-loss bus photonic waveguide at the same fabrication step. The photodetector demonstrates enhanced internal responsivity of 12.5mA/W for operation wavelength of 1.55µm corresponding to an internal quantum efficiency of 1%, about two orders of magnitude higher than our previously demonstrated results [22]. We attribute this improved detection efficiency to the presence of surface roughness at the boundary between the materials forming the Schottky contact. The combination of enhanced quantum efficiency together with a simple fabrication process provides a promising platform for the realization of all silicon photodetectors and their integration with other nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic structures towards the construction of monolithic silicon opto-electronic circuitry on-chip.

  2. Compositional arrangement of rod/shell nanoparticles: an approach to provide efficient plasmon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadivand, A.; Golmohammadi, S.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we investigated the optical properties of a novel compositional configuration of gold nanorod and silver nanoshell which is embedded in a SiO2 substance. The proper geometrical sizes for compositional rod/shell arrangement have been obtained based on the position and peak of plasmon resonance at λ ˜1550 nm. Adjusting the plasmon resonance position at declared spectrum helps us to provide an arrangement which shows high efficiency and minimum losses. The influence of destructive components such as internal damping and scattering on the rod/shell combination is demonstrated by corresponding diagrams. Moreover, we proposed a nano-array based on examined configuration and the quality of light transmission along the array is studied. We figured out and depicted optical properties of the array such as transmission loss factors, group velocities, transmitted power, transmission quality, and two-dimensional snapshots of surface plasmons (SPs) coupling between nanoparticles arrangements under transverse and longitudinal modes excitations. Ultimately, it is shown that the suggested nanostructure based on studied nanoparticles configuration has a potential to utilize in designing nanophotonic devices such as splitters, couplers, and routers. Finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) as a major simulation model has been employed to study the features of the waveguide.

  3. Scalar Product in the Space of Waveguide Modes of an Open Planar Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevastianov, A. L.; Sevastianov, L. A.; Tiutiunnik, A. A.; Nikolaev, N. E.

    2016-02-01

    To implement the method of adiabatic waveguide modes for modeling the propagation of polarized monochromatic electromagnetic radiation in irregular integrated optics structures it is necessary to expand the desired solution in basic adiabatic waveguide modes. This expansion requires the use of the scalar product in the space of waveguide vector fields of integrated optics waveguide. This work solves the first stage of this problem - the construction of the scalar product in the space of vector solutions of the eigenmode problem (classical and generalized) waveguide modes of an open planar waveguide. In constructing the mentioned sesquilinear form, we used the Lorentz reciprocity principle of waveguide modes and tensor form of the Ostrogradsky-Gauss theorem.

  4. Novel Devices for Plasmonic and Nanophotonic Networks: Exploiting X-ray Wavelengths at Optical Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    fins define a Fabry-Perot nano-cavity that concentrates surface plasmon polaritons at visible frequencies with Q-factors as high as 200. A simple...Direct imaging of propagation and damping of near-resonance surface plasmon polaritons using cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, J. T. van Wijngaarden... polaritons in metal- insulator-metal waveguides Verhagen, Ewold; Dionne, Jennifer A.; Kuipers, L. (Kobus); H.A. Atwater and A. Polman, NANO LETTERS

  5. Waveguide tapering for beam-width control in a waveguide transducer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Eui; Jeon, Hyun Joong; Kim, Hoe Woong; Kim, Yoon Young

    2014-03-01

    In a waveguide transducer that transmits an ultrasonic wave through a waveguide unit to a test structure, it is most preferred to send a non-dispersive ultrasonic wave of a narrow beam width. However, there is an unresolved conflict between the generation of the non- or less-dispersive wave and the transmission of a narrow-beam wave into a test structure. Among others, the thickness of the waveguide unit in a waveguide transducer is the key variable determining these two conflicting criteria, but the use of a uniformly-thick waveguide of any thickness cannot fulfill the two conflicting criteria simultaneously. In this study, we propose a specially-engineered tapered waveguide unit for the simultaneous satisfaction. An excitation unit is installed at the end of the thin region of the tapered waveguide and generates only the lowest non-dispersive shear-horizontal wave. Then the generated wave propagates through the tapered region of the waveguide unit and reaches the thick region of the waveguide with insignificant mode conversion to higher modes. If the tapered waveguide is used, the surviving lowest mode in the thick region of the waveguide is shown to carry most of the transmitted power and is finally propagated into a test structure. Because the beam size of the propagated wave and the thickness of the contacting waveguide region are inversely related, the thick contacting region of the tapered waveguide ensures narrow beam width. Numerical and experimental investigations were performed to check the effectiveness of the proposed waveguide-tapering approach.

  6. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Rodt, Sven Reitzenstein, Stephan; Strittmatter, André

    2015-07-15

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  7. Analysis of alternative splicing events for cancer diagnosis using a multiplexing nanophotonic biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Huertas, César S.; Domínguez-Zotes, Santos; Lechuga, Laura M.

    2017-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a promising tool not only for prevention, screening and development of more efficient treatment strategies, but also for diminishing the side effects caused by current therapies. Deciphering gene regulation pathways provides a reliable prognostic analysis to elucidate the origin of grave diseases and facilitate the selection of the most adequate treatment for each individual. Alternative splicing of mRNA precursors is one of these gene regulation pathways and enables cells to generate different protein outputs from the same gene depending on their developmental or homeostatic status. Its deregulation is strongly linked to disease onset and progression constituting a relevant and innovative class of biomarker. Herein we report a highly selective and sensitive nanophotonic biosensor based on the direct monitoring of the aberrant alternative splicing of Fas gene. Unlike conventional methods, the nanobiosensor performs a real-time detection of the specific isoforms in the fM-pM range without any cDNA synthesis or PCR amplification requirements. The nanobiosensor has been proven isoform-specific with no crosshybridization, greatly minimizing detection biases. The demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity make our nanobiosensor ideal for examining significant tumor-associated expression shifts of alternatively spliced isoforms for the early and accurate theranostics of cancer. PMID:28120920

  8. Hybrid Group IV Nanophotonic Structures Incorporating Diamond Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingyuan Linda; Ishiwata, Hitoshi; Babinec, Thomas M.; Radulaski, Marina; Müller, Kai; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G.; Dory, Constantin; Dahl, Jeremy; Edgington, Robert; Soulière, Veronique; Ferro, Gabriel; Fokin, Andrey A.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a new approach for engineering group IV semiconductor-based quantum photonic structures containing negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV$^-$) color centers in diamond as quantum emitters. Hybrid SiC/diamond structures are realized by combining the growth of nanoand micro-diamonds on silicon carbide (3C or 4H polytype) substrates, with the subsequent use of these diamond crystals as a hard mask for pattern transfer. SiV$^-$ color centers are incorporated in diamond during its synthesis from molecular diamond seeds (diamondoids), with no need for ionimplantation or annealing. We show that the same growth technique can be used to grow a diamond layer controllably doped with SiV$^-$ on top of a high purity bulk diamond, in which we subsequently fabricate nanopillar arrays containing high quality SiV$^-$ centers. Scanning confocal photoluminescence measurements reveal optically active SiV$^-$ lines both at room temperature and low temperature (5 K) from all fabricated structures, and, in particular, very narrow linewidths and small inhomogeneous broadening of SiV$^-$ lines from all-diamond nano-pillar arrays, which is a critical requirement for quantum computation. At low temperatures (5 K) we observe in these structures the signature typical of SiV$^-$ centers in bulk diamond, consistent with a double lambda. These results indicate that high quality color centers can be incorporated into nanophotonic structures synthetically with properties equivalent to those in bulk diamond, thereby opening opportunities for applications in classical and quantum information processing.

  9. Nanophotonic force microscopy: Characterizing particle–surface interactions using near-field photonics

    DOE PAGES

    Schein, Perry; Kang, Pilgyu; O’Dell, Dakota; ...

    2015-01-27

    Direct measurements of particle–surface interactions are important for characterizing the stability and behavior of colloidal and nanoparticle suspensions. Current techniques are limited in their ability to measure pico-Newton scale interaction forces on submicrometer particles due to signal detection limits and thermal noise. In this paper, we present a new technique for making measurements in this regime, which we refer to as nanophotonic force microscopy. Using a photonic crystal resonator, we generate a strongly localized region of exponentially decaying, near-field light that allows us to confine small particles close to a surface. From the statistical distribution of the light intensity scatteredmore » by the particle we are able to map out the potential well of the trap and directly quantify the repulsive force between the nanoparticle and the surface. Finally, as shown in this Letter, our technique is not limited by thermal noise, and therefore, we are able to resolve interaction forces smaller than 1 pN on dielectric particles as small as 100 nm in diameter.« less

  10. Nanophotonic force microscopy: Characterizing particle–surface interactions using near-field photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Schein, Perry; Kang, Pilgyu; O’Dell, Dakota; Erickson, David

    2015-01-27

    Direct measurements of particle–surface interactions are important for characterizing the stability and behavior of colloidal and nanoparticle suspensions. Current techniques are limited in their ability to measure pico-Newton scale interaction forces on submicrometer particles due to signal detection limits and thermal noise. In this paper, we present a new technique for making measurements in this regime, which we refer to as nanophotonic force microscopy. Using a photonic crystal resonator, we generate a strongly localized region of exponentially decaying, near-field light that allows us to confine small particles close to a surface. From the statistical distribution of the light intensity scattered by the particle we are able to map out the potential well of the trap and directly quantify the repulsive force between the nanoparticle and the surface. Finally, as shown in this Letter, our technique is not limited by thermal noise, and therefore, we are able to resolve interaction forces smaller than 1 pN on dielectric particles as small as 100 nm in diameter.

  11. Efficient and low-noise single-photon-level frequency conversion interfaces using silicon nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Davanço, Marcelo; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-06-01

    Optical frequency conversion has applications ranging from tunable light sources to telecommunications-band interfaces for quantum information science. Here, we demonstrate efficient, low-noise frequency conversion on a nanophotonic chip through four-wave-mixing Bragg scattering in compact (footprint <0.5 × 10-4 cm2) Si3N4 microring resonators. We investigate three frequency conversion configurations: spectral translation over a few nanometres within the 980 nm band; upconversion from 1,550 nm to 980 nm and downconversion from 980 nm to 1,550 nm. With conversion efficiencies ranging from 25% for the first process to >60% for the last two processes, a signal conversion bandwidth of >1 GHz, a required continuous-wave pump power of <60 mW and background noise levels between a few femtowatts and a few picowatts, these devices are suitable for quantum frequency conversion of single-photon states from InAs/GaAs quantum dots. Simulations based on coupled mode equations and the Lugiato-Lefever equation are used to model device performance, and show quantitative agreement with measurements.

  12. Nano-photonic light trapping near the Lambertian limit in organic solar cell architectures.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Rana; Timmons, Erik

    2013-09-09

    A critical step to achieving higher efficiency solar cells is the broad band harvesting of solar photons. Although considerable progress has recently been achieved in improving the power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells, these cells still do not absorb upto ~50% of the solar spectrum. We have designed and developed an organic solar cell architecture that can boost the absorption of photons by 40% and the photo-current by 50% for organic P3HT-PCBM absorber layers of typical device thicknesses. Our solar cell architecture is based on all layers of the solar cell being patterned in a conformal two-dimensionally periodic photonic crystal architecture. This results in very strong diffraction of photons- that increases the photon path length in the absorber layer, and plasmonic light concentration near the patterned organic-metal cathode interface. The absorption approaches the Lambertian limit. The simulations utilize a rigorous scattering matrix approach and provide bounds of the fundamental limits of nano-photonic light absorption in periodically textured organic solar cells. This solar cell architecture has the potential to increase the power conversion efficiency to 10% for single band gap organic solar cells utilizing long-wavelength absorbers.

  13. Self-induced back-action optical trapping in nanophotonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumeier, Lukas; Quidant, Romain; Chang, Darrick E.

    2015-12-01

    Optical trapping is an indispensable tool in physics and the life sciences. However, there is a clear trade off between the size of a particle to be trapped, its spatial confinement, and the intensities required. This is due to the decrease in optical response of smaller particles and the diffraction limit that governs the spatial variation of optical fields. It is thus highly desirable to find techniques that surpass these bounds. Recently, a number of experiments using nanophotonic cavities have observed a qualitatively different trapping mechanism described as ‘self-induced back-action trapping’ (SIBA). In these systems, the particle motion couples to the resonance frequency of the cavity, which results in a strong interplay between the intra-cavity field intensity and the forces exerted. Here, we provide a theoretical description that for the first time captures the remarkable range of consequences. In particular, we show that SIBA can be exploited to yield dynamic reshaping of trap potentials, strongly sub-wavelength trap features, and significant reduction of intensities seen by the particle, which should have important implications for future trapping technologies.

  14. Photonics and Nanophotonics and Information and Communication Technologies in Modern Food Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarapulova, Olha; Sherstiuk, Valentyn; Shvalagin, Vitaliy; Kukhta, Aleksander

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of the problem of conjunction of information and communication technologies (ICT) with packaging industry and food production was made. The perspective of combining the latest advances of nanotechnology, including nanophotonics, and ICT for creating modern smart packaging was shown. There were investigated luminescent films with zinc oxide nanoparticles, which change luminescence intensity as nano-ZnO interacts with decay compounds of food products, for active and intelligent packaging. High luminescent transparent films were obtained from colloidal suspension of ZnO and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The influence of molecular mass, concentration of nano-ZnO, and film thickness on luminescent properties of films was studied in order to optimize the content of the compositions. The possibility of covering the obtained films with polyvinyl alcohol was considered for eliminating water soluble properties of PVP. The luminescent properties of films with different covers were studied. The insoluble in water composition based on ZnO stabilized with colloidal silicon dioxide and PVP in polymethylmethacrylate was developed, and the luminescent properties of films were investigated. The compositions are non-toxic, safe, and suitable for applying to the inner surface of active and intelligent packaging by printing techniques, such as screen printing, flexography, inkjet, and pad printing.

  15. Photonics and nanophotonics and information and communication technologies in modern food packaging.

    PubMed

    Sarapulova, Olha; Sherstiuk, Valentyn; Shvalagin, Vitaliy; Kukhta, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the problem of conjunction of information and communication technologies (ICT) with packaging industry and food production was made. The perspective of combining the latest advances of nanotechnology, including nanophotonics, and ICT for creating modern smart packaging was shown. There were investigated luminescent films with zinc oxide nanoparticles, which change luminescence intensity as nano-ZnO interacts with decay compounds of food products, for active and intelligent packaging. High luminescent transparent films were obtained from colloidal suspension of ZnO and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The influence of molecular mass, concentration of nano-ZnO, and film thickness on luminescent properties of films was studied in order to optimize the content of the compositions. The possibility of covering the obtained films with polyvinyl alcohol was considered for eliminating water soluble properties of PVP. The luminescent properties of films with different covers were studied. The insoluble in water composition based on ZnO stabilized with colloidal silicon dioxide and PVP in polymethylmethacrylate was developed, and the luminescent properties of films were investigated. The compositions are non-toxic, safe, and suitable for applying to the inner surface of active and intelligent packaging by printing techniques, such as screen printing, flexography, inkjet, and pad printing.

  16. Nanophotonic approaches for nanoscale imaging and single-molecule detection at ultrahigh concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mivelle, Mathieu; Van Zanten, Thomas S; Manzo, Carlo; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2014-07-01

    Over the last decade, we have witnessed an outburst of many different optical techniques aimed at breaking the diffraction limit of light, providing super-resolution imaging on intact fixed cells. In parallel, single-molecule detection by means of fluorescence has become a common tool to investigate biological interactions at the molecular level both in vitro and in living cells. Despite these advances, visualization of dynamic events at relevant physiological concentrations at the nanometer scale remains challenging. In this review, we focus on recent advancements in the field of nanophotonics toward nanoimaging and single-molecule detection at ultrahigh sample concentrations. These approaches rely on the use of metal nanostructures known as optical antennas to localize and manipulate optical fields at the nanometer scale. We highlight examples on how different optical antenna geometries are being implemented for nanoscale imaging of cell membrane components. We also discuss different implementations of self-standing and two-dimensional antenna arrays for studying nanoscale dynamics in living cell membranes as well as detection of individual biomolecular interactions in the µM range for sensing applications.

  17. Nanophotonic detection of freely interacting molecules on a single influenza virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Pilgyu; Schein, Perry; Serey, Xavier; O'Dell, Dakota; Erickson, David

    2015-07-01

    Biomolecular interactions, such as antibody-antigen binding, are fundamental to many biological processes. At present, most techniques for analyzing these interactions require immobilizing one or both of the interacting molecules on an assay plate or a sensor surface. This is convenient experimentally but can constrain the natural binding affinity and capacity of the molecules, resulting in data that can deviate from the natural free-solution behavior. Here we demonstrate a label-free method for analyzing free-solution interactions between a single influenza virus and specific antibodies at the single particle level using near-field optical trapping and light-scattering techniques. We determine the number of specific antibodies binding to an optically trapped influenza virus by analyzing the change of the Brownian fluctuations of the virus. We develop an analytical model that determines the increased size of the virus resulting from antibodies binding to the virus membrane with uncertainty of ±1-2 nm. We present stoichiometric results of 26 ± 4 (6.8 ± 1.1 attogram) anti-influenza antibodies binding to an H1N1 influenza virus. Our technique can be applied to a wide range of molecular interactions because the nanophotonic tweezer can handle molecules from tens to thousands of nanometers in diameter.

  18. Biocompatibility and cytotoxicity study of nanophotonic rigid gas permeable contact lens material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomić, M.; Munćan, J.; Stamenković, D.; Jokanović, M.; Matija, L.

    2013-04-01

    Since materials on nanoscale have different characteristics from materials on macro scale their biocompatibility should be precisely and specifically investigated. Fullerenes, the third carbon allotrope, are one of the most used nanomaterials. The least stable and the most common is fullerene C60. One of the main disadvantages of fullerene is its low solubility in water. In order to make it soluble, it must be functionalized with polar groups such as -OH and -COOH. From all the water soluble fullerenes the most important ones are those with -OH groups attached named fullerols. We have developed new materials for contact lenses by adding fullerene (C60) and fullerol (C60(OH)24) into PMMA. The aim of our investigation was to compare the influences of those materials on aqueous solutions similar to tear film. For the analysis of the solutions we used opto-magnetic imaging and IR spectroscopy. The acquired spectrums were commented and compared with the standard contact lens material, which was analyzed by the same methods. The ISO 10993 cytotoxicity test on extract of nanophotonic material with incorporated C60 was done as well. This research contributes to better understanding of the biocompatibility of new rigid gas permeable contact lens materials.

  19. Impact of Atomic Layer Deposition to NanoPhotonic Structures and Devices: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Muhammad Rizwan; Ali, Rizwan; Khan, Mohammad Bilal; Turunen, Jari; Honkanen, Seppo

    2014-10-01

    We review the significance of optical thin films by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) method to fabricate nanophotonic devices and structures. ALD is a versatile technique to deposit functional coatings on reactive surfaces with conformal growth of compound materials, precise thickness control capable of angstrom resolution and coverage of high aspect ratio nanostructures using wide range of materials. ALD has explored great potential in the emerging fields of photonics, plasmonics, nano-biotechnology, and microelectronics. ALD technique uses sequential reactive chemical reactions to saturate a surface with a monolayer by pulsing of a first precursor (metal alkoxides or covalent halides), followed by reaction with second precursor molecules such as water to form the desired compound coatings. The targeted thickness of the desired compound material is controlled by the number of ALD cycles of precursor molecules that ensures the self limiting nature of reactions. The conformal growth and filling of TiO2 and Al2O3 optical material on nanostructures and their resulting optical properties have been described. The low temperature ALD-growth on various replicated sub-wavelength polymeric gratings is discussed.

  20. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Rodt, Sven; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  1. Cooling Waveguide Flanges in Microwave Transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. C.; Hartop, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Flang appendage circulates coolant for conductive heat removal. Flange appendage bore accomodates coolant tube. O-ring surrounds bore; when adjacent waveguide sections are bolted together, continuous conduit is formed for coolant. Pressure release groove in modified flange prevents coolant from entering waveguide should O'ring seal fail.

  2. Planar fluoride waveguides for amplifiers and lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Grishutkina, T E; Doroshenko, M E; Karasik, A Ya; Konyushkin, V A; Konyushkin, D V; Nakladov, A N; Osiko, V V; Tsvetkov, V B

    2015-08-31

    We have produced planar optical waveguides having a crystalline CaF{sub 2} – YF{sub 3} – NdF{sub 3} mixed yttrofluorite core and two reflective claddings in order to improve waveguide excitation efficiency. Under diode pumping, lasing has been achieved at a wavelength of 1064 nm with a slope efficiency near 15%. (lasers)

  3. High temperature pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Caines, Michael J.

    1983-01-01

    A pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide is provided to which one end may be attached a transducer and at the other end a high temperature material for continuous ultrasonic testing of the material. The ultrasonic signal is coupled from the waveguide into the material through a thin, dry copper foil.

  4. Capillary waveguide optrodes for Medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieslinger, Dietmar; Weigl, Bernhard H.; Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1997-01-01

    Glass capillaries with a chemically sensitive coating on the inner surface are used as optical sensors for medical diagnostics. The capillary simultaneously serves as a sample compartment, a sensor element, and an inhomogeneous optical waveguide. Different optical setups have been investigated and compared regarding its waveguiding properties.

  5. Dielectric matrices with air cavities as a waveguide photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanov, D. A.; Skripal', A. V.; Merdanov, M. K.; Gorlitskii, V. O.

    2016-02-01

    Frequency dependences of the transmission coefficient of a microwave photonic crystal that represents a structure containing alternating layers of ceramic material (Al2O3) with a relatively large number of cavities and foam plastic are studied in the presence and absence of distortions of the periodicity of a photonic structure. The frequency dependences of the transmission coefficient can be analyzed using a model of effective medium that makes it possible to consider the interaction of electromagnetic wave and photonic crystal using a transfer matrix of a 1D photonic crystal. The band character of the frequency dependence of the transmission coefficient of the photonic crystal related to the periodicity of the photonic crystal in the transverse plane for the waveguide with a standard cross section is not manifested in a certain range of material permittivities.

  6. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  7. On-chip plasmonic waveguide optical waveplate

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Linfei; Huo, Yijie; Zang, Kai; Paik, Seonghyun; Chen, Yusi; Harris, James S.; Zhou, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Polarization manipulation is essential in almost every photonic system ranging from telecommunications to bio-sensing to quantum information. This is traditionally achieved using bulk waveplates. With the developing trend of photonic systems towards integration and miniaturization, the need for an on-chip waveguide type waveplate becomes extremely urgent. However, this is very challenging using conventional dielectric waveguides, which usually require complex 3D geometries to alter the waveguide symmetry and are also difficult to create an arbitrary optical axis. Recently, a waveguide waveplate was realized using femtosecond laser writing, but the device length is in millimeter range. Here, for the first time we propose and experimentally demonstrate an ultracompact, on-chip waveplate using an asymmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguide to create an arbitrary optical axis. The device is only in several microns length and produced in a flexible integratable IC compatible format, thus opening up the potential for integration into a broad range of systems. PMID:26507563

  8. Light propagation in periodically modulated complex waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Sean; Yang, Jianke

    2015-03-01

    Light propagation in optical waveguides with periodically modulated index of refraction and alternating gain and loss are investigated for linear and nonlinear systems. Based on a multiscale perturbation analysis, it is shown that for many non-parity-time- (PT -) symmetric waveguides, their linear spectrum is partially complex; thus light exponentially grows or decays upon propagation, and this growth or decay is not altered by nonlinearity. However, several classes of non-PT -symmetric waveguides are also identified to possess all-real linear spectrum. For PT -symmetric waveguides, phase transition is predicted analytically. In the nonlinear regime longitudinally periodic and transversely quasilocalized modes are found for PT -symmetric waveguides both above and below phase transition. These nonlinear modes are stable under evolution and can develop from initially weak initial conditions.

  9. High-bandwidth and low-loss multimode polymer waveguides and waveguide components for high-speed board-level optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamiedakis, N.; Chen, J.; Penty, R. V.; White, I. H.

    2016-03-01

    Multimode polymer waveguides are being increasingly considered for use in short-reach board-level optical interconnects as they exhibit favourable optical properties and allow direct integration onto standard PCBs with conventional methods of the electronics industry. Siloxane-based multimode waveguides have been demonstrated with excellent optical transmission performance, while a wide range of passive waveguide components that offer routing flexibility and enable the implementation of complex on-board interconnection architectures has been reported. In recent work, we have demonstrated that these polymer waveguides can exhibit very high bandwidth-length products in excess of 30 GHz×m despite their highly-multimoded nature, while it has been shown that even larger values of > 60 GHz×m can be achieved by adjusting their refractive index profile. Furthermore, the combination of refractive index engineering and launch conditioning schemes can ensure high bandwidth (> 100 GHz×m) and high coupling efficiency (<1 dB) with standard multimode fibre inputs with relatively large alignment tolerances (~17×15 μm2). In the work presented here, we investigate the effects of refractive index engineering on the performance of passive waveguide components (crossings, bends) and provide suitable design rules for their on-board use. It is shown that, depending on the interconnection layout and link requirements, appropriate choice of refractive index profile can provide enhanced component performance, ensuring low loss interconnection and adequate link bandwidth. The results highlight the strong potential of this versatile optical technology for the formation of high-performance board-level optical interconnects with high routing flexibility.

  10. Hybrid grapheme plasmonic waveguide modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansell, D.; Thackray, B. D.; Aznakayeva, D. E.; Thomas, P.; Auton, G. H.; Marshall, O. P.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Radko, I. P.; Han, Z.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Grigorenko, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    The unique optical and electronic properties of graphene allow one to realize active optical devices. While several types of graphene-based photonic modulators have already been demonstrated, the potential of combining the versatility of graphene with sub-wavelength field confinement of plasmonic/metallic structures is not fully realized. Here we report fabrication and study of hybrid graphene-plasmonic modulators. We consider several types of modulators and identify the most promising one for light modulation at telecom and near-infrared. Our proof-of-concept results pave the way towards on-chip realization of efficient graphene-based active plasmonic waveguide devices for optical communications.

  11. High-index proton-exchanged MgO:LiNbO3 optical waveguides using adipic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pun, E. Y. B.; Loi, K. K.; Mak, C. F.; Chung, P. S.

    1993-03-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of proton-exchanged optical waveguides in z-cut MgO:LiNbO3 using adipic acid as a new proton source. These waveguides exhibit propagation losses of less than 1 dB/cm, a linear-step index profile, and a surface index increase of 0.149 measured at 0.633 μm wavelength. This is the largest surface index change reported for proton-exchanged MgO:LiNbO3 waveguides. The diffusion parameters were characterized optically, and the diffusion constant D0 and the activation energy Q were found to be 5.40×1010 μm2/h and 103.27 kJ/mol, respectively. The diffusion rate is slower than that of the popular phosphoric acid.

  12. Fabrication of SiO2-GeO2 Glass Optical Waveguides by the Gas-Phase Doping Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Osamu; Hirata, Masukazu; Arii, Mitsuzo

    1990-12-01

    A new method of fabricating silica glass optical waveguides has been developed. Porous silica glasses made by the sol-gel method were used as substrates, into which a dopant was introduced by utilizing the adsorption equilibrium between porous glass and vapor of the relevant dopant material. Index distributions within the glass were produced by placing the doped glass under reduced pressure to outgas the dopant from the surface of the glass, followed by transforming the dopant into oxide by hydrolysis, and then the porous glass was densified to give nonporous glass. Combining this method with the selective photopolymerization method, where the undesired portion of pores was clogged by polymer, 3D waveguides have been fabricated. The SiO2-GeO2 waveguides thus fabricated have index differences of more than 0.02 with the propagation loss of less than 1 dB/cm.

  13. One-dimensional photonic crystal slot waveguide for silicon-organic hybrid electro-optic modulators.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hai; Xu, Xiaochuan; Chung, Chi-Jui; Subbaraman, Harish; Pan, Zeyu; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Chen, Ray T

    2016-12-01

    In an on-chip silicon-organic hybrid electro-optic (EO) modulator, the mode overlap with EO materials, in-device effective r33, and propagation loss are among the most critical factors that determine the performance of the modulator. Various waveguide structures have been proposed to optimize these factors, yet there is a lack of comprehensive consideration on all of them. In this Letter, a one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal (PC) slot waveguide structure is proposed that takes all these factors into consideration. The proposed structure takes advantage of the strong mode confinement within a low-index region in a conventional slot waveguide and the slow-light enhancement from the 1D PC structure. Its simple geometry makes it robust to resist fabrication imperfections and helps reduce the propagation loss. Using it as a phase shifter in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer structure, an integrated silicon-organic hybrid EO modulator was experimentally demonstrated. The observed effective EO coefficient is as high as 490 pm/V. The measured half-wave voltage and length product is less than 1  V·cm and can be further improved. A potential bandwidth of 61 GHz can be achieved and further improved by tailoring the doping profile. The proposed structure offers a competitive novel phase-shifter design, which is simple, highly efficient, and with low optical loss, for on-chip silicon-organic hybrid EO modulators.

  14. Ultralow loss cavities and waveguides scattering loss cancellation

    DOEpatents

    Rakich, Peter T

    2014-01-07

    A waveguide system includes a first waveguide having surface roughness along at least one surface and a second waveguide substantially identical to the first waveguide and having substantially identical surface roughness along a corresponding side. The first and second waveguides are separated from each other by a predermined distance and are configured to receive respective first and second light signals having antisymmetric modes. The predetermined distance between the first and second waveguide tends to cause cancellation of at least far-field polarization radiation emanating from the first and second waveguides and resulting from surface roughness.

  15. Interaction of environmental contaminants with zebrafish organic anion transporting polypeptide, Oatp1d1 (Slco1d1)

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko; Fent, Karl; Smital, Tvrtko

    2014-10-01

    Polyspecific transporters from the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP/Oatp) superfamily mediate the uptake of a wide range of compounds. In zebrafish, Oatp1d1 transports conjugated steroid hormones and cortisol. It is predominantly expressed in the liver, brain and testes. In this study we have characterized the transport of xenobiotics by the zebrafish Oatp1d1 transporter. We developed a novel assay for assessing Oatp1d1 interactors using the fluorescent probe Lucifer yellow and transient transfection in HEK293 cells. Our data showed that numerous environmental contaminants interact with zebrafish Oatp1d1. Oatp1d1 mediated the transport of diclofenac with very high affinity, followed by high affinity towards perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), nonylphenol, gemfibrozil and 17α-ethinylestradiol; moderate affinity towards carbaryl, diazinon and caffeine; and low affinity towards metolachlor. Importantly, many environmental chemicals acted as strong inhibitors of Oatp1d1. A strong inhibition of Oatp1d1 transport activity was found by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), chlorpyrifos-methyl, estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2), followed by moderate to low inhibition by diethyl phthalate, bisphenol A, 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4 tetrahydronapthalene and clofibrate. In this study we identified Oatp1d1 as a first Solute Carrier (SLC) transporter involved in the transport of a wide range of xenobiotics in fish. Considering that Oatps in zebrafish have not been characterized before, our work on zebrafish Oatp1d1 offers important new insights on the understanding of uptake processes of environmental contaminants, and contributes to the better characterization of zebrafish as a model species. - Highlights: • We optimized a novel assay for determination of Oatp1d1 interactors • Oatp1d1 is the first SLC characterized fish xenobiotic transporter • PFOS, nonylphenol, diclofenac, EE2, caffeine are high affinity Oatp1d1substrates • PFOA, chlorpyrifos

  16. D1/D5 dopamine receptors modulate spatial memory formation.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Weber C N; Köhler, Cristiano C; Radiske, Andressa; Cammarota, Martín

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effect of the intra-CA1 administration of the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH23390 and the D1/D5 receptor agonist SKF38393 on spatial memory in the water maze. When given immediately, but not 3h after training, SCH23390 hindered long-term spatial memory formation without affecting non-spatial memory or the normal functionality of the hippocampus. On the contrary, post-training infusion of SKF38393 enhanced retention and facilitated the spontaneous recovery of the original spatial preference after reversal learning. Our findings demonstrate that hippocampal D1/D5 receptors play an essential role in spatial memory processing.

  17. Waveguide-Based Biosensors for Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mukundan, Harshini; Anderson, Aaron S.; Grace, W. Kevin; Grace, Karen M.; Hartman, Nile; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Swanson, Basil I.

    2009-01-01

    Optical phenomena such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, polarization, interference and non-linearity have been extensively used for biosensing applications. Optical waveguides (both planar and fiber-optic) are comprised of a material with high permittivity/high refractive index surrounded on all sides by materials with lower refractive indices, such as a substrate and the media to be sensed. This arrangement allows coupled light to propagate through the high refractive index waveguide by total internal reflection and generates an electromagnetic wave—the evanescent field—whose amplitude decreases exponentially as the distance from the surface increases. Excitation of fluorophores within the evanescent wave allows for sensitive detection while minimizing background fluorescence from complex, “dirty” biological samples. In this review, we will describe the basic principles, advantages and disadvantages of planar optical waveguide-based biodetection technologies. This discussion will include already commercialized technologies (e.g., Corning’s EPIC® Ô, SRU Biosystems’ BIND™, Zeptosense®, etc.) and new technologies that are under research and development. We will also review differing assay approaches for the detection of various biomolecules, as well as the thin-film coatings that are often required for waveguide functionalization and effective detection. Finally, we will discuss reverse-symmetry waveguides, resonant waveguide grating sensors and metal-clad leaky waveguides as alternative signal transducers in optical biosensing. PMID:22346727

  18. Plasmonic antennas hybridized with dielectric waveguides.

    PubMed

    Bernal Arango, Felipe; Kwadrin, Andrej; Koenderink, A Femius

    2012-11-27

    For the purpose of using plasmonics in an integrated scheme where single emitters can be probed efficiently, we experimentally and theoretically study the scattering properties of single nanorod gold antennas as well as antenna arrays placed on one-dimensional dielectric silicon nitride waveguides. Using real space and Fourier microscopy correlated with waveguide transmission measurements, we quantify the spectral properties, absolute strength, and directivity of scattering. The scattering processes can be well understood in the framework of the physics of dipolar objects placed on a planar layered environment with a waveguiding layer. We use the single plasmonic structures on top of the waveguide as dipolar building blocks for new types of antennas where the waveguide enhances the coupling between antenna elements. We report on waveguide hybridized Yagi-Uda antennas which show directionality in out-coupling of guided modes as well as directionality for in-coupling into the waveguide of localized excitations positioned at the feed element. These measurements together with simulations demonstrate that this system is ideal as a platform for plasmon quantum optics schemes as well as for fluorescence lab-on-chip applications.

  19. Optofluidic waveguides: I. Concepts and implementations

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Holger; Hawkins, Aaron R.

    2011-01-01

    We review recent developments and current status of liquid-core optical waveguides in optofluidics with emphasis on suitability for creating fully planar optofluidic labs-on-a-chip. In this first of two contributions, we give an overview of the different waveguide types that are being considered for effectively combining micro and nanofluidics with integrated optics. The large number of approaches is separated into conventional index-guided waveguides and more recent implementations using wave interference. The underlying principle for waveguiding and the current status are described for each type. We then focus on reviewing recent work on microfabricated liquid-core antiresonant reflecting optical (ARROW) waveguides, including the development of intersecting 2D waveguide networks and optical fluorescence and Raman detection with planar beam geometry. Single molecule detection capability and addition of electrical control for electrokinetic manipulation and analysis of single bioparticles are demonstrated. The demonstrated performance of liquid-core ARROWs is representative of the potential of integrated waveguides for on-chip detection with ultrahigh sensitivity, and points the way towards the next generation of high-performance, low-cost and portable biomedical instruments. PMID:21442048

  20. Resonant dielectric nanostructures: a low-loss platform for functional nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Manuel; Staude, Isabelle

    2016-10-01

    This review overviews the state of the art of research into high-index dielectric nanoresonators and their use in functional photonic nanostructures at optical frequencies. We start by providing the motivations for this research area and by putting it into context with the more well-established subfields of nanophotonics, in particular nanoplasmonics. Following the introduction, fundamental concepts regarding the optical properties of subwavelength dielectric nanoresonators are established. To this end, we provide a brief summary of the Mie theory, before focussing on optically induced magnetic response in Mie-resonant dielectric nanoparticles. We discuss the influence of the nanoparticle’s shape on its optical response, and provide an overview of directional effects that can occur when light is scattered by a Mie-resonant nanoparticle. We then dedicate a few words to technology-related aspects, including an overview of fabrication methods for Mie-resonant dielectric nanoparticles. Next, recent progress on all-dielectric nanoantennas is presented, focussing on strategies to locally enhance optical near-fields and to achieve directional emission patterns. We then turn to all-dielectric metasurfaces and their potential applications. We touch on dielectric metamaterial reflectors and Fano-resonant dielectric metasurfaces, before discussing graded Mie-resonant dielectric metasurfaces for wavefront control applications in more detail. Following this, an overview of the recent progress in active, tunable and nonlinear dielectric nanostructures is provided. Finally, prospects and challenges are discussed, particularly the realization of highly efficient Mie-resonant nanostructures at visible frequencies, the integration of Mie-resonant nanostructures with active and functional materials, and the construction of three-dimensional high-index dielectric nanostructures.

  1. An innovative nanophotonic information processing concept implementing cogent micro/nanosensors for space robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoli, Salvatore

    2013-02-01

    Cogent sensors, defined as sensors that are capable of performing the transformation of raw data into information, are shown to be of the essence for realization of the long sought-after autonomous robots for space applications. A strongly miniaturized integration of sensing and information processing systems is needed for cogent sensors designed for autonomous sensing—information processing (IP)—actuating behavior. It is shown that the recently developed field of quantum holography (QH), stemming from geometric quantization of any holographic processes through the Heisenberg Group (G) and deeply different, as stressed in detail, from other meanings of "quantum holography" in the literature, supplies the nanophotonic tools for designing and assembling an associative memory (AM) as the brain implementing such strong cogency. An AM is designed through a free-space interconnected large planar multilayer architecture of quantum well-based two-port neurons implementing a shift register on the manifold of G, and whose input consists of photonic holograms from high frequency pulsed microlasers in the infrared band of em or em-transduced outside signals. The optoelectronics as relative, integrated into a hybrid chip involving photonic detectors, microlasers and electronic components for the clock control system, would allow cycle times as short as 30 ns with the large spatial bandwidth available in photonics. IP through QH concerns the encoding and decoding of holographic interference patterns, not of mere binary digital logical (syntactic) information. Accordingly, QH defines on the G's manifold an IP paradigm where information as experimental knowledge is processed; i.e., IP concerns both syntax and semantics. It is shown that such QH-neural brain would cogently deal with spurious signals as random noise that would be caused to die out on the way to the intended target through parallel massive and real-time IP.

  2. Nanophotonics and nanochemistry: controlling the excitation dynamics for frequency up- and down-conversion in lanthanide-doped nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanying; Yang, Chunhui; Prasad, Paras N

    2013-07-16

    Nanophotonics is an emerging science dealing with the interaction of light and matter on a nanometer scale and holds promise to produce new generation nanophosphors with highly efficient frequency conversion of infrared (IR) light. Scientists can control the excitation dynamics by using nanochemistry to produce hierarchically built nanostructures and tailor their interfaces. These nanophosphors can either perform frequency up-conversion from IR to visible or ultraviolet (UV) or down-conversion, which results in the IR light being further red shifted. Nanophotonics and nanochemistry open up numerous opportunities for these photon converters, including in high contrast bioimaging, photodynamic therapy, drug release and gene delivery, nanothermometry, and solar cells. Applications of these nanophosphors in these directions derive from three main stimuli. Light excitation and emission within the near-infrared (NIR) "optical transparency window" of tissues is ideal for high contrast in vitro and in vivo imaging. This is due to low natural florescence, reduced scattering background, and deep penetration in tissues. Secondly, the naked eye is highly sensitive in the visible range, but it has no response to IR light. Therefore, many scientists have interest in the frequency up-conversion of IR wavelengths for security and display applications. Lastly, frequency up-conversion can convert IR photons to higher energy photons, which can then readily be absorbed by solar materials. Current solar devices do not use abundant IR light that comprises almost half of solar energy. In this Account, we present our recent work on nanophotonic control of frequency up- and down-conversion in fluoride nanophosphors, and their biophotonic and nanophotonic applications. Through nanoscopic control of phonon dynamics, electronic energy transfer, local crystal field, and surface-induced non-radiative processes, we were able to produce new generation nanophosphors with highly efficient frequency

  3. Optical waveguide materials, structures, and dispersion modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jiaming; Lin, Jian; Li, Wenxiu; Xue, Xia; Huang, Anping; Xiao, Zhisong

    2016-11-01

    Optical waveguide is used in most integrated optic devices to confine and guide light in higher refractive index channels. The structures and materials of slot waveguides are reviewed in this paper. Coupled resonator optical waveguides (CROWs) can be used for a rotation sensor with compact size, low power consumption and low cost. The loss determines the ultimate sensitivity of CROW gyros. Resonator-based optical gyroscope's sensitivity for measuring rotation is enhanced via using the anomalous dispersion characteristic of superluminal light propagation, which can be also generated by using passive optical resonators.

  4. Waveguide optical isolator: a new design.

    PubMed

    Ando, K

    1991-03-20

    A new design of a thin film waveguide optical isolator is described. It is composed of a nonreciprocal mode converter by the Faraday effect, a reciprocal mode converter by the Cotton-Mouton effect, an integrated mirror, and TE-mode selectors. Its mode transfer matrices are derived. Numerical calculations show that wider tolerances of the film parameters and smaller dimensions are obtained compared with the ordinary tandem type waveguide isolators without the integrated mirror. This structure is free of the problem of the localized control of the directions of the magnetization, which has been required for the ordinary tandem type waveguide isolator.

  5. Waveguide grating mirror for laser resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabady, Rabi Ibrahim

    Improved beam quality for semiconductor lasers has been a challenging problem since laser invention. The approach proposed in this thesis for beam improvement is based on zero-order anomalies in the reflectance spectra of periodically corrugated waveguides, which is the waveguide analogy of the well-known Wood anomalies in diffraction spectra of metallic gratings. The proposed investigation include developing a high-quality and reliable technologies for optical waveguides, holographic-grating, and optical resonant filters. Applications of this research include high-power and high-brightness vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), large area lasers, and laser arrays for optical communications, lidars, and industrial material processing.

  6. Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Karen M.; Swanson, Basil I.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2007-03-13

    The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

  7. Optical planar waveguide for cell counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, John; Mueller, Andrew J.; Prinz, Adrian; Butte, Manish J.

    2012-01-01

    Low cost counting of cells has medical applications in screening, military medicine, disaster medicine, and rural healthcare. In this report, we present a shallow, buried, planar waveguide fabricated by potassium ion exchange in glass that enables low-cost and rapid counting of metal-tagged objects that lie in the evanescent field of the waveguide. Laser light transmitted through the waveguide was attenuated proportionately to the presence of metal-coated microstructures fabricated from photoresist. This technology enables the low-cost enumeration of cells from blood, urine, or other biofluids.

  8. Guided modes of elliptical metamaterial waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Halterman, Klaus; Feng, Simin; Overfelt, P. L.

    2007-07-15

    The propagation of guided electromagnetic waves in open elliptical metamaterial waveguide structures is investigated. The waveguide contains a negative-index media core, where the permittivity {epsilon} and permeability {mu} are negative over a given bandwidth. The allowed mode spectrum for these structures is numerically calculated by solving a dispersion relation that is expressed in terms of Mathieu functions. By probing certain regions of parameter space, we find the possibility exists to have extremely localized waves that transmit along the surface of the waveguide.

  9. Nano-photonic organic solar cell architecture for advanced light management utilizing dual photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2015-09-01

    Organic solar cells have rapidly increasing efficiencies, but typically absorb less than half of the incident solar spectrum. To increase broadband light absorption, we rigorously design experimentally realizable solar cell architectures based on dual photonic crystals. Our optimized architecture consists of a polymer microlens at the air-glass interface, coupled with a photonic-plasmonic crystal at the metal cathode. The microlens focuses light on the periodic nanostructure that generates strong light diffraction. Waveguiding modes and surface plasmon modes together enhance long wavelength absorption in P3HT-PCBM. The architecture has a period of 500 nm, with absorption and photocurrent enhancement of 49% and 58%, respectively.

  10. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia in Glut1D on Ketogenic Diet.

    PubMed

    Klepper, Joerg; Leiendecker, Baerbel; Heussinger, Nicole; Lausch, Ekkehart; Bosch, Friedrich

    2016-04-01

    High-fat ketogenic diets are the only treatment available for Glut1 deficiency (Glut1D). Here, we describe an 8-year-old girl with classical Glut1D responsive to a 3:1 ketogenic diet and ethosuximide. After 3 years on the diet a gradual increase of blood lipids was followed by rapid, severe asymptomatic hypertriglyceridemia (1,910 mg/dL). Serum lipid apheresis was required to determine liver, renal, and pancreatic function. A combination of medium chain triglyceride-oil and a reduction of the ketogenic diet to 1:1 ratio normalized triglyceride levels within days but triggered severe myoclonic seizures requiring comedication with sultiam. Severe hypertriglyceridemia in children with Glut1D on ketogenic diets may be underdiagnosed and harmful. In contrast to congenital hypertriglyceridemias, children with Glut1D may be treated effectively by dietary adjustments alone.

  11. Second harmonic generation of diamond-blade diced KTiOPO4 ridge waveguides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Rüter, Christian E; Volk, Martin F; Chen, Cheng; Shang, Zhen; Lu, Qingming; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Zhou, Shengqiang; Chen, Feng; Kip, Detlef

    2016-07-25

    We report on the fabrication of ridge waveguides in KTiOPO4 nonlinear optical crystals through carbon ion irradiation followed by precise diamond blade dicing. The diced side-walls have low roughness, which allows for low propagation loss of ~1dB/cm in fabricated of ridges. The waveguide property investigation has been performed at 1064 nm as well as 532 nm, showing good guidance at both TE and TM polarizations. Based on type II phase matching configuration, efficient second harmonic generation of green light at room temperature has been realized. High conversion efficiencies of ~1.12%W-1 and ~12.4% have been obtained for frequency doubling under the pump of continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed fundamental waves at 1064 nm, respectively.

  12. TBC1D24 genotype–phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    Balestrini, Simona; Milh, Mathieu; Castiglioni, Claudia; Lüthy, Kevin; Finelli, Mattea J.; Verstreken, Patrik; Cardon, Aaron; Stražišar, Barbara Gnidovec; Holder, J. Lloyd; Lesca, Gaetan; Mancardi, Maria M.; Poulat, Anne L.; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Banka, Siddharth; Bilo, Leonilda; Birkeland, Laura E.; Bosch, Friedrich; Brockmann, Knut; Cross, J. Helen; Doummar, Diane; Félix, Temis M.; Giuliano, Fabienne; Hori, Mutsuki; Hüning, Irina; Kayserili, Hulia; Kini, Usha; Lees, Melissa M.; Meenakshi, Girish; Mewasingh, Leena; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Peluso, Silvio; Mey, Antje; Rice, Gregory M.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Taylor, Jenny C.; Troester, Matthew M.; Stanley, Christine M.; Ville, Dorothee; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Falace, Antonio; Fassio, Anna; Lemke, Johannes R.; Biskup, Saskia; Tardif, Jessica; Ajeawung, Norbert F.; Tolun, Aslihan; Corbett, Mark; Gecz, Jozef; Afawi, Zaid; Howell, Katherine B.; Oliver, Karen L.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; de Falco, Fabrizio A.; Oliver, Peter L.; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in TBC1D24. Methods: We acquired new clinical, EEG, and neuroimaging data of 11 previously unreported and 37 published patients. TBC1D24 mutations, identified through various sequencing methods, can be found online (http://lovd.nl/TBC1D24). Results: Forty-eight patients were included (28 men, 20 women, average age 21 years) from 30 independent families. Eighteen patients (38%) had myoclonic epilepsies. The other patients carried diagnoses of focal (25%), multifocal (2%), generalized (4%), and unclassified epilepsy (6%), and early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (25%). Most patients had drug-resistant epilepsy. We detail EEG, neuroimaging, developmental, and cognitive features, treatment responsiveness, and physical examination. In silico evaluation revealed 7 different highly conserved motifs, with the most common pathogenic mutation located in the first. Neuronal outgrowth assays showed that some TBC1D24 mutations, associated with the most severe TBC1D24-associated disorders, are not necessarily the most disruptive to this gene function. Conclusions: TBC1D24-related epilepsy syndromes show marked phenotypic pleiotropy, with multisystem involvement and severity spectrum ranging from isolated deafness (not studied here), benign myoclonic epilepsy restricted to childhood with complete seizure control and normal intellect, to early-onset epileptic encephalopathy with severe developmental delay and early death. There is no distinct correlation with mutation type or location yet, but patterns are emerging. Given the phenotypic breadth observed, TBC1D24 mutation screening is indicated in a wide variety of epilepsies. A TBC1D24 consortium was formed to develop further research on this gene and its associated phenotypes. PMID:27281533

  13. Analytical approximation for photonic array modes in 1D photonic crystal superlattices.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elena; Shteeman, Vladislav; Hardy, Amos A

    2016-04-01

    We present a comprehensive analytical approximation for array modes (both the modal fields and their associated propagation constants) for 1D photonic crystal superlattices (i.e., large periodic arrays of repeated sequences of different coupled waveguides/lasers). In this class, a regular periodicity of a photonic lattice is supplemented with the additional periodicity of a larger scale. Our approximation is a vectorial approach, accounting for the TE and TM polarizations. It can be applied to both the low- and high-contrast photonic devices. We used the model of standing waves for analytical evaluation of envelopes of array modes in a photonic superlattice. Combination of the model of standing waves with the coupled-mode formalism for infinite photonic superlattices allows evaluation of propagation constants of the array modes. Both the evaluations require only a fraction of a second for computation. Still, the results, acquired with the analytical approximation, are very close to those of well-established approaches. Furthermore, for the first time, analytical expressions for the modal fields and propagation constants become available.

  14. Development of high-resolution arrayed waveguide grating spectrometers for astronomical applications: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatkine, Pradip; Veilleux, Sylvain; Hu, Yiwen; Zhu, Tiecheng; Meng, Yang; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Dagenais, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Astrophotonics is the next-generation approach that provides the means to miniaturize near-infrared (NIR) spectrometers for upcoming large telescopes and make them more robust and inexpensive. The target requirements for our spectrograph are: a resolving power of 3000, wide spectral range (J and H bands), free spectral range of about 30 nm, high on-chip throughput of about 80% (-1dB) and low crosstalk (high contrast ratio) between adjacent on-chip wavelength channels of less than 1% (-20 dB). A promising photonic technology to achieve these requirements is Arrayed Waveguide Gratings (AWGs). We have developed our first generation of AWG devices using a silica-on-silicon substrate with a very thin layer of Si3N4 in the core of our waveguides. The waveguide bending losses are minimized by optimizing the geometry of the waveguides. Our first generation of AWG devices are designed for H band have a resolving power of 1500 and free spectral range of 10 nm around a central wavelength of 1600 nm. The devices have a footprint of only 12 mm × 6 mm. They are broadband (1450-1650 nm), have a peak on-chip throughput of about 80% ( -1 dB) and contrast ratio of about 1.5% (-18 dB). These results confirm the robustness of our design, fabrication and simulation methods. Currently, the devices are designed for Transverse Electric (TE) polarization and all the results are for TE mode. We are developing separate J- and H-band AWGs with higher resolving power, higher throughput and lower crosstalk over a wider free spectral range to make them better suited for astronomical applications.

  15. Color sorting by retinal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Labin, Amichai M; Ribak, Erez N

    2014-12-29

    Light is being detected by the two distinct types of photoreceptors in the human retina: cones and rods. Before light arrives at the photoreceptors, it must traverse the whole retina, along its array of higher-index Müller cells serving as natural waveguides. Here we analyze this optical process of light propagation through Müller cells by two independent optical methods: numerical beam propagation and analytical modal analysis. We show that the structure and refractive index profile of the Müller cells create a unique spatio-spectral distribution of light. This distribution corresponds to the positions and spectral sensitivities of both cones and rods to improve their light absorption.

  16. Slotted antenna waveguide plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A high density plasma generated by microwave injection using a windowless electrodeless rectangular slotted antenna waveguide plasma source has been demonstrated. Plasma probe measurements indicate that the source could be applicable for low power ion thruster applications, ion implantation, and related applications. This slotted antenna plasma source invention operates on the principle of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR). It employs no window and it is completely electrodeless and therefore its operation lifetime is long, being limited only by either the microwave generator itself or charged particle extraction grids if used. The high density plasma source can also be used to extract an electron beam that can be used as a plasma cathode neutralizer for ion source beam neutralization applications.

  17. Waveguides having patterned, flattened modes

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, Michael J.; Pax, Paul H.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2015-10-27

    Field-flattening strands may be added to and arbitrarily positioned within a field-flattening shell to create a waveguide that supports a patterned, flattened mode. Patterning does not alter the effective index or flattened nature of the mode, but does alter the characteristics of other modes. Compared to a telecom fiber, a hexagonal pattern of strands allows for a three-fold increase in the flattened mode's area without reducing the separation between its effective index and that of its bend-coupled mode. Hexagonal strand and shell elements prove to be a reasonable approximation, and, thus, to be of practical benefit vis-a-vis fabrication, to those of circular cross section. Patterned flattened modes offer a new and valuable path to power scaling.

  18. Multimode waveguide based directional coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Rajib; Rifat, Ahmmed A.; Sabouri, Aydin; Al-Qattan, Bader; Essa, Khamis; Butt, Haider

    2016-07-01

    The Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) based platform overcomes limitations of the previous copper and fiber based technologies. Due to its high index difference, SOI waveguide (WG) and directional couplers (DC) are widely used for high speed optical networks and hybrid Electro-Optical inter-connections; TE00-TE01, TE00-TE00 and TM00-TM00 SOI direction couplers are designed with symmetrical and asymmetrical configurations to couple with TE00, TE01 and TM00 in a multi-mode semi-triangular ring-resonator configuration which will be applicable for multi-analyte sensing. Couplers are designed with effective index method and their structural parameters are optimized with consideration to coupler length, wavelength and polarization dependence. Lastly, performance of the couplers are analyzed in terms of cross-talk, mode overlap factor, coupling length and coupling efficiency.

  19. Rab28 is a TBC1D1/TBC1D4 substrate involved in GLUT4 trafficking.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhou; Menzel, Franziska; Benninghoff, Tim; Chadt, Alexandra; Du, Chen; Holman, Geoffrey D; Al-Hasani, Hadi

    2017-01-01

    The Rab-GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 play important roles in the insulin-stimulated translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 from intracellular vesicles to the plasma membrane in muscle cells and adipocytes. We identified Rab28 as a substrate for the GAP domains of both TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 in vitro. Rab28 is expressed in adipose cells and skeletal muscle, and its GTP-binding state is acutely regulated by insulin. We found that in intact isolated mouse skeletal muscle, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Rab28 decreases basal glucose uptake. Conversely, in primary rat adipose cells, overexpression of Rab28-Q72L, a constitutively active mutant, increases basal cell surface levels of an epitope-tagged HA-GLUT4. Our results indicate that Rab28 is a novel GTPase involved in the intracellular retention of GLUT4 in insulin target cells.

  20. Polymer and composite polymer slot waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Marianne; Fegadolli, William S.; Lira, Hugo L. R.; Vahimaa, Pasi; Hiltunen, Jussi; Aikio, Sanna; Almeida, Vilson R.; Karioja, Pentti

    2014-05-01

    A fully polymer slot Young interferometer operating at 633 nm wavelength was fabricated by using nanoimprint molding method. The phase response of the interference pattern was measured with several concentrations of glucose-water solutions, utilizing both TE and TM polarization states. The sensor was experimentally found to detect a bulk refractive index change of 6.4×10-6 RIU. Temperature dependency of silicon slot waveguide has been demonstrated to be reduced with composite slot waveguide structure. The slot filled with thermally stable polymer having negative thermo-optic coefficient showed nearly an athermal operation of silicon slot waveguide. Experimental results show that the slot waveguide geometry covered with Ormocomp has thermo-optical coefficient of 6 pm/K.

  1. Electro-optic Waveguide Beam Deflector.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    beam deflection by variation in the electro - optic effect produced within the waveguide region in response to known or determinable magnitude variations in the electrical potential of an applied signal source.

  2. Multistaged stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A multistaged Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier for providing a high gain Stokes output signal. The amplifier uses a plurality of optically coupled capillary waveguide amplifiers and one or more regenerative amplifiers to increase Stokes gain to a level sufficient for power amplification. Power amplification is provided by a multifocused Raman gain cell or a large diameter capillary waveguide. An external source of CO.sub.2 laser radiation can be injected into each of the capillary waveguide amplifier stages to increase Raman gain. Devices for injecting external sources of CO.sub.2 radiation include: dichroic mirrors, prisms, gratings and Ge Brewster plates. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 input radiation to the first stage can be coupled and amplified between successive stages.

  3. Photoreceptor waveguides and effective retinal image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohnsen, Brian

    2007-03-01

    Individual photoreceptor waveguiding suggests that the entire retina can be considered as a composite fiber-optic element relating a retinal image to a corresponding waveguided image. In such a scheme, a visual sensation is produced only when the latter interacts with the pigments of the outer photoreceptor segments. Here the possible consequences of photoreceptor waveguiding on vision are studied with important implications for the pupil-apodization method commonly used to incorporate directional effects of the retina. In the absence of aberrations, it is found that the two approaches give identical predictions for an effective retinal image only when the pupil apodization is chosen twice as narrow as suggested by the traditional Stiles-Crawford effect. In addition, phase variations in the retinal field due to ocular aberrations can delicately alter a waveguided image, and this may provide plausible justification for an improved visual sensation as compared with what should be expected on the grounds of a retinal image only.

  4. Wideband waveguide polarizer development for SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P.; Stanton, P.

    1991-01-01

    A wideband polarizer for the Deep Space Network (DSN) 34 meter beam waveguide antenna is needed for the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) project. The results of a computer analysis of a wideband polarizer are presented.

  5. Radiation from Axisymmetric Waveguide Fed Horns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinn, G. C.; Hoppe, D. J.; Epp, L. W.

    1995-01-01

    Return losses and radiation patterns for axisymmetric waveguide fed horns are calculated with the finite element method (FEM) in conjunction with the method of moments (MoM) and the mode matching technique (MM).

  6. Flexible parylene-film optical waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagiwa, S.; Ishida, M.; Kawano, T.

    2015-08-01

    Modulation of neuronal activities by light [e.g., laser or light-emitting diode] using optogenetics is a powerful tool for studies on neuronal functions in a brain. Herein, flexible thin-film optical waveguide arrays based on a highly biocompatible material of parylene are reported. Parylene-C and -N thin layers with the different refractive indices form the clad and the core of the waveguide, respectively, and neural recording microelectrodes are integrated to record optical stimuli and electrical recordings simultaneously using the same alignment. Both theoretical and experimental investigations confirm that light intensities of more than 90% can propagate in a bent waveguide with a curvature radius of >5 mm. The proposed flexible thin-film waveguide arrays with microelectrodes can be used for numerous spherical bio-tissues, including brain and spinal cord samples.

  7. Low-index discontinuity terahertz waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Michael; Marchewka, Astrid; Kurz, Heinrich

    2006-10-01

    A new type of dielectric THz waveguide based on recent approaches in the field of integrated optics is presented with theoretical and experimental results. Although the guiding mechanism of the low-index discontinuity (LID) THz waveguide is total internal reflection, the THz wave is predominantly confined in the virtually lossless low-index air gap within a high-index dielectric waveguide due to the continuity of electric flux density at the dielectric interface. Attenuation, dispersion and single-mode confinement properties of two LID structures are discussed and compared with other THz waveguide solutions. The new approach provides an outstanding combination of high mode confinement and low transmission losses currently not realizable with any other metal-based or photonic crystal approach. These exceptional properties might enable the breakthrough of novel integrated THz systems or endoscopy applications with sub-wavelength resolution.

  8. Optical Waveguide Output Couplers Fabricated in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Abushagur, Mustafa A. G.; Ashley, Paul R.; Johnson-Cole, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Waveguide output couplers fabricated in Norland Optical Adhesive (NOA) #81 and AMOCO Ultradel 9020D polyimide are investigated. The output couplers are implemented using periodic relief gratings on a planar waveguide. Design theory of the couplers is based on the perturbation approach. Coupling of light from waveguide propagation modes to output radiation modes is described by coupled mode theory and the transmission line approximation of the perturbed area (grating structure). Using these concepts, gratings can be accurately designed to output a minimum number of modes at desired output angles. Waveguide couplers were designed using these concepts. These couplers were fabricated and analyzed for structural accuracy, output beam accuracy, and output efficiency. The results for the two different materials are compared.

  9. Optical waveguide device with an adiabatically-varying width

    DOEpatents

    Watts; Michael R. , Nielson; Gregory N.

    2011-05-10

    Optical waveguide devices are disclosed which utilize an optical waveguide having a waveguide bend therein with a width that varies adiabatically between a minimum value and a maximum value of the width. One or more connecting members can be attached to the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width thereof to support the waveguide bend or to supply electrical power to an impurity-doped region located within the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width. The impurity-doped region can form an electrical heater or a semiconductor junction which can be activated with a voltage to provide a variable optical path length in the optical waveguide. The optical waveguide devices can be used to form a tunable interferometer (e.g. a Mach-Zehnder interferometer) which can be used for optical modulation or switching. The optical waveguide devices can also be used to form an optical delay line.

  10. An Investigation of Dielectric Loaded Ridged Waveguide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-31

    propagation in any waveguide may be characterized by its field distribution. For homogeneous waveguides, modes are usually classified as TE (transverse...modes other than TE,,,.0 are characterized as LSE or LSM. Introduction of the ridge will cause distortion of the fields from true LSE or LSM nature...specify each of the LSE and LSM modes with any given mode characterized as the LSEm, mode or the LSM ,, mode. The first index m refers to the

  11. Broadband waveguide QED system on a chip

    SciTech Connect

    Quan Qimin; Bulu, Irfan; Loncar, Marko

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate that a slot waveguide provides a broadband loss-free platform suitable for applications in quantum optics. We find that strong coupling between light quanta and a single quantum emitter placed in the waveguide slot can be achieved with efficiency higher than 96% and Purcell factor (spontaneous emission factor) larger than 200. The proposed system is a promising platform for quantum information processing and can be used to realize an efficient single photon source and optically addressable photon register.

  12. Understanding the nanophotonic light-trapping structure of diatom frustule for enhanced solar energy conversion: a theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangfan; Wang, Chen; Baker, Evan; Wang, Jane; Sun, Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Recent designs in nanophotonic light-trapping technologies offer promising potential to develop high-efficiency thin-film solar cell at dramatically reduced cost. However, the lack of a cost effective scalable nanomanufacturing technique remains the main road-block. In nature, diatoms exhibit high solar energy harvesting efficiency due to their frustules (i.e., hard porous cell wall made of silica) possessing remarkable hierarchical nano-features optimized for the photosynthetic process through millions of years evolution. To explore this unique light trapping effect, different species of diatoms (Coscinodiscus sp. and Coscinodiscus wailesii) are cultured and characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM). Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) and Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method are employed to numerically study the nanophotonic light-trapping effect. The absorption efficiency is significantly enhanced over the spectrum region centered on 450nm and 700nm where the electric fields are found strongly confined within the active layer. The transmission and reflection spectra are also measured by optical spectroscopy and the experimental results are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  13. Towards new applications using capillary waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Stasio, Nicolino; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Papadopoulos, Ioannis N.; Farahi, Salma; Simandoux, Olivier; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Bossy, Emmanuel; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the enhancement of the sensing capabilities of glass capillaries. We exploit their properties as optical and acoustic waveguides to transform them potentially into high resolution minimally invasive endoscopic devices. We show two possible applications of silica capillary waveguides demonstrating fluorescence and optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging using a single 330 μm-thick silica capillary. A nanosecond pulsed laser is focused and scanned in front of a capillary by digital phase conjugation through the silica annular ring of the capillary, used as an optical waveguide. We demonstrate optical-resolution photoacoustic images of a 30 μm-thick nylon thread using the water-filled core of the same capillary as an acoustic waveguide, resulting in a fully passive endoscopic device. Moreover, fluorescence images of 1.5 μm beads are obtained collecting the fluorescence signal through the optical waveguide. This kind of silica-capillary waveguide together with wavefront shaping techniques such as digital phase conjugation, paves the way to minimally invasive multi-modal endoscopy. PMID:26713182

  14. Polar discontinuities and 1D interfaces in monolayered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Gordillo, Rafael; Pruneda, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Interfaces are the birthplace of a multitude of fascinating discoveries in fundamental science, and have enabled modern electronic devices, from transistors, to lasers, capacitors or solar cells. These interfaces between bulk materials are always bi-dimensional (2D) 'surfaces'. However the advent of graphene and other 2D crystals opened up a world of possibilities, as in this case the interfaces become one-dimensional (1D) lines. Although the properties of 1D nanoribbons have been extensively discussed in the last few years, 1D interfaces within infinite 2D systems had remained mostly unexplored until very recently. These include grain boundaries in polycrystalline samples, or interfaces in hybrid 2D sheets composed by segregated domains of different materials (as for example graphene/BN hybrids, or chemically different transition metal dichalcogenides). As for their 2D counterparts, some of these 1D interfaces exhibit polar characteristics, and can give rise to fascinating new physical properties. Here, recent experimental discoveries and theoretical predictions on the polar discontinuities that arise at these 1D interfaces will be reviewed, and the perspectives of this new research topic, discussed.

  15. Ion-sensing properties of 1D vanadium pentoxide nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The application of one-dimensional (1D) V2O5·nH2O nanostructures as pH sensing material was evaluated. 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures were obtained by a hydrothermal method with systematic control of morphology forming different nanostructures: nanoribbons, nanowires and nanorods. Deposited onto Au-covered substrates, 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures were employed as gate material in pH sensors based on separative extended gate FET as an alternative to provide FET isolation from the chemical environment. 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures showed pH sensitivity around the expected theoretical value. Due to high pH sensing properties, flexibility and low cost, further applications of 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures comprise enzyme FET-based biosensors using immobilized enzymes. PMID:22709724

  16. Light wheel confined in a purely dielectric composite waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yu Qian; Jin, Yi; He, Sailing

    2009-03-16

    A properly designed composite waveguide consisting of a one-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide and a conventional dielectric waveguide is proposed for the realization of a localized "light wheel". Light confinedly rotating between the two waveguides is numerically demonstrated and explained physically in detail. A delocalized "light wheel" is found at the band gap edge caused by contra-directional coupling between the two waveguides. Because of this delocalized "light wheel" , the composite waveguide can be used to trap light as a cavity, and a quality factor of 9 x 10(3) is achieved as an example. The present structure is completely dielectric and thus easy to realize with a low loss.

  17. Ion-exchanged glass waveguide technology: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervonen, Ari; West, Brian R.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2011-07-01

    We review the history and current status of ion exchanged glass waveguide technology. The background of ion exchange in glass and key developments in the first years of research are briefly described. An overview of fabrication, characterization and modeling of waveguides is given and the most important waveguide devices and their applications are discussed. Ion exchanged waveguide technology has served as an available platform for studies of general waveguide properties, integrated optics structures and devices, as well as applications. It is also a commercial fabrication technology for both passive and active wave-guide components.

  18. Large-area nanofabrication and applications in advanced nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wei

    The research work presented in this dissertation includes novel large area nanofabrication techniques and their applications in advanced nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. The fabrications and applications include: 1) high performance transparent electrodes, 2) a novel plasmonic nanocavity and its applications in organic solar cells and light emitting diodes, and 3) a bipolar plasmonic nonlinear optical device to enhance and tune second harmonic generation. Based upon these topics, the thesis is divided into the following parts. First, a novel transparent electrode (TE), metallic deep subwavelength mesh electrode is developed and fabricated, showing better transmittance and conductance than previous TEs. Its performance dependence on nanostructure geometries and materials are investigated. The deep-subwavelength mesh electrode also has excellent antiglare properties. Such electrodes are fabricated on 4" wafer by nanoimprint, scalable to meter sizes. Second, a novel plasmonic nanocavity from the MESH is developed, named "plasmonic cavity with subwavelength hole-array (PlaCSH)", consisting of a thin MESH as a transparent front electrode, a thin metal back electrode, and in-between layer of active material. This structure is used to create high performance solar cells and LEDs. PlaCSH solar cell gives a solution to three central challenges in organic solar cells (light coupling into solar cell, light trapping in a sub-absorption-length-thick layer, and replacement of the indium-tin-oxide). Experimentally, the PlaCSH polymer SCs achieve high light coupling-efficiency/absorptance/power conversion efficiency, along with broad-band, Omni angle/polarization acceptance. In OLEDs, PlaCSH shows numerous benefits with both the small- molecule and polymer active materials. Enhanced light extraction, internal quantum efficiency, ambient light absorption, contrast, viewing angle, brightness, and decreased glare are all observed. The above experiments -- along with

  19. Monolithic integration of active and second-order nonlinear functionality in Bragg reflection waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijlani, Bhavin J.

    2011-07-01

    This thesis explored the theory, design, fabrication and characterization of AlGaAs Bragg reflection waveguides (BRW) towards the goal of a platform for monolithic integration of active and optically nonlinear devices. Through integration of a diode laser and nonlinear phase-matched cavity, the possibility of on-chip nonlinear frequency generation was explored. Such integrated devices would be highly useful as a robust, alignment free, small footprint and electrically injected alternative to bulk optic systems. A theoretical framework for modal analysis of arbitrary 1-D photonic crystal defect waveguides is developed. This method relies on the transverse resonance condition. It is then demonstrated in the context of several types of Bragg reflection waveguides. The framework is then extended to phase-match second-order nonlinearities and incorporating quantum-wells for diode lasers. Experiments within a slab and ridge waveguide demonstrated phase-matched Type-I second harmonic generation at fundamental wavelength of 1587 and 1600 nm, respectively; a first for this type of waveguide. For the slab waveguide, conversion efficiency was 0.1 %/W. In the more strongly confined ridge waveguides, efficiency increased to 8.6 %/W owing to the increased intensity. The normalized conversion efficiency was estimated to be at 600 %/Wcm2. Diode lasers emitting at 980 nm in the BRW mode were also fabricated. Verification of the Bragg mode was performed through imaging the near- field of the mode. Propagation loss of this type of mode was measured directly for the first time at ≈ 14 cm-1. The lasers were found to be very insensitive with characteristic temperature at 215 K. Two designs incorporating both laser and phase-matched nonlinearity within the same cavity were fabricated, for degenerate and non-degenerate down-conversion. Though the lasers were sub-optimal, a parametric fluorescence signal was readily detected. Fluorescence power as high as 4 nW for the degenerate design

  20. Pitch-based pattern splitting for 1D layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Ryo; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Koji; Tsujita, Koichiro; Yaegashi, Hidetami; Oyama, Kenichi; Smayling, Michael C.; Axelrad, Valery

    2015-07-01

    The pattern splitting algorithm for 1D Gridded-Design-Rules layout (1D layout) for sub-10 nm node logic devices is shown. It is performed with integer linear programming (ILP) based on the conflict graph created from a grid map for each designated pitch. The relation between the number of times for patterning and the minimum pitch is shown systematically with a sample pattern of contact layer for each node. From the result, the number of times for patterning for 1D layout is fewer than that for conventional 2D layout. Moreover, an experimental result including SMO and total integrated process with hole repair technique is presented with the sample pattern of contact layer whose pattern density is relatively high among critical layers (fin, gate, local interconnect, contact, and metal).

  1. Flexible Photodetectors Based on 1D Inorganic Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Flexible photodetectors with excellent flexibility, high mechanical stability and good detectivity, have attracted great research interest in recent years. 1D inorganic nanostructures provide a number of opportunities and capabilities for use in flexible photodetectors as they have unique geometry, good transparency, outstanding mechanical flexibility, and excellent electronic/optoelectronic properties. This article offers a comprehensive review of several types of flexible photodetectors based on 1D nanostructures from the past ten years, including flexible ultraviolet, visible, and infrared photodetectors. High‐performance organic‐inorganic hybrid photodetectors, as well as devices with 1D nanowire (NW) arrays, are also reviewed. Finally, new concepts of flexible photodetectors including piezophototronic, stretchable and self‐powered photodetectors are examined to showcase the future research in this exciting field. PMID:27774404

  2. PC-1D installation manual and user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Basore, P.A.

    1991-05-01

    PC-1D is a software package for personal computers that uses finite-element analysis to solve the fully-coupled two-carrier semiconductor transport equations in one dimension. This program is particularly useful for analyzing the performance of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, but can be applied to any bipolar device whose carrier flows are primarily one-dimensional. This User's Guide provides the information necessary to install PC-1D, define a problem for solution, solve the problem, and examine the results. Example problems are presented which illustrate these steps. The physical models and numerical methods utilized are presented in detail. This document supports version 3.1 of PC-1D, which incorporates faster numerical algorithms with better convergence properties than previous versions of the program. 51 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Atmospheric refraction correction for Ka-band blind pointing on the DSS-13 beam waveguide antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Borroto, I. M.; Alvarez, L. S.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the atmospheric refraction corrections at the DSS-13 34-m diameter beam waveguide (BWG) antenna for the period Jul. - Dec. 1990 is presented. The current Deep Space Network (DSN) atmospheric refraction model and its sensitivity with respect to sensor accuracy are reviewed. Refraction corrections based on actual atmospheric parameters are compared with the DSS-13 station default corrections for the six-month period. Average blind-pointing improvement during the worst month would have amounted to 5 mdeg at 10 deg elevation using actual surface weather values. This would have resulted in an average gain improvement of 1.1 dB.

  4. Ultra-Low Loss, Chip-Based Hollow-Core Waveguide Using High-Contrast Grating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-28

    also the first experimental verification for 2D HCG-HW design using the 1D w- k diagram for HCG-HCW [8] and the effective index method [9] to this new...cladding are defined by different HCG parameters to provide lateral confinement. b, Ray optics illustration for a I D slab HCG-HCW. k vector is decomposed...into the propagation constant k , and transverse component kx. 8 is the angle between k and k :· d is the waveguide height, and E indicates the

  5. 2-D simulation of a waveguide free electron laser having a helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Lee, B.C.; Jeong, Y.U.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a 2-D simulation code for the calculation of output power from an FEL oscillator having a helical undulator and a cylindrical waveguide. In the simulation, the current and the energy of the electron beam is 2 A and 400 keV, respectively. The parameters of the permanent-magnet helical undulator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, magnetic field = 1.3 kG. The gain per pass is 10 and the output power is calculated to be higher than 10 kW The results of the 2-D simulation are compared with those of 1-D simulation.

  6. GIS-BASED 1-D DIFFUSIVE WAVE OVERLAND FLOW MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    KALYANAPU, ALFRED; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY N.; BURIAN, STEVEN J.

    2007-01-17

    This paper presents a GIS-based 1-d distributed overland flow model and summarizes an application to simulate a flood event. The model estimates infiltration using the Green-Ampt approach and routes excess rainfall using the 1-d diffusive wave approximation. The model was designed to use readily available topographic, soils, and land use/land cover data and rainfall predictions from a meteorological model. An assessment of model performance was performed for a small catchment and a large watershed, both in urban environments. Simulated runoff hydrographs were compared to observations for a selected set of validation events. Results confirmed the model provides reasonable predictions in a short period of time.

  7. Nanophotonics for quantum optics using nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond.

    PubMed

    Santori, C; Barclay, P E; Fu, K-M C; Beausoleil, R G; Spillane, S; Fisch, M

    2010-07-09

    Optical microcavities and waveguides coupled to diamond are needed to enable efficient communication between quantum systems such as nitrogen-vacancy centers which are known already to have long electron spin coherence lifetimes. This paper describes recent progress in realizing microcavities with low loss and small mode volume in two hybrid systems: silica microdisks coupled to diamond nanoparticles, and gallium phosphide microdisks coupled to single-crystal diamond. A theoretical proposal for a gallium phosphide nanowire photonic crystal cavity coupled to diamond is also discussed. Comparing the two material systems, silica microdisks are easier to fabricate and test. However, at low temperature, nitrogen-vacancy centers in bulk diamond are spectrally more stable, and we expect that in the long term the bulk diamond approach will be better suited for on-chip integration of a photonic network.

  8. Ultralow-loss waveguide crossings for the integration of microfluidics and optical waveguide sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Yan, Hai; Wang, Zongxing; Zou, Yi; Yang, Chun-Ju; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Subbaraman, Harish; Tang, Naimei; Xu, Xiaochuan; Fan, D. L.; Wang, Alan X.; Chen, Ray T.

    2015-03-01

    Integrating photonic waveguide sensors with microfluidics is promising in achieving high-sensitivity and cost-effective biological and chemical sensing applications. One challenge in the integration is that an air gap would exist between the microfluidic channel and the photonic waveguide when the micro-channel and the waveguide intersect. The air gap creates a path for the fluid to leak out of the micro-channel. Potential solutions, such as oxide deposition followed by surface planarization, would introduce additional fabrication steps and thus are ineffective in cost. Here we propose a reliable and efficient approach for achieving closed microfluidic channels on a waveguide sensing chip. The core of the employed technique is to add waveguide crossings, i.e., perpendicularly intersecting waveguides, to block the etched trenches and prevent the fluid from leaking through the air gap. The waveguide crossings offer a smooth interface for microfluidic channel bonding while bring negligible additional propagation loss (0.024 dB/crossing based on simulation). They are also efficient in fabrication, which are patterned and fabricated in the same step with waveguides. We experimentally integrated microfluidic channels with photonic crystal (PC) microcavity sensor chips on silicon-on-insulator substrate and demonstrated leak-free sensing measurement with waveguide crossings. The microfluidic channel was made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and pressure bonded to the silicon chip. The tested flow rates can be varied from 0.2 μL/min to 200 μL/min. Strong resonances from the PC cavity were observed from the transmission spectra. The spectra also show that the waveguide crossings did not induce any significant additional loss or alter the resonances.

  9. Resolving parity and order of Fabry-Pérot modes in semiconductor nanostructure waveguides and lasers: Young's interference experiment revisited.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liaoxin; Ren, Ming-Liang; Liu, Wenjing; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2014-11-12

    Semiconductor nanostructures such as nanowires and nanoribbons functioning as Fabry-Pérot (F-P)-type optical cavities and nanolasers have attracted great interest not only for their potential use in nanophotonic systems but also to understand the physics of light-matter interactions at the nanoscale. Due to their nanoscale dimensions, new techniques need to be continuously developed to characterize the nature of highly confined optical modes. Furthermore, the inadequacy of typical far-field photoluminescence experiments for characterizing the nanoscale cavity modes such as parity and order has precluded efforts to obtain precise information that is required to fully understand these cavities. Here, we utilize a modified Young's interference method based on angle-resolved microphotoluminescence spectral technique to directly reveal the parity of F-P cavity modes in CdS nanostructures functioning as waveguides and nanolasers. From these analyses, the mode order can be straightforwardly obtained with the help of numerical simulations. Moreover, we show that the Young's technique is a general technique applicable to any F-P type cavities in nanoribbons, nanowires, or other photonic and plasmonic nanostructures.

  10. Untangled modes in multimode waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plöschner, Martin; Tyc, TomáÅ.¡; Čižmár, TomáÅ.¡

    2016-03-01

    Small, fibre-based endoscopes have already improved our ability to image deep within the human body. A novel approach introduced recently utilised disordered light within a standard multimode optical fibre for lensless imaging. Importantly, this approach brought very significant reduction of the instruments footprint to dimensions below 100 μm. The most important limitations of this exciting technology is the lack of bending flexibility - imaging is only possible as long as the fibre remains stationary. The only route to allow flexibility of such endoscopes is in trading-in all the knowledge about the optical system we have, particularly the cylindrical symmetry of refractive index distribution. In perfect straight step-index cylindrical waveguides we can find optical modes that do not change their spatial distribution as they propagate through. In this paper we present a theoretical background that provides description of such modes in more realistic model of real-life step-index multimode fibre taking into account common deviations in distribution of the refractive index from its ideal step-index profile. Separately, we discuss how to include the influence of fibre bending.

  11. Non-cooperative Brownian donkeys: A solvable 1D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez de Cisneros, B.; Reimann, P.; Parrondo, J. M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A paradigmatic 1D model for Brownian motion in a spatially symmetric, periodic system is tackled analytically. Upon application of an external static force F the system's response is an average current which is positive for F < 0 and negative for F > 0 (absolute negative mobility). Under suitable conditions, the system approaches 100% efficiency when working against the external force F.

  12. Improved cooling design for high power waveguide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. C. J.; Hartop, R.

    1981-06-01

    Testing of X band high power components in a traveling wave resonator indicates that this improved cooling design reduces temperature in the waveguide and flange. The waveguide power handling capability and power transmission reliability is increased substantially.

  13. Improved cooling design for high power waveguide system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. C. J.; Hartop, R.

    1981-01-01

    Testing of X band high power components in a traveling wave resonator indicates that this improved cooling design reduces temperature in the waveguide and flange. The waveguide power handling capability and power transmission reliability is increased substantially.

  14. Erbium-doped silicon-oxycarbide materials for advanced optical waveguide amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallis, Spyros

    As a novel silicon based material, amorphous silicon oxycarbide (a-SiC xOyHz) has found many important applications (e.g. as a low-k material for interconnects) in Si microelectronics. This Ph.D. thesis work has explored another potential application of amorphous silicon oxycarbide: as a silicon-based host material for planar erbium-doped waveguide amplifiers (EDWAs) that operate at the telecommunications wavelength of 1540 nm. Such EDWAs are an important component of planar photonic integrated circuits being developed for implementation of the fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) technology. Furthermore, these Si-based EDWAs could be combined with other Si photonic devices (e.g. light sources, detectors, modulators) for achieving opto-electronic integration on Si chips, or silicon micro/nanophotonics. This thesis will start with basics about Er-doped systems and material challenges in the design of EDWAs. A detailed study of the structural and optical properties of a-SiCxOyHz materials under various deposition and processing conditions, concerning several aspects, such as thin film composition, chemical bonding, refractive index and optical gap, will be presented and discussed. Lastly, this work will focus on the photoluminescence (PL) properties of erbium-doped amorphous silicon oxycarbides (a-SiCxOyHz:Er). Results of both Er-related (near infrared ˜1540 nm) and matrix-related (visible) luminescence properties will be presented, and mechanisms leading to efficient excitation of Er ions in the materials will be discussed. This work indicates that a-SiC xOyHz:Er can be a promising matrix for realizing high-performance EDWAs using inexpensive broadband light sources.

  15. Electro-optic switching based on a waveguide-ring resonator made of dielectric-loaded graphene plasmon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhe; Zhu, Zhi Hong; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Jian Fa; Cai Guo, Chu; Liu, Ken; Yuan, Xiao Dong; Qiao Qin, Shi

    2016-09-01

    We numerically demonstrate that electro-optic switching in the mid-infrared range can be realized using a waveguide-ring resonator made of dielectric-loaded graphene plasmon waveguides (DLGPWs). The numerical results are in good agreement with the results of physical analysis. The switching mechanism is based on dynamic modification of the resonant wavelengths of the ring resonator, achieved by varying the Fermi energy of a graphene sheet. The results reveal that a switching ratio of ∼24 dB can be achieved with only a 0.01 eV change in the Fermi energy. Such electrically controlled switching operation may find use in actively tunable integrated photonic circuits.

  16. Waveguides in Thin Film Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakisov, Sergey; Abdeldayem, Hossin; Venkateswarlu, Putcha; Teague, Zedric

    1996-01-01

    Results on the fabrication of integrated optical components in polymeric materials using photo printing methods will be presented. Optical waveguides were fabricated by spin coating preoxidized silicon wafers with organic dye/polymer solution followed by soft baking. The waveguide modes were studied using prism coupling technique. Propagation losses were measured by collecting light scattered from the trace of a propagation mode by either scanning photodetector or CCD camera. We observed the formation of graded index waveguides in photosensitive polyimides after exposure of UV light from a mercury arc lamp. By using a theoretical model, an index profile was reconstructed which is in agreement with the profile reconstructed by the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin calculation technique using a modal spectrum of the waveguides. Proposed mechanism for the formation of the graded index includes photocrosslinking followed by UV curing accompanied with optical absorption increase. We also developed the prototype of a novel single-arm double-mode interferometric sensor based on our waveguides. It demonstrates high sensitivity to the chance of ambient temperature. The device can find possible applications in aeropropulsion control systems.

  17. Simple Broadband Circular Polarizer in Oversized Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, Torsten

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a possibility is shown to realize a simple waveguide polarizer producing nearly the same circular polarization over a broad frequency range up to an octave. It is based upon the combination of two smoothly squeezed oversized waveguides with different diameters. The principle is similar to an achromatic lens in optics, where two counteracting lenses with differently sloped wavelength dependencies of the refractive index are combined to compensate the dispersion in the desired wavelength range. Consequently, two different wavelengths of light are brought into focus at the same plane. A waveguide for the transmission of microwaves has a similar frequency dependence of the refractive index resulting in a frequency-dependent phase shift between two propagating waves polarized along the symmetry axes of a waveguide with an elliptical cross section. For this reason, an incident wave with a linear polarization between the axes of symmetry can be only converted into a circularly polarized wave over a limited frequency range. However, the diameter and the shape along two counteracting squeezed waveguides can be adjusted in such a way that the frequency dependence of the resultant phase shift is finally canceled out.

  18. MMICs with Radial Probe Transitions to Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Pukala, David; Soria, Mary; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd; Radisic, Vesna; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    A document presents an update on the innovation reported in Integrated Radial Probe Transition From MMIC to Waveguide (NPO-43957), NASA Tech Briefs Vol. 31, No. 5 (May 2007), page 38. To recapitulate: To enable operation or testing of a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC), it is necessary to mount the MMIC in a waveguide package that typically has cross-sectional waveguide dimensions of the order of a few hundred microns. A radial probe transition between an MMIC operating at 340 GHz and a waveguide had been designed (but not yet built and tested) to be fabricated as part of a monolithic unit that would include the MMIC. The radial probe could readily be integrated with an MMIC amplifier because the design provided for fabrication of the transition on a substrate of the same material (InP) and thickness (50 m) typical of substrates of MMICs that can operate above 300 GHz. As illustrated in the updated document by drawings, photographs, and plots of test data, the concept has now been realized by designing, fabricating, and testing several MMIC/radial- probe integrated-circuit chips and designing and fabricating a waveguide package to contain each chip.

  19. Stopping light by an air waveguide with anisotropic metamaterial cladding.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tian; Zhao, Junming; Feng, Yijun

    2009-01-05

    We present a detailed study of oscillating modes in a slab waveguide with air core and anisotropic metamaterial cladding. It is shown that, under specific dielectric configurations, slow and even stopped electromagnetic wave can be supported by such an air waveguide. We propose a linearly tapped waveguide structure that could lead the propagating light to a complete standstill. Both the theoretical analysis and the proposed waveguide have been validated by full-wave simulation based on finite-difference time-domain method.

  20. Coupling characteristics between slot plasmonic mode and dielectric waveguide mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shuai; Liu, Fang; Wan, Ruiyuan; Huang, Yidong

    2010-12-01

    A hybrid coupler composed of a slot plasmonic waveguide and a dielectric waveguide is proposed and its coupling characteristics are analyzed. The simulation results show that the ultra-small mode of the slot plasmonic waveguide can be excited efficiently by the dielectric waveguide mode within the coupling length of just several microns, which provides an interface between the slot plasmonic devices and dielectric devices. Meanwhile, based on this hybrid the coupler, a highly integrated refractive index sensor could be realized.

  1. Capabilities of DLW for fabrication of planar waveguides in PDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandura, D.; Pudiš, D.; Gašo, P.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, capabilities of the fabrication technology for planar waveguide structures and devices in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are presented. Direct laser writing in combination with imprinting technique was used to pattern photoresist layer as a master for imprinting process. In the next step, PDMS waveguide structures as channel waveguide, Y-branch waveguide splitter and ring resonator were imprinted. Finally, optical and morphological properties of prepared devices were investigated by confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy.

  2. Low-loss amorphous silicon wire waveguide for integrated photonics: effect of fabrication process and the thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shiyang; Lo, G Q; Kwong, D L

    2010-11-22

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) wire waveguides were fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and anisotropic dry etching. With the optimized fabrication process, the propagation losses of as low as 3.2 ± 0.2 dB/cm for the TE mode and 2.3 ± 0.1 dB/cm for the TM mode were measured for the 200 nm (height) × 500 nm (width) wire waveguides at 1550 nm using the standard cutback method. The loss becomes larger at shorter wavelength (~4.4 dB/cm for TE and ~5.0 dB/cm for TM at 1520 nm) and smaller at longer wavelength (~1.9 dB/cm for TE and ~1.4 dB/cm for TM at 1620 nm). With the waveguide width shrinking from 500 nm to 300 nm, the TM mode loss keeps almost unchanged whereas the TE mode loss increases, indicating that the predominant loss contributor is the waveguide sidewall roughness, similar to the crystalline silicon waveguides. Although the a-Si:H and the upper cladding SiO2 were both deposited at 400°C, the propagation loss of the fabricated a-Si:H wire waveguides starts to increase upon furnace annealing under atmosphere at a temperature larger than 300°C: ~13-15 dB/cm after 400°C/30 min annealing and >70 dB/cm after 500°C/30 min annealing, which can be attributed to hydrogen out-diffusion. Even higher temperature (i.e., >600°C) annealing leads to the propagation loss approaching to the polycrystalline silicon counterparts (~40-50 dB/cm) due to onset of a-Si:H solid-phase crystallization.

  3. EEsoF MICAD and ACADEMY macro files for coplanar waveguide and finite ground plan coplanar waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.

    1995-01-01

    A collection of macro files is presented which when appended to either the EEsoF MICAD.ELE or EEsoF ACADEMY.ELE file permits the layout of coplanar waveguide and finite ground plane coplanar waveguide circuits.

  4. Study on stimulated emission from polymer distributed feedback waveguide using interference ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Cheng, Hao; Sun, Yangyang

    2014-11-01

    A polymer distributed feedback (DFB) laser was fabricated by two-beam interference from MEH-PPV film on clear glass substrate. A direct-writing technique was reported that achieves large-area 1D DFB polymer lasers. The polymer thin film was exposed to a single-shot illumination of the interference pattern of one UV laser pulse at 355 nm. The direct-writing and the lasing characters of 1D DFB polymer lasers were demonstrated. The results show the lower threshold and full width at half maximum (FWHM) from DFB polymer laser than slab waveguide. The peak position is tuned by changing the period from 340 nm to 350 nm. The results show that the simple and low-cost technique that enables highly reproducible mass fabrication is required for the easy realization and more profound investigation of the polymer lasers based on the DFB configuration.

  5. Photolithography fabrication of sol-gel ridge waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sara, Rahmani; Touam, Tahar; Blanchetiere, Chantal; Saddiki, Z.; Saravanamuttu, Kalaichelvi; Du, Xin M.; Chrostowski, Jacek; Andrews, Mark P.; Najafi, S. Iraj

    1998-07-01

    We report on fabrication of ridge waveguides in UV-light sensitive glass sol-gel thin films, deposited on silicon substrate, using a simple photolithography process. The single-layer films are prepared at low temperature and deep UV-light (DUV) is employed to make the waveguides. The effect of fabrication parameters on waveguide shape is investigated.

  6. Microminiature optical waveguide structure and method for fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Strand, O.T.; Deri, R.J.; Pocha, M.D.

    1998-12-08

    A method for manufacturing low-cost, nearly circular cross section waveguides comprises starting with a substrate material that a molten waveguide material can not wet or coat. A thin layer is deposited of an opposite material that the molten waveguide material will wet and is patterned to describe the desired surface-contact path pedestals for a waveguide. A waveguide material, e.g., polymer or doped silica, is deposited. A resist material is deposited and unwanted excess is removed to form pattern masks. The waveguide material is etched away to form waveguide precursors and the masks are removed. Heat is applied to reflow the waveguide precursors into near-circular cross-section waveguides that sit atop the pedestals. The waveguide material naturally forms nearly circular cross sections due to the surface tension effects. After cooling, the waveguides will maintain the round shape. If the width and length are the same, then spherical ball lenses are formed. Alternatively, the pedestals can be patterned to taper along their lengths on the surface of the substrate. This will cause the waveguides to assume a conical taper after reflowing by heat. 32 figs.

  7. Microminiature optical waveguide structure and method for fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Strand, Oliver T.; Deri, Robert J.; Pocha, Michael D.

    1998-01-01

    A method for manufacturing low-cost, nearly circular cross section waveguides comprises starting with a substrate material that a molten waveguide material can not wet or coat. A thin layer is deposited of an opposite material that the molten waveguide material will wet and is patterned to describe the desired surface-contact path pedestals for a waveguide. A waveguide material, e.g., polymer or doped silica, is deposited. A resist material is deposited and unwanted excess is removed to form pattern masks. The waveguide material is etched away to form waveguide precursors and the masks are removed. Heat is applied to reflow the waveguide precursors into near-circular cross-section waveguides that sit atop the pedestals. The waveguide material naturally forms nearly circular cross sections due to the surface tension effects. After cooling, the waveguides will maintain the round shape. If the width and length are the same, then spherical ball lenses are formed. Alternatively, the pedestals can be patterned to taper along their lengths on the surface of the substrate. This will cause the waveguides to assume a conical taper after reflowing by heat.

  8. Thermal annealing of waveguides formed by ion implantation of silica-on-Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. M.; Ridgway, M. C.; Kurver, A.; Leech, P. W.; Simpson, P. J.

    1998-05-01

    Buried channel waveguides have been fabricated by ion implantation of Plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD)-grown silica-on-Si. Post-implantation annealing was observed to have a significant influence on waveguide loss as measured at a wavelength of 1550 nm-loss decreased abruptly from an as-implanted value of ˜1 dB/cm to ˜0.15 dB/cm following a 400°C/ h annealing cycle. However, annealing at greater temperatures (500°C) yielded a value comparable to the as-implanted result. For the present paper, the various factors that potentially influenced the observed loss behaviour have been addressed. Such factors included thermally-induced changes to density and refractive index, mode profile spreading and subsequent interaction with the waveguide surface, precipitation of the implanted ions and annealing of both intrinsic and implantation-induced defects. The observed loss behaviour has been attributed to a combination of effects dominated by a reduction in implantation-induced defect concentrations (300-400°C), where such defects acted as scattering and/or absorption centres, and mode profile spreading (400-600°C) due to a reduction in refractive index.

  9. Efficient active waveguiding properties of Mo6 nano-cluster-doped polymer nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigeon, J.; Huby, N.; Amela-Cortes, M.; Molard, Y.; Garreau, A.; Cordier, S.; Bêche, B.; Duvail, J.-L.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate 1D nanostructures based on a Mo6@SU8 hybrid nanocomposite in which photoluminescent Mo6 clusters are embedded in the photosensitive SU8 resist. Tens of micrometers long Mo6@SU8-based tubular nanostructures were fabricated by the wetting template method, enabling the control of the inner and outer diameter to about 190 nm and 240 nm respectively, as supported by structural and optical characterizations. The image plane optical study of these nanotubes under optical pumping highlights the efficient waveguiding phenomenon of the red luminescence emitted by the clusters. Moreover, the wave vector distribution in the Fourier plane determined by leakage radiation microscopy gives additional features of the emission and waveguiding. First, the anisotropic red luminescence of the whole system can be attributed to the guided mode along the nanotube. Then, a low-loss propagation behavior is evidenced in the Mo6@SU8-based nanotubes. This result contrasts with the weaker waveguiding signature in the case of UV210-based nanotubes embedding PFO (poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)). It is attributed to the strong reabsorption phenomenon, owing to overlapping between absorption and emission bands in the semi-conducting conjugated polymer PFO. These results make this Mo6@SU8 original class of nanocomposite a promising candidate as nanosources for submicronic photonic integration.

  10. Resonance blocking and passing effects in two-dimensional elastic waveguides with obstacles.

    PubMed

    Glushkov, Evgeny; Glushkova, Natalia; Golub, Mikhail; Eremin, Artem

    2011-07-01

    Resonance localization of wave energy in two-dimensional (2D) waveguides with obstacles, known as a trapped mode effect, results in blocking of wave propagation. This effect is closely connected with the allocation of natural resonance poles in the complex frequency plane, which are in fact the spectral points of the related boundary value problem. With several obstacles the number of poles increases in parallel with the number of defects. The location of the poles in the complex frequency plane depends on the defect's relative position, but the gaps of transmission coefficient plots generally remain in the same frequency ranges as for every single obstacle separately. This property gives a possibility to extend gap bands by a properly selected combination of various scatterers. On the other hand, a resonance wave passing in narrow bands associated with the poles is also observed. Thus, while a resonance response of a single obstacle works as a blocker, the waveguide with several obstacles becomes opened in narrow vicinities of nearly real spectral poles, just as it is known for one-dimensional (1D) waveguides with a finite number of periodic scatterers. In the present paper the blocking and passing effects are analyzed based on a semi-analytical model for wave propagation in a 2D elastic layer with cracks or rigid inclusions.

  11. Excitation of a Parallel Plate Waveguide by an Array of Rectangular Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, Sembiam

    2011-01-01

    This work addresses the problem of excitation of a parallel plate waveguide by an array of rectangular waveguides that arises in applications such as the continuous transverse stub (CTS) antenna and dual-polarized parabolic cylindrical reflector antennas excited by a scanning line source. In order to design the junction region between the parallel plate waveguide and the linear array of rectangular waveguides, waveguide sizes have to be chosen so that the input match is adequate for the range of scan angles for both polarizations. Electromagnetic wave scattered by the junction of a parallel plate waveguide by an array of rectangular waveguides is analyzed by formulating coupled integral equations for the aperture electric field at the junction. The integral equations are solved by the method of moments. In order to make the computational process efficient and accurate, the method of weighted averaging was used to evaluate rapidly oscillating integrals encountered in the moment matrix. In addition, the real axis spectral integral is evaluated in a deformed contour for speed and accuracy. The MoM results for a large finite array have been validated by comparing its reflection coefficients with corresponding results for an infinite array generated by the commercial finite element code, HFSS. Once the aperture electric field is determined by MoM, the input reflection coefficients at each waveguide port, and coupling for each polarization over the range of useful scan angles, are easily obtained. Results for the input impedance and coupling characteristics for both the vertical and horizontal polarizations are presented over a range of scan angles. It is shown that the scan range is limited to about 35 for both polarizations and therefore the optimum waveguide is a square of size equal to about 0.62 free space wavelength.

  12. Plasmonic Excitations of 1D Metal-Dielectric Interfaces in 2D Systems: 1D Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Daniel R.; Menabde, Sergey G.; Yu, Sunkyu; Park, Namkyoo

    2014-04-01

    Surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) excitations of metal-dielectric interfaces are a fundamental light-matter interaction which has attracted interest as a route to spatial confinement of light far beyond that offered by conventional dielectric optical devices. Conventionally, SPPs have been studied in noble-metal structures, where the SPPs are intrinsically bound to a 2D metal-dielectric interface. Meanwhile, recent advances in the growth of hybrid 2D crystals, which comprise laterally connected domains of distinct atomically thin materials, provide the first realistic platform on which a 2D metal-dielectric system with a truly 1D metal-dielectric interface can be achieved. Here we show for the first time that 1D metal-dielectric interfaces support a fundamental 1D plasmonic mode (1DSPP) which exhibits cutoff behavior that provides dramatically improved light confinement in 2D systems. The 1DSPP constitutes a new basic category of plasmon as the missing 1D member of the plasmon family: 3D bulk plasmon, 2DSPP, 1DSPP, and 0D localized SP.

  13. Atomic layer deposited second-order nonlinear optical metamaterial for back-end integration with CMOS-compatible nanophotonic circuitry.

    PubMed

    Clemmen, Stéphane; Hermans, Artur; Solano, Eduardo; Dendooven, Jolien; Koskinen, Kalle; Kauranen, Martti; Brainis, Edouard; Detavernier, Christophe; Baets, Roel

    2015-11-15

    We report the fabrication of artificial unidimensional crystals exhibiting an effective bulk second-order nonlinearity. The crystals are created by cycling atomic layer deposition of three dielectric materials such that the resulting metamaterial is noncentrosymmetric in the direction of the deposition. Characterization of the structures by second-harmonic generation Maker-fringe measurements shows that the main component of their nonlinear susceptibility tensor is about 5 pm/V, which is comparable to well-established materials and more than an order of magnitude greater than reported for a similar crystal [Appl. Phys. Lett.107, 121903 (2015)APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.4931492]. Our demonstration opens new possibilities for second-order nonlinear effects on CMOS-compatible nanophotonic platforms.

  14. A compact thermo-optical multimode-interference silicon-based 1 × 4 nano-photonic switch.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haifeng; Song, Junfeng; Chee, Edward K S; Li, Chao; Zhang, Huijuan; Lo, Guoqiang

    2013-09-09

    An ultra-compact multimode-interference (MMI)-based 1 × 4 nano-photonic switch is demonstrated by employing silicon thermo-optical effect on SOI platform. The device performance is systematically characterized by comprehensively investigating the constituent building blocks, including 1 × 4 power splitter, 4 × 4 MMI coupler and groove-isolated thermo-optical heaters. An instructive model is established to statistically estimate the required power consumption and investigate the influence of the power imbalance of the 4 × 4 MMI coupler on the switching performance. At the designed wavelength of 1550 nm, the average insertion loss of different switching states is 1.7 dB, and the transmission imbalance is 1.05 dB. The worst extinction ratio and crosstalk of all the output ports reach 11.48 dB and -11.38 dB, respectively.

  15. Silicon nitride grating waveguide based directional coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jijun; Li, Anyuan; Akimoto, Ryoichi; Zeng, Heping

    2016-10-01

    Silicon nitride is a promising wave-guiding material for integrated photonics applications with a wide transparency bandwidth from visible to mid-infrared, with a superior performance in fiber-coupling and propagation losses, more tolerant fabrication process to the structure parameters variation and compatible with the CMOS technology. Directional coupler (DC) is very popular for realizing beam splitter because of its structural simplicity and no excess loss intrinsically. Here, a conventional silicon nitride directional coupler, three-dimensional vertical coupler, and grating waveguide assisted coupler are designed and fabricated, and compared with each other. A grating waveguide based coupler with a period of 300 nm and coupling length of 26 um, can realize a wideband 3-dB splitter for the wavelength in the range from 1540 to 1620 nm, for a transverse electric (TE) polarized wave. With further optimization of the grating period and duty cycle, the device performance can be further improved with a wider bandwidth.

  16. Photonic hybrid assembly through flexible waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörhoff, K.; Prak, A.; Postma, F.; Leinse, A.; Wu, K.; Peters, T. J.; Tichem, M.; Amaning-Appiah, B.; Renukappa, V.; Vollrath, G.; Balcells-Ventura, J.; Uhlig, P.; Seyfried, M.; Rose, D.; Santos, R.; Leijtens, X. J. M.; Flintham, B.; Wale, M.; Robbins, D.

    2016-05-01

    Fully automated, high precision, cost-effective assembly technology for photonic packages remains one of the main challenges in photonic component manufacturing. Next to the cost aspect the most demanding assembly task for multiport photonic integrated circuits (PICs) is the high-precision (±0.1 μm) alignment and fixing required for optical I/O in InP PICs, even with waveguide spot size conversion. In a European research initiative - PHASTFlex - we develop and investigate an innovative, novel assembly concept, in which the waveguides in a matching TriPleX interposer PIC are released during fabrication to make them movable. After assembly of both chips by flip-chip bonding on a common carrier, TriPleX based actuators and clamping functions position and fix the flexible waveguides with the required accuracy.

  17. Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Babaee, Sahab; Overvelde, Johannes T B; Chen, Elizabeth R; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-11-01

    We combine numerical simulations and experiments to design a new class of reconfigurable waveguides based on three-dimensional origami-inspired metamaterials. Our strategy builds on the fact that the rigid plates and hinges forming these structures define networks of tubes that can be easily reconfigured. As such, they provide an ideal platform to actively control and redirect the propagation of sound. We design reconfigurable systems that, depending on the externally applied deformation, can act as networks of waveguides oriented along one, two, or three preferential directions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the capability of the structure to guide and radiate acoustic energy along predefined directions can be easily switched on and off, as the networks of tubes are reversibly formed and disrupted. The proposed designs expand the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials and exploit complex waveguiding to enhance control over propagation and radiation of acoustic energy, opening avenues for the design of a new class of tunable acoustic functional systems.

  18. Quantum interference between transverse spatial waveguide modes

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Aseema; Zhang, Mian; Dutt, Avik; Ramelow, Sven; Nussenzveig, Paulo; Lipson, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Integrated quantum optics has the potential to markedly reduce the footprint and resource requirements of quantum information processing systems, but its practical implementation demands broader utilization of the available degrees of freedom within the optical field. To date, integrated photonic quantum systems have primarily relied on path encoding. However, in the classical regime, the transverse spatial modes of a multi-mode waveguide have been easily manipulated using the waveguide geometry to densely encode information. Here, we demonstrate quantum interference between the transverse spatial modes within a single multi-mode waveguide using quantum circuit-building blocks. This work shows that spatial modes can be controlled to an unprecedented level and have the potential to enable practical and robust quantum information processing. PMID:28106036

  19. Alpha Radiation Effects on Silicon Oxynitride Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Morichetti, Francesco; Grillanda, Stefano; Manandhar, Sandeep; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Kimerling, Lionel; Melloni, Andrea; Agarwal, Anuradha M.

    2016-09-21

    Photonic technologies are today of great interest for use in harsh environments, such as outer space, where they can potentially replace current communication systems based on radiofrequency components. However, very much alike to electronic devices, the behavior of optical materials and circuits can be strongly altered by high-energy and high-dose ionizing radiations. Here, we investigate the effects of alpha () radiation with MeV-range energy on silicon oxynitride (SiON) optical waveguides. Irradiation with a dose of 5×1015 cm-2 increases the refractive index of the SiON core by nearly 10-2, twice as much that of the surrounding silica cladding, leading to a significant increase of the refractive index contrast of the waveguide. The higher mode confinement induced by -radiation reduces the loss of tightly bent waveguides. We show that this increases the quality factor of microring resonators by 20%, with values larger than 105 after irradiation.

  20. High-Performance Flexible Waveguiding Photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chun-Hsien; Chuang, Jui-Kang; Chen, Fang-Chung

    2013-01-01

    The use of flat-plane solar concentrators is an effective approach toward collecting sunlight economically and without sun trackers. The optical concentrators are, however, usually made of rigid glass or plastics having limited flexibility, potentially restricting their applicability. In this communication, we describe flexible waveguiding photovoltaics (FWPVs) that exhibit high optical efficiencies and great mechanical flexibility. We constructed these FWPVs by integrating poly-Si solar cells, a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) waveguide, and a TiO2-doped backside reflector. Optical microstructures that increase the light harvesting ability of the FWPVs can be fabricated readily, through soft lithography, on the top surface of the PDMS waveguide. Our optimized structure displayed an optical efficiency of greater than 42% and a certified power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5.57%, with a projected PCE as high as approximately 18%. This approach might open new avenues for the harvesting of solar energy at low cost with efficient, mechanically flexible photovoltaics. PMID:23873225

  1. Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Babaee, Sahab; Overvelde, Johannes T. B.; Chen, Elizabeth R.; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    We combine numerical simulations and experiments to design a new class of reconfigurable waveguides based on three-dimensional origami-inspired metamaterials. Our strategy builds on the fact that the rigid plates and hinges forming these structures define networks of tubes that can be easily reconfigured. As such, they provide an ideal platform to actively control and redirect the propagation of sound. We design reconfigurable systems that, depending on the externally applied deformation, can act as networks of waveguides oriented along one, two, or three preferential directions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the capability of the structure to guide and radiate acoustic energy along predefined directions can be easily switched on and off, as the networks of tubes are reversibly formed and disrupted. The proposed designs expand the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials and exploit complex waveguiding to enhance control over propagation and radiation of acoustic energy, opening avenues for the design of a new class of tunable acoustic functional systems. PMID:28138527

  2. Waveguide finite elements for curved structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnveden, Svante; Fraggstedt, Martin

    2008-05-01

    A waveguide finite element formulation for the analysis of curved structures is introduced. The formulation is valid for structures that along one axis have constant properties. It is based on a modified Hamilton's principle valid for general linear viscoelastic motion, which is derived here. Using this principle, material properties such as losses may be distributed in the system and may vary with frequency. Element formulations for isoparametric solid elements and deep shell elements are presented for curved waveguides as well as for straight waveguides. In earlier works, the curved elements have successfully been used to model a passenger car tyre. Here a simple validation example and convergence study is presented, which considers a finite length circular cylinder and all four elements presented are used, in turn, to model this structure. Calculated results compare favourably to those in the literature.

  3. Quantum interference between transverse spatial waveguide modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Aseema; Zhang, Mian; Dutt, Avik; Ramelow, Sven; Nussenzveig, Paulo; Lipson, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Integrated quantum optics has the potential to markedly reduce the footprint and resource requirements of quantum information processing systems, but its practical implementation demands broader utilization of the available degrees of freedom within the optical field. To date, integrated photonic quantum systems have primarily relied on path encoding. However, in the classical regime, the transverse spatial modes of a multi-mode waveguide have been easily manipulated using the waveguide geometry to densely encode information. Here, we demonstrate quantum interference between the transverse spatial modes within a single multi-mode waveguide using quantum circuit-building blocks. This work shows that spatial modes can be controlled to an unprecedented level and have the potential to enable practical and robust quantum information processing.

  4. Modal characteristics of crossed rectangular waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, F.-L. C.

    1977-01-01

    An integral-eigenvalue problem is formulated for a crossed rectangular waveguide and solved numerically by applying the Ritz-Galerkin method. Theoretical formulas for determining cutoff frequencies and modal-field expressions are obtained for the specific case of a symmetrical rectangular waveguide, cutoff frequencies are calculated numerically, and the results are verified by comparison with available experimental data. The modal fields are expressed in terms of Fourier series for both TE and TM modes. It is found that the bandwidth can be increased to a maximum of 38% when the waveguide dimensions are properly selected and that the numerical results are in agreement with those computed by the method of partial regions. Some practical applications of the modal-field equations are briefly noted.

  5. Assembly and performance of silicone polymer waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lostutter, Calob K.; Hodge, Malcolm H.; Marrapode, Thomas R.; Swatowski, Brandon W.; Weidner, W. Ken

    2016-03-01

    We report on the functionality and key performance properties of 50 μm x 50 μm flexible graded index silicone polymer waveguides. The materials show low optical propagation losses of < 0.04 dB/cm @ 850 nm over 1 m lengths as well as stability to 2000 hours 85°C/85% relative humidity and 5 cycles of 260°C solder wave reflow testing. Methods to fabricate large area panels are demonstrated for scaled manufacturing of polymer based optical printed wiring boards. The polymer waveguides are terminated with a passive direct fiber attach method. Fully MPO connectorized waveguide panels are realized and their optical performance properties assessed.

  6. Beam waveguides in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, R. C.; Smith, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    A beam waveguide is a mechanism for guiding electromagnetic radiation from one part of an antenna to another through a series of reflectors. Appropriate placement of reflectors on an antenna allows a beam to be guided around the elevation axis and/or below the alidade. The beam waveguide permits placement of all electronics in a room on the alidade below the elevation axis, or below the alidade; feed horn covers to be protected from the weather; and feed electronics to be in spacious rooms rather than in crowded cones, and always level rather than tipping with change in elevation angle. These factors can lead to lower costs in implementation such as Ka-band, better antenna performance at X-band, more efficient and stable performance of transmitters and receivers, and lower maintenance and operating costs. Studies are underway to determine methods for converting the major antennas of the Deep Space Network (DSN) to beam waveguide operations by 1995.

  7. Guided plasmon polaritons for triangular metallic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuntian; Xiao, Sanshui; Nielsen, Torben Roland

    2008-11-01

    The properties of guided plasmon polaritons supported by a triangular metallic waveguide are presented. The waveguide examined is a metal core with equilateral triangular cross section embedded in an infinite lossless dielectric media. Based on the rotation symmetry of the waveguide, the sketch of the supported fundament modes is given. The fundamental modes can be constructed by a proper combination of the corner modes and surface modes, which can be supported by isolated metal corners and metallic-dielectric interface respectively. The mode properties of the metallic waveguide, e.g., the dispersion and propagation length with the size of the metal core, mode field orientation and field distribution profiles are addressed by using a finite element method. The numerical singularities of the optical field are removed by smoothing the corners with an appropriate arc at the nano meter scale. The guided modes supported by the structure are determined and characterized for both subwavelength and suprawavelength. We find that the corner modes exist in both regimes, while the surface modes only appear in the suprawavelenth. Our results also show that the mode properties preserve a certain kind of symmetry of the waveguides. The degenerate modes exist both for the corner guided modes and for surface guided modes. The first fundamental corner modes is a polarization-independent mode without the cut-off size of the waveguides. Calculations also show how sensitively the mode changes with the corner sharpness. The propagation constant of the corner modes is sensitive to the corner sharpness, while the side modes are unaffected.

  8. Morphodynamics and sediment tracers in 1-D (MAST-1D): 1-D sediment transport that includes exchange with an off-channel sediment reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, J. Wesley; Viparelli, Enrica; Piégay, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    Bed material transported in geomorphically active gravel bed rivers often has a local source at nearby eroding banks and ends up sequestered in bars not far downstream. However, most 1-D numerical models for gravel transport assume that gravel originates from and deposits on the channel bed. In this paper, we present a 1-D framework for simulating morphodynamic evolution of bed elevation and size distribution in a gravel-bed river that actively exchanges sediment with its floodplain, which is represented as an off-channel sediment reservoir. The model is based on the idea that sediment enters the channel at eroding banks whose elevation depends on total floodplain sediment storage and on the average elevation of the floodplain relative to the channel bed. Lateral erosion of these banks occurs at a specified rate that can represent either net channel migration or channel widening. Transfer of material out of the channel depends on a typical bar thickness and a specified lateral exchange rate due either to net channel migration or narrowing. The model is implemented using an object oriented framework that allows users to explore relationships between bank supply, bed structure, and lateral change rates. It is applied to a ∼50-km reach of the Ain River, France, that experienced significant reduction in sediment supply due to dam construction during the 20th century. Results are strongly sensitive to lateral exchange rates, showing that in this reach, the supply of sand and gravel at eroding banks and the sequestration of gravel in point bars can have strong influence on overall reach-scale sediment budgets.

  9. 1D Josephson quantum interference grids: diffraction patterns and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, M.; Badoni, D.; Corato, V.; Merlo, V.; Ottaviani, I.; Salina, G.; Cirillo, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Winkler, D.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the magnetic response of transmission lines with embedded Josephson junctions and thus generating a 1D underdamped array. The measured multi-junction interference patterns are compared with the theoretical predictions for Josephson supercurrent modulations when an external magnetic field couples both to the inter-junction loops and to the junctions themselves. The results provide a striking example of the analogy between Josephson phase modulation and 1D optical diffraction grid. The Fiske resonances in the current-voltage characteristics with voltage spacing {Φ0}≤ft(\\frac{{\\bar{c}}}{2L}\\right) , where L is the total physical length of the array, {Φ0} the magnetic flux quantum and \\bar{c} the speed of light in the transmission line, demonstrate that the discrete line supports stable dynamic patterns generated by the ac Josephson effect interacting with the cavity modes of the line.

  10. 1-D Numerical Analysis of ABCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Richard

    1999-01-01

    ABCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engine into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Except for the heat source, the basic operation of the ABCC is similar to the basic operation of the RBCC engine. The ABCC is intended to have a higher specific impulse than the RBCC for single stage Earth to orbit vehicle. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in ABCC propulsion system. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model using conservation of mass, linear momentum, and energy equations that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic ABCC engine following a flight path. At specific points during the development of the 1-D numerical model a myriad of tests were performed to prove the program produced consistent, realistic numbers that follow compressible flow theory for various inlet conditions.

  11. Forecast analysis of optical waveguide bus performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledesma, R.; Rourke, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    Elements to be considered in the design of a data bus include: architecture; data rate; modulation, encoding, detection; power distribution requirements; protocol, work structure; bus reliability, maintainability; interterminal transmission medium; cost; and others specific to application. Fiber- optic data bus considerations for a 32 port transmissive star architecture, are discussed in a tutorial format. General optical-waveguide bus concepts, are reviewed. The electrical and optical performance of a 32 port transmissive star bus, and the effects of temperature on the performance of optical-waveguide buses are examined. A bibliography of pertinent references and the bus receiver test results are included.

  12. Single Mode Optical Waveguide Design Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-10

    AD-AI04 584 CORNING GLASS WORKS NY F/G 20/6 SINGLE MODE OPTICAL WAVEGUIDE DESIGN INVESTIGATION. (7 N JUL 81 V A BHAGAVATJLA, R A WESTWIG. D B KECK...Contract N00173-8O-C-0563 / V. A./Bhagavatula R. A..Westwig D. B.!Keck Corning Glass Works Corning, New York H> July 1,0, 1981 CL 8m NA Single Mode Optical...Waveguide Design Inve-tigation Progress Report 3 1. Sumpry 1.1 ,A total of six fibers have been fabricated with parameters fitting the design matrix

  13. Silica waveguide devices and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C. J.; Schmidt, Kevin M.; Lin, Wenhua

    2005-03-01

    Silica waveguide technology transitioned from laboratories to commercial use in early 1990. Since then, various applications have been exploited based on this technology. Tens of thousands of array waveguide grating (AWG) devices have been installed worldwide for DWDM Mux and Demux. The recent FTTH push in Japan has renewed the significance of this technology for passive optical network (PON) application. This paper reviews the past development of this technology, compare it with competing technologies, and outline the future role of this technology in the evolving optical communications.

  14. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

    1993-01-05

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  15. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Carson, Richard F.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  16. Soft tissue cutting with ultrasonic mechanical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Mark. P.; McGuinness, Garrett; Gavin, Graham P.

    2012-05-01

    The use of ultrasonic vibrations transmitted via small diameter wire waveguides represents a technology that has potential for minimally invasive procedures in surgery. This form of energy delivery results in distal tip mechanical vibrations with amplitudes of vibration of up to 50 μm and at frequencies between 20-50 kHz commonly reported. This energy can then be used by micro-cutting surgical tools and end effectors for a range of applications such as bone cutting, cement removal in joint revision surgery and soft tissue cutting. One particular application which has gained regulatory approval in recent years is in the area of cardiovascular surgery in the removal of calcified atherosclerotic plaques and chronic total occlusions. This paper builds on previous work that was focused on the ultrasonic perforation of soft vascular tissue using ultrasonically activated mechanical waveguides and the applied force required to initiate failure in soft tissue when compared with non-ultrasonic waveguides. An ultrasonic device and experimental rig was developed that can deliver ultrasonic vibrations to the distal tip of 1.0 mm diameter nickel-titanium waveguides. The operation of the ultrasonic device has been characterized at 22.5 kHz with achievable amplitudes of vibration in the range of 16 - 40μm. The experimental rig allows the ultrasonically activated waveguide to be advanced through a tissue sample over a range of feedrates and the waveguide-tissue interaction force can be measured during perforation into the tissue. Preliminary studies into the effects of feedrate on porcine aortic arterial tissue perforation forces are presented as part of this work. A range of amplitudes of vibration at the wire waveguide distal tip were examined. The resulting temperature increase when perforating artery wall when using the energized wire waveguides is also examined. Results show a clear multistage failure of the tissue. The first stage involves a rise in force up to some

  17. Gamma-ray irradiated polymer optical waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C.-C.; Wei, T.-Y.; Chang, C.-Y.; Wang, W.-S.; Wei, Y.-Y.

    2008-01-14

    Optical waveguides fabricated by gamma-ray irradiation on polymer through a gold mask are presented. The gamma-ray induced index change is found almost linearly dependent on the dose of the irradiation. And the measured propagation losses are low enough for practical application. Due to the high penetrability of gamma ray, uniform refractive index change in depth can be easily achieved. Moreover, due to large-area printing, the uniformity of waveguide made by gamma-ray irradiation is much better than that by e-beam direct writing.

  18. Bidirectional waveguide coupling with plasmonic Fano nanoantennas

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Rui; Decker, Manuel Staude, Isabelle; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2014-08-04

    We introduce the concept of a bidirectional, compact single-element Fano nanoantenna that allows for directional coupling of light in opposite directions of a high-index dielectric waveguide for two different operation wavelengths. We utilize a Fano resonance to tailor the radiation phases of a gold nanodisk and a nanoslit that is inscribed into the nanodisk to realize bidirectional scattering. We show that this Fano nanoantenna operates as a bidirectional waveguide coupler at telecommunication wavelengths and, thus, is ideally suitable for integrated wavelength-selective light demultiplexing.

  19. DIELECTRIC-LOADED WAVE-GUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Robertson-Shersby-Harvie, R.B.; Mullett, L.B.

    1957-04-23

    This patent presents a particular arrangement for delectric loading of a wave-guide carrying an electromagnetic wave in the E or TM mode of at least the second order, to reduce the power dissipated as the result of conduction loss in the wave-guide walls. To achieve this desirabie result, the effective dielectric constants in the radial direction of adjacent coaxial tubular regions bounded approximateiy by successive nodai surfaces within the electromagnetic field are of two different values alternating in the radial direction, the intermost and outermost regions being of the lower value, and the dielectric constants between nodes are uniform.

  20. Waveguide-QED-based photonic quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huaixiu; Gauthier, Daniel J; Baranger, Harold U

    2013-08-30

    We propose a new scheme for quantum computation using flying qubits--propagating photons in a one-dimensional waveguide interacting with matter qubits. Photon-photon interactions are mediated by the coupling to a four-level system, based on which photon-photon π-phase gates (CONTROLLED-NOT) can be implemented for universal quantum computation. We show that high gate fidelity is possible, given recent dramatic experimental progress in superconducting circuits and photonic-crystal waveguides. The proposed system can be an important building block for future on-chip quantum networks.

  1. Ultrahigh-Q nanocavity with 1D photonic gap.

    PubMed

    Notomi, M; Kuramochi, E; Taniyama, H

    2008-07-21

    Recently, various wavelength-sized cavities with theoretical Q values of approximately 10(8) have been reported, however, they all employ 2D or 3D photonic band gaps to realize strong light confinement. Here we numerically demonstrate that ultrahigh-Q (2.0x10(8)) and wavelength-sized (V(eff) approximately 1.4(lambda/n)3) cavities can be achieved by employing only 1D periodicity.

  2. Nonreciprocity of edge modes in 1D magnonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenkov, I.; Kalyabin, D.; Osokin, S.; Klos, J. W.; Krawczyk, M.; Nikitov, S.

    2015-03-01

    Spin waves propagation in 1D magnonic crystals is investigated theoretically. Mathematical model based on plane wave expansion method is applied to different types of magnonic crystals, namely bi-component magnonic crystal with symmetric/asymmetric boundaries and ferromagnetic film with periodically corrugated top surface. It is shown that edge modes in magnonic crystals may exhibit nonreciprocal behaviour at much lower frequencies than in homogeneous films.

  3. The stability of 1-D soliton in transverse direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Deepa; Bera, Ratan Kumar; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman

    2016-12-01

    The complete characterization of the exact 1-D solitary wave solutions (both stationary and propagating) for light plasma coupled system have been studied extensively in the parameter space of light frequency and the group speed [Poornakala et al., Phys. Plasmas 9(5), 1820 (2002)]. It has been shown in 1-D that solutions with single light wave peak and paired structures are stable and hence long lived. However, solutions having multiple peaks of light wave are unstable due to Raman scattering instability [Saxena et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 072307 (2007)]. Here, we have shown with the help of 2-D fluid simulation that single peak and paired solutions too get destabilized by the transverse filamentation instability. The numerical growth rates obtained from simulations is seen to compare well with the analytical values. It is also shown that multiple peaks solitons first undergo the regular 1-D forward Raman scattering instability. Subsequently, they undergo a distinct second phase of destabilization through transverse filamentation instability. This is evident from the structure as well as the plot of the perturbed energy which shows a second phase of growth after saturating initially. The growth rate of the filamentation instability being comparatively slower than the forward Raman instability this phase comes quite late and is clearly distinguishable.

  4. Examining Prebiotic Chemistry Using O(^1D) Insertion Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Brian M.; Laas, Jacob C.; Weaver, Susanna L. Widicus

    2013-06-01

    Aminomethanol, methanediol, and methoxymethanol are all prebiotic molecules expected to form via photo-driven grain surface chemistry in the interstellar medium (ISM). These molecules are expected to be precursors for larger, biologically-relevant molecules in the ISM such as sugars and amino acids. These three molecules have not yet been detected in the ISM because of the lack of available rotational spectra. A high resolution (sub)millimeter spectrometer coupled to a molecular source is being used to study these molecules using O(^1D) insertion reactions. The O(^1D) chemistry is initiated using an excimer laser, and the products of the insertion reactions are adiabatically cooled using a supersonic expansion. Experimental parameters are being optimized by examination of methanol formed from O(^1D) insertion into methane. Theoretical studies of the structure and reaction energies for aminomethanol, methanediol, and methoxymethanol have been conducted to guide the laboratory studies once the methanol experiment has been optimized. The results of the calculations and initial experimental results will be presented.

  5. Development of 1D Liner Compression Code for IDL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, Akihisa; Slough, John; Pancotti, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    A 1D liner compression code is developed to model liner implosion dynamics in the Inductively Driven Liner Experiment (IDL) where FRC plasmoid is compressed via inductively-driven metal liners. The driver circuit, magnetic field, joule heating, and liner dynamics calculations are performed at each time step in sequence to couple these effects in the code. To obtain more realistic magnetic field results for a given drive coil geometry, 2D and 3D effects are incorporated into the 1D field calculation through use of correction factor table lookup approach. Commercial low-frequency electromagnetic fields solver, ANSYS Maxwell 3D, is used to solve the magnetic field profile for static liner condition at various liner radius in order to derive correction factors for the 1D field calculation in the code. The liner dynamics results from the code is verified to be in good agreement with the results from commercial explicit dynamics solver, ANSYS Explicit Dynamics, and previous liner experiment. The developed code is used to optimize the capacitor bank and driver coil design for better energy transfer and coupling. FRC gain calculations are also performed using the liner compression data from the code for the conceptual design of the reactor sized system for fusion energy gains.

  6. Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The current global energy problem can be attributed to insufficient fossil fuel supplies and excessive greenhouse gas emissions resulting from increasing fossil fuel consumption. The huge demand for clean energy potentially can be met by solar-to-electricity conversions. The large-scale use of solar energy is not occurring due to the high cost and inadequate efficiencies of existing solar cells. Nanostructured materials have offered new opportunities to design more efficient solar cells, particularly one-dimensional (1-D) nanomaterials for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. These 1-D nanostructures, including nanotubes, nanowires, and nanorods, offer significant opportunities to improve efficiencies of solar cells by facilitating photon absorption, electron transport, and electron collection; however, tremendous challenges must be conquered before the large-scale commercialization of such cells. This review specifically focuses on the use of 1-D nanostructures for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. Other nanostructured solar cells or solar cells based on bulk materials are not covered in this review. Major topics addressed include dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells, and p-n junction solar cells.

  7. Ridge waveguides in Nd:ABC3O7 disordered crystals produced by swift C5+ ion irradiation and precise diamond dicing: Broad band guidance and spectroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Luan, Qingfang; He, Ruiyun; Cheng, Chen; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Zhou, Shengqiang; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Chen, Feng

    2015-05-01

    Optical ridge waveguides have been manufactured in the crystals of Nd:SrLaGa3O7 and Nd:SrGdGa3O7 by combining techniques of swift carbon ion irradiation with precise diamond blade dicing. The guiding properties of the waveguides are investigated at broadband (at wavelength of 633 nm, 1064 nm, and 4 μm). After annealing treatment at 200 °C for 1 h, the propagation losses of ridge waveguides could be reduced to as low as 1 dB/cm. The confocal microfluorescence emission spectra confirm that the fluorescence properties of Nd3+ ions are almost unchanged after the ion irradiation processing, showing promising potentials as application of miniature light sources in integrated optics.

  8. Nano-Photonic Structures for Light Trapping in Ultra-Thin Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Pathi, Prathap; Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2017-01-13

    Thick wafer-silicon is the dominant solar cell technology. It is of great interest to develop ultra-thin solar cells that can reduce materials usage, but still achieve acceptable performance and high solar absorption. Accordingly, we developed a highly absorbing ultra-thin crystalline Si based solar cell architecture using periodically patterned front and rear dielectric nanocone arrays which provide enhanced light trapping. The rear nanocones are embedded in a silver back reflector. In contrast to previous approaches, we utilize dielectric photonic crystals with a completely flat silicon absorber layer, providing expected high electronic quality and low carrier recombination. This architecture creates a dense mesh of wave-guided modes at near-infrared wavelengths in the absorber layer, generating enhanced absorption. For thin silicon (<2 μm) and 750 nm pitch arrays, scattering matrix simulations predict enhancements exceeding 90%. Absorption approaches the Lambertian limit at small thicknesses (<10 μm) and is slightly lower (by ~5%) at wafer-scale thicknesses. Parasitic losses are ~25% for ultra-thin (2 μm) silicon and just 1%-2% for thicker (>100 μm) cells. There is potential for 20 μm thick cells to provide 30 mA/cm² photo-current and >20% efficiency. This architecture has great promise for ultra-thin silicon solar panels with reduced material utilization and enhanced light-trapping.

  9. Nano-Photonic Structures for Light Trapping in Ultra-Thin Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pathi, Prathap; Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2017-01-01

    Thick wafer-silicon is the dominant solar cell technology. It is of great interest to develop ultra-thin solar cells that can reduce materials usage, but still achieve acceptable performance and high solar absorption. Accordingly, we developed a highly absorbing ultra-thin crystalline Si based solar cell architecture using periodically patterned front and rear dielectric nanocone arrays which provide enhanced light trapping. The rear nanocones are embedded in a silver back reflector. In contrast to previous approaches, we utilize dielectric photonic crystals with a completely flat silicon absorber layer, providing expected high electronic quality and low carrier recombination. This architecture creates a dense mesh of wave-guided modes at near-infrared wavelengths in the absorber layer, generating enhanced absorption. For thin silicon (<2 μm) and 750 nm pitch arrays, scattering matrix simulations predict enhancements exceeding 90%. Absorption approaches the Lambertian limit at small thicknesses (<10 μm) and is slightly lower (by ~5%) at wafer-scale thicknesses. Parasitic losses are ~25% for ultra-thin (2 μm) silicon and just 1%–2% for thicker (>100 μm) cells. There is potential for 20 μm thick cells to provide 30 mA/cm2 photo-current and >20% efficiency. This architecture has great promise for ultra-thin silicon solar panels with reduced material utilization and enhanced light-trapping. PMID:28336851

  10. Single rolled-up InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot microtubes integrated with silicon-on-insulator waveguides.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhaobing; Veerasubramanian, Venkat; Bianucci, Pablo; Mukherjee, Shouvik; Mi, Zetian; Kirk, Andrew G; Plant, David V

    2011-06-20

    We report on single rolled-up microtubes integrated with silicon-on-insulator waveguides. Microtubes with diameters of ~7 μm, wall thicknesses of ~250 nm, and lengths greater than 100 μm are fabricated by selectively releasing a coherently strained InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot layer from the handling GaAs substrate. The microtubes are then transferred from their host substrate to silicon-on-insulator waveguides by an optical fiber abrupt taper. The Q-factor of the waveguide coupled microtube is measured to be 1.5×10(5), the highest recorded for a semiconductor microtube cavity to date. The insertion loss and extinction ratio of the microtube are 1 dB and 34 dB respectively. By pumping the microtube with a 635 nm laser, the resonance wavelength is shifted by 0.7 nm. The integration of InGaAs/GaAs microtubes with silicon-on-insulator waveguides provides a simple, low loss, high extinction passive filter solution in the C+L band communication regime.

  11. Transversal Anderson localization of sound in acoustic waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yangtao; Ke, Manzhu; Feng, Junheng; Wang, Mudi; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-04-22

    We present designs of one-dimensional acoustic waveguide arrays and investigate wave propagation inside. Under the condition of single identical waveguide mode and weak coupling, the acoustic wave motion in waveguide arrays can be modeled with a discrete mode-coupling theory. The coupling constants can be retrieved from simulations or experiments as the function of neighboring waveguide separations. Sound injected into periodic arrays gives rise to the discrete diffraction, exhibiting ballistic or extended transport in transversal direction. But sound injected into randomized waveguide arrays readily leads to Anderson localization transversally. The experimental results show good agreement with simulations and theoretical predictions.

  12. Mode imaging and loss evaluation of semiconductor waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Kim, Changsu; Yoshita, Masahiro; Nakamura, Takahiro; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken W.

    2014-05-15

    An imaging and loss evaluation method for semiconductor waveguides coupled with non-doped quantum wells is presented. Using the internal emission of the wells as a probe light source, the numbers and widths of the modes of waveguides with various ridge sizes were evaluated by CCD imaging, and the obtained values were consistent with effective index method calculation. Waveguide internal losses were obtained from analyses of the Fabry-Pérot fringes of waveguide emission spectra. We quantified the quality of 29 single-mode waveguide samples as an internal loss and variation of 10.2 ± 0.6  cm{sup −1}.

  13. Linear-array ultrasonic waveguide transducer for under sodium viewing.

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S. H.; Chien, H. T.; Wang, K.; Lawrence, W. P.; Engel, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-09-01

    In this report, we first present the basic design of a low-noise waveguide and its performance followed by a review of the array transducer technology. The report then presents the concept and basic designs of arrayed waveguide transducers that can apply to under-sodium viewing for in-service inspection of fast reactors. Depending on applications, the basic waveguide arrays consist of designs for sideway and downward viewing. For each viewing application, two array geometries, linear and circular, are included in design analysis. Methods to scan a 2-D target using a linear array waveguide transducer are discussed. Future plan to develop a laboratory array waveguide prototype is also presented.

  14. Nonlinear evolution equations for surface plasmons for nano-focusing at a Kerr/metallic interface and tapered waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutcher, Sihon H.; Osei, Albert; Biswas, Anjan

    2012-06-01

    Maxwell's equations for a metallic and nonlinear Kerr interface waveguide at the nanoscale can be approximated to a (1+1) D Nonlinear Schrodinger type model equation (NLSE) with appropriate assumptions and approximations. Theoretically, without losses or perturbations spatial plasmon solitons profiles are easily produced. However, with losses, the amplitude or beam profile is no longer stationary and adiabatic parameters have to be considered to understand propagation. For this model, adiabatic parameters are calculated considering losses resulting in linear differential coupled integral equations with constant definite integral coefficients not dependent on the transverse and longitudinal coordinates. Furthermore, by considering another configuration, a waveguide that is an M-NL-M (metal-nonlinear Kerr-metal) that tapers, the tapering can balance the loss experienced at a non-tapered metal/nonlinear Kerr interface causing attenuation of the beam profile, so these spatial plasmon solitons can be produced. In this paper taking into consideration the (1+1)D NLSE model for a tapered waveguide, we derive a one soliton solution based on He's Semi-Inverse Variational Principle (HPV).

  15. Enhanced four-wave-mixing effects by large group indices of one-dimensional silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Seung Hwan; Lee, Seoung Hun; Jong, Heung Sun; Lee, Jong-Moo; Lee, El-Hang; Kim, Kyong Hon

    2013-12-02

    Enhanced four-wave-mixing (FWM) effects have been observed with the help of large group-indices near the band edges in one-dimensional (1-D) silicon photonic crystal waveguides (Si PhCWs). A significant increase of the FWM conversion efficiency of about 17 dB was measured near the transmission band edge of the 1-D PhCW through an approximate 3.2 times increase of the group index from 8 to 24 with respect to the central transmission band region despite a large group-velocity dispersion. Numerical analyses based on the coupled-mode equations for the degenerated FWM process describe the experimentally measured results well. Our results indicate that the 1-D PhCWs are good candidates for large group-index enhanced nonlinearity devices even without having any special dispersion engineering.

  16. Polarization rotation and coupling between silicon waveguide and hybrid plasmonic waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangsik; Qi, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    We present a polarization rotation and coupling scheme that rotates a TE0 mode in a silicon waveguide and simultaneously couples the rotated mode to a hybrid plasmonic (HP0) waveguide mode. Such a polarization rotation can be realized with a partially etched asymmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguide consisting of a silicon strip waveguide, a thin oxide spacer, and a metal cap made from copper, gold, silver or aluminum. Two implementations, one with and one without the tapering of the metal cap are presented, and different taper shapes (linear and exponential) are also analyzed. The devices have large 3 dB conversion bandwidths (over 200 nm at near infrared) and short length (< 5 μm), and achieve a maximum coupling factor of ∼ 78% with a linearly tapered silver metal cap. PMID:25969038

  17. Analysis of the Suspended H-Waveguide and Other Related Dielectric Waveguide Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    propagation constants of a slot leaky-wave antenna array constructed from a sus- pended H- waveguide is presented. A technique for improving the radiation...spectral domain approach for determining the complex propagation constants of a slot leaky-wave antenna array constructed from a suspended H-vaveguide... analysis for the suspended H- waveguide could also be used for other planar dielectric structures of rectangular cross-section. Information in Figs. 7 and

  18. Electrically Tunable Nd:YAG waveguide laser based on Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Linan; Tan, Yang; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Zhou, Shengqiang; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a tunable hybrid Graphene-Nd:YAG cladding waveguide laser exploiting the electro-optic and the Joule heating effects of Graphene. A cladding Nd:YAG waveguide was fabricated by the ion irradiation. The multi-layer graphene were transferred onto the waveguide surface as the saturable absorber to get the Q-switched pulsed laser oscillation in the waveguide. Composing with appropriate electrodes, graphene based capacitance and heater were formed on the surface of the Nd:YAG waveguide. Through electrical control of graphene, the state of the hybrid waveguide laser was turned on or off. And the laser operation of the hybrid waveguide was electrically tuned between the continuous wave laser and the nanosecond pulsed laser. PMID:27833114

  19. Electrically Tunable Nd:YAG waveguide laser based on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Linan; Tan, Yang; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Zhou, Shengqiang; Chen, Feng

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate a tunable hybrid Graphene-Nd:YAG cladding waveguide laser exploiting the electro-optic and the Joule heating effects of Graphene. A cladding Nd:YAG waveguide was fabricated by the ion irradiation. The multi-layer graphene were transferred onto the waveguide surface as the saturable absorber to get the Q-switched pulsed laser oscillation in the waveguide. Composing with appropriate electrodes, graphene based capacitance and heater were formed on the surface of the Nd:YAG waveguide. Through electrical control of graphene, the state of the hybrid waveguide laser was turned on or off. And the laser operation of the hybrid waveguide was electrically tuned between the continuous wave laser and the nanosecond pulsed laser.

  20. Surface plasmon mode analysis of nanoscale metallic rectangular waveguide.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanmin; Wu, Bae-Ian; Chen, Hongsheng; Kong, Jin Au

    2007-09-17

    A detailed study of guided modes in a nanoscale metallic rectangular waveguide is presented by using the effective dielectric constant approach. The guided modes, including both traditional waveguide mode and surface plasmon mode, are investigated for the silver rectangular waveguide. The mode evolution in narrow waveguide is also discussed with the emphasis on the dependence of mode dispersion with waveguide height. Finally, the red-shift of the cutoff wavelength of the fundamental mode is observed when the waveguide height decreases, contrary to the behavior of regular metallic waveguide with PEC boundary. The comprehensive analysis can provide some guideline in the design of subwavelength optical devices based on the dispersion characteristics of metallic rectangular bore.

  1. Supermode dispersion and waveguide-to-slot mode transition in arrays of silicon-on-insulator waveguides.

    PubMed

    de Nobriga, Charles E; Hobbs, Gareth D; Wadsworth, William J; Knight, Jonathan C; Skryabin, Dmitry V; Samarelli, Antonio; Sorel, Marc; De La Rue, Richard M

    2010-12-01

    In this Letter, we report group index measurements of the supermodes of an array of two strongly coupled silicon-on-insulator waveguides. We observe coupling-induced dispersion that is greater than the material and waveguide dispersion of the individual waveguides. We demonstrate that the system transforms from supporting the two supermodes associated with two coupled waveguides to the single mode of a slot waveguide within the investigated spectral range. During the cutoff of the antisymmetric supermode, an anti-crossing between the symmetric TM and antisymmetric TE supermodes has been observed.

  2. Strongly Confined Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons Waveguiding Enabled by Planar Staggered Plasmonic Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Longfang; Xiao, Yifan; Liu, Yanhui; Zhang, Liang; Cai, Guoxiong; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel route to achieving highly efficient and strongly confined spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) waveguides at subwavelength scale enabled by planar staggered plasmonic waveguides (PSPWs). The structure of these new waveguides consists of an ultrathin metallic strip with periodic subwavelength staggered double groove arrays supported by a flexible dielectric substrate, leading to unique staggered EM coupling and waveguiding phenomenon. The spoof SPP propagation properties, including dispersion relations and near field distributions, are numerically investigated. Furthermore, broadband coplanar waveguide (CPW) to planar staggered plasmonic waveguide (PSPW) transitions are designed to achieve smooth momentum matching and highly efficient spoof SPP mode conversion. By applying these transitions, a CPW-PSPW-CPW structure is designed, fabricated and measured to verify the PSPW’s propagation performance at microwave frequencies. The investigation results show the proposed PSPWs have excellent performance of deep subwavelength spoof SPPs confinement, long propagation length and low bend loss, as well as great design flexibility to engineer the propagation properties by adjusting their geometry dimensions and material parameters. Our work opens up a new avenue for development of various advanced planar integrated plasmonic devices and circuits in microwave and terahertz regimes. PMID:27917930

  3. Strongly Confined Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons Waveguiding Enabled by Planar Staggered Plasmonic Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Longfang; Xiao, Yifan; Liu, Yanhui; Zhang, Liang; Cai, Guoxiong; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a novel route to achieving highly efficient and strongly confined spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) waveguides at subwavelength scale enabled by planar staggered plasmonic waveguides (PSPWs). The structure of these new waveguides consists of an ultrathin metallic strip with periodic subwavelength staggered double groove arrays supported by a flexible dielectric substrate, leading to unique staggered EM coupling and waveguiding phenomenon. The spoof SPP propagation properties, including dispersion relations and near field distributions, are numerically investigated. Furthermore, broadband coplanar waveguide (CPW) to planar staggered plasmonic waveguide (PSPW) transitions are designed to achieve smooth momentum matching and highly efficient spoof SPP mode conversion. By applying these transitions, a CPW-PSPW-CPW structure is designed, fabricated and measured to verify the PSPW’s propagation performance at microwave frequencies. The investigation results show the proposed PSPWs have excellent performance of deep subwavelength spoof SPPs confinement, long propagation length and low bend loss, as well as great design flexibility to engineer the propagation properties by adjusting their geometry dimensions and material parameters. Our work opens up a new avenue for development of various advanced planar integrated plasmonic devices and circuits in microwave and terahertz regimes.

  4. Wideband Waveguide Acousto-Optic Bragg Cell.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The results of an effort to improve the performance specifications of acousto - optic Bragg cells are reported. Various configurations of multiple...would provide a 700 MHz acousto - optic bandwidth. Investigated were Bragg cells fabricated on Ti diffused LiNb03 waveguides as well as Ti diffused LiNb03

  5. Nonlinear optical beam interactions in waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Meier, Joachim; Stegeman, George I; Silberberg, Y; Morandotti, R; Aitchison, J S

    2004-08-27

    We report our investigation of Kerr nonlinear beam interactions in discrete systems. The influence of power and the relative phase between two Gaussian shaped beams was investigated in detail by performing numerical simulations of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation and comparing the results with experiments done in AlGaAs waveguide arrays. Good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained.

  6. Transmission characteristics of finite periodic dielectric waveguides.

    PubMed

    Luan, Pi-Gang; Chang, Kao-Der

    2006-04-17

    Transmission properties of the periodic dielectric waveguide (PDWG) formed by aligning a sequence of dielectric cylinders in air are investigated theoretically. Unlike photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs), light confinement in a PDWG is due to total internal reflection. Besides, the dispersion relation of the guided modes is strongly influenced by the dielectric periodicity along the waveguide. The band structure for the guided modes is calculated using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The first band is used for guiding light, which makes PDWG single mode. Transmission is calculated using the multiple scattering method for various S shaped PDWGs, each containing two opposite bends. When PDWG operates in appropriate frequency ranges, high transmission (above 90%) is observed, even if the radius of curvature of the bends is reduced to three wavelengths. This feature indicates that the guiding ability of PDWG can be made better than the conventional waveguide when used in an optical circuit. In addition, PDWG has the advantage that it can be bent to any arbitrary shape while still preserves the high transmission, avoiding the geometric restriction that PCWs are subject to.

  7. Optimization of Aperiodic Waveguide Mode Converters

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G J; White, D A; Thompson, C A

    2004-12-09

    Previous studies by Haq, Webb and others have demonstrated the design of aperiodic waveguide structures to act as filters and mode converters. These aperiodic structures have been shown to yield high efficiency mode conversion or filtering in lengths considerably shorter than structures using gradual transitions and periodic perturbations. The design method developed by Haq and others has used mode-matching models for the irregular, stepped waveguides coupled with computer optimization to achieve the design goal using a Matlab optimization routine. Similar designs are described here, using a mode matching code written in Fortran and with optimization accomplished with the downhill simplex method with simulated annealing using an algorithm from the book Numerical Recipes in Fortran. Where Haq et al. looked mainly for waveguide shapes with relatively wide cavities, we have sought lower profile designs. It is found that lower profiles can meet the design goals and result in a structure with lower Q. In any case, there appear to be very many possible configurations for a given mode conversion goal, to the point that it is unlikely to find the same design twice. Tolerance analysis was carried out for the designs to show edge sensitivity and Monte Carlo degradation rate. The mode matching code and mode conversion designs were validated by comparison with FDTD solutions for the discontinuous waveguides.

  8. Planned waveguide electric field breakdown studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Faya; Li Zenghai

    2012-12-21

    This paper presents an experimental setup for X-band rf breakdown studies. The setup is composed of a section of WR90 waveguide with a tapered pin located at the middle of the waveguide E-plane. Another pin is used to rf match the waveguide so it operates in a travelling wave mode. By adjusting the penetration depth of the tapered pin, different surface electric field enhancements can be obtained. The setup will be used to study the rf breakdown rate dependence on power flow in the waveguide for a constant maximum surface electric field on the pin. Two groups of pins have been designed. The Q of one group is different and very low. The other has a similar Q. With the test of the two groups of pins, we should be able to discern how the net power flow and Q affect the breakdown. Furthermore, we will apply an electron beam treatment to the pins to study its effect on breakdown. Overall, these experiments should be very helpful in understanding rf breakdown phenomena and could significantly benefit the design of high gradient accelerator structures.

  9. Transforming guided waves with metamaterial waveguide cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viaene, S.; Ginis, V.; Danckaert, J.; Tassin, P.

    2016-04-01

    Metamaterials make use of subwavelength building blocks to enhance our control on the propagation of light. To determine the required material properties for a given functionality, i.e., a set of desired light flows inside a metamaterial device, metamaterial designs often rely on a geometrical design tool known as transformation optics. In recent years, applications in integrated photonics motivated several research groups to develop two-dimensional versions of transformation optics capable of routing surface waves along graphene-dielectric and metal-dielectric interfaces. Although guided electromagnetic waves are highly relevant to applications in integrated optics, no consistent transformation-optical framework has so far been developed for slab waveguides. Indeed, the conventional application of transformation optics to dielectric slab waveguides leads to bulky three-dimensional devices with metamaterial implementations both inside and outside of the waveguide's core. In this contribution, we develop a transformationoptical framework that still results in thin metamaterial waveguide devices consisting of a nonmagnetic metamaterial core of varying thickness [Phys. Rev. B 93.8, 085429 (2016)]. We numerically demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of our equivalence relations with three crucial functionalities: a beam bender, a beam splitter and a conformal lens. Our devices perform well on a qualitative (comparison of fields) and quantitative (comparison of transmitted power) level compared to their bulky counterparts. As a result, the geometrical toolbox of transformation optics may lead to a plethora of integrated metamaterial devices to route guided waves along optical chips.

  10. Chalcogenide Glass Optical Waveguides for Infrared Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Anne, Marie-Laure; Keirsse, Julie; Nazabal, Virginie; Hyodo, Koji; Inoue, Satoru; Boussard-Pledel, Catherine; Lhermite, Hervé; Charrier, Joël; Yanakata, Kiyoyuki; Loreal, Olivier; Le Person, Jenny; Colas, Florent; Compère, Chantal; Bureau, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Due to the remarkable properties of chalcogenide (Chg) glasses, Chg optical waveguides should play a significant role in the development of optical biosensors. This paper describes the fabrication and properties of chalcogenide fibres and planar waveguides. Using optical fibre transparent in the mid-infrared spectral range we have developed a biosensor that can collect information on whole metabolism alterations, rapidly and in situ. Thanks to this sensor it is possible to collect infrared spectra by remote spectroscopy, by simple contact with the sample. In this way, we tried to determine spectral modifications due, on the one hand, to cerebral metabolism alterations caused by a transient focal ischemia in the rat brain and, in the other hand, starvation in the mouse liver. We also applied a microdialysis method, a well known technique for in vivo brain metabolism studies, as reference. In the field of integrated microsensors, reactive ion etching was used to pattern rib waveguides between 2 and 300 μm wide. This technique was used to fabricate Y optical junctions for optical interconnections on chalcogenide amorphous films, which can potentially increase the sensitivity and stability of an optical micro-sensor. The first tests were also carried out to functionalise the Chg planar waveguides with the aim of using them as (bio)sensors. PMID:22423209

  11. LF Daytime Earth Ionosphere Waveguide Calculations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    this sort could be responsible for the slight discrep- ancies between the waveguide and wave hop calculations. In view of the differ- ence in methods...205.45 ANALYTICAL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING CORP DOC CON FOR DONALD I GALE OLD CCCORD RD BURLINGTON. ’A 01803 LAWRENCE LIVERMORE LABORATORY RADIO SCIE NCES Po

  12. Coplanar waveguide feed for microstrip patch antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Williams, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    A coplanar waveguide (CPW) loop is shown to be an effective low VSWR feed for microstrip antennas. The low VSWR transition between the CPW and the antenna is obtained without the use of a matching circuit, and it is relatively insensitive to the position of the antenna and the feed.

  13. Dispersive solitons in magneto-optic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Guzman, Jose; Ullah, Malik Zaka; Asma, Mir; Zhou, Qin; Biswas, Anjan

    2017-03-01

    This paper obtains bright, dark and singular dispersive optical soliton solutions with magneto-optic waveguides. The governing equation is the coupled Schrödinger-Hirota equation. The existence criteria of these solitons are also presented. Both Kerr law and power law of nonlinearity are considered.

  14. Investigation of semiconductor clad optical waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchman, T. E.; Mcwright, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    Glass waveguides are studied because of the ease and economy of fabricating devices in glass. All calculations are based on the assumption of a glass guide and substrate, but the effects being studied will occur on other materials if the proper refractive indices are used in the calculations.

  15. Vector Reflectometry in a Beam Waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eimer, J. R.; Bennett, C. L.; Chuss, D. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a one-port calibration technique for characterization of beam waveguide components with a vector network analyzer. This technique involves using a set of known delays to separate the responses of the instrument and the device under test. We demonstrate this technique by measuring the reflected performance of a millimeter-wave variable-delay polarization modulator.

  16. RWGSCAT - RECTANGULAR WAVEGUIDE JUNCTION SCATTERING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    In order to optimize frequency response and determine the tolerances required to meet RF specifications, accurate computer modeling of passive rectangular waveguide components is often required. Many rectangular waveguide components may be represented either exactly or approximately as a number of different size rectangular waveguides which are connected in series. RWGSCAT, Rectangular WaveGuide junction SCATtering program, solves for the scattering properties of a waveguide device. This device must consist of a number of rectangular waveguide sections of different cross sectional area which are connected in series. Devices which fall into this category include step transformers, filters, and smooth or corrugated rectangular horns. RWGSCAT will model such devices and accurately predict the reflection and transmission characteristics, taking into account higher order (other than dominant TE 10) mode excitation if it occurs, as well as multiple reflections and stored energy at each discontinuity. For devices which are large with respect to the wavelength of operation, the characteristics of the device may be required for computing a higher order mode or a number of higher order modes exciting the device. Such interactions can be represented by defining a scattering matrix for each discontinuity in the device, and then cascading the individual scattering matrices in order to determine the scattering matrix for the overall device. The individual matrices are obtained using the mode matching method. RWGSCAT is written in FORTRAN 77 for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. It has been successfully compiled and implemented using Lahey FORTRAN 77 under MS-DOS. A sample MS-DOS executable is provided on the distribution medium. It requires 377K of RAM for execution. Sample input data is also provided on the distribution medium. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are

  17. Extended-Range Ultrarefractive 1D Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal has been made to exploit the special wavelength-dispersive characteristics of devices of the type described in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms (NPO-30232) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 10a. A photonic crystal is an optical component that has a periodic structure comprising two dielectric materials with high dielectric contrast (e.g., a semiconductor and air), with geometrical feature sizes comparable to or smaller than light wavelengths of interest. Experimental superprisms have been realized as photonic crystals having three-dimensional (3D) structures comprising regions of amorphous Si alternating with regions of SiO2, fabricated in a complex process that included sputtering. A photonic crystal of the type to be exploited according to the present proposal is said to be one-dimensional (1D) because its contrasting dielectric materials would be stacked in parallel planar layers; in other words, there would be spatial periodicity in one dimension only. The processes of designing and fabricating 1D photonic crystal superprisms would be simpler and, hence, would cost less than do those for 3D photonic crystal superprisms. As in 3D structures, 1D photonic crystals may be used in applications such as wavelength-division multiplexing. In the extended-range configuration, it is also suitable for spectrometry applications. As an engineered structure or artificially engineered material, a photonic crystal can exhibit optical properties not commonly found in natural substances. Prior research had revealed several classes of photonic crystal structures for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden in certain frequency ranges, denoted photonic bandgaps. It had also been found that in narrow frequency bands just outside the photonic bandgaps, the angular wavelength dispersion of electromagnetic waves propagating in photonic crystal superprisms is much stronger than is the angular wavelength dispersion obtained

  18. Cascaded Second-Order Nonlinearities in Waveguides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundheimer, Michael Lee

    The cascaded second-order nonlinearity arising from the second-harmonic generation process in noncentrosymmetric media is a novel approach to achieving the nonlinear phase shifts required for all-optical signal processing. The research presented in this dissertation demonstrated and measured the cascaded second-order nonlinearity for the first time in viable integrated optical waveguide formats. Cascaded self-phase modulation was measured in potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO_4 or KTP) segmented quasi-phasematched waveguides at wavelengths near 855 nm and in the optical fiber telecommunications window near 1.585 μm using picosecond and femtosecond pulses, respectively. Spectral modulation and broadening were observed on the output fundamental spectrum and compared to predictions from pulsed second -harmonic generation theory under conditions of group-velocity mismatch (temporal walk-off) and group-velocity dispersion. Peak cascaded phase shifts of the fundamental of approximately pi at 855 nm were inferred with 690 W of peak guided power. Peak cascaded phase shifts of approximately pi/2 were inferred at 1.585 μm with 760 W of peak power in the guide. Direct interferometric measurements of the magnitude and sign of the cascaded nonlinear phase shift of the fundamental were performed in temperature-tuned lithium niobate (LiNbO _3) channel waveguides at 1.32 mum. The cascaded phase shift was shown to change sign upon passing through the phasematching condition, as required by theory. Peak cascaded phase shifts of +0.53 pi and -0.13 pi were measured for 86 W peak power in these waveguides. A non-uniform temperature profile along the waveguide led to a non-uniform wavevector-mismatch along the guide, resulting in an enhanced positive phase shift and an increased temperature bandwidth for the phase shift. The phase shifts achieved in this research are large enough to be suitable for some all-optical signal processing functions.

  19. Efficient waveguide coupler based on metal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenjun; Yang, Junbo; Chang, Shengli; Zhang, Jingjing; Lu, Huanyu

    2015-10-01

    Because of the diffraction limit of light, the scale of optical element stays in the order of wavelength, which makes the interface optics and nano-electronic components cannot be directly matched, thus the development of photonics technology encounters a bottleneck. In order to solve the problem that coupling of light into the subwavelength waveguide, this paper proposes a model of coupler based on metal materials. By using Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) wave, incident light can be efficiently coupled into waveguide of diameter less than 100 nm. This paper mainly aims at near infrared wave band, and tests a variety of the combination of metal materials, and by changing the structural parameters to get the maximum coupling efficiency. This structure splits the plane incident light with wavelength of 864 nm, the width of 600 nm into two uniform beams, and separately coupled into the waveguide layer whose width is only about 80 nm, and the highest coupling efficiency can reach above 95%. Using SPPs structure will be an effective method to break through the diffraction limit and implement photonics device high-performance miniaturization. We can further compress the light into small scale fiber or waveguide by using the metal coupler, and to save the space to hold more fiber or waveguide layer, so that we can greatly improve the capacity of optical communication. In addition, high-performance miniaturization of the optical transmission medium can improve the integration of optical devices, also provide a feasible solution for the photon computer research and development in the future.

  20. ESO science data product standard for 1D spectral products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micol, Alberto; Arnaboldi, Magda; Delmotte, Nausicaa A. R.; Mascetti, Laura; Retzlaff, Joerg

    2016-07-01

    The ESO Phase 3 process allows the upload, validation, storage, and publication of reduced data through the ESO Science Archive Facility. Since its introduction, 2 million data products have been archived and published; 80% of them are one-dimensional extracted and calibrated spectra. Central to Phase3 is the ESO science data product standard that defines metadata and data format of any product. This contribution describes the ESO data standard for 1d-spectra, its adoption by the reduction pipelines of selected instrument modes for in-house generation of reduced spectra, the enhanced archive legacy value. Archive usage statistics are provided.