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  1. Major pelvic injuries in equestrian sports

    PubMed Central

    O'Farrell, D A; Irshad, F; Thorns, B S; McElwain, J P

    1997-01-01

    A series of pelvic and acetabular injuries caused by horse riding accidents is reported. The importance of wearing appropriate protective clothing when riding is emphasised. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:9298563

  2. Diagnosing and treating lateral epicondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, P.; Yaffe, M. J.; Rohan, I.

    1994-01-01

    Lateral epicondylitis is often encountered in primary care. Although its diagnosis can be fairly straightforward, its treatment is often difficult. This review examines the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of tennis elbow. Management options are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8312757

  3. Interventional radiology. Application to family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Asch, M.; Law, P. K.; Jaffer, N.

    1996-01-01

    New minimally invasive interventional radiologic procedures are being developed and refined. These alternatives to standard surgical treatments have fewer complications, shorter hospital stays, and lower costs. A variety of procedures that assist in both benign and malignant diseases are particularly suited for palliative care in end-stage malignancy. Images Figure 1, Figure 2 Figure 3, Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8792020

  4. Be smart, don't kick the heart

    PubMed Central

    Braam, R.L.; Hertzberger, D.P.; Meursing, B.T.J.; Ophuis, A.J.M. Oude

    2005-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is a rare cause of cardiac pathology. Nevertheless, a variety of life-threatening cardiac diseases can be caused by blunt chest traumas. In this case report we describe a myocardial infarction associated with kickboxing. We also review the literature describing myocardial infarction associated with blunt chest trauma. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696509

  5. Computers in Radiation Oncology: The Third Decade

    PubMed Central

    Sternick, Edward S.

    1978-01-01

    Computers have been used for the past 25 years in radiation oncology for such diverse activities as treatment planning, treatment machine verification, image processing, and tumor registry analysis. This paper reviews each of these areas, with examples of working systems, and outlines a computer hardware configuration most suitable for their implementation. ImagesFig. 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5

  6. Common Dermatoses of Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Gora, Irv

    1986-01-01

    Within the pediatric population of their practices, family physicians frequently encounter infants with skin rashes. This article discusses several of the more common rashes of infancy: atopic dermatitis, cradle cap, diaper dermatitis and miliaria. Etiology, clinical picture and possible approaches to treatment are presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:21267297

  7. Stereolithography for Posterior Fossa Cranioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Agner, Celso; Dujovny, Manuel; Evenhouse, Raymond; Charbel, Fady T.; Sadler, Lewis

    1998-01-01

    Posterior fossa cranioplasty has been suggested for improvement of neurological symptoms following craniectomy. However, there is no particular recommendation in the literature about techniques for prosthesis manufacture and implantation. We report our experience using rapid prototyping technology and stereolithography for pre-surgical implant design and production of cranioplasties. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171056

  8. Evolutionary anticipation of the human heart.

    PubMed Central

    Victor, S.; Nayak, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the comparative anatomy of hearts from fish, frog, turtle, snake, crocodile, birds (duck, chicken, quail), mammals (elephant, dolphin, sheep, goat, ox, baboon, wallaby, mouse, rabbit, possum, echidna) and man. The findings were analysed with respect to the mechanism of evolution of the heart. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:11041025

  9. Esophageal Manifestations of Multisystem Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mapp, Esmond

    1980-01-01

    The esophagus may be involved directly or indirectly by numerous disease conditions. On occasion, the esophageal process may be the key to the diagnosis. In some situations, the esophageal manifestation of a disease may be more immediately life-threatening than the primary process. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7310903

  10. ACUTE HYDRONEPHROSIS MIMICKING RENAL COLIC

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Donald C.; Kaufman, Joseph J.

    1964-01-01

    Hydronephrosis may be acute, recurrent and related to ingestion of fluid. Frequently a lower polar vessel is an etiological factor. The condition is amenable to corrective operation by a variety of surgical techniques, as in the six cases here reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:14154288

  11. Protocols in Medicolegal Veterinary Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Green, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines for the examination of cases involving death of animals from gunshot and arrow wounds are described. Appropriate procedures for collecting and preserving specimens and exhibits are also included. A brief description of the appearance of various gunshot wounds is given. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:7260828

  12. Association of Heterotopic Neuroglial Tissue with an Arachnoid Cyst in the Internal Auditory Canal

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Howard W.; Nager, George T.; Holliday, Michael J.; Long, Donlin M.

    1995-01-01

    An arachnoid cyst arising within the internal auditory canal, or within the cerebellopontine angle and subsequently extending into the internal meatus and enlarging it, is a rare occurrence. Nevertheless, the neurootologist and the neurosurgeon have an interest in its existence because its clinical manifestations are identical with the ones produced by a schwannoma, involving overwhelmingly the cochleovestibular nerve in that region. An equally rare observation in that location is the presence of ectopic neuroglial tissue. The two can occur independently or in combination. Examples of such lesions are presented, and their possible pathogenesis is discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 3Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17171156

  13. The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Yale: the first one hundred fifty years, from Nathan Smith to Lee Buxton.

    PubMed Central

    Kohorn, E. I.

    1993-01-01

    The persons who directed the academic teaching of women's health at Yale Medical School are presented by biographical sketches recounting their achievements and some of the difficulties they encountered. Three who provided particular catalysis were Nathan Smith, Herbert Thoms, and Lee Buxton. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:8303913

  14. Primary Schwannoma of the Petrous Apex

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Karl L.; Hankinson, Hal L.; Nissen, Alan J.; McDaniel, Shawna L.

    1995-01-01

    We present two patients with primary petrous apex schwannoma. These tumors were centered on the petrous carotid artery and are thought to have originated from the deep petrosal nerve. This would account for the paucity of neurologic deficits in these patients. Imaging findings and surgical treatment of primary petrous apex schwannomas are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:17170967

  15. Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Leukemoid Reaction, Marantic Endocarditis, and Consumptive Thrombocytopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, Joseph C.; Ireland, Charles S.; Scott, Richard N.

    1982-01-01

    This paper details the simultaneous occurrence of a severe leukemoid reaction, non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) (marantic endocarditis), and a consumptive thrombocytopathy without signs of micro-angiopathic hemolysis on peripheral blood smear in a patient with terminal metastatic, undifferentiated, large cell bronchogenic carcinoma. The case is presented and the condition is discussed in detail. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:6889655

  16. Early Clinical Signs and Symptoms of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Miedzinski, Lil J.

    1992-01-01

    Early clinical signs and symptoms of human immunodeficiency virus infection are protean and can reflect the effects of the virus or represent early manifestations of an illness associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Knowledge of a patient's potential risk for HIV infection and of the natural history of the illness allow early signs and symptoms to be recognized. Early intervention can delay progression to AIDS. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21221397

  17. Protein turbines. I: The bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed Central

    Elston, T C; Oster, G

    1997-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is driven by a flux of ions between the cytoplasm and the periplasmic lumen. Here we show how an electrostatic mechanism can convert this ion flux into a rotary torque. We demonstrate that, with reasonable parameters, the model can reproduce many of the experimental measurements. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 p720-a PMID:9251788

  18. Atlanto-axial subluxation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Thurlow, Robert D

    1988-01-01

    One of the causes of death in rheumatoid patients is cord compression following atlanto-axial subluxation. Dislocations in the cervical spine are common with patients who have rheumatoid arthritis. Anterior subluxation occurs in up to 35%, followed by vertical subluxation in 22.2%, lateral subluxation in 20.6% and rarely posterior subluxation. A case report is presented to illustrate such a complication. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4

  19. Extended-Field Isocentric Irradiation for Hodgkin's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Good, Roger R.; Jones, Ernest O.; Somers, James E.; McAnulty, Bruce E.; McCaul, Gayle F.; Rogers, Sally S.; Reeves, Michael A.; Sanders, Cheryl K.

    1987-01-01

    Extended-field therapeutic irradiation is the treatment of choice for the majority of patients diagnosed with pathologic stages I and II Hodgkin's disease, and total nodal irradiation can be effectively used to treat selected stage III Hodgkin's patients. Standard 100-cm source-to-axis distance extended-field isocentric technique and results are presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:3312619

  20. A Desktop Computer Based Workstation for Display and Analysis of 3-D and 4-D Biomedical Images

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Bradley J.; Robb, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    While great advances have been made in developing new and better ways to produce medical images, the technology to efficiently display and analyze them has lagged. This paper describes design considerations and development of a workstation based on an IBM PC/AT for the analysis of three and four dimensional medical image data. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9

  1. Diseases of the Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, G.

    1988-01-01

    This article provides a clinical approach to the more common oral mucosal lesions. Histologic diagnoses are not included, apart from their use in diagnosis and management. In a small number of oral mucosal lesions, clinical appearance is sufficiently distinctive to permit accurate diagnosis, but a biopsy is usually necessary. Clinical appearance is important in directing further investigations such as culture and serologic testing. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:21253207

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Central Nervous System—An Update

    PubMed Central

    Brant-Zawadzki, Michael; Norman, David; Newton, T. Hans; Kucharczyk, Walter

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has developed rapidly and now has superior ability to detect and to characterize disease in the central nervous system without any significant biologic hazard. It is becoming the screening method of choice in the diagnosis of neoplasm, ischemia, hemorrhage, infection and degenerative and demyelinating diseases involving the central nervous system. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:3976220

  3. Ferritin is associated with the aberrant tau filaments present in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, M.; Valpuesta, J. M.; de Garcini, E. M.; Quintana, C.; Arrasate, M.; López Carrascosa, J. L.; Rábano, A.; García de Yébenes, J.; Avila, J.

    1998-01-01

    Tau-containing filaments purified from the brain of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) patients were isolated and characterized. These filaments co-purify with regular particles that biophysical and biochemical methods identified as ferritin shells. In vivo, brain tau accumulation in PSP co-localized with ferritin. These results suggest that ferritin/iron could modulate the formation of tau aggregates in PSP. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:9626057

  4. Excimer laser ophthalmic surgery: evaluation of a new technology.

    PubMed Central

    Infeld, D. A.; O'Shea, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide information and an overview of the potential risks and benefits of excimer laser surgery, a new and promising technique in ophthalmic surgery. Although this review concentrates on the use of the laser for refractive purposes, novel therapeutic techniques are also discussed. It is hoped that this will enable general practitioners, optometrists and physicians to provide appropriate advice and counselling for patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10211324

  5. Computerized Tomography: Its Role in Interstitial Brachytherapy of Pelvic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Taylor, Judith; Jones, E.O.; McAnulty, Bruce

    1986-01-01

    The advantages of computerized tomography (CT) in the treatment planning of external beam radiation therapy have been shown in several studies. The authors extended the use of CT to the interstitial brachytherapy treatment planning of pelvic malignancies. CT was found to be invaluable in localizing pelvic tumors, selecting implant techniques, and checking the accuracy of the implant. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:3950985

  6. Rubeosis iridis generated by insulin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Shabo, A L; Maxwell, D S; Kreiger, A E; Straatsma, B R

    1976-01-01

    There are important similarities between human and experimental monkey rubeosis iridis. We believe that we have developed a useful primate model to study iris neovascularization and that the possible role of immunity to insulin in the pathogenesis of human diabetic rubeosis iridis warrants further detailed consideration. Images FIGURE 8 FIGURE 1. 1 FIGURE 1. 2 FIGURE 1. 3 FIGURE 1. 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:405785

  7. Pulmonary Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cells and Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    During the past ten years, functions of alveolar type II cells have been well characterized with isolated cells in vitro. Some of the functions were well known from studies in vivo, but others such as transepithelial sodium transport were unsuspected. A better understanding of this important pulmonary cell type improves our knowledge of the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome and may in time lead to new therapeutic strategies. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:3909639

  8. NON-INFECTIOUS INFLAMMATORY AND NEOPLASTIC DISORDERS OF THE MALE GENITALIA

    PubMed Central

    Reed, William B.; Nickel, Walter R.; Winer, Louis H.

    1964-01-01

    The cutaneous manifestations of the male external genitalia are difficult to diagnose. They may be associated with systemic disease (Reiter's disease, psoriatic arthritis, angiokeratoma corporis diffusum). In dealing with a lesion of this area that does not heal, adequate biopsy is advisable to rule out malignant disease (Bowen's disease, melanoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, Paget's disease, erythroplasia). ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:14131400

  9. Concurrent Bovine Virus Diarrhea and Bovine Papular Stomatitis Infection in a Calf

    PubMed Central

    Bohac, J. G.; Yates, W. D. G.

    1980-01-01

    A case of concurrent infection with the viruses of bovine virus diarrhea and papular stomatitis in a calf is reported. The difficulties posed by such situations are described and the criteria used for diagnosis outlined. The two diseases are reviewed briefly and the possible mechanisms whereby bovine virus diarrhea virus is suspected of facilitating infection by other agents are discussed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:7459795

  10. ASCARIASIS

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, J. H.; Feder, B. H.; Myers, G. G.

    1961-01-01

    Ascaris infestations may be found in California, particularly in patients who have migrated from endemic regions. Clinical manifestations include vague abdominal pains, unexplained fever, anemia, malaise and upper respiratory tract infections. Intestinal obstruction and infections are among the severe complications that can occur. Diagnosis is made by the observation of worms or ova in the feces, and occasionally by roentgenographic manifestations. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:18732434

  11. An atypical clay shoveler's fracture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Victor B; Astri, Frank

    2001-01-01

    A case of an atypical clay shoveler's fracture with involvement of the spinolaminar line is described. Causative mechanisms of injury, radiographic appearances, differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis are reviewed. Classic clay shoveler's fractures are considered stable fractures. However, when the spinolaminar line is disrupted, spinal cord involvement must be ruled out. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4aFigure 4bFigure 5Figure 6

  12. Common injuries of the shoulder. Diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, P J; Paulos, L E

    1995-01-01

    Shoulder pain is often the presenting complaint of patients seeing their primary care physicians. Overuse and traumatic injuries make up most of the causes. A physical examination with minimal diagnostic tests can lead to the correct diagnosis in most cases. Most conditions can be treated conservatively (nonsurgically). Appropriate referral to a specialist depends on the severity of the initial injury or the patient's lack of response to conservative treatment (or both). We discuss common injuries of the shoulder, emphasizing a practical diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:7483592

  13. Comparison of DNA adducts from exposure to complex mixtures in various human tissues and experimental systems

    PubMed Central

    Lewtas, Joellen; Mumford, Judy; Everson, Richard B.; Hulka, Barbara; Wilcosky, Tim; Kozumbo, Walter; Thompson, Claudia; George, Michael; Dobiáš, Lubomir; Šrám, Radim; Li, Xueming; Gallagher, Jane

    1993-01-01

    DNA adducts derived from complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic compounds emitted from tobacco smoke are compared to industrial pollution sources (e.g., coke ovens and aluminum smelters), smoky coal burning, and urban air pollution. Exposures to coke oven emissions and smoky coal, both potent rodent skin tumor initiators and lung carcinogens in humans, result in high levels of DNA adducts compared to tobacco smoke in the in vitro calf thymus DNA model system, in cultured lymphocytes, and in the mouse skin assay. Using tobacco smoke as a model in human studies, we have compared relative DNA adduct levels detected in blood lymphocytes, placental tissue, bronchoalveolar lung lavage cells, sperm, and autopsy tissues of smokers and nonsmokers. Adduct levels in DNA isolated from smokers were highest in human heart and lung tissue with smaller but detectable differences in placental tissue and lung lavage cells. Comparison of the DNA adduct levels resulting from human exposure to different complex mixtures shows that emissions from coke ovens, aluminum smelters, and smoky coal result in higher DNA adduct levels than tobacco smoke exposure. These studies suggest that humans exposed to complex combustion mixtures will have higher DNA adduct levels in target cells (e.g., lung) as compared to nontarget cells (e.g., lymphocytes) and that the adduct levels will be dependent on the genotoxic and DNA adduct-forming potency of the mixture. ImagesFIGURE 1.FIGURE 1.FIGURE 2.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 4. PMID:8319665

  14. A comparison between the cytological and histological characteristics in thirteen canine and feline thymomas

    PubMed Central

    Rae, Catherine A.; Jacobs, Robert M.; Couto, C. Guillermo

    1989-01-01

    Cytological smears and histological sections collected from histologically diagnosed cases of thymoma in nine dogs and four cats were reviewed. Most of the histological features were apparent in the cytological specimens with two notable differences. The epithelial component was underestimated and Hassal's corpuscles were not observed using Wright's-stained cytological preparations. Features of thymoma were recognized in seven of the nine cases in which fine needle aspiration biopsy was done. Therefore, cytology, and specifically fine needle aspiration biopsy, has the potential to be a useful aid in the rapid diagnosis of canine and feline thymomas. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:17423346

  15. Clinical and pathological effects on the rabbit's eye of some plant-derived ophthalmic swabs.

    PubMed Central

    Oji, E. O.

    1990-01-01

    The stems of corn, millet, sugar cane and the banana leaf frond excite some clinical and pathological effects in the rabbit's eye when implanted either into the anterior chamber (AC) or subconjunctivally. These effects have not been sight threatening. The materials can either be left to be cleared by the body's phagocytes when they produce mild inflammatory reaction or removed surgically if the inflammatory response is moderate when fragments have been left intraocularly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2221773

  16. Towards the development of a standard test procedure for mouthguard assessment

    PubMed Central

    Greasley, A; Karet, B

    1997-01-01

    A simulated upper jaw, made from a rubber arch containing replaceable ceramic teeth and a renewable composite jawbone, offers promise in assessing the performance of custom made mouthguard designs. Impact tests, involving precise assessment of jaw and tooth fractures caused by projectiles of various energies and profiles, simulate conditions that approximate to common clinical observation. Such conditions offer the most sensitive indices for assessing both improved mouthguard designs and product quality and reliability. Damage caused by the dissipation of the impact energy may be transferred within this simulated oral cavity by minor changes to the impact conditions. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:9132208

  17. Fusobacteremia in a Calf with Necrotic Stomatitis, Enteritis and Granulocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Nimmo-Wilkie, Judith S.; Radostits, O. M.

    1981-01-01

    This case of fusobacteremia appears to be identical to an interesting and unusual syndrome previously reported. We wish to bring the syndrome to the attention of others who may be able to elucidate the etiology further. Because hematological examinations are frequently not done on calves, this condition may be more common than reports suggest. Perhaps others who observe this syndrome in calves may be able to investigate the role of other agents such as viruses or mycotoxins. Experimental work may be able to establish whether or not the exotoxins of Fusobacterium necrophorum can suppress granulopoiesis. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:7248893

  18. From flint to stainless steel: observations on surgical instrument composition.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, J.

    1993-01-01

    Man's failure to extract deeply embedded thorns and arrowheads, with bare hands and teeth, stimulated 'instrument substitutes' mimicking these appendages. Evidence from primitive communities suggest animal, plant and mineral items were employed, both before and after metal became the standard material of today's armamentarium. Changing surgical instrument composition has mirrored concurrent technology and manufacturing methods both of which are reviewed. Particular significance is accorded flint, bronze, crucible steel, thermal sterilisation, nickel-plate, stainless steel and disposable plastics. The paper is based on an exhibition From Flint to Stainless Steel on display at the College. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8215156

  19. Observations on chronic polyarthritis in monkeys1

    PubMed Central

    Bywaters, E G L

    1981-01-01

    Erosion and inflammatory changes in the carpus, fingers and toes of a rhesus monkey, Macaca mulatta, are described; this was one of 152 animals in each of which four fixed limbs were available for examination. The histological changes resembled closely those found in adult human rheumatoid arthritis. The limited literature is reviewed (including cases with amyloid disease). ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12. PMID:7299780

  20. Complications of splintage in congenital dislocation of the hip.

    PubMed Central

    Langkamer, V G; Clarke, N M; Witherow, P

    1991-01-01

    The use of abduction splintage in the treatment of congenital dislocation of the hip has an important morbidity. Six children who developed complications are presented in this paper. Sustained splintage of an unreduced hip, overcorrection of the femoral head displacement, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, full thickness pressure sores, and excessive tibial torsion may occur as a consequence of treatment. Expert supervision of abduction splintage, correct case selection, and regular review are necessary to reduce the incidence of such complications. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1755647

  1. Glomerular Polycystic Kidney Disease in a Dog (Blue Merle Collie)

    PubMed Central

    Chalifoux, A.; Phaneuf, J. -B.; Olivieri, M.; Gosselin, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Glomerular polycystic kidney disease was diagnosed in an 11 month old, female, Blue Merle Collie. Clinical signs (polyuria, polydipsia, vomiting, diarrhea, partial anorexia) and laboratory work (blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum phosphorus, specific gravity, proteinuria, nonregenerative anemia) indicated chronic renal failure. However, after the study of a biopsy specimen, a definitive diagnosis was reached and the prognosis was determined. Necropsy findings and histopathological studies revealed: presence of glomerular cysts, atrophy of glomerular tufts and sclerosis of the interstitial tissue. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:17422209

  2. Effects of different enzymic treatments on the release of titin fragments from rabbit skeletal myofibrils. Purification of an 800 kDa titin polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Astier, C; Labbé, J P; Roustan, C; Benyamin, Y

    1993-01-01

    In myofibrils, titin (also called connectin) molecules span from Z line to M line and constitute a third filament system containing an elastic domain in the I band. This giant protein is particularly sensitive to proteolysis in situ. Treatment of rabbit skeletal myofibrils with exogenous proteinases induces a release of titin fragments, which are detected in the soluble myofibrillar fraction. The cleavage of titin occurs at specific points localized at the proximity of Z line and could lead to a concomitant release of alpha-actinin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8457201

  3. Physical mapping by FISH of the DiGeorge critical region (DGCR): Involvement of the region in familial cases

    PubMed Central

    Desmaze, C.; Prieur, M.; Amblard, F.; Aïkem, M.; LeDeist, F.; Demczuk, S.; Zucman, J.; Plougastel, B.; Delattre, O.; Croquette, M.-F.; Brevière, G.-M.; Huon, C.; Le Merrer, M.; Mathieu, M.; Sidi, D.; Stephan, J.-L.; Aurias, A.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the relative ordering, by fluorescence in situ hybridization, of cosmid loci and translocation breakpoints in the DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) critical region of chromosome 22. This physical map enables us to define a large region, commonly deleted in a majority of affected patients, and the smallest deleted region which, when lost, is sufficient to produce DGS. In four instances, a similar large deleted region is observed in a familial context. In these pedigrees, the deletion is encountered in one parent with mild features of the disease. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 2Figure 4 PMID:8250039

  4. Moyamoya Disease in Black Adults

    PubMed Central

    Makoyo, Phinehas Z.

    1979-01-01

    A 40-year-old hypertensive black female, who suddenly developed aphasia, lethargy, and a right hemiparesis, and a 42-year-old non-hypertensive black male, who suddenly developed intractable headache, drowsiness, and vomiting, were found by angiography to have moyamoya disease. This condition is characterized by a decreased caliber of the internal carotid arteries and bilateral occlusion of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries with visualization of an extensive collateral network of tortuous blood vessels of the rete mirabile type at the base of the brain. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:448757

  5. Location of brown recluse venom attachment sites on human erythrocytes by the firritin-labeled antibody technique.

    PubMed Central

    Futrell, J. M.; Morgan, P. N.; Su, S. P.; Roth, S. I.

    1979-01-01

    Brown recluse spider (loxosceles reclusa) venom has been demonstrated by a ferritin-labeled antibody technique to attach to human erythrocyte cell membranes. The number of individual attachment sites per cell is proportional to the concentration of the venom used to sensitize the erythrocytes. Structural changes in the red cell membrane are associated with the venom attachment. These sites may be related to the red cell hemolysis which sometimes occurs in the human as a result of the spider bite. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:377995

  6. In Vivo Photocycle of the Euglena gracilis Photoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Barsanti, Laura; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Walne, Patricia L.; Gualtieri, Paolo

    1997-01-01

    We present the light-induced photocycle of the paraflagellar swelling of Euglena gracilis. The kinetics of this process was reconstructed by sampling its fluorescence emission and switching the excitation light from 365 nm to 436 nm. Stable intermediates in the photocycle were manifested. The measured millisecond resolution kinetics best fits a Michaelis-Menten equation. The data provide strong evidence that the paraflagellar swelling, a three-dimensional natural crystal of a light-detecting protein, is the true Euglena photoreceptor. ImagesFIGURE 1FIGURE 2FIGURE 3FIGURE 5FIGURE 6 PMID:9017185

  7. Cauda Equina Neuritis: A Chronic Idiopathic Polyneuritis in Two Horses

    PubMed Central

    Rousseaux, C. G.; Futcher, K. G.; Clark, E. G.; Naylor, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Two cases of cauda equina neuritis are compared and contrasted. Neurological deficits of the tail and perineum were noted and functional deficits were seen in gait, urination, defecation and cranial nerve function. Lesions consisted of nonsuppurative inflammation of the nerve trunks and proliferation of the perineurium of the cauda equina. Cranial nerve involvement in one case supported a diagnosis of polyneuritis equi rather than cauda equina neuritis. The possible etiologies and pathogenesis of this disease are discussed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:17422405

  8. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  9. HYPERTENSIVE-ISCHEMIC LEG ULCERS

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Eugene M.; Schmidt, Otto E. L.

    1950-01-01

    Ischemic ulcers of the leg having characteristics different from those of ordinary leg ulcers have been observed in a small number of hypertensive patients, mostly women, during the past few years. Such ulcers are usually located above the ankle. They begin with a small area of purplish discoloration at the site of slight trauma, and progress to acutely tender ulceration. In studies of tissue removed from the margin and the base of an ulcer of this kind, obliterative arteriolar sclerotic changes, ischemic-appearing connective tissue and inflammatory changes were noted. Two additional cases are reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:15398887

  10. Management of chemical burns of the canine cornea

    PubMed Central

    Christmas, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Significant clinical signs and general principles of treatment for chemical burns of the canine cornea are presented using three typical case studies for illustration. Alkali burns are more common in dogs than acid burns. The sources of alkali in this study were soap, cement, and mortar dust. Common signs of chemical burns are ocular pain, corneal ulceration, tear film inadequacy, corneal edema, and marked corneal neovascularity. Successful treatment requires thorough ocular lavage, treatment for corneal ulceration, and adequate anti-inflammatory therapy when the corneal epithelium becomes intact. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:17423874

  11. Giant Solitary Synovial Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint with Intracranial Extension

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Salú, José L.; Lázaro, Rafael; Aldasoro, José; Gonzalez-Darder, José M.

    1998-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis are rare entities but are well-described lesions in the literature that can affect many joint areas of the body. A case of tumoral synovial chondromatosis involving the temporomandibular joint with intracranial extension through mandibular fossa is reported. As long as there was significant infratemporal and extradural invasion of the middle and posterior fossa, a transtemporal and infratemporal approach was performed and total removal of the lesions was achieved. A brief review of skull base synovial chondromatosis is presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11 PMID:17171059

  12. Neurological symptoms and cerebrovascular accidents: manifestations of left-sided cardiac tumours in adults

    PubMed Central

    Said, S.A.M.; Droste, H.T.; Baart, J.C.; Klaver, M.M.; Sie, H.T.

    2004-01-01

    We present two adult patients with a left-sided cardiac tumour in whom the diagnosis was established by transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography. They both presented with a cerebrovascular accident. Cardiac surgery for tumour excision was offered but refused by one and successfully performed in the other. In one of the patients, right femoro-crural bypass was undertaken because of arterial insufficiency. The patient who refused surgical intervention died secondary to severe septic shock. In the other patient serial transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography showed no tumour recurrence at four years of follow-up post tumour extirpation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696276

  13. Moyamoya disease.

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, M.; Howlett, D. C.; Saks, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare cerebrovascular condition of uncertain aetiology commonly affecting young persons. The disease is mainly seen in Japanese patients. We report two cases of moyamoya disease in Caucasian women and review the postulated aetiological factors and associated conditions as well as the spectrum of invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities useful in the diagnosis and follow-up of the disease, with particular reference to the developing role of magnetic resonance imaging and angiography. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9373593

  14. Pulmonary Complications of Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Leon S.; Boylen, Thomas C.

    1974-01-01

    Complications resulting from drug abuse more frequently affect the lung than any other organ. The spectrum of pulmonary complications associated with drug abuse is wide. The current practice of using mixtures of drugs is mainly responsible for the increase in pulmonary complications. The chief complications observed in a series of 241 drug abuse patients were aspiration pneumonitis (12.9 percent), pulmonary edema (10.0 percent), and pneumonia (7.5 percent). ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:4812215

  15. BLACK LESIONS OF THE SKIN

    PubMed Central

    Becker, S. William

    1958-01-01

    Benign melanocytic lesions include lentigo, ephelid (freckle), pigmented nevus, sacral spot, blue nevus, and combined nevus and blue nevus. Malignant melanocytic lesions are melanomas, which arise from melanocytes at the epidermodermal junction, or, rarely, from blue nevi. They usually originate in brown plaques known as lentigo maligna, in pigmented nevi, or in normal skin. Melanoma is diagnosed clinically in less than 50 per cent of instances. Biopsy is therefore of great importance, since practically all melanoma can be cured by adequate early resection. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8. PMID:13511215

  16. The N terminal region of human tau is present in Alzheimer's disease protein A68 and is incorporated into paired helical filaments.

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, A.; Ksiezak-Reding, H.; Liu, W. K.; Dickson, D. W.; Yen, S. H.

    1991-01-01

    Antibody (Ab) E-1 was raised to the amino terminus (19 to 33 amino acid residues) of human tau. It recognized Alzheimer's disease proteins A68 (MW 60, 64, 68 kd), labeled paired helical filaments, and had no reactivity with tau from rat, mouse, and bovine brains. The results indicate that the N terminus of tau is incorporated in A68 proteins and paired helical filaments and that human tau proteins contain species-specific amino acid sequences. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1721492

  17. A review of alternative approaches in the management of iatrogenic femoral pseudoaneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, G. J.; Ray, S. A.; Lewis, J. S.; Lopez, A. J.; Powell, B. W.; Moss, A. H.; Dormandy, J. A.; Belli, A. M.; Buckenham, T. M.

    1999-01-01

    The management of iatrogenic pseudoaneurysms (IPAs) demands close co-operation between radiologist, vascular surgeon and plastic surgeon. Ideally, each patient should be reviewed employing a team approach. Many IPAs require only observation; those with a volume greater than 6 cm3 will require treatment as spontaneous thrombosis is uncommon. Radiological treatment options include ultrasound guided compression repair (UGCR), embolisation, and covered stenting. Occasionally, these are unsuccessful or contra-indicated, and the vascular surgical approach is discussed in detail. Finally, the role of the plastic surgeon in dealing with skin ischaemia is detailed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:10615187

  18. The pore dimensions of gramicidin A.

    PubMed Central

    Smart, O S; Goodfellow, J M; Wallace, B A

    1993-01-01

    The ion channel forming peptide gramicidin A adopts a number of distinct conformations in different environments. We have developed a new method to analyze and display the pore dimensions of ion channels. The procedure is applied to two x-ray crystal structures of gramicidin that adopt distinct antiparallel double helical dimer conformations and a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure for the beta6.3 NH2-terminal to NH2-terminal dimer. The results are discussed with reference to ion conductance properties and dependence of pore dimensions on the environment. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:7508762

  19. Vortex shedding as a precursor of turbulent electrical activity in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cabo, C; Pertsov, A M; Davidenko, J M; Baxter, W T; Gray, R A; Jalife, J

    1996-01-01

    In cardiac tissue, during partial blockade of the membrane sodium channels, or at high frequencies of excitation, inexcitable obstacles with sharp edges may destabilize the propagation of electrical excitation waves, causing the formation of self-sustained vortices and turbulent cardiac electrical activity. The formation of such vortices, which visually resembles vortex shedding in hydrodynamic turbulent flows, was observed in sheep epicardial tissue using voltage-sensitive dyes in combination with video-imaging techniques. Vortex shedding is a potential mechanism leading to the spontaneous initiation of uncontrolled high-frequency excitation of the heart. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8785270

  20. The Haemophilus somnus disease complex (Hemophilosis): A review

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Frederick W.; Janzen, Eugene D.

    1989-01-01

    Haemophilus somnus has long been associated with thrombotic meningoencephalomyelitis but has also been identified as the agent responsible for other clinical diseases including respiratory disease, reproductive problems, myocarditis, otitis, conjunctivitis, mastitis, and polyarthritis. Exposure to the bacteria is widespread and infection may occur via the respiratory tract from urogenital excretions and secretions. Diagnosis and treatment of hemophilosis may be easy or difficult depending on the manifestation presented, and special procedures must be taken to facilitate isolation of the organism. Satisfactory control measures are not available; vaccination is the only preventive measure demonstrating a beneficial effect. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:17423440

  1. Advantages of using aquatic animals for biomedical research on reproductive toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Mottet, N K; Landolt, M L

    1987-01-01

    Major advantages of the use of aquatic animals, such as trout, English sole, or sea urchins, for studying the mechanisms of reproductive toxicology are discussed. The remarkable synchrony of differentiation of gametes in large quantities for detailed morphologic and biochemical measurements enables research not readily done on mammalian nonseasonal breeders. Structural differences such as the absence of a fibrous sheath in the more simple structure of fish and sea urchin sperm flagella facilitates comparative study of the mechanism of action of microtubules in flagella movement and the coupling of mitochondrial energy production to microtubules movement. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. PMID:3297666

  2. An outbreak of cysticercosis in feedlot cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bundza, Adam; Finley, Gordon G.; Easton, Kenneth L.

    1988-01-01

    An outbreak of cysticercosis (infestation with the larvae of Taenia saginata) occurred in feedlot cattle in Ontario in 1986. Two hundred and thirty-three of 271 steers were confirmed histologically to be positive for cysticerci. Nineteen (8.2%) animals had viable cysticerci, 87 (37.3%) had degenerated cysticerci, 77 (33.0%) had mineralized cysticerci, and 50 (21.5%) steers had lymphoid granulomas consistent with cysticercosis. Three viable cysticerci were partly evaginated and one degenerate cysticercus was fully evaginated. ImagesFigure 1., Figure 2., Figure 3., Figure 4., Figure 5., Figure 6., Figure 7., Figure 8., Figure 9., F PMID:17423200

  3. Primary Hepatocellular Tumors in Animals Killed at Meat Packing Plants: Report of 11 cases

    PubMed Central

    Bundza, A.; Greig, A. S.; Dukes, T. W.

    1984-01-01

    Eight bovine, two ovine and one porcine primary hepatocellular neoplasms were found during a five year survey of tumors from meat packing plants. The tumors varied in size and usually were yellow-grey. Some were encapsulated and divided into lobules by fibrous septa. The tumor cells closely resembled normal hepatocytes and were arranged in a trabecular pattern or in sheets with caverns or were a mixture of the two. Eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions were present in one bovine and one ovine case. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:17422364

  4. Velocardiofacial syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, A. C.; Super, M.

    1997-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is a syndrome of multiple anomalies that include cleft palate, cardiac defects, learning difficulties, speech disorder and characteristic facial features. It has an estimated incidence of 1 in 5000. The majority of cases have a microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2. The phenotype of this condition shows considerable variation, not all the principal features are present in each case. Identification of the syndrome can be difficult as many of the anomalies are minor and present in the general population. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9497944

  5. Brain asymmetry as a potential biomarker for developmental TCDD intoxication: a dose-response study.

    PubMed Central

    Henshel, D S; Martin, J W; DeWitt, J C

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that in ovo exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related compounds is correlated with the development of grossly asymmetric brains. This asymmetry is manifested as a difference between the two halves of the forebrain and the tecta. Previously, only wildlife species (heron, cormorant, and eagle) had been shown to manifest this response. In the wildlife studies, the frequency and degree of left-right interhemispheric differences had been correlated with the levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) in eggs from the same nest (heron, cormorant). We studied the effect of in ovo exposure to TCDD on the brain throughout development in a sensitive laboratory model (chicken). Embryos from chicken eggs (Gallus gallus) injected with one of several doses of TCDD or vehicle control were sacrificed after 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, or 20 days of incubation, or incubated to hatch and then sacrificed either within 24 hr or at 3 weeks post-hatch. Measurements of both chicken embryo and hatchling brains indicated that 1) TCDD alone induced the brain asymmetry in developing chickens; 2) this brain asymmetry was similar to that observed in animals exposed in the wild to a mixture of TCDD-related contaminants; 3) there was a dose-related increase in both the frequency and severity of brain asymmetry observed at all ages measured; and 4) the asymmetry was measurable in embryonic brains at an age when the braincase was a thin, flexible layer (embryonic day 9), implying that the effect of TCDD was directly on the developing brain and not indirectly via an effect on the braincase. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 6. D Figure 7. PMID:9294718

  6. Skin and liver diseases induced in flounder (Platichthys flesus) after long-term exposure to contaminated sediments in large-scale mesocosms.

    PubMed Central

    Vethaak, A D; Jol, J G; Meijboom, A; Eggens, M L; Rheinallt, T; Wester, P W; van de Zande, T; Bergman, A; Dankers, N; Ariese, F; Baan, R A; Everts, J M; Opperhuizen, A; Marquenie, J M

    1996-01-01

    indicate that long-term exposure to chemically contaminated dredged spoil can induce liver neoplasia and other liver lesions in flounder at contaminant levels comparable to those found in the natural environment. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:8959412

  7. The history and evolution of surgical instruments. VI. The surgical blade: from finger nail to ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, J.

    1995-01-01

    Elective surgery requires planned incisions and incisions require appropriate blades. In the prehistoric era, division of the umbilical cord and other minor procedures were probably undertaken with human teeth and nails, and later with plant, animal and mineral substitutes, as witnessed by studies of primitive societies still surviving or recently extinct. More efficient metallic blades appeared in historic times and ultimately generated five specific shapes which are analysed in detail. Today, as minimally invasive techniques, endoscopes, laser and ultrasound sources evolve, many hallowed incisions of surgical access diminish in length or disappear entirely. In historical terms, elective surgery of the twentieth century will be recalled as an interlude characterised by maximally invasive incisions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7486768

  8. Phalangeal and Navicular Bone Hypoplasia and Hoof Malformation in the Hind Limbs of a Foal

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D. R. K.; Leach, D. H.; Bell, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Anatomical anomalies in the hind feet of a seven month old Appaloosa foal were identified and investigated through the use of gross anatomical dissection, radiography and angiography. Abnormalities were restricted to the distal aspect of both hind legs, the right hind leg being more severely affected. Anatomically the right foot resembled that of an equine fetus of approximately 120 days gestational age. Disruption of vascular perfusion to hoof structures was evident in both hind legs and was related to areas of abnormal bone conformation as well as to areas of abnormal ossification and calcification. Phalangeal and navicular bone hypoplasia were apparent as were soft tissue and joint anomalies. Although the etiology of the defects identified remains obscure, several theories are suggested, namely heritability, acquired defects and the possible teratogenic effects of clenbuterol. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:17422612

  9. Ulcer in the basis of Zenker's diverticulum mimicking esophageal malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Odemis, Bolent; Ataseven, Hilmi; Basar, Omer; Ertugrul, Ibrahim; Yüksel, Osman; Turhan, Nesrin

    2006-01-01

    Complications of Zenker's diverticulum are rare and include ulcer, bleeding and malignancy. Ulcer in the basis of diverticulum is a very rare complication and to date only four cases have been reported in the literature. Herein, we report a new case of ulcer in Zenker's diverticulum mimicking esophageal malignancy presumed to be due to aspirin and/or alcohol consumption. The exact diagnosis was troublesome and needed to perform diagnostic procedures repeatedly. The patient underwent external pharyngoesophageal diverticulectomy. We emphasize that endoscope should be withdrawn if any resistance is encountered during esophageal intubation-even with forward-viewing endoscope-especially when there is a Zenker's diverticulum suspicion and the patient receives ulcerogenic agents. Endoscopic examination should be performed prior to any definitive surgical procedure in all patients with Zenker's diverticulum. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:16895291

  10. Direct observation of defect structure in protein crystals by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Devaud, G; Furcinitti, P S; Fleming, J C; Lyon, M K; Douglas, K

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the structure of S-layers isolated from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From the AFM images, we were able to directly observe individual dimers of the crystal, defects in the crystal structure, and twin boundaries. We have identified two types of boundaries, one defined by a mirror plane and the other by a glide plane. This work shows that twin boundaries are highly structured regions that are directly related to the organization of units within each crystal domain. Projection maps from TEM images have shown that there are significant differences in the final average maps has allowed us to relate high magnification views obtained by AFM to the relatively high resolution information obtained by electron microscopy and image processing. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:1420904

  11. A monoclonal antibody to the human c-erbB3 protein stimulates the anchorage-independent growth of breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, T.; Gullick, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    The c-erbB3 protein is a member of the type I growth factor receptor family. It has a widespread pattern of expression in normal tissues and is overexpressed in about 20% of breast cancers. We have raised a specific monoclonal antibody, called SGP1, against the extracellular domain of c-erbB3 which recognises the native form of the protein. The monoclonal antibody was found to modestly but significantly stimulate the anchorage-independent cloning efficiency of the breast tumour cell lines BT483 and T47D, both of which express the c-erbB3 protein. No effect was observed on 293 cells lacking expression, nor did a control isotype-matched antibody promote the growth of any of the cells tested. These results suggest that the c-erbB3 protein may normally act as a growth factor receptor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:8080731

  12. Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Hemrend, Bernard; Altuna, Gurkan; Tompson, Bryan

    1989-01-01

    The authors of this article offer an introduction to the field of orthodontics. They present the latest advances in orthodontic appliances and some of the possible consequences of orthodontic treatment. They discuss a number of cases and offer examples of some of the more common problems that the orthodontist is asked to treat. Such cases include severe Class II, division 1 malocclusion, surgical orthodontics, “long-face” syndrome, adult orthodontics-TMJ-periodontics, late adult growth, and post-retention changes. Practical information useful to the physician who encounters patient with these disorders is balanced with good research data to support the various claims. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:21249042

  13. Confirmation of destruction of salmonellae within murine peritoneal exudate cells by immunocytochemical technique.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, F R; Hsu, H S; Mumaw, V R; Moncure, C W

    1989-01-01

    A procedure was developed with which peritoneal exudate cell (PEC) preparations were fixed in a glutaraldehyde-picric acid mixture, post-fixed with osmium tetroxide, embedded in LR White resin and then stained with immunogold probe. It provided tissue sections showing both well-defined ultrastructures as well as specifically labelled Salmonella O antigens by electron microscopy. Inbred, male C57BL/6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with 2 x 10(7) virulent Salmonella typhimurium. Peritoneal exudate cells were harvested at 16 and 20 hr after infection. Disintegrating intracellular bacteria were identified as salmonellae by the immunogold markers. Deposition of gold particles in the cytoplasm of phagocytes also indicated that intracellular debris contained digested pathogen. This investigation therefore confirms previous findings of the destruction of salmonellae within inflammatory polymorphs and macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:2668159

  14. Tissue and Subcellular Localization of Enzymes Catabolizing (R)-Amygdalin in Mature Prunus serotina Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Elisabeth; Li, Chun Ping; Poulton, Jonathan E.

    1992-01-01

    In black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) homogenates, (R)-amygdalin is catabolized to HCN, benzaldehyde, and d-glucose by the sequential action of amygdalin hydrolase, prunasin hydrolase, and mandelonitrile lyase. The tissue and subcellular localizations of these enzymes were determined within intact black cherry seeds by direct enzyme analysis, immunoblotting, and colloidal gold immunocytochemical techniques. Taken together, these procedures showed that the two β-glucosidases are restricted to protein bodies of the procambium, which ramifies throughout the cotyledons. Although amygdalin hydrolase occurred within the majority of procambial cells, prunasin hydrolase was confined to the peripheral layers of this meristematic tissue. Highest levels of mandelonitrile lyase were observed in the protein bodies of the cotyledonary parenchyma cells, with lesser amounts in the procambial cell protein bodies. The residual endosperm tissue had insignificant levels of amygdalin hydrolase, prunasin hydrolase, and mandelonitrile lyase. Images Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:16652960

  15. Comparative late effects of X-rays and negative pimesons on the mouse kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, S. W.; Yuhas, J. M.; Key, C. R.; Hogstrom, K. R.; Butler, J. L.; Kligerman, M. M.

    1979-01-01

    A system is described for comparing various modalities and fractionation schedules of radiation by means of their long-term morphologic effects upon the mouse kidney. The comparison system utilizes a grading scale for histopathologic changes in which a given histologic grade depends upon meeting defined threshold criteria, rather than quantitation of a particular measurement. Renal tubular alterations served as the basis for comparison, since they appeared more reliably defined than glomerular changes. The radiation dose that induced a specific threshold effect in kidneys from 50% of the animals at 6 months was defined as the effective dose-50%, or ED50.ED50 was found for x-rays and negative pimesons administered in 1, 2, or 5 fractions. From these data, the relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) of negative pi-mesons with respect to x-rays was determined for each fractionation schedule. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:525675

  16. Trauma on the Isle of Man.

    PubMed Central

    Hackney, R G; Varley, G; Stevens, D; Green, A

    1993-01-01

    The Isle of Man Tourist Trophy motorcycle races remain one of the most popular venues for motorcycle races. This is despite the reduced status of the event. The reason for the loss of world championship and formula one status is the nature of the road racing circuit itself. The twisting narrow roads are only closed to the public at certain times during the practice and race weeks. Motorcycling visitors to the event attempt to emulate their heroes on machines capable of high speeds. Casualties from both visitors and racers are dealt with efficiently by an expanded medical service. This includes the use of an aeromedical evacuation helicopter. Casualties from the visitors exceeded those from the racers themselves during the period reported. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8457818

  17. Giant Cell Tumor (Osteoclastoma) of the Petrous Bone

    PubMed Central

    Spallone, Aldo; Flores, Gerardo Lopez; Zaldivar, Luis Ochoa; Estupinan, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    A case of a basal middle fossa giant cell tumor occurring in a 46-year-old man is described. The lesion appeared at the computed tomography (CT) scan examination as an hypodense mass with a peripheral “ring-like” enhancement, and no evident erosion of the skull base. The tumor, which infiltrated the basal temporal parenchyma, was removed via a temporal transzygomatic craniotomy, and extensive drilling of the petrous bone. Despite the occurrence, of significant postoperative complications, the patient ultimately showed a good clinical outcome, with no signs of recurrence at the 1-year follow-up CT scanning. The clinical and diageostic aspects and the management policy, of this rare lesion are discussed. Imagesp156-aFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171132

  18. The Middle Fossa Transpetrous Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nassif, Paul S.; Hankinson, Hal L.; Horn, Karl L.

    1997-01-01

    Surgical access to lesions of the temporal bone anterior to the internal auditory canal and medial to the petrous carotid artery has concerned surgeons for nearly a century. A variety of approaches have been developed to gain access to this region. We report our experience with the middle fossa transpetrous approach for the treatment of a variety of petroclival and/or prepontine lesions. Tentorial transection and the retrolabyrinthine approach to extend this technique is also discussed. In properly selected cases, the middle fossa transpetrous approach is successful in maintaining hearing, labyrinthine and facial function without compromising surgical exposure. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11 PMID:17171001

  19. Lymphadenopathy in macaques experimentally infected with the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV).

    PubMed Central

    Chalifoux, L. V.; Ringler, D. J.; King, N. W.; Sehgal, P. K.; Desrosiers, R. C.; Daniel, M. D.; Letvin, N. L.

    1987-01-01

    A T-cell tropic lentivirus of macaques the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), has morphologic, growth, and antigenic properties that indicate that it is related to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the etiologic agent of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in humans. Six juvenile macaques developed persistent lymphadenopathy (greater than 3 months in duration) after inoculation with SIV. The histologic appearance of the lymph nodes was characterized by marked follicular hyperplasia with abundant proliferative B cells infiltrating into the paracortex. The number of T8-positive lymphocytes equaled or exceeded the number of T4-positive lymphocytes in the paracortex. These findings, in association with immunologic abnormalities and a previously observed fatal immunodeficiency syndrome in SIV-infected macaques, provide further evidence of the importance of SIV-induced disease in macaques as a model for the study of AIDS. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3037910

  20. A study of guanidinobenzoatase during development of mesothelioma induced in the rat by fibrous erionite.

    PubMed Central

    Steven, F. S.; Hill, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Exposure to the fibrous mineral erionite is known to induce mesothelioma in man and laboratory animals. Previous studies demonstrated the presence of a trypsin-like protease associated with tumour cells. This protease could be demonstrated by the use of fluorescent probes which located cells possessing this enzyme. We have employed this fluorescent probe technique to follow the early events in the lungs of rats exposed to erionite. The evidence presented shows that the mesothelial cells initially lack this enzyme but the enzyme can be detected within hours of exposure of the rat to erionite. The number of mesothelial cells possessing the enzyme steadily increased after a single exposure to the mineral until the animal finally died with a massive pleural tumour. This is the first study of such fluorescent probes in the early stages of tumour induction. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2851310

  1. Musical Stimulation in the Developmentally Delayed Child: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nanelle Lavina; Molnar, Eva T.; Knasel, Anne L.

    1987-01-01

    Music is a convenient way of bypassing barriers of communication and eliciting responses that may be helpful in the diagnoses and treatment of illness. The use of background music in elevators, in doctors' offices, and in stores are good examples of how music can be used to affect the subconscious mind. In this pilot study drums were used to better define the effects of particular elements of music and sound. When repetitive rhythms are presented as background music to a group of severely developmentally delayed children, three out of four subjects show a definite change in level of development in the unstructured task of free drawing. To discover more about the effects of the various elements of music and to better identify patterns in the environment that are conducive to optimal functioning, further studies are indicated. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:2468780

  2. Maggots, mutilations and myth: Patterns of postmortem scavenging of the bovine carcass

    PubMed Central

    Nation, P. Nick; Williams, Elisabeth S.

    1989-01-01

    Based upon what is known about the habits of common carrion eaters in Alberta, we review the patterns of postmortem scavenging of carcasses of cattle. We then compare with these patterns those reported in the lay press and by veterinarians investigating cattle mutilations in Alberta. We conclude that the so-called “mutilation” of cattle in Alberta was due to scavenging of carcasses and further conclude that claims of human involvement in such incidents require, as a first condition, that postmortem scavenging of the carcass be excluded. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11. PMID:17423422

  3. S-100 protein in soft-tissue tumors derived from Schwann cells and melanocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Stefansson, K.; Wollmann, R.; Jerkovic, M.

    1982-01-01

    In soft tissues outside the central nervous system, S-100 protein is found normally only in Schwann cells. Using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunohistochemical method S-100 was also found in tumors derived from Schwann cells and melanocytes, including neurofibromas, neurilemomas, granular cell myoblastomas, cutaneous nevi, and malignant melanomas. S-100 was not detected in malignant Schwannomas, neuroblastomas, oat cell carcinomas, medullary carcinomas of the thyroid, paragangliomas, or meningiomas. S-100 was also absent from neoplasms of soft tissues not usually considered to arise from cells of neural crest origin. S-100 appears to be a useful marker for identifying neoplasms derived from Schwann cells and melanocytes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:6278936

  4. Exposure to atmospheric radon.

    PubMed Central

    Steck, D J; Field, R W; Lynch, C F

    1999-01-01

    We measured radon (222Rn) concentrations in Iowa and Minnesota and found that unusually high annual average radon concentrations occur outdoors in portions of central North America. In some areas, outdoor concentrations exceed the national average indoor radon concentration. The general spatial patterns of outdoor radon and indoor radon are similar to the spatial distribution of radon progeny in the soil. Outdoor radon exposure in this region can be a substantial fraction of an individual's total radon exposure and is highly variable across the population. Estimated lifetime effective dose equivalents for the women participants in a radon-related lung cancer study varied by a factor of two at the median dose, 8 mSv, and ranged up to 60 mSv (6 rem). Failure to include these doses can reduce the statistical power of epidemiologic studies that examine the lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9924007

  5. Melanoma in Black Patients

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    Melanoma in black patients is uncommon but not rare. This paper reports six cases seen in one general surgeon's practice in Arkansas during a 14-year period. A review of the current literature regarding melanoma in blacks is given. Characteristically, melanoma in blacks is found on the soles of the feet, palms of the hands, or mucous membranes. The tumor has a deadly potential unless it is treated at an early stage; four of the patients reported have died of metastatic disease. A public health program is needed to make physicians and the public aware of the incidence and location of this tumor. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:7120473

  6. Chloroplast Structure and Function Is Altered in the NCS2 Maize Mitochondrial Mutant 1

    PubMed Central

    Roussell, Deborah L.; Thompson, Deborah L.; Pallardy, Steve G.; Miles, Donald; Newton, Kathleen J.

    1991-01-01

    The nonchromosomal stripe 2 (NCS2) mutant of maize (Zea mays L.) has a DNA rearrangement in the mitochondrial genome that segregates with the abnormal growth phenotype. Yet, the NCS2 characteristic phenotype includes striped sectors of pale-green tissue on the leaves. This suggests a chloroplast abnormality. To characterize the chloroplasts present in the mutant sectors, we examined the chloroplast structure by electron microscopy, chloroplast function by radiolabeled carbon dioxide fixation and fluorescence induction kinetics, and thylakoid protein composition by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The data from these analyses suggest abnormal or prematurely arrested chloroplast development. Deleterious effects of the NCS2 mutant mitochondria upon the cells of the leaf include structural and functional alterations in the both the bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:16668157

  7. Monocyte/macrophage-specific monoclonal antibody Ki-M1 recognizes interdigitating reticulum cells.

    PubMed Central

    Radzun, H. J.; Parwaresch, M. R.; Feller, A. C.; Hansmann, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, Ki-M1, was produced, and its immunoreactivity was tested by light and electron-microscopic immunohistochemistry. Ki-M1 was found to react with monocytes, cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), interdigitating reticulum cells (IDC), and the so-called indeterminate dendritic cells of lymphoid tissue. No reactivity was seen in other human tissues or other hematopoietic cells, including granulocytes and cells of the unstimulated promyelocyte cell line HL-60. Thus, Ki-M1 is the first of the monoclonal antibodies to MPS cells to react with both human IDC and MPS cells. This suggests that IDC and MPS cells may have a common cytogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:6391190

  8. Rearrangements of T-cell antigen receptor gamma and delta chain genes are detected in the long-term cultured bone marrow cells of athymic nude mice but not in those of euthymic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikai, Y; Takeda, Y; Ohga, S; Kishihara, K; Matsuzaki, G; Nomoto, K

    1989-01-01

    We have previously shown that extrathymic rearrangements of T-cell receptor (TcR) gamma and delta chain genes occur in the peripheral lymphoid tissues of athymic nude mice. To further determine where the TcR gene rearrangements occur in nude mice, we investigated the rearrangement and expression of the TcR genes in the long-term cultured bone marrow (LTBM) cells which were homogenous in developments without mature T cells as assessed by FACS analysis. The LTBM derived from euthymic mice contained TcR gamma and delta chain genes in germline configuration, while gene rearrangements of both locus were detected in the LTBM cells from nude mice. These results suggested that gamma and delta gene rearrangements do occur in the bone marrow cells of nude mice and that the T-cell precursors in bone marrow may be increased in frequency in such animals. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2541071

  9. Thy-1 antigen: selective association in lymphoid organs with the vascular basement membrane involved in lymphocyte recirculation.

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, M A; Morris, R J

    1980-01-01

    The cell surface differentiation antigen, Thy-1, was demonstrated by immunofluorescence to be associated with collagen-based connective tissue (mainly basement membrane) around some blood vessels in rat lymphoid organs. This association is highly selective: only certain types of blood vessel within a given lymphoid organ were found to be Thy-1+; and different lymphoid organs (thymus, bone marrow, lymph node and spleen) had characteristic differences in the types of blood vessel that bear Thy-1. In lymph node and spleen the vessels that were Thy-1+ were those involved in lymphocyte recirculation and homing (post-capillary venules and arterioles of white pulp); the possibility that Thy-1 may function in mediating selective adhesion of small lymphocytes to extracellular substrates during recirculation is discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:6991398

  10. Manipulation of individual viruses: friction and mechanical properties.

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, M R; Washburn, S; Superfine, R; Finch, M; Brooks, F P; Chi, V; Taylor, R M

    1997-01-01

    We present our results on the manipulation of individual viruses using an advanced interface for atomic force microscopes (AFMs). We show that the viruses can be dissected, rotated, and translated with great facility. We interpret the behavior of tobacco mosaic virus with a mechanical model that makes explicit the competition between sample-substrate lateral friction and the flexural rigidity of the manipulated object. The manipulation behavior of tobacco mosaic virus on graphite is shown to be consistent with values of lateral friction observed on similar interfaces and the flexural rigidity expected for macromolecular assemblies. The ability to manipulate individual samples broadens the scope of possible studies by providing a means for positioning samples at specific binding sites or predefined measuring devices. The mechanical model provides a framework for interpreting quantitative measurements of virus binding and mechanical properties and for understanding the constraints on the successful, nondestructive AFM manipulation of delicate samples. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 PMID:9138585

  11. Chemotherapy of eyelid and peritorbital tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Luxenberg, M N; Guthrie, T H

    1985-01-01

    Eight patients with nine histologically proven BCC or SCC involving the eyelids and periorbital tissues were treated with systemic and/or local (iontophoresis) chemotherapy using cisplatin and doxorubicin. All patients had either refused surgery, would have required extensive procedures, or had medical problems contraindicating surgery. Systemic chemotherapy induced a CR or PR in eight of nine lesions. No patient has required maintenance chemotherapy and no significant toxic side effects were encountered. The length of follow-up ranges from 2 to 50 months. Iontophoretic therapy with cisplatin was used to treat five small foci of new, recurrent or persistent tumor(s) in three of these patients, and resulted in a partial response in all five lesions. Systemic or local chemotherapy offers an alternative to current standard forms of treatment for BCC and SCC in selected cases. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:3832525

  12. Recurrent Pneumothorax Associated with a Pulmonary Emphysematous Bulla in a Dog: Surgical Correction and Proposed Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stogdale, L.; O'Connor, C.D.; Williams, M.C.; Smuts, M.M.S.

    1982-01-01

    A three year old dog was affected with recurrent dyspnea for two months, due to a recurrent pneumothorax. This followed an episode of mild blunt trauma to the thorax and transient strangulation. Conservative therapy of aspiration of air by repeated thoracentesis gave only temporary relief. Thoracic radiographs indicated the presence of a bulla in the right middle lung lobe. An exploratory thoracotomy confirmed the diagnosis, and a lobectomy was successfully performed. The pathogenesis of acquired pulmonary bullae is postulated. Reasons for the predisposition of the right middle lung lobe are outlined. These are related to the anatomy of the right middle bronchus, and include its position between the right pulmonary artery and vein, its oval shape, and the absence of cartilagenous support at its origin. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:17422186

  13. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB-mediated phosphorylation of PDGF beta receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Coats, S R; Love, H D; Pledger, W J

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates the proliferation of Balb/c-3T3 fibroblasts through binding and subsequent activation of PDGF receptors. Activation of the PDGF receptors has been proposed to involve receptor dimerization. PDGF-AB has been shown to bind PDGF alpha and beta receptor subunits to form PDGF alpha beta and alpha alpha receptor dimers. In this paper we demonstrate that, following the down-regulation of PDGF alpha receptors, the binding of PDGF-AB to beta receptors occurred at 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C. PDGF-AB stimulated the phosphorylation of PDGF beta receptor monomers in cells depleted of PDGF alpha receptors by prior exposure to PDGF-AA. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8297345

  14. Operant psychology goes to the fair: Marian and Keller Breland in the popular press, 1947-1966

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Robert E.; Gillaspy, J. Arthur

    2005-01-01

    Marian and Keller Breland pioneered the application of operant psychology to commercial animal training during the 1940s and 1950s. The Brelands' story is relatively unknown in the history of behavior analysis. Using information from the Breland-Bailey papers, this paper describes the development and activities of Animal Behavior Enterprises (ABE), the Brelands' animal training business. We also review popular press coverage of the Brelands between 1947 and 1966 to investigate the level of public exposure to ABE-trained animals and to the principles and methods of operant psychology. An examination of 308 popular print articles featuring the Brelands indicates that there was public exposure of behavior analysis through the popular press coverage of ABE-trained animals. Furthermore, the expansion of operant methods to the marine mammal and bird training industries can be linked to the Brelands' mass media exposure. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:22478446

  15. The need for water quality criteria for frogs.

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, R; Grue, C E

    1995-01-01

    Amphibians are considered reliable indicators of environmental quality. In the western United States, a general decline of frog populations parallels an apparent worldwide decline. The factors thought to be contributing to declines in frog populations include habitat loss, introduction of exotic species, overexploitation, disease, climate change, and decreasing water quality. With respect to water quality, agroecosystems use 80-90% of the water resources in the western United States, frequently resulting in highly eutrophic conditions. Recent investigations suggest that these eutrophic conditions (elevated pH, water temperature, and un-ionized ammonia) may be associated with frog embryo mortality or malformations. However, water quality criteria for frogs and other amphibians do not currently exist. Here, we briefly review data that support the need to develop water quality parameters for frogs in agroecosystems and other habitats. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 5. PMID:7607135

  16. PubMed Central

    Teuscher, E.; Lamothe, P.; Tellier, P.; Lavallée, J. -C.

    1982-01-01

    A toxic nephrosis in calves treated with a drug containing tetracycline degradation products Tetracyclines may prove to be toxic, especially when they are administered in excessive quantity. Toxicity and high mortality were experienced in calves that had been given the recommended dose of a drug which accidentally contained tetracycline degradation products, namely: 4-epianhydrotetracycline, epitetracycline and anhydrotetracycline. Lesions of acute and subacute nephrosis were observed. In calves dying rapidly, an abnormal coloration of skeletal muscles, myocardium and brain was also noted on postmortem examination, and a degeneration of the liver was evident. As the calves were already sick when they received the drug, dehydration and other pathogenic factors might have worsened their condition. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:17422199

  17. Jugular Foramen Arteriovenous Shunt with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rodesch, G.; Comoy, J.; Hurth, M.; Lasjaunias, P.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 37-year-old man with an extracerebral arteriovenous fistula at the skull base, revealed by subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage. The malformation was fed by the neuromeningeal trunk of the ascending pharyngeal artery and drained into left laterobulbar veins. Embolization with bucrylate was performed and occluded totally the shunting zone. A 1-year follow-up angiogram confirmed the good stability of the result, the patient being asymptomatic. This case emphasizes the quality of results that can be obtained with bucrylate in arterioverious fistulas presenting with hemorrhage. It confirms that the external carotid artery must be studied when dealing with intracranial hemorrhage. On the other hand, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography may depict vascular abnormalities but do not always indicate the shunting area, thus the pathologic type of the malformation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 5p136-b PMID:17170835

  18. Persistent or Slow Viral Infections and Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Adams, John M.

    1975-01-01

    The discovery of persistent transmissible agents by veterinarians has led to striking advances in the infectious cause of neuropathies of human beings. There is evidence for persisting infection in congenital rubella and the herpes group of viruses including cytomegalovirus infections. Hepatitis types A and B are candidates for inclusion in the category of persisting viral infections. The rubeola or measles virus is established as a persistent virus which causes elevated antibodies in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of many patients with severe demyelinating disease such as subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis. Elevated antibodies against vaccinia virus have been found in the cerebrospinal fluid of some patients with multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica, a rare form of multiple sclerosis. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:165638

  19. Delineation of a contiguous gene syndrome with multiple exostoses, enlarged parietal foramina, craniofacial dysostosis, and mental retardation, caused by deletions in the short arm of chromosome 11.

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, O.; Wuyts, W.; Van Hul, W.; Hecht, J. T.; Meinecke, P.; Hogue, D.; Werner, W.; Zabel, B.; Hinkel, G. K.; Powell, C. M.; Shaffer, L. G.; Willems, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    A contiguous gene syndrome due to deletions of the proximal short arm of chromosome 11 is described in eight patients belonging to four families. The main clinical features are multiple exostoses, enlarged parietal foramina, craniofacial dysostosis, and mental retardation. The patients have cytogenetic and/or molecular deletions of chromosome 11p11-p13. These deletions are located between the centromere and D11S914 in a region of approximately 20cM. The present study confirms the presence of a multiple exostoses gene on chromosome 11p. Furthermore, it suggests that the gene for isolated foramina parietalie permagna and genes associated with craniofacial dysostosis and mental retardation reside in the same chromosomal region. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8644736

  20. A morphologic study of unexplained hepatitis following halothane anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Wills, E. J.; Walton, B.

    1978-01-01

    A survey of postoperative jaundice throughout the United Kingdom allowed the detailed analysis of 76 patients with unexplained hepatitis following halothane anesthesia ("halothane hepatitis"). In 16 patients liver biopsy specimens were examined by light and/or electron microscopy to determine whether the liver morphology could aid the differentiation between "halothane" and "acute viral" hepatitis. The mitochondrial changes often claimed to be characteristic of holothane hepatitis were unremarkable in our patients. Since lipid vacuolation and a predominantly centrilobular distribution of necrosis are not classically described in fatal viral hepatitis, the presence of these features in some of our fatal cases was of some diagnostic interest. In general, however, the results of light and electron microscopy in patients with unexplained postoperative hepatitis is considered to have little differential diagnositc value. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:645815

  1. Ultrasonographic scan in knee pain in athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, N; Regine, R; Carrillo, F; Minelli, S; Beaconsfield, T

    1992-01-01

    Fifty-two knees were examined using real-time high-definition ultrasonography with a 7.5 MHz probe. The extra-articular structures were easily visualized and diagnosis of patellar tendon lesions and Baker's cysts formulated. While the meniscal cartilages were shown as a homogeneous triangular structure between the femoral condyle and the tibial plateau, no lesions were detected. Deeper intra-articular structures, such as the cruciate ligaments, were not shown by the scan, thus their evaluation was not possible. Given its low cost, wide availability, non-invasiveness and patients' acceptability of the technique, ultrasonography may play an important role in the diagnosis of soft tissue lesions in and around the knee joint. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:1623366

  2. Insects and Spiders: Infestations and Bites

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, E.W.T.

    1987-01-01

    Despite successful eradication techniques and specific effective therapies, insect bites and infestations remain a source of great human misery. The current scabies pandemic shows no signs of abating. Bed bugs, which through the ages have been second only to the malarial mosquito as an insect vector of fatal infection, have now been implicated in the transmission of Hepatitis B and possibly African acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The incidence of head- and pubic lice is on the rise, the latter paralleling, and often co-existing with, other sexually transmitted diseases. Black widow spiders are native to many populous areas in southern Canada, and the brown recluse spider's range now encompasses Canada, thanks to moving vans and central heating. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21263961

  3. Epidural Abscess Masquerading as Lateral Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Brodner, David C.; Cutler, Jeff; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Amedee, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    Controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants, the evacuation of the sinus, or the use of medical treatment alone surrounds the treatment of lateral sinus thrombosis. Treatment of an epidural abscess associated with coalescent mastoiditis is much less controversial-drainage is usually recommended. The differing treatments of these complications mandate accurate diagnosis. The advent of more sophisticated radiological studies has facilitated diagnosis of these complications; however, tests are not infallible. We present three cases in which preoperative imaging demonstrates an epidural abscess mimicking lateral sinus thrombosis by compression of the vessel. A false-positive computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study may lead to the wrong diagnosis and, consequently, improper treatment. In light of this possibility, we recommend surgical exploration in all such cases. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171148

  4. Novel ways to noninvasively detect inflammation of the myocardium: contrast-enhanced MRI and myocardial contrast echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    van den Brink, M.R.; Geluk, C.A.; Lindner, J.R.; Velthuis, B.K.; Vonken, E.J.; Cramer, M.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Both contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) and myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) are promising tools to detect cardiac inflammation. CE-MRI can be used to characterise the location and extent of myocardial inflammation, since areas of abnormal signal enhancement associated with regional wall motion abnormalities reliably indicate areas of active myocarditis. In MCE, chemically composed microbubbles can be visualised by ultrasound and used to determine the status of the cardiac microvasculature. If there is any inflammation the microbubbles will be phagocytosed by neutrophils and monocytes, thus enabling the degree of inflammation to be assessed. These noninvasive techniques may allow early diagnosis and accurate evaluation of myocardial inflammation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696203

  5. Multiple tumor types appear in a transgenic mouse with the ras oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Cardiff, R. D.; Leder, A.; Kuo, A.; Pattengale, P. K.; Leder, P.

    1993-01-01

    A transgenic mouse strain with the zeta-globin promoter and the vHa-ras oncogene develops an array of mesenchymal and epithelial neoplasms described here. The predominate mesenchymal tumors were dermal spindle cell tumors, which resembled malignant fibrous histiocytomas found in humans. They were associated with hepatosplenomegaly and developed beneath squamous papillomas. The hepatosplenomegaly was associated with infiltrates of cells that tended toward myelocytic or monocytic differentiation. Other epithelial tumors included keratoacanthomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Squamous cysts, some with squamous cell carcinomas, of the salivary glands and mammary carcinomas were also found. Odontogenic tumors, which sometimes differentiated into ameloblastomas, were one of the more unusual tumor types observed. Other, less frequent tumors were also noted. The tumors described here are a potentially valuable experimental resource that may lead to an understanding of malignant fibrous histiocytoma-like lesions, odontogenic tumors, and tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8475993

  6. A Malaysian Experience with Animal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Little, P. B.

    1979-01-01

    The report summarizes a one year period of investigation of death losses in West Malaysian livestock. Lesions and etiological agents are mentioned for cattle, sheep, goats, swine, poultry and companion animals as well as some miscellaneous species. Special observations related to a common paramphistome induced hepatic biliary infestation in cattle, a serious malignant head catarrh outbreak in which possible cattle to cow aerosol transmission occurred. Trismus observed in some cattle with malignant head catarrh was associated with arteriolitis and ganglioneuritis of the V cranial nerve. Parasitic, bacterial, viral toxic and neoplastic diseases are recorded in the various species. The occurrence of fatal chronic fluorosis in laboratory guinea pigs and cerebral nematodiasis in a Thoroughbred racehorse are documented. ImagesFigure 1.FIGURE 2.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 4.FIGURE 5.FIGURE 6.FIGURE 7.FIGURE 8.FIGURE 9.FIGURE 10.FIGURE 11. PMID:761153

  7. Sacroiliac joint pain due to bacterial infection: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Burns, SH; Mierau, DR; Howlett, E

    1995-01-01

    Isolated infection of the sacroiliac joint is a rare cause of low back pain. Delayed diagnosis can result in significant morbidity. The diagnosis may be missed initially if physicians do not consider the possibility of infection. The clinical index of suspicion should increase in the presence of certain historical and examination findings. These include intravenous drug use, immunosuppression, recent infection elsewhere, fever and warmth or swelling over the sacroiliac joint. Two cases of sacroiliac joint pain due to Staphylococcus aureus infection are presented, with an overview of the etiology, diagnosis and management of the disorder. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6(a)Figure 6(b)Figure 7Figure 8

  8. Paralaryngeal Abscess with Laryngeal Hemiplegia and Fistulation in a Horse

    PubMed Central

    Barber, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    A three year old Thoroughbred filly was examined because of bilateral nasal discharge and external swelling of the left laryngeal area. Endoscopy revealed an enlarged left arytenoid cartilage, left laryngeal hemiplegia and drainage of purulent material into the lumen of the larynx. Radiographs showed a large fluid and gas filled cavity overlying the caudal larynx and cranial trachea. Surgical drainage and debridement of the abscess led to complete healing by secondary intention. Laryngeal ventriculectomy was performed as a treatment for left laryngeal hemiplegia, but a grave prognosis for respiratory soundness was given due to the extensive laryngeal fibrosis. The etiology of the Staphylococcus aureus abscess is unknown but may have originated from oral trauma to the larynx. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:7337917

  9. Intraoperative Cranial Nerve Monitoring During Posterior Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kartush, Jack M.; LaRouere, Michael J.; Graham, Malcolm D.; Bouchard, Kenneth R.; Audet, Blaise V.

    1991-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of neurophysiologic function is rapidly evolving as an important adjunct during skull base surgery to reduce the incidence of neurologic deficit. Facial nerve monitoring is an excellent model, since electrical and mechanical evoked potentials can be directly presented to the surgeon in real-time through an acoustic loudspeaker display. The lower cranial nerves may also be monitored using similar electromyographic techniques. Auditory system monitoring is more difficult due to the low amplitude response that requires averaging and filtering to extract the evoked potential. In conjunction with auditory monitoring, improved hearing preservation may be further enhanced by concomitant facial nerve monitoring, since the surgeon is alerted to traumatic manipulations that may affect both facial and cochlear nerves. Techniques and interpretative issues are presented to maximize the efficacy and safety of cranial nerve monitoring. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5 PMID:17170827

  10. The epidemiology of prescribing in an urban general practice

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The total prescribing in an urban general practice was recorded over a six-month period and classified according to the length of time that drugs were continued. The number of patients receiving any prescription rose with age, as did the total number of items per patient prescribed for; while the continued items rose with age, the number of items prescribed once only per patient remained constant in all age groups. The bulk of the total prescribing was for the elderly and this was mainly for continued items. The classification also shows that certain drug groups are liable to be continued whereas others are virtually always prescribed once only. The implications of these findings for self-audit of prescribing and the care of the elderly in general practice are discussed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:7452600

  11. Occupational exposure to polychlorinated dioxins, polychlorinated furans, polychlorinated biphenyls, and biphenylenes after an electrical panel and transformer accident in an office building in Binghamton, NY.

    PubMed Central

    Schecter, A; Tiernan, T

    1985-01-01

    A polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and tri- and tetrachlorinated benzene-containing electrical transformer was involved in an explosion and fire in a modern office building in Binghamton, New York, on February 5, 1981. Because of an unusual system of air shafts the entire building and adjacent garage became contaminated with toxic chemicals. Polychlorinated dioxins, furans, and biphenylenes were formed as pyrolytic by-products. Before the extent of the chemical contamination was appreciated workers were exposed to these chemicals. Four years after the explosion and after the expenditure of over $22 million for cleaning and other expenses, the building remains closed. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. PMID:3928358

  12. Morphological and morphometric study of atrial specific granules and other secretory components in dogs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Caliari, M. V.; Lana, M.; Leite, V. H.; Tafuri, W. L.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in blood volume can induce morphometric and morphological alterations in the secretory complex of the myoendocrine cells due to the stretching of atrial walls. These alterations were studied by electron microscopy, using dogs infected intraperitonially with Trypanosoma cruzi and necropsied during the acute phase of the infection when congestive heart failure was present. Several changes were observed in the myoendocrine cells of the heart: hypertrophy and hyperplasia of rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex, increase in telenuclear secretory complex, increase in fusion of type B atrial specific granules (ASG), decrease of the total number of ASG, enlargement of the maximum diameter of type A ASG and a relative increase in the number of type B ASG. These alterations suggest a larger secretory activity of the atrial myoendocrine cells with a larger secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7547444

  13. A functional marker centromere with no detectable alpha-satellite, satellite III, or CENP-B protein: activation of a latent centromere?

    PubMed Central

    Voullaire, L E; Slater, H R; Petrovic, V; Choo, K H

    1993-01-01

    We report the investigation of an unusual human supernumerary marker chromosome 10 designated "mar del(10)." This marker is present together with two other marker chromosomes in the karyotype of a boy with mild developmental delay. It has a functional centromere at a primary constriction and is mitotically stable. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using alpha-satellite and satellite III DNA as probes failed to detect any signal at the primary constriction site. CENP-B protein could not be demonstrated, although the presence of at least some centromeric proteins was confirmed using a CREST antiserum. Consideration of these and other cytogenetic and FISH results supports a mechanism of formation of the mar del(10) chromosome involving the activation of a latent intercalary centromere at 10q25. Images Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7684888

  14. Analysis of breast milk to assess exposure to chlorinated contaminants in Kazakstan: high levels of 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in agricultural villages of southern Kazakstan.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, K; Petreas, M X; Chuvakova, T; Kazbekova, G; Druz, N; Seminova, G; Sharmanov, T; Hayward, D; She, J; Visita, P; Winkler, J; McKinney, M; Wade, T J; Grassman, J; Stephens, R D

    1998-01-01

    To assess levels of chlorinated contaminants in breast milk, we measured organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in breast milk samples collected in 1994 according to the World Health Organization protocol from 92 donors that were representative of regional populations in southern Kazakstan. High levels (10-120 pg/g fat) of 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most toxic of the PCDD/PCDF congeners, were found in breast milk samples from an agricultural region. TCDD was the major contributor (75%) to the international toxicity equivalents of these samples. The same distinctive PCDD/PCDF congener pattern was found in 15 breast milk samples and 4 serum samples collected in 1996 in a follow-up study, and has now been confirmed by three analytical laboratories. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9831540

  15. Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar hardjo type hardjobovis in bovine embryos fertilized in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bielanski, A B; Surujballi, O

    1998-01-01

    The association of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar hardjo type hardjobovis with bovine embryos produced by in vitro fertilization was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Morula stage embryos with an intact zona pellucida (ZP) were exposed to this spirochete for 24 h in culture medium, washed by the standard washing procedure as recommended by the International Embryo Transfer Society, and then examined. SEM showed typical helicoid leptospires on the surface and in the pores of the ZP. TEM showed cross and longitudinal sections of leptospires in the matrix and channels of the ZP, in the perivitelline and intercellular spaces, on the vitellus and in the embryonic cells. Some of the embryos that were penetrated showed damage to the membranes and the cytoplasm. The ineffectiveness of the washing procedure, for the removal of hardjobovis from exposed embryos may be of importance to the industry. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:9684055

  16. Cosmetic Facial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Peter A.

    1987-01-01

    Canadians have committed themselves to a healthier lifestyle, and many are seeking to look as well as they feel. For patients with realistic expectations, modern techniques of cosmetic facial surgery can enhance appearance and be of psychological benefit. Today most procedures can be done under local anesthesia on an out-patient basis. Facial contour defects can be improved by means of procedures such as rhinoplasty, mentoplasty, otoplasty and malarplasty. Facial rejuvenation surgery to decrease the signs of aging includes the forehead lift, eyebrow and eyelid lift, rhytidectomy, liposuction and chemical peeling. Newer controversial trends in cosmetic facial surgery include collagen implantation and fat transfer for contour defects, and eyelid tattooing. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21263984

  17. A historical perspective of thirteen unheralded contributors to medicodental progress.

    PubMed Central

    Dummett, C. O.

    1989-01-01

    Brief highlights of the careers of 13 Afro-American dentists have been presented. Their professional lives demonstrated both a commitment to the advancement of dentistry and a dedication to the betterment of humanity. Of the 13, three spent their professional lives exclusively in dental education, research, and public health. The remaining 10 were dental clinicians who served patients with competence, care, and concern. Additionally, they contributed to dentistry's image and progress by improving medicodental relations, pioneering in university dental education, engaging in philanthropy, qualifying for dental specialties, exerting leadership in dental professional organizations, integrating dentistry in hospital care, solving community health problems, and participating in all aspects of dental journalism. A sizable portion of their energies was expended in enhancing the quality of life in their communities and the nation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:2651678

  18. Umbilical hernia in Xhosa infants and children.

    PubMed Central

    James, T

    1982-01-01

    During the period 12 March 1980 to 10 March 1981 a consecutive series of 1200 Xhosa (Black) infants and young children, ranging in age from the newborn to the prepubertal, who attended the general outpatients department for a variety of medical complaints were examined for umbilical herniation. None had undergone any surgical operation, and patients with conditions possibly associated with umbilical herniation were excluded. Evidence of umbilical protrusion was found in 742 (61.8%), with a similar incidence in males and females. The overall incidence was reflected in each age group by a preponderance of children with umbilical hernia. This study confirms the validity of a generally-held impression that in Black children there is a strong tendency towards the persistence of umbilical hernia when it appears after separation of the cord. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:7086806

  19. From socialist principles to motorcycle maintenance: the origin and development of the salaried physician model in the Israeli Public Health Services, 1918 to 1998.

    PubMed Central

    Shvarts, S; de Leeuw, D L; Granit, S; Benbassat, J

    1999-01-01

    For more than 70 years, physicians in the Israeli health care system have been employed on a fixed salary rather than on a fee-for-service basis. The present report is a brief review of the origin and development of this unique salaried physician model and its effect on the terms of physicians' employment. Archival documents were reviewed. The salaried physician model was introduced to ensure egalitarian health care for patients rather than equal payment for physicians. It was accepted by physicians because it guaranteed their employment and income. However, over the years, the salaried physician model has evolved into a complex wage scale, with multiple fringe benefits that bypass formal agreements in order to reward individual physicians. In addition, the salaried physician model has encouraged illegal private practice, which is viewed today as one of the major problems of the Israeli Public Health Services. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:9949759

  20. Virtual electrodes in cardiac tissue: a common mechanism for anodal and cathodal stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wikswo, J P; Lin, S F; Abbas, R A

    1995-01-01

    Traditional cable analyses cannot explain complex patterns of excitation in cardiac tissue with unipolar, extracellular anodal, or cathodal stimuli. Epifluorescence imaging of the transmembrane potential during and after stimulation of both refractory and excitable tissue shows distinctive regions of simultaneous depolarization and hyperpolarization during stimulation that act as virtual cathodes and anodes. The results confirm bidomain model predictions that the onset (make) of a stimulus induces propagation from the virtual cathode, whereas stimulus termination (break) induces it from the virtual anode. In make stimulation, the virtual anode can delay activation of the underlying tissue, whereas in break stimulation this occurs under the virtual cathode. Thus make and break stimulations in cardiac tissue have a common mechanism that is the result of differences in the electrical anisotropy of the intracellular and extracellular spaces and provides clear proof of the validity of the bidomain model. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8599628

  1. The molecular pathology of progressive symmetric erythrokeratoderma: a frameshift mutation in the loricrin gene and perturbations in the cornified cell envelope.

    PubMed Central

    Ishida-Yamamoto, A; McGrath, J A; Lam, H; Iizuka, H; Friedman, R A; Christiano, A M

    1997-01-01

    The erythrokeratodermas (EKs) are a group of disorders characterized by erythematous plaques associated with variable features that include palmoplantar keratoderma. One type of EK is known as "progressive symmetric erythrokeratoderma" (PSEK). We studied members of a family of Japanese origin in which the index case with PSEK had had well-demarcated nonmigratory erythematous plaques on her extremities since birth. Sequence determination of the loricrin gene revealed an insertion of a C following nucleotide 709. The mutation results in a frameshift that changes the terminal 91 amino acids in the wild-type polypeptide into missense amino acids and adds 65 additional residues. This further implicates loricrin defects in the pathogenesis of disorders with palmoplantar keratoderma and pseudoainhum. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9326323

  2. MCM generator: a Java-based tool for generating medical metadata.

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, F.; Hersh, W.

    1998-01-01

    In a previous paper we introduced the need to implement a mechanism to facilitate the discovery of relevant Web medical documents. We maintained that the use of META tags, specifically ones that define the medical subject and resource type of a document, help towards this goal. We have now developed a tool to facilitate the generation of these tags for the authors of medical documents. Written entirely in Java, this tool makes use of the SAPHIRE server, and helps the author identify the Medical Subject Heading terms that most appropriately describe the subject of the document. Furthermore, it allows the author to generate metadata tags for the 15 elements that the Dublin Core considers as core elements in the description of a document. This paper describes the use of this tool in the cataloguing of Web and non-Web medical documents, such as images, movie, and sound files. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9929299

  3. Using 3-D shape models to guide segmentation of MR brain images.

    PubMed Central

    Hinshaw, K. P.; Brinkley, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of medical images poses one of the major challenges in computer vision. Approaches that rely solely on intensity information frequently fail because similar intensity values appear in multiple structures. This paper presents a method for using shape knowledge to guide the segmentation process, applying it to the task of finding the surface of the brain. A 3-D model that includes local shape constraints is fitted to an MR volume dataset. The resulting low-resolution surface is used to mask out regions far from the cortical surface, enabling an isosurface extraction algorithm to isolate a more detailed surface boundary. The surfaces generated by this technique are comparable to those achieved by other methods, without requiring user adjustment of a large number of ad hoc parameters. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9357670

  4. Growth and invasion of human melanomas in human skin grafted to immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Juhasz, I.; Albelda, S. M.; Elder, D. E.; Murphy, G. F.; Adachi, K.; Herlyn, D.; Valyi-Nagy, I. T.; Herlyn, M.

    1993-01-01

    An orthotopic model of human melanoma was developed in which malignant cells were injected into human skin grafted to nude and SCID mice. Melanoma cells proliferated and invaded the human skin grafts with characteristic patterns. Three of six melanomas grew as multiple nodules and infiltered the grafts without major architectural changes in the dermis, whereas the others invaded the dermis along collagen fibers with prominent endothelial vessels. By contrast, melanoma cells inoculated into mouse skin grew as diffusely expanding nodules that did not invade the murine dermis. In human skin grafts, human melanoma cells were angiogenic for human blood vessels, and murine vessels were only found at the periphery of grafts. Tumor cells invaded the human vessels, and four out of seven cell lines metastasized to lungs, suggesting that this model is useful to determine in vivo the interactions between normal and malignant human cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8342600

  5. A structure-effect study of the induction by polyamines of the transport in vitro of the precursor of ornithine transcarbamylase.

    PubMed Central

    Marcote, M J; Corella, D; González-Bosch, C; Hernández-Yago, J

    1994-01-01

    Polyamines induce the transport in vitro of the precursor of ornithine transcarbamylase (pOTC) into isolated rat liver mitochondria by facilitating its functional binding to these organelles. Comparative studies of the effect on the in vitro transport of pOTC of polyamine derivatives and related compounds have allowed us to establish that: (i) at least two protonated amino groups per molecule are necessary to induce the pOTC transport; (ii) a distance of three -CH2- groups between the amino groups in diamines is enough to induce this effect, although no differences were observed with diamines having distances of three to eight -CH2- groups. Longer distances resulted in a marked decrease of the effect. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8198546

  6. The Countess Margaret of Henneberg and her 365 children.

    PubMed Central

    Bondeson, J; Molenkamp, A

    1996-01-01

    According to an obscure medieval legend, the Countess Margaret of Henneberg, a notable Dutch noblewoman, gave birth to 365 children in the year 1276. The haughty Countess had insulted a poor beggar woman carrying twins, since she believed that a pair of twins must have different fathers, and that their mother must be an adultress. She was punished by God, and gave birth to 365 minute children on Good Friday, 1276. The Countess died shortly after, together with her offspring, in the village of Loosduinen near The Hague. The Countess and her numerous brood were frequently described in historical and obstetrical works. To this day, a memorial tablet and two basins, representing those in which the 365 children were baptized, are to be seen in the church of Loosduinen. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9014889

  7. Manipulative management of back pain in patients with spondyloisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, J. D.; Potter, G. E.; Kirkaldy-Willis, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    The authors see a large number of back problems, many with complicating features, and are involved in an ongoing assessment of the effectiveness of various treatment modalities, particularly spinal manipulation. This paper deals with spondylolisthesis. Included is a discussion of the definition, classification, etiology and epidemiology of spondylolisthesis. Pain mechanisms are discussed along with the role of conservative and surgical management. Results are presented in a series of cases managed by manipulative methods. The authors conclude that spinal manipulation is of great value in selected cases of back pain in which there is radiographic evidence of spondylolisthesis. No claim is made that such treatment is influencing the spondylolisthesis itself, but that in most cases the spondylolisthesis is an incidental finding, and no contraindication to manipulative therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10

  8. Cytochromes P450 and species differences in xenobiotic metabolism and activation of carcinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D F; Ioannides, C; Parke, D V

    1998-01-01

    The importance of cytochrome P450 isoforms to species differences in the metabolism of foreign compounds and activation of procarcinogens has been identified. The possible range of P450 isozymes in significant variations in toxicity exhibited by experimental rodent species may have a relevance to chemical risk assessment, especially as human P450s are likely to show changes in the way they metabolize xenobiotics. Consequently, in the safety evaluation of chemicals, we should be cautious in extrapolating results from experimental animal models to humans. This paper focuses on examples in which species differences in P450s lead to significant alterations in carcinogenic response, and includes a discussion of the current procedures for toxicity screening, with an emphasis on short-term tests. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9755138

  9. Radiographic Diagnosis of Intestinal Perforation in Early Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jacob J.; Mikity, Victor G.

    1966-01-01

    Records of 25 patients with intestinal perforation in early infancy who were treated at the Los Angeles County General Hospital in a period of 15 years were reviewed. Sixteen had roentgen evidence of pneumoperitoneum, and nine did not. The mortality rate was 94 per cent in the group with pneumoperitoneum, 78 per cent in the other, and 88 per cent overall. Multiple sites in the gastrointestinal tract were involved, and the causes of the lesions were diverse and frequently obscure. Prematurity, obstetrical and iatrogenic complications, and congenital anomalies were factors often associated with intestinal perforation. Roentgen features appeared to offer the best hope for diagnosis and appropriate treatment. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:5909251

  10. Public health implications of components of plastics manufacture. Flame retardants.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, E M; Liepins, R

    1975-01-01

    The four processes involved in the flammability of materials are described and related to the various flame retardance mechanisms that may operate. Following this the four practical approaches used in improving flame retardance of materials are described. Each approach is illustrated with a number of typical examples of flame retardants or synthetic procedures used. This overview of flammability, flame retardance, and flame retardants used is followed by a more detailed examination of most of the plastics manufactured in the United States during 1973, their consumption patterns, and the primary types of flame retardants used in the flame retardance of the most used plastics. The main types of flame retardants are illustrated with a number of typical commercial examples. Statistical data on flame retardant market size, flame retardant growth in plastics, and price ranges of common flame retardants are presented. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:1175568

  11. Indication for Interstitial Brachytherapy in Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Taylor, Judith; Scott, Joseph C.; Jacobs, Allan J.; Rojas, John

    1984-01-01

    More than 40 patients with gynecological, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal malignancies, both primary and recurrent but confined to the pelvis, were treated with interstitial irradiation over a four-year period. Interstitial irradiation was the choice of treatment for early carcinoma of the prostate, carcinoma of the anal canal less than T2, recurrent carcinoma of the uterine cervix, and carcinoma of the cervical stump. The authors' experience in treating recurrent carcinoma of the uterine cervix with interstitial irradiation is the basis for the indications for selecting the technique of interstitial irradiation presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10 PMID:6471113

  12. Lymphoreticular Lesions in Beef Cattle at an Ontario Abattoir

    PubMed Central

    Herenda, Drago; Dukes, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    During the period April 1983 to March 1986, lymphoreticular lesions in cattle were surveyed at an Ontario abattoir. Postmortem examination of 171,157 cattle revealed macroscopic lesions in 696 animals (0.4%). The most frequent finding was abscessation of a single lymph node, a finding that was observed in 353 cases (50.7% of animals with lesions/0.2% of total slaughter). Actinobacillary granulomas were present in 252 lymph nodes (36.2%/0.1%). Other specific lesions included mycobacteriosis and mycotic or parasitic lymphadenitis. Cases of nonspecific chronic lymphadenitis or granulomas in lymph nodes, pigmentations, malformations, hyperplasia, and neoplasia were also seen. Abscesses were the most common splenic lesions. One animal had localized lymphangiectasia of the epicardium. ImagesFigure 1., Figure 2., Figure 3., Figure 4., Figure 5., Figure 6. PMID:17423120

  13. Neurologic Complications of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Walter R.

    1987-01-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a syndrome requiring unique knowledge of its versatile manifestations for accurate diagnosis and skillfull management of its numerous complications for successful treatment. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III), a replication-complete virus, is now reported as the etiologic agent. The neurologic complications of AIDS cover the spectrum of neurologic diseases and usually have multiple causative factors, all of which should be appropriately managed. These complications can be successfully treated, although constant monitoring is required because recurrence is frequent. The neurologic complications are the second most frequent cause of death in AIDS patients. Tests that are usually reliable in diagnosing neurologic diseases may not be reliable in patients with AIDS. The management of AIDS is a multidisciplinary effort, and the neurologist should fulfill a role in the management team. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:3334059

  14. Rationale of the REPARATOR study

    PubMed Central

    Eefting, F.D.; Cramer, M.J.; Stella, P.R.S.; Rensing, B.J.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    The REPARATOR study is a multicentre clinical trial in which the effect of 80 mg atorvastatin on microvascular (re)perfusion and late ventricular remodelling, and infarct size in patients presenting with an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction is studied. Primary endpoint is end-systolic volume index at three months measured by quantitative cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Secondary endpoints are cardiac MI (CMR) measurements of global and regional left ventricular function, MRI measurements of infarct size on admission, one week and three months as well as changes between MRI investigations, biochemical markers of infarct size, blush grade, and TIMI frame count. A total of 50 patients will be enrolled. Including three months follow-up, the study will last for six months. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696602

  15. Coronary artery fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Said, S.A.M.; Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Fieren, M.J.C.H.; Meijboom, E.J.; van der Werf, T.; Bennink, G.B.W.E.

    2002-01-01

    The aetiology of congenital coronary artery fistulas remains a challenging issue. Coronary arteries with an anatomically normal origin may, for obscure reasons, terminate abnormally and communicate with different single or multiple cardiac chambers or great vessels. When this occurs, the angiographic morphological appearance may vary greatly from discrete channels to plexiform network of vessels. Coronary arteriovenous fistulas (CAVFs) have neither specific signs nor pathognomonic symptoms; the spectrum of clinical features varies considerably. The clinical presentation of symptomatic cases can include angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, fatigue, dyspnoea, CHF, SBE, ventricular and supraventricular tachyarrhythmias or even sudden cardiac death. CAVFs may, however, be a coincidental finding during diagnostic coronary angiography (CAG). CAG is considered the gold standard for diagnosing and delineating the morphological anatomy and pathway of CAVFs. There are various tailored therapeutic modalities for the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of CAVFs, including conservative pharmacological strategy, percutaneous transluminal embolisation and surgical ligation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696067

  16. Effect of verapamil on blood pressure and lesions in heart and kidney of rats made hypertensive by deoxycorticosterone (DOC).

    PubMed Central

    Aguas, A. P.; Nickerson, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of verapamil, a calcium antagonist, was studied in rats treated with deoxycorticosterone (DOC). DOC induced hypertensive cardiovascular disease with accompanying gross and microscopic lesions in heart and kidney. Verapamil administered in the drinking fluid (1% sodium chloride) prevented hypertension and significantly ameliorated the incidence and severity of cardiovascular lesions. With exception of the spleen, verapamil did not prevent renal or myocardial hypertrophy in rats treated with DOC in spite of prevention of hypertension. The level of verapamil in the serum of animals consuming verapamil (0.37 +/- 0.16 microgram/ml) was less than that of the DOC-verapamil group (0.89 +/- 0.16 microgram/ml), although the difference was not significant. These results confirm the efficacy of verapamil in reducing blood pressure and in ameliorating vascular lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6849371

  17. The Catheter—How to Use and When Not to Use

    PubMed Central

    Prentiss, R. J.; Mullenix, R. B.; Feeney, M. J.; Howe, G. E.; Steel, J. F.; Cole, J. W.; Flynn, V. J.; Walther, A. B.; Sorensen, M. B.

    1969-01-01

    Catheterization should not be used without true indication. Careful control of hydration, sedation, anesthesia and use of anticholinergic agents before, during and after operation can do a great deal to prevent the need for catheterization. When the procedure is necessary, simple, inexpensive measures of care usually are sufficient. Prophylactic antisepsis before and after, with reexamination of the urine after discontinuance of antiseptic drugs to make sure there is no recrudescence, prevents acute and chronic infections. The catheter recommended for routine male and female catheterization is the 14-16 (French) olive tip coude (Tieman) catheter or the Tieman-Foley. Closed drainage systems are the best. Continuous irrigation is without value. Water is an excellent irrigant. Calcium deposits are prevented by Renacidin® instillation and acetic acid irrigation. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8. PMID:5347199

  18. The etiology of Balkan endemic nephropathy: still more questions than answers.

    PubMed Central

    Tatu, C A; Orem, W H; Finkelman, R B; Feder, G L

    1998-01-01

    Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) has attracted increasing attention as a possible environmental disease, and a significant amount of research from complementary scientific fields has been dedicated to its etiology. There are two actual competing theories attempting to explain the cause of this kidney disease: 1) the mycotoxin hypothesis, which considers that BEN is produced by ochratoxin A ingested intermittently in small amounts by the individuals in the endemic regions, and 2) the Pliocene lignite hypothesis, which proposes that the disease is caused by long-term exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other toxic organic compounds leaching into the well drinking water from low rank coals underlying or proximal to the endemic settlements. We outline the current developments and future prospects in the study of BEN and differentiate possible factors and cofactors in disease etiology. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9799184

  19. Potential for bias in epidemiologic studies that rely on glass-based retrospective assessment of radon.

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, C R

    1995-01-01

    Retrospective assessment of exposure to radon remains the greatest challenge in epidemiologic efforts to assess lung cancer risk associated with residential exposure. An innovative technique based on measurement of alpha-emitting, long-lived daughters embedded by recoil into household glass may one day provide improved radon dosimetry. Particulate air pollution is known, however, to retard the plate-out of radon daughters. This would be expected to result in a differential effect on dosimetry, where the calibration curve relating the actual historical radon exposure to the remaining alpha-activity in the glass would be different in historically smoky and nonsmoky environments. The resulting "measurement confounding" can distort inferences about the effect of radon and can also produce spurious evidence for synergism between radon exposure and cigarette smoking. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:8605854

  20. Arteriosclerosis in Seven Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bundza, Adam; Stevenson, Daniel A.

    1987-01-01

    Sporadic arteriosclerosis of the aorta, with or without pulmonary ossification, occurred in seven cattle from slaughter-houses and farms. Aortic walls were thickened, and had many white or yellow mineralized plaques on the intimal surface. The lungs did not collapse, were firm, gritty and crepitant on palpation, and sponge-like in appearance on cross section. Microscopically, the aortas had mineral deposits in the tunica intima and media, varying in size and structure and surrounded by fibrous tissue. Lungs in four cases contained multiple spicules of metaplastic bone within alveolar walls. This disease was associated with high doses of vitamin D3 in three cows and one heifer. ImagesFigure 1., Figure 2., Figure 3., Figure 4. PMID:17422885

  1. Expression in cultured human neuroblastoma cells of epitopes associated with affected neurons in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ko, L. W.; Sheu, K. F.; Young, O.; Thaler, H.; Blass, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    Of three human neuroblastoma lines tested, IMR32K (and IMR32 parental line) was the only cell line that, after its exposure to a differentiation medium, consistently developed materials recognized immunocytochemically by a panel of antibodies against paired helical filaments (PHF). Ultrastructurally, these cells accumulated, at their perikarya and neuritic extensions, spatially discrete arrays of fibrils, which occasionally occurred in twisted pairs. When these fibrillar structures appeared as paired helices, they exhibited dimensions and configurations reminiscent of PHF found in affected Alzheimer neurons, although less compact. Immunoelectron microscope examinations of the fibrillar structures in these neuroblastoma cells with one of these anti-PHF immunoprobes revealed that only subsets of fibrillar structures that appeared thickened or aggregated to form bundles were selectively immunolabeled. Cultures of these immortal neuroblastoma lines may provide a convenient model for studying aspects of PHF formation that are hard to examine in Alzheimer brain obtained at autopsy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1691594

  2. Lactotransferrin immunocytochemistry in Alzheimer and normal human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Kawamata, T.; Tooyama, I.; Yamada, T.; Walker, D. G.; McGeer, P. L.

    1993-01-01

    Lactotransferrin (LF) expression was investigated immunocytochemically in postmortem brain tissues of normal controls and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The antibody to LF stained some neurons weakly in young adult brains, but it stained many neurons as well as the glia of all types in elderly brains. LF expression was greatly up-regulated in both neurons and glia in affected AD tissue. It was very strongly associated with such extracellular pathological entities as diffuse and consolidated amyloid deposits and extracellular neurofibrillary tangles. In addition, it was identified in a minority of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads, and degenerative neurites. LF is an iron scavenger and a complement inhibitor. Up-regulation may be a defense mechanism in AD-affected brain tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8494052

  3. Mucoceles of the sphenoid sinus: neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations.

    PubMed Central

    Alper, M G

    1976-01-01

    Seven examples of mucocele of the sphenoid sinus have been described. The characteristic symptoms and signs have been described, and the diagnostic neuroradiologic features have been demonstrated. The condition is not a benign one, as is demonstrated by total blindness which occurred in one patient (Case 2). A high index of suspicion for this condition with early referral for neuroradiologic diagnosis leads to proper management and treatment which is usually successful. Images FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 7 C FIGURE 7 D FIGURE 7 E FIGURE 7 F FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 A FIGURE 10 B FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 12 A FIGURE 12 B FIGURE 12 C FIGURE 13 PMID:867637

  4. Plastination: a modern approach to chiropractic teaching

    PubMed Central

    Grondin, Gilles

    1998-01-01

    Plastination is a unique method for the preservation of biological material for teaching and research. The plastinated specimens are dry, odorless, non-toxic and durable. They can be manipulated by teachers and students without protective equipment like gloves. Invented in 1978 by Doctor Gunther von Hagens from the University of Heidelberg, this technique, that involves the replacement of water by a curable polymer, has spread rapidly all around the world and is actually used in over 250 universities and colleges. To our knowledge, the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, is the first institution to use plastinated specimens for teaching anatomy, neuroanatomy, pathology and radiology to students in chiropractic. This paper describes the various steps of the method (fixation, dehydration, impregnation and curing) and presents some examples of the utilization of plastinated specimens. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6

  5. The hairy family of Burma: a four generation pedigree of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Bondeson, J; Miles, A E

    1996-01-01

    A Burmese family with congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa had an eventful history in the nineteenth century. The earlier members of this family were employed at the court of Ava, but the later ones spent their lives in show business, being widely exhibited for money in the 1880s. Their extraordinary hairiness attracted much curiosity, and they were photographed several times. The hairy Burmese are the only example of a four-generation pedigree of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa, which is consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. There is good evidence that, when the members of this family were hairy, their dentition was also deficient. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 (a) Figure 5 (b) PMID:8774541

  6. Segmental myofiber necrosis in myotonic dystrophy - An immunoperoxidase study of immunoglobulins in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, M. M.; Banerjee, D.; Hudson, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Because serum immunoglobulin G levels are low in patients with myotonic dystrophy, it was hypothesized that it might be catabolized within abnormal muscle fibers. Accordingly, immunohistochemical stains for immunoglobulins were performed on muscle sections derived at biopsy or autopsy from patients with myotonic dystrophy, other forms of muscular dystrophy, nondystrophic muscle disease, or normal muscle. Positive staining for immunoglobulins was found only in necrotic segments of myofibers (in 7 of 19 dystrophic and 6 of 27 nondystrophic subjects), and it is believed that the staining was due to nonspecific diffusion. However, staining reactions distinguished between incipient necrosis and artifactual contraction bands and allowed us to study segmental myofiber necrosis, comparing its frequency in the various muscle diseases. Segmental myofiber necrosis was present in 4 of 16 cases of myotonic dystrophy. The relevance of this finding to the clinical and morphologic features of myotonic dystrophy is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6351629

  7. Rabbit antisera against three different bacteria which can induce reactive arthritis: analysis by ELISA, immunoprecipitation and Western Blot.

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, M; Kobayashi, S; Hill, J L; Kono, D H; Yu, D T

    1985-01-01

    Three strains of bacteria which induce reactive arthritis were collected: a Shigella flexneri, designated 7060; another Sh. flexneri, designated 316; and a Yersinia enterocolitica of serotype 03. Rabbit antisera were generated against each of them to test for the extent and nature of cross-reactivity among these strains. When analysed by the ELISA technique, antisera against 7060 and 316 showed strong cross-reactivity with Y. enterocolitica. In contrast, the reaction of antisera prepared against putatively non-arthritis-causing bacteria reacted several-folds less. Using immunoprecipitation, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western Blot procedures, a 92,000 MW cross-reactive antigen on the Yersinia was identified. The antigen was present on the outer membranes of the Y. enterocolitica, and enzyme digestion experiments showed that this antigen was protein in nature. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3884493

  8. Establishment of two new cell lines derived from human breast carcinomas with HER-2/neu amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, P.; Leibovitz, A.; Dalton, W.; Villar, H.; Kute, T.; Davis, J.; Nagle, R.; Trent, J.

    1991-01-01

    Two human cell lines (UACC-812 and 893), both containing significant amplification of the HER-2/neu gene, were established from biopsy specimens of breast carcinomas. One patient had Stage II breast carcinoma; the other had metastatic disease. Characterisation of these lines has revealed that both are highly aneuploid containing multiple clonal chromosome alterations, have doubling times near 100 h, and are oestrogen and progesterone receptor negative. Electron microscopy demonstrates that both lines contain numerous microvilli, cytoplasmic filaments, multivesicular bodies, and desmosomes. Immunoblot analysis for P-glycoprotein using the monoclonal antibody C219 was negative for both patient cell lines. These relatively rare cell lines may represent a useful model to investigate human breast carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1674877

  9. Characterization of Clonality of Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Human B Lymphoproliferative Disease in Mice with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nakamine, Hirokazu; Masih, Aneal S.; Okano, Motohiko; Taguchi, Yuichi; Pirruccello, Samuel J.; Davis, Jack R.; Mahloch, Mark L.; Beisel, Kirk W.; Kleveland, Kimberly; Sanger, Warren G.; Purtilo, David T.

    1993-01-01

    To improve the diagnostic accuracy and understanding of the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs) occurring in immunosuppressed transplant recipients (post-transplantation LPD), clonality of Epstein-Barr virus-induced human LPDs in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency was examined by analyzing: 1) human immunoglobulin genes and their products, 2) the clonality of Epstein-Barr virus DNA, and 3) genetic alteration of c-myc or bcl-2 genes. A spectrum of clonality was found in the LPDs comparable with that reported for post-transplantation LPDs, although rearrangements of c-myc or bcl-2 genes were not detected. It is confirmed that this system is useful in terms of clonality for understanding the early phases in the pathogenesis of post-transplantation LPD or LPD in immune deficient patients. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:8380952

  10. Pathogenicity of porcine respiratory coronavirus isolated in Québec.

    PubMed Central

    Jabrane, A; Girard, C; Elazhary, Y

    1994-01-01

    Porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV) is present in many countries, including Canada, but controversy still exists concerning its pathogenicity. Eight-week-old piglets were inoculated intratracheally with a Quebec PRCV isolate (1Q90). Two contact piglets were kept with the inoculated animals. Three animals served as control. Polypnea and dyspnea were the main clinical signs observed. Diffuse bronchioloalveolar damage occurred 24 hours postinoculation. Changes compatible with bronchointerstitial pneumonia were present six days postinoculation. The inoculated virus was recovered from the respiratory tract and mesenteric lymph nodes, but not from the digestive tract, of the inoculated as well as the contact piglets. No virus was isolated from the control piglets. The development of clinical signs and histopathological changes in inoculated as well as in contact piglets and the reisolation of the inoculated virus demonstrated that PRCV can be an important respiratory pathogen. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:8069830

  11. Selected new developments in asbestos immunotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, G J; Corsini, E; Simeonova, P

    1998-01-01

    Research over the past three decades has shown that the mammalian immune system can be altered by the occupational exposure of asbestos. Early clinical studies generally focused on systemic observations of immune alteration such as the number and function of peripheral lymphocytes and monocytes. More recently as the regulatory influence of local immunity in health and disease becomes more defined, immunologic changes occurring in the lung, the primary target organ of asbestos, have been significant areas of investigation. This review will focus on recent studies that examine the influence of asbestos on pulmonary immunity as well as the role of host immune competence in asbestos-related disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9539011

  12. Pulmonary mineral dust. A study of ninety patients by electron microscopy, electron microanalysis, and electron microdiffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, J. P.; Henoc, P.; Galle, P.; Pariente, R.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a study of 90 patients are presented. Intrapulmonary mineral deposits were characterized by electron diffraction and electron probe microanalysis. Using this method, pneumoconioses may be distinguidhed from other pneumopathies. In cases of pneumoconiosis, there exists a specific relationship between the etiology of the dust exposure and the crystallographic characteristics of the intrapulmonary deposits. The nature of the deposits may be indicative of a specific type of pneumoconiosis. This method is particularly useful in differentiating between asbestos bodies and ferruginous bodies. The value of the method in general and its importance in the study of pneumoconiosis are discussed. Images Figure 4 Figure 13 Figure 5 Figure 14 Figure 6 Figure 15 Figure 7 Figure 16 Figure 8 Figure 17 Figure 1 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 2 Figure 11 Figure 3 Figure 12 PMID:937507

  13. Anaerobic orbital cellulitis: a clinical and experimental study.

    PubMed Central

    Jedrzynski, M S; Bullock, J D; McGuire, T W; Elder, B L; Bullock, J D

    1991-01-01

    In this article we have reviewed the clinical and bacteriologic aspects of anaerobic orbital cellulitis and have presented six patients to illustrate these points. Physicians who treat patients with orbital cellulitis should have a high index of suspicion for possible instances involving anaerobes, so that appropriate management can be started early. To investigate this problem further, we created an animal model of anaerobic orbital cellulitis. This model may be useful in future studies of the pathogenesis and treatment of this serious and often devastating disease. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:1808813

  14. Pitfalls in the investigation of children with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Smellie, J M; Rigden, S P

    1995-01-01

    The histories and imaging results are presented in 10 children in whom errors had been made in the interpretation of early investigations. Ultrasonography may not detect either vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) or renal scars or inflammation. The reduced nephrogram or renal swelling following a first attack of acute pyelonephritis may not be recognised without renal measurement on an intravenous urogram. Renal scarring may be diagnosed incorrectly on the basis of functional defects of isotope uptake on a technetium 99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid study. In the absence of VUR, the micturating cystogram will not visualise the kidneys. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 p254-b p254-c Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7741579

  15. Serial transplantation reveals the stem-cell-like regenerative potential of adult mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Overturf, K.; al-Dhalimy, M.; Ou, C. N.; Finegold, M.; Grompe, M.

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has shown that adult mouse hepatocytes can divide at least 18 times in vivo. To test whether this represents the upper limit of their regenerative capacity, we performed serial transplantation of hepatocytes in the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficiency murine model of liver repopulation. Hepatocytes from adult donors were serially transplanted in limiting numbers six times and resulted in complete repopulation during each cycle. This corresponds to a minimal number of 69 cell doublings or a 7.3 x 10(20)-fold expansion. No evidence for abnormal liver function or altered hepatic architecture was found in repopulated animals. We conclude that a fraction of adult mouse hepatocytes have growth potential similar to that of hematopoietic stem cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9358753

  16. Tissue damage and nutritional factors in experimental respiratory tract (Co-)carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Reuzel, P G; Feron, V J; Spit, B J; Beems, R B; Kroes, R

    1983-01-01

    Cofactors involved in respiratory tract carcinogenesis were studied in Syrian golden hamsters or in rats using benzo(a)pyrene as the carcinogenic agent. These factors included severe tissue damage induced by electro-coagulation, glass fibers administered by intratracheal instillation, acetaldehyde as irritant vapor, food restriction, and nutrients such as vitamin A and saturated and unsaturated fats. In addition, the effects of a combined exposure to four different major gaseous cigarette smoke components--methyl nitrate, isoprene, methyl chloride and acetaldehyde--and to one solid cigarette smoke component--norharman--were examined in short- and long-term inhalation studies. An interesting finding was the carcinogenicity of acetaldehyde, of which the possible mechanism is briefly discussed. Another conspicuous observation was the substantial increase in number and size of lipid droplets in alveolar fibroblasts of hamsters fed a high vitamin A diet. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. PMID:6307680

  17. Transplacental induction of peripheral nervous tumor in the Syrian golden hamster by N-nitroso-N-ethylurea. A new animal model for von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, T.; Hara, M.; Kasuga, T.

    1989-01-01

    Multiple peripheral nervous tumors were induced in 45 of 60 (75.0%) Syrian golden hamsters by transplacental administration of N-ethyl-N-nitro-sourea. Moreover, melanomas, pheochromocytomas, and Wilms' tumors developed in six (10.0%), three (5.0%), and 13 (21.7%) animals, respectively. The histologic, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic findings of the peripheral nervous tumors were similar to those of human neurofibroma, and their growth pattern and distribution resembled those of human von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis (VRNF). The occurrence of melanoma, pheochromocytoma, and proliferative foci of melanin-containing cells in neurofibroma suggests that the targets of ENU in hamsters are the neural crest-derived cells. With its high incidence of Wilms' tumor, the hamster with ENU-induced tumors is considered to be a good animal model for human neurocristopathy, including VRNF. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2551169

  18. Computer Man Simulation of Incapacitation: An Automated Approach to Wound Ballistics and Associated Medical Care Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Clare, V.; Ashman, W.; Broome, P.; Jameson, J.; Lewis, J.; Merkler, J.; Mickiewicz, A.; Sacco, W.; Sturdivan, L.

    1981-01-01

    Wound ballistics assessments traditionally have been based on correlations between some quantification of “ballistic dose” and an empirical/subjective medical quantification of human functional degradation. Although complicated by the highly inhomogeneous nature of the human body and by the voluminous data handling requirements these correlation values were obtained by manual methods. The procedure required a substantial commitment of time and resources, thereby restricting the data base from which incapacitation evaluations were made. The obvious advantages of automated wound ballistics analyses have been realized in the ARRADCOM Computer Man System, capable of duplicating the results of the manual system while reducing the time required for each analysis from three months to less than one day. The versatility of the system also makes it readily adaptable to other ballistic, medical, and paramedical assessment tasks. ImagesFIGURE 1FIGURE 2FIGURE 3FIGURE 4FIGURE 5FIGURE 6FIGURE 7FIGURE 8FIGURE 9FIGURE 10FIGURE 11FIGURE 12FIGURE 13

  19. Neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed Central

    Garg, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is the most common parasitic disease of the central nervous system. Varied clinical manifestations occur, due to deposition of larvae of the parasite Taenia solium in cerebral parenchyma, meninges, spinal cord, muscles, eyes and skin. The diagnosis of neurocysticercosis can be made with a fairly high degree of accuracy with the help of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Serological tests and histopathological examination of subcutaneous nodules provide additional support in establishing the diagnosis. The anticysticercal drugs albendazole and praziquantel have been extensively used, and found to be effective for all types of neurocysticercosis. However, recently controversy has been raised about their safety, and long-term clinical usefulness. Preventive health measures, such as provision of safe drinking water and excretion disposal, still offer the best ways to manage this disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9799883

  20. Imaging of coronary atherosclerosis and identification of the vulnerable plaque

    PubMed Central

    de Feyter, P.J.; Serruys, P. W.; Nieman, K.; Mollet, N.; Cademartiri, F.; van Geuns, R. J.; Slager, C.; van der Steen, A.F.W.; Krams, R.; Schaar, J.A.; Wielopolski, P.; Pattynama, P.M.T.; Arampatzis, A.; van der Lugt, A.; Regar, E.; Ligthart, J.; Smits, P.

    2003-01-01

    Identification of the vulnerable plaque responsible for the occurrence of acute coronary syndromes and acute coronary death is a prerequisite for the stabilisation of this vulnerable plaque. Comprehensive coronary atherosclerosis imaging in clinical practice should involve visualisation of the entire coronary artery tree and characterisation of the plaque, including the three-dimensional morphology of the plaque, encroachment of the plaque on the vessel lumen, the major tissue components of the plaque, remodelling of the vessel and presence of inflammation. Obviously, no single diagnostic modality is available that provides such comprehensive imaging and unfortunately no diagnostic tool is available that unequivocally identifies the vulnerable plaque. The objective of this article is to discuss experience with currently available diagnostic modalities for coronary atherosclerosis imaging. In addition, a number of evolving techniques will be briefly discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:25696244

  1. Pathologic and virologic study of fatal Lassa fever in man.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D. H.; McCormick, J. B.; Johnson, K. M.; Webb, P. A.; Komba-Kono, G.; Elliott, L. H.; Gardner, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Postmortem examination of 21 virologically documented cases of Lassa fever, including 6 complete autopsies, was performed as part of a field study of community-acquired Lassa fever in Sierra Leone. The most consistently observed lesions were hepatocellular, adrenal, and splenic necrosis and adrenal cytoplasmic inclusions. Neither these lesions, nor other milder and less constantly observed lesions such as myocarditis, renal tubular injury, and interstitial pneumonia, appeared severe enough to explain the cause of death in Lassa fever. The central nervous system (CNS) contained no specific lesions. Viral titrations demonstrated high viral content in liver, lung, spleen, kidney, heart, placenta, and mammary gland. Clinical laboratory data included elevation of hepatic enzymes, creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Because of the paucity of pathologic lesions in spite of widely disseminated viral infection, further investigation of humoral inflammatory mechanisms is indicated. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7081389

  2. Variability of neuropathologic lesions in experimental methylmercurial encephalopathy in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, C. M.; Mottet, N. K.; Body, R. L.; Luschei, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    Acute and chronic intoxications of rhesus monkeys with methylmercury produced lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) with different distributions. Neuronal degeneration and astroglial proliferation predominated in the dentate nucleus, lateral geniculate nucleus, thalamus and pontine nuclei in 2 monkeys that received 2 mg/kg/day for 17 and 18 days, whereas pseudolaminar necrosis and astroglial proliferation were observed in the cerebral crotex, maximally in the calcarine and insular regions, in 4 monkeys that received 0.5 to 0.8 mg/kg/day for 3 to 8.5 months. Mercury concentrations in the CNS were much higher in the acutely intoxicated animals than in the chronically intoxicated animals, but the correlation between concentrations of mercury and the histologic destruction was not precise. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:821350

  3. Integrated defense system overlaps as a disease model: with examples for multiple chemical sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Rowat, S C

    1998-01-01

    The central nervous, immune, and endocrine systems communicate through multiple common messengers. Over evolutionary time, what may be termed integrated defense system(s) (IDS) have developed to coordinate these communications for specific contexts; these include the stress response, acute-phase response, nonspecific immune response, immune response to antigen, kindling, tolerance, time-dependent sensitization, neurogenic switching, and traumatic dissociation (TD). These IDSs are described and their overlap is examined. Three models of disease production are generated: damage, in which IDSs function incorrectly; inadequate/inappropriate, in which IDS response is outstripped by a changing context; and evolving/learning, in which the IDS learned response to a context is deemed pathologic. Mechanisms of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) are developed from several IDS disease models. Model 1A is pesticide damage to the central nervous system, overlapping with body chemical burdens, TD, and chronic zinc deficiency; model 1B is benzene disruption of interleukin-1, overlapping with childhood developmental windows and hapten-antigenic spreading; and model 1C is autoimmunity to immunoglobulin-G (IgG), overlapping with spreading to other IgG-inducers, sudden spreading of inciters, and food-contaminating chemicals. Model 2A is chemical and stress overload, including comparison with the susceptibility/sensitization/triggering/spreading model; model 2B is genetic mercury allergy, overlapping with: heavy metals/zinc displacement and childhood/gestational mercury exposures; and model 3 is MCS as evolution and learning. Remarks are offered on current MCS research. Problems with clinical measurement are suggested on the basis of IDS models. Large-sample patient self-report epidemiology is described as an alternative or addition to clinical biomarker and animal testing. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9539008

  4. Acid Secretion and Serum Gastrin Levels in the Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, R. Edward; Longmire, William P.; Passaro, Edward

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen cases of patients with the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome were reviewed. In two cases the diagnosis was made by incidental biopsy of small liver nodules at operation for peptic ulcer disease. Seven patients had gastric secretory tests which showed a basal acid output to maximum acid output ratio of more than 65 percent. Five patients had bao:mao ratios less than 50 percent. A 30-month interval between incidental discovery of tumor and clinically evident disease was observed in two patients. Recurrence of symptoms after excision of tumor was noted after a similar interval in another case. Serum gastrin levels, before total gastrectomy, were elevated in all cases. The lowest preoperative level in this series of patients was 550 picograms per ml (normal 100 to 150 picograms). They were diagnostic in two patients with normal gastric secretory studies. The levels fell to normal following total gastrectomy in six patients. Two patients still had elevated levels five years and 14 years after total gastrectomy. One was discovered to have a parathyroid adenoma with hypercalcemia. Total gastrectomy was curative in all the patients with the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome; lesser operations were not. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:5031740

  5. Anatomic and Radiologic Appearance of Several Variants of the Craniocervical Junction

    PubMed Central

    Prescher, Andreas; Brors, Dominik; Adam, Gerhard

    1996-01-01

    Four typical manifestations of the occipital vertebra are described from both an anatomic and a radiologic point of view; the basilar process, the condylus tertius, the paracondylar process, and the isolated prebasioccipital arch. The clinical importance of the described variants is discussed. ImagesFigure 1aFigure 1bFigure 1p86-bFigure 2Figure 2Figure 3Figure 3Figure 4p91-bFigure 4 PMID:17170982

  6. An elastic network model based on the structure of the red blood cell membrane skeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, J C; Skalak, R; Chien, S; Hoger, A

    1996-01-01

    A finite element network model has been developed to predict the macroscopic elastic shear modulus and the area expansion modulus of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane skeleton on the basis of its microstructure. The topological organization of connections between spectrin molecules is represented by the edges of a random Delaunay triangulation, and the elasticity of an individual spectrin molecule is represented by the spring constant, K, for a linear spring element. The model network is subjected to deformations by prescribing nodal displacements on the boundary. The positions of internal nodes are computed by the finite element program. The average response of the network is used to compute the shear modulus (mu) and area expansion modulus (kappa) for the corresponding effective continuum. For networks with a moderate degree of randomness, this model predicts mu/K = 0.45 and kappa/K = 0.90 in small deformations. These results are consistent with previous computational models and experimental estimates of the ratio mu/kappa. This model also predicts that the elastic moduli vary by 20% or more in networks with varying degrees of randomness. In large deformations, mu increases as a cubic function of the extension ratio lambda 1, with mu/K = 0.62 when lambda 1 = 1.5. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 20 FIGURE A1 FIGURE A2 FIGURE A3 PMID:8770194

  7. Seasonal and spatial variation of the bacterial mutagenicity of fine organic aerosol in southern california.

    PubMed Central

    Hannigan, M P; Cass, G R; Lafleur, A L; Busby, W F; Thilly, W G

    1996-01-01

    reactions occur, they likely occur in the winter and spring seasons as well as the photochemically more active summer and early fall periods. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:8732954

  8. Coronary artery stents.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, A. J.; Coltart, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of coronary stents to treat the acute complications of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and to reduce the restenosis rate following this procedure is reviewed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8761499

  9. Bilateral pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae treated with balloon embolization.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S.; Ruttley, M. J.; Fisher, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A patient with bilateral pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae is described who was treated successfully by embolization of the two fistulae with detachable balloons introduced percutaneously through the femoral vein. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3714608

  10. Mutations in the COL5A1 gene are causal in the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes I and II.

    PubMed Central

    De Paepe, A; Nuytinck, L; Hausser, I; Anton-Lamprecht, I; Naeyaert, J M

    1997-01-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous connective-tissue disorder of which at least nine subtypes are recognized. Considerable clinical overlap exists between the EDS I and II subtypes, suggesting that both are allelic disorders. Recent evidence based on linkage and transgenic mice studies suggest that collagen V is causally involved in human EDS. Collagen V forms heterotypic fibrils with collagen I in many tissues and plays an important role in collagen I fibrillogenesis. We have identified a mutation in COL5A1, the gene encoding the pro(alpha)1(V) collagen chain, segregating with EDS I in a four-generation family. The mutation causes the substitution of the most 5' cysteine residue by a serine within a highly conserved sequence of the pro(alpha)1(V) C-propeptide domain and causes reduction of collagen V by preventing incorporation of the mutant pro(alpha)1(V) chains in the collagen V trimers. In addition, we have detected splicing defects in the COL5A1 gene in a patient with EDS I and in a family with EDS II. These findings confirm the causal role of collagen V in at least a subgroup of EDS I, prove that EDS I and II are allelic conditions, and represent a, so far, unique example of a human collagen disorder caused by substitution of a highly conserved cysteine residue in the C-propeptide domain of a fibrillar collagen. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:9042913

  11. The image and advocacy of public health in American caricature and cartoons from 1860 to 1900.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, B

    1997-01-01

    The decades just before and after the founding of the American Public Health Association in 1872 saw an efflorescence of political cartooning and caricature in national-circulation weeklies. Part of the political and social critique that cartoonists and their editors provided the public focused on needs or opportunities for preventing illness and accidents. This paper presents a small selection of editorial cartoons that agitated in support of public health activities over 4 decades. The goals are to illustrate several concerns that rose to national prominence in that era, to examine the kinds of imagery that newspapers and magazine editors offered their readers, and to observe how frequently the public was encouraged to see politicians and commercial interests as responsible for preventable health problems. This discussion focuses exclusively on propagandistic images, leaving aside the reportorial depictions of events in the news and the neutral illustrations of methods and machines in scientific and technical publications. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:9366637

  12. Relationships between environmental organochlorine contaminant residues, plasma corticosterone concentrations, and intermediary metabolic enzyme activities in Great Lakes herring gull embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, A; Moon, T W; Kennedy, S W; Glen, G A

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to survey and detect differences in plasma corticosterone concentrations and intermediary metabolic enzyme activities in herring gull (Larus argentatus) embryos environmentally exposed to organochlorine contaminants in ovo. Unincubated fertile herring gull eggs were collected from an Atlantic coast control site and various Great Lakes sites in 1997 and artificially incubated in the laboratory. Liver and/or kidney tissues from approximately half of the late-stage embryos were analyzed for the activities of various intermediary metabolic enzymes known to be regulated, at least in part, by corticosteroids. Basal plasma corticosterone concentrations were determined for the remaining embryos. Yolk sacs were collected from each embryo and a subset was analyzed for organochlorine contaminants. Regression analysis of individual yolk sac organochlorine residue concentrations, or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TEQs), with individual basal plasma corticosterone concentrations indicated statistically significant inverse relationships for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), non-ortho PCBs, and TEQs. Similarly, inverse relationships were observed for the activities of two intermediary metabolic enzymes (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzyme) when regressed against PCDDs/PCDFs. Overall, these data suggest that current levels of organochlorine contamination may be affecting the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and associated intermediary metabolic pathways in environmentally exposed herring gull embryos in the Great Lakes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10064546

  13. Differential expression of SKALP/Elafin in human epidermal tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Alkemade, H. A.; Molhuizen, H. O.; van Vlijmen-Willems, I. M.; van Haelst, U. J.; Schalkwijk, J.

    1993-01-01

    Recently we described a new epidermal serine proteinase inhibitor, skin-derived antileukoproteinase (SKALP), also known as elafin. SKALP/elafin was found to be absent in normal human epidermis, but can be induced in vitro and in vivo under hyperproliferative conditions. Here we studied the expression of SKALP/elafin in several types of epidermal tumors (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, actinic keratosis, and keratoacanthoma). Using immunohistochemical staining SKALP/elafin appeared to be differentially expressed in these tumors. Functional measurements of anti-proteinase activity, and Western blotting of tumor extracts confirmed our findings at the histological level. In well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, SKALP/elafin messenger RNA was demonstrated by non-radioactive in situ hybridization. We conclude that SKALP/elafin is a marker for abnormal or disturbed squamous differentiation. A possible role of SKALP/elafin in the control of tumor cell invasion is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8256855

  14. Interaction of Haemophilus parasuis with nasal and tracheal mucosa following intranasal inoculation of cesarean derived colostrum deprived (CDCD) swine.

    PubMed Central

    Vahle, J L; Haynes, J S; Andrews, J J

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-three cesarean derived, colostrum deprived pigs were obtained at 5 wk of age and inoculated intranasally with either 1.4 x 10(8) colony forming units of Haemophilus parasuis or sterile phosphate buffered saline. Pigs were euthanized at 4, 8, 12, 18, 26, or 36 h post-inoculation and tissues from the oropharynx and respiratory tract were obtained for qualitative bacterial culture, immunohistochemistry for H. parasuis antigens, and light and transmission electron microscopy. Haemophilus parasuis was consistently isolated from the nasal cavity (17/17, 100%) and trachea (13/17, 76%) and rarely isolated from the lung (3/17, 18%) and blood stream (1/17, 6%) of infected pigs. Antigens of H. parasuis were sporadically detected on the nasal mucosa (6/17, 35%) and trachea (8/17, 47%). Light microscopic lesions included submucosal and intraepithelial infiltrates of neutrophils and infrequent, patchy loss of cilia. Ultrastructural changes in nasal mucosal epithelial cells included cell protrusion, loss of cilia, and dilation of the cytocavitary network. Bacteria were infrequently identified and were either within an amorphous material at the apical surface of the cilia or were between individual cilia. These results suggest H. parasuis associates with the nasal mucosa and can induce a suppurative rhinitis with nasal mucosal epithelial cell degeneration. This process may represent an initial event in the pathogenesis of H. parasuis infection of swine. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:9243000

  15. Disseminated peritoneal leiomyomatosis. Clonality analysis by X chromosome inactivation and cytogenetics of a clinically benign smooth muscle proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Quade, B. J.; McLachlin, C. M.; Soto-Wright, V.; Zuckerman, J.; Mutter, G. L.; Morton, C. C.

    1997-01-01

    Disseminated peritoneal leiomyomatosis (DPL, leiomyomatosis peritonealis disseminata) is a rare condition in which multiple histologically benign smooth muscle tumorlets diffusely stud peritoneal and omental surfaces in females, predominantly of reproductive age. Although the distribution of these lesions suggests a metastatic process, DPL generally has a benign clinical course and has been regarded as a metaplastic process. We assessed clonality of 42 tumorlets and 15 normal tissues from four females with DPL by analyzing X chromosome inactivation as indicated by the methylation status of the androgen receptor gene (HUMARA). In each of the four patients, the same parental X chromosome was nonrandomly inactivated in all tumorlets, consistent with a metastatic unicentric neoplasm, or alternatively, selection for an X-linked allele in clonal multicentric lesions. Anomalous demethylation of the marker for X inactivation (HUMARA) was associated with loss of heterozygosity for markers spanning the X chromosome, or monosomy X, in part of one leiomyomatous lesion. Biallelic demethylation of the HUMARA microsatellite polymorphism was also found in one intramural leiomyoma. Two of six DPL lesions karyotyped had cytogenetic abnormalities involving chromosomes 7, 12, and 18, suggesting a pathogenesis in common with uterine leiomyomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9176406

  16. Detection of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences in oral mucosa of HIV-infected patients by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, P. J.; Schulten, E. A.; Mullink, H.; ten Kate, R. W.; Jiwa, M.; van der Waal, I.; Meijer, C. J.; Walboomers, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was analyzed in 21 oral biopsy specimens of HIV-infected patients using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Biopsies were categorized as hairy leukoplakia (HL) (n = 12), candidiasis (n = 3), oral warts (n = 2), and clinically normal epithelium (n = 4). For HPV detection a modified general primer-mediated PCR method (GP-PCR), which detects a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes at sub-picogram levels, was used. Human papillomavirus DNA was only found in two oral warts and was identified as HPV type 32. Epstein-Barr virus DNA was detected in 16 biopsy specimens, including the 12 HLs, 2 cases of candidiasis, and 2 samples of normal epithelium. Epstein-Barr virus positivity in HL could be confirmed by Southern blot analysis and DNA in situ hybridization using biotinylated DNA probes (bio-DISH). Epstein-Barr virus bio-DISH was also positive in one sample of normal epithelium from a patient with HL. The results indicate that HL is strongly associated with EBV and not with any of the common HPV types that react with general HPV primers in the PCR. However the detection of EBV in normal oral epithelium by PCR and bio-DISH suggests that the presence of this virus is not exclusively related to HL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2169191

  17. Photoelectron imaging of cells: photoconductivity extends the range of applicability.

    PubMed Central

    Habliston, D L; Hedberg, K K; Birrell, G B; Rempfer, G F; Griffith, O H

    1995-01-01

    Photoelectron imaging is a sensitive surface technique in which photons are used to excite electron emission. This novel method has been applied successfully in studies of relatively flat cultured cells, viruses, and protein-DNA complexes. However, rounded-up cell types such as tumor cells frequently are more difficult to image. By comparing photoelectron images of uncoated and metal-coated MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells, it is shown that the problem is specimen charging rather than a fundamental limitation of the electron imaging process. This is confirmed by emission current measurements on uncoated monolayers of MCF-7 carcinoma cells and flatter, normal Wi-38 fibroblasts. We report here that sample charging in photoelectron microscopy can be eliminated in most specimens by simultaneous use of two light sources--the standard UV excitation source (e.g., 254 nm) and a longer wavelength light source (e.g., 325 nm). The reduction in sample charging results largely from enhanced photoconduction in the bulk sample and greatly extends the range of cells that can be examined by photoelectron imaging. The contributions of photoconductivity, the electric field of the imaging system, and the short escape depths of the photoelectrons combine to make photoelectron imaging a uniquely sensitive technique for the study of biological surfaces. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8534832

  18. Expression of very low density lipoprotein receptor in the vascular wall. Analysis of human tissues by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Multhaupt, H. A.; Gåfvels, M. E.; Kariko, K.; Jin, H.; Arenas-Elliot, C.; Goldman, B. I.; Strauss, J. F.; Angelin, B.; Warhol, M. J.; McCrae, K. R.

    1996-01-01

    The recently cloned very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor binds triglyceride-rich, apolipoprotein-E-containing lipoproteins with high affinity. The observation that VLDL receptor mRNA is abundantly expressed in extracts of tissues such as skeletal muscle and heart, but not liver, has led to the hypothesis that this receptor may facilitate the peripheral uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. However, little information is available concerning the types of cells that express this receptor in vivo. As expression of the VLDL receptor in the vascular wall might have important implications for the uptake and transport of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and perhaps facilitate the development of atherosclerosis in hypertriglyceridemic individuals, we used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to determine whether VLDL receptor mRNA and protein was expressed in human vascular tissue. We observed expression of the receptor by both endothelial and smooth muscle cells within normal arteries and veins, as well as within atherosclerotic plaques. In the latter, the VLDL receptor was also expressed by macrophage-derived foam cells. The widespread distribution of the VLDL receptor in vascular tissue suggests a potentially important role for this receptor in normal and pathophysiological vascular processes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8669483

  19. Establishment of a retinoic acid-resistant human acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) model in human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) transgenic severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, Y.; Kizaki, M.; Kinjo, K.; Awaya, N.; Muto, A.; Ito, M.; Kawai, Y.; Umezawa, A.; Hata, J.; Ueyama, Y.; Ikeda, Y.

    1998-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms and identify novel approaches to overcoming retinoic acid (RA) resistance in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), we established the first human RA-resistant APL model in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. UF-1 cells, an RA-resistant APL cell line established in our laboratory, were transplanted into human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-producing SCID (hGMTg SCID) mice and inoculated cells formed subcutaneous tumours in all hGMTg SCID mice, but not in the non-transgenic control SCID mice. Single-cell suspensions (UF-1/GMTg SCID cells) were similar in morphological, immunological, cytogenetic and molecular genetic features to parental UF-1 cells. All-trans RA did not change the morphological features of cells or their expression of CD11b. RA did not alter the growth curve of cells as determined by MTT assay, suggesting that UF-1/GMTg SCID cells are resistant to RA. These results demonstrate that this is the first RA-resistant APL animal model that may be useful for investigating the biology of this myeloid leukaemia in vivo, as well as for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches including patients with RA-resistant APL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9764578

  20. Inflammatory sequences in acute pulmonary radiation injury.

    PubMed Central

    Slauson, D. O.; Hahn, F. F.; Benjamin, S. A.; Chiffelle, T. L.; Jones, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    The histopathologic events in the developing acute pulmonary inflammatory reaction to inhaled particles of Yttrium 90 are detailed. In animals that died or were sacrificed during the first year after inhalation exposure, microscopic findings of acute inflammation predominated and included vascular congestion; stasis, focal hemorrhage; edema; various inflammatory cell infiltrates; cytolysis and desquamation of bronchiolar and alveolar epithelium followed by regeneration; vascular injury and repair; and the eventual development of pulmonary fibrosis. Accumulation of alveolar fibrin deposits was an additional characteristic, though not a constant feature of the early stages of radiation pneumonitis. In addition to the direct effects of radiation on pulmonary cell populations, the histopathologic findings were suggestive of diverse activation of various cellular and humoral mediation systems in their pathogenesis. The potential interrelationships of systems responsible for increased vascular permeability, coagulation and fibrinolysis, chemotaxis, and direct cellular injury were discussed and related to the pathogenesis of the microscopic findings characteristic of early pulmonary radiation injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:1258976

  1. Pancreatic adenocarcinomas frequently show p53 gene mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, A.; Capelli, P.; Mukai, K.; Zamboni, G.; Oda, T.; Iacono, C.; Hirohashi, S.

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-four pancreatic adenocarcinomas were studied for the presence of p53 gene mutations by the single-strand conformation polymorphism method and by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. p53 protein expression was immunohistochemically evaluated using monoclonal PAb1801 and polyclonal CM1 antibodies. Mutations were detected in 14 cases. The transitions were six G to A and two A to G; the transversions were one C to G and two A to C; the remaining three were frameshift mutations. Immunostaining results were identical with both antibodies. Nuclear immunohistochemical p53-positive cells were found in nine p53 mutated cases and in 12 cases in which no mutation was detected. In most of these latter cases only a minority of cancer cells showed immunohistochemical positivity. Twenty-nine cases, including all p53 mutated cancers, were known to contain codon 12 Ki-ras gene mutations. Also in the light of the demonstrated cooperation of ras and p53 gene alterations in the transformation of cultured cells, our data suggest that p53 mutation is one of the genetic defects that may have a role in the pathogenesis of a proportion of pancreatic cancers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8494051

  2. Increased expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 during active hepatic fibrogenesis: correlation with monocyte infiltration.

    PubMed Central

    Marra, F.; DeFranco, R.; Grappone, C.; Milani, S.; Pastacaldi, S.; Pinzani, M.; Romanelli, R. G.; Laffi, G.; Gentilini, P.

    1998-01-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 is a chemoattractant and activator for circulating monocytes and T lymphocytes. We investigated MCP-1 protein and gene expression during chronic liver disease at different stages, using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, respectively. In normal liver, a modest expression of MCP-1 was confined to few peri-sinusoidal cells and to bile duct epithelial cells. During chronic hepatitis, MCP-1 immunostaining and gene expression were evident in the inflammatory infiltrate of the portal tract. In tissue from patients with active cirrhosis, MCP-1 expression was clearly up-regulated and was present in the portal tract, in the epithelial cells of regenerating bile ducts, and in the active septa surrounding regenerating nodules. A combination of in situ hybridization for MCP-1 and immunohistochemistry showed that activated stellate cells and monocyte/macrophages contribute to MCP-1 expression in vivo together with bile duct epithelial cells. Comparison of serial sections of liver biopsies from patients with various degrees of necro-inflammatory activity showed that infiltration of the portal tracts with monocytes/macrophages is directly correlated with the expression of MCP-1. These data expand previous in vitro studies showing that secretion of MCP-1 may contribute to the formation and maintenance of the inflammatory infiltrate observed during chronic liver disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9466568

  3. Autoantibodies to purified nuclear proteins related to DNA metabolism during ageing and in SLE patients.

    PubMed Central

    Astaldi Ricotti, G C; Pazzaglia, M; Martelli, A M; Cerino, A; Bestagno, M; Caprelli, A; Riva, S; Pedrini, M A; Facchini, A

    1987-01-01

    In this study the specificity of circulating autoantibodies in ANA+ aged donors, ANA- donors and SLE patients was investigated by immunoblotting on total nuclear proteins and by ELISA on purified nuclear proteins, possibly related to DNA metabolism, such as DNA polymerase alpha, DNA-dependent ATPase, DNA Topoisomerase I, ssDBP, hnRNP, HMG and histones. Immunoblotting showed that sera from ANA+ aged donors present fewer antibodies to nuclear proteins, especially to those between 21,000 and 45,000, molecular weight (MW), than sera from SLE patients. When the specificity of antisera was further studied on purified nuclear proteins, it was found that the majority of sera from SLE patients react with most of the proteins tested, whereas sera from ANA+ aged donors mainly react with DNA polymerase alpha, DNA-dependent ATPase, DNA Topoisomerase I and histones. In addition, sera from a few ANA- donors also reacted with certain purified nuclear proteins in a statistically significant age-related manner. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3497092

  4. A rivalry of foulness: official and unofficial investigations of the London cholera epidemic of 1854.

    PubMed Central

    Paneth, N; Vinten-Johansen, P; Brody, H; Rip, M

    1998-01-01

    Contemporaneous with John Snow's famous study of the 1854 London cholera epidemic were 2 other investigations: a local study of the Broad Street outbreak and an investigation of the entire epidemic, undertaken by England's General Board of Health. More than a quarter-century prior to Koch's description of Vibrio comma, a Board of Health investigator saw microscopic "vibriones" in the rice-water stools of cholera patients that, in his later life, he concluded had been cholera bacilli. Although this finding was potential evidence for Snow's view that cholera was due to a contagious and probably live agent transmitted in the water supply, the Board of Health rejected Snow's conclusions. The Board of Health amassed a huge amount of information which it interpreted as supportive of its conclusion that the epidemic was attributable not so much to water as to air. Snow, by contrast, systematically tested his hypothesis that cholera was water-borne by exploring evidence that at first glance ran contrary to his expectations. Snow's success provides support for using a hypothetico-deductive approach in epidemiology, based on tightly focused hypotheses strongly grounded in pathophysiology. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:9772861

  5. Troponin T cross-linking in human apoptotic cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gorza, L.; Menabó, R.; Di Lisa, F.; Vitadello, M.

    1997-01-01

    Intracellular calcium overload of guinea pig cardiomyocytes is accompanied by troponin T cross-linking, which is revealed by changes in immunoreactivity of anti-troponin T antibodies. We presently investigated whether the same process is detectable in the human heart. Immunohistochemistry shows myofibrillar staining with BN-59 anti-troponin T antibody with rare cardiomyocytes in samples obtained at surgery, whereas approximately 50% of myocytes are labeled in heart samples taken at autopsy within 3 hours of death, and every cardiomyocyte is stained after exposure of biopsy sections to 10 mmol/L calcium. Western blot analysis shows reactive polypeptides of approximately 70 and 85 to 90 kd in addition to troponin T in both treated and autopsy heart sections. Neither reactivity in immunohistochemistry nor additional reactive polypeptides in Western blot are detectable when calpain or transglutaminase is inhibited during exposure of sections to high calcium. Troponin T crosslinking occurs also in isolated myofibrils, which show staining with BN-59 at either sarcomeric A or I bands. Labeling with TdT-mediated dUTP nick and labeling (TUNEL) to demonstrate apoptosis reveals DNA fragmentation in BN-59-positive myocytes. Thus, troponin T cross-linking occurs in human cardiac myocytes concomitantly with apoptosis and autopsy autolysis, suggesting that similar cytosolic alterations can be produced by different types of myocyte death. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9176400

  6. Apoptosis, oncosis, and necrosis. An overview of cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Majno, G.; Joris, I.

    1995-01-01

    The historical development of the cell death concept is reviewed, with special attention to the origin of the terms necrosis, coagulation necrosis, autolysis, physiological cell death, programmed cell death, chromatolysis (the first name of apoptosis in 1914), karyorhexis, karyolysis, and cell suicide, of which there are three forms: by lysosomes, by free radicals, and by a genetic mechanism (apoptosis). Some of the typical features of apoptosis are discussed, such as budding (as opposed to blebbing and zeiosis) and the inflammatory response. For cell death not by apoptosis the most satisfactory term is accidental cell death. Necrosis is commonly used but it is not appropriate, because it does not indicate a form of cell death but refers to changes secondary to cell death by any mechanism, including apoptosis. Abundant data are available on one form of accidental cell death, namely ischemic cell death, which can be considered an entity of its own, caused by failure of the ionic pumps of the plasma membrane. Because ischemic cell death (in known models) is accompanied by swelling, the name oncosis is proposed for this condition. The term oncosis (derived from ónkos, meaning swelling) was proposed in 1910 by von Reckling-hausen precisely to mean cell death with swelling. Oncosis leads to necrosis with karyolysis and stands in contrast to apoptosis, which leads to necrosis with karyorhexis and cell shrinkage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7856735

  7. Human Xq24-Xq28: approaches to mapping with yeast artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, M; Little, R D; Abidi, F; Porta, G; Labella, T; Cooper, T; Della Valle, G; D'Urso, M; Schlessinger, D

    1990-01-01

    One hundred twenty-seven yeast strains with artificial chromosomes containing Xq24-Xqter human DNA were obtained starting from a human/hamster somatic cell hybrid. The clones were characterized with respect to their insert size, stability, and representation of a set of Xq24-Xqter DNA probes. The inserts of the clones add up to 19.3 megabase (Mb) content, or about 0.4 genomic equivalents of that portion of the X chromosome, with a range of 40-650 kb in individual YACs. Eleven clones contained more than one YAC, the additional ones usually having hamster DNA inserts; the individual YACs could be separated by extracting the total DNA from such strains and using it to retransform yeast cells. One of the YACs, containing the probe for the DXS49 locus, was grossly unstable, throwing off smaller versions of an initial 300-kb YAC during subculture; the other YACs appeared to breed true on subculture. Of 52 probes tested, 12 found cognate YACs; the YACs included one with the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogense gene and another containing four anonymous probe sequences (DX13, St14, cpx67, and cpx6). Xq location of YACs is being verified by in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes, and fingerprinting and hybridization methods are being used to detect YACs that overlap. Images Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2294758

  8. Familial canine dermatomyositis. Initial characterization of the cutaneous and muscular lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Hargis, A. M.; Haupt, K. H.; Hegreberg, G. A.; Prieur, D. J.; Moore, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Familial canine dermatomyositis is a recently identified disease of collie dogs that resembles human juvenile dermatomyositis. The lesions in the skin and muscles obtained by biopsy from two litters of dogs were characterized for the purpose of determining the similarity of the lesions to those of human dermatomyositis. The cutaneous lesions began between 7 and 11 weeks of age and were present on the face, lips, ears, and skin over bony prominences of the limbs, feet, sternum, and tip of the tail. Histologically the cutaneous lesions frequently consisted of vesicles, pustules, and ulcers on the lips, face, and ears. Neutrophils, lymphocytes, mast cells, and macrophages were present throughout the dermis. Neutrophils and lymphocytes were also present in and around vessels. Between 13 and 19 weeks of age generalized muscle atrophy was noted. The muscle lesions consisted of interstitial lymphocyte, plasma cell, macrophage, and neutrophil accumulation; myofiber degeneration, regeneration, and atrophy; and fibrosis. Perivascular neutrophils, lymphocytes, and plasma cells were also seen. Histologically, the lesions resembled those present in human juvenile dermatomyositis; and these observations, coupled with clinical, immunologic, and clinical pathologic observations presented elsewhere, suggest that familial canine dermatomyositis is an appropriate and potentially useful model for human juvenile dermatomyositis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:6465285

  9. Exposure to mercury alters early activation events in fish leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    MacDougal, K C; Johnson, M D; Burnett, K G

    1996-01-01

    Although fish in natural populations may carry high body burdens of both organic and inorganic mercury, the effects of this divalent metal on such lower vertebrates is poorly understood. In this report, inorganic mercury in the form of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) is shown to produce both high-dose inhibition and low-dose activation of leukocytes in a marine teleost fish, Sciaenops ocellatus. Concentrations of inorganic mercury > or = 10 microM suppressed DNA synthesis and induced rapid influx of radiolabeled calcium, as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous cellular proteins. Lower concentrations (0.1-1 microM) of HgCl2 that activated cell growth also induced a slow sustained rise in intracellular calcium in cells loaded with the calcium indicator dye fura-2, but did not produce detectable tyrosine phosphorylation of leukocyte proteins. These studies support the possibility that subtoxic doses of HgCl2 may inappropriately activate teleost leukocytes, potentially altering the processes that regulate the magnitude and specificity of the fish immune response to environmental pathogens. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:8930553

  10. Juvenile ceroid lipofuscinosis. Evidence for methylated lysine in neural storage body protein.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, M. L.; Rodrigues, M.

    1991-01-01

    Juvenile ceroid lipofuscinosis, or Batten disease, is a hereditary disorder characterized by progressive visual loss, seizures, cognitive and psychomotor deterioration, and early death, usually between 15 and 35 years of age. Individuals with this disease have massive deposits of autofluorescent inclusion bodies in cells of most tissues. The accumulation of these intracellular deposits suggests that juvenile ceroid-lipofuscinosis is a storage disease resulting from the inability of cells to metabolize some normal cellular constituent. It has been reported that the storage material is largely protein, much of which is a specific mitochondrial protein that apparently is not properly metabolized in subjects with Batten disease. The storage bodies were partially purified from the retinas of two siblings who died as a result of juvenile ceroid lipofuscinosis, as well as from the cerebral cortex of an unrelated individual with this disorder. Chromatographic analysis of storage body protein acid hydrolysates indicated that they contained a large amount of the modified amino acid epsilon-N-trimethyllysine. The abundance of this amino acid in the storage protein suggests that the disease may result from excessive methylation or from a failure to demethylate intermediate forms of the stored proteins. Acid hydrolysis also solubilized a fluorescent component from the retinal storage material, suggesting that the stored protein has a bound fluorescent adduct. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1899540

  11. Proliferative Hemorrhagic Enteropathy in Swine: An Outbreak and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yates, W. D. G.; Clark, E. G.; Osborne, A. D.; Enweani, C. C.; Radostits, O. M.; Theede, A.

    1979-01-01

    An account is given of an acute outbreak of hemorrhagic enteric disease in 34 young adult boars of primarily Yorkshire breeding at a performance testing station in Western Canada. Two of the boars died. A diagnosis of proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy was made on the basis of clinical signs, gross necropsy and histopathological lesions. Campylobacter-like bacteria were seen in the apical cytoplasm of epithelial cells of the ileal mucosa by Warthin-Faulkner stain on histological sections, but were not isolated on culture. Treatment with several drugs simultaneously was associated with termination of the outbreak, but the therapeutic effect was not controlled by leaving some animals untreated. Reported sequelae, such as porcine intestinal adenomatosis, were not present at necropsy or slaughter of pigs surviving the outbreak, but all were killed no longer than two months after the first case was observed. This outbreak is discussed in the context of previously reported hemorrhagic enteric conditions of pigs. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:396978

  12. Multiple Peroxisomal Enzymatic Deficiency Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vamecq, Joseph; Draye, Jean-Pierre; Van Hoof, François; Misson, Jean-Paul; Evrard, Philippe; Verellen, Gaston; Eyssen, Hendrik J.; Van Eldere, Johan; Schutgens, Ruud B. H.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Roels, Frank; Goldfischer, Sidney L.

    1986-01-01

    Biologic, morphologic, and biochemical investigations performed in 2 patients demonstrate multiple peroxisomal deficiencies in the cerebrohepatorenal syndrome of Zellweger (CHRS) and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD). Very long chain fatty acids, abnormal bile acids, including bile acid precursors (di- and trihydroxycoprostanoic acids), and C29-dicarboxylic acid accumulated in plasma in both patients. Generalized hyperaminoaciduria was also present. Peroxisomes could not be detected in CHRS liver and kidney; however, in the NALD patient, small and sparse cytoplasmic bodies resembling altered peroxisomes were found in hepatocytes. Hepatocellular and Kupffer cell lysosomes were engorged with ferritin and contained clefts and trilaminar structures believed to represent very long chain fatty acids. Enzymatic deficiencies reflected the peroxisomal defects. Hepatic glycolate oxidase and palmitoyl-CoA oxidase activities were deficient. No particle-bound catalase was found in cultured fibroblasts, and ether glycerolipid (plasmalogen) biosynthesis was markedly reduced. Administration of phenobarbital and clofibrate, an agent that induces peroxisomal proliferation and enzymatic activities, to the NALD patient did not bring about any changes in plasma metabolites, liver peroxisome population, or oxidizing activities. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:2879480

  13. Physiological and toxicological aspects of smoke produced during the combustion of polymeric materials.

    PubMed Central

    Einhorn, I N

    1975-01-01

    Normally one expects that flame contact is the major cause of injury and death during fires. Analysis of the factors involved in numerous fires has revealed that most deaths were not due to flame contact, but were a consequence of the production of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and other combustion products, such as aldehydes, low molecular weight alcohols, hydrogen cyanide, and other noxious species. The major emphasis within the scope of this paper relates to the physiological and toxicological aspects of smoke produced during the combustion of materials. Special emphasis is directed toward laboratory procedures which have been developed to determine the qualitative and quantitative analysis of smoke, factors pertaining to smoke development, and to measure the response of laboratory animals exposed to smoke. The effects that fire retardants, incorporated into polymeric materials as a means of improving flammability characteristics, may have on smoke development, the mechanism of polymer degradation, and on the survival response of laboratory animals are also considered. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. PMID:170077

  14. Basic fibroblast growth factor: its role in the control of smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, C. L.; Reidy, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The formation of an intimal lesion in an injured artery is the consequence of the replication and migration of smooth muscle cells. Recent studies have implicated basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) as an important mediator of replication in the arterial media, and platelet-derived growth factor as an important mediator of migration. However, the degree of arterial trauma produced during injury has a significant influence on the time of onset of intimal thickening, suggesting that factors released from damaged smooth muscle cells may affect migration. We have investigated the role of one of these factors, bFGF, in smooth muscle cell migration in vivo. We found that 1) deendothelialization of the rat carotid artery results in significantly more migration when it is accompanied by traumatic injury to the underlying smooth muscle; 2) the rate of migration in arteries that have been gently deendothelialized is significantly stimulated by systemic injection of bFGF; and 3) inhibition of bFGF with a blocking antibody significantly reduces the amount of migration after traumatic deendothelializing injury with a balloon catheter. These findings suggest that bFGF plays an important role in the mediation of smooth muscle cell migration after arterial injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8213998

  15. Endoscopic Management of a Giant Cholesterol Cyst of the Petrous Apex

    PubMed Central

    Fucci, Michael J.; Alford, Eugene L.; Lowry, Louis D.; Keane, William M.; Sataloff, Robert T.

    1994-01-01

    Giant cholesterol cyst (GCC) of the petrous apex is a rare clinical entity. This benign cystic lesion can cause neurologic deficits and vascular compromise by persistent growth and progressive bone destruction. Magnetic resonance imaging studies of GCC show the lesions to be hyperintense on T1-weighted sequences with progressively lower signal intensities on the first and second echoes of T2-weighted sequences. These findings are relatively specific for GCC, permitting a narrow differential diagnosis. The goal of surgery is to provide adequate drainage with the creation of a permanent fistula. The classic approaches to these lesions are the posterior fossa craniotomy and the middle fossa extradural craniotomy. The translabyrinthine approach provides wide exposure at the expense of cochlear and vestibular function. The transsphenoidal approach provides adequate drainage with hearing preservation and no craniotomy. The endoscopic, endonasal transsphenoidal approach to a 2.5 cm GCC of the petrous apex accomplished complete drainage with the creation of a fistula. Advances in endoscopic technique and instrumentation facilitated the addition of the approach to the surgeon's armamentarium. In selected cases, this approach provides adequate surgical exposure with minimal morbidity. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17170927

  16. Image-Guided Surgery of the Skull Base Using a Novel Miniature Position Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Smouha, Eric E.; Shapiro, Avishai W.; Davis, Raphael P.; Shindo, Maisie L.; Sobol, Louis L.; Acker, David E.

    1999-01-01

    Image-guided navigational systems have been a useful adjunct for minimally invasive surgery of the skull base. A novel miniature position sensor has been developed that uses a low magnetic field for real-time tracking of surgical instruments. The 1.7-mm-diameter sensor attached to the position and orientation system (Magellan®, Biosense, Inc., Johnson and Johnson Co., Baldwin Park, CA) was deployed through various surgical instruments or used in a hand-held fashion with a malleable shaft probe. We report on our experience using this electromagnetic system in a series of lesions of the sella and clivus. After patient/image registration, the system was consistently accurate to within 2 mm. We have found this system to be particularly advantageous in endoscopic surgery of cystic lesions of the skull base, where access is limited and anatomy may be distorted. In three patients, this device obviated the need for an extensive external surgical approach. Case histories are presented, which illustrate the specific advantages this miniature system provides during skull base surgery. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171125

  17. Chondrosarcoma of the Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Tadashi; Sasaki, Tomio; Takakura, Kintomo; Ishida, Tsuyoshi

    1992-01-01

    Five patients with chondrosarcoma, grade I or II, and one with mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the skull base were treated at our clinic between 1967 and 1991. The patients were three men and three women who ranged in age from 21 to 39 years. The presenting symptoms were diplopia, decreased visual acuity, or symptoms of involvement of VIIIth and lower cranial nerves. The duration of the symptoms ranged from 18 months to 14 years. A plain skull x-ray and tomography of the skull, computed tomographic (CT) scans, and magnetic resonance images (MRI) revealed a calcified mass. Angiograms showed an occlusion of the arteries or venous sinuses, or both, in four patients, and a distinct tumor stain in one. The tumors were subtotally removed in all six cases. Two patients received postoperative irradiation for the residual tumor. In one patient, extraocular movement was compromised postoperatively, although in the other five patients there was no aggravation of the neurologic signs. Follow-up CT scans and MRI demonstrated no recurrent tumors nor any enlargement of residual tumors. Based on these findings, we advocate aggressive surgical removal of these tumors, which should be augmented by radiation therapy if the postoperative CT scans or MRI reveal residual tumors. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10 PMID:17170863

  18. Cardiac myofibroblasts express alpha smooth muscle actin during right ventricular pressure overload in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, K. O.; Taatjes, D. J.; Schwarz, J.; vonTurkovich, M.; Low, R. B.

    1991-01-01

    A number of changes occur in contractile proteins and mechanical performance of the heart within 2 weeks of right ventricular pressure overload in 8- to 12-week-old rabbits. These changes are accompanied by increases in collagen concentration and the ratio of type I to type III collagen. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the evolution of these connective tissue changes morphologically and to characterize the interstitial cells that might be responsible. The myocardium is infiltrated by mononuclear inflammatory cells 2 days after banding, accompanied by focal myocyte necrosis. By 7 days, the inflammatory infiltrates subside and the damaged myocytes seen at 2 days are replaced by new collagen and a population of spindle-shaped cells, with ultrastructural features of myofibroblasts. A significant proportion of these cells contain alpha smooth muscle actin by immunohistochemical analysis. At 14 days, there is a large increase in stainable collagen with complex remodeling and reduplication of the collagen fiber network of the interstitium. Alpha smooth muscle actin-containing myofibroblasts persist, but their immunoreactivity appears reduced compared with day 7. The authors hypothesize that the interstitial fibroblasts that acquire smooth-muscle-like features in this model play a critical role in the heart's response to severe and sudden mechanical stress and are at least partly responsible for the changes in connective tissue that occur as a result of pressure overload in this model. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1853934

  19. Treatment of difficult fractures and nonunions of the humerus and elbow with a modified Küntscher nail.

    PubMed Central

    Burdeaux, B. D.; York, B. P.

    1993-01-01

    A series of fourteen difficult fractures and nonunions of the humerus and elbow have been treated over a period of twenty-eight years with a modified Kuntscher Nail. A total of twenty-six operative attempts had been previously made in this group of fourteen patients. One patient had eight failed surgeries prior to treatment. Slots were placed along the spine of the nail for transfixion with screws. In two instances additional modification of the Kuntscher nail was made by attaching a plate to the end of the nail for fixation to the ulna after retrograde insertion into the humerus. One such device was used to fuse the elbow. The other was used to stabilize a low nonunion in which the elbow was already fused. Union was obtained in nine cases with failure in five. Four of the failures united with one additional surgery. The one failed case had a surgical neck fracture which was eventually treated with a Neer prosthesis. The method described may not be superior to other methods; however, it can be successful in obtaining union in difficult elbow and humerus fractures or nonunions resulting from multiple failed prior procedures. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4a Figure 4b Figure 5a Figure 5b Figure 6a Figure 6b Figure 7a Figure 7b Figure 8a Figure 8b PMID:7820742

  20. c-myc protooncogene expression in mouse erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lachman, H M

    1989-01-01

    Murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells are erythroid progenitors whose programs of erythroid differentiation has been interrupted by transformation with the Friend virus complex. As a result of the ability of certain chemicals such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) to induce terminal erythroid differentiation, the cells have been used as a model for understanding the molecular basis of cellular differentiation. Recent work on MEL cells as well as other differentiating systems indicates that expression of cellular protooncogenes is implicated in chemically mediated differentiation. In MEL cells the expression of the c-myc protooncogene undergoes unusual biphasic changes following inducer treatment. Levels of c-myc mRNA decrease 10- to 20-fold between 1 and 2 hr and are then reexpressed between 12 and 24 hr. These changes occur as a result of complex transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory events. Recent DNA transfection experiments, in which MEL cells were transfected with myc expression vectors, indicate that both the early decrease in c-myc expression and its subsequent reexpression are important events in the differentiation pathway. The work on MEL cells, as well as on other models of differentiation, is directed at understanding the molecular basis of leukemogenic transformation and cellular differentiation. The ability of c-myc, as well as other protooncogenes, to influence both of these events indicates that cellular protooncogenes play a central role in their regulation. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. PMID:2647476

  1. An Epizootic of Parainfluenza Virus Type 1 in a Group of C57B16 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Descôteaux, J.-P.; Boulay, G.; Potworowski, E.

    1980-01-01

    An epizootic of respiratory troubles was noticed in a group of C57B16 mice used to study their response following inoculations of different thymic extracts. The infection was characterized by a high level of mortalities. Macroscopically, the lungs of affected animals showed red consolidated areas on the lobes. Microscopically, an acute bronchopneumonia with eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies in the epithelial cells of the bronchi were seen. Those lesions suggest a parainfluenza virus type 1 infection. The presence of viral particles, morphologically similar to members of the Paramyxoviridae family in lung homogenates observed under electron microscopy and the elevated serum complement fixation and hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers to parainfluenza virus type 1 confirm the diagnosis. The source of the infection is unknown but four hypothesis are proposed. Healthy animals free of demonstrable antibodies specific to parainfluenza virus type 1 were obtained and the experiment was repeated. No mortalities were observed and the animals remained free of demonstrable complement fixation and hemagglutination inhibition antibodies throughout the experiment. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:6244888

  2. Characterization of human vascular smooth muscle cells transformed by the early genetic region of SV40 virus.

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, A.; Greenspan, P.; Nagpal, M. L.; Nachtigal, S. A.; Nachtigal, M.

    1991-01-01

    Human arterial smooth muscle cells transfected with the plasmid pSV3-neo, which contains the SV40 virus early region and the neor gene, developed colonies of morphologically transformed cells. Five cell strains were initiated from these colonies and could be subcultivated for up to 9 months before entering a stage of crisis that ended their life span. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules containing viral sequences were found free and integrated in the transformed cells. The intranuclear SV40 large T antigen and the p53 cellular protein were expressed in the transformed cells. Most of the transformed cells were spindle shaped but some were large and multinucleated. The modal chromosome numbers were in the triploid range, and aberrations, particularly dicentrics, were common. The transcripts for smooth muscle actins were significantly reduced and there were less alpha-actin filaments detected by immunofluorescence. Cytochemical staining disclosed a large accumulation of lipid droplets in the transformed cells incubated with rabbit hypercholesterolemic beta-very-low-density lipoprotein. Chemical analysis showed that cholesteryl esters were significantly elevated in these cells. Phenotypic changes induced in human vascular smooth muscle cells by SV40 early genes are similar to those found in smooth muscle cells from atherosclerotic lesions and may indicate common pathogenetic mechanisms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1653520

  3. Expression of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion proteins by sinusoidal endothelial cells in the normal and cirrhotic human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Couvelard, A.; Scoazec, J. Y.; Feldmann, G.

    1993-01-01

    We compared the expression of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion proteins by sinusoidal endothelial cells in normal human liver, in which the endothelial lining of hepatic sinusoids is discontinuous and devoid of basement membrane, and in cirrhosis, during which sinusoids might undergo a process of capillarization and acquire a continuous lining and a typical basement membrane. In normal liver, sinusoidal endothelial cells displayed a very restricted repertory of cell-adhesion molecules: the intercellular adhesion molecules PECAM-1 and CD34 were undetectable and only two integrins, alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 5 beta 1, were present, whereas the laminin receptors alpha 6 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1 were undetectable and the beta 3 integrins were faintly expressed. In capillarized sinusoids, sinusoidal endothelial cells displayed striking changes in their repertory of cell-adhesion molecules, including the expression of PECAM-1 protein and messenger RNAs and the induction of the laminin receptors alpha 6 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1. Such changes co-localized with subendothelial laminin deposits. In conclusion, normal sinusoidal endothelial cells express a distinctive set of cell-adhesion molecules, adapted to their structural and microenvironmental characteristics, and this repertory is dramatically modified during sinusoidal capillarization, possibly as a consequence of the concomitant matrix changes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8362973

  4. Nonpathogenicity of antiintestinal antibody in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Rabin, B. S.; Rogers, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    Rabbits were immunized with intestinal extract prepared from rabbits, guinea pigs, and germ-free rats. The resultant serum antibody response to intestinal antigen was determined by gel precipitation and direct tissue immunofluorescence. Forty-eight hours prior to sacrifice of each immunized animal, a portion of the duodenum, ileum, and colon were traumatized to bring circulating antibody into contact with the tissue. Sections for histology and direct immunofluorescence were taken from the area of trauma, just adjacent to the area, and 10 cm from it. The humoral immune response, the presence of tissue bound immunoglobulin, and tissue histology were compared. The area of trauma in normal and immunized animals showed the same histologic changes. In each animal, tissue just adjacent to the area of trauma and 10 cm from it were histologically identical. The pathologic alterations in the immunized animals were similar to those associated with malabsorption in man. Direct immunofluorescence of the intestinal tissue revealed bound immunoglobulin in histologically normal and abnormal tissue. Precipitating antibody to intestine was present in the serum of rabbits with normal and abnormal histology. Thus, antiintestinal antibody as dected by precipitation in gel and direct tissue immunofluorescence does not appear to be a factor in the pathogenesis of this model of immunologically induced histologic changes in the intestine. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1266943

  5. A 10-bp deletion in the apolipoprotein epsilon gene causing apolipoprotein E deficiency and severe type III hyperlipoproteinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Feussner, G.; Dobmeyer, J.; Gröne, H. J.; Lohmer, S.; Wohlfeil, S.

    1996-01-01

    Type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) is usually associated with homozygosity for apolipoprotein (apo) E2. We identified a 30-year-old male German of Hungarian ancestry with severe type III HLP and apo E deficiency. The disease was expressed in an extreme phenotype with multiple cutaneous xanthomas. Apo E was detectable only in trace amounts in plasma but not in the different lipoprotein fractions. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified segments of the apo epsilon gene identified a 10-bp deletion in exon 4 (bp 4037-4046 coding for amino acids 209-212 of the mature protein). The mutation is predictive for a reading frameshift introducing a premature stop codon (TGA) at amino acid 229. By western blot analysis, we found small amounts of a truncated apo E in the patient's plasma. Family analysis revealed that the proband was homozygous--and 10 of 24 relatives were heterozygous--for the mutation. Heterozygotes had, as compared to unaffected family members, significantly higher triglycerides (TG), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol and a significantly higher VLDL cholesterol-to-serum TG ratio, which is indicative of a delayed remnant catabolism. We propose that the absence of a functionally active apo E is the cause of the severe type III HLP in the patient and that the mutation, even in a single dose in heterozygotes, predisposes in variable severity to the phenotypic expression of the disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8571954

  6. Differences in cellular glycoconjugates of quiescent, inflamed, and neoplastic colonic epithelium in colitis and cancer-prone tamarins.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R.; King, N.; Alroy, J.

    1988-01-01

    In the preceding paper the authors demonstrated that the lectin staining patterns of normal colonic epithelium obtained from colitis and carcinoma-prone cotton top tamarins (CTTs), Saguinus oedipus, a New World primate, differs from colitis- and carcinoma-resistant primate species. In this study they determined the usefulness of cytochemical features in inflamed epithelium as indicators for malignant change. They compared the lectin staining pattern in inflamed mucosa and adjacent mucosa with colonic carcinoma from 8 CTTs with that of 9 clinically healthy CTTs with no histologic evidence of colitis. Deparaffinized sections were labeled with ten biotinylated lectins and stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex method. Numerous significant differences were demonstrated in the lectin staining pattern between normal epithelium and colonic carcinoma; fewer between normal and chronic inflamed epithelium. However, between chronic inflamed epithelium and colonic carcinoma significant staining differences were observed with only two lectins, peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I). These findings suggest that there is a progression in alteration of lectin staining pattern from normal epithelium, via chronic colitis, to colonic carcinoma. Furthermore, the differences between chronic colitis and colonic carcinoma are expressed only with those lectins that are associated with malignant transformation of human colonic epithelium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3132858

  7. Expression of occludin, tight-junction-associated protein, in human digestive tract.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Y.; Shiozaki, H.; Hirao, M.; Maeno, Y.; Doki, Y.; Inoue, M.; Monden, T.; Ando-Akatsuka, Y.; Furuse, M.; Tsukita, S.; Monden, M.

    1997-01-01

    The tight junction seals cells together at a subapical location and functionally separates the plasma membrane into an apical and a basolateral domain. This junction is one of the most characteristic structural markers of the polarized epithelial cell. Recently, occludin has been identified as an integral transmembrane protein localizing at the tight junction and directly associated with ZO-1, an undercoat-constitutive cytoplasmic protein. We have investigated occludin expression in conjunction with ZO-1 in normal epithelia and cancers of human digestive tract by immunostaining with a new antibody raised against human occludin. In the normal simple columnar epithelium, occludin was expressed together with ZO-1 as a single line at the apical cell border. However, in the esophagus, which has a stratified squamous epithelium, no occludin expression could be detected, but ZO-1 was expressed in the spinous layer. As for cancers, both occludin and ZO-1 showed the same expression in differentiated adenocarcinoma cells as in normal epithelium, but in poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas, the expression of these two proteins was reduced. There was significant correlation between tumor differentiation and expression of these proteins. These results suggest that occludin, together with ZO-1, is involved in the formation of gland-like structures. In addition, occludin expression can serve as a histopathological indicator for differentiation in gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9212730

  8. Platelet satellitism: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural morphology of platelet-polymorph (platelet-polymorphonuclear leukocyte) rosettes was investigated in EDTA-anticoagulated blood obtained from two patients who exhibited the phenomenon of platelet satellitism. Most of the platelet profiles were attached to the polymorph surface by broad areas of contact. Examination of these broad areas of contact at high magnification revealed an intercellular material of low electron density. This material appeared to form strands, which bridged the intercellular space and spanned the entire area formed by the apposing plasma membranes. Phagocytosis of entire platelets was only observed in 1 case. The platelet profiles that participated in rosette formation revealed a large number of glycogen particles, compared with unattached platelets. Ultrastructural examination of "stress" platelets obtained from five normal subjects treated with steroids similarly showed a large number of glycogen particles, although no rosette formation or phagocytosis of platelets was observed. The etiology of platelet satellitism is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7223859

  9. Silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Castranova, V; Vallyathan, V

    2000-01-01

    Exposure to coal mine dust and/or crystalline silica results in pneumoconiosis with initiation and progression of pulmonary fibrosis. This review presents characteristics of simple and complicated coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) as well as pathologic indices of acute and chronic silicosis by summarizing results of in vitro, animal, and human investigations. These results support four basic mechanisms in the etiology of CWP and silicosis: a) direct cytotoxicity of coal dust or silica, resulting in lung cell damage, release of lipases and proteases, and eventual lung scarring; b) activation of oxidant production by pulmonary phagocytes, which overwhelms the antioxidant defenses and leads to lipid peroxidation, protein nitrosation, cell injury, and lung scarring; c) activation of mediator release from alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells, which leads to recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages, resulting in the production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive species and in further lung injury and scarring; d) secretion of growth factors from alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells, stimulating fibroblast proliferation and eventual scarring. Results of in vitro and animal studies provide a basis for proposing these mechanisms for the initiation and progression of pneumoconiosis. Data obtained from exposed workers lend support to these mechanisms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10931786

  10. Unexpected immunoreactivities of intermediate filament antibodies in human brain and brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Franke, F. E.; Schachenmayr, W.; Osborn, M.; Altmannsberger, M.

    1991-01-01

    Immunoreactivities of 35 different monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that detect intermediate filaments were studied systematically on serial cryostat sections of 14 well-defined human gliomas (five astrocytomas, three oligodendrogliomas, six glioblastomas) and on normal brain. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), vimentin, desmin, neurofilaments, and broad-specificity keratin MAbs, as well as MAbs that recognize several or only single keratin polypeptides, were used. Unexpected reactivities were surprisingly frequent. As these may lead to diagnostic confusion and misinterpretation on this material, the authors investigated these phenomena more thoroughly. Four major sources of artifactual staining were found: 1) positive staining attributable to the rabbit gamma G immunoglobulins used in the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique; 2) certain desmin and keratin MAbs cross-reacted with astrocytic glia and with other brain-specific epitopes; 3) technical difficulties; 4) some MAbs directed against neurofilaments and keratins showed unexpected reactivities only on individual anaplastic gliomas. The implications of these findings for intermediate filament typing of neuropathologic material are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1713022

  11. The role of fibronectin in the development of experimental amyloidosis. Evidence of immunohistochemical codistribution and binding property with serum amyloid protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, E.; Shiroo, M.; Nakanishi, I.; Migita, S.

    1989-01-01

    Azocasein-induced amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis in CBA/K1Jms mice was investigated to elucidate a preference of serum amyloid A (SAA) deposition in the spleen. By indirect immunofluorescence using anti-SAA/AA antibodies the initial deposition of SAA/AA was recognized in the marginal zone of spleen at 20 days after azocasein injection. Indirect immunofluorescence using anti-fibronectin antibodies also showed meshwork positivity in the corresponding area more intensely than that in controls. Immunoelectron microscopy using anti-SAA/AA revealed the presence of positively stained flocculent materials on cell surfaces of macrophages in the marginal area in addition to amyloid fibril. The tissue fibronectin rapidly increased in the spleen and maintained 10 times more than that of controls until the 20th day. Binding assay of SAA on frozen sections revealed the presence of SAA-binding substances in the perifollicular area. Affinity chromatographic assay showed fibronectin have a binding capacity to SAA1 and SAA2. By binding assay on the microtiter plate, SAA had more affinity to fibronectin than those of heparan sulfate, collagen type I, or serum amyloid P component. These results indicate that fibronectin plays an important role in the development of amyloidosis by working as a linking protein between SAA and the cell surface of macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:2757120

  12. Aquatic-Based Rehabilitation and Training for the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Thein, Jill M.; Brody, Lori Thein

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To describe the application of aquatic rehabilitative exercise to injuries of the upper extremity. Background: Water has been used for centuries as a medium for rehabilitation, relaxation, and training. Athletes use the pool to rehabilitate specific injuries, as a training medium during injury recovery, and as an alternative training site. The pool can be used to rehabilitate a number of upper extremity impairments, as well as to restore functional movement patterns in a resistive medium. Description: Exercises can be modified to be performed in pools of varying size and depth. Well-chosen equipment will enhance the rehabilitative opportunities for the clinician and patient. Clinical Advantages: All aspects of the rehabilitation program, including passive stretching, resistive exercise, functional movement patterns, and cardiovascular training, can take place in the same location. The water's warmth and buoyancy enhance stretching, while the buoyancy allows initiation of resistive exercise at a low level. The water's viscosity provides resistance throughout a movement pattern in any plane. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:16558651

  13. Keratin proteins in human lung carcinomas. Combined use of morphology, keratin immunocytochemistry, and keratin immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed Central

    Banks-Schlegel, S. P.; McDowell, E. M.; Wilson, T. S.; Trump, B. F.; Harris, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Light-microscopic immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy demonstrated that adenocarcinomas (AC) and squamous cell (epidermoid) carcinomas (SCCs) of human lung contained keratin proteins in the form of tonofilament bundles. However, moderately differentiated (md) SCCs contained abundant keratin, whereas poorly differentiated (pd) SCCs and all ACs contained lesser amounts. Lung tumors with the diagnosis of AC or SCC, as defined by WHO criteria, were also analyzed by immunoprecipitation techniques for the presence of keratin proteins. Regardless of the degree of tumor differentiation, SCCs contained a 44 kd keratin which was lacking in ACs. Interestingly, normal bronchial epithelium also contained the same 44 kd keratin. In addition, as SCCs became more differentiated, they exhibited even greater differences in the profile of synthesized keratins. Specifically, the relative abundance of the intermediate-sized keratins (57 and 59 kd) was increased in the md SCCs. Although keratin protein patterns appear to be a valuable adjunct in distinguishing AC from SCC, their usefulness as a diagnostic tool will require survey of a larger number of poorly differentiated tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:6198920

  14. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes in long-term culture.

    PubMed Central

    Bour, E. S.; Ward, L. K.; Cornman, G. A.; Isom, H. C.

    1996-01-01

    Apoptosis occurs naturally in the liver and increases in specific pathogenic processes. We previously described the use of a chemically defined medium supplemented with epidermal growth factor and dimethylsulfoxide to maintain rat hepatocytes in a highly differentiated state for more than 30 days (long-term culture). In this study, we showed that hepatocytes in long-term dimethylsulfoxide culture have definite advantages over using cells in short-term culture (cells in culture for 2 to 4 days) to study apoptosis. We demonstrated that treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha induced apoptosis (detected morphologically and by formation of an oligonucleosomal DNA ladder) only in hepatocytes that had been subjected to dimethylsulfoxide removal. Neither treatment with TNF-alpha alone or dimethylsulfoxide removal alone induced apoptosis. Apoptosis could be induced by concentrations as low as 500 U of TNF-alpha/ml. Although a DNA ladder was not detected by 12 hours after TNF-alpha treatment, it was easily identified by 24 hours. We conclude that this system can be used 1) to examine the underlying mechanism by which TNF-alpha causes apoptosis in hepatocytes and 2) to study induction of apoptosis in hepatocytes by other agents. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8579111

  15. The avian respiratory system: a unique model for studies of respiratory toxicosis and for monitoring air quality.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R E; Brain, J D; Wang, N

    1997-01-01

    There are many distinct differences (morphologic, physiologic, and mechanical) between the bird's lung-air-sac respiratory system and the mammalian bronchoalveolar lung. In this paper, we review the physiology of the avian respiratory system with attention to those mechanisms that may lead to significantly different results, relative to those in mammals, following exposure to toxic gases and airborne particulates. We suggest that these differences can be productively exploited to further our understanding of the basic mechanisms of inhalant toxicology (gases and particulates). The large mass-specific gas uptake by the avian respiratory system, at rest and especially during exercise, could be exploited as a sensitive monitor of air quality. Birds have much to offer in our understanding of respiratory toxicology, but that expectation can only be realized by investigating, in a wide variety of avian taxa, the pathophysiologic interactions of a broad range of inhaled toxicants on the bird's unique respiratory system. Images p188-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. PMID:9105794

  16. Neurotrophin and Neurotrophin Receptors in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Michael J.; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Kraemer, Rosemary; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Tessarollo, Lino; Mahadeo, Debbie; Sharif, Setareh; Kaplan, David R.; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Parada, Luis; Toran-Allerand, C. Dominique; Hajjar, David P.; Hempstead, Barbara L.

    1995-01-01

    The neurotrophins, a family of related polypeptide growth factors including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin (NT)-3 and NT-4/5 promote the survival and differentiation of distinctive sets of embryonic neurons. Here we define a new functional role for neurotrophins, as autocrine or local paracrine mediators of vascular smooth muscle cell migration. We have identified neurotrophins, and their cognate receptors, the trk tyrosine kinases, in human and rat vascular smooth muscle cells in vivo. In vitro, cultured human smooth muscle cells express BDNF; NT-3; and trk A, B, and C Similarly, rat smooth muscle cells expressed all three trk receptors as well as all four neurotrophins. Moreover, NGF induces cultured human smooth muscle cell migration at subnanomolar concentrations. In the rat aortic balloon deendothelialization model of vascular injury, the expression of NGF, BDNF, and their receptors trk A and trk B increased dramatically in the area of injury within 3 days and persisted during the formation of the neointima. In human coronary atherosclerotic lesions, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4/5, and the trk B and trk C receptors could be demonstrated in smooth muscle cells. These findings suggest that neurotrophins play an important role in regulating the response of vascular smooth muscle cells to injury. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:7639328

  17. Expression of neural cell adhesion molecule in normal and neoplastic human neuroendocrine tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Hemperly, J. J.; Lloyd, R. V.

    1991-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) is a group of cell surface glycoproteins involved in direct cell--cell adhesion. N-CAM expression in normal and neoplastic tissues was examined with specific antibodies and oligonucleotide probes by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Most neuroendocrine cells and tumors with secretory granules expressed N-CAM protein and mRNA. Parathyroid adenomas (4) were somewhat unusual, because N-CAM mRNA, but not protein, was detected in some of these benign neoplasms. Most non-neuroendocrine cells and tumors did not express N-CAM, although uterine smooth muscle and an adrenal cortical carcinoma were both positive. Western blots disclosed proteins of 180, 140, and 120 kd in normal adult brain, whereas two pheochromocytomas, a null cell adenoma, and a gastrinoma had proteins of approximately 180 and 140 kd. These results indicate that N-CAM protein and mRNA are widely expressed in neuroendocrine cells and neoplasms. N-CAM oligonucleotide probes as well as antibodies against N-CAM can be used as broad-spectrum neuroendocrine markers. In addition, these molecular probes can be used to examine the role of N-CAM in the development and regulation of neuroendocrine tissues. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2012179

  18. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy of a superstructure of fluid dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Klösgen, B; Helfrich, W

    1997-01-01

    Using cryo-transmission electron microscopy, we have obtained abundant and reproducible evidence for a superstructure of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers. Dispersions of vesicles were prepared by gentle shaking of a 2% suspension of DOPC in water followed in part by extrusion through a porous technical membrane. Sampling and cryofixation took place at various times within 3 weeks after the preparation. From the micrographs we infer that the small fraction of vesicles enclosing one another develop passages (connections) between the bilayers. In contrast, the superstructure is basically a feature of disconnected membranes. Among its modifications are isolated membrane bends or folds and a grainy membrane texture with a minimal grain spacing of 4-6 nm. In the extruded dispersions the passages and the superstructure seem to be formed mostly within the first day. The fraction of smooth and unilamellar vesicles is large at all times and in all dispersions. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:9414216

  19. The Apexcardiogram in Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Howard H.

    1972-01-01

    The apexcardiogram (acg), when recorded serially in patients with acute myocardial infarction (ami), preinfarction angina (pia) and stable ischemic heart disease (ihd), appeared to reflect the abnormal patterns of contraction of the left ventricle in these conditions. Thus, paradoxical bulging (dyskinesis) of the systolic wave or increased “a” wave amplitude with gradual recovery over several weeks was found in all 60 patients with documented ami and in 18 of 20 patients with pia. Electrocardiogram changes were noted, however, in only eight of the pia patients. Changes in the acg frequently antedated ischemia in the ecg. Paradoxical bulging of the systolic wave of the acg was additionally noted in patients during the pain of angina pectoris but this promptly disappeared after the administration of nitroglycerine. Patients with classic angina often had normal resting ecg's but abnormal resting acg's. In contrast to the relatively transient abnormalities noted above, the acg remained unchanged in most patients with stable ihd during follow-up of three months to two years. Patients undergoing coronary bypass operations, however, showed immediate improvement in the acg in the postoperative period. These results suggest the acg reflects the contractile pattern of the left ventricle, and may be an indirectly recorded ventriculogram. Its enhanced sensitivity and the earlier development of changes in comparison to the ecg make this a valuable tool in the study of patients with heart disease. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:5008498

  20. Hot-spot mutations in the p53 gene of liver nodules induced in rats fed DL-ethionine with a methyl-deficient diet.

    PubMed Central

    Tsujiuchi, T.; Yeleswarapu, L.; Konishi, Y.; Lombardi, B.

    1997-01-01

    Male F-344 rats were fed for 15 weeks a methyl-deficient L-amino acid defined diet containing 0.05% DL-ethionine. Nodules protruding from the surface of the liver were dissected free of surrounding tissue, and polyadenylated RNA isolated from the nodules was reverse transcribed. The region of the p53 gene comprising codons 120-290 was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, and cDNAs were sequenced. Mutations were detected in nodules obtained from 7 of 12 rats. In all seven cases, the same two point mutations were present. The first was at the first base of codon 246 and consisted of a C-->T transition (C:G-->T:A, Arg-->Cys), while the second was at the second base of codon 247 and consisted of a G-->T transversion (G:C-->T:A, Arg-->Leu). It is concluded that the hepatocarcinogen ethionine induces specific hot-spot p53 gene mutations; this is in contrast to the mutations at various sites previously observed to occur in rats fed a hepatocarcinogenic methyl-deficient diet alone. The results also provide the first evidence that ethionine is mutagenic in the rat. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9218726

  1. Protein Energy Malnutrition and Fat Mobilization in Neonatal Calves

    PubMed Central

    Schoonderwoerd, Matt; Doige, Cecil E.; Wobeser, Gary A.; Naylor, Jonathan M.

    1986-01-01

    Fat stores and organ weights were assessed in calves at birth (n=5) and after seven days of milk (n=5) or electrolyte (n=5) feeding. Compared to newborn calves, milk-fed calves had a significant (p < 0.05) redistribution of fat from perirenal area to bone marrow. The thymus also involuted during milk feeding. In electrolyte-fed calves there was a significant loss of perirenal and bone marrow fat. The visible omental, mesenteric and subcutaneous fat stores were depleted. Epicardial fat stores were not visibly affected. There was a high correlation between bone marrow crude fat and bone marrow dry matter (R=0.92). This suggests that dry matter estimations can be used to assess bone marrow fat stores. Perirenal fat may be intermediate in type between brown and white adipose tissue because it is mobilized in response to fasting, and formalin fixed perirenal fat did not contain detectable levels of thermogenin. ImagesFigure 1., Figure 2., Figure 3., Figure 4., Figure 5.Figure 6., Figure 7., Figure 8., Figure 9. PMID:17422704

  2. Cell and tissue distribution of synthetic oligonucleotides in healthy and tumor-bearing nude mice. An autoradiographic, immunohistological, and direct fluorescence microscopy study.

    PubMed Central

    Plenat, F.; Klein-Monhoven, N.; Marie, B.; Vignaud, J. M.; Duprez, A.

    1995-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides have the ability to inhibit individual gene expression in the potential treatment of cancer and viral diseases. However, the way parenterally administered oligonucleotides distribute themselves into healthy tissues or tumors is poorly understood. In this study, the cell and tissue distribution of two modified or unmodified phosphodiester pentadeca-beta-oligonucleotides intravenously administered to healthy or tumor-bearing nude mice was assessed by autoradiography as well as by direct fluorescence and immunoenzymatic histological methods. Resistance of oligonucleotides to degradation by nuclease activity was previously studied in vitro. Using these methods we were able to show the following: 1) within minutes, oligonucleotides permeate all cells and tissues with the exceptions of erythrocytes and intervertebral discs; 2) cell and tissue distribution does not depend on the sequence of the given oligonucleotide; 3) concentration of oligonucleotides is higher within the connective tissue cells than in the interstitial matrix; 4) after uptake, oligomers partition throughout all of the cellular compartments, including at the highest intracellular concentrations in the nuclei; 5) oligonucleotides penetrate easily the tumor cell compartments, oligonucleotide diffusion being unimpeded by the extracellular matrix. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:7604874

  3. Extracellular matrix components induce endocrine differentiation in vitro in NCI-H716 cells.

    PubMed Central

    de Bruïne, A. P.; Dinjens, W. N.; van der Linden, E. P.; Pijls, M. M.; Moerkerk, P. T.; Bosman, F. T.

    1993-01-01

    Endocrine cells occur in +/- 30% of colorectal adenocarcinomas. The significance of this phenomenon in terms of tumor behavior is still controversial. Endocrine differentiation in colorectal cancer cell lines is almost confined to tumor xenografts in vivo, suggesting that endocrine differentiation might be regulated by epithelial-stromal interactions. This hypothesis was studied in the cecal adenocarcinoma-derived cell line NCI-H716 by comparing the expression of chromogranin A protein and messenger RNA in vivo and in vitro and by attempts to induce differentiation in vitro. We found that chromogranin A expression, which was strongest in vivo, could be significantly enhanced in vitro by culturing tumor cells in the presence of native extracellular matrix, on fibroblast feeder layers, and in a defined medium with basic fibroblast growth factor. The results suggest that the extracellular matrix induces endocrine differentiation through factors (e.g., basic fibroblast-growth factor) that may be produced by stromal cells and after secretion bind to the extracellular matrix. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8456938

  4. Analysis of the growth properties and physical state of the human papillomavirus type 16 genome in cell lines derived from primary cervical tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, L.; Mikumo, R.; Mark, H. F.; Lauchlan, S.

    1993-01-01

    We have established three cell lines from keratinizing and nonkeratinizing cervical carcinomas with distinct growth properties in vitro and in vivo. Each cell line contained human papillomavirus type 16 DNA sequences, but the lines differed in the physical state of the viral genome present in the cells. A high copy number of episomal human papillomavirus type 16 DNA sequences was detected in the TC-140 line derived from a keratinizing cervical cancer. This cell line had an aneuploid karyotype, did not grow in soft agarose, and formed benign cystlike nodules in nude mice, similar in morphology to well-differentiated areas of the primary tumor. Only integrated human papillomavirus type 16 sequences were detected in the TC-146A and TC-146B lines established from a nonkeratinizing large-cell cervical carcinoma. These cell lines exhibited reduced sensitivity to transforming growth factor-beta 1 and produced invasive, but not progressively growing, tumors in nude mice. These cell lines should complement existing in vitro models of cervical carcinogenesis and provide useful tools for understanding the importance of virus integration in the transformation process as well as the cellular and molecular basis for tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8395773

  5. Proliferative potential and p53 overexpression in precursor and early stage lesions of bronchioloalveolar lung carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, H.; Kameda, Y.; Nakamura, N.; Nakatani, Y.; Inayama, Y.; Iida, M.; Noda, K.; Ogawa, N.; Shibagaki, T.; Kanisawa, M.

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the pathogenesis of bronchioloalveolar lung carcinoma (BAC), we evaluated the lesion size, growth fraction, and p53 overexpression of atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) and early stage BAC. AAH was classified as showing low grade or high grade atypia. AAH-like carcinoma, presumably very early stage BAC, was distinguished from AAH in that it exhibited remarkable atypia suggestive of malignant potential and from overt BAC in that it lacked unequivocal malignant features, including invasive/destructive growth. The growth fraction was determined immunohistochemically in terms of the Ki-67 labeling index. The overexpression of p53 was evaluated by assessing the nuclear accumulation of immunoreactive p53 protein. Both the lesion size and the growth fraction increased from low grade AAH, to high grade AAH, to AAH-like carcinoma, and to overt adenocarcinoma. The overexpression of p53 in AAH-like carcinoma was similar to that in overt adenocarcinoma and was more frequent than that in AAH. Our findings indicate that AAH, AAH-like carcinoma, and overt BAC represent different categories, although the cellular events occurring in these lesions presumably represent a continuous spectrum of the changes that are reflected in the cytomorphology and lesion size. The findings here suggest that AAH and AAH-like carcinomas constitute a population of heterogeneous lesions representing different steps toward overt BAC. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7717455

  6. Comparative pathology of silicate pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, C.; Abraham, J.; Brambilla, E.; Benirschke, K.; Bloor, C.

    1979-01-01

    A simple pneumoconiosis with lamellar birefringent crystals was observed in animals dying in the San Diego Zoo. We studied 100 autopsies from 11 mammalian and eight avian species. In mammals, mild pulmonary lesions comprised crystal-laden macrophages in alveoli and lymphatics. Interstitial fibrosis was present in 20% of cases. There were no nodules. In birds, dust retention produced large granulomas around tertiary bronchi without fibrosis. Mineralogic analysis using scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed most of the crystals to be silicates. Ninety percent were complex silicates, with aluminum-potassium silicates comprising 70% of the analyzed particles. Electron and x-ray diffraction showed the silicates to be muscovite mica and its hydrothermal degradation product, ie, illite clay. This mica was also present on filtration membranes of atmospheric air samples obtained from the San Diego Zoo. The amount of dust retention was related to the animal's age, anatomic or ecologic variances, and length of stay in the San Diego Zoo. Its semidesert atmosphere is rich in silicates, which are inhaled and deposited in the lungs. Similar mica-induced lesions are found in humans living in this region or the Southwest of the USA. This simple pneumoconiosis is likely to be widespread in human populations living in desert or semidesert climates. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:223447

  7. Allelic deletions of the VHL gene detected in multiple microscopic clear cell renal lesions in von Hippel-Lindau disease patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lubensky, I. A.; Gnarra, J. R.; Bertheau, P.; Walther, M. M.; Linehan, W. M.; Zhuang, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Patients with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease develop a spectrum of bilateral clear-cell renal lesions including cysts and renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). VHL gene deletions have been previously reported in VHL-associated macroscopic RCC. Although histological analysis suggests that microscopic cystic lesions in the VHL patients may represent precursors of the RCC, there is at present no direct molecular evidence of their relationship. To investigate the relationship between cystic lesions and RCC, 26 microdissected archival renal lesions from two VHL disease patients were studied for loss of heterozygosity at the VHL gene locus using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. The renal lesions included 2 benign cysts, 5 atypical cysts, 5 microscopic RCCs in situ, 5 cysts lined by a single layer of cells, in which RCCs in situ were developing, and 2 microscopic and 7 macroscopic RCCs. Except for a single benign cyst, 25 of 26 renal lesions showed nonrandom allelic loss of the VHL gene. In either of the 2 patients, the same VHL allele was deleted in all of the lesions tested, indicating loss of the wild-type allele and retention of the inherited, mutated VHL allele. The results suggest that all clear-cell lesions in the VHL kidney represent neoplasms and that the loss of the VHL gene occurs early in their development. Atypical and benign cysts most likely represent the initial phenotype in malignant transformation to the RCC. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8952541

  8. The generation of DNA single-strand breaks during the reduction of chromate by ascorbic acid and/or glutathione in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kortenkamp, A; O'Brien, P

    1994-01-01

    The potential role of iron and copper and the involvement of hydroxyl radicals in the DNA cleavage caused by chromate and glutathione (GSH) has been investigated. We have also studied the ability of chromate, on reaction with ascorbate as well as in mixed solutions of ascorbate and GSH, to cause DNA strand breaks. In both fully demetalated and conventional (i.e., metal contaminated) systems, chromate and GSH induced similar numbers of DNA strand breaks. This observation suggests that traces of iron or copper contaminating the reaction mixtures do not play a major role in the DNA cleavage caused by chromate and GSH. A series of hydroxyl radical scavengers exhibited a protective influence on the induction of DNA strand breaks. However, glucose and sucrose, both strong hydroxyl radical scavengers, showed no concentration-dependent inhibition of DNA cleavage. Competition kinetics studies yielded apparent rate constants that were not consistent with hydroxyl radicals being the species responsible for DNA strand breaks. Ascorbate in combination with chromate was also found to induce strand breaks in DNA; this damage could be attributed to reactive intermediates generated during the reduction. When mixed systems of ascorbate and GSH in the presence of chromate were investigated, there were clearly interactions between the two reductants. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:7843105

  9. Reconstruction of the lids of a child with microblepharon and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Merriam, J C; Stalnecker, M C; Merriam, G R

    1988-01-01

    The initial stages in the rehabilitation of a male child with severe microblepharon, corneal opacities, bilateral facial clefts, bilateral complete cleft lip and palate, and unilateral syndactyly are described. Review of the literature suggests that severe microblepharon is associated with other craniofacial anomalies, and often the child is stillborn or retarded. Surviving children have been abandoned because of their appearance. The child described in this case appears to be unique because his intelligence is normal, and, to our knowledge, this is the first reported case of penetrating keratoplasty after reconstruction of functional eyelids. The principal problems after corneal grafting appear to have been chronic partial exposure due to inadequate lid length and a poor Bell's reflex and the persistence of a rim of vascularized fibrous tissue around the corneal graft. Future reconstructive surgery is outlined. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 PMID:2979029

  10. Diverse responses of human fibroblasts to a highly purified fibroblast-activating factor from the U937 line of human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Turck, C W; Kennedy, P W; Schiogolev, S I; Goetzl, E J

    1989-01-01

    The responses of human dermal fibroblasts to highly purified fibroblast-activating factor (FAF), derived from supernatants of U937 human monocytes stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), were investigated with several in vitro assays of specific synthetic functions. The highly purified peptide was detected as a single 16,000-18,000 MW protein, by both silver staining and Western blot analysis, with an antiserum generated against a synthetic peptide representing the amino-terminal sequence of 17 amino acids. At concentrations that induced similar levels of fibroblast proliferation, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), interleukin-1 (IL-1), acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) and FAF also stimulated fibroblasts to generate and release prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and proteoglycans. TGF-beta had the least effect on proteoglycan production. In contrast, the production and secretion of collagen evoked by FAF was only minimal when compared to that observed with IL-1 and aFGF. FAF and aFGF promoted fibroblast-induced collagen gel contraction with similar potency. Thus, the profile of fibroblast effects is a specific property of each cytokine. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:2592015

  11. Analytical Debye-Huckel model for electrostatic potentials around dissolved DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, K; Keyes, E; Kephart, T W; Edwards, G

    1997-01-01

    We present an analytical, Green-function-based model for the electric potential of DNA in solution, treating the surrounding solvent with the Debye-Huckel approximation. The partial charge of each atom is accounted for by modeling DNA as linear distributions of atoms on concentric cylindrical surfaces. The condensed ions of the solvent are treated with the Debye-Huckel approximation. The resultant leading term of the potential is that of a continuous shielded line charge, and the higher order terms account for the helical structure. Within several angstroms of the surface there is sufficient information in the electric potential to distinguish features and symmetries of DNA. Plots of the potential and equipotential surfaces, dominated by the phosphate charges, reflect the structural differences between the A, B, and Z conformations and, to a smaller extent, the difference between base sequences. As the distances from the helices increase, the magnitudes of the potentials decrease. However, the bases and sugars account for a larger fraction of the double helix potential with increasing distance. We have found that when the solvent is treated with the Debye-Huckel approximation, the potential decays more rapidly in every direction from the surface than it did in the concentric dielectric cylinder approximation. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:9199767

  12. Electronic structure of Q-A in reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. I. Electron paramagnetic resonance in single crystals.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, R A; Lendzian, F; Abresch, E C; Lubitz, W; Feher, G

    1995-01-01

    The magnitude and orientation of the electronic g-tensor of the primary electron acceptor quinone radical anion, Q-A, has been determined in single crystals of zinc-substituted reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26 at 275 K and at 80 K. To obtain high spectral resolution, EPR experiments were performed at 35 GHz and the native ubiquinone-10 (UQ10) in the reaction center was replaced by fully deuterated UQ10. The principal values and the direction cosines of the g-tensor axes with respect to the crystal axes a, b, c were determined. Freezing of the single crystals resulted in only minor changes in magnitude and orientation of the g-tensor. The orientation of Q-A as determined by the g-tensor axes deviates only by a few degrees (< or = 8 degrees) from the orientation of the neutral QA obtained from an average of four different x-ray structures of Rb. sphaeroides reaction centers. This deviation lies within the accuracy of the x-ray structure determinations. The g-tensor values measured in single crystals agree well with those in frozen solutions. Variations in g-values between Q-A, Q-B, and UQ10 radical ion in frozen solutions were observed and attributed to different environments. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 9 PMID:8527644

  13. Developmental Staging of Maize Microspores Reveals a Transition in Developing Microspore Proteins 1

    PubMed Central

    Bedinger, Patricia A.; Edgerton, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    A method for the preparation of developmentally staged microspores and young pollen from maize (Zea mays) has been devised. The preparations are of sufficient purity and quantity for biochemical analysis, including the analysis of steady-state protein and RNA populations associated with each stage. A major transition in protein populations occurs during the developmental period that encompasses microspore mitosis, the asymmetric nuclear division producing the vegetative and generative nuclei. Several differences between early and late stage proteins can be detected by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins reveals that over half of the steady-state proteins differ between the younger and older stages, either quantitative or qualitative. One protein that increases in relative abundance about fourfold is actin. In vitro translation of RNA isolated from staged microspores demonstrates changes in microspore gene expression during the same developmental period. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:16667300

  14. Mutations and phenotype in isolated glycerol kinase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A. P.; Muscatelli, F.; Stafford, A. N.; Chelly, J.; Dahl, N.; Blomquist, H. K.; Delanghe, J.; Willems, P. J.; Steinmann, B.; Monaco, A. P.

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate that isolated glycerol kinase (GK) deficiency in three families results from mutation of the Xp21 GK gene. GK mutations were detected in four patients with widely differing phenotypes. Patient 1 had a splice-site mutation causing premature termination. His general health was good despite absent GK activity, indicating that isolated GK deficiency can be silent. Patient 2 had GK deficiency and a severe phenotype involving psychomotor retardation and growth delay, bone dysplasia, and seizures, similar to the severe phenotype of one of the first described cases of GK deficiency. His younger brother, patient 3, also had GK deficiency, but so far his development has been normal. GK exon 17 was deleted in both brothers, implicating additional factors in causation of the severe phenotype of patient 2. Patient 4 had both GK deficiency with mental retardation and a GK missense mutation (D440V). Possible explanations for the phenotypic variation of these four patients include ascertainment bias; metabolic or environmental stress as a precipitating factor in revealing GK-related changes, as has previously been described in juvenile GK deficiency; and interactions with functional polymorphisms in other genes that alter the effect of GK deficiency on normal development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8651297

  15. Cyclodestructive surgery for glaucoma: past, present, and future.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, M B

    1985-01-01

    When surgical attempts to control glaucoma by improving aqueous outflow are not successful, the alternative approach is usually to reduce aqueous inflow by a cyclodestructive procedure. Cyclodestructive elements that have been tried in the past include diathermy, electrolysis, and beta irradiation. Cyclocryotherapy is presently the most commonly used cyclodestructive procedure, although this operation has significant limitations, and newer techniques are being evaluated utilizing laser energy or ultrasonic radiation. Each of these procedures uses a transcleral approach, which has the disadvantages of (1) the inability to precisely quantitate the destruction of the ciliary processes, and (2) damage to adjacent tissue. Transpupillary cyclophotocoagulation minimizes these problems, but is limited to the small number of eyes in which adequate gonioscopic visualization of the ciliary processes can be achieved. An alternative approach for aphakic eyes is intraocular cyclophotocoagulation, utilizing an endophotocoagulator through a pars plana incision. Depending on the status of the eye, visualization for this technique can be accomplished either by the transpupillary route or with an endoscope. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:3832531

  16. Preparing to perform an awake fiberoptic intubation.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, M. E.; Shorten, G. D.

    1998-01-01

    Fiberoptically guided tracheal intubation represents one of the most important advances in airway management to occur in the past thirty years. Perhaps its most important role is in management of the anticipated difficult airway. This is a situation in which the dangers of encountering the life-threatening "can't intubate, can't ventilate" situation can be avoided by placement of an endotracheal tube while the patient is awake. Although skill at the procedure of endoscopy is obviously necessary in this setting, these authors hold that success or failure of the technique frequently depends on the adequacy of preparation. These measures include 1) pre-operative assessment of the patient; 2) careful explanation of what lies in store; 3) "setting the stage"; 4) preparing the equipment to be used; and 5) preparing the patient (antisialogue, sedation, application of topical anesthesia to the upper airway). If these preparatory measures are carried out meticulously, the likelihood of performing a successful and comfortable awake fiberoptic tracheal intubation is greatly increased. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:10604785

  17. The Identification of a Heat-Shock Protein Complex in Chloroplasts of Barley Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Adrian K.; Critchley, Christa

    1992-01-01

    In vivo radiolabeling of chloroplast proteins in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Corvette) leaves and their separation by one-dimensional electrophoresis revealed at least seven heat-shock proteins between 24 and 94 kD, of which most have not been previously identified in this C3 species. Fractionation into stromal and thylakoid membrane components showed that all chloroplast heat-shock proteins were synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes, translocated into the chloroplast, and located in the stroma. Examination of stromal preparations by native (nondissociating) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of a high-molecular mass heat-shock protein complex in barley. This complex was estimated to be 250 to 265 kD in size. Dissociation by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a single protein component, a 32-kD heat-shock protein. The synthesis of this protein and the formation of the heat-shock protein complex were dependent on functional cytoplasmic ribosomes. Immunological studies showed that the heat-shock protein complex did not contain any proteins homologous to the α-subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase subunit-binding protein. Other features about the complex included the absence of nucleic acid (RNA or DNA) and its nondissociation in the presence of Mg2+/ATP. These results suggest that the heat-shock protein complex in barley chloroplasts is a homogeneous octamer of 32-kD subunits. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:16653243

  18. Coexpression of type I and type II human macrophage scavenger receptors in macrophages of various organs and foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Naito, M.; Suzuki, H.; Mori, T.; Matsumoto, A.; Kodama, T.; Takahashi, K.

    1992-01-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptors are trimeric membrane glycoproteins implicated in the pathologic deposition of cholesterol in arterial walls during atherogenesis. Two types of cDNAs for functional human receptors have been cloned, but their physiologic roles remain obscure. To study the expression of these receptors, the authors generated antibodies against scavenger receptor type-specific synthetic peptide. Immunohistochemical examination using these antibodies and other anti-human receptor antibodies shows that type I and type II receptor proteins can be detected in foam cells in various stages of atherosclerosis, most evidently in fatty streaks. Co-expression of the two types of receptor protein was also detected in macrophages of various organs. Both types of the protein were detected on the surface and the membrane of endosomes in macrophages. These results indicate that both type I and type II scavenger receptors are expressed and functionally active in physiologic and pathologic conditions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1519666

  19. Histologic evolution of the reactions to hemorrhage in the premature human infant's brain. A combined ultrasound and autopsy study and a comparison with the reaction in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Darrow, V. C.; Alvord, E. C.; Mack, L. A.; Hodson, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    With the development and routine use of real-time ultrasound scanning, it has been possible to collect 20 autopsy cases of infants in whom the ultrasound scan was first normal and then showed evidence of subependymal/intraventricular hemorrhage (SEH/IVH). Analysis of these cases with known postnatal origin of the hemorrhage permitted the development for the first time of a time scale to characterize the temporal evolution of the histopathologic reactions to hemorrhage in the premature human brain. This time scale was then used to define the histologic stage of the lesions in 27 other cases of infants who had a scan demonstrating SEH/IVH prior to death but who had not a previously normal scan. Only 2 cases were found to lie off the original scale, indicating a prenatal onset of the hemorrhage in about 5% of the total cases. Thus, postnatal events immediately preceding the onset of the hemorrhage are more likely to be implicated in the pathogenesis of SEH/IVH than prenatal or obstetric events. Comparison with similar reactions in the adult indicate that the early reactions by macrophages occur at about the same rate but the routine transfer of iron from macrophages to astrocytes and the much slower rate of absorption to form a cyst in the adult combine to form a complicated pattern that requires a different set of criteria for the intermediate and late stages in the adult. Images Figure 4 Figure 3 Figure 9 Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:3276212

  20. Intraoperative two-dimensional echocardiography and color flow Doppler imaging: a basic transesophageal single plane patient examination sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, T. D.; Lippmann, H.

    1993-01-01

    Recent advances in technology have allowed application of transesophageal echocardiography to intraoperative care of critically ill patients. Early clinical application primarily involved evaluation of left ventricular regional wall motion. However, valid intraoperative use of transesophageal echocardiography should also encompass systematic assessment of the entire heart as well as the great vessels. This report describes a 10-step sequence of single plane, two-dimensional echocardiographic views which constitute a basic patient examination capable of being performed by a practitioner whose primary responsibility is the delivery of anesthesia care. A 5-step color flow Doppler examination sequence is also presented. These views complement the two-dimensional echocardiographic steps. Representations of methods for grading Doppler-defined valvular regurgitation complete the report. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 26 PMID:7825339

  1. Influence of surface chemistry on the structural organization of monomolecular protein layers adsorbed to functionalized aqueous interfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Lösche, M; Piepenstock, M; Diederich, A; Grünewald, T; Kjaer, K; Vaknin, D

    1993-01-01

    The molecular organization of streptavidin (SA) bound to aqueous surface monolayers of biotin-functionalized lipids and binary lipid mixtures has been investigated with neutron reflectivity and electron and fluorescence microscopy. The substitution of deuterons (2H) for protons (1H), both in subphase water molecules and in the alkyl chains of the lipid surface monolayer, was utilized to determine the interface structure on the molecular length scale. In all cases studied, the protein forms monomolecular layers underneath the interface with thickness values of approximately 40 A. A systematic dependence of the structural properties of such self-assembled SA monolayers on the surface chemistry was observed: the lateral protein density depends on the length of the spacer connecting the biotin moiety and its hydrophobic anchor. The hydration of the lipid head groups in the protein-bound state depends on the dipole moment density at the interface. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE A1 PMID:8298041

  2. Expression of vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor by human granulosa and theca lutein cells. Role in corpus luteum development.

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, B. R.; Brown, L. F.; Manseau, E. J.; Senger, D. R.; Dvorak, H. F.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF) is a cytokine that is overexpressed in many tumors, in healing wounds, and in rheumatoid arthritis. VPF/VEGF is thought to induce angiogenesis and accompanying connective tissue stroma in two ways: 1), by increasing microvascular permeability, thereby modifying the extracellular matrix and 2), as an endothelial cell mitogen. VPF/VEGF has been reported in animal corpora lutea and we investigated the possibility that it might be present in human ovaries and have a role in corpus luteum formation. We here report that VPF/VEGF mRNA and protein are expressed by human ovarian granulosa and theca cells late in follicle development and, subsequent to ovulation, by granulosa and theca lutein cells. Therefore, VPF/VEGF is ideally positioned to provoke the increased permeability of thecal blood vessels that occurs shortly before ovulation. VPF/VEGF likely also contributes to the angiogenesis and connective tissue stroma generation that accompany corpus luteum/corpus albicans formation. Finally, VPF/VEGF was overexpressed in the hyperthecotic ovarian stroma of Stein-Leventhal syndrome in which it may also have a pathophysiological role. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7531945

  3. Studies on experimental pulmonary granulomas. I. Detection of lymphokines in granulomatous lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Masih, N.; Majeska, J.; Yoshida, T.

    1979-01-01

    Granulomatous reactions were immunologically induced in guinea pigs by several procedures, including intravenous injections of Bacille Calmette Gúerin (BCG) into animals immunized with complete Freund's Adjuvant and an intravenous injection of agarose beads linked to a specific antigen (dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin) into immune animals. The tissue extracts obtained from lungs at various stages of granuloma formation were examined for macrophage migration inhibition (MIF) activity. The activity was found in a high incidence during the early stages of the granulomatous response. In contrast, MIF activity could be detected only rarely in granulomatous spleens and not in granulomatous livers. Chemotactic factor activity and mitogenic factor activity were only sporadically detectable. The MIF activity was associated with fractions showing chemical heterogeneity. One fraction was physicochemically indistinguishable from conventional lymphocyte-derived MIF; the other was a substance of large molecular weight. These results demonstrate the presence of biologically active mediators in immune granulomas, which may be related to early events involved in the induction or enhancement of such reactions. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:377991

  4. Spontaneous subcapsular and intrarenal hematoma demonstrated by various diagnostic modalities and monitored by ultrasonography until complete resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Shih, W. J.; Pulmano, C.; Han, J. K.; Lee, C.

    2000-01-01

    A patient with acute right abdominal pain and nausea underwent various diagnostic imaging studies, including ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), technetium-99m DTPA renal study, and contrast arteriogram. The 99mTc renal study showed a linear photopenic area along the lateral cortical aspect of the right kidney and a focal cortical defect in the left kidney. These lesions corresponded to the findings of US, CT, MRI, and contrast angiography. Because of a suspected malignant mass, a CT-guided aspiration biopsy of the right kidney was performed that resulted in bloody fluid without malignant cells. The patient's condition was diagnosed as intrarenal and subcapsular renal hematoma. The patient was treated conservatively and followed up with CT and US studies. Sequential CT and US demonstrated gradual reduction of the size of the hematoma, and complete resolution was confirmed by US 1.5 years later. As long as underlying pathology can be ruled out, conservative management of spontaneous renal subcapsular hematoma is recommended. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:10976177

  5. The structure of divalent cation-induced aggregates of PIP2 and their alteration by gelsolin and tau.

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, L A; Cunningham, C C; Chen, J; Prestwich, G D; Kosik, K S; Janmey, P A

    1997-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) serves as a precursor for diacylglycerol and inositol trisphosphate in signal transduction cascades and regulates the activities of several actin binding proteins that influence the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Molecules of PIP2 form 6-nm diameter micelles in water, but aggregate into larger, multilamellar structures in physiological concentrations of divalent cations. Electron microscopic analysis of these aggregates reveals that they are clusters of striated filaments, suggesting that PIP2 aggregates form stacks of discoid micelles rather than multilamellar vesicles or inverted hexagonal arrays as previously inferred from indirect observations. The distance between striations within the filaments varies from 4.2 to 5.4 nm and the diameter of the filaments depends on the dehydrated ionic radius of the divalent cation, with average diameters of 19, 12, and 10 nm for filaments formed by Mg2+, Ca2+, and Ba2+, respectively. The structure of the divalent cation-induced aggregates can be altered by PIP2 binding proteins. Gelsolin and the microtubule associated protein tau both affect the formation of aggregates, indicating that tau acts as a PIP2 binding protein in a manner similar to gelsolin. In contrast, another PIP2 binding protein, profilin, does not modify the aggregates. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:9284311

  6. Correlation of digital rectal examination, prostate specific antigen, and transrectal ultrasound in prostate carcinoma in African Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, R. I.; Sibley, A. F.

    1997-01-01

    Since there is general agreement that screening for prostate cancer should be carried out, at least for high-risk individuals, there should be little debate that African-American men should be screened. Current screening guidelines include the two most cost-effective methods of early detection, digital rectal examination and prostate specific antigen. The use of transrectal ultrasound and guided biopsy improves the yield. This article reports on the findings of 50 African-American patients with prostatic carcinoma diagnosed by sonographically guided biopsy in a single, community urology practice. Overall, prostate specific antigen was elevated in 94%, digital rectal examination was positive in 60%, and transrectal ultrasound was positive in 78%. A focal hypoechoic lesion was demonstrated in 58%. When the site of tumor, as specified in the pathology report, was correlated with the findings on digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasound, both digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasound were positive in 45%. Transrectal ultrasound was positive when digital rectal examination was negative in 30%. Digital rectal examination was positive when ultrasound was not in 14%. Random biopsy revealed areas of carcinoma that were not detected by digital rectal examination nor ultrasound in 40%. We conclude that even though random biopsy significantly improves the detection of prostate carcinoma, sonographic guidance is beneficial to systematically biopsy the gland and to avoid omission of characteristic lesions during random samplings. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9170832

  7. Hyperganglionosis mimicking Hirschsprung's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Athow, A C; Filipe, M I; Drake, D P

    1991-01-01

    Three patients with hyperganglionosis are reported in whom an initial diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease was suspected. In one patient there was a classic presentation with constipation, in another Hirschsprung's disease coexisted, and in the third the initial inadequate suction rectal biopsy specimen was suggestive of Hirschsprung's disease on acetylcholinesterase staining. Evidence of hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the intermuscular and submucosal plexuses on a full thickness bowel biopsy specimen was used to confirm the diagnosis of hyperganglionosis, suggested by the characteristic demonstration of moderate increase in the number of acetylcholinesterase stained nerve fibres in the lamina propria mucosae on rectal biopsy. Surgical management was guided by clinical signs. Two patients had colonic resections; the third had temporary stomal diversion. Hyperganglionosis is rarer than Hirschsprung's disease but is known to mimic it. We suggest full thickness bowel specimens are needed to confirm the diagnosis and that inadequate rectal suction biopsies must be interpreted with caution. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1755642

  8. pH-dependent specific binding and combing of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Allemand, J F; Bensimon, D; Jullien, L; Bensimon, A; Croquette, V

    1997-01-01

    Recent developments in the rapid sequencing, mapping, and analysis of DNA rely on the specific binding of DNA to specially treated surfaces. We show here that specific binding of DNA via its unmodified extremities can be achieved on a great variety of surfaces by a judicious choice of the pH. On hydrophobic surfaces the best binding efficiency is reached at a pH of approximately 5.5. At that pH a approximately 40-kbp DNA is 10 times more likely to bind by an extremity than by a midsegment. A model is proposed to account for the differential adsorption of the molecule extremities and midsection as a function of pH. The pH-dependent specific binding can be used to align anchored DNA molecules by a receding meniscus, a process called molecular combing. The resulting properties of the combed molecules will be discussed. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:9336201

  9. Remodeling the shape of the skeleton in the intact red cell.

    PubMed Central

    Khodadad, J K; Waugh, R E; Podolski, J L; Josephs, R; Steck, T L

    1996-01-01

    The role of the membrane skeleton in determining the shape of the human red cell was probed by weakening it in situ with urea, a membrane-permeable perturbant of spectrin. Urea by itself did not alter the biconcave disk shape of the red cell; however, above threshold conditions (1.5 M, 37 degrees C, 10 min), it caused an 18% reduction in the membrane elastic shear modulus. It also potentiated the spiculation of cells by lysophosphatidylcholine. These findings suggest that the contour of the resting cell is not normally dependent on the elasticity of or tension in the membrane skeleton. Rather, the elasticity of the skeleton stabilizes membranes against deformation. Urea treatment also caused the projections induced both by micropipette aspiration and by lysophosphatidylcholine to become irreversible. Furthermore, urea converted the axisymmetric conical spicules induced by lysophosphatidylcholine into irregular, curved and knobby spicules; i.e., echinocytosis became acanthocytosis. Unlike controls, the ghosts and membrane skeletons obtained from urea-generated acanthocytes were imprinted with spicules. These data suggest that perturbing interprotein associations with urea in situ allowed the skeleton to evolve plastically to accommodate the contours imposed upon it by the overlying membrane. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8789122

  10. Distinct expression profiles of stromelysin-2 (MMP-10), collagenase-3 (MMP-13), macrophage metalloelastase (MMP-12), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP-3) in intestinal ulcerations.

    PubMed Central

    Vaalamo, M.; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M. L.; Puolakkainen, P.; Kere, J.; Saarialho-Kere, U.

    1998-01-01

    Programmed expression of matrix metalloproteinases is involved in wound healing in various organs. We have previously demonstrated enhanced expression of collagenase-1, stromelysin-1, matrilysin, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1) in gastrointestinal ulcerations. To further define the role of matrix-degrading enzymes and their inhibitors in intestinal inflammation and ulcerations, the expression of stromelysin-2 (MMP-10), collagenase-3 (MMP-13), macrophage metalloelastase (HME, MMP-12), and TIMP-3 mRNAs was studied using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in 38 samples representing ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, ischemic colitis, and normal intestine. As controls for normally healing intestinal wounds, 12 postoperative samples of rat experimental jejunal anastomoses were also examined. The colitis types studied did not essentially differ in their MMP expression. We found stromelysin-2 mRNA in laminin-5-positive and Ki-67-negative enterocytes bordering the ulcerations. HME was abundantly expressed by macrophages in the vicinity of shedding mucosal epithelium and beneath the necrotic surface of the ulcers. Collagenase-3 and TIMP-3 were expressed by fibroblast-like cells deeper in the remodeling intestinal wall. Expression for stromelysin-2 and collagenase-3 was observed in granulation tissue, but not the epithelium, of the rat anastomoses. Our results suggest a role for stromelysin-2 in epithelial migration and for metalloelastase in macrophage movement and epithelial cell shedding. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9546361

  11. Preparation and analysis of large, flat crystals of Ca(2+)-ATPase for electron crystallography.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, D; Hsiung, H H; Pace, R C; Stokes, D L

    1995-01-01

    Obtaining large, flat, well ordered crystals represents the key to structure determination by electron crystallography. Multilamellar crystals of Ca(2+)-ATPase are a good candidate for this methodology, and we have optimized methods of crystallization and of preparation for cryoelectron microscopy. In particular, high concentrations of glycerol were found to prevent nucleation and to reduce stacking; thus, by seeding solutions containing 40% glycerol, we obtained thin crystals that were 5-30 microns in diameter and 2-10 unit cells thick. We found that removing vesicles and minimizing concentrations of divalent cations were critical to preparing flat crystals in the frozen-hydrated state. Finally, we developed two methods for determining the number of lamellae composing individual crystals, information that is required for structure determination of this crystal form. The first method, using low magnification images of freeze-dried crystals, is more practical in our case. Nevertheless, the alternative method, involving analysis of Laue zones from electron diffraction patterns of slightly tilted crystals, may be of general use in structure determination from thin, three-dimensional crystals. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 PMID:7756535

  12. A variety of environmentally persistent chemicals, including some phthalate plasticizers, are weakly estrogenic.

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, S; Reynolds, T; White, R; Parker, M G; Sumpter, J P

    1995-01-01

    Sewage, a complex mixture of organic and inorganic chemicals, is considered to be a major source of environmental pollution. A random screen of 20 organic man-made chemicals present in liquid effluents revealed that half appeared able to interact with the estradiol receptor. This was demonstrated by their ability to inhibit binding of 17 beta-estradiol to the fish estrogen receptor. Further studies, using mammalian estrogen screens in vitro, revealed that the two phthalate esters butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP) and di-n-butylphthalate (DBP) and a food antioxidant, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) were estrogenic; however, they were all less estrogenic than the environmental estrogen octylphenol. Phthalate esters, used in the production of various plastics (including PVC), are among the most common industrial chemicals. Their ubiquity in the environment and tendency to bioconcentrate in animal fat are well known. Neither BBP nor DBP were able to act as antagonists, indicating that, in the presence of endogenous estrogens, their overall effect would be cumulative. Recently, it has been suggested that environmental estrogens may be etiological agents in several human diseases, including disorders of the male reproductive tract and breast and testicular cancers. The current finding that some phthalate compounds and some food additives are weakly estrogenic in vitro, needs to be supported by further studies on their effects in vivo before any conclusions can be made regarding their possible role in the development of these conditions. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:7556011

  13. Cytochemical demonstration of constitutive H2O2 production by macrophages in synovial tissue from rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffstein, S. T.; Gennaro, D. E.; Meunier, P. C.

    1988-01-01

    Generation of toxic oxygen metabolites by inflammatory cells is considered to be one of the mechanisms by which inflammation produces tissue injury. This concept is based on in vitro studies of purified leukocyte populations because it has not been possible to assess production of these metabolites in tissues. In order to determine whether or not inflammatory cells in tissue generate H2O2, the authors modified an earlier cytochemical method for the localization of H2O2. The incubation medium consists of 0.5 mM CeCl3 in a Hepes-buffered balanced salt solution with Cl- as the only anion. Synovial tissue from the knees of normal and 16-day adjuvant arthritic rats was incubated in this medium for 30 minutes and then fixed and processed for electron microscopy. No H2O2 reaction product was visible in normal synovium. In contrast, patchy deposits of H2O2 reaction product were seen adjacent to a subpopulation of synovial lining macrophages in synovium from inflamed knee joints. These data show that rat synovial macrophages are capable of generating H2O2 when appropriately stimulated and that such a stimulus is present in adjuvant arthritis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3257356

  14. Pulmonary and thoracic macrophage subpopulations and clearance of particles from the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, B E

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary macrophages consist of several subpopulations that can be defined by their anatomical locations as well as by other criteria. In addition to the well-known alveolar macrophages that reside on the alveolar surface, pulmonary macrophages also occur in the conducting airways, in various pulmonary interstitial regions, and, in some mammalian species, in the lung's intravascular compartment. Other thoracic macrophages of relevance to pulmonary defense and some lung disease processes are the pleural macrophages resident in the pleural space and macrophages present in regional lymph nodes that receive lymphatic drainage from the lung. Of the above subpopulations of pulmonary and thoracic macrophages, the alveolar macrophages have received the most experimental attention in the context of the pulmonary clearance and retention of deposited particles. Accordingly, less information is currently available regarding the roles other pulmonary and thoracic populations of macrophages may play in the removal of particles from the lower respiratory tract and associated tissue compartments. This report provides an overview of the various subpopulations of pulmonary and thoracic macrophages, as defined by their anatomical locations. The known and postulated roles of macrophages in the pulmonary clearance and retention of particles are reviewed, with particular emphasis on macrophage-associated processes involved in the pulmonary clearance of relatively insoluble particles. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 14. FIGURE 15. FIGURE 16. FIGURE 17. FIGURE 18. FIGURE 19. A FIGURE 19. B FIGURE 21. FIGURE 22. PMID:1396454

  15. PROSTHESIS FOR CHILD AMPUTEES—The Program at University of California at Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Milo B.

    1956-01-01

    The Child Amputee Program has operated jointly for the past three years at the University of California at Los Angeles under the Department of Engineering and the School of Medicine. The following seven points have been evolved after three years of operation: 1. Team effort for involved rehabilitation problems seems to be more effective than any other approach. 2. Psychological effect on both the patient and family is much deeper than was realized. 3. The optimum age for first fitting of a prosthesis is much earlier than had been generally believed—under one year, as opposed to age five or later. 4. Training adequate for efficient and easy use of the prosthesis is absolutely essential and must be followed with periodic training in new skills. 5. Comfort and function must be provided or a prosthesis will not be used. 6. Scaled-down adult components are helpful, but do not supply all the needs of growing children. Special types of tools are needed for the many varied activities of childhood. 7. At the outset of the program, disability was calculated in terms of the site of amputation. Now it is realized that the true determination of disability is above the ears. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:13364675

  16. Postmortem findings in four litters of dogs with familial canine dermatomyositis.

    PubMed Central

    Hargis, A. M.; Prieur, D. J.; Haupt, K. H.; Collier, L. L.; Evermann, J. F.; Ladiges, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Postmortem evaluations were performed on 20 juvenile to young adult collie and collie-Labrador retriever crossbred dogs with dermatomyositis and 10 neonatal collies. Cutaneous, muscular, and vascular lesions were present in the juvenile and adult dogs and were most severe in areas of the head and distal extremities. In more severely affected dogs, lesions were more generalized, including myositis of esophageal muscle and arteritis of skin, muscle, bladder, and spermatic cord. Although viruses were not isolated from muscle, crystalline viral-like structures were present in cytoplasm of endothelial cells within skeletal muscle. The dogs with dermatitis and myositis consistently had lymphoid hyperplasia, especially of peripheral lymph nodes. More severely affected dogs were smaller than less severely affected littermates, and the more severely affected males had reduced weight of testicles and prostate glands, compared with body weight. The reduced weight of genital organs correlated positively with reduced fertility. A few lymphoid aggregates were present in or around thyroid glands of 6 of the 20 dogs. There was no histologic evidence of glomerular disease in any of the dogs. The neonatal collies had no evidence of dermatomyositis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:3717301

  17. Imaging biological structures with the cryo atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Sheng, S; Shao, Z

    1996-01-01

    It has long been recognized that one of the major limitations in biological atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the softness of most biological samples, which are easily deformed or damaged by the AFM tip, because of the high pressure in the contact area, especially from the very sharp tips required for high resolution. Another is the molecular motion present at room temperature due to thermal fluctuation. Using an AFM operated in liquid nitrogen vapor (cryo-AFM), we demonstrate that cryo-AFM can be applied to a large variety of biological samples, from immunoglobulins to DNA to cell surfaces. The resolution achieved with cryo-AFM is much improved when compared with AFM at room temperature with similar specimens, and is comparable to that of cryo-electron microscopy on randomly oriented macromolecules. We will also discuss the technical problems that remain to be solved for achieving even higher resolution with cryo-AFM and other possible applications of this novel technique. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:8889193

  18. Identification of a 23 kDa protein from maize photoaffinity-labelled with 5-azido-[7-3H]indol-3-ylacetic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Feldwisch, J; Zettl, R; Campos, N; Palme, K

    1995-01-01

    A 23 kDa protein (p23) was identified in microsomal extracts from maize coleoptiles by photoaffinity labelling with 5-azido-[7-3H]indol-3-ylacetic acid ([3H]N3IAA). Labelling of p23 was blocked by unlabelled IAA, N3IAA, indol-3-ylbutyric acid and indol-3-yl-lactate. In addition, labelling was efficiently decreased by tryptophan, as well as by the scavenger p-aminobenzoic acid. Labelling was, however, not affected by synthetic auxins such as 1-naphthylacetic acid or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Competition data suggest that the label was probably bound via the indole ring, and hence labelling was not specific for auxins. The 23 kDa protein was solubilized from crude microsomes by extraction with Triton X-100 and purified to homogeneity by ion-exchange, size-exclusion and reversed-phase chromatography. After electroblotting, the amino acid sequences of the p23 N-terminus as well as the several tryptic peptides were obtained. Database comparisons revealed sequence identity with a maize manganese superoxide dismutase. We conclude that photoaffinity labelling of p23 was pseudo-affinity, and therefore the binding site for IAA is not specific. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7848285

  19. Effects of in utero exposure to nonsteroidal estrogens on mouse testis.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martínez, C; Ferreras-Estrada, M C; García-Iglesias, M J; Bravo-Moral, A M; Espinosa-Alvarez, J; Escudero-Diez, A

    1997-01-01

    Male mice exposed in utero to alpha-zearalanol (zeranol) or diethylstilbestrol (DES) were analyzed postnatally to evaluate the possible changes on their testicular morphology as part of an examination of the effects of transplacental exposure to non-steroidal estrogens on sensitive tissues. Pregnant NMRI mice were injected subcutaneously with ethyl oleate (0.1 mL) alone (negative control) or with 150 micrograms/kg of body weight of zeranol or DES (positive control) on days 9 and 10 of gestation. Experimental and control male offspring were euthanized at days 45 (n = 47), 90 (n = 44), 180 (n = 40) and 365 (n = 26) after birth and their gonads were examined by light and electron microscopy. The results suggested that prenatal zeranol or DES exposure induced more severe and earlier (at 45 d) testicular abnormalities than in negative control (at 6 mo). These age-related alterations were characterized by regressive changes in the germinal epithelium and Sertoli's cells as well as foci of Leydig's cells around atrophied seminiferous tubules and dysplasia of the rete testis epithelium. On the contrary, the presence of Leydig's cells with immature morphology and their arrangement in sheet could be attributable exclusively to estrogen treatment. The presence of no neoplasm was confirmed. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. PMID:9114959

  20. Multimodal action of single Na+ channels in myocardial mouse cells.

    PubMed Central

    Böhle, T; Benndorf, K

    1995-01-01

    Unitary Na+ currents of myocardial mouse cells were studied at room temperature in 10 cell-attached patches, each containing one and only one channel. Small-pore patch pipettes (resistance 10-97 M omega when filled with 200% Tyrode's solution) with exceptionally thick walls were used. Observed were both rapidly inactivating (6 patches) and slowly inactivating (3 patches) Na+ currents. In one patch, a slow transition from rather fast to slow inactivation was detected over a time of 0.5 h. A short and a long component of the open-channel life time were recorded at the beginning, but only a short one at the end of the experiment. Concomitantly, the first latency was slowed. Amplitude histograms showed that the electrochemical driving force across the pore of the channel did not change during this time. In three patches, a fast and repetitive switching between different modes of Na+ channel action could be clearly identified by plotting the long-time course of the averaged current per trace. The ensemble-averaged current formed in each mode was different in kinetics and amplitude. Each mode had a characteristic mean open-channel life time and distribution of first latency, but the predominant single-channel current amplitude was unaffected by mode switches. It is concluded that two types of changes in kinetics may happen in a single Na+ channel: fast and reversible switches between different modes, and a slow loss of inactivation. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 7 PMID:7711232

  1. Enhanced expression of cytochrome P450 in stomach cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, G. I.; Taylor, M. C.; Burke, M. D.; Melvin, W. T.

    1998-01-01

    The cytochromes P450 have a central role in the oxidative activation and detoxification of a wide range of xenobiotics, including many carcinogens and several anti-cancer drugs. Thus the cytochrome P450 enzyme system has important roles in both tumour development and influencing the response of tumours to chemotherapy. Stomach cancer is one of the commonest tumours of the alimentary tract and environmental factors, including dietary factors, have been implicated in the development of this tumour. This type of tumour has a poor prognosis and responds poorly to current therapies. In this study, the presence and cellular localization of several major forms of P450, CYP1A, CYP2E1 and CYP3A have been investigated in stomach cancer and compared with their expression in normal stomach. There was enhanced expression of CYP1A and CYP3A in stomach cancer with CYP1A present in 51% and CYP3A present in 28% of cases. In contrast, no P450 was identified in normal stomach. The presence of CYP1A and CYP3A in stomach cancer provides further evidence for the enhanced expression of specific forms of cytochrome P450 in tumours and may be important therapeutically for the development of anti-cancer drugs that are activated by these forms of P450. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9569036

  2. A novel theoretical approach to the analysis of dendritic transients.

    PubMed Central

    Agmon-Snir, H

    1995-01-01

    A novel theoretical framework for analyzing dendritic transients is introduced. This approach, called the method of moments, is an extension of Rall's cable theory for dendrites. It provides analytic investigation of voltage attenuation, signal delay, and synchronization problems in passive dendritic trees. In this method, the various moments of a transient signal are used to characterize the properties of the transient. The strength of the signal is measured by the time integral of the signal, its characteristic time is determined by its centroid ("center of gravity"), and the width of the signal is determined by a measure similar to the standard deviation in probability theory. Using these signal properties, the method of moments provides theorems, expressions, and efficient algorithms for analyzing the voltage response in arbitrary passive trees. The method yields new insights into spatiotemporal integration, coincidence detection mechanisms, and the properties of local interactions between synaptic inputs in dendritic trees. The method can also be used for matching dendritic neuron models to experimental data and for the analysis of synaptic inputs recorded experimentally. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 PMID:8580308

  3. Histogenesis of pancreatic carcinogenesis in the hamster: ultrastructural evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Flaks, B

    1984-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinogenesis in the Syrian hamster, induced by beta-oxidized derivatives of N-nitroso-di-n-propylamine, constitutes a valuable model of human cancer of the exocrine pancreas. In both species the majority of tumors are adenocarcinomas: superficially, on the basis of their histological appearance, these appear to be ductal in origin. However, sequential analysis, by electron microscopy, of the development of pancreatic neoplasia in the hamster model indicates that acinar cells may participate in the histogenesis of "ductal" adenomas and carcinomas. Acinar cells appear to undergo changes in differentiation, including pseudoductular transformation, giving rise to a new population of cells that resemble ductular or centroacinar types. This new population may then proliferate to form, first, cystic foci and subsequently cystadenomas and adenocarcinomas. Mucous metaplasia appears to develop at late stages of tumor development. Although the participation of ductular and centroacinar cells in pancreatic carcinogenesis cannot be excluded, very few tumors arise from the ductal epithelium. It is possible that some human pancreatic adenocarcinomas may also have their origin from dysplastic acinar cells, by analogy with the hamster model: focal acinar dysplasia being common in human pancreatic cancer patients. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 13. FIGURE 14. FIGURE 15. FIGURE 16. FIGURE 17. FIGURE 18. PMID:6383797

  4. An experimental mouse testicular teratoma as a model for neuroepithelial neoplasia and differentiation. II. Electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Herman, M. M.; Sipe, J. C.; Rubinstein, L. J.; Vandenberg, S. R.; Spence, A. M.; Vraa-Jensen, J.

    1975-01-01

    The electron microscopic features of the stages of divergent neuroepithelial differentiation in the solid implants of a transplantable mouse testicular teratoma (OTT-6050) are presented and compared to the sequential stages of cytogenesis that have been described in the developing avian and mammalian central nervous system. Primitive neuroepithelial tumor cells showed the features of undifferentiated multipotential matrix (or ventricular) cells of the neural tube. They formed primitive medullary rosettes, from which various transitions were traced to more differentiated, cilia-containing ependymoblastomatous rosettes; the transitional features included increased granular endoplasmic reticulum and microvilli formation. Glial differentiation was characterized by the presence of mature ependymal rosettes and of astrocytes containing glial filaments. Neuronal differentiation included the development of synapses and the presence of dense-core vesicles in nerve cell processes. No intermediate cell forms were found that suggested multiple lines of differentiation occurring within a single cell. Images Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 21 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 PMID:171962

  5. Atomic force microscopy study of the secretory granule lumen.

    PubMed Central

    Parpura, V; Fernandez, J M

    1996-01-01

    We have used an atomic force microscope to study the mechanical properties of the matrix found in the lumen of secretory granules isolated from mast cells. The matrices were insoluble and had an average height of 474 +/- 197 nm. The volume of these matrices increased reversibly about tenfold by decreasing the valency of the bathing external cation (La3+ < Ca2+ < Na+). The elastic (Young's) modulus was found to decrease by about 100-fold (4.3 MPa in La3+ to 37 kPa in Na+) upon a tenfold increase in the matrix volume. A swollen granule matrix had an elastic modulus similar to that of gelatin in water. The elastic modulus was inversely related to the change in the volume of the matrix, following a relationship similar to that predicted for the elasticity of weakly cross-linked polymers. Our results show that the matrix of these secretory granules have the mechanical properties of weak ion exchange resins, lending strong support to an ion exchange mechanism for the storage and release of cationic secretory products. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 9 PMID:8913576

  6. Lung injury mediated by antibodies to endothelium. II. Study of the effect of repeated antigen-antibody interactions in rabbits tolerant to heterologous antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G.; Caldwell, P. R.; Andres, G.; Brentjens, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of repeated interactions of antibodies with cell surface antigens have been examined in in vitro, but not in in vivo systems. In this study are described the results of multiple antibody-cell surface antigen interactions in vivo. Rabbits were given repeated intravenous injections of goat antibodies to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), an antigen expressed on the surface of lung endothelial cells. For prevention of anaphylactic reactions, which would have been induced by multiple injections of heterologous immune or nonimmune IgG, the rabbits were made neonatally tolerant to goat IgG. Divalent immune IgG given daily for 21 days induced chronic antigenic modulation (antigen disappearance) with resistance to antibody-mediated inflammatory lesions. The rabbits, however, developed degenerative changes of alveolar endothelial and epithelial cells. Administration of immune IgG every other day for 43 days allowed partial reexpression of ACE and was associated with intravascular, but not interstitial, inflammatory changes. In contrast, repeated administration of monovalent immune Fab did not induce antigenic modulation but caused severe, lethal, interstitial pneumonitis. Thus, in this experimental model the development of acute interstitial inflammatory changes correlates with persistence of antigen and is abrogated by disappearance of antigen induced by divalent antibodies. Further, repeated endothelial antigen antibody interactions fail to induce chronic inflammatory or sclerosing lung lesions. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:3034065

  7. Degradation of basement membrane laminin by human neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G.

    PubMed Central

    Heck, L. W.; Blackburn, W. D.; Irwin, M. H.; Abrahamson, D. R.

    1990-01-01

    To determine the susceptibility of laminin to proteolytic degradation by inflammatory cells, soluble laminin was incubated with supernatants from phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated human neutrophils. The appearance of laminin cleavage fragments was then detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Treatment of supernatants with diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), anti-human neutrophil elastase (HNE), and anti-human neutrophil cathepsin G (HNCG) IgGs effectively blocked the degradation of laminin. In contrast, treatment of supernatants with EDTA failed to inhibit laminin digestion, indicating that neutrophil metalloproteinases had little laminin-degrading activity. In additional experiments, laminin was incubated with purified HNE and HNCG. Both enzymes extensively cleaved laminin in a dose- and time-dependent manner yielding similar products, but HNE was generally more potent. Immunofluorescence microscopy of cryostat sections of mouse kidney treated with HNE or HNCG also showed widespread loss of laminin epitopes from basement membranes. The proteolytic degradation of laminin by neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G indicates an important role for these enzymes in basement membrane damage during inflammation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2356859

  8. Different molecular basis for fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficiency in the two clinical forms of hereditary tyrosinemia (type I).

    PubMed Central

    Tanguay, R M; Valet, J P; Lescault, A; Duband, J L; Laberge, C; Lettre, F; Plante, M

    1990-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia is characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH; E.C.3.7.1.2), the last enzyme in the catabolic pathway of tyrosine. FAH was purified from rat and human liver and was used to immunize rabbits. Specific antibodies were used to probe protein extracts of livers and other tissues of normal and tyrosinemic patients. No immunoreactive FAH band was observed on immunoblots of liver, kidneys, and lymphocytes from patients presenting with the acute form of hereditary tyrosinemia. Patients with the chronic form had immunoreactive FAH at a level approximately 20% of normal liver values, which was correlated with the measured enzymatic activity. Immunoblot analysis of aborted fetal tissues revealed normal FAH immunoreactivity in normal liver and kidneys. No FAH immunoreactivity was found in liver and kidneys of tyrosinemic fetuses. The presence of FAH immunoreactivity in normal fetal tissues suggests that deficient FAH activity in tyrosinemia is not simply related to a developmentally regulated expression of the enzyme. By this immunoblot assay, FAH was detected in most human tissues, with maximal immunoreactivity in liver and kidneys and with only trace amounts in chorionic villi and cultured amniocytes. These data confirm that the primary defect in the acute form of hereditary tyrosinemia is an absence of FAH. Moreover, these data suggest that both clinical forms of the disease have a different molecular basis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2378356

  9. Acute hyperuricemic nephropathy in rats. An electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Waisman, J.; Mwasi, L. M.; Bluestone, R.; Klinenberg, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Hyperuricemia and uricosuria were induced in rats fed uric acid and oxonic acid. Kidneys then were studied by light and electron microscopy. After 1 day of hyperuricemia, animals had deposits of uric acid and urate crystals within collecting tubules of the renal papillae, and tubular cells were altered. By 10 days, there was an exudative response with further injury to epithelium. Clear spaces within lumens, epithelium, and neutrophils suggested the presence of crystals; however, there was no direct ultrastructural evidence that neutrophils or epithelial cells ingested crystals and suffered injury. Presumably, crystals readily seen in frozen, unfixed tissue were lost during preparation for electron microscopy. Nonetheless, the ultrastructural findings indicated that hyperuricemic nephropathy was initiated in a fashion analogous to urate arthropathy. Urate crystals formed within collecting tubules, epithelial cells were altered, and most likely there was chemotaxis of neutrophils which underwent degranulation and vacuolation followed by lysis freeing any ingested urate. Release of ingested crystals plus precipitation of new crystals both might serve to sustain the nephritis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:1190294

  10. Rehabilitation of a child with partial unilateral cryptophthalmos and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, H; Merriam, J C; Jones, I S

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: This paper describes the surgical rehabilitation of a child with craniofacial anomalies, unilateral syndactyly, and partial unilateral cryptophthalmos associated with inferior colobomata of the iris and optic nerve and agenesis of the inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscles. The clinical presentation of cryptophthalmos is described. METHODS: The medical literature since the original description of cryptophthalmos in 1872 was reviewed to define patterns of inheritance and the incidence of associated anomalies. RESULTS: Including this patient, 149 case reports of cryptophthalmos were identified. In two families transmission from parent to child suggests dominant inheritance. None of the five dominant cases had any other anomalies, and all had bilateral complete cryptophthalmos. The incidence of cryptophthalmos in the remaining families is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. This group includes patients with bilateral, unilateral, and partial cryptophthalmos. Other anomalies are common, including those of the ear and nose, limbs, genitourinary system, and mouth and palate. Mortality in the perinatal period is associated with renal agenesis, laryngeal atresia, and pulmonary hypoplasia. CONCLUSIONS: Cryptophthalmos is a rare congenital anomaly with two patterns of inheritance. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8719680

  11. Clinical Applications of Magnetic Resonance Imaging—Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Cammoun, Driss; Davis, Kathleen A.; Hendee, William R.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has far-reaching real and possible clinical applications. Its usefulness has been best explored and realized in the central nervous system, especially the posterior fossa and brain stem, where most abnormalities are better identified than with computed tomography. Its lack of ionizing radiation and extreme sensitivity to normal and abnormal patterns of myelination make magnetic resonance imaging advantageous for diagnosing many neonatal and pediatric abnormalities. New, reliable cardiac gating techniques open the way for promising studies of cardiac anatomy and function. The ability to image directly in three orthogonal planes gives us new insight into staging and follow-up of pelvic tumors and other pelvic abnormalities. Exquisite soft tissue contrast, far above that attainable by other imaging modalities, has made possible the early diagnosis of traumatic ligamentous knee injury, avascular necrosis of the hip and diagnosis, treatment planning and follow-up of musculoskeletal neoplasms. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:3911592

  12. Characterisation of inorganic microparticles in pigment cells of human gut associated lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J J; Ainley, C C; Harvey, R S; Mason, I M; Kendall, M D; Sankey, E A; Dhillon, A P; Thompson, R P

    1996-01-01

    Macrophages at the base of human gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), become loaded early in life with dark granular pigment that is rich in aluminium, silicon, and titanium. The molecular characteristics, intracellular distribution, and source of this pigment is described. Laser scanning and electron microscopy showed that pigmented macrophages were often closely related to collagen fibres and plasma cells in GALT of both small and large intestine and contained numerous phagolysosomes, previously described as granules, that are rich in electron dense submicron sized particles. Morphological assessment, x ray microanalysis, and image electron energy loss spectroscopy showed three distinct types of microparticle: type I - spheres of titanium dioxide, 100-200 nm diameter, characterised as the synthetic food-additive polymorph anatase; type II - aluminosilicates, < 100-400 nm in length, generally of flaky appearance, often with adsorbed surface iron, and mostly characteristic of the natural clay mineral kaolinite; and type III - mixed environmental silicates without aluminium, 100-700 nm in length and of variable morphology. Thus, this cellular pigment that is partly derived from food additives and partly from the environment is composed of inert inorganic microparticles and loaded into phagolysosomes of macrophages within the GALT of all human subjects. These observations suggest that the pathogenicity of this pigment should be further investigated since, in susceptible individuals, the same intracellular distribution of these three types of submicron particle causes chronic latent granulomatous inflammation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:8675092

  13. The lipid-rich core region of human atherosclerotic fibrous plaques. Prevalence of small lipid droplets and vesicles by electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Guyton, J. R.; Klemp, K. F.

    1989-01-01

    Abundant extracellular lipid deposits are associated with cell necrosis and tissue weakening in the core region of human atherosclerotic fibrous plaques. The ultrastructural morphology of the core region, previously undefined because of lipid extraction artifacts, was studied with the aid of new osmium-thiocarbohydrazide-osmium and osmium-tannic acid-paraphenylenediamine sequences for tissue processing. Small droplets of neutral lipid (30 to 400 nm profile diameter) and lipid vesicles with aqueous centers accounted for more than 90% of the area occupied by lipid-rich structures in the core region. No foam cells were present. Cholesterol crystals, lipid droplets of a size similar to those in foam cells (0.4 to 6 mu), and larger neutral lipid deposits (greater than 6 mu) together occupied less than 10% of the total area of lipid structures. Abundant lipid vesicles were associated with the nearby presence of cholesterol crystals, whereas small lipid droplets were predominant in areas without crystals. Many droplets had surface defects in the form of pits and vesicular blebs. These morphologic findings are explained most concisely by postulating direct accumulation of extracellular lipid from interstitial lipoproteins as a major process in core region formation. Moreover, a dynamic state of ongoing physical/metabolic transformation of extracellular lipid deposits is suggested. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2646938

  14. Heavily T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Landmarks of the Cavernous Sinus and Paracavernous Region

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, M.; Bobek-Billewicz, B.; Sloniewski, P.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance anatomy of the cavernous sinus. Heavily T2-weighted submillimetric sequence in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes was performed in 16 healthy patients. The sequence provides high contrast between fluid and other structures of the cavernous sinus. High signal intensity of the venous spaces of the cavernous sinus provides a kind of a background for internal carotid artery, cranial nerves, and meninges, as well as bony and fibrous structures. The study was performed with the help of an anatomic atlas. Different magnetic resonance (MR) landmarks of the cavernous and parasellar region were introduced and demonstrated. MR images, superior to computer tomography, allow a detailed assessment of the cavernous sinus anatomy. Delineation by magnetic resonance of tiny anatomical structures may help the neurosurgeon trace the exact outline of a tumor and help to plan an adequate strategy if complete resection is attempted. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 8 PMID:17171105

  15. Helium-neon laser treatment transforms fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Pourreau-Schneider, N.; Ahmed, A.; Soudry, M.; Jacquemier, J.; Kopp, F.; Franquin, J. C.; Martin, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    The differentiation of myofibroblastic cells from normal human gingival fibroblasts in vitro has been established by transmission electron microscopy and quantitated by immunohistochemistry, using antigelsolin monoclonal antibodies. Untreated control cultures were compared to cultures exposed to Helium-Neon (He-Ne) laser irradiation. A direct and massive transformation of the cultured fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was observed as early as 24 hours after laser treatment, whereas control cultures were comprised of only resting fibroblasts and active fibroblasts. This in vitro induction of myofibroblasts may be analogous to that which occurs in vivo. Therefore we undertook a similar study using biopsies from gingival tissues after wisdom tooth extraction. Myofibroblasts were present in the connective tissue of laser-treated gums 48 hours after irradiation, but not in untreated contralateral control tissues. These data provide evidence that the primary biologic effect of the Helium-Neon laser on connective tissue is the rapid generation of myofibroblasts from fibroblasts. The induction of a phenotype with contractile properties may have clinical significance in the acceleration of the wound-healing process. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2372040

  16. Single cytoplasmic dynein molecule movements: characterization and comparison with kinesin.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Khan, S; Sheetz, M P

    1995-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a major microtubule motor for minus-end directed movements including retrograde axonal transport. To better understand the mechanism by which cytoplasmic dynein converts ATP energy into motility, we have analyzed the nanometer-level displacements of latex beads coated with low numbers of cytoplasmic dynein molecules. Cytoplasmic dynein-coated beads exhibited greater lateral movements among microtubule protofilaments (ave. 5.1 times/microns of displacement) compared with kinesin (ave. 0.9 times/micron). In addition, dynein moved rearward up to 100 nm over several hundred milliseconds, often in correlation with off-axis movements from one protofilament to another. We suggest that single molecules of cytoplasmic dynein move the beads because 1) there is a linear dependence of bead motility on dynein/bead ratio, 2) the binding of beads to microtubules studied by laser tweezers is best fit by a first-order Poisson, and 3) the run length histogram of dynein beads follows a first-order decay. At the cellular level, the greater disorder of cytoplasmic dynein movements may facilitate transport by decreasing the duration of collisions between kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein-powered vesicles. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 9 PMID:8580344

  17. Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor in Human Acute Cardiac Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Arbustini, Eloisa; Grasso, Maurizia; Diegoli, Marta; Bramerio, Manuela; Foglieni, Andrea Scotti; Albertario, Marco; Martinelli, Luigi; Gavazzi, Antonello; Goggi, Claudio; Campana, Carlo; Vigano, Mario

    1991-01-01

    The authors performed an immunohistochemical study on expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) in endomyocardial biopsies from human cardiac allografts. TNFα immunoreactivity was found in 45% biopsies with mild acute rejection, in 83% biopsies with focal moderate rejection, in 80% biopsies with diffuse moderate rejection. Biopsies with absent rejection did not show immunoreactive cells. In mild rejection, positive cells were few and scanty monocytes and macrophages (MAC-387 and LN5 positive cells) and T lymphocytes (UCHL-1/CD45 RO positive cells) (up to 20% of all infiltrating cells). Expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens on infiltrating and endothelial cells occurred earlier and independent of TNFα reactivity. Number of immunoreactive cells increased in moderate rejection (up to 50%). Immunoreactivity was also present in nonpigmented macrophages in part of the biopsies with resolving rejection (45%). The authors conclude that TNFα is expressed in acute cardiac rejection by immunologically activated inflammatory cells. Immunoreactive cells increase in number with increasing severity of the reaction. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:1928295

  18. Hairless micropig skin. A novel model for studies of cutaneous biology.

    PubMed Central

    Lavker, R. M.; Dong, G.; Zheng, P. S.; Murphy, G. F.

    1991-01-01

    Reported here is the structural and immunohistochemical similarities between the Yucatan hairless micropig (HMP) skin and that of humans. Hairless micropig skin surface was composed of complex intersecting furrows that created geometric patterns remarkably similar to human skin surface glyphics. The dermal--epidermal interface consisted of undulant downgrowths that interdigitated with dermal papillae. Hairless micropig epidermis contained two morphologically distinct populations of basal keratinocytes (serrated and nonserrated). Similar heterogeneity has been seen only in human epidermis and primate palmar epidermis. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the HMP epidermis is reactive with monoclonal and polyclonal antisera to keratin proteins. Melanocytes reactive with antisera to S-100 protein, as in human skin, also were observed in HMP epidermis. Organization of dermal extracellular matrix, including collagen and elastic fibers, and the organization and reactivity of the microvasculature with antisera to factor VIII, were consistent with human skin. The costicosteroid-induced atrophy and subsequent rebound phenomenon after withdrawal of steroid observed in HMP skin was similar with that observed in humans. It is concluded that HMP skin approximates human skin significantly more precisely than most existing species and is an excellent model for studies of cutaneous physiology and pharmacology. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2000942

  19. Spontaneous apoptosis in human thymocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Tiso, M.; Gangemi, R.; Bargellesi Severi, A.; Pizzolitto, S.; Fabbi, M.; Risso, A.

    1995-01-01

    Apoptosis seems to be involved in different stages of immune cell development. In particular, experimental evidence suggests that it is a major form of cell death in the thymus. The present analysis of human thymocytes reveals that a fraction of these cells, cultured in vitro, undergoes spontaneous apoptosis. This observation is based both on molecular (DNA fragmentation) and morphological (electron microscopic) investigations of the cells. The apoptotic thymocytes are CD3- or CD3lo, CD4lo, and CD8lo and do not express Bcl-2 protein. Furthermore, thymocytes die by apoptosis when exposed to pharmacological stimuli, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, dexamethasone, ATP, or Ca++ ionophore. Thus the apoptotic machinery in thymocytes can be triggered by an imbalance in growth factors in the in vitro culture media and can be modulated by various biochemical signals. The process of spontaneous apoptosis is independent of mRNA or protein synthesis, as actinomycin D and cycloheximide fail to inhibit this phenomenon. Furthermore, apoptosis seems to require active oxidative phosphorylation, as it is prevented by incubation of the cells with inhibitors of the respiratory chain. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7639336

  20. Malignant histiocytosis. A phenotypic and genotypic investigation.

    PubMed Central

    Cattoretti, G.; Villa, A.; Vezzoni, P.; Giardini, R.; Lombardi, L.; Rilke, F.

    1990-01-01

    Ten cases of malignant histiocytosis (MH) were evaluated for clinical and histopathologic features, phenotype, and rearrangement of T cell receptor (TCR) beta, gamma, and alpha and immunoglobulin (Ig) genes (7/10). All cases were HLA-DR+ and CD30-positive. Four cases had molecular evidence of T cell lineage such as TCR beta, gamma, and alpha rearrangements, and one additional case synthesized the cytoplasmic TCR beta chain. The remaining five cases did not show unequivocal T, B, natural killer (NK) cell, or macrophagic origin, and three of them had germline TCR and Ig genes. Ultrastructural analysis was not helpful for the definition of the cell lineage. Most myelomonocytic markers (MAC387, CD13, CD14, CD64, CD68) were either negative on the MH cells or were expressed on cells with rearranged TCR gene. Precursor (CD34, CD7) and NK (CD16, CD56, and CD57) cell markers were not found. The lineage of a number of cases of MH remains unresolved. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:2349962

  1. Spontaneous in vitro differentiation of a myoepithelial cell line (PA 16/23) from a pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland is associated with reduced production of the autocrine growth factor interleukin 6.

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, O.; Bani, D.; Giudizi, M. G.; Biagiotti, R.; Almerigogna, F.; Toccafondi, G.; Fini-Storchi, O.; Romagnani, S.

    1994-01-01

    A myoepithelial cell line (PA 16/23) was derived from a pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland. PA 16/23 cells have light microscopic, immunophenotypical and ultrastructural features of immature myoepithelial cells, i.e. they are of fusiform or stellate shape and show keratin and actin cytofilaments located mainly in the perinuclear cytoplasm, desmosomes and tracts of basal lamina. The PA 16/23 cells grew actively and expressed mRNA for and produced interleukin 6 (IL-6) which was released into the culture medium. This cytokine, in turn, acted as an autocrine growth factor on the cells. PA 16/23 cells also expressed high-affinity IL-6 receptors. In these cells, both IL-6 production and proliferation could be modulated by exogenous stimulants, such as IL-6 itself, IL-1, IL-4, tumour necrosis factor alpha, interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide. From the 40th culture passage onwards, the PA 16/23 cells ceased to grow, either spontaneously or in response to exogenous stimulants. Moreover, they strongly reduced IL-6 production, and underwent morphological differentiation into more mature myoepithelial cells, with an increased amount and a different arrangement of the keratin and actin cytofilaments, which formed thick bundles in the peripheral cytoplasm. These findings suggest a role for IL-6 in modulating the proliferation and, possibly, the differentiation of the PA 16/23 cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8198972

  2. Chromosome 5 allelic losses are early events in tumours of the papilla of Vater and occur at sites similar to those of gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Achille, A.; Baron, A.; Zamboni, G.; Di Pace, C.; Orlandini, S.; Scarpa, A.

    1998-01-01

    During our studies of DNA fingerprinting of tumours of the pancreas and papilla (ampulla) of Vater, using arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR), we noticed two bands showing a decreased intensity in six of ten ampullary tumours with respect to matched normal tissues. Those bands were both assigned to chromosome 5. Such a finding was somewhat in contrast with the reportedly low frequency of APC gene mutations in ampullary cancers, located at chromosome 5q21, and suggested that loci different from that of APC might be the target of chromosome 5 allelic losses (LOH) in these tumours. Therefore, we analysed chromosome 5 LOH in a panel of 27 ampullary tumours, including eight adenomas, four early- and 15 advanced-stage cancers, using 16 PCR-amplified CA microsatellite polymorphic markers spanning the entire chromosome. Nineteen cases (70%) showed LOH, and the interstitial deletions found in these tumours described two smallest common deleted regions, in which putative suppressor genes might reside. They were at 5q13.3-q14 and at 5q23-q31 respectively, which correspond to those found in gastric tumours. In addition, the presence of 5q LOH in six of eight adenomas and in three of four early-stage cancers suggests that such phenomena occur at early stages of neoplastic progression of the ampullary epithelium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9862579

  3. The aesthetics of behavioral arrangements

    PubMed Central

    Hineline, Philip N.

    2005-01-01

    With their origins in scientific validation, behavior-analytic applications have understandably been developed with an engineering rather than a crafting orientation. Nevertheless, traditions of craftsmanship can be instructive for devising aesthetically pleasing arrangements—arrangements that people will try, and having tried, will choose to continue living with. Pye (1968) provides suggestions for this, particularly through his distinctions between workmanship of risk versus workmanship of certainty, and the mating of functional precision with effective or otherwise pleasing variability. Close examination of woodworking tools as well as antique machines offers instructive analogues that show, for instance, that misplaced precision can be dysfunctional when precision is not essential to a design. Variability should be allowed or even encouraged. Thus, in the design of behavioral contingencies as well as of practical or purely aesthetic objects, “precise versus variable” is not necessarily a distinction between good and bad. More generally, behavior analysts would do well to look beyond their technical experience for ways to improve the aesthetics of contingency design while continuing to understand the resulting innovations in relation to behavior-analytic principles. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:22478437

  4. THE TREATMENT OF URINARY TRACT CALCULI

    PubMed Central

    Leadbetter, Wyland F.

    1958-01-01

    From review of recent information relative to calculus formation in the kidney, the conclusion reached that we do not yet understand, despite much effort, the basic physicochemical mechanisms involved. Since this is so, it has seemed best to the author for the present to rely, in treating patients with renal stones, on simple therapeutic concepts, which, if carefully and conscientiously applied, produce good results. The concepts are the elimination of known causes such as parathyroid adenomas and obstructive lesions, elimination or at least treatment of infections, diminution of urinary components which form the basis of calculi by limiting the oral intake or absorption from the gastrointestinal tract and maintenance of a dilute urine of desired pH. A plan for preoperative study is suggested to allow planned therapy. Indications for operative removal of calculi as well as some points of technique are discussed. It is emphasized that surgical removal of a calculus is but an incident in the care of patients with calculi and that treatment during the postoperative period and followup therapy is most important if success is to be achieved. Reports of cases to illustrate the application of these concepts are presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16 PMID:13523394

  5. Characterization of Satellite DNA from Three Marine Dinoflagellates (Dinophyceae): Glenodinium sp. and Two Members of the Toxic Genus, Protogonyaulax 1

    PubMed Central

    Boczar, Barbara A.; Liston, John; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    1991-01-01

    Using CsCl-Hoechst dye or CsCl-ethidium bromide gradients, satellite and nuclear DNAs were separated and characterized in three marine dinoflagellates: Glenodinium sp., and two toxic dinoflagellates, Protogonyaulax tamarensis and Protogonyaulax catenella. In all three dinoflagellates, the lowest density fraction, satellite DNA1, hybridized to chloroplast genes derived from terrestrial plants and/or other algae. Dinoflagellate chloroplast DNAs exhibited molecular sizes of 114 to 125 kilobase pairs, which is consistent with plastid sizes determined for other chromophytic algae (120-150 kilobase pairs). Mitochondrial DNA was not resolved from nuclear DNA in this system. Two additional satellite DNAs, satellite DNA2 and satellite DNA3, recovered from P. tamarensis and P. catenella were similar to one another, both within and between species, when characterized by restriction enzyme analysis. These satellites were 85 to 95 kilobase pairs in size, and exhibited restriction fragments that hybridized to yeast nuclear ribosomal RNA genes. Restriction enzyme analyses and DNA hybridization studies of cpDNA document that the two Protogonyaulax isolates are not evolutionarily identical. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:16668443

  6. Are metaplasias in colorectal adenomas truly metaplasias?

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, M.; Fenoglio, C. M.; Robboy, S. J.; King, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Five thousand seven hundred seventy-eight adenomas or adenomas containing carcinoma from 3215 patients were examined by routine histologic methods for the presence of epithelial metaplasias. Three forms of epithelial metaplasia were encountered: squamous cell metaplasia (0.44%), Paneth cell metaplasia (0.20%), and melanocytic metaplasia (0.017%). In several instances multiple forms of metaplasia were encountered in the same polyp. In those cases in which the paraffin blocks were available, a Grimelius stain was performed. Grimelius-positive cells were present in 63% of the adenomas containing a metaplastic cell type. All cases with Paneth cell differentiation were immunoreactive for lysozyme; all lesions containing areas of squamous differentiation were immunoreactive for keratin except 2. The histopathologic features of these cases are discussed, and it is concluded that rather than representing a true metaplastic process, Paneth cell, squamous cell, and melanocyte differentiation represent the full range of cellular differentiation that endodermally derived tissues can exhibit, particularly when they undergo neoplastic alterations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6202148

  7. Analysis of the VNTR locus D1S80 by the PCR followed by high-resolution PAGE.

    PubMed Central

    Budowle, B; Chakraborty, R; Giusti, A M; Eisenberg, A J; Allen, R C

    1991-01-01

    Allelic data for the D1S80 locus was obtained by using the PCR and subsequent analysis with a high-resolution, horizontal PAGE technique and silver staining. Compared with RFLP analysis of VNTR loci by Southern blotting, the approach described in this paper offers certain advantages: (1) discrete allele resolution, (2) minimal measurement error, (3) correct genotyping of single-band VNTR patterns, (4) a nonisotopic assay, (5) a permanent record of the electrophoretic separation, and (6) reduced assay time. In a sample of 99 unrelated Caucasians, the D1S80 locus demonstrated a heterozygosity of 80.8% with 37 phenotypes and 16 alleles. The distribution of genotypes is in agreement with expected values according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Furthermore, the observed number of alleles and the level of heterozygosity, obtained through the protocol described here, were congruent with each other in accordance with the expectation of a mutation-drift equilibrium model for a single, homogeneous, random-mating population. Therefore, the analysis of D1S80 and similar VNTR loci by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AMP-FLP) may prove useful as models for population genetic issues for VNTR loci analyzed by RFLP typing via Southern blotting. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1670750

  8. Soft tissue calcification in chronic dialysis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kuzela, D. C.; Huffer, W. E.; Conger, J. D.; Winter, S. D.; Hammond, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    Autopsy protocols and microscopic slides of 56 dialyzed and 18 nondialyzed chronically uremic patients were reviewed to assess the presence, extent, and severity of extraosseous soft tissue calcification. Calcification was identified in 79% of the dialysis patients and 44% of the nondialysis patients (P iss less than .025). Soft tissue calcification most frequently involved the heart, lungs, stomach, and kidneys. Lesions were severe in 36% of the dialysis patients and, when strategically located within the myocardium, were life-threatening. The deaths of 6 dialysis patients were attributed to severe calcification of the cardiac conduction system and/or myocardium. The presence and severity of soft tissue calcification was not related to duration of dialysis, patients' age, degree of parathyroid gland hyperplasia, radiographic evidence of soft tissue calcification, serum calcium and phosphate levels, Ca X P products, or type or severity of metabolic bone disease. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:836675

  9. Production and characterization of a recombinant anti-MUC1 scFv reactive with human carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Denton, G.; Sekowski, M.; Spencer, D. I.; Hughes, O. D.; Murray, A.; Denley, H.; Tendler, S. J.; Price, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant single-chain fragments (scFv) of the murine anti-MUC1 monoclonal antibody C595 have been produced using the original hybridoma cells as a source of variable heavy (V(H))- and variable light (V(L))-chain-encoding antibody genes. The use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), bacteriophage (phage) display technology and gene expression systems in E. coli has led to the production of soluble C595 scFv. The scFv has been purified from the bacterial supernatant by peptide epitope affinity chromatography, leading to the recovery of immunoreactive C595 scFv, which was similar in activity to the C595 parent antibody. Analysis by DNA sequencing, SDS-PAGE and Western blotting has demonstrated the integrity of the scFv, while ELISA, FACScan analysis, fluorescence quenching, quantitative immunoreactivity experiments and immunohistochemistry confirm that the activity of the scFv compares favourably with that of the parent antibody. The retention of binding activity to MUC1 antigen on human bladder and breast carcinoma tissue specimens illustrates the potential application of this novel product as an immunodiagnostic and immunotherapeutic reagent. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 7 PMID:9303360

  10. Driving through: postpartum care during World War II.

    PubMed Central

    Temkin, E

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, public outcry over shortened hospital stays for new mothers and their infants led to the passage of a federal law banning "drive-through deliveries." This recent round of brief postpartum stays is not unprecedented. During World War II, a baby boom overwhelmed maternity facilities in American hospitals. Hospital births became more popular and accessible as the Emergency Maternal and Infant Care program subsidized obstetric care for servicemen's wives. Although protocols before the war had called for prolonged bed rest in the puerperium, medical theory was quickly revised as crowded hospitals were forced to discharge mothers after 24 hours. To compensate for short inpatient stays, community-based services such as visiting nursing care, postnatal homes, and prenatal classes evolved to support new mothers. Fueled by rhetoric that identified maternal-child health as a critical factor in military morale, postpartum care during the war years remained comprehensive despite short hospital stays. The wartime experience offers a model of alternatives to legislation for ensuring adequate care of postpartum women. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:10191809

  11. Immunopathology of glomerulonephritis associated with chronic woodchuck hepatitis virus infection in woodchucks (Marmota monax).

    PubMed Central

    Peters, D. N.; Steinberg, H.; Anderson, W. I.; Hornbuckle, W. E.; Cote, P. J.; Gerin, J. L.; Lewis, R. M.; Tennant, B. C.

    1992-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of necropsy findings of 705 woodchucks was performed to determine the prevalence and morphology of immune-mediated glomerulonephritis, its relationship to woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infection, and the presence of major WHV antigens. Twenty-six woodchucks had glomerular lesions. Renal tissue of the 26 animals was evaluated histologically and immunohistochemically for immune-mediated glomerulonephritis. Of these 26 animals, immune-mediated glomerulonephritis was diagnosed in six, all of which were chronic WHV carriers. Membranous glomerulonephritis was identified in three animals, two of which also had mesangial proliferation. Host immunoglobulin was present within the mesangium and along capillary loops in all three. Woodchuck hepatitis virus core antigen (WHcAg) was present along capillary loops of two of these animals, one membranous and one mixed, and in the mesangium of all three. Woodchuck hepatitis virus surface antigen (WHsAg) deposition was similar to WHcAg deposition but was only present along capillaries in those animals with mixed nephritis. The remaining three animals had mesangial proliferation. WHsAg and host immunoglobulin deposition were predominately mesangial; WHcAg was not detected. Transmission electron microscopy showed thickening of the capillary loop basement membranes and subepithelial electron-dense deposits in animal one, and deposits in the mesangium in animal six. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:1632459

  12. Experimental murine chronic hepatitis: results following intrahepatic inoculation of human uveitis mycoplasma-like organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L. A.; Wirostko, E.; Wirostko, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    Mycoplasma-like organisms (MLO) are non-cultivated intracellular cell-wall deficient pathogenic bacteria with a distinctive ultrastructural appearance. Diagnosis of MLO disease depends on finding the organisms in parasitized cells using a transmission electron microscope. MLO are a well studied cause of transmissible chronic plant disease responsive to antibiotics. MLO have recently been found to cause human chronic uveitis, orbital, and retinal disease with autoimmune features. Ophthalmic leucocytes in these patients display MLO parasitization. Inoculation of human uveitis MLO into mouse eyelids produced chronic uveitis. MLO also disseminated to produce randomly distributed lethal systemic disease including chronic hepatitis. MLO parasitized leucocytes were present in all disease sites. Direct intrahepatic inoculation of human hepatic pathogens is a simple and efficient technique to produce murine hepatitis. This report describes the delayed onset widespread inflammatory liver disease produced by direct intrahepatic inoculation of human chronic uveitis MLO in 12 of 20 mice versus 0 in 40 controls (P < 0.05). The liver disease was accompanied by elevated serum SGOT levels, splenomegaly, and accelerated mortality. All 12 inflamed livers displayed MLO parasitized leucocytes versus 0 of 10 control livers. The resemblance of human chronic active hepatitis, massive hepatic necrosis, and post-necrotic cirrhosis to the MLO induced murine liver disease, the role of molecular biologic techniques in the detection and classification of those bacteria, and in therapy of MLO disease are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8398804

  13. Cellular localization of type I III and IV procollagen gene transcripts in normal and fibrotic human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Milani, S.; Herbst, H.; Schuppan, D.; Surrenti, C.; Riecken, E. O.; Stein, H.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have determined the cell types producing alpha 1 (I), alpha 2 (I), alpha 1 (III), and alpha 1 (IV) procollagen gene transcripts in adult human liver by in situ hybridization with [35S]-labeled RNA probes. The liver specimens comprised a total of 20 biopsies with normal histology and biopsies with fibrosis or cirrhosis at different clinical stages and of heterogeneous origins. In normal liver, procollagen type I, III, and IV transcripts were detected in stromal and vascular mesenchymal cells of portal tracts and central veins, as well as in some perisinusoidal cells of the lobule. In fibrotic liver, increased levels of these procollagen mRNAs were observed in the same locations, and particularly enhanced in stromal cells of fibrotic septa and portal tracts, as well as in perisinusoidal cells. Expression of alpha 1 (IV) procollagen RNA was additionally found in some vascular endothelial and bile duct epithelial cells. Although previously suggested as the major source of liver collagens, hepatocytes showed no significant procollagen transcript levels in any of our samples. Thus, procollagen synthesis does not appear to be a function of hepatocytes, but rather of mesenchymal, endothelial, and bile duct epithelial cells in adult human liver. These findings may have implications for the development of specifically targeted antifibrotic therapies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2372043

  14. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and -2 RNA expression in rat and human liver fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, H.; Wege, T.; Milani, S.; Pellegrini, G.; Orzechowski, H. D.; Bechstein, W. O.; Neuhaus, P.; Gressner, A. M.; Schuppan, D.

    1997-01-01

    The remodeling of extracellular matrix during chronic liver disease may partially be attributed to altered activity of matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs). Expression of TIMP-1 and -2 was studied by in situ hybridization combined with immunohistochemistry in rat (acute and chronic carbon tetrachloride intoxication and secondary biliary fibrosis) and human livers and on isolated rat hepatic stellate cells. TIMP-1 and -2 transcripts appeared in rat livers within 1 to 3 hours after intoxication, pointing to a role in the protection against accidental activation of matrix metalloproteinases, and were present at high levels in all fibrotic rat and human livers predominantly in stellate cells. TIMP-2 RNA distribution largely matched with previously reported patterns of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (72-kd gelatinase) expression, suggesting generation of a TIMP-2/matrix metalloproteinase-2 complex (large inhibitor of metalloproteinases). Isolated stellate cells expressed TIMP-1 and -2 RNA. Addition of transforming growth factor-beta 1 enhanced TIMP-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 RNA levels in vitro, whereas TIMP-2-specific signals were reduced, likely to result in a stoichiometric excess of matrix-metalloproteinase-2 over TIMP-2. In the context of previous demonstrations of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in vivo, these patterns suggest an intrahepatic environment permitting only limited matrix degradation, ultimately resulting in redistribution of extracellular matrix with relative accumulation of collagen type 1. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9137090

  15. Immunopathologic aspects of woodchuck hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Frommel, D.; Crevat, D.; Vitvitsky, L.; Pichoud, C.; Hantz, O.; Chevalier, M.; Grimaud, J. A.; Lindberg, J.; Trépo, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    The natural history of infection with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) has been studied in a colony of 38 Marmota monax. Besides serologic assessment for WHV markers, light-microscopic findings of 61 liver biopsies were correlated with the results of immunofluorescence analysis for nucleocapsid (WHcAg) and surface (WHsAg) antigens. Twenty-four chronic WHsAg carriers all featured signs of continuous viral replication. Two major immunomorphologic patterns were observed in their livers: 1) portal hepatitis in which WHcAg accumulated in the cytoplasm and WHsAg was associated with the hepatocyte membrane and 2) periportal hepatitis in which WHcAg shifted toward nuclear localization and WHsAg became mostly intracytoplasmic. Progression from portal to periportal hepatitis, observed in 7 woodchucks, appeared to be induced by a partial recovery of specific immune reactivity to WHV, insufficient, however, to interrupt WHV replication. Deposits of WHsAg and immunoglobulins were present in the kidney and spleen of animals with severe hepatitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:6324594

  16. Differential effects of FGFR2 mutations on syndactyly and cleft palate in Apert syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Slaney, S. F.; Oldridge, M.; Hurst, J. A.; Moriss-Kay, G. M.; Hall, C. M.; Poole, M. D.; Wilkie, A. O.

    1996-01-01

    Apert syndrome is a distinctive human malformation characterized by craniosynostosis and severe syndactyly of the hands and feet. It is caused by specific missense substitutions involving adjacent amino acids (Ser252Trp or Pro253Arg) in the linker between the second and third extracellular immunoglobulin domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). We have developed a simple PCR assay for these mutations in genomic DNA, based on the creation of novel (SfiI) and (BstUI) restriction sites. Analysis of DNA from 70 unrelated patients with Apert syndrome showed that 45 had the Ser252Trp mutation and 25 had the Pro253Arg mutation. Phenotypic differences between these two groups of patients were investigated. Significant differences were found for severity of syndactyly and presence of cleft palate. The syndactyly was more severe with the Pro253Arg mutation, for both the hands and the feet. In contrast, cleft palate was significantly more common in the Ser252Trp patients. No convincing differences were found in the prevalence of other malformations associated with Apert syndrome. We conclude that, although the phenotype attributable to the two mutations is very similar, there are subtle differences. The opposite trends for severity of syndactyly and cleft palate in relation to the two mutations may relate to the varying patterns of temporal and tissue-specific expression of different fibroblast growth factors, the ligands for FGFR2. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8651276

  17. INSECTS AS ALLERGEN INJECTANTS—Severe Reactions to Bites and Stings of Arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Frank

    1962-01-01

    Arthropods capable of penetrating human skin often cause severe local and systemic reactions. Local reactions suggest delayed hypersensitivity while systemic symptoms resemble more the anaphylactic shock in animals. The nature of the antigen remains obscure but predominant evidence suggests its presence throughout the entire organism. Positive history of hypersensitivity to insect injectants was obtained in approximately 20 per cent of persons in the course of routine interviews of 1,078 patients. Repeated bites and stings at long or irregular intervals often induce a state of hypersensitivity, while repeated regular injections of extracts of these insects at shorter intervals may greatly reduce the hypersensitivity. The clinical evidence of allergic sensitivity to insect bites and stings cannot be readily confirmed by skin testing or by other immunological procedures. The history and the character of the lesions as well as certain entomological knowledge of the habits of the insects offer a better basis for specific diagnosis. Treatment with extracts of the whole offending insect generally provides good results but the protection afforded by such treatment varies in degree and duration. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:14485406

  18. Molecular analysis of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency with hepatocardiomuscular expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefont, J. P.; Taroni, F.; Cavadini, P.; Cepanec, C.; Brivet, M.; Saudubray, J. M.; Leroux, J. P.; Demaugre, F.

    1996-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency, an inherited disorder of mitochondrial long-chain fatty-acid (LCFA) oxidation, results in two distinct clinical phenotypes, namely, an adult (muscular) form and an infantile (hepatocardiomuscular) form. The rationale of this phenotypic heterogeneity is poorly understood. The adult form of the disease is commonly ascribed to the Ser-113-Leu substitution in CPT II. Only few data are available regarding the molecular basis of the infantile form of the disease. We report herein a homozygous A-2399-C transversion predicting a Tyr-628-Ser substitution in a CPT II-deficient infant. In vitro expression of mutant cDNA in COS-1 cells demonstrated the responsibility of this mutation for the disease. Metabolic consequences of the SER-113-Leu and Tyr-628-Ser substitutions were studied in fibroblasts. The Tyr-628-Ser substitution (infantile form) resulted in a 10% CPT II residual activity, markedly impairing LCFA oxidation, whereas the Ser-113-Leu substitution (adult form) resulted in a 20% CPT II residual activity, with out consequence on LCFA oxidation. These data show that CPT II activity has to be reduced below a critical threshold in order for LCFA oxidation in fibroblasts to be impaired. The hypothesis that this critical threshold differs among tissues could provide a basis to explain phenotypic heterogeneity of CPT II deficiency. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8651281

  19. Cellular bases of experimental amebic liver abscess formation.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, V.; Mena-Lopez, R.; Anaya-Velazquez, F.; Martinez-Palomo, A.

    1984-01-01

    The complete sequence of morphologic events during amebic liver abscess formation in the hamster has been studied, from the lodgement of amebas in the hepatic sinusoids to the development of extensive liver necrosis. Following intraportal inoculation of live amebas, the early stages of the lesion (from 1 to 12 hours) were characterized by acute cellular infiltration composed of an increasingly large number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, which surrounded centrally located trophozoites. Histiocytes and lysed leukocytes were situated on the periphery of the lesions. Hepatocytes close to the early lesions showed degenerative changes which led to necrosis; however, direct contact of liver cells with amebas was very rarely observed. At later stages, the extent of necrosis increased, macrophages and epithelioid cells replaced most leukocytes, and well-organized granulomas developed. Extensive necrosis associated with fused granulomas was present by Day 7. The results suggest that Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites do not produce amebic liver abscesses in hamsters through direct lysis of hepatocytes. Rather, tissue destruction is the result of the accumulation and subsequent lysis of leukocytes and macrophages surrounding the amebas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:6385728

  20. Purification and partial characterization of a cadmium-binding protein from the liver of rainbow trout (Onchorynchus mykiss).

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, J E; Fredrickson, R A; Fuentealba, I C; Markham, R J

    1999-01-01

    This study describes the isolation and partial characterization of a low molecular weight (approximately 14 kDa), cadmium-binding protein from rainbow trout (Onchorynchus mykiss) liver. Rainbow trout were injected intraperitoneally with 3.5 mg/kg cadmium chloride (total body dose) twice weekly for 3 wk. Livers were removed and a cadmium-binding protein was isolated. Monoclonal antibodies produced against this protein were used in the affinity purification process. Amino acid analysis showed the protein contained 3.8 mol% cysteine, 3.5 mol% phenylalanine, 2.2 mol% tyrosine and 1.9 mol% histidine. The low cysteine content suggests that it was distinct from metallothionein. The monoclonal antibodies were also used to identify the protein in liver homogenates from both cadmium-exposed and control fish and in the testes of cadmium-exposed mice lacking the gene for both metallothionein-1 and metallothionein-II. The compound identified in this study represents a non-metallothionein cadmium-binding protein that appears to be highly conserved. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:10534000

  1. The pathology of an epizootic of acquired immunodeficiency in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, K. G.; Prahalada, S.; Lowenstine, L. J.; Gardner, M. B.; Maul, D. H.; Henrickson, R. V.

    1984-01-01

    A syndrome of acquired immunodeficiency within a group of outdoor-housed rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) with unusually high mortality has been identified at the California Primate Research Center. The cause of death for most of the affected animals included septicemia and/or chronic diarrhea with wasting, often complicated by other problems. In many cases, multiple or unusual infectious agents were isolated or recognized, including cytomegalovirus, Cryptosporidium spp., and Candida albicans. Septicemias due to usually innocuous agents such as Staphylococcus epidermidis and Alcaligenes faecalis were seen. Two animals developed cutaneous fibrosarcomas. Affected animals had generalized lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, with depletion of T-cell populations, initially follicular hyperplasia followed by depletion, and absence of plasma cells. This spontaneous disease syndrome in nonhuman primates has similarities to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in humans, providing an animal model for the study of the complex factors modulating the immune system. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6691418

  2. Regulation of an in vivo metal-exchangeable superoxide dismutase from Propionibacterium shermanii exhibiting activity with different metal cofactors.

    PubMed Central

    Sehn, A P; Meier, B

    1994-01-01

    The anaerobic, but aerotolerant Propionibacterium freudenreichii sp. shermanii contains a single superoxide dismutase [EC 1.15.1.1.] exhibiting comparable activity with iron or manganese as metal cofactor. The formation of superoxide dismutase is not depending on the supplementation of iron or manganese to the culture medium. Even in the absence of these metals the protein is built in comparable amounts. Bacteria grown in the absence of iron and manganese synthesize a superoxide dismutase with very low activity which had incorporated copper. If the medium was also depleted of copper, cobalt was incorporated, leading to an enzymically inactive form. In the absence of cobalt an enzymically inactive superoxide dismutase was built with unknown metal contents. Upon aeration the amount of superoxide dismutase activity increased continuously up to 9 h, due to a de novo synthesis of the protein. This superoxide dismutase had incorporated iron into the active centre. The superoxide dismutase of Propionibacterium shermanii is able to form a much wider variety of complexes with trace metal ions in vivo than previously recognized, leading to the hypothesis that the original function of these proteins was the binding of cytoplasmic trace metals present in excess. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7818484

  3. The intra-examiner reliability of manual muscle testing of the hip and shoulder with a modified sphygmomanometer: a preliminary study of normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Perossa, Daniel R; Dziak, Martin; Vernon, Howard T; Hayashita, Kaye

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the intrarater reliability of manual muscle assessment of the hip and shoulder using a modified sphygmomanometer. In addition, it was intended to establish a preliminary database of values from normal, healthy male and female volunteers. Eighty subjects participated in the test sessions, 40 males and 40 females between the ages of 19-22. Forty subjects participated in each of the hip and shoulder test sessions. Each examiner tested different paired movements on the subjects in one single session for the two separate joints. The tested movements consisted of hip extension, flexion and abduction and shoulder abduction, extension, flexion, internal and external rotation. All movements were tested by the patient-initiated method. Each movement was repeated twice, with a 30-35 second rest interval between the trials. The results showed that the intratester reliability coefficients for the hip ranged from 0.94-0.97, while, for the shoulder, the range was 0.86-0.97. Norms are expressed as mean (SD) values. These data conformed to previously established expectations, in that side-to-side differences were less than 10% and test values for males were larger than females in all tests. It was concluded that manual muscle assessment using a modified sphygmomanometer has acceptable intra-examiner reliability for the hip and shoulder when using the patient-initiated method. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8

  4. Immunocytochemical localization of progesterone receptors in endocrine cells of the human pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Doglioni, C.; Gambacorta, M.; Zamboni, G.; Coggi, G.; Viale, G.

    1990-01-01

    Progesterone receptors (PgR) have been immunocytochemically localized in the nuclei of several (40% to 75%) endocrine cells of the human pancreas and in a more variable number of neoplastic cells of 7 of 18 endocrine pancreatic tumors. Conversely the exocrine epithelial cells of the pancreas did not exhibit any PgR immunoreactivity in normal as well as in different pathologic conditions, including pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Estrogen receptors were not detected in any of the pancreatic samples investigated. Double immunocytochemical experiments have documented that PgR immunoreactivity in normal Langerhans islets is a consistent feature of most (75%) glucagon-producing A cells, of approximately 5% to 20% of insulin-producing B cells, and of a variable percentage of pancreatic polypeptide (PP)-producing cells, ranging from 5% to 70%. These figures were not affected by the sex, age, or underlying disease of the patients. The reported findings corroborate previous clinical and experimental evidence indicating that sex steroid hormones may have some regulatory effects on the functional activity of the endocrine pancreas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2240168

  5. Coexpression of wild-type and variant oestrogen receptor mRNAs in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Castles, C. G.; Klotz, D. M.; Fuqua, S. A.; Hill, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    Wild-type as well as variant oestrogen receptor (ER) mRNAs with exon 5 and 7 deleted were identified in a panel of human breast tumour cell lines by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction followed by dideoxynucleotide sequence analysis, and then quantitated by ribonuclease protection analysis. All cell lines categorised as ER+ by ligand-binding analysis expressed both wild-type and variant ER transcripts. Most cell lines classified as ER- did not express any ER transcript. However, three ER- cell lines (BT-20, MDA-MB-330 and T47Dco) expressed both wild-type and variant transcripts. A differential pattern of expression of wild type to variant was seen in both ER+ and ER- cell lines, however this pattern was not paralleled by differences in ligand-binding activity. Breast tumour cell lines previously classified as ER- expressed significantly lower levels of ER transcripts than did their ER+ counterparts. In view of these findings, as well as earlier reports that the exon 5 deletion ER variant encodes a dominant-positive receptor, it seems clear that some cell lines are misclassified as ER-, and express both wild-type and variant ER mRNAs, and that the overexpression of this variant may account, in part, for their oestrogen-independent phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7734323

  6. Comparison of 3 Methods of External Support for Management of Acute Lateral Ankle Sprains

    PubMed Central

    Guskiewicz, Kevin M.; Riemann, Bryan L.; Onate, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of 3 different types of injury support systems (standard elastic wrap with horseshoe, Aircast Sport Stirrup, and Omni Multiphase orthosis) used in treating acute inversion ankle sprains. Subjects: We recruited 30 physically active college-aged subjects who had sustained a grade 1 + or 2 lateral ankle sprain within the previous 24 hours for the study. Design and Setting: Subjects were randomly placed into one of 3 groups, the first treated with standard elastic wrap with horseshoe, the second with an Aircast Sport Stirrup, and the third with an Omni Multiphase orthosis. Subjects reported to the athletic training room on days 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 postinjury. Measurements: We assessed subjects for ankle volume, functional performance, and self-perception of symptoms during the 5 postinjury assessments. Results: We found no significant differences among the 3 groups on measures of volume, level of function, and self-perception of symptoms. Conclusions: Our results suggest that none of these methods is superior to the others for reducing swelling, restoring function, or relieving symptoms during the acute management of lateral ankle sprains. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:16558549

  7. Immunofluorescent localization of adhesive glycoproteins in resting and thrombin-stimulated platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Wencel-Drake, J. D.; Plow, E. F.; Zimmerman, T. S.; Painter, R. G.; Ginsberg, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and transport of thrombospondin (TSP), fibrinogen (Fbg), fibronectin (Fn), and Factor VIII-related antigen (VIII:RAg) in resting and thrombin-stimulated platelets was investigated by immunofluorescence microscopy. In resting intact cells, little surface staining was seen for these proteins. In permeable resting cells, punctate staining similar to that reported for platelet factor 4 was observed. Double-label immunofluorescence staining for Fbg and either beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG), TSP, or Fn demonstrated co-localization, indicating their presence in the same intracellular structures. VIII:RAg showed general co-localization; however, the staining was finer, suggesting a possible differential intragranular localization. Thrombin stimulation induced the appearance of larger (approximately 0.5 mu) immunofluorescent masses of these proteins. In thrombin-stimulated cells, co-localization of all proteins in these masses was observed by double label immunofluorescence. Thus, TSP, Fbg, Fn, and beta TG are localized in the same structure in resting cells. Thrombin stimulates formation of common larger masses of these proteins prior to their release, suggesting that they reach the cell surface through a common intermediate. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:6232852

  8. Macrophage-parasite interaction in the lesions of cutaneous leishmaniasis. An ultrastructural study.

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, M. J.; Wells, C. W.

    1986-01-01

    Localized cutaneous infections with Leishmania, which demonstrate complex host-parasite interactions, were studied ultrastructurally in 16 patients at phases ranging from onset to resolution. In the early lesions the host macrophages were 1) heavily parasitized and vesiculated, 2) undifferentiated, or 3) large and active, with fewer organisms. Progressive activation and epithelioid transformation of incoming monocytes was associated with the elimination of parasites. Killing and degradation appeared to take place simultaneously within the phagolysosome, but lysosomal fusion did not prevent survival into the activated cell stage. Host cell lysis, the alternative mechanism of parasite elimination, was accomplished following contact of the macrophage with plasma cells or its engulfment by a large granular cell. Lysis was either sporadic, proceeding from the periphery, or total in a central mass; and in each case macrophage lysis was preceded by connective tissue damage. The externalized parasites appeared to enhance both the activation and lytic processes, but degraded extracellular organisms were associated with dendritic-like cells more than with macrophages. This needs further study. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3963151

  9. Putative markers for the detection of breast carcinoma cells in blood.

    PubMed Central

    Eltahir, E. M.; Mallinson, D. S.; Birnie, G. D.; Hagan, C.; George, W. D.; Purushotham, A. D.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate certain genes for their suitability as molecular markers for detection of breast carcinoma cells using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RNA was prepared from MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells and peripheral blood leucocytes of healthy female volunteers. This RNA was screened for mRNA of MUC1, cytokeratin 19 (CK19) and CD44 (exons 8-11) by RT-PCR and the results validated by Southern blots. Variable degrees of expression of MUC1 and CD44 (exons 8-11) were detected in normal peripheral blood, rendering these genes non-specific for epithelial cells and therefore unsuitable for use as markers to detect breast carcinoma cells. Although CK19 mRNA was apparently specific, it was deemed unsuitable for use as a marker of breast cancer cells in light of its limited sensitivity. Furthermore, an attempt at using nested primers to increase sensitivity resulted in CK19 mRNA being detected after two amplification rounds in blood from healthy volunteers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9579823

  10. Versican gene expression in human articular cartilage and comparison of mRNA splicing variation with aggrecan.

    PubMed Central

    Grover, J; Roughley, P J

    1993-01-01

    The chondrocytes in human articular cartilage from subjects of all ages express mRNAs for both of the aggregating proteoglycans aggrecan and versican, although the level of expression of versican mRNA is much lower than that of aggrecan mRNA. Aggrecan shows alternative splicing of the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain within its C-terminal globular region, but there is no evidence for a major difference in situ in the relative expression of this domain with age. At all ages studied from birth to the mature adult, a greater proportion of transcripts lacked the EGF domain. The relative proportions of the two transcripts did not change upon culture and passage of isolated chondrocytes. In contrast, the neighbouring complement regulatory protein (CRP)-like domain was predominantly expressed irrespective of age, but cell culture did result in variation of the splicing of this domain. Versican possesses two EGF-like domains and one CRP-like domain, but at all ages the three domains were predominantly present in all transcripts. This situation persisted upon culture and passage of the chondrocytes. Thus, unlike aggrecan, the versican expressed by human articular cartilage does not appear to undergo alternative splicing of its C-terminal globular region, either in cartilage in situ or in chondrocytes in culture. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8484718

  11. Somatic mosaicism in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Colman, S. D.; Rasmussen, S. A.; Ho, V. T.; Abernathy, C. R.; Wallace, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    Using loss of heterozygosity analysis, a method designed to detect moderate to large gene deletions, we have identified a new-mutation neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patient who is somatically mosaic for a large maternally derived deletion in the NF1 gene region. The deletion extends at least from exon 4 near the 5' end of the gene to intron 39 near the 3' end. The gene-coding region is, therefore, mostly or entirely deleted, encompassing a loss of > or = 100 kb. We hypothesize that the deletion occurred at a relatively early developmental timepoint, since signs of NF1 in this patient are not confined to a specific body region, as seen in "segmental" NF, and since both mesodermally and ectodermally derived cells are affected. This report provides the first molecular evidence of somatic mosaicism in NF1 and, taken together with a recent report of germ-line mosaicism in NF1, adds credence to the concept that mosaicism plays an important role in phenotypic and genetic aspects of NF1 and may even be a relatively common phenomenon. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8644707

  12. Visualisation of doxorubicin in human and animal tissues and in cell cultures by immunogold-silver staining.

    PubMed Central

    Henneberry, H. P.; Aherne, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    In previous pharmacologic studies, the native fluorescent properties of doxorubicin (DOX) have been utilised to visualise tissue and cellular drug distribution. Such distribution studies provide valuable additional information to that obtained by measuring tissue drug concentration alone. An alternative immunocytochemical method of drug localisation using a rabbit immunoadsorbed antiserum to DOX and silver-enhanced gold-labelled second antibodies has been used to achieve visualisation of DOX in normal and malignant tissues from drug-treated animals and patients, and in human tumour cell lines treated in vitro. Non-specific staining in untreated tissues or in controls stained without primary antibody was minimal. Widespread dark brown to black specific immunostaining was observed in the normal tissues of drug-treated animals and in rat sarcoma and in the mouse EMT6 mammary tumour. In human breast tumour biopsy samples obtained at surgery 1 h following a 25 mg intravenous dose of DOX, considerable variation in drug distribution was observed which appeared to be related to drug concentration. Both nuclear and membrane staining was apparent; the latter was especially noticeable in human tumour cells grown in the presence of DOX at concentrations greater than 0.92 microM. Immunolocalisation using silver enhanced gold-labelled reagents provides an additional technique to study cell and organ specific differences in drug uptake and distribution. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1733446

  13. Immunolocalization of entactin, a sulfated basement membrane component, in rodent tissues, and comparison with GP-2 (laminin).

    PubMed Central

    Bender, B. L.; Jaffe, R.; Carlin, B.; Chung, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    Entactin is a sulfated glycoprotein in the extracellular basement membrane like matrix produced by M1536-B3 cells, a mouse endodermal line derived from an embryonal carcinoma. It has a molecular weight of 158,000 and is chemically and immunologically distinguishable from GP-2 (laminin) and fibronectin. Antibodies produced against entactin and GP-2 react with subepithelial and vascular basement membranes in rat lung, liver, spleen, and kidney and mouse placenta and kidney when examined by light microscopy. Both antibodies yield staining around the marginal sinus of the white pulp of the spleen. Antientactin reacts with basement membrane and mesangium in rat glomeruli, and anti-GP2 does not. Ultrastructurally, staining in kidneys is strongest at epithelial or endothelial cell membranes bordering basement membranes, with only moderate staining of the basement membrane proper. Intracellular staining is not present. The location of entactin suggests that it has a role in the interaction of cells with extracellular matrix, possibly in adhesion. Lack of intracellular staining suggests that the tissues studied are not actively producing entactin or GP-2 and that these substances may be fairly stable in adult organisms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:6165248

  14. Glycosaminoglycans in the rat aorta. Ultrastructural localization with toluidine blue O and osmium--ferrocyanide procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Coltoff-Schiller, B.; Goldfischer, S.

    1981-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of sclerotic vascular disease. The localization of GAGs in the rat aorta was examined by two different ultrastructural cytochemical approaches. These procedures are believed to demonstrate 1) anionic sites, with fixatives that contain either toluidine blue or ruthenium red, both cationic dyes, and 2) polysaccharides, proteoglycans, and glycoproteins, with an osmium--ferrocyanide mixture that binds to vicinal diols. Both procedures stain a network of insoluble, 2--8-nm filaments that bridge collagen fibers, elastin, basement membranes, and plasma membranes. These structures resist digestion with chondroitinase ABC and appear to be identical to the filaments that have previously been demonstrated with ruthenium red. Focal 6--12-nm densities are present where filaments intersect. However, the large granules that are made visible with ruthenium red are not seen in toluidine blue or osmium--ferrocyanide preparations. A soluble and relatively amorphous component surrounds the tightly packed bundles of collagen in the media and is preserved and stained by toluidine blue and osmium--ferrocyanide mixtures. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6172040

  15. Phosphate-Regulated Induction of Intracellular Ribonucleases in Cultured Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Löffler, Andreas; Abel, Steffen; Jost, Wolfgang; Beintema, Jaap J.; Glund, Konrad

    1992-01-01

    Four intracellular RNases were found to be induced in cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cells upon phosphate starvation. Localization studies revealed three (RNases LV 1-3) in the vacuoles and one (RNase LX) outside these organelles. All of these RNases were purified to homogeneity and were shown to be type I RNases on the basis of type of splitting, substrate, and base specificity at the cleavage site, molecular weight, isoelectric point, and pH optimum. Moreover, RNase LV 3 was shown by fingerprinting of tryptic digests on reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and sequencing the N terminus and two tryptic peptides to be structurally very similar to a recently characterized extracellular RNase LE which is also phosphate regulated (Nürnberger et al. [1990] Plant Physiol 92: 970-976; Jost et al. [1991] Eur J Biochem 198: 1-6). Expression of the four intracellular RNases is induced by depleting the cells of phosphate and repressed by adding phosphate. Our studies indicate that higher plants, in addition to secreting enzymes for scavanging phosphate under starvation conditions, also induce intracellularly emergency rescue systems. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:16668816

  16. Time course and cellular localization of interleukin-10 mRNA and protein expression in autoimmune inflammation of the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Jander, S.; Pohl, J.; D'Urso, D.; Gillen, C.; Stoll, G.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis of the Lewis rat is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by a self-limiting monophasic course. In this study, we analyzed the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 at the mRNA and protein level in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis actively induced with the encephalitogenic 68-86 peptide of guinea pig myelin basic protein. Semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that IL-10 mRNA expression peaked during the acute phase of the disease at days 11 and 13. IL-10 mRNA was synchronously induced with mRNA for the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma. Immunocytochemistry with a monoclonal antibody against rat IL-10 showed that the peak of IL-10 mRNA was accompanied by an abundant expression of IL-10 protein during the acute stage of the disease. Both in situ hybridization and double labeling immunocytochemistry in combination with confocal microscopy identified T cells, macrophages/microglia, and astrocytes as major cellular sources of IL-10 in vivo. The early peak of IL-10 production was unexpected in light of its well-documented anti-inflammatory properties. Additional studies are required to determine whether endogenous IL-10 contributes to rapid clinical remission typical for Lewis rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis or if it plays other, yet undefined, roles in central nervous system autoimmunity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9546358

  17. Cellular composition of atherosclerotic and uninvolved human aortic subendothelial intima. Light-microscopic study of dissociated aortic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Orekhov, A. N.; Karpova, I. I.; Tertov, V. V.; Rudchenko, S. A.; Andreeva, E. R.; Krushinsky, A. V.; Smirnov, V. N.

    1984-01-01

    Alcoholic-alkaline dissociation was used in the study of cellular composition of human aorta. Cells were isolated from an uninvolved intima and intima with different types of atherosclerotic lesions: fatty infiltration, fatty streak, and atherosclerotic plaque. In the isolated suspension we evaluated the ratio of four previously described morphologic forms of cells: stellate, elongated, elongated with side processes, and flat cells of irregular shape. It was demonstrated that the quota of stellate cells in an atherosclerotic lesion considerably exceeds that of the normal intima. For elongated cells the opposite is true. The other two cell forms are represented in the uninvolved and atherosclerotic intima in approximately equal proportions. Alteration of the ratio of different morphologic forms occurs because of the fact that the number of cells belonging to different morphologic forms increases disproportionately in the lesion zone. Specifically, the number of stellate cells is increased much more substantially, compared with elongated cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6711678

  18. Intravenous Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) of Hemodialysis Access Fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Gregory J.; Burnett, Keith R.; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Friedenberg, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    Hemodialysis access fistulae or grafts are subject to a variety of complications, including thrombosis, stenoses, and aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm formation. The usual radiologic methods to evaluate these problems consist of retrograde venous angiography or standard femoral or brachial arteriography. Both are invasive, and may traumatize the artery or graft. Six patients with internal blood access were studied using digital subtraction angiography; five using a central venous injection and one with direct graft injection. Preliminary results indicate that intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IV-DSA) can depict the anatomy of access fistula with adequate spatial resolution. Pathologic entities (stenoses, aneurysms) can be demonstrated, as well as other findings of uncertain clinical significance (kinks and webs). In addition, hemodynamic data can be inferred from the near-physiologic sequence of vessel opacification. Methods are in development that will allow determination of absolute blood flow in pertinent vessels via IV-DSA. There were no complications in this small series, and all examinations were performed on outpatients utilizing standard technique. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:3537322

  19. Diverse spectrum of tumors in male Sprague-Dawley rats following single high doses of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU).

    PubMed Central

    Stoica, G.; Koestner, A.

    1984-01-01

    In this study, 30-day-old male Sprague-Dawley rats, were inoculated intraperitoneally with a single dose of 45, 90, and 180 mg/kg of N-ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU). A wide spectrum of neoplasms occurred. The most common tumors were those of the mammary gland and of the nervous system. Although the incidence of mammary tumors was highest in the two high-dose groups (90 and 180 mg/kg ENU), the incidence of neurogenic tumors was highest in the 45 mg/kg dose group. Mammary tumor development led to early death and precluded development of tumors of the nervous system, which require a longer latency period. A variety of neoplasms of other organs have been associated particularly with high doses of ENU, including ameloblastic tumors, carcinomas of the thyroid, prostate, kidney, pancreas, intestine, and lung, hemilymphatic tumors, and sarcomas. It is concluded that large doses of ENU are capable of expanding the tumor spectrum in young male rats beyond the target organs generally affected with lower doses, as described in earlier reports. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6465287

  20. Early lesions of Kaposi's sarcoma in homosexual men. An ultrastructural comparison with other vascular proliferations in skin.

    PubMed Central

    McNutt, N. S.; Fletcher, V.; Conant, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    An aggressive variant of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) has appeared in young homosexual men with evidence of systemic immunosuppression. The ultrastructure in biopsy specimens from 8 KS cases in young homosexual men has been compared with that in biopsy specimens from 4 KS cases in elderly heterosexuals and with that in biopsy specimens from 23 cases of benign vascular disorders of skin. In all cases of KS the small blood vessels lacked a prominent investment of pericytes and their processes, had a fragmented and often absent basal lamina, had frequent discontinuities in the endothelial lining, and had only a few small junctional densities between endothelial cells. Some clinically aggressive cases of KS also had necrosis of individual endothelial cells and had prominent cytoplasmic processes entrapping individual collagen fibers. The benign disorders lacked these features. These differences in the structure of the small vessels may be of diagnostic value in some early cases of KS. The loss of dendritic pericytes in blood capillaries in KS might relate to the telangiectasia which is a prominent feature of the early lesions of KS. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6301283

  1. Light- and electron-microscopic histochemistry of Fabry's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Faraggiana, T.; Churg, J.; Grishman, E.; Strauss, L.; Prado, A.; Bishop, D. F.; Schuchman, E.; Desnick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A histochemical study was performed on light- and electron-microscopic level in a case of Fabry's disease. The patient underwent kidney transplantation for renal failure and died of heart failure 6 months later. Patient's tissues were studied at the light- and electron-microscopic levels with various embedding and staining techniques for lipids and carbohydrates. Two peroxidase-labeled lectins (from Ricinus communis and from Bandeiraea simplicifolia) known to have affinity for alpha- and beta-D-galactose, were strongly reactive with the storage material on frozen sections. The ultrahistochemical and extraction tests showed that the typical granules had a variable reactivity and morphologic characteristics in different cells, probably reflecting different composition. A small number of typical deposits were also observed in the transplanted kidney. This is the first reported case of recurrence of the storage disease in the allograft. Of interest was also the fact that the patient's blood inhibited normal alpha-galactosidase activity, suggesting a possible inhibitor-related mechanism in the pathogenesis of the recurrence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 PMID:6786101

  2. Evidence for the experimental transmission of cerebral beta-amyloidosis to primates.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, H. F.; Ridley, R. M.; Duchen, L. W.; Crow, T. J.; Bruton, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The brains of three marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) injected intracerebrally 6-7 years earlier with brain tissue from a patient with early onset Alzheimer's disease were found to contain moderate numbers of amyloid plaques with associated argyrophilic dystrophic neurites and cerebral amyloid angiopathy but no neurofibrillary tangles. The plaques and vascular amyloid stained positively with antibodies to beta (A4)-protein. The brains of three age-matched control marmosets from the same colony did not show these neuropathological features. The brain of one of two marmosets injected with brain tissue from a patient with prion disease with concomitant beta-amyloid plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy also showed beta-amyloid plaques and angiopathy but no spongiform encephalopathy. An occasional plaque was found in the brains of two of four marmosets injected with brain tissue from three elderly patients with age-related pathology, two of whom had an additional diagnosis of possible prion disease. Neither plaques nor cerebral amyloid angiopathy were found in six other marmosets who were older than the injected animals, in 12 further marmosets who were slightly younger but who had been injected several years previously with brain tissue which did not contain beta-amyloid, or in 10 younger marmosets who had been subjected to various neurosurgical procedures. These results suggest that cerebral beta-amyloidosis may be induced by the introduction of exogenous amyloid beta-protein. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8217779

  3. Disseminated BK type polyomavirus infection in an AIDS patient associated with central nervous system disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vallbracht, A.; Löhler, J.; Gossmann, J.; Glück, T.; Petersen, D.; Gerth, H. J.; Gencic, M.; Dörries, K.

    1993-01-01

    A 27-year-old man with hemophilia type A and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome developed a subacute meningoencephalitis, associated with a normotensive internal hydrocephalus, 14 weeks before his death. From cerebrospinal fluid and brain autopsy material, a virus could be isolated and was classified by Southern blot analysis and restriction endonuclease reactions as the human polyomavirus BK. The postmortem findings of polyomavirus antigen and BK virus DNA in various cell types of the kidneys, lungs, and central nervous system strongly suggest that BK virus was the causative agent of a tubulointerstitial nephropathy, an interstitial desquamative pneumonitis, and a subacute meningoencephalitis with accentuation of the ventricular and meningeal surfaces of the brain. Besides distinctive cytopathic effects, the presence of intranuclear inclusions was a prominent histopathological feature. Therefore, the human polyomavirus BK should be regarded as a new candidate on the still growing list of opportunistic pathogens in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8391217

  4. Pulsed laser imaging of rapid Ca2+ gradients in excitable cells.

    PubMed Central

    Monck, J R; Robinson, I M; Escobar, A L; Vergara, J L; Fernandez, J M

    1994-01-01

    Excitable cells are thought to respond to action potentials by forming short lived and highly localized Ca2+ gradients near sites of Ca2+ entry or near the site of Ca2+ release by intracellular stores. However, conventional imaging techniques lack the spatial and temporal resolution to capture these gradients. Here we demonstrate the use of pulsed-laser microscopy to measure Ca2+ gradients with submicron spatial resolution and millisecond time resolution in two preparations where the Ca2+ signal is thought to be fast and highly localized: adrenal chromaffin cells, where the entry of Ca2+ through voltage dependent Ca2+ channels triggers exocytotic fusion; and skeletal muscle fibers, where intracellular Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum initiates contraction. In chromaffin cells, Ca2+ gradients developed over 10-100 ms and were initially restricted to discrete submembrane domains, or hot spots, before developing into complete rings of elevated Ca2+ concentration. In frog skeletal muscle large, short-lived (approximately 6 ms) Ca2+ gradients were observed within individual sarcomeres following induction of action potentials. The pulsed laser imaging approach permits, for the first time, the capture and critical examination of rapid Ca2+ signaling events such as those underlying excitation-secretion and excitation-contraction coupling. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:7948669

  5. Common commercial cosmetic products induce arthritis in the DA rat.

    PubMed Central

    Sverdrup, B; Klareskog, L; Kleinau, S

    1998-01-01

    Many different agents, including mineral oil and silicone, have the capacity to act as immunological adjuvants, i.e., they can contribute to the activation of the immune system. Some adjuvants, including mineral oil, are known to induce arthritis in certain strains of rats after intradermal injection or percutaneous application. The aim of this study was to determine if common commercial cosmetic products containing mineral oil could induce arthritis in the highly susceptible DA (Dark Agouti) rat. Intradermal injection of five out of eight assayed cosmetic products without further additives resulted in arthritis with synovitis. One of the products induced a very aggressive arthritis, which had declined after 5-9 weeks. When this product was also assayed for arthritogenicity upon percutaneous administration, it induced a mild and transient arthritis in 5 out of 10 DA rats, whereas control animals showed no clinical signs of joint involvement. No arthritic reaction was seen in rats after peroral feeding with the most arthritogenic product or by intravaginal application of Freund's adjuvants. Silicone gel implants in DA rats did not cause arthritis. We conclude that mineral oils included in common commercially available products retain their adjuvant properties and are arthritogenic in the presently investigated arthritis-prone rat strain. There is yet no evidence that mineral oils present in cosmetics may contribute to arthritis in humans, but we suggest that this question should be subject to further investigation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9417771

  6. Intratumor Cellular Heterogeneity and Alterations in ras Oncogene and p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene in Human Prostate Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Noboru; Hiasa, Yoshio; Matsuda, Hirofumi; Tao, Ming; Tsuzuki, Toshihide; Hayashi, Isao; Kitahori, Yoshiteru; Shiraishi, Taizo; Yatani, Ryuichi; Shimazaki, Jun; Lin, Jung-Chung

    1995-01-01

    To assess the potential role of ras oncogene activation and P53 tumor suppressor gene mutations in the development of human prostate carcinoma, nine cases of histologically heterogeneous prostate tumors obtained from total prostatectomies were probed for these specific events. Each tumor was divided into 5 to 10 areas according to different growth or histological patterns. Targeted DNA sequences coding for ras and p53 were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, analyzed by single-strand conformational polymorphisms, and confirmed by direct DNA sequencing. Point mutations of the ras gene were found in three of the nine tumors. Two contained K-ras codon 13 and H-ras codon 61 mutations, found in only one and three areas of each lesion, respectively. The third tumor contained two different point mutations in K-ras codons 13 and 61 in different foci of the sample. Loss of heterozygosity at the polymorphic codon 72 in the p53 gene was detected in two of four informative cases (50%) showing fragment cleavage by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Mutations in p53, missense transversions, single base insertions, and two base deletions were also detected in three tumors. The present results reveal mutated ras and p53 occasionally occurring in small foci of the tumor and that genetic mutations in p53, as opposed to those in ras, are more closely associated with invasive growth of heterogeneous prostate carcinoma. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:7573356

  7. A hundred years of importation: The first animal quarantine station in North America; Lévis, Québec, 1876-1982

    PubMed Central

    Dukes, Thomas W.; Labonté, Bertrand

    1991-01-01

    Quarantine, as a means of preventing disease importation, has been used for people and animals since the mid-19th century in Canada. The first animal quarantine facility in North America was established at Lévis, Québec in 1876. This quarantine station existed at Lévis until 1982 when it was closed and the function moved to Mirabel, Québec, near the International Airport. Veterinarians were in charge during the life of the Lévis Quarantine Station and some were also in charge of the Port of Quebec or a nearby District Office prior to the 1950's. In 1884 and 1886 the value of such a facility was illustrated in preventing the entry into Canada of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and a vesicular disease. It was described in 1933 as “undoubtedly our most important quarantine station” and a year's operating costs as “trifling in comparison to losses which could occur if a foreign plague invaded this country”. This facility's history also illustrated the close veterinary and human medical cooperation during the early days of organized veterinary medicine in Canada. The station was an example for the establishment of other such facilities in North America. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:17423811

  8. Aberrant Processing of Polyphenol Oxidase in a Variegated Grapevine Mutant 1

    PubMed Central

    Rathjen, Anne H.; Robinson, Simon P.

    1992-01-01

    Bruce's Sport is a mutant grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) with green and white variegated fruit derived from the Sultana variety. The white regions of tissue have decreased polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity resulting in a reduced capacity for browning. Active PPO from Sultana grapes was purified and had an apparent molecular weight of 40,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Western blots indicated that mature Sultana grapes contained a single 40-kilodalton PPO, and young Sultana berries also had small quantities of a 60-kilodalton protein. Bruce's Sport grapes had much less of the 40-kilodalton PPO and greater amounts of the 60-kilodalton band. Protease digestion of Bruce's Sport extracts decreased the proportion of the 60-kilodalton protein and increased the 40-kilodalton band. A cDNA clone of grape PPO was used to probe a northern blot of Sultana and Bruce's Sport RNA and hybridized to a 2.2-kilobase transcript in both grapevines. The level of PPO mRNA was high in the early stages of berry development but then declined. The results suggest that in grapevine the active 40-kilodalton form of PPO is synthesized as a precursor protein of at least 60 kilodaltons, and normal processing is interrupted in Bruce's Sport resulting in the accumulation of the 60-kilodalton inactive preform of PPO. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:16669082

  9. Characterization of a primary bile ductular cell culture from the livers of rats during extrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Sirica, A. E.; Sattler, C. A.; Cihla, H. P.

    1985-01-01

    The establishment of novel bile ductular cell cultures was accomplished with the use of explants of a hyperplastic bile ductular tissue preparation obtained from rat livers at 10 to 15 weeks after bile duct ligation or a bile ductular cell fraction isolated from this tissue preparation by a procedure involving Percoll density gradient centrifugation. Observations made on these primary explant and monolayer bile ductular cell cultures were limited to the first 3 days of culture where the morphologic features of the bile ductular epithelium remained fairly well preserved, while fibroblast contamination was found to be very low. These cultured cells also retained over this period a high specific activity for the bile ductular cell marker enzyme gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, as well as possessed measurable but decreasing specific activities for leucine aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase. Karyotypic analysis of the cultured monolayer cells further showed them to be diploid. In addition, preliminary transplantation studies demonstrated the presence of well-differentiated bile ductular-like structures following inoculation of the freshly isolated bile ductular cell fraction into the interscapular fat pads of recipient rats. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2861743

  10. Validity of the uniform mixing assumption: determining human exposure to environmental tobacco smoke.

    PubMed Central

    Klepeis, N E

    1999-01-01

    When using the mass balance equation to model indoor air quality, the primary assumption is that of uniform mixing. Different points in a single compartment are assumed to have the same instantaneous pollutant concentrations as all other points. Although such an assumption may be unrealistic, under certain conditions predictions (or measurements) of exposures at single points in a room are still within acceptable limits of error (e.g., 10%). In this article, three studies of the mixing of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) pollutants are reviewed, and data from several other ETS field studies are presented. Under typical conditions for both short sources (e.g., 10 min) and the continuous sources of ETS in smoking lounges, I find that average exposure concentrations for a single point in a room represent the average exposure across all points in the room within 10% for averaging times ranging from 12 to 80 min. I present a method for determining theoretical estimates of acceptable averaging times for a continuous point source. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:10350521

  11. The estrogenicity of bisphenol A-related diphenylalkanes with various substituents at the central carbon and the hydroxy groups.

    PubMed Central

    Perez, P; Pulgar, R; Olea-Serrano, F; Villalobos, M; Rivas, A; Metzler, M; Pedraza, V; Olea, N

    1998-01-01

    The chemical structure of hydroxylated diphenylalkanes or bisphenols consists of two phenolic rings joined together through a bridging carbon. This class of endocrine disruptors that mimic estrogens is widely used in industry, particularly in plastics. Bisphenol F, bisphenol A, fluorine-containing bisphenol A (bisphenol AF), and other diphenylalkanes were found to be estrogenic in a bioassay with MCF7 human breast cancer cells in culture (E-SCREEN assay). Bisphenols promoted cell proliferation and increased the synthesis and secretion of cell type-specific proteins. When ranked by proliferative potency, the longer the alkyl substituent at the bridging carbon, the lower the concentration needed for maximal cell yield; the most active compound contained two propyl chains at the bridging carbon. Bisphenols with two hydroxyl groups in the para position and an angular configuration are suitable for appropriate hydrogen bonding to the acceptor site of the estrogen receptor. Our data suggest that estrogenicity is influenced not only by the length of the substituents at the bridging carbon but also by their nature. Because diphenylalkane derivatives are widespread and their production and use are increasing, potential exposure of humans to estrogenic bisphenols is becoming a significant issue. The hazardous effects of inadvertent exposure to bisphenol-releasing chemicals in professional workers and the general populations therefore deserve investigation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9449681

  12. The relation of experimental arthritis to the distribution of streptococcal cell wall fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Dalldorf, F. G.; Cromartie, W. J.; Anderle, S. K.; Clark, R. L.; Schwab, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The intraperitoneal injection of peptidoglycan-carbohydrate fragments from Group A streptococci produces a chronic, polyarticular, erosive synovitis in rats. The cell wall material accumulates rapidly in the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes, where it causes little injury. At the same time, selective localization and persistence of the material in the synovial and periarticular tissues occurs. Its presence in the joint is associated with acute and recurrent inflammation with focal synotivitis, pannus formation, joint destruction, and ankylosis. Cell wall fragments become localized in the synovial and periarticular tissues at a time when there are leukocytes in the bloodstream, which appear to contain the material. During this early phase vascular lesions appear in the synovium and in periarticular tissues with collections of fibrin, neutrophils, macrophages, and cell wall fragments near the venules and capillaries. Recurrent episodes of inflammation and joint injury, associated with persistent cell wall antigen within macrophages, were observed over a period of 90 days. Images Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 PMID:6996490

  13. Immunoreactivity of anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibodies to human heart valves. Evidence for multiple cross-reactive epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Cunningham, M. W.; McManus, B. M.

    1991-01-01

    Association of group A streptococci with acute rheumatic fever and valvular heart disease is well established; however the basis of valve injury remains unclear. In this study, anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) cross-reactive with myocardium were reacted with sections from 22 rheumatic valves, nine normal, five endocarditic, one 'floppy,' and one Marfan valve. In immunohistochemical studies, MAb reactivity was observed with cardiac myocytes, smooth muscle cells, cell surface and cytoplasm of endothelial cells lining valves, and valvular interstitial cells. Endothelial basement membrane and elastin fibrils reacted with the MAbs, whereas collagen was unreactive. Similar reactivity was seen with sera from acute rheumatic fever patients. The anti-streptococcal MAbs reacted with intravalvular myosin and vimentin in Western blots, and purified elastin competitively inhibited the binding of the anti-streptococcal MAbs to whole group A streptococci. The data show that human heart valves have numerous sites of immunoreactivity with anti-streptococcal MAbs and acute rheumatic fever sera of potential importance in the pathogenesis of rheumatic valvular injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:1704188

  14. Pulmonary and generalized lysosomal storage induced by amphiphilic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Z

    1984-01-01

    Administration of amphiphilic drugs to experimental animals causes formation of myelinoid bodies in many cell types, accumulation of foamy macrophages in pulmonary alveoli and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. These changes are the result of an interaction between the drugs and phospholipids which leads to an alteration in physicochemical properties of the phospholipids. Impairment of the digestion of altered pulmonary secretions in phagosomes of macrophages results in accumulation of foam cells in pulmonary alveoli. Impairment of the metabolism of altered phospholipids removed by autophagy induces an accumulation of myelinoid bodies. The administration of amphiphilic compounds thus causes pulmonary intra-alveolar histiocytosis which is a part of a drug-induced lysosomal storage or generalized lipidosis. The accumulation of drug-lipid complexes in myelinoid bodies and in pulmonary foam cells may lead to alteration of cellular functioning and to clinical disease. Currently over 50 amphiphilic drugs are known. Unique pharmacological properties necessitate clinical use of some of these drugs. The occurrence and severity of potential clinical side effects depend on the nature of each drug, dosage and duration of treatment, simultaneous administration of other drugs and foods, individual metabolic pattern of the patient and other factors. Further studies on factors preventing and potentiating adverse effects of amphiphilic drugs are indicated. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. PMID:6376111

  15. Induction of experimental allergic sialadenitis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Hirokawa, K.

    1985-01-01

    This article reports that sialadenitis developed in female CRJ:CD-1 mice thymectomized 3 days after birth and later immunized with a homogenate of the submandibular salivary gland emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant. Significant inflammatory changes did not develop in various control groups, including animals thymectomized at Day 3 but not immunized and animals not thymectomized on the day of birth but immunized. Because a more marked decrease of Lyt 2+ cells was found in mice thymectomized on Day 3 after birth than in neonatally thymectomized mice, thymectomy at 3 days of age is more effective for the induction of sialadenitis, presumably by markedly decreasing a population of suppressor T cells. The lesions observed in mice with sialadenitis were mostly composed of small and medium-sized lymphocytes stained by anti-Thy 1.2 and Lyt 2 antibodies and in later stages by immunoglobulin-containing cells in the periphery of inflammatory lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3156505

  16. Immunological Characterization of a Tapetal Protein in Developing Anthers of Lilium longiflorum 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Co-Shine; Walling, Linda L.; Eckard, Kathleen J.; Lord, Elizabeth M.

    1992-01-01

    Antiserum was raised in rabbits against a lily (Lilium longiflorum) anther-specific protein (LLA-15). Monospecific anti-LLA-15 antibodies were prepared to investigate the distribution of LLA-15 during anther development in a variety of flowering plants. Immunoblot analyses of total protein from floral and vegetative organs confirmed that LLA-15 or LLA-15-like proteins accumulated to detectable levels only in a discrete stage of anther development. In situ localization using anti-rabbit immunoglobulin G conjugated with gold particles confirmed that LLA-15 was specifically localized in the tapetal tissue of lily anthers. The maximal level of LLA-15 was strictly coincident with the peak of tapetal secretory functions. Immunoblots of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels of lily anther proteins indicated that the seven LLA-15 isoforms ranged from isoelectric point 5.6 to 6.1. In vitro translation of lily anther mRNAs showed that four of these isoforms were primary products, the additional three being a result of posttranslational processing of the primary translation products. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:16669007

  17. Vascular growth factors and receptors in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Böhling, T.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Persico, M. G.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1996-01-01

    Capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas are highly vascular central nervous system tumors of controversial origin. Of interest in their pathogenesis are mechanisms regulating endothelial cell growth. The endothelial cell mitogen vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates angiogenesis, and together with its two receptor tyrosine kinases VEGFR-1(FLT1) and VEGFR-2(KDR), is up-regulated during the malignant progression of gliomas. We have analyzed the expression of VEGF and its receptors, the related placental growth factor (PlGF) and the endothelial receptors FLT4 and Tie by in situ hybridization in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in all of the hemangiopericytomas studied and highly expressed in the stromal cells of hemangioblastomas. In addition, some hemangioblastoma tumor cells expressed high levels of PlGF. Significantly elevated levels of Tie mRNA, Tie protein, VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 but not FLT4 mRNAs were observed in the endothelia of both tumor types. In hemangioblastomas, however, the receptors were also highly expressed by a subpopulation of stromal cells. Consistent results were obtained for a human hemangioblastoma cell line in culture. Up-regulation of the endothelial growth factors and receptors may result in autocrine or paracrine stimulation of endothelial cells and their precursors involved in the genesis of these two vascular tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8774132

  18. Expression of endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine kinases and growth factors in human brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Kaipainen, A.; Mentula, P.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Paetau, A.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1995-01-01

    Key growth factor-receptor interactions involved in angiogenesis are possible targets for therapy of CNS tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific endothelial cell mitogen that has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis, a requirement for solid tumor growth. The expression of VEGF, the closely related placental growth factor (PIGF), the newly cloned endothelial high affinity VEGF receptors KDR and FLT1, and the endothelial orphan receptors FLT4 and Tie were analyzed by in situ hybridization in normal human brain tissue and in the following CNS tumors: gliomas, grades II, III, IV; meningiomas, grades I and II; and melanoma metastases to the cerebrum. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in the majority of low grade tumors studied and was highly expressed in cells of malignant gliomas. Significantly elevated levels of Tie, KDR, and FLT1 mRNAs, but not FLT4 mRNA, were observed in malignant tumor endothelia, as well as in endothelia of tissues directly adjacent to the tumor margin. In comparison, there was little or no receptor expression in normal brain vasculature. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that these endothelial receptors are induced during tumor progression and may play a role in tumor angiogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7856749

  19. Duodenal content reflux esophagitis in the rat: an animal model for the ulcer-associated cell lineage (UACL)?

    PubMed Central

    Hanby, A. M.; Pera, M.; Filipe, I.; Duranceau, A.; Wright, N. A.; Pera, M.; Grande, L.; Poulsom, R.

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the histological changes observed in the mucosa of 10 rats in the region of a esophagojejunostomy to evaluate it as a model for the ulcer-associated cell lineage (UACL). In man, the UACL has a distinctive morphology, proliferative organization, and pattern of trefoil peptide localization. We have therefore examined these aspects aided by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to the trefoil peptides TFF1, TFF2, and TFF3. Only TFF2 was studied by immunohistochemistry, whereas the mRNAs for all three peptides were examined by in situ hybridization using 35S-labeled riboprobes. The marker MIB-1 to the Ki67 proliferation-related antigen was used to examine the proliferative organization of UACL-like changes. In all cases, columnar epithelialization of the distal esophagus was seen, and in all, glands with morphological and gene expression attributes of the UACL were identified. TFF3 mRNA localized patchily throughout the UACL, whereas TFF1 mRNA was found in the upper portions of the lineage and TFF2 mRNA and its product in the acini. These lineages showed virtually no intrinsic proliferative activity. These appearances are similar to those seen in early human UACL, and we therefore propose this that this represents the first published animal model of this lineage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9403733

  20. Equine phacoclastic uveitis: the clinical manifestations, light microscopic findings, and therapy of 7 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Grahn, B H; Cullen, C L

    2000-01-01

    This retrospective clinical study describes the clinical manifestations, light microscopic findings, and diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic lens rupture in the horse. Rupture of the lens capsule in the horse usually results in a chronic, blinding inflammation (phacoclastic uveitis) unless prompt surgical and medical therapies are implemented. The clinical manifestations of acute lens capsule rupture included: cataract; intralenticular displacement of iridal pigment; lens cortical fragments attached to the perforated lens capsule, iris, and corneal endothelium; miosis; aqueous flare; and usually a corneal or scleral perforation with ulceration or focal full thickness corneal edema and scarring. The clinical signs of chronic phacoclastic uveitis include blindness, phthisis bulbi, and generalized corneal opacification related to scarring, vascularization, pigmentation, and edema. In one horse, acute phacoclastic uveitis was successfully treated with phacoemulsification to remove the ruptured lens and medical therapy to control the accompanying inflammation. The affected eyes of the horses with chronic phacoclastic uveitis were enucleated because of persistent clinical signs of nonulcerative keratitis and uveitis, despite long-term medical management. The clinical manifestations and lack of improvement with medical therapy are similar in the horse, dog, cat, and rabbit. However, the histologic findings in equine phacoclastic uveitis differ significantly from those in the dog, and rabbit. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. PMID:10816830

  1. Prognostic Factors Including Proliferation Markers Ki-67, bax, and bcl-2 in Temporal Bone Paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Gjuric, Mislav; Völker, Uwe; Katalinic, Alexander; Wolf, Stephan Rüdiger

    1997-01-01

    Valuable criteria with which to predict the clinical behavior of the temporal bone paraganglioma or the response to treatment are lacking. The analysis of markers of cell proliferation is a possibility to estimate the prognosis. Extensive patient data on 40 temporal bone paragangliomas were gathered over the years and correlated with the data obtained by staining histologic sections with bcl-2, bax, and MIB I markers of cellular proliferation. The immunohistochemistry was in all cases negative for bcl-2, positive for bax, and for Ki-67 positive in 20% of tumors. The scores for Ki-67 did not correlate with the majority of clinical parameters, except for treatment modality, preoperative hearing loss, and cranial nerve involvement. The tendency toward poorer hearing and a higher incidence of preoperative lower cranial nerve palsies was demonstrated in patients with higher Ki-67 scores. Furthermore, the higher rate of subtotal tumor removals in these patients reveals technical difficulties in accomplishing a radical removal, although the incidence of residual tumors was thus not affected. In view of the present information obtained with proliferation markers, the site of tumor origin still remains the most predictive variable for the course of the disease. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171028

  2. Protein tracking and detection of protein motion using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, N H; Fritz, M; Radmacher, M; Cleveland, J P; Schmidt, C F; Hansma, P K

    1996-01-01

    Height fluctuations over three different proteins, immunoglobulin G, urease, and microtubules, have been measured using an atomic force microscope (AFM) operating in fluid tapping mode. This was achieved by using a protein-tracking system, where the AFM tip was periodically repositioned above a single protein molecule (or structure) as thermal drifting occurred. Height (z-piezo signal) data were taken in 1 - or 2-s time slices with the tip over the molecule and compared to data taken on the support. The measured fluctuations were consistently higher when the tip was positioned over the protein, as opposed to the support the protein was adsorbed on. Similar measurements over patches of an amphiphile, where the noise was identical to that on the support, suggest that the noise increase is due to some intrinsic property of proteins and is not a result of different tip-sample interactions over soft samples. The orientation of the adsorbed proteins in these preliminary studies was not known; thus it was not possible to make correlations between the observed motion and specific protein structure or protein function beyond noting that the observed height fluctuations were greater for an antibody (anti-bovine IgG) and an enzyme (urease) than for microtubules. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9172768

  3. Autopsy pathology in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, C. M.; O'Leary, T. J.; Levens, D. L.; Simrell, C. R.; Macher, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a devastating new illness which appears to be sexually and parenterally transmissible. AIDS was first described in the male homosexual community; however, the disease has more recently been described among intravenous drug abusers, Haitians, hemophiliacs, and others. The etiologic agent is unknown. AIDS may represent an infection by a previously undescribed organism, a mutant of a known microorganism, or a multifactorial combination of environmental, immunologic, and genetic factors. As a consequence of the disease's seemingly irreversible ablation of the cell-mediated immune system, AIDS victims succumb to a variety of infections and/or unusual neoplasms. In its fully developed form, mortality approaches 100%. At autopsy the gross and microscopic pathology of the syndrome can be divided into three general categories: 1) morphologic manifestations of profound lymphoid depletion; 2) infections, usually with mixed opportunistic pathogens; and 3) unusual neoplasms, most frequently Kaposi's sarcoma or high-grade lymphomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 PMID:6311021

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging. Application to family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, R. H.; Somers, S.; Jurriaans, E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review indications, contraindications, and risks of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to help primary care physicians refer patients appropriately for MRI, screen for contraindications to using MRI, and educate patients about MRI. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Recommendations are based on classic textbooks, the policies of our MRI group, and a literature search using MEDLINE with the MeSH headings magnetic resonance imaging, brain, musculoskeletal, and spine. The search was limited to human, English-language, and review articles. Evidence in favour of using MRI for imaging the head, spine, and joints is well established. For cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic conditions, MRI has been shown useful for certain indications, usually to complement other modalities. MAIN MESSAGE: For demonstrating soft tissue conditions, MRI is better than computed tomography (CT), but CT shows bone and acute bleeding better. Therefore, patients with trauma or suspected intracranial bleeding should have CT. Tumours, congenital abnormalities, vascular structures, and the cervical or thoracic spine show better on MRI. Either modality can be used for lower back pain. Cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic abnormalities should be imaged with ultrasound or CT before MRI. Contraindications for MRI are mainly metallic implants or shrapnel, severe claustrophobia, or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: With the increasing availability of MRI scanners in Canada, better understanding of the indications, contraindications, and risks will be helpful for family physicians and their patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:10509224

  5. Cystitis induced by infection with the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Czub, S.; Duray, P. H.; Thomas, R. E.; Schwan, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the urinary bladder is a consistent source for isolating the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, from both experimentally infected and naturally exposed rodents. We examined histopathologic changes in the urinary bladder of different types of rodents experimentally infected with Lyme spirochetes, including BALB/c mice (Mus musculus), nude mice (M. musculus), white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus), and grasshopper mice (Onychomys leucogaster). Animals were inoculated intraperitoneally, subcutaneously, or intranasally with low-passaged spirochetes, high-passaged spirochetes, or phosphate-buffered saline. At various times after inoculation, animals were killed and approximately one-half of each urinary bladder and kidney were cultured separately in BSK-II medium while the other half of each organ was prepared for histologic examination. Spirochetes were cultured from the urinary bladder of all 35 mice inoculated with low-passaged spirochetes while we were unable to isolate spirochetes from any kidneys of the same mice. The pathologic changes observed most frequently in the urinary bladder of the infected mice were the presence of lymphoid aggregates, vascular changes, including an increase in the number of vessels and thickening of the vessel walls, and perivascular infiltrates. Our results demonstrate that nearly all individuals (93%) of the four types of mice examined had a cystitis associated with spirochetal infection. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1443051

  6. Expression and adhesive ability of gicerin, a cell adhesion molecule, in the pock lesions of chorioallantoic membranes infected with an avian poxvirus.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Y; Kotani, T; Hiroi, S; Egawa, M; Ogawa, K; Sasaki, F; Taira, E

    2001-01-01

    The expression and adhesive activities of gicerin, a cell adhesion protein, in the pock lesions on chicken chorioallantoic membranes (CAM) infected with an avian poxvirus were studied. In normal CAMs, gicerin was found on the flattened epithelial cells, and neurite outgrowth factor (NOF) was in the basement membrane. However, in the pock lesions on infected CAMs, gicerin was overexpressed on the cell membranes of hyperplastic epithelial cells forming thick epithelial layers. Neurite outgrowth factor was also found mainly in the basement membrane, but occasionally showed aberrant expression among hyperplastic cells. In vitro analyses, using the dissociated cells from pock lesions, demonstrated that an anti-gicerin polyclonal antibody inhibit cell aggregation activity and cell adhesion to NOF. These results suggest that gicerin might promote the cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix protein bindings of the hyperplastic epithelial cells by its homophilic and heterophilic adhesive activities, and contribute to pock formation on the infected CAMs. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 5. PMID:11768132

  7. Morphology of irradiated microvasculature: a combined in vivo and electron-microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, K.; Cliff, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a standardized experimental system to investigate the local effects of ionizing irradiation in the absence of systemic responses due to radiation. Twenty fully healed rabbit ear chambers in 13 rabbits were irradiated with single exposures of 7500 rads of beta-rays from a strontium-90 source. The irradiation resulted in an acute response, with cellular infiltration of the ear chambers, loss of vasomotion in arterioles, and vasodilatation. Over the weeks following irradiation, a gradual reduction in the number of blood and lymphatic vessels was noticed. A gradual reduction in the number of cells in the interstitium was also observed. Finally, only a few thin-walled blood vessels remained. Their endothelium contained no recognizable organelles and in places had disappeared completely, to expose the vascular basement membrane to the blood. These vessels were observed to be still flowing. No evidence either of capillary blockage due to swelling of endothelial cells or of platelet aggregation leading to thrombosis was obtained. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7055211

  8. Iron metabolism and cell membranes. III. Iron-induced alterations in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jauregui, H. O.; Bradford, W. D.; Arstila, A. U.; Kinney, T. D.; Trump, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    The morphologic characteristics of acute iron loading were studied in HeLa cells incubated in an iron-enriched Eagle's medium containing 500 mug/ml of iron. Chemical studies showed that ferritin synthesis was rapidly induced and the concentration of intracellular ferritin increased up to 72 hours. Closely coupled with an increase in HeLa cell ferritin was a marked decrease in the rate of cell multiplication. The significant ultrastructural findings of iron-induced HeLa cell injury are characterized by the appearance of both autophagic multivesicular and residual bodies over the first 72 hours of iron incubation. The prominence of multivesicular bodies was noted after only 4 hours' incubation, with iron and myelin figures first appearing after 6 hours. Thus, the partial arrest of cell multiplication was associated with an increase in cytoplasmic residual bodies containing iron and other debris. The distribution of intracellular ferritin within HeLa cells differs significantly from the distribution described previously in hepatic parenchymal cells. In HeLa cells, ferritin particles were confined to lysosomal vesicles and were not identified in cell sap, endoplasmic reticulum, or Golgi apparatus. Images Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1155583

  9. Ultrastructural evidence of alveolar epithelial injury in idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans-organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, J. L.; Katzenstein, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    The ultrastructural features of idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans-organizing pneumonia (BOOP) were studied in 9 patients. As expected, the characteristic air space fibrosis was composed of spindled fibroblasts and myofibroblasts arranged concentrically within an electron-lucent stroma. In 6 patients there was evidence of incorporation of air space fibrosis into the interstitium. A surprising finding in all patients was the presence of extensive epithelial damage involving peribronchiolar alveolar septa. Necrosis and sloughing of alveolar lining cells resulted in denuding of epithelial basal laminae. Complex infoldings and deep invaginations of the denuded basal laminae into alveolar septa were common. These ultrastructural changes involving the interstitium are similar to those occurring in the interstitial pneumonias, and suggest that BOOP also results from acute epithelial injury. The different clinical manifestations and prognosis of these entities may relate to the peribronchiolar localization of the epithelial damage in BOOP compared with more diffuse involvement of distal lung in the interstitial pneumonias. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3394793

  10. Bay or baylike regions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were potent inhibitors of Gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, L M; Rummel, A M; Masten, S J; Trosko, J E; Upham, B L

    1998-01-01

    Many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known carcinogens, and a considerable amount of research has been devoted to predicting the tumor-initiating potential of PAHs based on chemical structure. However, there has been little research into the effects of PAHs on the epigenetic events of tumor promotion and no structural correlation has been made thereof. Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) activity was used in this study as an epigenetic biomarker to determine the structure-activity relationships of twelve different PAHs. The PAHs used were naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, anthracene, 1-methylanthracene, 2-methylanthracene, 9-methylanthracene, 9, 10-dimethylanthracene, phenanthrene, fluorene, 1-methylfluorene, and fluoranthene. Results showed that PAHs containing bay or baylike regions inhibited GJIC more than did the linear PAHs. The nonnaphthalene PAHs were not cytotoxic as determined by a vital dye uptake assay, but the naphthalene compounds were cytotoxic at the higher doses, indicating that the down regulation of GJIC by these naphthalenes could be a consequence of general membrane damage. Inhibition of GJIC by all the inhibitory PAHs was reversed when the cells were refreshed with PAH-free growth medium. Inhibition of GJIC occurred within 0.5-5 min and correlated with the aqueous solubility of the PAHs. The present study revealed that there are structural determinants of epigenetic toxicity as determined by GJIC activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:9417772

  11. Immunohistochemical localization of transforming growth factor beta isoforms in asbestos-related diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Jagirdar, J; Lee, T C; Reibman, J; Gold, L I; Aston, C; Bégin, R; Rom, W N

    1997-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional cytokine and growth factor, plays a key role in scarring and fibrotic processes because of its ability to induce extracellular matrix proteins and modulate the growth and immune function of many cell types. These effects are important in inflammatory disorders with fibrosis and cancer. The asbestos-related diseases are characterized by fibrosis in the lower respiratory tract and pleura and increased occurrence of lung cancer and mesothelioma. We performed immunohistochemistry with isoform-specific antibodies to the three TGF-beta isoforms on 16 autopsy lungs from Quebec, Canada, asbestos miners and millers. There was increased immunolocalization of all three TGF-beta isoforms in the fibrotic lesions of asbestosis and pleural fibrosis. The hyperplastic type II pneumocytes contained all three isoforms. By contrast, there was differential spatial immunostaining for the TGF-beta isoforms in malignant mesothelioma, with TGF-beta 1 in the stroma but TGF-beta 2 in the tumor cells. These data are consistent with an important role for TGF-beta in accumulation of extracellular matrix and cell proliferation in asbestos-related diseases. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. PMID:9400723

  12. Exogenous transforming growth factor-beta amplifies its own expression and induces scar formation in a model of human fetal skin repair.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, R Y; Sullivan, K M; Argenta, P A; Meuli, M; Lorenz, H P; Adzick, N S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fetal skin wounds heal without scarring. To determine the role of TGF-beta 1 in fetal wound healing, mRNA expression of TGF-beta 1 was analyzed in human fetal and adult skin wounds. METHODS: Human fetal skin transplanted to a subcutaneous location on an adult athymic mouse that was subsequently wounded heals without scar, whereas human adult skin heals with scar formation in that location. In situ hybridization for TGF-beta 1 mRNA expression and species-specific immunohistochemistry for fibroblasts, macrophages, and neutrophils were performed in human adult wounds, fetal wounds, and fetal wounds treated with a TGF-beta 1 slow release disk. RESULTS: Transforming growth factor-beta 1 mRNA expression was induced by wounding adult skin. No TGF-beta 1 mRNA upregulation was detected in human fetal skin after wounding. However, when exogenous TGF-beta 1 was added to human fetal skin, induction of TGF-beta 1 mRNA expression in human fetal fibroblasts occurred, an adult-like inflammatory response was detected, and the skin healed with scar formation. CONCLUSIONS: Transforming growth factor-beta 1 is an important modulator in scar formation. Anti-TGF-beta 1 strategies may promote scarless healing in adult wounds. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:7639582

  13. Tonoplast-Bound Protein Kinase Phosphorylates Tonoplast Intrinsic Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kenneth D.; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1992-01-01

    Tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) is a member of a family of putative membrane channels found in bacteria, animals, and plants. Plants have seed-specific, vegetative/reproductive organ-specific, and water-stress-induced forms of TIP. Here, we report that the seed-specific TIP is a phosphoprotein whose phosphorylation can be monitored in vivo by allowing bean cotyledons to take up [32P]orthophosphate and in vitro by incubating purified tonoplasts with γ-labeled [32P]ATP. Characterization of the in vitro phosphorylation of TIP indicates that a membrane-bound protein kinase phosphorylates TIP in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The capacity of the isolated tonoplast membranes to phosphorylate TIP declined markedly during seed germination, and this decline occurred well before the development-mediated decrease in TIP occurs. Phosphoamino acid analysis of purified, radiolabeled TIP showed that serine is the major, if not only, phosphorylated residue, and cyanogen bromide cleavage yielded a single radioactive peptide peak on a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatogram. Estimation of the molecular mass of the cyanogen bromide phosphopeptide by laser desorption mass spectroscopy led to its identification as the hydrophilic N-terminal domain of TIP. The putative phosphate-accepting serine residue occurs in a consensus phosphorylation site for serine/threonine protein kinases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:16653198

  14. Apoptosis during an early stage of nephrogenesis induces renal hypoplasia in bcl-2-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, M.; Nakauchi, H.; Nakayama, K.; Nakayama, K.; Loh, D.; Watanabe, T.

    1996-01-01

    Renal development in bcl-2-deficient mice was monitored to examine the temporal and spatial function of this gene during nephrogenesis in vivo. Extensive apoptosis occurred during abnormal nephrogenesis in bcl-2-deficient mice. In embryos and newborn mice, the sequence of morphological events was monitored by morphology in conjunction with morphometry, and bcl-2 -/-, bcl-2 +/-, and bcl-2 +/+ mice were compared. In bcl-2 -/- mice, initial induction of nephrons was detected by embryonic day 13 (E-13) as normal. Then, apoptotic cells became five times more frequent at E-13 to E-16 with a significant reduction (1/5) in nephron number at E-17 to E-19 in bcl-2 -/- mice compared with bcl-2 +/+ mice. No morphological difference was evident between bcl-2 +/- mice and bcl-2 +/+ mice by morphometry. Apoptotic cells were found mainly among the mesenchyme and less frequently in tubuli. Little apoptosis among ureteric buds was noted. In bcl-2 -/- mice at E-17 to E-19, inactive branching and insufficient convolution of ureteric buds were accompanied by fulminant apoptosis in the mesenchyme. Neonatal bcl-2 -/- mice lacked the nephrogenic zone, exhibiting renal hypoplasia. Thus, bcl-2 seems to inhibit apoptosis in renal stem cells during the induction of nephrons in vivo. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8623928

  15. A Kinetic Chain Approach for Shoulder Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, John; Uhl, Timothy L.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To introduce an approach to shoulder rehabilitation that integrates the kinetic chain throughout the rehabilitation program while providing the theoretical rationale for this program. Background: The focus of a typical rehabilitation program is to identify and treat the involved structures. However, in activities of sport and daily life, the body does not operate in isolated segments but rather works as a dynamic unit. Recently, rehabilitation programs have emphasized closed kinetic chain exercises, core-stabilization exercises, and functional programs. These components are implemented as distinct entities and are used toward the end of the rehabilitation program. Description: Kinetic chain shoulder rehabilitation incorporates the kinetic link biomechanical model and proximal-to-distal motor-activation patterns with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and closed kinetic chain exercise techniques. This approach focuses on movement patterns rather than isolated muscle exercises. Patterns sequentially use the leg, trunk, and scapular musculature to activate weakened shoulder musculature, gain active range of motion, and increase strength. The paradigm of kinetic chain shoulder rehabilitation suggests that functional movement patterns and closed kinetic chain exercises should be incorporated throughout the rehabilitation process. Clinical Advantages: The exercises in this approach are consistent with biomechanical models, apply biomechanical and motor control theory, and work toward sport specificity. The exercises are designed to stimulate weakened tissue by motion and force production in the adjacent kinetic link segments. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8. PMID:16558646

  16. The role of pancreatic islets in experimental pancreatic carcinogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, O.; Ohigashi, H.; Imaoka, S.; Nakai, I.; Mitsuo, M.; Weide, L.; Pour, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    Our previous studies have suggested that the presence of intact islets is essential for the induction of pancreatic exocrine tumors in the Syrian hamster model. To validate this, we investigated the effect of the carcinogen, N-nitrosobis(2-oxo-propyl)amine (BOP) in hamsters, in which homologous isolated intact islets were transplanted into the submandibular gland (SMG). Freshly isolated pure islets from hamster donors were transplanted into the left SMG of 20 female host hamsters. Ten of these hamsters (group 1) received BOP (40 mg/kg) weekly for 3 weeks. Another 10 hamsters (group 2) were kept untreated. In groups 3 and 4 (10 hamsters each) the salt solution or isolated pancreatic ductal cells, respectively, was injected into the gland. In other groups (10 hamsters each) islets were transplanted into the peri-SMG connective tissue (group 5) or into the renal subcapsular space (group 6). Hamsters of group 1 (40 mg/kg, weekly for 3 weeks) as were group 7 hamsters, which served as BOP-treated controls. All BOP-treated hamsters developed pancreatic lesions. Similar hyperplastic and atypical ductal/ductular proliferation and in situ carcinoma were found in the SMG of many group 1 hamsters. No such lesions were found in the SMG, peri-SMG, or renal subcapsular space of the other groups. Islets appear to be involved in carcinogenicity of BOP. The mechanism is obscure. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7485408

  17. Glomerular basement membrane expansion in passive Heymann nephritis. Absence of increased synthesis of type IV collagen, laminin, or fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, M. A.; Boyd, C. D.; Leardkamolkarn, V.; Abrahamson, D. R.; Minto, A. W.; Salant, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution and synthetic rate of glomerular basement membrane components was examined in the Passive Heymann Nephritis model of experimental membranous nephropathy. The extensive tissue injury that developed included subepithelial electron-dense deposits, podocyte foot process effacement, and expansion of the glomerular basement membrane. Levels of mRNA for type IV collagen, laminin, and fibronectin from isolated glomeruli was quantitated by slot-blot analysis and showed no change in experimental animals as compared to controls at either 1 week, 3 weeks, or 3 months after disease induction. Immunoelectron microscopy with gold-labeled anti-laminin IgG revealed no difference in the number of particles bound to the glomerular basement membrane of experimental animals and controls. Immunofluorescence with both type IV collagen antisera and anti-laminin antibody showed no difference in the intensity or pattern of staining. Despite extensive glomerular damage and glomerular basement membrane thickening, no evidence was found for either an increase in the synthetic rate of type IV collagen, laminin, or fibronectin or for an accumulation of basement membrane laminin within the damaged glomeruli. Alternate processes, such as diminished density of matrix components or accumulation of other unmeasured matrix constituents, presumably account for the expansion of the glomerular basement membrane seen in experimental membranous nephropathy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1992771

  18. A defect in the metabolic activation of sulfate in a patient with achondrogenesis type IB.

    PubMed Central

    Superti-Furga, A.

    1994-01-01

    Achondrogenesis type I is a perinatally lethal, short-limb chondrodysplasia. Two types, IA and IB, have been distinguished by radiographic and histological criteria; both types appear to be inherited as autosomal recessive traits. The underlying molecular defects are not known, but histochemical studies have suggested that in achondrogenesis type IB, cartilage matrix is deficient in sulfated proteoglycans. We have studied cartilage extracts of one newborn with achondrogenesis type IB and found that proteoglycans were quantitatively reduced, and, unlike in control cartilage, they did not stain with toluidine blue and did not bind to DEAE. Impaired synthesis of sulfated proteoglycans was observed also in fibroblast cultures of the achondrogenesis IB patient. Radioactive labeling and immunoprecipitation studies indicated that core protein and side chains of proteoglycans were synthesized normally but were not sulfated. Analysis of sulfate metabolism in fibroblast cultures showed, in the patient's cells, normal intracellular levels of free sulfate but markedly reduced levels of the two intermediate compounds in the sulfate activation pathway, adenosine-phosphosulfate and phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate. The results can be explained by deficient activity of one of the enzymes responsible for the biologic activation of sulfate, possibly similar to that observed in cartilage (but not in skin) of the recessive, nonlethal mouse mutant brachymorphic and leading to defective sulfation of macromolecules. Expression of the sulfation defect in cultured fibroblasts may offer a diagnostic tool for the disorder. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7977372

  19. Immunohistochemical investigation of the tissue distribution of mannan-binding lectin in non-infected and virus-infected chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, O L; Jørgensen, P H; Hedemand, J; Jensenius, J C; Koch, C; Laursen, S B

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the results of immuno-histochemical staining for chicken mannan-binding lectin (MBL) in formalin-fixed tissue sections from non-infected chickens, and from chickens infected with infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) or infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). In the non-infected chickens, MBL was detected in the cytoplasm of a few hepatocytes and in the germinal centres of the caecal tonsils, whereas sections of kidney, heart muscle, spleen, cerebrum, thymus, adrenal gland, bursa of Fabricius, bone marrow and trachea were without staining. In the ILTV-infected chickens, an intense staining reaction for MBL was detected in the cytoplasm of all hepatocytes and on the surface of, and inside, ILTV-infected cells. Also in the IBDV-infected chickens, an intense staining reaction for MBL was detected in the cytoplasm of all hepatocytes. No staining was seen in the follicles of the bursa of Fabricius, but MBL was present in non-identified cells in the interstitium, and in the cytoplasm of macrophage-like cells, located peripheral to the ellipsoid of the spleen. These findings indicate the liver as the primary site of MBL synthesis, and points to up-regulation as a result of the viral infections. The location outside the liver could indicate a role of MBL in the immune defence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9708196

  20. The leadership principles of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and their relevance to surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brunicardi, F. Charles; Cotton, Ronald T.; Cole, George W.; Martinez, George

    2007-01-01

    In order to face the challenges in healthcare this century, it is essential that surgeons understand modern leadership principles. One of the greatest leaders in history was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who provides a shining example of level-5 leadership for us to study. The study of leadership principles of great leaders can provide us with practical methods of conflict resolution as well as inspiration to keep us engaged and focused. As leaders of the medical community, we face numerous challenges, including discovering and implementing new treatments for disease, providing care for the indigent, overcoming educational challenges such as incorporating the ACGME Core Competencies into our surgical training and promoting diversity in education. Achieving these goals is often hindered by the environment in which we labor-nearly 50 million are uninsured, the rising cost of medical care is currently at 16% of the GNP, and reimbursement rates are falling-which makes the practice of surgery a significant challenge. Effective leadership will be paramount in achieving these goals. In this editorial, which summarizes a presentation given to the Surgical Section of the annual National Medical Association meeting, five important leadership principles that are important for surgeons have been selected and related to the outstanding leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:17304963

  1. Growth characteristics and metastatic properties of human breast cancer xenografts in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Visonneau, S.; Cesano, A.; Torosian, M. H.; Miller, E. J.; Santoli, D.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the growth and metastatic potential of two human breast cancer cell lines and 16 patient-derived biopsy specimens, representing the most common histological types of breast carcinomas, upon subcutaneous implantation into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. The method of engraftment we used, based on implantation of intact tissue specimens and complete immunosuppression of the host, provided an easier system to grow human breast carcinoma specimens in mouse models and resulted in a 50% success rate of tumor take. No correlation was found between growth in SCID mice and pathological diagnosis, grading, or estrogen/progesterone receptor expression by the tumor biopsy specimen. Serial passage of the tumor fragments in SCID mice resulted in increased metastasis rates and more rapid emergence of a palpable tumor mass. A tumor from a patient with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, which grew aggressively and metastasized in 100% of the female SCID mice, was also successfully engrafted in 100% of nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID female mice, but systemic spread was minimal. Fragments of the same tumor grew in only 33% of male SCID mice with very limited metastases. A strong correlation (r = 0.997) was observed between tumor burden and the presence of soluble (serum) interleukin-2 receptor, a marker associated with a subset of human breast tumors. All together, these data indicate the usefulness of SCID/human breast tumor xenografts for measuring tumor progression and evaluating novel therapeutic approaches to breast cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:9588898

  2. Papillary Tumor of the Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Bernhard; Kronsbein, Hartmut; Kahle, Gabriele; Prescher, Andreas; Draf, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    Papillary tumors of the middle and inner ear have been interpreted histogenetically in many ways. In 1989 Heffner proposed the endolymphatic sac epithelium as a possible origin. These rare tumors are clinically aggressive and can cause extensive temporal bone destruction. Because of this behavior, endolymphatic sac tumors (ELST) were classified as low-grade adenocarcinomas, although metastasis has not yet been documented. Two papillary neoplasms of the temporal bone are presented, which we believe are examples of adenomatous tumors arising from the epithelium of the endolymphatic sac. One was associated with a pituitary adenoma. A third case of a papillary middle ear neoplasm is described that shows histologic features similar to the other two, but it was located in the tympanum and had no connection to the endolymphatic sac. This report focuses on clinical, radiologic, and histologic findings of papillary tumors of the temporal bone with additional emphasis on modern concepts of histogenesis and aspects of differential diagnosis. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17167601

  3. Endonasal Endoscopic Closure of Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Schmerber, S.; Righini, Ch.; Lavielle, J.-P.; Passagia, J.-G.; Reyt, E.

    2001-01-01

    The authors review their experience with endoscopic repair of skull base defects associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea involving the paranasal sinuses. A total of 22 patients was treated endoscopically between 1992 and 1998. The repair method consisted of closure of the CSF fistula with a free autologous abdominal fat graft and fibrin glue, supported with a sheet of silastic. The primary closure rate was 82% (18/22), and the overall closure rate was 95.5% (21/22) without recurrence or complications within an average follow-up of 5 years (14-83 months). A single patient still complains of cerebrospinal rhinorrhea, although this was never proved by any clinical, endoscopic, or biological (β2-transferrin) examination. The repair of ethmoidal-sphenoidal cerebrospinal fluid fistulae by endonasal endoscopic surgery is an excellent technique, both safe and effective. Fat is a material of choice, as it is tight and resists infection well. The technique and indications for endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17167603

  4. Ultrastructural evaluation of parathyroid glands and thyroid C cells of cattle fed Solanum malacoxylon.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, W. T.; Capen, C. C.; Döbereiner, J.; Tokarnia, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    Fine structural alterations of thyroid C cells and parathyroid chief cells were evaluated after feeding dried leaves of the calcinogenic plant, Solanum malacoxylon, to cattle for 1, 6 and 32 days. Thyroid C cells initially were degranulated in response to the hypercalcemia, and parathyroid chief cells accumulated secretory granules. There was hypertrophy of thyroid C cells with well-developed secretory organelles but few secretory granules in the cytoplasm after 6 days of feeding S. malacoxylon. Inactive chief cells with dispersed profiles of endoplasmic reticulum and increased lysosomal bodies predominated in the parathyroid glands. Multiple foci of soft tissue mineralization were present in the heart, lung, and kidney. Thyroid C cells underwent hypertrophy and hyperplasia after 32 days of S. malacoxylon, and parathyroid chief cells were inactive or atrophic in response to the long-term hypercalcemia. Severe soft tissue mineralization was present throughout the cardiovascular system, lung, kidney, and spleen. These ultrastructural changes in thyroid C cells and parathyroid chief cells plus the widespread soft tissue mineralization observed after feeding cattle small amounts of S. malacoxylon are consistent with the recent evidence that leaves of this plant are a potent source of the active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, of vitamin D. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:869016

  5. Multiparameter analyses of spontaneous nonthymic lymphomas occurring in NFS/N mice congenic for ecotropic murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Fredrickson, T. N.; Morse, H. C.; Yetter, R. A.; Rowe, W. P.; Hartley, J. W.; Pattengale, P. K.

    1985-01-01

    Mouse strains congenic for ecotropic retrovirus genes have a much higher frequency of spontaneous lymphomas than the background NFS/N strain. In this study, most of these lymphomas have been identified as B-cell in origin by morphologic features, identification of immunoglobulin class, and cell-surface antigens. The classification suggested by Pattengale and Taylor proved to be applicable to the lymphomas studied. Most were of large follicular center cells and are considered typical of the type formerly designated as "reticulum cell sarcoma, type B." Many lymphomas contained a large proportion of nonneoplastic cells which partially obscured their neoplastic component. The role of ecotropic murine leukemia viruses as etiologic agents for B-cell lymphomas remains equivocal. However, because the only difference between the NFS/N and congenic mice is the expression of viruses in the latter, it appears that these viruses are somehow involved in induction of B-cell lymphomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:2998195

  6. Understanding Multidirectional Instability of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Cordasco, Frank A.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of the evaluation and treatment of the patient with multidirectional shoulder instability. Data Sources: I searched MEDLINE for the years from 1980 to 2000 using the key words “shoulder joint,” “instability,” “dislocation,” “multidirectional shoulder instability,” and “inferior capsular shift.” Data Synthesis: Multidirectional instability is symptomatic glenohumeral subluxation or dislocation in more than 1 direction: anterior, inferior, or posterior. The primary pathology is a loose and patulous capsule, and the entity is more common than previously recognized. Multidirectional instability affects young, sedentary patients with generalized ligamentous laxity, often with bilateral symptoms and an atraumatic history, but it also affects athletes, many of whom have sustained injuries. Patients with multidirectional instability may also have Bankart lesions and humeral head impression defects. Conclusions/Recommendations: Patients with multidirectional instability must be identified before appropriate treatment can be initiated. If a course of rehabilitation fails to improve the patient's symptoms, an inferior capsular shift procedure has been demonstrated to be an effective surgical option. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:16558641

  7. An ultrastructural analysis of endothelial change paralleling platelet aggregation in a light/dye model of microvascular insult.

    PubMed Central

    Povlishock, J. T.; Rosenblum, W. I.; Sholley, M. M.; Wei, E. P.

    1983-01-01

    Those microvascular endothelial events that parallel the evolution of platelet aggregation were evaluated in a well-controlled animal model. Cat pial microvessels were observed through a cranial window while local platelet aggregation was produced by intravenous injection of sodium fluorescein and simultaneous exposure of the pial vessels to light from a filtered mercury lamp that excited the fluorescein. The vessels were fixed in situ when the in vivo observations of a preselected vessel indicated early, intermediate, or advanced aggregation in that vessel. The preselected vessel was then harvested for ultrastructural study together with adjacent vessels from the illuminated field. These vessels and appropriate controls were compared in semiserial thin sections. The onset of platelet aggregation in both venules and arterioles was accompanied by focal endothelial lucency, vacuole formation, luminal membrane rupture, and swelling of the nuclear envelope. These changes were not found in control material. With intermediate aggregation these changes were more common, while with advanced aggregation these abnormalities occurred together with focal endothelial denudation. Thus, in this model denudation occurred only with advanced aggregation and was not a prerequisite for aggregation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6824062

  8. Constitutive and cytokine-induced expression of human leukocyte antigens and cell adhesion molecules by human myotubes.

    PubMed Central

    Michaelis, D.; Goebels, N.; Hohlfeld, R.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the immunobiology of muscle is relevant to muscular autoimmune diseases and to gene therapies based on myoblast transfer. We have investigated the constitutive and cytokine-induced intra- and extracellular expression of histocompatibility human leukocyte antigens (HLA) and cell adhesion molecules by multinucleated human myotubes using immunofluorescence microscopy. Myotubes constitutively expressed HLA class I but not HLA class II. Exposure to interferon-gamma, but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha, induced HLA-DR in the cytoplasm and on the surface membrane of approximately 40 to 95% of cultured myotubes. Surface expression was strongest in perinuclear membrane areas, and cytoplasmic expression was strongest at branching points and at the tips of myotubes. HLA-DP and HLA-DQ were not expressed in detectable amounts. Both interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (CD54) in the cytoplasm and on the surface of nearly all myotubes. The distribution of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and HLA-DR was similar but not identical in double-positive myotubes. The leukocyte function-associated (LFA) adhesion molecules LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18), LFA-2 (CD2), and LFA-3 (CD58) could not be detected in the cytoplasm or on the surface. Our results indicate that cytokine-induced myotubes can participate in immune interactions with T lymphocytes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8214008

  9. A prospective study of rock climbing injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, J P; McNaughton, G W; Grant, P T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the rate, causes, and nature of rock climbing injuries presenting to an accident and emergency (A&E) department. METHODS: Patients presenting with rock climbing injuries to an urban A&E department were studied prospectively for one year. RESULTS: 19 rock climbers presented during the year, at a rate of one per 2774 A&E attendances. Fourteen climbers were injured on outdoor cliffs and five on the local indoor climbing wall, where the safety mats were noted to be in poor condition. Eighteen climbers had been injured during falls, 17 hitting the ground. Twelve of these climbers sustained fractures, four of which were missed on initial attendance. The remaining climber sustained the characteristic A2 pulley finger injury, which was treated conservatively with a good result. CONCLUSIONS: The risks of rock climbing in Britain would be reduced if lead climbers arranged protection at earlier stages of climbs. Sports centres with climbing walls should regularly inspect and repair their safety equipment. It is important for staff in A&E departments to appreciate the large forces involved in any climbing fall, in order that significant injuries are not missed. Those treating injured climbers should also be aware of the specific injuries to which elite climbers are predisposed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8799601

  10. Neonatal Cardiac Distress—A Practical Approach to Recognition, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Cayler, Glen G.

    1968-01-01

    The death rate among neonates with cardiovascular disease is 50 percent during the first six months, with the majority dying during the first month. With early diagnosis most of these babies could be saved. In approaching the diagnosis of cardiac distress in the newborn, it is important to remember that the types of cardiovascular disease which cause symptoms and death early in life are quite different from those in older children. Lesions such as hypoplasia of the left heart, transposition of the great arteries, endocardial fibroelastosis, pulmonary atresia, mitral atresia, tricuspid atresia and truncus arteriosus are common, not rare, causes of cardiac distress in the newborn. A classification of neonatal cardiovascular diseases into seven pathophysiological groups is presented as a basis for an effective, practical approach to the differential diagnosis of the potentially lethal lesions. This approach is simplified further since over 90 percent of babies with cardiac distress have one of three lesions: (1) Large left-to-right shunt (characterized by the presence of massive plethora on the chest roentgenogram), (2) Large right-to-left shunt (association with intense cyanosis) or (3) Severe obstruction (including hypoplasia of the left heart, which is the most common cause of death due to cardiac distress during the first week of life). ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:4867629

  11. Elemental analysis of renal slices by proton-induced X-ray emission.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, T; Chen, Q; Fernando, Q; Keith, R; Gandolfi, A J

    1993-01-01

    We optimized proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) for tissue analysis in a toxicity-disposition study. We used cultured rabbit renal slices as the biological system to demonstrate the use of PIXE analysis. The renal slices were exposed to HgCl2, CdCl2, K2Cr2O7, or NaAsO2 alone or in a mixture. The PIXE analysis provides information on concentrations of elements above atomic number 11, and it is the only analytical technique that can determine 20-30 elements nondestructively in a single, small sample (approximately 5 mg) with detection limits of 1-5 ppm (dry weight). The renal slices are thin targets that yield X-ray emission spectra with low backgrounds and high elemental sensitivities. The nondestructive nature of PIXE and the ability to simultaneously measure uptake of multiple metals and endogenous elements are unique to this methodology. Images p302-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 6. D Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 7. C Figure 7. D p307-a PMID:8275986

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is expressed by glomerular visceral epithelial cells in human membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Neale, T. J.; Rüger, B. M.; Macaulay, H.; Dunbar, P. R.; Hasan, Q.; Bourke, A.; Murray-McIntosh, R. P.; Kitching, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was examined in biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, immunogold electron microscopy, immunoassay in serum and urine, and urinary immunoblot. Striking glomerular capillary wall and visceral glomerular epithelial cell TNF-alpha protein staining was observed in all cases of membranous nephropathy and membranous lupus nephropathy. Staining was less frequently observed in crescentic glomerulonephritis and in isolated cases of other histological subtypes of glomerulonephritis, usually in association with glomerular macrophages. By immunogold electron microscopy TNF-alpha was localized in membranous nephropathy within the visceral glomerular epithelial cells, and also in the glomerular basement membrane, especially in relation to immune deposits. In situ hybridization localized TNF-alpha mRNA exclusively to glomerular epithelial cells in all biopsies with membranous morphology but not in other histological subtypes. Concentrations of TNF-alpha were significantly increased compared with normal controls in the urine of patients with membranous nephropathy and with crescentic glomerulonephritis. The expression of TNF-alpha by glomerular epithelial cells exclusively and universally in biopsies showing a membranous morphology strongly suggests this cytokine has a role in the pathogenesis of membranous nephropathy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7778683

  13. Binding of normal human IgG to myelin sheaths, glia and neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Aarli, J A; Aparicio, S R; Lumsden, C E; Tönder, O

    1975-01-01

    The binding of normal human serum, purified IgG and IgG fragments to central nervous tissue was studied by the anti-globulin consumption (AGCT) and immunofluorescence (IF) techniques. In the AGCT, F(ab')2 fragments failed to react, whereas IgG and Fc fragments did so. In IF experiments, the binding was localized to myelin sheaths, glia and neurons; Fab monomers at a protein concentration of 1-3 mg/ml dod not react with the tissue, but purified Fc fragments at 0-0625 mg/ml did. The binding is neither tissue- nor species-specific. Lipid and protein extraction procedures indicated that the factor responsible for binding to myelin was basic protein. It was concluded that the binding of normal IgG to central nervous tissue is medicated by the Fc part of the molecule. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:803915

  14. Chronic hepatitis: a retrospective study in 34 dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, C; Guest, S; Haywood, S; Horney, B

    1997-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize the histological changes observed in 34 accessioned cases of canine chronic hepatitis and to correlate these changes with the clinical pathological data. Cases of chronic hepatitis were subdivided into 6 categories: chronic active hepatitis (10/34), chronic persistent hepatitis (7/32), chronic cholestatic hepatitis (6/34), fibrosing hepatitis with cirrhosis (3/34), chronic cholangiohepatitis (3/34), and miscellaneous secondary hepatitis (5/34). Iron accumulation was a consistent finding in all livers examined. Although all cases of chronic hepatitis had elevated liver enzymes, no correlation was detected between biochemical parameters and the severity of morphologic changes. Similarly, no correlation was detected between rhodanine staining for copper and morphologic or biochemical indicators of cholestasis. However, presence of copper correlated well with reticulo-fibrosis (r = 0.8) and bile duct hyperplasia, suggesting that changes in the hemodynamics of the hepatic acini due to fibrosis could influence storage of copper. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:9187802

  15. Lymphoreticular and myeloid pathogenesis of Venezuelan equine encephalitis in hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D. H.; Harrison, A.; Murphy, K.; Flemister, M.; Murphy, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    Ultrastructural, histopathologic, and virologic studies of adult hamsters infected with virulent Venezuelan equine encelphalomyelitis (VEE) virus (Subtype I-B) demonstrated precise chronologic and topographic progression of lesions and viral replication in extraneural sites. Thymus contained the earliest lesions and the highest initial and subsequent viral titers. No particular cytotropism was observed as highly efficient viral replication and severe cytonecrosis proceded. Early cortical necrosis of splenic periarteriolar lymphocytic sheath was followed by lymphoblastoid repopulation of the peripheral zone. Massive bone marrow necrosis was accompained by ultrastructural evidence of VEE viral particle production in reticulum cells, rubricytes, myeloid cells, lymphoblastoid cells, and megakaryocytes. Speed, efficiency, destructiveness, and relative sensitivity of virtually all lymphoreticular and hematopoetic cells were hallmarks of virulent VEE infection in the hamster. Images Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 12A and B Figure 13 Figure 7 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:941983

  16. Growth factor expression during rat development: a comparison of TGF-beta 3, TGF-alpha, bFGF, PDGF and PDGF-R.

    PubMed Central

    Burton, P. B.; Quirke, P.; Sorensen, C. M.; Nehlsen-Cannarella, S. L.; Bailey, L. L.; Knight, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    At least part of the mechanism underlying fetal development appears to be the production of a number of growth factors considered important in the process of tumour formation. Using immunocytochemistry, we have investigated the temporal and spatial pattern of expression of some of the important growth factors, by the fetus. We describe here the cellular localization of transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-beta 3), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and its receptor (PDGF-R), TGF-alpha and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in the fetal rat from day 13 to 21 of gestation. Using antisera raised against an N-terminal portion of TGF-beta 3, immunoreactivity peaked around day 16 and was seen predominantly within epithelial cells. However, using antisera raised against the C-terminal of this molecule immunoreactivity was seen exclusively within the extracellular matrix underlying adjacent epithelia, and was maintained up until day 21 of gestation. Strong expression of TGF-alpha was seen in cells of most organs throughout the gestation period studied. Immunoreactivity for bFGF, PDGF and PDGF-R peaked around day 18 in both epithelial and mesenchymal cells of all major organ systems and then declined by day 21. These data suggest distinct roles for each factor during embryogenesis and tumorigenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8471538

  17. Reactive oxygen species: their relation to pneumoconiosis and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Vallyathan, V; Shi, X; Castranova, V

    1998-01-01

    Occupational exposures to mineral particles cause pneumoconiosis and other diseases, including cancer. Recent studies have suggested that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play a key role in the mechanisms of disease initiation and progression following exposure to these particles. ROS-induced primary stimuli result in the increased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and other mediators, promoting events that appear to be important in the progression of cell injury and pulmonary disease. We have provided evidence supporting the hypothesis that inhalation of insoluble particles such as asbestos, agricultural dusts, coal, crystalline silica, and inorganic dust can be involved in facilitating multiple pathways for persistent generation of ROS, which may lead to a continuum of inflammation leading to progression of disease. This article briefly summarizes some of the recent findings from our laboratories with emphasis on the molecular events by which ROS are involved in promoting pneumoconiosis and carcinogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9788890

  18. Water pollution and human health in China.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C; Maurer, C; Wang, Y; Xue, S; Davis, D L

    1999-01-01

    China's extraordinary economic growth, industrialization, and urbanization, coupled with inadequate investment in basic water supply and treatment infrastructure, have resulted in widespread water pollution. In China today approximately 700 million people--over half the population--consume drinking water contaminated with levels of animal and human excreta that exceed maximum permissible levels by as much as 86% in rural areas and 28% in urban areas. By the year 2000, the volume of wastewater produced could double from 1990 levels to almost 78 billion tons. These are alarming trends with potentially serious consequences for human health. This paper reviews and analyzes recent Chinese reports on public health and water resources to shed light on what recent trends imply for China's environmental risk transition. This paper has two major conclusions. First, the critical deficits in basic water supply and sewage treatment infrastructure have increased the risk of exposure to infectious and parasitic disease and to a growing volume of industrial chemicals, heavy metals, and algal toxins. Second, the lack of coordination between environmental and public health objectives, a complex and fragmented system to manage water resources, and the general treatment of water as a common property resource mean that the water quality and quantity problems observed as well as the health threats identified are likely to become more acute. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10090702

  19. Polymorphism in the assembly of polyomavirus capsid protein VP1.

    PubMed Central

    Salunke, D M; Caspar, D L; Garcea, R L

    1989-01-01

    Polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1, purified after expression of the recombinant gene in Escherichia coli, forms stable pentamers in low-ionic strength, neutral, or alkaline solutions. Electron microscopy showed that the pentamers, which correspond to viral capsomeres, can be self-assembled into a variety of polymorphic aggregates by lowering the pH, adding calcium, or raising the ionic strength. Some of the aggregates resembled the 500-A-diameter virus capsid, whereas other considerably larger or smaller capsids were also produced. The particular structures formed on transition to an environment favoring assembly depended on the pathway of the solvent changes as well as on the final conditions. Mass measurements from cryoelectron micrographs and image analysis of negatively stained specimens established that a distinctive 320-A-diameter particle consists of 24 close-packed pentamers arranged with octahedral symmetry. Comparison of this unexpected octahedral assembly with a 12-capsomere icosahedral aggregate and the 72-capsomere icosahedral virus capsid by computer graphics methods indicates that similar connections are made among trimers of pentamers in these shells of different size. The polymorphism in the assembly of VP1 pentamers can be related to the switching in bonding specificity required to build the virus capsid. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:2557933

  20. Induction of a Putative Ca2+-ATPase mRNA in NaCl-Adapted Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Prat, Eva; Narasimhan, Meena L.; Binzel, Marla L.; Botella, Miguel A.; Chen, Zutang; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Bressan, Ray A.; Hasegawa, Paul M.

    1992-01-01

    A cDNA clone was isolated that encodes the partial sequence of a putative endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase of tobacco. The 1.497-kb insert had an open reading frame of 1.149 kb. The deduced peptide had the greatest homology to the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases of Drosophila and Artemia, followed by the mammalian and avian enzymes (SERCA2 and 3). The cDNA insert hybridized to a single mRNA of 4.4 kb from tobacco cultured cells or plant tissues. The level of this transcript was induced about 2-fold by NaCl shock in 428 mm NaCl-deadapted tobacco cells that were maintained in medium without salt, but not in unadapted cells. The level of this transcript was 3- to 4-fold higher in 428 mm NaCl-adapted cells growing in salt than in unadapted cells growing without salt. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:16653146

  1. Analysis of apoptosis during hair follicle regression (catagen)

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, G.; Botchkarev, V. A.; Botchkareva, N. V.; Ling, G.; van der Veen, C.; Paus, R.

    1997-01-01

    Keratinocyte apoptosis is a central element in the regulation of hair follicle regression (catagen), yet the exact location and the control of follicular keratinocyte apoptosis remain obscure. To generate an "apoptomap" of the hair follicle, we have studied selected apoptosis-associated parameters in the C57BL/6 mouse model for hair research during normal and pharmacologically manipulated, pathological catagen development. As assessed by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP fluorescein nick end-labeling (TUNEL) stain, apoptotic cells not only appeared in the regressing proximal follicle epithelium but, surprisingly, were also seen in the central inner root sheath, in the bulge/isthmus region, and in the secondary germ, but never in the dermal papilla. These apoptosis hot spots during catagen development correlated largely with a down-regulation of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio but only poorly with the expression patterns of interleukin-1beta converting enzyme, p55TNFR, and Fas/Apo-1 immunoreactivity. Instead, a higher correlation was found with p75NTR expression. During cyclophosphamide-induced follicle dystrophy and alopecia, massive keratinocyte apoptosis occurred in the entire proximal hair bulb, except in the dermal papilla, despite a strong up-regulation of Bax and p75NTR immunoreactivity. Selected receptors of the tumor necrosis factor/nerve growth factor family and members of the Bcl-2 family may also play a key role in the control of follicular keratinocyte apoptosis in situ. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5. a Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:9403711

  2. Complex Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula and Ruptured Aneurysm in Neurofibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Tori C.; Manness, Wayne K; Hershey, Beverly L.; Yazdi, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    The objective and importance of this study was to describe the challenges encountered with treating a high-flow vertebral arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and ruptured aneurysm in a patient with life-threatening hemorrhage. A 36-year-old female with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) presented 2 weeks after uneventful cesarean section with a rapidly expanding pulsatile neck mass. Angiography demonstrated a complex left vertebral AVF and multiple associated vertebral artery aneurysms. Emergent endovascular coil embolization was performed using a retrograde and antegrade approach to occlude the fistulas and trap the ruptured aneurysm, successfully treating the acute hemorrhage. Subsequent definitive therapy was accomplished utilizing a combined neurointerventional and neurosurgical strategy of direct-puncture acrylic embolization and ligation of the vertebral artery. Recent advances in neurointerventional technology allow novel approaches in the primary and/or preoperative treatment of complex vascular lesions such as those seen in NF1. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5p40-b PMID:17171099

  3. Immunolocalization and gene expression of oxytocin receptors in carcinomas and non-neoplastic tissues of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolati, G.; Cassoni, P.; Ghisolfi, G.; Negro, F.; Sapino, A.

    1996-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that oxytocin (OT), in addition to the induction of myometrial and myoepithelial cell contraction, can influence proliferation and differentiation in developing mammary glands and in breast cancer cells, hence the interest in detecting and locating OT receptors (OTRs). We produced rabbit antisera and a monoclonal antibody against a synthetic peptide corresponding to the carboxy terminus of the predicted OTR sequence. We tested their specificity in immunoblasts and immunocytochemical tests. All of the antibodies specifically stained myometrium (at term of pregnancy). In the human breast, OTRs were detected in myoepithelial cells along ducts of normal lobules and in sclerosing adenosis. Intraductal cells in benign hyperplastic lesions were also positive. OTRs were demonstrated in cases of primary and metastatic carcinomas of the breast. In the same tissues, OTR gene expression was shown by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction procedures detecting the specific mRNA. These results suggest that the interaction between OT and its receptors might play a role in the origin and evolution of non-neoplastic lesions and carcinomas of the breast. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:8669475

  4. Cell lineage study in the liver using retroviral mediated gene transfer. Evidence against the streaming of hepatocytes in normal liver.

    PubMed Central

    Bralet, M. P.; Branchereau, S.; Brechot, C.; Ferry, N.

    1994-01-01

    The fate of normal hepatocytes in adult rat liver was studied after genetic labeling using the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene coupled to a nuclear localization signal. The marker gene was introduced by direct in vivo retroviral-mediated gene transfer into hepatocytes 24 hours after partial hepatectomy. Analysis of beta-galactosidase expression in the liver at various time after gene transfer revealed that labeled hepatocytes were distributed throughout the entire lobule with a predominance in the periportal and mediolobular regions. Long-term experiments demonstrated that division of hepatocytes did occur as was revealed by the increasing number of beta-galactosidase-positive cells in isolated clusters. There was no evidence for the participation of stem cells in this process. Moreover, we found that after more than 1 year, the pattern of distribution of positive cells within the lobule was not modified. This suggests that hepatocytes do not migrate from the portal space to the perivenous region, as has been previously hypothesized. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8178942

  5. Patient fat biopsies for chemical analysis and liver biopsies for ultrastructural characterization after exposure to polychlorinated dioxins, furans and PCBs.

    PubMed Central

    Schecter, A; Tiernan, T; Schaffner, F; Taylor, M; Gitlitz, G; VanNess, G F; Garrett, J H; Wagel, D J

    1985-01-01

    A subset of workers was followed after exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins, and furans in an occupational medicine clinic setting. Patterns of PCBs found in adipose tissue resembled the pattern seen when soot from the incident or Aroclor 1254 was examined by GC-MS. Adipose tissue also revealed levels of hepta- and octachlorinated furans and dioxins as high as 8400 ppt in one repeatedly exposed worker. Control fat from patients with no known exposure to furans or dioxins was usually in the several hundred parts per trillion range for these isomers, but slightly over 2000 ppt in one sample. Electron microscopic analysis of liver biopsies from three patients who developed mild elevations of hepatic enzymes in their serum revealed morphologic alterations in some ways similar to those seen in animals after feeding experiments with PCBs, dioxins or the Binghamton State Office Building soot. These include pleomorphic mitochondria, giant mitochondria, prominent dense mitochondrial granules, cristae parallel to the long axis of the mitochondria and crystalline structure within same mitochondria as well as lipid droplets in liver cells and slightly dilated smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. PMID:3928350

  6. Glaucoma: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Infeld, D. A.; O'Shea, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Glaucoma is the third most prevalent cause of global blindness, accounting for over 5 million blind. It is common in Western Countries; the estimated prevalence of primary open angle glaucoma rises from a total prevalence of 1.1% to approximately 3% of our population as it ages. Ethnicity affects both the risk of developing glaucoma and the outcome. It is an expensive disease both to detect and to treat. Recent scientific advances include elucidation of the genetic mechanism behind the disease and the study of haemodynamic and biochemical co-factors in the development of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, particularly in relation to the pathogenesis of normal tension glaucoma. Several new types of topical medication have recently been developed for use in glaucoma; both the impact of these therapies and their cost effectiveness remain to be evaluated. There are widely differing regimes which effectively treat glaucoma; some ophthalmologists prefer early surgical intervention whilst others reserve surgery for relatively advanced disease. All methods of current treatment rely on the reduction of intra-ocular pressure; as yet there is no medication which has been definitively proven to be either neuroprotective or to influence favourably optic nerve perfusion. Despite this, most sufferers of glaucoma are able to lead lives of quality. Increased community awareness of glaucoma, and earlier detection of the condition, will doubtless result in decreased morbidity due to glaucoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:10320884

  7. Expression of the TrkB neurotrophin receptor by thymic macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    García-Suárez, O; Hannestad, J; Esteban, I; Sainz, R; Naves, F J; Vega, J A

    1998-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that some members of the neurotrophic factor family of neurotrophins could be implicated in the regulation of immune responses. Neurotrophins, as well as their tyrosine kinase signal-transducing receptors (the so-called Trk neurotrophin receptors), have been detected in different lymphoid tissues, although their cellular localization is not well known. In this study we used single and double immunohistochemistry to localize TrkB in situ in the rat thymus (in animals from 0 days to 2 years of age), in cytospin preparations of rat thymic cells, and in two mouse monocyte-macrophage cell lines (RAW 264.7 and J774A.1). We found TrkB protein expression in a subpopulation of cells in the corticomedullary junction, which simultaneously expressed the rat macrophage marker ED1. The density of TrkB-expressing cells increased with age, reaching maximal values at 2 years. Conversely, no evidence of TrkB protein expression could be found in dendritic cells, epithelial cells or thymocytes. Thymic macrophages in cytospin preparations, as well as in the mouse monocyte macrophage cell lines, also expressed TrkB protein. Although the possible function of TrkB in the thymic macrophage remains to be clarified, present findings add further evidence to the proposed role of neurotrophins in the immune system. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figures 4 and 5 PMID:9741346

  8. The mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) mutation in mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes (MELAS): genetic, biochemical, and morphological correlations in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, C T; Ricci, E; Bonilla, E; DiMauro, S; Schon, E A

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes (MELAS) has recently been associated with an A----G transition at position 3243 within the mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene. Besides altering the tRNA(Leu(UUR)) sequence, this point mutation lies within a DNA segment responsible for transcription termination of the rRNA genes. We have studied the distribution and expression of mutant mtDNAs in muscle biopsies from MELAS patients. Histochemical, immunohistochemical, and single-fiber PCR analysis showed that ragged-red fibers (RRF) are associated both with high levels of mutant mitochondrial genomes (greater than 85% mutant mtDNA) and with a partial cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. By quantitative in situ hybridization, the steady-state ratios of mRNAs:rRNAs were found to be similar to controls in six of eight patients studied. In two other patients the relative levels of heavy-strand mRNAs were slightly increased, but a patient with myoclonic epilepsy and RRF also exhibited a similar increase. These results directly correlate the A----G transition at mtDNA position 3243 with muscle mitochondrial proliferation, partial respiratory-chain impairment, decreased mitochondrially synthesized protein content, and no specific alterations in mitochondrial ratios of mRNAs:rRNAs. Images p[941]-a Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1315123

  9. Occurrence of polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTs) in indoor particulate matter.

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, U; Schweizer, E; Schweinsberg, F; Wodarz, R; Rettenmeier, A W

    1996-01-01

    In the course of a routine investigation concerned with polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination of dust collected in classrooms of a junior high school, a group of electron capture detector (ECD)-sensitive compounds with high boiling points were found in addition to PCBs. Using gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric techniques, these compounds were identified as polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTs). Additional measurements indicated that the PCTs were present only in particulate matter collected from the tops of fluorescent light frames but not in air samples obtained concomitantly in the classrooms. Attempts to identify the PCT emission source were unsuccessful. A survey of the literature revealed that PCTs are ubiquitously distributed environmental contaminants, although no data on their indoor occurrence have been reported to date. In view of the toxic effects of PCTs, which seem to be as important as those of PCBs, further attention should be given to the possible presence of PCTs in indoor environments. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:8959406

  10. Atelosteogenesis type II is caused by mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate-transporter gene (DTDST): evidence for a phenotypic series involving three chondrodysplasias.

    PubMed Central

    Hästbacka, J.; Superti-Furga, A.; Wilcox, W. R.; Rimoin, D. L.; Cohn, D. H.; Lander, E. S.

    1996-01-01

    Atelosteogenesis type II (AO II) is a neonatally lethal chondrodysplasia whose clinical and histological characteristics resemble those of another chondrodysplasia, the much less severe diastrophic dysplasia (DTD). The similarity suggests a shared pathogenesis involving lesions in the same biochemical pathway and perhaps the same gene. DTD is caused by mutations in the recently identified diastrophic dysplasia sulfate-transporter gene (DTDST). Here, we report that AOII patients also have DTDST mutations, which lead to defective uptake of inorganic sulfate and insufficient sulfation of macromolecules by patient mesenchymal cells in vitro. Together with our recent observation that a third even more severe chondrodysplasia, achondrogenesis type IB, is also caused by mutations in DTDST, these results demonstrate a phenotypic series of three chondrodysplasias of increasing severity caused by lesions in a single sulfate-transporter gene. The severity of the phenotype appears to be correlated with the predicted effect of the mutations on the residual activity of the DTDST protein. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:8571951

  11. N-acetylcysteine as an antidote in methylmercury poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Ballatori, N; Lieberman, M W; Wang, W

    1998-01-01

    Methylmercury is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and potent neurotoxin. Treatment of methylmercury poisoning relies almost exclusively on the use of chelating agents to accelerate excretion of the metal. The present study demonstrates that oral administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a widely available and largely nontoxic amino acid derivative, produces a profound acceleration of urinary methylmercury excretion in mice. Mice that received NAC in the drinking water (10 mg/ml) starting at 48 hr after methylmercury administration excreted from 47 to 54% of the 203Hg in urine over the subsequent 48 hr, as compared to 4-10% excretion in control animals. When NAC-containing water was given from the time of methylmercury administration, it was even more effective at enhancing urinary methylmercury excretion and at lowering tissue mercury levels. In contrast, excretion of inorganic mercury was not affected by oral NAC administration. The ability of NAC to enhance methylmercury excretion when given orally, its relatively low toxicity, and is wide availability in the clinical setting indicate that it may be an ideal therapeutic agent for use in methylmercury poisoning. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9520359

  12. Assessing confounding, effect modification, and thresholds in the association between ambient particles and daily deaths.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, J

    2000-01-01

    I examined the relationship between daily deaths and airborne particles in 10 U.S. cities with varying climatic conditions and seasons in which particle concentrations were high. Airborne particles were associated with significant increases in daily deaths [0.67% increase for a 10 microg/m(3) increase in particles; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.52-0.81%]. This association was the same in summer and winter. To examine potential confounding by other pollutants, I regressed city- and season-specific effect sizes against the relationship between airborne particles and other pollutants. Controlling for other pollutants did not substantially (or significantly) change the estimated effect of airborne particles. Socioeconomic differences between cities likewise did not modify the effect. The increase in daily deaths that occurred out of hospitals (0.89% per 10 microg/m(3); CI, 0.67-1.10%) was substantially greater than the increase in deaths in hospitals (0. 49%; CI, 0.31-0.68%). This is consistent with results previously reported in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and suggests that the particle-associated deaths are not just being brought forward by a few days. It is also consistent with recent animal and human studies of the mechanisms of particle toxicity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:10856032

  13. Biologically addressable monolayer structures formed by templates of sulfur-bearing molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Duschl, C; Liley, M; Corradin, G; Vogel, H

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrate that the combined application of Langmuir-Blodgett and self-assembly techniques allows the fabrication of patterns with contrasting surface properties on gold substrates. The process is monitored using fluorescence microscopy and surface plasmon spectroscopy and microscopy. These structures are suitable for the investigation of biochemical processes at surfaces and in ultrathin films. Two examples of such processes are shown. In the first example, the structures are addressed through the binding of a monoclonal antibody to a peptide. This demonstrates the formation of self-assembled monolayers by cysteine-bearing peptides on gold, and the directed binding of proteins to the structured layers. A high contrast between specific and unspecific binding of proteins is observed by the patterned presentation of antigens. Such films possess considerable potential for the design of multichannel sensor devices. In the second example, a structured phospholipid layer is produced by controlled self-assembly from vesicle solution. The structures created--areas of phospholipid bilayer, surrounded by a matrix of phospholipid monolayer--allow formation of a supported bilayer which is robust and strongly bound to the gold support, with small areas of free-standing bilayer which very closely resemble a phospholipid cell membrane. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 PMID:7811937

  14. Risk reversals in predictive testing for Huntington disease.

    PubMed Central

    Almqvist, E; Adam, S; Bloch, M; Fuller, A; Welch, P; Eisenberg, D; Whelan, D; Macgregor, D; Meschino, W; Hayden, M R

    1997-01-01

    The first predictive testing for Huntington disease (HD) was based on analysis of linked polymorphic DNA markers to estimate the likelihood of inheriting the mutation for HD. Limits to accuracy included recombination between the DNA markers and the mutation, pedigree structure, and whether DNA samples were available from family members. With direct tests for the HD mutation, we have assessed the accuracy of results obtained by linkage approaches when requested to do so by the test individuals. For six such individuals, there was significant disparity between the tests. Three went from a decreased risk to an increased risk, while in another three the risk was decreased. Knowledge of the potential reasons for these changes in results and impact of these risk reversals on both patients and the counseling team can assist in the development of strategies for the prevention and, where necessary, management of a risk reversal in any predictive testing program. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9382108

  15. Structure of the extracellular surface of the gap junction by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Hoh, J H; Sosinsky, G E; Revel, J P; Hansma, P K

    1993-01-01

    The extracellular surface of the gap junction cell-to-cell channels was imaged in phosphate-buffered saline with an atomic force microscope. The fully hydrated isolated gap junction membranes adsorbed to mica were irregular sheets approximately 1-2 microns across and 13.2 (+/- 1.3) nm thick. The top bilayer of the gap junction was dissected by increasing the force applied to the tip or sometimes by increasing the scan rate at moderate forces. The exposed extracellular surface revealed a hexagonal array with a center-to-center spacing of 9.4 (+/- 0.9) nm between individual channels (connexons). Images of individual connexons with a lateral resolution of < 3.5 nm, and in the best case approximately 2.5 nm, were reliably and reproducibly obtained with high-quality tips. These membrane channels protruded 1.4 (+/- 0.4) nm from the extracellular surface of the lipid membrane, and the atomic force microscope tip reached up to 0.7 nm into the pore, which opened up to a diameter of 3.8 (+/- 0.6) nm on the extracellular side. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:8396452

  16. Ecotoxicity in the Reconquista River, province of Buenos Aires, Argentina: a preliminary study.

    PubMed Central

    Herkovits, J; Perez-Coll, C S; Herkovits, F D

    1996-01-01

    The Reconquista River in Argentina is considered a "supercritical" river basin due to environmental degradation. Within its valley of 1.547 km2, there are more than 3 million inhabitants and 12,000 industries. Using early-life-stage toxicity tests with Bufo arenarum embryos (the most sensitive of three native species), we determined the water quality at six sampling stations of the river valley and expressed the results as acute and chronic toxicity units. Along most of the river, the toxicity was higher than the allowable level of whole industrial effluent toxicity recommended by U.S. EPA. In a tributary stream, Arroyo Moron, the water was about 10 times more toxic than the criteria maximum concentration (CMC) recommended by U.S. EPA for industrial effluents. Similar degradation of the water quality was found taking as a reference value an upstream sampling station. In all places where the water quality was worse than the CMC, no macroorganisms were found, and in one of these places, a large number of dead fishes was observed. Our study points out that amphibian early-life-stage toxicity tests could be appropriate for assessing water contamination and water quality, which is essential for diagnosis, protection of environmental services, monitoring, and restoration purposes. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:8820587

  17. The centenary of Lester Dragstedt--fifty years of therapeutic vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Modlin, I. M.; Darr, U.

    1994-01-01

    Lester Reynolds Dragstedt was trained initially as a physiologist and subsequently became a surgeon. He achieved renown not only because of his intellectual and technical skills, but because he was able to utilize physiological principles to define the development of surgical procedures. A humble upbringing in Anaconda, Montana was followed by a scientific education in Chicago. His brief background in surgery was obtained during a two year period spent mostly in Vienna and Budapest. At the University of Chicago, he pioneered the development of therapeutic vagotomy in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease. His research interests were many and varied, ranging from the toxemia of intestinal obstruction to the quest for a pancreatic hormone which might regulate fat metabolism. After retiring as Chairman of Surgery at the University of Chicago, he assumed a research position in surgery at the University of Florida in Gainesville. Dragstedt was a creative scientist, a superlative clinical surgeon, and a teacher honored by his pupils. The example of his life confirms the benefit of scientific inquiry when applied to clinical and surgical practice. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7502534

  18. p53 mutation is a poor prognostic indicator for survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing surgical tumour ablation.

    PubMed Central

    Honda, K.; Sbisà, E.; Tullo, A.; Papeo, P. A.; Saccone, C.; Poole, S.; Pignatelli, M.; Mitry, R. R.; Ding, S.; Isla, A.; Davies, A.; Habib, N. A.

    1998-01-01

    Forty-two patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were resected and their tumours were analysed for p53 mutations by GC-clamped denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and gene sequencing. All the exons have been analysed in this study. Eight of 12 HCCs with cirrhosis due to viral hepatitis and the two patients with sarcomatoid changes displayed p53 mutations. In contrast, no mutation was observed in the fibrolamellar variant (n = 9), non-cirrhotics (n = 13) and alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 6). The mutations observed were in exons 5-8. Two mutations were observed in codons 136 and 213 as well as a T insertion between residues 156 and 157 (exon 5) and these are reported for the first time in HCC. Likewise, the silent mutation polymorphism in codon 213 was noticed in 3 of the 42 patients. Survival analysis of these patients after surgery showed the mean and median survival in patients with wild-type p53 to be 60 and 43 months respectively. In the group with p53 mutations, the mean and median survival was 15 and 12 months. The difference was statistically significant (P= 0.003). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9514057

  19. Metaplastic and mitotic activity of the ischemic (endocrine) kidney in experimental renal hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, M.; Solymoss, B.; Benchimol, S.; Desormeaux, Y.; Langlais, J.; Ballak, M.

    1979-01-01

    Partial ligation of the aorta between the renal arteries in the rat induces malignant hypertension, metaplasia of smooth-muscle cells of arterioles and arteries into juxtaglomerular cells, and a complex series of events in tubular cells at all levels of the ischemic kidney. The tubular cells of the outer cortex, particularly the proximal convoluted cells, show a very rapid and progressive simple atrophy. In contrast, necrosis of individual cells is followed by mitotic activity in atrophic tubular cells of the inner cortex, medulla, and papilla. Subsequently, polyploidy and hyperplasia occur in the inner cortex. At the same time, hypertrophy of the protein-synthesizing apparatus and an increase in protein, DNA, and RNA, followed by a decrease in the protein content, are seen in the tubular cells of the inner cortex. In the medulla and papilla, necrosis of individual cells proceeds side by side with waves of mitotic activity. These events take place, albeit to a lesser degree, even in cases of very mild renal ischemia. While they may by unrelated to hypertension, these changes are probably involved in the increase in hydrolytic enzyme activity characteristic of the ischemic renal cortex. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:474709

  20. Immune electron microscopic characterization of monoclonal antibodies to Alzheimer neurofibrillary tangles.

    PubMed Central

    Wrzolek, M. A.; Merz, P. A.; Kascsak, R.; Grundke-Iqbal, I.; Iqbal, K.; Rubenstein, R.; Tonna-DeMasi, M.; Goller, N. L.; Mehta, P.; Wisniewski, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Characterization of eleven monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), raised to isolated sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-treated Alzheimer's neurofibrillary tangles (ANT), has revealed the presence of at least two different epitopes. MAbs were tested for reactivity to ubiquitin and paired helical filaments (PHF) isolated by three different procedures. The effect of protease and/or alkaline phosphatase pretreatment on the reactivity of the MAbs with isolated PHF was also examined. All MAbs that had reacted strongly in the ELISA with sonicated SDS-treated ANT also immune decorated isolated PHF to varying degrees. Two MAbs exhibited a high reactivity to PHF: 3-39 and 5-25. MAb 3-39 was found to recognize a protease sensitive epitope. In contrast MAb 5-25 was found to consistently decorate isolated PHF in all preparations and exhibited a strong reactivity to ubiquitin, and the epitope in isolated PHF was not protease sensitive. Thus structural PHF after protease treatment and detergent treatment contain an antigenic site that is present in ubiquitin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1379780

  1. Achieving success with the silicone expander for overacting superior obliques.

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Z F; Greenberg, M

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report the results of and complications with silicone expander surgery for the overacting superior oblique. METHODS: A total of 26 patients with bilateral overaction of the superior oblique and A-pattern strabismus and 5 patients with unilateral overacting superior oblique secondary to inferior oblique palsy were treated with a 7 mm silicone expander. Care was taken not to enter the sub-Tenon's space. RESULTS: The group that underwent bilateral superior oblique surgery had an average preoperative pattern of 37.42 diopters (D) and an average correction of 35.37 D. Three patients had a severe unilateral postoperative inflammatory incident that was successfully treated with oral and topical corticosteroids. One of these patient developed Brown's syndrome. Another patient, who had no postoperative inflammatory incident, also developed Brown's syndrome. In these 4 patients, the sub-Tenon's space was inadvertently entered during surgery. CONCLUSION: The silicone expander surgery has a very high success rate in treating the A-pattern associated with the bilateral overacting superior oblique. This procedure also works well for the unilateral superior oblique that overacts owing to an inferior oblique palsy. No cyclotorsion symptoms occurred after this surgery. However, 4 patients had complications because the sub-Tenon's space was exposed during surgery. With this procedure, there is a learning curve to obtain the skill not to enter the sub-Tenon's space. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:10703132

  2. Immunopathology of chronic lentivirus-induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkerson, M. J.; Davis, W. C.; Baszler, T. V.; Cheevers, W. P.

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluated histopathology and mononuclear cell phenotypes in synovial lesions of chronic arthritis induced by experimental infection of Saanen goats with caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus. Histological examination of carpal joint synovium of three infected goats with clinical arthritis revealed progressive lesions consisting of membrane villus hypertrophy with extensive angiogenesis and mononuclear cell infiltration and degenerative changes of membrane villus necrosis associated with loss of vasculature and infiltrates. Changes in synovial tissue of five age-matched infected goats without clinical arthritis were limited to moderate synovial membrane hyperplasia also noted in an age-matched uninfected goat. Immunohistochemistry identified CD45R+ CD5- B lymphocytes as the principal component of most perivascular infiltrates in arthritic synovium. Other mononuclear cells included perivascular CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and macrophages with a prominent accumulation of CD8+ T lymphocytes at the lining surface of inflamed villi. T lymphocytes and macrophages as well as synovial lining cells were activated with respect to MHC class II but not for interleukin-2 receptors. Inflamed villi also contained lymphoid aggregates comprised of B cell germinal centers and activated T-cell mantles. B cells expressing immunoglobulin occurred around follicles and throughout inflamed villi. These findings indicate that memory immune responses that favor expansion and maturation of B cells and immunoglobulin production contribute to the immunopathology of chronic arthritis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7778682

  3. Evidence for allosteric regulation of succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Um, H D; Klein, C

    1993-01-01

    We have previously reported that distinctly different concentrations of GDP stimulate the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of p36, the alpha-subunit of succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS) in Dictyostelium discoideum. In this present study, we have investigated the mechanism underlying these dual effects of GDP. Dephosphorylation of p36 is induced by relatively high levels of GDP and is coincident with the formation of GTP. This indicates that, at high concentrations, GDP serves as a substrate of SCS. However, 100-fold lower concentrations of GDP, which do not bind to the catalytic site to induce SCS dephosphorylation, stimulate p36 phosphorylation. This stimulation is not diminished by dilution of the sample, and is retained during purification of the protein. Gel-filtration analyses indicate that SCS in our system behaves as a non-interacting alpha beta dimer, the hydrodynamic behaviour of which is not altered by the presence of added GDP. The data indicate that altered protein-protein interactions do not account for the stimulation of p36 phosphorylation by low GDP concentrations. We propose that GDP functions as an allosteric regulator of SCS, and experiments using guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate (GDP[S]) are shown to distinguish further the allosteric and catalytic binding sites. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8240297

  4. Increased small intestinal apoptosis in coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, S F; Attia, L; Scholes, J V; Walters, J R; Holt, P R

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coeliac disease (CD) mucosa is flattened despite epithelial hyperproliferation. AIMS: To establish mechanisms of cell loss in CD. PATIENTS: 14 controls, 17 active CD patients, and 16 maintained with gluten free diet. METHODS: Programmed cell death was examined in small intestinal biopsy specimens by staining fragmented DNA using terminal uridine deoxynucleotidyl nick end labelling (TUNEL), in comparison with haematoxylin and eosin stained adjacent sections. Double staining with anti-CD45 antibodies determined the origin of apoptotic cells. Apoptosis was graded from 1-3 (< 5, 5-20, > 20% respectively). Proliferating cells, immunostained by Ki-67 (MIB-1) antibody, were counted. RESULTS: Apoptotic cells were seen rarely by haematoxylin and eosin but more readily by TUNEL. In controls, 1.4 +/- 0.2% of epithelial cells were apoptotic (mean grade 1.1), mainly located in the upper villus. In active CD, frequent apoptotic cells were distributed throughout the crypt-villus unit (mean grade 2.4), decreasing after treatment to 1.1 (p < 0.001) even when still histologically abnormal. CD45 antibodies rarely stained apoptotic cells in active CD. The number of TUNEL positive cells correlated with proliferating cell number (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Enterocyte apoptosis is greatly increased in untreated CD, correlates with proliferation, and falls to normal with a gluten free diet, before histological improvement. Increased apoptosis may be responsible for villous atrophy in CD. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9038662

  5. Ischemic tissue injury.

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, R. B.; Ganote, C. E.; Reimer, K. A.

    1975-01-01

    The subendocardial to subepicardial gradient in the severity of ischemia following acute coronary occlusion is described. The effects of mild, moderate, and severe ischemia on cell structure and function are compared in summary form, and special attention is given to the effects of severe ischemia on myocardial cells. The characteristics of reversible and irreversible ischemic injury are defined in biologic terms. The failure of cell volume regulation in cells which have entered an irreversible state of ischemic injury is demonstrated by the use of free-hand slices in vitro. Irreversibility is associated with structural defects in the plasma membrane and is reflected in an increased slice inulin-diffusible space, increased slice H2O and Na+ content, and failure of the tissue to maintain the high K+ and Mg2+ levels characteristic of normal left ventricular myocardium. Defective cell membrane function is an early feature of irreversible ischemic injury and may be a primary event in the genesis of the irreversible state. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1180331

  6. Amyloid deposits in bioprosthetic cardiac valves after long-term implantation in man. A new localization of amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Goffin, Y. A.; Gruys, E.; Sorenson, G. D.; Wellens, F.

    1984-01-01

    Congo red staining with microscopic examination under polarized light was performed in 30 porcine bioprosthetic cardiac valves and one autologous fascia lata valve explanted from 31 patients in order to detect the presence of amyloid. Microdeposits of amyloid were present in the sewing ring of the fascia lata valve and in 10 porcine bioprostheses, and this finding was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy in 3 porcine bioprostheses. All amyloid-laden porcine valves had been implanted for at least 33 months before removal, and all except two showed dysfunction and/or severe degeneration of cuspal tissue. Statistical analyses failed to establish any correlation between the presence of amyloid and patient-related factors. In a majority of porcine bioprostheses amyloid was permanganate-sensitive and tryptophan-positive. The pathogenesis of this new form of heart valve amyloidosis might consist in penetration of human macrophages in deteriorated bioprosthetic cusps and their interaction with blood-borne amyloid precursors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:6421168

  7. Immunohistologic and ultrastructural study of the sclerotic skin in chronic graft-versus-host disease in man.

    PubMed Central

    Janin-Mercier, A.; Devergie, A.; Van Cauwenberge, D.; Saurat, J. H.; Bourges, M.; Lapiere, C. M.; Gluckman, E.

    1984-01-01

    Thirteen skin biopsies were performed on 8 patients at different stages of skin sclerosis in chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). On the same skin biopsies an immunostaining with antibodies directed against Types I and III procollagen, Types I, III, IV, V collagen, and laminin, and an ultrastructural study were performed. Alterations were observed at the dermal-epidermal junction and in the superficial dermis with a large deposit on Type III procollagen in the incipient scleroses and of Type I procollagen in the oldest ones. In this sclerotic superficial dermis, collagen fibers of irregular diameter were associated with mast cells and active fibroblasts, macrophages, and lymphocytes in close contact. The skin sclerosis in chronic GVHD might be considered a form of cutaneous fibrosis with features of excessive tissue repair related to an immunologic reaction between lymphocytes of the graft and tissue host cells. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 8 PMID:6372497

  8. Chemically induced bidirectional differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Speers, W. C.; Birdwell, C. R.; Dixon, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    N,N-dimethylacetamide, hexamethylene bisacetamide, and Polybrene induced rapid and extensive differentiation in vitro in an otherwise slowly differentiating subline of embryonal carcinoma cells. The type of differentiated cell induced was dependent on the spatial organization of the stem cells during drug treatment. In monalayer culture "epithelial" cells were produced exclusively. However, treatment of aggregated suspension cultures yielded predominantly "fibroblast-like" cells. The undifferentiated embryonal carcinoma cells and the two differentiated cell types were morphologically distinct when examined by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy; and they had differences in cell surface antigens. Both differential cell types produced large amounts of fibronectin, whereas the embryonal carcinoma cells produced only minimal amounts. This system provides a convenient way to induce relatively synchronous differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells into specific differentiated cell types. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:507191

  9. Widespread cytoskeletal pathology characterizes corticobasal degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Feany, M. B.; Dickson, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a rare, progressive neurological disorder characterized by widespread neuronal and glial pathology. Using immunohistochemistry and laser confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that the nonamyloid cortical plaques of CBD are actually collections of abnormal tau in the distal processes of astrocytes. These glial cells express both vimentin and CD44, markers of astrocyte activation. Glial pathology also includes tau-positive cytoplasmic inclusions, here localized to Leu 7-expressing oligodendrocytes. In addition, a wide array of neuronal pathology is defined with tau-positive inclusions in multiple domains of a variety of cortical neurons. CBD thus exhibits widespread glial and neuronal cytoskeletal pathology, including a novel structure, the astrocytic plaque. CBD is a disease of generalized cytoskeletal disruption affecting several cell types and multiple domains of these cells. The further definition of CBD pathology refines the diagnosis and pathophysiological understanding of this unique disease and has important implications for other neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease, characterized by abnormal tau deposition. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7778678

  10. Alzheimer's disease. A double-labeling immunohistochemical study of senile plaques.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, D. W.; Farlo, J.; Davies, P.; Crystal, H.; Fuld, P.; Yen, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The senile plaque is one of the histopathologic changes that characterizes Alzheimer's disease and the aging brain. The histopathology of senile plaques was studied using double-labeling immunohistochemistry and lectin histochemistry with thioflavin S fluorescent microscopy in 9 cases of Alzheimer's disease, 2 nondemented elderly individuals, and 3 individuals with non-Alzheimer primary degenerative dementias. Every plaque that was visualized with thioflavin also had amyloid, but not all thioflavin-positive plaques contained neurites that could be recognized with specific monoclonal antibodies to paired helical filament, tau, or neurofilament epitopes. Some neurofilament-positive neurites were not visualized with thioflavin, but almost all tau-positive neurites were colabeled with thioflavin. Microglia were associated with most plaques. Most plaques were also surrounded by fibrous astrocytes. These results suggest that amyloid may be the common feature that defines senile plaques, but that other elements may be more specific for Alzheimer's disease, because extensive neuritic degeneration was seen only in Alzheimer brains and not in either nondemented elderly individuals with senile plaques or in non-Alzheimer dementia cases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2456021

  11. High levels of circulating beta-amyloid peptide do not cause cerebral beta-amyloidosis in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, K.; Ho, L.; Younkin, S. G.; Kunkel, D. D.; Ogburn, C. E.; LeBoeuf, R. C.; Furlong, C. E.; Deeb, S. S.; Nochlin, D.; Wegiel, J.; Wisniewski, H. M.; Martin, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    We have established transgenic mice that constitutively overproduce the signal sequence and the 99-amino-acid carboxyl-terminal region of the human beta-amyloid precursor protein. The transgenic mice strongly expressed the transgene in multiple tissues under the control of a cytomegalovirus enhancer/chick beta-actin promoter. There were exceptionally high levels of beta-amyloid peptides in the plasma (approximately 17 times or more compared with the human plasma level). Although some transgenic mice from one founder line developed amyloidosis in the intestine, no neuropathology was found in transgenic mice up to age 29 months. Given the absence of cerebral beta-amyloidosis despite extremely high levels of circulating beta-amyloid peptides in the transgenic mice, the results suggest that local cerebral metabolism of beta-amyloid precursor protein may play a predominant role in cerebral beta-amyloidosis in transgenic mice. Such transgenic mice may be useful for the investigation of the etiology of the disease and for the establishment of therapeutic strategies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8686746

  12. Molecular features of hypothalamic plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Standaert, D. G.; Lee, V. M.; Greenberg, B. D.; Lowery, D. E.; Trojanowski, J. Q.

    1991-01-01

    The pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves subcortical as well as cortical structures. The authors have used immunohistochemical methods to study the molecular composition of AD plaques in the hypothalamus. In contrast to previous studies using histochemical methods, the authors observed large numbers of diffuse plaques in the AD hypothalamus labeled with an antiserum to the beta-amyloid, or A4 peptide, of the beta-amyloid precursor proteins (beta APPs), whereas A4-immunoreactive plaques were uncommon in the hypothalamus of patients without AD. Unlike plaques in the cortex and hippocampus of AD patients, hypothalamic plaques did not contain epitopes corresponding to other regions of the beta APPs, nor did they contain tau-, neurofilament-, or microtubule-associated protein-reactive epitopes, and did not disrupt the neuropil or produce astrogliosis. These findings demonstrate that there are substantial molecular and cellular differences in the pathologic features of AD in the hypothalamus compared with those observed in hippocampal and cortical structures, which may provide insight into the pathogenetic mechanisms of AD. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1653521

  13. Detection of HLA-DR on microglia in the human brain is a function of both clinical and technical factors.

    PubMed Central

    Mattiace, L. A.; Davies, P.; Dickson, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    Detection of HLA-DR, a class II major histocompatibility antigen, on glial cells is dependent not only on duration and type of tissue fixation and processing, but also on clinical factors. Glial cells labeled by anti-HLA-DR were consistent with microglia by light microscopic and ultrastructural criteria, and were colabeled with other microglial markers, including LN-1, Leu-M5, and leukocyte common antigen (LCA). In young and elderly subjects who died suddenly, anti-HLA-DR labeled microglia in the white matter, but far fewer cells in the gray matter. In subjects who died of chronic debilitating illness, such as Alzheimer's disease and carcinomatosis, anti-HLA-DR labeled numerous microglia throughout both the gray and white matter. In Alzheimer's disease, microglia were aggregated in compact senile plaques, but loosely associated with diffuse amyloid deposits. These results suggest that HLA-DR may be constitutively expressed in white matter, but induced in gray matter microglia in chronic disease states or in association with amyloid deposits. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:1693471

  14. Massive accumulation of modified tau and severe depletion of normal tau characterize the cerebral cortex and white matter of Alzheimer's disease. Demonstration using the hydrated autoclaving method.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, R. W.; Iwaki, T.; Kitamoto, T.; Sato, Y.; Tateishi, J.

    1992-01-01

    Using the hydrated autoclaving method, a new immunohistochemical procedure to enhance tau immunoreactivity in formalin-fixed brain tissue, the authors recently reported that tau protein is detected in neuronal cell bodies and proximal dendrites, gray matter neuropil, axons, and glial cells in normal human hippocampus and neocortex. In the this study, the authors performed a comparative study of the distribution of normal and modified forms of tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and control brains. In the cerebral cortex and white matter of AD brains, a massive accumulation of modified tau and/or severe depletion of normal tau were documented in all the tau compartments. In mild AD cases, gray matter neuropil, axons, and glial cells were less severely involved than neuronal perikarya. In the controls, neuronal perikarya were often involved by modified tau accumulation, but the other compartments showed normal distribution. These observations suggest that modifications of tau which lead to neurofibrillary lesions in AD may begin in neuronal perikarya and extend to the other tau compartments in advanced stages of the disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1373272

  15. Astrocytes and microglia in human brain share an epitope recognized by a B-lymphocyte-specific monoclonal antibody (LN-1).

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, D. W.; Mattiace, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    A B-lymphocyte-specific mouse monoclonal antibody, LN-1, recognizes two morphologic classes of glial cells in human brain. The nature and duration of tissue fixation and processing are critical in the detection of the two cell types. In tissue that is lightly fixed, LN-1 recognizes astrocytes. The astrocytic nature of the LN-1 reactive glial cell was confirmed by cytologic features, tissue distribution, immunoelectron microscopy, double labeling immunofluorescent microscopy, and staining of serial sections with antibodies to glial fibrillary acidic protein. In tissue that is fixed for longer periods or in Bouin's fixative, two glial cell types are recognized: astrocytes and microglia. The identity of the latter cell type as microglia was confirmed by morphologic features, tissue distribution, immunoelectron microscopy, and double staining with monoclonal antibodies or lectins to macrophage markers, including class II major histocompatibility antigens. The two cell types had different disposition in senile plaques of elderly individuals and of those with Alzheimer's disease. Astrocytes were present at the periphery of the plaques, whereas microglial cells were centrally placed, often in juxtaposition to amyloid. The results are discussed with respect to ontogeny of glial cells and the ability of monoclonal antibodies to recognize epitopes on unrelated proteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2476034

  16. Famine relief and imperial policy in early modern Morocco: the political functions of public health.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, A R

    1981-01-01

    There has been no systematic ethnology nor comparative history of public health. In fact, there has been a broad consensus that prior to the arrival of missionaries and colonial health authorities there was no indigenous public health. These assumptions apply to only some settings and do not reflect the general history of public health. The present study concerns public health in the first century of Alawi rule in Morocco, ca. 1670-1790. The early Alawi sultans undertook public health programs, most of which concerned the prevention and relief of mass starvation. Goals of the programs were consistent with other features of their public policies. Effectiveness of the programs was limited partly by technical and scientific factors, but more by political constraints, especially the sultans' higher priorities for political stability than public welfare and public health. These data provide important insights not only into Moroccan social and political history, but also into the more general problem of the political nature of public health. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:7027811

  17. Constitutive expression of multidrug resistance in human colorectal tumours and cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, R.; Weber, T. K.; Morse, B.; Arceci, R.; Staniunas, R.; Steele, G.; Summerhayes, I. C.

    1993-01-01

    In this study we report detection of mdr1 gene expression in the liver metastases of 7/11 patients with colon carcinoma and characterise the MDR phenotype associated with a panel of 19 human colon carcinoma cell lines. Within this panel, mdr1 mRNA biosynthesis and surface localisation of Pgp were assessed with respect to MDR functionality where the cell lines are representative of different clinical stages of tumour progression, metastatic potential and differentiation. The data indicates that constitutive levels of mdr1 mRNA/Pgp expression may not necessarily result in the functional expression of the MDR phenotype. While low levels of mdr1 mRNA/Pgp were detected in 5/8 well differentiated colon cell lines, only 2/8 were functionally MDR. In contrast, 10/11 moderate and poorly differentiated lines expressed mdr1 mRNA/Pgp and of these, 9/11 were functionally MDR. The phosphorylation status of the mature 170 kD P-glycoprotein and the surface localisation of this glycoprotein showed the strongest correlation with functionality. Analysis of cell lines for cross-resistance and chemosensitivity profiles against a battery of chemotherapeutic drugs suggests multiple mechanisms, in addition to Pgp, contribute to the overall resistance of colorectal cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8098614

  18. Equine glaucoma: a retrospective study of 13 cases presented at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine from 1992 to 1999.

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, C L; Grahn, B H

    2000-01-01

    The prevalence of equine glaucoma seen by the ophthalmology service at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) was 6.5%. The majority of cases (11/13) were associated with clinical manifestations of uveitis. Congenital glaucoma was documented in 1 case, and primary glaucoma was diagnosed in a 12-year-old quarter horse. There were no breed or sex predilections evident. Affected horses were middle-aged to old (average age = 9.5 years, ranging from 2 weeks to 23 years). The clinical manifestations of equine glaucoma included blindness, diffuse corneal edema, corneal vascularization, buphthalmia, corneal striae, recurrent secondary ulcerative keratitis, and less commonly, iris bombé, tapetal hyper-reflectivity, complete pupillary occlusion from posterior synechiae, and optic disc cupping. Elevated intraocular pressure confirmed the diagnosis (n = 10), while 3 cases were normotensive with signs of glaucoma including corneal striae and buphthalmia. Affected eyes were treated medically and/or surgically. Regardless of the therapy instituted, the visual outcome was poor. Most affected eyes were blind at presentation or became blind within a few weeks. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5a. PMID:10857031

  19. Bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: the value of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed Central

    Davids, P H; Ringers, J; Rauws, E A; de Wit, L T; Huibregtse, K; van der Heyde, M N; Tytgat, G N

    1993-01-01

    This study describes the value of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Twelve consecutive patients were studied over a one year period. In all patients the biliary tree was visualised during ERCP. Four patients had complete bile duct obstruction, seven patients had a stricture (two with concomitant leakage), and one patient had leakage from a hepatic branch. Three patients with complete obstruction, presented with a relatively prolonged symptom free, 'silent' period before diagnosis. In all four patients with complete transection, a proximal hepaticojejunostomy was performed. In one patient with a tough fibrous stricture, secondary to incorrect clip placement, passage of the guidewire was impossible, leaving surgical reconstruction as the only therapeutic option. All remaining seven patients with leakage or strictures, or both were successfully treated by endoscopic sphincterotomy only (n = 1) or sphincterotomy and subsequent stent placement (n = 6). When patients do not recover uneventfully after laparoscopic cholecystectomy even without cholestasis or jaundice, early ERCP is recommended as a safe and valuable method to detect bile duct injury and to suggest treatment. Subsequently, more than half of such patients can be treated endoscopically. Extended follow up is needed to evaluate the longterm results. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8406163

  20. Etiology, forms, and prognosis of gastrointestinal dysfunction resembling vagal indigestion occurring after surgical correction of right abomasal displacement.

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, N; Fecteau, G; Hélie, P; Lapointe, J M; Chouinard, L; Babkine, M; Desrochers, A; Couture, Y; Dubreuil, P

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the etiology and types of vagal indigestion (VI) occurring after right displacement of the abomasum or abomasal volvulus (RDA/AV), and the prognosis for each type. Data of cows presented for RDA/AV from a retrospective (n = 288) and a prospective (n = 132) study were used. Vagal indigestion occurred in 39 and 22 cows in each study, respectively. A necropsy was performed in 29 cases. Gastric compartment dilation compatible with VI type III or IV occurred in 23 cases. An abnormal gastric wall was detected in 22 cases. Peritonitis was present in 18 cows. Vagal nerve lesions were present in 5 out of 13 cases studied. Clinical, hematological, and necropsy results suggested a classification of VI with respect to presence or absence of peritonitis. Gastric wall damage, peritonitis and vagal nerve lesions appear important in the etiology. Considering peritonitis occurrence, antimicrobial therapy appears necessary in the treatment of RDA/AV. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:11062835

  1. Cytokeratin 20 in human carcinomas. A new histodiagnostic marker detected by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Moll, R.; Löwe, A.; Laufer, J.; Franke, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have recently identified a new cytokeratin (CK) polypeptide, CK 20, whose expression is almost entirely confined to the gastric and intestinal epithelium, urothelium, and Merkel cells. Seven monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for CK 20 were raised and characterized by applying immunoblotting and immunocytochemical screening. All of them reacted on frozen tissue sections. A further MAb, IT-Ks20.8, recognized CK 20 in sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples. A total of 711 cases of primary and metastatic cancer, mostly carcinomas, were analyzed immunohistochemically for CK-20 expression, using CK-20 specific guinea-pig antibodies and MAbs. The expression spectrum of CK 20 in carcinomas resembled that seen in the corresponding normal epithelia of origin. CK-20 positivity was seen in the vast majority of adenocarcinomas of the colon (89/93 cases), mucinous ovarian tumors, transitional-cell and Merkel-cell carcinomas and frequently also in adenocarcinomas of the stomach, bile system, and pancreas. Most squamous cell carcinomas in general and most adenocarcinomas from other sites (breast, lung, endometrium), nonmucinous tumors of the ovary, and small-cell lung carcinomas were essentially or completely negative. The authors propose to use CK 20 as a diagnostic marker valuable in distinguishing different types of carcinomas, notably when presenting as metastases. Images Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:1371204

  2. Abnormal regional blood flow responses during and after exercise in human sympathetic denervation.

    PubMed Central

    Puvi-Rajasingham, S; Smith, G D; Akinola, A; Mathias, C J

    1997-01-01

    1. Blood pressure, superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and skeletal muscle blood flow, cardiac index (CI) and systemic vascular resistance responses to supine leg exercise were measured in six age-matched normal subjects (controls) and in eleven subjects with sympathetic denervation due to primary autonomic failure (AF). 2. During exercise, blood pressure rose in controls but fell markedly in AF. After exercise, blood pressure rapidly returned to baseline in controls but remained low in AF. During exercise, systemic vascular resistance fell in controls and AF but tended to fall further in AF and remained low post exercise. CI increased similarly in controls and AF. 3. During exercise, SMA blood flow fell similarly in controls and AF, but the fall initially was slower in AF; recovery was more rapid post exercise in controls. SMA vascular resistance tended to rise less and more slowly in AF and remained elevated post exercise. 4. Forearm muscle (FM) blood flow and FM vascular resistance did not change from resting values in controls or AF post exercise. After exercise, leg muscle (LM) blood flow rose and LM vascular resistance fell equally in both groups although LM blood flow remained elevated, 10 min post exercise in AF. 5. In sympathetically denervated humans, increased blood flow (due to excessive vasodilatation, lack of sympathetic restraint, or both) in leg muscle during and after exercise in combination with impaired splanchnic vasoconstriction in the early stages of exercise may have contributed to exercise-induced hypotension. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9457657

  3. Arterial medial necrosis and hemorrhage induced in rats by intravenous infusion of fenoldopam mesylate, a dopaminergic vasodilator.

    PubMed Central

    Yuhas, E. M.; Morgan, D. G.; Arena, E.; Kupp, R. P.; Saunders, L. Z.; Lewis, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    Fenoldopam mesylate, a selective, postsynaptic, dopaminergic vasodilator, was administered to rats for assessment of its clinical, toxicologic, and pathologic effects. Groups of 8 male and 8 female rats received 5, 25, 50, or 100 micrograms/kg/min by intravenous infusion for 24 hours. Groups of 12 male and 12 female rats received 2, 8, 16, or 20 mg/kg/day by intravenous injection once daily for 12 days. Tissues were examined by light microscopy. Rats infused for 24-hours with 5-100 micrograms/kg/min of fenoldopam had lesions of renal and splanchnic arteries characterized by medial necrosis and hemorrhage. None were seen in control rats or those administered the compound by intravenous injection. Arteries with four to five layers of medial smooth-muscle cells were most severely and frequently affected. Lesions were particularly severe in interlobular pancreatic arteries and subserosal gastric arteries. They occurred first at 4 hours, were present at low incidence at 8 hours, were induced in unrestrained rats, and were not caused by the experimental procedures employed. The nature and disposition of this novel arterial lesion in the rat suggests that its pathogenesis may be related to the pharmacologic activity of fenoldopam mesylate at the dopamine receptor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2858975

  4. Focal arteriolar insudation. A response of arterioles to chronic nonspecific irritation.

    PubMed Central

    Cuénoud, H. F.; Joris, I.; Langer, R. S.; Majno, G.

    1987-01-01

    The subcutaneous insertion of sterile, inert plastic pellets over the cremaster muscles of rats induces characteristic focal lesions of the arterioles at a distance from the pellets. These lesions appear with a delay of about 6 hours; by light microscopy they are characterized by a focal dilatation accompanied by endothelial damage and increased permeability. They are more severe if the pellets are loaded with histamine and are inhibited if the pellets are loaded with serotonin. Electron microscopy shows interendothelial gaps; the media is massively infiltrated with blood components and fibrin. The medial smooth muscle cells are stretched and at times necrotic; inflammatory cells are scarce. On the basis of these features the lesion was named focal arteriolar insudation (FAI). Although its pathogenesis is not yet clear, the data at hand suggest that it is caused by endogenous mediators affecting the smooth muscle cells and/or the endothelium. FAI appears to be a specific arteriolar response to chronic nonspecific irritation. Images Figure 7 Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:3296773

  5. Distribution of somatostatin receptors in normal and neoplastic human tissues: recent advances and potential relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, J. C.; Schaer, J. C.; Markwalder, R.; Waser, B.; Horisberger, U.; Laissue, J.

    1997-01-01

    This short review describes the localization of somatostatin receptors with in vitro receptor autoradiography techniques in several non-classical, normal human somatostatin target tissues as well as in selected human tumors. In addition to brain, gut and neuroendocrine localizations, somatostatin receptors are expressed in most lymphatic tissues, including gut-associated lymphatic tissue, spleen and thymus; in the cortical and medullary area of the kidney; in the stroma of the prostate and in the epithelial cells of the thyroid. Among human tumors, the extremely high density of somatostatin receptors in medulloblastomas should be stressed as well as the favorable prognostic role of the presence of somatostatin receptors in neuroblastomas. Moreover, several types of mesenchymal tumors have somatostatin receptors as well. The receptor subtypes expressed by distinct tumors may vary: Whereas medulloblastomas and neuroblastomas predominantly express sst2, prostate cancers express sst1 rather than sst2. A further emerging somatostatin target is represented by the peritumoral veins, also known to express sst2 receptors. The multiple somatostatin targets in normal and pathological human tissues represents the basis for potential diagnostic and clinical applications of somatostatin analogs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9825475

  6. The tumor microenvironment: possible role of integrins and the extracellular matrix in tumor biological behavior of intratubular germ cell neoplasia and testicular seminomas.

    PubMed Central

    Timmer, A.; Oosterhuis, J. W.; Schraffordt Koops, H.; Sleijfer, D. T.; Szabo, B. G.; Timens, W.

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the distribution of integrin subunits and extracellular matrix proteins in normal testis, intratubular germ cell neoplasia (ITGCN), and primary and metastatic seminomas. Compared to normal testis in ITGCN, Sertoli cells showed increased expression of alpha 3, alpha 6, and beta 1 integrin subunits. Malignant intratubular germ cells stained for alpha 3, alpha 6, and beta 1 integrin subunits. Progression of ITGCN to invasive seminoma was associated with loss of alpha 3 integrin subunit expression by tumor cells. Consequent to this loss, it can be speculated that the strong expression on ITGCN may be related to the noninvasive character of the lesion as is also known from other noninvasive tumors. All tumors showed a strong expression of alpha 6 and beta 1 integrin subunits. The alpha 5 integrin subunit was weakly expressed in primary seminomas in all stages. No differences were observed in integrin expression between primary and metastatic tumors. The distribution of extracellular matrix proteins was heterogeneous and revealed clear architectural differences between seminomas that may reflect different stages of tumor stroma formation. To our knowledge, the results presented in this study provide the first information on the possible role of tumor-extracellular matrix interactions in the biological behavior of ITGCN and testicular seminomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8178927

  7. Three-dimensional models of non-NMDA glutamate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, M J; Wo, Z G; Oswald, R E

    1996-01-01

    Structural models have been produced for three types of non-NMDA inotropic glutamate receptors: an AMPA receptor, GluR1, a kainate receptor, GluR6; and a low-molecular-weight kainate receptor from goldfish, GFKAR alpha. Modeling was restricted to the domains of the proteins that bind the neurotransmitter glutamate and that form the ion channel. Model building combined homology modeling, distance geometry, molecular mechanics, interactive modeling, and known constraints. The models indicate new potential interactions in the extracellular domain between protein and agonists, and suggest that the transition from the "closed" to the "open" state involves the movement of a conserved positive residue away from, and two conserved negative residues into, the extracellular entrance to the pore upon binding. As a first approximation, the ion channel domain was modeled with a structure comprising a central antiparallel beta-barrel that partially crosses the membrane, and against which alpha-helices from each subunit are packed; a third alpha-helix packs against these two helices in each subunit. Much, but not all, of the available data were consistent with this structure. Modifying the beta-barrel to a loop-like topology produced a model consistent with available data. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8785317

  8. Scanning ion conductance microscopy of living cells.

    PubMed Central

    Korchev, Y E; Bashford, C L; Milovanovic, M; Vodyanoy, I; Lab, M J

    1997-01-01

    Currently there is a great interest in using scanning probe microscopy to study living cells. However, in most cases the contact the probe makes with the soft surface of the cell deforms or damages it. Here we report a scanning ion conductance microscope specially developed for imaging living cells. A key feature of the instrument is its scanning algorithm, which maintains the working distance between the probe and the sample such that they do not make direct physical contact with each other. Numerical simulation of the probe/sample interaction, which closely matches the experimental observations, provides the optimum working distance. The microscope scans highly convoluted surface structures without damaging them and reveals the true topography of cell surfaces. The images resemble those produced by scanning electron microscopy, with the significant difference that the cells remain viable and active. The instrument can monitor small-scale dynamics of cell surfaces as well as whole-cell movement. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9251784

  9. Bovine kidney beta-mannosidase: purification and characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Sopher, B L; Traviss, C E; Cavanagh, K T; Jones, M Z; Friderici, K H

    1993-01-01

    Lysosomal beta-mannosidase was purified 160,000-fold in 24% yield from bovine kidney by a four-step purification procedure, which included concanavalin A-Sepharose, immunoaffinity, TSK-butyl and h.p.l.c. cation-exchange chromatography. When analysed by SDS/PAGE and detected by Coomassie Blue or silver staining, the purified enzyme preparation consists of two prominent peptides (100 and 110 kDa) and a third minor peptide (84 kDa). These three peptides are immunologically related and are consistently associated with beta-mannosidase activity in all chromatographic steps. Removal of N-linked carbohydrate from the 84, 100 and 110 kDa peptides decreases their molecular sizes to 75, 86 and 91 kDa respectively. Bovine kidneys lacking beta-mannosidase, activity, acquired from calves affected with beta-mannosidosis, do not contain detectable quantities of the three beta-mannosidase peptides, as judged by monoclonal- and polyclonal-antibody reactivity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8424779

  10. Microtus oeconomus (Rodentia), a useful mammal for studying the induction of sex-chromosome nondisjunction and diploid gametes in male germ cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tates, A D

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary data indicate that chemicals can also increase the frequency of sex-chromosome nondisjunction. Positive results--which certainly need further confirmation--have been obtained for MMS, p-fluorophenylalanine, vincristine, procarbazine, carbendazim, and bleomycin. Nocodazole, benomyl, colcemic, 6-mercaptopurine, and halothane were all negative at the concentrations tested. For the induction of diploid spermatids positive results were only obtained for MMS and parafluorophenylalanine. In view of the results obtained, the Microtus system is considered a very useful tool for analyzing factors contributing to the high frequency of aneuploidy and triploidy among abortuses and of aneuploidy in liveborn infants of men. A method is described for the detection of sex-chromosome nondisjunction and diploid spermatids in male germ cells of the field vole Microtus oeconomus. The method is based on the unique distribution pattern of heterochromatin in Microtus cells, which makes it possible to identify X and Y chromosomes in early spermatids with a simple C-banding procedure. Slide preparation is easy. Scoring of early spermatids for extra sex-chromosomes is simple and 2000-4000 cells per hour can be examined. With the Microtus system it has now been demonstrated that radiation of spermatocyte stages with doses of 50, 100 and 200 R results in a higher frequency of sex chromosome nondisjunction and of diploid gametes. Both types of aberrant gametes can be produced during the first and second meiotic division. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:387396

  11. Replication of parainfluenza (Sendai) virus in isolated rat pulmonary type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Castleman, W. L.; Northrop, P. J.; McAllister, P. K.

    1989-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were to determine whether alveolar type II epithelial cells isolated from rat lung and maintained in tissue culture would support productive replication of parainfluenza type 1 (Sendai) virus and to determine whether isolated type II cells from neonatal (5-day-old) rats that are more susceptible to viral-induced alveolar dysplasia supported viral replication to a greater extent than those from weanling (25-day-old) rats. Isolated and cultured type II cells from neonatal and weanling rats that were inoculated with Sendai virus supported productive replication as indicated by ultrastructural identification of budding virions and viral nucleocapsids in type II cells and by demonstration of rising titers of infectious virus from inoculated type II cell cultures. Alveolar macrophages from neonatal and weanling rats also supported viral replication, although infectious viral titers in macrophage cultures were lower than those from type II cell cultures. Only minor differences were detected between viral titers from neonatal and weanling type II epithelial cell cultures. Higher densities of viral nucleocapsids were observed in neonatal type II cells than in those from weanling rats. The results indicate that isolated type II alveolar epithelial cells support productive replication of parainfluenza virus and that type II cells are probably more efficient in supporting productive viral replication than are alveolar macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2541612

  12. Activation-dependent expression of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Föll, J L; Dannecker, L; Zehrer, C; Hettmer, S; Berger, J; Elmlinger, M; Niethammer, D; Ranke, M B; Dannecker, G E

    1998-01-01

    The expression of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) was assayed in mononuclear cells originating from different organs of the immune system. All mononuclear cells studied did express IGFBP-2, but the expression level was found to be dependent on the cell type and origin of the cell. T cells showed a higher expression of IGFBP-2 mRNA than did B cells, and CD34+ stem cells expressed IGFBP-2 mRNA at a high level. Expression was highest in bone marrow and thymus. Stimulation of peripheral mononuclear cells resulted in a marked increase of IGFBP-2 mRNA and also intracellular IGFBP-2, as analysed by fluorescence staining. This increase parallels the increase of other known T-cell activation markers. Furthermore, the increase of intracellular IGFBP-2 seems to precede T-cell blast formation and all T cells in active phases of the cell cycle have high levels of IGFBP-2. Our results provide a basis for further investigations on the contribution of the IGF-system to the regulation of T-cell proliferation and differentiation. IGFBP-2, in particular, may have an important influence in the regulation of T-cell activation and proliferation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:9741338

  13. Nodules Initiated by Rhizobium meliloti Exopolysaccharide Mutants Lack a Discrete, Persistent Nodule Meristem 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng; Signer, Ethan R.; Hirsch, Ann M.

    1992-01-01

    Infection of alfalfa with Rhizobium meliloti exo mutants deficient in exopolysaccharide results in abnormal root nodules that are devoid of bacteria and fail to fix nitrogen. Here we report further characterization of these abnormal nodules. Tightly curled root hairs or shepherd's crooks were found after inoculation with Rm 1021-derived exo mutants, but curling was delayed compared with wild-type Rm 1021. Infection threads were initiated in curled root hairs by mutants as well as by wild-type R. meliloti, but the exo mutant-induced threads aborted within the peripheral cells of the developing nodule. Also, nodules elicited by Rm 1021-derived exo mutants were more likely to develop on secondary roots than on the primary root. In contrast with wild-type R. meliloti-induced nodules, the exo mutant-induced nodules lacked a well defined apical meristem, presumably due to the abortion of the infection threads. The relationship of these findings to the physiology of nodule development is discussed. ImagesFigure 3Figure 1Figure 2Figure 4 PMID:16668605

  14. Hyperglycemic glucose concentrations up-regulate the expression of type VI collagen in vitro. Relevance to alterations of peripheral nerves in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Muona, P.; Jaakkola, S.; Zhang, R. Z.; Pan, T. C.; Pelliniemi, L.; Risteli, L.; Chu, M. L.; Uitto, J.; Peltonen, J.

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopy of peripheral nerves obtained from two diabetic patients revealed large deposits of microfibrils and the presence of Luse bodies in the vicinity of perineurial cells. Microfibrils were found to accumulate also in the sciatic nerves of diabetic BB rats; these microfibrillar deposits were shown to contain type VI collagen by immunoelectron microscopy. Connective tissue cells cultured from rat sciatic nerves were exposed to high glucose concentrations. High glucose concentrations up-regulated the mRNA steady-state levels of alpha 1(VI), alpha 2(VI), and alpha 3(VI) chains of type VI collagen and caused accumulation of type VI collagen-containing fibrils in the cultures. Immunostaining and in situ hybridizations demonstrated that perineurial cells, Schwann cells, and fibroblasts expressed type VI collagen at the mRNA and protein levels. The results suggest that the turnover and supramolecular assembly of type VI collagen are perturbed in diabetic nerves and that glucose per se increases the expression of type VI collagen in vitro. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8494053

  15. Expression of collagenase-3 (matrix metalloproteinase-13) in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, N.; Airola, K.; Grénman, R.; Kariniemi, A. L.; Saarialho-Kere, U.; Kähäri, V. M.

    1997-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the head and neck are malignant tumors with high capacity to invade and metastasize. We have examined expression of the new collagenase, collagenase-3 (MMP-13), in SCCs of the head and neck. MMP-13 mRNAs were detected in 22 of 29 SCC cell lines: in 14 of 15 primary SCC cell lines and in 8 of 14 SCC cell lines from recurrent tumors or metastases. MMP-13 mRNAs were expressed by all 6 cell lines from highly invasive primary tumors and in all 4 cell lines from small aggressive tumors. Using in situ hybridization, MMP-13 mRNAs were detected in 15 of 17 SCC tumor samples. In most tumors, MMP-13 was expressed by tumor cells at the invading front of the tumors, but in a subset of SCCs, MMP-13 mRNA was also expressed by stromal fibroblasts. No MMP-13 expression was detected in intact skin or oral mucosa. MMP-13 mRNA levels in SCC cells were enhanced by transforming growth factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor-alpha, and keratinocyte growth factor. Specific expression of MMP-13 by SCC cells in vitro and in vivo strongly suggests a role for MMP-13 in the high invasion capacity of SCC cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9250162

  16. Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia: novel mutations in the beta4 integrin gene (ITGB4).

    PubMed Central

    Pulkkinen, L.; Kim, D. U.; Uitto, J.

    1998-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia (EB-PA; OMIM 226730) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive blistering disorder, including lethal and nonlethal variants. Recently, expression of alpha6beta4 integrin, a transmembrane protein of the epithelial basement membranes, has been shown to be altered in these patients. In this work, we have explored the molecular pathology of the lethal form of EB-PA, and we describe novel ITGB4 mutations in five alleles of three patients. The mutation detection strategy included polymerase chain reaction amplification of each exon of ITGB4, followed by heteroduplex analysis and direct nucleotide sequencing. The novel mutations included a homozygous 2-bp deletion in exon 34 (4501delTC), compound heterozygosity for a 2-bp deletion within the paternal allele (120delTG) within exon 3 and a cysteine substitution in the maternal allele (C245G) within exon 7, and the paternal nonsense mutation within exon 4 (Q73X). Thus, three of four distinct mutations predicted truncated polypeptide chains, whereas the missense mutation in the extracellular domain of beta4 integrin may affect ligand binding or dimerization of alpha6 and beta4 integrin subunits. These mutations emphasize the critical importance of the alpha6beta4 integrin in providing stability to the association of epidermis to the underlying dermis at the cutaneous basement membrane zone. Images Figure 1 Figure2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9422533

  17. The mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH): a military and surgical legacy.

    PubMed Central

    King, Booker; Jatoi, Ismalil

    2005-01-01

    Operation Iraqi Freedom was perhaps the last military campaign that will ever utilize the services of a mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH). The Army has now essentially replaced the MASH with combat surgical hospitals (CSH) and forward surgical teams (FST). MASH units were designed as mobile, flexible, forward-deployed military hospitals, providing care for the wounded near the frontlines of the battlefield. These hospitals not only saved thousands of lives during war but also greatly influenced the delivery of trauma and critical care in civilian hospitals. The MASH was made popular by the television series of the 1970s, depicting the 4077th during the Korean War. Although a comical series, these television episodes provided viewers with a glimpse of life in a MASH during time of war. This article chronicles the history of the MASH from its inception during World War II to recent experiences in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 p656-a PMID:15926641

  18. Variations in polyoma virus genotype in relation to tumor induction in mice. Characterization of wild type strains with widely differing tumor profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, C. J.; Freund, R.; Mandel, G.; Ballmer-Hofer, K.; Talmage, D. A.; Benjamin, T. L.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have explored the effects of variations in mouse polyoma virus genotype on patterns of tumor formation in the mouse. Four "wild type" virus strains were surveyed. Two were highly oncogenic, inducing multiple tumors of epithelial and mesenchymal origin, at high frequency and with short latency. The other two strains were weakly oncogenic, inducing fewer tumors, solely of mesenchymal origin, and after a long latency. These sharply contrasting tumor profiles were reproduced with virus stocks derived from molecularly cloned viral genomes. Though vastly different in their oncogenic properties, these cloned viruses proved equally effective in transforming established rat fibroblasts in culture and showed the same patterns of tumor antigen expression in cultured mouse cells. Complexes of polyoma middle T antigen and pp60c-src were demonstrated in extracts of epithelial tumors induced by a highly oncogenic virus strain. It is concluded that polyoma viral genetic determinants for tumor induction in the mouse are more complex than those previously defined by the use of cell transformation systems. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 PMID:2437801

  19. Rous-Whipple Award Lecture. Contributions to the physiology and pathology of the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Gonatas, N. K.

    1994-01-01

    The importance of the Golgi apparatus in the transport, processing, and targeting of proteins destined for secretion, plasma membranes, and lysosomes has emerged from numerous studies. In this paper we review studies from our laboratory dealing with 1) the Golgi apparatus during mitosis and the role of microtubules in maintaining the structure of the organelle, 2) the endocytosis of antibodies, exogenous lectins, and toxins into the Golgi apparatus of several cells including neurons in vivo and in vitro, 3) the traffic of MG-160, a membrane sialoglycoprotein of the medial cisternae of the Golgi apparatus, from the trans-Golgi network to the Golgi cisternae, and 4) the involvement of the Golgi apparatus of motor neurons in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We conclude with a summary of ongoing work on the primary structure of MG-160 and introduce evidence suggesting that this intrinsic membrane protein of the Golgi apparatus may be involved in the regulation of endogenous, autocrine, basic fibroblast growth factor. We hope that this review will stimulate studies on the Golgi apparatus of neurons, which may lead to the discovery of neuron-specific properties of this important organelle and its involvement in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 PMID:7943166

  20. A pathogenetic study of the early connective tissue lesions of viral caprine arthritis-encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, D. S.; Crawford, T. B.; Klevjer-Anderson, P.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were designed to correlate morphologic lesions with the presence of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV). Twenty-one cesarean-derived goat kids were infected with 10(6) to 10(7) TCID50 of virus, killed sequentially, and examined for viral antigens by immunofluorescence, viral infectivity by isolation and titration, and morphologic changes by light microscopy. Fluorescent viral antigens were detected from 1 to 10 days postinoculation (DPI) and only in synovial cells. Virus was reisolated from several joints and from brain 0.5 to 79 DPI. Increases in synovial fluid cell counts were noted by 1 DPI, and morphologic changes in synovial membranes were present from 3 to 45 DPI. Joint lesions progressed from mild synovial cell hyperplasia and perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration to severe synovial cell hyperplasia and mononuclear cell infiltration with villous hypertrophy. Lesions elsewhere were mild, consisting only of perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates. Eleven cesarean-derived control goats were negative for viral antigens, virus, and morphologic lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6990770

  1. Molecular polarity in tropomyosin-troponin T co-crystals.

    PubMed Central

    Cabral-Lilly, D; Tobacman, L S; Mehegan, J P; Cohen, C

    1997-01-01

    New features of the structure and interactions of troponin T and tropomyosin have been revealed by electron microscopy of so-called double-diamond co-crystals. These co-crystals were formed using rabbit alpha2 tropomyosin complexed with troponin T from either skeletal or cardiac muscle, which have different lengths in the amino-terminal region, as well as a bacterially expressed skeletal muscle troponin T fragment of 190 residues that lacks the amino-terminal region. Differences in the images of the co-crystals have allowed us to establish the polarities of both the troponin T subunit and tropomyosin in the projected lattice. Moreover, in agreement with their sequences, the amino-terminal region of a bovine cardiac muscle troponin T isoform appears to be longer than that from the rabbit skeletal muscle troponin T isoform and to span more of the amino terminus of tropomyosin at the head-to-tail filament joints. Images of crystals tilted relative to the electron beam also reveal the supercoiling of the tropomyosin filaments in this lattice. Based on these results, a three-dimensional model of the double-diamond lattice has been constructed. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9336171

  2. The effect of therapeutic drugs used in inflammatory bowel disease on the incidence and growth of colonic cancer in the dimethylhydrazine rat model.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A. E.; Patterson, F.; Crouch, R.

    1992-01-01

    An increased incidence of colonic cancer is associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Sulphasalazine, metronidazole and more recently, modified forms of 5-aminosalicylic acid are used for maintenance therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. In a series of experiments, we used the 1,2-dimethylhydrazine animal model of colonic cancer in conjunction with these drugs, to study the effect on the development of colon cancer. Inbred male Wistar rats were divided into groups receiving orally: metronidazole 18 mg Kg-1 dy-1; sulphasalazine 60 mg Kg-1 dy-1; 5-aminosalicylic acid 30 and 60 mg Kg-1 dy-1 and olsalazine 60 mg Kg-1 dy-1 administered daily. Half of each group also received weekly injections of DMH 40 mg Kg-1. Metronidazole, sulphasalazine and 30 mg Kg-1 dy-1 5-aminosalicylic acid were co-carcinogenic, increasing either the number of cancers or tumour size. In contrast 60 mg Kg-1 dy-1 5-aminosalicylic acid inhibited tumour size and olsalazine had no effect. These results may have a bearing on long term maintenance therapy in inflammatory bowel disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1358165

  3. A pharmacokinetic model of inhaled methanol in humans and comparison to methanol disposition in mice and rats.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, R A; Ward, K W; Pollack, G M

    1995-01-01

    We estimated kinetic parameters associated with methanol disposition in humans from data reported in the literature. Michaelis-Menten elimination parameters (Vmax = 115 mg/L/hr; Km = 460 mg/L) were selected for input into a semi-physiologic pharmacokinetic model. We used reported literature values for blood or urine methanol concentrations in humans and nonhuman primates after methanol inhalation as input to an inhalation disposition model that evaluated the absorption of methanol, expressed as the fraction of inhaled methanol concentration that was absorbed (phi). Values of phi for nonexercising subjects typically varied between 0.64 and 0.75; 0.80 was observed to be a reasonable upper boundary for fractional absorption. Absorption efficiency in exercising subjects was lower than that in resting individuals. Incorporation of the kinetic parameters and phi into a pharmacokinetic model of human exposure to methanol, compared to a similar analysis in rodents, indicated that following an 8-hr exposure to 5000 ppm of methanol vapor, blood methanol concentrations in the mouse would be 13- to 18-fold higher than in humans exposed to the same methanol vapor concentration; blood methanol concentrations in the rat under similar conditions would be 5-fold higher than in humans. These results demonstrate the importance in the risk assessment for methanol of basing extrapolations from rodents to humans on actual blood concentrations rather than on methanol vapor exposure concentrations. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C PMID:7588485

  4. Structure and activation dynamics of RBL-2H3 cells observed with scanning force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, D; Spudich, A

    1994-01-01

    Surface and subsurface dynamics of Rat Basophilic Leukemia cells, a model system of stimulated secretion, were imaged using Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) at a rate of 50-60 s/image. Cytoskeletal elements and organelles were tracked within quiescent cells and those activated after IgE receptor crosslinking. In addition, surface waves were observed moving within the plasma membrane. The structures seen in quiescent and activated cells can be correlated with those seen in electron micrographs and topographic SFM images of fixed detergent-extracted cells. Furthermore, images of the detergent-extracted nuclei reveal the presence of numerous nuclear pore complexes. High-magnification images of the nuclear pore complexes show evidence of subunit structure and exhibit dimensions consistent with those reported previously using electron microscopy. The behavior and overall change in morphology of cells observed during activation was consistent with that observed under similar conditions with Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. This study demonstrates that SFM, unlike other techniques, can be used to provide high-resolution information in both fixed and living cells. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:8061220

  5. Widespread histologic distribution of the alpha 2 beta 1 integrin cell-surface collagen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Zutter, M. M.; Santoro, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    The alpha 2 beta 1 integrin (platelet membrane glycoprotein Ia-IIa, VLA-2, ECMR-II) functions as a cell surface receptor for collagen. The authors have determined the histologic distribution of the alpha 2 beta 1 receptor in normal tissues by immunohistochemical technique. The studies revealed that the alpha 2 beta 1 receptor was expressed on fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and epithelial cells from multiple sites including skin, tonsil, breast, sweat gland, gastrointestinal tract, lung, bladder, cervix, and prostate. Follicular dendritic cells of the lymph node, tonsil, and spleen and dendritic cells of the thymus also expressed the alpha 2 beta 1 receptor. The receptor also was present on Schwann cells of ganglia and on neuroglia. Greatly enhanced expression of the receptor in regions of proliferating epithelium suggests that enhanced expression of alpha 2 beta 1 is associated with orderly, regulated cell proliferation. The circumferential staining pattern of the alpha 2 beta 1 integrin within many epithelia is virtually identical to that observed for other adhesive receptors, such as the cadherins, which have been implicated in cell-cell adhesion. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:2164774

  6. The Purification, Properties, and Localization of an Abundant Legume Seed Lectin Cross-Reactive Material from Spartium junceum 1

    PubMed Central

    Hankins, Charles N.; Herman, Eliot M.; Kindinger, Juanita; Shannon, Leland M.

    1991-01-01

    The seeds of Spartium junceum contained a large quantity of lectin-like protein that did not appear to be either a hemagglutinin or active lectin. The cross-reactive material (CRM), like most legume seed lectins, was a tetrameric glycoprotein of about 130,000 Mr. The singlesized subunits of about 33,000 Mr were not covalently associated. The amino acid composition was typical of legume lectins and was rich in hydroxy-amino acids and poor in sulfur-containing amino acids. The Spartium CRM contained about 3.5% covalently associated carbohydrate, most likely of the high-mannose type, since the CRM was precipitated by concanavalin A. The CRM was localized by electron-microscopic immunocytochemistry and found to be exclusively in protein-filled vacuoles (protein bodies). Because this protein was so similar immunologically, structurally, and in its physiology, to classic legume seed lectins, it is most likely a lectin homolog. Similar seed lectin CRMs appear to be both common and widespread in the Leguminosae. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:16668191

  7. Characterization and Comparison of Arcelin Seed Protein Variants from Common Bean 1

    PubMed Central

    Hartweck, Lynn M.; Vogelzang, Robert D.; Osborn, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    Four variants of arcelin, an insecticidal seed storage protein of bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., were investigated. Each variant (arcelin-1, -2, -3, and -4) was purified, and solubilities and Mrs were determined. For arcelins-1, -2, and -4, the isoelectric points, hemagglutinating activities, immunological cross-reactivities, and N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined. On the basis of native and denatured Mrs, the variants were classified as being composed of dimer protein (arcelin-2), tetramer protein (arcelins-3 and -4), or both dimer and tetramer proteins (arcelin-1). Although the dimer proteins (arcelins-1d and -2) could be distinguished by Mrs and isoelectric points, they were identical for their first 37 N-terminal amino acids and had similar immunological cross-reactions, and bean lines containing these variants had a DNA restriction fragment in common. The tetramer proteins arcelin-1t and arcelin-4 also could be distinguished from each other based on Mrs and isoelectric points; however, they had similar immunological cross-reactions and they were 77 to 93% identical for N-terminal amino acid composition. The similarities among arcelin variants, phytohemagglutinin, and a bean α-amylase inhibitor suggest that they are all encoded by related members of a lectin gene family. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 6 PMID:16668372

  8. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for 2,4-toluenediamine leached from polyurethane foam-covered breast implants.

    PubMed Central

    Luu, H M; Hutter, J C; Bushar, H F

    1998-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to assess the low-dose exposure of patients to the carcinogen 2, 4-toluenediamine (2,4-TDA) released from the degradation of the polyester urethane foam (PU) used in Meme silicone breast implants. The tissues are represented as five compartments: liver, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, slowly perfused tissues (e.g., fat), and richly perfused tissues (e.g., muscle). The PBPK model was fitted to the plasma and urine concentrations of 2,4-TDA and its metabolite 4-AAT (4-N-acetyl-2-amino toluene) in rats given low doses of 2, 4-TDA intravenously and subcutaneously. The rat model was extrapolated to simulate oral and implant routes in rats. After adjusting for human physiological parameters, the model was then used to predict the bioavailability of 2,4-TDA released from a typical 4.87-g polyester urethane foam implant found in a patient who weighed 58 kg with the Meme and had the breast implant for 10 years. A quantitative risk assessment for 2,4-TDA was performed and the polyester urethane foam did present an unreasonable risk to health for the patient. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9637796

  9. Carcinoma of type II pneumocytes: immunodiagnosis of a subtype of "bronchioloalveolar carcinomas".

    PubMed Central

    Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.; Torikata, C.

    1981-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues from North American (N = 12) and Japanese (N = 11) patients with lung carcinomas were stained by the immunoperoxidase method for surfactant-specific apoprotein. Cytoplasmic and focal nuclear staining was seen in three "bronchioloalveolar carcinomas" occurring in Japanese patients. We refer to these three tumors as carcinomas of Type II pneumocytes. These neoplasms formed discrete masses with minimal growth along the alveolar septa at margins of the tumors. Papillary growth with lymphocytic infiltrates in the stalks of the papillary processes was the usual growth pattern. Focal noncaseating granulomas were seen in the stroma of 2 cases, and similar granulomas in the draining lymph nodes were noted in 1. The abundant cytoplasm was foamy, and the nuclei were generally vacuolated with frequent eosinophilic inclusions in the vacuoles. By electron microscopy, osmiophilic lamellar bodies or whorled lamellas were seen in the cytoplasm of the 3 tumors staining for surfactant apoprotein. The nuclei in 2 of the 3 cases contained tubular inclusions; the tubules had a diameter of 60 nm and a 20-nm core. Images Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 and 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6258440

  10. National Museum of Dentistry exhibition: the future is now! African Americans in dentistry.

    PubMed Central

    Dummett, Clifton O.

    2003-01-01

    Inspired by recently published NDA II: The Story of America's Second National Dental Association and sponsored jointly by the National Dental Association Foundation and the Colgate-Palmolive Company, an historical exhibit on dentistry in the African-American community was one of the celebrations for the Golden Anniversary of the American Academy of the History of Dentistry. This exhibit premiered on Sept. 27, 2002 in the National Museum of Dentistry located on the medical/dental campus of the University of Maryland in Baltimore. The Museum recently became an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution. Contents of the exhibit were photographs, charts, artifacts, memorabilia, etc. These materials presented an overview of African-American activities in dental education, research, patient care, general practice, dental specialities, military service, and public health. Also included were inter-racial relationships, socioeconomic developments, and participation in civil rights endeavors that played a major role in changing out-dated accepted customs. The exhibit's purpose was to celebrate dentistry's ministrations as a health professional among African Americans in particular and the nation at large over the past two centuries. Respect for and progress of black dentists paralleled that of black physicians who were instrumental in including dentist and pharmacists as equal members in the National Medical Association since the latter's inception in 1895. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:14527058

  11. bcl-2 rearrangement in Hodgkin's disease. Results of polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and sequencing on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, A. H.; Cunningham, R. E.; Frizzera, G.; O'Leary, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    We examined 81 cases of Hodgkin's disease for evidence of the t(14;18) translocation, using the polymerase chain reaction assay on lysates of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Seven of 74 amplifiable cases (9%) were positive for the translocation, which involves the bcl-2 oncogene and the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene. Two of these cases were sequenced and the breakpoints had the same pattern found in follicular lymphoma. The nuclei from one of the cases were sorted into large and small subpopulations. The t(14;18) signal was more intense in the large nucleus subpopulation, which contained a greater proportion of Reed-Sternberg-like nuclei. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that Reed-Sternberg cells carry the translocation, but they do not exclude the possibility that the translocation is found in cells representing the reactive component of Hodgkin's disease. The results also demonstrate that routinely processed material is suitable for polymerase chain reaction-based analysis of translocations, although the sensitivity is reduced 10- to 100-fold, compared with fresh tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8434638

  12. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha up-regulates decay-accelerating factor gene expression in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, A; Fujiyama, Y; Sumiyoshi, K; Sakumoto, H; Okabe, H; Bamba, T

    1997-01-01

    The increased expression of decay-accelerating factor (DAF) has been detected in intestinal epithelial cells at the inflamed mucosa. In this study, we examined the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on DAF expression in three intestinal epithelial cell lines. DAF mRNA expression was evaluated by Northern blot analysis, and DAF protein expression was analysed by biotin labelling and immunoprecipitation. TNF-alpha induced a marked increase in DAF mRNA and protein expression in HT-29, T84 and Caco-2 cells. In HT-29 cells, the effects of TNF-a on DAF mRNA accumulation were observed in a dose-dependent manner; DAF mRNA accumulation reached a maximum at 3-6 hr, and then gradually decreased. These effects of TNF-alpha required de novo protein synthesis. Messenger RNA stability studies suggested that TNF-alpha partially regulated DAF gene expression by a posttranscriptional mechanism. Moreover, the combination of TNF-alpha and interleukin (IL)-4 induced an additive increase in DAF mRNA accumulation in HT-29 and T84 cells. In human intestinal epithelial cells, TNF-alpha acts as a potent inducer of DAF mRNA expression, indicating an important role for TNF-alpha in the regulation of DAF expression at the inflamed mucosa. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9155641

  13. Malignant neoplasms of decidual origin (deciduosarcomas) induced by estrogen-progestin-releasing intravaginal devices in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Zook, B. C.; Spiro, I.; Hertz, R.

    1987-01-01

    A combination of estrogen and levonorgestrel was continuously delivered to 23 adult rabbits for up to 2 years via a Silastic ring device sutured into the vagina. Twenty-one control rabbits were given similar rings devoid of drugs. A marked decidual reaction of the endometrium occurred in 16 of 23 test rabbits. In 14 test rabbits (61%) malignant tumors developed of decidual type cells not heretofore described. The deciduosarcomas were composed of anaplastic cells that invaded the uterine walls, uterine lymphatics, and in 4 of 13 (31%) rabbits that survived 2 years of treatment, the tumors metastasized to the lungs. Several deciduosarcomas appeared to arise within the spleen or other abdominal organs. Other drug-related lesions included uterine or vaginal polyps, endometrial atrophy, and focal necrosis and mineralization of the uterine wall. Cells from several deciduosarcomas failed to produce tumors in nude mice or to colonize on soft agar. No decidualization or decidual neoplasms were seen in the controls. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3039851

  14. Self-assembly of collagen fibers. Influence of fibrillar alignment and decorin on mechanical properties.

    PubMed Central

    Pins, G D; Christiansen, D L; Patel, R; Silver, F H

    1997-01-01

    Collagen is the primary structural element in extracellular matrices. In the form of fibers it acts to transmit forces, dissipate energy, and prevent premature mechanical failure in normal tissues. Deformation of collagen fibers involves molecular stretching and slippage, fibrillar slippage, and, ultimately, defibrillation. Our laboratory has developed a process for self-assembly of macroscopic collagen fibers that have structures and mechanical properties similar to rat tail tendon fibers. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of subfibrillar orientation and decorin incorporation on the mechanical properties of collagen fibers. Self-assembled collagen fibers were stretched 0-50% before cross-linking and then characterized by microscopy and mechanical testing. Results of these studies indicate that fibrillar orientation, packing, and ultimate tensile strength can be increased by stretching. In addition, it is shown that decorin incorporation increases ultimate tensile strength of uncross-linked fibers. Based on the observed results it is hypothesized that decorin facilitates fibrillar slippage during deformation and thereby improves the tensile properties of collagen fibers. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:9336212

  15. Association between air pollution and intrauterine mortality in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, L A; Loomis, D; Conceição, G M; Braga, A L; Arcas, R M; Kishi, H S; Singer, J M; Böhm, G M; Saldiva, P H

    1998-01-01

    The associations among daily counts of intrauterine mortality and pollutant concentrations (NO2, SO2, CO, O3, and particulate matter (3/4)10 microm) were investigated for the period ranging from January 1991 to December 1992 in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. We used Poisson regression techniques, adjusted for season and weather. The association between intrauterine mortality and air pollution was strong for NO2 (coefficient = 0.0013/ microg/m3; p<0.01) but lesser for SO2 (coefficient = 0.0005/ microg/m3; p<0.10) and CO (coefficient = 0.0223/ppm; p<0.10). A significant association was observed when an index that combined these three pollutants was considered in the models instead of considering each pollutant individually (p<0.01). These associations exhibited a short time lag, not over 5 days. In addition, some evidence of fetal exposure to air pollution was obtained by disclosing a significant association between the levels of carboxyhemoglobin of blood sampled from the umbilical cord and ambient CO levels in children delivered by nonsmoking pregnant women in the period from May to July 1995. Our results suggest that air pollution in São Paulo may promote adverse health effects on fetuses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9618348

  16. Giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed Central

    Donshik, P C

    1994-01-01

    Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a syndrome found frequently as a complication of contact lenses. Many variables can affect the onset and severity of the presenting signs and symptoms. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses appear to result in less severe signs and symptoms, with a longer time before the development of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Nonionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses tend to produce less severe signs and symptoms than ionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses. Enzymatic treatment appears to lessen the severity of signs and symptoms. The association of an allergy appears to play a role in the onset of the severity of the signs and symptoms but does not appear to affect the final ability of the individual to wear contact lenses. Using multiple treatment options, such as changing the polymer to a glyceryl methyl methacrylate or a rigid lens, or utilizing a soft lens on a frequent-replacement basis, can result in a success rate of over 90%. In individuals who still have a return of symptoms, the use of topical mast cell stabilizers or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug as an adjunctive therapy offers the added possibility of keeping these patients in contact lenses. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 11 C FIGURE 11 D PMID:7886881

  17. Immortalisation of human oesophageal epithelial cells by a recombinant SV40 adenovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Inokuchi, S.; Handa, H.; Imai, T.; Makuuchi, H.; Kidokoro, M.; Tohya, H.; Aizawa, S.; Shimamura, K.; Ueyama, Y.; Mitomi, T.

    1995-01-01

    We introduced the origin-defective SV40 early gene into cultured human oesophageal epithelial cells by infection of a recombinant SV40 adenovirus vector. The virus-infected cells formed colonies 3-4 weeks after infection in medium containing fetal calf serum. When the cells derived from 'serum-resistant' colonies were then maintained in the serum-free medium with a low calcium ion concentration, some of them passed the cell crisis and kept growing for over 12 months. These cells, regarded as immortalised cells, resembled the primarily cultured oesophageal epithelial cells in morphology and had some of their original characteristics. Treatment of the cells with a high calcium concentration induced phenotypic changes. These cells still responded to transforming growth factor beta. When the immortalised cells were injected into severe combined immunodeficient mice, they transiently formed epithelial cysts, although the typical differentiation pattern of the oesophageal epithelium was not observed. These cysts regressed within 2 months without development into tumours. The results indicated that human oesophageal epithelial cells were reproducibly immortalised by infection with a recombinant SV40 adenovirus vector at relatively high efficiency. The immortalised cells should be useful in studies on oesophageal carcinogenesis and in assessing the cooperative effects with other oncogene products or carcinogens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7536023

  18. Interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 gene expression in human monocytes stimulated with Salmonella typhimurium porins.

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, M; Cipollaro de L'ero, G; Donnarumma, G; Marcatili, A; Galdiero, F

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether Salmonella typhimurium porins can affect the expression of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) genes. Human monocytes were treated with porins, and total RNAs were analysed by Northern blotting to evaluate the expression of IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 in both treated and untreated cell cultures. Porins induced a significant increase in IL-1 and IL-6 transcripts. This increase was related to the dose of porins, and it peaked 5 hr after treatment. The same results were obtained when polymyxin B was added to the porin preparation to eliminate eventual traces of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) associated with porins. The porins-mediated increase in interleukin transcripts did not require de novo protein synthesis, and it was because of the enhanced half-life of IL-1 and IL-6 mRNAs, rather an increased rate of gene transcription. These data suggest that porins may affect inflammatory and immunological responses by enhancing the expression of cytokine genes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8567029

  19. Anatomy of the thorax and shoulder girdle displayed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J. D.; Shaver, M. L.; Batra, P.; Brown, K.

    1991-01-01

    In 1971, radiographic anatomy of the human body was added to the gross anatomy course at UCLA. Radiographic contrast studies and plain anatomical displays were formulated into teaching packages for all organ systems. Residents presented each package to first-year medical students in the dissection laboratory to augment the teaching of anatomy. In November 1984, magnetic resonance imaging was instituted in the radiology department. Imaging the chest produced coronal and axial planes which displayed the muscles and soft tissues of the thorax. In 1986, the authors presented their study of MR anatomy of the chest and shoulder girdle to the American Association of Anatomists. The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate the anatomy of the thorax and shoulder girdle as displayed by magnetic resonance, correlated with regional anatomy, with emphasis on soft tissue structures. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:1994062

  20. Transient functional expression of alphaVbeta 3 on vascular cells during wound repair.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R. A.; Tonnesen, M. G.; Gailit, J.; Cheresh, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    During early granulation tissue formation of wound repair, new capillaries invade the fibrin clot, a process that undoubtedly requires an interaction of vascular cells with the wound provisional matrix composed mainly of fibrin, fibronectin, and vitronectin. Integrin alphaVbeta3 is the vascular cell receptor for these wound-associated adhesive proteins. Therefore, we investigated the expression of this receptor on new capillaries of healing full-thickness cutaneous porcine wounds. During granulation tissue formation, alphaVbeta3 was expressed specifically on capillary sprouts invading the central fibrin clot whereas the closely related integrin alphaVbeta5 failed to localize to these cells. Cyclic peptides or antibody antagonists of alphaVbeta3 specifically inhibited granulation tissue formation in a transient manner during the period of invasive angiogenesis. Immunolocalization studies revealed that alphaVbeta3 became aggregated and lost from sprouting vessels after treatment with a peptide antagonist. In contrast, beta 1 integrins were not modulated by this treatment. Once granulation tissue filled the wound and invasive angiogenesis terminated, the alphaVbeta3 showed little or no expression in the granulation tissue microvasculature. These data demonstrate that integrin alphaVbeta3 plays a fundamental, but transient, role during invasive angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation in a healing wound. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:8623913

  1. The isolated ciliary bilayer is useful for studies of aqueous humor formation.

    PubMed Central

    Sears, M L; Yamada, E; Cummins, D; Mori, N; Mead, A; Murakami, M

    1991-01-01

    An intact ciliary epithelial bilayer has been isolated from the rabbit eye by perfusion, microsurgical dissection, and recovery techniques. Vital subcellular organelles and intercellular junctions of this epithelial bilayer preparation are very well preserved. The total electrical resistance of the epithelial bilayer is 350 ohms, and the transepithelial potential is 650 microV, nonpigmented epithelium side negative. The electrical resistance is reduced by 0.2 mM EGTA and the transepithelial potential reduced by 0.1 mM ouabain. Bicarbonate depletion at a constant pH of 7.4 rapidly and significantly reduces the transepithelial potential. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors decrease transmembrane potential by as much as 30%. These morphologic and physiologic experiments authenticate the validity of this bilayered epithelial preparation for future use in detailed studies of the mechanism of aqueous humor formation. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 PMID:1808804

  2. Pathology of the thymus after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in man. A histologic immunohistochemical study of 36 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Hermelink, H. K.; Sale, G. E.; Borisch, B.; Storb, R.

    1987-01-01

    A major hypothesis to explain the immunodeficiency associated with bone marrow transplantation states that thymic epithelial damage due to graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) abrogates or delays the recovery of normal immunologic function. This study evaluated the thymus glands of 36 human bone marrow transplant recipients dying between 4 and 1742 days after transplant using histology, histochemistry, and immunohistology. The observations lead to a model of thymic damage by irradiation, chemotherapy, and GVHD in which early injury by all three of these agents results in profound thymic atrophy followed by long-delayed restitution. Patients undergoing total body irradiation showed more severe damage to thymic cortical and medullary epithelium than did patients undergoing chemotherapy alone as preparation for transplantation. Patients with GVHD showed additional damage in the form of individual thymic epithelial cell death and showed HLA-DR surface protein expression on thymic epithelium during GVHD. Longer-term survivors showed a profoundly delayed restitution of normal thymic epithelium and delayed evidence of restored lymphopoiesis. A few patients dying late after transplant showed evidence of reconstitution of normal thymic structure or nodules of lymphopoiesis in focal areas of epithelial-cell reconstitution. Evidence of such lymphopoiesis was seen at times ranging between 90 and 1742 days after grafting. The data are consistent with a model of long-standing thymic damage caused by GVHD which is reversible after the development of tolerance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3314529

  3. Epstein-Barr virus in a CD8-positive T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Richel, D. J.; Lepoutre, J. M.; Kapsenberg, J. G.; Ooms, E. C.; Boom, W. R.; Boucher, C. A.; Kluin, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    In contrast to its role in B-lymphomagenesis, Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) only incidentally has been associated with T-cell lymphomas. In the present report we describe a fourth patient with EBV-related T-cell lymphoma. The patient presented with an angio-immunoblastic lymphadenopathy (AILD)-like T-cell lymphoma. Serology was compatible with chronic Epstein-Barr (EBV) infection. After a 1-year period of waxing and waning lymphadenopathy, this lymphoma evolved to an aggressive CD8+ Immunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. A relationship with the chronic EBV infection was indicated by the finding of EBV genome in the tumor tissue by Southern blot analysis. Moreover, EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA) was detected in situ within individually defined CD8+ tumor cells by two-color immunofluorescence. Two alternative possibilities, namely that EBV primarily played a role in lymphomagenesis of the AILD-like T-cell lymphoma or that the virus was an additional oncogenic event in the final process of tumor progression to the immunoblastic lymphoma, are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:2161617

  4. Western thymomas lack Epstein-Barr virus by Southern blotting analysis and by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Inghirami, G.; Chilosi, M.; Knowles, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors investigated 16 western thymomas, 9 from the United States and 7 from Europe, for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA sequences by both Southern blot hybridization analysis and polymerase chain reaction using EBV-specific DNA probes that detect the long internal repeat and terminal repeat regions and the EBNA-1 gene. None of the 16 thymomas contained evidence of the EBV genome, even though we could detect EBV by Southern blotting when EBV DNA represents less than or equal to 1% of the total DNA and by polymerase chain reaction when a single EBV-positive cell is present among 10(5) EBV-negative cells. These results fail to demonstrate EBV genome in western thymomas and stand in contrast to those of McGuire et al (Am J Pathol 1988, 131:385) who previously reported that the EBV genome is present in thymomas occurring in southern Chinese patients. Therefore EBV does not appear to be implicated in the pathogenesis of all thymomas. The presence of EBV in eastern thymomas, regions where EBV is endemic may be due to epidemiologic factors and/or genetic predispositions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2162629

  5. Susceptible periods during embryogenesis of the heart and endocrine glands.

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, T W

    2000-01-01

    One of the original principles of teratology states that, "Susceptibility to teratogenesis varies with the developmental stage at the time of exposure to an adverse influence" [Wilson JG. Environment and Birth Defects. New York:Academic Press, 1973]. The time of greatest sensitivity encompasses the period of organ formation during weeks 3-8 following fertilization in human gestation. At this time, stem cell populations for each organ's morphogenesis are established and inductive events for the initiation of differentiation occur. Structural defects of the heart and endocrine system are no exception to this axiom and have their origins during this time frame. Although the function and maturation of these organs may be affected at later stages, structural defects and loss of cell types usually occur during these early phases of development. Thus, to determine critical windows for studying mechanisms of teratogenesis, it is essential to understand the developmental processes that establish these organs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:10852854

  6. Tenascin-C and human tendon degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, G. P.; Harrall, R. L.; Cawston, T. E.; Hazleman, B. L.; Mackie, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of tenascin in supraspinatus tendons to determine whether an alteration in tenascin expression was associated with human tendon degeneration. Tenascin was present in all of the tendons studied, although with two distinct patterns of expression. First, tenascin was associated with organized, fibrous regions of the tendon matrix that were typical of the normal tendon structure. This distribution is consistent with a role for tenascin in collagen fibril organization, perhaps maintaining the interface between fibrils and adjacent structures. Second, although tenascin was generally absent from poorly organized matrix in degenerate tendons, it was strongly associated with some rounded cells in disorganized fibrocartilaginous regions that were more abundant in pathological specimens. Tenascin was also found around infiltrating blood vessels, with more intense staining associated with a mononuclear cell infiltrate. Western blotting of tendon extracts showed differences in tenascin isoform expression, with only the small (200-kd) tenascin isoform found in normal tendons. Degenerate tendons also expressed the 300-kd isoform, consistent with a role for the larger tenascin isoform in tendon disease, potentially stimulating tenocyte proliferation, cell rounding, and fibrocartilaginous change. Proteolytic fragments of tenascin were detected but only in ruptured tendons, an indication of matrix remodeling in degenerate tendons, with fragment sizes consistent with the activity of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8780397

  7. Cryoelectron microscopy of low density lipoprotein in vitreous ice.

    PubMed Central

    Spin, J M; Atkinson, D

    1995-01-01

    In this report, images of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in vitreous ice at approximately 30 A resolution are presented. These images show that LDL is a quasi-spherical particle, approximately 220-240 A in diameter, with a region of low density (lipid) surrounded by a ring (in projection) of high density believed to represent apolipoprotein B-100. This ring is seen to be composed of four or five (depending on view) large regions of high density material that may represent protein superdomains. Analysis of LDL images obtained at slightly higher magnification reveals that areas of somewhat lower density connect these regions, in some cases crossing the projectional interiors of the LDL particles. Preliminary image analysis of LDL covalently labeled at Cys3734 and Cys4190 with 1.4-nm Nanogold clusters demonstrates that this methodology will provide an important site-specific marker in studies designed to map the organization of apoB at the surface of LDL. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 PMID:7612855

  8. Distribution of cytokeratin polypeptides in human transitional cell carcinomas, with special emphasis on changing expression patterns during tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    Schaafsma, H. E.; Ramaekers, F. C.; van Muijen, G. N.; Lane, E. B.; Leigh, I. M.; Robben, H.; Huijsmans, A.; Ooms, E. C.; Ruiter, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    The expression of cytokeratin (CK) polypeptides was studied in 59 transitional cell carcinomas (TCC) of the urinary tract of different grade and stage. Using a panel of 14 polypeptide-specific monoclonal CK-antibodies we identified immunohistochemically 8 different CKs separately, ie, CKs 4, 7, 8, 10, 13, 14, 18, and 19, while in immunoblotting studies CK5 expression was detected indirectly by using the antibody RCK102, recognizing CK5 + 8. In low-grade TCCs (G1-G2), the CK distribution was comparable to that in normal urothelium, however with a variable expression of CK13 in the different tumors and a uniform distribution of CK7. In higher-grade TCCs (G3), a decrease in CK13 expression was observed, particularly in the areas of muscle invasion. Furthermore, the appearance and increasing expression of CK14 (not present in normal urothelium or G1 TCCs) with higher grade and stage was striking. With tumor progression changes in epitope configurations of CK8 and CK18 were detected, as concluded from immunohistochemical assays with the panel of monoclonal antibodies for each of these two CKs. In extreme cases this resulted in differential staining patterns of the invasive and noninvasive components within one tumor. In 7 of 32 G3 TCCs, some of which showed areas with evident squamous differentiation, a decrease in the expression of CK7 and/or CK8 was seen. We conclude that tumor progression in TCCs is associated with discrete changes of CK expression, which can be detected using monoclonal antibodies. Images Figure 1 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1689541

  9. Common Pediatric Urological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Wm. Lane M.; Leung, Alexander K.C.; Boag, Graham S.

    1991-01-01

    The clinical and radiological presentations of 12 pediatric urological disorders are described. The described disorders include pyelonephritis, vesicoureteral reflux, ureteropelvic obstruction, ureterovesical obstruction, ectopic ureterocele, posterior urethral valves, multicystic dysplastic kidney, polycystic kidney disease, ectopic kidney, staghorn calculi, urethral diverticulum, and urethral meatal stenosis. ImagesFigure 1-2Figure 3Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6-7Figure 8-9Figure 10Figure 11-12 PMID:21229068

  10. Yucca Mountain transportation routes: Preliminary characterization and risk analysis; Volume 2, Figures [and] Volume 3, Technical Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Souleyrette, R.R. II; Sathisan, S.K.; di Bartolo, R.

    1991-05-31

    This report presents appendices related to the preliminary assessment and risk analysis for high-level radioactive waste transportation routes to the proposed Yucca Mountain Project repository. Information includes data on population density, traffic volume, ecologically sensitive areas, and accident history.

  11. Empirical modeling of an in vitro activity of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Svendsgaard, D J; Ward, T R; Tilson, H A; Kodavanti, P R

    1997-01-01

    position are more active than other congeners. Also, congeners with log Kow between 5.2 and 6.6 are generally more active. The estimated combination index indicated that the joint action of PCB congeners in the three commercial mixtures was less than dose additive. The error sum of squares was significantly large, which may indicate a lack of fit of the logistic model. Empirical Bayes estimates (EBE) are weighted averages of model predictions and observations of E50s and can be better estimates than the fitted model when there is a lack of fit. The PRESS statistic for the EBE indicated larger prediction error than for the logistic model, but the EBE provided better estimates of commercial mixture E50s based on dose addition. This may indicate that the logistic model is not incorporating all the information in the single congener data needed to predict mixtures. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. PMID:9349838

  12. 16 CFR Figures 2 and 3 to Part 1512 - Handlebar Stem Loading and Entrance 8 Observation Angles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Handlebar Stem Loading and Entrance 8 Observation Angles 2 Figures 2 and 3 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Figs. 2 and 3 Figures...

  13. 16 CFR Figures 2 and 3 to Part 1512 - Handlebar Stem Loading and Entrance 8 Observation Angles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Handlebar Stem Loading and Entrance 8 Observation Angles 2 Figures 2 and 3 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Figs. 2 and 3 Figures...

  14. 16 CFR Figures 2 and 3 to Part 1512 - Handlebar Stem Loading and Entrance 8 Observation Angles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Handlebar Stem Loading and Entrance 8 Observation Angles 2 Figures 2 and 3 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Figs. 2 and 3 Figures...

  15. 16 CFR Figures 2 and 3 to Part 1512 - Handlebar Stem Loading and Entrance 8 Observation Angles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Handlebar Stem Loading and Entrance 8 Observation Angles 2 Figures 2 and 3 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Figs. 2 and 3 Figures...

  16. 16 CFR Figures 2 and 3 to Part 1512 - Handlebar Stem Loading and Entrance 8 Observation Angles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Handlebar Stem Loading and Entrance 8 Observation Angles 2 Figures 2 and 3 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Figs. 2 and 3 Figures...

  17. Contingency diagrams as teaching tools

    PubMed Central

    Mattaini, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Contingency diagrams are particularly effective teaching tools, because they provide a means for students to view the complexities of contingency networks present in natural and laboratory settings while displaying the elementary processes that constitute those networks. This paper sketches recent developments in this visualization technology and illustrates approaches for using contingency diagrams in teaching. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:22478208

  18. Harlequin ichthyosis (ichq): a juvenile lethal mouse mutation with ichthyosiform dermatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, J. P.; Boggess, D.; Hogan, M. E.; Sundberg, B. A.; Rourk, M. H.; Harris, B.; Johnson, K.; Dunstan, R. W.; Davisson, M. T.

    1997-01-01

    Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:9212754

  19. Relationship of Chromosome Changes to Neoplastic Cell Transformation

    PubMed Central

    DiPaolo, Joseph A.; Popescu, Nicolae C.

    1976-01-01

    chromosome number or structure. Our studies indicate that chromosome changes are not essential for establishment of neoplasms but that karyotypic instability may result in response to selective growth pressures. ImagesFigure 2Figure 11Figure 3Figure 12Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 1Figure 10 PMID:826168

  20. Human papillomavirus in vulvar and vaginal carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Hietanen, S.; Grénman, S.; Syrjänen, K.; Lappalainen, K.; Kauppinen, J.; Carey, T.; Syrjänen, S.

    1995-01-01

    A number of reports associate human papillomavirus (HPV) with cervical cancer and cancer cell lines derived from this tumour type. Considerably fewer reports have focused on the role of HPV in carcinomas from other sites of female anogenital squamous epithelia. In this study we have tested for the presence of HPV in eight low-passage vulvar carcinoma cell lines and one extensively passaged cell line, A431. One cell line from a primary vaginal carcinoma was included. The presence of the HPV was evaluated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), by Southern blot analysis and by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. General primer-mediated PCR was applied by using primers from the L1 region, E1 region and HPV 16 E7 region. Southern blot hybridisation was performed under low-stringency conditions (Tm = -35 degrees C) using a whole genomic HPV 6/16/18 probe mixture and under high stringency conditions (Tm = -18 degrees C) with the whole genomic probes of HPV 16 and 33. HPV 16 E6-E7 mRNA was assessed by ribonuclease protection assay (RPA). HPV was found in only one vulvar carcinoma cell line, UM-SCV-6. The identified type, HPV 16, was integrated in the cell genome and could be amplified with all primers used. Also E6-E7 transcripts were found in these cells. Five original tumour biopsies were available from the HPV-negative cell lines for in situ hybridisation. All these were HPV negative with both the HPV 6/16/18 screening probe mixture under low stringency and the HPV 16 probe under high stringency. The results indicate that vulvar carcinoma cell lines contain HPV less frequently than cervical carcinoma cell lines and suggest that a significant proportion of vulvar carcinomas may evolve by an HPV-independent mechanism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7599042

  1. Strain differences in vaginal responses to the xenoestrogen bisphenol A.

    PubMed Central

    Long, X; Steinmetz, R; Ben-Jonathan, N; Caperell-Grant, A; Young, P C; Nephew, K P; Bigsby, R M

    2000-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is the monomer component of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins; human exposure derives from leachate in foodstuffs packaged in certain plastics or from epoxy-based dental appliances. BPA stimulates prolactin secretion in Fischer 344 (F344) rats but not in Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats. The present studies were performed to determine if another classic estrogen target tissue, the rat vagina, responds to BPA in a strain-specific manner. In F344 rats BPA increased DNA synthesis in vaginal epithelium with a median effective dose (ED(50)) of 37.5 mg/kg body weight; DNA synthesis was not stimulated in S-D rats by any dose tested. Clearance of (3)H-BPA from blood followed the same time course in both strains of rats, with a half-life of 90 min. Scatchard analysis of [(3)H]estradiol binding showed no strain differences in concentration or affinity of the vaginal estrogen receptor. BPA increased the level of mRNA for the immediate early gene, c-fos, with similar dose-response curves in both rat strains. Thus, F344 and S-D rats exhibit differences in sensitivity to BPA at the level of cell proliferation in the vaginal epithelium. However, metabolic clearance of BPA and the early events that lead to the proliferative response, receptor-ligand interaction and induction of immediate early genes, show no strain differences. These observations suggest that differences in intermediate effects must account for the difference in sensitivity of the proliferative response to the xenoestrogen. Furthermore, these results point to the need for caution in choosing a suitable end point and animal model when seeking to test the estrogenic effects of xenobiotics. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:10706531

  2. Use of outpatient clinics as a health indicator for communities around a coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed Central

    Goren, A I; Hellmann, S; Glaser, E D

    1995-01-01

    The permit to operate the first coal fired power plant in Israel was issued with the condition that a comprehensive network to monitor its effects on the environment, health, and agriculture must be installed and operated around the plant. The health monitoring system consists of four studies, which started 1 year prior to the operation of the plant and were carried out for 10 years. In the framework of the health monitoring system, a study of requests for health services was carried out. In this survey, 8 clinics of the Sick Fund, served by 16 physicians, were followed up. The clinics were located as near as possible to air pollution monitoring stations and represent expected different levels of pollution. A health recorder summarized each day's visits to each physician and tabulated the total visits for each day and the visits due to respiratory tract complaints. Multivariate stepwise regressions on total as well as on respiratory complaints were carried out. The independent variables in the regressions were sulfur dioxide, meteorological parameters (such as temperature and humidity), and flu epidemics. Temperature was almost always significantly correlated with respiratory complaints, but less correlated with total visits among, adults and children. Sulfur dioxide, most meterological parameters and flu epidemics were not meaningful explanatory factor in the regressions. Ambient air pollution levels did not exceed the Israeli air quality or the more stringent local air quality standards, the monthly and annual average sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides values were very low. Images p1110-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:8747016

  3. Canine GM1-gangliosidosis. A clinical, morphologic, histochemical, and biochemical comparison of two different models.

    PubMed Central

    Alroy, J.; Orgad, U.; DeGasperi, R.; Richard, R.; Warren, C. D.; Knowles, K.; Thalhammer, J. G.; Raghavan, S. S.

    1992-01-01

    The clinical, morphologic, histochemical, and biochemical features of GM1-gangliosidosis in two canine models, English Springer Spaniel (ESS) and Portuguese Water Dog (PWD), have been compared. The disease onset, its clinical course, and survival period of the affected dogs were similar in both models. Skeletal dysplasia was noted radiographically at 2 months of age, whereas at 4 1/2 months of age there was progressive neurologic impairment. However, dwarfism and coarse facial features were seen only in ESS. Both models had similar deficiency in activity of lysosomal beta-galactosidase, but possessed a normal protein activator for GM1-beta-galactosidase. Both models stored GM1-ganglioside, asialo-GM1, and oligosaccharides in brain. Furthermore, only the PWD stored glycoproteins containing polylactosaminoglycans in visceral organs, and neither model stored them in the brain. Morphologically, both models demonstrated similar storage material in multiple tissues and cell types. The ultrastructure of the storage material was cell-type specific and identical in both models. However, some differences in the lectin staining pattern were noted. Our clinical, biochemical, and histochemical findings indicate that PWD and ESS may represent two different mutations of the beta-galactosidase gene. Moreover, the authors conclude that it is difficult, and inappropriate, to apply the human classification of GM1-gangliosidosis (i.e. infantile, juvenile, and adult forms) to these canine models. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:1546746

  4. Immunogold localization of SP-A in lungs of infants dying from respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    deMello, D. E.; Heyman, S.; Phelps, D. S.; Floros, J.

    1993-01-01

    Prematurely born infants can develop the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) because of a deficiency of pulmonary surfactant. This lipoprotein complex synthesized by type II pneumocytes has different ultrastructural forms--intra- and extracellular lamellar bodies, which within the alveoli are transformed into tubular myelin, and this in turn gives rise to the surface monolayer, the functionally active form of surfactant. We have previously shown that at autopsy RDS lungs lack tubular myelin and have decreased immunoreactivity for antisera to surfactant protein A (SP-A), an important component of tubular myelin. Therefore, we proposed a role for SP-A in the conversion of lamellar bodies to tubular myelin and in the pathogenesis of RDS. To explore this possibility further, we compared in 14 RDS and 14 control lungs the distribution of SP-A in ultrathin sections, using affinity-purified rabbit anti-human-SP-A IgG and goat anti-rabbit IgG-conjugated with 10 nm colloidal gold particles. In controls, gold label was present in lamellar bodies, endoplasmic reticulum, on the cytoplasmic membrane of type II cells, and on lamellar bodies and tubular myelin either within alveoli or macrophages. In RDS lungs, reduced label was present in the same intracellular compartments and organelles, except in tubular myelin, which is absent. It is postulated that if SP-A is indeed necessary for the conversion of lamellar bodies to tubular myelin, in RDS either there is a deficiency of adequate amounts of functional SP-A or some other important component of surfactant is missing. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8494055

  5. Clinical manifestations of primary hyperparathyroidism before and after parathyroidectomy. A case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, A K; Duh, Q Y; Katz, M H; Siperstein, A E; Clark, O H

    1995-01-01

    the parathyroid patients versus 13% of the thyroid patients claimed they were less depressed. CONCLUSION: When examined thoroughly, few patients with primary hyperparathyroidism were asymptomatic or without associated conditions, and most patients experienced subjective improvement after successful parathyroidectomy. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:7677469

  6. Lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's disease. An immunohistochemical analysis of 208 reviewed Hodgkin's disease cases from the German Hodgkin Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    von Wasielewski, R.; Werner, M.; Fischer, R.; Hansmann, M. L.; Hübner, K.; Hasenclever, D.; Franklin, J.; Sextro, M.; Diehl, V.; Georgii, A.

    1997-01-01

    There is wide consensus that lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin's disease (LPHD) represents a distinct clinicopathological entity of B-cell origin. However, inconsistent results of immunophenotyping studies and low confirmation rates among multi-center trials pose the question of whether LPHD really expresses heterogeneous marker profiles or whether it represents a mixture of morphologically similar entities. Among 2,836 cases reviewed by the German Hodgkin Study Group, immunophenotyping was performed on 1) cases classified or confirmed as LPHD by the reference panel (n = 104) or 2) cases not confirmed as LPHD but classified as classical HD (cHD) within the reference study trial (n = 104). In most cases, immunohistochemistry revealed a phenotype either LPHD-like (CD20+, CD15-, CD30-, CD45+) or cHD-like (CD15+, CD30+, CD20-, CD45-). In 27 cases, the immunophenotype was not fully conclusive. Additional markers for Epstein-Barr virus and CD57 and in situ hybridization for mRNA light chains allowed for a more clear-cut distinction between LPHD and cHD. However, in 25 of 104 cases, immunohistochemistry disproved the morphological diagnosis of LPHD of the panel experts, whereas 13 cases originally not confirmed as LPHD showed a LPHD-like immunopattern. Immunohistochemically confirmed LPHD cases showed a significantly better freedom from treatment failure (P = 0.033) than cHD; this was not observed in the original study classification based only on morphology (P > 0.05). Significantly better survival for LPHD cases improved from P = 0.047 (original study classification) to P = 0.0071 when classified by immunohistochemistry. Our results show that LPHD is a more immunohistochemical rather than a purely morphological diagnosis. Immunophenotyping of HD biopsies suspected of being LPHD is mandatory when a modified therapy protocol, that is, one different from those used in cHD, is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9060817

  7. Molecular dynamics study of free energy profiles for organic cations in gramicidin A channels.

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Y; Pear, M R; Busath, D D

    1997-01-01

    The free energy profiles for four organic cations in right-handed single-helix gramicidin A dimers were computed by using umbrella sampling molecular dynamics with CHARMM. Ion-water column translocations were facilitated by using a novel "water-tunnel" approach. The overlapping pieces of free energy profile for adjacent windows were selected from three trajectories that differed in initial ion rotation and were aligned by the method of umbrella potential differences. Neglected long-range electrostatic energies from the bulk water and the bilayer were computed with DelPhi and added to the profile. The approach was corroborated for the formamidinium-guanidinium pair by using perturbation dynamics at axial positions 0, 6, 12, and 15 A from the channel center. The barrier to ethylammonium entry was prohibitive at 21 kcal/mol, whereas for methylammonium it was 5.5 kcal/mol, and the profile was quite flat through the channel, roughly consistent with conductance measurements. The profile for formamidinium was very similar to that of methylammonium. Guanidinium had a high entry barrier (deltaF = +8.6 kcal/mol) and a narrow deep central well (deltaF = -2.6 kcal/mol), qualitatively consistent with predictions from voltage-dependent potassium current block measurements. Its deep central well, contrasting with the flat profile for formamidinium, was verified with perturbation dynamics and was correlated with its high propensity to form hydrogen bonds with the channel at the dimer junction (not shared by the other three cations). Analysis of the ensemble average radial forces on the ions demonstrates that all four ions undergo compressive forces in the channel that are at maximum at the center of the monomer and relieved at the dimer junction, illustrating increased flexibility of the channel walls in the center of the channel. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9336167

  8. The fetal form of the acetylcholine receptor distinguishes rhabdomyosarcomas from other childhood tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Gattenloehner, S.; Vincent, A.; Leuschner, I.; Tzartos, S.; Müller-Hermelink, H. K.; Kirchner, T.; Marx, A.

    1998-01-01

    The fetal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) of muscle is an oligomeric membrane protein with subunit composition alpha2betadeltagamma. After birth, the adult form, in which an epsilon-subunit replaces the gamma-subunit, predominates, and expression of the fetal form is limited to thymic myoid cells, extraocular muscles, and denervated striated muscle. We looked for expression of AChR in rhabdomyosarcomas and other childhood tumors by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. mRNA for the AChR gamma-subunit was detected in all embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas tested (n = 16) and in some tumors with a rhabdomyomatous component (n = 2) but not in other nonrhabdomyomatous tumors of childhood and adults (n = 45). The fetal form of the AChR was detected immunohistochemically in five of eight embryonal and four of eight alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas and in two Wilms' tumors with a rhabdomyomatous component but not in other tumors or in normal muscle. We conclude that reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for AChR gamma-subunit could be useful for the diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma of childhood and for the detection of micrometastases and minimal residual disease. In addition, the fetal AChR protein is the first extracellular tumor marker that can distinguish rhabdomyosarcomas from nonrhabdomyomatous tumors and from normal muscle. Our findings, therefore, imply that the fetal AChR may be a target for in vivo imaging and, as AChR internalization and degradation is increased by antibody-induced cross-linking, may also provide a sensitive and specific target for immunotherapeutic strategies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9466570

  9. Neurotrophin and neurotrophin receptor proteins in medulloblastomas and other primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the pediatric central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Washiyama, K.; Muragaki, Y.; Rorke, L. B.; Lee, V. M.; Feinstein, S. C.; Radeke, M. J.; Blumberg, D.; Kaplan, D. R.; Trojanowski, J. Q.

    1996-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) of the central nervous system (CNS) are poorly understood childhood neoplasms, and medulloblastomas are the most common pediatric PNETs. Neoplastic cells in medulloblastomas and other PNETs resemble progenitor cells of the developing central nervous system, but they also may exhibit the molecular phenotype of immature neurons or glia. As neurotrophins play a role in regulating differentiation, proliferation, and cell death in the normal developing central nervous system, and recent evidence suggests that neurotrophins may influence the behavior of medulloblastomas, we studied 29 PNET biopsy samples (27 of which were posterior fossa medulloblastomas) by immunobistochemistry using antibodies specific for each of the major high affinity neurotrophin receptor proteins, ie, TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC. A subset of these tumors also was examined by Western blot. Immunoreactive TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC were observed in neoplastic cells in 8 (27%), 18 (62%), and 14 (48%) of these PNETs, respectively. Additional immunohistochemical studies of a subset of these PNETs using antibodies to neurotrophins that primarily activate TrkB and TrkC, ie, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3, and neurotrophin-4/5, showed that immunoreactive brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3, and neurotrophin-4/5 were detected in 22, 9, and 19% of these PNET biopsies, respectively. Finally, 19 pediatric brain tumors other than these PNETs also were studied here, and they expressed these neurotrophins and their receptors to a variable extent. The demonstration here that neurotrophins and their cognate receptor proteins are expressed in PNETs as well as in other pediatric brain tumors may imply that signal transduction pathways mediated by neurotrophins and/or their receptors influence the induction or progression of these common childhood neoplasms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8774147

  10. The association of viruses with urveal melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Albert, D M

    1979-01-01

    Electron microscopic examination of 57 ocular melanomas (54 human, two feline and one canine) revealed the presence of viral particles in six specimens. Herpesviruses particles were observed in one human specimen and were passed in human fibroblasts (WI-38), where they gave rise to intranuclear inclusions. A-type oncornavirus particles (oncogenic RNA virus) were observed in a second case, both in cells of tumor directly removed from an enucleated eye as well as in cells grown in tissue culture. In three human specimens and one feline specimen, togavirus particles were observed. Rubella is a member of this group, and the possibility that the presence of togavirus in these tumors is the result of latent ocular infection by rubella virus is raised. Herpes virus and RNA tumor viruses are widely considered as having a possible etiologic role for certain human cancers. The observation of togavirus is unexpected, as this virus has not been previously implicated in human or animal tumors. Injection of an RNA tumor virus (Gardner strain feline sarcoma virus) into the anterior chamber of newborn kittens resulted in the development of iris and ciliary body melanomas, many of which showed invasion and, in one instance, metastasis. This is the first animal model of a viral-induced uveal melanoma, and the histology and ultrastructure are described. These results emphasize the need for the continued investigation of the role of these viruses in uveal melanoma. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 PMID:545833

  11. Health effects of indoor fluoride pollution from coal burning in China.

    PubMed Central

    Ando, M; Tadano, M; Asanuma, S; Tamura, K; Matsushima, S; Watanabe, T; Kondo, T; Sakurai, S; Ji, R; Liang, C; Cao, S

    1998-01-01

    The combustion of high fluoride-content coal as an energy resource for heating, cooking, and food drying is a major exhaust emission source of suspended particulate matter and fluoride. High concentrations of these pollutants have been observed in indoor air of coal-burning families in some rural areas in China. Because airborne fluoride has serious toxicological properties, fluoride pollution in indoor air and the prevalence of fluorosis have been analyzed in a fluorosis area and a healthy nonfluorosis area in China and in a rural area in Japan. For human health, fluoride in indoor air has not only been directly inhaled by residents but also has been absorbed in stored food such as corn, chilies, and potatoes. In the fluorosis area in China, concentrations of urinary fluoride in the residents have been much higher than in the nonfluorosis area in China and in the rural area in Japan. In the fluorosis area, almost all elementary and junior high school students 10-15 years of age had dental fluorosis. Osteosclerosis in the skeletal fluorosis patients was very serious. Urinary deoxypyridinoline in rural residents in China was much higher than in rural residents in Japan. Data suggest that bone resorption was extremely stimulated in the residents in China and that fluoride may stimulate both bone resorption and bone formation. Because indoor fluoride from combustion of coal is easily absorbed in stored food and because food consumption is a main source of fluoride exposure, it is necessary to reduce airborne fluoride and food contamination to prevent serious fluorosis in China. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9518433

  12. Preoperative assessment for laparoscopic cholecystectomy: feasibility of using spiral computed tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, A H; Inui, H; Imamura, A; Uetsuji, S; Kamiyama, Y

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors investigated the preoperative feasibility of using spiral computed tomography (SCT) after intravenous infusion cholangiography (IVC-SCT) for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: In laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the aberrant or unusual anatomy of the bile duct and severe inflammation or adhesions around the gallbladder sometimes require a conversion to open surgery. METHODS: Laparoscopic cholecystectomies (LC's) were attempted on 440 patients, and preoperative IVC-SCT also was attempted in all of these patients. Using this spiral scanning technique, the bile ducts, cystic duct, and gallbladder were assessed for contour abnormalities, relative position, and filling defects. Forty-seven patients were diagnosed with having stones in their common bile duct or common hepatic duct. RESULTS: Three-hundred eighty-seven patients out of the 440 patients (88.0%) who were subjected to IVC-SCT had the length and course of their cystic duct successfully determined. Anomalous unions of the cystic duct were seen in 59 (15.2%) of 387 patients with respect to the operative findings, and 48 of 440 patients (10.9%) had severe adhesions to Calot's triangle and the surrounding tissues. In these 48 patients, 45 patients (94%) had a nonvisualized cystic duct on IVC-SCT. The preoperative assessment of the feasibility (dense adhesions obscuring Calot's triangle) of using IVC-SCT demonstrated that the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 93%, 98%, and 94%, respectively. Five patients had to be converted to open surgery, and the overall morbidity rates for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy was 0.9% (4 of 440). CONCLUSIONS: The most important factor in assessing the feasibility of using laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not the nonvisualized gallbladder, but the nonvisualized cystic duct on IVC-SCT. IVC-SCT may be of benefit to those patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3

  13. Corrective Neuromuscular Approach to the Treatment of Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pettitt, Robert; Dolski, Angela

    2000-01-01

    corrective neuromuscular approach in the management of iliotibial band friction syndrome represents a viable alternative to orthotic intervention. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:16558617

  14. Murine autoimmune oophoritis, epididymoorchitis, and gastritis induced by day 3 thymectomy. Autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Tung, K. S.; Smith, S.; Matzner, P.; Kasai, K.; Oliver, J.; Feuchter, F.; Anderson, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    In adult mice thymectomized at age 3 days (D3TX), increased incidences and/or levels of organ-specific antibodies to oocytes and/or zona pellucida, to testicular cell-sperm-differentiation antigens (TSDA), and to gastric parietal cells were detected, and these correlated significantly with oophoritis, orchitis (not epididymovasitis), and gastritis, respectively. The autoantibodies occurred in mice with the corresponding endogenous antigens. Thus, anti-oocyte/zona antibodies were detected in female, anti-TSDA antibodies in male, and anti-parietal cell antibodies in both sexes. Anti-oocyte/zona antibodies were first detected at age 5-6 weeks and were absent by 25 weeks. Serum antizona antibodies, but not anti-oocyte antibodies, inhibited mouse fertilization in vitro. In contrast, antibodies to sperm acrosome and antibodies to sperm surface did not correlate with testicular or epididymal disease. Moreover, both male and female mice had increased levels of anti-sperm surface antibodies, indicating that the sperm antigens detected may not be organ-specific. In addition, sera from 5-10% of D3TX mice reacted with a wide spectrum of epididymal and testicular antigens with defined cellular locations but of yet unknown specificity. Although the incidence of antibodies to cytoskeletal antigens was not significantly elevated after D3TX, anti-nuclear antibodies were more frequently detected in (SWR/J X A/J) F1 (SWRAF1) and (C57 BL/6J X A/J) F1 (B6AF1) mice after D3TX. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3826296

  15. Murine autoimmune oophoritis, epididymoorchitis, and gastritis induced by day 3 thymectomy. Immunopathology.

    PubMed Central

    Tung, K. S.; Smith, S.; Teuscher, C.; Cook, C.; Anderson, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    (C57BL/6 X A/J) F1, (SWR/J X A/J) F1 and BALB/cBy mice, thymectomized on Day 3 (D3TX) or Day 7 (D7TX) or sham thymectomized (STX), were studied for immunopathologic changes in the ovary, testis, and gastric wall. In 95% of B6AF1, 100% of SWRAF1, and 35% of BALB/cBy mice ovarian disease developed, with onset at 5-6 weeks of age. Ovarian disease was not found in D7TX or STX mice. In D3TX mice, it was associated with mononuclear infiltration and ovarian follicle destruction, leading to atrophy. Epididymovasitis was detected in 70-90% of SWRAF1, 50% of B6AF1, and 64% of BALB/cBy mice after D3TX; whereas orchitis occurred in about 20% of SWRAF1 and B6AF1 mice. In some mice epididymovasitis also developed after D7TX, but not after STX. In contrast to the negative immunohistochemical findings in diseased ovaries, typical immune complex-like deposits of mouse IgG were detected by immunofluorescence along the basement membrane of epididymal ducts and seminiferous tubules. However, maximum incidence of epididymitis preceded immune complex detection. Gastritis developed in both female (57%) and male (50%) BALB/cBy mice after D3TX, occasionally after D7TX, but not after STX. Gastric mucosa was hypertrophic with dilated glands and heavy lymphocytic infiltrations throughout all gastric layers. BALB/cBy mice with gastritis usually did not have disease in the gonads, and vice versa. This study, therefore, confirms and extends the findings of Nishizuka and colleagues. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3548402

  16. A histologic study of the extracellular matrix during the development of glomerulosclerosis in murine chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bergijk, E. C.; Munaut, C.; Baelde, J. J.; Prins, F.; Foidart, J. M.; Hoedemaeker, P. J.; Bruijn, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The development of glomerulosclerosis was studied in murine chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), which is a model for human systemic lupus erythematosus. The authors investigated the distribution patterns of six components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), i.e., laminin, fibronectin, collagen types I, III, IV, and VI during the course of the disease. All of these ECM components except collagen type I were found in the glomeruli of normal mice, where all of them were intrinsic constituents of the mesangium. Laminin, fibronectin, and collagen type IV were also found in the glomerular capillary walls. Starting 6 weeks after the induction of GvHD and continuing at week 8, the onset of an expansion of the mesangial matrix was observed. At the same time, the amounts of laminin, fibronectin, and collagen types IV and VI increased. Ten weeks after the onset of the disease, glomerulosclerosis developed. Traces of the interstitial collagen type I were found in sclerotic glomeruli. The levels of four ECM components, i.e., collagens III, IV, VI, and laminin were markedly decreased in the sclerotic glomeruli as compared with week 8. In contrast, the amount of fibronectin in the sclerotic glomeruli increased dramatically. Immunoelectron microscopic examination showed fibronectin in the sclerotic lesions, in contrast to laminin, collagen type I, and collagen type IV. It is concluded that the sclerotic lesions in murine chronic GvHD contain fibronectin. The small amounts of the ECM components laminin, as well as collagens III, IV, and VI in the sclerotic glomeruli in GvHD, might represent remnants of mesangial material and collapsed capillary walls. These components are probably replaced by increased production and/or accumulation of collagen type I and fibronectin. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1580327

  17. Targeting of the rasT24 oncogene to the proximal convoluted tubules in transgenic mice results in hyperplasia and polycystic kidneys.

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, D. L.; Barrios, R.; Massey, C.; Bañez, E. I.; Ou, C. N.; Rajagopalan, S.; Aguilar-Cordova, E.; Lebovitz, R. M.; Overbeek, P. A.; Lieberman, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    Five families of transgenic mice were derived from one-cell-stage embryos injected with gamma GT-rasT24, a fusion gene consisting of the gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma GT) 5' flanking region containing promoter I linked to a mutated (codon 12) human H-ras oncogene. The transgene was expressed selectively in the kidneys, eyes, and brains of all families as determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, nuclease protection assays, and in situ hybridization. In two of five families, kidney lesions consisting of proximal tubular hyperplasia, renal cysts, and microadenomas developed in male animals; males also expressed higher levels of gamma GT/rasT24 RNA. Early lesions consisted of proximal tubular hyperplasia as defined by alkaline phosphatase histochemistry, gamma GT immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy and could be correlated with the presence of rasT24 RNA within the cystic proximal tubular epithelium by in situ hybridization. Advanced lesions also involved other segments of the nephron and consisted of cysts lined by a flattened unicellular layer of attenuated epithelium. No rasT24 could be identified within cystic lesions of the distal nephron and collecting tubules by in situ hybridization, and they most likely arise by external compression. Animals from the two transgenic strains exhibiting cystic lesions die of renal failure beginning at 8 months of age. No difference in cell-cycle parameters or DNA ploidy between transgenic and control kidneys was identified by flow cytometric analysis. No renal carcinomas developed. The primary renal effects of the H-rasT24 oncogene in this model system consist of proximal tubular hyperplasia and polycystic kidneys. This model appears to provide a useful in vivo system for the study of ras oncogene function and control of renal cell proliferation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8097368

  18. Hepatocyte membrane injury and bleb formation following low dose comfrey toxicity in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Yeong, M. L.; Wakefield, S. J.; Ford, H. C.

    1993-01-01

    Comfrey, a popular herbal remedy, contains hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids and has been implicated in recent human toxicity. Although alkaloids from other plant sources have been extensively researched, studies on the hepatotoxic effects of comfrey alkaloids are scant. The effects of high dose comfrey toxicity have been studied and the present investigation was undertaken to identify changes associated with relatively low dose toxicity. Eight young adult rats were dosed weekly for six weeks with 50 mg/kg of comfrey derived alkaloids. The animals were dissected one week after the last dose and the livers examined by light and electron microscopy. Changes at the light microscopic level showed vascular congestion, mild zone 3 necrosis and loss of definition of hepatocyte cellular membranes. Extensive ultrastructural abnormalities were identified in the form of endothelial sloughing and the loss of hepatocyte microvilli. A striking finding was florid bleb formation on the sinusoidal borders of hepatocytes. Many blebs were shed into the space of Disse and extruded to fill, and sometimes occlude, sinusoidal lumina. Platelets were frequently found in areas of bleb formation. There was evidence of late damage in collagenization of Disse's space. Hepatocyte bleb formation is known to occur under a variety of pathological conditions but there is little to no information in the literature on the effects, if any, of bleb formation on fibrogenesis and the microcirculation and its role in the pathogenesis of liver disease. The pyrrolizidine alkaloids of comfrey may serve as an experimental tool to study the process of bleb formation and the intimate relationship between hepatocyte and sinusoidal injury in the liver. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8499322

  19. Activated protein kinase C binds to intracellular receptors in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Flores, M; García-Sáinz, J A

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify in rat hepatocytes cellular polypeptides that bind protein kinase C (PKC) and may influence its activity and its compartmentation. At least seven proteins, with apparent M(r) values between 12,000 and 36,000, that behave like Receptors for Activated C-Kinase (RACKs) were found in the Triton-X-100-insoluble fraction of these cells; i.e. PKC bound to these polypeptides when it was in its active form. RACKS seem to be PKC substrates. Studies using isotype-specific PKC antibodies suggested some selectivity of RACKs, i.e. RACKs in the M(r) approximately 28,000-36,000 region bound PKC-alpha and PKC-beta in the presence of phosphatidylserine, diolein and Ca2+, whereas those of M(r) approximately 12,000-14,000 bound all isoforms studied, and, in contrast with the other RACKs, they did this even in the absence of Ca2+. Peptide I (KGDYEKILVALCGGN), which has a sequence suggested to be involved in the PKC-RACKs interaction [Mochly-Rosen, Khaner, Lopez and Smith (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 14866-14868], inhibited PKC activity. Preincubation of RACKs with antisera directed against peptide I prevented PKC binding to them. The data suggest that peptide I blocks PKC binding to RACKs by two mechanisms: inhibition of PKC activity and competition with a putative binding site. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8257439

  20. Dural and Arachnoid Membraneous Protection of the Abducens Nerve at the Petroclival Region

    PubMed Central

    Ozveren, M. Faik; Uchida, Koichi; Tekdemir, Ibrahim; Cobanoglu, Bengu; Akdemir, Ismail; Kawase, Takeshi; Deda, Haluk

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the membranous protection of the abducens nerve in the petroclival region. The petroclival portion of the abducens nerve was studied in ten dissections from five cadaveric head specimens. One of the heads was used for histological sections. Four heads were injected with colored latex for microsurgical dissections. The histological sections were prepared from petroclival dura mater, embedded in paraffin blocks, stained, sectioned in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes, and evaluated by light microscopy. The abducens nerve was covered by a dural sleeve and arachnoidal membrane during its course within the petroclival area. Following the petrous apex, the abducens nerve was fixed by a sympathetic plexus and connective tissue extensions to the lateral wall of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery and to the medial wall of Meckel's cave. Fibrous trabeculations inside the venous space were attached to the dural sleeve. The lateral clival artery accompanied the dural sleeve of the abducens nerve and supplied the petroclival dura mater. The arterioles accompanying the abducens nerve through the subarachnoid space supplied the nerve within the dural sleeve. The arachnoid membrane covered the abducens nerve within the dural sleeve to the petrous apex, and arachnoid granulations found on the dural sleeve protruded into the venous space. The extension of the arachnoid membrane to the petrous apex and the presence of arachnoid granulations on the dural sleeve suggest that the subarachnoid space continues in the dural sleeve. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17167676