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Sample records for 1d velocity structure

  1. Investigation of 1-D crustal velocity structure beneath Izmir Gulf and surroundings by using local earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Orhan; Özer, Ćaglar

    2016-04-01

    In this study; we examined one dimensional crustal velocity structure of Izmir gulf and surroundings. We used nearly one thousand high quality (A and B class) earthquake data which recorded by Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency (AFAD) [1], Bogazici University (BU-KOERI) [2] and National Observatory of Athens (NOA) [3,4]. We tried several synthetic tests to understand power of new velocity structure, and examined phase residuals, RMS values and shifting tests. After evaluating these tests; we decided one dimensional velocity structure and minimum 1-D P wave velocities, hypocentral parameter and earthquake locations from VELEST algorithm. Distribution of earthquakes was visibly improved by using new minimum velocity structure.

  2. Forward waveform modelling procedure for 1-D crustal velocity structure and its application to the southern Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seongryong; Rhie, Junkee; Kim, Geunyoung

    2011-04-01

    We propose a full-grid search procedure for broad-band waveform modelling to determine a 1-D crustal velocity model. The velocity model can be more constrained because of the use of broad-band waveforms instead of traveltimes for the crustal phases, although only a small number of event-station pairs were employed. Despite the time-consuming nature of the full-grid search method to search the whole model parameter space, the use of an empirical relationship between the P- and S-wave velocities can significantly reduce computation time. The proposed method was applied to a case in the southern Korean Peninsula. Broad-band waveforms obtained from two inland earthquakes that occurred on 2007 January 20 (Mw 4.6) and 2004 April 26 (Mw 3.6) were used to test the method. The three-layers over half-space crustal velocity model of the P- and S-wave velocities was estimated. Comparisons of waveform fitness between the final model and previously published models demonstrate advancements in the average value of waveform fitness for the inland earthquakes. In addition, 1-D velocity models were determined for three distinct tectonic regions, namely, the Gyonggi Massif, the Okcheon Belt and the Gyeongsang Basin, which are all located inside the study area. A comparison between the three models demonstrates that the crustal thickness of the southern Korean Peninsula increases from NW to SE and that the lower crustal composition of the Okcheon belt differs from that of the other tectonic regions.

  3. On constitutive functions for hindered settling velocity in 1-D settler models: Selection of appropriate model structure.

    PubMed

    Torfs, Elena; Balemans, Sophie; Locatelli, Florent; Diehl, Stefan; Bürger, Raimund; Laurent, Julien; François, Pierre; Nopens, Ingmar

    2017-03-01

    Advanced 1-D models for Secondary Settling Tanks (SSTs) explicitly account for several phenomena that influence the settling process (such as hindered settling and compression settling). For each of these phenomena a valid mathematical expression needs to be selected and its parameters calibrated to obtain a model that can be used for operation and control. This is, however, a challenging task as these phenomena may occur simultaneously. Therefore, the presented work evaluates several available expressions for hindered settling based on long-term batch settling data. Specific attention is paid to the behaviour of these hindered settling functions in the compression region in order to evaluate how the modelling of sludge compression is influenced by the choice of a certain hindered settling function. The analysis shows that the exponential hindered settling forms, which are most commonly used in traditional SST models, not only account for hindered settling but partly lump other phenomena (compression) as well. This makes them unsuitable for advanced 1-D models that explicitly include each phenomenon in a modular way. A power-law function is shown to be more appropriate to describe the hindered settling velocity in advanced 1-D SST models.

  4. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  5. 1-D seismic velocity model and hypocenter relocation using double difference method around West Papua region

    SciTech Connect

    Sabtaji, Agung E-mail: agung.sabtaji@bmkg.go.id; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    West Papua region has fairly high of seismicity activities due to tectonic setting and many inland faults. In addition, the region has a unique and complex tectonic conditions and this situation lead to high potency of seismic hazard in the region. The precise earthquake hypocenter location is very important, which could provide high quality of earthquake parameter information and the subsurface structure in this region to the society. We conducted 1-D P-wave velocity using earthquake data catalog from BMKG for April, 2009 up to March, 2014 around West Papua region. The obtained 1-D seismic velocity then was used as input for improving hypocenter location using double-difference method. The relocated hypocenter location shows fairly clearly the pattern of intraslab earthquake beneath New Guinea Trench (NGT). The relocated hypocenters related to the inland fault are also observed more focus in location around the fault.

  6. Ion velocity distribution at the termination shock: 1-D PIC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Quanming; Yang Zhongwei; Lembege, Bertrand

    2012-11-20

    The Voyager 2 (V2) plasma observations of the proton temperature downstream of the quasi-perpendicular heliospheric termination shock (TS) showed that upstream thermal solar wind ions played little role in the shock dissipation mechanism and their downstream temperature is an order of magnitude smaller than predicted by MHD Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. While pickup ions (PUI) are generally expected to play an important role in energy dissipation at the shock, the details remain unclear. Here, one-dimensional (1-D) Particle-in-cell (PIC) code is used to examine kinetic properties and downstream velocity distribution functions of pickup ions (the hot supra-thermal component) and solar wind protons (SWs, the cold component) at the perpendicular heliospheric termination shock. The code treats the pickup ions self-consistently as a third component. Present results show that: (1) both of the incident SWs and PUIs can be separated into two parts: reflected (R) ions and directly transmitted (DT) ions, the energy gain of the R ions at the shock front is much larger than that of the DT ions; (2) the fraction of reflected SWs and their downstream temperature decrease with the relative percentage PUI%; (3) no matter how large the PUI% is, the downstream ion velocity distribution function always can be separated into three parts: 1. a high energy tail (i.e. the wings) dominated by the reflected PUIs, 2. a low energy core mainly contributed by the directly transmitted SWs, and 3. a middle energy part which is a complicated superposition of reflected SWs and directly transmitted PUIs. The significance of the presence of pickup ions on shock front micro-structure and nonstationarity is also discussed.

  7. On a 1D nonlocal transport equation with nonlocal velocity and subcritical or supercritical diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    We study a 1D transport equation with nonlocal velocity with subcritical or supercritical dissipation. For all data in the weighted Sobolev space Hk (wλ,κ) ∩L∞, where k = max ⁡ (0 , 3 / 2 - α) and wλ,κ is a given family of Muckenhoupt weights, we prove a global existence result in the subcritical case α ∈ (1 , 2). We also prove a local existence theorem for large data in H2 (wλ,κ) ∩L∞ in the supercritical case α ∈ (0 , 1). The proofs are based on the use of the weighted Littlewood-Paley theory, interpolation along with some new commutator estimates.

  8. Minimum 1-D P-wave velocity reference model for Northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeifar, Meysam; Diehl, Tobias; Kissling, Edi

    2016-04-01

    Uniform high-precision earthquake location is of importance in a seismically active area like northern Iran where the earthquake catalogue is a prerequisite for seismic hazard assessment and tectonic interpretation. We compile a complete and consistent local earthquake data set for the northern Iran region, using information from two independently operating seismological networks, Iran Seismological Center (IRSC) network, administered by the Geophysical Institute of Tehran University, and Iran Broadband network administered by International Institute of Engineering Earthquake and Seismology (IIEES). Special care is taken during the merging process to reduce the number of errors in the data, including station parameters, event pairing, phase identification, and to the assessment of quantitative observation uncertainties. The derived P-wave 1D-velocity model for Northern Iran may serve for consistent routine high-precision earthquake location and as initial reference model for 3D seismic tomography.

  9. Constitutive modeling and control of 1D smart composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Jonathan P.; Ostrowski, James P.; Ponte-Castaneda, Pedro

    1998-07-01

    Homogenization techniques for determining effective properties of composite materials may provide advantages for control of stiffness and strain in systems using hysteretic smart actuators embedded in a soft matrix. In this paper, a homogenized model of a 1D composite structure comprised of shape memory alloys and a rubber-like matrix is presented. With proportional and proportional/integral feedback, using current as the input state and global strain as an error state, implementation scenarios include the use of tractions on the boundaries and a nonlinear constitutive law for the matrix. The result is a simple model which captures the nonlinear behavior of the smart composite material system and is amenable to experiments with various control paradigms. The success of this approach in the context of the 1D model suggests that the homogenization method may prove useful in investigating control of more general smart structures. Applications of such materials could include active rehabilitation aids, e.g. wrist braces, as well as swimming/undulating robots, or adaptive molds for manufacturing processes.

  10. Velocity-dependent quantum phase slips in 1D atomic superfluids

    PubMed Central

    Tanzi, Luca; Scaffidi Abbate, Simona; Cataldini, Federica; Gori, Lorenzo; Lucioni, Eleonora; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni; D’Errico, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Quantum phase slips are the primary excitations in one-dimensional superfluids and superconductors at low temperatures but their existence in ultracold quantum gases has not been demonstrated yet. We now study experimentally the nucleation rate of phase slips in one-dimensional superfluids realized with ultracold quantum gases, flowing along a periodic potential. We observe a crossover between a regime of temperature-dependent dissipation at small velocity and interaction and a second regime of velocity-dependent dissipation at larger velocity and interaction. This behavior is consistent with the predicted crossover from thermally-assisted quantum phase slips to purely quantum phase slips. PMID:27188334

  11. Data Analysis of cGPS stations in central Greece: station velocities and 1-D strain estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganas, Athanassios; Chousianitis, Konstantinos; Gianniou, Michalis

    2013-04-01

    We processed 30-s GPS data from permanent GNSS stations in central Greece, available at NOA since 2006. We obtained position time series along with horizontal and vertical velocities using the Kalman filtering approach and accounting for time-correlated noise content. The station distribution allowed us to draw velocity profiles and to calculate rates of baseline length change (1-D strain). In central Greece, the coherent picture of the velocity pattern for Attica and north-eastern Peloponnese (Corinth) stations (effectively a velocity "plateau" at 30 mm/yr) indicates that these areas belong to the same crustal block, although some internal strain is present within Attica's crust as well as across the Saronic Gulf. Our 1-D strain estimates are in general agreement with geological data (fault slip rates) in central Greece, implying accommodation of this crustal extension along E-W striking active normal faults. Some NE-SW directed shortening is mapped in the wider area to the west of the termination of the North Anatolian Fault (Sporades islands).

  12. Seismicity and Improved Velocity Structure in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Gok, R M; Rodgers, A J; Al-Enezi, A

    2006-01-26

    The Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN) began operation in 1997 and consists of nine three-component stations (eight short-period and one broadband) and is operated by the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Although the region is largely believed to be aseismic, considerable local seismicity is recorded by KNSN. Seismic events in Kuwait are clustered in two main groups, one in the south and another in the north. The KNSN station distribution is able to capture the southern cluster within the footprint of the network but the northern cluster is poorly covered. Events tend to occur at depths ranging from the free surface to about 20 km. Events in the northern cluster tend to be deeper than those in south, however this might be an artifact of the station coverage. We analyzed KNSN recordings of nearly 200 local events to improve understanding of seismic events and crustal structure in Kuwait, performing several analyses with increasing complexity. First, we obtained an optimized one-dimensional (1D) velocity model for the entire region using the reported KNSN arrival times and routine locations. The resulting model is consistent with a recently obtained model from the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities. Crustal structure is capped by the thick ({approx} 7 km) sedimentary rocks of the Arabian Platform underlain by normal velocities for stable continental crust. Our new model has a crustal thickness of 44 km, constrained by an independent study of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities by Pasyanos et al (2006). Locations and depths of events after relocation with the new model are broadly consistent with those reported by KISR, although a few events move more than a few kilometers. We then used a double-difference tomography technique (tomoDD) to jointly locate the events and estimate three-dimensional (3D) velocity structure. TomoDD is based on hypoDD relocation algorithm and it makes use of both absolute and

  13. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Gok, R; Zor, E; Walter, W

    2004-09-03

    We investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet and form a complex tectonic structure. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provided a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure. Zor et al. found an average 46 km thick crust in Anatolian plateau using six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver function alone with many-layered parameterization may result in an apparent depth-velocity tradeoff. In order to improve previous velocity model, we employed the joint inversion method with many layered parameterization of Julia et al. (2000) to the ETSE receiver functions. In this technique, the receiver function and surface-wave observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. We consider azimuthal changes of receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups. We calculated the receiver functions using iterative time-domain deconvolution technique and surface wave group velocity dispersion curves between 10-100 sec. We are making surface wave dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and have incorporated them into a regional group velocity model. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocity in the northeast. This indicates slow upper mantle velocities in the region consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. We started with both the 1-D model that is obtained with the 12 tones dam explosion shot data recorded by ETSE network and the existing receiver function

  14. Seismicity and Improved Velocity Structure in Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gok, R.; Rodgers, A.; Al-Enezi, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN) began operation in 1997 and consists of nine three-component stations (eight short-period and one broadband). Although the region is largely believed to be aseismic, considerable local seismicity is recorded by KNSN. Seismic events in Kuwait are clustered in two main groups, one in the south and another in the north. The KNSN station distribution is able to capture the southern cluster within the footprint of the network but the northern cluster is poorly covered. We have analyzed KNSN recordings of nearly 200 local events to improve understanding of seismic events and crustal structure in Kuwait, performing several analyses with increasing complexity. First, we obtained an optimized one-dimensional (1D) velocity model for the entire region using the KNSN bulletin locations. We observe a consistency of this model with the model obtained from the joint inversion of receiver function and surface wave group velocities. Crustal structure is capped by the thick (~ 7 km) sedimentary rocks of the Arabian Platform and normal velocities for stable continental crust. We then used a double-difference tomography technique (tomoDD) and the optimized 1D model to jointly locate the events and estimate three-dimensional (3D) structure by tomographic inversion. TomoDD is based on hypoDD relocation algorithm and it makes use of both absolute and relative arrival times. We obtained ~1500 absolute P and S arrival times and ~3200 P and S wave arrival time differences. Finally, we calculated Mw's of nearly 100 events using the coda magnitude technique of Mayeda et al., (2003). Although the current studies will not be able to reveal the source of current seismicity in Kuwait, we obtain a considerable amount of improvement in the velocity model and the reduced scatter of travel time residuals relative to the routine KNSN bulletin. The new velocity model and moment magnitudes will be utilized in ground motion prediction and hazard estimate studies

  15. Computation of 1-D shock structure using nonlinear coupled constitutive relations and generalized hydrodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenwen; Jiang, Zhongzheng; Chen, Weifang

    2016-11-01

    The moment methods in rarefied gas dynamics could be divided into generalized hydrodynamic equations (GHE) and extended hydrodynamic equations (EHE), e.g., Burnett equations, Grad equations and R-13 equations, theoretically. Eu firstly developed the GHE based on a non-equilibrium canonical distribution function and demonstrated the thermodynamically consistent of this model. Subsequently, nonlinear coupled constitutive relations (NCCR) was proposed by Myong by omitting the product of heat flux and velocity gradient in GHE to reduce the computational complexity. According to the successful application in 1-D shock wave structure and 2-D flat plate flow, the capability of NCCR has already been demonstrated successfully. The motivation of this study was to investigate the different behavior of NCCR and GHE for monatomic and diatomic gases in one-dimensional shock structure problems. Therefore, argon and nitrogen shock structure was calculated using both GHE and NCCR model up to Ma=50. The 3rd order MUSCL scheme for inviscid term and the 2nd order central difference scheme for viscid scheme were employed to carry out the computations. Finally, the present results including shock wave profile and its qualitative properties by NCCR and GHE are compared with that of DSMC and NS equations. The results showed that the GHE yield 1-D shock wave in much closer agreement with DSMC results than do the NCCR model without considering the computational complexity and efficiency in present cases.

  16. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M. E.; Gok, R.; Zor, E.; Walter, W. R.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the crust and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet, forming a complex tectonic regime. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provide a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure of the region. Zor et al. (2003) found an average 46 km thick crust in the Anatolian plateau using a six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver functions alone, however, may result in an apparent depth-velocity trade-off [Ammon et al., 1990]. In order to improve upon this velocity model, we have combined the receiver functions with surface wave data using the joint inversion method of Julia et al. (2000). In this technique, the two sets of observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. The receiver functions are calculated using an iterative time-domain deconvolution technique. We also consider azimuthal changes in the receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups accordingly. We are improving our surface wave model by making Love and Rayleigh dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and incorporating them into a regional group velocity model for periods between 10 and 100 seconds. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocities toward the northeast, indicating slow upper mantle velocities in the area consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. Starting models used for the joint inversions include both a 1-D model from a 12-ton dam shot recorded by ETSE [Gurbuz et al., 2004] and

  17. Tunable Design of Structural Colors Produced by Pseudo-1D Photonic Crystals of Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Tong, Liping; Qi, Wei; Wang, Mengfan; Huang, Renliang; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-07-01

    It is broadly observed that graphene oxide (GO) films appear transparent with a thickness of about several nanometers, whereas they appear dark brown or almost black with thickness of more than 1 μm. The basic color mechanism of GO film on a sub-micrometer scale, however, is not well understood. This study reports on GO pseudo-1D photonic crystals (p1D-PhCs) exhibiting tunable structural colors in the visible wavelength range owing to its 1D Bragg nanostructures. Striking structural colors of GO p1D-PhCs could be tuned by simply changing either the volume or concentration of the aqueous GO dispersion during vacuum filtration. Moreover, the quantitative relationship between thickness and reflection wavelength of GO p1D-PhCs has been revealed, thereby providing a theoretical basis to rationally design structural colors of GO p1D-PhCs. The spectral response of GO p1D-PhCs to humidity is also obtained clearly showing the wavelength shift of GO p1D-PhCs at differently relative humidity values and thus encouraging the integration of structural color printing and the humidity-responsive property of GO p1D-PhCs to develop a visible and fast-responsive anti-counterfeiting label. The results pave the way for a variety of potential applications of GO in optics, structural color printing, sensing, and anti-counterfeiting.

  18. Tandem repeats modify the structure of the canine CD1D gene.

    PubMed

    Looringh van Beeck, F A; Leegwater, P A J; Herrmann, T; Broere, F; Rutten, V P M G; Willemse, T; Van Rhijn, I

    2013-06-01

    Among the CD1 proteins that present lipid antigens to T cells, CD1d is the only one that stimulates a population of T cells with an invariant T-cell receptor known as NKT cells. Sequencing of a 722 nucleotide gap in the dog (Canis lupus familiaris) genome revealed that the canine CD1D gene lacks a sequence homologous to exon 2 of human CD1D, coding for the start codon and signal peptide. Also, the canine CD1D gene contains three different short tandem repeats that disrupt the expected gene structure. Because canine CD1D cDNA lacks sequences homologous to human exon 2 and 3, the functionality of canine CD1d protein may be affected, and this could have consequences for the development and activation of canine NKT cells.

  19. Global horizontal shear velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, T. M.; Priestley, K. F.; Debayle, E.; Chapman, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    Rayleigh wave data have been used extensively to produce various SV-wave tomographic models of the upper mantle. Love wave data are more difficult to deal with resulting in fewer SH-wave tomographic models. The models also do not incorporate higher mode information which can place better constraints on the model. We have assembled a large, horizontal component data set and have inverted these seismogram in the 4-13 mHz band including higher mode information. We use a version of the automated waveform inversion technique modified for Love waves. We have explored the effects of various crustal models and because of the greater sensitivity of Love waves to the crustal structure, at present, we limit our inversion to this lower frequency band. Due to the higher mode Love waves having similar group velocities between the periods of 50-100 s for oceanic paths, interference occurs which partition techniques have difficulties dealing with. The modified technique used here does not require partitioning the data and can help extract the data more easily at these period bands. We present a new VSH and Xi model for the upper mantle. High VSH extending to about 250 km depth occurs beneath the cratons and Tibet; Low VSH occurs beneath the mid-ocean ridges, the back arc basins and beneath the Afar hotspot. The Xi model shows that VSH is greater by approximately 3% at 100km and rapidly drops to zero at around 300 km depth where the mantle becomes isotropic. At 250 km depth, there are regions where SV is greater than SH, suggesting more vertical flow beneath mid-ocean ridges at these depths.

  20. Comparison of high group velocity accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.; Wilson, P.B.

    1987-02-01

    It is well known that waveguides with no perturbations have phase velocities greater than the velocity of light c. If the waveguide dimensions are chosen so that the phase velocity is only moderately greater than c, only small perturbations are required to reduce the phase velocity to be synchronous with a high energy particle bunch. Such a lightly loaded accelerator structure will have smaller longitudinal and transverse wake potentials and hence will lead to lower emittance growth in an accelerated beam. Since these structures are lightly loaded, their group velocities are only slightly less than c and not in the order of 0.01c, as is the case for the standard disk-loaded structures. To ascertain that the peak and average power requirements for these structures are not prohibitive, we examine the elastance and the Q for several traveling wave structures: phase slip structures, bellows-like structures, and lightly loaded disk-loaded structures.

  1. Generation of a pseudo-2D shear-wave velocity section by inversion of a series of 1D dispersion curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves utilizes a multichannel recording system to estimate near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities from high-frequency Rayleigh waves. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity (vS) section is constructed by aligning 1D models at the midpoint of each receiver spread and using a spatial interpolation scheme. The horizontal resolution of the section is therefore most influenced by the receiver spread length and the source interval. The receiver spread length sets the theoretical lower limit and any vS structure with its lateral dimension smaller than this length will not be properly resolved in the final vS section. A source interval smaller than the spread length will not improve the horizontal resolution because spatial smearing has already been introduced by the receiver spread. In this paper, we first analyze the horizontal resolution of a pair of synthetic traces. Resolution analysis shows that (1) a pair of traces with a smaller receiver spacing achieves higher horizontal resolution of inverted S-wave velocities but results in a larger relative error; (2) the relative error of the phase velocity at a high frequency is smaller than at a low frequency; and (3) a relative error of the inverted S-wave velocity is affected by the signal-to-noise ratio of data. These results provide us with a guideline to balance the trade-off between receiver spacing (horizontal resolution) and accuracy of the inverted S-wave velocity. We then present a scheme to generate a pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section with high horizontal resolution using multichannel records by inverting high-frequency surface-wave dispersion curves calculated through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. This method chooses only a pair of consecutive traces within a shot gather to calculate a dispersion curve. We finally invert surface-wave dispersion curves of synthetic and real-world data. Inversion results of both synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that

  2. Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Human Steroid 5-Reductase (AKR1D1)

    SciTech Connect

    Costanzo, L.; Drury, J; Christianson, D; Penning, T

    2009-01-01

    Human steroid 5{beta}-reductase (aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1D1) catalyzes reduction of {Delta}{sup 4}-ene double bonds in steroid hormones and bile acid precursors. We have reported the structures of an AKR1D1-NADP{sup +} binary complex, and AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-cortisone, AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-progesterone and AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-testosterone ternary complexes at high resolutions. Recently, structures of AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-5{beta}-dihydroprogesterone complexes showed that the product is bound unproductively. Two quite different mechanisms of steroid double bond reduction have since been proposed. However, site-directed mutagenesis supports only one mechanism. In this mechanism, the 4-pro-R hydride is transferred from the re-face of the nicotinamide ring to C5 of the steroid substrate. E120, a unique substitution in the AKR catalytic tetrad, permits a deeper penetration of the steroid substrate into the active site to promote optimal reactant positioning. It participates with Y58 to create a 'superacidic' oxyanion hole for polarization of the C3 ketone. A role for K87 in the proton relay proposed using the AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-5{beta}-dihydroprogesterone structure is not supported.

  3. Analysis of the rotational structure in the high-resolution infrared spectra of trans-hexatriene-1,1-d2 and -cis-1-d1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Fuson, Hannah A.; Tian, Hengfeng; Blake, Thomas A.

    2012-09-01

    Mixtures of trans-hexatriene-1,1-d2, -cis-1-d1, and -trans-1-d1 have been synthesized. Anharmonic frequencies and harmonic intensities were predicted with the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ model for the out-of-plane (a″) modes of the three isotopologues. Assignments are proposed for most of the a″ vibrational modes above 500 cm-1. Ground state (GS) rotational constants have been determined for the 1,1-d2 and cis-1-d1 species from the analysis of rotational structure of C-type bands in the high-resolution (0.0015 cm-1) infrared spectra in a mixture of the three isotopologues. The GS constants for the 1,1-d2 species are A0 = 0.8018850(6), B0 = 0.0418540(6), and C0 = 0.0397997(4) cm-1. The GS constants for the cis-1-d1 species are A0 = 0.809388(1), B0 = 0.043532(2), and C0 = 0.041320(1) cm-1. Small inertial defects confirm planarity for both species. These ground state rotational constants are intended for use in determining a semiexperimental equilibrium structure and evaluating the influence of chain length on π-electron delocalization in polyenes.

  4. The structure of nanocomposite 1D cationic conductor crystal@SWNT.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, N A; Kumskov, A S; Zakalyukin, R M; Vasiliev, A L; Chernisheva, M V; Eliseev, A A; Krestinin, A V; Freitag, B; Hutchison, J L

    2012-06-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of one-dimensional (1D) crystals of the cationic conductors CuI, CuBr and AgBr inside single-walled carbon nanotubes, mainly (n, 0), were obtained using the capillary technique. 1D crystal structure models were proposed based on the high resolution transmission electron microscopy performed on a FEI Titan 80-300 at 80 kV with aberration correction. According to the models and image simulations there are two modifications of 1D crystal: hexagonal close-packed bromine (iodine) anion sublattice (growth direction <001>) and 1D crystal cubic structure (growth direction <112>) compressed transversely to the nanotube (D(m) ∼1.33 nm) axis. Tentatively this kind of 1D crystal can be considered as monoclinic. One modification of the anion sublattice reversibly transforms into the other inside the nanotube, probably initiated by electron beam heating. As demonstrated by micrographs, copper or silver cations can occupy octahedral positions or are statistically distributed across two tetrahedral positions. A 1DAgBr@SWNT (18, 0; 19, 0) pseudoperiodic 'lattice distortion' is revealed resulting from convolution of the nanotube wall function image with 1D cubic crystal function image.

  5. Structural resistance of chemically modified 1-D nanostructured titanates in inorganic acid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Marinkovic, Bojan A.; Fredholm, Yann C.; Morgado, Edisson

    2010-10-15

    Sodium containing one-dimensional nanostructured layered titanates (1-D NSLT) were produced both from commercial anatase powder and Brazilian natural rutile mineral sands by alkali hydrothermal process. The 1-D NSLT were chemically modified with proton, cobalt or iron via ionic exchange and all products were additionally submitted to intensive inorganic acid aging (pH = 0.5) for 28 days. The morphology and crystal structure transformations of chemically modified 1-D NSLT were followed by transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was found that the original sodium rich 1-D NSLT and cobalt substituted 1-D NSLT were completely converted to rutile nanoparticles, while the protonated form was transformed in a 70%-30% (by weight) anatase-rutile nanoparticles mixture, very similar to that of the well-known TiO{sub 2}-photocatalyst P25 (Degussa). The iron substituted 1-D NSLT presented better acid resistance as 13% of the original structure and morphology remained, the rest being converted in rutile. A significant amount of remaining 1-D NSLT was also observed after the acid treatment of the product obtained from rutile sand. The results showed that phase transformation of NSLT into titanium dioxide polymorph in inorganic acid conditions were controllable by varying the exchanged cations. Finally, the possibility to transform, through acid aging, 1-D NSLT obtained from Brazilian natural rutile sand into TiO{sub 2}-polymorphs was demonstrated for the first time to the best of authors' knowledge, opening path for producing TiO{sub 2}-nanoproducts with different morphologies through a simple process and from a low cost precursor.

  6. Jovian cloud structure and velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. L.; Terrile, R. J.; Collins, S. A.; Smith, B. A.; Muller, J.-P.; Hunt, G. E.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Beebe, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    A global view of Jovian small-scale morphologies and zonal velocity profiles has been discussed previously. In the present paper, a regional comparison is made of the structures and velocity fields (meridional and zonal velocities) in the Jovian atmosphere as observed by Voyager I imaging system. The cloud structures discussed are fairly independent of the visual wavelength. The analysis shows that although both Jovian hemispheres exhibit similar patterns of diminishing and alternating eastward and westward jets as one progresses polewards, there is a pronounced asymmetry in the structural appearance of the two hemispheres.

  7. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Niemitz, Matthias; Bisson, Jonathan; Lodewyk, Michael W; Soldi, Cristian; Shaw, Jared T; Tantillo, Dean J; Saya, Jordy M; Vos, Klaas; Kleinnijenhuis, Roel A; Hiemstra, Henk; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Friesen, J Brent

    2016-02-05

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of "structural correctness" depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D (1)H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D (1)H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by (1)H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D (1)H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication.

  8. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of “structural correctness” depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D 1H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by 1H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D 1H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  9. Formation of 1D adsorbed water structures on CaO(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xunhua; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Ghiringhelli, Luca M.; Levchenko, Sergey V.; Scheffler, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of water with oxide surfaces is of fundamental importance for basic and engineering sciences. Recently, a spontaneous formation of one-dimensional (1D) adsorbed water structures have been observed on CaO(001). Interestingly, at other alkaline earth metal oxides, in particular MgO(001) and SrO(001), such structures have not been found experimentally. We calculate the relative stability of adsorbed water structures on the three oxides using density-functional theory combined with the ab initio atomistic thermodynamics. Low-energy structures at different coverages are obtained with a first-principles genetic algorithm. Finite-temperature vibrational spectra are calculated using ab initio molecular dynamics. We find a range of (T, p) conditions where 1D structures are thermodynamically stable on CaO(001). The orientation and vibrational spectra of the 1D structures are in agreement with the experiments. The formation of the 1D structures is found to be actuated by a symmetry breaking in the adsorbed water tetramer, as well as by a balance between water-water and water-substrate interactions, determined by the lattice constant of the oxide.

  10. Analysis of Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared Spectra of the TRANS-HEXATRIENE-1,1-D2 and -CIS-1-D1 Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Fuson, Hannah A.; Tian, Hengfeng; Blake, Thomas A.

    2011-06-01

    Hexatriene-1,1-D2 with some admixture of the cis-1-D1 and trans-1-D1 species was synthesized by reaction of 2,4-pentadienal and (methyl-D3)-triphenylphosphonium iodide (Wittig reagent). The trans isomer was isolated by preparative gas chromatography, and the high-resolution (0.0015 Cm-1) infrared spectrum was recorded on a Bruker IFS 125HR instrument. The rotational structure in two C-type bands for the 1,1-D2 species was analyzed. For this species the bands at 902.043 and 721.864 Cm-1 yielded composite ground state rotational constants of A0 = 0.801882(1), B0 = 0.041850(2), and C0 = 0.039804(1) Cm-1. For the cis-1-D1 species the C-type band at 803.018 Cm-1 gave A0 = 0.809384(2), B0 = 0.043530(3), and C0 = 0.041321(2) Cm-1. By iodine-catalyzed isomerization, we have obtained some of the much less favored cis isomer and hope to obtain microwave spectra for its three deuterium-substituted species. The rotational constants reported here contribute to data needed for determining a semi-experimental structure for trans-hexatriene, which should show that the structural consequences of pi-electron delocalization increase with the chain length of polyenes.

  11. Crustal velocity structure of western Dharwar Craton, South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, D.; Chandrakala, K.; Padmavathi Devi, P.; Sridhar, A. R.; Sain, K.; Reddy, P. R.

    2001-03-01

    A deep seismic sounding (DSS) experiment was carried out across the Indian shield in 1972-1975. Kaila et al. (Kaila, K.L., Roy Chowdhury, K., Reddy, P.R., Krishna, V.G., Hari Narain, Subbotin, S.I., Sollogub, V.B., Chekunov, A.V., Kharetchko, G.E., Lazarenko, M.A., Ilchenko T.V., 1979. Crustal structure along Kavali-Udipi profile in the Indian peninsular shield from deep seismic sounding. J. Geol. Soc. of Ind., 20, 307-333) presented a crustal depth section based on the interpretation of the analog seismic data. In this paper, we re-examine the crustal structure of the Western Dharwar Craton (WDC) by reprocessing the data of three major shot points. Kinematic 1-D inversion, followed by 2-D forward modeling of the first arrival refraction and a few persistent wide-angle reflection phases, was carried out to build, a first order two-dimensional velocity model of this segment of the profile. This model brings out a simple crustal velocity structure consisting of an upper and lower crust. The upper crust (velocity 6.0-6.2 km/s) is on average 23 km thick, which is underlain by a lower crust of velocity 6.8-7.0 km/s. The average Moho depth in this part is about 37-40 km, with higher-than-normal P n velocity of 8.4 km/s. A relatively deep Moho in this part of the Archean peninsular shield is associated with relatively low velocities in the lower crust, perhaps indicating absence of underplating in this region. Present results bring out the fact that the crust of WDC is not so typical as many other Archean crusts, in terms of both thickness and velocities.

  12. Velocity structure and seismicity of southeastern Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Ronald Douglas; Long, Leland Timothy

    1996-04-01

    The seismic zone in southeastern Tennessee is at the confluence of major crustal features, which have been interpreted largely from potential data, and their relation to seismicity could help us understand why major earthquakes sometimes occur in the eastern United States. In this paper we solve for the previously unknown velocity structure of the upper crust by an inversion of travel time residuals from relocated earthquakes. The gravity anomalies are included by using a linear relation between average anomalous density and average anomalous velocity. The velocity model demonstrates that the seismicity is concentrated in areas of average to below average velocity and does not appear to be associated with one of the previously identified major crustal features. The high-velocity zones mark areas that are generally lacking in seismicity. The association of earthquake hypocenters with regions of low-velocity crustal rocks is consistent with other intraplate seismic zones, and this association supports the conjecture that intraplate earthquakes occur in crust that may have been weakened. The velocity anomalies at midcrustal depths do not support the New York-Alabama (NY-AL) lineament as a linear feature extending through southeastern Tennessee and parallel to contours in gravity anomalies as originally proposed. A continuation of the (NY-AL) lineament to the southwest requires either a 15 degree southwestward change in direction or a displacement to be consistent with the velocity anomalies. The seismically active areas in southeastern Tennessee do not appear to be constrained by the major crustal features, but instead, the seismicity is characterized by the distribution of hypocenters and their association with low-velocity regions at midcrustal depths.

  13. Structural and mechanistic insights into regulation of the retromer coat by TBC1d5

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Da; Zhang, Jin-San; Li, Fang; Wang, Jing; Deng, Zhihui; White, Mark A.; Osborne, Douglas G.; Phillips-Krawczak, Christine; Gomez, Timothy S.; Li, Haiying; Singla, Amika; Burstein, Ezra; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Rosen, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Retromer is a membrane coat complex that is recruited to endosomes by the small GTPase Rab7 and sorting nexin 3. The timing of this interaction and consequent endosomal dynamics are thought to be regulated by the guanine nucleotide cycle of Rab7. Here we demonstrate that TBC1d5, a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Rab7, is a high-affinity ligand of the retromer cargo selective complex VPS26/VPS29/VPS35. The crystal structure of the TBC1d5 GAP domain bound to VPS29 and complementary biochemical and cellular data show that a loop from TBC1d5 binds to a conserved hydrophobic pocket on VPS29 opposite the VPS29–VPS35 interface. Additional data suggest that a distinct loop of the GAP domain may contact VPS35. Loss of TBC1d5 causes defective retromer-dependent trafficking of receptors. Our findings illustrate how retromer recruits a GAP, which is likely to be involved in the timing of Rab7 inactivation leading to membrane uncoating, with important consequences for receptor trafficking. PMID:27827364

  14. Uranium(VI) coordination polymers with pyromellitate ligand: Unique 1D channel structures and diverse fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yingjie; Bhadbhade, Mohan; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Price, Jason R.; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Zhaoming; Kong, Linggen; Čejka, Jiří; Lu, Kim; Lumpkin, Gregory R.

    2015-03-15

    Three new coordination polymers of uranium(VI) with pyromellitic acid (H{sub 4}btca) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. (ED)[(UO{sub 2})(btca)]·(DMSO)·3H{sub 2}O (1) (ED=ethylenediammonium; DMSO=dimethylsulfoxide) has a lamellar structure with intercalation of ED and DMSO. (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 2}(OH){sub 6}(btca)]·~6H{sub 2}O (2) has a 3D framework built from 7-fold coordinated uranyl trinuclear units and btca ligands with 1D diamond-shaped channels (~8.5 Å×~8.6 Å). [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)(btca)]·4H{sub 2}O (3) has a 3D network constructed by two types of 7-fold coordinated uranium polyhedron. The unique μ{sub 5}-coordination mode of btca in 3 enables the formation of 1D olive-shaped large channels (~4.5 Å×~19 Å). Vibrational modes, thermal stabilities and fluorescence properties have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Table of content: three new uranium(VI) coordination polymers with pyromellitic acid (H{sub 4}btca) have been synthesized via room temperature and hydrothermal synthesis methods, and structurally characterized. Two to three dimensional (3D) frameworks are revealed. All 3D frameworks have unique 1D large channels. Their vibrational modes, thermal stabilities and photoluminescence properties have been investigated. - Highlights: • Three new coordination polymers of U(VI) with pyromellitic acid (H{sub 4}btca). • Structures from a 2D layer to 3D frameworks with unique 1D channels. • Unusual µ{sub 5}-(η{sub 1}:η{sub 2}:η{sub 1}:η{sub 2:}η{sub 1}) coordination mode of btca ligand. • Vibrational modes, thermal stabilities and luminescent properties reported.

  15. Low band gap frequencies and multiplexing properties in 1D and 2D mass spring structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Arafa H.; Mehaney, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    This study reports on the propagation of elastic waves in 1D and 2D mass spring structures. An analytical and computation model is presented for the 1D and 2D mass spring systems with different examples. An enhancement in the band gap values was obtained by modeling the structures to obtain low frequency band gaps at small dimensions. Additionally, the evolution of the band gap as a function of mass value is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the local resonance property in frequency ranges within the gaps in the band structure for the corresponding infinite periodic lattice in the 1D and 2D mass spring system. A linear defect formed of a row of specific masses produces an elastic waveguide that transmits at the narrow pass band frequency. The frequency of the waveguides can be selected by adjusting the mass and stiffness coefficients of the materials constituting the waveguide. Moreover, we pay more attention to analyze the wave multiplexer and DE-multiplexer in the 2D mass spring system. We show that two of these tunable waveguides with alternating materials can be employed to filter and separate specific frequencies from a broad band input signal. The presented simulation data is validated through comparison with the published research, and can be extended in the development of resonators and MEMS verification.

  16. Velocity structure and evolution of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. N.; Dainty, A. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Anderson, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    Seismic data from the Apollo Passive Seismic Network stations are analyzed to determine the velocity structure and to infer the composition and physical properties of the lunar interior. Data from artificial impacts (SIBV booster and LM-ascent stage) cover a distance range of 9 to 1750 km. Travel times and amplitudes, as well as theoretical seismograms, are used to derive a velocity model for the outer 150 km of the moon. The P-wave velocity model confirms an earlier report of a lunar crust in the eastern part of Oceanus Procellarum. The crust is about 60 km thick and may consist of two layers in the mare regions. Possible values for the P-wave velocity in the uppermost mantle are between 7.6 and 9.0 km/sec. The 9 km/sec velocity represents either a localized heterogeneous unit, or a thin layer less than about 40 km in thickness. The elastic properties of the deep interior, as inferred from the seismograms of natural events (meteoroid impacts and moonquakes) occurring at great distances, indicate that there is an increase in attenuation and a possible decrease of velocity at depths below about 1000 km.

  17. 1d, 2d, and 3d periodic structures: Electromagnetic characterization, design, and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockett, Timothy John

    Periodic structures have many useful applications in electromagnetics including phased arrays, frequency selective surfaces, and absorbing interfaces. Their unique properties can be used to provide increased performance in antenna gain, electromagnetic propagation, and electromagnetic absorption. In antenna arrays, repeating elements create a larger eective aperture, increasing the gain of the antenna and the ability to scan the direction of the main beam. Three-dimensional periodic structures, such as an array of shaped pillars such as columns, cones, or prisms have the potential of improving electromagnetic absorption, improving performance in applications such as solar cell eciency and absorbing interfaces. Furthermore, research into periodic structures is a continuing endeavor where novel approaches and analysis in appropriate applications can be sought. This dissertation will address the analysis, diagnostics, and enhancement of 1D, 2D, and 3D periodic structures for antenna array applications and solar cell technology. In particular, a unique approach to array design will be introduced to prevent the appearance of undesirable grating lobes in large antenna arrays that employ subarrays. This approach, named the distortion diagnostic procedure, can apply directly to 1D and 2D periodic structures in the form of planar antenna arrays. Interesting corollaries included here are developments in millimeter-wave antenna measurements including spiral planar scanning, phaseless measurements, and addressing antennas that feature an internal source. Finally, analysis and enhancement of 3D periodic structures in nanostructure photovoltaic arrays and absorbing interfaces will be examined for their behavior and basic operation in regards to improved absorption of electromagnetic waves.

  18. Magnetic properties driven by local structure in quasi-1D Ising chain system cobaltate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongjae; Kim, Beom Hyun; Kim, Kyoo; Choi, Hong Chul; Park, Sang-Yeon; Jeong, Y.-H.; Min, B. I.

    2012-02-01

    Using ab-initio band structure method and the microscopic model calculation, the origins of the large orbital magnetic moment and unique magnetic anisotropy in the quasi-1D magnetic cobaltate, α-CoV2O6, is investigated. Unique crystal electric field effect in α-CoV2O6 is combined with the strong spin-orbit coupling, results in intriguing magnetic properties of the system. Based on the estimated strengths of the intra- and the inter-chain exchange interaction, experimentally found 1/3 magnetization plateau in the MH curve can be attributed to spin-flop mechanism. Origin of the reduced magnetic entropy behavior is found to be the strong uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the quasi-1D Ising chain system.

  19. Thermodynamic nature of vitrification in a 1D model of a structural glass former

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, A. N.

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new spin-glass model with no positional quenched disorder which is regarded as a coarse-grained model of a structural glass-former. The model is analyzed in the 1D case when the number N of states of a primary cell is large. For N → ∞, the model exhibits a sharp freezing transition of the thermodynamic origin. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the glass transition is accompanied by a significant growth of a static length scale ξ pointing to the structural (equilibrium) nature of dynamical slowdown effects in supercooled liquids.

  20. Thermodynamic nature of vitrification in a 1D model of a structural glass former

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. N.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a new spin-glass model with no positional quenched disorder which is regarded as a coarse-grained model of a structural glass-former. The model is analyzed in the 1D case when the number N of states of a primary cell is large. For N → ∞, the model exhibits a sharp freezing transition of the thermodynamic origin. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the glass transition is accompanied by a significant growth of a static length scale ξ pointing to the structural (equilibrium) nature of dynamical slowdown effects in supercooled liquids.

  1. Thermodynamic nature of vitrification in a 1D model of a structural glass former.

    PubMed

    Semenov, A N

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new spin-glass model with no positional quenched disorder which is regarded as a coarse-grained model of a structural glass-former. The model is analyzed in the 1D case when the number N of states of a primary cell is large. For N → ∞, the model exhibits a sharp freezing transition of the thermodynamic origin. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the glass transition is accompanied by a significant growth of a static length scale ξ pointing to the structural (equilibrium) nature of dynamical slowdown effects in supercooled liquids.

  2. Isotropic photon drag: Analytic expressions for velocity (3D) and position (1D) with applications to blackbody friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    The motion of objects traveling at relativistic speeds and subject only to isotropic photon drag (blackbody friction as a special case) is modeled. The objects are assumed to be perfectly absorbing. Analytic expressions for velocity and position as a function of time for objects subject to photon drag are obtained for the case in which the photons are constrained to one-dimensional motion. If the object is also assumed to be a perfect emitter of energy, analytic expressions are found for time as a function of velocity of the body for photons constrained to one-dimensional motion, and for a full three-dimensional isotropic photon background. The derivations are carried out entirely from the point of view of a reference frame at rest relative to the isotropic photon field, so that no changes of reference frame are involved. The results for the three-dimensional model do not agree with work by previous authors, and this discrepancy is discussed. The derivations are suitable for use in the undergraduate classroom. Example cases for a light sail and a micron-sized sand grain are examined for interactions with the cosmic background radiation, assuming a temperature of 3000 K, the temperature at the time the universe became transparent, and it is found that relativistic speeds would decay on a time scale of years.

  3. Uppermost mantle seismic velocity structure beneath USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, J. S.; Shearer, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    We apply Pn tomography beneath the entire USArray footprint to image uppermost mantle velocity structure and anisotropy, as well as crustal thickness constraints, beneath the United States. The sparse source distribution in the eastern United States and the resulting longer raypaths provide new challenges and justify the inclusion of additional parameters that account for the velocity gradient in the mantle lid. At large scale, Pn velocities are higher in the eastern United States compared to the west, but we observe patches of lower velocities around the New Madrid seismic zone and below the eastern Appalachians. For much of the mantle lid below the central and eastern United States we find a moderate positive velocity gradient. In the western United States, we observe a moderate gradient in the region of the Juan de Fuca subduction zone, but no significant gradient to the south and east of this region. In terms of anisotropy, we find that the Pn fast axes generally do not agree with SKS splitting orientations, suggesting significant vertical changes in anisotropy in the upper mantle. In particular the circular pattern of the fast polarization direction of SKS in the western United States is much less pronounced in the Pn results, and in the eastern US the dominant Pn fast direction is approximately north-south, whereas the SKS fast polarizations are oriented roughly parallel to the absolute plate motion direction.

  4. Study of phase transformation and crystal structure for 1D carbon-modified titania ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Lihui Zhang, Fang; Li, Jinxia

    2014-02-15

    One-dimensional hydrogen titanate ribbons were successfully prepared with hydrothermal reaction in a highly basic solution. A series of one-dimensional carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons were prepared via calcination of the mixture of hydrogen titanate ribbons and sucrose solution under N{sub 2} flow at different temperatures. The phase transformation process of hydrogen titanate ribbons was investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction at various temperatures. Besides, one-dimensional carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons calcined at different temperatures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms, diffuse reflectance ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and so on. Carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons showed one-dimensional ribbon crystal structure and various crystal phases of TiO{sub 2}. After being modified with carbon, a layer of uniform carbon film was coated on the surface of TiO{sub 2} ribbons, which improved their adsorption capacity for methyl orange as a model organic pollutant. One-dimensional carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons also exhibited enhanced visible-light absorbance with the increase of calcination temperatures. - Highlights: • The synthesis of 1D carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons. • The phase transformation of 1D carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons. • 1D carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} exhibites enhanced visible-light absorbance.

  5. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maskaly, Karlene Rosera

    2005-06-01

    increasing RMS roughness. Again, the homogenization approximation is able to predict these results. The problem of surface scratches on 1D photonic crystals is also addressed. Although the reflectivity decreases are lower in this study, up to a 15% change in reflectivity is observed in certain scratched photonic crystal structures. However, this reflectivity change can be significantly decreased by adding a low index protective coating to the surface of the photonic crystal. Again, application of homogenization theory to these structures confirms its predictive power for this type of imperfection as well. Additionally, the problem of a circular pores in 2D photonic crystals is investigated, showing that almost a 50% change in reflectivity can occur for some structures. Furthermore, this study reveals trends that are consistent with the 1D simulations: parameter changes that increase the absolute reflectivity of the photonic crystal will also increase its tolerance to structural imperfections. Finally, experimental reflectance spectra from roughened 1D photonic crystals are compared to the results predicted computationally in this thesis. Both the computed and experimental spectra correlate favorably, validating the findings presented herein.

  6. Fine velocity structures collisional dissipation in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2016-04-01

    In a weakly collisional plasma, such as the solar wind, collisions are usually considered far too weak to produce any significant effect on the plasma dynamics [1]. However, the estimation of collisionality is often based on the restrictive assumption that the particle velocity distribution function (VDF) shape is close to Maxwellian [2]. On the other hand, in situ spacecraft measurements in the solar wind [3], as well as kinetic numerical experiments [4], indicate that marked non-Maxwellian features develop in the three-dimensional VDFs, (temperature anisotropies, generation of particle beams, ring-like modulations etc.) as a result of the kinetic turbulent cascade of energy towards short spatial scales. Therefore, since collisional effects are proportional to the velocity gradients of the VDF, the collisionless hypothesis may fail locally in velocity space. Here, the existence of several characteristic times during the collisional relaxation of fine velocity structures is investigated by means of Eulerian numerical simulations of a spatially homogeneous force-free weakly collisional plasma. The effect of smoothing out velocity gradients on the evolution of global quantities, such as temperature and entropy, is discussed, suggesting that plasma collisionality can increase locally due to the velocity space deformation of the particle velocity distribution. In particular, by means of Eulerian simulations of collisional relaxation of a spatially homogeneous force-free plasma, in which collisions among particles of the same species are modeled through the complete Landau operator, we show that the system entropy growth occurs over several time scales, inversely proportional to the steepness of the velocity gradients in the VDF. We report clear evidences that fine velocity structures are dissipated by collisions in a time much shorter than global non-Maxwellian features, like, for example, temperature anisotropies. Moreover we indicate that, if small-scale structures

  7. Tight-Binding Approximations in 1D and 2D Coupled-Cavity Photonic Crystal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Nicole C. L.

    Light confinement and controlling an optical field has numerous applications in the field of telecommunications for optical signals processing. When the wavelength of the electromagnetic field is on the order of the period of a photonic microstructure, the field undergoes reflection, refraction, and coherent scattering. This produces photonic bandgaps, forbidden frequency regions or spectral stop bands where light cannot exist. Dielectric perturbations that break the perfect periodicity of these structures produce what is analogous to an impurity state in the bandgap of a semiconductor. The defect modes that exist at discrete frequencies within the photonic bandgap are spatially localized about the cavity-defects in the photonic crystal. In this thesis the properties of two tight-binding approximations (TBAs) are investigated in one-dimensional and two-dimensional coupled-cavity photonic crystal structures. We require an efficient and simple approach that ensures the continuity of the electromagnetic field across dielectric interfaces in complex structures. In this thesis we develop E- and D-TBAs to calculate the modes in finite 1D and 2D two-defect coupled-cavity photonic crystal structures. In the E- and D-TBAs we expand the coupled-cavity [vector electron]-modes in terms of the individual [vector electron]- and [vector D meson]-modes, respectively. We investigate the dependence of the defect modes, their frequencies and quality factors on the relative placement of the defects in the photonic crystal structures. We then elucidate the differences between the two TBA formulations, and describe the conditions under which these formulations may be more robust when encountering a dielectric perturbation. Our 1D analysis showed that the 1D modes were sensitive to the structure geometry. The antisymmetric D mode amplitudes show that the D. TBA did not capture the correct (tangential [vector electron]-field) boundary conditions. However, the D-TBA did not yield

  8. Uranium(VI) coordination polymers with pyromellitate ligand: Unique 1D channel structures and diverse fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Bhadbhade, Mohan; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Price, Jason R.; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Zhaoming; Kong, Linggen; Čejka, Jiří; Lu, Kim; Lumpkin, Gregory R.

    2015-03-01

    Three new coordination polymers of uranium(VI) with pyromellitic acid (H4btca) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. (ED)[(UO2)(btca)]·(DMSO)·3H2O (1) (ED=ethylenediammonium; DMSO=dimethylsulfoxide) has a lamellar structure with intercalation of ED and DMSO. (NH4)2[(UO2)6O2(OH)6(btca)]·~6H2O (2) has a 3D framework built from 7-fold coordinated uranyl trinuclear units and btca ligands with 1D diamond-shaped channels (~8.5 Å×~8.6 Å). [(UO2)2(H2O)(btca)]·4H2O (3) has a 3D network constructed by two types of 7-fold coordinated uranium polyhedron. The unique μ5-coordination mode of btca in 3 enables the formation of 1D olive-shaped large channels (~4.5 Å×~19 Å). Vibrational modes, thermal stabilities and fluorescence properties have been investigated.

  9. Crystal structure of TBC1D15 GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain and its activity on Rab GTPases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Na; Gu, Xin; Zhou, X Edward; Wang, Weidong; Cheng, Dandan; Ge, Yinghua; Ye, Fei; Xu, H Eric; Lv, Zhengbing

    2017-04-01

    TBC1D15 belongs to the TBC (Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16) domain family and functions as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Rab GTPases. So far, the structure of TBC1D15 or the TBC1D15·Rab complex has not been determined, thus, its catalytic mechanism on Rab GTPases is still unclear. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the Shark and Sus TBC1D15 GAP domains, to 2.8 Å and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. Shark-TBC1D15 and Sus-TBC1D15 belong to the same subfamily of TBC domain-containing proteins, and their GAP-domain structures are highly similar. This demonstrates the evolutionary conservation of the TBC1D15 protein family. Meanwhile, the newly determined crystal structures display new variations compared to the structures of yeast Gyp1p Rab GAP domain and TBC1D1. GAP assays show that Shark and Sus GAPs both have higher catalytic activity on Rab11a·GTP than Rab7a·GTP, which differs from the previous study. We also demonstrated the importance of arginine and glutamine on the catalytic sites of Shark GAP and Sus GAP. When arginine and glutamine are changed to alanine or lysine, the activities of Shark GAP and Sus GAP are lost.

  10. Unresolved velocity structure in diffuse interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, John H.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    1988-01-01

    Recent high-resolution observations of interstellar absorption lines of CH and CN toward Zeta Oph obtained by Crane et al. (1986), and Palazzi et al. (1988), exhibit line widths that suggest thermal line broadening at high temperature, T about 1200 K. Observations of CO line emission at 2.6 mm toward Zeta Oph (Langer et al.,1987) indicate that the molecular gas resides in four distinct velocity components that span less than 3 km/s in Doppler velocity. Simulated CH and CN absorption line profiles are compared for high-temperature (T = 1200 K) thermal broadening and for a combination of low-temperature (T = 50 K) thermal plus turbulent broadening. It is shown that the two broadening models reproduce existing observations comparably well and are virtually indistinguishable at a lambda/Delta-lambda ratio of about 100,000. The observed differences in the CH and CN line widths may reflect slightly different distributions of those molecules along the line of sight. The simulations use very recent, improved laboratory spectroscopic data on CH (Bernath). Some related consequences of such unresolved velocity structure on the ultraviolet absorption lines of CO are examined. Indirect diagnostics of temperature in the Zeta Oph cloud favor low-temperature thermal plus turbulent broadening, and the implied rate of dissipation of turbulence is in harmony with estimates of the global input of mechanical energy into to interstellar medium.

  11. Structural transformation in monolayer materials: a 2D to 1D transformation.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Kasra; Attariani, Hamed; LeSar, Richard A

    2016-07-20

    Reducing the dimensions of materials to atomic scales results in a large portion of atoms being at or near the surface, with lower bond order and thus higher energy. At such scales, reduction of the surface energy and surface stresses can be the driving force for the formation of new low-dimensional nanostructures, and may be exhibited through surface relaxation and/or surface reconstruction, which can be utilized for tailoring the properties and phase transformation of nanomaterials without applying any external load. Here we used atomistic simulations and revealed an intrinsic structural transformation in monolayer materials that lowers their dimension from 2D nanosheets to 1D nanostructures to reduce their surface and elastic energies. Experimental evidence of such transformation has also been revealed for one of the predicted nanostructures. Such transformation plays an important role in bi-/multi-layer 2D materials.

  12. Method of single expression: an exact solution for wavelength scale 1D photonic structure computer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, Hovik V.; Knyazyan, Tamara M.

    2003-12-01

    The principles of the method of single expression (MSE) for boundary problems solution in classical electrodynamics are presented. In the MSE the solution of the Helmholtz's equation is presented in the special form of a single expression describing resultant amplitude and phase distributions in the medium. This form of solution presenation permits to pass over the restrictions of the superposition principle and to solve both linear and nonlinear problems with ths same ease. In the MSE the Helmholtz's equation is reformulated to the set of first order differential equations and the boundary problem is solved numerically. No approximations are implied either in Helmholtz's equation or in boundary conditions. Using the MSE steady-state boundary problems are modeled for wavelength scale multilayer and modulated 1D photonic structures including amplification and nonuniformity evoked by intense electromagnetic field.

  13. The Role of the Impedivity in the Magnetotelluric Response of 1D and 2D Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Roberta; Giulia Di Giuseppe, Maria; Troiano, Antonio; Patella, Domenico; Mariano Castelo Branco, Raimundo

    2014-05-01

    The influence of the resistivity dispersion on the magnetotelluric (MT) response is analyzed. MT uses the natural electromagnetic (EM) field to determine the electrical resistivity of the subsoil and retrieve the geometry of lithospheric structures, revealing the presence of bodies as metallic deposits, hydrocarbons reservoirs, geothermal fluids. The frequency range of the EM field used varies from 10-4 to 104 Hz. If the soil is polarizable, the dispersion of the resistivity, whose characteristic frequency interval is between 10-2 and 102 Hz, may affect MT responses. Resistivity dispersion is a known phenomenology, which constitutes the basis of the Induced Polarization (IP) prospecting method. In the frequency domain (FD), the dispersion consists in a variation of the resistivity parameter as the frequency of the exciting current is changed. The dispersive resistivity, called impedivity, is a complex function of the frequency. At vanishing frequency, however, the impedivity is real and coincides with the classical resistivity parameter used in DC geoelectrical methods. A real asymptote is also approached as the frequency tends to infinity. The complex physical and chemical fluid-metal-rock interactions may produce induced polarization effects, which are related to the dispersion in rocks. This is manifested on the MT response, creating a distortion on the experimental curves. Disregarding the distortion effect may lead to misleading interpretation of the surveyed structures. We show the results from simulation of the MT responses, when dispersion is assumed to characterize the electrical properties of a region of the explored half-space. Initially, a 1D-layered earth is considered, with intermediate layer assumed to be dispersive. The influence of the dispersion amplitude on the shape of the MT responses is evaluated. The dispersion alters the shape of the curves in a way that, without any external constraints, may make the interpretation of the curves quite

  14. Flow Structure Determined Enhancing and Inhibiting Convective Heat Transfers in Quasi 1D Magnetic Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weili; Huang, Jun; Liu, Tianshu

    2016-11-01

    We have found previously that the convective flow in magnetic fluid responds to applied magnetic fields differently, depending on the relative direction of the gradient of temperature to that of the field. In this work we report the velocity profiles from these flows obtained from optical flow method. The peculiar magnetic driving force as well as the special configurations give rise to unique flow patterns, distinctly depends on the specific relative orientation of the temperature to that of field. The streamline plots indicate formation of local or global flow structures that explain the different effects of field on the heat transfer in the sample. For one configuration, the magneto-thermo convection causing the "heat" to be localized, stopping the equilibration process in the system. We will discuss the different responses to the applied magnetic fields for two different sample configurations in terms of relative orientation of the temperature and field gradients.

  15. Velocity Structure Determination Through Seismic Waveform Modeling and Time Deviations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B.; Zhu, L.; Tan, Y.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2001-12-01

    Through the use of seismic waveforms recorded by TriNet, a dataset of earthquake focal mechanisms and deviations (time shifts) relative to a standard model facilitates the investigation of the crust and uppermost mantle of southern California. The CAP method of focal mechanism determination, in use by TriNet on a routine basis, provides time shifts for surface waves and Pnl arrivals independently relative to the reference model. These shifts serve as initial data for calibration of local and regional seismic paths. Time shifts from the CAP method are derived by splitting the Pnl section of the waveform, the first arriving Pn to just before the arrival of the S wave, from the much slower surface waves then cross-correlating the data with synthetic waveforms computed from a standard model. Surface waves interact with the entire crust, but the upper crust causes the greatest effect. Whereas, Pnl arrivals sample the deeper crust, upper mantle, and source region. This natural division separates the upper from lower crust for regional calibration and structural modeling and allows 3-D velocity maps to be created using the resulting time shifts. Further examination of Pnl and other arrivals which interact with the Moho illuminate the complex nature of this boundary. Initial attempts at using the first 10 seconds of the Pnl section to determine upper most mantle structure have proven insightful. Two large earthquakes north of southern California in Nevada and Mammoth Lakes, CA allow the creation of record sections from 200 to 600 km. As the paths swing from east to west across southern California, simple 1-D models turn into complex structure, dramatically changing the waveform character. Using finite difference models to explain the structure, we determine that a low velocity zone is present at the base of the crust and extends to 100 km in depth. Velocity variations of 5 percent of the mantle in combination with steeply sloping edges produces complex waveform variations

  16. Electrophysiological and Structural Remodeling in Heart Failure Modulate Arrhythmogenesis. 1D Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Juan F.; Cardona, Karen; Romero, Lucia; Ferrero, Jose M.; Trenor, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a final common pathway or descriptor for various cardiac pathologies. It is associated with sudden cardiac death, which is frequently caused by ventricular arrhythmias. Electrophysiological remodeling, intercellular uncoupling, fibrosis and autonomic imbalance have been identified as major arrhythmogenic factors in heart failure etiology and progression. Objective In this study we investigate in silico the role of electrophysiological and structural heart failure remodeling on the modulation of key elements of the arrhythmogenic substrate, i.e., electrophysiological gradients and abnormal impulse propagation. Methods Two different mathematical models of the human ventricular action potential were used to formulate models of the failing ventricular myocyte. This provided the basis for simulations of the electrical activity within a transmural ventricular strand. Our main goal was to elucidate the roles of electrophysiological and structural remodeling in setting the stage for malignant life-threatening arrhythmias. Results Simulation results illustrate how the presence of M cells and heterogeneous electrophysiological remodeling in the human failing ventricle modulate the dispersion of action potential duration and repolarization time. Specifically, selective heterogeneous remodeling of expression levels for the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and SERCA pump decrease these heterogeneities. In contrast, fibroblast proliferation and cellular uncoupling both strongly increase repolarization heterogeneities. Conduction velocity and the safety factor for conduction are also reduced by the progressive structural remodeling during heart failure. Conclusion An extensive literature now establishes that in human ventricle, as heart failure progresses, gradients for repolarization are changed significantly by protein specific electrophysiological remodeling (either homogeneous or heterogeneous). Our simulations illustrate and provide new insights into this

  17. Entangling strings of neutral atoms in 1D atomic pipeline structures.

    PubMed

    Dorner, U; Fedichev, P; Jaksch, D; Lewenstein, M; Zoller, P

    2003-08-15

    We study a string of neutral atoms with nearest neighbor interaction in a 1D beam splitter configuration, where the longitudinal motion is controlled by a moving optical lattice potential. The dynamics of the atoms crossing the beam splitter maps to a 1D spin model with controllable time dependent parameters, which allows the creation of maximally entangled states of atoms by crossing a quantum phase transition. Furthermore, we show that this system realizes protected quantum memory, and we discuss the implementation of one- and two-qubit gates in this setup.

  18. Velocities in Magnetoconvective Structures inside Sunspot Umbrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, A.; Rubio, L. B.; van der Voort, L. R.

    2012-08-01

    We study the velocity field of umbral dots at a resolution of 0.″14. Our analysis is based on full Stokes spectropolarimetric measurements of a pore taken with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. We determine the flow velocity at different heights in the photosphere from a bisector analysis of the Fe I 630 nm lines. We find that most umbral dots are associated with strong upflows in deep photospheric layers. Some of them also show concentrated patches of downflows at their edges with velocities of up to 1000 m s-1 and enhanced net circular polarization signals. These results appear to validate numerical models of magnetoconvection in the presence of strong magnetic fields.

  19. Velocity-space structure of runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, V.; Cairns, R.A.; Lashmore-Davies, C.N.; Shoucri, M.M.

    1986-09-01

    The region of velocity space is determined in which electron runaway occurs because of a dc electric field. Phase-space analysis of the relaxation equations describing test electrons, corroborated by two-dimensional (2-D) numerical integration of the Fokker--Planck equation, reveals that the Dreicer condition for runaway v-italic/sup 2//sub parallel/> or =(2+Z-italic/sub i-italic/)E-italic/sub c-italic//E-italic is only sufficient. A weaker condition v-italic/sup 2//sub parallel/> or =(2+Z-italic/sub i-italic/)/sup 1//sup ///sup 2/E-italic/sub c-italic//E-italic is established, and it is shown, in general, that runaway in velocity space only occurs for those electrons that are outside one of the separatrices of the relaxation equations. The scaling with v-italic/sub parallel/ of the parallel distribution function and of the perpendicular temperature is also derived.

  20. Shear wave velocity structures of the Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtar, Talal A.; Al-Saeed, Mohammed M.

    1994-02-01

    The shear velocity structures of the different tectonic provinces of the Arabian Peninsula has been studied using surface wave data recorded by the RYD (Riyadh) station. The inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities indicates that the Arabian shield can be modeled by two layers, each of which is 20 km thick with a shear velocity of 3.61 km/s in the upper crust and 3.88 km/s in the lower crust. The underlying upper mantle velocity is 4.61 km/s. Inversion of both Love and Rayleigh waves group velocities shows that the Arabian platform upper and lower crusts are comparable in their thicknesses to those of the shield, but with shear velocities of 3.4 and 4 km/s, respectively. The upper mantle velocity beneath the platform is 4.4 km/s and the average total thickness of the crust is 45 km.

  1. 3D crustal velocity structure beneath the broadband seismic array in the Gyeongju area of Korea by receiver function analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Hun; Lee, Jung Mo; Cho, Hyun-Moo; Kang, Tae-Seob

    2016-10-01

    A temporary seismic array was in operation between October 2010 and March 2013 in the Gyeongju area of Korea. Teleseismic records of the seismic array appropriate for receiver function analysis were collected, and selected seismograms were split into five groups based on epicenters-the Banda-Molucca, Sumatra, Iran, Aleutian, and Vanuatu groups. 1D velocity structures beneath each seismic station were estimated by inverting the stacked receiver functions for possible groups. The inversion was done by applying a genetic algorithm, whereas surface wave dispersion data were used as constraints to avoid non-uniqueness in the inversion. The composite velocity structure was constructed by averaging the velocity structures weighted by the number of receiver functions used in stacking. The uncertainty analysis for the velocity structures showed that the average of 95% confidence intervals was ± 0.1 km/s. The 3D velocity structure was modeled through interpolation of 1D composite velocity structures. Moho depths were determined in each composite velocity structure based on the AK135-F S-wave velocity model, and the depths were similar to the H-κ analysis results. The deepest Moho depth in the study area was found to be 31.9 km, and the shallowest, was 25.9 km. The Moho discontinuity dips in a southwestward direction beneath the area. A low velocity layer was also detected between 4 and 14 km depth. Adakitic intrusions and/or a high geothermal gradient appear to be the causes of this low velocity layer. The 3D velocity structure can be used to reliably assess seismic hazards in this area.

  2. 3D and 2D structural characterization of 1D Al/Al2 O3 biphasic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Miró, M Martinez; Veith, M; Lee, J; Soldera, F; Mücklich, F; Bennewitz, R; Aktas, C

    2015-05-01

    1D Al/Al2 O3 nanostructures have been synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of the molecular precursor [(t) BuOAlH2 ]2 . The deposited nanostructures grow chaotically on the substrate forming a layer with a high porosity (80%). Depending on the deposition time, diverse nanostructured surfaces with different distribution densities were achieved. A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction has been evaluated for every nanostructure density using the Focus Ion Beam (FIB) tomography technique and reconstruction software tools. Several structural parameters such as porosity, Euler number, geometrical tortuosity and aspect ratio have been quantified through the analysis with specified software of the reconstructions. Additionally roughness of the prepared surfaces has been characterized at micro- and nanoscale using profilometry and AFM techniques, respectively. While high aspects ratio around 20-30 indicates a strong anisotropy in the structure, high porosity values (around 80%) is observed as a consequence of highly tangled geometry of such 1D nanostructures.

  3. Large-scale velocity structures in turbulent thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, X L; Tong, P

    2001-09-01

    A systematic study of large-scale velocity structures in turbulent thermal convection is carried out in three different aspect-ratio cells filled with water. Laser Doppler velocimetry is used to measure the velocity profiles and statistics over varying Rayleigh numbers Ra and at various spatial positions across the whole convection cell. Large velocity fluctuations are found both in the central region and near the cell boundary. Despite the large velocity fluctuations, the flow field still maintains a large-scale quasi-two-dimensional structure, which rotates in a coherent manner. This coherent single-roll structure scales with Ra and can be divided into three regions in the rotation plane: (1) a thin viscous boundary layer, (2) a fully mixed central core region with a constant mean velocity gradient, and (3) an intermediate plume-dominated buffer region. The experiment reveals a unique driving mechanism for the large-scale coherent rotation in turbulent convection.

  4. Assembling carbon fiber–graphene–carbon fiber hetero-structures into 1D–2D–1D junction fillers and patterned structures for improved microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huimin; Liu, Lin; Li, Hai-Bing; Song, Wei-Li; Bian, Xing-Ming; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Chen, Mingji; Yuan, Xujin; Chen, Haosen; Fang, Daining

    2017-04-01

    Since carbon-based structures of various dimensions, including one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes, two-dimensional (2D) graphene and three-dimensional (3D) carbon foams, have attracted significant attention as microwave absorption fillers, we present an exceptional hetero-junction filler with a 1D–2D–1D feature, achieved by manipulating 2D graphene into 1D carbon fibers in the fiber-extruding process under the electric field. The as-fabricated 1D–2D–1D structural fillers exhibited much-improved dielectric properties and promoted microwave absorption performance in their composites, which is linked to the establishment of enhanced polarization capability, the generation of increased electric loss pathway and the creation of more favorable electromagnetic energy consumption conditions. The results suggest that employing 2D graphene in the 1D–2D–1D nanostructures played the critical role in tuning the electromagnetic response ability, because of its intrinsic electric advantages and dimensional features. To broaden the effective absorption bandwidth, periodic pattern-absorbing structures were designed, which showed combined absorption advantages for various thicknesses. Our strategy for fabricating 1D–2D–1D structural fillers illuminates a universal approach for manipulating dimensions and structures in the nanotechnology.

  5. Shear velocity structure of the northern California lithosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Levander, A.R. ); Kovach, R.L. )

    1990-11-10

    The authors have determined the regional shear velocity structure of the lithosphere beneath the Coast Ranges and the Great Valley in northern California from inversion of three fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocity curves. The dispersion measurements were made along three different paths crossing the Coast Ranges and Great Valley roughly perpendicular to the North American-Pacific plate boundary. The three dispersion curves diverge at periods greater than about 20 s; phase velocities are systematically higher from the northwest to the southeast along the transform margin. Inverting the phase velocities for crustal and upper mantle structure shows that this divergence is indicative of a 3-5% increase in the upper mantle shear velocity from the Napa-Great Valley region to the Diablo Range-Great Valley region. Crustal shear velocities are consistent with the lithologies expected in the middle and lower crust. The increase in mantle shear velocity from northwest to southeast is anticipated by a tectonic model for the development of the California transform margin in which asthenospheric material is emplaced at the base of the North American crust in the slab gap south of the Mendocino triple junction. Adjacent to the plate boundary, this process creates a subcrustal corridor of cooling asthenosphere which is gradually incorporated in the lithosphere lid. They suggest that this causes the observed increase in upper mantle shear velocity away from the triple junction. Finite difference simulations of Rayleigh wave propagation across asthenosphere corridor models produce synthetic phase velocity curves which are similar to the field observations.

  6. Temperature tuning of band-structure of 1D periodic elastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, H.; Srivastava, A.; Griswold, R.; Nemat-Nasser, S.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper we show that the bandstructure of a periodic elastic composite, in addition to being dependent upon the micro-constituents and their microarchitecture, may also be controlled by changing the temperature. The essential idea is to fabricate a periodic composite with constituent materials which have temperature dependent elastic properties. As temperature is changed, such a composite is expected to exhibit a bandstructure which changes with the temperature dependent properties of its micro-constituents. For our purpose, we use polyurea and steel to make a 1-D periodic composite. Ultrasonic measurements are done on the sample from 0.5 kHz to 1.5 MHz under changing temperature and the change in the second passband is studied. It is observed that the change in the bandstructure is significant when the temperature is changed from -50°C to 50°C. Experimental results are compared with the theoretical calculations and it is shown that good agreement exists for the observed bandstructure.

  7. Synthesis, crystal structure, and properties of a 1-D terbium-substituted monolacunary Keggin-type polyoxotungstate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pengtao; Si, Yanan; Wan, Rong; Zhang, Shaowei; Wang, Jingping; Niu, Jingyang

    2015-03-05

    A new 1-D linear chainlike terbium-substituted polyoxometalate [Tb(H2O)2(α-PW11O39)](4-) (1) has been synthesized in aqueous solution and characterized by elemental analysis, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), IR spectrum, thermal analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. X-ray structural analysis reveals that 1 displays a 1-D linear chain containing [Tb(H2O)2(α-PW11O39)](4-) moieties. The Tb(III) cation incorporated into the monolacunary Keggin-type [α-PW11O39](7-) unit resides in a distorted monocapped triangular prismatic geometry and acts as a linker to join two adjacent [α-PW11O39](7-) units to form a 1-D chain structure. Solid-state photoluminescent property of 1 has been investigated at room temperature and the photoluminescent emission mainly results from the synergistic effect of the Tb(III) cation and the Na7[α-PW11O39] precursor. The ESI-MS spectrum of 1 confirms that the polyanion [Tb(H2O)(HPW11O39)](3-) is stable in aqueous solution.

  8. Transmission properties analysis of 1D PT-symmetric photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossakowska-Wyszyńska, Agnieszka; Witoński, Piotr; Szczepański, Paweł

    2016-12-01

    The transmission properties of one dimensional PT-symmetric photonic crystal (PC) structure with gain and loss regions are presented. Obtained characteristics illustrate the influence of the structures parameters such as the ratio of the PC period to the operating wavelength, the number of the primitive cells creating PC, the loss and gain level (imaginary part of the refractive indices) on reflection and transmission coefficients. It demonstrates strong nonreciprocal response of the structure.

  9. Modeling structures of 1D PhC for telecommunication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawistowski, Zygmunt J.; Jaskorzyńska, BoŻena

    2016-09-01

    Effective method of modeling 1-dimensional photonic crystals structures is presented. As an illustration of the method a concept of widely tunable narrow band drop filter is described. As an active electro-optic material a liquid crystal is used. Very good parameters are obtained so the presented structure is suitable for fast packet switched wavelength division multiplexing networks (WDM).

  10. Exploring group 14 structures: 1D to 2D to 3D.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Dong; Cahill, Thomas J; Hoffmann, Roald

    2010-06-11

    Various one-, two- and three-dimensional Group 14 (C, Si, Ge, Sn, and Pb) element structures at P = 1 atm are studied in this work. As expected, coordination number (CN)--not an unambiguous concept for extended structures--plays an important part in the stability of structures. Carbon not only favors four-coordination, but also is quite happy with pi-bonding, allowing three- and even two-coordination to compete. Highly coordinated (CN > 4) discrete carbon molecules are rare; that "saturation of valence" is reflected in the instability of C extended structures with CN > 4. Si and Ge are quite similar to each other in their preferences. They are less biased in their coordination than C, allowing (as their molecular structures do) CN = 5 and 6, but tending towards four-coordination. Sn and Pb 3D structures are very flexible in their bonding, so that in these elements four- to twelve-coordinate structures are close in energy. This lack of discrimination among ordered structures also points to an approach to the liquid state, consistent with the low melting point of Sn and Pb. The Group 14 liquid structures we simulate in molecular dynamics calculations show the expected, effective, first coordination number increase from 5.1 for Si to 10.4 for Pb. A special point of interest emerging from our study is the instability of potential multilayer graphene structures down Group 14. Only for C will these be stable; for all the other Group 14 elements pristine, unprotected, bi- and multilayer graphenes should collapse, forming "vertical" bonds as short as the in-plane ones.

  11. Tomographic three-dimensional seismic velocity structure of the SW Ibero-Maghrebian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoulali, Youssef; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Caldeira, Bento; Borges, José Fernando; Hahou, Youssef

    2010-05-01

    The present tomographic study focuses on SW Ibero-Maghrebian region. To locate the seismic events and find the local velocity structure of epicentral area, the P and S arrivals at 42 stations located at north of Morocco, south of Portugal and Spain are used. The arrival times data used, in this study, were obtained by the "Instituto de Meteorologia" (IM, Lisbon, Portugal), the National Institute of Geophysics (CNRST, Rabat, Morocco) and the "Instituto Geografico Nacional" (IGN, Madrid, Spain) (between 12/1988 and 30/2008). The preliminary estimate of origin times and hypocentral coordinates are determined by the hypocenter 3.2 program. In this study we use a linearized inversion procedure comprising two steps: 1) finding the minimal 1-D model and simultaneous relocation of hypocenters and 2) determination of local velocity structure assuming a continuous velocity field. The earth structure is represented in three dimensions by velocity at discrete points, and velocity at any intervening point is determined by linear interpolation among the surrounding eight grid points. The resolutions tests results indicate that the calculated images give near true structure for the studied region at 15, 30, 45 and 60 km depth. At 5km depth it gives near true structure in the continental region of Portugal, Spain, and Morocco. This study shows that the total crustal thickness varies from 30 to 35 km and contains low-velocity anomalies. A prominent low velocity anomaly that shows a maximum decrease in P-wave velocity of approximately 6 per cent in the Gibraltar region is observed extending down to a depth of approximately 30 km. This low velocity demarcates a small bloc located between Iberia and Nubia plates. The resulting tomographic image has a prominent high velocity anomaly that shows a maximum increase in P-wave velocity of approximately 6 per cent between 45 to 60 km depth beneath South of Portugal and the Golf of Cadiz. High-velocity anomalies could be associated with the

  12. Optical reflectance and omnidirectional bandgaps in Fibonacci quasicrystals type 1-D multilayer structures containing exponentially graded material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bipin K.; Thapa, Khem B.; Pandey, Praveen C.

    2013-06-01

    A theoretical study of optical reflectance and reflection bands of 1-D photonic quasi-crystals (Fibonacci type arrangement) composed of exponentially graded material is presented. The proposed structures consist of two different layers, one of them is of constant refractive index (L) and the other one is of exponentially graded refractive index (S) dielectric materials. Four different generations (2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th) of the Fibonacci sequence for 10 periods in one dimension (1-D) are considered and compared in view of their optical reflectance and bandgaps for both TE and TM polarisations. Also, we proposed some heterostructures made by the combination of different Fibonacci generations and their periods to obtain suitable omnidirectional reflection band. We used the transfer matrix method (TMM) to obtain the reflectance, bandgaps and omnidirectional reflectional bandgaps (ODR) of such structures in near infrared spectrum (800-2200 nm) at different angles of incidence. We show that ODR exists in these types of structures. The number of ODRs and total bandgap depend on the Fibonacci generations. Extraordinary ODR bandgaps are obtained in the case of heterostructures formed by the combination of different generations of the Fibonacci sequence. The ODR for these structures is similar to the ODR of photonic crystals containing left-handed materials. This work would be useful to study the Fibonacci type photonic crystals having graded index materials and also it will open new window to design several photonic crystal devices like sensors, reflectors, etc. in the infrared region.

  13. Extremal inversion of lunar travel time data. [seismic velocity structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhard, N.; Jackson, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    The tau method, developed by Bessonova et al. (1974), of inversion of travel times is applied to lunar P-wave travel time data to find limits on the velocity structure of the moon. Tau is the singular solution to the Clairaut equation. Models with low-velocity zones, with low-velocity zones at differing depths, and without low-velocity zones, were found to be consistent with data and within the determined limits. Models with and without a discontinuity at about 25-km depth have been found which agree with all travel time data to within two standard deviations. In other words, the existence of the discontinuity and its size and location have not been uniquely resolved. Models with low-velocity channels are also possible.

  14. Electronic and structural properties of 3D, 2D and 1D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Filipe Joao

    In this work several applications of the ab initio pseudopotential density functional theory method are presented. With this method it is possible to calculate the electronic ground state properties of many systems like bulk solids, surfaces, nanotubes, and nanowires, and draw conclusions about the systems structural and electronic properties. With modifications of this approach excited states can also be treated. The first chapter of this thesis gives a brief description of the computational techniques employed. The second chapter describes results of calculations on the structural and electronic properties of carbon and germanium. We try to shed some light on a still poorly understood structural phase transition of graphite under pressure at low temperatures, which is different from the high temperature regime. Next, we study the phase transition path of germanium under pressure and predict the existence of a new phase. The following chapter explores the possibility of superconductivity in the graphite-like compound BC3 since there are many similarities between the electronic structure of this material and the 39 K superconductor MgB2. Subsequently, results of calculations on the adsorption of indium atoms on carbon nanotubes and graphite-like surfaces are presented. These studies explain some very interesting experimental results of In migration on nanotubes in an electrical potential. In the following chapters the electronic properties of very thin metallic MoSe nanowires are studied, and the different regimes of stability of metallic monatomic chains of Au, Al, Ag, Pd, Rh, and Ru are investigated and compared. Chapter 7 addresses the possible polymerization of C60 molecules inside carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. Finally, the propagation of a light signal in a medium with gains and losses is investigated, and the possibility of a discontinuity in the index of refraction is discussed.

  15. Local duality in spin structure functions g1(p) and g1(d)

    SciTech Connect

    Yelena Prok

    2006-02-01

    Inclusive double spin asymmetries obtained by scattering polarized electrons off polarized protons and deuterons have been analyzed to address the issue of quark hadron duality in the polarized spin structure functions gp 1 and gd 1. A polarized electron beam, solid polarized NH3 and ND3 targets and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) in Hall B were used to collect the data. The resulting gp 1 and gd 1 were averaged over the nucleon resonance energy region (M

  16. Structure elucidation of organic compounds from natural sources using 1D and 2D NMR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, Gulacti; Ulubelen, Ayhan

    2007-05-01

    In our continuing studies on Lamiaceae family plants including Salvia, Teucrium, Ajuga, Sideritis, Nepeta and Lavandula growing in Anatolia, many terpenoids, consisting of over 50 distinct triterpenoids and steroids, and over 200 diterpenoids, several sesterterpenoids and sesquiterpenoids along with many flavonoids and other phenolic compounds have been isolated. For Salvia species abietanes, for Teucrium and Ajuga species neo-clerodanes for Sideritis species ent-kaurane diterpenes are characteristic while nepetalactones are specific for Nepeta species. In this review article, only some interesting and different type of skeleton having constituents, namely rearranged, nor- or rare diterpenes, isolated from these species will be presented. For structure elucidation of these natural diterpenoids intensive one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques ( 1H, 13C, APT, DEPT, NOE/NOESY, 1H- 1H COSY, HETCOR, COLOC, HMQC/HSQC, HMBC, SINEPT) were used besides mass and some other spectroscopic methods.

  17. Imaging Spectroscopy of a Sunspot: Thermal and Velocity Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is (1) to confirm and establish the working of a dual-etalon Fabry-Pérot imaging spectroscopy system at the National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak Dunn Solar Telescope and (2) to use this system to extend previous work by many authors and understand the structure and dynamics of sunspots. A detailed investigation of the thermal and velocity structure in an isolated sunspot, using the Fe I 5576 Å spectral line, is presented. The concept of flowless maps is incorporated, to separate velocity and intensity effects. The resulting intensities are used to generate thermal maps of the sunspot along the height of formation of a spectral line, followed by a thermal span map. The thermal span in penumbral regions is in the range of 1350-1580 K. It is a factor of 2 smaller in the umbra. Using spectral line bisectors, we extend the concept of a velocity span to a sunspot, following Gray. The velocity span is used to study the velocity gradients across a sunspot. The velocity span maximizes in the middle of the sunspot penumbra and falls off on either side. The Doppler-neutralized mean bisectors from the disk-side and limb-side penumbra show more sharply inclined gradients, when compared with the C-shaped photospheric bisectors. The mean umbral bisectors show sharp, <-shaped profiles. In most of the penumbra, the individual bisectors are sharply inclined, with a shape of ``/'' or ``\\,'' indicative of a highly suppressed convective flow. The intensity and velocity data show that a new family of penumbral filaments rises in the middle penumbra. Bisector intensity-velocity relationships display opposite gradients in the inner and outer penumbra, showing the rising and falling parts of curved penumbral flux tubes. Some clustering of the bisector intensity-velocity relationship is perhaps due to the fluted nature of flux tubes.

  18. Quark-Hadron Duality in Spin Structure Functions $g_1^p$ and $g_1^d$

    SciTech Connect

    P.E. Bosted; K.V. Dharmawardane; G.E. Dodge; T.A. Forest; S.E. Kuhn; Y. Prok

    2006-07-25

    New measurements of the spin structure functions of the proton and deuteron g{sub 1}{sup p}(x, Q{sup 2}) and g{sub 1}{sup d}(x, Q{sup 2}) in the nucleon resonance region are compared with extrapolations of target-mass-corrected next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD fits to higher energy data. Averaged over the entire resonance region (W < 2 GeV), the data and QCD fits are in good agreement in both magnitude and Q{sup 2} dependence for Q{sup 2} > 1.7 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}. This ''global'' duality appears to result from cancellations among the prominent ''local'' resonance regions: in particular strong {sigma}{sub 3/2} contributions in the {Delta}(1232) region appear to be compensated by strong {sigma}{sub 1/2} contributions in the resonance region centered on 1.5 GeV. These results are encouraging for the extension of NLO QCD fits to lower W and Q{sup 2} than have been used previously.

  19. Crystal structures of bovine CD1d reveal altered αGalCer presentation and a restricted A' pocket unable to bind long-chain glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Guillaume, Joren; Pauwels, Nora; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Zajonc, Dirk M

    2012-01-01

    NKT cells play important roles in immune surveillance. They rapidly respond to pathogens by detecting microbial glycolipids when presented by the non-classical MHC I homolog CD1d. Previously, ruminants were considered to lack NKT cells due to the lack of a functional CD1D gene. However, recent data suggest that cattle express CD1d with unknown function. In an attempt to characterize the function of bovine CD1d, we assessed the lipid binding properties of recombinant Bos taurus CD1d (boCD1d) in vitro. BoCD1d is able to bind glycosphingolipids (GSLs) with fatty acid chain lengths of C₁₈, while GSLs with fatty acids of C₂₄ do not bind. Crystal structures of boCD1d bound to a short-chain C₁₂-di-sulfatide antigen, as well as short-chain C₁₆-αGalCer revealed that the Á pocket of boCD1d is restricted in size compared to that of both mouse and human CD1d, explaining the inability of long chain GSL's to bind to boCD1d. Moreover, while di-sulfatide is presented similarly compared to the presentation of sulfatide by mouse CD1d, αGalCer is presented differently at the cell surface, due to an amino acid Asp151Asn substitution that results in loss of intimate contacts between the αGalCer headgroup and CD1d. The altered αGalCer presentation by boCD1d also explains its lack of cross-activation of mouse iNKT cells and raises the interesting question of the nature and function of bovine lipid-reactive T cells.

  20. Crystal Structures of Bovine CD1d Reveal Altered αGalCer Presentation and a Restricted A’ Pocket Unable to Bind Long-Chain Glycolipids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Guillaume, Joren; Pauwels, Nora; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2012-01-01

    NKT cells play important roles in immune surveillance. They rapidly respond to pathogens by detecting microbial glycolipids when presented by the non-classical MHC I homolog CD1d. Previously, ruminants were considered to lack NKT cells due to the lack of a functional CD1D gene. However, recent data suggest that cattle express CD1d with unknown function. In an attempt to characterize the function of bovine CD1d, we assessed the lipid binding properties of recombinant Bos taurus CD1d (boCD1d) in vitro. BoCD1d is able to bind glycosphingolipids (GSLs) with fatty acid chain lengths of C18, while GSLs with fatty acids of C24 do not bind. Crystal structures of boCD1d bound to a short-chain C12-di-sulfatide antigen, as well as short-chain C16-αGalCer revealed that the Á pocket of boCD1d is restricted in size compared to that of both mouse and human CD1d, explaining the inability of long chain GSL’s to bind to boCD1d. Moreover, while di-sulfatide is presented similarly compared to the presentation of sulfatide by mouse CD1d, αGalCer is presented differently at the cell surface, due to an amino acid Asp151Asn substitution that results in loss of intimate contacts between the αGalCer headgroup and CD1d. The altered αGalCer presentation by boCD1d also explains its lack of cross-activation of mouse iNKT cells and raises the interesting question of the nature and function of bovine lipid-reactive T cells. PMID:23110152

  1. Correlation between spin structure oscillations and domain wall velocities

    PubMed Central

    Bisig, André; Stärk, Martin; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Büttner, Felix; Noske, Matthias; Weigand, Markus; Eisebitt, Stefan; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic sensing and logic devices based on the motion of magnetic domain walls rely on the precise and deterministic control of the position and the velocity of individual magnetic domain walls in curved nanowires. Varying domain wall velocities have been predicted to result from intrinsic effects such as oscillating domain wall spin structure transformations and extrinsic pinning due to imperfections. Here we use direct dynamic imaging of the nanoscale spin structure that allows us for the first time to directly check these predictions. We find a new regime of oscillating domain wall motion even below the Walker breakdown correlated with periodic spin structure changes. We show that the extrinsic pinning from imperfections in the nanowire only affects slow domain walls and we identify the magnetostatic energy, which scales with the domain wall velocity, as the energy reservoir for the domain wall to overcome the local pinning potential landscape. PMID:23978905

  2. Correlation between spin structure oscillations and domain wall velocities.

    PubMed

    Bisig, André; Stärk, Martin; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Büttner, Felix; Noske, Matthias; Weigand, Markus; Eisebitt, Stefan; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic sensing and logic devices based on the motion of magnetic domain walls rely on the precise and deterministic control of the position and the velocity of individual magnetic domain walls in curved nanowires. Varying domain wall velocities have been predicted to result from intrinsic effects such as oscillating domain wall spin structure transformations and extrinsic pinning due to imperfections. Here we use direct dynamic imaging of the nanoscale spin structure that allows us for the first time to directly check these predictions. We find a new regime of oscillating domain wall motion even below the Walker breakdown correlated with periodic spin structure changes. We show that the extrinsic pinning from imperfections in the nanowire only affects slow domain walls and we identify the magnetostatic energy, which scales with the domain wall velocity, as the energy reservoir for the domain wall to overcome the local pinning potential landscape.

  3. Exponents of the spectral functions and dynamical structure factor of the 1D Lieb-Liniger Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Sacramento, P. D.

    2016-06-01

    We study the (k , ω) -plane finite-energy line shape of the zero-temperature one-boson removal spectral function (ω < 0) , one-boson addition spectral function (ω > 0) , and charge dynamical structure factor (ω > 0) of the 1D Lieb-Liniger Bose gas with repulsive boson interaction c > 0. Our analysis of the problem focuses on the line shape at finite excitation energies in the vicinity of these functions spectrum upper (ω < 0) or lower (ω > 0) threshold. Specifically, we derive the exact momentum, interaction, and density dependences of the exponents controlling such a line shape in each of the N = 1 , 2 , 3 , … momentum subdomains k ∈ [(N - 1) 2 πn , N 2 πn ] . Here n = N / L is the boson density, N the boson number, and L the system length. In the thermodynamic limit considered in our study nearly all spectral weight of the dynamical correlation functions is for large values of n / c contained in the N = 1 momentum subdomain k ∈ [ 0 , 2 πn ] . As n / c decreases a small fraction of that weight is transferred to the remaining set of N = 2 , 3 , 4 , … momentum subdomains, particularly to the N = 2 subdomain. In the case of the momentum subdomain k ∈ [ 0 , 2 πn ] , our exact results agree with those of previous studies. For that subdomain the above exponents are plotted as a function of the momentum for several n / c values. Our derivation of the line shapes of the three dynamical correlation functions relies on the use of a simplified form of the pseudofermion dynamical theory of the fermionic 1D Hubbard model suitably modified in this paper for the 1D Bose gas.

  4. Large-scale shear velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath Europe and surrounding regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, C. P.; Meier, T. M.; Lebedev, S.; Friederich, W.

    2009-12-01

    The automated multimode waveform inversion technique developed by Lebedev et al. (2005) was applied to available data of broadband stations in Europe and surrounding regions. It performs a fitting of the complete waveform starting from the S-wave onset to the surface wave. Assuming the location and focal mechanism of a considered earthquake as known, the first basic step is to consider each available seismogram separately and to find the 1D-model that can explain the filtered seismogram best. In a second step, each 1D-model serves as a linear constraint in an inversion for a 3D S-wave velocity model of the upper mantle. We collected data for the years from 1990 to 2006 from all permanent stations for which data were available via the data centers of ORFEUS, GEOFON amd IRIS, and from others that build the Virtual European Seismological Network (VEBSN). In addition, we incorporated data from temporary experiments like SVEKALAPKO, TOR and the Eifel plume project as well as permanent stations in France. Just recently we were also able to add the data recorded by the temporary broadband EGELADOS network in the southern Aegean. In this way, a huge data set of about 500000 seismograms came about from which about 60000 1D-models could be constructed. The resulting models exhibit an overwhelming structural detail in relation to the size of the region considered in the inversion. They are to our knowledge the most detailed models of shear wave velocity currently available for the European upper mantle and surroundings. Most prominent features are an extremely sharp demarcation of the East European platform from Western Europe. Narrow high velocity regions follow the Hellenic arc and the Ionian trench toward the north. Whereas high velocities are found beneath the western Alps between about 100 km to 200 km depth, the eastern Alps show a low velocity anomaly at these depths. Low velocity zones are found at depths around 150 km in the Pannonian basin, the back-arc of the

  5. The 3D velocity structure beneath Iceland: Identifying melt pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R.

    2003-04-01

    The integration of various seismic datasets, recorded by the broadband HOTSPOT network deployed across Iceland, provides one of the highest resolution studies of the crust and mantle structure associated with a plume-ridge system. The mantle P- and S-velocity models (ICEMAN), derived from teleseismic body-wave and surface wave analysis, show a vertical, cylindrical low velocity anomaly ˜200 km in diameter extending from ˜400 km, the maximum depth of resolution, up to ˜200 km above which low velocity material is present beneath all of Iceland. The maximum P- and S-velocity anomalies of -2% and -4% respectively are found beneath the northwestern edge of Vatnajokull. The crustal S-velocity model (ICECRTb) is constrained by local surface waves, refraction experiments and receiver functions, and shows significant variation in crustal thickness. The thinnest, ˜15 km, crust is found around coastal regions, the thickest crust is beneath northwestern Vatnajokull where it reaches a thickness of 45 km. Within this thick crustal root is a vertical low velocity anomaly connecting the core of the mantle anomaly to horizontal low velocity regions that extend along the western and eastern volcanic zones but not the northern volcanic zone. These crustal low velocity zones are interpreted as regions through which melt is fed from the mantle to shallow magma chambers beneath the rift zones, where crustal formation occurs. The pipework between the core of the mantle anomaly and the southern rift zones is responsible for ˜30 km thick crust. Its absence to the north results in relatively thin, ˜20 km thick, crust.

  6. Predicting High Explosive Detonation Velocities from Their Composition and Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    for a gamut of ideal explosives. The explosives ranged from nitroaromatics, cyclic and linear nitramines, nitrate esters and nitro-nitrato...structure is postulated for a gamut of explosives. Since detonation velocity, DQ, is density dependent, the linear regression plot. Figure 1, of the

  7. Controlled Self-Assembly of Cyclophane Amphiphiles: From 1D Nanofibers to Ultrathin 2D Topological Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhengxu; Li, Lianwei; Lo, Wai-Yip; Zhao, Donglin; Wu, Qinghe; Zhang, Na; Su, Yu-An; Chen, Wei; Yu, Luping

    2016-07-05

    A novel series of amphiphilic TC-PEG molecules were designed and synthesized based on the orthogonal cyclophane unit. These molecules were able to self-assemble from 1D nanofibers and nanobelts to 2D ultrathin nanosheets (3 nm thick) in a controlled way by tuning the length of PEG side chains. The special structure of the cyclophane moiety allowed control in construction of nanostructures through programmed noncovalent interactions (hydrophobic hydrophilic interaction and pi-pi interaction). The self-assembled nanostructures were characterized by combining real space imaging (TEM, SEM, and AFM) and reciprocal space scattering (GIWAXS) techniques. This unique supramolecular system may provide a new strategy for the design of materials with tunable nanomorphology and functionality.

  8. Structural Basis of the Interaction between Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 1 (TSC1) and Tre2-Bub2-Cdc16 Domain Family Member 7 (TBC1D7).

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiayue; Wang, Zhizhi; Hoogeveen-Westerveld, Marianne; Shen, Guobo; Gong, Weimin; Nellist, Mark; Xu, Wenqing

    2016-04-15

    Mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 cause tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of benign tumors in various vital organs and tissues. TSC1 and TSC2, the TSC1 and TSC2 gene products, form the TSC protein complex that senses specific cellular growth conditions to control mTORC1 signaling. TBC1D7 is the third subunit of the TSC complex, and helps to stabilize the TSC1-TSC2 complex through its direct interaction with TSC1. Homozygous inactivation of TBC1D7 causes intellectual disability and megaencephaly. Here we report the crystal structure of a TSC1-TBC1D7 complex and biochemical characterization of the TSC1-TBC1D7 interaction. TBC1D7 interacts with the C-terminal region of the predicted coiled-coil domain of TSC1. The TSC1-TBC1D7 interface is largely hydrophobic, involving the α4 helix of TBC1D7. Each TBC1D7 molecule interacts simultaneously with two parallel TSC1 helices from two TSC1 molecules, suggesting that TBC1D7 may stabilize the TSC complex by tethering the C-terminal ends of two TSC1 coiled-coils.

  9. Structural variation from heterometallic cluster-based 1D chain to heterometallic tetranuclear cluster: Syntheses, structures and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shu-Hua; Zhao, Ru-Xia; Li, He-Ping; Ge, Cheng-Min; Li, Gui; Huang, Qiu-Ping; Zou, Hua-Hong

    2014-08-15

    Using the solvothermal method, we present the comparative preparation of ([Co{sub 3}Na(dmaep){sub 3}(ehbd)(N{sub 3}){sub 3}]·DMF){sub n} (1) and [Co{sub 2}Na{sub 2}(hmbd){sub 4}(N{sub 3}){sub 2}(DMF){sub 2}] (2), where Hehbd is 3-ethoxy-2-hydroxy-benzaldehyde, Hhmbd is 3-methoxy-2-hydroxy-benzaldehyde, and Hdmaep is 2-dimethylaminomethyl-6-ethoxy-phenol, which was synthesized by an in-situ reaction. Complexes 1 and 2 were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. Complex 1 is a novel heterometallic cluster-based 1-D chain and 2 is a heterometallic tetranuclear cluster. The (Co{sub 3}{sup II}Na) and (Co{sub 2}{sup II}Na{sub 2}) cores display dominant ferromagnetic interaction from the nature of the binding modes through μ{sub 1,1,1}-N{sub 3}{sup –} (end-on, EO). - Graphical abstract: Two novel cobalt complexes have been prepared. Compound 1 consists of tetranuclear (Co{sub 3}{sup II}Na) units, which further formed a 1-D chain. Compound 2 is heterometallic tetranuclear cluster. Two complexes display dominant ferromagnetic interaction. - Highlights: • Two new heterometallic complexes have been synthesized by solvothermal method. • The stereospecific blockade of the ligands in the synthesis system seems to be the most important synthetic parameter. • The magnetism studies show that 1 and 2 exhibit ferromagnetic interactions. • Complex 1 shows slowing down of magnetization and not blocking of magnetization.

  10. Vorticity structuring and velocity rolls triggered by gradient shear bands.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Suzanne M

    2007-07-01

    We suggest a mechanism by which vorticity structuring and velocity rolls can form in complex fluids, triggered by the linear instability of one-dimensional gradient shear banded flow. We support this with a numerical study of the diffusive Johnson-Segalman model. In the steady vorticity structured state, the thickness of the interface between the bands remains finite in the limit of zero stress diffusivity, presenting a possible challenge to the accepted theory of shear banding.

  11. Hierarchical Velocity Structure in the Core of Abell 2597

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Still, Martin; Mushotzky, Richard

    2004-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton RGS and EPIC data of the putative cooling flow cluster Abell 2597. Velocities of the low-ionization emission lines in the spectrum are blue shifted with respect to the high-ionization lines by 1320 (sup +660) (sub -210) kilometers per second, which is consistent with the difference in the two peaks of the galaxy velocity distribution and may be the signature of bulk turbulence, infall, rotation or damped oscillation in the cluster. A hierarchical velocity structure such as this could be the direct result of galaxy mergers in the cluster core, or the injection of power into the cluster gas from a central engine. The uniform X-ray morphology of the cluster, the absence of fine scale temperature structure and the random distribution of the the galaxy positions, independent of velocity, suggests that our line of sight is close to the direction of motion. These results have strong implications for cooling flow models of the cluster Abell 2597. They give impetus to those models which account for the observed temperature structure of some clusters using mergers instead of cooling flows.

  12. Photonic Crystals: Tunable Design of Structural Colors Produced by Pseudo-1D Photonic Crystals of Graphene Oxide (Small 25/2016).

    PubMed

    Tong, Liping; Qi, Wei; Wang, Mengfan; Huang, Renliang; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-07-01

    The production of structural colors based on graphene oxide (GO) pseudo-one-dimensional photonic crystals (p1D-PhCs) in the visible spectrum is reported on page 3433 by W. Qi and co-workers. The structural colors could be tuned by simply changing either the volume or concentration of the aqueous GO dispersion. Moreover, GO p1D-PhCs exhibit visible and rapid responsiveness to humidity.

  13. Designed Quasi-1D Potential Structures Realized in Compositionally Graded InAs1-xPx Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Nylund, Gustav; Storm, Kristian; Lehmann, Sebastian; Capasso, Federico; Samuelson, Lars

    2016-02-10

    III-V semiconductor heterostructures are important components of many solid-state optoelectronic devices, but the ability to control and tune the electrical and optical properties of these structures in conventional device geometries is fundamentally limited by the bulk dimensionality and the inability to accommodate lattice-mismatched material combinations. Here we demonstrate how semiconductor nanowires may enable the creation of arbitrarily shaped one-dimensional potential structures for new types of designed device functionality. We describe the controlled growth of stepwise compositionally graded InAs1-xPx heterostructures defined along the axes of InAs nanowires, and we show that nanowires with sawtooth-shaped composition profiles behave as near-ideal unipolar diodes with ratchet-like rectification of the electron transport through the nanowires, in excellent agreement with simulations. This new type of designed quasi-1D potential structure represents a significant advance in band gap engineering and may enable fundamental studies of low-dimensional hot-carrier dynamics, in addition to constituting a platform for implementing novel electronic and optoelectronic device concepts.

  14. Velocity and Attenuation Structure of the Geysers Geothermal Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Zucca, J. J.; Hutchings, L. J.; Kasameyer, P. W.

    1993-01-01

    The Geysers geothermal field is located in northern California and is one of the world's largest producers of electricity from geothermal energy. The resource consists of primarily dry steam which is produced from a low, porosity fractured graywacke. Over the last several years steam pressure at the Geysers has been dropping. Concern over decline of the resource has prompted research to understand its fundamental nature. A key issue is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and attenuation data at the Geysers in terms of the geologic structure and fluid saturation in the reservoir. Our data consist of approximately 300 earthquakes that are of magnitude 1.2 and are distributed in depth between sea level and 2.5 km. Using compressional-wave arrival times, we invert for earthquake location, origin time, and velocity along a three-dimensional grid. Using the initial pulse width of the compressional-wave, we invert for the initial pulse width associated with the source, and the one-dimensional Q structure. We find that the velocity structure correlates with known mapped geologic units, including a velocity high that is correlated with a felsite body at depth that is known from drilling. The dry steam reservoir, which is also known from drilling, is mostly correlated with low velocity. The Q increases with depth to the top of the dry steam reservoir and decreases with depth within the reservoir. The decrease of Q with depth probably indicates that the saturation of the matrix of the reservoir rock increases with depth.

  15. HOTCFGM-1D: A Coupled Higher-Order Theory for Cylindrical Structural Components with Through-Thickness Functionally Graded Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this three-year project was to develop and deliver to NASA Lewis one-dimensional and two-dimensional higher-order theories, and related computer codes, for the analysis, optimization and design of cylindrical functionally graded materials/structural components for use in advanced aircraft engines (e.g., combustor linings, rotor disks, heat shields, blisk blades). To satisfy this objective, a quasi one-dimensional version of the higher-order theory, HOTCFGM-1D, and four computer codes based on this theory, for the analysis, design and optimization of cylindrical structural components functionally graded in the radial direction were developed. The theory is applicable to thin multi-phased composite shell/cylinders subjected to macroscopically axisymmetric thermomechanical and inertial loading applied uniformly along the axial direction such that the overall deformation is characterized by a constant average axial strain. The reinforcement phases are uniformly distributed in the axial and circumferential directions, and arbitrarily distributed in the radial direction, thereby allowing functional grading of the internal reinforcement in this direction.

  16. Velocity Structure in the West Bohemia Seismic Zone: Velocity Models Retrieved from different Earthquake Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Löberich, E.; Kieslich, A.; Calo, M.; Vavrycuk, V.; Buske, S.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake swarms, fluid migration and gas springs are indications of the ongoing geodynamic processes within the West Bohemia seismic zone located at the Czech-German border. The possible relationship between the fluids, gas and seismicity is of particular interest and has motivated numerous past, ongoing and future studies, including a multidisciplinary monitoring proposal through the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). The most seismically active area within the West Bohemia seismic zone is located at the Czech town Nový Kostel. The Nový Kostel zone experiences frequent swarms of several hundreds to thousands of earthquakes over a period of weeks to several months. The seismicity is always located in the same area and depth range (~5-15 km), however the activated fault segments and planes differ. For example, the 2008 swarm activated faults along the southern end of the seismic zone, the 2011 swarm activated the northern segment, and the recent 2014 swarm activated the middle of the seismic zone. This indicates changes to the local stress field, and may relate to fluid migration and/or the complicated tectonic situation. The West Bohemia Seismic Network (WEBNET) is ideally located for studying the Nový Kostel swarm area and provides good azimuthal coverage. Here, we use the high quality P- and S-wave arrival picks recorded by WEBNET to calculate swarm-dependent velocity models for the 2008 and 2011 swarms, and an averaged (swarm independent) model using earthquakes recorded between 1991 and 2011. To this end, we use double-difference tomography to calculate P- and S-wave velocity models. The models are compared and examined in terms of swarm-dependent velocities and structures. Since the P-to-S velocity ratio is particularly sensitive to the presence of pore fluids, we derive ratio models directly from the inverted P- and S-wave models in order to investigate the potential influence of fluids on the seismicity. Finally, clustering

  17. Synthesis, crystal structures, magnetic and luminescent properties of unique 1D p-ferrocenylbenzoate-bridged lanthanide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, P.F.; Zhang, F.M.; Li, G.M.; Zhang, J.W.; Sun, W.B.; Suda, M.; Einaga, Y.

    2009-07-15

    Treatments of p-ferrocenylbenzoate [p-NaOOCH{sub 4}C{sub 6}Fc, Fc=(eta{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5})Fe(eta{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4})] with Ln(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O afford seven p-ferrocenylbenzoate lanthanide complexes {l_brace}[Ln(OOCH{sub 4}C{sub 6}Fc){sub 2}(mu{sub 2}-OOCH{sub 4}C{sub 6}Fc){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}](H{sub 3}O){r_brace}{sub n} [Ln=Ce (1), Pr (2), Sm (3), Eu (4), Gd (5), Tb (6) and Dy (7)]. X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals that the isomorphous complexes {l_brace}[Ce(OOCH{sub 4}C{sub 6}Fc){sub 2}(mu{sub 2}-OOCH{sub 4}C{sub 6}Fc){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}](H{sub 3}O){r_brace}{sub n} (1) and {l_brace}[Pr(OOCH{sub 4}C{sub 6}Fc){sub 2}(mu{sub 2}-OOCH{sub 4}C{sub 6}Fc){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}](H{sub 3}O){r_brace}{sub n} (2) form a unique 1D double-bridged infinite chain structure bridged by mu{sub 2}-OOCH{sub 4}C{sub 6}Fc groups. Each Ln(III) ion adopts a dodecahedron coordination environment with eight coordinated oxygen atoms from two terminal monodentate coordinated FcC{sub 6}H{sub 4}COO{sup -} units, two terminal monodentate coordinated H{sub 2}O molecules and four mu{sub 2}-{sup -}OOCH{sub 4}C{sub 6}Fc units. The luminescent spectra reveal that only 4 and 6 exhibit characteristic emissions of lanthanide ions, Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions, respectively. The variable-temperature magnetic properties of 5 and 7 suggest that a ferromagnetic coupling between spin carriers may exist in 5. - Graphical abstract: Seven p-ferrocenylbenzoate lanthanide coordination polymers were synthesized. Given is the perspective view of a unique 1D double-bridged infinite chain structure of 1, excitation and emission spectra of 6 and plots of chi{sub m}T vs. T and chi{sub m}{sup -1} vs. T of 5.

  18. Deep Mantle Large Low Shear-Wave Velocity Provinces: Principally Thermal Structures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, R.; Goes, S. D. B.

    2014-12-01

    The two large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) that dominate lower-mantle structure may hold key information on Earth's thermal and chemical evolution. It is generally accepted that these provinces are hotter than background mantle and are likely the main source of mantle plumes. Increasingly, it is also proposed that they hold a dense (primitive and/or recycled) compositional component. The principle evidence that LLSVPs may represent thermo-chemical `piles' comes from seismic constraints, including: (i) their long-wavelength nature; (ii) sharp gradients in shear-wave velocity at their margins; (iii) non-Gaussian distributions of deep mantle shear-wave velocity anomalies; (iv) anti-correlated shear-wave and bulk-sound velocity anomalies (and elevated ratios between shear- and compressional-wave velocity anomalies); (v) anti-correlated shear-wave and density anomalies; and (vi) 1-D/radial profiles of seismic velocity that deviate from those expected for an isochemical, well-mixed mantle. In addition, it has been proposed that hotspots and the reconstructed eruption sites of large igneous provinces correlate in location with LLSVP margins. Here, we review recent results, which indicate that the majority of these constraints do not require thermo-chemical piles: they are equally well (or poorly) explained by thermal heterogeneity alone. Our analyses and conclusions are largely based on comparisons between imaged seismic structure and synthetic seismic structures from a set of thermal and thermo-chemical mantle convection models, which are constrained by 300 Myr of plate motion histories. Modelled physical structure (temperature, pressure and composition) is converted into seismic velocities via a thermodynamic approach that accounts for elastic, anelastic and phase contributions and, subsequently, a tomographic resolution filter is applied to account for the damping and geographic bias inherent to seismic imaging. Our results indicate that, in terms of

  19. Syntheses, structures, and photoluminescence of d 10 coordination architectures: From 1D to 3D complexes based on mixed ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Gang; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Du, Dong-Ying; Wang, Xin-Long; Su, Zhong-Min

    2011-05-01

    Six new compounds, namely, {[Cd 3(Himpy) 3(tda) 2]·3H 2O} n ( 1), {[Zn 3(bipy) 2(tda) 2(H 2O) 2]·4H 2O} n ( 2), {[Cd 3(bipy) 3(tda) 2]·4H 2O} n ( 3), {[Cd 3(tda) 2(H 2O) 3Cl]·H 2O} n ( 4), {[Zn 2(tz)(tda)(H 2O) 2]·H 2O} n ( 5) and {[Cd 7(pz)(tda) 4(OAc)(H 2O) 7]·3H 2O} n ( 6) [H 3tda = 1H-1,2,3-triazole-4,5-dicarboxylic acid, Himpy = 2-(1H-imidazol-2-yl)pyridine, bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine, Htz = 1H-1,2,4-triazole, H 2pz = piperazine] have been prepared under hydrothermal condition and characterized by elemental analyses, infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Compound 1 is a 1D column-like structure and displays a 3D supramolecular network via the π···π stacking interaction. The compounds 2 and 3 exhibit similar 2D layer-like structure, which further extend to 3D supermolecular structure by the π···π stacking interaction. All of compounds 4- 6 display 3D framework with diverse topology constructed from the tda 3- ligands in different coordination modes and secondary ligands (or bridging atom) connecting metal ions. Furthermore, the thermal stabilities and photoluminescent properties of compounds 1- 6 were studied.

  20. Lithospheric structure beneath Eastern Africa from joint inversion of receiver functions and Rayleigh wave velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugda, Mulugeta Tuji

    appears to have been thinned by ˜30-50 km and the maximum shear wave velocity reduced by ˜0.3 km/s. Results from a 1D conductive thermal model suggest that the shear velocity structure of the lithosphere beneath the Ethiopian Plateau can be explained by a plume model, if a plume rapidly thinned the lithosphere by ˜30--50 km at the time of the flood basalt volcanism (c. 30 Ma), and if warm plume material has remained beneath the lithosphere since then. About 45-65% of the 1-1.5 km of plateau uplift in Ethiopia can be attributed to the thermally perturbed lithospheric structure. In the final part of this thesis, the shear-wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath Kenya has been obtained from a joint inversion of receiver functions, and Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities. The crustal structure from the joint inversion is consistent with crustal structure published previously by different authors. The lithospheric mantle beneath the East African Plateau in Kenya is similar to the lithosphere under the East African Plateau in Tanzania. Beneath the Kenya Rift, the lithosphere extends to a depth of at most ˜75 km. The lithosphere under the Kenya Plateau is not perturbed when compared to the highly perturbed lithosphere beneath the Ethiopian Plateau. On the other hand, the lithosphere under the Kenya Rift is perturbed as compared to the Kenya Plateau or the rest of the East African Plateau, but is not as perturbed as the lithosphere beneath the Main Ethiopian Rift or the Afar. Although Kenya and Ethiopia have similar uplift and rifting histories, they have different volcanic histories. Much of Ethiopia has been affected by the Afar Flood Basalt volcanism, which may be the cause of this difference in lithospheric structure between these two regions.

  1. Observation of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling in 1-D and 2-D extended structures of copper(II) terephthalates

    SciTech Connect

    Deakin, L.; Arif, A.M.; Miller, J.S.

    1999-11-01

    The reaction between CuCl{sub 2}{center{underscore}dot}2H{sub 2}O and disodium terephthalate, Na{sub 2}tp, in aqueous solution simultaneously produces chain, bis(aqua)[{mu}-(terephthalato-{kappa}O:{kappa}O{prime})]copper(II), monohydrate, Cutp(OH{sub 2}){sub 2}{center{underscore}dot}H{sub 2}O (1), and layered, bis(aqua)[{mu}-(terephthalato-{kappa}O)]copper(II), Cutp(OH{sub 2}){sub 2} (2), structured materials. 1 (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}CuO{sub 7}) belongs to the orthorhombic P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 space group [a = 6.3015(4) {angstrom}, b = 6.8743(4) {angstrom}, c = 22.9972(14) {angstrom}, and Z = 4] and incorporates tp in a bridging bis-monodentate binding mode and Cu(II) in a tetragonally elongated octahedron. 2 (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}CuO{sub 6}) which belongs to the orthorhombic Pmc2{sub 1} space group [a = 10.7421(8) {angstrom}, b = 7.2339(10) {angstrom}, c = 5.7143(13) {angstrom}, and Z = 2] incorporates tp in a mono-bidentate binding mode and Cu(II) in a distorted square pyramid. 1 and 2 exhibit axial X-band powder EPR spectra with G{sub {perpendicular}} = 2.08, g{sub {parallel}} = 2.29 (1) and g{sub {perpendicular}} = 2.07, g{sub {parallel}} = 2.29 (2) at 300 K. 1 obeys the Curie-Weiss law at high temperatures ({theta} = {minus}7.2 K) and at low temperatures behaves as 1-D magnetic chains with an exchange-coupling constant of J/k{sub B} = {minus}9.15 K (H = {minus}2JS{sub 1}{center{underscore}dot}S{sub 2}). This material displays a spontaneous moment below 2 K under small applied magnetic fields, consistent with the presence of spin canting. 2 exhibits ferromagnetic interactions with {theta} = +0.8 K. Along the 1-D chain where coordinated water forms the bridge between metal centers, the coupling between Cu(II) is J/k{sub B} = +0.6 K. The fit of the magnetic susceptibility for 2 using a molecular field correction, which takes into consideration antiferromagnetic interactions between chains via the tp ligand, yields J{prime}/k{sub B} = {minus}0.13 K.

  2. Controlled structures of a 1D chiral metallosalen polymer by photo- and solvent-induced partial depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xiaobing; Dong, Taiwei; Li, Gao; Cui, Yong

    2011-04-07

    A 1D chiral metallosalen polymer with free pyridine groups is self-assembled and its molecular weight, conformation, architecture and optical property are controlled by depolymerization through sunlight irradiation or alcohol inclusions.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and comparison of polyaniline 1D-structure controlled by poly(L-lactide) and poly(D-lactide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhou-Jie; Shen, Qing

    2016-01-01

    1D-structural polyaniline (PANI) was controllably synthesized by utilizing the poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and poly(D-lactide) (PDLA) as controllers. FESEM images showed that the morphology of 1D-structural PANI controlled by PDLA likes a joint obviously unlike PLLA controlled vertebra structure reported previously. To set the ratio of ANI/PLLA (ml/g) at 0.45/0.135, 0.45/0.270 and 0.45/0.540, the formed PANI 1D structure was changed in the cross-section as four round leaves, four non-round leaves and four sharp leaves, respectively. FTIR and XRD analysis indicated that the PLLA and PDLA both were doped in PANI chains while the PLLA was strongly in the electrons delocalization than that of the PDLA due probably to the L-type stronger in crystal polymorphism than that of the D-type.

  4. Nonlinear Landau damping and formation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal structures for plasmas with q-nonextensive velocity distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Raghunathan, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2013-03-15

    In the past, long-time evolution of an initial perturbation in collisionless Maxwellian plasma (q = 1) has been simulated numerically. The controversy over the nonlinear fate of such electrostatic perturbations was resolved by Manfredi [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2815-2818 (1997)] using long-time simulations up to t=1600{omega}{sub p}{sup -1}. The oscillations were found to continue indefinitely leading to Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK)-like phase-space vortices (from here on referred as 'BGK structures'). Using a newly developed, high resolution 1D Vlasov-Poisson solver based on piecewise-parabolic method (PPM) advection scheme, we investigate the nonlinear Landau damping in 1D plasma described by toy q-distributions for long times, up to t=3000{omega}{sub p}{sup -1}. We show that BGK structures are found only for a certain range of q-values around q = 1. Beyond this window, for the generic parameters, no BGK structures were observed. We observe that for values of q<1 where velocity distributions have long tails, strong Landau damping inhibits the formation of BGK structures. On the other hand, for q>1 where distribution has a sharp fall in velocity, the formation of BGK structures is rendered difficult due to high wave number damping imposed by the steep velocity profile, which had not been previously reported. Wherever relevant, we compare our results with past work.

  5. Imaging of 3-D seismic velocity structure of Southern Sumatra region using double difference tomographic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, Titik; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-01

    Southern Sumatra region has a high level of seismicity due to the influence of the subduction system, Sumatra fault, Mentawai fault and stretching zone activities. The seismic activities of Southern Sumatra region are recorded by Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA's) Seismograph network. In this study, we used earthquake data catalog compiled by MCGA for 3013 events from 10 seismic stations around Southern Sumatra region for time periods of April 2009 - April 2014 in order to invert for the 3-D seismic velocities structure (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio). We applied double-difference seismic tomography method (tomoDD) to determine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio with hypocenter adjustment. For the inversion procedure, we started from the initial 1-D seismic velocity model of AK135 and constant Vp/Vs of 1.73. The synthetic travel time from source to receiver was calculated using ray pseudo-bending technique, while the main tomographic inversion was applied using LSQR method. The resolution model was evaluated using checkerboard test and Derivative Weigh Sum (DWS). Our preliminary results show low Vp and Vs anomalies region along Bukit Barisan which is may be associated with weak zone of Sumatran fault and migration of partial melted material. Low velocity anomalies at 30-50 km depth in the fore arc region may indicated the hydrous material circulation because the slab dehydration. We detected low seismic seismicity in the fore arc region that may be indicated as seismic gap. It is coincides contact zone of high and low velocity anomalies. And two large earthquakes (Jambi and Mentawai) also occurred at the contact of contrast velocity.

  6. Imaging of 3-D seismic velocity structure of Southern Sumatra region using double difference tomographic method

    SciTech Connect

    Lestari, Titik; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    Southern Sumatra region has a high level of seismicity due to the influence of the subduction system, Sumatra fault, Mentawai fault and stretching zone activities. The seismic activities of Southern Sumatra region are recorded by Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA’s) Seismograph network. In this study, we used earthquake data catalog compiled by MCGA for 3013 events from 10 seismic stations around Southern Sumatra region for time periods of April 2009 – April 2014 in order to invert for the 3-D seismic velocities structure (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio). We applied double-difference seismic tomography method (tomoDD) to determine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio with hypocenter adjustment. For the inversion procedure, we started from the initial 1-D seismic velocity model of AK135 and constant Vp/Vs of 1.73. The synthetic travel time from source to receiver was calculated using ray pseudo-bending technique, while the main tomographic inversion was applied using LSQR method. The resolution model was evaluated using checkerboard test and Derivative Weigh Sum (DWS). Our preliminary results show low Vp and Vs anomalies region along Bukit Barisan which is may be associated with weak zone of Sumatran fault and migration of partial melted material. Low velocity anomalies at 30-50 km depth in the fore arc region may indicated the hydrous material circulation because the slab dehydration. We detected low seismic seismicity in the fore arc region that may be indicated as seismic gap. It is coincides contact zone of high and low velocity anomalies. And two large earthquakes (Jambi and Mentawai) also occurred at the contact of contrast velocity.

  7. Synthesis, crystal structures, magnetic and luminescent properties of unique 1D p-ferrocenylbenzoate-bridged lanthanide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, P. F.; Zhang, F. M.; Li, G. M.; Zhang, J. W.; Sun, W. B.; Suda, M.; Einaga, Y.

    2009-07-01

    Treatments of p-ferrocenylbenzoate [ p-NaOOCH 4C 6Fc, Fc=( η5-C 5H 5)Fe( η5-C 5H 4)] with Ln(NO 3) 3· nH 2O afford seven p-ferrocenylbenzoate lanthanide complexes {[ Ln(OOCH 4C 6Fc) 2( μ2-OOCH 4C 6Fc) 2(H 2O) 2](H 3O)} n [ Ln=Ce ( 1), Pr ( 2), Sm ( 3), Eu ( 4), Gd ( 5), Tb ( 6) and Dy ( 7)]. X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals that the isomorphous complexes {[Ce(OOCH 4C 6Fc) 2( μ2-OOCH 4C 6Fc) 2(H 2O) 2](H 3O)} n ( 1) and {[Pr(OOCH 4C 6Fc) 2( μ2-OOCH 4C 6Fc) 2(H 2O) 2](H 3O)} n ( 2) form a unique 1D double-bridged infinite chain structure bridged by μ2-OOCH 4C 6Fc groups. Each Ln(III) ion adopts a dodecahedron coordination environment with eight coordinated oxygen atoms from two terminal monodentate coordinated FcC 6H 4COO - units, two terminal monodentate coordinated H 2O molecules and four μ2- -OOCH 4C 6Fc units. The luminescent spectra reveal that only 4 and 6 exhibit characteristic emissions of lanthanide ions, Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions, respectively. The variable-temperature magnetic properties of 5 and 7 suggest that a ferromagnetic coupling between spin carriers may exist in 5.

  8. Satellite-derived light extinction coefficient and its impact on thermal structure simulations in a 1-D lake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolfaghari, Kiana; Duguay, Claude R.; Kheyrollah Pour, Homa

    2017-01-01

    A global constant value of the extinction coefficient (Kd) is usually specified in lake models to parameterize water clarity. This study aimed to improve the performance of the 1-D freshwater lake (FLake) model using satellite-derived Kd for Lake Erie. The CoastColour algorithm was applied to MERIS satellite imagery to estimate Kd. The constant (0.2 m-1) and satellite-derived Kd values as well as radiation fluxes and meteorological station observations were then used to run FLake for a meteorological station on Lake Erie. Results improved compared to using the constant Kd value (0.2 m-1). No significant improvement was found in FLake-simulated lake surface water temperature (LSWT) when Kd variations in time were considered using a monthly average. Therefore, results suggest that a time-independent, lake-specific, and constant satellite-derived Kd value can reproduce LSWT with sufficient accuracy for the Lake Erie station. A sensitivity analysis was also performed to assess the impact of various Kd values on the simulation outputs. Results show that FLake is sensitive to variations in Kd to estimate the thermal structure of Lake Erie. Dark waters result in warmer spring and colder fall temperatures compared to clear waters. Dark waters always produce colder mean water column temperature (MWCT) and lake bottom water temperature (LBWT), shallower mixed layer depth (MLD), longer ice cover duration, and thicker ice. The sensitivity of FLake to Kd variations was more pronounced in the simulation of MWCT, LBWT, and MLD. The model was particularly sensitive to Kd values below 0.5 m-1. This is the first study to assess the value of integrating Kd from the satellite-based CoastColour algorithm into the FLake model. Satellite-derived Kd is found to be a useful input parameter for simulations with FLake and possibly other lake models, and it has potential for applicability to other lakes where Kd is not commonly measured.

  9. Relationships between Th1 or Th2 iNKT Cell Activity and Structures of CD1d-Antigen Complexes: Meta-analysis of CD1d-Glycolipids Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Xavier; Renault, Nicolas; Farce, Amaury; Chavatte, Philippe; Hénon, Eric

    2014-01-01

    A number of potentially bioactive molecules can be found in nature. In particular, marine organisms are a valuable source of bioactive compounds. The activity of an α-galactosylceramide was first discovered in 1993 via screening of a Japanese marine sponge (Agelas mauritanius). Very rapidly, a synthetic glycololipid analogue of this natural molecule was discovered, called KRN7000. Associated with the CD1d protein, this α-galactosylceramide 1 (KRN7000) interacts with the T-cell antigen receptor to form a ternary complex that yields T helper (Th) 1 and Th2 responses with opposing effects. In our work, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations (11.5 µs in total) involving eight different ligands (conducted in triplicate) in an effort to find out correlation at the molecular level, if any, between chemical modulation of 1 and the orientation of the known biological response, Th1 or Th2. Comparative investigations of human versus mouse and Th1 versus Th2 data have been carried out. A large set of analysis tools was employed including free energy landscapes. One major result is the identification of a specific conformational state of the sugar polar head, which could be correlated, in the present study, to the biological Th2 biased response. These theoretical tools provide a structural basis for predicting the very different dynamical behaviors of α-glycosphingolipids in CD1d and might aid in the future design of new analogues of 1. PMID:25376021

  10. Constraining Source Locations of Shallow Subduction Megathrust Earthquakes in 1-D and 3-D Velocity Models - A Case Study of the 2002 Mw=6.4 Osa Earthquake, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, I.; Arroyo, I. G.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake source locations are generally routinely constrained using a global 1-D Earth model. However, the source location might be associated with large uncertainties. This is definitively the case for earthquakes occurring at active continental margins were thin oceanic crust subducts below thick continental crust and hence large lateral changes in crustal thickness occur as a function of distance to the deep-sea trench. Here, we conducted a case study of the 2002 Mw 6.4 Osa thrust earthquake in Costa Rica that was followed by an aftershock sequence. Initial relocations indicated that the main shock occurred fairly trenchward of most large earthquakes along the Middle America Trench off central Costa Rica. The earthquake sequence occurred while a temporary network of ocean-bottom-hydrophones and land stations 80 km to the northwest were deployed. By adding readings from permanent Costa Rican stations, we obtain uncommon P wave coverage of a large subduction zone earthquake. We relocated this catalog using a nonlinear probabilistic approach using a 1-D and two 3-D P-wave velocity models. The 3-D model was either derived from 3-D tomography based on onshore stations and a priori model based on seismic refraction data. All epicentres occurred close to the trench axis, but depth estimates vary by several tens of kilometres. Based on the epicentres and constraints from seismic reflection data the main shock occurred 25 km from the trench and probably along the plate interface at 5-10 km depth. The source location that agreed best with the geology was based on the 3-D velocity model derived from a priori data. Aftershocks propagated downdip to the area of a 1999 Mw 6.9 sequence and partially overlapped it. The results indicate that underthrusting of the young and buoyant Cocos Ridge has created conditions for interpolate seismogenesis shallower and closer to the trench axis than elsewhere along the central Costa Rica margin.

  11. Developing regionalized models of lithospheric thickness and velocity structure across Eurasia and the Middle East from jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A; Hansen, S; Rodgers, A; Matzel, E

    2009-07-06

    In this project, we are developing models of lithospheric structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East by regionalizing 1D velocity models obtained by jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities. We expect the regionalized velocity models will improve our ability to predict travel-times for local and regional phases, such as Pg, Pn, Sn and Lg, as well as travel-times for body-waves at upper mantle triplication distances in both seismic and aseismic regions of Eurasia and the Middle East. We anticipate the models will help inform and strengthen ongoing and future efforts within the NNSA labs to develop 3D velocity models for Eurasia and the Middle East, and will assist in obtaining model-based predictions where no empirical data are available and for improving locations from sparse networks using kriging. The codes needed to conduct the joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions (PRFs), S-wave receiver functions (SRFs), and dispersion velocities have already been assembled as part of ongoing research on lithospheric structure in Africa. The methodology has been tested with synthetic 'data' and case studies have been investigated with data collected at an open broadband stations in South Africa. PRFs constrain the size and S-P travel-time of seismic discontinuities in the crust and uppermost mantle, SRFs constrain the size and P-S travel-time of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and dispersion velocities constrain average S-wave velocity within frequency-dependent depth-ranges. Preliminary results show that the combination yields integrated 1D velocity models local to the recording station, where the discontinuities constrained by the receiver functions are superimposed to a background velocity model constrained by the dispersion velocities. In our first year of this project we will (i) generate 1D velocity models for open broadband seismic stations in the

  12. Gold-induced nanowires on the Ge(100) surface yield a 2D and not a 1D electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, N.; Heimbuch, R.; Eliëns, S.; Smit, S.; Frantzeskakis, E.; Caux, J.-S.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Golden, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    Atomic nanowires on semiconductor surfaces induced by the adsorption of metallic atoms have attracted a lot of attention as possible hosts of the elusive, one-dimensional Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. The Au/Ge(100) system in particular is the subject of controversy as to whether the Au-induced nanowires do indeed host exotic, 1D (one-dimensional) metallic states. In light of this debate, we report here a thorough study of the electronic properties of high quality nanowires formed at the Au/Ge(100) surface. The high-resolution ARPES data show the low-lying Au-induced electronic states to possess a dispersion relation that depends on two orthogonal directions in k space. Comparison of the E (kx,ky) surface measured using high-resolution ARPES to tight-binding calculations yields hopping parameters in the two different directions that differ by approximately factor of two. Additionally, by pinpointing the Au-induced surface states in the first, second, and third surface Brillouin zones and analyzing their periodicity in k||, the nanowire propagation direction seen clearly in STM can be imported into the ARPES data. We find that the larger of the two hopping parameters corresponds, in fact, to the direction perpendicular to the nanowires (tperp). This proves that the Au-induced electron pockets possess a two-dimensional, closed Fermi surface, and this firmly places the Au/Ge(100) nanowire system outside potential hosts of a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. We combine these ARPES data with scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements of the spatially resolved electronic structure and find that the spatially straight—wirelike—conduction channels observed up to energies of order one electron volt below the Fermi level do not originate from the Au-induced states seen in the ARPES data. The former are rather more likely to be associated with bulk Ge states that are localized to the subsurface region. Despite our proof of the 2D (two-dimentional) nature of the Au

  13. Monitoring of concrete structures using the ultrasonic pulse velocity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaiskos, G.; Deraemaeker, A.; Aggelis, D. G.; Van Hemelrijck, D.

    2015-11-01

    Concrete is the material most produced by humanity. Its popularity is mainly based on its low production cost and great structural design flexibility. Its operational and ambient loadings including environmental effects have a great impact in the performance and overall cost of concrete structures. Thus, the quality control, the structural assessment, the maintenance and the reliable prolongation of the operational service life of the existing concrete structures have become a major issue. In the recent years, non-destructive testing (NDT) is becoming increasingly essential for reliable and affordable quality control and integrity assessment not only during the construction of new concrete structures, but also for the existing ones. Choosing the right inspection technique is always followed by a compromise between its performance and cost. In the present paper, the ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) method, which is the most well known and widely accepted ultrasonic concrete NDT method, is thoroughly reviewed and compared with other well-established NDT approaches. Their principles, inherent limitations and reliability are reviewed. In addition, while the majority of the current UPV techniques are based on the use of piezoelectric transducers held on the surface of the concrete, special attention is paid to a very promising technique using low-cost and aggregate-size piezoelectric transducers embedded in the material. That technique has been evaluated based on a series of parameters, such as the ease of use, cost, reliability and performance.

  14. Velocity-vorticity correlation structures in compressible turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Li, Shi-Yao; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-11-01

    A velocity-vorticity correlation structure (VVCS) analysis is applied to analyze data of 3-dimensional (3-D) direct numerical simulations (DNS), to investigate the quantitative properties of the most correlated vortex structures in compressible turbulent boundary layer (CTBL) at Mach numbers, Ma = 2 . 25 and 6 . 0 . It is found that the geometry variation of the VVCS closely reflects the streamwise development of CTBL. In laminar region, the VVCS captures the instability wave number of the boundary layer. The transition region displays a distinct scaling change of the dimensions of VVCS. The developed turbulence region is characterized by a constant spatial extension of the VVCS. For various Mach numbers, the maximum correlation coefficient of the VVCS presents a clear multi-layer structure with the same scaling laws as a recent symmetry analysis proposed to quantifying the sublayer, the log-layer, and the wake flow. A surprising discovery is that the wall friction coefficient, Cf, holds a "-1"-power law of the wall normal distance of the VVCS, ys. This validates the speculation that the wall friction is determined by the near-wall coherent structure, which clarifies the correlation between statistical structures and the near-wall dynamics. Project 11452002 and 11172006 supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  15. Multifractal structures in radial velocity measurements for exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sordo, Fabio; Sahil Agarwal, Debra A. Fischer, John S. Wettlaufer

    2015-01-01

    The radial velocity method is a powerful way to search for exoplanetary systems and it led to many discoveries of exoplanets in the last 20 years.Nevertheless, in order observe Earth-like planets, such method needs to be refined, i.e. one needs to improve the signal-to-noise ratio.On one hand this can be achieved by building spectrographs with better performances, but on the other hand it is also central to understand the noise present in the data.Radial-velocity data are time-series which contains the effect of planets as well as of stellar disturbances. Therefore, they are the result of different physical processes which operate on different time-scales, acting in a not always periodic fashionI present here a possible approach to such problem, which consists in looking for multifractal structures in the time-series coming from radial velocity measurements, identifying the underlying long-range correlations and fractal scaling properties, and connecting them to the underlying physical processes, like stellar oscillation, granulation, rotation, and magnetic activity.This method has been previously applied to satellite data related to Arctic sea albedo, relevant for identify trends and noise in the Arctic sea ice (Agarwal, Moon and Wettlaufer, Proc. R. Soc., 2012).Here we use such analysis for exoplanetary data related to possible Earth-like planets.Moreover, we apply the same procedure to synthetic data from numerical simulation of stellar dynamos, which give insight on the mechanism responsible for the noise. In such way we can therefore raise the signal-to-noise ratio in the data using the synthetic data as predicted noise to be subtracted from the observations.

  16. Dark matter direct detection with non-Maxwellian velocity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Weiner, Neal; Diemand, Jürg; Moore, Ben; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim; Madau, Piero; Zemp, Marcel E-mail: neal.weiner@nyu.edu E-mail: pmadau@ucolick.org E-mail: dpotter@physik.uzh.ch E-mail: mzemp@umich.edu

    2010-02-01

    The velocity distribution function of dark matter particles is expected to show significant departures from a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. This can have profound effects on the predicted dark matter - nucleon scattering rates in direct detection experiments, especially for dark matter models in which the scattering is sensitive to the high velocity tail of the distribution, such as inelastic dark matter (iDM) or light (few GeV) dark matter (LDM), and for experiments that require high energy recoil events, such as many directionally sensitive experiments. Here we determine the velocity distribution functions from two of the highest resolution numerical simulations of Galactic dark matter structure (Via Lactea II and GHALO), and study the effects for these scenarios. For directional detection, we find that the observed departures from Maxwell-Boltzmann increase the contrast of the signal and change the typical direction of incoming DM particles. For iDM, the expected signals at direct detection experiments are changed dramatically: the annual modulation can be enhanced by more than a factor two, and the relative rates of DAMA compared to CDMS can change by an order of magnitude, while those compared to CRESST can change by a factor of two. The spectrum of the signal can also change dramatically, with many features arising due to substructure. For LDM the spectral effects are smaller, but changes do arise that improve the compatibility with existing experiments. We find that the phase of the modulation can depend upon energy, which would help discriminate against background should it be found.

  17. Stabilization of Ca1-dFe2-xMnxO4 (0.44 lt x lt 2) with CaFe2O4-type Structure and Ca2plus Defects in 1D Channels

    SciTech Connect

    T Yang; M Croft; A Ignatov; I Nowik; R Cong; M Greenblatt

    2011-12-31

    Solid solutions of Ca{sub 1-{delta}}Fe{sub 2-x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 4} (0.45 {<=} x {<=} 2) were synthesized from CaCl{sub 2} as flux at 850 C in air. The entire series, even with x = 2, crystallizes in the CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-type structure (Pnma), rather than in the CaMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}-type structure (Pbcm). Rietveld refinements confirmed mixed-valency Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} and a substantial level of Ca{sup 2+} deficiency ({delta} {approx} 0.25) at high x. With increasing x, the unit-cell dimensions a and b decrease, while that of c increases. Detailed structural analyses, together with Mn K-edge X-ray absorption and {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy studies, revealed that the stabilization of CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-type structure, even at high values of x, is due to the existence of non-Jahn-Teller active Mn{sup 4+} (and Fe{sup 3+}), which is compensated by the formation of the Ca{sup 2+} deficiencies in the one-dimensional (1D) channels of Ca{sub 1-{delta}}Fe{sub 2-x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 4} during the flux synthesis. Antiferromagnetic (AFM) long-range ordering is achieved for all compounds at low temperature, because of strong AFM interactions between Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} and Fe{sup 3+}. In addition, a spin (or cluster) glass component was also observed, as expected, because of the extensive Mn/Fe structural and Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} charge disordering.

  18. From 2D graphene to 1D graphene nanoribbons: dimensional crossover signals in the structural thermal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobry, Ariel; Costamagna, Sebastián

    2011-03-01

    I this work, by analyzing the thermal excited rippling in the graphene honeycomb lattice, we find clear signals of an existing dimensional crossover from 2D to 1D while reducing one of the dimensions of the graphene layer. Trough a joint study, using montecarlo atomistic simulations and analytical calculation based, we find that the normal-normal correlation function G (q) does not change the power law behavior valid on the long wavelength limit, however the system size dependency of the quadratic out of plane displacement h2 shows a breakdown of its corresponding scaling law. In this case we show that a new scaling law appear which correspond to a truly 1D system. On the basis of these results, and having explored a wide number of realistic systems size, we conclude that narrow nanoribbons presents strongest corrugations than the square graphene sheets. This result could have important consequences on the electron transport properties of freestanding graphene systems.

  19. P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath the Baikal Rift Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, R. A.; Nyblade, A. A.; Boman, E. C.

    2001-12-01

    Over 100 p wave travel times from the 1500 km en echelon Baikal Rift system are used in this study.The events range 3 to 13 degrees from Talaya, Russia (TLY) along the axis of southwest northeast trending rift in East Siberia. A Herglotz Wiechert inversion of these events resolved a crust of 6.4 km/s and a gradient in the mantle starting at 35 km depth and 7.7 km/s down to 200 km depth and 8.2 km/s. This is compatible with Gao et al,1994 cross sectional structure which cuts the rift at about 400km from TLY. The Baikal Rift hosts the deepest lake and is the most seismically active rift in the world. It is one of the few continental rifts, it separates the Siberian craton and the Syan-Baikal mobile fold belt. Two events, the March 21 1999 magnitude 5.7 earthquake 638 km from TLY and the November 13th 1995 magnitude 5.9 earthquake 863 km from TLY were modeled for there PnL wave structure using the discrete wavenumber method and the Harvard CMT solutions with adjusted depths from p-pP times. The PnL signals match well. A genetic algorithm will used to perturb the velocity structure and compare to a selection of the events between 3 and 13 degrees many will require moment tensor solutions.

  20. Advanced structural design for precision radial velocity instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Dan; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Barnes, Stuart; Bean, Jacob; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Brennan, Patricia; Budynkiewicz, Jamie; Chun, Moo-Young; Conroy, Charlie; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Epps, Harland; Evans, Ian; Evans, Janet; Foster, Jeff; Frebel, Anna; Gauron, Thomas; Guzman, Dani; Hare, Tyson; Jang, Bi-Ho; Jang, Jeong-Gyun; Jordan, Andres; Kim, Jihun; Kim, Kang-Min; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; McCracken, Kenneth; McMuldroch, Stuart; Miller, Joseph; Mueller, Mark; Oh, Jae Sok; Ordway, Mark; Park, Byeong-Gon; Park, Chan; Park, Sung-Joon; Paxson, Charles; Phillips, David; Plummer, David; Podgorski, William; Seifahrt, Andreas; Stark, Daniel; Steiner, Joao; Uomoto, Alan; Walsworth, Ronald; Yu, Young-Sam

    2016-07-01

    The GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) is an echelle spectrograph with precision radial velocity (PRV) capability that will be a first light instrument for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). G-CLEF has a PRV precision goal of 40 cm/sec (10 cm/s for multiple measurements) to enable detection of Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zones of sun-like stars1. This precision is a primary driver of G-CLEF's structural design. Extreme stability is necessary to minimize image motions at the CCD detectors. Minute changes in temperature, pressure, and acceleration environments cause structural deformations, inducing image motions which degrade PRV precision. The instrument's structural design will ensure that the PRV goal is achieved under the environments G-CLEF will be subjected to as installed on the GMT azimuth platform, including: Millikelvin (0.001 °K) thermal soaks and gradients 10 millibar changes in ambient pressure Changes in acceleration due to instrument tip/tilt and telescope slewing Carbon fiber/cyanate composite was selected for the optical bench structure in order to meet performance goals. Low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and high stiffness-to-weight are key features of the composite optical bench design. Manufacturability and serviceability of the instrument are also drivers of the design. In this paper, we discuss analyses leading to technical choices made to minimize G-CLEF's sensitivity to changing environments. Finite element analysis (FEA) and image motion sensitivity studies were conducted to determine PRV performance under operational environments. We discuss the design of the optical bench structure to optimize stiffness-to-weight and minimize deformations due to inertial and pressure effects. We also discuss quasi-kinematic mounting of optical elements and assemblies, and optimization of these to ensure minimal image motion under thermal, pressure, and inertial loads expected during PRV observations.

  1. 3-D imaging of large scale buried structure by 1-D inversion of very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aydmer, A.A.; Chew, W.C.; Cui, T.J.; Wright, D.L.; Smith, D.V.; Abraham, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    A simple and efficient method for large scale three-dimensional (3-D) subsurface imaging of inhomogeneous background is presented. One-dimensional (1-D) multifrequency distorted Born iterative method (DBIM) is employed in the inversion. Simulation results utilizing synthetic scattering data are given. Calibration of the very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) experimental waveforms is detailed along with major problems encountered in practice and their solutions. This discussion is followed by the results of a large scale application of the method to the experimental data provided by the VETEM system of the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is shown to have a computational complexity that is promising for on-site inversion.

  2. P- and S-velocity structure beneath the Three Gorges region (central China) from local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, B.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-05-01

    A seismic experiment provides new insights on the crustal structure of the head area of the Three Gorges Reservoir in central China. The region is characterized by a relatively high rate of reservoir-induced seismicity that is often triggered within those areas associated with the ascending water level. Our 3-D velocity model of the Three Gorges region shows that the Huangling anticline (HLA) is characterized by a high-velocity crust, and the Zigui Basin (ZGB) has lower crustal velocities. The 3-D tomographic inversions are conducted using 11 901 P-wave and 12 032 S-wave arrival times from 1342 events recorded by the local network of seismic stations from early 2001 to late 2006. Initial models with varying velocity gradients are extracted to constrain a data-driven optimum 1-D model for 3-D iterative inversion scheme. Checkerboard tests are applied to assess model reliability, indicating a reasonable level of lateral and vertical resolutions. The P- and S-tomographic models reveal a local high-velocity anomaly from 5 to 10 km beneath SW portion of the HLA and a strong, large low-velocity anomaly between about 5-10 km depths at the south margin of the ZGB. Moreover, the southwest border of HLA underthrust the ZGB with slightly bigger angle. Also, a prominent high-velocity anomaly is located below 5 km beneath Shazhenxi, and to the west, the velocity anomaly turns out to be negative. There is no record help explaining the dramatic feature since incorporating local tectonic and topography, it suggests sharp gap in velocity near surface is primarily due to several secondary fracture zones. The surface responses of velocity discontinuity are generally aligned parallel to the trending of fault. Relatively good agreement between regional features and the velocity perturbations promotes further interpretation. Earthquake swarm activities from source relocation occur on the outer portions of high-velocity anomaly with nearly perpendicular dip angle. Thus, the seismicity

  3. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  4. Four 1-D metal-organic polymers self-assembled from semi-flexible benzimidazole-based ligand: Syntheses, structures and fluorescent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chun-lin; Wang, Shi-min; Liu, Sai-nan; Yu, Tian-tian; Li, Rui-ying; Xu, Hong; Liu, Zhong-yi; Sun, Huan; Cheng, Jia-jia; Li, Jin-peng; Hou, Hong-wei; Chang, Jun-biao

    2016-08-01

    Four one-dimensional (1-D) metal-organic polymers based on methylene-bis(1,1‧-benzimidazole)(mbbz), namely, {[Hg(mbbz)(SCN)2]·1/3H2O}n (1), [Co(mbbz)(Cl)2]n (2), {[Co(mbbz)(SO4)]·CH3OH}n (3) and {[Zn(mbbz)(SO4)]·CH3OH}n (4) have been successfully synthesized and structurally characterized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that polymers 1 and 2 exhibit interesting 1-D double helical chain structures, while polymers 3 and 4 are 1-D double chain structures due to the bridging effect of mbbz ligands and sulfate anions. These polymers containing the mbbz-based ligand have a high degree of dependence on the corresponding counter anions. Furthermore, the fluorescence properties of the four polymers were also investigated in the solid state, showing the fluorescence signal changes in comparing with that of free ligand mbbz.

  5. Effect of Fermion Velocity on Phase Structure of QED3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Feng; Feng, Hong-Tao; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-11-01

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB) in thermal QED3 with fermion velocity is studied in the framework of Dyson-Schwinger equations. By adopting instantaneous approximation and neglecting the transverse component of gauge boson propagator at finite temperature, we numerically solve the fermion self-energy equation in the rainbow approximation. It is found that both DCSB and fermion chiral condensate are suppressed by fermion velocity. Moreover, the critical temperature decreases as fermion velocity increases. Supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11535005 and the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province under Grant No. BK20130387

  6. Complex Shear Wave Velocity Structure Imaged Beneath Africa and Iceland.

    PubMed

    Ritsema; van Heijst HJ; Woodhouse

    1999-12-03

    A model of three-dimensional shear wave velocity variations in the mantle reveals a tilted low velocity anomaly extending from the core-mantle boundary (CMB) region beneath the southeastern Atlantic Ocean into the upper mantle beneath eastern Africa. This anomaly suggests that Cenozoic flood basalt volcanism in the Afar region and active rifting beneath the East African Rift is linked to an extensive thermal anomaly at the CMB more than 45 degrees away. In contrast, a low velocity anomaly beneath Iceland is confined to the upper mantle.

  7. Syntheses, crystal structures and properties of two 1-D cadmium(II) coordination polymers based on 1,1'-(1,3-propanediyl)bis-1H-benzimidazole

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Huaixia; Meng Xiangru; Liu Yun; Hou Hongwei Fan Yaoting; Shen Xiaoqing

    2008-09-15

    The combination of framework-builders 1,1'-(1,3-propanediyl)bis-1H-benzimidazole (pbbm), Cd(II) ion and framework-regulator ClO{sub 4}{sup -} or SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} provides two new coordination polymers [Cd(pbbm){sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sub n}(1) and {l_brace}[Cd(pbbm)SO{sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].CH{sub 3}OH{r_brace}{sub n}(2). Both of them display 1-D chain framework, but their detailed structures are clearly different from each other. 1 displays a 1-D ribbon of rings framework, 2 features an interesting infinite 1-D looped chain structure composed of two kinds of rings, the smaller 8-membered ring and the larger 20-membered ring. The antimicrobial activities of the two polymers were tested by the agar diffusion method and the results indicated that they exhibited antimicrobial activities against bacterial strands. The measurement of the non-isothermal kinetics of the thermal decomposition of 2 reveals that there are at least three steps that occur in its decomposition process. - Graphical abstract: Two new Cd(II)-containing complexes have been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The antimicrobial activity and the non-isothermal kinetics of the thermal decomposition of the polymers were also investigated. Display Omitted.

  8. Interpolatory fixed-point algorithm for an efficient computation of TE and TM modes in arbitrary 1D structures at oblique incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Molina, Manuel; Francés Monllor, Jorge; Álvarez López, Mariela; Neipp López, Cristian; Carretero López, Luis

    2010-05-01

    We develop the Interpolatory Fixed-Point Algorithm (IFPA) to compute efficiently the TE and TM reflectance and transmittance coefficients for arbitrary 1D structures at oblique incidence. For this purpose, we demonstrate that the semi-analytical solutions of the Helmholtz equation provided by the fixed-point method have a polynomial dependence on variables that are related to the essential electromagnetic parameters -incidence angle and wavelength-, which allows a drastic simplification of the required calculations taking the advantage of interpolation for a few parameter values. The first step to develop the IFPA consists of stating the Helmholtz equation and boundary conditions for TE and TM plane incident waves on a 1D finite slab with an arbitrary permittivity profile surrounded by two homogeneous media. The Helmholtz equation and boundary conditions are then transformed into a second-order initial value problem which is written in terms of transfer matrices. By applying the fixed-point method, the coefficients of such transfer matrices are obtained as polynomials on several variables that can be characterized by a reduced set of interpolating parameters. We apply the IFPA to specific examples of 1D diffraction gratings, optical rugate filters and quasi-periodic structures, for which precise solutions for the TE and TM modes are efficiently obtained by computing less than 20 interpolating parameters.

  9. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  10. Transition zone S velocity structure beneath the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Grand, S. P.; Brandt, M. B.

    2009-12-01

    Models of seismic velocity as a function of depth through the upper mantle provide some of the strongest constraints on the mineralogy and composition of the mantle. Although receiver function studies have provided new information on the depths of upper mantle discontinuities they do not provide as much information on seismic gradients and velocities in the upper mantle. The waveforms and travel times of upper mantle turning waves provide the strongest constraints on vertical variations in upper mantle velocity although in the past they suffered from the lack of dense profiles of data sampling a single part of the upper mantle that would minimize effects of 3D variations in velocity. Here we model a dense profile of triplicated upper mantle broadband S waves recorded by USArray and NARS-Baja stations in the western United States and Mexico. Earthquakes along the East Pacific Rise were recorded along profiles within 5 degree backazimuth windows with stations at a maximum of .5 degree separation. The distance range covered is from 30 to 60 degrees and thus the waves sample the mantle from the lithosphere to depths near 1000 km. The data were inverted using a conjugate gradient algorithm that utilizes the reflectivity synthetic technique. The results show a much smaller gradient within the transition zone than PREM with larger jumps in velocity at the 410 and 660 km depth discontinuities. These results are more consistent with velocities predicted for a pyrolite composition than the PREM model. Between pyrolite and piclogite, our results are far more consistent with velocities predicted for a pyrolite composition.

  11. Velocity structure in long period variable star atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilachowski, C.; Wallerstein, G.; Willson, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    A regression analysis of the dependence of absorption line velocities on wavelength, line strength, excitation potential, and ionization potential is presented. The method determines the region of formation of the absorption lines for a given data and wavelength region. It is concluded that the scatter which is frequently found in velocity measurements of absorption lines in long period variables is probably the result of a shock of moderate amplitude located in or near the reversing layer and that the frequently observed correlation of velocity with excitation and ionization are a result of the velocity gradients produced by this shock in the atmosphere. A simple interpretation of the signs of the coefficients of the regression analysis is presented in terms of preshock, post shock, or across the shock, together with criteria for evaluating the validity of the fit. The amplitude of the reversing layer shock is estimated from an analysis of a series of plates for four long period variable stars along with the most probable stellar velocity for these stars.

  12. LOS velocity as a tracer of coronal cavity magnetic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak-Steslicka, Urszula; Gibson, Sarah; Fan, Yuhong

    The Coronal Multi-Channel Polarimeter (CoMP) makes daily observations of the lower corona in linear polarization, but also measures Doppler shifts, which allows us to obtain the line-of-sight velocity of coronal plasma. CoMP observations of polarization of coronal emission allows, for the first time, an analysis of the coronal magnetic field direction in quiescent prominence cavities. We present an analysis of Doppler velocity measurements of the numerous quiescent prominence cavities. Such observations are common in cavities and characteristic concentric circles of different values of flow may appear. CoMP data analysis of quiescent cavities is important for understanding pre-CME configuration.

  13. Syntheses, crystal structures, and characterization of three 1D, 2D and 3D complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huai-Xia; Liang, Zhen; Hao, Bao-Lian; Meng, Xiang-Ru

    2014-10-15

    Three new 1D to 3D complexes, namely, ([Ni(btec)(Himb){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·6H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1), ([Cd(btec){sub 0.5}(imb)(H{sub 2}O)]·1.5H{sub 2}O){sub n} (2), and ([Zn(btec){sub 0.5}(imb)]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (3) (H{sub 4}btec=1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, imb=2-(1H-imidazol-1-methyl)-1H-benzimidazole) have been synthesized by adjusting the central metal ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that complex 1 possesses a 1D chain structure which is further extended into the 3D supramolecular architecture via hydrogen bonds. Complex 2 features a 2D network with Schla¨fli symbol (5{sup 3}·6{sup 2}·7)(5{sup 2}·6{sup 4}). Complex 3 presents a 3D framework with a point symbol of (4·6{sup 4}·8)(4{sup 2}·6{sup 2}·8{sup 2}). Moreover, their IR spectra, PXRD patterns, thermogravimetric curves, and luminescent emissions were studied at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Three new 1D to 3D complexes with different structural and topological motifs have been obtained by modifying the central metal ions. Additionally, their IR, TG analyses and fluorescent properties are also investigated. - Highlights: • Three complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands. • The complexes are characterized by IR, luminescence and TGA techniques. • Benzenetetracarboxylates display different coordination modes in complexes 1–3. • Changing the metal ions can result in complexes with completely different structures.

  14. Crystal Structure of Human Liver delta {4}-3-Ketosteroid 5 beta-Reductase (AKR1D1) and Implications for Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Costanzo,L.; Drury, J.; Penning, T.; Christianson, D.

    2008-01-01

    AKR1D1 (steroid 5{beta}-reductase) reduces all 4-3-ketosteroids to form 5{beta}-dihydrosteroids, a first step in the clearance of steroid hormones and an essential step in the synthesis of all bile acids. The reduction of the carbon-carbon double bond in an a,{beta}-unsaturated ketone by 5{beta}-reductase is a unique reaction in steroid enzymology because hydride transfer from NADPH to the {beta}-face of a 4-3-ketosteroid yields a cis-A/B-ring configuration with an {approx}90 bend in steroid structure. Here, we report the first x-ray crystal structure of a mammalian steroid hormone carbon-carbon double bond reductase, human 4-3-ketosteroid 5{beta}-reductase (AKR1D1), and its complexes with intact substrates. We have determined the structures of AKR1D1 complexes with NADP+ at 1.79- and 1.35- Angstroms resolution (HEPES bound in the active site), NADP+ and cortisone at 1.90- Angstroms resolution, NADP+ and progesterone at 2.03- Angstroms resolution, and NADP+ and testosterone at 1.62- Angstroms resolution. Complexes with cortisone and progesterone reveal productive substrate binding orientations based on the proximity of each steroid carbon-carbon double bond to the re-face of the nicotinamide ring of NADP+. This orientation would permit 4-pro-(R)-hydride transfer from NADPH. Each steroid carbonyl accepts hydrogen bonds from catalytic residues Tyr58 and Glu120. The Y58F and E120A mutants are devoid of activity, supporting a role for this dyad in the catalytic mechanism. Intriguingly, testosterone binds nonproductively, thereby rationalizing the substrate inhibition observed with this particular steroid. The locations of disease-linked mutations thought to be responsible for bile acid deficiency are also revealed.

  15. From 1D and 2D ZnO nanostructures to 3D hierarchical structures with enhanced gas sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Alenezi, Mohammad R; Henley, Simon J; Emerson, Neil G; Silva, S Ravi P

    2014-01-07

    Facile and low cost hydrothermal routes are developed to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical ZnO structures with high surface-to-volume ratios and an increased fraction of (0001) polar surfaces. Hierarchical ZnO nanowires (ZNWs) and nanodisks (ZNDs) assembled from initial ZnO nanostructures are prepared from sequential nucleation and growth following a hydrothermal process. These hierarchical ZnO structures display an enhancement of gas sensing performance and exhibit significantly improved sensitivity and fast response to acetone in comparison to other mono-morphological ZnO, such as nanoparticles, NWs, or NDs. In addition to the high surface-to-volume ratio due to its small size, the nanowire building blocks show the enhanced gas sensing properties mainly ascribed to the increased proportion of exposed active (0001) planes, and the formation of many nanojunctions at the interface between the initial ZnO nanostructure and secondary NWs. This work provides the route for structure induced enhancement of gas sensing performance by designing a desirable nanostructure, which could also be extended to synthesize other metal oxide nanostructures with superior gas sensing performance.

  16. Tailoring the spin waves band structure of 1D magnonic crystals consisting of L-shaped iron/permalloy nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubbiotti, G.; Silvani, R.; Tacchi, S.; Madami, M.; Carlotti, G.; Yang, Z.; Adeyeye, A. O.; Kostylev, M.

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated both experimentally and numerically the magnonic band structure of arrays of closely spaced Fe/permalloy nanowires (NWs) with an L-shape cross-section using the Brillouin light scattering technique and GPU-based micromagnetic simulations. NWs consist of a 340 nm wide and 10 nm thick permalloy layer covered by a 170 nm wide Fe overlayer. The thickness of the latter was varied in the range from 0 to 10 nm in order to analyze its influence on the magnonic band structure. We found that both the frequency and the spatial profile of the most intense and dispersive mode, can be efficiently tuned by the presence of the thin Fe NW overlayer. In particular, by increasing the Fe thickness, one observes a substantial frequency increase, while the spatial profile of the mode narrows and moves to the permalloy NW portion not covered by Fe. In addition, the presence of the Fe overlayer causes a significant increase of the number of detected modes and a change of their intensity in the Brillouin spectra as a function of the Bloch wave number. These results show that it is possible to engineer the band structure of magnonic crystals consisting of bi-layered, L-shaped, NWs by a careful control of the overlayer thickness.

  17. P wave velocity structure beneath Greenland using teleseismic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Lee, W.; Yoo, H.

    2013-12-01

    A three-dimensional P-wave velocity model was inverted with 3032 ray paths from 416 events observed on the GLISN network from 2009 to 2013. The relative travel times were computed with respect to the IASP91 global reference model using the multi-channel cross correlation method (MCCC) by VanDecar and Crosson {, 1990 #1}. Our model space was parameterized laterally with 1°×1° from 55°N to 85°N in latitude and from 20°W to 80°W in longitude. This high latitude model space causes spatial distortion in the model parameters on the spherical coordinate for the teleseismic body wave tomography. To minimize a distortion in the model parameters the spherical coordinate system was rotated as the referent stations SUMG and SCO, located on the middle of Greenland, to equator, and all stations and seismic events were converted to this new coordinate system. All ray paths were computed by a three dimensional ray tracing algorithm developed with pseudobending technique and Snell's law {Zhao, 1992 #1}, and travel times were corrected by ice and crustal thicknesses for each observed station as well. Our inverted model shows a broad low velocity anomaly ( -1.5%) in the mid-eastern parts of Greenland, which is connected to the low velocity anomaly beneath Iceland. Another low velocity anomaly was observed below 300km in the middle of Greenland where the Icelandic mantle plume was located in 60Ma. P wave velocity anomaly depth slices from 150 km to 400 km on the rotated coordinate from the center of Green land to the equator.

  18. Propagation of the Ultra-Short Laser Pulses Through the Helical 1D Photonic Crystal Structure with Twist Defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, Dmitrii V.; Iegorov, Roman

    2016-02-01

    The presence of the photonic band-gap is a featured property of the cholesteric liquid crystals (CLC). It can be practically realized for almost any reasonable wavelengths with very high degree of tunability. We have investigated theoretically the influence of the twist defect of the CLC helical structure onto the bandwidth-limited ultra-short laser pulse propagating inside the photonic band-gap. The changes of both pulse duration and peak power with defect angle were observed together with pulse acceleration and retardation for a case of normal incidence of the light.

  19. In-situ measurements of velocity structure within turbidity currents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, J. P.; Noble, M.A.; Rosenfeld, L.K.

    2004-01-01

    Turbidity currents are thought to be the main mechanism to move ???500,000 m3 of sediments annually from the head of the Monterey Submarine Canyon to the deep-sea fan. Indirect evidence has shown frequent occurrences of such turbidity currents in the canyon, but the dynamic properties of the turbidity currents such as maximum speed, duration, and dimensions are still unknown. Here we present the first-ever in-situ measurements of velocity profiles of four turbidity currents whose maximum along-canyon velocity reached 190 cm/s. Two turbidity currents coincided with storms that produced the highest swells and the biggest stream flows during the year-long deployment. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Fluid Structure Interaction Effects on Composites Under Low Velocity Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Interaction, FSI, low velocity impact, carbon fiber reinforced polymers, CFRP, carbon nanotubes, CNT, vacuum assisted resin transfer molding, VARTM . 16...Ethyl Ketone Peroxide MWCNT Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube VARTM Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding xiv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK...samples used in this research is known as vacuum assisted resin transfer molding ( VARTM ). VARTM is a very common method used in low pressure composite

  1. Three-dimensional velocity structure of the Kilauea caldera, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, P.B.; Chouet, B.A.; Okubo, P.G.; Villasenor, A.; Benz, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    High-resolution velocity models (0.5 km resolution) of the Kilauea caldera region are obtained by the tomographic inversion of both P- and S-waye arrival times. Data are from the permanent Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) seismic network, a broadband seismic network, and a temporary array of stations centered on the southern boundary of the caldera. A low-velocity P-wave anomaly is imaged centered on the southeastern edge of the caldera, with a velocity contrast of about 10% and a volume of 27 km3. The VP/VS model mimics the spatial extent of the P-wave anomaly, but is partitioned into two discrete anomalous volumes centered on the southern boundary of the caldera and on the upper east rift of the volcano. The corresponding Poisson's ratio in these zones is high (?? = 0.25-0.32) which is consistent with a densely-cracked, hot volume which may contain partial melt. The large-scale features of the models are consistent with results obtained from an earlier, larger-scale (2 km resolution) tomographic image of Kilauea Volcano based on HVO network data.

  2. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  3. Upper Arctic Ocean velocity structure from in-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recinos, Beatriz; Rabe, Benjamin; Schauer, Ursula

    2016-04-01

    The gross circulation of the upper and intermediate layers of the Arctic Ocean has been inferred from water mass properties: the mixed layer, containing fresh water from the shelf seas, travels from Siberia towards the Atlantic sector, and the saline and warm layer of Atlantic origin below, follows cyclonic pathways along topographic features. Direct observations of the flow below the sea ice are, however, sparse and difficult to obtain. This research presents the analysis of a unique time series/section of in situ velocity measurements obtained by a drifting ice-tethered platform in the Transpolar Drift near the North Pole. Two instruments were used to obtain in situ measurements of velocity, temperature, salinity and pressure: an Ice-tethered Acoustic Current profiler (ITAC) and an Ice-tethered Profiler (ITP). Both systems were deployed in the Amundsen basin, during the Arctic Ocean expedition ARK XXII/2 of the German Research Vessel Polarstern in September 2007. The systems transmitted profile data from the 14th of September to the 29th of November 2007 and covered a maximum depth range of 23 to 400 m. The results are compared to observations by a shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) from the 2011 Polarstern expedition ARK-XXVI/3, and wind and ice concentration from satellite reanalysis products. The data set allows an overview of the upper and intermediate circulation along the Lomonosov Ridge. Near-surface velocity and ice drift obtained by the ITAC unit are consistent with the Transpolar Drift Current. Ekman transports calculated from the observed ice drift and assumed ice-ocean drag behaviour suggest that Ekman dynamics influenced velocities at depths greater than the Ekman layer. Direct velocity observations in combination with water mass analyses from the temperature and salinity data, suggest the existence of a current along the Eurasian side of the Lomonosov Ridge within the warm Atlantic layer below the cold halocline. At those depths

  4. Control over band structure and tunneling in bilayer graphene induced by velocity engineering.

    PubMed

    Cheraghchi, Hosein; Adinehvand, Fatemeh

    2014-01-08

    The band structure and transport properties of massive Dirac fermions in bilayer graphene with velocity modulation in space are investigated in the presence of a previously created band gap. It is pointed out that velocity engineering may be considered as a factor to control the band gap of symmetry-broken bilayer graphene. The band gap is direct and independent of velocity value if the velocity modulated in two layers is set up equally. Otherwise, in the case of interlayer asymmetric velocity, not only is the band gap indirect, but also the electron-hole symmetry fails. This band gap is controllable by the ratio of the velocity modulated in the upper layer to the velocity modulated in the lower layer. In more detail, the shift of momentum from the conduction band edge to the valence band edge can be engineered by the gate bias and velocity ratio. A transfer matrix method is also elaborated to calculate the four-band coherent conductance through a velocity barrier possibly subjected to a gate bias. Electronic transport depends on the ratio of velocity modulated inside the barrier to that for surrounding regions. As a result, a quantum version of total internal reflection is observed for thick enough velocity barriers. Moreover, a transport gap originating from the applied gate bias is engineered by modulating the velocities of the carriers in the upper and lower layers.

  5. A Comparison of Long-Period SKS Datasets And What They Reveal About 1D Outer Core Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, C. T.; Ritsema, J. E.; Grand, S.

    2010-12-01

    Seismology is the most direct tool for documenting the presences or absence of outer core stratification. The outermost core is most effectively sampled by SKS, S2KS, S3KS, S4KS, etc.) which have bottoming depths at the top of the outermost core. In order to incorporate modern data sets (e.g., USArray, Europe, China, etc), we need to sift through massive amounts of seismic data to identify the smaller portion of quality signals in a time-efficient manner. We evaluate the application of a cluster analysis technique (Houser et al., 2008) toward identifying and evaluating the SKS phases that traverse the outer core. Cluster analysis is a semi-automated method for interrogating large datasets by processing all the data for an earthquake while allowing the user to graphically interact with the data to remove low quality records. The Houser et al. (2008) cluster analysis method has already been applied to diffracted S waves (Manners et al., 2004), and here we will expand the cluster analysis to the radial component core phases. These newly measured SKS arrival times will be compared with SKS arrival time measurements used in previous mantle tomographic models, namely, S20RTS (Ritsema and van Heist, 2002) using a purely automated method and TXBW (Grand, 2002) using a purely manual method. We find that the arrival times collected by the three methods (automated, clustered, and manual) during overlapping time frames are in agreement within the measurement error bars. Therefore, the SKS data from these studies can be combined to constrain the radial structure of the outermost core. Thus, cluster analysis is an ideal tool for developing a large compilation of SKS arrival times from modern global seismic data, while simultaneously providing a measure of data quality.

  6. The preliminary results: Internal seismic velocity structure imaging beneath Mount Lokon

    SciTech Connect

    Firmansyah, Rizky; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Kristianto

    2015-04-24

    Historical records that before the 17{sup th} century, Mount Lokon had been dormant for approximately 400 years. In the years between 1350 and 1400, eruption ever recorded in Empung, came from Mount Lokon’s central crater. Subsequently, in 1750 to 1800, Mount Lokon continued to erupt again and caused soil damage and fall victim. After 1949, Mount Lokon dramatically increased in its frequency: the eruption interval varies between 1 – 5 years, with an average interval of 3 years and a rest interval ranged from 8 – 64 years. Then, on June 26{sup th}, 2011, standby alert set by the Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation. Peak activity happened on July 4{sup th}, 2011 that Mount Lokon erupted continuously until August 28{sup th}, 2011. In this study, we carefully analyzed micro-earthquakes waveform and determined hypocenter location of those events. We then conducted travel time seismic tomographic inversion using SIMULPS12 method to detemine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio structures beneath Lokon volcano in order to enhance our subsurface geological structure. During the tomographic inversion, we started from 1-D seismic velocities model obtained from VELEST33 method. Our preliminary results show low Vp, low Vs, and high Vp/Vs are observed beneath Mount Lokon-Empung which are may be associated with weak zone or hot material zones. However, in this study we used few station for recording of micro-earthquake events. So, we suggest in the future tomography study, the adding of some seismometers in order to improve ray coverage in the region is profoundly justified.

  7. Group velocity dispersion characteristics and one-dimensional regional shear velocity structure of the eastern Indian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik

    2017-02-01

    In the past three years, a semi-permanent network of fifteen 3-component broadband seismographs has become operational in the eastern Indian shield region occupying the Archean (∼2.5-3.6 Ga) Singhbhum-Odisha craton (SOC) and the Proterozoic (∼1.0-2.5 Ga) Chotanagpur Granitic Gneissic terrane (CGGT). The reliable and accurate broadband data for the recent 2015 Nepal earthquake sequence from 10 broadband stations of this network enabled us to estimate the group velocity dispersion characteristics and one-dimensional regional shear velocity structure of the region. First, we measure fundamental mode Rayleigh- and Love-wave group velocity dispersion curves in the period range of 7-70 s and then invert these curves to estimate the crustal and upper mantle structure below the eastern Indian craton (EIC). We observe that group velocities of Rayleigh and Love waves in SOC are relatively high in comparison to those of CGGT. This could be attributed to a relatively mafic-rich crust-mantle structure in SOC resulting from two episodes of magmatism associated with the 1.6 Ga Dalma and ∼117 Ma Rajmahal volcanisms. The best model for the EIC from the present study is found to be a two-layered crust, with a 14-km thick upper-crust (UC) of average shear velocity (Vs) of 3.0 km/s and a 26-km thick lower-crust (LC) of average Vs of 3.6 km/s. The present study detects a sharp drop in Vs (∼-2 to 3%) at 120-260 km depths, underlying the EIC, representing the probable seismic lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) at 120 km depth. Such sharp fall in Vs below the LAB indicates a partially molten layer. Further, a geothermal gradient extrapolated from the surface heat flow shows that such a gradient would intercept the wet basalt solidus at 88-103 km depths, suggesting a 88-103 km thick thermal lithosphere below the EIC. This could also signal the presence of small amounts of partial melts. Thus, this 2-3% drop in Vs could be attributed to the presence of partial melts in the

  8. The velocity field under breaking waves: coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melville, W. Kendall; Veron, Fabrice; White, Christopher J.

    2002-03-01

    Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) measurements of the velocity field under breaking waves in the laboratory are presented. The region of turbulent fluid directly generated by breaking is too large to be imaged in one video frame and so an ensemble-averaged representation of the flow is built up from a mosaic of image frames. It is found that breaking generates at least one coherent vortex that slowly propagates downstream at a speed consistent with the velocity induced by its image in the free surface. Both the kinetic energy of the flow and the vorticity decay approximately as t[minus sign]1. The Reynolds stress of the turbulence also decays as t[minus sign]1 and is, within the accuracy of the measurements, everywhere negative, consistent with downward transport of streamwise momentum. Estimates of the mometum flux from waves to currents based on the measurements of the Reynolds stress are consistent with earlier estimates. The implications of the measurements for breaking in the field are discussed. Based on geometrical optics and wave action conservation, we suggest that the presence of the breaking-induced vortex provides an explanation for the suppression of short waves by breaking. Finally, in Appendices, estimates of the majority of the terms in the turbulent kinetic energy budget are presented at an early stage in the evolution of the turbulence, and comparisons with independent acoustical measurements of breaking are presented.

  9. Lithospheric Shear Velocity and Discontinuity Structure of Hudson Bay from S-to-P Receiver Functions and Jointly Inverted P-to-S Receiver Functions and Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, R. W.; Miller, M. S.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Hudson Bay overlies some of the thickest Precambrian lithosphere on Earth, whose internal structures contain important clues to the earliest workings of plate formation. The Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE) has thus far constrained its seismic wavespeed, anisotropy, and discontinuity structures. However, previous work has either focused on a single imaging method or briefly compared two independent methods. In this study, we combine surface wave dispersion curves with P to S receiver functions (PRF) to jointly invert for 1D shear velocity, and also compute independent S to P receiver functions (SRF) using teleseismic earthquakes recorded at 36 broadband seismic stations from the HuBLE experiment and 9 additional regional stations. High shear velocities are observed to depths of 200-300 km in the region, indicating a thick depleted lithospheric keel, with maximum thickness in the center of Hudson Bay. The 1D shear velocity profiles typically exhibit a low-velocity zone in the lower crust, consistent with the hypothesis of post-orogenic or syn-orogenic lower crustal flow or the tectonic burial of metasediments. Observations of a flat Moho in the Rae domain of northwestern Hudson Bay are consistent with an Archean-aged crust, which has remained unaltered since formation. Structures observed within the mantle lithosphere in the depth-stacked S to P receiver functions appear to dip from the Hearne domain towards the Rae domain, suggestive of lithospheric formation through plate tectonic processes. This implies that plate tectonic processes were in action during the Archean when these provinces formed.

  10. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of Mt. Etna, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villasenor, A.; Benz, H.M.; Filippi, L.; De Luca, G.; Scarpa, R.; Patane, G.; Vinciguerra, S.

    1998-01-01

    The three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of Mt. Etna is determined to depths of 15 km by tomographic inversion of first arrival times from local earthquakes recorded by a network of 29 permanent and temporary seismographs. Results show a near-vertical low-velocity zone that extends from beneath the central craters to a depth of 10 km. This low-velocity region is coincident with a band of steeply-dipping seismicity, suggesting a magmatic conduit that feeds the summit eruptions. The most prominent structure is an approximately 8-km-diameter high-velocity body located between 2 and 12 km depth below the southeast flank of the volcano. This high-velocity body is interpreted as a remnant mafic intrusion that is an important structural feature influencing both volcanism and east flank slope stability and faulting.

  11. Crystal Structure of Human Liver [delta][superscript 4]-3-Ketosteroid 5[beta]-Reductase (AKR1D1) and Implications for Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Costanzo, Luigi; Drury, Jason E.; Penning, Trevor M.; Christianson, David W.

    2008-07-15

    AKR1D1 (steroid 5{beta}-reductase) reduces all {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroids to form 5{beta}-dihydrosteroids, a first step in the clearance of steroid hormones and an essential step in the synthesis of all bile acids. The reduction of the carbon-carbon double bond in an {alpha}{beta}-unsaturated ketone by 5{beta}-reductase is a unique reaction in steroid enzymology because hydride transfer from NADPH to the {beta}-face of a {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroid yields a cis-A/B-ring configuration with an {approx}90{sup o} bend in steroid structure. Here, we report the first x-ray crystal structure of a mammalian steroid hormone carbon-carbon double bond reductase, human {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroid 5{beta}-reductase (AKR1D1), and its complexes with intact substrates. We have determined the structures of AKR1D1 complexes with NADP{sup +} at 1.79- and 1.35-{angstrom} resolution (HEPES bound in the active site), NADP{sup +} and cortisone at 1.90-{angstrom} resolution, NADP{sup +} and progesterone at 2.03-{angstrom} resolution, and NADP{sup +} and testosterone at 1.62-{angstrom} resolution. Complexes with cortisone and progesterone reveal productive substrate binding orientations based on the proximity of each steroid carbon-carbon double bond to the re-face of the nicotinamide ring of NADP{sup +}. This orientation would permit 4-pro-(R)-hydride transfer from NADPH. Each steroid carbonyl accepts hydrogen bonds from catalytic residues Tyr{sup 58} and Glu{sup 120}. The Y58F and E120A mutants are devoid of activity, supporting a role for this dyad in the catalytic mechanism. Intriguingly, testosterone binds nonproductively, thereby rationalizing the substrate inhibition observed with this particular steroid. The locations of disease-linked mutations thought to be responsible for bile acid deficiency are also revealed.

  12. Simple synthesis of PbSe nanocrystals and their self-assembly into 2D ‘flakes’ and 1D ‘ribbons’ structures

    SciTech Connect

    Díaz-Torres, E.; Ortega-López, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • PbSe is obtained in a simple way by the co-precipitation method at low-temperature. • The structural, morphological and optical properties of PbSe were studied. • Adding NH{sub 4}OH to the precursor solutions influences on the morphology. • 2D- and 1D-PbSe structures assemble by oriented attachment. • PbSe can be a potential candidate for thermoelectric applications. - Abstract: This work presents a simple and low-temperature method to prepare a variety of Lead selenide (PbSe) nanostructures, using aqueous solutions of Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and NaHSe. Nanostructures with different morphology were obtained by varying the Pb:Se molar ratio, as well as the mixing sequence of NH{sub 4}OH with either Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} or NaHSe. Nanoparticles with different shapes (spherical and octahedral), and self-assembled structures (flakes and ribbons) were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. X-ray results confirmed that the PbSe rock-salt crystalline structure was obtained for all of the prepared samples. The crystal size is in the order of 7.3 to 8.9 nm for single nanocrystals. The absorption spectra of the samples show exciton absorption bands at 1395 nm and 1660 nm. This material could be used to develop more advanced structures for thermoelectric generators.

  13. Investigation of structural heterogeneity at the SPE site using combined P–wave travel times and Rg phase velocities

    DOE PAGES

    Rowe, Charlotte A.; Patton, Howard J.

    2015-10-01

    Here, we present analyses of the 2D seismic structure beneath Source Physics Experiments (SPE) geophone lines that extended radially at 100 m spacing from 100 to 2000 m from the source borehole. With seismic sources at only one end of the geophone lines, standard refraction profiling methods cannot resolve seismic velocity structures unambiguously. In previous work, we demonstrated overall agreement between body-wave refraction modeling and Rg dispersion curves for the least complex of the five lines. A more detailed inspection supports a 2D reinterpretation of the structure. We obtained Rg phase velocity measurements in both the time and frequency domains,more » then used iterative adjustment of the initial 1D body-wave model to predict Rg dispersion curves to fit the observed values. Our method applied to the most topographically severe of the geophone lines is supplemented with a 2D ray-tracing approach, whose application to P-wave arrivals supports the Rg analysis. In addition, midline sources will allow us to refine our characterization in future work.« less

  14. Three-dimensional P and S wave velocity structure of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benz, H.M.; Chouet, B.A.; Dawson, P.B.; Lahr, J.C.; Page, R.A.; Hole, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The three-dimensional P and S wave structure of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, and the underlying crust to depths of 7-8 km is determined from 6219 P wave and 4008 S wave first-arrival times recorded by a 30-station seismograph network deployed on and around the volcano. First-arrival times are calculated using a finite-difference technique, which allows for flexible parameterization of the slowness model and easy inclusion of topography and source-receiver geometry. The three-dimensional P wave velocity structure and hypocenters are determined simultaneously, while the three-dimensional S wave velocity model is determined using the relocated seismicity and an initial S wave velocity model derived from the P wave velocity model assuming an average Vp/Vs ratio of 1.78. Convergence is steady with approximately 73% and 52% reduction in P and S wave arrival time RMS, respectively, after 10 iterations. The most prominent feature observed in the three-dimensional velocity models derived for both P and S waves is a relative low-velocity, near-vertical, pipelike structure approximately 1 km in diameter that extends from 1 to 6 km beneath sea level. This feature aligns axially with the bulk of seismicity and is interpreted as a highly fractured and altered zone encompassing a magma conduit. The velocity structure beneath the north flank of the volcano between depths of 1 and 6 km is characterized by large lateral velocity variations. High velocities within this region are interpreted as remnant dikes and sills and low velocities as regions along which magma migrates. No large low-velocity body suggestive of a magma chamber is resolved in the the upper 7-8 km of the crust.

  15. Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of 5-(4-Sulfophenylazo) salicylate-bridged 1D coordination polymers containing linear trinuclear metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong; Song, Li-jun; Ju, Zhan-feng; Li, Wei; Zhang, Jie

    2008-03-01

    Three new trinuclear metal complexes with an azobenzene-containing ligand [M 3(Sasa) 2(Py) 2(H 2O) 8] (Na 2HSasa = 5-(4-Sulfophenylazo) salicylic acid disodium salt; Py = pyridine; M = Cu, Co, Zn), are synthesized through the interface diffusion and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, XRPD analysis and spectral methods. The metal ions in distorted octahedral coordination environments are connected by Sasa ligands to form 1D coordination polymer chain containing the linear trinuclear units with single syn-anti carboxylate bridges. The extensive hydrogen bonding interactions hold these chains together into 3D supramolecular network. Weak antiferromagnetic interactions between adjacent metal ions with J = -1.85 cm -1 and J = -2.81 cm -1 dominate the magnetic properties of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes, separately.

  16. Determination of Bedrock Variations and S-wave Velocity Structure in the NW part of Turkey for Earthquake Hazard Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozel, A. O.; Arslan, M. S.; Aksahin, B. B.; Genc, T.; Isseven, T.; Tuncer, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Tekirdag region (NW Turkey) is quite close to the North Anatolian Fault which is capable of producing a large earthquake. Therefore, earthquake hazard mitigation studies are important for the urban areas close to the major faults. From this point of view, integration of different geophysical methods has important role for the study of seismic hazard problems including seismotectonic zoning. On the other hand, geological mapping and determining the subsurface structure, which is a key to assist management of new developed areas, conversion of current urban areas or assessment of urban geological hazards can be performed by integrated geophysical methods. This study has been performed in the frame of a national project, which is a complimentary project of the cooperative project between Turkey and Japan (JICA&JST), named as "Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in the Marmara Region and Disaster Education". With this principal aim, this study is focused on Tekirdag and its surrounding region (NW of Turkey) where some uncertainties in subsurface knowledge (maps of bedrock depth, thickness of quaternary sediments, basin geometry and seismic velocity structure,) need to be resolved. Several geophysical methods (microgravity, magnetic and single station and array microtremor measurements) are applied and the results are evaluated to characterize lithological changes in the region. Array microtremor measurements with several radiuses are taken in 30 locations and 1D-velocity structures of S-waves are determined by the inversion of phase velocities of surface waves, and the results of 1D structures are verified by theoretical Rayleigh wave modelling. Following the array measurements, single-station microtremor measurements are implemented at 75 locations to determine the predominant frequency distribution. The predominant frequencies in the region range from 0.5 Hz to 8 Hz in study area. On the other hand, microgravity and magnetic measurements are performed on

  17. Finite-frequency traveltime tomography of San Francisco Bay region crustal velocity structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2007-01-01

    Seismic velocity structure of the San Francisco Bay region crust is derived using measurements of finite-frequency traveltimes. A total of 57 801 relative traveltimes are measured by cross-correlation over the frequency range 0.5-1.5 Hz. From these are derived 4862 'summary' traveltimes, which are used to derive 3-D P-wave velocity structure over a 341 ?? 140 km2 area from the surface to 25 km depth. The seismic tomography is based on sensitivity kernels calculated on a spherically symmetric reference model. Robust elements of the derived P-wave velocity structure are: a pronounced velocity contrast across the San Andreas fault in the south Bay region (west side faster); a moderate velocity contrast across the Hayward fault (west side faster); moderately low velocity crust around the Quien Sabe volcanic field and the Sacramento River delta; very low velocity crust around Lake Berryessa. These features are generally explicable with surface rock types being extrapolated to depth ???10 km in the upper crust. Generally high mid-lower crust velocity and high inferred Poisson's ratio suggest a mafic lower crust. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  18. 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Syahputra, Ahmad; Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat

    2013-09-09

    We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

  19. Estimation of shallow S-wave velocity structure and site response characteristics by microtremor array measurements in Tekirdag region, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagoz, Ozlem; Chimoto, Kosuke; Citak, Seckin; Ozel, Oguz; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Hatayama, Ken

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we aimed to explore the S-wave velocity structure of shallow soils using microtremors in order to estimate site responses in Tekirdag and surrounding areas (NW Turkey). We collected microtremor array data at 44 sites in Tekirdag, Marmara Ereglisi, Corlu, and Muratlı. The phase velocities of Rayleigh waves were estimated from the microtremor data using a Spatial Autocorrelation method. Then, we applied a hybrid genetic simulated annealing algorithm to obtain a 1D S-wave velocity structure at each site. Comparison between the horizontal-to-vertical ratio of microtremors and computed ellipticities of the fundamental mode Rayleigh waves showed good agreement with validation models. The depth of the engineering bedrock changed from 20 to 50 m in the Tekirdag city center and along the coastline with a velocity range of 700-930 m/s, and it ranged between 10 and 65 m in Marmara Ereglisi. The average S-wave velocity of the engineering bedrock was 780 m/s in the region. We obtained average S-wave velocities in the upper 30 m to compare site amplifications. Empirical relationships between the AVs30, the site amplifications, and also average topographic slopes were established for use in future site effects microzonation studies in the region.

  20. Structure of the Crust beneath Cameroon, West Africa, from the Joint Inversion of Rayleigh Wave Group Velocities and Receiver Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Tokam, A K; Tabod, C T; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Wiens, D A; Pasyanos, M E

    2010-02-18

    Cameroon using 1-D shear wave velocity models obtained from the joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities and P-receiver functions for 32 broadband seismic stations. From the 1-D shear wave velocity models, we obtain new insights into the composition and structure of the crust and upper mantle across Cameroon. After briefly reviewing the geological framework of Cameroon, we describe the data and the joint inversion method, and then interpret variations in crustal structure found beneath Cameroon in terms of the tectonic history of the region.

  1. Mononuclear, dinuclear and 1-D polymeric complexes of Cd(II) of a pyridyl pyrazole ligand: Syntheses, crystal structures and photoluminescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kinsuk; Konar, Saugata; Jana, Atanu; Barik, Anil Kumar; Roy, Sangita; Kar, Susanta Kumar

    2013-03-01

    The syntheses, crystal structures and photoluminescence properties of four new Cd(II) complexes are reported using strongly coordinating ligand 3,5-dimethyl-1-(2'-pyridyl) pyrazole (L) in presence of anionic ancillary bridging ligands as nitrite, chloride and dicyanamide. Among the complexes two (1 and 2) are monomeric, 3 is μ2 - chloro bridged dimer and the last one (4) is a mixed alternate chloro - end to end (EE) dicyanamide bridged 1D polymer. All the four complexes have been X-ray crystallographically characterized. The ligand L behaves as a potent bidentate neutral N, N donor. Geometrical diversity of Cd(II) complexes is due to no loss or gain of crystal field stability with the variation of geometry. Consequently the stability of a structure depends on steric requirements. The ligand L shows considerable fluorescence and all four complexes in methanol exhibit interesting photoluminescence properties with different emission intensities. The band maxima and fluorescence efficiency (in methanol) are found to be dependent on the coordination chromophore and structural rigidity induced by the incorporated Cd(II) ion. Among the synthesized complexes 1 exhibits the highest fluorescence intensity in methanol.

  2. Velocity Structure and Plasma Properties in Halo CMEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, William (Technical Monitor); Raymond, John C.

    2003-01-01

    We have identified a set of 23 Halo CMEs through July 2002 and 21 Partial Halo CMEs from the LASCO Halo CME Mail Archive for which Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) spectra exist. For each event we have collected basic information such as the event speed, whether or not UVCS caught the bright front, lines detected, Doppler shift and associated flare class. We have also obtained excellent observations of some of the spectacular events in November 2003, and we have made theoretical calculations pertaining to CME expansion at the heights observed by UVCS. We first analyzed the halo CMEs on 21 April and 24 August 2002 and the partial halo on 23 July 2002, because the X-class flares associated with these CMEs were extensively observed by RHESSI and other instruments as part of the MAX MILLENIUM campaign. These very fast CMEs showed extremely violent disruption of the pre-CME streamers, little or no cool prominence material, and the unusual (for UVCS heights) hot emission line [Fe XVIII]. Results, including a discussion of the current sheet interpretation for the [Fe XVIII] emission, are published in Raymond et al. and presented at the Fall 2002 AGU meeting and the solar physics summer school in L'Aquila, Italy. We are currently preparing two papers on the Dec. 28, 2000 partial halo event. This event was chosen to take advantage of the SEP event measured by WIND and ACE, and because a Type II radio burst coincides with the time that broad, blue-shifted O VI emission appeared in the UVCS spectra. One paper deals with a new density and velocity diagnostic for very fast CMEs; pumping of O VI lambda 1032 by Ly beta and pumping of O VI lambda 1038 by O VI lambda 1032. The other discusses physics of the shock wave and association with the SEP event. In the coming year we plan to expand the list of Halo and Partial Halo events observed by UVCS through the end of 2003. We will look at those events as a class to search for correlation between UV spectral characteristics

  3. Density, Velocity and Ionization Structure in Accretion-Disc Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Long, Knox

    2004-01-01

    This was a project to exploit the unique capabilities of FUSE to monitor variations in the wind- formed spectral lines of the luminous, low-inclination, cataclysmic variables(CV) -- RW Sex. (The original proposal contained two additional objects but these were not approved.) These observations were intended to allow us to determine the relative roles of density and ionization state changes in the outflow and to search for spectroscopic signatures of stochastic small-scale structure and shocked gas. By monitoring the temporal behavior of blue-ward extended absorption lines with a wide range of ionization potentials and excitation energies, we proposed to track the changing physical conditions in the outflow. We planned to use a new Monte Carlo code to calculate the ionization structure of and radiative transfer through the CV wind. The analysis therefore was intended to establish the wind geometry, kinematics and ionization state, both in a time-averaged sense and as a function of time.

  4. Amplitude Anomalies of S Waves Caused by Low Shear Velocity Structures at the Base of the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, A.; Capdeville, Y.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that the direct S and Sdiff waveforms of earthquakes in Papua New Guinea region recorded by seismographs in Northern America are distorted due to sampling slow shear velocity anomalies at the base of the mantle. The emergence of postcursours to the S/Sdiff waves and the travel time anomalies have been reasonably explained by placing a ultra low velocity zone (ULVZ) in southwest of Hawaii. In this study, we focused on the amplitude anomalies of the S/Sdiff waveforms. The direct S phase show very low amplitude at stations in Southern California, at the distance and azimuth around 90 and 55 degrees from the earthquake. The amplitude is as low as 10% of the synthetic amplitude of a standard 1D model, especially at higher frequency range above 0.025 Hz. We first checked and confirmed that the anomalies are not due to errors in the focal mechanism, which is used to calculate the reference synthetic waveforms. Also we checked that the amplitude anomalies are unlikely to be caused by the structures near the earthquake or near the stations, by looking at the amplitude of the depth phases or waveforms of other earthquakes. We assumed that the anomalies are produced by the focusing and defocusing effect of sampling 3D heterogeneous at the base of the mantle, and searched for the causal structures. Full 3D synthetic waveforms are calculated down to 8 seconds for tens of structural models with slow anomalies of different size and velocity reduction placed on the core-mantle boundary (CMB). The result shows that existing tomographic models do not fully explain the observed amplitude anomalies. Stronger shear velocity anomalies are required. The previously proposed thin large ULVZ placed on the CMB southwest of Hawaii partly explains the observed amplitude reduction, even at the distance as short as 90 degrees from the earthquake. This result indicates the significance of finite frequency effect of the ULVZ structure to the S waves, since the ray

  5. Scalings of scalar structure functions in a velocity field with coherent vortical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. A.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    In planar turbulence modeled as an isotropic and homogeneous collection of two-dimensional noninteracting compact vortices, the structure functions Sp(r) of a statistically stationary passive scalar field have the following scaling behavior in the limit where the Péclet number Pe-->∞: Sp(r)~const+ln(r/L Pe-1/3) for L Pe-1/3<1-D) for L Pe-1/2<structures generated by the vortices (1/2<=D<2/3). Note that L Pe-1/2 is the scalar Taylor microscale that stems naturally from our analytical treatment of the advection-diffusion equation. The essential ingredients of our theory are the locality of interscale transfer and Lundgren's time average assumption. A phenomenological theory explicitly based only on these two ingredients reproduces our results and a generalization of this phenomenology to spatially smooth chaotic flows yields (k ln k)-1 generalized power spectra for the advected scalar fields.

  6. Density, Velocity and Ionization Structure in Accretion-disc Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Knox

    We propose to exploit the unique capabilities of it FUSE to monitor variations in the wind-formed spectral lines of 3 luminous, low-inclination, cataclysmic variables (CVs). Our principal goal is to improve our understanding of the dynamics of accretion-disc winds. We have previously used HST to investigate substantial and rapid (sim hours to minutes) variability in our target stars, BZ Cam, RW Sex and V603 Aql, and have demonstrated that their disc-outflows are highly structured. We aim here to follow up our discoveries by securing FUSE time-series data. These observations will allow us to determine the relative roles of density and ionization state changes in the outflow and to search for spectroscopic signatures of stochastic small-scale structure and shocked gas. By monitoring the temporal behavior of blue-ward extended absorption lines with a wide range of ionization potentials and excitation energies, we will track the changing physical conditions in the outflow. A new sophisticated Monte Carlo code will be used to calculate the ionization structure of and radiative transfer through CV winds. This will allow us to establish the wind geometry, kinematics and ionization state, both in a time-averaged sense and as a function of time. Our FUSE observations will provide a legacy that will be fundamental to the development of dynamical models of accretion-disc-driven winds, permitting critical tests of recent hydrodynamic simulations of unstable, line-driven disc winds.

  7. Line-of-sight velocity as a tracer of coronal cavity magnetic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak-Steslicka, Urszula; Gibson, Sarah; Chmielewska, Ewa

    2016-03-01

    We present a statistical analysis of 66 days of observations of quiescent (non-erupting) coronal cavities and associated velocity and thermal structures. We find that nested rings of LOS-oriented velocity are common in occurrence and spatially well correlated with cavities observed in emission. We find that the majority of cavities possess multiple rings, and a range in velocity on the order of several km/sec. We find that the tops of prominences lie systematically below the cavity center and location of largest Doppler velocity. Finally, we use DEM analysis to consider the temperature structure of two cavities in relation to cavity, prominence, and flows. These observations yield new constraints on the magnetic structure of cavities, and on the conditions leading up to solar eruptions.

  8. Crustal and Uppermost Mantle Shear Velocity Structure across the Mariana Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, C.; Wiens, D.; Lizarralde, D.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the shear wave structure of the crust and uppermost mantle across the Northern and Central Mariana trench using data recorded by a temporary network deployed in 2012-2013, including 7 island stations and 20 ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs). The goal of this study is to constrain velocity variations resulting from possible serpentinization of the incoming plate and the forearc mantle, and thus better understand the water budget of subduction zones. We use an ambient noise analysis method to reveal surface wave phase velocities at short period (8-30 s). Vertical component cross correlations show distinct fundamental and 1st higher-mode Rayleigh wave signals, especially between station pairs in the incoming plate. The 1st higher-mode Rayleigh wave is of significant importance for resolving crustal and shallowest upper mantle structure in regions covered by deep water. A multichannel cross correlation method (Eikonal tomography) is applied to Rayleigh waves from teleseismic earthquakes to obtain phase velocity at 25-80 s period. Finally the combined phase velocity curve from noise and teleseismic earthquakes is inverted at each point to determine the shear velocity structure. Preliminary inversion results for the incoming plate indicate slightly thickened crust that may be caused by a large Cretaceous igneous event associated with nearby seamounts. A high velocity anomaly emerges at around 20 km depth in the same region. We will present the entire 3-D shear wave velocity model across the trench during the AGU fall meeting.

  9. Upper mantle structure of central and West Antarctica from array analysis of Rayleigh wave phase velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeszel, David S.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Aster, Richard C.; Dalziel, Ian W. D.; Huerta, Audrey D.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Wilson, Terry J.; Winberry, J. Paul

    2016-03-01

    The seismic velocity structure of Antarctica is important, both as a constraint on the tectonic history of the continent and for understanding solid Earth interactions with the ice sheet. We use Rayleigh wave array analysis methods applied to teleseismic data from recent temporary broadband seismograph deployments to image the upper mantle structure of central and West Antarctica. Phase velocity maps are determined using a two-plane wave tomography method and are inverted for shear velocity using a Monte Carlo approach to estimate three-dimensional velocity structure. Results illuminate the structural dichotomy between the East Antarctic Craton and West Antarctica, with West Antarctica showing thinner crust and slower upper mantle velocity. West Antarctica is characterized by a 70-100 km thick lithosphere, underlain by a low-velocity zone to depths of at least 200 km. The slowest anomalies are beneath Ross Island and the Marie Byrd Land dome and are interpreted as upper mantle thermal anomalies possibly due to mantle plumes. The central Transantarctic Mountains are marked by an uppermost mantle slow-velocity anomaly, suggesting that the topography is thermally supported. The presence of thin, higher-velocity lithosphere to depths of about 70 km beneath the West Antarctic Rift System limits estimates of the regionally averaged heat flow to less than 90 mW/m2. The Ellsworth-Whitmore block is underlain by mantle with velocities that are intermediate between those of the West Antarctic Rift System and the East Antarctic Craton. We interpret this province as Precambrian continental lithosphere that has been altered by Phanerozoic tectonic and magmatic activity.

  10. Using seismically constrained magnetotelluric inversion to recover velocity structure in the shallow lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorkamp, M.; Fishwick, S.; Jones, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    Typical surface wave tomography can recover well the velocity structure of the upper mantle in the depth range between 70-200km. For a successful inversion, we have to constrain the crustal structure and assess the impact on the resulting models. In addition,we often observe potentially interesting features in the uppermost lithosphere which are poorly resolved and thus their interpretationhas to be approached with great care.We are currently developing a seismically constrained magnetotelluric (MT) inversion approach with the aim of better recovering the lithospheric properties (and thus seismic velocities) in these problematic areas. We perform a 3D MT inversion constrained by a fixed seismic velocity model from surface wave tomography. In order to avoid strong bias, we only utilize information on structural boundaries to combine these two methods. Within the region that is well resolved by both methods, we can then extract a velocity-conductivity relationship. By translating the conductivitiesretrieved from MT into velocities in areas where the velocity model is poorly resolved, we can generate an updated velocity model and test what impactthe updated velocities have on the predicted data.We test this new approach using a MT dataset acquired in central Botswana over the Okwa terrane and the adjacent Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons togetherwith a tomographic models for the region. Here, both datasets have previously been used to constrain lithospheric structure and show some similarities.We carefully asses the validity of our results by comparing with observations and petrophysical predictions for the conductivity-velocity relationship.

  11. Mantle shear-wave velocity structure beneath the Hawaiian hot spot.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Cecily J; Solomon, Sean C; Laske, Gabi; Collins, John A; Detrick, Robert S; Orcutt, John A; Bercovici, David; Hauri, Erik H

    2009-12-04

    Defining the mantle structure that lies beneath hot spots is important for revealing their depth of origin. Three-dimensional images of shear-wave velocity beneath the Hawaiian Islands, obtained from a network of sea-floor and land seismometers, show an upper-mantle low-velocity anomaly that is elongated in the direction of the island chain and surrounded by a parabola-shaped high-velocity anomaly. Low velocities continue downward to the mantle transition zone between 410 and 660 kilometers depth, a result that is in agreement with prior observations of transition-zone thinning. The inclusion of SKS observations extends the resolution downward to a depth of 1500 kilometers and reveals a several-hundred-kilometer-wide region of low velocities beneath and southeast of Hawaii. These images suggest that the Hawaiian hot spot is the result of an upwelling high-temperature plume from the lower mantle.

  12. Crustal and Upper Mantle S-velocity Structure From Receiver Functions Analisys Around Terra Nova Bay Base, Antartica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piana Agostinetti, N.; Amato, A.; Cattaneo, M.; de Gori, P.; di Bona, M.

    In the framework of the italian PNRA (Progetto Nazionale di Ricerche in Antartide), we have started to re-analize teleseismic waveforms recorded, using three-components seismometers (equipped with 5 seconds sensors, Lennartz 3D-5s), during five summer campaings, from 1993 to 2000. Seismic stations were deployed around Terra Nova Bay (TNB) italian base, from the sea to reach the interior of the Transantartic Moun- tains (TAM), the most striking example of nocontractional mountain belt. During the last campaingn (1999-2000) seismic stations were deployed deep into Northern Vic- toria Land to reach Rennik and Lillie Glaciers Area and George V coast region, the northest part of TAM. Our main goals were: to compute, using frequency-domanin deconvolution method by Di Bona [1998], Receiver Functions covering all the area around TNB italian antartic base; to map of Moho-depth and intercrustal S-waves ve- locity discontinuity from 1-D velocity model computed using Sambridge's inversion scheme [Sambridge,1999]; to analize new teleseimic waveforms recorded near TNB base: continuos recording, from 1999 to present, permits more accurate modelling S-velocity crustal structure in this critical area situated at the edge of the ipothetic rift [Stern and ten Brik, 1989; Stump and Fitzgerald, 1992; ten Brik et al., 1997]; to present final results from BACKTAM expedition.

  13. Three-dimensional shear wave velocity structure in the Atlantic upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Esther Kezia Candace

    Oceanic lithosphere constitutes the upper boundary layer of the Earth's convecting mantle. Its structure and evolution provide a vital window on the dynamics of the mantle and important clues to how the motions of Earth's surface plates are coupled to convection in the mantle below. The three-dimensional shear-velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the Atlantic Ocean is investigated to gain insight into processes that drive formation of oceanic lithosphere. Travel times are measured for approximately 10,000 fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves, in the period range 30-130 seconds, traversing the Atlantic basin. Paths with >30% of their length through continental upper mantle are excluded to maximize sensitivity to the oceanic upper mantle. The lateral distribution of Rayleigh wave phase velocity in the Atlantic upper mantle is explored with two approaches. One, phase velocity is allowed to vary only as a function of seafloor age. Two, a general two-dimensional parameterization is utilized in order to capture perturbations to age-dependent structure. Phase velocity shows a strong dependence on seafloor age, and removing age-dependent velocity from the 2-D maps highlights areas of anomalously low velocity, almost all of which are proximal to locations of hotspot volcanism. Depth-dependent variations in vertically-polarized shear velocity (Vsv) are determined with two sets of 3-D models: a layered model that requires constant VSV in each depth layer, and a splined model that allows VSV to vary continuously with depth. At shallow depths (˜75 km) the seismic structure shows the expected dependence on seafloor age. At greater depths (˜200 km) high-velocity lithosphere is found only beneath the oldest seafloor; velocity variations beneath younger seafloor may result from temperature or compositional variations within the asthenosphere. The age-dependent phase velocities are used to constrain temperature in the mantle and show that, in contrast to previous results for

  14. CELFE/NASTRAN Code for the Analysis of Structures Subjected to High Velocity Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    CELFE (Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian Finite Element)/NASTRAN Code three-dimensional finite element code has the capability for analyzing of structures subjected to high velocity impact. The local response is predicted by CELFE and, for large problems, the far-field impact response is predicted by NASTRAN. The coupling of the CELFE code with NASTRAN (CELFE/NASTRAN code) and the application of the code to selected three-dimensional high velocity impact problems are described.

  15. Structure and Dynamics of Asymmetric Poly(styrene-b-1,4-isoprene) Diblock Copolymer under 1D and 2D Nanoconfinement.

    PubMed

    Kipnusu, Wycliffe K; Elmahdy, Mahdy M; Mapesa, Emmanuel U; Zhang, Jianqi; Böhlmann, Winfried; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Papadakis, Christine M; Kremer, Friedrich

    2015-06-17

    The impact of 1- and 2-dimensional (2D) confinement on the structure and dynamics of poly(styrene-b-1,4-isoprene) P(S-b-I) diblock copolymer is investigated by a combination of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Grazing-Incidence Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS), and Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS). 1D confinement is achieved by spin coating the P(S-b-I) to form nanometric thin films on silicon substrates, while in the 2D confinement, the copolymer is infiltrated into cylindrical anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) nanopores. After dissolving the AAO matrix having mean pore diameter of 150 nm, the SEM images of the exposed P(S-b-I) show straight nanorods. For the thin films, GISAXS and AFM reveal hexagonally packed cylinders of PS in a PI matrix. Three dielectrically active relaxation modes assigned to the two segmental modes of the styrene and isoprene blocks and the normal mode of the latter are studied selectively by BDS. The dynamic glass transition, related to the segmental modes of the styrene and isoprene blocks, is independent of the dimensionality and the finite sizes (down to 18 nm) of confinement, but the normal mode is influenced by both factors with 2D geometrical constraints exerting greater impact. This reflects the considerable difference in the length scales on which the two kinds of fluctuations take place.

  16. Structural Modulation from 1D Chain to 3D Framework: Improved Thermostability, Insensitivity, and Energies of Two Nitrogen-Rich Energetic Coordination Polymers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaoqi; Wu, Yunlong; Deng, Chongqing; Yang, Guoping; Zhang, Jiangong; Sun, Zhihua; Ma, Haixia; Gao, Chao; An, Zhongwei

    2016-11-07

    Two new energetic coordination polymers (CPs) [Pb(BT)(H2O)3]n (1) and [Pb3(DOBT)3(H2O)2]n·(4H2O)n (2) with 1D and 3D structures were synthesized by employing two rational designed ligands, 1H,1'H-5,5'-bitetrazole (H2BT) and 1H,1'H-[5,5'-bitetrazole]-1,1'-diol ligands (DHBT), respectively. Thermal analyses and sensitivity tests show that the 3D architecture reinforces the network of 2 which has higher thermal stability and lower sensitivity than that of 1. Through oxygen-bomb combustion calorimetry the molar enthalpy of formation of 2 is derived to be much higher than that of 1 as well as the reported CPs. Herein, more importantly, the heats of detonation (ΔHdet) were calculated according to the decomposition products of TG-DSC-MS-FTIR simultaneous analyses for the first time. The calculated results show that ΔHdet of 2 is 23% higher than that of 1. This research demonstrates that 3D energetic CP with outstanding energetic properties can be obtained through efficient and reasonable design.

  17. Forest-atmosphere BVOC exchange in diverse and structurally complex canopies: 1-D modeling of a mid-successional forest in northern Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Alexander M.; Cheng, Susan J.; Ashworth, Kirsti; Guenther, Alex B.; Hardiman, Brady S.; Bohrer, Gil; Steiner, Allison L.

    2015-11-01

    Foliar emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC)-important precursors of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols-vary widely by vegetation type. Modeling studies to date typically represent the canopy as a single dominant tree type or a blend of tree types, yet many forests are diverse with trees of varying height. To assess the sensitivity of biogenic emissions to tree height variation, we compare two 1-D canopy model simulations in which BVOC emission potentials are homogeneous or heterogeneous with canopy depth. The heterogeneous canopy emulates the mid-successional forest at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). In this case, high-isoprene-emitting foliage (e.g., aspen and oak) is constrained to the upper canopy, where higher sunlight availability increases the light-dependent isoprene emission, leading to 34% more isoprene and its oxidation products as compared to the homogeneous simulation. Isoprene declines from aspen mortality are 10% larger when heterogeneity is considered. Overall, our results highlight the importance of adequately representing complexities of forest canopy structure when simulating light-dependent BVOC emissions and chemistry.

  18. Forest-atmosphere BVOC exchange in diverse and structurally complex canopies: 1-D modeling of a mid-successional forest in northern Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Alexander M.; Cheng, Susan J.; Ashworth, Kirsti; Guenther, Alex B.; Hardiman, Brady; Bohrer, Gil; Steiner, A. L.

    2015-11-01

    Foliar emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC)dimportant precursors of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosolsdvary widely by vegetation type. Modeling studies to date typi-cally represent the canopy as a single dominant tree type or a blend of tree types, yet many forests are diverse with trees of varying height. To assess the sensitivity of biogenic emissions to tree height vari-ation, we compare two 1-D canopy model simulations in which BVOC emission potentials are homo-geneous or heterogeneous with canopy depth. The heterogeneous canopy emulates the mid-successional forest at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). In this case, high-isoprene-emitting fo-liage (e.g., aspen and oak) is constrained to the upper canopy, where higher sunlight availability increases the light-dependent isoprene emission, leading to 34% more isoprene and its oxidation products as compared to the homogeneous simulation. Isoprene declines from aspen mortality are 10% larger when heterogeneity is considered. Overall, our results highlight the importance of adequately representing complexities of forest canopy structure when simulating light-dependent BVOC emissions and chemistry.

  19. Beta 1D integrin displaces the beta 1A isoform in striated muscles: localization at junctional structures and signaling potential in nonmuscle cells.

    PubMed

    Belkin, A M; Zhidkova, N I; Balzac, F; Altruda, F; Tomatis, D; Maier, A; Tarone, G; Koteliansky, V E; Burridge, K

    1996-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domains of integrins provide attachment of these extracellular matrix receptors to the cytoskeleton and play a critical role in integrin-mediated signal transduction. In this report we describe the identification, expression, localization, and initial functional characterization of a novel form of beta 1 integrin, termed beta 1D. This isoform contains a unique alternatively spliced cytoplasmic domain of 50 amino acids, with the last 24 amino acids encoded by an additional exon. Of these 24 amino acids, 11 are conserved when compared to the beta 1A isoform, but 13 are unique (Zhidkova, N. I., A. M. Belkin, and R. Mayne. 1995. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 214:279-285; van der Flier, A., I. Kuikman, C. Baudoin, R, van der Neuf, and A. Sonnenberg. 1995. FEBS Lett. 369:340-344). Using an anti-peptide antibody against the beta 1D integrin subunit, we demonstrated that the beta 1D isoform is synthesized only in skeletal and cardiac muscles, while very low amounts of beta 1A were detected by immunoblot in striated muscles. Whereas beta 1A could not be detected in adult skeletal muscle fibers and cardiomyocytes by immunofluorescence, beta 1D was localized to the sarcolemma of both cell types. In skeletal muscle, beta 1D was concentrated in costameres, myotendinous, and neuromuscular junctions. In cardiac muscle this beta 1 isoform was found in costamers and intercalated discs. beta 1D was associated with alpha 7A and alpha 7B in adult skeletal muscle. In cardiomyocytes of adult heart, alpha 7B was the major partner for the beta 1D isoform. beta 1D could not be detected in proliferating C2C12 myoblasts, but it appeared immediately after myoblast fusion and its amount continued to rise during myotube growth and maturation. In contrast, expression of the beta 1A isoform was downregulated during myodifferentiation in culture and it was completely displaced by beta 1D in mature differentiated myotubes. We also analyzed some functional properties of the beta 1D

  20. PKP Waveform Complexity and Its Implications to Fine Structure Near the Edge of African Large Low Shear Velocity Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Teh-Ru Alex; Tanaka, Satoru; Takeuchi, Nozomu

    2010-05-01

    and receiver-side structure do not play a predominant role in generating these anomalous PKPab waveforms. We then look into structural anomaly near the core-mantle-boundary (CMB) since PKPab grazes the CMB at a very shallow angle and it can effectively interact with it and possibly produce anomalous PKPab waveforms. We first explore 1-D model space by introducing velocity anomaly directly above the CMB, with a velocity perturbation up to a few tens of percents in S wave velocity and P wave velocity. We calculate synthetics up to 2 Hz by Direct Solution Method (DSM) and Reflectivity Method to examine waveform anomaly at long period band (0.01-0.2 Hz) as well as short-period band (0.5-2 Hz). Our preliminary result indicates that the model with a thin (~ 15 km) ultra-low velocity zone (ULVZ, 30% reduction in P wave and S wave velocity) is capable of reproducing characteristics of these anomalous PKPab waveforms at both frequency bands. The pierce points of PKPab in the source side at CMB are near the southeast Indian Ocean where S wave velocity is only slightly faster than PREM. On the other hand, the pierce points in the receiver side are at the eastern edge of the African Large Low Shear Velocity Province (LLSVP). One interesting feature of our ULVZ model is that dlnVs/dlnVp is about 1, which is different from most ULVZ models where dlnVs/dlnVp is about 3.

  1. Regional P wave velocity structure of the Northern Cascadia Subduction Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramachandran, K.; Hyndman, R.D.; Brocher, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the first regional three-dimensional, P wave velocity model for the Northern Cascadia Subduction. Zone (SW British Columbia and NW Washington State) constructed through tomographic inversion of first-arrival traveltime data from active source experiments together with earthquake traveltime data recorded at permanent stations. The velocity model images the structure of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, megathrust, and the fore-arc crust and upper mantle. Beneath southern Vancouver Island the megathrust above the Juan de Fuca plate is characterized by a broad zone (25-35 km depth) having relatively low velocities of 6.4-6.6 km/s. This relative low velocity zone coincides with the location of most of the episodic tremors recently mapped beneath Vancouver Island, and its low velocity may also partially reflect the presence of trapped fluids and sheared lower crustal rocks. The rocks of the Olympic Subduction Complex are inferred to deform aseismically as evidenced by the lack of earthquakes withi the low-velocity rocks. The fore-arc upper mantle beneath the Strait of Georgia and Puget Sound is characterized by velocities of 7.2-7.6 km/s. Such low velocities represent regional serpentinization of the upper fore-arc mantle and provide evidence for slab dewatering and densification. Tertiary sedimentary basins in the Strait of Georgia and Puget Lowland imaged by the velocity model lie above the inferred region of slab dewatering and densification and may therefore partly result from a higher rate of slab sinking. In contrast, sedimentary basins in the Strait of Juan de Fuca lie in a synclinal depression in the Crescent Terrane. The correlation of in-slab earthquake hypocenters M>4 with P wave velocities greater than 7.8 km/s at the hypocenters suggests that they originate near the oceanic Moho of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Velocity structure of a bottom simulating reflector offshore Peru: Results from full waveform inversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pecher, I.A.; Minshull, T.A.; Singh, S.C.; Von Huene, R.

    1996-01-01

    Much of our knowledge of the worldwide distribution of submarine gas hydrates comes from seismic observations of Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs). Full waveform inversion has proven to be a reliable technique for studying the fine structure of BSRs using the compressional wave velocity. We applied a non-linear full waveform inversion technique to a BSR at a location offshore Peru. We first determined the large-scale features of seismic velocity variations using a statistical inversion technique to maximise coherent energy along travel-time curves. These velocities were used for a starting velocity model for the full waveform inversion, which yielded a detailed velocity/depth model in the vicinity of the BSR. We found that the data are best fit by a model in which the BSR consists of a thin, low-velocity layer. The compressional wave velocity drops from 2.15 km/s down to an average of 1.70 km/s in an 18m thick interval, with a minimum velocity of 1.62 km/s in a 6 m interval. The resulting compressional wave velocity was used to estimate gas content in the sediments. Our results suggest that the low velocity layer is a 6-18 m thick zone containing a few percent of free gas in the pore space. The presence of the BSR coincides with a region of vertical uplift. Therefore, we suggest that gas at this BSR is formed by a dissociation of hydrates at the base of the hydrate stability zone due to uplift and subsequently a decrease in pressure.

  3. 3D P-wave Velocity Structure Beneath the Eastern Canadian Shield and Northern Appalachian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villemaire, M.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Bastow, I. D.

    2010-12-01

    Previous seismic studies of the upper mantle of the Canadian Shield have indicated some low-velocity anomalies within the cratonic lithosphere in the Abitibi-Grenville region. The lack of seismograph station coverage to the east and south-east of the studied area prevented definition of the 3D geometry of these anomalies. Adding new stations from the province of Quebec and from the northeastern United States allows us to carry out new studies of the P-wave velocity structure of the upper mantle, in order to better understand the complexity of the region and the interaction of the lithosphere with possible thermal anomalies in the underlying mantle. We analysed teleseismic P wave arrivals from almost 200 earthquakes, recorded at 45 stations deployed across the provinces of Quebec and Ontario and across the northeastern US. The relative arrival times of teleseismic P waves across the array were measured using the cross-correlation method of VanDecar & Crosson (1990). The travel time data were then inverted to estimate the 3D P-wave velocity structure beneath the region, using the least-squares tomographic inversion code of VanDecar (1991). The model shows some interesting features. We see a diffuse low-velocity structure beneath New-England that extends to at least 500 km depth, and that may be related to the Appalachian Mountain belt. There is also a linear low-velocity structure, flanked by higher velocities, perpendicular to the Grenville Front, and along the Ottawa Valley. We interpret this feature as a mantle signature of the Great Meteor Hotspot track. We have looked for systematic differences between the mantle underlying the Archean Superior craton and the Proterozoic Grenville Province but did not find a significant difference in the upper mantle. We investigate the role of thermal and compositional effects to interpret the velocity models and to relate the patterns of the anomalies to past and present tectonic structures.

  4. Seismic Velocity Structure of the Mantle beneath the Hawaiian Hotspot and Geodynamic Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, C. J.; Laske, G.; Ballmer, M. D.; Ito, G.; Collins, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.; Rychert, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Data from the PLUME deployments of land and ocean bottom seismometers have provided unprecedented new constraints on regional seismic structure of the mantle beneath the Hawaiian Islands and motivated a new generation of geodynamic models for understanding hotspot origins. Three-dimensional finite-frequency body-wave tomographic images of S- and P-wave velocity structure reveal an upper-mantle low-velocity anomaly beneath Hawaii that is elongated in the direction of the island chain and surrounded by a high-velocity anomaly in the shallow upper mantle that is parabolic in map view. Low velocities continue downward to the mantle transition zone between 410 and 660 km depth and extend into the topmost lower mantle southeast of Hawaii. Upper mantle structure from both S and P waves is asymmetric about the island chain, with lower velocities just southwest of the island of Hawaii and higher velocities to the east. Independent Rayleigh-wave tomography displays a similarly asymmetric structure in the lower lithosphere and asthenosphere, and also reveals a low-velocity anomaly (with horizontal dimensions of 100 by 300 km across and along the chain, respectively) beneath the hotspot swell that reaches to depths of at least 140 km. Shear-wave splitting observations dominantly reflect fossil lithospheric anisotropy, although a signature of asthenospheric flow also may be resolvable. S-to-P receiver function imaging of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary suggests shoaling from 100 km west of Hawaii to 80 km beneath the island, a pattern consistent with results from Rayleigh wave imaging. In terms of mantle plume geodynamic models, the broad upper-mantle low-velocity region beneath the Hawaiian Islands may reflect the "diverging pancake" at the top of the upwelling zone; the surrounding region of high velocities could represent a downwelling curtain of relatively cool sublithospheric material; and the low-velocity anomalies southeast of Hawaii in the transition zone and

  5. Seismic wave velocity of rocks in the Oman ophiolite: constraints for petrological structure of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Shibata, S.; Akizuki, R.; Arima, M.; Tatsumi, Y.; Arai, S.

    2010-12-01

    Evaluation of rock velocities and comparison with velocity profiles defined by seismic refraction experiments are a crucial approach for understanding the petrological structure of the crust. In this study, we calculated the seismic wave velocities of various types of rocks from the Oman ophiolite in order to constrain a petrological structure of the oceanic crust. Christensen & Smewing (1981, JGR) have reported experimental elastic velocities of rocks from the Oman ophiolite under oceanic crust-mantle conditions (6-430 MPa). However, in their relatively low-pressure experiments, internal pore-spaces might affect the velocity and resulted in lower values than the intrinsic velocity of sample. In this study we calculated the velocities of samples based on their modal proportions and chemical compositions of mineral constituents. Our calculated velocities represent the ‘pore-space-free’ intrinsic velocities of the sample. We calculated seismic velocities of rocks from the Oman ophiolite including pillow lavas, dolerites, plagiogranites, gabbros and peridotites at high-pressure-temperature conditions with an Excel macro (Hacker & Avers 2004, G-cubed). The minerals used for calculations for pillow lavas, dolerites and plagiogranites were Qtz, Pl, Prh, Pmp, Chl, Ep, Act, Hbl, Cpx and Mag. Pl, Hbl, Cpx, Opx and Ol were used for the calculations for gabbros and peridotites. Assuming thermal gradient of 20° C/km and pressure gradient of 25 MPa/km, the velocities were calculated in the ranges from the atmospheric pressure (0° C) to 200 MPa (160° C). The calculation yielded P-wave velocities (Vp) of 6.5-6.7 km/s for the pillow lavas, 6.6-6.8 km/s for the dolerites, 6.1-6.3 km/s for the plagiogranites, 6.9-7.5 km/s for the gabbros and 8.1-8.2 km/s for the peridotites. On the other hand, experimental results reported by Christensen & Smewing (1981, JGR) were 4.5-5.9 km/s for the pillow lavas, 5.5-6.3 km/s for the dolerites, 6.1-6.3 km/s for the plagiogranites, 6

  6. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of the Pampean Flat Slab Region from Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Warren, L. M.; Alvarado, P. M.; Gilbert, H. J.

    2010-12-01

    The South American Cordillera formed by the subduction of the Nazca plate beneath South America. While this is often considered a ‘typical’ compressive upper plate subduction zone, there are several along-strike variations in both the nature of subduction and the style of deformation. From 30° to 32° S the Nazca plate flattens out at 100 km depth for ~300 km before resuming a steeper angle of subduction. Flat slab subduction shutoff of arc magmatism and caused deformation to migrate inboard into the Sierras Pampeanas. While flat slab subduction has had a profound impact on the regions’s tectonics, the presence of preexisting features related to the rifting of Gondwanaland and the accretion of terranes have also had a large impact on deformation. We use ambient noise tomography (ANT) to calculate regional shear wave velocities to better understand the tectonic development of the Pampean flat slab region. ANT utilizes the cross correlation of seismic noise to approximate the Green’s function between two seismic stations. Using this technique, we measure Rayleigh wave phase velocities at periods between 8 and 30 seconds, allowing us to measure shear wave velocities down to 40 km depth. Initial tomography results show a strong correlation between phase velocity and basin structure. Fast phase velocities at the 10 second period correlate with the Sierra de Pie de Palo, Sierra de Valle Fertil in the west and the Sierras de Cordoba in the east, while slow velocities correlate with the Bermejo and Cuyo basins. At longer periods (beyond 20 seconds), there is a pattern of slow phase velocities in the west beneath the Precordillera and the high Andes while fast phase velocities are present in the east beneath the Sierras Pampeanas. These fast velocities most likely reflect faster mid- to lower crustal velocities and a shallower Moho. To further our interpretation we inverted phase velocities to calculate regional shear wave structure. At shallow depths (< 15 km) the

  7. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the technically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  8. Upper mantle shear wave velocity structure of the east Anatolian-Caucasus region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobeltsyn, Gleb Anatolyevich

    The Eastern Anatolian-Caucasus region is a relatively young part of the Alpine- Himalayan orogenic belt and has been formed as the result of the ongoing continental collision of Arabia and Eurasia. In spite of a number of geological studies that have been conducted in this area, there is still no consensus within the geoscience community about the regional tectonic settings and a model for the late Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Anatolian Plateau. Knowledge of the upper mantle velocity structure in this region can provide the geological community with important constraints that are crucial for developing an understanding of the regional geology and the processes associated with early stages of mountain building. In the present dissertation, I describe two studies of the regional upper mantle S wave velocity structure. In order to derive the absolute velocity structure of the upper mantle, I have applied surface wave tomography to model Rayleigh wave phase velocities as a function of period. Then I inverted the Rayleigh phase velocities to obtain S wave velocities as a function of depth. The resulted high-resolution 3-D S wave velocity model of the regional upper mantle is characterized by a better depth resolution than any preexisting tomographic models. I also conducted an S wave splitting analysis using traditional methods and developed a two-layer grid search algorithm in order to infer the upper mantle anisotropic structure. The results of the S wave splitting analysis for the stations located in Azerbaijan are the first in the region. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  9. Shallow velocity structure and Poisson's ratio at the Tarzana, California, strong-motion accelerometer site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Lee, W.H.K.

    1996-01-01

    The 17 January 1994, Northridge, California, earthquake produced strong ground shaking at the Cedar Hills Nursery (referred to here as the Tarzana site) within the city of Tarzana, California, approximately 6 km from the epicenter of the mainshock. Although the Tarzana site is on a hill and is a rock site, accelerations of approximately 1.78 g horizontally and 1.2 g vertically at the Tarzana site are among the highest ever instrumentally recorded for an earthquake. To investigate possible site effects at the Tarzana site, we used explosive-source seismic refraction data to determine the shallow (<70 m) P- and S-wave velocity structure. Our seismic velocity models for the Tarzana site indicate that the local velocity structure may have contributed significantly to the observed shaking. P-wave velocities range from 0.9 to 1.65 km/sec, and S-wave velocities range from 0.20 and 0.6 km/sec for the upper 70 m. We also found evidence for a local S-wave low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the top of the hill. The LVZ underlies a CDMG strong-motion recording site at depths between 25 and 60 m below ground surface (BGS). Our velocity model is consistent with the near-surface (<30 m) P- and S-wave velocities and Poisson's ratios measured in a nearby (<30 m) borehole. High Poisson's ratios (0.477 to 0.494) and S-wave attenuation within the LVZ suggest that the LVZ may be composed of highly saturated shales of the Modelo Formation. Because the lateral dimensions of the LVZ approximately correspond to the areas of strongest shaking, we suggest that the highly saturated zone may have contributed to localized strong shaking. Rock sites are generally considered to be ideal locations for site response in urban areas; however, localized, highly saturated rock sites may be a hazard in urban areas that requires further investigation.

  10. 1-D "Platinum Wire" Stacking Structure Built of Platinum(II) Diimine Bis(σ-acetylide) Units with Luminescence in the NIR Region.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jiajia; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zhou, Huajun; Gai, Xuqiao; Jia, Ting; Xu, Liang; Zhang, Jianjun; Li, Yanqin; Ni, Jun

    2016-10-17

    A square-planar platinum(II) complex, Pt(DiBrbpy)(C≡CC6H4Et-4)2 (1) (DiBrbpy = 4,4-dibromo-2,2'-bipyridine), and crystals of its three solvated forms, namely, 1·DMSO, 1·1/2(CH3CN), and 1·1/8(CH2Cl2), were developed and characterized. 1·DMSO and 1·1/2(CH3CN) contain quasi-dimeric and dimeric structures with luminescence in the visible range, whereas 1·1/8(CH2Cl2) exhibits NIR luminescence at 1022 nm due to its intrinsic 1-D "platinum wire" stacking structure with strong Pt-Pt interactions. 1·1/8(CH2Cl2) represents the first compound based on platinum(II) diimine bis(σ-acetylide) molecular units with the NIR luminescence beyond 1000 nm. 1 selectively responds to DMSO and CH3CN by changing its color and luminescence property and the three solvated forms can be reversibly converted to each other upon exposure to corresponding solvent vapors. Their desolvated forms, namely 1a, 1b, and 1c, obtained after heating 1·DMSO, 1·1/2(CH3CN), and 1·1/8(CH2Cl2), respectively, can also be restored to the original solvated forms upon exposure to corresponding solvent vapors. 1a and 1b emit NIR luminescence peaked at 998 and 1018 nm respectively, suggesting indirect synthetic methods as powerful alternatives to achieve NIR luminescence with long wavelength. In contrast, 1c exhibits a red luminescence with a broad unstructured emission band centered at 667 nm. All the responses to organic solvent vapors and heating are due to the structural transformations which result in the conversion of the lowest energy excited states between (3)MLCT/(3)LLCT and (3)MMLCT in solid-state as supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations.

  11. Relationship of D'' structure with the velocity variations near the inner-core boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Sheng-Nian; Ni, Sidao; Helmberger, Don

    2002-06-01

    Variations in regional differential times between PKiKP (i) and PKIKP (I) have been attributed to hemispheric P-velocity variations of about 1% in the upper 100 km of the inner core (referred to as HIC). The top of the inner core appears relatively fast beneath Asia where D'' is also fast. An alternative interpretation could be the lateral variation in P velocity at the lowermost outer core (HOC) producing the same differential times. To resolve this issue, we introduce the diffracted PKP phase near the B caustic (Bdiff) in the range of 139-145° epicenter distances, and the corresponding differential times between Bdiff and PKiKP and PKIKP as observed on broadband arrays. Due to the long-wavelength nature of Bdiff, we scaled the S-wave tomography model with k values (k ≡ dlnVs/dlnVp) to obtain large-scale P-wave velocity structure in the lower mantle as proposed by earlier studies. Waveform synthetics of Bdiff constructed with small k's predict complex waveforms not commonly observed, confirming the validity of large scaling factor k. With P-velocity in lower mantle constrained at large scale, the extra travel-time constraint imposed by Bdiff helps to resolve the HOC-HIC issue. Our preliminary results suggest k > 2 for the lowermost mantle and support HIC hypothesis. An important implication is that there appears to be a relationship of D'' velocity structures with the structures near the inner core boundary via core dynamics.

  12. Latitudinal velocity structures up to the solar poles estimated from interplanetary scintillation tomography analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, M.; Fujiki, K.; Ohmi, T.; Tokumaru, M.; Yokobe, A.; Hakamada, K.

    2001-08-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft observed high-speed wind at high latitudes up to 80° and found that the high-speed solar wind increased in velocity gradually with latitude and that the velocity had asymmetry between Northern and Southern Hemispheres. We have investigated the velocity increase up to the polar regions for the Carrington rotations of 1908-1915 in the year 1996. For this purpose we have made tomographic analyses of the latitudinal structure of the solar wind speed using interplanetary scintillation data obtained at heliocentric distances of 0.1-0.9 AU and latitudes up to 90°. The tomographic analysis method was modified from its previous version [Kojima et al., 1998] so that it could obtain more reliable solutions with better sensitivity in the polar region than the previous method. The results from the observations in 1996 showed that the velocity increased with latitude and had the N-S asymmetry as observed by Ulysses. These features persisted during the period analyzed. Since the asymmetry was found in rather short period observations of several Carrington rotations and at distances within 0.9 AU, it is caused neither by temporal evolution of the solar wind structures nor by interactions in the solar wind in interplanetary space. These global latitudinal velocity structures agree qualitatively with the magnetic flux expansion factor.

  13. Dinuclear and 1D iron(III) Schiff base complexes bridged by 4-salicylideneamino-1,2,4-triazolate: X-ray structures and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Herchel, Radovan; Pavelek, Lubomír; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2011-11-28

    Four new iron(III) complexes were obtained by the reaction of 4-salicylideneamino-1,2,4-triazole (Hsaltrz) and selected dinuclear μ-oxo-bridged iron(III) Schiff base complexes [{FeL(4)}(2)(μ-O)], where L(4) represents a terminal tetradentate dianionic Schiff-base ligand. X-ray structural analysis revealed a novel bridging mode of κN,κO of the saltrz ligand to form dinuclear complexes [{Fe(salen)(μ-saltrz)}(2)]·CH(3)OH (1) (H(2)salen = N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylimine)) and [{Fe(salpn)(μ-saltrz)}(2)] (2) (H(2)salpn = N,N'-1,2-propylenbis(salicylimine)), whereas one-dimensional (1D) zig-zag chains were formed in the case of [{Fe(salch)(μ-saltrz)}·0.5CH(3)OH](n) (3) (H(2)salch = N,N'-cyclohexanebis(salicylimine)) and [Fe(salophen)(μ-saltrz)](n) (4) (H(2)salophen = N,N'-o-phenylenebis(salicylimine)). It was also shown that the rigidity of the terminal ligand L(4) can be considered as the key factor for the molecular dimensionality of the products. The thorough magnetic analysis based on SQUID experiments, including the isotropic exchange and the zero-field splitting of both temperature and field dependent data, was performed for dimeric (1 and 2) and also for polymeric compounds (3 and 4) and revealed weak antiferromagnetic exchange mediated by the saltrz anions with much larger D-parameter (|D|≫|J|).

  14. Crustal and uppermost mantle velocity structure beneath northwestern China revealed by ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Li, S.; Song, X.; Gong, M.; Li, X.; Jia, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this study three-component ambient noise data recorded at 148 seismic stations from newly upgraded provincial digital seismic network in northwestern China and adjacent region are used to obtain Rayleigh wave and Love wave group velocity maps. Cross-correlations are calculated in one-hour segments and stacked over 9 months from 2009 January to September to estimate empirical Rayleigh and Love wave Green's functions. Group velocity dispersion curves for both Rayleigh and Love waves between 7 s and 50 s periods were measured for each interstation path by applying the multiple filter analysis method with phase-matched processing. Our group velocity maps show clear lateral variations which are correlated well with major geological structures and tectonic units in the study region. Shear wave velocity structures are then inverted and show that the Tibetan Plateau has a very thick crust with a low-velocity zone in its mid-to-lower crust. Along the northern margin of the plateau with a steep topographic gradient, the low-velocity zone does not extend to the Tarim basin which may indicate that crustal materials beneath the Tarim basin are colder and stronger than beneath the plateau, therefore inhibit the extension of crustal flow and deformation of the Tibetan Plateau, resulting in very sharp topography contrasts. In the northeastern margin where the Tibetan Plateau, Alashan block and Ordos platform collided together, the low-velocity zone diminishes around the eastern end of the KunLun fault. Meanwhile, our results also reveal obvious lateral velocity changes in the crust beneath the Tarim basin. In the upper crust, the Manjaer depression is featured with very low velocities and the Bachu uplift with high velocities; in the mid-to-lower crust, the northern basin overall displays lower velocities than the southern part along the latitude 40°N with a west-east striking which is consistent with the high magnetic anomaly zone and may related to the central suture belt

  15. Effect of Anisotropic Velocity Structure on Acoustic Emission Source Location during True-Triaxial Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani Tabari, Mehdi; Goodfellow, Sebastian; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Although true-triaxial testing (TTT) of rocks is now more extensive worldwide, stress-induced heterogeneity due to the existence of several loading boundary effects is not usually accounted for and simplified anisotropic models are used. This study focuses on the enhanced anisotropic velocity structure to improve acoustic emission (AE) analysis for an enhanced interpretation of induced fracturing. Data from a TTT on a cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone is used in this study to evaluate the methodology. At different stages of the experiment the True-Triaxial Geophysical Imaging Cell (TTGIC), armed with an ultrasonic and AE monitoring system, performed several velocity surveys to image velocity structure of the sample. Going beyond a hydrostatic stress state (poro-elastic phase), the rock sample went through a non-dilatational elastic phase, a dilatational non-damaging elasto-plastic phase containing initial AE activity and finally a dilatational and damaging elasto-plastic phase up to the failure point. The experiment was divided into these phases based on the information obtained from strain, velocity and AE streaming data. Analysis of the ultrasonic velocity survey data discovered that a homogeneous anisotropic core in the center of the sample is formed with ellipsoidal symmetry under the standard polyaxial setup. Location of the transducer shots were improved by implementation of different velocity models for the sample starting from isotropic and homogeneous models going toward anisotropic and heterogeneous models. The transducer shot locations showed a major improvement after the velocity model corrections had been applied especially at the final phase of the experiment. This location improvement validated our velocity model at the final phase of the experiment consisting lower-velocity zones bearing partially saturated fractures. The ellipsoidal anisotropic velocity model was also verified at the core of the cubic rock specimen by AE event location of

  16. Transdimensional Love-wave tomography of the British Isles and shear-velocity structure of the East Irish Sea Basin from ambient-noise interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galetti, Erica; Curtis, Andrew; Baptie, Brian; Jenkins, David; Nicolson, Heather

    2017-01-01

    We present the first Love-wave group-velocity and shear-velocity maps of the British Isles obtained from ambient noise interferometry and fully nonlinear inversion. We computed interferometric inter-station Green's functions by cross-correlating the transverse component of ambient noise records retrieved by 61 seismic stations across the UK and Ireland. Group-velocity measurements along each possible inter-station path were obtained using frequency-time analysis and converted into a series of inter-station traveltime data sets between 4 and 15 s period. Traveltime uncertainties estimated from the standard deviation of dispersion curves constructed by stacking randomly selected subsets of daily cross-correlations were observed to be too low to allow reasonable data fits to be obtained during tomography. Data uncertainties were therefore estimated again during the inversion as distance-dependent functionals. We produced Love-wave group-velocity maps within eight different period bands using a fully nonlinear tomography method which combines the transdimensional reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (rj-McMC) algorithm with an eikonal ray tracer. By modelling exact ray paths at each step of the Markov chain we ensured that the nonlinear character of the inverse problem was fully and correctly accounted for. Between 4 and 10 s period, the group-velocity maps show remarkable agreement with the known geology of the British Isles and correctly identify a number of low-velocity sedimentary basins and high-velocity features. Longer period maps, in which most sedimentary basins are not visible, are instead mainly representative of basement rocks. In a second stage of our study we used the results of tomography to produce a series of Love-wave group-velocity dispersion curves across a grid of geographical points focussed around the East Irish Sea sedimentary basin. We then independently inverted each curve using a similar rj-McMC algorithm to obtain a series of 1-D shear-velocity

  17. Seismic anisotropy and velocity structure beneath the southern half of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, I.; Hearn, T. M.; Morales, J.; Torcal, F.

    2005-06-01

    Travel times of 11,612 Pn arrivals collected from 7675 earthquakes are inverted to image the uppermost mantle velocity and anisotropy structure beneath the southern half of the Iberian Peninsula and surrounding regions. Pn phases are routinely identified and picked for epicentral distances from 200 to 1200 km. The method used in this study allows simultaneous imaging of variations of Pn velocity and anisotropy. The results show an average uppermost mantle velocity beneath the study area of 8.0 km/s. The peninsular area covered by the Iberian massif is characterized by high Pn velocity, as expected in tectonically stable regions, indicating areas of the Hercynian belt that have not recently been reactivated. The margins of the Iberian Peninsula have undergone a great number of recent tectonic events and are characterized by a pronouncedly low Pn velocity, as is common in areas greatly affected by recent tectonic and magmatic activity. Our model indicates that the Betic crustal root might be underlined by a negative anomaly beneath the southeastern Iberian Peninsula. In the Atlantic Ocean, we find a sharp variation in the uppermost mantle velocities that coincides with the structural complexity of the European and African plate boundary in the Gulf of Cadiz. Our results show a very pronounced low-velocity anomaly offshore from Cape San Vicente whereas high velocities are distributed along the coast in the Gulf of Cadiz. In the Alboran Sea and northern Morocco, the direction of the fastest Pn velocity found is almost parallel to the Africa-Eurasia plate convergence vector (northwest-southeast) whereas to the north, this direction is almost parallel to the main trend of the Betic Cordillera, i.e. east-west in its central part and north-south in the curvature of the Arc of Gibraltar. This suggests that a significant portion of the uppermost mantle has been involved in the orogenic deformation that produced the arcuate structure of the Betic Cordillera. However, we

  18. Upper-crustal velocity structure along 150 km of the Mendeleev Ridge from tomographic inversion of long-offset refraction data collected during HLY0602

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P. M.; van Avendonk, H. J.; Lawver, L. A.

    2007-12-01

    In the summer of 2006 we acquired a unique seismic refraction data set on the Chukchi Borderlands and Mendeleev Ridge utilizing USCGC Healy and two helicopters. The array on the Mendeleev Ridge consisted of 14 instrument sites with 12 km spacing between instruments. On every site we deployed a Sea-Ice Seismometer (S- IS) especially designed for this experiment in the ice-covered part of the Arctic Ocean. Each S-IS contained a vertical component geophone that was buried in the ice and a hydrophone that was hanging from the ice edge in the water. From the 14 instrument sites, 10 contained useful data with refracted crustal arrivals up to offsets of 40 km. Because of extensive drifting of the receivers (40 km in 5 days and containing numerous loops), and because of the irregular geometry of airgun shots due to the problems of sailing through ice-covered seas, a 3D ray-shooting code was developed to calculate ray paths within a 3D velocity model that extends along 150 km in the X- direction and along 35 km in the Y-direction. Using the velocity model proposed by Lebedeva-Ivanova et al. (2006) we observe that the maximum depth of our calculated ray paths is 11 km below sealevel. Using all the available data, the Root Mean Square (RMS) difference between observed and calculated travel-times is of the order of 500 ms. Initially a simple 1D travel-time inversion was developed to constrain the velocity structure of the basement underneath a layer of water (3D) and a layer of sediment (1D). This inversion was carried out on 2 pairs of receivers: one pair in the NNE and one more towards the SSW part of the line. Inversion of S-IS 45N-42 (NNE) results in a model with a velocity of 5.5 km s-1 at the top of the basement, slowly increasing to a velocity of 5.7 km s-1 at 3 km below the top of the basement (RMS = 117 ms). Inversion of S-IS 49-45S (SSW) results in a model with a velocity of 4.8 km s-1 at the top of the basement, increasing to a velocity of 5.9 km s-1 at 3 km below

  19. Probing Near Surface Shear Velocity Structure from Ambient Noise in Hefei Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Yao, H.; Fang, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has widely been used to achieve high resolution 3-D crustal velocity structure. Recently, various studies also indicate that high-frequency surface wave signals can be extracted from cross correlation of ambient noise. So it makes ambient noise tomography capable to investigate near surface velocity structure. This is important for studies related to strong motion estimation due to earthquakes and characterization of structure in oil and gas exploration fields. Here we investigate near surface 3-D velocity structure using high-frequency (0.5 - 2 Hz) ambient noise tomography in the urban area of Hefei city, Anhui province in eastern China. We collected continuous ambient noise data of two weeks from 17 stations in the center of city with a lateral scale about 5 km by 7 km. The S-transform technique is used to stack vertical-component cross-correlation functions from hourly data, which yields much higher SNR of the high frequency surface waves than traditional linear stack. We developed a ray-tracing based iterative surface wave tomography method with spatial smoothing constraints (model regularization) based on ray path density.This method is used to construct frequency-dependent phase velocity maps in the study area, which can account for the effect of ray bending in the tomographic inversion. We also developed a new direct surface wave inversion method to iteratively invert surface wave dispersion data of all paths for 3-D variations of shear wave velocity in the study area without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomography inversion. Hefei city is located in a basin and its southern suburb close to the Chao Lake, the fifth largest lake in China. The inversion results show that the north part has much higher velocity(~2.5 km/s) in the top several hundred meters than the south part(~0.8 km/s), basically consistent with the

  20. Offshore Southern California lithospheric velocity structure from noise cross-correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, D. C.; Kohler, M. D.; Tsai, V. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    A new shear wave velocity model offshore Southern California is presented that images plate boundary deformation including both thickening and thinning of the crustal and mantle lithosphere at the westernmost edge of the North American continent. The Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Broadband Architecture from the California Offshore Region Experiment (ALBACORE) ocean bottom seismometer array, together with 65 stations of the onshore Southern California Seismic Network, is used to measure ambient noise correlation functions and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves which are inverted for 3-D shear wave velocities. The resulting velocity model defines the transition from continental lithosphere to oceanic, illuminating the complex history and deformation in the region. A transition to the present-day strike-slip regime between the Pacific and North American Plates resulted in broad deformation and capture of the now >200 km wide continental shelf. Our velocity model suggests the persistence of the uppermost mantle volcanic processes associated with East Pacific Rise spreading adjacent to the Patton Escarpment, which marks the former subduction of Farallon Plate underneath North America. The most prominent of these seismic structures is a low-velocity anomaly underlying the San Juan Seamount, suggesting ponding of magma at the base of the crust, resulting in thickening and ongoing adjustment of the lithosphere due to the localized loading. The velocity model also provides a robust framework for future earthquake location determinations and ground-shaking simulations for risk estimates.

  1. Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps and three-dimensional shear velocity structure of the western US from local non-plane surface wave tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Snoke, J. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    We utilize two-and-three-quarter years of vertical-component recordings made by the Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope to constrain three-dimensional (3-D) seismic shear wave velocity structure in the upper 200 km of the western United States. Single-taper spectral estimation is used to compile measurements of complex spectral amplitudes from 44 317 seismograms generated by 123 teleseismic events. In the first step employed to determine the Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity structure, we implement a new tomographic method, which is simpler and more robust than scattering-based methods (e.g. multi-plane surface wave tomography). The TA is effectively implemented as a large number of local arrays by defining a horizontal Gaussian smoothing distance that weights observations near a given target point. The complex spectral-amplitude measurements are interpreted with the spherical Helmholtz equation using local observations about a succession of target points, resulting in Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods over the range of 18–125 s. The derived maps depend on the form of local fits to the Helmholtz equation, which generally involve the nonplane-wave solutions of Friederich et al. In a second step, the phase-velocity maps are used to derive 3-D shear velocity structure. The 3-D velocity images confirm details witnessed in prior body-wave and surface-wave studies and reveal new structures, including a deep (>100 km deep) high-velocity lineament, of width ∼200 km, stretching from the southern Great Valley to northern Utah that may be a relic of plate subduction or, alternatively, either a remnant of the Mojave Precambrian Province or a mantle downwelling. Mantle seismic velocity is highly correlated with heat flow, Holocene volcanism, elastic plate thickness and seismicity. This suggests that shallow mantle structure provides the heat source for associated magmatism, as well as thinning of the thermal lithosphere, leading to relatively high

  2. Structural changes upon excitation of D1-D2-Cyt b559 photosystem II reaction centers depend on the beta-carotene content.

    PubMed

    Losi, Aba; Yruela, Inmaculada; Reus, Michael; Holzwarth, Alfred R; Braslavsky, Silvia E

    2003-07-01

    Different preparations of D1-D2-Cyt b559 complexes from spinach with different beta-carotene (Car) content [on average from <0.5 to 2 per reaction center (RC)] were studied by means of laser-induced optoacoustic spectroscopy. phiP680(+)Pheo(-) does not depend on the preparation (or on the Car content) inasmuch as the magnitude of the prompt heat (produced within 20 ns) does not vary for the different samples upon excitation at 675 and 620 nm. The energy level of the primary charge-separated state, P680(+)Pheo(-), was determined as EP680(+)Pheo(-) = 1.55 eV. Thus, an enthalpy change accompanying charge separation from excited P680 of deltaH*P680Pheo-->P680(+)Pheo(-) = -0.27 eV is obtained. Calculations using the heat evolved during the time-resolved decay of P680(+)Pheo(-) (< or = 100 ns) affords a triplet (3[P680Pheo]) quantum yield phi3[P680Pheo] = 0.5 +/- 0.14. The structural volume change, deltaV1, corresponding to the formation of P680(+)Pheo(-), strongly depends on the Car content; it is ca. -2.5 A3 molecule(-1) for samples with <0.5 Car on average, decreases (in absolute value) to -0.5 +/- 0.2 A3 for samples with an average of 1 Car, and remains the same for samples with two Cars per RC. This suggests that the Car molecules induce changes in the ground-state RC conformation, an idea which was confirmed by preferential excitation of Car with blue light, which produced different carotene triplet lifetimes in samples with 2 Car compared to those containing less carotene. We conclude that the two beta-carotenes are not structurally equivalent. Upon blue-light excitation (480 nm, preferential carotene absorption) the fraction of energy stored is ca. 60% for the 9Chl-2Car sample, whereas it is 40% for the preparations with one or less Cars on average, indicating different paths of energy distribution after Car excitation in these RCs with remaining chlorophyll antennae.

  3. Shear velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of Madagascar derived from surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Martin J.; Wysession, Michael E.; Aleqabi, Ghassan; Wiens, Douglas A.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Shore, Patrick; Rambolamanana, Gérard; Andriampenomanana, Fenitra; Rakotondraibe, Tsiriandrimanana; Tucker, Robert D.; Barruol, Guilhem; Rindraharisaona, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    The crust and upper mantle of the Madagascar continental fragment remained largely unexplored until a series of recent broadband seismic experiments. An island-wide deployment of broadband seismic instruments has allowed the first study of phase velocity variations, derived from surface waves, across the entire island. Late Cenozoic alkaline intraplate volcanism has occurred in three separate regions of Madagascar (north, central and southwest), with the north and central volcanism active until <1 Ma, but the sources of which remains uncertain. Combined analysis of three complementary surface wave methods (ambient noise, Rayleigh wave cross-correlations, and two-plane-wave) illuminate the upper mantle down to depths of 150 km. The phase-velocity measurements from the three methods for periods of 8-182 s are combined at each node and interpolated to generate the first 3-D shear-velocity model for sub-Madagascar velocity structure. Shallow (upper 10 km) low-shear-velocity regions correlate well with sedimentary basins along the west coast. Upper mantle low-shear-velocity zones that extend to at least 150 km deep underlie the north and central regions of recent alkali magmatism. These anomalies appear distinct at depths <100 km, suggesting that any connection between the zones lies at depths greater than the resolution of surface-wave tomography. An additional low-shear velocity anomaly is also identified at depths 50-150 km beneath the southwest region of intraplate volcanism. We interpret these three low-velocity regions as upwelling asthenosphere beneath the island, producing high-elevation topography and relatively low-volume magmatism.

  4. Three-Dimensional Shear Wave Velocity Structure of the Peru Flat Slab Subduction Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies focused on flat slab subduction segments in central Chile (L. S. Wagner, 2006) and Alaska (B. R. Hacker and G. A. Aber, 2012) suggest significant differences in seismic velocity structures, and hence, composition in the mantle wedge between flat and normal "steep" subducting slabs. Instead of finding the low velocities and high Vp/Vs ratios common in normal subduction zones, these studies find low Vp, high Vs, and very low Vp/Vs above flat slabs. This may indicate the presence of dry, cold material in the mantle wedge. In order to investigate the seismic velocities of the upper mantle above the Peruvian flat segment, we have inverted for 2D Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps using data from the currently deployed 40 station PULSE seismic network and some adjacent stations from the CAUGHT seismic network. We then used the sensitivity of surface waves to shear wave velocity structure with depth to develop a 3D shear wave velocity model. This model will allow us to determine the nature of the mantle lithosphere above the flat slab, and how this may have influenced the development of local topography. For example, dry conditions (high Vs velocities) above the flat slab would imply greater strength of this material, possibly making it capable of causing further inland overthrusting, while wet conditions (low Vs) would imply weaker material. This could provide some insight into the ongoing debate over whether the Fitzcarrald arch (along the northern most flank of the Altiplano) could be a topographical response to the subducted Nazca ridge hundred kilometers away from the trench (N. Espurt, 2012, P. Baby, 2005, V. A. Ramos, 2012) or not (J. Martinod, 2005, M. Wipf, 2008, T. Gerya, 2008).

  5. Measuring local flow velocities and biofilm structure in biofilm systems with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Manz, Bertram; Volke, Frank; Goll, Danile; Horn, Harald

    2003-11-20

    The characterization of substrate transport in the bulk phase and in the biofilm matrix is one of the problems which has to be solved for the verification of biofilm models. Additionally, the surface structure of biofilms has to be described with appropriate parameters. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the promising methods for the investigation of transport phenomena and structure in biofilm systems. The MRI technique allows the noninvasive determination of flow velocities and biofilm structures with a high resolution on the sub-millimeter scale. The presented investigations were carried out for defined heterotrophic biofilms which were cultivated in a tube reactor at a Reynolds number of 2000 and 8000 and a substrate load of 6 and 4 g/m2d glucose. Magnetic resonance imaging provides both structure data of the biofilm surface and flow velocities in the bulk phase and at the bulk/biofilm interface. It is shown that the surface roughness of the biofilms can be determined in one experiment for the complete cross section of the test tubes both under flow and stagnant conditions. Furthermore, the local shear stress was calculated from the measured velocity profiles. In the investigated biofilm systems the local shear stress at the biofilm surface was up to 3 times higher compared to the mean wall shear stress calculated on the base of the mean flow velocity.

  6. Teleseismic array analysis of upper mantle compressional velocity structure. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Relative array analysis of upper mantle lateral velocity variations in southern California, analysis techniques for dense data profiles, the P-wave upper mantle structure beneath an active spreading center: the Gulf of California, and the upper mantle under the Cascade ranges: a comparison with the Gulf of California are presented.

  7. Lithospheric velocity structure of the Anatolian plateau-Caucasus-Caspian region

    SciTech Connect

    Gök, R.; Mellors, R. J.; Sandvol, E.; Pasyanos, M.; Hauk, T.; Takedatsu, R.; Yetirmishli, G.; Teoman, U.; Turkelli, N.; Godoladze, T.; Javakishvirli, Z.

    2011-05-07

    The Anatolian plateau-Caucasus-Caspian region is an area of complex lithospheric structure accompanied by large variations in seismic wave velocities. Despite the complexity of the region, little is known about the detailed lithospheric structure. Using data from 31 new, permanent broadband seismic stations along with results from a previous 29 temporary seismic stations and 3 existing global seismic stations in the region, a 3-D velocity model is developed using joint inversion of teleseismic receiver functions and surface waves. Both group and phase dispersion curves (Love and Rayleigh) were derived from regional and teleseismic events. Additional Rayleigh wave group dispersion curves were determined using ambient noise correlation. Receiver functions were calculated using P arrivals from 789 teleseismic (30°–90°) earthquakes. The stacked receiver functions and surface wave dispersion curves were jointly inverted to yield the absolute shear wave velocity to a depth of 100 km at each station. The depths of major discontinuities (sediment-basement, crust-mantle, and lithosphere-asthenosphere) were inferred from the velocity-depth profiles at the location of each station. Distinct spatial variations in crustal and upper mantle shear velocities were observed. The Kura basin showed slow (~2.7–2.9 km/s) upper crustal (0–11 km) velocities but elevated (~3.8–3.9 km/s) velocities in the lower crust. The Anatolian plateau varied from ~3.1–3.2 in the upper crust to ~3.5–3.7 in the lower crust, while velocities in the Arabian plate (south of the Bitlis suture) were slightly faster (upper crust between 3.3 and 3.4 km/s and lower crust between 3.8 and 3.9 km/s). The depth of the Moho, which was estimated from the shear velocity profiles, was 35 km in the Arabian plate and increased northward to 54 km at the southern edge of the Greater Caucasus. Moho depths in the Kura and at the edge of the Caspian showed more spatial variability but ranged between 35 and 45 km

  8. Lithospheric velocity structure of the Anatolian plateau-Caucasus-Caspian region

    DOE PAGES

    Gök, R.; Mellors, R. J.; Sandvol, E.; ...

    2011-05-07

    The Anatolian plateau-Caucasus-Caspian region is an area of complex lithospheric structure accompanied by large variations in seismic wave velocities. Despite the complexity of the region, little is known about the detailed lithospheric structure. Using data from 31 new, permanent broadband seismic stations along with results from a previous 29 temporary seismic stations and 3 existing global seismic stations in the region, a 3-D velocity model is developed using joint inversion of teleseismic receiver functions and surface waves. Both group and phase dispersion curves (Love and Rayleigh) were derived from regional and teleseismic events. Additional Rayleigh wave group dispersion curves weremore » determined using ambient noise correlation. Receiver functions were calculated using P arrivals from 789 teleseismic (30°–90°) earthquakes. The stacked receiver functions and surface wave dispersion curves were jointly inverted to yield the absolute shear wave velocity to a depth of 100 km at each station. The depths of major discontinuities (sediment-basement, crust-mantle, and lithosphere-asthenosphere) were inferred from the velocity-depth profiles at the location of each station. Distinct spatial variations in crustal and upper mantle shear velocities were observed. The Kura basin showed slow (~2.7–2.9 km/s) upper crustal (0–11 km) velocities but elevated (~3.8–3.9 km/s) velocities in the lower crust. The Anatolian plateau varied from ~3.1–3.2 in the upper crust to ~3.5–3.7 in the lower crust, while velocities in the Arabian plate (south of the Bitlis suture) were slightly faster (upper crust between 3.3 and 3.4 km/s and lower crust between 3.8 and 3.9 km/s). The depth of the Moho, which was estimated from the shear velocity profiles, was 35 km in the Arabian plate and increased northward to 54 km at the southern edge of the Greater Caucasus. Moho depths in the Kura and at the edge of the Caspian showed more spatial variability but ranged between 35

  9. Crustal and uppermost mantle velocity structure beneath northwestern China from seismic ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyi; Li, S.; Song, X. D.; Gong, M.; Li, X.; Jia, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we conduct ambient noise seismic tomography of northwestern China and adjacent regions. The data include 9 months (2009 January to 2009 September) three-component continuous data recorded at 146 seismic stations of newly upgraded China Provincial Digital Seismic Networks and regional Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan networks. Empirical Rayleigh and Love wave Green's functions are obtained from interstation cross-correlations. Group velocity dispersion curves for both Rayleigh and Love waves between 7 and 50 s periods were measured for each interstation path by applying the multiple-filter analysis method with phase-matched processing. The group velocity maps show clear lateral variations which correlate well with major geological structures and tectonic units in the study region. Shear wave velocity structures are inverted from Rayleigh wave and love wave dispersion maps. The results show that the Tibetan Plateau has a very thick crust with a low-velocity zone in its mid-lower crust. Along the northern margin of the plateau where a steep topographic gradient is present, the low-velocity zone does not extend to the Tarim basin which may indicate that crustal materials beneath the Tarim basin are colder and stronger than beneath the plateau, therefore inhibit the extension of mid-lower crustal flow and deformation of the Tibetan Plateau, resulting in very sharp topography contrasts. In the northeastern margin with a gentle topographic gradient toward the Ordos platform, the low-velocity zone diminishes around the eastern KunLun fault. Meanwhile, our results reveal obvious lateral velocity changes in the crust beneath the Tarim basin. In the upper crust, the Manjaer depression in the eastern Tarim basin is featured with very low velocities and the Bachu uplift in the western Tarim basin with high velocities; in the mid-lower crust, the northern Tarim basin in general displays lower velocities than the southern part along latitude ˜40° N with an east

  10. Seismic velocity structure of the sediment seaward of Cascadia Subduction Zone deformation front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.; Gibson, J. C.; Carbotte, S. M.; Canales, J. P.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Carton, H. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present seismic velocity structure of the sediment section seaward of the Cascadia Subduction Zone deformation front (DF), derived from multichannel seismic data acquired during the 2012 Juan de Fuca Ridge to Trench experiment. Detailed velocity analyses are conducted on every 100th prestack-time-migrated common reflection point gather (625 m spacing) within 45 km seaward of the DF along two ridge-to-trench transects offshore Oregon at 44.6˚N and Washington at 47.4˚N respectively, and on every 200th common mid-point gather (1250 m spacing) along a ~400 km-long trench-parallel transect ~15 km from the DF. We observe a landward increase of sediment velocity starting from ~15-20 km from the DF on both Oregon and Washington transects, which may result from increased horizontal compressive tectonic stress within the accretionary wedge and thermally induced dehydration processes in the sediment column. Although the velocity of near-basement sediments at 30 km from the DF is similar (~3.1 km/s) on both transects, the velocity increases are larger on the Washington transect, to ~4.0 km/s beneath the DF (sediment thickness ~3.2 km), than on the Oregon transect, to ~3.6 km/s beneath the DF (sediment thickness ~3.5 km). The long-wavelength sediment velocity structure on the trench-parallel transect confirms this regional difference in deep sediment velocity and also highlights variations related to a group of WNW-trending strike-slip faults along the margin. Offshore Washington, where higher sediment velocity seaward of the DF is observed, the accretionary wedge is wide with a decollement located close to the basement and landward-verging thrust faults. By contrast, offshore Oregon, the lower sediment velocity seaward of the DF is associated with a narrow accretionary wedge, a shallow decollement ~1 km above the basement, and seaward-verging thrust faults. The regional differences in deep sediment velocity may be related to the along-strike variation in sediment

  11. Engineering the electronic structure of graphene superlattices via Fermi velocity modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Jonas R. F.

    2017-01-01

    Graphene superlattices have attracted much research interest in the last years, since it is possible to manipulate the electronic properties of graphene in these structures. It has been verified that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic structure of the system. The electronic structure in the vicinity of these points has been studied for a gapless and gapped graphene superlattice and for a graphene superlattice with a spatially modulated energy gap. In each case a different behavior was obtained. In this work we show that via Fermi velocity engineering it is possible to tune the electronic properties of a graphene superlattice to match all the previous cases studied. We also obtained new features of the system never observed before, reveling that the electronic structure of graphene is very sensitive to the modulation of the Fermi velocity. The results obtained here are relevant for the development of novel graphene-based electronic devices.

  12. Multiple triangulation analysis: application to determine the velocity of 2-D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.-Z.; Zong, Q.-G.; Wang, J.; Pu, Z. Y.; Zhang, X. G.; Shi, Q. Q.; Cao, J. B.

    2006-11-01

    In order to avoid the ambiguity of the application of the Triangulation Method (multi-spacecraft timing method) to two-dimensional structures, another version of this method, the Multiple Triangulation Analysis (MTA) is used, to calculate the velocities of these structures based on 4-point measurements. We describe the principle of MTA and apply this approach to a real event observed by the Cluster constellation on 2 October 2003. The resulting velocity of the 2-D structure agrees with the ones obtained by some other methods fairly well. So we believe that MTA is a reliable version of the Triangulation Method for 2-D structures, and thus provides us a new way to describe their motion.

  13. D″ shear velocity heterogeneity, anisotropy and discontinuity structure beneath the Caribbean and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnero, Edward J.; Lay, Thorne

    2003-11-01

    The D″ region in the lowermost mantle beneath the Caribbean and Central America is investigated using shear waves from South American earthquakes recorded by seismic stations in North America. We present a large-scale, composite study of volumetric shear velocity heterogeneity, anisotropy, and the possible presence of a D″ discontinuity in the region. Our data set includes: 328 S( Sdiff)- SKS differential travel times, 300 ScS-S differential travel times, 125 S( Sdiff) and 120 ScS shear wave splitting measurements, and 297 seismograms inspected for Scd, the seismic phase refracted from a high-velocity D″ layer. Broadband digital data are augmented by high-quality digitized analog WWSSN data, providing extensive path coverage in our study area. In all, data from 61 events are utilized. In some cases, a given seismogram can be used for velocity heterogeneity, anisotropy, and discontinuity analyses. Significant mid-mantle structure, possibly associated with the ancient subducted Farallon slab, affects shear wave travel times and must be corrected for to prevent erroneous mapping of D″ shear velocity. All differential times are corrected for contributions from aspherical mantle structure above D″ using a high-resolution tomography model. Travel time analyses demonstrate the presence of pervasive high velocities in D″, with the highest velocities localized to a region beneath Central America, approximately 500-700 km in lateral dimension. Short wavelength variability overprints this general high-velocity background. Corrections are also made for lithospheric anisotropy beneath the receivers. Shear wave splitting analyses of the corrected waveforms reveal D″ anisotropy throughout the study area, with a general correlation with heterogeneity strength. Evidence for Scd arrivals is pervasive across the study area, consistent with earlier work, but there are a few localized regions (100-200 km) lacking clear Scd arrivals, which indicates heterogeneity in the

  14. The sedimentary and crustal velocity structure of Makarov Basin and adjacent Alpha Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelatos, John; Funck, Thomas; Mosher, David C.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the velocity structure of Makarov Basin and the adjacent Alpha Ridge to determine the tectonic origins of these features and link them to the larger Amerasia Basin. Seismic data from sonobuoys distributed along a 650 km-long line extending from Alpha Ridge and across Makarov Basin to the Lomonosov Ridge were analyzed for this purpose. Forward modelling of traveltimes, supported by coincident multi-channel seismic reflection and shipborne gravity data, were used to determine the P-wave velocity structure along the line. The sedimentary cover averages 0.5 km-thick on Alpha Ridge and 1.9 km-thick in Makarov Basin, but reaches up to 5 km-thick at the base of Lomonosov Ridge. Velocities in the sedimentary section range from 1.6 to 4.3 km s- 1. As suggested by relatively high velocities, interbedded volcaniclastic or volcanic rock may occur in the deep sedimentary section. The shallow basement of Alpha Ridge (3.3 to 3.6 km s- 1) is characterized by semi-continuous high amplitude reflections and is interpreted as volcanic rock possibly intercalated with sedimentary rock. Velocities do not vary significantly in the upper and mid-crustal layers between Alpha Ridge and Makarov Basin. Total crustal thickness decreases from 27 km beneath Alpha Ridge to 5 km-thick in Makarov Basin then thickens to > 20 km over a short distance as part of Lomonosov Ridge. The crustal structure of Alpha Ridge is consistent with previous studies suggesting that the Alpha-Mendeleev ridge complex is part of a large igneous province (LIP) with thick igneous crust. The lack of change in crustal velocities between Alpha Ridge and Makarov Basin suggests that the basin, at least partly, either formed during or was influenced by LIP-related magmatism. The rapid transition of crustal thicknesses from Makarov Basin to Lomonosov Ridge supports the interpretation that this section of the ridge is a transform margin.

  15. Crustal shear velocity structure in the Southern Lau Basin constrained by seafloor compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Yang; Webb, Spahr C.

    2016-05-01

    Seafloor morphology and crustal structure vary significantly in the Lau back-arc basin, which contains regions of island arc formation, rifting, and seafloor spreading. We analyze seafloor compliance: deformation under long period ocean wave forcing, at 30 ocean bottom seismometers to constrain crustal shear wave velocity structure along and across the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). Velocity models obtained through Monte Carlo inversion of compliance data show systematic variation of crustal structure in the basin. Sediment thicknesses range from zero thickness at the ridge axis to 1400 m near the volcanic arc. Sediment thickness increases faster to the east than to the west of the ELSC, suggesting a more abundant source of sediment near the active arc volcanoes. Along the ELSC, upper crustal velocities increase from the south to the north where the ridge has migrated farther away from the volcanic arc front. Along the axial ELSC, compliance analysis did not detect a crustal low-velocity body, indicating less melt in the ELSC crustal accretion zone compared to the fast spreading East Pacific Rise. Average upper crust shear velocities for the older ELSC crust produced when the ridge was near the volcanic arc are 0.5-0.8 km/s slower than crust produced at the present-day northern ELSC, consistent with a more porous extrusive layer. Crust in the western Lau Basin, which although thought to have been produced through extension and rifting of old arc crust, is found to have upper crustal velocities similar to older oceanic crust produced at the ELSC.

  16. Teleseismic tomography of the compressional wave velocity structure beneath the Long Valley region, California

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, P.B.; Evans, J.R.; Iyer, H.M. )

    1990-07-10

    In 1982 and 1984 the U.S. Geological Survey used several seismic networks, totaling over 90 stations, to record teleseismic P waves and measure travel time residuals in an area centered on the Long Valley caldera. The authors inverted the travel time residuals to obtain a three-dimensional image of the velocity structure with resolution of 5-6 km to depths of 70 km beneath the array. Direct inversion of these data indicates that the 2- to 4-km-thick low-velocity caldera fill contaminates the signal from any midcrustal velocity anomalies beneath the caldera. Thus two methods were used to strip the effects of the upper crust from the travel time residuals: (1) ray tracing through upper crustal velocity models provided by seismic refraction experiments and gravity surveys, and (2) an iterative stripping scheme using the inversion itself. The methods produce essentially identical results and adequately remove the effects of the shallowest crustal structures, including the caldera fill and hydrothermal alteration effects. The resulting stripped models show two well-resolved midcrustal low-velocity bodies in the Long Valley region. The first body is centered between 7 and 20 km depth beneath the resurgent dome of the Long Valley caldera and has a volume of 150-600 km{sup 3}. The second, with a similar volume, is centered between 10 and 20 km depth beneath the Mono Craters, about 10 km north of Long Valley. Velocity contrasts in both of these bodies are about 6-10%, and the features are interpreted as silicic magma chambers. This experiment does not preclude the presence of additional pockets of magma smaller than 5 km across in the upper crust, particularly beneath the resurgent dome of the caldera (which would be removed with the stripping methods). The high eruptive rate of the Mono Craters and these upper mantle structures suggest that the focus of volcanism is shifting north from Long Valley to the Mono Craters

  17. Do Invertebrate Activity and Current Velocity Affect Fungal Assemblage Structure in Leaves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Verónica; Graça, Manuel A. S.

    2006-02-01

    In this study we assessed the effect of current velocity and shredder presence, manipulated in artificial channels, on the structure of the fungal assemblage colonizing alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertner) leaves incubated in coarse and fine mesh bags. Fungal sporulation rates, cumulative conidial production and number of species of aquatic hyphomycetes were higher in leaves exposed to high rather than to low current velocity. The opposite was observed regarding Simpson's index (D) on the fungal assemblage. Some species of aquatic hyphomycetes were consistently stimulated in high current channels. No effect of shredders or of mesh type was observed.

  18. Three Dimensional Seismic Velocity Structure of the Subducted Pacific Slab Beneath NE Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Y.; Nakajima, J.; Okada, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    2006-12-01

    The occurrence of earthquakes in the subducting slab is an enigma because the fact that lithostatic pressure at such depths appears to be too high for any brittle fracture. Dehydration embrittlement has been proposed as a possible mechanism for triggering intraslab earthquakes. It is accepted that the slab is hydrated prior to subduction principally through infiltration of seawater via normal or transform faulting [e.g. Kirby et al., 1996] and/or through hot-spot magmatism [Seno and Yamanaka, 1996]. During subduction, the fluids released by dehydration reactions induce in situ mechanical instability and brittle deformation by increasing pore pressure. Mishra and Zhao [2004] revealed the existence of low-velocity zone around the hypocenter of the 2003 Miyagi- Oki intraslab earthquake (M7.1). Nakajima and Hasegawa [2006] detected a linear alignment of seismicity and a narrow low-velocity zone along it within the Pacific slab beneath Kanto, Japan. These results suggest that the occurrence of intraslab earthquakes is closely associated with the heterogeneous structure in the subducted slab. This study is the first attempt to investigate 3D seismic velocity structure in the subducted Pacific slab for the entire NE Japan. A detailed investigation of heterogeneous structure is essential to understand the mechanism for triggering intraslab earthquake. We apply the Double-Difference Tomogaphy method (Zhang and Thurber, 2003) to arrival-time data of 208,026 and 142,259 P and S waves, respectively, obtained from 3131 earthquakes that occurred from October 1997 to March 2006. The total number of stations used in this study is 206. We adopted a grid spacing of 10km-40km in the horizontal direction and 5-30km in the vertical direction. At the first inversion, we used only absolute travel-time data and determine large scale velocity structure, and then differential travel-time data were added to the absolute data to investigate slab structure in detail. The obtained results show

  19. Liquid structure and temperature invariance of sound velocity in supercooled Bi melt.

    PubMed

    Emuna, M; Mayo, M; Greenberg, Y; Caspi, E N; Beuneu, B; Yahel, E; Makov, G

    2014-03-07

    Structural rearrangement of liquid Bi in the vicinity of the melting point has been proposed due to the unique temperature invariant sound velocity observed above the melting temperature, the low symmetry of Bi in the solid phase and the necessity of overheating to achieve supercooling. The existence of this structural rearrangement is examined by measurements on supercooled Bi. The sound velocity of liquid Bi was measured into the supercooled region to high accuracy and it was found to be invariant over a temperature range of ∼60°, from 35° above the melting point to ∼25° into the supercooled region. The structural origin of this phenomenon was explored by neutron diffraction structural measurements in the supercooled temperature range. These measurements indicate a continuous modification of the short range order in the melt. The structure of the liquid is analyzed within a quasi-crystalline model and is found to evolve continuously, similar to other known liquid pnictide systems. The results are discussed in the context of two competing hypotheses proposed to explain properties of liquid Bi near the melting: (i) liquid bismuth undergoes a structural rearrangement slightly above melting and (ii) liquid Bi exhibits a broad maximum in the sound velocity located incidentally at the melting temperature.

  20. Liquid structure and temperature invariance of sound velocity in supercooled Bi melt

    SciTech Connect

    Emuna, M.; Mayo, M.; Makov, G.; Greenberg, Y.; Caspi, E. N.; Yahel, E.; Beuneu, B.

    2014-03-07

    Structural rearrangement of liquid Bi in the vicinity of the melting point has been proposed due to the unique temperature invariant sound velocity observed above the melting temperature, the low symmetry of Bi in the solid phase and the necessity of overheating to achieve supercooling. The existence of this structural rearrangement is examined by measurements on supercooled Bi. The sound velocity of liquid Bi was measured into the supercooled region to high accuracy and it was found to be invariant over a temperature range of ∼60°, from 35° above the melting point to ∼25° into the supercooled region. The structural origin of this phenomenon was explored by neutron diffraction structural measurements in the supercooled temperature range. These measurements indicate a continuous modification of the short range order in the melt. The structure of the liquid is analyzed within a quasi-crystalline model and is found to evolve continuously, similar to other known liquid pnictide systems. The results are discussed in the context of two competing hypotheses proposed to explain properties of liquid Bi near the melting: (i) liquid bismuth undergoes a structural rearrangement slightly above melting and (ii) liquid Bi exhibits a broad maximum in the sound velocity located incidentally at the melting temperature.

  1. Lithospheric Velocity Structure of the Anatolain plateau-Caucasus-Caspian Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Gok, R; Mellors, R J; Sandvol, E; Pasyanos, M; Hauk, T; Yetirmishli, G; Teoman, U; Turkelli, N; Godoladze, T; Javakishvirli, Z

    2009-04-15

    Anatolian Plateau-Caucasus-Caspian region is an area of complex structure accompanied by large variations in seismic wave velocities. Despite the complexity of the region little is known about the detailed lithospheric structure. Using data from 29 new broadband seismic stations in the region, a unified velocity structure is developed using teleseismic receiver functions and surface waves. Love and Rayleigh surface waves dispersion curves have been derived from event-based analysis and ambient-noise correlation. We jointly inverted the receiver functions with the surface wave dispersion curves to determine absolute shear wave velocity and important discontinuities such as sedimentary layer, Moho, lithospheric-asthenospheric boundary. We combined these new station results with Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment results (29 stations). Caspian Sea and Kura basin underlained by one of the thickest sediments in the world. Therefore, short-period surface waves are observed to be very slow. The strong crustal multiples in receiver functions and the slow velocities in upper crust indicate the presence of thick sedimentary unit (up to 20 km). Crustal thickness varies from 34 to 52 km in the region. The thickest crust is in Lesser Caucasus and the thinnest is in the Arabian Plate. The lithospheric mantle in the Greater Caucasus and the Kura depression is faster than the Anatolian Plateau and Lesser Caucasus. This possibly indicates the presence of cold lithosphere. The lower crust is slowest in the northeastern part of the Anatolian Plateau where Holocene volcanoes are located.

  2. Experimental investigation on structures and velocity of liquid jets in a supersonic crossflow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhen-guo Wu, Liyin; Li, Qinglian; Li, Chun

    2014-09-29

    Particle image velocimetry was applied in the study focusing on the structure and velocity of water jets injected into a Ma = 2.1 crossflow. The instantaneous structures of the jet, including surface waves in the near-injector region and vortices in the far-field, were visualized clearly. Spray velocity increases rapidly to 66% of the mainstream velocity in the region of x/d < 15, owing to the strong gas-liquid interaction near the orifice. By contrast, the velocity grows slowly in the far-field region, where the liquid inside the spray is accelerated mainly by the continuous driven force provided by the mainstream with the gas-liquid shear. The injection and atomization of liquid jet in a supersonic crossflow serves as a foundation of scramjet combustion process, by affecting the combustion efficiency and some other performances. With various forces acting on the liquid jet (Mashayek et al. [AIAA J. 46, 2674–2686 (2008)] and Wang et al. [AIAA J. 50, 1360–1366 (2012)]), the atomization process involves very complex flow physics. These physical processes include strong vortical structures, small-scale wave formation, stripping of small droplets from the jet surface, formations of ligaments, and droplets with a wide range of sizes.

  3. Experimental investigation on structures and velocity of liquid jets in a supersonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-guo; Wu, Liyin; Li, Qinglian; Li, Chun

    2014-09-01

    Particle image velocimetry was applied in the study focusing on the structure and velocity of water jets injected into a Ma = 2.1 crossflow. The instantaneous structures of the jet, including surface waves in the near-injector region and vortices in the far-field, were visualized clearly. Spray velocity increases rapidly to 66% of the mainstream velocity in the region of x/d < 15, owing to the strong gas-liquid interaction near the orifice. By contrast, the velocity grows slowly in the far-field region, where the liquid inside the spray is accelerated mainly by the continuous driven force provided by the mainstream with the gas-liquid shear. The injection and atomization of liquid jet in a supersonic crossflow serves as a foundation of scramjet combustion process, by affecting the combustion efficiency and some other performances. With various forces acting on the liquid jet (Mashayek et al. [AIAA J. 46, 2674-2686 (2008)] and Wang et al. [AIAA J. 50, 1360-1366 (2012)]), the atomization process involves very complex flow physics. These physical processes include strong vortical structures, small-scale wave formation, stripping of small droplets from the jet surface, formations of ligaments, and droplets with a wide range of sizes.

  4. The anisotropy1 D604N Mutation in the Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase1 Catalytic Domain Reduces Cell Wall Crystallinity and the Velocity of Cellulose Synthase Complexes1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Miki; Himmelspach, Regina; Ward, Juliet; Whittington, Angela; Hasenbein, Nortrud; Liu, Christine; Truong, Thy T.; Galway, Moira E.; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Hocart, Charles H.; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple cellulose synthase (CesA) subunits assemble into plasma membrane complexes responsible for cellulose production. In the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) model system, we identified a novel D604N missense mutation, designated anisotropy1 (any1), in the essential primary cell wall CesA1. Most previously identified CesA1 mutants show severe constitutive or conditional phenotypes such as embryo lethality or arrest of cellulose production but any1 plants are viable and produce seeds, thus permitting the study of CesA1 function. The dwarf mutants have reduced anisotropic growth of roots, aerial organs, and trichomes. Interestingly, cellulose microfibrils were disordered only in the epidermal cells of the any1 inflorescence stem, whereas they were transverse to the growth axis in other tissues of the stem and in all elongated cell types of roots and dark-grown hypocotyls. Overall cellulose content was not altered but both cell wall crystallinity and the velocity of cellulose synthase complexes were reduced in any1. We crossed any1 with the temperature-sensitive radial swelling1-1 (rsw1-1) CesA1 mutant and observed partial complementation of the any1 phenotype in the transheterozygotes at rsw1-1’s permissive temperature (21°C) and full complementation by any1 of the conditional rsw1-1 root swelling phenotype at the restrictive temperature (29°C). In rsw1-1 homozygotes at restrictive temperature, a striking dissociation of cellulose synthase complexes from the plasma membrane was accompanied by greatly diminished motility of intracellular cellulose synthase-containing compartments. Neither phenomenon was observed in the any1 rsw1-1 transheterozygotes, suggesting that the proteins encoded by the any1 allele replace those encoded by rsw1-1 at restrictive temperature. PMID:23532584

  5. Path-Averaged Velocity Structure Model for the NW Region of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Arifi, N. S.; Fayez, A. A.; Simila, G. W.

    2001-12-01

    A realistic velocity structure model that characterizes a network area is very essential, since it is the most critical factor in determining hypocenter parameters and fault plane solutions. Two velocity models (El-Isa and Gnzburg) were examined in this project with a sub-set of earthquake data. The third model (which is a four layered model) was chosen and applied for the whole data set of the northwestern region of Saudi Arabia. This model produced the lowest residual, and also minimized the location depth error to less than ± 13.39 km and the horizontal location error to less than ± 3.35 and ±13.16 km for the two horizontal components, relative to the first and second models. The use of this model significantly increased the precision and reliability of hypocenter estimates. In this model, arrival times from earthquakes and available explosions (near the study area) are used to determine the velocities in these four layers. Recently, three large explosions were detonated in the Dead Sea in order to calibrate seismic travel times and improve location accuracy for the International Monitoring System (IMS) to monitor a Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). These explosions provided calibration data for regional seismic networks in the Middle East. In this paper we report analysis of seismic data from these shots as recorded by King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) in Saudi Arabia. The shots were well observed in the distance range 180-480 km mostly to the south of the Dead Sea in the Gulf of Aqaba region of northwestern Saudi Arabia. An average one-dimensional velocity model for the paths was calculated from the travel times of the regional phases Pn, Pg and Sg. Short-period Sn phases were not observed. The velocity model features a thin crust (crustal thickness 26-30 km) and low velocities (average P-wave velocity 5.8-6.0 km/sec). These velocities and depths were used to adjust model No. 3. Below the Moho (at 28 km depth), the P

  6. Calculation of velocity structure functions for vortex models of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffman, P. G.; Pullin, D. I.

    1996-11-01

    Velocity structure functions (up'-up)m are calculated for vortex models of isotropic turbulence. An integral operator is introduced which defines an isotropic two-point field from a volume-orientation average for a specific solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Applying this to positive integer powers of the longitudinal velocity difference then gives explicit formulas for (up'-up)m as a function of order m and of the scalar separation r. Special forms of the operator are then obtained for rectilinear stretched vortex models of the Townsend-Lundgren type. Numerical results are given for the Burgers vortex and also for a realization of the Lundgren-strained spiral vortex, and comparison with experimental measurement is made. In an Appendix, we calculate values of the velocity-derivative moments for the Townsend-Burgers model.

  7. Upper mantle P velocity structure beneath the Baikal Rift from modeling regional seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, Richard A.; Nyblade, Andrew A.

    2003-02-01

    Uppermost mantle P wave velocity structure beneath the Baikal rift and southern margin of the Siberian Platform has been investigated by using a grid search method to model Pnl waveforms from two moderate earthquakes recorded by station TLY at the southwestern end of Lake Baikal. The results yielded a limited number of successful models which indicate the presence of upper mantle P wave velocities beneath the rift axis and the margin of the platform that are 2-5% lower than expected. The magnitude of the velocity anomalies and their location support the presence of a thermal anomaly that extends laterally beyond the rift proper, possibly created by small-scale convection or a plume-like, thermal upwelling.

  8. Three-dimenstional crustal velocity structure beneath the strait of georgia, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, B.C.; Ellis, R.M.; Zelt, C.A.; Hyndman, R.D.; Lowe, C.; Spence, G.D.; Fisher, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Strait of Georgia is a topographic depression straddling the boundary between the Insular and Coast belts in southwestern British Columbia. Two shallow earthquakes located within the strait (M = 4.6 in 1997 and M = 5.0 in 1975) and felt throughout the Vancouver area illustrate the seismic potential of this region. As part of the 1998 Seismic Hazards Investigation of Puget Sound (SHIPS) experiment, seismic instruments were placed in and around the Strait of Georgia to record shots from a marine source within the strait. We apply a tomographic inversion procedure to first-arrival travel-time data to derive a minimum-structure 3-D P-wave velocity model for the upper crust to about 13 km depth. We also present a 2-D velocity model for a profile orientated across the Strait of Georgia derived using a minimum-parameter traveltime inversion approach. This paper represents the first detailed look at crustal velocity variations within the major Cretaceous to Cenozoic Georgia Basin, which underlies the Strait of Georgia. The 3-D velocity model clearly delineates the structure of the Georgia Basin. Taking the 6 km s-1 isovelocity contour to represent the top of the underlying basement, the basin thickens from between 2 and 4 km in the northwestern half of the strait to between 8 and 9 km at the southeastern end of the study region. Basin velocities in the northeastern half are 4.5-6 km s-1 and primarily represent the Upper Cretaceous Nanaimo Group. Velocities to the south are lower (3-6 km s-1) because of the additional presence of the overlying Tertiary Huntingdon Formation and more recent sediments, including glacial and modern Fraser River deposits. In contrast to the relatively smoothly varying velocity structure of the basin, velocities of the basement rocks, which comprise primarily Palaeozoic to Jurassic rocks of the Wrangellia Terrane and possibly Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous granitic rocks of the Coast Belt, show significantly more structure, probably an indication

  9. The lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia: Young volcanism in an old shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zheng; Julià, Jordi; Mai, P. Martin

    2016-04-01

    We are utilizing receiver function and surface wave dispersion data to investigate the lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia. The Arabian plate consists of the western Arabian shield and the eastern Arabian platform. The Arabian shield is a complicated mélange of several Proterozoic terrains, separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks (so-called harrats). The Arabian platform is covered by thick Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. To understand the geo-dynamics and present-day geology in western Saudi Arabia, the origin and activity of the harrats needs to be investigated: are they controlled primarily by a local mantle plume underneath western Saudi Arabia or by lateral mantle flow from the Afar and (perhaps) Jordan hotspots? In our study, we first estimate Vp/Vs ratios by applying the H-κ stacking technique and construct local shear-wave velocity-depth profiles by jointly inverting teleseismic P-receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities at 56 broadband stations deployed by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). Our results reveal significant lateral variations in crustal thickness, S-velocity, and bulk Vp/Vs ratio. The Arabian shield has, on average a ~34 km thick crust with Vs ~3.72 km/s and Vp/Vs ~1.73. Thinner crust (~25 - 32 km thick) with strong lateral variations is present along the Red Sea coast. In contrast, the Arabian platform reveals a ~41 km thick crust with Vs ~3.52 km/s and Vp/Vs ~1.77. We find anomalously high Vp/Vs ratios at Harrat Lunayyir, interpreted as solidified magma intrusions. Slow shear-velocities in the upper-mantle lid throughout the southernmost and northernmost Arabian shield suggest lateral heating from hot mantle upwellings centered beneath Afar and (perhaps) Jordan. Our findings on crustal S-velocity structures, Vp/Vs ratios, and upper-mantle lid velocities support the hypothesis of lateral mantle flow from the Afar and (perhaps

  10. Simultaneous inversion of 3D velocity structure, hypocenter locations, and reflector geometry in Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Leiph Alexander

    We develop and apply a non-linear inversion of direct and wide-angle reflection travel times for 3-D P-wave velocity structure, earthquake hypocenters, and reflector geometry under NW Washington focusing on the structure of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. The first-arrival travel times are derived from both active-source experiments and from local earthquakes. The reflection arrivals were picked from data collected during the 1998 Wet SHIPS active-source experiment, which consisted of air-gun sources within the inland water-ways of NW Washington and SW British Columbia to land-based stations. Our inversion procedure reduces the well-known trade-off between reflector position and the velocities above it by the combination of simultaneous inversion and adequate crossing paths. We interpret the wide-angle reflector as the Moho of the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. The relocated intraslab earthquakes separate into two groups: those located up-dip of the 45km reflector depth contour generally lie below the reflector in material whose velocity exceeds 7.7km/s, placing them within the subducting mantle, while those down-dip of this contour occur within material whose velocities are 6.8--7.5km/s, placing them within subducted oceanic crust. We interpret these groups of earthquakes as resulting from serpentine dehydration in the subducted mantle and the basalt to eclogite transformation in the subducted crust. We have performed velocity checkerboard, slab velocity resolution, and parameter sensitivity tests to estimate our ability to resolve the relationship among the reflector, intraslab hypocenters, and slab velocity structure. These tests indicate we have the necessary resolvability and can distinguish the relative locations among the velocities, reflector, and intraslab hypocenters within the subducting slab to +/-2km. The occurrence of events within the subducted mantle geometrically allows for larger magnitude earthquakes than could occur if they were confined to

  11. Three-dimensional P and S velocity structure in the Coalinga Region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberhart-Phillips, D.

    1990-01-01

    The Coalinga earthquake sequence of 1983 provided a unique opportunity to perform a three-dimensional velocity and hypocenter inversion in an area of complex three-dimensional structure dominated by folding and blind thrusts. Inversion of 7696 P and 1511 S first arrivals from earthquakes and 696 P first arrivals from refraction shots produced a three-dimensional velocity model with grid spacing of 1-2 km in the hypocentral area. The overall shape and location of velocity features correspond well to the mapped surface geology. There is a linear high-velocity body (6.1-6.5 km/s), about 25 km long, from 6 to 8 km depth, that may represent a fragment of Coast Range ophiolite. A shallow low-velocity zone (LVZ), which extends for 20 km along the fold axis at about 6 km depth and correlates with LVZs observed in both the refraction and the reflection data, may indicate high pore pressure caused by lateral compressive strain, Deeper LVZs occur within inferred Franciscan material and may represent multiple thrust faults. -from Author

  12. Effects of fresh gas velocity and thermal expansion on the structure of a Bunsen flame tip

    SciTech Connect

    Higuera, F.J.

    2010-08-15

    Numerical computations and order-of-magnitude estimates are used to describe the tip region of a Bunsen flame where the flame departs from a planar flame at an angle to the incoming fresh gas flow. A single irreversible Arrhenius reaction with high activation energy is assumed. The well-known linear relation between flame velocity and curvature is recovered in the thermodiffusive limit, when the thermal expansion of the gas is left out, for velocities of the fresh gas (U{sub 0}) only slightly larger than the velocity of a planar flame (U{sub L}), provided this flame is stable. For large values of the velocity ratio U{sub 0}/U{sub L}, the tip region becomes slender and the curvature of the reaction sheet at the tip increases proportionally to U{sub 0}/U{sub L}. The thermal expansion of the gas across the flame reduces the aspect ratio of the tip region. A qualitative analysis of the structure of the tip region for very exothermic reactions shows that this region ceases to be slender when the burnt-to-fresh gas temperature ratio becomes of the order of the velocity ratio U{sub 0}/U{sub L}. For even larger values of the temperature ratio, the tip region becomes a cap of characteristic size not very different from the thickness of a planar flame. (author)

  13. Teleseismic tomography of the compressional wave velocity structure beneath the Long Valley region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, P.B.; Evans, J.R.; Iyer, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    In 1982 and 1984 the US Geological Survey used several seismic networks, totaling over 90 stations, to record teleseismic P waves and measure travel time residuals in an area centered on the Long Valley caldera. The travel time residuals have been inverted to obtain a three-dimensional image of the velocity structure with resolution of 5-6 km to depths of 70 km beneath the array. Direct inversion of these data indicates that the 2- to 4-km-thick low-velocity caldera fill contaminates the signal from any midcrustal velocity anomalies beneath the caldera. Two methods were used to strip the effects of the upper crust from the travel time residuals and the resulting "stripped' models show two well-resolved midcrustal low-velocity bodies in the Long Valley region. The features are interpreted as silicic magma chambers and the presence of additional pockets of magma <5 km across in the upper crust is not ruled out. The high eruptive rate of the Mono Craters and upper mantle velocity anomalies suggest that the focus of volcanism is shifting north from Long Valley to the Mono Craters. -from Authors

  14. One dimensional P wave velocity structure of the crust beneath west Java and accurate hypocentre locations from local earthquake inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Supardiyono; Santosa, Bagus Jaya

    2012-06-20

    A one-dimensional (1-D) velocity model and station corrections for the West Java zone were computed by inverting P-wave arrival times recorded on a local seismic network of 14 stations. A total of 61 local events with a minimum of 6 P-phases, rms 0.56 s and a maximum gap of 299 Degree-Sign were selected. Comparison with previous earthquake locations shows an improvement for the relocated earthquakes. Tests were carried out to verify the robustness of inversion results in order to corroborate the conclusions drawn out from our reasearch. The obtained minimum 1-D velocity model can be used to improve routine earthquake locations and represents a further step toward more detailed seismotectonic studies in this area of West Java.

  15. The 2012 Ferrara seismic sequence: from a 1D reliable crustal structure for moment tensor solutions to strong implications for seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttinelli, M.; Malagnini, L.; Herrmann, R. B.; Munafò, I.; Anselmi, M.; Akinci, A.; Boschi, E.

    2012-12-01

    On May 20 2012, an event of ML 5.9 (MW 5.6) struck the southern edge of the Po river plain (Pianura Padana). The earthquake was preceded by a foreshock of ML 4.1 (MW 3.8), less than 3 hours before the MW 5.6 main. Hypocentral depths were 6.3 km for both events. Centroid depths were 5 and 6 km, respectively. The activated fault was a reverse one, dipping to the south. Then a complex seismic sequence started, in which more than six earthquakes with ML greater than 5 struck the area, the last one on June 3, 2012. Aftershocks delineated a 50 km-long and 10-15 km-wide zone, approximately elongated in the WE direction. More than 2100 events were located between May 19 and June 25 2012 by the INGV National Seismic Network, 80 of them with ML greater than 3.5. The damage due to the ML 5+ earthquakes was widespread, as they severely hit historical towns and industrial infrastructures. However, a striking inconsistency exists between the relatively small moment magnitudes and the corresponding high level of damage. In order to define a velocity structure for the crust beneath the Pianura Padana, to be used for waveform inversion of moment tensors, we gathered all the geophysical and geological information available for the area. The model is characterized by very thick and shallow Quaternary sediments, to be used for the inversion of broadband waveforms for moment tensor (MT) solutions, in the frequency band between 0.02-0.1 Hz. We calculated moment tensors for 20 events down to MW~3.2. We demonstrate how surface waves dominate the seismograms in the region, which may have played a major role in enhancing the damage to industrial structures observed in the epicentral area. Synthetic seismograms computed using the developed model well reproduced the anomalous durations of the ground motion observed in Pianura Padana, also highlighting important implications for the seismic hazard in the entire area. The present seismic hazard assessment as well as the size of the historical

  16. On the velocity in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mercolli, Lorenzo; Pajer, Enrico E-mail: enrico.pajer@gmail.com

    2014-03-01

    We compute the renormalized two-point functions of density, divergence and vorticity of the velocity in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. Because of momentum and mass conservation, the corrections from short scales to the large-scale power spectra of density, divergence and vorticity must start at order k{sup 4}. For the vorticity this constitutes one of the two leading terms. Exact (approximated) self-similarity of an Einstein-de Sitter (ΛCDM) background fixes the time dependence so that the vorticity power spectrum at leading order is determined by the symmetries of the problem and the power spectrum around the non-linear scale. We show that to cancel all divergences in the velocity correlators one needs new counterterms. These fix the definition of velocity and do not represent new properties of the system. For an Einstein-de Sitter universe, we show that all three renormalized cross- and auto-correlation functions have the same structure but different numerical coefficients, which we compute. We elucidate the differences between using momentum and velocity.

  17. IRIS and the S-velocity structure of the North American upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lee, S.; Frederiksen, A. W.

    2004-12-01

    Owing to its US-based origin and resulting seismogram holdings the Data Management Center (DMC) of the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) has greatly facilitated waveform tomographic studies worldwide, and for North America in particular. We report on one such undertaking, in which nearly one and a half thousand seismograms from the IRIS DMC and the Canadian National Seismic Network have been interactively analyzed and used in a Partitioned Waveform Inversion for a tomographic model for the three-dimensional S-velocity structure of the North American upper mantle. A predecessor (NA95) of this new model is consistent with global tomographic models and revealed additional detail such as an upper-mantle component of subducted Farallon lithosphere, an enigmatic structure for the Wyoming lithosphere, and a V-shaped dent in the new England cratonic lithosphere. These details in turn helped spark additional IRIS activity in the form of further analyses of the data holdings of the DMC and PASSCAL experiments addressing these details. The new model provides relatively high-resolution images of the high-velocity rigid root beneath the Canadian shield and central US, which extends to depths of 200-300 km, the low velocities beneath the tectonically active Cordillera and the continent west of it, which also reach depths of 200-300 km, and details herein such as those mentioned above. Below these structures, high-velocity features in the transition zone are not as steep as but in line with the dipping high-velocity Farallon slab imaged in the lower mantle with tomographic methods that include teleseismic body waves. Increased accuracy in the new model, relative to its predecessors, is largely a result of extending the data base that constrains it. We checked the effects of using sensitivity kernels that cover elliptical areas around the great circles and found that they do not lead to better a posteriori data fits.

  18. The observation of correlated velocity structures in a translucent molecular cloud and implications for turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnani, L.; Larosa, T. N.; Shore, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    We present a formaldehyde map of the translucent high-latitude molecular cloud MBM 16. The molecular gas traced by the H2CO is located in spatially distinct large structures that exhibit velocity coherence on a scale of 0.5 pc. These structures are not pressure-confined and are probably not self-gravitating. They may be transient structures. If so, we suggest that they are produced by shear flows whose scale length is of order the size of the cloud.

  19. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure of the San Francisco Bay area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hole, J.A.; Brocher, T.M.; Klemperer, S.L.; Parsons, T.; Benz, H.M.; Furlong, K.P.

    2000-01-01

    Seismic travel times from the northern California earthquake catalogue and from the 1991 Bay Area Seismic Imaging Experiment (BASIX) refraction survey were used to obtain a three-dimensional model of the seismic velocity structure of the San Francisco Bay area. Nonlinear tomography was used to simultaneously invert for both velocity and hypocenters. The new hypocenter inversion algorithm uses finite difference travel times and is an extension of an existing velocity tomography algorithm. Numerous inversions were performed with different parameters to test the reliability of the resulting velocity model. Most hypocenters were relocated 12 km under the Sacramento River Delta, 6 km beneath Livermore Valley, 5 km beneath the Santa Clara Valley, and 4 km beneath eastern San Pablo Bay. The Great Valley Sequence east of San Francisco Bay is 4-6 km thick. A relatively high velocity body exists in the upper 10 km beneath the Sonoma volcanic field, but no evidence for a large intrusion or magma chamber exists in the crust under The Geysers or the Clear Lake volcanic center. Lateral velocity contrasts indicate that the major strike-slip faults extend subvertically beneath their surface locations through most of the crust. Strong lateral velocity contrasts of 0.3-0.6 km/s are observed across the San Andreas Fault in the middle crust and across the Hayward, Rogers Creek, Calaveras, and Greenville Faults at shallow depth. Weaker velocity contrasts (0.1-0.3 km/s) exist across the San Andreas, Hayward, and Rogers Creek Faults at all other depths. Low spatial resolution evidence in the lower crust suggests that the top of high-velocity mafic rocks gets deeper from west to east and may be offset under the major faults. The data suggest that the major strike-slip faults extend subvertically through the middle and perhaps the lower crust and juxtapose differing lithology due to accumulated strike-slip motion. The extent and physical properties of the major geologic units as

  20. Treatise on seismicity and velocity structure of the northern Mississippi Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafanejad, Akramalsadat

    Seismicity of the New Madrid seismic zone, velocity structure of the northern Mississippi Embayment and extent of lithospheric discontinuities have been investigated in this work. Spatial variations of seismic b-value in the NMSZ have been determined. A region of high b-value (b˜1.8) in the northern segment of the Reelfoot fault has been found which reflects higher frequency in the occurrence rate of small earthquakes. This is attributed to fault creep in a medium with high silica content, high pore fluid pressure and extensive velocity heterogeneity. In another study, power spectral ratios of horizontal to vertical (H/V) and vertical to horizontal (V/H) components of teleseismic P-waves recorded by broadband seismic stations inside the Mississippi embayment have been examined to produce a 3-D average velocity map of the sediments. Fundamental resonance frequencies for S-wave reverberations in the northern Mississippi Embayment are about 0.2 to 0.4 Hz. Detailed linear gradient velocity models for Vp and Vs have also been calculated using teleseismic vertical and radial transfer functions at 60 broadband stations inside the Mississippi embayment and simultaneously inverting for velocity parameters. This led to a detailed 3-D linear gradient Vp and Vs model of the sediments for the first time. P-wave velocity starts at about 1.0 km/s near the surface and increases with depth to 3.5 to 4 km/s in deeper parts of the embayment. S-wave velocities vary from 0.3km/s to 1.6 km/s in deeper sections to the southwest. This detailed velocity structure of the unconsolidated sediments is developed so that it could be used to downward continue the transfer functions to the depth of 5 km to remove the effects of observed amplification, reverberation and large P-S conversions that occurs at the sediment-bedrock interface. The resulting waveforms are depth migrated to image the lateral and vertical changes of major reflectors with depth. The Moho boundary is observed with high

  1. Complete regional waveform modeling to estimate seismic velocity structure and source parameters for CTBT monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Bredbeck, T; Rodgers, A; Walter, W

    1999-07-23

    The velocity structures and source parameters estimated by waveform modeling provide valuable information for CTBT monitoring. The inferred crustal and uppermost mantle structures advance understanding of tectonics and guides regionalization for event location and identification efforts. Estimation of source parameters such as seismic moment, depth and mechanism (whether earthquake, explosion or collapse) is crucial to event identification. In this paper we briefly outline some of the waveform modeling research for CTBT monitoring performed in the last year. In the future we will estimate structure for new regions by modeling waveforms of large well-observed events along additional paths. Of particular interest will be the estimation of velocity structure in aseismic regions such as most of Africa and the Former Soviet Union. Our previous work on aseismic regions in the Middle East, north Africa and south Asia give us confidence to proceed with our current methods. Using the inferred velocity models we plan to estimate source parameters for smaller events. It is especially important to obtain seismic moments of earthquakes for use in applying the Magnitude-Distance Amplitude Correction (MDAC; Taylor et al., 1999) to regional body-wave amplitudes for discrimination and calibrating the coda-based magnitude scales.

  2. Structural Integrity Of Low-Velocity Impacted C/SIC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoche, R.; Drose, A.

    2012-07-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are most favourable for thermal protection systems & hot structures in re-entry vehicles since they offer superior heat resistance, high specific strength as well as a low coefficient of temperature expansion (CTE). To ensure the structural integrity of these C/SiC structures and thus mission safety all potential degradation effects during manufacturing and lifetime have to be considered. One of the most probable defects which may harm the structural integrity significantly can be caused by low-velocity impacts (LVI) which may occur during transportation and integration by e.g. dropping of tools. Thus the present study focuses on the residual mechanical and thermo-mechanical performance of C/SiC composites after being exposed to a low-velocity impact in terms of initial and residual mechanical performance, changes in microstructure, as well as thermo-mechanical performance through exposing specimens to multiple experimentally simulated re-entries. The results reveal the impact characteristics and damage mechanisms of C/SiC CMC exposed to a low-velocity impact and evidence the functional reliability as well as the damage tolerance of the C/SiC material investigated.

  3. Shear wave velocity structure of the Anatolian Plate: anomalously slow crust in southwestern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, Jonathan R.; Biryol, C. Berk; Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George; Ward, Kevin M.

    2015-07-01

    The Anatolian Plate is composed of different lithospheric blocks and ribbon continents amalgamated during the closure of the Paleotethys Ocean and Neotethys Ocean along a subduction margin. Using ambient noise tomography, we investigate the crustal and uppermost mantle shear wave velocity structure of the Anatolian Plate. A total of 215 broad-band seismic stations were used spanning 7 yr of recording to compute 13 778 cross-correlations and obtain Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements for periods between 8 and 40 s. We then perform a shear wave inversion to calculate the seismic velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle. Our results show that the overall crustal shear wave velocities of the Anatolian crust are low (˜3.4 km s-1), indicative of a felsic overall composition. We find that prominent lateral seismic velocity gradients correlate with Tethyan suture zones, supporting the idea that the neotectonic structures of Turkey are exploiting the lithospheric weaknesses associated with the amalgamation of Anatolia. Anomalously slow shear wave velocities (˜3.15 km s-1 at 25 km) are located in the western limb of the Isparta Angle in southwestern Turkey. In the upper crust, we find that these low shear wave velocities correlate well with the projected location of a carbonate platform unit (Bey Dağlari) beneath the Lycian Nappe complex. In the lower crust and upper mantle of this region, we propose that the anomalously slow velocities are due to the introduction of aqueous fluids related to the underplating of accretionary material from the underthrusting of a buoyant, attenuated continental fragment similar to the Eratosthenes seamount. We suggest that this fragment controlled the location of the formation of the Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator fault in the eastern Aegean Sea during rapid slab rollback of the Aegean Arc in early Miocene times. Lastly, we observe that the uppermost mantle beneath continental Anatolia is generally slow (˜4.2 km s-1

  4. New upper mantle P-velocity model of Eurasia resolves connections to main regional tectonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, I.; Kaban, M. K.; Cloetingh, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present a new model of P-velocity anomalies in the upper mantle beneath Eurasia constructed by merging several existing models and by computing new results for a number of gap areas. The models were computed based on tomographic inversions of travel-time data from the worldwide catalogues (ISC, 2001). The calculations were performed in a series of overlapping circular areas of 700-1000 km size. All data with rays corresponding to sources and/or stations in the areas traveling through the target volume were, at least partly, used in the inversions. In case of lack of stations and events, the calculations were based on PP-rays with reflection points in the target area. The new model of Eurasia resolves connections between upper mantle structures and main tectonic units. Cratonic blocks in Eurasia, such as the East-European, Siberian, Indian and Arabian cratons are detected in terms of high-velocity patterns down to 250-300 km depth. The subduction zones in the western Pacific, Burma and the Mediterranean are robustly resolved, consistent with previous studies. In zones of continental collision, we observe traces of mantle delamination as drops of high-velocity material in the mantle. Sites of intraplate volcanism in Europe, Siberia, Mongolia and Yakutia coincide with low-velocity areas, interpreted as overheated upper mantle. Digital version of the model can be downloaded at www.ivan-art.com/temp/vis_eurasia.zip. P-velocity anomalies beneath Eurasia at 100 km depth from regional tomographic inversion. Polygons indicate possible locations of cratonic lithosphere blocks; stars mark the areas of Cenozoic volcanism. P-velocity anomalies beneath Eurasia at 300 km depth from regional tomographic inversion. Polygons indicate possible locations of cratonic lithosphere blocks.

  5. Seismic velocity structure and microearthquake source properties at The Geysers, California, geothermal area

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, D.R.

    1986-12-01

    The method of progressive hypocenter-velocity inversion has been extended to incorporate S-wave arrival time data and to estimate S-wave velocities in addition to P-wave velocities. S-wave data to progressive inversion does not completely eliminate hypocenter-velocity tradeoffs, but they are substantially reduced. Results of a P and S-wave progressive hypocenter-velocity inversion at The Geysers show that the top of the steam reservoir is clearly defined by a large decrease of V/sub p//V/sub s/ at the condensation zone-production zone contact. The depth interval of maximum steam production coincides with minimum observed V/sub p//V/sub s/, and V/sub p//V/sub s/ increses below the shallow primary production zone suggesting that reservoir rock becomes more fluid saturated. The moment tensor inversion method was applied to three microearthquakes at The Geysers. Estimated principal stress orientations were comparable to those estimated using P-wave firstmotions as constraints. Well constrained principal stress orientations were obtained for one event for which the 17 P-first motions could not distinguish between normal-slip and strike-slip mechanisms. The moment tensor estimates of principal stress orientations were obtained using far fewer stations than required for first-motion focal mechanism solutions. The three focal mechanisms obtained here support the hypothesis that focal mechanisms are a function of depth at The Geysers. Progressive inversion as developed here and the moment tensor inversion method provide a complete approach for determining earthquake locations, P and S-wave velocity structure, and earthquake source mechanisms.

  6. Analysis of the 3D Structure and Velocity of a CME on 2 January 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, F. M.; Cremades, H.

    We perform an analysis of the 3D structure and velocity of a CME (coronal mass ejection) ejected on 2 January 2008. The event was imaged by both STEREO A and B spacecraft (mutual separation of ˜44°), providing polarized images of the event from two different points of view. To obtain information on the 3D structure of the CME from polarized images, a polarization technique (Moran & Davila, Science 305, 66, 2003) is applied. Aided by this method, we have constructed topographical maps which show the height of the various event features from the plane of the sky (i.e. toward or away from the observer) and have dinamically analyzed and compared the real and projected on the plane of the sky velocities.

  7. Peeling linear inversion of upper mantle velocity structure with receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xuzhang; Zhou, Huilan

    2012-02-01

    A peeling linear inversion method is presented to study the upper mantle (from Moho to 800 km depth) velocity structures with receiver functions. The influences of the crustal and upper mantle velocity ratio error on the inversion results are analyzed, and three valid measures are taken for its reduction. This method is tested with the IASP91 and the PREM models, and the upper mantle structures beneath the stations GTA, LZH, and AXX in northwestern China are then inverted. The results indicate that this inversion method is feasible to quantify upper mantle discontinuities, besides the discontinuities between 3 h M ( h M denotes the depth of Moho) and 5 h M due to the interference of multiples from Moho. Smoothing is used to overcome possible false discontinuities from the multiples and ensure the stability of the inversion results, but the detailed information on the depth range between 3 h M and 5 h M is sacrificed.

  8. Design and test of a superconducting structure for high-velocity ions

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Kennedy, W.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1992-10-01

    Following the successful development of a niobium coaxial half-wave structure we have designed, built and tested a new half-wave geometry: the spoke resonator. This geometry is better suited for high frequency resonators and for the acceleration of high velocity ions. The prototype cavity is a 2-gap structure resonating at 855 MHz, and optimized for particle velocity of 0.30 c. It is easier to manufacture than the coaxial half-wave resonator and the geometry can be straightforwardly extended to multigap designs. Rf-tests have been performed on this cavity both prior to and after high temperature annealing. An accelerating gradient of 7.2 MV/m (cw) and 7.8 MV/m (pulsed) was observed at 4.2 K. After annealing, a low power Q{sub 0} of 1.2 {times}10{sup 8} was observed with small Q degradation due to field emission at high accelerating fields.

  9. Design and test of a superconducting structure for high-velocity ions

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Kennedy, W.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1992-01-01

    Following the successful development of a niobium coaxial half-wave structure we have designed, built and tested a new half-wave geometry: the spoke resonator. This geometry is better suited for high frequency resonators and for the acceleration of high velocity ions. The prototype cavity is a 2-gap structure resonating at 855 MHz, and optimized for particle velocity of 0.30 c. It is easier to manufacture than the coaxial half-wave resonator and the geometry can be straightforwardly extended to multigap designs. Rf-tests have been performed on this cavity both prior to and after high temperature annealing. An accelerating gradient of 7.2 MV/m (cw) and 7.8 MV/m (pulsed) was observed at 4.2 K. After annealing, a low power Q{sub 0} of 1.2 {times}10{sup 8} was observed with small Q degradation due to field emission at high accelerating fields.

  10. Role of microscopic properties in the evolution of large scale internal structure in the UltraLow Velocity Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Amiya; Hier-Majumder, Saswata

    2016-04-01

    Seismic observations at the Earth's core -mantle boundary show regions marked by anomalously low shear (30%) and compressional wave (10%) speeds, called UltraLow Velocity Zones (ULVZs). These ULVZs are characterized by their low topography (few tens of km above the core-mantle boundary) spanning few thousand of km in length and possible presence of partial melting, and a 8-10% increase in density compared to the surrounding mantle materials and low viscosity. Current understanding attributes presence of partial melt in the ULVZs for its low viscosity. Recent studies have shown that such rheology can be explained by the presence of Fe-rich phases, which does not require the presence of partial melt in the system. Ascent of such a dense, low viscosity material from the core-mantle boundary is mechanically difficult. Earlier studies have shown mantle convection as the guiding factor in controlling the flow and geometry of the ULVZs, without any quantification about their internal structure. There have been some recent studies in 1D and 2D, which models ULVZs as multiphase system. However, there is no numerical model that shows the evolution of ULVZs in 3D and development of the internal structures within these zones. Rock deformation experiments and theoretical analysis explicitly show that the melt-volume fraction and the dihedral angle have strong effect on the melt topology and seismic properties in partially molten systems like ULVZs. Employing these well constrained microstructural properties, the present study aims to explore the complex three-dimensional internal structure within the patchy ULVZs geometry. Our two-phase finite element model shows that the partial melt segregate within the ULVZ as a function of strong deformation in the matrix.

  11. Anisotropic Shear-wave Velocity Structure of East Asian Upper Mantle from Waveform Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, J.; Yuan, H.; French, S. W.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Ni, S.

    2012-12-01

    East Asia is a seismically active region featuring active tectonic belts, such as the Himalaya collision zone, western Pacific subduction zones and the Tianshan- Baikal tectonic belt. In this study, we applied full waveform time domain tomography to image 3D isotropic, radially and azimuthally anisotropic upper mantle shear velocity structure of East Asia. High quality teleseismic waveforms were collected for both permanent and temporary stations in the target and its adjacent regions, providing good ray path coverage of the study region. Fundamental and overtone wave packets, filtered down to 60 sec, were inverted for isotropic and radially anisotropic shear wave structure using normal mode asymptotic coupling theory (NACT: Li and Romanowicz, 1995). Joint inversion of SKS measurements and seismic waveforms was then carried out following the methodology described in (Marone and Romanowicz, 2007). The 3D velocity model shows strong lateral heterogeneities in the target region, which correlate well with the surface geology in East Asia. Our model shows that Indian lithosphere has subducted beneath Tibet with a different northern reach from western to eastern Tibet,. We also find variations of the slab geometry in Western Pacific subduction zones. Old and stable regions, such as, Indian shield, Siberia platform, Tarim and Yangtze blocks are found to have higher shear wave velocity in the upper mantle. Lower velocity anomalies are found in regions like Baikal rift, Tienshan, Indochina block, and the regions along Japan island-Ryukyu Trench and Izu-bonin Trench. The dominant fast and slow velocity boundaries in the study region are well correlated with tectonic belts, such as the central Asian orogenic belt and Alty/Qilian-Qinling/Dabie orogenic belt. Our radially anisotropic model shows Vsh> Vsv in oceanic regions and at larger depths(>300km), and Vsv > Vsh in some orogenic zones.. We'll show preliminary results of azimuthally anisotropic joint inversion of SKS

  12. Shear wave velocity structure of Reed Bank, southern continental margin of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaodong; Ruan, Aiguo; Zhao, Minghui; Qiu, Xuelin; Wu, Zhenli; Niu, Xiongwei

    2015-03-01

    The shear wave velocity structure of a wide angle seismic profile (OBS973-2) across Reed Bank in the southern continental margin of the South China Sea (SCS) is simulated by 2-D ray-tracing method, based on its previous P-wave model. This profile is 369-km-long and consists of fifteen three-component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS). The main results are as follows.(1) The model consists of seven layers and the shear wave velocity increases from 0.7 km/s at the top of sediment layer to 4.0 km/s in the lower crust. (2) The Moho depth decreases from 20-22 km at the Reed Bank to 9-11 km at the deep oceanic basin with the shear wave velocity of 4.2 km/s below the Moho. (3) The Vp/Vs ratio decreases with depth through the sedimentary layers, attributed to increased compaction and consolidation of the rocks. (4) In the continental upper crust (at model distance 90-170 km), S-wave velocity (2.5-3.2 km/s) is relatively low and Vp/Vs ratio (1.75-1.82) is relatively high compared with the other parts of the crust, corresponding to the lower P-wave velocity in the previous P-wave model and normal faults revealed by MCS data, indicating that a strong regional extensional movement had occurred during the formation process of the SCS at the Reed Bank area. (5) The S-wave structures indicate that Reed Bank crust has different rock compositions from that in the east section of the northern margin, denying the presence of conjugate relationship of Reed Bank with Dongsha islands. According to P-wave models and other data, we inferred that Reed Bank and Macclesfield were separated from the same continental crust during the rifting and break-up process.

  13. Low velocity normal fault structures associated with intermediate depth seismicity - insights from body wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, T.; Rietbrock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Low velocity structures in the upper slab have been inferred from guided wave studies (e.g Abers 2000) and subsequently resolved by a number of geophysical methods including receiver function analyses and high resolution seismic tomography . These low velocity structures are potentially explained by the presence of hydrous mineral assemblages in the subducted oceanic crust. This supports the long proposed theory that mineral dehydration during subduction may weaken the crust and allow for intermediate depth seismicity. Recently it has been proposed that normal faulting in the slab may provide a mechanism for hydration deep in the slab, as stress changes due to slab bending promotes the downward pumping of fluids (Faccenda et al. 2009). At greater depth, the reactivation of outer rise normal faults has been postulated by Ranero et al. (2005) as a cause Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity. However there is no direct seismological evidence of normal faults at intermediate depths. Here we present seismic evidence that these faults are in fact associated with low velocities, possibly caused by hydrous minerals or the presence of fluids. We analyse dispersive P-wave arrivals from intermediate depth events in Northern Japan. Finite difference wave propagation models are used to constrain the structure related to this dispersion. Dispersion of deeper events (>150 km) can be explained by a low velocity layer (LVL) at the top of the slab acting as a waveguide. This LVL has a thickness of ~8 km, and a 5 - 12% reduction in velocity. Shallower events (70 - 150 km depth) that occur well below the top of the slab also show dispersion. This cannot be attributed to the upper LVL as the event must be on or near to the waveguide for dispersion to occur. Numerical modeling shows that these shallower dispersive events can be explained by very low velocity structures dipping with a normal fault geometry. We propose that these dipping planes might indicate hydrated material along normal

  14. Surface-wave propagation and phase-velocity structure from observations on the USArray Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Anna E.

    We address questions relating to the velocity structure of the Earth in three ways: mapping the phase-velocity structure of the western United States, examining deviations of wave paths due to lateral variations in velocity, and demonstrating that Love wave fundamental-mode phase measurements from array methods can be significantly contaminated by overtone interference, dependent on differences in fundamental-mode and first-overtone phase-velocity structure. All of the studies presented in this work use USArray Transportable Array data, which allow for dense, high-quality measurements at an unprecedented level. To image the uppermost mantle beneath the western US, we improve upon single-station phase measurements by differencing them to produce a baseline data set of phase measurements along inter-station paths, for both Love and Rayleigh waves from 25--100 s. Additional measurements of the arrival angle and local phase velocity are made using a mini-array method similar to beamforming. The arrival-angle measurements are used to correct the two-station baseline measurements and produce a corrected data set. Both the baseline and corrected data sets are separately inverted, producing phase-velocity maps on a 0.5°-by-0.5° grid. We select the corrected maps as the preferred models for Rayleigh waves, with better fits to the data and more consistent measurements. We find that arrival-angle measurements for Love waves may be biased by overtone interference, and hence select the baseline maps as the preferred models for Love waves. The final set of phase-velocity maps is consistent with expectations from known geologic features, and is useful for both calculation of phase for regional paths and studies of radial anisotropy within the region. We use the mini-array method to make observations of the deviations of waves from the great-circle path. Measured arrival angles vary from 0° to +/-15°. We compile results from earthquakes in small source regions, allowing the

  15. Shear wave velocity structure of the Anatolian Plate and surrounding regions using Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, J. R.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Biryol, C. B.; Ward, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Anatolian Plate consists of various lithospheric terranes amalgamated during the closure of the Tethys Ocean, and is currently extruding to the west in response to a combination of the collision of the Arabian plate in the east and the roll back of the Aegean subduction zone in the west. We used Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) at periods <= 40s to investigate the crust and uppermost mantle structure of the Anatolian Plate. We computed a total of 13,779 unique cross-correlations using one sample-per-second vertical component broadband seismic data from 215 stations from 8 different networks over a period of 7 years to compute fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave dispersion curves following the method of Benson et al. (2007). We then inverted the dispersion data to calculate phase velocity maps for 11 periods from 8 s - 40 s throughout Anatolia and the Aegean regions (Barmin et al. 2001). Using smoothed Moho values derived from Vanacore et al. (2013) in our starting models, we inverted our dispersion curves using a linear least-squares iterative inversion scheme (Herrmann & Ammon 2004) to produce a 3-D shear-wave velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle throughout Anatolia and the Aegean. We find a good correlation between our seismic shear wave velocities and paleostructures (suture zones) and modern deformation (basin formation and fault deformation). The most prominent crustal velocity contrasts occur across intercontinental sutures zones, resulting from the juxtaposition of the compositionally different basements of the amalgamated terranes. At shallow depths, seismic velocity contrasts correspond closely with surficial features. The Thrace, Cankiri and Tuz Golu basins, and accretionary complexes related to the closure of the Neotethys are characterized by slow shear wave velocities, while the Menderes and Kirsehir Massifs, Pontides, and Istanbul Zone are characterized by fast velocities. We find that the East Anatolia Plateau has slow shear-wave velocities

  16. The lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia: Young volcanism in an old shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zheng; Julià, Jordi; Zahran, Hani; Mai, P. Martin

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia by conducting H-κ stacking analysis and jointly inverting teleseismic P-receiver functions and fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave group velocities at 56 broadband stations deployed by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). The study region, the Arabian plate, is traditionally divided into the western Arabian shield and the eastern Arabian platform: The Arabian shield itself is a complicated mélange of crustal material, composed of several Proterozoic terrains separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks (locally known as harrats). The Arabian platform is primarily covered by 8 to 10 km of Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. Our results reveal high Vp/Vs ratios in the region of Harrat Lunayyir, which are interpreted as solidified magma intrusions from old magmatic episodes in the shield. Our results also indicate slow velocities and large upper mantle lid temperatures below the southern and northern tips of the Arabian shield, when compared with the values obtained for the central shield. We argue that our inferred patterns of lid velocity and temperature are due to heating by thermal conduction from the Afar plume (and, possibly, the Jordan plume), and that volcanism in western Arabia may result from small-scale adiabatic ascent of magma diapirs.

  17. Compressive strength evaluation of structural lightweight concrete by non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method.

    PubMed

    Bogas, J Alexandre; Gomes, M Glória; Gomes, Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the compressive strength of a wide range of structural lightweight aggregate concrete mixes is evaluated by the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method. This study involves about 84 different compositions tested between 3 and 180 days for compressive strengths ranging from about 30 to 80 MPa. The influence of several factors on the relation between the ultrasonic pulse velocity and compressive strength is examined. These factors include the cement type and content, amount of water, type of admixture, initial wetting conditions, type and volume of aggregate and the partial replacement of normal weight coarse and fine aggregates by lightweight aggregates. It is found that lightweight and normal weight concretes are affected differently by mix design parameters. In addition, the prediction of the concrete's compressive strength by means of the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity test is studied. Based on the dependence of the ultrasonic pulse velocity on the density and elasticity of concrete, a simplified expression is proposed to estimate the compressive strength, regardless the type of concrete and its composition. More than 200 results for different types of aggregates and concrete compositions were analyzed and high correlation coefficients were obtained.

  18. Velocity structure around the Baikal rift zone from teleseismic and local earthquake traveltimes and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Carole; Koulakov, Ivan; Deverchère, Jacques

    1998-10-01

    We present new results on the velocity structure of the Baikal rift zone, Asia, deduced from a comparative teleseismic and local tomography analysis. The aim of this paper is to better identify the role of deep mantle processes versus that of far-field tectonic effects on the occurrence of extensional tectonics within a continental plate. We use 36000 traveltimes of P-refracted waves from the ISC catalogues and Pg and Pn traveltimes of 578 earthquakes recorded by the Russian regional network to determine a velocity model by the use of local and teleseismic inversion procedures. The models show that some velocity patterns are continuous from the surface down to at least 400 km. Among them, a narrow negative anomaly goes through Mongolia and follows the southern and eastern margins of the Siberian craton: this structure is interpreted as a thin mantle plume rising beneath the rift axis. However, our results do not evidence any wide asthenospheric upwarp at this place. Other velocity anomalies observed near the surface are not deeply rooted. In particular, a negative anomaly is observed at shallow levels (48 km) beneath the northern third of Lake Baikal, which is disconnected from deeper structures. It may be explained by the existence of underplated magmatic material at the bottom of the crust. By comparing the geometry of deep-rooted anomalies to the present-day stress field patterns, we conclude that the sub-lithospheric mantle dynamics is not the main factor controlling extensional processes in the Baikal rift. However, it does contribute to a thermal weakening of the lithosphere along a mechanical discontinuity bounding the Siberian shield. We finally conclude that three favourable conditions are gathered in the Baikal area to generate extension: far-field extensional stress field, mechanical inherited lithospheric weakness and heat supply. Further studies should help to precise the genetic link between these three factors.

  19. A 3-D crustal velocity structure across the Variscides of southwest Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, M.; Readman, P. W.; O'Reilly, B. M.; Shannon, P. M.

    2003-04-01

    In the VARNET-96 experiment three seismic refraction profiles were acquired to examine the crustal structure in the south-west of Ireland. The shotpoint geometry allowed for both in-line and off-line fan shot recordings on the three profiles. Results of 3-D inversion modelling illustrate that there is pervasive lateral heterogeneity of the sedimentary and crustal velocity structure south of the Shannon Estuary. Palaeozoic strata at the south coast are about 5-6 km thick associated with the sedimentary infill of the Munster and South Munster Basins. To the north, shallow upper crust in the vicinity of the Killarney-Mallow Fault Zone is followed by a 3-4 km thick sedimentary succession in the Dingle-Shannon Basin. A zone of high-velocity upper crust (6.4-6.6 km/s) beneath the South Munster Basin correlates with a gravity high between the Kenmare-Killarney and the Leinster Granite gravity lows. Other high-velocity zones beneath Dingle Bay and the Kenmare River region may be associated with the deep traces of the Killarney-Mallow Fault Zone and the Cork-Kenmare Line. The 3-D velocity model was taken as a basis for the computation of PmP reflected arrivals from the crust-mantle boundary. The Moho depth varies from 28-29 km at the south coast to 32-33 km beneath the Dingle-Shannon Basin. Pervasive Variscan deformation appears to be confined to the sedimentary and upper crustal structure thus supporting a thin-skinned tectonic model for Variscan deformation. Deep-crustal variations only occur where they can be correlated with major tectonic features such as the Caledonian Iapetus Suture near the Shannon Estuary. The shallowing of the Moho towards the coast may result from Mesozoic crustal extension in the adjacent offshore sedimentary basins.

  20. Acoustic wave velocities in two-dimensional composite structures based on acousto-optical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'neva, P. V.; Trushin, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Sound velocities in two-dimensional composite structures based on isotropic and anisotropic acousto-optical crystals have been determined by numerical simulations. The isotropic materials are represented by fused quartz (SiO2) and flint glass, while anisotropic materials include tetragonal crystals of paratellurite (TeO2) and rutile (TiO2) and a trigonal crystal of tellurium (Te). It is established that the acoustic anisotropy of periodic composite structures strongly depends on both the chemical composition and geometric parameters of components.

  1. The structure of high-velocity gas in Orion and the possible role of IRc9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    The spatial and velocity distribution of shocked gas in the Orion molecular cloud has been studied in detail through observations of near-infrared and middle-infrared H2 lines. It is argued that the observed structure requires either an asymmetric outflow or an inhomogeneous ambient molecular cloud, and that the second explanation appears the more likely. It is suggested that mild activity by IRc9, such as a T Tauri type wind or FU Orionis type flare, would be consistent with its apparent nature and could have caused the necessary density structure in the cloud.

  2. Shallow Velocity and Q Structure of Tianjin Basin from P, PP, PPP and Psed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, X.; Ni, S.; Zhang, X.; Wang, F.

    2009-12-01

    Earthquake engineer consider that shallow structure is a major issue on earthquake ground motions. Conventionally, the S velocity of 30 meters is consulted to determine the ground standard. On the other hand, there are suggestions from some researchers that the whole unconsolidated sediments should be considered because large intrinsic attenuation may be a natural consequence of nonlinear, strain-dependent degradation of the shear modulus. (Vucetic, 1994 ). At the same time, almost all the unconsolidated sediments are the nature of basin morphology. The research about shallow detailed velocity and Q structure from 30 m to 400 m is not sufficient. Recently, Langston provided some results that Qp is remarked large that do not like conventional seismological opinions, in the Mississippi Embayment (Langston, 2005). Qp could be effectively determined by Psed which is the robust phase in seisgrams. Psed wave is the trapped wave in unconsolidated sediments. It can be considered the “Whispering Gallery” phase that propagates just below the surface (Walter Mooney, 1980). In the other way, Qp can be estimated by transformed waves and Qs can be evaluated by transformed waves and Rayleigh waves. There are abundance of refraction/reflection experiments in Bohai basin where is more over 30 million peoples settled down. The active fault experiment of China Earthquake Administration in Tianjin is with dense shot points and receiver spaces recorded plenty of refraction seisgrams, from Dec. 2005 to Jan. 2006. We analyzed the P, PP, PPP and Psed phases in the refraction seisgrams and provided the shallow velocity and Q structure in Tianjin basin. We prefer to use the reflectivity method, calculation synthetic seismogram (Wang R, 2007), to model those seismic refraction data. We presented one dimensional detailed velocity model that contain 3 distinct high velocity gradients ranged 20km and analyzed P and the secondary phases to estimate the Q structure of the sedimentary section

  3. Direct ambient noise tomography for 3-D near surface shear velocity structure: methodology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has provided essential constraints on crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure in global seismology. Recent studies demonstrate that high frequency (e.g., ~ 1 Hz) surface waves between receivers at short distances can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation and then be used for imaging near surface or shallow crustal shear velocity structures. This approach provides important information for strong ground motion prediction in seismically active area and overburden structure characterization in oil and gas fields. Here we propose a new tomographic method to invert all surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wavespeed without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency-dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. The wavelet coefficients of the velocity model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, and upon iterations the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated from the newly obtained velocity model. We apply this new method to determine the 3-D near surface wavespeed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan, Hefei urban area and a shale and gas production field in China using the high-frequency interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion data extracted from ambient noisecross-correlation. The results reveal strong effects of off-great-circle propagation of high-frequency surface waves in these regions with above 30% shear wavespeed variations. The proposed approach is more efficient and robust than the traditional two-step surface wave tomography for imaging complex

  4. P wave crustal velocity structure in the greater Mount Rainier area from local earthquake tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Lees, J.M.; Malone, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    We present results from a local earthquake tomographic imaging experiment in the greater Mount Rainier area. We inverted P wave arrival times from local earthquakes recorded at permanent and temporary Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network seismographs between 1980 and 1996. We used a method similar to that described by Lees and Crosson [1989], modified to incorporate the parameter separation method for decoupling the hypocenter and velocity problems. In the upper 7 km of the resulting model there is good correlation between velocity anomalies and surface geology. Many focal mechanisms within the St. Helens seismic zone have nodal planes parallel to the epicentral trend as well as to a north-south trending low-velocity trough, leading us to speculate that the trough represents a zone of structural weakness in which a moderate (M 6.5-7.0) earthquake could occur. In contrast, the western Rainier seismic zone does not correlate in any simple way with anomaly patterns or focal mechanism fault planes, leading us to infer that it is less likely to experience a moderate earthquake. A ???10 km-wide low-velocity anomaly occurs 5 to 18 km beneath the summit of Mount Rainier, which we interpret to be a signal of a region composed of hot, fractured rock with possible small amounts of melt or fluid. No systematic velocity pattern is observed in association with the southern Washington Cascades conductor. A midcrustal anomaly parallels the Olympic-Wallowa lineament as well as several other geophysical trends, indicating that it may play an important role in regional tectonics. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Crust and Upper Mantle Velocity Structure of the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamwandha, C. A.; Powell, C. A.; Langston, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed P wave velocity (Vp) and S wave velocity models (Vs) and Vp/Vs ratios for the crust and upper mantle associated with the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) are presented. The specific study region spans latitude 34 to 39.5 degrees north and longitude 87 to 93 degrees west and extends to a depth of at least 500 km. The density of data from three networks - The Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Network (CNMSN) operated by CERI, the Earthscope transportable array (TA), and the FlexArray (FA) Northern Embayment Lithospheric Embayment (NELE) project stations - provides us with the opportunity to derive detailed velocity models for this region. We use arrival times from local and regional earthquakes and travel time residuals from teleseismic earthquakes recorded by the three networks from September 2011 to date. The teleseismic body wave arrival times are measured using an Automated and Interactive Measurement of Body Wave Arrival Times (AIMBAT) package (Lou et al., 2012). We perform a joint local and teleseismic inversion (Zhao et al.,1994) to determine the velocity structure. For the local events, the hypocenters are relocated iteratively in the inversion process using an efficient 3-D ray tracing technique. We image a significant low velocity anomaly in the upper mantle with a concentration at about 200 - 300 km depth and it is a consistent feature in both the Vp and Vs tomography results. Checkerboard tests show that the spatial resolution is high in the upper mantle especially for the Vp model. The spatial resolution in the crust is fairly high for most of the study area except at the edges and the southeastern part, which can be attributed to diminished local earthquake activity. We perform synthetic tests to isolate smearing effects and further confirm the features in the tomographic images. Vp/Vs ratios are determined for the portions of the model with highest resolution. Preliminary results indicate that significant Vp/Vs ratio variations are present only at

  6. Velocity structure, composition and discrimination of crustal provinces in the former Soviet Union

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorkin, A. V.

    1998-12-01

    Significant progress had been made over the last two decades in seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection investigations of continental Russia. Highlights of this progress include the determination of crustal thickness, lithospheric body-wave velocities, compressional and shear wave attenuation, and existence of deeply penetrating dipping reflectors. These new multiwave Deep Seismic Sounding (DSS) data, recorded along geotraverses crossing Precambrian cratons (PC), provinces of Cenozoic basin deposition (CB), and Palaeozoic fold belts (PB), provide a basis for the study of Eurasian continental structure and tectonics. Interpretation of DSS data has shown that geological provinces of different age and tectonic history can be distinguished by the relationship between Vp/ Vs and the crystalline crustal thickness ( h). There are two primary relationships in the Vp/ Vs vs. h function. In the first (characteristics of PC), Vp/ Vs is directly proportional to crustal thickness. In the second relationship, observed in CB and PB, Vp/ Vs is inversely proportional to crustal thickness. Province boundaries are imaged as dipping reflectors through analysis of the wave field of three component records using special velocity filtering. Dynamic features of these reflections suggest that these boundaries are detachment faults separating relatively thin layers with complicated fine structure. The composition of the crystalline crust, determined from body wave velocities, varies significantly over the transition zone from one geological province to another. Mapping of regions according to the Vp/ Vs vs. h function, shows a correlation of the known mineral, oil, and gas deposits with province boundaries.

  7. The transverse velocity and excitation structure of the HH 110 jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, A.; López, R.; Raga, A. C.; Estalella, R.; Anglada, G.

    2003-03-01

    We present long-slit spectroscopic observations of the HH 110 jet obtained with the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope. We have obtained for the first time, spectra for slit positions along and across the jet axis (at the position of knots B, C, I, J and P) to search for the observational signatures of entrainment and turbulence by studying the kinematics and the excitation structure. We find that the HH 110 flow accelerates from a velocity of 35 km s-1 in knot A up to 110 km s-1 in knot P. We find some systematic trends for the variation of the emission line ratios along the jet. No clear trends for the variation of the radial velocity are seen across the width of the jet beam. The cross sections of the jet show complex radial velocity and line emission structures which differ quite strongly from each other. Based on observations made with the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope operated on La Palma by the Issac Newton Group of Telescopes at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  8. Crustal seismic velocity structure from Eratosthenes Seamount to Hecataeus Rise across the Cyprus Arc, eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welford, J. Kim; Hall, Jeremy; Hübscher, Christian; Reiche, Sönke; Louden, Keith

    2015-02-01

    Wide-angle reflection/refraction seismic profiles were recorded across the Cyprus Arc, the plate boundary between the African Plate and the Aegean-Anatolian microplate, from the Eratosthenes Seamount to the Hecataeus Rise immediately south of Cyprus. The resultant models were able to resolve detail of significant lateral velocity variations, though the deepest crust and Moho are not well resolved from the seismic data alone. Conclusions from the modelling suggest that (i) Eratosthenes Seamount consists of continental crust but exhibits a laterally variable velocity structure with a thicker middle crust and thinner lower crust to the northeast; (ii) the Hecataeus Rise has a thick sedimentary rock cover on an indeterminate crust (likely continental) and the crust is significantly thinner than Eratosthenes Seamount based on gravity modelling; (iii) high velocity basement blocks, coincident with highs in the magnetic field, occur in the deep water between Eratosthenes and Hecataeus, and are separated and bounded by deep low-velocity troughs and (iv) one of the high velocity blocks runs parallel to the Cyprus Arc, while the other two appear linked based on the magnetic data and run NW-SE, parallel to the margin of the Hecataeus Rise. The high velocity block beneath the edge of Eratosthenes Seamount is interpreted as an older magmatic intrusion while the linked high velocity blocks along Hecataeus Rise are interpreted as deformed remnant Tethyan oceanic crust or mafic intrusives from the NNW-SSE oriented transform margin marking the northern boundary of Eratosthenes Seamount. Eratosthenes Seamount, the northwestern limit of rifted continental crust from the Levant Margin, is part of a jagged rifted margin transected by transform faults on the northern edge of the lower African Plate that is being obliquely subducted under the Aegean-Anatolian upper plate. The thicker crust of Eratosthenes Seamount may be acting as an asperity on the subducting slab, locally locking up

  9. Transdimensional Love-wave tomography of the British Isles and shear-velocity structure of the East Irish Sea Basin from ambient-noise interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galetti, Erica; Curtis, Andrew; Baptie, Brian; Jenkins, David; Nicolson, Heather

    2016-08-01

    one-dimensional shear velocity profiles. By merging all 1D profiles, we created a fully three-dimensional model of the crust beneath the East Irish Sea. The depth to basement in this model compares well with that averaged from seismic reflection profiles. This result is the first 3-dimensional model in the UK with fully quantified uncertainties: it shows basin depths and basement structures, and their concomitant uncertainties.

  10. Influence of the spray velocity on arc-sprayed coating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, H.-D.; Nassenstein, K.

    1999-09-01

    Thermal spray processes such as plasma spraying and HVOF have gained markets due to a steady process of development of materials and equipment. One disadvantage of thermal spray processes is that costs must be competitive compared to techniques such as PTA and electroplating. In order to reduce costs, the more economical spray processes like conventional wire flame spraying, as well as arc spraying, are becoming more popular. There are modern arc spray gun designs on the market that meet the requirements of modern coating properties, for example aviation overhaul applications as well as the processing of cored wires. Nevertheless, the physical basis of arc spraying is well known. The aim of the present investigation is to show how the influence of spray velocity (not particle velocity) affects coating structure with respect to arc spray parameters.

  11. Group velocity effect on resonant, long-range wake-fields in slow wave structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.

    2002-03-01

    Synchronous wake-fields in a dispersive waveguide are derived in a general explicit form on the basis of a rigorous electro-dynamical approach using Fourier transformations. The fundamental role of group velocity in wake-field propagation, calculation of attenuation, amplitudes, form-factors and loss-factors is analyzed for single bunch radiation. Adiabatic tapering of the waveguide and bunch density variation is taken into account analytically for the time-domain fields. Effects of field "compression/expansion" and group delays are demonstrated. The role of these effects is discussed for single bunch wake-fields, transient beam loading, BBU and HOMs. A novel waveguide structure with central rf coupling and both positive and negative velocities is proposed. It can be used effectively in both high-energy accelerators and single-section linacs.

  12. Variation of the upper mantle velocity structure along the central-south Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Sandvol, E. A.; Shen, Y.; Gao, H.; Zhang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Variations in the subduction angle of the Nazca plate beneath the South American plate has lead to different modes of deformation and volcanism along the Andean active margin. The volcanic gap between the central and southern Andean volcanic zones is correlated with the Pampean flat-slab subduction zone, where the subducting Nazca slab changes from a 30-degree dipping slab beneath the Puna plateau to a horizontal slab beneath the Sierras Pampeanas, and then to a 30-degree dipping slab beneath the south Andes from north to south. The Pampean flat-slab subduction correlates spatially with the track of the Juan Fernandez Ridge, and is associated with the inboard migration of crustal deformation. A major Pliocene delamination event beneath the southern Puna plateau has previously been inferred from geochemical, geological, and preliminary geophysical data. The mechanisms for the transition between dipping- and flat-subduction slab and the mountain building process of the central Andean plateau are key issues to understanding the Andean-type orogenic process. We use a new frequency-time normalization approach to extract very-broadband (up to 300 second) empirical Green's functions (EGFs) from continuous seismic records. The long-period EGFs provide the sensitivity needed to constrain the deep mantle structure. The broadband waveform data are from 393 portable stations of eight temporary networks: PUNA, SIEMBRA, CHARGE, RAMP, East Sierras Pampeanas, BANJO/SEDA, REFUCA, ANCORP, and 31 permanent stations accessed from both the IRIS DMC and GFZ GEOFON DMC. A finite difference wave propagation method is used to generate synthetic seismograms from 3-D velocity model. We use 3-D traveltime sensitivity kernels, and traveltime residuals measured by waveform cross-correlation to directly invert the upper mantle shear-wave velocity structure. The preliminary model shows strong along-strike velocity variations within in the mantle wedge and the subducting NAZCA slab. Low upper

  13. Variation of the upper mantle velocity structure along the central-south Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaofeng; Sandvol, Eric; Shen, Yang; Gao, Haiying

    2014-05-01

    Variations in the subduction angle of the Nazca plate beneath the South American plate has lead to different modes of deformation and volcanism along the Andean active margin. The volcanic gap between the central and southern Andean volcanic zones is correlated with the Pampean flat-slab subduction zone, where the subducting Nazca slab changes from a 30-degree dipping slab beneath the Puna plateau to a horizontal slab beneath the Sierras Pampeanas, and then to a 30-degree dipping slab beneath the south Andes from north to south. The Pampean flat-slab subduction correlates spatially with the track of the Juan Fernandez Ridge, and is associated with the inboard migration of crustal deformation. A major Pliocene delamination event beneath the southern Puna plateau has previously been inferred from geochemical and geological and preliminary geophysical data. The mechanisms for the transition between dipping- and flat-subduction slab and the mountain building process of the central Andean plateau are key issues to understanding the Andean-type orogenic process. We use a new frequency-time normalization approach with non-linear stacking to extract very-broadband (up to 300 second) empirical Green's functions (EGFs) from continuous seismic records. The long-period EGFs provide the deeper depth-sensitivity needed to constrain the mantle structure. The broadband waveform data are from 393 portable stations of four temporary networks: PUNA, SIEMBRA, CHARGE, RAMP, East Sierras Pampeanas, BANJO/SEDA, REFUCA, ANCORP, and 31 permanent stations accessed from both the IRIS DMC and GFZ GEOFON DMC. A finite difference waveform propagation method is used to generate synthetic seismograms from 3-D velocity model. We use 3-D traveltime sensitivity kernels, and traveltime residuals measurement by waveform cross-correlation to directly invert the upper mantle shear-wave velocity structure. The preliminary model shows strong along-strike velocity variations within in the mantle wedge and

  14. On velocity gradient dynamics and fine-scale structure: experiments support DNS and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, John; Dawson, James

    2015-11-01

    The fine scales of turbulence are embodied by statistics of velocity gradients. In solving exact equations for their evolution, the challenge is to specify how the pressure Hessian acts. This is determined by the footprints that ``structures'' of enstrophy and strain leave in conditional average pressure fields. We use direct and approximate conditional averaging methods to extract this structure from different turbulence datasets: a direct numerical simulation and a unique scanning tomography experiment in a ``French washing machine''. Direct comparisons between simulation and experiment show the structure and resulting dynamics are in excellent, quantitative agreement. This evidence supports existing modelling approaches and provides insights towards their refinement. Moreover, it demonstrates the dynamical significance and the reproducibility of fine-scale structure.

  15. Vertical structure of fluid velocity for flow through vegetation under waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H.; Cox, D.; Albert, D.; Mori, N.; Smith, H. D.

    2010-12-01

    Interaction between hydrodynamics (e.g., wave attenuation, fluid flow characteristics) and vegetation in coastal area is very important to develop strategies for maintenance of sustainable ecological systems. However, there are several difficulties in collecting and analyzing field data of wave attenuation and fluid flow characteristics in coastal vegetation owing to complexity of the various physical processes, such as changes in wind speed and direction, tides, wave refraction and shoaling. Furthermore, without understanding the impact of waves on real vegetation, it is difficult to develop scale-model tests. Therefore, a controlled laboratory environment at prototype scale with live plants is recommended to quantify the hydrodynamics and responses of vegetation. To account for this, a large-scale laboratory experiment was conducted during the summer of 2010 at the Large Wave Flume (104m long, 3.6m wide, and 4.6m deep) at O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (HWRL) at Oregon State University. Live plants (Schoenoplectus pungens or threesquare bulrush) were collected from the field (Tillamook, Oregon), and transplanted to twelve 8-ft long planters. The planters were placed into 4 channels with different plant densities. To our knowledge, this is the first test using live plants in a controlled, high energy wave environment. Observations of hydrodynamics under regular waves will be presented with an emphasis on the vertical structures of fluid velocity with different plant densities. The velocity data were measured using Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) and decomposed into mean current, wave-induced velocity and turbulence. Finally, the effect of the vegetation on the vertical structures of fluid velocity will be discussed. It is acknowledged that this work was conducted as part of Ecological modeling of emergent vegetation for sustaining wetlands in high wave energy coastal environments (NSF 0828549).

  16. Influence of plankton community structure on the sinking velocity of marine aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, L. T.; Boxhammer, T.; Larsen, A.; Hildebrandt, N.; Schulz, K. G.; Riebesell, U.

    2016-08-01

    About 50 Gt of carbon is fixed photosynthetically by surface ocean phytoplankton communities every year. Part of this organic matter is reprocessed within the plankton community to form aggregates which eventually sink and export carbon into the deep ocean. The fraction of organic matter leaving the surface ocean is partly dependent on aggregate sinking velocity which accelerates with increasing aggregate size and density, where the latter is controlled by ballast load and aggregate porosity. In May 2011, we moored nine 25 m deep mesocosms in a Norwegian fjord to assess on a daily basis how plankton community structure affects material properties and sinking velocities of aggregates (Ø 80-400 µm) collected in the mesocosms' sediment traps. We noted that sinking velocity was not necessarily accelerated by opal ballast during diatom blooms, which could be due to relatively high porosity of these rather fresh aggregates. Furthermore, estimated aggregate porosity (Pestimated) decreased as the picoautotroph (0.2-2 µm) fraction of the phytoplankton biomass increased. Thus, picoautotroph-dominated communities may be indicative for food webs promoting a high degree of aggregate repackaging with potential for accelerated sinking. Blooms of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi revealed that cell concentrations of 1500 cells/mL accelerate sinking by about 35-40%, which we estimate (by one-dimensional modeling) to elevate organic matter transfer efficiency through the mesopelagic from 14 to 24%. Our results indicate that sinking velocities are influenced by the complex interplay between the availability of ballast minerals and aggregate packaging; both of which are controlled by plankton community structure.

  17. Regional velocity structure in northern California from inversion of scattered seismic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitz, Fred F.

    1999-07-01

    Seismic surface waves recorded by the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network have been analyzed in order to constrain three-dimensional lateral heterogeneity of the upper mantle under northern California. A total of 2164 seismograms from 173 teleseismic events were windowed for the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave, followed by estimation of complex amplitude spectra over the period range 16 to 100 s using a multiple-taper method. Since Rayleigh waves at shorter periods, particularly below 35 s, suffer from serious multipathing or "non-plane" wave arrivals, these amplitude spectra have been interpreted as the product of wavefront distortion along the teleseismic propagation path and seismic structure beneath the network. The amplitude spectra are first modeled in terms of non-plane incoming wavefields and structural phase velocity perturbations period by period. After corrections for Moho and surface topography, the phase velocity maps are inverted for three-dimensional shear velocity perturbations δνs down to a depth of 200 km. The δνs maps are in good agreement with the results of body studies over a broad spatial scale. The dominant signals are associated with the thermal effects of the active Gorda and fossil Farallon subducted slab stretching from Mount Shasta through the western Sierran foothills to the southern Great Valley and asthenospheric upwelling beneath the northern Coast Ranges. The southern Sierra Nevada Range is characterized by fast δνs down to ˜50 km and slow velocities between ˜60 and 120 km depth, in agreement with independent inferences of a cold crust and warm upper mantle, which may provide the buoyancy forces necessary to support the elevation of the range.

  18. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure in the Sichuan basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Maomao; Hubbard, Judith; Plesch, Andreas; Shaw, John H.; Wang, Lining

    2016-02-01

    We present a new three-dimensional velocity model of the crust in the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. The model describes the velocity structure of the Sichuan basin and surrounding thrust belts. The model consists of 3-D surfaces representing major geologic unit contacts and faults and is parameterized with Vp velocity-depth functions calibrated using sonic logs. The model incorporates data from 1166 oil wells, industry isopach maps, geological maps, and a digital elevation model. The geological surfaces were modeled based on structure contour maps for various units from oil wells and seismic reflection profiles. These surfaces include base Quaternary, Mesozoic, Paleozoic, and Proterozoic horizons. The horizons locally exhibit major offsets that are compatible with the locations and displacements of important faults systems. This layered, upper crustal 3-D model extends down to 10-15 km depth and illustrates lateral and vertical variations of velocity that reflect the complex evolution of tectonics and sedimentation in the basin. The model also incorporates 3-D descriptions of Vs and density for sediments that are obtained from empirical relationships with Vp using direct measurements of these properties in borehole logs. To illustrate the impact of our basin model on earthquake hazards assessment, we use it to calculate ground motions and compare these with observations for the 2013 Lushan earthquake. The result demonstrates the effects of basin amplification in the western Sichuan basin. The Sichuan CVM model is intended to facilitate fault systems analysis, strong ground motion prediction, and earthquake hazards assessment for the densely populated Sichuan region.

  19. Novel 1D coordination polymer {l_brace}Tm(Piv){sub 3{r_brace}n}: Synthesis, structure, magnetic properties and thermal behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Fomina, Irina; Dobrokhotova, Zhanna; Aleksandrov, Grygory; Emelina, Anna; Bykov, Mikhail; Bogomyakov, Artem; Puntus, Lada; Novotortsev, Vladimir; Eremenko, Igor

    2012-01-15

    The new 1D coordination polymer {l_brace}Tm(Piv){sub 3{r_brace}n} (1), where Piv=OOCBu{sup t-}, was synthesized in high yield (>95%) by the reaction of thulium acetate with pivalic acid in air at 100 Degree-Sign S. According to the X-ray diffraction data, the metal atoms in compound 1 are in an octahedral ligand environment unusual for lanthanides. The magnetic and luminescence properties of polymer 1, it's the solid-phase thermal decomposition in air and under argon, and the thermal behavior in the temperature range of -50 Horizontal-Ellipsis +50 Degree-Sign S were investigated. The vaporization process of complex 1 was studied by the Knudsen effusion method combined with mass-spectrometric analysis of the gas-phase composition in the temperature range of 570-680 K. - Graphical Abstract: Novel 1D coordination polymer {l_brace}Tm(Piv){sub 3{r_brace}n} was synthesized and studied by X-ray diffraction. The magnetic, luminescence properties, the thermal behavior and the volatility for the compound {l_brace}Tm(Piv){sub 3{r_brace}n} were investigated. Black-Small-Square Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We synthesized the coordination polymer {l_brace}Tm(Piv){sub 3{r_brace}n}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tm atoms in polymer have the coordination number 6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polymer exhibits blue-color emission at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polymer shows high thermal stability and volatility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polymer has no phase transitions in the range of -50 Horizontal-Ellipsis +50 Degree-Sign S.

  20. Velocity structure of the Kapuskasing Uplift, northern Ontario, from seismic refraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, A. V.; Ellis, R. M.

    1989-06-01

    A crustal scale seismic refraction experiment was conducted over the Kapuskasing structural zone, northern Ontario, in 1984. The zone cuts obliquely across the east-west structural grain of the Superior Province in the Canadian shield and has been proposed as a cross section of Archean crust exposed by thrust faulting along the Ivanhoe Lake cataclastic zone during early Proterozoic time. Five seismic refraction lines of 360-450 km were shot over the area. There were 18 profile shots and two fan shots with a recorder spacing of 2-5 km. We have modeled the travel times and amplitudes of the data from the profile lines and analyzed reflections from the crust-mantle boundary on the fan shots. We have imaged a low-velocity zone under the Abitibi greenstone belt ranging from 4-5 to 9-12 km depth that is underlain by a highly reflective zone. There is a considerable deepening of the Moho from 40-43 km to 50-53 km under and to the west of the southern end of the Kapuskasing structural zone. A high-velocity anomaly of 6.6-6.7 km/s has been imaged in the upper crust down to 20 km depth beneath the Kapuskasing structure with a suggested dip of 15°±2° to the west. This corresponds well to the proposed location of a granulite zone thrust up from the middle or lower crust in the early Proterozoic.

  1. Velocity and pressure fields associated with near-wall turbulence structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, Arne V.; Alfredsson, P. Henrik; Kim, John

    1990-01-01

    Computer generated databases containing velocity and pressure fields in three-dimensional space at a sequence of time-steps, were used for the investigation of near-wall turbulence structures, their space-time evolution, and their associated pressure fields. The main body of the results were obtained from simulation data for turbulent channel flow at a Reynolds number of 180 (based on half-channel height and friction velocity) with a grid of 128 x 129 x and 128 points. The flow was followed over a total time of 141 viscous time units. Spanwise centering of the detected structures was found to be essential in order to obtain a correct magnitude of the associated Reynolds stress contribution. A positive wall-pressure peak is found immediately beneath the center of the structure. The maximum amplitude of the pressure pattern was, however, found in the buffer region at the center of the shear-layer. It was also found that these flow structures often reach a maximum strength in connection with an asymmetric spanwise motion, which motivated the construction of a conditional sampling scheme that preserved this asymmetry.

  2. Seismic velocity structure and earthquake relocation for the magmatic system beneath Long Valley Caldera, eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing

    2015-04-01

    A new three-dimensional (3-D) seismic velocity model and high-precision location catalog for earthquakes between 1984 and 2014 are presented for Long Valley Caldera and its adjacent fault zones in eastern California. The simul2000 tomography algorithm is applied to derive the 3-D Vp and Vp/Vs models using first-arrivals of 1004 composite earthquakes obtained from the original seismic data at the Northern California Earthquake Data Center. The resulting Vp model reflects geological structures and agrees with previous local tomographic studies. The simultaneously resolved Vp/Vs model is a major contribution of this study providing an important complement to the Vp model for the interpretation of structural heterogeneities and physical properties in the study area. The caldera is dominated by low Vp anomalies at shallow depths due to postcaldera fill. High Vp and low Vp/Vs values are resolved from the surface to ~ 3.4 km depth beneath the center of the caldera, corresponding to the structural uplift of the Resurgent Dome. An aseismic body with low Vp and high Vp/Vs anomalies at 4.2-6.2 km depth below the surface is consistent with the location of partial melt suggested by previous studies based on Vp models only and the inflation source locations based on geodetic modeling. The Sierran crystalline rocks outside the caldera are generally characterized with high Vp and low Vp/Vs values. The newly resolved velocity model improves absolute location accuracy for the seismicity in the study area and ultimately provides the basis for a high-precision earthquake catalog based on similar-event cluster analysis and waveform cross-correlation data. The fine-scale velocity structure and precise earthquake relocations are useful for investigating magma sources, seismicity and stress interaction and other seismological studies in Long Valley.

  3. Analysis of the rotational structure in the high-resolution infrared spectra of cis,cis- and trans,trans-1,4-difluorobutadiene-1-d1 and trans,trans-1,4-difluorobutadiene-1,4-d2

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Norman C.; Chen, Yihui; Lu, Yuhua; Neese, Christopher F.; Nemchick, Deacon J.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-06-01

    Samples of cis,cis- and trans,trans-1,4-difluorobutadiene-1- d1 and of trans,trans-1,4-difluorobutadiene-1,4-d2 have been synthesized, and high-resolution (≤0.0018 cm-1) infrared spectra of these substances have been recorded in the gas phase. Analysis of the rotational structure, mostly in C-type bands, has yielded ground state rotational constants. For the two 1-d1 species more than one band has been analyzed. For the 1,4-d2 species only one band was available for analysis. However, good agreement between the experimental centrifugal distortion constants and those predicted with a B3LYP/cc-pVTZ model give strong support to the analysis of the very dense spectrum. The ground state rotational constants are a contribution to finding semiexperimental equilibrium structures of the two nonpolar isomers of 1,4- difluorobutadiene.

  4. Crustal Velocity Structure of the Bengal Basin from Regionally Recorded Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, M.; Kim, W. Y.; Akhter, S. H.; Mondal, D. R.; Seeber, L.; Steckler, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Bengal Basin lies near the junction of the Himalaya and the Burma Arc subduction system. Continental collision is taking place to the north where the Indian Shield converges with the Himalayas with the intervening uplifted Shillong basement block. The Bengal Basin is built over the passive margin of India and has prograded the shelf 300-400 km since the Eocene. The basin is colliding with and subducting eastward under the Burma Arc. Global seismic velocity models do not apply well to this region because of the depositional environment in the Bengal Basin with sediment thicknesses ~20 km surrounded by Precambrian basement and an accretionary prism. Accurate velocity models are needed to improve earthquake locations and focal mechanism solutions in this region of high seismic hazard. While previous studies in this area show diffuse seismicity [Howe et al., 2013] there are several identifiable earthquake clusters. An improved velocity model will improve the accuracy of the hypocenters in known clusters as well as illuminate previously unidentified clusters. Several studies provide useful velocity constraints using well-logs, receiver function analysis, and surface wave dispersion [e.g., Sikder & Alam, 2003; Lindsay et al., 1991; Curray et al., 1991; Mitra et al., 2005,2008]. These approaches, as well as gravity studies [Rajasakhar & Mishra, 2008], support the suggestion of a layer of sediment gradually thickening from northwest to southeast, to more than 15-20 km thick in some places. While receiver function analysis and well-log data are extremely helpful with constrain depth-dependent crustal structure, lateral variations in structure are not well-sampled. In order to obtain better constraints, we use hypocenters and travel times of local and regional earthquakes that have source-receiver raypaths that stay within the crust and upper mantle. An array of seismographs has been in operation in Bangladesh since 2007. This study uses the recordings from this array to

  5. Additional Constraints on the Shallow Seismic Velocity Structure of the Atlantis Massif Oceanic Core Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henig, A. S.; Blackman, D. K.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.; Canales, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate the detailed structure of the uppermost ~km of Atlantis Massif, an oceanic core complex at 30°N on the Mid Atlantic Ridge, using pre-existing multichannel seismic data. The Synthetic On- Bottom Experiment (SOBE) method that we employ downward continues both the shots and receivers to a depth just above the seafloor. This allows us to pick refracted arrivals recorded on the streamer at very-near offset, providing constraints from rays that are received within the 300-2000 m range that was unavailable to earlier studies where standard shot gathers had been analyzed. Thus, we can better model the upper few hundred meters of the section which, in turn, adds confidence for determining the deeper (400-1500 m) structure. New work on a ridge-parallel line has been added to last year's work on a cross-axis line over the Central Dome of the massif. Tomographic results are similar for these crossing lines: a thin (100-150 m) low velocity (< 3 km/s) layer caps the dome; high horizontal gradients (>1.25 s-1) occur in local (1-2 km wide) regions within these 6-8 km long subsections of the MCS lines analyzed to date; and very high vertical velocity gradients, greater than 3.75 s-1, occur within the km just below the exposed detachment in these areas. We obtain general agreement with Canales et al., 2008, results over the Central Dome but our models suggest a finer scale lateral heterogeneity. We have begun analysis of additional and extended MCS lines over the domal core of the massif and our priority for this presentation is to assess the detailed structure of the Southern Ridge. In at least some areas the thin, low velocity layer contrasts sufficiently with underlying material that a clear refracted arrival is visible in supergathers. We will determine whether the low velocity layer persists over the whole dome or if it is restricted to the Central Dome. An important question is whether its thickness on the Southern Ridge, if it exists there, differs from that

  6. Far-offset Airgun Imaging of the Mantle: Lithospheric velocity structure of the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarralde, D.; Gaherty, J.; Collins, J. A.; Hirth, G.

    2001-12-01

    The extraction of oceanic crust at mid-ocean ridges leaves behind residual mantle depleted of basaltic constituents and volatiles, with an embedded structural fabric associated with melting and mantle flow beneath a spreading center. This basic layered structure should remain in the lithosphere as it cools and translates from the ridge, providing a record of mid-ocean ridge processes over time. Images of the seismic velocity structure within the uppermost oceanic mantle will thus provide a powerful compliment to geologic and geophysical studies of oceanic crust from which much of our understanding of mid-ocean-ridge processes has come. In June 2001, we conducted a lithosphere-scale active-source seismic refraction experiment along an 800-km-long transect in the western Atlantic to investigate the seismic structure of oceanic mantle lithosphere. The transect extends along a plate-kinematic flow line ranging in age from 87 to 145 Ma (a portion of the IPOD-USGS transect). The experiment involved 16 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) deployed along the transect in 3-km-seperated pairs spaced 80-120 km apart and 3 OBSs plus a seismometer on Bermuda located 75, 150, and 350 km off of the transect. These instruments recorded shots from R/V Maurice Ewing's 9,750-cu.-in. airgun array. Shooting occurred in two modes. At 32 locations at the ends of the transect, each spaced 6 km apart, 18-30 shots were fired while steaming in a circle of radius ~800 m. The shot interval was 9 minutes. Over the inner 500-km of the transect, between 4 and 7 passes were made while shooting on distance every 1 km. The extraordinary shot-time intervals were required to ensure all water-borne shot energy had crossed the array befor the next shot was fired. By stacking the co-located and "circle" shots, and by merging data from the paired instruments, profiles can be created with a trace spacing of 1-3 km, which is unprecedented for an experiment of this scale. We will present fully processed record

  7. Probing the Detailed Seismic Velocity Structure of Subduction Zones Using Advanced Seismic Tomography Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2005-12-01

    Subduction zones are one of the most important components of the Earth's plate tectonic system. Knowing the detailed seismic velocity structure within and around subducting slabs is vital to understand the constitution of the slab, the cause of intermediate depth earthquakes inside the slab, the fluid distribution and recycling, and tremor occurrence [Hacker et al., 2001; Obara, 2002].Thanks to the ability of double-difference tomography [Zhang and Thurber, 2003] to resolve the fine-scale structure near the source region and the favorable seismicity distribution inside many subducting slabs, it is now possible to characterize the fine details of the velocity structure and earthquake locations inside the slab, as shown in the study of the Japan subduction zone [Zhang et al., 2004]. We further develop the double-difference tomography method in two aspects: the first improvement is to use an adaptive inversion mesh rather than a regular inversion grid and the second improvement is to determine a reliable Vp/Vs structure using various strategies rather than directly from Vp and Vs [see our abstract ``Strategies to solve for a better Vp/Vs model using P and S arrival time'' at Session T29]. The adaptive mesh seismic tomography method is based on tetrahedral diagrams and can automatically adjust the inversion mesh according to the ray distribution so that the inversion mesh nodes are denser where there are more rays and vice versa [Zhang and Thurber, 2005]. As a result, the number of inversion mesh nodes is greatly reduced compared to a regular inversion grid with comparable spatial resolution, and the tomographic system is more stable and better conditioned. This improvement is quite valuable for characterizing the fine structure of the subduction zone considering the highly uneven distribution of earthquakes within and around the subducting slab. The second improvement, to determine a reliable Vp/Vs model, lies in jointly inverting Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs using P, S, and S

  8. Time varying velocity structures in Earth's outer core: Constraints from exotic P-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, E. A.; Irving, J. C.; Deuss, A. F.; Cormier, V. F.

    2011-12-01

    The outer core is one of the most dynamic divisions of our planet. However, despite undergoing vigorous convection, the outer core is not necessarily a uniform, homogeneous layer of the Earth. Accumulation of light element enriched iron at the top of the outer core, below the core-mantle boundary, may lead to the formation of a stably stratified layer, corresponding to the E' layer as defined by Bullen. The E' layer would have different properties to the rest of the outer core and may be a source of scattering. The lowermost outer core, the F layer, may also have different physical properties than the rest of the outer core, either due to the crystallisation of iron or the release of light elements as the inner core grows. Time varying structure in the Earth's core has been observed in some previous studies, particularly using earthquake doublets. The vigorous convection in the outer core may lead to small-scale lateral variations in its velocity structure over time, due to the movement of fluids and slurry near to the core-mantle and inner core boundaries. We investigate the velocity and attenuation structure of the upper 1500 km of the outer core using high frequency PmKP seismic phases. PmKP waves travel as P-waves throughout the Earth, bouncing m-1 times on the underside of the core-mantle boundary. By analysing the relative arrival times and amplitudes of the PmKP waves and other seismic phases, and comparing these to synthetic waveforms, it is possible to constrain the velocity and attenuation characteristics of the upper 1500 km of the outer core. We correct for known mantle structure and explore the effects of core-mantle boundary topography. To investigate the scattering characteristics of the uppermost outer core and the sharpness of any stratified layers we search for precursors to PmKP phases, which are elusive. P4KP-PcP differential travel times suggest that the uppermost 1300 km of the outer core is up to 0.4% slower than PREM. There is some evidence

  9. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure beneath the Indonesian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspito, Nanang T.; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Miyatake, Takashi; Shimazaki, Kunihiko; Hirahara, Kazuro

    1993-04-01

    We present the P-wave seismic tomography image of the mantle to a depth of 1200 km beneath the Indonesian region. The ARTB inversion method is applied to a dataset of 118,203 P-wave travel times of local and teleseismic events taken from ISC bulletins. Although the resolution is sufficient for detailed discussion in only a limited part of the study region, the results clarify the general tectonic framework in this region and indicate a possible remnant seismic slab in the lower mantle. Structures beneath the Philippine Islands and the Molucca Sea region are well resolved and high-velocity zones corresponding to the slabs of the Molucca Sea and Philippine Sea plates are well delineated. Seismic zones beneath the Manila, Negros and Cotabato trenches are characterized by high-velocity anomalies, although shallow structures were not resolved. The Molucca Sea collision zone and volcanic zones of the Sangihe and Philippine arcs are dominated by low-velocity anomalies. The Philippine Sea slab subducts beneath the Philippine Islands at least to a depth of 200 km and may reach depths of 450 km. The southern end of the slab extends at least to about 6°N near southern Mindanao. In the south, the two opposing subducting slabs of the Molucca Sea plate are clearly defined by the two opposing high-velocity zones. The eastward dipping slab can be traced about 400 km beneath the Halmahera arc and may extend as far north as about 5°N. Unfortunately, resolution is not sufficient to reveal detailed structures at the boundary region between the Halmahera and Philippine Sea slabs. The westward dipping slab may subduct to the lower mantle although its extent at depth is not well resolved. This slab trends N-S from about 10°N in the Philippine Islands to northern Sulawesi. A NE-SW-trending high-velocity zone is found in the lower mantle beneath the Molucca Sea region. This high-velocity zone may represent a remnant of the former subduction zone which formed the Sulawesi arc during the

  10. Evaluating 1d Seismic Models of the Lunar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Thorne, M. S.; Weber, R. C.; Schmerr, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    A four station seismic network was established on the Moon from 1969 to 1977 as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP). A total of nine 1D seismic velocity models were generated using a variety of different techniques. In spite of the fact that these models were generated from the same data set, significant differences exist between them. We evaluate these models by comparing predicted travel-times to published catalogs of lunar events. We generate synthetic waveform predictions for 1D lunar models using a modified version of the Green's Function of the Earth by Minor Integration (GEMINI) technique. Our results demonstrate that the mean square errors between predicted and measured P-wave travel times are smaller than those for S-wave travel times in all cases. Moreover, models fit travel times for artificial and meteoroid impacts better than for shallow and deep moonquakes. Overall, models presented by Nakamura [Nakamura, 1983] and Garcia et al. [Garcia et al., 2011] predicted the observed travel times better than all other models and were comparable in their explanation of travel-times. Nevertheless, significant waveform differences exist between these models. In particular, the seismic velocity structure of the lunar crust and regolith strongly affect the waveform characteristics predicted by these models. Further complexity is added by possible mantle discontinuity structure that exists in a subset of these models. We show synthetic waveform predictions for these models demonstrating the role that crustal structure has in generating long duration seismic coda inherent in the lunar waveforms.

  11. Quasi-static and multi-site high velocity impact response of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Lakshya

    Understanding of low and high velocity transverse impact of laminated fiber reinforced composites is of interest in military, aerospace, marine and civilian structures. Recent advances in the field of numerical simulation provide a means of predicting the performance characteristics of layered materials for impact protection. The overall objective of this work is to investigate the behavior of laminated composites which include both thermoplastic and thermoset systems subjected to quasi-static, low and high velocity impact; both from an experimental and numerical modeling view point. To analyze this problem, a series of quasi-static, low and high velocity impact tests have been performed on laminated composite plates namely E-glass/polypropylene, S2-glass/epoxy and carbon/polyphenylene sulphide. To analyze the perforation mechanism, ballistic limit and damage evolution, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code LS-DYNA is used. Selecting proper material models and contact definition is one of the major criteria for obtaining accurate numerical simulation. Material model 162 (MAT 162), a progressive failure model based on modified Hashin's criteria and continuum damage mechanics (CDM) has been assigned to predict failure of the laminate. This approach is used because during transverse impact, a composite laminate undergoes progressive damage. The laminate and the projectile are meshed using brick elements with single integration points. The impact velocity ranges from 180 to 400 m s -1. This work focuses on three main aspects; (i) To obtain static and dynamic material properties to incorporate into the finite element model and predict the ballistic limit of a composite laminate based on the information from quasi-static punch shear test; (ii) To understand penetration, material erosion, ballistic limit and delamination mechanisms for single and multi-site high velocity (or ballistic) impact of composite laminates; (iii) To investigate the different failure

  12. Calculation of velocity structure functions for vortex models of isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Saffman, P.G.; Pullin, D.I.

    1996-11-01

    Velocity structure functions ({ital u}{sub {ital p}}{sup {prime}}{minus}{ital u}{sub {ital p}}){sup {ital m}} are calculated for vortex models of isotropic turbulence. An integral operator is introduced which defines an isotropic two-point field from a volume-orientation average for a specific solution of the Navier{endash}Stokes equations. Applying this to positive integer powers of the longitudinal velocity difference then gives explicit formulas for ({ital u}{sub {ital p}}{sup {prime}}{minus}{ital u}{sub {ital p}}){sup {ital m}} as a function of order {ital m} and of the scalar separation {ital r}. Special forms of the operator are then obtained for rectilinear stretched vortex models of the Townsend{endash}Lundgren type. Numerical results are given for the Burgers vortex and also for a realization of the Lundgren-strained spiral vortex, and comparison with experimental measurement is made. In an Appendix, we calculate values of the velocity-derivative moments for the Townsend{endash}Burgers model. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Is there structure in the velocity dispersion maps of turbulent disks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva-Altamirano, P.; Fisher, D.; Glazebrook, K.

    2016-06-01

    Galaxies at z > 1 have shown to be different from galaxies at local redshifts. They have irregular morphologies with prominent star-forming clumps. However, due to the limited resolution of high-redshift observations, it is difficult to disentangle the physical processes that create and destroy star-forming clumps. Leaving many open questions in the study of galaxy evolution. The DYnamics of Newly Assembled Massive Objects (DYNAMO) survey aims to observe local galaxies (z < 0.25) with properties similar to those at high redshift (z˜2). This poster presents the near infrared spectra of 3 DYNAMO objects taken with the OSIRIS integral-field spectrograph on the Keck telescope. The high spatial and spectral resolution of OSIRIS allows us to obtain detailed kinematic maps. We are able to resolve the velocity dispersion of individual star-forming clumps down to sizes of ~300 pc. We find that after removing the systematics there is a significant structure in the velocity dispersion. However, whether there is a correlation between velocity dispersion and star formation, remains an open question. This work aims to disentangle the role of turbulence in the life and dead of star-forming clumps.

  14. Simulation of High Velocity Impact on Composite Structures - Model Implementation and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueler, Dominik; Toso-Pentecôte, Nathalie; Voggenreiter, Heinz

    2016-08-01

    High velocity impact on composite aircraft structures leads to the formation of flexural waves that can cause severe damage to the structure. Damage and failure can occur within the plies and/or in the resin rich interface layers between adjacent plies. In the present paper a modelling methodology is documented that captures intra- and inter-laminar damage and their interrelations by use of shell element layers representing sub-laminates that are connected with cohesive interface layers to simulate delamination. This approach allows the simulation of large structures while still capturing the governing damage mechanisms and their interactions. The paper describes numerical algorithms for the implementation of a Ladevèze continuum damage model for the ply and methods to derive input parameters for the cohesive zone model. By comparison with experimental results from gas gun impact tests the potential and limitations of the modelling approach are discussed.

  15. Wind tunnel investigation of the effect of high relative velocities on the structural integrity of birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresnahan, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in a supersonic wind tunnel to determine the effect a sudden high velocity headwind had on the physical deformation and structural breakup characteristics of birds. Several sizes of recently killed birds were dropped into the test section at free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 and photographed with high-speed motion-picture cameras. These conditions simulated flow conditions encountered when birds are ingested into the inlets of high speed aircraft, thereby constituting a safety hazard to the aircraft and its occupants. The investigation shows that, over the range of headwind conditions tested, the birds remained structurally intact and did not suffer any appreciable deformation or structural breakup.

  16. Investigation of structural heterogeneity at the SPE site using combined P–wave travel times and Rg phase velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Charlotte A.; Patton, Howard J.

    2015-10-01

    Here, we present analyses of the 2D seismic structure beneath Source Physics Experiments (SPE) geophone lines that extended radially at 100 m spacing from 100 to 2000 m from the source borehole. With seismic sources at only one end of the geophone lines, standard refraction profiling methods cannot resolve seismic velocity structures unambiguously. In previous work, we demonstrated overall agreement between body-wave refraction modeling and Rg dispersion curves for the least complex of the five lines. A more detailed inspection supports a 2D reinterpretation of the structure. We obtained Rg phase velocity measurements in both the time and frequency domains, then used iterative adjustment of the initial 1D body-wave model to predict Rg dispersion curves to fit the observed values. Our method applied to the most topographically severe of the geophone lines is supplemented with a 2D ray-tracing approach, whose application to P-wave arrivals supports the Rg analysis. In addition, midline sources will allow us to refine our characterization in future work.

  17. Scaling of velocity and scalar structure functions in ac electrokinetic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Guiren

    2017-02-01

    Electrokinetic (EK) turbulence or electrohydrodynamic (EHD) turbulence has been recently achieved in different fluids under both ac [G. Wang et al., Lab Chip 14, 1452 (2014), 10.1039/C3LC51403J; Phys. Rev. E 93, 013106 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.013106] and dc electric fields [A. Varshney et al., Soft Matter 12, 1759 (2016), 10.1039/C5SM02316E]. Here, through dimensional analysis, scaling laws of both velocity and electric conductivity structure functions in the forced cascade region of ac EK turbulence can be predicated (similar to Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling law in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection), in either macroscale or microscale flows. In the forced cascade region, EK force, which relies on the direct cascade of conductivity structures, injects energy directly into a wide spectral region to sustain the flow disturbance. The scaling exponents of the second-order velocity and conductivity structures are 2/5 and 4/5, respectively. In addition to the scaling regions, two characteristic small length scales are derived for both weak and strong electric body forces, respectively. This theoretical investigation can significantly enhance our understanding of EK or EHD turbulence while forced by an ac electric field. It can further broaden our understanding of the forced cascade region of forced turbulence and make the manipulation of the turbulent cascade process more flexible and controllable.

  18. Methods to determine the Orientation and Velocity of 2-D structures based on multi- spacecraft data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Pu, Z.; Zhou, X.; Wang, J.; Zong, Q.; Shi, Q.

    2006-12-01

    Many techniques have been developed to study the axial orientation and/or velocity of 2-D structures (flux ropes), by analyzing in situ data from single or multiple spacecraft. To obtain the axial orientation, there are magnetic based MVA (BMVA), current based MVA (CMVA), Minimum Direction Derivative (MDD) and Multiple Triangulation Analysis (MTA) as a modified version of timing method. To further calculate the velocity, we have DeHoffmann-Teller analysis, Spatio-Temporal Difference (STD) and several version of timing method including MTA. After a brief introduction on the principle of these methods, we theoretically estimate their error ranges based on modeled structures to examine the validity of these techniques. Because of their different principles, their error bars are shown to be distinct, depending on the parameters (such as radius, model selected and even the satellite crossing path) of the certain structure. The error estimation thus provides us some clue on the selection of methods under different conditions. Some real events are further analyzed using these techniques as the example.

  19. Near-surface velocity structure from borehole and refraction seismic surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, D.; Lawton, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    Seismic refraction and borehole reflection data have been used in conjunction with other geophysical tools to characterize the near-surface geology in the vicinity of a shallow well near Calgary, Alberta. The investigated section is comprised primarily of glacial tills and gravels. Seismic waves generated in the lower gravel units travel as compressional waves up to the till/gravel interface, where they are converted to shear waves upon transmission. Velocity structure from a reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) survey agrees closely with that from refraction surveying.

  20. Seismic velocity structure and seismotectonics of the eastern San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardebeck, J.L.; Michael, A.J.; Brocher, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Hayward Fault System is considered the most likely fault system in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, to produce a major earthquake in the next 30 years. To better understand this fault system, we use microseismicity to study its structure and kinematics. We present a new 3D seismic-velocity model for the eastern San Francisco Bay region, using microseismicity and controlled sources, which reveals a ???10% velocity contrast across the Hayward fault in the upper 10 km, with higher velocity in the Franciscan Complex to the west relative to the Great Valley Sequence to the east. This contrast is imaged more sharply in our localized model than in previous regional-scale models. Thick Cenozoic sedimentary basins, such as the Livermore basin, which may experience particularly strong shaking during an earthquake, are imaged in the model. The accurate earthquake locations and focal mechanisms obtained by using the 3D model allow us to study fault complexity and its implications for seismic hazard. The relocated hypocenters along the Hayward Fault in general are consistent with a near-vertical or steeply east-dipping fault zone. The southern Hayward fault merges smoothly with the Calaveras fault at depth, suggesting that large earthquakes may rupture across both faults. The use of the 3D velocity model reveals that most earthquakes along the Hayward fault have near-vertical strike-slip focal mechanisms, consistent with the large-scale orientation and sense of slip of the fault, with no evidence for zones of complex fracturing acting as barriers to earthquake rupture.

  1. Effect of the band structure in a rigorous two-body model with long-range interactions in 1D optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Tom; Simoni, Andrea; Launay, Jean-Michel

    2016-05-01

    We compute scattering and bound state properties for two ultracold molecules in a pure 1D optical lattice. We introduce reference functions with complex quasi-momentum that naturally account for the effect of excited energy bands. Our exact results for a short-range interaction are first compared with the simplest version of the standard Bose-Hubbard (BH) model. Such comparison allows us to highlight the effect of the excited bands, of the non-on-site interaction and of tunneling with distant neighbor, that are not taken into account in the BH model. The effective interaction can depend strongly on the particle quasi-momenta and can present a resonant behavior even in a deep lattice. As a second step, we study scattering of two polar particles in the optical lattice. Peculiar Wigner threshold laws stem from the interplay of the long range dipolar interaction and the presence of the energy bands. We finally assess the validity of an extended Bose-Hubbard model for dipolar gases based on our exact two-body calculations. This work was supported by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (Contract No. ANR-12-BS04-0020-01).

  2. P and S Wave Velocity Structure and Vp/Vs Ratios for the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, M.; Deshon, H.; Powell, C.

    2008-12-01

    Three dimensional P and S wave velocity models have been constructed for the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) using double difference local earthquake tomography (tomoDD). TomoDD incorporates catalog arrival times with catalog and waveform cross correlation differential times to solve for P and S wave velocity and for high resolution earthquake locations. For the NMSZ, we utilized 101504 P wave differential times and 67811 S wave differential times from 1157 earthquakes recorded over the time period 2000 to 2007 by the Cooperative NMSZ Network. The NMSZ consists of three intersecting arms of seismicity located in the central United States. There are approximately 200 earthquakes a year in the NMSZ despite the absence of a major plate boundary. Most earthquakes occur along the central Reelfoot Fault leading to uneven source distribution. We use a finite difference travel time calculator combined with an irregular inversion grid of nodes spaced every 5 to 20 kilometers horizontally and 1 to 3 kilometers vertically. Model resolution was examined using chessboard and spike tests and indicated that resolution is highest close to the source region between depths of 5 to 12 kilometers. P and S wave models indicate that velocities close to the source region are slightly low relative to the 1D starting model. The decrease in velocities may be indicative of rock properties, such as increased fluid content and fracturing. A high P and S wave velocity anomaly located away from known faults is associated with a known mafic intrusion to the northwest of seismicity.

  3. Improving the shear wave velocity structure beneath Bucharest (Romania) using ambient vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Elena Florinela; Michel, Clotaire; Poggi, Valerio; Fäh, Donat; Radulian, Mircea; Balan, Florin Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Large earthquakes from the intermediate-depth Vrancea seismic zone are known to produce in Bucharest ground motion characterized by predominant long periods. This phenomenon has been interpreted as the combined effect of both seismic source properties and site response of the large sedimentary basin. The thickness of the unconsolidated Quaternary deposits beneath the city is more than 200 m, the total depth of sediments is more than 1000 m. Complex basin geometry and the low seismic wave velocities of the sediments are primarily responsible for the large amplification and long duration experienced during earthquakes. For a better understanding of the geological structure under Bucharest, a number of investigations using non-invasive methods have been carried out. With the goal to analyse and extract the polarization and dispersion characteristics of the surface waves, ambient vibrations and low-magnitude earthquakes have been investigated using single station and array techniques. Love and Rayleigh dispersion curves (including higher modes), Rayleigh waves ellipticity and SH-wave fundamental frequency of resonance (f0SH) have been inverted simultaneously to estimate the shear wave velocity structure under Bucharest down to a depth of about 8 km. Information from existing borehole logs was used as prior to reduce the non-uniqueness of the inversion and to constrain the shallow part of the velocity model (<300 m). In this study, we use data from a 35-km diameter array (the URS experiment) installed by the National Institute for Earth Physics and by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology during 10 months in the period 2003-2004. The array consisted of 32 three-component seismological stations, deployed in the urban area of Bucharest and adjacent zones. The large size of the array and the broad-band nature of the available sensors gave us the possibility to characterize the surface wave dispersion at very low frequencies (0.05-1 Hz) using frequency-wavenumber techniques

  4. VARNET-96: three-dimensional upper crustal velocity structure of SW Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, M.; O'Reilly, B. M.; Readman, P. W.; Shannon, P. M.; Prodehl, C.

    2003-05-01

    During the VARNET-96 seismic experiment three seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiles were acquired in order to examine the crustal structure in the southwest of Ireland. A total of 170 seismic stations were used on 300 recording sites. The shotpoint geometry was designed to allow for inline and offline fan shot recordings on the three profiles, using a total of 34 shots. Results from 3-D ray-trace and inversion modelling illustrate the pervasive lateral heterogeneity of the crust south of the Shannon Estuary. About 5 km of interpreted Palaeozoic sediment at the south coast was associated with the sedimentary infill of the Munster and South Munster Basins. This sedimentary layer, which thins to approximately 2 km in the northern Munster Basin, is significantly thinner than previously estimated from geological field studies. High-velocity zones beneath Dingle Bay and the Kenmare River region may be associated with the deep traces of the Killarney-Mallow Fault Zone and the Cork-Kenmare line. A zone of high-velocity upper crust (6.4-6.6 km s-1) beneath the South Munster Basin is found in the area between the Kenmare-Killarney and the Leinster Granite gravity lows. The depth to the Moho varies from approximately 28-29 km at the south coast to approximately 32-33 km in the Dingle-Shannon Basin. The interpretation of the 2-D and 3-D velocity models suggests that Variscan deformation is confined to sedimentary and upper crustal structures in the southwest of Ireland.

  5. Seismic scattering and velocity structure near the Earth's core-mantle boundary beneath the South China Sea and north Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, J.; Wen, L.

    2013-12-01

    We constrain seismic scatterers near the Earth's core-mantle boundary beneath the South China Sea and north Indonesia using the observed PKP precursory energy and velocity structure in the region using the travel time of the core-reflected phases. The PKP precursor data are collected from the seismic data recorded in the USArray and the core-reflected seismic data include ScS and ScP phases recorded in the China National Digital Seismographic Network, the F-net in Japan, the Global Seismographic Network and several regional arrays. Migration of PKP precursory energy reveals crescent-shaped scatterers distributed from the middle of the South China Sea to the north of Sulawesi Island. ScSH-SH differential-travel-times suggest a complex shear-velocity structure near the core-mantle boundary, changing from a low-velocity patch to a high shear-velocity patch and to another low shear-velocity patch from east to west beneath the middle of the South China Sea. ScP-P differential travel-time residuals reveal a low-velocity patch in northeast of Sulawesi Sea, a high-velocity patch in north of Sulawesi Sea, another low-velocity patch in the middle of Sulawesi Sea and another high-velocity patch in north of the Kalimantan Island. Overall, the seismic structure in the region can be characterized by alternative presence of high- and low-velocity patches near the core-mantle boundary, with the abrupt shear-wave velocity changes between the patches being the source of seismic scattering in the region.

  6. COMPLEX STRUCTURE IN CLASS 0 PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPES. III. VELOCITY GRADIENTS IN NON-AXISYMMETRIC ENVELOPES, INFALL, OR ROTATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Bergin, Edwin; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Looney, Leslie W.; Maret, Sebastien

    2012-03-20

    We present an interferometric kinematic study of morphologically complex protostellar envelopes based on observations of the dense gas tracers N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3}. The strong asymmetric nature of most envelopes in our sample leads us to question the common interpretation of velocity gradients as rotation, given the possibility of projection effects in the observed velocities. Several 'idealized' sources with well-ordered velocity fields and envelope structures are now analyzed in more detail. We compare the interferometric data to position-velocity (PV) diagrams of kinematic models for spherical rotating collapse and filamentary rotating collapse. For this purpose, we developed a filamentary parameterization of the rotating collapse model to explore the effects of geometric projection on the observed velocity structures. We find that most envelopes in our sample have PV structures that can be reproduced by an infalling filamentary envelope projected at different angles within the plane of the sky. The infalling filament produces velocity shifts across the envelope that can mimic rotation, especially when viewed at single-dish resolutions and the axisymmetric rotating collapse model does not uniquely describe any data set. Furthermore, if the velocities are assumed to reflect rotation, then the inferred centrifugal radii are quite large in most cases, indicating significant fragmentation potential or more likely another component to the line-center velocity. We conclude that ordered velocity gradients cannot be interpreted as rotation alone when envelopes are non-axisymmetric and that projected infall velocities likely dominate the velocity field on scales larger than 1000 AU.

  7. Finite Element Simulation of Low Velocity Impact Damage on an Aeronautical Carbon Composite Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemanle Sanga, Roger Pierre; Garnier, Christian; Pantalé, Olivier

    2016-12-01

    Low velocity barely visible impact damage (BVID) in laminated carbon composite structures has a major importance for aeronautical industries. This contribution leads with the development of finite element models to simulate the initiation and the propagation of internal damage inside a carbon composite structure due by a low velocity impact. Composite plates made from liquid resin infusion process (LRI) have been subjected to low energy impacts (around 25 J) using a drop weight machine. In the experimental procedure, the internal damage is evaluated using an infrared thermographic camera while the indentation depth of the face is measured by optical measurement technique. In a first time we developed a robust model using homogenised shells based on degenerated tri-dimensional brick elements and in a second time we decided to modelize the whole stacking sequence of homogeneous layers and cohesive interlaminar interfaces in order to compare and validate the obtained results. Both layer and interface damage initiation and propagation models based on the Hashin and the Benzeggagh-Kenane criteria have been used for the numerical simulations. Comparison of numerical results and experiments has shown the accuracy of the proposed models.

  8. The impact of stellar feedback on the density and velocity structure of the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisdale, Kearn; Agertz, Oscar; Romeo, Alessandro B.; Renaud, Florent; Read, Justin I.

    2017-04-01

    We study the impact of stellar feedback in shaping the density and velocity structure of neutral hydrogen (H I) in disc galaxies. For our analysis, we carry out ∼4.6 pc resolution N-body+adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic simulations of isolated galaxies, set up to mimic a Milky Way and a Large and Small Magellanic Cloud. We quantify the density and velocity structure of the interstellar medium using power spectra and compare the simulated galaxies to observed H I in local spiral galaxies from THINGS (The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey). Our models with stellar feedback give an excellent match to the observed THINGS H I density power spectra. We find that kinetic energy power spectra in feedback-regulated galaxies, regardless of galaxy mass and size, show scalings in excellent agreement with supersonic turbulence (E(k) ∝ k-2) on scales below the thickness of the H I layer. We show that feedback influences the gas density field, and drives gas turbulence, up to large (kpc) scales. This is in stark contrast to density fields generated by large-scale gravity-only driven turbulence. We conclude that the neutral gas content of galaxies carries signatures of stellar feedback on all scales.

  9. A detailed three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure in Italy from local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Stefano, Raffaele; Castello, Barbara; Chiarabba, Claudio; Grazia Ciaccio, Maria

    2010-05-01

    We here present an updated high resolution tomographic P-wave velocity model of the lithosphere in Italy, obtained by adding about 296,600 P-wave arrival observations from ~7.200 earthquakes, from the preliminary update of the CSI 2.0, recorded in the period 2003-2007, to the previously inverted dataset (165,000 P-wave arrivals).Additional events have been strictly selected for location quality (azimuthal gap < 135°; horizontal error <= 2km; vertical error <= 4km; rms < 1s) and a number of P-wave observations >= 8. Our results confirm the main structural features in the best resolved parts of the inverted volume and show a much better resolution in some of the previously less resolved areas, due to both the larger number of inverted phases and the more even distribution of seismic stations. Surface basins and relationships between the Adriatic, Tyrrhenian, and European plates are better imaged. The integrated analysis of 20 years of seismicity and the high resolution tomographic images obtained, allows us to add new constraints to the kynematics and the geodynamics of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in this region. We also present preliminary results obtained by thickening the nodes spacing from 15km x15km to 10km x 10km and we finally compare the complex velocity structures imaged by the inversion of the two different grid spacing.

  10. Upper mantle velocity structure beneath the Cameroon Volcanic Line region and implications for the formation of mantle hot lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, A. N.; Wiens, D. A.; Euler, G. G.; Nyblade, A.; Shore, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is a 1800km long feature, extending SW-NE from the Gulf of Guinea into Central Africa. Volcanism along the line does not display the typical age progression exhibited by hotspot-related volcanic tracks, leading to speculation over the geodynamic source of this intraplate feature. Numerous models have been proposed to explain the linear nature of the CVL in the absence of age progression, including laterally transported material from a single or multiple plumes, reactivation of the Central African Shear Zone, edge-flow convection associated with the neighboring Congo Craton, and convection driven by lithospheric instabilities at the edge of continental lithosphere. In this study, we calculate Rayleigh wave phase velocities and upper mantle shear wave velocity structure beneath the continental portion of the CVL to investigate the geodynamic source of the CVL. Rayleigh wave phase velocities are measured at periods from 20 to 182 seconds following the two-plane wave methodology developed by Forsyth and Li (2005), and using data from the Cameroon Seismic Experiment, which consists of 32 broadband stations deployed between 2005 and 2007. These phase velocities are then inverted to build a model of shear wave velocity structure in the upper mantle beneath the CVL. We find that phase velocities beneath the CVL are reduced, while velocities beneath the Congo Craton to the south are elevated. This is observed for all periods, but the difference between regions decreases at the longest periods measured in the study. Shear wave velocity structure indicates a tabular low velocity anomaly directly beneath the CVL, extending from 50km to at least 200km depth, with a sharp vertical boundary with the faster velocities beneath the Congo Craton. These observations are most consistent with the edge convection or lithospheric instability models as the source of the continental CVL. Further study of offshore structure will aid in better characterizing

  11. Glass-based 1-D dielectric microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiasera, Alessandro; Scotognella, Francesco; Valligatla, Sreeramulu; Varas, Stefano; Jasieniak, Jacek; Criante, Luigino; Lukowiak, Anna; Ristic, Davor; Gonçalves, Rogeria Rocha; Taccheo, Stefano; Ivanda, Mile; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ramponi, Roberta; Martucci, Alessandro; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a reliable RF sputtering techniques allowing to fabricate glass-based one dimensional microcavities, with high quality factor. This property is strongly related to the modification of the density of states due to the confinement of the gain medium in a photonic band gap structure. In this short review we present some of the more recent results obtained by our team exploiting these 1D microcavities. In particular we present: (1) Er3+ luminescence enhancement of the 4I13/2 → 4I15/2 transition; (2) broad band filters based on disordered 1-D photonic structures; (3) threshold defect-mode lasing action in a hybrid structure.

  12. Two-phase modeling of DDT: Structure of the velocity-relaxation zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapila, A. K.; Son, S. F.; Bdzil, J. B.; Menikoff, R.; Stewart, D. S.

    1997-12-01

    The structure of the velocity relaxation zone in a hyperbolic, nonconservative, two-phase model is examined in the limit of large drag, and in the context of the problem of deflagration-to-detonation transition in a granular explosive. The primary motivation for the study is the desire to relate the end states across the relaxation zone, which can then be treated as a discontinuity in a reduced, equivelocity model, that is computationally more efficient than its parent. In contrast to a conservative system, where end states across thin zones of rapid variation are determined principally by algebraic statements of conservation, the nonconservative character of the present system requires an explicit consideration of the structure. Starting with the minimum admissible wave speed, the structure is mapped out as the wave speed increases. Several critical wave speeds corresponding to changes in the structure are identified. The archetypal structure is partly dispersed, monotonic, and involves conventional hydrodynamic shocks in one or both phases. The picture is reminiscent of, but more complex than, what is observed in such (simpler) two-phase media as a dusty gas.

  13. Group Velocity Tomography for Eastern Mexico and Crustal Structure for Tehuantepec Isthmus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba Montiel, F.; Iglesias, A.; Melgar, D.; Singh, S.; Perez-Campos, X.

    2013-05-01

    We use seismic noise records from the broadband network of the Mexican National Seismological Service (Servicio Sismológico Nacional) and from MASE and VEOX stations (two temporal seismic experiments) to compute the vertical-vertical component of noise cross correlations for station pairs. MASE (Mesoamerican Seismic Experiment) consisted of one hundred stations deployed along a profile perpendicular to the trench and starting in Acapulco,Gro. Mex. This experiment ran from December 2004 until May, 2007. Fifty of these stations were relocated in a N-S profile crossing the Tehuantepec Isthmus from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific coast. These stations were operated from July 2007 until February 2009 and this stage of the experiment was called VEOX (Veracruz-Oaxaca). From the cross correlation for each pair of stations, Rayleigh wave dispersion curves were computed which represents the average group velocity between stations pairs. Furthermore, regional earthquakes recorded by the stations, were used to compute Rayleigh wave dispersion curves, which represent the average group velocity between epicenter and station. This mixed set of group velocity measurements was inverted to obtain tomographic images in discrete periods (5-50 s). Resolution tests show that the better-covered regions are surrounding both temporal experiments. Good coverage is also achieved in the large area between both experiments. In order to find details of crustal structure in the Tehuantepec Isthmus we use a set of previously computed receiver functions (Melgar and Pérez-Campos, 2011), to perform a joint inversion together with local dispersion curves reconstructed from the tomographic images. Results show good agreement with previous results by Melgar and Pérez-Campos (2011).

  14. Can we trace the eastern Gondwanan margin in Australia? New perspectives from transdimensional inversion of ambient noise for 3D shear velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilia, S.; Rawlinson, N.; Direen, N. G.

    2013-12-01

    provides a parsimonious trade-off between data fit and model complexity, rather than adopting the ad hoc regularization often utilized by linearized inversion techniques. After obtaining 2D maps for different periods, these are then discretized into a uniform grid of nodes, each of which has associated group dispersion curve. Subsequently, the group dispersion curve at each node is inverted for 1D shear velocity model using the same robust, data driven Bayesian technique as before. Finally, the 1D models are merged together to achieve the first 3D shear velocity structure beneath southeast Australia, Bass Strait and Tasmania to a depth of 30 km, which is expected to shed new light on the ancient eastern Gondwana margin in Australia. Preliminary results show crustal structure to a high level of detail, particularly in mainland Australia and Tasmania. The transition along the proto-Pacific margin of eastern Gondwana from Precambrian central and western Australia to Paleozoic eastern Australia has been revealed, which appears to follow a trend of relatively low shear velocity that reconnects, across Bass Strait, to the Tamar Fracture System in eastern Tasmania.

  15. Title of abstract - Different approaches to the determining of 3-d P and S wave velocity structures of the crust beneath Northern Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukova, O.

    2003-04-01

    The seismic images of the crust beneath Northern Tien Shan (NTS) are obtained with using of different sets of data and several algorithms for solution of local earthquake tomography problem. The NTS is a very interesting region from geophysical point if view due to high seismic activity caused by interplate collision: Tien Shan and Kazakh. A rectangular region under investigation is constrained by lines 41.90o N - 43.40o N and 73.50o E- 76.50o E. 14661 P and 14436 S wave arrival times recorded 12 seismic stations of the Kyrgyzstan Broadband Network (KNET) from local earthquake in 1991-1999 years are used. In addition, data from 267 local earthquake recorded over a period of about 20 years by a regional arrays of 93 seismographs in NTS are involved in inversions. 1-d optimal velocity models and stations delays are estimated with help of program VELEST (E.Kissling, 1995). Block parameterization of model and ray tracing described by Thurber and Ellsworth (1980) are used for determination of 3-d velocity structure and relocation of events as one of the approaches (programs S.Roecker Sphypit90 and Sphrel3d). Other approach consists in application linear or cubic B spline interpolation of velocity function and ray tracing Um and Thurber (1987) for the solution of forward problem (program C.Thurber et al. Simulps and own program). The data resolution analysis and statistical analysis of models was carried out. Calculated P wave tomographic models were compared with tomographic models S.Roecker et al. (1993), S.Ghose et al. (1998) and T.Sabitova (1996). The main result is the confirmation of existence of different seismic velocity structure beneath Kyrgyz Range and Chu Basin. Using various sets of date and methods for reconstruction velocity model is effective in reveal of more reliable velocity heterogeneities in the domain of research. The author is grateful to dr. I. Kitov for help and to dr. I.Sanina for useful discussion.

  16. Structures in Ionospheric Number Density and Velocity Associated with Polar Cap Ionization Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kivanc, O.; Heelis, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral characteristics of polar cap F region irregularities on large density gradients associated with polar ionization patches are studied using in situ measurements made by the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) spacecraft. The 18 patches studied in this paper were identified by the algorithm introduced by Coley and Heelis, and they were encountered during midnight-noon passes of the spacecraft. Density and velocity spectra associated with these antisunward convecting patches are analyzed in detail. Observations indicate the presence of structure on most patches regardless of the distance between the patch and the cusp where they are believed to develop. Existence of structure on both leading and trailing edges is established when such edges exist. Results, which show no large dependence of Delta N/N power on the sign of the edge gradient del N, do not allow the identification of leading and trailing edges of the patch. The Delta N/N is an increasing function of gradient del N regardless of the sign of the gradient. The correlation between Delta N/N and Delta V is generally poor, but for a given intensity in Delta V, Delta N/N maximizes in regions of large gradients in N. There is evidence for the presence of unstructured patches that seem to co-exist with unstructured horizontal velocities. Slightly smaller spectral indices for trailing edges support the presence of the E X B drift instability. Although this instability is found to be operating in some cases, results suggest that stirring may be a significant contributor to kilometer-size structures in the polar cap.

  17. Fabrication and investigation of 1D and 2D structures in LiNbO 3 thin films by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriche, F.; Boudrioua, A.; Kremer, R.; Dogheche, E.; Neiss-Clauss, E.; Mouras, R.; Fischer, A.; Beghoul, M.-R.; Fogarassy, E.; Boutaoui, N.

    2010-09-01

    Lithium niobate thin films were deposited on sapphire substrate by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique. One and two dimensional structures have been made using a KrF excimer laser at 248 nm and 6 ns pulse width, under various conditions of ablation, in order to assess the applicability of laser direct-writing of photonic waveguides. The optical and waveguiding properties of LiNbO 3 thin films were studied by prism-coupling technique, while micro-Raman spectroscopy was used for structural and composition characterization, as well as laser processing mechanism investigation. The surface morphology of the processed structures was obtained by a Nomarski optical microscope, an atomic force microscope and a White Light Interferometer Microscope.

  18. Crustal shear-wave velocity structure beneath Sumatra from receiver function modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Dipok K.; Borah, Kajaljyoti; Goyal, Ayush

    2016-05-01

    We estimated the shear-wave velocity structure and Vp/Vs ratio of the crust beneath the Sumatra region by inverting stacked receiver functions from five three-component broadband seismic stations, located in diverse geologic setting, using a well known non-linear direct search approach, Neighborhood Algorithm (NA). Inversion results show significant variation of sediment layer thicknesses from 1 km beneath the backarc basin (station BKNI and PMBI) to 3-7 km beneath the coastal part of Sumatra region (station LHMI and MNAI) and Nias island (station GSI). Average sediment layer shear velocity (Vss) beneath all the stations is observed to be less (∼1.35 km/s) and their corresponding Vp/Vs ratio is very high (∼2.2-3.0). Crustal thickness beneath Sumatra region varies between 27 and 35 km, with exception of 19 km beneath Nias island, with average crustal Vs ∼3.1-3.4 km/s (Vp/Vs ∼1.8). It is well known that thick sediments with low Vs (and high Vp/Vs) amplify seismic waves even from a small-magnitude earthquake, which can cause huge damage in the zone. This study can provide the useful information of the crust for the Sumatra region. Since, Sumatra is an earthquake prone zone, which suffered the strong shaking of Great Andaman-Sumatra earthquake; this study can also be helpful for seismic hazard assessment.

  19. Particle Acceleration Affected by the Evolving Velocity Structures in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubouchi, K.

    2015-12-01

    It is accepted that high-energy particles are efficiently generated during their crossing of shocks in space, where the diffusive shock acceleration is the most standard process to explain the observed energy spectrum beyond the order of a gigaelectronvolt. In contrast, recent spacecraft observations have shown different characteristics in a lower energy range (a kilo- to megaelectronvolt): particles in the heliosphere have a power-law spectrum in particle speed with a spectral index of -5, which is commonly found in any solar wind conditions. This is a puzzling result that the shocks are not a necessary element responsible for accelerating particles. The alternative mechanism, a pump acceleration, is proposed where particles are accelerated in a region containing large-scale compressions and expansions (e.g., Fisk and Gloeckler, JGR 2014). In the present study, we elucidate the validity of this mechanism by performing hybrid simulations to investigate the particle, particularly pickup ions, dynamics in various situations of non-uniform velocity field, such as a simple fast/slow flow interaction, sinusoidal structures, or random profiles, and to compare the velocity spectrum of suprathermal particles in each case. We also study the scale dependence of acceleration processes by comparing the spectrum of the energetic H+, He+, and O+.

  20. Phase mapping of ultrashort pulses in bimodal photonic structures: A window on local group velocity dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersen, H.; van Dijk, E. M. H. P.; Korterik, J. P.; van Hulst, N. F.; Kuipers, L.

    2004-12-01

    The amplitude and phase evolution of ultrashort pulses in a bimodal waveguide structure has been studied with a time-resolved photon scanning tunneling microscope (PSTM). When waveguide modes overlap in time intriguing phase patterns are observed. Phase singularities, arising from interference between different modes, are normally expected at equidistant intervals determined by the difference in effective index for the two modes. However, in the pulsed experiments the distance between individual singularities is found to change not only within one measurement frame, but even depends strongly on the reference time. To understand this observation it is necessary to take into account that the actual pulses generating the interference signal change shape upon propagation through a dispersive medium. This implies that the spatial distribution of phase singularities contains direct information on local dispersion characteristics. At the same time also the mode profiles, wave vectors, pulse lengths, and group velocities of all excited modes in the waveguide are directly measured. The combination of these parameters with an analytical model for the time-resolved PSTM measurements shows that the unique spatial phase information indeed gives a direct measure for the group velocity dispersion of individual modes. As a result interesting and useful effects, such as pulse compression, pulse spreading, and pulse reshaping become accessible in a local measurement.

  1. Phase mapping of ultrashort pulses in bimodal photonic structures: a window on local group velocity dispersion.

    PubMed

    Gersen, H; van Dijk, E M H P; Korterik, J P; van Hulst, N F; Kuipers, L

    2004-12-01

    The amplitude and phase evolution of ultrashort pulses in a bimodal waveguide structure has been studied with a time-resolved photon scanning tunneling microscope (PSTM). When waveguide modes overlap in time intriguing phase patterns are observed. Phase singularities, arising from interference between different modes, are normally expected at equidistant intervals determined by the difference in effective index for the two modes. However, in the pulsed experiments the distance between individual singularities is found to change not only within one measurement frame, but even depends strongly on the reference time. To understand this observation it is necessary to take into account that the actual pulses generating the interference signal change shape upon propagation through a dispersive medium. This implies that the spatial distribution of phase singularities contains direct information on local dispersion characteristics. At the same time also the mode profiles, wave vectors, pulse lengths, and group velocities of all excited modes in the waveguide are directly measured. The combination of these parameters with an analytical model for the time-resolved PSTM measurements shows that the unique spatial phase information indeed gives a direct measure for the group velocity dispersion of individual modes. As a result interesting and useful effects, such as pulse compression, pulse spreading, and pulse reshaping become accessible in a local measurement.

  2. Change in the structure of Escherichia coli population related to the settling velocities in karst aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, F.; Massei, N.; Berthe, T.; Deloffre, J.; Fournier, M.; Bertel, F.; jolivet, F.; lallemand, H.; Niepceron, F.; Sellier, C.; Benjamin, S.

    2012-04-01

    Change in the structure of Escherichia coli population related to the settling velocities in karst aquifer. Fabienne Petit1, Fanny Bertel2, Florence Jolivet2, Hélène Lallemand2, Fanny Niepceron2, Clémentine Sellier2, Benjamin Smith2, Thierry Berthe, Julien Deloffre1, Matthieu Fournier1,Nicolas Massei 1. 1- Université de Rouen, UMR 6143 M2C, 76821 Mont-Saint-Aignan, France 1- CNRS, UMR 6143 M2C, 76821 Mont-Saint-Aignan, France 1- SFR SCALE, 76821 Mont-Saint-Aignan, France 2 Research project of students from MasterEnvironment ( ESEB University of Rouen) According to the farming or human use of their watershed, the karst aquifers were particularly vulnerable to contamination by fecal bacteria mainly Escherichia coli (E. coli). To date, if E. coli is a commensal bacteria originated from intestinal tracts of humans and vertebrate animals, the water and sediment are also considered as a putative second habitat where some strains could be naturalized. Among the phenotypic characteristics of E.coli, association with particles not only could enhance the survival of some strains but also greatly influenced the particles dynamics. The great genetic diversity of E. coli may explain this variety of lifestyles of this bacteria species. Indeed we have previously shown that in river, the structure of the population of E. coli was not stable, but depended on hydrological conditions (Ratajczak, 2010). In this work we go further into the understanding of the behaviour of E. coli population in karstic hydrosystem by investigating (i) the structure of E. coli population based on the distribution in four main phylo-groups (A, B1, B2, D) according their settling velocities from surface water to groundwater. For this purpose we combined microbiology , microscopy (SEM) and hydrology approaches. During their transfer along the karst hydrosystem, both modalities of the association of E. coli to the particles and, the structure of E. coli population were modified. Settling experiment led

  3. 3D P and S Wave Velocity Structure and Tremor Locations in the Parkfield Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Thurber, C. H.; Shelly, D. R.; Bennington, N. L.; Cochran, E. S.; Harrington, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    We have assembled a new dataset to refine the 3D seismic velocity model in the Parkfield region. The S arrivals from 184 earthquakes recorded by the Parkfield Experiment to Record MIcroseismicity and Tremor array (PERMIT) during 2010-2011 were picked by a new S wave picker, which is based on machine learning. 74 blasts have been assigned to four quarries, whose locations were identified with Google Earth. About 1000 P and S wave arrivals from these blasts at permanent seismic network were also incorporated. Low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) occurring within non-volcanic tremor (NVT) are valuable for improving the precision of NVT location and the seismic velocity model at greater depths. Based on previous work (Shelley and Hardebeck, 2010), waveforms of hundreds of LFEs in same family were stacked to improve signal qualify. In a previous study (McClement et al., 2013), stacked traces of more than 30 LFE families at the Parkfileld Array Seismic Observatory (PASO) have been picked. We expanded our work to include LFEs recorded by the PERMIT array. The time-frequency Phase Weight Stacking (tf-PWS) method was introduced to improve the stack quality, as direct stacking does not produce clear S-wave arrivals on the PERMIT stations. This technique uses the coherence of the instantaneous phase among the stacked signals to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the stack. We found that it is extremely effective for picking LFE arrivals (Thurber et al., 2014). More than 500 P and about 1000 S arrivals from 58 LFE families were picked at the PERMIT and PASO arrays. Since the depths of LFEs are much deeper than earthquakes, we are able to extend model resolution to lower crustal depths. Both P and S wave velocity structure have been obtained with the tomoDD method. The result suggests that there is a low velocity zone (LVZ) in the lower crust and the location of the LVZ is consistent with the high conductivity zone beneath the southern segment of the Rinconada fault that

  4. Joint Inversion of Seismic and Gravity Data for Velocity Structure and Hypocentral Locations of the Colombian Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Maceira, M.; Prieto, G. A.; Zhang, H.; Ammon, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Joint inversions of geophysical data recover models that simultaneously fit multiple types of constraints while playing upon the various sensitivities of each data type. Here, we combine body wave arrival times with surface wave dispersion measurements and gravity observations to develop a combined 3D P- and S-wave velocity model for the crust and upper mantle of Colombia. P- and S-wave arrival times were obtained for local earthquakes from instruments in the Colombian National Seismic Network. Rayleigh wave dispersion curves were inverted for using a subset of network stations and larger local earthquakes. Gravity observations were extracted from the global satellite-based model EGM2008. Preliminary results using body waves only show reduced velocities beneath the volcanic arc in the upper 25 km of the crust. Crustal velocities are also reduced from the 1D starting model beneath the Eastern Cordillera in the northern half of the country. Relocations of intermediate-depth seismicity clearly indicate a discontinuity in the slab centered 5° N latitude, where the southern portion of the slab is ~200 km trenchward of the northern portion, coincident with the termination of arc volcanism and in recent years interpreted as due to a slab tear [Vargas and Mann, 2013]. Seismicity below 100 km depth in the southern portion of the subduction zone­­­ is surrounded by a ~100-km-thick region of elevated velocities, associated with the subduction of the Nazca Plate, and embedded within a broader region of reduced velocities. The northern portion of the subduction zone at 100 km depth and below is characterized by a broad region of elevated velocities, which may be consistent with a slab of an old, thickened Caribbean Plate origin. The overlapping of the edges of the Nazca and Caribbean slabs may contribute to the seismicity of the Bucaramanga nest.

  5. Structural determination of prunusins A and B, new C-alkylated flavonoids from Prunus domestica, by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Azhar; Fatima, Itrat; Kosar, Shaheen; Ahmed, Rehana; Malik, Abdul

    2010-02-01

    Prunusins A (1) and B (2), the new C-alkylated flavonoids, have been isolated from the seed kernels of Prunus domestica. Their structures were assigned from (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonating spectra, DEPT and by correlation spectroscopy, HMQC and HMBC experiments. 3, 5, 7, 4'-Tetrahydroxyflavone (3) and 3, 5, 7-trihydroxy-8, 4'-dimethoxyflavone (4) have also been reported from this species. Both compounds (1) and (2) showed significant antifungal activity against pathogenic fungus Trichophyton simmi.

  6. Large-scale structure after COBE: Peculiar velocities and correlations of cold dark matter halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurek, Wojciech H.; Quinn, Peter J.; Salmon, John K.; Warren, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    Large N-body simulations on parallel supercomputers allow one to simultaneously investigate large-scale structure and the formation of galactic halos with unprecedented resolution. Our study shows that the masses as well as the spatial distribution of halos on scales of tens of megaparsecs in a cold dark matter (CDM) universe with the spectrum normalized to the anisotropies detected by Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) is compatible with the observations. We also show that the average value of the relative pairwise velocity dispersion sigma(sub v) - used as a principal argument against COBE-normalized CDM models-is significantly lower for halos than for individual particles. When the observational methods of extracting sigma(sub v) are applied to the redshift catalogs obtained from the numerical experiments, estimates differ significantly between different observation-sized samples and overlap observational estimates obtained following the same procedure.

  7. Synthesis, Structure, and Magnetic Properties of A2Cu5(TeO3)(SO4)3(OH)4 (A = Na, K): The First Compounds with a 1D Kagomé Strip Lattice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yingying; Guo, Wenbin; Xiang, Hongping; Zhang, Suyun; Yang, Ming; Cui, Meiyan; Wang, Nannan; He, Zhangzhen

    2016-01-19

    Two new tellurite-sulfates A2Cu5(TeO3)(SO4)3(OH)4 (A = Na, K) have been synthesized by a conventional hydrothermal method. Both compounds feature 1D kagomé strip structure built by distorted CuO6 octahedra, which can be regarded as the dimensional reduction of kagomé lattice. Magnetic measurements confirmed that the titled compounds possess antiferromagnetic ordering at low temperature, while a field-induced magnetic transition can be observed at critical field. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to obtain distorted kagomé strip compounds.

  8. Three-dimensional upper crustal velocity structure beneath San Francisco Peninsula, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Zoback, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents new seismic data from, and crustal models of the San Francisco Peninsula. In much of central California the San Andreas fault juxtaposes the Cretaceous granitic Salinian terrane on its west and the Late Mesozoic/Early Tertiary Franciscan Complex on its east. On San Francisco Peninsula, however, the present-day San Andreas fault is completely within a Franciscan terrane, and the Pilarcitos fault, located southwest of the San Andreas, marks the Salinian-Franciscan boundary. This circumstance has evoked two different explanations: either the Pilarcitos is a thrust fault that has pushed Franciscan rocks over Salinian rocks or the Pilarcitos is a transform fault that has accommodated significant right-lateral slip. In an effort to better resolve the subsurface structure of the peninsula faults, we established a temporary network of 31 seismographs arrayed across the San Andreas fault and the subparallel Pilarcitos fault at ???1-2 km spacings. These instruments were deployed during the first 6 months of 1995 and recorded local earthquakes, air gun sources set off in San Francisco Bay, and explosive sources. Travel times from these sources were used to augment earthquake arrival times recorded by the Northern California Seismic Network and were inverted for three-dimensional velocity structure. Results show lateral velocity changes at depth (???0.5-7 km) that correlate with downward vertical projections of the surface traces of the San Andreas and Pilarcitos faults. We thus interpret the faults as high-angle to vertical features (constrained to a 70??-110?? dip range). From this we conclude that the Pilarcitos fault is probably an important strike-slip fault that accommodated much of the right-lateral plate boundary strain on the peninsula prior to the initiation of the modern-day San Andreas fault in this region sometime after about 3.0 m.y. ago.

  9. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure and earthquake relocations at Katmai, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Rachel; Thurber, Clifford; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Bennington, Ninfa

    2014-01-01

    We invert arrival time data from local earthquakes occurring between September 2004 and May 2009 to determine the three-dimensional (3D) upper crustal seismic structure in the Katmai volcanic region. Waveforms for the study come from the Alaska Volcano Observatory's permanent network of 20 seismic stations in the area (predominantly single-component, short period instruments) plus a densely spaced temporary array of 11 broadband, 3-component stations. The absolute and relative arrival times are used in a double-difference seismic tomography inversion to solve for 3D P- and S-wave velocity models for an area encompassing the main volcanic centers. The relocated hypocenters provide insight into the geometry of seismogenic structures in the area, revealing clustering of events into four distinct zones associated with Martin, Mageik, Trident-Novarupta, and Mount Katmai. The seismic activity extends from about sea level to 2 km depth (all depths referenced to mean sea level) beneath Martin, is concentrated near 2 km depth beneath Mageik, and lies mainly between 2 and 4 km depth below Katmai and Trident-Novarupta. Many new features are apparent within these earthquake clusters. In particular, linear features are visible within all clusters, some associated with swarm activity, including an observation of earthquake migration near Trident in 2008. The final velocity model reveals a possible zone of magma storage beneath Mageik, but there is no clear evidence for magma beneath the Katmai-Novarupta area where the 1912 eruptive activity occurred, suggesting that the storage zone for that eruption may have largely been evacuated, or remnant magma has solidified.

  10. Uncertainty Estimation of Shear-wave Velocity Structure from Bayesian Inversion of Microtremor Array Dispersion Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosso, S. E.; Molnar, S.; Cassidy, J.

    2010-12-01

    Bayesian inversion of microtremor array dispersion data is applied, with evaluation of data errors and model parameterization, to produce the most-probable shear-wave velocity (VS) profile together with quantitative uncertainty estimates. Generally, the most important property characterizing earthquake site response is the subsurface VS structure. The microtremor array method determines phase velocity dispersion of Rayleigh surface waves from multi-instrument recordings of urban noise. Inversion of dispersion curves for VS structure is a non-unique and nonlinear problem such that meaningful evaluation of confidence intervals is required. Quantitative uncertainty estimation requires not only a nonlinear inversion approach that samples models proportional to their probability, but also rigorous estimation of the data error statistics and an appropriate model parameterization. A Bayesian formulation represents the solution of the inverse problem in terms of the posterior probability density (PPD) of the geophysical model parameters. Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods are used with an efficient implementation of Metropolis-Hastings sampling to provide an unbiased sample from the PPD to compute parameter uncertainties and inter-relationships. Nonparametric estimation of a data error covariance matrix from residual analysis is applied with rigorous a posteriori statistical tests to validate the covariance estimate and the assumption of a Gaussian error distribution. The most appropriate model parameterization is determined using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC), which provides the simplest model consistent with the resolving power of the data. Parameter uncertainties are found to be under-estimated when data error correlations are neglected and when compressional-wave velocity and/or density (nuisance) parameters are fixed in the inversion. Bayesian inversion of microtremor array data is applied at two sites in British Columbia, the area of highest seismic risk in

  11. Quantification of transition dipole strengths using 1D and 2D spectroscopy for the identification of molecular structures via exciton delocalization: Application to α-helices

    PubMed Central

    Grechko, Maksim; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrational and electronic transition dipole strengths are often good probes of molecular structures, especially in excitonically coupled systems of chromophores. One cannot determine transition dipole strengths using linear spectroscopy unless the concentration is known, which in many cases it is not. In this paper, we report a simple method for measuring transition dipole moments from linear absorption and 2D IR spectra that does not require knowledge of concentrations. Our method is tested on several model compounds and applied to the amide I′ band of a polypeptide in its random coil and α-helical conformation as modulated by the solution temperature. It is often difficult to confidently assign polypeptide and protein secondary structures to random coil or α-helix by linear spectroscopy alone, because they absorb in the same frequency range. We find that the transition dipole strength of the random coil state is 0.12 ± 0.013 D2, which is similar to a single peptide unit, indicating that the vibrational mode of random coil is localized on a single peptide unit. In an α-helix, the lower bound of transition dipole strength is 0.26 ± 0.03 D2. When taking into account the angle of the amide I′ transition dipole vector with respect to the helix axis, our measurements indicate that the amide I′ vibrational mode is delocalized across a minimum of 3.5 residues in an α-helix. Thus, one can confidently assign secondary structure based on exciton delocalization through its effect on the transition dipole strength. Our method will be especially useful for kinetically evolving systems, systems with overlapping molecular conformations, and other situations in which concentrations are difficult to determine. PMID:23163364

  12. The association of brain structure with gait velocity in older adults: a quantitative volumetric analysis of brain MRI

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Mindy J.; Lipton, Michael L.; Lipton, Richard B.; Verghese, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While cortical processes play an important role in controlling locomotion, the underlying structural brain changes associated with slowing of gait in aging are not yet fully established. Our study aimed to examine the relationship between cortical gray matter volume (GM), white matter volume (WM), ventricular volume (VV), hippocampal and hippocampal subfield volumes, and gait velocity in older adults free of dementia. Methods Gait and cognitive performance was tested in 112 community-residing adults, age 70 years and over, participating in the Einstein Aging Study. Gait velocity (cm/s) was obtained using an instrumented walkway. Volumetric MRI measures were estimated using a FreeSurfer software. We examined the cross-sectional relationship of GM, WM, VV, and hippocampal total and subfield volumes and gait velocity using linear regression models. In complementary models, the effect of memory performance on the relationship between gait velocity and regional volumes was evaluated. Results Slower gait velocity was associated with smaller cortical GM and total hippocampal volumes. There was no association between gait velocity and WM or VV. Among hippocampal subfields, only smaller presubiculum volume was significantly associated with decrease in gait velocity. Addition of the memory performance to the models attenuated the association between gait velocity and all volumetric measures. Conclusions Our findings indicate that total GM and hippocampal volumes as well as specific hippocampal subfield volumes are inversely associated with locomotor function. These associations are probably affected by cognitive status of study population. PMID:25921321

  13. Structure and Active Stie Residues of Pg1D, an N-Acetyltransferase from the Bacillosamine Synthetic Pathway Required for N-Glycan Synthesis in Campylobacter jejuni

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Ruane, K.; Sulea, T.; Watson, D.; Proteau, A.; Leclerc, S.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Young, N.

    2008-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is highly unusual among bacteria in forming N-linked glycoproteins. The heptasaccharide produced by its pgl system is attached to protein Asn through its terminal 2, 4-diacetamido-2, 4,6-trideoxy-d-Glc (QuiNAc4NAc or N, N'-diacetylbacillosamine) moiety. The crucial, last part of this sugar's synthesis is the acetylation of UDP-2-acetamido-4-amino-2, 4,6-trideoxy-d-Glc by the enzyme PglD, with acetyl-CoA as a cosubstrate. We have determined the crystal structures of PglD in CoA-bound and unbound forms, refined to 1.8 and 1.75 Angstroms resolution, respectively. PglD is a trimer of subunits each comprised of two domains, an N-terminal {alpha}/{beta}-domain and a C-terminal left-handed {beta}-helix. Few structural differences accompany CoA binding, except in the C-terminal region following the {beta}-helix (residues 189-195), which adopts an extended structure in the unbound form and folds to extend the {beta}-helix upon binding CoA. Computational molecular docking suggests a different mode of nucleotide-sugar binding with respect to the acetyl-CoA donor, with the molecules arranged in an 'L-shape', compared with the 'in-line' orientation in related enzymes. Modeling indicates that the oxyanion intermediate would be stabilized by the NH group of Gly143', with His125' the most likely residue to function as a general base, removing H+ from the amino group prior to nucleophilic attack at the carbonyl carbon of acetyl-CoA. Site-specific mutations of active site residues confirmed the importance of His125', Glu124', and Asn118. We conclude that Asn118 exerts its function by stabilizing the intricate hydrogen bonding network within the active site and that Glu124' may function to increase the pKa of the putative general base, His125'.

  14. Study on Coherent Structure of Turbulent Thermal Convection by Simultaneous Measurement of Temperature and Velocity by Liquid Crystal Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Masataka; Hashizume, Yuji

    2006-11-01

    In order to understand the formation and the development of the plume structure in turbulent thermal convection, the temporal and spatial variations of temperature and velocity field are measured in the non-penetrative thermal convection of the horizontal fluid layer using the combined liquid crystal thermometry and stereo-velocimetry. It is found that the spoke structure is generated near the heated surface and moves along the heated surface unsteadily changing the cell size. The thermal plume is generated from the high temperature region of the spoke structure, where the vertical velocity component is clearly observed near the heated surfaces.

  15. SGLOBE-rani: a new global whole-mantle model of isotropic and radially anisotropic shear-wave velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, A.; Chang, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new global whole-mantle model of isotropic and radially anisotropic S velocity structure (SGLOBE-rani) based on ~43,000,000 surface-wave and ~420,000 bodywave travel time measurements, which is expanded in spherical harmonic basis functions up to degree 35. We incorporate crustal thickness perturbations as model parameters in the inversions to properly consider crustal effects and suppress the leakage of crustal structure into mantle structure. This is possible since we utilize short-period group velocity data with a period range down to 16 s, which are strongly sensitive to the crust. The isotropic S-velocity model shares common features with previous global S-velocity models and shows excellent consistency with several high-resolution upper mantle models. Our anisotropic model also agrees well with previous regional studies. Nevertheless, our new model of 3-D radial anisotropy shows some features not seen in previous whole-mantle models, such as faster SV velocity anomalies along subduction zones at transition zone depths and faster SH velocity beneath slabs in the lower mantle. The derived crustal thickness perturbations also bring potentially important information about the crustal thickness beneath oceanic crusts, which has been difficult to constrain due to poor access compared with continental crusts. We interpret our results in terms of mineralogy and geodynamical processes in the transition zone and uppermost lower mantle.

  16. Three-dimensional velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in southwestern China and its tectonic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Chun-Yong; Chan, W.W.; Mooney, W.D.

    2003-01-01

    Using P and S arrival times from 4625 local and regional earthquakes recorded at 174 seismic stations and associated geophysical investigations, this paper presents a three-dimensional crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of southwestern China (21??-34??N, 97??-105??E). Southwestern China lies in the transition zone between the uplifted Tibetan plateau to the west and the Yangtze continental platform to the east. In the upper crust a positive velocity anomaly exists in the Sichuan Basin, whereas a large-scale negative velocity anomaly exists in the western Sichuan Plateau, consistent with the upper crustal structure under the southern Tibetan plateau. The boundary between these two anomaly zones is the Longmen Shan Fault. The negative velocity anomalies at 50-km depth in the Tengchong volcanic area and the Panxi tectonic zone appear to be associated with temperature and composition variations in the upper mantle. The Red River Fault is the boundary between the positive and negative velocity anomalies at 50-km depth. The overall features of the crustal and the upper mantle structures in southwestern China are a low average velocity, large crustal thickness variations, the existence of a high-conductivity layer in the crust or/and upper mantle, and a high heat flow value. All these features are closely related to the collision between the Indian and the Asian plates.

  17. Estimations of the S-wave velocity structures in Chia-Yi City, Taiwan, using the array records of microtremors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.-C.; Wu, C.-F.

    2006-11-01

    Shear-wave velocities (VS) have been widely used for the site characterization of earthquake ground motion. We report here our investigation of the S-wave velocity structures of Chia-Yi City, Taiwan using the array records of microtremors at seven sites. The dispersion curves at these sites were first calculated using the F-K method proposed by Capon (1969); the S-wave velocity structures in Chia-Yi City were then estimated by employing the surface wave inversion technique (Herrmann, 1991). At frequencies lower than about 1 Hz, the propagation directions are concentrated in the northwest and southwest quadrants. The generation of these may be attributed to the ocean waves of the Taiwan Strait. The harder site (CBA) has higher phase velocities, while the softer sites (CWB, SHP and YRU) have lower phase velocities, especially at frequencies between 1 and 5 Hz. The shallow velocity structures (0-1,500 m) can be roughly divided into four to five layers. The depth of the alluvium gradually increases from east to west and from north to south.

  18. Structure and mechanical properties of β-TCP scaffolds prepared by ice-templating with preset ice front velocities.

    PubMed

    Flauder, Stefan; Gbureck, Uwe; Müller, Frank A

    2014-12-01

    Anisotropic scaffolds with the typical structure of lamellar, aligned and continuous pores were successfully achieved by the directional solidification of water-based β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) suspensions. Adjustable porosities from 49 to 82%, tunable pore widths from 8 to 50μm and linked ceramic cells with wall thicknesses from 4 to 30μm were obtained. Correlated compressive strengths reached from 0.4MPa (82% porosity, low solidification velocity of 10μms(-1)) to 40MPa (49% porosity, high solidification velocity of 30μms(-1)). At a given scaffold porosity, the compressive strength increased by more than twofold with increasing solidification velocity due to attendant structural changes. Thus, the key to controlling structural sizes, besides the trivial control of porosity through the water content in the initial suspension, is to control the solidification velocity. In this study, an analytical solution of the heat conduction equation was used as a novel approach to control the solidification velocity during the process. The relationships between processing conditions and resulting structure as well as between structure and mechanical properties were elucidated and discussed.

  19. Moments of the Spin Structure Functions g1p and g1d for 0.05 < Q2 < 3.0 GeV2

    SciTech Connect

    Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Burkert, Volker; Deur, Alexandre; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dodge, Gail; Griffioen, Keith; Kuhn, Sebastian; Minehart, Ralph; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, G.; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Beard, Kevin; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bonner, Billy; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Fersch, Robert; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Huertas, Marco; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Kim, Kyungmo; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klusman, Mike; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, K.; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O'Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, J.; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seely, Mikell; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, Jeffrey; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Suleiman, Riad; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; V

    2009-02-01

    The spin structure functions $g_1$ for the proton and the deuteron have been measured over a wide kinematic range in $x$ and \\Q2 using 1.6 and 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident upon polarized NH$_3$ and ND$_3$ targets at Jefferson Lab. Scattered electrons were detected in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, for $0.05 < Q^2 < 5 $\\ GeV$^2$ and $W < 3$ GeV. The first moments of $g_1$ for the proton and deuteron are presented -- both have a negative slope at low \\Q2, as predicted by the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule. The first result for the generalized forward spin polarizability of the proton $\\gamma_0^p$ is also reported, and shows evidence of scaling above $Q^2$ = 1.5 GeV$^2$. Although the first moments of $g_1$ are consistent with Chiral Perturbation Theory (\\ChPT) calculations up to approximately $Q^2 = 0.06$ GeV$^2$, a significant discrepancy is observed between the $\\gamma_0^p$ data and \\ChPT\\ for $\\gamma_0^p$,even at the lowest \\Q2.

  20. Ammonia detection of 1-D ZnO/polypyrrole nanocomposite: Effect of CSA doping and their structural, chemical, thermal and gas sensing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Shilpa; Karmakar, Narayan; Shah, Akshara; Kothari, D. C.; Mishra, Satyendra; Shimpi, Navinchandra G.

    2017-02-01

    Nanocomposites of polypyrrole (PPy) with varying concentration of ZnO nanorods (ZnO NRs) were synthesized using in-situ oxidative polymerization technique. The prepared nanocomposites (PPy, PPy-ZnO and CSA doped PPy-ZnO) were studied for various oxidizing and reducing gases at room temperature and found to be more selective towards ammonia gas. Various concentrations of ZnO NRs in Ppy matrix were studied and 15% was found to be optimum in terms of sensor response (66% towards 120 ppm NH3). Further, with 15% doping of camphor sulphonic acid (CSA) in PPy-ZnO nanocomposite for 15% ZnO NRs in Ppy matrix, sensor response increased from 66 to 79% towards 120 ppm of NH3. Structural, Optical and thermal behavior of nanocomposites were studied using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, room temperature Photoluminescence (PL) Spectroscopy, Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). ZnO has been completely embedded inside the polymeric chains as observed from in SEM. Meanwhile, FT-IR spectra indicate better conjugation and interaction in nanocomposites. With CSA doping interaction grows stronger due to extended delocalization over π electrons leading to higher sensor response and with response time and recovery time of 24 s and 34 s respectively. CSA doped PPy-ZnO (15%) nanocomposites observed to be a potential candidate for ammonia detection at lower ppm level.

  1. Spatial structures of CO2, H2O, temperature and vertical wind velocity observed by aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selbach, Christoph; Schween, Jan; Crewell, Susanne; Geiss, Heiner; Neininger, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    During the FLUXPAT campaigns in 2008 and 2009 the MetAir Dimona research aricraft performed several fligths above a patchy, agricultural dominated landscape near Juelich/Germany. The measurements are aimed to capture the variability of water vapor and CO2 and derive turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer close to the ground. Flights took place at two main levels around 150 m and 250 m above ground. Agriculture in this region is dominated by two different crops: sugar beet and wheat. Flights were scheduled in April and August as at these times of the year strong contrasts can be found between different fields. In April sugar beet is usually just seeded whereas wheat already forms a closed canopy. In August wheat unlike sugar beat is already harvested. We analyse the correlation lengths (L*) of CO2, H2O, temperature and vertical wind velocity on flight legs. L* is the median of the power spectrum i.e. 50 percent of the variance is in structures larger than L*. For the different quantities L* shows different behaviours during the day and between different flight levels. The structure lengthscales of CO2 have a large dependency on daytime and strongly decrease during noon and afternoon. We will present some approaches to explain this behaviour.

  2. Effect of velocity ratio on coherent-structure dynamics in turbulent free shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam

    2014-11-01

    The relevance of the vortex-gas model to the large scale dynamics of temporally evolving turbulent free shear layers has been established by extensive simulations (Phys. Rev. E 89, 013009 (2014)). The effects of velocity ratio (r =U2 /U1) on shear layer dynamics are revealed by spatially evolving vortex-gas shear-layer simulations using a computational model based on Basu et al. (Appl. Math. Modelling 19, (1995)), but with a crucial improvement that ensures conservation of global circulation. The simulations show that the initial conditions and downstream boundaries can significantly affect the flow over substantial part of the domain, but the equilibrium spread rate is a universal function of r, and is within the experimental scatter. The spread in the r = 0 limit is higher than Galilean-transformed temporal value. The present 2D simulations at r = 0 show continuous growth of structures, while merger-dominated evolution is observed for r = 0 . 23 (and higher). These two mechanisms were observed across the same two values of r in the experiments of D'Ovidio & Coats (J. Fluid Mech. 737, 2013), but the continuous growth was instead attributed to mixing-transition and 3D. The 2D mechanisms responsible for the observed continuous growth of structures are analyzed in detail. Supported in part by RN/Intel/4288 and RN/DRDO/4124.

  3. Estimation of shallow S-wave velocity structure in the Puli basin, Taiwan, using array measurements of microtremors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Feng; Huang, Huey-Chu

    2012-05-01

    The September 21, 1999, Chi-Chi earthquake induced strong shaking, resulting in severe damage in the Puli area. According to Huang and Tarng (2005), the collapse of many structures during the earthquake was very closely related to site effects. Shallow shear-wave velocities are widely used for earthquake ground-motion site characterization. Thus, we investigate S-wave velocity structures for the Puli area by performing microtremor array measurements at 16 sites. Dispersion curves at these sites are calculated using the F-K method (Capon, 1969) for the vertical component; S-wave velocity structures for the Puli area are then estimated by surface wave inversion (Herrmann, 1991). If the S-wave velocity of the bedrock is assumed to be 2000 m/s, the depths of the Quaternary sediments in the Puli area are between 300 m (FAL, PIP) and 870 m (DAH). Moreover, there are 3˜6 distinct interfaces in the shallow velocity structure (0˜1000 m). The depth of the bedrock gradually increases from the edge (SIN, PIP) to the center (PUL, DAH) of the basin and the thickest Quaternary sediments appear near Heng-Chih-Cheng (DAH).

  4. Probing structure-induced optical behavior in a new class of self-activated luminescent 0D/1D CaWO₄ metal oxide – CdSe nanocrystal composite heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jinkyu; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Hoy, Jessica; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Li, Zhuo-Qun; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Taylor, Gordon T.; Misewich, James A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-01-30

    In this report, we synthesize and characterize the structural and optical properties of novel heterostructures composed of (i) semiconducting nanocrystalline CdSe quantum dot (QDs) coupled with (ii) both one and zero-dimensional (1D and 0D) motifs of self-activated luminescence CaWO₄ metal oxides. Specifically, ~4 nm CdSe QDs have been anchored onto (i) high-aspect ratio 1D nanowires, measuring ~230 nm in diameter and ~3 μm in length, as well as onto (ii) crystalline 0D nanoparticles (possessing an average diameter of ~ 80 nm) of CaWO₄ through the mediation of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a connecting linker. Composite formation was confirmed by complementary electron microscopy and spectroscopy (i.e. IR and Raman) data. In terms of luminescent properties, our results show that our 1D and 0D heterostructures evince photoluminescence (PL) quenching and shortened PL lifetimes of CaWO₄ as compared with unbound CaWO₄. We propose that a photo-induced electron transfer process occurs from CaWO₄ to CdSe QDs, a scenario which has been confirmed by NEXAFS measurements and which highlights a decrease in the number of unoccupied orbitals in the conduction bands of CdSe QDs. By contrast, the PL signature and lifetimes of MPA-capped CdSe QDs within these heterostructures do not exhibit noticeable changes as compared with unbound MPA-capped CdSe QDs. The striking difference in optical behavior between CaWO₄ nanostructures and CdSe QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. In addition, the PL quenching behaviors for CaWO₄ within the heterostructure configuration were examined by systematically varying (i) the quantities and coverage densities of CdSe QDs as well as (ii) the intrinsic morphology (and by extension, the inherent crystallite size) of CaWO₄ itself.

  5. Characterization of Physical Structure from Measurements of Sound Velocity in Aqueous Solutions of Various Saccharides and Alditols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David Eugene

    Little basic research has been reported on the physical structure of aqueous solutions of saccharides. Sound velocimeters can be used to study physical structure of solutions, non-destructively. The La Place relationship was used to calculate adiabatic compressibility values for solutions from experimentally determined values for sound velocity and density. Using a sound velocimeter, aqueous solutions of twelve alditols and saccharides were studied at various concentrations and temperatures. Data indicated that over most of the temperature range employed (20 to 70 C) adiabatic compressibility of the solutions was the dominant factor in defining sound velocity through and structural rigidity of solution. As concentration of solute increased, more rigid structures were formed in solution, which caused sound velocity values to increase with increasing concentrations of solute; maximum sound velocity values were obtained at progressively lower temperatures. Analysis of data for sound velocity, density and adiabatic compressibility of various solutions provided partial insight into effects of each solute molecule on structure of solutions. A furanose form in a monosaccharide contributed to a more rigid structure than did a pyranose ring when below 30C. At higher temperatures the pyranose ring provided more rigidity than did the furanose ring. Hydroxyl groups in the equatorial position generally contributed more to rigidity of structure than did OH groups in axial positions. Disaccharides contributed differences from the inherent monosaccharides. A (beta) glycosidic linkage provided more structural rigidity of solution than did a linkage. Among the alditols, mannitol and sorbitol contributed very similar characteristics to solutions. Xylitol, in solution provided less rigidity, density and sound velocity than did mannitol-sorbitol in proportion to the lower molecular weight or xylitol. From the data for velocity of sound through single sugar solutions values for

  6. The ZH ratio method for long-period seismic data: inversion for S-wave velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Tomoko; Tanimoto, T.; Rivera, L.

    2009-10-01

    The particle motion of surface waves, in addition to phase and group velocities, can provide useful information for S-wave velocity structure in the crust and upper mantle. In this study, we applied a new method to retrieve velocity structure using the ZH ratio, the ratio between vertical and horizontal surface amplitudes of Rayleigh waves. Analysing data from the GEOSCOPE network, we measured the ZH ratios for frequencies between 0.004 and 0.05 Hz (period between 20 and 250s) and inverted them for S-wave velocity structure beneath each station. Our analysis showed that the resolving power of the ZH ratio is limited and final solutions display dependence on starting models; in particular, the depth of the Moho in the starting model is important in order to get reliable results. Thus, initial models for the inversion need to be carefully constructed. We chose PREM and CRUST2.0 in this study as a starting model for all but one station (ECH). The eigenvalue analysis of the least-squares problem that arises for each step of the iterative process shows a few dominant eigenvalues which explains the cause of the inversion's initial-model dependence. However, the ZH ratio is unique in having high sensitivity to near-surface structure and thus provides complementary information to phase and group velocities. Application of this method to GEOSCOPE data suggest that low velocity zones may exist beneath some stations near hotspots. Our tests with different starting models show that the models with low-velocity anomalies fit better to the ZH ratio data. Such low velocity zones are seen near Hawaii (station KIP), Crozet Island (CRZF) and Djibuti (ATD) but not near Reunion Island (RER). It is also found near Echery (ECH) which is in a geothermal area. However, this method has a tendency to produce spurious low velocity zones and resolution of the low velocity zones requires further careful study. We also performed simultaneous inversions for volumetric perturbation and

  7. The uppermost mantle shear wave velocity structure of eastern Africa from Rayleigh wave tomography: constraints on rift evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, J. P.; Adams, A.; Nyblade, A. A.; Mulibo, G. D.; Tugume, F.

    2013-08-01

    An expanded model of the 3-D shear wave velocity structure of the uppermost mantle beneath eastern Africa has been developed using earthquakes recorded by the AfricaArray East African Seismic Experiment in conjunction with data from permanent stations and previously deployed temporary stations. The combined data set comprises 331 earthquakes recorded on a total of 95 seismic stations spanning Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia and Malawi. In this study, data from 149 earthquakes were used to determine fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities at periods ranging from 20 to 182 s using the two-plane wave method, and then combined with the similarly processed published measurements and inverted for a 3-D shear wave velocity model of the uppermost mantle. New features in the model include (1) a low-velocity region in western Zambia, (2) a high-velocity region in eastern Zambia, (3) a low-velocity region in eastern Tanzania and (4) low-velocity regions beneath the Lake Malawi rift. When considered in conjunction with mapped seismicity, these results support a secondary western rift branch striking southwestwards from Lake Tanganyika, likely exploiting the relatively weak lithosphere of the southern Kibaran Belt between the Bangweulu Block and the Congo Craton. We estimate a lithospheric thickness of ˜150-200 km for the substantial fast shear wave anomaly imaged in eastern Zambia, which may be a southward subsurface extension of the Bangweulu Block. The low-velocity region in eastern Tanzania suggests that the eastern rift branch trends southeastwards offshore eastern Tanzania coincident with the purported location of the northern margin of the proposed Ruvuma microplate. Pronounced velocity lows along the Lake Malawi rift are found beneath the northern and southern ends of the lake, but not beneath the central portion of the lake.

  8. Study on 3-D velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in Sichuan-yunnan region, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, C.; Mooney, W.D.; Wang, X.; Wu, J.; Lou, H.; Wang, F.

    2002-01-01

    Based on the first arrival P and S data of 4 625 regional earthquakes recorded at 174 stations dispersed in the Yunnan and Sichuan Provinces, the 3-D velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in the region is determined, incorporating with previous deep geophysical data. In the upper crust, a positive anomaly velocity zone exists in the Sichuan basin, whereas a negative anomaly velocity zone exists in the western Sichuan plateau. The boundary between the positive and negative anomaly zones is the Longmenshan fault zone. The images of lower crust and upper mantle in the Longmenshan fault, Xianshuihe fault, Honghe fault and others appear the characteristic of tectonic boundary, indicating that the faults litely penetrate the Moho discontinuity. The negative velocity anomalies at the depth of 50 km in the Tengchong volcanic area and the Panxi tectonic zone appear to be associated with the temperature and composition variations in the upper mantle. The overall features of the crustal and the upper mantle structures in the Sichuan-Yunnan region are the lower average velocity in both crust and uppermost mantle, the large crustal thickness variations, and the existence of high conductivity layer in the crust or/and upper mantle, and higher geothermal value. All these features are closely related to the collision between the Indian and the Asian plates. The crustal velocity in the Sichuan-Yunnan rhombic block generally shows normal.value or positive anomaly, while the negative anomaly exists in the area along the large strike-slip faults as the block boundary. It is conducive to the crustal block side-pressing out along the faults. In the major seismic zones, the seismicity is relative to the negative anomaly velocity. Most strong earthquakes occurred in the upper-mid crust with positive anomaly or normal velocity, where the negative anomaly zone generally exists below.

  9. Crystal Structures of Mouse CD1d-IGb3 Complex And Its Cognate Valpha14 T Cell Receptor Suggest a Model for Dual Recognition of Foreign And Self Glycolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Zajonc, D.M.; Saveage, P.B.; Bendelac, A.; Wilson, I.A.; Teyton, L.

    2009-05-28

    The semi-invariant Valpha14Jalpha18 T cell receptor (TCR) is expressed by regulatory NKT cells and has the unique ability to recognize chemically diverse ligands presented by CD1d. The crystal structure of CD1d complexed to a natural, endogenous ligand, isoglobotrihexosylceramide (iGb3), illustrates the extent of this diversity when compared to the binding of potent, exogenous ligands, such as alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer). A single mode of recognition for these two classes of ligands would then appear problematic for a single T cell receptor. However, the Valpha14 TCR adopts two different conformations in the crystal where, in one configuration, the presence of a larger cavity between the two CDR3 regions could accommodate iGb3 and, in the other, a smaller cavity fits alpha-GalCer more snugly. Alternatively, the extended iGb3 headgroup could be 'squashed' upon docking of the TCR and accommodated between the CD1 and TCR surfaces. Thus, the same TCR may adopt alternative modes of recognition for these foreign and self-ligands for NKT cell activation.

  10. Beyond Donor-Acceptor (D-A) Approach: Structure-Optoelectronic Properties-Organic Photovoltaic Performance Correlation in New D-A1 -D-A2 Low-Bandgap Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Chochos, Christos L; Drakopoulou, Sofia; Katsouras, Athanasios; Squeo, Benedetta M; Sprau, Christian; Colsmann, Alexander; Gregoriou, Vasilis G; Cando, Alex-Palma; Allard, Sybille; Scherf, Ullrich; Gasparini, Nicola; Kazerouni, Negar; Ameri, Tayebeh; Brabec, Christoph J; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos

    2017-04-01

    Low-bandgap near-infrared polymers are usually synthesized using the common donor-acceptor (D-A) approach. However, recently polymer chemists are introducing more complex chemical concepts for better fine tuning of their optoelectronic properties. Usually these studies are limited to one or two polymer examples in each case study so far, though. In this study, the dependence of optoelectronic and macroscopic (device performance) properties in a series of six new D-A1 -D-A2 low bandgap semiconducting polymers is reported for the first time. Correlation between the chemical structure of single-component polymer films and their optoelectronic properties has been achieved in terms of absorption maxima, optical bandgap, ionization potential, and electron affinity. Preliminary organic photovoltaic results based on blends of the D-A1 -D-A2 polymers as the electron donor mixed with the fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C71 -butyric acid methyl ester demonstrate power conversion efficiencies close to 4% with short-circuit current densities (J sc ) of around 11 mA cm(-2) , high fill factors up to 0.70, and high open-circuit voltages (V oc s) of 0.70 V. All the devices are fabricated in an inverted architecture with the photoactive layer processed in air with doctor blade technique, showing the compatibility with roll-to-roll large-scale manufacturing processes.

  11. 1D polymeric copper(I) complex [Cu2(μ-(2,6-Cl-ba)2en)(μ-I)2]n with exceptionally short Cusbnd Cu distance: Synthesis, characterization, thermal study and crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaji, Aliakbar Dehno; Peyghoun, Seyyed Javad; Akbari, Alireza; Feizi, Nourollah; Dusek, Michal; Eigner, Vaclav

    2017-01-01

    A new 1D polymeric three coordinated copper(I) complex, [Cu2(μ-(2,6-Cl-ba)2en)(μ-I)2]n, with the bidentate Schiff base ligand N,N‧-bis(2,6-dichlorobenzylidene)ethane-1,2-diamine containing a flexible spacer (dbnd NCH2sbnd CH2sbnd Ndbnd) was synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, UV-Vis, FT-IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy and thermal analaysis. Its molecular structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and shows the (2,6-Cl-ba)2en acts as a bis-monodentate bridging ligand forming the dinuclear [Cu2(μ-(2,6-Cl-ba)2en)] groups. Such dinuclear groups are bridged by two iodine anions [(μ-I)2] to form a 1D polymeric copper(I) complex. The copper(I) ions are coordinated in a distorted trigonal planar geometry by two I atoms and one nitrogen atom of Schiff base ligand (2,6-Cl-ba)2en.

  12. Forces Generated by High Velocity Impact of Ice on a Rigid Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Padula, Santo A., II; Revilock, Duane M.; Melis, Matthew E.

    2006-01-01

    Tests were conducted to measure the impact forces generated by cylindrical ice projectiles striking a relatively rigid target. Two types of ice projectiles were used, solid clear ice and lower density fabricated ice. Three forms of solid clear ice were tested: single crystal, poly-crystal, and "rejected" poly-crystal (poly-crystal ice in which defects were detected during inspection.) The solid ice had a density of approximately 56 lb/cu ft (0.9 gm/cu cm). A second set of test specimens, termed "low density ice" was manufactured by molding shaved ice into a cylindrical die to produce ice with a density of approximately 40 lb/cu ft (0.65 gm/cu cm). Both the static mechanical characteristics and the crystalline structure of the ice were found to have little effect on the observed transient response. The impact forces generated by low density ice projectiles, which had very low mechanical strength, were comparable to those of full density solid ice. This supports the hypothesis that at a velocity significantly greater than that required to produce fracture in the ice, the mechanical properties become relatively insignificant, and the impact forces are governed by the shape and mass of the projectile.

  13. Vibronic structure of VO{sub 2} probed by slow photoelectron velocity-map imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jongjin B.; Weichman, Marissa L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2014-01-21

    We report high-resolution anion photoelectron spectra of vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}{sup −}) obtained by slow electron velocity-map imaging of trapped and cryogenically cooled anions. Vibrationally resolved spectra are obtained for photodetachment to the first three neutral electronic states, giving an electron affinity of 1.8357(5) eV for the X-tilde{sup 2} A{sub 1} ground state and term energies of 0.1845(8) eV and 0.8130(5) eV for the A-tilde{sup 2}B{sub 1} and B-tilde{sup 2}A{sub 1} excited states, respectively. The vibrational fundamentals ν{sub 1} and ν{sub 2} are obtained for all three states. Experimental assignments are confirmed by energies from electronic structure calculations and Franck-Condon spectral simulations. These simulations support assigning the anion ground state as the X-tilde{sup 3}B{sub 1} state. With this assignment, photodetachment to the B-tilde{sup 2}A{sub 1} state involves a nominally forbidden two-electron transition, suggesting extensive configuration interaction in neutral VO{sub 2}.

  14. Velocity structure of the Long Valley caldera from the inversion of local earthquake P and S travel times

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, A.E. Jr.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.

    1993-11-10

    A high-resolution tomographic study of the Long Valley region began in 1989 with the installation of a special fan array of eight three-component borehole (80-160 m depths) receivers on the northwestern rim of the caldera to provide the data necessary for a joint inversion for hypocenters and the three-dimensional P and S wave velocity structure in and below the caldera. The experiment specifically targeted the subsurface location of the previously inferred magma chamber beneath the Resurgent Dome. Additional coverage was provided by existing US Geological Survey and University of Nevada, Reno seismographic networks. The authors employed the progressive inversion scheme of Thurber, with cubic spline interpolation after Michelini and McEvilly. The final model is based on data from 280 well-distributed local earthquakes. Some 6900 arrival times were used, including about 700 S wave times from the three-component stations. The resulting velocity structure reflects the known geology, defining the low-velocity Sierran block and highland terrane. No isolated distinct low-velocity anomalies are revealed beneath the caldera floor, although a diffuse zone of reduced velocity persists to a depth of about 8 km. These lower velocities may be related to hydrothermal alteration and/or extensive fractures. The Vp/Vs structure contains significant lateral variation within and beneath the caldera to about 8 km depth, and these variations can be related to accepted models of the active geothermal system. The lack of a significant S wave velocity anomaly, along with the normal or low values of the Vp/Vs ratio, argues against the presence of a sizable and distinct magma body at shallow to midcrustal depth beneath Long Valley caldera, although a very low percentage of partial melt cannot be precluded. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Developing Regionalized Models of Lithospheric Thickness and Velocity Structure Across Eurasia and the Middle East from Jointly Inverting P-Wave and S-Wave Receiver Functions with Rayleigh Wave Group and Phase Velocities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    DEVELOPING REGIONALIZED MODELS OF LITHOSPHERIC THICKNESS AND VELOCITY STRUCTURE ACROSS EURASIA AND THE MIDDLE EAST FROM JOINTLY INVERTING P-WAVE...09NA293221 and DE-AC52-07NA273442 Proposal No. BAA09-13 ABSTRACT The main goal of this project is to develop models of lithospheric velocity...of the lithosphere are key for accurately modeling not only travel times but also surface-wave dispersion velocities and full waveforms at regional

  16. Minimization of the mean square velocity response of dynamic structures using an active-passive dynamic vibration absorber.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Y L; Wong, W O; Cheng, L

    2012-07-01

    An optimal design of a hybrid vibration absorber (HVA) with a displacement and a velocity feedback for minimizing the velocity response of the structure based on the H(2) optimization criterion is proposed. The objective of the optimal design is to reduce the total vibration energy of the vibrating structure under wideband excitation, i.e., the total area under the velocity response spectrum is minimized in this criterion. One of the inherent limitations of the traditional passive vibration absorber is that its vibration suppression is low if the mass ratio between the absorber mass and the mass of the primary structure is low. The active element of the proposed HVA helps further reduce the vibration of the controlled structure, and it can provide very good vibration absorption performance even at a low mass ratio. Both the passive and active elements are optimized together for the minimization of the mean square velocity of the primary system as well as the active force required in the HVA. The proposed HVA was tested on single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) and continuous vibrating structures and compared to the traditional passive vibration absorber.

  17. Developing Regionalized Models of Lithospheric Thickness and Velocity Structure Across Eurasia and the Middle East from Jointly Inverting P-Wave and S-Wave Receiver Functions with Rayleigh Wave Group and Phase Velocities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    DEVELOPING REGIONALIZED MODELS OF LITHOSPHERIC THICKNESS AND VELOCITY STRUCTURE ACROSS EURASIA AND THE MIDDLE EAST FROM JOINTLY INVERTING P-WAVE... lithospheric velocity structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East. We expect the regionalized models will improve...important differences in lithospheric structure between the cratonic regions of Eastern Europe and the tectonic regions of Western Europe and the

  18. Shear wave velocity, seismic attenuation, and thermal structure of the continental upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artemieva, I.M.; Billien, M.; Leveque, J.-J.; Mooney, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic velocity and attenuation anomalies in the mantle are commonly interpreted in terms of temperature variations on the basis of laboratory studies of elastic and anelastic properties of rocks. In order to evaluate the relative contributions of thermal and non-thermal effects on anomalies of attenuation of seismic shear waves, QS-1, and seismic velocity, VS, we compare global maps of the thermal structure of the continental upper mantle with global QS-1 and Vs maps as determined from Rayleigh waves at periods between 40 and 150 S. We limit the comparison to three continental mantle depths (50, 100 and 150 km), where model resolution is relatively high. The available data set does not indicate that, at a global scale, seismic anomalies in the upper mantle are controlled solely by temperature variations. Continental maps have correlation coefficients of <0.56 between VS and T and of <0.47 between QS and T at any depth. Such low correlation coefficients can partially be attributed to modelling arrefacts; however, they also suggest that not all of the VS and QS anomalies in the continental upper mantle can be explained by T variations. Global maps show that, by the sign of the anomaly, VS and QS usually inversely correlate with lithospheric temperatures: most cratonic regions show high VS and QS and low T, while most active regions have seismic and thermal anomalies of the opposite sign. The strongest inverse correlation is found at a depth of 100 km, where the attenuation model is best resolved. Significantly, at this depth, the contours of near-zero QS anomalies approximately correspond to the 1000 ??C isotherm, in agreement with laboratory measurements that show a pronounced increase in seismic attenuation in upper mantle rocks at 1000-1100 ??C. East-west profiles of VS, QS and T where continental data coverage is best (50??N latitude for North America and 60??N latitude for Eurasia) further demonstrate that temperature plays a dominant, but non-unique, role in

  19. From 1D chain to 3D network: a new family of inorganic-organic hybrid semiconductors MO3(L)(x) (M = Mo, W; L = organic linker) built on perovskite-like structure modules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Hejazi, Mehdi; Thiagarajan, Suraj J; Woerner, William R; Banerjee, Debasis; Emge, Thomas J; Xu, Wenqian; Teat, Simon J; Gong, Qihan; Safari, Ahmad; Yang, Ronggui; Parise, John B; Li, Jing

    2013-11-20

    MO3 (M = Mo, W) or VI-VI binary compounds are important semiconducting oxides that show great promise for a variety of applications. In an effort to tune and enhance their properties in a systematic manner we have applied a designing strategy to deliberately introduce organic linker molecules in these perovskite-like crystal lattices. This approach has led to a wealth of new hybrid structures built on one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) VI-VI modules. The hybrid semiconductors exhibit a number of greatly improved properties and new functionality, including broad band gap tunability, negative thermal expansion, largely reduced thermal conductivity, and significantly enhanced dielectric constant compared to their MO3 parent phases.

  20. Crust and upper mantle P wave velocity structure beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Results from the Jemez teleseismic tomography experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steck, Lee K.; Thurber, Clifford H.; Fehler, Michael C.; Lutter, William J.; Roberts, Peter M.; Baldridge, W. Scott; Stafford, Darrik G.; Sessions, Robert

    1998-10-01

    New results are presented from the teleseismic component of the Jemez Tomography Experiment conducted across Valles caldera in northern New Mexico. We invert 4872 relative P wave arrival times recorded on 50 portable stations to determine velocity structure to depths of 40 km. The three principle features of our model for Valles caldera are: (1) near-surface low velocities of -17% beneath the Toledo embayment and the Valle Grande, (2) midcrustal low velocities of -23% in an ellipsoidal volume underneath the northwest quadrant of the caldera, and (3) a broad zone of low velocities (-15%) in the lower crust or upper mantle. Crust shallower than 20 km is generally fast to the northwest of the caldera and slow to the southeast. Near-surface low velocities are interpreted as thick deposits of Bandelier tuff and postcaldera volcaniclastic rocks. Lateral variation in the thickness of these deposits supports increased caldera collapse to the southeast, beneath the Valle Grande. We interpret the midcrustal low-velocity zone to contain a minimum melt fraction of 10%. While we cannot rule out the possibility that this zone is the remnant 1.2 Ma Bandelier magma chamber, the eruption history and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks erupted in Valles caldera following the Bandelier tuff make it more likely that magma results from a new pulse of intrusion, indicating that melt flux into the upper crust beneath Valles caldera continues. The low-velocity zone near the crust-mantle boundary is consistent with either partial melt in the lower crust or mafic rocks without partial melt in the upper mantle. In either case, this low-velocity anomaly indicates that underplating by mantle-derived melts has occurred.

  1. Lithospheric Shear Velocity Structure of South Island, New Zealand from Rayleigh Wave Tomography of Amphibious Array Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. S.; Sheehan, A. F.; Stachnik, J. C.; Lin, F. C.; Collins, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first 3D shear velocity model extending well offshore of New Zealand's South Island, imaging the lithosphere beneath Campbell and Challenger plateaus. Our model is constructed via linearized inversion of both teleseismic (18 -70 s period) and ambient noise-based (8 - 25 s period) Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements. We augment an array of 29 ocean-bottom instruments deployed off the South Island's east and west coasts in 2009-2010 with 28 New Zealand land-based seismometers. The ocean-bottom seismometers and 4 of the land seismometers were part of the Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa (MOANA) experiment, and the remaining land seismometers are from New Zealand's permanent GeoNet array. Major features of our shear wave velocity (Vs) model include a low-velocity (Vs<4.3km/s) body extending to at least 75km depth beneath the Banks and Otago peninsulas, a high-velocity (Vs~4.7km/s) upper mantle anomaly underlying the Southern Alps to a depth of 100km, and discontinuous lithospheric velocity structure between eastern and western Challenger Plateau. Using the 4.5km/s contour as a proxy for the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, our model suggests that the lithospheric thickness of Challenger Plateau is substantially greater than that of Campbell Plateau. The high-velocity anomaly we resolve beneath the central South Island exhibits strong spatial correlation with subcrustal earthquake hypocenters along the Alpine Fault (Boese et al., 2013). The ~400km-long low velocity zone we image beneath eastern South Island underlies Cenozoic volcanics and mantle-derived helium observations (Hoke et al., 2000) on the surface. The NE-trending low-velocity zone dividing Challenger Plateau in our model underlies a prominent magnetic discontinuity (Sutherland et al., 1999). The latter feature has been interpreted to represent a pre-Cretaceous crustal boundary, which our results suggest may involve the entire mantle lithosphere.

  2. Crust and upper mantle P wave velocity structure beneath Valles caldera, New Mexico: Results from the Jemez teleseismic tomography experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, Lee K.; Fehler, Michael C.; Roberts, Peter M.; Baldridge, W. Scott; Stafford, Darrik G.; Lutter, William J.; Sessions, Robert

    1998-10-01

    New results are presented from the teleseismic component of the Jemez Tomography Experiment conducted across Valles caldera in northern New Mexico. We invert 4872 relative {ital P} wave arrival times recorded on 50 portable stations to determine velocity structure to depths of 40 km. The three principle features of our model for Valles caldera are: (1) near-surface low velocities of {minus}17{percent} beneath the Toledo embayment and the Valle Grande, (2) midcrustal low velocities of {minus}23{percent} in an ellipsoidal volume underneath the northwest quadrant of the caldera, and (3) a broad zone of low velocities ({minus}15{percent}) in the lower crust or upper mantle. Crust shallower than 20 km is generally fast to the northwest of the caldera and slow to the southeast. Near-surface low velocities are interpreted as thick deposits of Bandelier tuff and postcaldera volcaniclastic rocks. Lateral variation in the thickness of these deposits supports increased caldera collapse to the southeast, beneath the Valle Grande. We interpret the midcrustal low-velocity zone to contain a minimum melt fraction of 10{percent}. While we cannot rule out the possibility that this zone is the remnant 1.2 Ma Bandelier magma chamber, the eruption history and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks erupted in Valles caldera following the Bandelier tuff make it more likely that magma results from a new pulse of intrusion, indicating that melt flux into the upper crust beneath Valles caldera continues. The low-velocity zone near the crust-mantle boundary is consistent with either partial melt in the lower crust or mafic rocks without partial melt in the upper mantle. In either case, this low-velocity anomaly indicates that underplating by mantle-derived melts has occurred. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  3. Use of Seismic Reflection Data and Traveltime Tomography to Image the Near Surface Velocity Structure in the Mississippi Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Magnani, M.; Waldron, B.; Powell, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Memphis aquifer represents one of the highest quality reservoirs of drinking water in the nation and it is separated from the shallow unconfined aquifer by the Upper Claiborne clay. Recent studies show that the confining unit might be discontinuous over the greater Memphis area exposing the Memphis aquifer to potential contamination. We present the results of a seismic reflection profile collected near Memphis, TN with the goal of imaging the structures and potential breaches in the Upper Claiborne confining clay. The imaged area is characterized by a highly heterogeneous shallow velocity structure and low P wave velocities in the ultrashallow unconsolidated materials. The data were collected using a shotgun source and a 1 m source spacing, 0.25 m receiver spacing and a 168-geophone spread for a max offset of 42 m. Raw seismic data show several reflected arrivals in the first 200ms, widespread ground roll, and air wave energy as well as consistent refracted phases across the 1 km - long profile. In addition to the reflection profile we present the preliminary results of first arrival travel time tomography performed along the profile to constrain the velocity field in the shallow portion of the profile. The velocity was then used to remove the effect of the near surface velocity variations. The main data processing steps included elevation statics and frequency and FK filtering. First arrival travel time modeling started with an initial estimate of the 2-layer velocity model using the slope/intercept method. We then modeled first-arrival picks on 1095 shot gathers using the Geo TOMO+ package. The algorithm computes travel times by tracing turning rays and is also able to handle raypaths through low-velocity zones (blind zones). The final resolution is estimated through a ray-information density map, which shows the cumulative contribution of the ray segments traversing different areas of the model. Synthetic models were generated and tested for the tomography

  4. Assembly of 1D, 2D and 3D lanthanum(iii) coordination polymers with perchlorinated benzenedicarboxylates: positional isomeric effect, structural transformation and ring-opening polymerisation of glycolide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chun; Dai, An-Qi; Huang, Kun-Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Cui, Ai-Jun; He, Ming-Yang; Chen, Qun

    2016-02-28

    Utilizing a series of positional isomers of tetrachlorinated benzenedicarboxylic acid ligands, seven La(iii)-based coordination polymers were solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Their structural dimensionalities varying from 1D double chains, to the 2D 3,4,5-connected network, to 3D 6-connected pcu topological nets are only governed by the positions of carboxyl groups on the tetrachlorinated benzene ring. A comprehensive analysis and comparison reveals that the size of the carbonyl solvent molecules (DMF, DEF, DMA, and NMP) can affect the coordination geometries around the La(iii) ions, the coordination modes of carboxylate groups, the packing arrangements, and the void volumes of the overall crystal lattices. One as-synthesized framework further shows an unprecedented structural transformation from a 3D 6-connected network to a 3D 4,5-connected net through the dissolution and reformation pathway in water, suggesting that these easily hydrolyzed lanthanide complexes may serve as precursors to produce new high-dimensional frameworks. The bulk solvent-free melt polymerisation of glycolide utilizing these La(iii) complexes as initiators has been reported herein for the first time. All complexes were found to promote the polymerization of glycolide over a temperature range of 200 to 220 °C, producing poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) with a molecular weight up to 93,280. Under the same experimental conditions, the different catalytic activities for these complexes may result from their structural discrepancy.

  5. Fine Scale Structure of Low and Ultra-Low Velocity Patches in the Lowermost Mantle: Some Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, K.; Romanowicz, B. A.; French, S.

    2015-12-01

    The lowermost part of the mantle, which is roughly halfway to the center of the earth, plays a key role as a thermal and chemical boundary layer between the solid, silicate mantle and fluid, iron outer core. Constraining the seismic velocity structure in this region provides important insights on mantle dynamics, and core-mantle interactions. Recently, global shear wave velocity tomography has confirmed the presence of broad plume conduits extending vertically through the lower mantle in the vicinity of major hotspots (SEMUCB-WM1, French and Romanowicz, 2015). These conduits are rooted in D" in patches of strongly reduced shear velocity, at least some of which, such as Hawaii, appear to contain known ultra low velocity zones (e.g. Cottaar and Romanowicz, 2012). We seek to determine whether these patches generally contain ULVZs, and to contrast them with less extreme structures such as the PERM anomaly (Lekic et al., 2012). Because global tomography cannot resolve such fine scale structure, we apply forward modeling of higher frequency (10-20s) Sdiff waveforms in 3D complex structures using the Spectral Element Method. We focus on Iceland, Hawaii and the PERM anomaly, and Sdiff observations at USArray and/or dense broadband arrays in Europe. In all three cases, Sdiff waveforms are clearly distorted by these anomalies, with either a complex coda and/or evidence for amplitude focusing. As a start, we design simple cylindrical models of shear velocity reduction, and contrast the best fitting ones at each location considered in terms of diameter, height above the core-mantle boundary and strength of velocity reduction. We refine previously obtained models for Hawaii and the Perm Anomaly. For Iceland, the waveforms show a strong azimuthally dependent post-cursor, with maximum travel time delay of ~20s and focusing effects. The preliminary best fitting model shows a structure of 700km in diameter, ~15% reduction in shear wave velocity, extending ~40 km above the core

  6. Anisotropic velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle in the Taiwan region from local travel time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovlev, Andrey; Koulakov, Ivan; Wu, Yih-Min

    2014-05-01

    Taiwan Island located in a contact zone between the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates, the tectonic processes in this area are mostly controlled by the relative kinematics of these two plates. In the east, the Philippine Sea plate subducts northward under the Eurasian plate along the Ryukyu trench. Off the southern tip of Taiwan, the South China Sea subplate, part of the Eurasian plate, subducts eastward under the Philippine Sea plate underneath the Luzon Island. The Taiwan Island is located at the junction between these two subduction zones. Here we present anisotropic velocity model of the crust and upper mantle in the Taiwan region derived from local travel time tomography. We use more than 300 000 P and more than 150 000 S rays coming from 12910 earthquakes occurred in the Taiwan region and registered by 816 stations of different local Taiwanese seismic networks. The ANITA algorithm, for iterative nonlinear inversion of local earthquake data in orthorhombic anisotropic media with one predefined vertical orientation, was used for the tomographic inversion. This algorithm presumes anisotropy for only P velocity described as horizontally oriented ellipsoid. For S velocity we presume an isotropic model. Results show a good agreement with tectonic structure of the region. Obtained isotropic P and S velocity models show fit to each other. The most prominent features of the models are Philippine Sea plate characterized by increased velocities and decreased velocities observed along the Luzon and Ryukyu arcs. We observe that orientation of the fast velocity axis within the Philippine Sea plate coincides with direction of its displacement. Along the Luzon and Ryukyu arcs orientation of the fast velocities axis coincide with the arcs extension. The results show that upper mantle beneath the eastern Taiwan characterized by decreased velocities and N-S orientation of the fast velocity axis. The western Taiwan characterized by alteration of the relatively small negative

  7. Three-dimensional velocity structure and high-precision earthquake relocations at Augustine, Akutan, and Makushin Volcanoes, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Thurber, C. H.; Power, J. A.; Prejean, S. G.

    2010-12-01

    Alaska contains over 100 volcanoes, 21 of which have been active within the past 20 years, including Augustine in Cook Inlet, and Akutan and Makushin in the central Aleutian arc. We incorporate 14-15 years of earthquake data from the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) to obtain P-wave velocity structure and high-precision earthquake locations at each volcano. At Augustine, most relocated seismicity is beneath the summit at an average depth of 0.6 km. In the weeks leading to the 2006 eruption, seismicity shallowed and focused on a NW-SE line, suggestive of an inflating dike. Through August 2006, intermittent seismicity was observed at 1 to 4.5 km depth, pointing to an association with the transport of magma. Active-source data are also incorporated into the tomographic inversion, illuminating a high-velocity column beneath the summit, and elevated velocities on the south flank. The high-velocity column surrounds the observed deeper seismicity and is likely due to intruded volcanic material. The elevated velocities on the south flank are associated with uplifted zeolitzed sandstones. Akutan most recently erupted in 1992, before the seismic network was installed. Most seismicity is above 9 km depth, with 10% occurring between 14 to30 km depth. Seismicity is separated into two main groups that dip away from the caldera—one to the east and one to the west. The eastern group contains earthquakes from a swarm in early 1996 and the western group contains earthquakes from mid-1996 through the present that form rough lines radiating from the summit. Ongoing seismicity also occurs in a broader region beneath the caldera. Makushin most recently erupted in 1995, also prior to seismic monitoring by AVO. Relocations here show that most seismicity is at 3 to 13 km depth and either beneath the caldera or within one of two dipping clusters 20 km to the northeast. Additional seismicity occurs at up to 25 km depth beneath the summit, as well as scattered throughout the island at

  8. Seismic velocity structure of the subducting Pacific plate in the Izu-Bonin region

    SciTech Connect

    Iidaka, Takashi; Mizoue, Megumi; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi )

    1992-10-01

    Observed travel time residual data from a spatially dense seismic network above deep earthquakes in the Izu-Bonin region are compared with 3D ray tracing calculations. The data are inconsistent with a homogeneous slab model and consistent with a heterogenous slab model with regional velocity variations. The residual data can be explained by a model that has a velocity gradient within the slab. In the subducting Pacific plate, the velocity near the center of the slab is faster than that near the upper boundary, and gradually decreases toward the bottom of the plate. A model with a velocity decrease of 3 percent, as predicted by a thermal profile, explains the observed data. 52 refs.

  9. Comparative velocity structure of active Hawaiian volcanoes from 3-D onshore-offshore seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.; Morgan, J.K.; Zelt, C.A.; Okubo, P.G.; Peters, L.; Benesh, N.

    2007-01-01

    We present a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the combined subaerial and submarine portions of the southeastern part of the Island of Hawaii, based on first-arrival seismic tomography of marine airgun shots recorded by the onland seismic network. Our model shows that high-velocity materials (6.5-7.0??km/s) lie beneath Kilauea's summit, Koae fault zone, and the upper Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) and upper and middle East Rift Zone (ERZ), indicative of magma cumulates within the volcanic edifice. A separate high-velocity body of 6.5-6.9??km/s within Kilauea's lower ERZ and upper Puna Ridge suggests a distinct body of magma cumulates, possibly connected to the summit magma cumulates at depth. The two cumulate bodies within Kilauea's ERZ may have undergone separate ductile flow seaward, influencing the submarine morphology of Kilauea's south flank. Low velocities (5.0-6.3??km/s) seaward of Kilauea's Hilina fault zone, and along Mauna Loa's seaward facing Kao'iki fault zone, are attributed to thick piles of volcaniclastic sediments deposited on the submarine flanks. Loihi seamount shows high-velocity anomalies beneath the summit and along the rift zones, similar to the interpreted magma cumulates below Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes, and a low-velocity anomaly beneath the oceanic crust, probably indicative of melt within the upper mantle. Around Kilauea's submarine flank, a high-velocity anomaly beneath the outer bench suggests the presence of an ancient seamount that may obstruct outward spreading of the flank. Mauna Loa's southeast flank is also marked by a large, anomalously high-velocity feature (7.0-7.4??km/s), interpreted to define an inactive, buried volcanic rift zone, which might provide a new explanation for the westward migration of Mauna Loa's current SWRZ and the growth of Kilauea's SWRZ. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Regional structural analysis and velocity model (Vp) of the Chittagong-Myanmar Fold and Thrust Belt, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgi, P.; Hubbard, J.; Peterson, D. E.; Akhter, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Bangladesh sits on the seismically active Chittagong-Myanmar Fold and Thrust Belt (CMFB), a partially exposed accretionary prism associated with the India-Eurasia collision. Ground shaking due to local and regional earthquakes presents a potential hazard to Bangladesh, one of the most populated areas in the world. In order to constrain this hazard, we first investigate potential seismic sources (active faults), and second we analyze the material through which seismic energy propagates. To address potential earthquake sources, we focus on the Comilla Anticline, which is the frontal-most exposed structure of the CMFB as well as the most proximal to the capital city of Dhaka. We present several industry-acquired and depth-converted seismic reflection profiles, which exhibit an asymmetric detachment fold rising from a relatively deep décollement (5-6 km). Because there is no strong evidence for an associated emergent thrust, this actively growing fold may have low seismic potential. We place this work into a regional context by integrating previous research of CMFB structures to create a regional structural model, which reveals laterally varying wedge geometry. To address ground shaking, the second component of this work, we assess stacking velocities from our seismic reflection data in conjunction with sonic log velocities from several locations in Bangladesh. These data show varying velocity versus depth trends by region. Following similar, data-rich studies performed in the Los Angeles and adjacent basins, we use data and theory-driven fitting techniques to analyze depth-velocity trends for these different regions, and interpolate to create a laterally varying regional seismic velocity model. Velocities generally slow from east to west, consistent with the younging trend as we move from older, exhumed CMFB formations to recent and undeformed deposits.

  11. Approach for simultaneous determination of thickness and sound velocity in layered structures based on sound field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnicke, Elfgard; Wolf, Mario; Kümmritz, Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    This paper describes a non-invasive, nondestructive method for the simultaneous determination of sound velocity and thickness of the different layers of a layered structure by means of ultrasound. It will be demonstrated how further information about the reflected sound field, in addition to the time of flight, is acquired by using annular arrays. Because of this supplementary information, reflectors or other probes at known distances are not necessary and the specimen does not have to be placed in a medium with known sound velocity. Two different evaluation methods combined with a geometric model are explained. To improve the accuracy, measured signals are also evaluated by a wave propagation model.

  12. Probing structure-induced optical behavior in a new class of self-activated luminescent 0D/1D CaWO₄ metal oxide – CdSe nanocrystal composite heterostructures

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Jinkyu; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; ...

    2015-01-30

    In this report, we synthesize and characterize the structural and optical properties of novel heterostructures composed of (i) semiconducting nanocrystalline CdSe quantum dot (QDs) coupled with (ii) both one and zero-dimensional (1D and 0D) motifs of self-activated luminescence CaWO₄ metal oxides. Specifically, ~4 nm CdSe QDs have been anchored onto (i) high-aspect ratio 1D nanowires, measuring ~230 nm in diameter and ~3 μm in length, as well as onto (ii) crystalline 0D nanoparticles (possessing an average diameter of ~ 80 nm) of CaWO₄ through the mediation of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a connecting linker. Composite formation was confirmed by complementarymore » electron microscopy and spectroscopy (i.e. IR and Raman) data. In terms of luminescent properties, our results show that our 1D and 0D heterostructures evince photoluminescence (PL) quenching and shortened PL lifetimes of CaWO₄ as compared with unbound CaWO₄. We propose that a photo-induced electron transfer process occurs from CaWO₄ to CdSe QDs, a scenario which has been confirmed by NEXAFS measurements and which highlights a decrease in the number of unoccupied orbitals in the conduction bands of CdSe QDs. By contrast, the PL signature and lifetimes of MPA-capped CdSe QDs within these heterostructures do not exhibit noticeable changes as compared with unbound MPA-capped CdSe QDs. The striking difference in optical behavior between CaWO₄ nanostructures and CdSe QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. In addition, the PL quenching behaviors for CaWO₄ within the heterostructure configuration were examined by systematically varying (i) the quantities and coverage densities of CdSe QDs as well as (ii) the intrinsic morphology (and by extension, the inherent crystallite size) of CaWO₄ itself.« less

  13. Detection of fault structure under a near-surface low velocity layer by seismic tomography: synthetics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanny, Teuku A.; Sassa, Koichi

    1996-09-01

    We have developed a new method to detect a fault structure under a near-surface low velocity layer (LVL) by seismic tomography. The field study showed that the tomography image reconstructed using borehole-surface configuration had a different result from that of using a crosshole configuration. The image reconstructed by using a borehole-surface configuration showed a decrease in seismic velocities along boreholes, and also the tomogram result using both configurations can not detect the subsurface fault structure. These phenomena are caused by the low velocity layer (LVL) at the top of investigation area. The basic idea hard is based on a downward continuation principle. By knowing the thickness of the LVL and the top of bedrock enables us to place 'virtual receiver' and/or 'virtual source' below the LVL. In this way, we can reconstruct the image by various tomographic methodologies. As an advantage, this method is easy to be use with the aid of ray tracing methodology. It can also reduce the effect of the near-surface LVL and can maximize the reconstructed image. The final result of our synthetic images by ILST, SIRT, and modified SIRT shows high accuracy and resolution for detection of fault structure under the low velocity layer.

  14. Density, porosity, mineralogy, and internal structure of cosmic dust and alteration of its properties during high-velocity atmospheric entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, T.; Kallonen, A.; Suuronen, J.-P.; Rochette, P.; Hutzler, A.; Gattacceca, J.; Badjukov, D. D.; SkáLa, R.; BöHmová, V.; ČUda, J.

    2014-07-01

    X-ray microtomography (XMT), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and magnetic hysteresis measurements were used to determine micrometeorite internal structure, mineralogy, crystallography, and physical properties at μm resolution. The study samples include unmelted, partially melted (scoriaceous), and completely melted (cosmic spherules) micrometeorites. This variety not only allows comparison of the mineralogy and porosity of these three micrometeorite types but also reveals changes in meteoroid properties during atmospheric entry at various velocities. At low entry velocities, meteoroids do not melt and their physical properties do not change. The porosity of unmelted micrometeorites varies considerably (0-12%) with one friable example having porosity around 50%. At higher velocities, the range of meteoroid porosity narrows, but average porosity increases (to 16-27%) due to volatile evaporation and partial melting (scoriaceous phase). Metal distribution seems to be mostly unaffected at this stage. At even higher entry velocities, complete melting follows the scoriaceous phase. Complete melting is accompanied by metal oxidation and redistribution, loss of porosity (1 ± 1%), and narrowing of the bulk (3.2 ± 0.5 g cm-3) and grain (3.3 ± 0.5 g cm-3) density range. Melted cosmic spherules with a barred olivine structure show an oriented crystallographic structure, whereas other subtypes do not.

  15. Forearc structure beneath southwestern British Columbia: A three-dimensional tomographic velocity model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramachandran, K.; Dosso, S.E.; Spence, G.D.; Hyndman, R.D.; Brocher, T.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional compressional wave velocity model of the forearc crust and upper mantle and the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath southwestern British Columbia and the adjoining straits of Georgia and Juan de Fuca. The velocity model was constructed through joint tomographic inversion of 50,000 first-arrival times from earthquakes and active seismic sources. Wrangellia rocks of the accreted Paleozoic and Mesozoic island arc assemblage underlying southern Vancouver Island in the Cascadia forearc are imaged at some locations with higher than average lower crustal velocities of 6.5-7.2 km/s, similar to observations at other island arc terranes. The mafic Eocene Crescent terrane, thrust landward beneath southern Vancouver Island, exhibits crustal velocities in the range of 6.0-6.7 km/s and is inferred to extend to a depth of more than 20 km. The Cenozoic Olympic Subduction Complex, an accretionary prism thrust beneath the Crescent terrane in the Olympic Peninsula, is imaged as a low-velocity wedge to depths of at least 20 km. Three zones with velocities of 7.0-7.5 km/s, inferred to be mafic and/or ultramafic units, lie above the subducting Juan de Fuca plate at depths of 25-35 km. The forearc upper mantle wedge beneath southeastern Vancouver Island and the Strait of Georgia exhibits low velocities of 7.2-7.5 km/s, inferred to correspond to ???20% serpentinization of mantle peridotites, and consistent with similar observations in other warm subduction zones. Estimated dip of the Juan de Fuca plate beneath southern Vancouver Island is ???11??, 16??, and 27?? at depths of 30, 40, and 50 km, respectively. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of Bandai volcano in northeastern Japan inferred from active seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, Teruo; Tanaka, Satoru; Ueki, Sadato; Hamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakamichi, Haruhisa; Nishimura, Takeshi; Oikawa, Jun; Tsutsui, Tomoki; Nishi, Kiyoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Sosuke; Miyamachi, Hiroki; Yamasato, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Yutaka

    2004-12-01

    The three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of the Bandai volcano has been revealed by tomographic inversion using approximately 2200 travel-time data collected during an active seismic survey comprising 298 temporary seismic stations and eight artificial shots. The key result of this study is the delineation of a high-velocity anomaly (Vp>4.6 km/s at sea-level) immediately below the summit peak. This feature extends to depths of 1-2 km below sea-level. The near-surface horizontal position of the high-velocity anomaly coincides well with that of a positive Bouguer gravity anomaly. Geological data demonstrate that sector collapses have occurred in all directions from the summit and that the summit crater has been repeatedly refilled with magmatic material. These observations suggest that the high-velocity region revealed in this study is a manifestation of an almost-solidified magmatic plumbing system. We have also noted that a near-surface low-velocity region (Vp<3.0 km/s at sea-level) on the southern foot of the volcano corresponds to the position of volcanic sediments including ash and debris avalanche material. In addition, we have made use of the tomographic results to recompute the hypocenters of earthquake occurring during seismic swarms beneath the summit in 1988 and 2000. Relocating the earthquakes using the three-dimensional velocity model clearly indicates that they predominantly occurred on two steeply dipping planes. Low-frequency earthquakes observed during the swarms in 2000 occurred in the seismic gap between the two clusters. The hypocentral regions of the seismic swarms and the low-frequency earthquakes are close to the higher-velocity zone beneath the volcano's summit. These observations suggest that the recent seismic activity beneath the summit is likely associated with thermal energy being released within the solidifying magmatic plumbing system.

  17. Partially obstructed channel: Contraction ratio effect on the flow hydrodynamic structure and prediction of the transversal mean velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Meftah, M.; Mossa, M.

    2016-11-01

    In this manuscript, we focus on the study of flow structures in a channel partially obstructed by arrays of vertical, rigid, emergent, vegetation/cylinders. Special attention is given to understand the effect of the contraction ratio, defined as the ratio of the obstructed area width to the width of the unobstructed area, on the flow hydrodynamic structures and to analyze the transversal flow velocity profile at the obstructed-unobstructed interface. A large data set of transversal mean flow velocity profiles and turbulence characteristics is reported from experiments carried out in a laboratory flume. The flow velocities and turbulence intensities have been measured with a 3D Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV)-Vectrino manufactured by Nortek. It was observed that the arrays of emergent vegetation/cylinders strongly affect the flow structures, forming a shear layer immediately next to the obstructed-unobstructed interface, followed by an adjacent free-stream region of full velocity flow. The experimental results show that the contraction ratio significantly affects the flow hydrodynamic structure. Adaptation of the Prandtl's log-law modified by Nikuradse led to the determination of a characteristic hydrodynamic roughness height to define the array resistance to the flow. Moreover, an improved modified log-law predicting the representative transversal profile of the mean flow velocity, at the obstructed-unobstructed interface, is proposed. The benefit of this modified log-law is its easier practical applicability, i.e., it avoids the measurements of some sensitive turbulence parameters, in addition, the flow hydrodynamic variables forming it are predictable, using the initial hydraulic conditions.

  18. 3D seismic velocity structure in the rupture area of the 2014 M8.2 Iquique earthquake in Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woollam, Jack; Fuenzallida, Amaya; Garth, Tom; Rietbrock, Andreas; Ruiz, Sergio; Tavera, Hernando

    2016-04-01

    Seismic velocity tomography is one of the key tools in Earth sciences to image the physical properties of the subsurface. In recent years significant advances have been made to image the Chilean subductions zone, especially in the area of the 2010 M8.8 Maule earthquake (e.g. Hicks et al., 2014), providing much needed physical constraints for earthquakes source inversions and rupture models. In 2014 the M8.2 Iquique earthquake struck the northern part of the Chilean subduction zone in close proximity to the Peruvian boarder. The pre- and aftershock sequence of this major earthquake was recorded by a densified seismological network in Northern Chile and Southern Peru, which provides an excellent data set to study in depth the 3D velocity structure along the subduction megathrust. Based on an automatic event catalogue of nearly 10,000 events spanning the time period March to May 2014 we selected approximately 450 events for a staggered 3D inversion approach. Events are selected to guarantee an even ray coverage through the inversion volume. We only select events with a minimum GAP of 200 to improve depth estimates and therefore increase resolution in the marine forearc. Additionally, we investigate secondary arrivals between the P- and S-wave arrival to improve depth location. Up to now we have processed about 450 events, from which about 150 with at least 30 P- and S-wave observations have been selected for the subsequent 3D tomography. Overall the data quality is very high, which allows arrival time estimates better than 0.05s on average. We will show results from the 1D, 2D, and preliminary 3D inversions and discuss the results together with the obtained seismicity distribution.

  19. A Joint Inversion for Velocity and Anisotropy Structure Beneath a Highly Extended Continental Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilon, Z.; Abers, G. A.; Gaherty, J. B.; Jin, G.

    2014-12-01

    We jointly invert body wave travel times for anisotropy and velocity variations within the Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea, one of the youngest (≤6Ma) and most highly-extended (≤190km) continental rifts known. We use data from the CDPapua passive seismic array deployed around the D'Entrecasteaux Islands; these islands lie within the maximally-thinned continental crust at the centre of the rift and host the world's youngest (5 - 7 Ma) UHP rocks. We have previously used SK(K)S splitting to identify strong anisotropy within this rift, with fast axis orientated parallel to extension, roughly N-S. Consistency of splitting direction across station, back azimuth and method of analysis indicates a simple anisotropic fabric beneath much of this region. Consequently, we simplify the anisotropic inversion by solving for perturbations to N-S and E-W shear velocities at each node. This work builds on our previous isotropic tomographic study by resolving tradeoffs between anisotropy and velocity heterogeneities. We cross-correlate shear wave arrivals separately on N-S and E-W components, using the Christoffel equations to show that the travel times of these orthogonal quasi-shear pulses distinctly record the fast and slow velocities within our model. We invert these data for velocities on an irregular mesh, using a finite frequency approach with a first fresnel zone approximation. Preliminary results identify the locus of the rift beneath the D'Entrecasteaux Islands, and demonstrate that substantial anisotropy is present beneath the region of major extension. This anisotropy is co-located with low seismic velocities that indicate almost total removal of lithosphere, consistent with gravity fitting. Therefore, we ascribe the anisotropy within the rift to LPO of highly sheared asthenospheric mantle as a result of the large magnitude of extension.

  20. Lithospheric shear velocity structure of South Island, New Zealand, from amphibious Rayleigh wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Justin S.; Sheehan, Anne F.; Stachnik, Joshua C.; Lin, Fan-Chi; Yeck, William L.; Collins, John A.

    2016-05-01

    We present a crust and mantle 3-D shear velocity model extending well offshore of New Zealand's South Island, imaging the lithosphere beneath the South Island as well as the Campbell and Challenger Plateaus. Our model is constructed via linearized inversion of both teleseismic (18-70 s period) and ambient noise-based (8-25 s period) Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements. We augment an array of 4 land-based and 29 ocean bottom instruments deployed off the South Island's east and west coasts in 2009-2010 by the Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa experiment with 28 land-based seismometers from New Zealand's permanent GeoNet array. Major features of our shear wave velocity (Vs) model include a low-velocity (Vs < 4.4 km/s) body extending from near surface to greater than 75 km depth beneath the Banks and Otago Peninsulas and high-velocity (Vs~4.7 km/s) mantle anomalies underlying the Southern Alps and off the northwest coast of the South Island. Using the 4.5 km/s contour as a proxy for the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, our model suggests that the lithospheric thickness of Challenger Plateau and central South Island is substantially greater than that of the inner Campbell Plateau. The high-velocity anomaly we resolve at subcrustal depths (>50 km) beneath the central South Island exhibits strong spatial correlation with upper mantle earthquake hypocenters beneath the Alpine Fault. The ~400 km long low-velocity zone we image beneath eastern South Island and the inner Bounty Trough underlies Cenozoic volcanics and the locations of mantle-derived helium measurements, consistent with asthenospheric upwelling in the region.

  1. Anisotropic shear-wave velocity structure of the Earth's mantle: A global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustowski, B.; EkströM, G.; DziewońSki, A. M.

    2008-06-01

    We combine a new, large data set of surface wave phase anomalies, long-period waveforms, and body wave travel times to construct a three-dimensional model of the anisotropic shear wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. Our modeling approach is improved and more comprehensive compared to our earlier studies and involves the development and implementation of a new spherically symmetric reference model, simultaneous inversion for velocity and anisotropy, as well as discontinuity topographies, and implementation of nonlinear crustal corrections for waveforms. A comparison of our new three-dimensional model, S362ANI, with two other models derived from comparable data sets but using different techniques reveals persistent features: (1) strong, ˜200-km-thick, high-velocity anomalies beneath cratons, likely representing the continental lithosphere, underlain by weaker, fast anomalies extending below 250 km, which may represent continental roots, (2) weak velocity heterogeneity between 250 and 400 km depths, (3) fast anomalies extending horizontally up to 2000-3000 km in the mantle transition zone beneath subduction zones, (4) lack of strong long-wavelength heterogeneity below 650 km suggesting inhibiting character of the upper mantle-lower mantle boundary, and (5) slow-velocity superplumes beneath the Pacific and Africa. The shear wave radial anisotropy is strongest at 120 km depth, in particular beneath the central Pacific. Lateral anisotropic variations appreciably improve the fit to data that are predominantly sensitive to the uppermost and lowermost mantle but not to the waveforms that control the transition zone and midmantle depths. Tradeoffs between lateral variations in velocity and anisotropy are negligible in the uppermost mantle but noticeable at the bottom of the mantle.

  2. Three-dimensional p-velocity structure of the summit caldera of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Stauber, D.A.; Iyer, N.M.; Mooney, W.D.; Dawson, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional high-resolution seismic study of the summit caldera of Newberry Volcano, Oregon, was conducted by the US Geological Survey using an adaptation of the method applied by Mercessian et al. (1984). Preliminary interpretation of the traveltime residuals reveals a ring of high P-velocity material coinciding with the inner ring fault system of the caldera in the upper 2 km. A zone of lower P velocities extends deeper than 2 km in the center of the caldera. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Analysis of the Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared Spectra of cis,cis- and trans,trans-1,4-DIFLUOROBUTADIENE-1-d_{1} and trans,trans-1,4-DIFLUOROBUTADIENE-1,4-d_{2}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Chen, Yihui; Lu, Yuhua; Neese, Christopher F.; Nemchick, Deacon J.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-06-01

    Samples of cis,cis- and trans,trans-1,4-difluorobutadiene-1-d_{1} (DFBD) and trans,trans-DFBD-1,4-d_{2} have been synthesized and investigated with high-resolution (0.0015 cm^{-1}) infrared spectroscopy. For the first two species the rotational structure in more than one band has been analyzed. For the 1,4-d_{2} species the spectrum of only one C-type band was available in an isotopic mixture. Ground state rotational constants are reported for all three molecules. It is proposed that quartic centrifugal distortion constants computed with a B3LYP/cc-pVTZ model can be used to assess the quality of observed rotational constants. The favorable comparison of predicted and observed ground state rotational constants for all four ^{13}C species of cis,trans-DFBD, which is MW active, demonstrates that the ground state rotational constants for the ^{13}C species of the cis,cis and trans,trans isomers can be successfully predicted with high accuracy. Rotational constants for a full set of isotopologues will be used to determine accurate semiexperimental equilibrium structures of the cis,cis and trans,trans species of DFBD. N. C. Craig, C. M. Oertel, D. C. Oertel, M. J. Tubergen, R. J. Lavrich, A. M Chaka J. Phys. Chem. A 106, 4230-4235 (2002).

  4. Anisotropic 3-D Crustal Velocity Structure of Idaho/ Oregon from a Joint Inversion of Group and Phase Velocities of Love and Rayleigh Waves from Ambient Seismic Noise: Results from the IDOR Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, P. M.; Panning, M. P.; Russo, R.; Mocanu, V. I.; Stanciu, A. C.; Torpey, M. E.; Hongsresawat, S.; VanDecar, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    We present new 3-D radially anisotropic and isotropic crustal velocity models beneath central Idaho and eastern Oregon. We produced the velocity models from Love and horizontal component Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity measurements on the IDaho/ORegon (IDOR) Passive seismic network, 86 broadband seismic stations, dataset using ambient noise tomography and the methods of Gallego et. al (2010) and Lin et. al (2008). We calculated inter-station group/phase velocities in narrow frequency bands from travel-time measurements of the rotated stacked horizontal component cross-correlations (bandpass filtered between 2 and 30 seconds), which we used to invert for velocity structure beneath the network. We derived group and phase velocity maps for each frequency band using the damped least-squares inversion method of Tarantola (2005), and then jointly inverted for velocity with depth. Moho depths are prescribed in the joint inversions based on receiver functions, also from the IDOR seismic data, and provides a starting crustal velocity model. Goals of our work include refining models of crustal structure in the accreted Blue Mountain terranes in the western study area; determining the depth extent of the Salmon River Suture/West Idaho Shear Zone (WISZ), which crosses north-south through the middle of the network; determining the architecture of the Idaho batholith, an extensive largely crustal-derived pluton; and examining the nature of the autochthonous (?) North American crust and lithosphere beneath and east of the batholith.

  5. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  6. Lithospheric Velocity Structure of the Upper Rhine Graben; A new Model for the Development of Europe's Largest Continental Rift.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granet, M.; Lopes Cardozo, G.; Herquel, G.

    2003-12-01

    The lithospheric structure of the Rhine Graben, part of the European Cenozoic Rift system (ECRIS), is studied with the help of a regional 3D teleseismic travel time tomography. Joint interpretation of the tomography, the SKS anisotropy, and a local earthquake tomographic study leads to a new model for the rifting and development of the Graben. Two seismic campaigns provided 2696 P and PKP travel time residuals of teleseismic events. The two data sets are combined and inverted together. This inversion yields detailed images of the P velocity structure of the lower crust and the lithospheric mantle down to a depth of 125 kilometers. An absence of strong low velocity anomalies in the region confirms that there is no shallow mantle diapir, this demonstrates the passive development of the rift. The observed velocity structures have an orientation 10° -20° oblique to the graben axis and are interpreted as inherited Variscan structures. These structures are thought to have played a dominant role during the Oligocene rifting of the Rhine Graben. Similar structures are known to have influenced the development of the Limagne graben (Massif Central), also part of the ECRIS. An absence of structures that are orientated parallel to the graben axis shows that the Upper Rhine Graben did not form following a traditional McKenzie or Wernicke model. A new model is presented in which strike slip movements on the Variscan structures in the lithospheric mantle are responsible for the extension in the crust. This conceptual model is supported by SKS anisotropy and helps to explain some of the features in the development of the continental rift in the overall compressive setting of the Alpine foreland.

  7. Crustal Thickness and Lower Crustal Velocity Structure Beneath the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R.; Soule, D. C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Weekly, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    In 2009, a multi-scale seismic tomography experiment was conducted on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge aboard the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. Ocean bottom seismometers were deployed at 64 sites and recorded 5567 shots of a 36-element, 6600 in.3 airgun array. The experiment extended 100 km along-axis and 60 km cross-axis. Two crustal tomographic analyses have previously been completed using data from the experiment. First, 93,000 manually picked crustal refraction arrivals (Pg) were used to develop a three-dimensional model of crustal velocity and thickness in the upper crust (Weekly et al. 2014). Second, this model was used as the starting model in an analysis that incorporated ~19,000 Moho reflection arrivals (PmP) for non-ridge crossing paths to image lower crustal velocity structure and crustal thickness off-axis. A key feature of this model is a ~0.5-1 km increase in crustal thickness beneath a bathymetric plateau that extends to either side of the central portion of the Endeavour segment. We present a tomographic inversions that incorporates ridge-crossing paths to examine spatial variations in lower crustal velocity and crustal thickness beneath the ridge axis. The preliminary results from an inversion that incorporates ~8700 manually picked ridge-crossing PmP arrival times reveals a ~10-km-wide low velocity zone extending throughout the lower crust with a velocity anomaly of -0.3 to -0.5 km/s at ≥4 km depth. This low velocity zone extends both to the north and south of the axial magma chamber reflector imaged previously beneath the central Endeavour. The inversion also shows significant variations in apparent crustal thickness along axis but additional analysis is required to understand whether these variations are well resolved.

  8. Vertical structure of near-bed cross-shore flow velocities in the swash zone of a dissipative beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inch, Kris; Masselink, Gerd; Puleo, Jack A.; Russell, Paul; Conley, Daniel C.

    2015-06-01

    Cross-shore velocity profiles are measured at 0.001 m vertical resolution and at 100 Hz over the lower 0.02-0.07 m of the water column in the mid swash zone on a dissipative, macrotidal beach. Swash motion is predominantly at infragravity frequencies and forced by significant wave heights exceeding 1.5 m and peak wave periods over 15 s. Observations of long duration (> 14 s) swashes during two rising tides are used to quantify the vertical structure of cross-shore flow velocities and estimate corresponding bed shear stress and friction coefficients. Analysis is performed on an individual swash event to an elevation of 0.07 m and an ensemble event made up of 24 individual swash events to an elevation of 0.02 m. Cross-shore velocities exceed 2 m s-1 and are of a similar magnitude during both the uprush and the backwash. Changes in velocity with elevation indicate that the swash zone boundary layer extends to 0.07 m during the strongest flows and is well-represented by the logarithmic model applied to this elevation, except near flow reversal. Maximum bed shear stresses estimated using the logarithmic model are 22 N m-2 and 10 N m-2 for the individual event and ensemble event respectively and mean values are larger during the backwash than the uprush. Mean friction coefficients estimated from equating the logarithmic model and the quadratic drag law are 0.018 and 0.019 for the individual event and ensemble event respectively. Bed shear stress may be underestimated if the logarithmic model is fit to a velocity profile that is only part boundary layer, emphasising the need for high resolution velocity profiles close to the bed for accurate bed shear stress predictions in the swash zone.

  9. The nearby spiral density-wave structure of the Galaxy: line-of-sight and longitudinal velocities of 223 Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, Evgeny; Hou, Li-Gang; Jiang, Ing-Guey; Ngeow, Chow-Choong

    2017-02-01

    The data of 223 stars within 4 kpc from the Sun and 400 pc from the plane are collected from Melnik et al., who listed photometric distances and velocities of 674 long-period Cepheids in the disc of our Galaxy. Both line-of-sight and transverse along the Galactic longitude velocities of the selected stars are analysed on the assumption that the system is the subject to Lin-Shu-type moderately unstable, low-amplitude, tightly wound and rigidly rotating density waves. Minimization of the least-squares estimator S of measured and modelled velocities of stars was performed in the geometrical parameters of waves. The wave structures defined from the two independent samples of velocities are nearly similar. Different radial scales (wavelengths) of velocity inhomogeneity of about 1, 2 and 4 kpc, which do not depend on the number of spiral arms m, were found. But for now it is unclear if one can identify these scales as fully independent global modes of collective oscillations or they are Fourier harmonics of a single wave, or they just reveal the segments of large-scale Orion, Sagittarius and Perseus arms. The dominant mode is the one-armed wave for the main minimum of all S considered. However, because the S values for fits with m = 1-4 are almost equal the latter conclusion must be regarded as tentative until more extensive data are available. High-precision Gaia observations could reveal in the near future whether the wave-like velocity fluctuations near the Sun reported here do indeed exist.

  10. Structure, Elasticity, and Wave-Velocities of MgSiO3-PEROVSKITE at Lower Mantle Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzcovitch, R. M.; Karki, B. B.; Coccocioni, M.

    2002-12-01

    The crystal structure, elastic constants, and wave-velocities of MgSiO3-perovskite (Mg-pv) have been determined throughout the lower mantle's (LM) pressure/temperature (P,T) regime by means of first principles computations of its vibrational density of states at various strained configurations and free energy calculations within the quasi-harmonic-approximation (QHA). The latter is tested "a posteriori" and shown to be valid at expected conditions. This completes the series of calculations on the thermoelastic properties of Mg-pv that are necessary to 1) narrow down constraints on LM's composition and thermal state, 2) shed light on the relative role of temperature on 3D velocity structures, and 3)on the anisotropy of this phase.

  11. 3D P-Wave Velocity Structure of the Deep Galicia Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, Gaye; Minshull, Timothy; Davy, Richard; Sawyer, Dale; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Reston, Timothy; Shillington, Donna; Ranero, Cesar

    2015-04-01

    The combined wide-angle reflection-refraction and multi-channel seismic (MCS) experiment, Galicia 3D, was carried out in 2013 at the Galicia rifted margin in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain. The main geological features within the 64 by 20 km (1280 km²) 3D box investigated by the survey are the peridotite ridge (PR), the fault bounded, rotated basement blocks and the S reflector, which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault. 44 short period four-component ocean bottom seismometers and 28 ocean bottom hydrophones were deployed in the 3D box. 3D MCS profiles sampling the whole box were acquired with two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. fired alternately every 37.5 m. We present the results from 3D first-arrival time tomography that constrains the P-wave velocity in the 3D box, for the entire depth sampled by reflection data. Results are validated by synthetic tests and by the comparison with Galicia 3D MCS lines. The main outcomes are as follows: 1- The 3.5 km/s iso-velocity contour mimics the top of the acoustic basement observed on MCS profiles. Block bounding faults are imaged as velocity contrasts and basement blocks exhibit 3D topographic variations. 2- On the southern profiles, the top of the PR rises up to 5.5 km depth whereas, 20 km northward, its basement expression (at 6.5 km depth) nearly disappears. 3- The 6.5 km/s iso-velocity contour matches the topography of the S reflector where the latter is visible on MCS profiles. Within a depth interval of 0.6 km (in average), velocities beneath the S reflector increase from 6.5 km/s to 7 km/s, which would correspond to a decrease in the degree of serpentinization from ~45 % to ~30 % if these velocity variations are caused solely by variations in hydration. At the intersections between the block bounding normal faults and the S reflector, this decrease happens over a larger depth interval (> 1 km), suggesting that faults act as conduit for the water flow in the upper mantle.

  12. 3D P-Wave Velocity Structure of the Deep Galicia Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, G.; Minshull, T. A.; Davy, R. G.; Sawyer, D. S.; Klaeschen, D.; Papenberg, C. A.; Reston, T. J.; Shillington, D. J.; Ranero, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The combined wide-angle reflection-refraction and multi-channel seismic (MCS) experiment, Galicia 3D, was carried out in 2013 at the Galicia rifted margin in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain. The main geological features within the 64 by 20 km (1280 km²) 3D box investigated by the survey are the peridotite ridge (PR), the fault bounded, rotated basement blocks and the S reflector, which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault. 44 short period four-component ocean bottom seismometers and 28 ocean bottom hydrophones were deployed in the 3D box. 3D MCS profiles sampling the whole box were acquired with two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. fired alternately every 37.5 m. We present the results from 3D first-arrival time tomography that constrains the P-wave velocity in the 3D box, for the entire depth sampled by reflection data. Results are validated by synthetic tests and by the comparison with Galicia 3D MCS lines. The main outcomes are as follows: 1- The 3.5 km/s iso-velocity contour mimics the top of the acoustic basement observed on MCS profiles. Block bounding faults are imaged as velocity contrasts and basement blocks exhibit 3D topographic variations. 2- On the southern profiles, the top of the PR rises up to 5.5 km depth whereas, 20 km northward, its basement expression (at 6.5 km depth) nearly disappears. 3- The 6.5 km/s iso-velocity contour matches the topography of the S reflector where the latter is visible on MCS profiles. Within a depth interval of 0.6 km (in average), velocities beneath the S reflector increase from 6.5 km/s to 7 km/s, which would correspond to a decrease in the degree of serpentinization from ~45 % to ~30 % if these velocity variations are caused solely by variations in hydration. At the intersections between the block bounding normal faults and the S reflector, this decrease happens over a larger depth interval (> 1 km), suggesting that faults act as conduit for the water flow in the upper mantle.

  13. Structure of backward facing step flow in low Reynolds number controlled by synthetic jet array with different injection velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Saneyuki

    2013-11-01

    This study presents detailed structure of separated flow downstream of a backward facing step affected by a non-uniform periodic disturbance along spanwise direction induced by synthetic jet array. The Reynolds number based on the step height ranged from 300 to 900. The frequency of the synthetic jet actuation was selected within the acceptance frequency range of separating shear layer. The periodic disturbance generates periodic transverse vortices whose size and shape change corresponding to the strength of the disturbance. The effect of different injection velocities in the synthetic jet array from those of adjacent jets on the transverse vortex structure and resulting reattachment process is discussed based on the wall shear stress measured by the Micro Flow Sensor (MFS) and flow visualization. Near wall behavior of the transverse vortex above the MFS was related to the sensor output. The results show that non-uniform injection velocity manipulated in the jet array induces difference in the distorted vortex structure and reattachment process in spanwise direction, which strongly depend on the Reynolds number and injection velocities of the synthetic jets.

  14. Gulf stream velocity structure through combined inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Near-surface velocities from an acoustic Doppler instrument are used in conjunction with CTD/O2 data to produce estimates of the absolute flow field off Cape Hatteras. The data set consists of two transects across the Gulf Stream made by the R/V Endeavor cruise EN88 in August 1982. An inverse procedure is applied which makes use of both the acoustic Doppler data and property conservation constraints. Velocity sections at approximately 73 deg. W and 71 deg. W are presented with formal errors of 1-2 cm/s. The net Gulf Stream transports are estimated to be 116 + or - 2 Sv across the south leg and 161 + or - 4 Sv across the north. A Deep Western Boundary Current transport of 4 + or - 1 Sv is also estimated. While these values do not necessarily represent the mean, they are accurate estimates of the synoptic flow field in the region.

  15. Transport velocity transformation - A convenient method for performance analysis of multilayer solar cell structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, M.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that in the case of low-level injection, space-charge quasi-neutrality, and spatially constant material parameters (including an electrostatic field), the individual layer can be treated analytically and the basic solar cell performance parameters can be evaluated from three equations. The first equation represents the transformation of the transport velocity across the layer from the other layer boundary. The second establishes the light-generated current output from the layer interface, under the influence of the transport velocities and minority-carrier density at both layer boundaries and of bulk recombination. The third equation describes the flow of these carriers across other layers. The power of the approach is considered to lie in its facility for analysis of the solar cell's performance layer by layer, giving a clear picture of the individual layer's influence on cell efficiency.

  16. An Investigation on Low Velocity Impact Response of Multilayer Sandwich Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Jedari Salami, S.; Sadighi, M.; Shakeri, M.; Moeinfar, M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of adding an extra layer within a sandwich panel and two different core types in top and bottom cores on low velocity impact loadings are studied experimentally in this paper. The panel includes polymer composite laminated sheets for faces and the internal laminated sheet called extra layer sheet, and two types of crushable foams are selected as the core material. Low velocity impact tests were carried out by drop hammer testing machine to the clamped multilayer sandwich panels with expanded polypropylene (EPP) and polyurethane rigid (PUR) in the top and bottom cores. Local displacement of the top core, contact force and deflection of the sandwich panel were obtained for different locations of the internal sheet; meanwhile the EPP and PUR were used in the top and bottom cores alternatively. It was found that the core material type has made significant role in improving the sandwich panel's behavior compared with the effect of extra layer location. PMID:24453804

  17. Imaging earth's interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth's mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  18. Imaging earth`s interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth`s mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  19. Effect of curvature and thickness on elastic wave velocity in cornea-like structures by FEM and OCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Vantipalli, Srilatha; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-hao; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Wave models, which have been utilized in the past to reconstruct corneal biomechanical properties based on the propagation of an elastic wave, were often developed assuming a thin-plate geometry. However, the curvature and thickness of the cornea are not considered when utilizing these models. In this work, optical coherence elastography (OCE) experiments were conducted on tissue-mimicking agar phantoms and contact lenses along with finite element (FE) modeling of four kinds of cornea-like structures to understand the effects of curvature and thickness on the group velocity of an elastic wave. As the radius of curvature increased from 19.1 to 47.7 mm, the group velocity of the elastic wave obtained by both FE and OCE from a spherical shell section model decreased from ~2.8 m/s to ~2.2 m/s. When the thickness of the agar phantom increased from 1.9 mm to 5.6 mm, the elastic wave velocity increased from ~3.0 m/s to ~4.1 m/s. Both the FE and OCE results show that the group velocity of the elastic wave decreased with radius of curvature but increased with thickness. Therefore, the curvature and thickness must be considered when developing accurate wave models for quantifying biomechanical properties of the cornea.

  20. Structure and dynamics of the Milky Way disk as revealed from the radial velocity distributions of APOGEE red clump stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyouchi, Daisuke; Chiba, Masashi

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of the Milky Way (MW) disk stars based on the analysis of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) data, to infer the past evolution histories of the MW disk component(s) possibly affected by radial migration and/or satellite accretions. APOGEE is the first near-infrared spectroscopic survey for a large number of the MW disk stars, providing their radial velocities and chemical abundances without significant dust extinction effects. We here adopt red-clump (RC) stars (Bovy et al. 2014), for which the distances from the Sun are determined precisely, and analyze their radial velocities and chemical abundances in the MW disk regions covering from the Galactocentric distance, R, of 5 kpc to 14 kpc. We investigate their dynamical properties, such as mean rotational velocities, and velocity dispersions, as a function of R, based on the MCMC Bayesian method. We find that at all radii, the dynamics of alpha-poor stars, which are candidates of young disk stars, is much different from that of alpha-rich stars, which are candidates of old disk stars. We find that our Jeans analysis for our sample stars reveals characteristic spatial and dynamical properties of the MW disk, which are generally in agreement with the recent independent work by Bovy et al. (2015) but with a different method from ours.

  1. Tectonics of Asia and Waveform Studies of the Velocity and Q Structure of the Mantle.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    equal intervals of slightly less than I sec. Next the group velocity dispersion was determined using the technique of Dziewonski et al. (1969) and...have used the oceanic earth model of Harkrider and Anderson (1966) for the source region in all cases. Several authors (e.g. Weidner, 1972; Patton, 1978...have found that variations in the assumed earth model do not seriously affect the Rayleigh wave radiation. Event I has been previously studied by

  2. Three-dimensional P velocity structure of the crust below Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stauber, D.A.; Green, S.M.; Iyer, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    Utilizing teleseismic P residuals, we have detected a column of high P velocity material extending from within 10 km of the surface below the summit of Newberry Volcano, Oregon, to midcrustal depths near 25 km. We interpret this column to be the expression of a swarm of predominantly subsolidus gabbroic sills and dikes which were intruded as the volcano was built. The high P velocities observed below the volcano severely limit the size of magma chambers which could presently exist in the crust below Newberry Volcano. Those possible include a few percent of partial belt distributed through large volumes of a mafic intrusion zone in the midcrust; a few, smaller, higher melt fraction zones in the midcrust with dimensions <6 km and whose aggregate volume is only a few percent of enclosing volumes of 200 km3; small magma bodies with dimensions of a few kilometers located within the upper 10 km of the crust; or a mafic, crystal-rich magma of arbitrary dimensions located in the upper few km. The low P velocities detected in the upper 4 km beneath the center of the summit caldera may be partially caused by a magma chamber in the second of these categories. -Authors

  3. Wave Structure and Velocity Profiles in Downwards Gas-Liquid Annular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadrazil, Ivan; Hewitt, Geoff; Matar, Omar; Markides, Christos

    2012-11-01

    A downwards flow of gas in the core of a vertical pipe, and of liquid in the annulus between the pipe wall and the gas phase is referred to as a ``downwards annular flow'' (DAF). DAFs are conventionally described in terms of short-lived, small-amplitude ``ripples,'' and large-amplitude, high-speed ``disturbances.'' We use a combination of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), Particle Image and Tracking Velocimetry (PIV, PTV) to study DAFs. We demonstrate through these techniques that the liquid films become progressively more complex with increasing liquid Reynolds number (ReL), while a similar increase of complexity is observed for increasing gas Reynolds number (ReG). Disturbance waves are observed for low and high ReL, and ripples for intermediate ReL. Additionally, a high degree of rolling breakdown of disturbance waves is observed in falling films at the highest ReL, which is a source of bubble entrainment into the film body. Our results will comprise: (i) statistical data on film thickness, and (ii) wave frequency, velocity, wavelength. In addition, a qualitative (e.g. re-circulation zones) and quantitative (e.g. mean/rms velocity profiles) velocity characterisation of the film flows will be presented.

  4. Large- and small-scale structure of the intermediate- and high-velocity clouds towards the LMC and SMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoker, J. V.; Fox, A. J.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-08-01

    We employ Ca II K and Na I D interstellar absorption-line spectroscopy of early-type stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC, SMC) to investigate the large- and small-scale structure in foreground intermediate- and high-velocity clouds (I/HVCs). Data include FLAMES-GIRAFFE Ca II K observations of 403 stars in four open clusters, plus FEROS or UVES spectra of 156 stars in the LMC and SMC. The FLAMES observations are amongst the most extensive probes to date of Ca II structures on ˜20 arcsec scales in Magellanic I/HVCs. From the FLAMES data within a 0.5° field of view, the Ca II K equivalent width in the I/HVC components towards three clusters varies by factors of ≥10. There are no detections of molecular gas in absorption at intermediate or high velocities, although molecular absorption is present at LMC and Galactic velocities towards some sightlines. The FEROS/UVES data show Ca II K I/HVC absorption in ˜60 per cent of sightlines. The range in the Ca II/Na I ratio in I/HVCs is from -0.45 to +1.5 dex, similar to previous measurements for I/HVCs. In 10 sightlines we find Ca II/O I ratios in I/HVC gas ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 dex below the solar value, indicating either dust or ionization effects. In nine sightlines I/HVC gas is detected in both H I and Ca II at similar velocities, implying that the two elements form part of the same structure.

  5. Sediment and Crustal Shear Velocity Structure offshore New Zealand from Seafloor Compliance, Receiver Functions and Rayleigh Wave Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. S.; Sheehan, A. F.; Stachnik, J. C.; Lin, F.; Collins, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a joint Monte Carlo inversion of teleseismic receiver functions, seafloor compliance, and Rayleigh wave dispersion and apply it here to ocean bottom seismic (OBS) data from offshore New Zealand. With this method we estimate sediment and crustal thickness and shear velocity structure beneath the Bounty Trough and the Tasman Sea flanking the South Island of New Zealand. Teleseismic receiver functions and surface wave dispersion measurements provide complementary constraints on shear velocity structure and interface depths beneath seismic stations. At ocean bottom seismic (OBS) stations the interpretation of these measurements is complicated by strong sediment reverberations that obscure deeper impedance contrasts such as the Moho. In principle, the seafloor's response to ocean loading from infragravity waves (seafloor compliance) can be used to determine shallow shear velocity information. This velocity information can subsequently be used to better model the receiver function reverberations, allowing deeper interfaces of tectonic interest to be resolved. Data for this study were acquired in 2009-2010 by the Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa (MOANA) experiment, which deployed 30 broadband OBS and differential pressure gauges (DPGs) off the South Island of New Zealand. High-frequency (5Hz) receiver functions were estimated using multitaper cross-correlation for events in a 30-90 degree epicentral distance range. Coherence-weighted stacks binned by epicentral distance were produced in the frequency domain to suppress noise. Seafloor compliance was measured using multitaper pressure and acceleration spectra averaged from 120 days of continuous data without large transient events. Seafloor compliance measurements on the order of 10-9 Pa-1 are sensitive to shear velocity structure in the uppermost 5km of the crust and sediments. Rayleigh dispersion measurements were obtained at periods of 6-27s from ambient noise cross correlation. Sediment

  6. Verification of the Velocity Structure in Mexico Basin Using the H/V Spectral Ratio of Microtremors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, S.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Nagashima, F.; Kawase, H.

    2011-12-01

    The authors have been proposing a new theory to calculate the Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V) spectral ratio of microtremors assuming that the wave field is completely diffuse and have attempted to apply the theory to understand the observed microtremor data. It is anticipated that this new theory can be applied to detect the subsurface velocity structure beneath urban area. Precise information about the subsurface velocity structure is essential for predicting strong ground motion accurately, which is necessary to mitigate seismic disaster. Mexico basin, who witnessed severe damage during the 1985 Michoacán Earthquake (Ms 8.1) several hundreds of kilometers away from the source region, is an interesting location in which the reassessment of soil properties is urgent. Because of subsidence, having improved estimates of properties is mandatory. In order to estimate possible changes in the velocity structure in the Mexico basin, we measured microtremors at strong motion observation sites in Mexico City. At those sites, information about the velocity profiles are available. Using the obtained data, we derive observed H/V spectral ratio and compare it with the theoretical H/V spectral ratio to gauge the goodness of our new theory. First we compared the observed H/V spectral ratios for five stations to see the diverse characteristics of this measurement. Then we compared the observed H/V spectral ratios with the theoretical predictions to confirm our theory. We assumed the velocity model of previous surveys at the strong motions observation sites as an initial model. We were able to closely fit both the peak frequency and amplitude of the observed H/V spectral ratio, by the theoretical H/V spectral ratio calculated by our new method. These results show that we have a good initial model. However, the theoretical estimates need some improvement to perfectly fit the observed H/V spectral ratio. This may be an indication that the initial model needs some adjustments. We

  7. Further structural constraints and uncertainties of a thin laterally varying ultralow-velocity layer at the base of the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnero, Edward J.; Helmberger, Donald V.

    1998-06-01

    Constraints and uncertainties are presented for modeling of an ultralow-velocity zone layer (ULVZ) at the base of Earth's mantle using an SKS wave with small segments of P wave diffraction at the SKS core entry and exit locations, called SPdKS. Source or receiver effects are ruled out as causes for the SPdKS anomalies used to map ULVZ structure, since systematic SPdKS-SKS travel time moveout behavior is present in profiles of recordings of a given earthquake at many seismographic stations and also for many events recorded at one station. The southwest Pacific region produces strong variability in observed SPdKS/SKS amplitude ratios (compared to synthetic seismograms), which geographically corresponds to an anomalous ULVZ region. Accurate determination of absolute ULVZ thicknesses requires knowledge of, in addition to magnitude of P wave velocity (Vp) reduction in the layer, the magnitude of S wave velocity (VS) reduction and density (ρ) perturbation (if any). Synthetic seismogram experiments demonstrate several key points regarding uncertainties and constraints in modeling ULVZ structure: (1) thicker layers (up to 300 km thick) with mild reductions (e.g., -2.5 to -5.0%) cannot reproduce the anomalous SPdKS behavior seen in the data; (2) for ULVZ layers less than 10 km thick, strong trade-offs exist between discontinuous velocity reductions and linear gradient reductions over a thicker zone; (3) uncertainties preclude precise determination of magnitude of δVP and δVS reductions, as well as the δVS:δVP ratio; (4) large density increases within the ULVZ (e.g., up to 60% and more) can efficiently broaden and delay the peak of the energy that we identify as SPdKS for models with strong velocity reductions in the layer; (5) models with extreme Q reductions in the ULVZ can affect SPdKS waveforms, and dampen spurious ringing energy present in Sd waveshapes due to the ULVZ; and (6) the minimum required Vp reduction for the most anomalous data (around -10%) trades off

  8. 1D molecular ladder of the ionic complex of terbium-4-sebacoylbis(1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolonate) and sodium dibenzo-18-crown-6: synthesis, crystal structure, and photophysical properties.

    PubMed

    Remya, P N; Biju, S; Reddy, M L P; Cowley, Alan H; Findlater, Michael

    2008-08-18

    On the basis of the novel heterocyclic beta-diketone, 4-sebacoylbis(1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (H 2SbBP), three new lanthanide complexes Tb 2(SbBP) 3(H 2O) 2 ( 1), Gd 2(SbBP) 3(H 2O) 2 ( 2), and [Tb(SbBP) 2] [Na(DB18C6)H 2O] ( 3) have been synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of 3 reveals that the complex crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/ c with a = 25.300(6) A, b = 19.204(7) A, c = 15.391(3) A, beta = 93.17(3) degrees , and V = 7466(4) A (3). The crystal structure of 3 is heterodinuclear and features a Tb (3+) center surrounded by two tetradentate bispyrazolone ligands in a somewhat distorted square-antiprismatic geometry. The Na (+) coordination environment is distorted hexagonal pyramidal and involves six oxygen atoms furnished by DB18C6 and one oxygen atom from a water molecule. The X-ray diffraction study of 3 also revealed an interesting 1D molecular ladder structure based on C-H/pi, intra- and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. The photophysical properties of 1 and 3 in solid state have been investigated, and the quantum yields and (5)D 4 lifetimes were found to be 4.82 +/- 0.01% and 18.13 +/- 0.82% and 1.11 +/- 0.01 and 2.82 +/- 0.02 ms, respectively.

  9. The crystal structure of 1-D-myo-inosityl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside deacetylase (MshB) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals a zinc hydrolase with a lactate dehydrogenase fold.

    PubMed

    Maynes, Jason T; Garen, Craig; Cherney, Maia M; Newton, Gerald; Arad, Dorit; Av-Gay, Yossef; Fahey, Robert C; James, Michael N G

    2003-11-21

    Mycothiol (1-D-myo-inosityl 2-(N-acetyl-L-cysteinyl)amido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside, MSH or AcCys-GlcN-inositol (Ins)) is the major reducing agent in actinomycetes, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The biosynthesis of MSH involves a deacetylase that removes the acetyl group from the precursor GlcNAc-Ins to yield GlcN-Ins. The deacetylase (MshB) corresponds to Rv1170 of M. tuberculosis with a molecular mass of 33,400 Da. MshB is a Zn2+ metalloprotein, and the deacetylase activity is completely dependent on the presence of a divalent metal cation. We have determined the x-ray crystallographic structure of MshB, which reveals a protein that folds in a manner resembling lactate dehydrogenase in the N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain consisting of two beta-sheets and two alpha-helices. The zinc binding site is in the N-terminal domain occupying a position equivalent to that of the NAD+ co-factor of lactate dehydrogenase. The Zn2+ is 5 coordinate with 3 residues from MshB (His-13, Asp-16, His-147) and two water molecules. One water would be displaced upon binding of substrate (GlcNAc-Ins); the other is proposed as the nucleophilic water assisted by the general base carboxylate of Asp-15. In addition to the Zn2+ providing electrophilic assistance in the hydrolysis, His-144 imidazole could form a hydrogen bond to the oxyanion of the tetrahedral intermediate. The extensive sequence identity of MshB, the deacetylase, with mycothiol S-conjugate amidase, an amide hydrolase that mediates detoxification of mycothiol S-conjugate xenobiotics, has allowed us to construct a faithful model of the catalytic domain of mycothiol S-conjugate amidase based on the structure of MshB.

  10. Peculiar velocities into the next generation: cosmological parameters from large surveys without bias from non-linear structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abate, Alexandra; Bridle, Sarah; Teodoro, Luis F. A.; Warren, Michael S.; Hendry, Martin

    2008-10-01

    We investigate methods to best estimate the normalization of the mass density fluctuation power spectrum (σ8) using peculiar velocity data from a survey like the six-degree Field Galaxy Velocity Survey (6dFGSv). We focus on two potential problems: (i) biases from non-linear growth of structure and (ii) the large number of velocities in the survey. Simulations of ΛCDM-like models are used to test the methods. We calculate the likelihood from a full covariance matrix of velocities averaged in grid cells. This simultaneously reduces the number of data points and smoothes out non-linearities which tend to dominate on small scales. We show how the averaging can be taken into account in the predictions in a practical way, and show the effect of the choice of cell size. We find that a cell size can be chosen that significantly reduces the non-linearities without significantly increasing the error bars on cosmological parameters. We compare our results with those from a principal components analysis following Watkins et al. and Feldman et al. to select a set of optimal moments constructed from linear combinations of the peculiar velocities that are least sensitive to the non-linear scales. We conclude that averaging in grid cells performs equally well. We find that for a survey such as 6dFGSv we can estimate σ8 with less than 3 per cent bias from non-linearities. The expected error on σ8 after marginalizing over Ωm is approximately 16 per cent.

  11. Shear-wave velocity structure beneath the Ngauruhoe Volcano, New Zealand using receiver function inversion with the genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, I.; Kim, K. Y.; Jolly, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Ngauruhoe Volcano is an andesitic volcano of 2,291 m height in the North Island, New Zealand. One-dimensional shear-wave velocity (Vs) structure beneath the OTVZ seismic station near the volcano was inferred by the genetic algorithm (GA) inversion of radial receiver functions (RFs). Radial RFs were derived from 337 teleseismic events (Mw ≥ 5.5 and epicentral distances between 30° and 90°) recorded by a broad-band seismometer at the seismic station during the period from November 11, 2011 to September 11, 2013. Among the derived RFs, only 87 RFs with higher signal to noise ratios were used for the GA inversion method. Three hundred velocity models for 100 generations were derived using velocity models comprising 32 layers with a maximum depth of 60 km. The inverted models were averaged to obtain the final Vs model, which indicates a clear discontinuity at a depth of 18±1 km where Vs abruptly increases from 3.1 to 4.0 km/s. Above the sharp Vs discontinuity indicating the Moho, an average Vs is 2.8 km/s. Low-velocity layers (LVLs) are identified at depths of 10-16 km in the lower crust (Vs < 3.0 km/s) and 28-40 km in the upper mantle (Vs < 4.4 km/s). Corresponding average Vs are 2.8 and 4.2 km/s, respectively. The thin crust with relatively low velocities and existence of LVLs in the lower crust and upper mantle allude to the presence of magma associated with the subducting Pacific Plate. The limited number of teleseismic events recorded at the OTVZ station prevents from further investigation into the effect of RFs of dipping boundaries and anisotropy.

  12. Variation of Crustal Shear Velocity Structure Along the Eastern Lau Back-Arc Spreading Center Constrained By Seafloor Compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Y.; Webb, S. C.; Dunn, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of seafloor compliance, the deformation under long period (typically 30-300 s) ocean wave forcing, are primarily sensitive to crustal shear velocity structure. We analyze seafloor compliance from data collected from a subset of 50 broadband Ocean Bottom Seismographs (OBS) deployed at the Eastern Lau spreading center (ELSC) from 2009 to 2010. The ELSC is a 400-km-long back-arc spreading center lying closely to the Tonga subduction trench in the southwestern Pacific. Seafloor morphology, crustal seismic structure and lava composition data show rapid variations along the ridge as the ridge migrates away from the volcanic arc front to the north, indicating a decreasing influence of the subducting slab. We calculate seafloor compliance functions by taking the spectral transfer function between the vertical displacement and pressure signal recorded by the 4-component OBSs, which are equipped with differential pressure gauges (DPGs). In the ridge perpendicular direction, compliance amplitude vary by more than an order of magnitude from the ridge crest to older seafloor covered by sediment. Along the spreading ridge, compliance measured from on-axis sites increases southwards, indicative of a decrease in the upper crustal shear velocity possibly due to increasing porosity and a thickening extrusive layer [Jacobs et al., 2007; Dunn et al., 2013]. We apply a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to invert the compliance functions for crustal shear velocities at various locations along the ELSC.

  13. High-Resolution Subduction Zone Seismicity and Velocity Structure in Ibaraki, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelly, D. R.; Beroza, G. C.; Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.; Ide, S.

    2004-12-01

    We use double-difference tomography (tomoDD) [Zhang and Thurber, 2003] and waveform-derived cross-correlation differential arrival times to invert for the earthquake locations and P- and S-wave velocity distributions in the subduction zone under Ibaraki Prefecture of north-central Honshu, Japan. The Ibaraki region is attractive for its high rate of slab seismicity and for the presence of an intermediate-depth double seismic zone. We relocate ~8000 events occurring in this region between June 2002 and June 2004. We use a combination of ~200,000 absolute travel times, ~5 million catalog-derived differential times, and ~5 million cross-correlation differential times derived from more than 150,000 waveforms, with roughly equal numbers of P- and S-wave data. Many of the waveforms are from HiNet borehole stations that provide particularly high-quality data. We also use data from JMA, the University of Tokyo, and Tohoku University. Since it is natural to expect sharp velocity contrasts in a subduction zone, we regularize the inversion using the total variation (TV) approach implemented through iteratively reweighted least squares. Because TV is an L1-norm regularization, sharp changes in velocity are penalized no more than gradual ones, but undulations in the velocity model remain damped. We will compare the TV results with those determined by standard least-squares, L2-norm regularization. Our results show increasingly organized seismicity including narrowing by up to 50% of the upper and lower limbs of the double seismic zone as viewed in cross-section. We find a zone of interplate events extending as deep as 60 km, forming a very distinct lineation in cross-section. Focal mechanisms support the interpretation that these are low angle, subduction interface events. These earthquakes are accompanied by a zone of very high Vp/Vs ratio within the downgoing plate, just beneath the seismicity, suggesting that high pore-pressures may enable seismic slip on the subduction

  14. GPS Velocities and Structure Across the Burma Accretionary Prism and Shillong Plateau in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, S. H.; Steckler, M. S.; Seeber, L.; Agostinetti, N. P.; Kogan, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    We have installed a suite of 18 GPS receiver across the Bengal Basin, covering the country of Bangladesh, near the junction of the Indian Shield, the Himayalan collision belt and the Burma Arc subduction zone. The crust of the Indian Shield thins eastward across the hinge zone of an Early Cretaceous continental margin. The thin continental and/or oceanic crust of the eastern Bengal Basin beyond the hinge zone is overlain by a thick sedimentary sequence of 16 km or more. This heavily-sedimented basin is being overridden from the north by the Shillong Massif, a 2-km high plateau exposing Indian Shield, and from the east by the accretionary prism of the Burma Arc subduction system. The soft collision of the Burma Arc with the Bengal Basin and Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) has built a large accretionary prism that widens northwards to 250-300 km. The prism reaches as much as half way across the deep Bengal Basin and the thrust front is blind and buried by the rapid sedimentation of the GBD. Our GPS data cover the frontal region of this unusual subaerial accretionary prism. The convergence across this belt is oblique and partitioned. Our GPS array in Bangladesh shows similar velocity gradients across the accretionary prism corresponding to both E-W shortening and N-S dextral shear. The rates are consistent with the data further east in India. How this motion is partitioned into elastic earthquake-cycle loading and permanent inelastic deformation is unclear. The north-dipping Dauki thrust fault is responsible for the uplifted Shillong Plateau overriding the low-lying and rapidly subsiding Surma Basin. This crustal scale convergent boundary could represent the beginning of a forward jump of the Himalayan front. The surface expression of this boundary is a regional south-verging anticline folding Quaternary sediment into its forelimb at the deformation front south of the Plateau. This suggests that the Dauki Fault, too, is blind and extends well south of the topographic

  15. Three dimensional P- and S-wave velocity structure along the central Alpine Fault, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Thurber, C. H.; Roecker, S. W.; Townend, J.; Rawles, C.; Chamberlain, C. J.; Boese, C. M.; Bannister, S.; Feenstra, J.; Eccles, J. D.

    2017-02-01

    The Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) on the central Alpine Fault, South Island, New Zealand, has motivated a broad range of geophysical and geological studies intended to characterize the fault system in the locality of the drill site at various scales. In order to better understand the structural features of the central Alpine Fault, we have developed three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity (VP and VS) models of the region by double-difference tomography using datasets from multiple seismic networks. In previous work, the quality of the S-wave model has been poor due to the small number of available S-wave picks. We have utilized a new high-accuracy automatic S-wave picker to increase the number of usable S-wave arrivals by more than a factor of two, thereby substantially improving the VS model. Compared to previous studies, our new higher-resolution VP model based on more observations shows a clear VP contrast (higher VP on the southeast hanging wall side) at depths of 5 - 10 km near the DFDP drill sites. With our better resolved VS model, in the same region, we detect a sharply defined high VS body (VS > 3.7 km/s) within the hanging wall. Our earthquake relocations reveal the presence of clusters within and around low-velocity zones in the hanging wall southeast of the Alpine Fault. Together with the improved earthquake locations, the P- and S-wave tomography results reveal the Alpine Fault to be marked by a velocity contrast throughout most of the study region. The fault dips southeastward at about 50^circ from 5 to 15 km depth, as inferred from the velocity structure, seismicity, and observations of fault zone guided waves.

  16. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure of Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii from local seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Guoqing; Shearer, Peter M.; Matoza, Robin S.; Okubo, Paul G.; Amelung, Falk

    2016-01-01

    We present a new three-dimensional seismic velocity model of the crustal and upper mantle structure for Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii. Our model is derived from the first-arrival times of the compressional and shear waves from about 53,000 events on and near the Island of Hawaii between 1992 and 2009 recorded by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory stations. The Vp model generally agrees with previous studies, showing high-velocity anomalies near the calderas and rift zones and low-velocity anomalies in the fault systems. The most significant difference from previous models is in Vp/Vs structure. The high-Vp and high-Vp/Vs anomalies below Mauna Loa caldera are interpreted as mafic magmatic cumulates. The observed low-Vp and high-Vp/Vs bodies in the Kaoiki seismic zone between 5 and 15 km depth are attributed to the underlying volcaniclastic sediments. The high-Vp and moderate- to low-Vp/Vs anomalies beneath Kilauea caldera can be explained by a combination of different mafic compositions, likely to be olivine-rich gabbro and dunite. The systematically low-Vp and low-Vp/Vs bodies in the southeast flank of Kilauea may be caused by the presence of volatiles. Another difference between this study and previous ones is the improved Vp model resolution in deeper layers, owing to the inclusion of events with large epicentral distances. The new velocity model is used to relocate the seismicity of Mauna Loa and Kilauea for improved absolute locations and ultimately to develop a high-precision earthquake catalog using waveform cross-correlation data.

  17. Three-dimensional velocity structure and earthquake locations beneath the northern Tien Shan of Kyrgyzstan, central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Sujoy; Hamburger, Michael W.; Virieux, Jean

    1998-02-01

    We used the arrival times of local earthquakes and quarry blasts recorded by the Kyrgyzstan Broadband Network (KNET) to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) P and S wave velocity models of the upper crust beneath an actively deforming mountain front and its associated foreland in the Kyrgyz Tien Shan. The continuous velocity models, described by cubic B spline interpolation of the squared slowness over a regular 3-D grid, were computed by simultaneous inversion of hypocenter and medium parameters. Exact ray tracing was done in the smooth 3-D medium by shooting rays from the sources to the stations by an analytical perturbation method based on the paraxial ray theory. The deduced large, sparse, linear system was solved using the damped, iterative, least squares algorithm LSQR. The stability and resolution of the result was qualitatively tested by two synthetic tests: the spike test and the checkerboard resolution test. We found that the models are well resolved up to a depth of ˜27 km for most parts of our image domain. The P and S wave velocity models are consistent with each other and provide evidence for marked heterogeneity in the upper crustal structure beneath the northern Tien Shan. At shallower depths (<7 km) the sediment-filled foreland is imaged as a relatively lower velocity feature compared to the mountains, which are cored by crystalline basement rocks. In contrast, at midcrustal depths the mountains are underlain by relatively lower velocity materials compared to the foreland. A distinct contrast in velocity structure is also observed between the eastern and western parts of the Kyrgyz Range at midcrustal depths, with the presence of relatively higher velocities toward the east. The seismicity is concentrated near the traces of major active faults and extends deeper beneath the foreland compared to the mountains. The regional compression in the Tien Shan is accommodated along a series of high-angle reverse faults distributed throughout the orogenic system

  18. Whole-field, time resolved velocity measurements of flow structures on insect wings during free flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, Kenneth; Thomson, Scott; Truscott, Tadd

    2012-11-01

    The development of micro air vehicles (MAVs) that are propelled using flapping flight necessitates an understanding of the unsteady aerodynamics that enable this mode of flight. Flapping flight has been studied using a variety of methods including computational models, experimentation and observation. Until recently, the observation of natural flyers has been limited to qualitative methods such as smoke-line visualization. Advances in imaging technology have enabled the use of particle image velocimetry (PIV) to gain a quantitative understanding of the unsteady nature of the flight. Previously published PIV studies performed on insects have been limited to velocities in a single plane on tethered insects in a wind tunnel. We present the three-dimensional, time-resolved velocity fields of flight around a butterfly, using an array of high-speed cameras at 1 kHz through a technique known as 3D Synthetic Aperture PIV (SAPIV). These results are useful in understanding the relationship between wing kinematics and the unsteady aerodynamics generated.

  19. Near-surface wave velocity structure of Faial (Azores - Portugal) Island for site effect studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, José; Neves, Samuel; Caldeira, Bento; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Carvalho, João; Carvalho, Alexandra

    2015-04-01

    Throughout history, the life of the Azorean people has been marked by earthquakes that have had different effects depending on their proximity and magnitude. This seismic activity, which may have volcanic or tectonic origins, has affected the population of these islands by destroying infrastructure and claiming lives. The social and economic impacts of these phenomena are enormous. The last significant event affecting the Azores (Portugal) was the July 1998 Mw=6.2 earthquake causing major destruction affecting more than 5000 people, causing 8 deaths, 150 persons injured and 1500 homeless. Ground motion simulations are mainly based on source characteristics and are heavily dependent on the medium, which is still poorly understood. Subsurface soil condition can amplify the seismic waves, so, for seismic response analysis, it is necessary to know the shallow soil properties and its spatial variability. For this purpose, we applied P and S-wave refraction, Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) to characterize shear wave velocity at different sites in the Faial Island, in particular, in sites where already occurred amplification. Ambient vibrations can also be used to estimate physical properties of the shallower geological formations. With this goal, the obtained velocity models were confirmed by comparison between real H/V curves with synthetic ones. We concluded that the anomalous intensities observed in some sites are strongly related to thick layers of soft sediments of pyroclastic deposits produced by old volcanic eruptions occurred in the Faial Island.

  20. GPS Velocities and Structure Across the Burma Accretionary Prism and Shillong Anticline in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckler, M. S.; Akhter, S. H.; Seeber, L.; Bilham, R. G.; Kogan, M. G.; Masson, F.; Maurin, T.; Mondal, D.; Piana Agostinetti, N.; Rangin, C.; Saha, P.

    2012-12-01

    We installed a suite of 25 GPS receivers between 2003 and 2012 covering the deltaic country of Bangladesh, which lies near the junction of the Indian Shield, the Himayalan collision belt and the Indo-Burman Wedge. The crust of the Indian Shield thins southeastward in the Bengal Basin across the hinge zone of an Early Cretaceous continental margin. The thin continental and/or oceanic crust of the Bengal Basin beyond the hinge zone is overlain by the southward prograding Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) creating a total sediment thickness of ≥16 km. This heavily-sedimented basin is being overthrust from the north by the Shillong Massif, a 2-km high basement-cored anticlinorium exposing Indian Shield, and from the east by the accretionary prism of the Indo-Burma Wedge. The soft, oblique collision of Burma with the Bengal Basin and Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) has built a large accretionary prism that widens northwards to 250-300 km. The prism reaches as much as half way across the deep Bengal Basin. The outer folds and the thrust front are blind and buried by the rapid sedimentation of the GBD. The GPS data in Bangladesh cover the frontal region of this unusual subaerial accretionary prism, while observations from India and Myanmar provide velocities for more internal parts of the system. The convergence across this belt is oblique and partitioned. The velocity gradients across the accretionary prism indicate E-W shortening at ~13 mm/y and N-S dextral shear at ~25 mm/y. The shortening appears to be more concentrated farther west, towards the thrust front, while the shear is more distributed and does not extend to the frontal folds. How this motion is further partitioned into elastic earthquake-cycle loading and permanent inelastic deformation remains unclear. The north-dipping Dauki thrust fault raises the Shillong Massif lowers the rapidly subsiding Surma Basin foredeep. This crustal scale convergent boundary could represent the beginning of a forward jump of the

  1. High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Structure of the Sichuan-Yunnan Region, Southwest China, Using Seismic Catalog and Waveform Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-13

    velocity beneath southeast Tibet from ambient noisy tomography (Yao et al., 2006). This low velocity anomaly may be related to lower or middle crustal flow ...2003). Upper mantle beneath southeast Asia from S velocity tomography , J. Geophys. Res. 108, no. B1, 2048, doi 10.1029/2000JB000073. Lees, J. M...upper mantle structure beneath western China from P wave travel time tomography , J. Geophys. Res., 107, 2220, doi 10.1029/2001JB000402. Yang, Z.X

  2. Upper mantle shear wave velocity structure beneath northern Victoria Land, Antarctica: Volcanism and uplift in the northern Transantarctic Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graw, Jordan H.; Adams, Aubreya N.; Hansen, Samantha E.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Hackworth, Lauren; Park, Yongcheol

    2016-09-01

    The Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) are the largest non-compressional mountain range on Earth, and while a variety of uplift mechanisms have been proposed, the origin of the TAMs is still a matter of great debate. Most previous seismic investigations of the TAMs have focused on a central portion of the mountain range, near Ross Island, providing little along-strike constraint on the upper mantle structure, which is needed to better assess competing uplift models. Using data recorded by the recently deployed Transantarctic Mountains Northern Network, as well as data from the Transantarctic Mountains Seismic Experiment and from five stations operated by the Korea Polar Research Institute, we investigate the upper mantle structure beneath a previously unexplored portion of the mountain range. Rayleigh wave phase velocities are calculated using a two-plane wave approximation and are inverted for shear wave velocity structure. Our model shows a low velocity zone (LVZ; ∼4.24 km s-1) at ∼160 km depth offshore and adjacent to Mt. Melbourne. This LVZ extends inland and vertically upwards, with more lateral coverage above ∼100 km depth beneath the northern TAMs and Victoria Land. A prominent LVZ (∼4.16-4.24 km s-1) also exists at ∼150 km depth beneath Ross Island, which agrees with previous results in the TAMs near the McMurdo Dry Valleys, and relatively slow velocities (∼4.24-4.32 km s-1) along the Terror Rift connect the low velocity anomalies. We propose that the LVZs reflect rift-related decompression melting and provide thermally buoyant support for the TAMs uplift, consistent with proposed flexural models. We also suggest that heating, and hence uplift, along the mountain front is not uniform and that the shallower LVZ beneath northern Victoria Land provides greater thermal support, leading to higher bedrock topography in the northern TAMs. Young (0-15 Ma) volcanic rocks associated with the Hallett and the Erebus Volcanic Provinces are situated directly

  3. Using micro-seismicity and seismic velocities to map subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure within the Coso geothermal field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaven, Joern Ole; Hickman, Stephen H.; Davatzes, Nicholas C.

    2012-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs derive their capacity for fluid and heat transport in large part from faults and fractures. Micro-seismicity generated on such faults and fractures can be used to map larger fault structures as well as secondary fractures that add access to hot rock, fluid storage and recharge capacity necessary to have a sustainable geothermal resource. Additionally, inversion of seismic velocities from micro-seismicity permits imaging of regions subject to the combined effects of fracture density, fluid pressure and steam content, among other factors. We relocate 14 years of seismicity (1996-2009) in the Coso geothermal field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform cross-correlation to augment to expansive catalog of P- and S-wave differential travel times recorded at Coso. We further carry out rigorous uncertainty estimation and find that our results are precise to within 10s of meters of relative location error. We find that relocated micro-seismicity outlines prominent, through-going faults in the reservoir in some cases. We also find that a significant portion of seismicity remains diffuse and does not cluster into more sharply defined major structures. The seismic velocity structure reveals heterogeneous distributions of compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave speed, with Vp generally lower in the main field when compared to the east flank and Vs varying more significantly in the shallow portions of the reservoir. The Vp/Vs ratio appears to outline the two main compartments of the reservoir at depths of -0.5 to 1.5 km (relative to sea-level), with a ridge of relatively high Vp/Vs separating the main field from the east flank. In the deeper portion of the reservoir this ridge is less prominent. Our results indicate that high-precision relocations of micro-seismicity can provide

  4. Modeling and inversion of elastic wave velocities and electrical conductivity in clastic formations with structural and dispersed shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino-López, A.; Mousatov, A.; Markov, M.; Kazatchenko, E.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach for simulating P- and S-wave velocities, and electrical conductivity in shaly-sand rocks and determining the shale spatial distribution (dispersed and/or structural shales). In this approach, we used the effective medium method and hierarchical model for clastic formations. We treat shaly-sand formations as porous natural-composite materials containing: solid grains (such as quartz, feldspars and structural shale) and pores completely filled with a mixture of hydrocarbon, water and dispersed shale. For calculating the effective elastic properties and electrical conductivity of this composite, we have applied the multi-component self-consistent effective media approximation (EMA) method. We simulate the elastic velocities and electrical conductivity for clastic formations in two steps. Firstly, we calculate the effective properties of mixture (combination of water, hydrocarbon and dispersed shale) filling the pores. Then we find the effective elastic and electrical conductivity properties of formation constituted of solid grains (quartz and structural shale) and pores with the effective properties determined in the previous step. We considered that all components are represented by ellipsoids. The aspect ratios (shapes) of grains and pores; are defined as a porosity function obtained for the model of clean sand formations. Modeling results have demonstrated that the shapes of both shale components (dispersed and structural) weakly affect the effective elastic velocities and electrical conductivity of shaly-sand formation and can be approximated by flatted ellipsoids. The model proposed has been used to determine the volumes of dispersed and structural shales for two sets of published experimental data obtained from the cores. For determining the shale distribution, we have performed the joint inversion of the following physical properties: P-, S-wave velocities, total porosity, and total shale volume. Additionally, we have

  5. High resolution velocity structure beneath Mount Vesuvius from seismic array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, Roberto; Tronca, Fabrizio; Bianco, Francesca; Del Pezzo, Edoardo

    2002-11-01

    A high resolution P-wave image of Mt. Vesuvius edifice has been derived from simultaneous inversion of travel times and hypocentral parameters of local earthquakes, land based shots and small aperture array data. The results give details down to 300-500 m. The relocated local seismicity appears to extend down to 5 km below the central crater, distributed in a major cluster, centered at 3 km below the central crater and in a minor group, with diffuse hypocenters inside the volcanic edifice. The two clusters are separated by an anomalously high Vp region at around 1 km depth. A zone with high Vp/Vs in the upper layers is interpreted as produced by the presence of intense fluid circulation. The highest energy quakes (up to M = 3.6) are located in the deeper cluster, in a high P-wave velocity zone. Our results favor an interpretation in terms of absence of shallow magma reservoirs.

  6. Structure of velocity distributions in shock waves in granular gases with extension to molecular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilquin, A.; Boudet, J. F.; Kellay, H.

    2016-08-01

    Velocity distributions in normal shock waves obtained in dilute granular flows are studied. These distributions cannot be described by a simple functional shape and are believed to be bimodal. Our results show that these distributions are not strictly bimodal but a trimodal distribution is shown to be sufficient. The usual Mott-Smith bimodal description of these distributions, developed for molecular gases, and based on the coexistence of two subpopulations (a supersonic and a subsonic population) in the shock front, can be modified by adding a third subpopulation. Our experiments show that this additional population results from collisions between the supersonic and subsonic subpopulations. We propose a simple approach incorporating the role of this third intermediate population to model the measured probability distributions and apply it to granular shocks as well as shocks in molecular gases.

  7. Superconducting accelerating structure for particle velocities from 0. 12 to 0. 23 c

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K.W.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    A split-ring resonator has been designed for an optimum particle velocity ..beta.. = v/c = 0.16 and a frequency of 145.5 MHz. The ratio of peak-surface electric field to effective accelerating field in the resonator has been reduced 20% from the value obtained in previously developed split-ring resonators. The improved design results from the use of elliptically-sectioned loading arms and drift tubes, which have been enlarged to reduce peak-surface fields and also shaped to eliminate beam-steering effects in the resonator. All fabrication problems presented by the more-complex geometry have been solved, and a prototype superconducting niobium resonator has been completed. An accelerating field of 3.3 MV/m at 4 watts rf input has been so far achieved, corresponding to an effective accelerating potential of 1.17 MV per resonator.

  8. Lithospheric structure of the westernmost Mediterranean inferred from finite frequency Rayleigh wave tomography S-velocity model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomeras, Imma; Villasenor, Antonio; Thurner, Sally; Levander, Alan; Gallart, Josep; Harnafi, Mimoun

    2016-04-01

    The Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, separated by the Alboran Sea and the Algerian Basin, constitute the westernmost Mediterranean. From north to south this region consists of the Pyrenees, the result of interaction between the Iberian and Eurasian plates; the Iberian Massif, a region that has been undeformed since the end of the Paleozoic; the Central System and Iberian Chain, regions with intracontinental Oligocene-Miocene deformation; the Gibraltar Arc (Betics, Rif and Alboran terranes) and the Atlas Mountains, resulting from post-Oligocene subduction roll-back and Eurasian-Nubian plate convergence. In this study we analyze data from recent broad-band array deployments and permanent stations on the Iberian Peninsula and in Morocco (Spanish IberArray and Siberia arrays, the US PICASSO array, the University of Munster array, and the Spanish, Portuguese, and Moroccan National Networks) to characterize its lithospheric structure. The combined array of 350 stations has an average interstation spacing of ~60 km, comparable to USArray. We have calculated the Rayleigh waves phase velocities from ambient noise for short periods (4 s to 40 s) and teleseismic events for longer periods (20 s to 167 s). We inverted the phase velocities to obtain a shear velocity model for the lithosphere to ~200 km depth. The model shows differences in the crust for the different areas, where the highest shear velocities are mapped in the Iberian Massif crust. The crustal thickness is highly variable ranging from ~25 km beneath the eastern Betics to ~55km beneath the Gibraltar Strait, Internal Betics and Internal Rif. Beneath this region a unique arc shaped anomaly with high upper mantle velocities (>4.6 km/s) at shallow depths (<65 km) is observed. We interpret this body as the subducting Alboran slab that is depressing the crust of the western Gibraltar arc to ~55 km depth. Low upper mantle velocities (<4.2 km/s) are observed beneath the Atlas, the northeastern end of the Betic Mountains and

  9. How the Density Environment Changes the Influence of the Dark Matter-Baryon Streaming Velocity on Cosmological Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamical effect of the relative velocity between dark matter and baryonic fluids, which remained supersonic after the epoch of recombination. The impact of this supersonic motion on the formation of cosmological structures was first formulated by Tseliakhovich & Hirata, in terms of the linear theory of small-scale fluctuations coupled to large-scale, relative velocities in mean-density regions. In their formalism, they limited the large-scale density environment to be that of the global mean density. We improve on their formulation by allowing variation in the density environment as well as the relative velocities. This leads to a new type of coupling between large-scale and small-scale modes. We find that the small-scale fluctuation grows in a biased way: faster in the overdense environment and slower in the underdense environment. We also find that the net effect on the global power spectrum of the density fluctuation is to boost its overall amplitude from the prediction by Tseliakhovich & Hirata. Correspondingly, the conditional mass function of cosmological halos and the halo bias parameter are both affected in a similar way. The discrepancy between our prediction and that of Tseliakhovich & Hirata is significant, and therefore, the related cosmology and high-redshift astrophysics should be revisited. The mathematical formalism of this study can be used for generating cosmological initial conditions of small-scale perturbations in generic, overdense (underdense) background patches.

  10. Wavelet phase analysis of two velocity components to infer the structure of interscale transfers in a turbulent boundary-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keylock, Christopher J.; Nishimura, Kouichi

    2016-04-01

    Scale-dependent phase analysis of velocity time series measured in a zero pressure gradient boundary layer shows that phase coupling between longitudinal and vertical velocity components is strong at both large and small scales, but minimal in the middle of the inertial regime. The same general pattern is observed at all vertical positions studied, but there is stronger phase coherence as the vertical coordinate, y, increases. The phase difference histograms evolve from a unimodal shape at small scales to the development of significant bimodality at the integral scale and above. The asymmetry in the off-diagonal couplings changes sign at the midpoint of the inertial regime, with the small scale relation consistent with intense ejections followed by a more prolonged sweep motion. These results may be interpreted in a manner that