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Sample records for 1g mutant hbv

  1. Selection of affinity-improved neutralizing human scFv against HBV PreS1 from CDR3 VH/VL mutant library.

    PubMed

    Chen, YanMin; Bai, Yin; Guo, XiaoChen; Wang, WenFei; Zheng, Qi; Wang, FuXiang; Sun, Dejun; Li, DeShan; Ren, GuiPing; Yin, JieChao

    2016-07-01

    A CDR3 mutant library was constructed from a previously isolated anti-HBV neutralizing Homo sapiens scFv-31 template by random mutant primers PCR. Then the library was displayed on the inner membrane surface in Escherichia coli periplasmic space. Seven scFv clones were isolated from the mutant library through three rounds of screening by flow cytometry. Competition ELISA assay indicates that isolated scFv fragments show more efficient binding ability to HBV PreS1 compared with parental scFv-31. HBV neutralization assay indicated that two clones (scFv-3 and 59) show higher neutralizing activity by blocking the HBV infection to Chang liver cells. Our method provides a new strategy for rapid screening of mutant antibody library for affinity-enhanced scFv clones and the neutralizing scFvs obtained from this study provide a potential alternative of Hepatitis B immune globulin. PMID:27255707

  2. Whole genome HBV deletion profiles and the accumulation of preS deletion mutant during antiviral treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV), because of its error-prone viral polymerase, has a high mutation rate leading to widespread substitutions, deletions, and insertions in the HBV genome. Deletions may significantly change viral biological features complicating the progression of liver diseases. However, the clinical conditions correlating to the accumulation of deleted mutants remain unclear. In this study, we explored HBV deletion patterns and their association with disease status and antiviral treatment by performing whole genome sequencing on samples from 51 hepatitis B patients and by monitoring changes in deletion variants during treatment. Clone sequencing was used to analyze preS regions in another cohort of 52 patients. Results Among the core, preS, and basic core promoter (BCP) deletion hotspots, we identified preS to have the highest frequency and the most complex deletion pattern using whole genome sequencing. Further clone sequencing analysis on preS identified 70 deletions which were classified into 4 types, the most common being preS2. Also, in contrast to the core and BCP regions, most preS deletions were in-frame. Most deletions interrupted viral surface epitopes, and are possibly involved in evading immuno-surveillance. Among various clinical factors examined, logistic regression showed that antiviral medication affected the accumulation of deletion mutants (OR = 6.81, 95% CI = 1.296 ~ 35.817, P = 0.023). In chronic carriers of the virus, and individuals with chronic hepatitis, the deletion rate was significantly higher in the antiviral treatment group (Fisher exact test, P = 0.007). Particularly, preS2 deletions were associated with the usage of nucleos(t)ide analog therapy (Fisher exact test, P = 0.023). Dynamic increases in preS1 or preS2 deletions were also observed in quasispecies from samples taken from patients before and after three months of ADV therapy. In vitro experiments demonstrated that preS2 deletions alone

  3. Mutant Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase (Gars) Ameliorates SOD1G93A Motor Neuron Degeneration Phenotype but Has Little Affect on Loa Dynein Heavy Chain Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Hazel P.; Chia, Ruth; Achilli, Francesca; Bryson, J. Barney; Greensmith, Linda; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Background In humans, mutations in the enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) cause motor and sensory axon loss in the peripheral nervous system, and clinical phenotypes ranging from Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy to a severe infantile form of spinal muscular atrophy. GARS is ubiquitously expressed and may have functions in addition to its canonical role in protein synthesis through catalyzing the addition of glycine to cognate tRNAs. Methodology/Principal Findings We have recently described a new mouse model with a point mutation in the Gars gene resulting in a cysteine to arginine change at residue 201. Heterozygous GarsC201R/+ mice have locomotor and sensory deficits. In an investigation of genetic mutations that lead to death of motor and sensory neurons, we have crossed the GarsC201R/+ mice to two other mutants: the TgSOD1G93A model of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the Legs at odd angles mouse (Dync1h1Loa) which has a defect in the heavy chain of the dynein complex. We found the Dync1h1Loa/+;GarsC201R/+ double heterozygous mice are more impaired than either parent, and this is may be an additive effect of both mutations. Surprisingly, the GarsC201R mutation significantly delayed disease onset in the SOD1G93A;GarsC201R/+ double heterozygous mutant mice and increased lifespan by 29% on the genetic background investigated. Conclusions/Significance These findings raise intriguing possibilities for the study of pathogenetic mechanisms in all three mouse mutant strains. PMID:19593442

  4. Mutant SOD1G93A Triggers Mitochondrial Fragmentation in Spinal Cord Motor Neurons: Neuroprotection by SIRT3 and PGC-1α

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenjun; Song, Yuting; Kincaid, Brad; Bossy, Blaise; Bossy-Wetzel, Ella

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) gene cause an inherited form of ALS with upper and lower motor neuron loss. The mechanism underlying mutant SOD1-mediated motor neuron degeneration remains unclear. While defects in mitochondrial dynamics contribute to neurodegeneration, including ALS, previous reports remain conflicted. Here, we report an improved technique to isolate, transfect, and culture rat spinal cord motor neurons. Using this improved system, we demonstrate that mutant SOD1G93A triggers a significant decrease in mitochondrial length and an accumulation of round fragmented mitochondria. The increase of fragmented mitochondria coincides with an arrest in both anterograde and retrograde axonal transport and increased cell death. In addition, mutant SOD1G93A induces a reduction in neurite length and branching that is accompanied with an abnormal accumulation of round mitochondria in growth cones. Furthermore, restoration of the mitochondrial fission and fusion balance by dominant-negative dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) expression rescues the mutant SOD1G93A-induced defects in mitochondrial morphology, dynamics, and cell viability. Interestingly, both SIRT3 and PGC-1α protect against mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal cell death by mutant SOD1G93A. This data suggests that impairment in mitochondrial dynamics participates in ALS and restoring this defect might provide protection against mutant SOD1G93A-induced neuronal injury. PMID:22819776

  5. Epidemiology of HBV S-gene mutants in the Liguria Region, Italy: Implications for surveillance and detection of new escape variants.

    PubMed

    Sticchi, Laura; Caligiuri, Patrizia; Cacciani, Roberto; Alicino, Cristiano; Bruzzone, Bianca

    2013-03-01

    HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) variants may impair diagnosis or allow the virus to escape vaccine-induced immunity and their circulation in the population can represent a Public Health threat. Their prevalence, however, is not yet completely established. Evidence indicates that amino acid substitutions within HBsAg can lead to conformational changes which allow mutated HBV to escape the vaccine-induced antibodies used in the screening tests. In such scenario, the aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HBV S-Gene escape mutants by sequencing the gene in a cohort of Ligurian patients monitored for viral load, genotype and drug resistance and to evaluate the risk of false negative HBsAg detection by routine screening tests. From 2007 to 2011, in 256 consecutive samples from Ligurian HBV positive patients sequencing assay for detection of RT/S-Gene mutations using Trugene HBV Genotyping kit (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc., Tarrytown, NY) was performed. Serological HBV tests and viral load were also performed. Analyzed sequences revealed G145R mutation in 8/256 (3.1%) examined sequences, it was alone in 5 patients and accompanied by other HBsAg mutations in 3 samples. HBsAg resulted undetectable by 3 of the 8 samples, derived from patients with multiple mutations: T126I-T131A-C139Y-E/D144G, T126I-M133L, and P120Q-T126I. The emergence of these mutants, at least the G145R, has already been addressed as a public health concern because of its capability of escaping the immune system. In the present study we point out a second aspect connected with their existence and with similar potential negative impact on public health, that is their capability of escape punctual detection. PMID:23296324

  6. A role for bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) glycoprotein E (gE) tyrosine phosphorylation in replication of BHV-1 wild-type virus but not BHV-1 gE deletion mutant virus.

    PubMed

    Shaw, A M; Braun, L; Frew, T; Hurley, D J; Rowland, R R; Chase, C C

    2000-03-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), an alphaherpesvirus, is a major pathogen that causes respiratory and reproductive infections. We observed tyrosine phosphorylation of a 95-kDa viral protein and dephosphorylation of 55- and 103-kDa cellular proteins during the course of BHV-1 infection. We demonstrated BHV-1 glycoprotein E (gE) to be the tyrosine phosphorylated viral protein by immunoprecipitation. Inhibition of phosphorylation of BHV-1 gE by tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin AG1478 substantially lowered the viral titer in Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells. The decrease in viral titer was directly proportional to the decrease in phosphorylation of the BHV-1 gE. Interestingly, these kinase inhibitors did not inhibit the replication of the BHV-1 gE deletion mutant virion (BHV-1gEDelta3.1). Our findings suggest that the wild-type BHV-1, with a functional gE protein, uses a different pathway of signaling events than the BHV-1 gE deletion mutant in replication. Our results indicate that the tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic tail of BHV-1 gE is an important post-translational modification of the functional protein. An application of this study may be the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in controlling the BHV-1 infection. PMID:10683338

  7. The Effects of Bee Venom Acupuncture on the Central Nervous System and Muscle in an Animal hSOD1G93A Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Cai, MuDan; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by the degeneration of lower and upper motor neurons, leading to muscle paralysis and respiratory failure. However, there is no effective drug or therapy to treat ALS. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), including acupuncture, pharmacopuncture, herbal medicine, and massage is popular due to the significant limitations of conventional therapy. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA), also known as one of pharmacopunctures, has been used in Oriental medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of BVA on the central nervous system (CNS) and muscle in symptomatic hSOD1G93A transgenic mice, an animal model of ALS. Our findings show that BVA at ST36 enhanced motor function and decreased motor neuron death in the spinal cord compared to that observed in hSOD1G93A transgenic mice injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with BV. Furthermore, BV treatment at ST36 eliminated signaling downstream of inflammatory proteins such as TLR4 in the spinal cords of symptomatic hSOD1G93A transgenic mice. However, i.p. treatment with BV reduced the levels of TNF-α and Bcl-2 expression in the muscle hSOD1G93A transgenic mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that BV pharmacopuncture into certain acupoints may act as a chemical stimulant to activate those acupoints and subsequently engage the endogenous immune modulatory system in the CNS in an animal model of ALS. PMID:25781653

  8. Abscisic Acid–Responsive Guard Cell Metabolomes of Arabidopsis Wild-Type and gpa1 G-Protein Mutants[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaofen; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Zhu, Mengmeng; Jeon, Byeong Wook; Albert, Reka; Chen, Sixue; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Individual metabolites have been implicated in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in guard cells, but a metabolite profile of this specialized cell type is lacking. We used liquid chromatography–multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry for targeted analysis of 85 signaling-related metabolites in Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell protoplasts over a time course of ABA treatment. The analysis utilized ∼350 million guard cell protoplasts from ∼30,000 plants of the Arabidopsis Columbia accession (Col) wild type and the heterotrimeric G-protein α subunit mutant, gpa1, which has ABA-hyposensitive stomata. These metabolomes revealed coordinated regulation of signaling metabolites in unrelated biochemical pathways. Metabolites clustered into different temporal modules in Col versus gpa1, with fewer metabolites showing ABA-altered profiles in gpa1. Ca2+-mobilizing agents sphingosine-1-phosphate and cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose exhibited weaker ABA-stimulated increases in gpa1. Hormone metabolites were responsive to ABA, with generally greater responsiveness in Col than in gpa1. Most hormones also showed different ABA responses in guard cell versus mesophyll cell metabolomes. These findings suggest that ABA functions upstream to regulate other hormones, and are also consistent with G proteins modulating multiple hormonal signaling pathways. In particular, indole-3-acetic acid levels declined after ABA treatment in Col but not gpa1 guard cells. Consistent with this observation, the auxin antagonist α-(phenyl ethyl-2-one)-indole-3-acetic acid enhanced ABA-regulated stomatal movement and restored partial ABA sensitivity to gpa1. PMID:24368793

  9. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Hepatitis B (HBV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis B (HBV) Print A A A Text Size ... Prevented? How Is It Treated? What Is It? Hepatitis (pronounced: hep-uh-TIE-tiss) is a disease ...

  10. Mutation spectra of the surface-protein-coding region of the HBV genome in HBV-vaccinated and non-vaccinated individuals in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Szomor, Katalin N; Dencs, Agnes; Garai, Eszter; Rusvai, Erzsébet; Berencsi, György; Takács, Mária

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has a major effect on health care systems, with about one-third of the world's population currently infected with the virus. There is an effective vaccine against HBV, which contains a recombinant "surface antigen" produced in an expression vector. Vaccination has proved to be successful in Hungary: the number of acute HBV cases has decreased in the past 10 years. Although an increasing number of publications report on "vaccine-escape" HBV variants which can infect HBV-vaccinated individuals, such mutant HBV strains have not yet been detected in Hungary. We therefore surveyed two risk groups for vaccine-escape or immunoglobulin-escape HBV mutations in Hungary: 28 actively and/or passively HBV-immunized children of HBV carrier mothers who proved to be HBsAg and/or anti-HBc positive and 40 symptomless HBV carrier pregnant women (presumably carrying genotype B or C). We focused on the coding sequences of the "a" immundominant region of the surface protein. We could not detect the G145R amino acid substitution associated with vaccine escape mutant virus. However, we could map other mutations potentially affecting the immunodominant "a" region of the HBV surface protein. PMID:18813870

  11. HBV culture and infectious systems.

    PubMed

    Hayes, C Nelson; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2016-07-01

    While an effective vaccine against hepatitis B virus (HBV) has long been available, chronic HBV infection remains a severe global public health concern. Current treatment options have limited effectiveness, and long-term therapy is required to suppress HBV replication; however, complete elimination of the virus is rare. The lack of suitable animal models and infection systems has hindered efforts to unravel the HBV life cycle, particularly the early events in HBV entry, which appear to be highly species- and tissue-specific. Human primary hepatocytes remain the gold standard for HBV replication studies but are limited by availability and variability. While the HepaRG cell line is permissive for HBV replication, other hepatoma cell lines such as HepG2 do not support HBV replication. The recent discovery of sodium taurocholate transporting peptide (NTCP) as a primary receptor for HBV binding has led to the development of replication-competent cell lines such as HepG2-NTCP. Human hepatocytes grown in chimeric mice have provided another approach that allows primary human hepatocytes to be used while overcoming many of their limitations. Although the difficulty in developing HBV infection systems has hindered development of effective treatments, the variability and limited replication efficiency among cell lines point to additional liver-specific factors involved in HBV infection. It is hoped that HBV infection studies will lead to novel drug targets and therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic HBV infection. PMID:26935052

  12. Combinatorial RNA Interference Therapy Prevents Selection of Pre-existing HBV Variants in Human Liver Chimeric Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yao-Ming; Sun, Cheng-Pu; Chou, Hui-Hsien; Wu, Tzu-Hui; Chen, Chun-Chi; Wu, Ping-Yi; Enya Chen, Yu-Chen; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter; Tao, Mi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Selection of escape mutants with mutations within the target sequence could abolish the antiviral RNA interference activity. Here, we investigated the impact of a pre-existing shRNA-resistant HBV variant on the efficacy of shRNA therapy. We previously identified a highly potent shRNA, S1, which, when delivered by an adeno-associated viral vector, effectively inhibits HBV replication in HBV transgenic mice. We applied the “PICKY” software to systemically screen the HBV genome, then used hydrodynamic transfection and HBV transgenic mice to identify additional six highly potent shRNAs. Human liver chimeric mice were infected with a mixture of wild-type and T472C HBV, a S1-resistant HBV variant, and then treated with a single or combined shRNAs. The presence of T472C mutant compromised the therapeutic efficacy of S1 and resulted in replacement of serum wild-type HBV by T472C HBV. In contrast, combinatorial therapy using S1 and P28, one of six potent shRNAs, markedly reduced titers for both wild-type and T472C HBV. Interestingly, treatment with P28 alone led to the emergence of escape mutants with mutations in the P28 target region. Our results demonstrate that combinatorial RNAi therapy can minimize the escape of resistant viral mutants in chronic HBV patients. PMID:26482836

  13. Molecular analysis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in an HIV co-infected patient with reactivation of occult HBV infection following discontinuation of lamivudine-including antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) is characterized by HBV DNA persistence even though the pattern of serological markers indicates an otherwise resolved HBV infection. Although OBI is usually clinically silent, immunocompromised patients may experience reactivation of the liver disease. Case presentation We report the case of an individual with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and anti-HBV core antibody positivity, who experienced severe HBV reactivation after discontinuation of lamivudine-including antiretroviral therapy (ART). HBV sequencing analysis showed a hepatitis B surface antigen escape mutant whose presence in an earlier sample excluded reinfection. Molecular sequencing showed some differences between two isolates collected at a 9-year interval, indicating HBV evolution. Resumption of ART containing an emtricitabine/tenofovir combination allowed control of plasma HBV DNA, which fell to undetectable levels. Conclusion This case stresses the ability of HBV to evolve continuously, even during occult infection, and the effectiveness of ART in controlling OBI reactivation in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:22054111

  14. HBV cure: why, how, when?

    PubMed

    Levrero, Massimo; Testoni, Barbara; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Current HBV treatments control replication and liver disease progression in the vast majority of treated patients. However, HBV patients often require lifelong therapies due to the persistence of transcriptionally active viral cccDNA mini-chromosome in the nucleus, which is not directly targeted by current antiviral therapies. A true complete cure of HBV would require clearance of intranuclear cccDNA from all infected hepatocytes. An intermediate but still relevant step forward that would allow treatment cessation would be reaching a functional cure, equivalent to resolved acute infection, with a durable HBsAg loss±anti-HBs seroconversion, undetectable serum DNA and persistence of cccDNA in a transcriptionally inactive status. Recent advances in technologies and pharmaceutical sciences, including the cloning of the mayor HBV receptor (i.e. the NTCP transporter) and the development in vitro HBV infection models, have heralded a new horizon of innovative antiviral and immune-therapeutic approaches. PMID:27447092

  15. Proteomics Based Identification of Cell Migration Related Proteins in HBV Expressing HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Huixing; Li, Xi; Chan, Vincent; Chen, Wei Ning

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics study was performed to investigate the specific protein expression profiles of HepG2 cells transfected with mutant HBV compared with wildtype HBV genome, aiming to identify the specific functions of SH3 binding domain (proline rich region) located in HBx. In addition to the cell movement and kinetics changes due to the expression of HBV genome we have observed previously, here we further targeted to explore the specific changes of cellular proteins and potential intracellular protein interactions, which might provide more information of the potential cellular mechanism of the differentiated cell movements. Specific changes of a number of proteins were shown in global protein profiling in HepG2 cells expressing wildtype HBV, including cell migration related proteins, and interestingly the changes were found recovered by SH3 binding domain mutated HBV. The distinctive expressions of proteins were validated by Western blot analysis. PMID:24763314

  16. HBV Genotypic Variability in Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Carmen L.; Aguilar, Julio C.; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions. PMID:25742179

  17. The HBV Drugs Work: Now What?

    PubMed

    Pruett, Timothy L

    2016-09-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents for Hepatitis B virus (HBV) suppression work, but only when administered to the patient. They do not appear to promote durable, long-term immunological control. After 3 years of effective anti-HBV therapy, a small percentage of patients maintained good control, manifest by controlled serum liver enzymes, low-level HBV-DNA, and controlled HBsAg concentrations. However, this did not occur in the majority of patients. We need a better understanding of the defects in HBV immunity and how to induce effective reconstitution that will maintain viral suppression, albeit either through innate or adaptive immunity. PMID:27580778

  18. Establishment of drug-resistant HBV small-animal models by hydrodynamic injection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Junjun; Han, Yanxing; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2014-01-01

    In antiviral therapy of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, drug resistance remains a huge obstacle to the long-term effectiveness of nucleoside/tide analogs (NAs). Primary resistance mutation (rtM204V) contributes to lamivudine (LAM)-resistance, and compensatory mutations (rtL180M and rtV173L) restore viral fitness and increase replication efficiency. The evaluation of new anti-viral agents against drug-resistant HBV is limited by the lack of available small-animal models. We established LAM-resistance HBV replication mice models based on clinical LAM-resistant HBV mutants. Double (rtM204V+rtL180M) or triple (rtM204V+rtL180M+rtV173L) lamivudine-resistant mutations were introduced into HBV expression vector, followed by hydrodynamic injection into tail vein of NOD/SCID mice. Viremia was detected on days 5, 9, 13 and 17 and liver HBV DNA was detected on day 17 after injection. The serum and liver HBV DNA levels in LAM-resistant model carrying triple mutations are the highest among the models. Two NAs, LAM and entecavir (ETV), were used to test the availability of the models. LAM and ETV inhibited viral replication on wild-type model. LAM was no longer effective on LAM-resistant models, but ETV retains a strong activity. Therefore, these models can be used to evaluate anti-viral agents against lamivudine-resistance, affording new opportunities to establish other drug-resistant HBV small-animal models. PMID:26579395

  19. The Dual Role of an ESCRT-0 Component HGS in HBV Transcription and Naked Capsid Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shu-Fan; Tsai, Ming-Lin; Huang, Jyun-Yuan; Chang, Ya-Shu; Shih, Chiaho

    2015-01-01

    The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) is an important cellular machinery for the sorting and trafficking of ubiquitinated cargos. It is also known that ESCRT is required for the egress of a number of viruses. To investigate the relationship between ESCRT and hepatitis B virus (HBV), we conducted an siRNA screening of ESCRT components for their potential effect on HBV replication and virion release. We identified a number of ESCRT factors required for HBV replication, and focused our study here on HGS (HRS, hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate) in the ESCRT-0 complex. Aberrant levels of HGS suppressed HBV transcription, replication and virion secretion. Hydrodynamic delivery of HGS in a mouse model significantly suppressed viral replication in the liver and virion secretion in the serum. Surprisingly, overexpression of HGS stimulated the release of HBV naked capsids, irrespective of their viral RNA, DNA, or empty contents. Mutant core protein (HBc 1–147) containing no arginine-rich domain (ARD) failed to secrete empty virions with or without HGS. In contrast, empty naked capsids of HBc 1–147 could still be promoted for secretion by HGS. HGS exerted a strong positive effect on the secretion of naked capsids, at the expense of a reduced level of virions. The association between HGS and HBc appears to be ubiquitin-independent. Furthermore, HBc is preferentially co-localized with HGS near the cell periphery, instead of near the punctate endosomes in the cytoplasm. In summary, our work demonstrated the importance of an optimum level of HGS in HBV propagation. In addition to an effect on HBV transcription, HGS can diminish the pool size of intracellular nucleocapsids with ongoing genome maturation, probably in part by promoting the secretion of naked capsids. The secretion routes of HBV virions and naked capsids can be clearly distinguished based on the pleiotropic effect of HGS involved in the ESCRT-0 complex. PMID

  20. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus (HBV) by LNA-mediated nuclear interference with HBV DNA transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhen; Xiang, Wenqing; Guo, Yajuan; Chen, Zhi; Liu, Wei; Lu, Daru

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} LNA-modified oligonucleotides can pass through the plasma membrane of cultured cells even without using transfection machinery. {yields} LNA-modified oligonucleotides passed efficiently across the cell membrane, and lipid-coating facilitated translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. {yields} LNA-oligonucleotide designed to target nuclear HBV DNA efficiently suppresses HBV replication and transcription in cultured hepatic cells. -- Abstract: Silencing target genes with small regulatory RNAs is widely used to investigate gene function and therapeutic drug development. Recently, triplex-based approaches have provided another attractive means to achieve targeted gene regulation and gene manipulation at the molecular and cellular levels. Nuclear entry of oligonucleotides and enhancement of their affinity to the DNA targets are key points of such approaches. In this study, we developed lipid-based transport of a locked-nucleic-acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA interference in human hepatocytes expressing HBV genomic DNA. In these cells, the LNA-modified oligonucleotides passed efficiently across the cell membrane, and lipid-coating facilitated translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The oligonucleotide specifically targeting HBV DNA clearly interfered with HBV DNA transcription as shown by a block in pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) production. The HBV DNA-targeted oligonucleotide suppressed HBV DNA replication and HBV protein production more efficiently than small interfering RNAs directed to the pgRNA. These results demonstrate that fusion with lipid can carry LNA-modified oligonucleotides to the nucleus where they regulate gene expression. Interfering with HBV DNA transcription by LNA-modified oligonucleotides has strong potential as a new strategy for HBV inhibition.

  1. A mouse model for HBV immunotolerance and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan; Liu, Longchao; Zhu, Danming; Peng, Hua; Su, Lishan; Fu, Yang-Xin; Zhang, Liguo

    2014-01-01

    Lack of an appropriate small animal model remains a major hurdle for studying the immunotolerance and immunopathogenesis induced by hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In this study, we report a mouse model with sustained HBV viremia after infection with a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) carrying a replicable HBV genome (AAV/HBV). Similar to the clinical HBV carriers, the mice infected with AAV/HBV were sero-negative for antibodies against HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). Immunization with the conventional HBV vaccine in the presence of aluminum adjuvant failed to elicit an immune response against HBV in these mice. To identify a vaccine that can potentially circumvent this tolerance, the TLR9 agonist CpG was added to HBsAg as an adjuvant. Vaccination of mice with HBsAg/CpG induced not only clearance of viremia, but also strong antibody production and T-cell responses. Furthermore, both the DNA replication and protein expression of HBV were significantly reduced in the livers of AAV/HBV-infected mice. Accordingly, AAV/HBV-infected mice may be used as a robust model for investigating the underlying mechanism(s) of HBV immunotolerance and for developing novel immunotherapies to eradicate HBV infections. PMID:24076617

  2. Functional analysis of 'a' determinant mutations associated with occult HBV in HIV-positive South Africans.

    PubMed

    Powell, Eleanor A; Boyce, Ceejay L; Gededzha, Maemu P; Selabe, Selokela G; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Blackard, Jason T

    2016-07-01

    Occult hepatitis B is defined by the presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Occult HBV is associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, reactivation during immune suppression, and virus transmission. Viral mutations contribute significantly to the occult HBV phenotype. Mutations in the 'a' determinant of HBsAg are of particular interest, as these mutations are associated with immune escape, vaccine escape and diagnostic failure. We examined the effects of selected occult HBV-associated mutations identified in a population of HIV-positive South Africans on HBsAg production in vitro. Mutations were inserted into two different chronic HBV backbones and transfected into a hepatocyte-derived cell line. HBsAg levels were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), while the detectability of mutant HBsAg was determined using an HA-tagged HBsAg expression system. Of the seven mutations analysed, four (S132P, C138Y, N146D and C147Y) resulted in decreased HBsAg expression in one viral background but not in the second viral background. One mutation (N146D) led to a decrease in HBsAg detected as compared to HA-tag, indicating that this mutation compromises the ability of the ELISA to detect HBsAg. The contribution of occult-associated mutations to the HBsAg-negative phenotype of occult HBV cannot be determined adequately by testing the effect of the mutation in a single viral background, and rigorous analysis of these mutations is required. PMID:27031988

  3. Hepatitis B escape mutants in Scottish blood donors.

    PubMed

    Larralde, Osmany; Dow, Brian; Jarvis, Lisa; Davidson, Fiona; Petrik, Juraj

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains as the viral infection with the highest risk of transmission by transfusion. This risk is associated with window period donations, occult HBV infection (OBI) and the emergence of escape mutants, which render blood donations false negative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) serological testing. A retrospective study was conducted to gain insights into the molecular epidemiology of HBV escape mutants in Scottish blood donors. The criterion for selection was HBV positivity either by serology or nucleic acid testing (NAT). HBsAg detection was compared across several commercial immunoassays. The full length S gene from plasma samples was PCR amplified, cloned and expressed in HepG2 cells. Eight samples showed HBsAg discordant results, while 5 OBI samples were found. Four escape mutants, containing missense mutations in the S gene, are described here. These mutations impaired HBsAg detection both from HBV infected plasma samples and from recombinant proteins derived from its infected donors. Phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the mutants were clustered in the genotype D and were closely related to strains from Asia and the Middle East. We report here a proline substitution, outside the major hydrophilic region, that impaired HBsAg detection in vivo and in vitro, warning about the risk for the emergence of vaccine escape mutants with mutations outside the major neutralisation site. PMID:23274404

  4. Global strategies are required to cure and eliminate HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Revill, Peter; Testoni, Barbara; Locarnini, Stephen; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Chronic HBV infection results in >1 million deaths per year from cirrhosis and liver cancer. No known cure for chronic HBV exists, due in part to the continued presence of transcriptionally active DNA in the nucleus that is not directly targeted by current antiviral therapies. A coordinated approach is urgently needed to advance an HBV cure worldwide, such as those established in the HIV field. We propose the establishment of an International Coalition to Eliminate Hepatitis B Virus (ICE-HBV) to facilitate the formation of international working groups on HBV virology, immunology, innovative tools and clinical trials: to promote awareness and education as well as to drive changes in government policy and ensure funds are channelled to HBV cure research and drug development. With the ICE-HBV in place, it should be possible to enable a HBV cure within the next decade. PMID:26907881

  5. The Role of Immune Cells in Chronic HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Jun; Zhai, Nai-Cui; Song, Hong-Xiao; Yang, Yang; Cui, An; Li, Tian-Yang; Tu, Zheng-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver diseases that may progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Host immune responses are important factors that determine whether HBV infection is cleared or persists. After infection, viral replication occurs inside hepatocytes, and the secretion of infectious virions can take place at high rates for decades. Consequently, HBV DNA and viral proteins, like HBV early antigen (HBeAg) and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), can be easily detected in serum. Chronic infection with HBV is the result of an ineffective antiviral immune response towards the virus. In this review, we discuss the role of immune cells in chronic HBV infection. PMID:26807384

  6. [Extrahepatic manifestations of HBV and HCV infection].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, H

    1997-07-16

    Acute as well as chronic infections by HBV and HCV can be associated with extrahepatic disease. As in liver disease of non-viral etiology, several extrahepatic manifestations can be observed that are non-specific for HBV or HCV, e.g. those clinical signs and symptoms frequently encountered when cirrhosis of the liver is present. In addition, distinct clinical conditions have been described in which the unterlying liver disease is specifically due to HBV or HCV infection. In chronic HBV infection, glomerulonephritis (of the membranous and of the membranoproliferative type) and polyarteritis nodosa have been observed. The pathogenesis of both conditions involves the deposition of circulating immune complexes. Although controlled trials are lacking, interferon therapy appears to be beneficial. The use of immunosuppressive drugs and of plasmapheresis should probably be limited to the initial phase of treatment. In chronic HCV infection, mixed cryoglobulinemia (and ensuing systemic vasculitis) is a frequent extrahepatic manifestation. The clinical presentation might include the presence of purpura, arthralgias, weakness and renal involvement. Nowadays, HCV can be regarded as the etiological agent of a form of mixed cryoglobulinemia formerly considered to be 'essential'. In addition, an association to lymphoma has been postulated recently. Interferon alpha has been used for treatment with similar response rates as those observed in HCV-infected patients without cryoglobulinemia. Interestingly, the antiviral activity of interferon, e.g. normalization of transaminases and loss of serum HCV RNA, was closely related to the beneficial effect on cryoglobulinemia. An association of Sjögren's syndrome and of porphyria cutanea tarda to HCV infection (though claimed before) remains questionable. Serological markers of autoimmunity, e.g. antinuclear antibodies or anti-LKM-1, are present in many patients with chronic HCV infection. The clinical relevance of this latter observation

  7. HBV endemicity in Mexico is associated with HBV genotypes H and G

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sonia; Panduro, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes have distinct genetic and geographic diversity and may be associated with specific clinical characteristics, progression, severity of disease and antiviral response. Herein, we provide an updated overview of the endemicity of HBV genotypes H and G in Mexico. HBV genotype H is predominant among the Mexican population, but not in Central America. Its geographic distribution is related to a typical endemicity among the Mexicans which is characterized by a low hepatitis B surface antigen seroprevalence, apparently due to a rapid resolution of the infection, low viral loads and a high prevalence of occult B infection. During chronic infections, genotype H is detected in mixtures with other HBV genotypes and associated with other co-morbidities, such as obesity, alcoholism and co-infection with hepatitis C virus or human immunodeficiency virus. Hepatocellular carcinoma prevalence is low. Thus, antiviral therapy may differ significantly from the standard guidelines established worldwide. The high prevalence of HBV genotype G in the Americas, especially among the Mexican population, raises new questions regarding its geographic origin that will require further investigation. PMID:24023487

  8. Clinical Relevance of HLA Gene Variants in HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Zou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Host gene variants may influence the natural history of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans, is one of the most important host factors that are correlated with the clinical course of HBV infection. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near certain HLA gene loci are strongly associated with not only persistent HBV infection but also spontaneous HBV clearance and seroconversion, disease progression, and the development of liver cirrhosis and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB). These variations also influence the efficacy of interferon (IFN) and nucleot(s)ide analogue (NA) treatment and response to HBV vaccines. Meanwhile, discrepant conclusions were reached with different patient cohorts. It is therefore essential to identify the associations of specific HLA allele variants with disease progression and viral clearance in chronic HBV infection among different ethnic populations. A better understanding of HLA polymorphism relevance in HBV infection outcome would enable us to elucidate the roles of HLA SNPs in the pathogenesis and clearance of HBV in different areas and ethnic groups, to improve strategies for the prevention and treatment of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27243039

  9. Performance evaluation of 70 hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) assays from around the world by a geographically diverse panel with an array of HBV genotypes and HBsAg subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Scheiblauer, H; El-Nageh, M; Diaz, S; Nick, S; Zeichhardt, H; Grunert, H-P; Prince, A

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives This study was conducted by the International Consortium for Blood Safety (ICBS) to identify high-quality test kits for detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) for the benefit of developing countries. Materials and Methods The 70 HBsAg test kits from around the world were evaluated comparatively for their clinical sensitivity, analytical sensitivity, sensitivity to HBV genotypes and HBsAg subtypes, and specificity using 394 (146 clinical, 48 analytical and 200 negative) ICBS Master Panel members of diverse geographical origin comprising the major HBV genotypes A-F and the HBsAg subtypes adw2,4, adr and ayw1-4. Results Seventeen HBsAg enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kits had high analytical sensitivity <0·13 IU/ml, showed 100% diagnostic sensitivity, and were even sensitive for the various HBV variants tested. An additional six test kits had high sensitivity (<0·13 IU/ml) but missed HBsAg mutants and/or showed reduced sensitivity to certain HBV genotypes. Twenty HBsAg EIA kits were in the sensitivity range of 0·13–1 IU/ml. The other eight EIAs and the 19 rapid assays had analytical sensitivities of 1 to >4 IU/ml. These assays were falsely negative for 1–4 clinical samples and 17 of these test kits showed genotype dependent sensitivity reduction. Analytical sensitivities for HBsAg of >1 IU/ml significantly reduce the length of the HBsAg positive period which renders them less reliable for detecting HBsAg in asymptomatic HBV infections. Reduced sensitivity for HBsAg with genetic diversity of HBV occurred with genotypes/subtypes D/ayw3, E/ayw4, F/adw4 and by S gene mutants. Specificity of the HBsAg assays was ≥99·5% in 57 test kits and 96·4–99·0% in the remaining test kits. Conclusion Diagnostic efficacy of the evaluated HBsAg test kits differed substantially. Laboratories should therefore be aware of the analytical sensitivity for HBsAg and check for the relevant HBV variants circulating in the relevant population

  10. Progress and Prospects of Anti-HBV Gene Therapy Development

    PubMed Central

    Maepa, Mohube B.; Roelofse, Ilke; Ely, Abdullah; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of an effective vaccine against hepatitis B virus (HBV), chronic infection with the virus remains a major global health concern. Current drugs against HBV infection are limited by emergence of resistance and rarely achieve complete viral clearance. This has prompted vigorous research on developing better drugs against chronic HBV infection. Advances in understanding the life cycle of HBV and improvements in gene-disabling technologies have been impressive. This has led to development of better HBV infection models and discovery of new drug candidates. Ideally, a regimen against chronic HBV infection should completely eliminate all viral replicative intermediates, especially covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA). For the past few decades, nucleic acid-based therapy has emerged as an attractive alternative that may result in complete clearance of HBV in infected patients. Several genetic anti-HBV strategies have been developed. The most studied approaches include the use of antisense oligonucleotides, ribozymes, RNA interference effectors and gene editing tools. This review will summarize recent developments and progress made in the use of gene therapy against HBV. PMID:26263978

  11. Biological characteristics of the rtA181T/sW172* mutant strain of Hepatitis B virus in animal model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effects of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) rtA181T/sW172* mutation on viral replication and pathogenicity was concerned recently. This study aimed to investigate the biological characteristics of rtA181T/sW172* mutant strain of HBV in animal model. Methods The rtA181T/sW172* mutant plasmid was constructed using the pHBV4.1 (wild type HBV) as a template. The wild and mutant HBV replication mouse models were established utilizing a hydrodynamic technique. The titers of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e antigen, and HBV DNA in serum, and the levels of HBsAg, hepatitis B core antigen(HBcAg), HBV DNA replication intermediates (HBV DNA RI) and HBV RNA in liver were measured after 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 12 and 15 days of plasmid injection. Results In wild-type HBV replication mouse model, serum HBsAg was high on day 1, 3, and 5, but became lower since day 7; while in mutant HBV mouse model, serum HBsAg was always at very low level. In liver tissues, HBV DNA RI of wild type HBV was detected on day 1 after transfection. The level subsequently peaked on day 3, gradually declined after day 5, and was almost undetectable on day 10. However, the HBV DNA RI levels of the mutant strain were always higher and lasted longer until day 15. Consistently, the expression levels of HBsAg and HBcAg in liver of the mutant group were significantly increased. Conclusions In the case of the HBV rtA181T/sW172* mutation, the secretion of serum HBsAg was impaired, whereas HBV DNA replication and HBsAg/HBcAg expression were increased in liver. These results suggest that the mutation can impair HBsAg secretion, and may cause the accumulation of viral core particles in liver. PMID:23171829

  12. Modelling Hepatitis B Virus Antiviral Therapy and Drug Resistant Mutant Strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Julie; Dix, Trevor; Allison, Lloyd; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Yuen, Lilly

    Despite the existence of vaccines, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still a serious global health concern. HBV targets liver cells. It has an unusual replication process involving an RNA pre-genome that the reverse transcriptase domain of the viral polymerase protein translates into viral DNA. The reverse transcription process is error prone and together with the high replication rates of the virus, allows the virus to exist as a heterogeneous population of mutants, known as a quasispecies, that can adapt and become resistant to antiviral therapy. This study presents an individual-based model of HBV inside an artificial liver, and associated blood serum, undergoing antiviral therapy. This model aims to provide insights into the evolution of the HBV quasispecies and the individual contribution of HBV mutations in the outcome of therapy.

  13. Bloodborne Pathogens: HIV and HBV Contagion Risks at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaros, Susan

    1996-01-01

    AIDS and hepatitis B are diseases caused by the viruses HIV and HBV, respectively, which are spread in blood and body fluids. HBV is 100 times more contagious than HIV. Diligent implementation of universal precautions, an exposure control plan, use of personal protective equipment, a vaccination program, and ongoing staff and camper education can…

  14. If You Have Chronic Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Infection

    MedlinePlus

    If you have chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection . . . If you have chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, you are not alone. Today, approximately one ... receive pneumococcal polysaccharide vac- cine.  Get vaccinated against hepatitis A. Hepati- tis A can further damage your ...

  15. HBV vaccine efficacy and detection and genotyping of vaccineé asymptomatic breakthrough HBV infection in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abushady, Eman AE; Gameel, Magda MA; Klena, John D; Ahmed, Salwa F; Abdel-Wahab, Kouka SE; Fahmy, Sanya M

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of mass vaccination against the hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Egypt, and to search for vaccinee asymptomatic breakthrough HBV infection and its genotype. METHODS: Seven hundred serum samples from vaccinated children and adults (aged 2-47 years) were used for quantitative and qualitative detection of HBsAb by ELISA. Three hundred and sixty serum samples representing undetectable or low or high HBsAb were screened for markers of active HBV infection (HBsAg, HBcAb (IgG) and HBeAb by ELISA, plus HBsAg by AxSYM) and HBV-DNA genotyping by nested multiplex PCR and by DNA sequencing. RESULTS: It was found that 65% of children aged 2-4 years, and 20.5% aged 4-13 years, as well as 45% adults were good responders to HBV vaccination mounting protective level HBsAb. Poor responders were 28%, 59.5% and 34%, and non-responders were 7%, 20% and 21% respectively, in the three studied groups. Markers of asymptomatic HBV infections were HBsAg detected by ELISA in 2.5% vs 11.39% by AxSYM. Other markers were HBcAb (IgG) in 1.38%, HBeAb in 0.83%, and HBV-DNA in 7.8%. All had HBV genotype E infection. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that HBV vaccine is efficient in controlling HBV infection among children and adults. The vaccine breakthrough infection was by HBV genotype E. A booster dose of vaccine is recommended, probably four years after initial vaccination. PMID:21860674

  16. Application of CRISPR/Cas9 Technology to HBV

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guigao; Zhang, Kuo; Li, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    More than 240 million people around the world are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Nucleos(t)ide analogs and interferon are the only two families of drugs to treat HBV currently. However, none of these anti-virals directly target the stable nuclear covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), which acts as a transcription template for viral mRNA and pre-genomic RNA synthesis and secures virus persistence. Thus, the fact that only a small number of patients treated achieve sustained viral response (SVR) or cure, highlights the need for new therapies against HBV. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 gene editing system can specifically target the conserved regions of the HBV genome. This results in robust viral suppression and provides a promising tool for eradicating the virus. In this review, we discuss the function and application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system as a novel therapy for HBV. PMID:26540039

  17. Rapamycin Enhances HBV Production by Inducing Cellular Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenjuan; Zhao, Fengrong; Huang, Ying; Li, Xia; Zhu, Sufei; Hu, Qin; Chen, Weixian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Some reports revealed that rapamycin could reactivate HBV infection. However, the mechanism has not been clearly explained. Objectives: In this report, we studied the mechanism by which rapamycin enhances HBV replication and expression by inducing cellular autophagy. Materials and Methods: HepG2.2.15 cells were treated with rapamycin to induce autophagy. Autophagosomes were observed by fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Autophagy marker protein LC3-Ⅱ/LC3-Ⅰwas detected by Western blotting. HBV DNA and mRNA were determined by real time PCR and Southern blotting. HBsAg was evaluated by ELISA. Results: In HepG2.2.15 cells, HBV DNA and HBsAg increased when host cells were treated with rapamycin and the effect was reversed by autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA). Conclusions: These results indicated a potential explanation for reactivation of HBV infection when patients with hepatitis receive rapamycin. PMID:25419217

  18. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate opposes HBV-induced incomplete autophagy by enhancing lysosomal acidification, which is unfavorable for HBV replication

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, L; Hu, J; Shu, W; Gao, B; Xiong, S

    2015-01-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major polyphenol in green tea, exhibits diverse beneficial properties, including antiviral activity. Autophagy is a cellular process that is involved in the degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged organelles. Recent evidence indicates that modulation of autophagy is a potential therapeutic strategy for various viral diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effect of EGCG on hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication and the possible involvement of autophagy in this process. Our results showed that HBV induced autophagosome formation, which was required for replication of itself. However, although EGCG efficiently inhibited HBV replication, it enhanced, but not inhibited, autophagosome formation in hepatoma cells. Further study showed that HBV induced an incomplete autophagy, while EGCG, similar to starvation, was able to induce a complete autophagic process, which appeared to be unfavorable for HBV replication. Furthermore, it was found that HBV induced an incomplete autophagy by impairing lysosomal acidification, while it lost this ability in the presence of EGCG. Taken together, these data demonstrated that EGCG treatment opposed HBV-induced incomplete autophagy via enhancing lysosomal acidification, which was unfavorable for HBV replication. PMID:25996297

  19. Therapeutic vaccines in HBV: lessons from HCV.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-02-01

    Currently, millions of people infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) are committed to decades of treatment with anti-viral therapy to control viral replication. However, new tools for immunotherapy that include both viral vectors and molecular checkpoint inhibitors are now available. This has led to a resurgence of interest in new strategies to develop immunotherapeutic strategies with the aim of inducing HBeAg seroconversion--an end-point that has been associated with a decrease in the rates of disease progression. Ultimately, a true cure will involve the elimination of covalently closed circular DNA which presents a greater challenge for immunotherapy. In this manuscript, I describe the development of immunotherapeutic strategies for HBV that are approaching or currently in clinical studies, and draw on observations of T cell function in natural infection supported by recent animal studies that may lead to additional rational vaccine strategies using checkpoint inhibitors. I also draw on our recent experience in developing potent vaccines for HCV prophylaxis based on simian adenoviral and MVA vectors used in prime-boost strategies in both healthy volunteers and HCV infected patients. I have shown that the induction of T cell immune responses is markedly attenuated when administered to people with persistent HCV viremia. These studies and recently published animal studies using the woodchuck model suggest that potent vaccines based on DNA or adenoviral vectored vaccination represent a rational way forward. However, combining these with drugs to suppress viral replication, alongside checkpoint inhibitors may be required to induce long-term immune control. PMID:25573348

  20. Breastfeeding and chronic HBV infection: Clinical and social implications

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Mihaela; Kamburov, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is among the most important causes of chronic HBV infection and is the commonest mode of transmission worldwide. Currently, the presence of HBsAg, HBeAg and HBV DNA in breast milk is confirmed. Several studies have reported that breastfeeding carries no additional risk that might lead to vertical transmission. Beyond some limitations, the surveys have not demonstrated any differences in HBV transmission rate regarding feeding practices in early childhood. Promotion of breastfeeding is substantial, especially for low-income individuals and regions with uncertain, unfeasible, and unsafe water supplies. Lactoferrin, minimal inflammation or activation within the infant gut during exclusive breastfeeding, and nonspecific biological molecules in the milk are identified as major factors of breast-milk defense. This review discusses preemptive antiviral therapy during pregnancy and lactation. Long-term follow up of breast-milk HBV concentrations and correlation with serum viral load; nucleos(t)ide analogue concentrations in breast milk in HBV-positive mothers in the setting of chronic HBV infection; safety of antiviral therapy during pregnancy and lactation; and the difference in viral load in the milk in exclusive or non-exclusive breastfeeding are still open questions. The paper reviews the current data and outlines the course of further investigation into this often underestimated issue. PMID:20976840

  1. HBV DNA vaccine with adjuvant cytokines induced specific immune responses against HBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Du, De-Wei; Jia, Zhan-Sheng; Li, Guang-Yu; Zhou, Yong-Ying

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To seek for an effective method to improve the immune responses induced by DNA vaccine expressing HBV surface antigen (pCR3.1-S) in Balb/c mice (H-2d). METHODS: The pCR3.1-S plasmid and the eukaryotic expression vectors expressing murine IL-2 (pDOR-IL-2) or IL-12 (pWRG3169) were injected into mice subcutaneously. The immune responses to pCR3.1-S and the adjuvant effect of the cytokines plasmid were studied. Meanwhile the effect of pCR3.1-S on anti-translated subcutaneous tumor of P815 mastocytoma cells stably expressing HBsAg (P815-HBV-S) was also studied. Anti-HBs in serum was detected by enzyme-linked immunoadsordent assay (ELISA) and HBsAg specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) activity was measured by 51Cr release assay. After three weeks of DNA immunization, the cells of P815-HBV-S were inoculated into mice subcutaneously and the tumor growth was measured every five days. The survival rate and living periods of mice were also calculated. RESULTS: After 8 wk DNA immunization, the A 450 nm values of sera in mice immunized with pCR3.1, pCR3.1-S and pCR3.1-S codeliveried with IL-2 or IL-12 plasmids were 0.03 ± 0.01, 1.24 ± 0.10, 1.98 ± 0.17 and 1.67 ± 0.12 respectively. Data in mice codeliveried pCR3.1-S with IL-2 or IL-12 plasmids were significantly higher than that of mice injected pCR3.1 or pCR3.1-S only. The HBsAg specific CTL activities in mice coinjected with pCR3.1-S and IL-2 or IL-12 eukaryotic expression vectors were (61.9 ± 7.1)% and (73.3 ± 8.8)%, which were significantly higher than that of mice injected with pCR3.1 (10.1 ± 2.1)% or pCR3.1-S (50.5 ± 6.4)%. The HBsAg specific CTL activities in mice injected with pCR3.1, pCR3.1-S, pCR3.1-S combined with IL-2 or IL-12 eukaryotic expression vectors decreased significantly to (3.2 ± 0.8)%, (10.6 ± 1.4)%, (13.6 ± 1.3)% and (16.9 ± 2.3)% respectively after the spleen cells were treated by anti-CD8+ monoclonal antibody, but presented no significant change to anti-CD4+ monoclonal antibody or

  2. Trained immunity in newborn infants of HBV-infected mothers

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Michelle; Sandalova, Elena; Low, Diana; Gehring, Adam J.; Fieni, Stefania; Amadei, Barbara; Urbani, Simonetta; Chong, Yap-Seng; Guccione, Ernesto; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The newborn immune system is characterized by an impaired Th1-associated immune response. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmitted from infected mothers to newborns is thought to exploit the newborns’ immune system immaturity by inducing a state of immune tolerance that facilitates HBV persistence. Contrary to this hypothesis, we demonstrate here that HBV exposure in utero triggers a state of trained immunity, characterized by innate immune cell maturation and Th1 development, which in turn enhances the ability of cord blood immune cells to respond to bacterial infection in vitro. These training effects are associated with an alteration of the cytokine environment characterized by low IL-10 and, in most cases, high IL-12p40 and IFN-α2. Our data uncover a potentially symbiotic relationship between HBV and its natural host, and highlight the plasticity of the fetal immune system following viral exposure in utero. PMID:25807344

  3. Changes of HBV DNA After Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma and the Efficacy of Antiviral Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao-Jun; Lao, Xiang-Ming; Shi, Ming; Li, Sheng-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Unlike systemic chemotherapy for hematological malignancies with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has only recently been reported to cause HBV reactivation and subsequent hepatitis. Most patients with HBV-related HCC have an underlying disease with liver fibrosis or cirrhosis, and TACE may potentially induce HBV reactivation and liver decompensation. Currently, there are no clinical guidelines for managing TACE-caused HBV reactivation. In this review, we summarize the changes of HBV status and liver function after TACE and the effect of antiviral treatment before, during, or after TACE. PMID:27105647

  4. Impairment of SOD1-G93A motility is linked to mitochondrial movement in axons of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jae Ryul; Kim, Sung Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is a well-known antioxidant enzyme. Mutation of SOD1 is closely associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. However, the pathologic pathways linking neurodegenerative diseases with mutation of SOD1 remain elusive. Here, we investigated the motility of SOD1-WT and -G93A (a pathogenic mutant of SOD1), and observed correlation of axonal transport of the mutant protein with mitochondria in primary cultured hippocampal neurons. The SOD1-G93A mutant showed significant accumulation at vGlut1-positive synaptic boutons and in cell bodies, compared to SOD1-WT. The proportions of motile WT and G93A proteins were similar (~30 %) while the motility velocity of SOD1-G93A was significantly slower (~40 %) than that of the WT counterpart. This motility defect of SOD1-G93A was highly correlated with mitochondrial movement. Our results collectively suggest that the SOD1-G93A mutant has a defect in motility that is linked to mitochondrial transport in axons. PMID:27464601

  5. Polymorphisms of FGFR1 in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haiyang; Xing, Chunyang; Wei, Bajin; Xu, Xiao; Wu, Liming; Wu, Jian; Chen, Leiming; Cao, Guoqiang; Chen, Hai; Meng, Xueqin; Yin, Shengyong; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in China. It is important to understand the genetic mechanisms underlying the development and progression of HBV-related HCC and to identify new biomarkers for clinical treatment. The important role of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) has been widely recognized in many types of cancers, but the association between FGFR polymorphisms and HCC carcinogenesis has been rarely reported. In this study, 199 patients with HBV-associated cirrhosis, 203 with HBV-associated HCC, and 184 healthy controls with no liver diseases were enrolled as participants. Using SNaPshot assays, five SNPs (rs13317, rs7825208, rs1047057, rs1047111, and rs1966265) of growth factor receptor genes were genotyped. Our results showed that the G/A and G/G genotypes at rs7825208 of FGFR1 were negatively correlated with HBV-related HCC (odds ratio (OR) = 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.22-0.93, P = 0.027). However, after Bonferroni correction, these significant differences no longer existed (P > 0.05). Our results indicated that these five polymorphisms of fibroblast growth factor receptor genes do not play any independent roles in the tumorigenesis and progression of HBV-related HCC in Han Chinese patients. PMID:26069105

  6. TLR3 Plays Significant Roles against HBV-Associated HCC

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-lan; Xu, Yu-yin; Chen, Li; Wang, Gui-lan; Shen, Yin

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is a pattern-recognizing receptor that is involved in immune signaling and plays a crucial role in survival by being able to recognize various viral components including double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The role of TLR3 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections is not well understood. To investigate the ability of TLR3 in regulating HBV replication in HCC, 80 cases of human HCC were collected and their tissue microarray was made. In HCC cells, the expression and location of TLR3, hepatitis-associated virus, and interstitial immunoreactive cells were assayed with immunohistochemical staining. The apoptosis of tumor cells was also detected by TUNEL stain. Correlations between TLR3 expression and HBV infection, interstitial immunoreactive cells, and cells apoptosis in HCC were investigated. In addition, we explored whether TLR3 agonist dsRNA can inhibit HepG2.2.15 cells secreting HBV. We found that the cytoplasmic expression of TLR3 in HCC is positively related to HBsAg infection and HCC with cirrhosis and promotes interstitial immunoreactive cells infiltration and cancer cells apoptosis. In HepG2.2.15 cells, dsRNA inhibited the secretion of HBV and induced apoptosis. These results indicate that TLR3 signaling activity may be involved in immune responses against HBV in HCC. PMID:25983748

  7. HBV polymerase overexpression due to large core gene deletion enhances hepatoma cell growth by binding inhibition of microRNA-100

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Hui; Tseng, Ying-Hsin; Lin, Wey-Ran; Hung, George; Chen, Tse-Ching; Wang, Tong-Hong; Lee, Wei-Chen; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Different types of hepatitis B virus (HBV) core gene deletion mutants were identified in chronic hepatitis B patients. However, their clinical roles in different stages of natural chronic HBV infection remained unclear. To address this issue, HBV core genes were sequenced in three gender- and age-matched patient groups diagnosed as chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), respectively. Functional analysis of the identified mutants was performed. A novel type of large-fragment core gene deletion (LFCD) was identified exclusively in HCC patients and significantly associated with unfavorable postoperative survival. The presence of LFCDs resulted in generation of precore-polymerase fusion protein or brought the polymerase reading frame under direct control of HBV precore/core promoter, leading to its over-expression. Enhanced cell proliferation and increased tumorigenicity in nude mice were found in hepatoma cells expressing LFCDs. Because of the epsilon-binding ability of HBV polymerase, we hypothesized that the over-expressed polymerase carrying aberrant amino-terminal sequence could bind to cellular microRNAs. Screening of a panel of microRNAs revealed physical association of a precore-polymerase fusion protein with microRNA-100. A binding inhibition effect on microRNA-100 by the precore-polymerase fusion protein with up-regulation of its target, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), was discovered. The binding inhibition and growth promoting effects could be reversed by overexpressing microRNA-100. Together, HCC patients carrying hepatitis B large-fragment core gene deletion mutants had an unfavorable postoperative prognosis. The growth promoting effect was partly due to polymerase overexpression, leading to binding inhibition of microRNA-100 and up-regulation of PLK1. PMID:26824500

  8. HBV-Associated Postinfectious Acute Glomerulonephritis: A Report of 10 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Junxia; Peng, Weihua; Yu, Guoqing; Wang, Liping; Chen, Jian; Zheng, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Postinfectious acute glomerulonephritis (PIGN) may occur after various bacterial and viral infections. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a cause of chronic glomerulonephritis. We report here 10 cases (ages 7–20 years-old) of chronic HBV carriers with acute glomerulonephritis, with positive glomerular staining of hepatitis B surface antigen, and detectable presence of HBV DNA in the glomeruli. This form of PIGN, HBV-PIGN, has not been previously identified. To further characterize clinical and pathological features of HBV- PIGN, we selected 10 cases of age-matched non-HBV PIGN for comparison. While both HBV associated PIGN and non-HBV PIGN similarly presented as proteinuria, hematuria, and hypertension, there was a trend of higher acute kidney injury and worsened prognosis in HBV-PIGN. 6 months after the onset, 4 patients with HBV associated PIGN did not show improvement from the disease, whereas all patients with non-HBV PIGN had complete or partial recovery. Pathologically, both HBV associated PIGN and non-HBV PIGN showed typical diffuse glomerular endocapillary proliferation, but HBV associated PIGN differed from classical PIGN with much fewer sub-epithelial glomerular “hump-shape” immune complex depositions. In conclusion, we have identified a novel association of HBV infection with acute glomerulonephritis. PMID:27512989

  9. A Novel Hydrodynamic Injection Mouse Model of HBV Genotype C for the Study of HBV Biology and the Anti-Viral Activity of Lamivudine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiumei; Liu, Guangze; Chen, Meijuan; Yang, Yang; Xie, Yong; Kong, Xiangping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Absence of an immunocompetent mouse model of persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has hindered the research of HBV infection and the development of antiviral medications. Objectives: In the present study, we aimed to develop a novel HBV genotype C mouse model by hydrodynamic injection (HI) and then used it to evaluate the antiviral activity of lamivudine. Materials and Methods: A quantity of 15 μg of HBV plasmid [pcDNA3.1 (+)-HBV1.3C], adeno-associated virus-HBV1.3C (pAAV-HBV1.3C) or pAAV-HBV1.2A) were injected into male C57BL/6 mice, by HI, accounting for a total of 13 mice per group. Then, lamivudine was administered to mice with sustained HBV viremia, for 4 weeks. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry methods were used to detect HBsAg, HBeAg, HBsAb, HBcAg and HBV DNA, in serum or liver of the mice, at indicated time points. Results: In 60% of the mice injected with pcDNA3.1 (+)-HBV1.3C, HBsAg, HBeAg, HBcAg and HBV DNA persisted for > 20 weeks in liver, post-injection, with no HBsAb appearance. Meanwhile, no significant inflammation was observed in these mice. Compared with pAAV-HBV1.2A and pAAV-HBV1.3C, pcDNA3.1 (+)-HBV1.3C administration led to higher and longer HBV viremia. Furthermore, serum HBV DNA was significantly reduced by lamivudine, after 4 weeks administration, and returned to the original level, after ceasing administration for 1 week, in the mice. Conclusions: In conclusion, our observations indicated that pcDNA3.1 (+)-HBV1.3C was superior to AAV/HBV plasmid for establishment of persistent HBV infection by HI, in vivo, and this mouse model could be useful for studies of hepatitis virology and for the development of innovatory treatments for HBV infections. PMID:27195013

  10. The prognosis and management of inactive HBV carriers.

    PubMed

    Invernizzi, Federica; Viganò, Mauro; Grossi, Glenda; Lampertico, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection lacking the serum hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and with antibodies against HBeAg (anti-HBe), are the prevalent subgroup of HBV carriers worldwide. The prognosis of these patients is different from inactive carriers (ICs), who are characterized by persistently normal serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and low (<2000 IU/ml) serum HBV DNA levels, a serological profile that may also be intermittently observed in patients with HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis. This is why a confirmed diagnosis of IC requires quarterly ALT and HBV DNA measurements for at least 1 year, while a single-point detection of combined HBsAg <1000 IU/ml and HBV DNA <2000 IU/ml has a robust predictive value for the diagnosis of IC. Characteristically, ICs have minimal or no histological lesions of the liver corresponding to liver stiffness values on Fibroscan of <5 kPa. Antiviral treatment is not indicated in ICs since the prognosis for the progression of liver disease is favourable if there are no cofactors of liver damage such as alcohol abuse, excess weight or co-infection with the hepatitis C virus or delta virus. Moreover, spontaneous HBsAg loss frequently occurs (1-1.9% per year) in these patients while the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is rare, at least in Caucasian patients. However, an emerging issue reinforcing the need for clinical surveillance of ICs is the risk of HBV reactivation in patients who undergo immunosuppressive therapy without receiving appropriate antiviral prophylaxis. After diagnosis, management of ICs includes monitoring of ALT and HBV DNA every 12 months with periodic measurement of serum HBsAg levels to identify viral clearance. PMID:26725905

  11. [Establishment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronic infection mouse model by in vivo transduction with a recombinant adeno-associated virus 8 carrying 1. 3 copies of HBV genome (rAAN8-1. 3HBV)].

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao-Yan; Yu, Chi-Jie; Wang, Gang; Tian, Wen-Hong; Lu, Yue; Zhang, Feng-Wei; Wang, Wen; Wang, Yue; Tan, Wen-Jie; Wu, Xiao-Bing

    2010-11-01

    In this report, we developed a HBV infection model in C57BL/6 mouse line by in vivo injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus 8 vector carrying 1. 3 copies of HBV genome (ayw subtype) (rAAV8-1. 3HBV). We firstly prepared and purified the rAAV8-1. 3HBV and then injected it into three C57BL/6 mice with the dose of 2 x 10e11vg, respectively. HBsAg and HBeAg were assayed in sera collected at different time points post injection. Ten weeks post injection, the three mice were sacrificed and blood and liver tissue were taken for assay. Copies of HBV DNA were detected by real time PCR and the way of HBV DNA replication was identified by PCR. Subsequently, detection of HBV antigen by immunohistochemistry and pathology analysis of liver tissue of mice were performed. The results suggested that expression of HBsAg and HBeAg lasted for at least 10 weeks in mice sera. Among mice injected with rAAV8-1. 3HBV, HBsAg levels were showed an 'increasing-decreasing-increasing' pattern (the lowest level at the 4th week post injection), while HBeAg levels were kept high and relatively stable. HBV DNA copies were 4.2 x 10(3), 3.6 x 10(3), 2.5 x 10(3) copies/mL in sera and 8.0 x 10(6), 5.7 x 10(6), 2.6 x 10(6) copies/g in hepatic tissues of three mice, respectively. We found that the linear 1. 3HBV DNA in the rAAV8-1. 3HBV could self form into circular HBV genome and replicate in livers of HBV transfected mice. HBsAg and HBcAg were both positive in liver tissue of mice injected with rAAV8-1. 3HBV and no obvious pathological characters were found in liver of mice injected with rAAV8-1. 3HBV. In conclusion, we successfully developed a HBV chronic infection model in C57BL/6 mouse line by in vivo transduction with the recombinant virus rAAV8-1. 3HBV, in which HBV genes could be continuously expressed and replicated over 10 weeks, and paved a way for further characterization of the human chronic hepatitis B virus infection and evaluation of vaccine and anti-HBV agents. PMID:21344744

  12. Differences in antiproliferative effect of STAT3 inhibition in HCC cells with versus without HBV expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yun; Zhou, Lin; Xie, Haiyang; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-06-05

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) plays an important role in the etiology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) inactivation could inhibit the tumor growth of HCC. In this study, differential antiproliferative effect of STAT3 inhibition was observed with HBV-related HCC cells being more resistant than non-HBV-related HCC cells. Resistance of HBV-related HCC cells to STAT3 inhibition was positively correlated to the expression of HBV. Enhanced ERK activation after STAT3 blockade was detected in HBV-related HCC cells but not in non-HBV-related HCC cells. Combined ERK and STAT3 inhibition eliminates the discrepancy between the two types of HCC cells. Moderate reduced HBV expression was found after STAT3 inhibition. These findings disclose a discrepancy in cellular response to STAT3 inhibition between non-HBV-related and HBV-related HCC cells and underscore the complexity of antiproliferative effect of STAT3 inactivation in HBV-related HCC cells. - Highlights: • HBV endows HCC cells with resistance to STAT3 inactivation on proliferation. • Abnormal ERK activation after STAT3 inhibition in HBV-related HCC cells. • Combined ERK and STAT3 inhibition eliminates the discrepancy. • STAT3 inhibition moderately reduces HBV expression.

  13. Virologic and Clinical Outcomes of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in HIV-HBV Coinfected Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Coffin, C.S.; Stock, P.G.; Dove, L.M.; Berg, C.L.; Nissen, N.N.; Curry, M.P.; Ragni, M.; Regenstein, F.G.; Sherman, K.E.; Roland, M.E.; Terrault, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the treatment of choice for endstage liver disease, but is controversial in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Using a prospective cohort of HIV-HBV coinfected patients transplanted between 2001–2007; outcomes including survival and HBV clinical recurrence were determined. Twenty-two coinfected patients underwent LT; 45% had detectable HBV DNA pre-LT and 72% were receiving anti-HBV drugs with efficacy against lamivudine-resistant HBV. Post-LT, all patients received hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) plus nucleos(t)ide analogues and remained HBsAg negative without clinical evidence of HBV recurrence, with a median follow-up 3.5 years. Low-level HBV viremia (median 108 IU/ml, range 9–789) was intermittently detected in 7/13 but not associated with HBsAg detection or ALT elevation. Compared with 20 HBV monoinfected patients on similar HBV prophylaxis and median follow-up of 4.0 years, patient and graft survival were similar: 100% vs. 85% in HBV mono- vs coinfected patients (p=0.08, log rank test). LT is effective for HIV-HBV coinfected patients with complications of cirrhosis, including those who are HBV DNA positive at the time of LT. Combination HBIG and antivirals is effective as prophylaxis with no clinical evidence of HBV recurrence but low level HBV DNA is detectable in ~50% of recipients. PMID:20346065

  14. Reliable timescale inference of HBV genotype A origin and phylodynamics.

    PubMed

    Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Svicher, Valentina; Gabanelli, Elena; Ebranati, Erika; Veo, Carla; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Giovanetti, Marta; Bussini, Linda; Salpini, Romina; Alteri, Claudia; Lai, Alessia; Tanzi, Elisabetta; Perno, Carlo Federico; Galli, Massimo; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    The worldwide distributed Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype A is classified into three subgenotypes, and one quasi-subgenotype. The majority of HBV-A subgenotypes are widespread in Africa and in ethnic groups that have relatively recently emigrated from African countries, whereas HBV-A2 is highly prevalent among subjects at high risk for sexual exposure to HBV in north-western Europe and the USA. The aim of this study was to reconstruct the origin and dispersion of HBV-A subgenotypes on a reliable timescale using short-term calibration based on heterochronous sampling for HBV-A2, and long-term calibration based on historical data for the other subgenotypes. To this aim, we analysed 113 newly characterised HBV-A isolates with 247 reference sequences retrieved from a public database. The phylodynamic reconstruction was performed by a Bayesian framework. The common ancestor of the currently circulating A subgenotypes was placed in west-central Africa a mean 1057 years ago. The genotype diverged into two main clades at the beginning of the 13th century: one including all of the west-central African quasi-subgenotypes and the other corresponding to subgenotype A1, originating in east Africa and further segregating into two main subclades: an "African" and a "cosmopolitan" clade. It is likely that the slave trade was the main source the spread of cosmopolitan HBV-A1, which was exported to Asia in the 17th century as a result of Arab or Portuguese trade, and to Latin America in the 18th centuries through the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The origin of the currently circulating A2 strains dates back to the first decades of the 20th century, and the evolutionary demography analysis suggests an exponential growth of infections, between 1970s and the mid-1990s. In conclusion, the very different epidemiological and evolutionary histories of HBV-A subgenotypes justify the use of different calibration approaches to reconstruct their reciprocal phylodynamics. PMID:25784568

  15. Towards an HBV cure: state-of-the-art and unresolved questions--report of the ANRS workshop on HBV cure.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Mirjam B; Lucifora, Julie; Mason, William S; Sureau, Camille; Beck, Jürgen; Levrero, Massimo; Kann, Michael; Knolle, Percy A; Benkirane, Monsef; Durantel, David; Michel, Marie-Louise; Autran, Brigitte; Cosset, François-Loïc; Strick-Marchand, Hélène; Trépo, Christian; Kao, Jia-Horng; Carrat, Fabrice; Lacombe, Karine; Schinazi, Raymond F; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Zoulim, Fabien

    2015-08-01

    HBV infection is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although HBV infection can be efficiently prevented by vaccination, and treatments are available, to date there is no reliable cure for the >240 million individuals that are chronically infected worldwide. Current treatments can only achieve viral suppression, and lifelong therapy is needed in the majority of infected persons. In the framework of the French National Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis 'HBV Cure' programme, a scientific workshop was held in Paris in June 2014 to define the state-of-the-art and unanswered questions regarding HBV pathobiology, and to develop a concerted strategy towards an HBV cure. This review summarises our current understanding of HBV host-interactions leading to viral persistence, as well as the roadblocks to be overcome to ultimately address unmet medical needs in the treatment of chronic HBV infection. PMID:25670809

  16. Prevalence of HBV and HBV vaccination coverage in health care workers of tertiary hospitals of Peshawar, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) may progress to serious consequences and increase dramatically beyond endemic dimensions that transmits to or from health care workers (HCWs) during routine investigation in their work places. Basic aim of this study was to canvass the safety of HCWs and determine the prevalence of HBV and its possible association with occupational and non-occupational risk factors. Hepatitis B vaccination coverage level and main barriers to vaccination were also taken in account. Results A total of 824 health care workers were randomly selected from three major hospitals of Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Blood samples were analyzed in Department of Zoology, Kohat University of Science and Technology Kohat, and relevant information was obtained by means of preset questionnaire. HCWs in the studied hospitals showed 2.18% prevalence of positive HBV. Nurses and technicians were more prone to occupational exposure and to HBV infection. There was significant difference between vaccinated and non-vaccinated HCWs as well as between the doctors and all other categories. Barriers to complete vaccination, in spite of good knowledge of subjects in this regard were work pressure (39.8%), negligence (38.8%) un-affordability (20.9%), and unavailability (0.5%). Conclusions Special preventive measures (universal precaution and vaccination), which are fundamental way to protect HCW against HBV infection should be adopted. PMID:21645287

  17. Low Prevalence of Liver Disease but Regional Differences in HBV Treatment Characteristics Mark HIV/HBV Co-Infection in a South African HIV Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ive, Prudence; MacLeod, William; Mkumla, Nompumelelo; Orrell, Catherine; Jentsch, Ute; Wallis, Carole L.; Stevens, Wendy; Wood, Robin; Sanne, Ian; Bhattacharya, Debika

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is endemic in South Africa however, there is limited data on the degree of liver disease and geographic variation in HIV/HBV coinfected individuals. In this study, we analysed data from the CIPRA-SA ‘Safeguard the household study’ in order to assess baseline HBV characteristics in HIV/HBV co-infection participants prior to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Methods 812 participants from two South African townships Soweto and Masiphumelele were enrolled in a randomized trial of ART (CIPRA-SA). Participants were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), and HBV DNA. FIB-4 scores were calculated at baseline. Results Forty-eight (5.9%) were HBsAg positive, of whom 28 (58.3%) were HBeAg positive. Of those with HBV, 29.8% had an HBV DNA<2000 IU/ml and ALT<40 IU/ml ; 83.0% had a FIB-4 score <1.45, consistent with absent or minimal liver disease. HBV prevalence was 8.5% in Masiphumelele compared to 3.8% in Soweto (relative risk 2.3; 95% CI: 1.3–4.0). More participants in Masiphumelele had HBeAg-negative disease (58% vs. 12%, p = 0.002) and HBV DNA levels ≤2000 IU/ml, (43% vs. 6% p<0.007). Conclusion One third of HIV/HBV co-infected subjects had low HBV DNA levels and ALT while the majority had indicators of only mild liver disease. There were substantial regional differences in HBsAg and HbeAg prevalence in HIV/HBV co-infection between two regions in South Africa. This study highlights the absence of severe liver disease and the marked regional differences in HIV/HBV co-infection in South Africa and will inform treatment decisions in these populations. PMID:24324573

  18. Occult HBV reactivation induced by ibrutinib treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    de Jésus Ngoma, Patrick; Kabamba, Benoît; Dahlqvist, Geraldine; Sempoux, Christine; Lanthier, Nicolas; Shindano, Tony; Van Den Neste, Eric; Horsmans, Yves

    2015-12-01

    Ibrutinib is a small molecule that has been recently developped for the treatment of B cell malignancies. Common side effects are diarrhoea, nausea, fatigue, infections, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Here we report the first case of Hepatitis B virus reactivation in a 80 years old chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patient receiving ibrutinib, suggesting that such treatment must be associated with HBV screening. PMID:26712054

  19. Construction and Immunological Evaluation of Multivalent Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Core Virus-Like Particles Carrying HBV and HCV Epitopes▿

    PubMed Central

    Sominskaya, Irina; Skrastina, Dace; Dislers, Andris; Vasiljev, Denis; Mihailova, Marija; Ose, Velta; Dreilina, Dzidra; Pumpens, Paul

    2010-01-01

    A multivalent vaccine candidate against hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections was constructed on the basis of HBV core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) as carriers. Chimeric VLPs that carried a virus-neutralizing HBV pre-S1 epitope corresponding to amino acids (aa) 20 to 47 in the major immunodominant region (MIR) and a highly conserved N-terminal HCV core epitope corresponding to aa 1 to 60 at the C terminus of the truncated HBcΔ protein (N-terminal aa 1 to 144 of full-length HBc) were produced in Escherichia coli cells and examined for their antigenicity and immunogenicity. The presence of two different foreign epitopes within the HBc molecule did not interfere with its VLP-forming ability, with the HBV pre-S1 epitope exposed on the surface and the HCV core epitope buried within the VLPs. After immunization of BALB/c mice, specific T-cell activation by both foreign epitopes and a high-titer antibody response against the pre-S1 epitope were found, whereas an antibody response against the HBc carrier was notably suppressed. Both inserted epitopes also induced a specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) response, as shown by the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production profile. PMID:20410327

  20. Preliminary characterisation of new glass reference materials (GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G) by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry using 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm wavelengths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guillong, M.; Hametner, K.; Reusser, E.; Wilson, S.A.; Gunther, D.

    2005-01-01

    New glass reference materials GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G have been characterised using a prototype solid state laser ablation system capable of producing wavelengths of 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm. This system allowed comparison of the effects of different laser wavelengths under nearly identical ablation and ICP operating conditions. The wavelengths 213 nm and 266 nm were also used at higher energy densities to evaluate the influence of energy density on quantitative analysis. In addition, the glass reference materials were analysed using commercially available 266 nm Nd:YAG and 193 nm ArF excimer lasers. Laser ablation analysis was carried out using both single spot and scanning mode ablation. Using laser ablation ICP-MS, concentrations of fifty-eight elements were determined with external calibration to the NIST SRM 610 glass reference material. Instead of applying the more common internal standardisation procedure, the total concentration of all element oxide concentrations was normalised to 100%. Major element concentrations were compared with those determined by electron microprobe. In addition to NIST SRM 610 for external calibration, USGS BCR-2G was used as a more closely matrix-matched reference material in order to compare the effect of matrix-matched and non matrix-matched calibration on quantitative analysis. The results show that the various laser wavelengths and energy densities applied produced similar results, with the exception of scanning mode ablation at 266 nm without matrix-matched calibration where deviations up to 60% from the average were found. However, results acquired using a scanning mode with a matrix-matched calibration agreed with results obtained by spot analysis. The increased abundance of large particles produced when using a scanning ablation mode with NIST SRM 610, is responsible for elemental fractionation effects caused by incomplete vaporisation of large particles in the ICP.

  1. HBV Outreach Programs Significantly Increase Knowledge and Vaccination Rates Among Asian Pacific Islanders.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, Tresa; Wang, Winnie; Dao, Doan; Wojciechowski, Helena; Lee, William M; Do, Son; Singal, Amit G

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) testing and vaccination rates remain low among Asian-American/Pacific Islanders (APIs) despite high rates of HBV infection. The aim of our study was to assess the effectiveness of an outreach campaign to increase HBV knowledge, testing, and vaccination among a cohort of APIs. Vietnamese Americans were invited to participate in a free HBV screening and vaccination outreach program though pubic service announcements. Attendees completed a survey to assess barriers to vaccination and HBV-related knowledge before and after a 30-min education session by a bilingual board-certified gastroenterologist. Among 98 participants, 100% (22/22) of HBV naïve patients were provided a HBV vaccination series at no cost and over 75% (14/18) of HBV-infected patients were connected to further medical care. Notable reported barriers to prior testing and/or vaccination were cost of the vaccine, concern about missing work for evaluation, and lack of provider recommendation. Knowledge levels about HBV risk factors, potential consequences, and treatment options were poor at baseline but significantly increased after the education session (49 vs. 64%, p < 0.001). Outreach campaigns linked with education can successfully address several barriers to HBV testing and offer an approach to improve HBV awareness and prevention among difficult-to-reach populations. PMID:25476035

  2. Selection of hepatitis B surface "escape" mutants during passive immune prophylaxis following liver transplantation: potential impact of genetic changes on polymerase protein function

    PubMed Central

    Shields, P; Owsianka, A; Carman, W; Boxall, E; Hubscher, S; Shaw, J; O'Donnell, K; Elias, E; Mutimer, D

    1999-01-01

    CASE REPORT—A patient is described who developed hepatitis B virus (HBV) reinfection five months following liver transplantation. Failure of hepatitis B immunoglobulin prophylaxis was associated with the emergence of mutations. HBV gene sequencing identified nucleotide substitutions associated with amino acid changes, one within the major hydrophilic region (MHR) of the HBV surface antigen at amino acid position 144 and one outside the MHR. Because of the overlapping reading frames of surface and polymerase genes, the latter surface antigen change was associated with an amino acid change in the polymerase protein. The patient developed significant allograft hepatitis and was treated with lamivudine (3TC) 100 mg daily. Rapid decline of serum HBV DNA was observed with loss of HBV e antigen and HBV surface antigen from serum. There was normalisation of liver biochemistry, and liver immunohistochemistry showed a reduction in HBV core and disappearance of HBs antigen staining.
CONCLUSION—Surface antigen encoding gene mutations associated with HBIg escape may be associated with alteration of the polymerase protein. The polymerase changes may affect sensitivity to antiviral treatment. Selection pressure on one HBV reading frame (for example, HBIg pressure on HBsAg, or nucleoside analogue pressure on polymerase protein) may alter the gene product of the overlapping frame. Such interactions are relevant to strategies employing passive immune prophylaxis and antiviral treatment.


Keywords: liver transplantation; prophylaxis; escape mutants; lamivudine PMID:10403747

  3. Broad Range of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Patterns, Dual Circulation of Quasi-Subgenotype A3 and HBV/E and Heterogeneous HBV Mutations in HIV-Positive Patients in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Bivigou-Mboumba, Berthold; François-Souquière, Sandrine; Deleplancque, Luc; Sica, Jeanne; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Amougou-Atsama, Marie; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Njouom, Richard; Rouet, François

    2016-01-01

    Integrated data on hepatitis B virus (HBV) patterns, HBV genotypes and mutations are lacking in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-infected patients from Africa. This survey was conducted in 2010–2013 among 762 HIV-1-positive adults from Gabon who were predominantly treated with 3TC-based antiretroviral treatment. HBV patterns were identified using immunoassays detecting total antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAb), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), IgM HBcAb, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), antibody to HBsAg (HBsAb) and an in-house real-time PCR test for HBV DNA quantification. Occult hepatitis B (OBI) was defined by the presence of isolated anti-HBc with detectable serum HBV DNA. HBV genotypes and HBV mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. Seventy-one (9.3%) patients tested positive for HBsAg, including one with acute hepatitis B (0.1%; 95% CI, 0.0%-0.2%), nine with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.6%–2.2%), 16 with HBeAg-negative CHB (2.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%–3.3%) and 45 inactive HBV carriers (5.9%; 95% CI, 4.4%–7.8%). Sixty-one (8.0%; 95% CI, 6.2%–10.1%) patients showed OBI. Treated patients showed similar HBV DNA levels to those obtained in untreated patients, regardless of HBV patterns. Around 15.0% of OBI patients showed high (>1,000 UI/mL) viremia. The mutation M204V/I conferring resistance to 3TC was more common in HBV/A (47.4%) than in HBV/E isolates (0%) (P = .04). Our findings encouraged clinicians to promote HBV vaccination in patients with no exposure to HBV and to switch 3TC to universal TDF in those with CHB. PMID:26764909

  4. Broad Range of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Patterns, Dual Circulation of Quasi-Subgenotype A3 and HBV/E and Heterogeneous HBV Mutations in HIV-Positive Patients in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Bivigou-Mboumba, Berthold; François-Souquière, Sandrine; Deleplancque, Luc; Sica, Jeanne; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Amougou-Atsama, Marie; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Njouom, Richard; Rouet, François

    2016-01-01

    Integrated data on hepatitis B virus (HBV) patterns, HBV genotypes and mutations are lacking in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-infected patients from Africa. This survey was conducted in 2010-2013 among 762 HIV-1-positive adults from Gabon who were predominantly treated with 3TC-based antiretroviral treatment. HBV patterns were identified using immunoassays detecting total antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAb), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), IgM HBcAb, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), antibody to HBsAg (HBsAb) and an in-house real-time PCR test for HBV DNA quantification. Occult hepatitis B (OBI) was defined by the presence of isolated anti-HBc with detectable serum HBV DNA. HBV genotypes and HBV mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. Seventy-one (9.3%) patients tested positive for HBsAg, including one with acute hepatitis B (0.1%; 95% CI, 0.0%-0.2%), nine with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.6%-2.2%), 16 with HBeAg-negative CHB (2.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%-3.3%) and 45 inactive HBV carriers (5.9%; 95% CI, 4.4%-7.8%). Sixty-one (8.0%; 95% CI, 6.2%-10.1%) patients showed OBI. Treated patients showed similar HBV DNA levels to those obtained in untreated patients, regardless of HBV patterns. Around 15.0% of OBI patients showed high (>1,000 UI/mL) viremia. The mutation M204V/I conferring resistance to 3TC was more common in HBV/A (47.4%) than in HBV/E isolates (0%) (P = .04). Our findings encouraged clinicians to promote HBV vaccination in patients with no exposure to HBV and to switch 3TC to universal TDF in those with CHB. PMID:26764909

  5. Comparison of the effects of formaldehyde and gaseous ozone on HBV-contaminated hospital quilts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dan; Li, Ziqiong; Jia, Bei; Che, Xiaoqiong; Song, Tianshuang; Huang, Wenxiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Besides being highly infectious, Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide. In hospital settings, it is easy for the environment and quilts to be contaminated by HBV patient blood and body fluids. Therefore, HBV can be transmitted to other patients via contaminated environmental surfaces or quilts, resulting in an HBV nosocomial infection. Formaldehyde and ozone are commonly used disinfectants that may influence this infectious situation. Objective: To investigate the clinical effectiveness of formaldehyde and gaseous ozone for the terminal cleaning of hospital quilts contaminated by HBV. Methods: Thin cloth and thick cotton soaked with the serum from high HBV copy number patients were prepared and disinfected using formaldehyde fumigation and gaseous ozone at different times. The copy numbers of HBV DNA in the HBV-contaminated cloth and cotton samples were measured quantitatively with fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: When gaseous ozone was used to disinfect HBV-contaminated quilts for 23 minutes (min), 36 min, 49 min, and 90 min, the HBV DNA copy number displayed no significant decrease compared with the copy number before disinfection (P > 0.05). In comparison, the copy number of the HBV DNA in the cloth group decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after formaldehyde fumigation disinfection for 1 hour (h), and there was no difference when longer times and increased concentrations were used. In the thick cotton group, there was also a significant decrease (P < 0.05) of the HBV DNA copy numbers, but the decrease was not as dramatic. In addition, in this group, the disinfection effect observed at 4 h was the strongest. Conclusions: The application of ozone to disinfect HBV-contaminated hospital quilts possibly has no effect, whereas, formaldehyde oxide fumigation effectively reduced HBV copy numbers. PMID:26770591

  6. Molecular Characterization of HBV Strains Circulating among the Treatment-Naive HIV/HBV Co-Infected Patients of Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Debraj; Pal, Ananya; Biswas, Avik; Panigrahi, Rajesh; Sarkar, Neelakshi; Das, Dipanwita; Sarkar, Jayeeta; Guha, Subhasish Kamal; Saha, Bibhuti; Chakrabarti, Sekhar; Chakravarty, Runu

    2014-01-01

    Previously we reported that the exposure to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection serves as a major threat among the treatment naive HIV infected population of eastern India. Hence, molecular characterization of these strains is of utmost importance in order to identify clinically significant HBV mutations. A total of 85 treatment naive HIV/HBV co-infected participants were included of whom the complete basal core promoter/precore region, the core and the whole envelope gene could be successfully sequenced for 59, 57 and 39 isolates respectively. Following phylogenetic analysis, it was found that HBV/D was the predominant genotype with HBV/D2 (38.5%) being the most prevalent subgenotype followed by HBV/A1. The major mutations affecting HBeAg expression includes the A1762T/G1764A (13.6%), G1896A (22%) and G1862T mutation (33.9%) which was predominantly associated with HBV/A1. Moreover, the prevalence of G1896A was considerably high among the HBeAg negative HIV/HBV co-infected subjects compared to HBV mono-infection. The main amino acid substitutions within the MHC class II restricted T-cell epitope of HBcAg includes the T12S (15.8%) and T67N (12.3%) mutation and the V27I (10.5%) mutation in the MHC class I restricted T-cell epitope. PreS1/S2 deletion was detected in 3 isolates with all harboring the BCP double mutation. Furthermore, the frequently occurring mutations in the major hydrophilic loop of the S gene include the T125M, A128V and M133I/L. Therefore, this study is the first from India to report useful information on the molecular heterogeneity of the HBV strains circulating among the treatment naive HIV/HBV co-infected population and is thus clinically relevant. PMID:24587360

  7. HBV influence on Response to Antiretroviral Therapy in Horizontally HIV-HBV Coinfected Patient during Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, Irina; Cupşa, A.M.; Stoian, Andreea Cristina; Dumitrescu, FLorentina; Giubelan, L.I.; Alexandru, D.O.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are few studies on pediatric HIV-HBV coinfection, so evidences about relationships between the two viruses are scarce. Objectives: influence of HBV infection on virological and immunological response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in antiretroviral-naïve horizontally HIV-HBV coinfected subjects during early childhood. Material and methods: observational study on 826 HIV+ subjects in evidence of Craiova Regional Centre (CRC); we analyzed the immunological and virological response at 6-12 months after starting first antiretroviral regimens compared in 2 groups: horizontally HIV-HBV coinfected subjects during early childhood (CoS) versus horizontally HIV infected subjects during early childhood without HBV infection (non-CoS). Results: Number of subjects: CoS-66 subjects, non-CoS-132 subjects. Demographic data: CoS-gender ratio F:M=0.886, the majority lived in rural area (57.58%), mean age on diagnosis-9.288±4.607 years, non-CoS-gender ratio F:M=0.859, the majority lived in urban area (53.79%), mean age on diagnosis-10.742±5.107 years. At baseline, HIV category was: CoS-A-1.52%, B-80.30%, C-18.18%, non-CoS-A-2.27%, B-70.45%, C-27.27% (p Chi2=0.332), the mean CD4+ cell count was: CoS-148.33±148.10 cells/ml, non-CoS-163.17±155.39 cells/ml (p Student=0.521) and the mean HIV viral load (HIV VL) was: CoS-5.06±0.80 lgcopies/ml (for 29 subjects), non-CoS-5.04±0.84 lgcopies/ml (for 61 subjects) (p Student=0.978). At the end of the studied period, the mean increase in CD4+ cell count was: CoS-177.068±141.676 cells/ml, non-CoS-176.015±191.751 cells/ml (p Student=0.969) and the mean decrease in HIV VL was: CoS-5.04±0.79 lgcopies/ml, non-COS-4.69±2.04 lgcopies/ml (p Student=0.911). Conclusions: The presence of HBV coinfection does not influence immunological or virological response to ART. PMID:24778861

  8. Study of paracetamol 1-g oral solution bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Farre, M; Roset, P N; Abanades, S; Menoyo, E; Alvarez, Y; Rovira, M; Baena, A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess paracetamol bioavailability after administering 1 g in oral solution. Eighteen healthy volunteers were selected for this open-label study. A total of 15.4 ml of Gelocatil Oral Solution (Laboratorios Gelos, S.L.), corresponding to 1 g of paracetamol, were administered to fasting subjects. Blood samples were collected at 0 min, 10 min, 20 min, 30 min, 45 min, 1 h, 1.5 h, 2 h, 3 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h, 10 h and 12 h. Paracetamol plasma concentrations were determined by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The study was conducted without deviations from protocol. Pharmacokinetic data from 18 subjects were allowed for estimating fast and high-paracetamol bioavailability: t(max) 20 min (10-45) [median (range)], C(max) 24. 3 mg/l (6.5) [mean (standard deviation)], AUC(0-t) 64.0 mg h/l (16.1) and AUC(0-00) 68.1 mg h/l (17.9). These results are comparable to those described for Gelocatil Oral Solution given at a 650 mg dose and for immediate release Gelocatil 650 mg tablets. Absorption speed was very fast, similar to that described for other oral-solution formulations, which provides an immediate onset of pain and fever relief. The results of this study show suitable bioavailability for 1 g Gelocatil Oral Solution, with fast-absorption speed that provides an immediate onset of pain and fever relief. PMID:18389096

  9. Core protein: a pleiotropic keystone in the HBV lifecycle

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnick, Adam; Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Tan, Zhenning; Lewellyn, Eric; Turner, William; Francis, Samson

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a small virus whose genome has only four open reading frames. We argue that the simplicity of the virion correlates with a complexity of functions for viral proteins. We focus on the HBV core protein (Cp), a small (183 residue) protein that self-assembles to form the viral capsid. However, its functions are a little more complicated than that. In an infected cell Cp modulates every step of the viral lifecycle. Cp is bound to nuclear viral DNA and affects its epigenetics. Cp correlates with RNA specificity. Cp assembles specifically on a reverse transcriptase-viral RNA complex or, apparently, nothing at all. Indeed Cp has been one of the model systems for investigation of virus self-assembly. Cp participates in regulation of reverse transcription. Cp signals completion of reverse transcription to support virus secretion. Cp carries both nuclear localization signals and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) binding sites; both of these functions appear to be regulated by contents of the capsid. Cp can be targeted by antivirals -- while self-assembly is the most accessible of Cp activities, we argue that it makes sense to engage the broader spectrum of Cp function. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on “From the discovery of the Australia antigen to the development of new curative therapies for hepatitis B: an unfinished story.” PMID:26129969

  10. Occult HBV Infection: A Faceless Enemy in Liver Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Romero, Jaime; Vargas, Gustavo; García-Román, Rebeca

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) represents a worldwide public health problem; the virus is present in one third of the global population. However, this rate may in fact be higher due to occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI). This condition is characterized by the presence of the viral genome in the liver of individuals sero-negative for the virus surface antigen (HBsAg). The causes of the absence of HBsAg in serum are unknown, however, mutations have been identified that produce variants not recognized by current immunoassays. Epigenetic and immunological host mechanisms also appear to be involved in HBsAg suppression. Current evidence suggests that OBI maintains its carcinogenic potential, favoring the progression of fibrosis and cirrhosis of the liver. In common with open HBV infection, OBI can contribute to the establishment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Epidemiological data regarding the global prevalence of OBI vary due to the use of detection methods of different sensitivity and specificity. In Latin America, which is considered an area of low prevalence for HBV, diagnostic screening methods using gene amplification tests for confirmation of OBI are not conducted. This prevents determination of the actual prevalence of OBI, highlighting the need for the implementation of cutting edge technology in epidemiological surveillance systems. PMID:24717680

  11. Molecular Chaperone Mediated Late-Stage Neuroprotection in the SOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Anna L.; Dick, James R.; Kanuga, Naheed; Kalmar, Bernadett; Greensmith, Linda; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and motor cortex. Mutations in superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are associated with familial ALS and lead to SOD1 protein misfolding and aggregation. Here we show that the molecular chaperone, HSJ1 (DNAJB2), mutations in which cause distal hereditary motor neuropathy, can reduce mutant SOD1 aggregation and improve motor neuron survival in mutant SOD1 models of ALS. Overexpression of human HSJ1a (hHSJ1a) in vivo in motor neurons of SOD1G93A transgenic mice ameliorated disease. In particular, there was a significant improvement in muscle force, increased motor unit number and enhanced motor neuron survival. hHSJ1a was present in a complex with SOD1G93A and led to reduced SOD1 aggregation at late stages of disease progression. We also observed altered ubiquitin immunoreactivity in the double transgenic animals, suggesting that ubiquitin modification might be important for the observed improvements. In a cell model of SOD1G93A aggregation, HSJ1a preferentially bound to mutant SOD1, enhanced SOD1 ubiquitylation and reduced SOD1 aggregation in a J-domain and ubiquitin interaction motif (UIM) dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that HSJ1a acts on mutant SOD1 through a combination of chaperone, co-chaperone and pro-ubiquitylation activity. These results show that targeting SOD1 protein misfolding and aggregation in vivo can be neuroprotective and suggest that manipulation of DnaJ molecular chaperones might be useful in the treatment of ALS. PMID:24023695

  12. The intracellular dynamics of hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication with reproduced virion "re-cycling".

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a causative agent of hepatitis. Clinical outcome of hepatitis type B depends on the viral titer observed in the peripheral blood of the patient. In the chronic hepatitis patient, production of HBV virion remains low level. On the other hand, the viral load prominently increases in fulminant hepatitis patient as compared with that in the chronic hepatitis patient. We previously proposed a mathematical model describing the intracellular dynamics of HBV replication. Our model clarified that there are two distinguishable replication patterns of HBV named "arrested" and "explosive" replication. In the arrested replication, the amount of virion newly reproduced from an infected cell remains low level, while the amount of virion extremely increases in the explosive replication. Viral load is drastically changed by slight alteration of expression ratio of 3.5kb RNA to 2.4kb mRNA of HBV. Though our model provided the switching mechanism determining the replication pattern of HBV, HBV dynamics is determined by not only the expression pattern of viral genes. In this study, "recycling" of HBV virion in the replication cycle is investigated as a new factor affecting the intracellular dynamics of HBV replication. A part of newly produced virion of HBV is reused as a core particle that is a resource of HBV replication. This recycling of HBV virion lowers the threshold for the explosive replication when waiting time for the next cycle of the replication is large. It is seemingly contradicting that prominent production of HBV is caused by large recycling rate and small release rate of HBV virion from infected cell to extracellular space. But the recycling of HBV virion can contribute to the positive feedback cycle of HBV replication for the explosive replication to accumulate the core particle as a resource of HBV replication in an infected cell. Accumulation of core particle in the infected cell can be risk factor for the exacerbation of hepatitis rather

  13. Recognition and management of HBV infection in a social context.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haeok; Hann, Hie-Won; Yang, Jin Hyang; Fawcett, Jacqueline

    2011-09-01

    Chronic viral hepatitis B and C infection is three to five times more frequent than HIV in the USA, and chronically infected people are at risk for long-term sequelae including cirrhosis, liver decomposition, and hepatocellular carcinoma (Institute of Medicine, 2010). Socio-cultural factors are central to the way an individual constructs hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, perceives it as serious health problem, and moves on to appropriate health behavior (Lee et al., J Canc Educ 25:337-342, 2010; Kim, J Health Care Poor Underserved 5:170-182, 2004; Lee et al., Asian Nurs Res 1:1-11, 2007; Wu et al, Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 8(1):127-234, 2007; Yang et al., J Korean Academy Nurs 40:662-675, 2010). The purpose of this study was to seek "real world" data about factors that influence the recognition and management of HBV infection in Korean Americans' socio-cultural contexts. The descriptive qualitative study used an interview informed by ethnography to collect data and was guided by the Network-Episode Model. (Pescosolido, Adv Med Sociol 2:161-184, 1991; Pescosolido, AJS 97:1096-1138, 1992; Pescosolido, Res Sociol Health Care 13A:171-197, 1996). The sample comprised 12 HBV patients and nine key informants. Six factors that influenced the management of HBV infection emerged from the interviews: recognition of disease within a social context, unrecognized disease in a hidden health system, the socio-cultural meaning of disease, lay construction of the cause of disease, misunderstandings and cultural learning styles, and personal and environmental barriers to health care. Each theme was associated with Korean American (KA) social contexts, participants' experiences, and the beliefs they held about the disease. The findings explored that the family network is "genetic code" for social networking among KAs and the network of patients was not geographically bound. Health management behaviors are mediated by an array of types and levels of social and personal networks, and

  14. Clonorchis sinensis Co-infection Could Affect the Disease State and Treatment Response of HBV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Chen, Tingjin; Kong, Xiangzhan; Sun, Hengchang; Yu, Xinbing; Xu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) is considered to be an important parasitic zoonosis because it infects approximately 35 million people, while approximately 15 million were distributed in China. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health issue. Two types of pathogens have the potential to cause human liver disease and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma. Concurrent infection with HBV and C. sinensis is often observed in some areas where C. sinensis is endemic. However, whether C. sinensis could impact HBV infection or vice versa remains unknown. Principal Findings Co-infection with C. sinensis and HBV develops predominantly in males. Co-infected C. sinensis and HBV patients presented weaker liver function and higher HBV DNA titers. Combination treatment with antiviral and anti-C. sinensis drugs in co-infected patients could contribute to a reduction in viral load and help with liver function recovery. Excretory-secretory products (ESPs) may, in some ways, increase HBV viral replication in vitro. A mixture of ESP and HBV positive sera could induce peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to produce higher level of Th2 cytokines including IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 compared to HBV alone, it seems that due to presence of ESP, the cytokine production shift towards Th2. C. sinensis/HBV co-infected patients showed higher serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels and lower serum IFN-γ levels. Conclusions/Significance Patients with concomitant C. sinensis and HBV infection presented weaker liver function and higher HBV DNA copies. In co-infected patients, the efficacy of anti-viral treatment was better in patients who were prescribed with entecavir and praziquantel than entecavir alone. One possible reason for the weaker response to antiviral therapies in co-infected patients was the shift in cytokine production from Th1 to Th2 that may inhibit viral clearance. C. sinensis/HBV co-infection could exacerbate the imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokine. PMID:27348302

  15. HBV is a risk factor for poor patient prognosis after curative resection of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhonghu; Zhao, Xin; Jiang, Peng; Xiao, Senlin; Wu, Guo; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Hui; Han, Xiuguo; Wang, Shuguang; Li, Xiaowu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Controversy exists regarding pathological factors affecting the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV-HCC). Their postoperative clinical behaviors and the exact HBV Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) thresholds that distinguish good and poor prognoses are unknown. This study aimed to compare clinicopathological, pre- and postoperative clinical factors and overall and recurrence-free survival (RFS) between HBV-HCC patients and nonhepatitis B and nonhepatitis C HCC (NBC-HCC) patients to determine the optimal prognostic HBV DNA threshold. Data from 1440 patients with HBV-HCC and NBC-HCC who underwent curative hepatectomy were retrospectively analyzed. Liver function in the HBV-HCC group was significantly worse than in the NBC-HCC group. Compared with NBC-HCC patients, HBV-HCC patients had significantly more vascular invasion and advanced HCC. The HBV-HCC patients also had significantly worse liver function and more complications. Further survival analysis showed significantly lower overall and RFS rates and a higher early recurrence rate in the HBV-HCC group. Univariate analysis indicated that HBV was a risk factor for overall and RFS. Finally, X-tile analysis revealed that the optimal HBV DNA cutoff points for predicting RFS and overall survival in HCC patients were 10,100 and 12,800 IU/mL, respectively. After hepatectomy for HCC, HBV-HCC patients had more complications and a worse prognosis than NBC-HCC patients. Antiviral therapy should be considered before hepatectomy in patients with high (more than approximately 104 IU/mL) HBV DNA levels. PMID:27495026

  16. Chimeric hepatitis B virus (HBV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) subviral envelope particles induce efficient anti-HCV antibody production in animals pre-immunized with HBV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Elodie; Roingeard, Philippe

    2015-02-18

    The development of an effective, affordable prophylactic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a medical priority. The recently described chimeric HBV-HCV subviral envelope particles could potentially be used for this purpose, as they could be produced by industrial procedures adapted from those established for the hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine. We show here, in an animal model, that pre-existing immunity acquired through HBV vaccination does not influence the immunogenicity of the HCV E2 protein presented by these chimeric particles. Thus, these chimeric HBV-HCV subviral envelope particles could potentially be used as a booster in individuals previously vaccinated against HBV, to induce protective immunity to HCV. PMID:25596457

  17. Hepatitis B virus genotypes and G1896A precore mutation in 486 Spanish patients with acute and chronic HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Frias, F; Jardi, R; Buti, M; Schaper, M; Hermosilla, E; Valdes, A; Allende, H; Martell, M; Esteban, R; Guardia, J

    2006-05-01

    This study aims to determine the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes (A-F) and their association with the G1896A precore mutation in 486 patients positive for HBV surface antigen. Genotypes were determined by RFLP and precore mutation by real-time PCR. Genotypes D (48.1%) and A (39.5%) were the most common, followed by F (4.1%) and B, C and E (<1%). The A to D ratio (A:D) was 1.4 in HBeAg+ chronic hepatitis B (CHB), 0.6 in HBeAg- CHB and 1.4 in HBeAg- inactive carriers. Distribution of these genotypes was different between HBeAg+ CHB and HBeAg- CHB (P = 0.02), and between HBeAg- CHB and HBeAg- inactive carriers (P = 0.009). Genotype A was the most prevalent in HBeAg+ CHB with elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (68.6%) and genotype D in HBeAg+ CHB with fluctuating ALT (60.7%). There was a difference in genotype prevalence between chronic and acute infection (P = 0.03). The precore mutant correlated with high levels of HBV-DNA in genotype d HBeAg- CHB. Genotype D is not as highly prevalent in Spanish patients as would be expected in a Mediterranean area. The unequal prevalence of genotypes between acute and chronic infection suggests that genotype A is associated with a higher tendency to cause chronic infection. PMID:16637866

  18. Pre-S2 deletion mutants of hepatitis B virus could have an important role in hepatocarcinogenesis in Asian children.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kenji; Thung, Swan N; Wu, Han-Chieh; Tran, Tung Thanh; Le Hoang, Phuc; Truong, Khai Dinh; Inui, Ayano; Jang, Ja June; Su, Ih-Jen

    2009-12-01

    Although many studies on the risk factors and their carcinogenesis in adult hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have been reported, they remain poorly understood in childhood HCC. A retrospective study of 42 HCC cases in Asian children was conducted. Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-DNA in HCC tissues was detected in 36 of 42 (86%) cases tested, while no hepatitis C virus (HCV)-RNA was detectable in any of HCCs. Twenty of 36 (56%) HCC cases were accompanied by cirrhosis. Surprisingly, very high prevalence of the HBV pre-S deletion mutant was recognized in 27 of 30 (90%) HCCs examined. They occurred most frequently in pre-S2 (20/27, 74%) followed by pre-S1 (5/27, 18.5%), and both pre-S1/S2 (2/27, 7.4%). Interestingly, the pre-S2 mutant consistently appeared with deletion at nt 4-57 in all of the 20 cases with the pre-S2 mutant (100%) and within this locus in the two cases with both pre-S-1/S2 mutants. Type II ground-glass hepatocytes in non-tumorous livers were seen in 15 of the 22 HCCs with the pre-S2 deletion mutant (68%). This hotspot mutation in the pre-S2 was further confirmed by complete genomic sequence of HBV in a Japanese boy who eventually developed HCC. Our result strongly suggests that HBV is a major contributor to the development of HCC in Asian children. The HBV pre-S2 deletion mutant at nt 4-57 which has a CD8 T-cell epitope could be responsible for the emergence and aggressive outcome of childhood HCC. Determination of this hotspot mutation in the pre-S2 region could be a useful index for predicting the clinical outcome of HCC development. PMID:19719772

  19. Current Concepts of HBV/HCV Coinfection: Coexistence, but Not Necessarily in Harmony

    PubMed Central

    Jamma, Shailaja; Hussain, Ghazi; Lau, Daryl T.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B and hepatitis C are important causes of chronic liver disease globally. Although HBV/HCV coinfection is not uncommon, its epidemiology is poorly defined. Numerous studies provided evidence that coinfection accelerates liver disease progression and increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. By applying new cell culture models to examine the interaction of both viruses, investigators concluded that HBV and HCV replicate in the same hepatocyte without interference. The roles of innate and adaptive immunity in determining the viral replication and disease outcomes still need rigorous investigation. To date, no standard-of-care recommendation exists for HBV/HCV coinfection. Pegylated interferon and ribavirin combination therapy demonstrated similar efficacy in suppressing HCV RNA in coinfection and HCV monoinfection. However, HBV reactivation during therapy can be a challenge. Future clinical trials evaluating the addition of a nucleoside/nucleotide analog for selective patients with HBV/HCV coinfection are essential for successful management of HBV/HCV coinfection. PMID:21258658

  20. Modulation of HBV replication by microRNA-15b through targeting hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Hongfei; Sun, Shihui; Yu, Hong; Guo, Yan; Kou, Zhihua; Zhao, Guangyu; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Zhang, Jianying; Li, Junfeng; Zhou, Yusen

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. The role played by microRNAs (miRNAs) in HBV replication and pathogenesis is being increasingly recognized. In this study, we found that miR-15b, an important miRNA during HBV infection and hepatocellular carcinoma development, directly binds hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) mRNA, a negative regulator of HBV Enhancer I, to attenuate HNF1α expression, resulting in transactivation of HBV Enhancer I, in turn causing the enhancement of HBV replication and expression of HBV antigens, including HBx protein, finally leading to the down-regulated expression of miR-15b in both cell lines and mice in a long cascade of events. Our research showed that miR-15b promotes HBV replication by augmenting HBV Enhancer I activity via direct targeting HNF1α, while HBV replication and antigens expression, particularly the HBx protein, then repress the expression of miR-15b. The reciprocal regulation between miR-15b and HBV controls the level of HBV replication and might play a role in persistent HBV infection. This work adds to the body of knowledge concerning the complex interactions between HBV and host miRNAs. PMID:24705650

  1. Gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and HBV replication are commonly regulated by PGC-1α-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Ting; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Chou, Chen-Kung; Lee, Kuen-Haur; Tsou, Ann-Ping; Lai, Jin-Mei; Yeh, Sheau-Farn; Huang, Chi-Ying F.

    2015-01-01

    PGC-1α, a major metabolic regulator of gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis, is strongly induced to coactivate Hepatitis B virus (HBV) gene expression in the liver of fasting mice. We found that 8-Br-cAMP and glucocorticoids synergistically induce PGC-1α and its downstream targets, including PEPCK and G6Pase. Also, HBV core promoter activity was synergistically enhanced by 8-Br-cAMP and glucocorticoids. Graptopetalum paraguayense (GP), a herbal medicine, is commonly used in Taiwan to treat liver disorders. Partially purified fraction of GP (named HH-F3) suppressed 8-Br-cAMP/glucocorticoid-induced G6Pase, PEPCK and PGC-1α expression and suppressed HBV core promoter activity. HH-F3 blocked HBV core promoter activity via inhibition of PGC-1α expression. Ectopically expressed PGC-1α rescued HH-F3-inhibited HBV surface antigen expression, HBV mRNA production, core protein levels, and HBV replication. HH-F3 also inhibited fatty acid synthase (FASN) expression and decreased lipid accumulation by down-regulating PGC-1α. Thus, HH-F3 can inhibit HBV replication, gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis by down-regulating PGC-1α. Our study indicates that targeting PGC-1α may be a therapeutic strategy for treatment of HBV infections. HH-F3 may have potential use for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B patients with associated metabolic syndrome. PMID:25762623

  2. ZEB2 inhibits HBV transcription and replication by targeting its core promoter

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jihua; Huang, Yecai; Huang, Ying; Hu, Qin; Chen, Juan; Chen, Weixian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of liver diseases, especially liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the interaction between host and HBV has not been fully elucidated. ZEB2 is a Smad-interacting, multi-zinc finger protein that acts as a transcription factor or repressor for several signaling pathways. This study found that the expression of ZEB2 was decreased in HBV-expressing cells. Overexpression of ZEB2 inhibited HBV DNA replicative intermediates, 3.5kb mRNA, core protein level, and the secretion of HBsAg and HBeAg. In contrast, ZEB2 knockdown promoted HBV replication. Furthermore, ZEB2 could bind to HBV core promoter and inhibit its promoter activity. Mutation at the ZEB2 binding site in HBV core promoter eradicated ZEB2-mediated inhibition of HBV replication. This study identifies ZEB2 as a novel host restriction factor that inhibits HBV replication in hepatocytes. These data may shed light on development of new antiviral strategies. PMID:26895378

  3. High prevalence of human parvovirus 4 infection in HBV and HCV infected individuals in shanghai.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelian; Zhang, Jing; Hong, Liang; Wang, Jiayu; Yuan, Zhengan; Zhang, Xi; Ghildyal, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) has been detected in blood and diverse tissues samples from HIV/AIDS patients who are injecting drug users. Although B19 virus, the best characterized human parvovirus, has been shown to co-infect patients with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus (HBV, HCV) infection, the association of PARV4 with HBV or HCV infections is still unknown.The aim of this study was to characterise the association of viruses belonging to PARV4 genotype 1 and 2 with chronic HBV and HCV infection in Shanghai.Serum samples of healthy controls, HCV infected subjects and HBV infected subjects were retrieved from Shanghai Center for Disease Control and Prevention (SCDC) Sample Bank. Parvovirus-specific nested-PCR was performed and results confirmed by sequencing. Sequences were compared with reference sequences obtained from Genbank to derive phylogeny trees.The frequency of parvovirus molecular detection was 16-22%, 33% and 41% in healthy controls, HCV infected and HBV infected subjects respectively, with PARV4 being the only parvovirus detected. HCV infected and HBV infected subjects had a significantly higher PARV4 prevalence than the healthy population. No statistical difference was found in PARV4 prevalence between HBV or HCV infected subjects. PARV4 sequence divergence within study groups was similar in healthy subjects, HBV or HCV infected subjects.Our data clearly demonstrate that PARV4 infection is strongly associated with HCV and HBV infection in Shanghai but may not cause increased disease severity. PMID:22235298

  4. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Promotes Degradation of SMC5/6 to Enhance HBV Replication.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Christopher M; Xu, Yanping; Li, Feng; Nio, Kouki; Reszka-Blanco, Natalia; Li, Xiaodong; Wu, Yaxu; Yu, Yanbao; Xiong, Yue; Su, Lishan

    2016-09-13

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) regulatory protein X (HBx) activates gene expression from the HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) genome. Interaction of HBx with the DDB1-CUL4-ROC1 (CRL4) E3 ligase is critical for this function. Using substrate-trapping proteomics, we identified the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) complex proteins SMC5 and SMC6 as CRL4(HBx) substrates. HBx expression and HBV infection degraded the SMC5/6 complex in human hepatocytes in vitro and in humanized mice in vivo. HBx targets SMC5/6 for ubiquitylation by the CRL4(HBx) E3 ligase and subsequent degradation by the proteasome. Using a minicircle HBV (mcHBV) reporter system with HBx-dependent activity, we demonstrate that SMC5/6 knockdown, or inhibition with a dominant-negative SMC6, enhance HBx null mcHBV-Gluc gene expression. Furthermore, SMC5/6 knockdown rescued HBx-deficient HBV replication in human hepatocytes. These results indicate that a primary function of HBx is to degrade SMC5/6, which restricts HBV replication by inhibiting HBV gene expression. PMID:27626656

  5. A defect in the RNA-processing protein HNRPDL causes limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1G (LGMD1G).

    PubMed

    Vieira, Natássia M; Naslavsky, Michel S; Licinio, Luciana; Kok, Fernando; Schlesinger, David; Vainzof, Mariz; Sanchez, Nury; Kitajima, João Paulo; Gal, Lihi; Cavaçana, Natale; Serafini, Peter R; Chuartzman, Silvia; Vasquez, Cristina; Mimbacas, Adriana; Nigro, Vincenzo; Pavanello, Rita C; Schuldiner, Maya; Kunkel, Louis M; Zatz, Mayana

    2014-08-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a heterogeneous group of genetically determined muscle disorders with a primary or predominant involvement of the pelvic or shoulder girdle musculature. More than 20 genes with autosomal recessive (LGMD2A to LGMD2Q) and autosomal dominant inheritance (LGMD1A to LGMD1H) have been mapped/identified to date. Mutations are known for six among the eight mapped autosomal dominant forms: LGMD1A (myotilin), LGMD1B (lamin A/C), LGMD1C (caveolin-3), LGMD1D (desmin), LGMD1E (DNAJB6), and more recently for LGMD1F (transportin-3). Our group previously mapped the LGMD1G gene at 4q21 in a Caucasian-Brazilian family. We now mapped a Uruguayan family with patients displaying a similar LGMD1G phenotype at the same locus. Whole genome sequencing identified, in both families, mutations in the HNRPDL gene. HNRPDL is a heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein family member, which participates in mRNA biogenesis and metabolism. Functional studies performed in S. cerevisiae showed that the loss of HRP1 (yeast orthologue) had pronounced effects on both protein levels and cell localizations, and yeast proteome revealed dramatic reorganization of proteins involved in RNA-processing pathways. In vivo analysis showed that hnrpdl is important for muscle development in zebrafish, causing a myopathic phenotype when knocked down. The present study presents a novel association between a muscular disorder and a RNA-related gene and reinforces the importance of RNA binding/processing proteins in muscle development and muscle disease. Understanding the role of these proteins in muscle might open new therapeutic approaches for muscular dystrophies. PMID:24647604

  6. Absence of Hepatitis B Resistance Mutants before Introduction of Oral Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moehlen, Martin; De Medina, Maria; Hill, Mary; Jeffers, Lennox; Schiff, Eugene R.; Martin, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to assess whether hepatitis B virus drug resistant mutations antedated the widespread use of nucleos(t)ide analogues in treatment naïve patients. A number of reports have suggested that drug resistant mutants can be detected in apparently treatment naïve patients. Study. Fifty deidentified serum samples collected from 1986 to 1992 from patients with replicative chronic HBV infection at the University of Miami were genotyped and tested for resistance mutations using a line probe assay InnoLiPA HBV DR v2/v3. Serum HBV DNA was measured. All patients had documented chronic HBV infection with a detectable viral load, HBeAg seropositivity, and absence of HIV infection. Results. Of the 50 individuals included, 86% were male, mean age was 40 ± 12 years, and mostly genotype A. The mean HBV DNA was 126 pg/mL (range 6.4 to 557.0). No mutations were identified. Conclusions. The absence of drug induced mutations in these sera collected several years prior to the introduction of oral antiviral therapy suggests that these mutations do not occur in treatment naïve populations. Detection of drug resistance in an apparently treatment naïve subject suggests either unrecognized prior antiviral therapy or infection by an inoculum from a treatment experienced patient. PMID:27335823

  7. A fusion DNA vaccine encoding middle version of HBV envelope protein fused to interleukin-21 did not enhance HBV-specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Su, Wen-Jing; Wang, Jue; Bai, Xue-Fan; Huang, Chang-Xing; Lian, Jian-Qi

    2014-11-01

    DNA vaccination can generate both humoral and cellular immunity, resulting in potential prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines in variety of conditions, including hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Fusion of cytokine gene is one of the ways to increase the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. Interleukin (IL)-21 has been demonstrated to play an immunomodulatory role in HBV infection. Thus, we aimed to investigate the ability of IL-21 in the regulation of middle version of HBV envelop protein (MS) DNA vaccine. Fusion plasmid encoding IL-21 linked with MS was constructed. Normal and HBV transgenic mice were immunized by plasmid. pcDNA-IL-21/S2S induced a comparable level of anti-HBs antibody and HBsAg-specific CD8+ T-cell response with pcDNA-S2S. Furthermore, the level of circulating HBsAg was decreased by induction of anti-HBs antibody and HBsAg-specific CD8+ T-cell response to both pcDNA-IL-21/S2S and pcDNA-S2S vaccination in HBV transgenic mice. Thus, immunization with DNA vaccine encoding HBV MS protein induced both T- and B-cell response by targeting the specific antigen. Furthermore, it was also revealed that MS DNA vaccination could break immune tolerance in HBV transgenic mice. But IL-21 did not strengthen immune response induced by HBV DNA immunization. Our study suggested that MS-expressing plasmid may be useful for both preventive and therapeutic methods in HBV infection. However, IL-21 does not improve the immunogenicity and efficacy of MS DNA vaccination, and thus may not be used as a therapeutic marker for chronic hepatitis B. PMID:25211639

  8. Spectroscopic investigations of HBV 475 in optical regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Shinichi )

    1989-03-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic analyses of HBV 475 are presented based on emission-line profiles of H-alpha, H-gamma, He I 4921-A, He I 5016-A, forbidden O III 4959-A, 5007-A, Fe II 5018-A, and Fe II 4924-A. Radial-velocity analyses show that only a part of the line components coincides well with previous measurements. Other remarkable components are found which are shifted to either the violet or red sides, depending on the indicated phase. Highly resolved emission-line profiles reveal that they are not compatible with the calculated profiles of proposed theoretical models. 21 refs.

  9. The correlation between serum HBsAg levels and viral loads depends upon wild‐type and mutated HBV sequences rather than the HBeAg/anti‐HBe status

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mo‐Han; Chen, Qin‐Yan; Harrison, Tim J.; Li, Guo‐Jian; Li, Hai; Wang, Xue‐Yan; Ju, Yu; Yang, Jin‐Ye

    2015-01-01

    Despite several studies regarding the correlation between serum HBsAg titers and viral loads, the association remains uncertain. Eighty‐nine individuals were selected randomly from a Chinese cohort of 2,258 subjects infected persistently with hepatitis B virus (HBV) for cross‐sectional and longitudinal analysis. Viral loads of mutant HBV are lower than those of wild type HBV. The serum HBsAg titers correlate positively with viral loads in both HBeAg positive and negative subjects (r = 0.449, P = 0.013; r = 0.300, P = 0.018, respectively). No correlation between serum HBsAg titer and viral loads was found in any of the four phases of chronic HBV infection. The serum HBsAg titers correlate positively with viral loads in the group with wild type sequences of the PreS/S, basal core promoter (BCP), and preC regions of HBV(r = 0.502, P = 0.040). However, the correlation was not seen in the group with mutations in these regions (r = 0.165, P = 0.257). The correlation between HBsAg titers and viral loads was seen in individuals with wild type PreS/S sequences but not in the subgroup with BCP double mutations or PreC stop mutation, although their sequences in the preS/S regions were wild type. All these findings were confirmed by the longitudinal analysis. In conclusion, the correlation between serum HBsAg levels and viral loads may not differ between HBeAg positive and negative individuals but may depend on wild‐type or mutated genomic sequences. Therefore, HBsAg quantitation may be used as a surrogate for viral loads in only wild‐type HBV infections. J. Med. Virol. 87:1351–1360, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25879734

  10. HBV carriage in children born from HIV-seropositive mothers in Senegal: The need of birth-dose HBV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Gueye, Sokhna Bousso; Diop-Ndiaye, Halimatou; Lo, Gora; Mintsa, Sandrine; Guindo, Ibrahima; Dia, Aminata; Sow-Sall, Amina; Gaye-Diallo, Aissatou; Mboup, Souleymane; Touré-Kane, Coumba

    2016-05-01

    Hepatitis B is a major public health problem in Senegal, a country with high prevalence and a transmission occurring mainly during infancy. Only, one 6-8 weeks vaccination campaign was initiated in 2005 and it was part of the expanded program of immunization. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HBsAg in children born from HIV-seropositive mothers by using dried blood specimens. Specimens were collected between July 2007 and November 2012 from children aged 2-48 weeks in Dakar and decentralized sites working on HIV mother-to-child transmission prevention. HBsAg detection was performed using Architect HBsAg Qualitative II kit (Abbott Diagnostics, Ireland) and for all reactive samples confirmation was done using Architect HBsAg Qualitative II Confirmatory kit (Abbott Diagnostics, Ireland). Nine hundred thirty samples were collected throughout the country with 66% out of Dakar, the capital city. The median age was 20 weeks and 88% of children were less than 1 year of age with a sex ratio of 1.27 in favor of boys. HBsAg was detected in 28 cases giving a global prevalence of 3%. According to age, HBsAg prevalences were 5.1% for children less than 6 weeks, 4.1% and 4.6%, respectively, for those aged 12-18 weeks and 18-24 weeks of age. The HIV prevalence was 2.6% with no HIV/HBV co-infection. This study showed a high rate of HBV infection in children under 24 months, highlighting the need to promote birth-dose HBV vaccination as recommended by WHO. PMID:26488892

  11. Integration of tumour and viral genomic characterisations in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Amaddeo, Giuliana; Cao, Qian; Ladeiro, Yannick; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Nault, Jean-Charles; Jaoui, Daphne; Gaston Mathe, Yann; Laurent, Christophe; Laurent, Alexis; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Calderaro, Julien; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common liver cancer. We characterised HCC associated with infection compared with non-HBV-related HCC to understand interactions between viral and hepatocyte genomic alterations and their relationships with clinical features. Methods Frozen HBV (n=86) or non-HBV-related (n=90) HCC were collected in two French surgical departments. Viral characterisation was performed by sequencing HBS and HBX genes and quantifying HBV DNA and cccDNA. Nine genes were screened for somatic mutations and expression profiling of 37 genes involved in hepatocarcinogenesis was studied. Results HBX revealed frequent non-sense, frameshift and deletions in tumours, suggesting an HBX inactivation selected in HCC. The number of viral copies was frequently lower in tumour than in non-tumour tissues (p=0.0005) and patients with low HBV copies in the non-tumour liver tissues presented additional risk factor (HCV, alcohol or non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis, p=0.006). P53 was the most frequently altered pathway in HBV-related HCC (47%, p=0.001). Furthermore, TP53 mutations were associated with shorter survival only in HBV-related HCC (p=0.02) whereas R249S mutations were identified exclusively in migrants. Compared with other aetiologies, HBV-HCC were more frequently classified in tumours subgroups with upregulation of genes involved in cell-cycle regulation and a progenitor phenotype. Finally, in HBV-related HCC, transcriptomic profiles were associated with specific gene mutations (HBX, TP53, IRF2, AXIN1 and CTNNB1). Conclusions Integrated genomic characterisation of HBV and non-HBV-related HCC emphasised the immense molecular diversity of HCC closely related to aetiologies that could impact clinical care of HCC patients. PMID:25021421

  12. Sleeping Beauty transposon-based system for rapid generation of HBV-replicating stable cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Zhang, Tian-Ying; Fang, Lin-Lin; Chen, Zi-Xuan; Song, Liu-Wei; Cao, Jia-Li; Yang, Lin; Yuan, Quan; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-08-01

    The stable HBV-replicating cell lines, which carry replication-competent HBV genome stably integrated into the genome of host cell, are widely used to evaluate the effects of antiviral agents. However, current methods to generate HBV-replicating cell lines, which are mostly dependent on random integration of foreign DNA via plasmid transfection, are less-efficient and time-consuming. To address this issue, we constructed an all-in-one Sleeping Beauty transposon system (denoted pTSMP-HBV vector) for robust generation of stable cell lines carrying replication-competent HBV genome of different genotype. This vector contains a Sleeping Beauty transposon containing HBV 1.3-copy genome with an expression cassette of the SV40 promoter driving red fluorescent protein (mCherry) and self-cleaving P2A peptide linked puromycin resistance gene (PuroR). In addition, a PGK promoter-driven SB100X hyperactive transposase cassette is placed in the outside of the transposon in the same plasmid.The HBV-replicating stable cells could be obtained from pTSMP-HBV transfected HepG2 cells by red fluorescence-activated cell sorting and puromycin resistant cell selection within 4-week. Using this system, we successfully constructed four cell lines carrying replication-competent HBV genome of genotypes A-D. The replication and viral protein expression profiles of these cells were systematically characterized. In conclusion, our study provides a high-efficiency strategy to generate HBV-replicating stable cell lines, which may facilitate HBV-related virological study. PMID:27091097

  13. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon Sik Seo, Hyun Wook Jung, Guhung

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  14. Clinical significance of hepatitis B surface antigen mutants

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Onorato, Lorenzo; Minichini, Carmine; Di Caprio, Giovanni; Starace, Mario; Sagnelli, Caterina; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health problem in many countries, with nearly 300 million people worldwide carrying HBV chronic infection and over 1 million deaths per year due to cirrhosis and liver cancer. Several hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) mutations have been described, most frequently due to a single amino acid substitution and seldom to a nucleotide deletion. The majority of mutations are located in the S region, but they have also been found in the pre-S1 and pre-S2 regions. Single amino acid substitutions in the major hydrophilic region of HBsAg, called the “a” determinant, have been associated with immune escape and the consequent failure of HBV vaccination and HBsAg detection, whereas deletions in the pre-S1 or pre-S2 regions have been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. This review article will focus on the HBsAg mutants and their biological and clinical implications. PMID:26644816

  15. Molecular characterization of hepatitis B virus (HBV) isolates, including identification of a novel recombinant, in patients with acute HBV infection attending an Irish hospital.

    PubMed

    Laoi, Bairbre Ni; Crowley, B

    2008-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is known to show significant genetic diversity. There are eight HBV genotypes (A-H) characterized by distinct geographical distribution. Mutations in the HBV genome, in particular precore (PC) and basal core promoter (BCP) mutations, may be important factors in the pathogenesis of disease. In this study genetic heterogeneity and phylogenetic analysis of HBV isolates from 32 naïve patients with acute HBV infection was investigated. Eleven patients presented with severe infection, while the remaining 21 had self-limiting illness. Only four isolates from patients with severe HBV infection harbored the G1896A stop codon mutation. One isolate (Irish-13), collected from a patient with acute asymptomatic infection, had a G1896A mutation and a 243 bp deletion of the polymerase gene. A triple mutation, T1753C/A1762T/G1764A was identified in only one isolate (Irish-3) associated with severe infection. The latter also had a mutation, A2339G, in the core gene, not previously reported in severe acute infection caused by genotype D. Variations within the S gene were identified in 6 isolates, including Gly145Ala, associated with vaccine immune escape, Asp144Glu, Ser143Leu and Phe134Leu, each associated with failure to detect HBsAg. Phylogenetic analysis was determined using amplicons of the S gene (678 bp) and distal-X/PC region (672 bp). Genotype A was the most common (75%), followed by genotype D (15.6%), and equal proportions of C, E, F, and H. A novel recombinant of genotypes D and E was identified in an isolate originating from West Africa. Genetic heterogeneity of HBV isolates of HBV isolates from patients with acute infection needs further study of its significance. PMID:18649329

  16. Design, synthesis, molecular docking studies and anti-HBV activity of phenylpropanoid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Li, Yubin; Wei, Wanxing; Wang, Kuiwu; Wang, Lisheng; Wang, Jianyi

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a series of phenylpropanoid derivatives were synthesized, and their anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) activity was evaluated. Most of the synthesized derivatives showed effective anti-HBV activity. And compound 4d-3 showed the most effective anti-HBV activity, performing strong potent inhibitory not only on the secretion of HBsAg (IC50 = 58.28 μM, SI = 23.26) and HBeAg (IC50 = 97.21 μM, SI = 13.95), but also on the HBV DNA replication (IC50 = 42.28 μM, SI = 32.06). The structure-activity relationships (SARs) of the derivatives had been discussed, which were useful for developing phenylpropanoid derivatives as novel anti-HBV agents. Moreover, the docking study of all synthesized compounds inside the HLA-A protein (PDB ID: 3OX8) active site was carried out to explore the molecular interactions and a molecular target for activity and a modified assay method measuring the interaction between our derivatives and HBcAg was investigated, indicating that the HBV core protein might be their potential target for anti-HBV. This study identified a new class of potent non-nucleoside anti-HBV agents. PMID:26980103

  17. Injecting and sexual risk correlates of HBV and HCV seroprevalence among new drug injectors

    PubMed Central

    Neaigus, Alan; Gyarmathy, V. Anna; Miller, Maureen; Frajzyngier, Veronica M.; Zhao, Mingfang; Friedman, Samuel R.; Des Jarlais, Don C.

    2007-01-01

    We examine injecting and sexual risk correlates of hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) seroprevalence among new injecting drug users (IDUs) (age 18–30 years, injecting ≤6 years). Participants were interviewed/serotested (HIVab, HBVcAb, HCVab) in New York City, 2/1999–2/2003. Gender-stratified, multivariate logistic regression was conducted. Participants (N=259) were: 68% male; 81% white. Women were more likely to test HCV seropositive (42% vs. 27%) and men HBV seropositive (24% vs. 12%); HIV seroprevalence was low (3%). Among both men and women, HBV seropositivity was associated with ever selling sex, and HCV seropositivity with ever having had infected (HIV, HBV or HCV) sex partners (among those ever sharing injecting equipment). Among women only, HBV seropositivity was associated with ever having had infected sex partners (regardless of ever sharing injecting equipment), and HCV seropositivity with ≥300 lifetime drug injections. Among men only, HCV seropositivity was associated with ≥40 lifetime number of sex partners (among those never sharing injecting equipment). In this new IDU sample, HBV and HCV seroprevalence differed by gender and were considerably higher than HIV seroprevalence. Early interventions, targeting injecting and sexual risks and including HBV vaccination, are needed among new IDUs to prevent HBV, HCV and, potentially, HIV epidemics. PMID:17289298

  18. Genomic responses to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ancey, Pierre-Benoit; Testoni, Barbara; Gruffaz, Marion; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Durand, Geoffroy; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Durantel, David; Herceg, Zdenko; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections are able to modify the host's cellular programs, with DNA methylation being a biological intermediate in this process. The extent to which viral infections deregulate gene expression and DNA methylation is not fully understood. In the case of Hepatitis B virus (HBV), there is evidence for an interaction between viral proteins and the host DNA methylation machinery. We studied the ability of HBV to modify the host transcriptome and methylome, using naturally infected primary human hepatocytes to better mimic the clinical setting. Gene expression was especially sensitive to culture conditions, independently of HBV infection. However, we identified non-random changes in gene expression and DNA methylation occurring specifically upon HBV infection. There was little correlation between expression and methylation changes, with transcriptome being a more sensitive marker of time-dependent changes induced by HBV. In contrast, a set of differentially methylated sites appeared early and were stable across the time course experiment. Finally, HBV-induced DNA methylation changes were defined by a specific chromatin context characterized by CpG-poor regions outside of gene promoters. These data support the ability of HBV to modulate host cell expression and methylation programs. In addition, it may serve as a reference for studies addressing the genome-wide consequences of HBV infection in human hepatocytes. PMID:26565721

  19. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Sik; Seo, Hyun Wook; Jung, Guhung

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. PMID:25576869

  20. Construction of the HBV S-ecdCD40L fusion gene and effects of HBV S-ecdCD40L modification on function of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, J-M; Lin, X-F; Huang, Z-M; Wu, J S

    2011-10-01

    We examined the effect of dendritic cells engineered to express an HBV S antigen CD40L fusion gene (HBV S-ecdCD40L). The DNA of HBV S gene and the cDNA of the extracellular domain of human CD40 ligand were linked by cloning. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy adults were incubated and induced into dendritic cells (DC) in presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4(IL-4). The DCs were transfected the novel construct, and the impact of the expressed clone assessed. We find that, compared with control groups, modification of DCs with HBV S-ecdCD40L fusion gene resulted in the activation of DCs with upregulated expression of immunologically important cell surface molecules (CD80, CD86 and HLA-DR) and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-12). The DCs modified with HBV S-ecdCD40L are able to stimulate enhanced allogeneic T-cell proliferation in vitro. Thus, the fusion gene HBV S-ecdCD40L can promote DC's activation and enhance its function and may prove to be the foundation for a new type of hepatitis B vaccine. PMID:21914064

  1. Actual and perceived HBV status among Asian Pacific Islander Americans in Rhode Island: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ha, Austin Y; Nguyen, Joyce E; Doyle, Richard J; Feller, Edward

    2015-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (HBV) in the Asian and Pacific Islander (API) American population is an under-recognized health issue in the United States. Among foreign-born API, the prevalence of HBV is approximately 10%. The prevalence in the general population is below 0.5%; among non-Hispanic whites it is below 0.2%. We examined beliefs held by the API populations in Rhode Island (RI) about personal HBV status and compared them with their actual HBV status. Of 59 total study participants, only 19 (32%) participants correctly knew their HBV status. Six (10%) participants were carriers of HBV; 18 (31%) lacked immunity to the virus. This pilot study suggests the RI API population is not knowledgeable about their own HBV status and are inadequately screened, vaccinated against, and treated for HBV. Increased statewide screening and education efforts, tailored to address this population, are needed to identify and inform those in need of medical attention or vaccination. PMID:25938399

  2. NIRF, a Novel Ubiquitin Ligase, Inhibits Hepatitis B Virus Replication Through Effect on HBV Core Protein and H3 Histones.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guanhua; Hu, Bin; Zhou, Danlin; Xuan, Yanyan; Bai, Lu; Duan, Changzhu

    2015-05-01

    Np95/ICBP90-like RING finger protein (NIRF), a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase, has been shown to interact with HBc and promote its degradation. This study investigated the effects of NIRF on replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the mechanisms. We have shown that NIRF inhibits replication of HBV DNA and secretion of HBsAg and HBeAg in HepG2 cells transfected with pAAV-HBV1.3. NIRF also inhibits the replication and secretion of HBV in a mouse model that expressed HBV. NIRF reduces acetylation of HBV cccDNA-bound H3 histones. These results showed that NIRF is involved in the HBV replication cycle not only through direct interaction with HBc but also reduces acetylation of HBV cccDNA-bound H3 histones. PMID:25664994

  3. Dynamics of an HBV Model with Drug Resistance Under Intermittent Antiviral Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ben-Gong; Tanaka, Gouhei; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi; Chen, Luonan

    2015-06-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) model and the therapy regimens of HBV disease. First, we propose a new mathematical model of HBV with drug resistance, and then analyze its qualitative and dynamical properties. Combining the clinical data and theoretical analysis, we demonstrate that our model is biologically plausible and also computationally viable. Second, we demonstrate that the intermittent antiviral therapy regimen is one of the possible strategies to treat this kind of complex disease. There are two main advantages of this regimen, i.e. it not only may delay the development of drug resistance, but also may reduce the duration of on-treatment time compared with the long-term continuous medication. Moreover, such an intermittent antiviral therapy can reduce the adverse side effects. Our theoretical model and computational results provide qualitative insight into the progression of HBV, and also a possible new therapy for HBV disease.

  4. Branched oligosaccharide structures on HBV prevent interaction with both DC-SIGN and L-SIGN.

    PubMed

    Op den Brouw, M L; de Jong, M A W P; Ludwig, I S; van der Molen, R G; Janssen, H L A; Geijtenbeek, T B H; Woltman, A M

    2008-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a DNA virus that infects the liver as primary target. Currently, a high affinity receptor for HBV is still unknown. The dendritic cell specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN is involved in pathogen recognition through mannose and fucose containing carbohydrates leading to the induction of an anti-viral immune response. Many glycosylated viruses subvert this immune surveillance function and exploit DC-SIGN as a port of entry and for trans-infection of target cells. The glycosylation pattern on HBV surface antigens (HBsAg) together with the tissue distribution of HBV would allow interaction between HBV and DC-SIGN and its liver-expressed homologue L-SIGN. Therefore, a detailed study to investigate the binding of HBV to DC-SIGN and L-SIGN was performed. For HCV, both DC-SIGN and L-SIGN are known to bind envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2. Soluble DC-SIGN and L-SIGN specifically bound HCV virus-like particles, but no interaction with either HBsAg or HepG2.2.15-derived HBV was detected. Also, neither DC-SIGN nor L-SIGN transfected Raji cells bound HBsAg. In contrast, highly mannosylated HBV, obtained by treating HBV producing HepG2.2.15 cells with the alpha-mannosidase I inhibitor kifunensine, is recognized by DC-SIGN. The alpha-mannosidase I trimming of N-linked oligosaccharide structures thus prevents recognition by DC-SIGN. On the basis of these findings, it is tempting to speculate that HBV exploits mannose trimming as a way to escape recognition by DC-SIGN and thereby subvert a possible immune activation response. PMID:18482282

  5. Distribution and Epidemiologic Trends of HBV Genotypes and Subtypes in 14 Countries Neighboring China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhao; Jianqiong, Wang; Hongmei, Li; Rong, Zeng; Li, Li; Jinping, Zhang; Tao, Shen

    2015-01-01

    Background: The number of cases of HBV infection reported by the WHO for each district and country is positively correlated with the number of HBV sequences in the database isolated from the corresponding district and country. Objectives: This study determined distribution characteristics of HBV genotypes and subtypes in 14 countries neighboring China. The progress made in genomic research involving HBV was also reviewed. Materials and Methods: Nine hundred fifty-one complete genome sequences of HBV from 14 countries neighboring China were selected from NCBI. The sequence-related information was analyzed and recorded. One hundred seventy-two sequences of HBV genotype B were screened for alignment using DNA star and MEGA 5.1. Results: Dominant HBV genotypes in the countries neighboring China were genotypes B, C and D and dominant subtypes were adw2 and adrq+. The association between genotype and serotype of HBV in these countries was shown to differ from previous research results. As shown by sequence alignment, the sequence divergence between five subgenotypes (B3, B5, B7, B8 and B9) was below 4%. The B subgenotypes shared six common specific amino acid sites in the S region. Conclusions: The B3, B5, B7, B8 and B9 subgenotypes can be clustered into quasi-sub-genotype B3 and the open reading frame of HBV has a start codon preference; however, whether a mutation in the start codon in the pre-S2 region has an impact on survival and replication of HBV remains to be determined. PMID:26045702

  6. Expanding motion in the ionized envelope of HBV 475

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, S.

    1981-01-01

    Expansion velocities in the ionized envelope of HBV 475 are obtained from line profiles of H-alpha, He I 6678, 7065, and forbidden Fe VII 6087. Two components of forbidden Fe VII 6087 show evidence of outward gas motion with high velocities from the central star. H-alpha and He I 6678 profiles are very similar to those obtained from observations of forbidden O III and Ne III lines, and have gas motion velocities corresponding to full widths at half-maximum of the lines which do not exceed the velocities of Fe(+6). Through investigations of He(+) and Fe(+5) ionization structures, it is concluded that the interacting stellar winds model is favorable to explain the velocity fields suggested by the line profiles.

  7. Association between interleukin-21 gene polymorphisms (rs12508721) and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q X; Li, S L; Yao, Y Q; Li, T J

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin-21 (IL-21), as a multifunctional cytokine, plays an important role in many diseases, such as cancer, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. We aimed to investigate the relationship between polymorphisms of IL-21 gene and susceptibility of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a Chinese population. Studied subjects were divided into three groups: 100 patients with HBV-related HCC, 115 patients with chronic HBV infection and 127 healthy controls. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood, and the polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction (PCR-LDR) method was used to genotype the SNPs (rs2221903, rs907715 and rs12508721) within IL-21 gene. Our results showed that IL-21 polymorphisms were associated with the risk of HCC and chronic HBV infection when compared with healthy controls. The rs2221903A/G AG genotype was associated with a higher risk of chronic HBV infection when compared with healthy controls [AG versus AA + GG, P = 0.036, OR = 1.898, 95%CI = 1.038-3.471]. The rs12508721C/T TT genotype was related with a lower risk of chronic HBV infection and HBV-related HCC than in healthy controls [TT versus CT + CC, P = 0.026, OR = 0.451, 95%CI = 0.221-0.920; P = 0.049, OR = 0.482, 95%CI = 0.231-1.005]. No significant difference in the genotype and allele distrubutions of rs907715G/A SNP was observed in the HBV-related HCC group, chronic HBV-infected group and the healthy control group when compared to each other. Our findings suggest that the rs12508721T/C and rs2221903A/G polymorphisms of IL-21 gene are associated with the susceptibility of HBV-related HCC and chronic HBV infection. The genetic variant may in fact cause protection against the HBV-related HCC. However, the function in these SNPs of IL-21 gene needs to clarify the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of HBV-related HCC further. PMID:27122304

  8. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) receptors: Deficiency in tumor results in scant HBV infection and overexpression in peritumor leads to higher recurrence risk

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Fan, Qing-Min; Yu, Guo-Feng; Yu, Dan-Dan; Gao, Lu; Sun, Kai; Han, Zhi-Peng; Li, Rong; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Qiu-Dong; Wu, Meng-Chao; Wang, Hong-Yang; Wei, Li-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis and recurrence. Here, we sought to characterize intratumoral and peritumoral expression of HBsAg and its specific receptors in HBsAg-positive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and further examined their correlation with the recurrence-free survival (RFS). HCC tissue and adjacent normal tissue specimens were acquired from HBsAg-positive patients. The presence of HBsAg and receptors, as well as hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) were detected by tissue microassay and immunohistochemistry. Necroinflammatory activity was evaluated by HE staining. The mean IOD of HBsAg and HBV DNA in the intratumoral tissues was markedly lower than that in the peritumoral tissues (P < 0.001). Pearson correlation analysis further showed a significant correlation between the expression of HBsAg and NTCP (r = 0.461, P < 0.001) or ASGPR (r = 0.506, P < 0.001) in peritumoral tissues. And the peritumoral HBsAg and receptors presented a positive association with necroinflammatory activity (P < 0.05). Inflammation induced by HBV infection presented a positive association with HPCs activation (P < 0.05). Additionally, due to lack of HBV receptors, HPCs was not preferentially infected with HBV, but activated HPCs had a significant correlation with HBsAg expression in peritumoral tissues, and the peritumoral HPCs activation was associated with RFS of HCC patients, therefore, the overexpression of HBsAg and receptors in peritumor were also with higher recurrence risk (P < 0.05). In conclusion, lack of HBV receptors resulted in scant HBV infection in tumor cells, and overexpression of HBsAg and receptors in peritumor was strongly associated with higher recurrence risk in HCC patients. PMID:26515593

  9. Abnormal Intracellular Calcium Signaling and SNARE-Dependent Exocytosis Contributes to SOD1G93A Astrocyte-Mediated Toxicity in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kawamata, Hibiki; Ng, Seng Kah; Diaz, Natalia; Burstein, Suzanne; Morel, Lydie; Osgood, Alexandra; Sider, Brittany; Higashimori, Haruki; Haydon, Philip G.

    2014-01-01

    Motor neurons are progressively and predominantly degenerated in ALS, which is not only induced by multiple intrinsic pathways but also significantly influenced by the neighboring glial cells. In particular, astrocytes derived from the SOD1 mutant mouse model of ALS or from human familial or sporadic ALS patient brain tissue directly induce motor neuron death in culture; however, the mechanisms of pathological astroglial secretion remain unclear. Here we investigated abnormal calcium homeostasis and altered exocytosis in SOD1G93A astrocytes. We found that purinergic stimulation induces excess calcium release from the ER stores in SOD1G93A astrocytes, which results from the abnormal ER calcium accumulation and is independent of clearance mechanisms. Furthermore, pharmacological studies suggested that store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), a calcium refilling mechanism responsive to ER calcium depletion, is enhanced in SOD1G93A astrocytes. We found that oxidant-induced increased S-glutathionylation and calcium-independent puncta formation of the ER calcium sensor STIM1 underlies the abnormal SOCE response in SOD1G93A astrocytes. Enhanced SOCE contributes to ER calcium overload in SOD1G93A astrocytes and excess calcium release from the ER during ATP stimulation. In addition, ER calcium release induces elevated ATP release from SOD1G93A astrocytes, which can be inhibited by the overexpression of dominant-negative SNARE. Selective inhibition of exocytosis in SOD1G93A astrocytes significantly prevents astrocyte-mediated toxicity to motor neurons and delays disease onset in SOD1G93A mice. Our results characterize a novel mechanism responsible for calcium dysregulation in SOD1G93A astrocytes and provide the first in vivo evidence that astrocyte exocytosis contributes to the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:24501372

  10. Association of an HLA-G 14-bp Insertion/Deletion polymorphism with high HBV replication in chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Laaribi, A B; Zidi, I; Hannachi, N; Ben Yahia, H; Chaouch, H; Bortolotti, D; Zidi, N; Letaief, A; Yacoub, S; Boudabous, A; Rizzo, R; Boukadida, J

    2015-10-01

    Identification of an HLA-G 14-bp Insertion/Deletion (Ins/Del) polymorphism at the 3' untranslated region of HLA-G revealed its importance in HLA-G mRNA stability and HLA-G protein level variation. We evaluated the association between the HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism in patients with chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a case-control study. Genomic DNA was extracted from 263 patients with chronic HBV hepatitis and 246 control subjects and was examined for the HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism by PCR. The polymorphic variants were genotyped in chronic HBV seropositive cases stratified according to HBV DNA levels, fibrosis stages and in a control population. There was no statistical significant association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and increased susceptibility to HBV infection neither for alleles (P = 0.09) nor for genotypes (P = 0.18). The stratification of HBV patients based on HBV DNA levels revealed an association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and an enhanced HBV activity with high HBV DNA levels. In particular, the Ins allele was significantly associated with high HBV DNA levels (P = 0.0024, OR = 1.71, 95% CI 1.2-2.4). The genotype Ins/Ins was associated with a 2.5-fold (95% CI, 1.29-4.88) increased risk of susceptibility to high HBV replication compared with the Del/Del and Ins/Del genotypes. This susceptibility is linked to the presence of two Ins alleles. No association was observed between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and fibrosis stage of HBV infection. We observed an association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and high HBV replication characterized by high HBV DNA levels in chronic HBV patients. These results suggest a potential prognostic value for disease outcome evaluation. PMID:25619305

  11. HBV lamivudine resistance among hepatitis B and HIV coinfected patients starting lamivudine, stavudine and nevirapine in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kim, H N; Scott, J; Cent, A; Cook, L; Morrow, R A; Richardson, B; Tapia, K; Jerome, K R; Lule, G; John-Stewart, G; Chung, M H

    2011-10-01

    Widespread use of lamivudine in antiretroviral therapy may lead to hepatitis B virus resistance in HIV-HBV coinfected patients from endemic settings where tenofovir is not readily available. We evaluated 389 Kenyan HIV-infected adults before and for 18 months after starting highly active antiretroviral therapy with stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine. Twenty-seven (6.9%) were HBsAg positive and anti-HBs negative, 24 were HBeAg negative, and 18 had HBV DNA levels ≤ 10,000 IU/mL. Sustained HBV suppression to <100 IU/mL occurred in 89% of 19 evaluable patients. Resistance occurred in only two subjects, both with high baseline HBV DNA levels. Lamivudine resistance can emerge in the setting of incomplete HBV suppression but was infrequently observed among HIV-HBV coinfected patients with low baseline HBV DNA levels. PMID:21914062

  12. A hypomorphic mutation of the gamma-1 adaptin gene (Ap1g1) causes inner ear, retina, thyroid, and testes abnormalities in mice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kenneth R; Gagnon, Leona H; Chang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes function in the intracellular sorting and vesicular transport of membrane proteins. The clathrin-associated AP-1 complex functions at the trans-Golgi network and endosomes, and some forms of this complex are thought to mediate the sorting of proteins in plasma membranes of polarized epithelial cells. A null mutation of the mouse Ap1g1 gene, which encodes the gamma-1 subunit of the AP-1 complex, causes embryonic lethality when homozygous, indicating its critical importance in early development but precluding studies of its possible roles during later stages. Here, we describe our analyses of a new spontaneous mutation of Ap1g1 named "figure eight" (symbol fgt) and show that it is an in-frame deletion of 6 bp, which results in the elimination of two amino acids of the encoded protein. In contrast to Ap1g1 (-/-) null mice, mice homozygous for the recessive fgt mutation are viable with adult survival similar to controls. Although Ap1g1 is ubiquitously expressed, the phenotype of Ap1g1 (fgt) mutant mice is primarily restricted to abnormalities in sensory epithelial cells of the inner ear, pigmented epithelial cells of the retina, follicular epithelial cells of the thyroid gland, and the germinal epithelium of the testis, suggesting that impaired AP-1 sorting and targeting of membrane proteins in these polarized cells may underlie the observed pathologies. Ap1g1 (fgt) mutant mice provide a new animal model to study the in vivo roles of gamma-1 adaptin and the AP-1 complex throughout development and to investigate factors that underlie its associated phenotypic abnormalities. PMID:27090238

  13. Chronic hepatitis B infection and HBV DNA-containing capsids: Modeling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Kalyan; Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of chronic HBV infection taking into account both uninfected and infected hepatocytes along with the intracellular HBV DNA-containing capsids and the virions. While previous HBV models have included either the uninfected hepatocytes or the intracellular HBV DNA-containing capsids, our model accounts for both these two populations. We prove the conditions for local and global stability of both the uninfected and infected steady states in terms of the basic reproduction number. Further, we incorporate a time lag in the model to encompass the intracellular delay in the production of the infected hepatocytes and find that this delay does not affect the overall dynamics of the system. The results for the model and the delay model are finally numerically illustrated.

  14. Sorafenib Combined With Transarterial Chemoembolization in Treating HBV-infected Patients With Intermediate Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-24

    PHENYTOIN/SORAFENIB [VA Drug Interaction]; Liver Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Hepatocellular; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Liver Diseases; Adenocarcinoma; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; DOXORUBICIN/TRASTUZUMAB [VA Drug Interaction]; HBV

  15. Know HBV: What Every Asian and Pacific Islander Should Know About Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the skin or eyes) appear, it is often too late for treatment to be effective. » T ransmitted just like HIV 1. A mother-to-child infection For Asians, HBV is commonly transmitted from a chronically infected ...

  16. Basis of HBV persistence and new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Thursz, Mark

    2014-09-01

    The majority of the morbidity and mortality associated with hepatitis B virus infection is due to viral persistence and its consequences. The heterogeneity of outcomes from HBV infection suggests that both viral and host factors influence the development of chronic infection. Study of host genetic susceptibility has revealed a number of genes including MHC class II loci and cytokine receptors, which decrease the risk of persistence. On the viral side, the replication system is adapted to generate high levels of virions without stimulating the innate immune system. Secreted viral proteins (HBsAg and HBeAg) suppress innate responses through inhibition of TLR signaling, which leads to a weak adaptive immune response with an exhausted phenotype that is incapable of inducing viral elimination. However, even when the adaptive immune system begins to take effect after HBe seroconversion, the ability of the virus to mutate and evade T and B cell-mediated responses helps to sustain persistent infection. Understanding the mechanisms of persistence is important for the design of therapeutic strategies. Although there are currently no specific drugs that target the viral minichromosome (cccDNA), it is expected that in the future we will be able to use existing drugs more effectively to eliminate the infection. PMID:26201329

  17. Co-infection assessment in HBV, HCV, and HIV patients in Western Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Mughales, Jamil A

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed coinfections among HIV, HBV, and HCV infected patients. Retrospective analysis of laboratory records for HIV, HBV, and HCV patients presenting at the HIV outpatient clinic. Serological data including hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg), hepatitis B e-antibody (anti-HBe), antibodies to HIV and HCV, anti-toxoplasmosis IgG and IgM antibodies, and anti-syphilis antibodies (VDRL) were collected. We obtained data for 628 (218 HCV, 268 HBV, and 142 HIV) patients. Male-to-female ratios were 1:1 for HCV, 3:4 for HBV, and 5:3 for HIV. Age means (SD) were 54.24 (16.40), 44.53 (18.83), and 40.39 (15.92) years for HCV, HBV, and HIV, respectively. In HIV group, the prevalence of HBV and HCV coinfections was 8.5% and 2.8%, respectively. In HBV group, the prevalence of HCV and HIV coinfections was 1.1% and 1.5%, respectively. In HCV group, HIV or HBV coinfections occurred at the same frequency (1.4%). An absence of screening for coinfections was detected in 7.0-48.5% patients as per the group and the infectious agent; which represents an estimated proportion of 20 out of 1,000 patients with an undiagnosed coinfection. Despite a relatively low prevalence of coinfections, a significant proportion of cases remain undiagnosed because of a lack of systematic screening. J. Med. Virol. 88:1545-1551, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26895691

  18. Cortical signature of patients with HBV-related cirrhosis without overt hepatic encephalopathy: a morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiu; Lv, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Ling; Wu, Hua-Wang; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Qiu, Ying-Wei; Zhang, Xue-Lin; Jiang, Gui-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients with hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis (HBV-RC) without overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) are associated with a varying degree of cognitive dysfunction. Several resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been conducted to explore the neural correlates of such cognitive deficits, whereas little effort has been made to investigate the cortical integrity in cirrhotic patients without OHE. Here, using cortical thickness, surface area and local gyrification index (lGI), this study performed a comprehensive analysis on the cortical morphometry of patients with HBV-RC without OHE (HBV-RC-NOHE) vs. matched healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, we found significantly increased cortical thickness in the bilateral lingual and parahippocampal gyrus, right posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, peri-calcarine sulcus and fusiform gyrus in patient with HBV-RC-NOHE, which may closely relate to be the low-grade brain edema. Cortical gyrification analysis showed significantly increased lGI in the left superior and inferior parietal cortex as well as lateral occipital cortex, which was speculated to be associated with disruptions in white matter connectivity and sub-optimal intra-cortical organization. In addition, the mean cortical thickness/lGI of the regions with structural abnormalities was shown to be negatively correlated with psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) of the patients with HBV-RC-NOHE. These morphological changes may serve as potential markers for the preclinical diagnosis and progression of HBV-RC-NOHE. PMID:26106307

  19. Pediatric HIV-HBV Coinfection in Lusaka, Zambia: Prevalence and Short-Term Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Peebles, Kathryn; Nchimba, Lweendo; Chilengi, Roma; Bolton Moore, Carolyn; Mubiana-Mbewe, Mwangelwa; Vinikoor, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is endemic in Africa, where it may occur as an HIV coinfection. Data remain limited on HIV-HBV epidemiology in Africa, particularly in children. Using programmatic data from pediatric HIV clinics in Lusaka, Zambia during 2011-2014, we analyzed the prevalence of chronic HBV coinfection (defined as a single positive hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg] test) and its impact on immune recovery and liver enzyme elevation (LEE) during the first year of antiretroviral therapy. Among 411 children and adolescents, 10.4% (95% confidence interval, 7.6-14.1) had HIV-HBV. Coinfected patients were more likely to have World Health Organization stage 3/4, LEE and CD4 <14% at care entry (all p < 0.05). During treatment, CD4 increases and LEE incidence were similar by HBsAg status. HBsAg positivity decreased (11.8% vs. 6.6%; p = 0.24) following HBV vaccine introduction. These findings support screening pediatric HIV patients in Africa for HBV coinfection. Dedicated cohorts are needed to assess long-term outcomes of coinfection. PMID:26338421

  20. Discovering novel direct acting antiviral agents for HBV using in silico screening.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshiki; Hayakawa, Michiyo; Yano, Yoshihiko; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Enomoto, Masaru; Tamori, Akihiro; Kawada, Norifumi; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Umeyama, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    The treatments for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) are interferon and nucleoside analogues reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. Because both treatments are less than ideal, we conducted to identify novel anti-viral agents for HBV-reverse transcriptase (HBV-RT). We determined the ligand-binding site of the HBV-RT by conducting a homological search of the amino acid sequence and then we also determined not only structural arrangement of the target protein but the target protein-binding site of the ligand using known protein-ligand complexes in registered in the protein data bank (PDB). Finally we simulated binding between the ligand candidates and the HBV-RT and evaluated the degree of binding (in silico screening). PXB cells derived from human-mouse chimeric mouse liver, infected with HBV were administrated with the candidates, and HBVDNA in the culture medium was monitored by realtime qPCR. Among compounds from the AKosSamples database, twelve candidates that can inhibit RT were also identified, two of which seem to have the potential to control HBV replication in vitro. PMID:25446116

  1. Cortical signature of patients with HBV-related cirrhosis without overt hepatic encephalopathy: a morphometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiu; Lv, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Ling; Wu, Hua-Wang; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Qiu, Ying-Wei; Zhang, Xue-Lin; Jiang, Gui-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients with hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis (HBV-RC) without overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) are associated with a varying degree of cognitive dysfunction. Several resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been conducted to explore the neural correlates of such cognitive deficits, whereas little effort has been made to investigate the cortical integrity in cirrhotic patients without OHE. Here, using cortical thickness, surface area and local gyrification index (lGI), this study performed a comprehensive analysis on the cortical morphometry of patients with HBV-RC without OHE (HBV-RC-NOHE) vs. matched healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, we found significantly increased cortical thickness in the bilateral lingual and parahippocampal gyrus, right posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, peri-calcarine sulcus and fusiform gyrus in patient with HBV-RC-NOHE, which may closely relate to be the low-grade brain edema. Cortical gyrification analysis showed significantly increased lGI in the left superior and inferior parietal cortex as well as lateral occipital cortex, which was speculated to be associated with disruptions in white matter connectivity and sub-optimal intra-cortical organization. In addition, the mean cortical thickness/lGI of the regions with structural abnormalities was shown to be negatively correlated with psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) of the patients with HBV-RC-NOHE. These morphological changes may serve as potential markers for the preclinical diagnosis and progression of HBV-RC-NOHE. PMID:26106307

  2. Inflammation Promotes Expression of Stemness-Related Properties in HBV-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Te-Sheng; Chen, Chi-Long; Wu, Yu-Chih; Liu, Jun-Jen; Kuo, Yung Che; Lee, Kam-Fai; Lin, Sin-Yi; Lin, Sey-En; Tung, Shui-Yi; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Huang, Yen-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The expression of cancer stemness is believed to reduce the efficacy of current therapies against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Understanding of the stemness-regulating signaling pathways incurred by a specific etiology can facilitate the development of novel targets for individualized therapy against HCC. Niche environments, such as virus-induced inflammation, may play a crucial role. However, the mechanisms linking inflammation and stemness expression in HCC remain unclear. Here we demonstrated the distinct role of inflammatory mediators in expressions of stemness-related properties involving the pluripotent octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4) in cell migration and drug resistance of hepatitis B virus-related HCC (HBV-HCC). We observed positive immunorecognition for macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1)/CD68 and OCT4/NANOG in HBV-HCC tissues. The inflammation-conditioned medium (inflamed-CM) generated by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated U937 human leukemia cells significantly increased the mRNA and protein levels of OCT4/NANOG preferentially in HBV-active (HBV+HBsAg+) HCC cells. The inflamed-CM also increased the side population (SP) cell percentage, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive cell population, and luciferase activity of OCT4 promoter-GFP/luciferase in HBV-active HCC cells. Furthermore, the inflamed-CM upregulated the expressions of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)/IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) and activated IGF-IR/Akt signaling in HBV-HCC. The IGF-IR phosphorylation inhibitor picropodophyllin (PPP) suppressed inflamed-CM-induced OCT4 and NANOG levels in HBV+HBsAg+ Hep3B cells. Forced expression of OCT4 significantly increased the secondary sphere formation and cell migration, and reduced susceptibility of HBV-HCC cells to cisplatin, bleomycin, and doxorubicin. Taking together, our results show that niche inflammatory mediators play critical roles in inducing the expression of stemness-related properties involving IGF-IR activation, and

  3. Inflammation Promotes Expression of Stemness-Related Properties in HBV-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Chih; Liu, Jun-Jen; Kuo, Yung Che; Lee, Kam-Fai; Lin, Sin-Yi; Lin, Sey-En; Tung, Shui-Yi; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Huang, Yen-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The expression of cancer stemness is believed to reduce the efficacy of current therapies against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Understanding of the stemness-regulating signaling pathways incurred by a specific etiology can facilitate the development of novel targets for individualized therapy against HCC. Niche environments, such as virus-induced inflammation, may play a crucial role. However, the mechanisms linking inflammation and stemness expression in HCC remain unclear. Here we demonstrated the distinct role of inflammatory mediators in expressions of stemness-related properties involving the pluripotent octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4) in cell migration and drug resistance of hepatitis B virus-related HCC (HBV-HCC). We observed positive immunorecognition for macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1)/CD68 and OCT4/NANOG in HBV-HCC tissues. The inflammation-conditioned medium (inflamed-CM) generated by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated U937 human leukemia cells significantly increased the mRNA and protein levels of OCT4/NANOG preferentially in HBV-active (HBV+HBsAg+) HCC cells. The inflamed-CM also increased the side population (SP) cell percentage, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive cell population, and luciferase activity of OCT4 promoter-GFP/luciferase in HBV-active HCC cells. Furthermore, the inflamed-CM upregulated the expressions of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)/IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) and activated IGF-IR/Akt signaling in HBV-HCC. The IGF-IR phosphorylation inhibitor picropodophyllin (PPP) suppressed inflamed-CM-induced OCT4 and NANOG levels in HBV+HBsAg+ Hep3B cells. Forced expression of OCT4 significantly increased the secondary sphere formation and cell migration, and reduced susceptibility of HBV-HCC cells to cisplatin, bleomycin, and doxorubicin. Taking together, our results show that niche inflammatory mediators play critical roles in inducing the expression of stemness-related properties involving IGF-IR activation, and

  4. [Advanced Testing and Laboratory for HBV, HCV, and HIV Infection].

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Matsuo

    2015-06-01

    Most target substances for immunoassay of infectious disease are antigens or antibodies which do not exist in the human body. Therefore, the method to set reference values is different from chemistry or hematology testing. High sensitivity is required for infectious disease testing, particularly for screening. Also, its reference values (cut-off values) are set as low as possible. Therefore, a false-positive reaction can be caused due to slightly non-specific reactions in infectious disease reagents. The specificities for infectious disease reagents were evaluated with 9 kinds of HCV antibody test kit and 9 kinds of HIV screening kit. The frequencies of false-positive results were 0.2-1.8 and 0.2-1.3%, respectively, and even a kit with a high specificity showed a false-positive result for 1 in 500 samples. The sensitivities for infectious disease reagents were evaluated with a newly developed super-high- sensitive HBs antigen assay kit and 8 kinds of chemiluminescence HBs antigen assay kit which are highly sensitive conventional kits. As a result, the super-high-sensitive kit was 10 to 40 times more sensitive than conventional kits. After introducing the super-high-sensitive kit to routine assays, 16 HBV-infected patients, who were not identified with the conventional kits, were detected for six months. On the other hand, we confirmed false-positive results due to contamination between specimens after introducing the super-high-sensitive kit. It is recommended to use the super-high-sensitive kit in a well-controlled environment to prevent contamination between specimens in order to generate highly reliable test results. PMID:26548240

  5. Therapeutic rAAVrh10 Mediated SOD1 Silencing in Adult SOD1G93A Mice and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Florie; Gernoux, Gwladys; Cardozo, Brynn; Metterville, Jake P.; Toro Cabreja, Gabriela C.; Song, Lina; Su, Qin; Gao, Guang Ping; Elmallah, Mai K.; Brown, Robert H.; Mueller, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease; survival in ALS is typically 3–5 years. No treatment extends patient survival by more than three months. Approximately 20% of familial ALS and 1–3% of sporadic ALS patients carry a mutation in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). In a transgenic ALS mouse model expressing the mutant SOD1G93A protein, silencing the SOD1 gene prolongs survival. One study reports a therapeutic effect of silencing the SOD1 gene in systemically treated adult ALS mice; this was achieved with a short hairpin RNA, a silencing molecule that has raised multiple safety concerns, and recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) 9. We report here a silencing method based on an artificial microRNA termed miR-SOD1 systemically delivered using adeno-associated virus rAAVrh10, a serotype with a demonstrated safety profile in CNS clinical trials. Silencing of SOD1 in adult SOD1G93A transgenic mice with this construct profoundly delayed both disease onset and death in the SOD1G93A mice, and significantly preserved muscle strength and motor and respiratory functions. We also document that intrathecal delivery of the same rAAVrh10-miR-SOD1 in nonhuman primates significantly and safely silences SOD1 in lower motor neurons. This study supports the view that rAAVrh10-miR-SOD1 merits further development for the treatment of SOD1-linked ALS in humans. PMID:26710998

  6. Hepatitis B virus infection in blood donors in Argentina: prevalence of infection, genotype distribution and frequency of occult HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Pisano, María Belén; Blanco, Sebastián; Carrizo, Horacio; Ré, Viviana Elizabeth; Gallego, Sandra

    2016-10-01

    This study describes the prevalence of HBV infection based on detection of HBsAg and HBV-DNA by NAT in 70,102 blood donors in Argentina (Córdoba province) and shows the viral genotype distribution and frequency of occult HBV infection (OBI) in this population. Forty-two donors were confirmed positive for HBV infection (0.06 %), and four had OBI. Genotype F was the most prevalent (71.4 %), followed by A (14.3 %), C (7.1 %) and D (7.1 %). This is the first report of the prevalence of confirmed HBV infection and the high frequency of occult HBV infection in a blood bank in Argentina. PMID:27383207

  7. Development of a highly sensitive bioluminescent enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis B virus surface antigen capable of detecting divergent mutants.

    PubMed

    Minekawa, Takayuki; Takehara, Shizuka; Takahashi, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are sometimes overlooked when using commercial kits to measure hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) due to their low sensitivities and reactivities to mutant strains of various genotypes. We developed an ultrasensitive bioluminescent enzyme immunoassay (BLEIA) for HBsAg using firefly luciferase, which is adaptable to a variety of HBsAg mutants, by combining four monoclonal antibodies with a polyclonal antibody against HBsAg. The measurement of seroconversion panels showed trace amounts of HBsAg during the early infection phase by the BLEIA because of its high sensitivity of 5 mIU/ml. The BLEIA detected HBsAg as early as did PCR in five of seven series and from 2.1 to 9.4 days earlier than commercial immunoassay methods. During the late infection phase, the BLEIA successfully detected HBsAg even 40 days after the disappearance of HBV DNA and the emergence of antibodies against HBsAg. The HBsAg BLEIA successfully detected all 13 recombinant HBsAg and 45 types of HBsAg mutants with various mutations within amino acids 90 to 164 in the S gene product. Some specimens had higher values determined by the BLEIA than those by a commercial chemiluminescent immunoassay; this suggests that such discrepancies were caused by the dissociation of preS1/preS2 peptides from the particle surface. With its highly sensitive detection of low-titer HBsAg, including various mutants, the HBsAg BLEIA is considered to be useful for the early diagnosis and prevention of HBV infection because of the shorter window of infection prior to detection, which facilitates early prediction of recurrence in HBV-infected individuals. PMID:23761660

  8. Prevalence of HBsAg mutants and impact of hepatitis B infant immunisation in four Pacific Island countries.

    PubMed

    Basuni, Ashraf A; Butterworth, Lesley; Cooksley, G; Locarnini, S; Carman, W F

    2004-07-29

    The prevalence rate of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Pacific Island countries is amongst the highest in the world. Hepatitis B immunisation has been incorporated into national programmes at various times, often with erratic supply and coverage, until a regionally co-ordinated programme, which commenced in 1995 ensured adequate supply. The effectiveness of these programmes was recently evaluated in four countries, Vanuatu and Fiji in Melanesia, Tonga in Polynesia and Kiribati in Micronesia. That evaluation established that the programmes had a substantial beneficial impact in preventing chronic hepatitis B infection [Vaccine 18 (2000) 3059]. Several studies of hepatitis B vaccination programmes in endemic countries have identified the potential significance of surface gene mutants as a cause for failure of immunisation. In the study outlined in this paper, we screened infected children and their mothers for the emergence and prevalence of these variants in specimens collected from the four country evaluation. Although the opportunity for the emergence of HBV vaccine escape mutants in these populations was high due to the presence of a considerable amount of the virus in the population and the selection pressure from vaccine use, there were no "a" determinant vaccine escape mutants found. This suggests that vaccine escape variants are not an important cause for failure to prevent HBV transmission in this setting. Other HBsAg variants were detected, but their functional significance remains to be determined. The failure to provide satisfactory protection during such immunisation programmes reflects the need for achieving and sustaining high vaccine coverage, improving the timeliness of doses as well as improving 'cold-chain' support, rather than the selection of vaccine-escape mutants of HBV. PMID:15246613

  9. Complete Spectrum of CRISPR/Cas9-induced Mutations on HBV cccDNA.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Christoph; Sohn, Ji A

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes chronic infections that cannot yet be cured. The virus persists in infected hepatocytes, because covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the template for the transcription of viral RNAs, is stable in nondividing cells. Antiviral therapies with nucleoside analogues inhibit HBV DNA synthesis in capsids in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes, but do not destroy nuclear cccDNA. Because over 200 million people are still infected, a cure for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) has become one of the major challenges in antiviral therapy. As a first step toward the development of curative therapies, we previously demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to functionally inactivate cccDNA derived from infectious HBV. Moreover, some evidence suggests that certain cytokines might induce an APOBEC-mediated cascade leading to the destruction of cccDNA. In this report we investigated whether a combination of the two mechanisms could act synergistically to inactivate cccDNA. Using next generation sequencing (NGS), we determined the complete spectrum of mutations in cccDNA following Cas9 cleavage and repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). We found that over 90% of HBV DNA was cleaved by Cas9. In addition our results showed that editing of HBV DNA after Cas9 cleavage is at least 15,000 times more efficient that APOBEC-mediated cytosine deamination following treatment of infected cells with interferon alpha (IFNα). We also found that a previously used method to detect cytosine deaminated DNA, termed 3D-PCR, overestimates the amount and frequency of edited HBV DNA. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is so far the best method to functionally inactivate HBV cccDNA and provide a cure for CHB. PMID:27203444

  10. Liver type I regulatory T cells suppress germinal center formation in HBV-tolerant mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long; Yin, Wenwei; Sun, Rui; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-10-15

    The liver plays a critical role in inducing systemic immune tolerance, for example, during limiting hypersensitivity to food allergy and in rendering acceptance of allotransplant or even hepatotropic pathogens. We investigated the unknown mechanisms of liver tolerance by using an established hepatitis B virus (HBV)-carrier mouse model, and found that these mice exhibited an antigen-specific tolerance toward peripheral HBsAg vaccination, showing unenlarged draining lymph node (DLN), lower number of germinal centers (GC), and inactivation of GC B cells and follicular T helper (Tfh) cells. Both in vivo and in vitro immune responses toward HBsAg were suppressed by mononuclear cells from HBV-carrier mice, which were CD4(+) Foxp3(-) type 1 regulatory T (Tr1)-like cells producing IL-10. Using recipient Rag1(-/-) mice, hepatic Tr1-like cells from day 7 of HBV-persistent mice acquired the ability to inhibit anti-HBV immunity 3 d earlier than splenic Tr1-like cells, implying that hepatic Tr1-like cells were generated before those in spleen. Kupffer cell depletion or IL-10 deficiency led to impairment of Tr1-like cell generation, along with breaking HBV persistence. The purified EGFP(+)CD4(+) T cells (containing Tr1-like cells) from HBV-carrier mice trafficked in higher numbers to DLN in recipient mice after HBsAg vaccination, and subsequently inactivated both Tfh cells and GC B cells via secreting IL-10, resulting in impaired GC formation and anti-HB antibody production. Thus, our results indicate Tr1-like cells migrate from the liver to the DLN and inhibit peripheral anti-HBV immunity by negatively regulating GC B cells and Tfh cells. PMID:24089450

  11. Performance evaluation of ExiStation HBV diagnostic system for hepatitis B virus DNA quantitation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Young Joo; Yoo, Soo Jin; Sohn, Yong-Hak; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2013-11-01

    The performance of a recently developed real-time PCR system, the ExiStation HBV diagnostic system, for quantitation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in human blood was evaluated. The detection limit, reproducibility, cross-reactivity, and interference were evaluated as measures of analytical performance. For the comparison study, 100 HBV-positive blood samples and 100 HBV-negative samples from Korean Blood Bank Serum were used, and the results of the ExiStation HBV system showed good correlation with those obtained using the Cobas TaqMan (r2=0.9931) and Abbott real-time PCR systems (r2=0.9894). The lower limit of detection was measured as 9.55 IU/mL using WHO standards and the dynamic range was linear from 6.68 to 6.68×10(9) IU/mL using cloned plasmids. The within-run coefficient of variation (CV) was 9.4%, 2.1%, and 1.1%, and the total CV was 11.8%, 3.6%, and 1.7% at a concentration of 1.92 log10 IU/mL, 3.88 log10 IU/mL, and 6.84 log10 IU/mL, respectively. No cross-reactivity or interference was detected. The ExiStation HBV diagnostic system showed satisfactory analytical sensitivity, excellent reproducibility, no cross-reactivity, no interference, and high agreement with the Cobas TaqMan and Abbott real-time PCR systems, and is therefore a useful tool for the detection and monitoring of HBV infection. PMID:23892129

  12. Hepatitis B vaccination with or without hepatitis B immunoglobulin at birth to babies born of HBsAg-positive mothers prevents overt HBV transmission but may not prevent occult HBV infection in babies: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pande, C; Sarin, S K; Patra, S; Kumar, A; Mishra, S; Srivastava, S; Bhutia, K; Gupta, E; Mukhopadhyay, C K; Dutta, A K; Trivedi, S S

    2013-11-01

    Vertical transmission of Hepatitis B virus HBV can result in a state of chronic HBV infection and its complications. HBV vaccination with or without hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) prevents transmission of overt infection to the babies. However, whether it also prevents occult HBV infection in babies is not known. Consecutive pregnant women of any gestation found to be HBsAg positive were followed till delivery, and their babies were included in the study. Immediately after delivery, babies were randomized to receive either HBIG or placebo in addition to recombinant HBV vaccine (at 0, 6, 10 and 14 weeks). The primary end-point of the study, assessed at 18 weeks of age, was remaining free of any HBV infection (either overt or occult) plus the development of adequate immune response to vaccine. The babies were further followed up for a median of 2 years of age to determine their eventual outcome. Risk factors for HBV transmission and for poor immune response in babies were studied. Of the 283 eligible babies, 259 were included in the trial and randomized to receive either HBIG (n=128) or placebo (n=131) in addition to recombinant HBV vaccine. Of the 222 of 259 (86%) babies who completed 18 weeks of follow-up, only 62/222 (28%) reached primary end-point. Of the remaining, 6/222 (3%) developed overt HBV infection, 142/222 (64%) developed occult HBV infection, and 12/222 (5%) had no HBV infection but had poor immune response. All 6 overt infections occurred in the placebo group (P=0.030), while occult HBV infections were more common in the HBIG group (76/106 [72%] vs. 66/116 [57%]; P=0.025). This may be due to the immune pressure of HBIG. There was no significant difference between the two groups in frequency of babies developing poor immune response or those achieving primary end-point. The final outcome of these babies at 24 months of age was as follows: overt HBV infection 4%, occult HBV infection 42%, no HBV infection but poor immune response 8% and no HBV

  13. Changes in Innate and Permissive Immune Responses after HBV Transgenic Mouse Vaccination and lLong-Term-siRNA Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ying; Ma, Heng-Hao; Xu, Man-Chun; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Wei-Yun; Zhao, Ya-Gang; Sun, Da-Yong; Hu, Wen-Kui; Liu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, no licensed therapy can thoroughly eradicate hepatitis B virus (HBV) from the body, including interferon α and inhibitors of HBV reverse-transcription. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) seem to be a promising tool for treating HBV, but had no effect on the pre-existing HBV covalently closed circular DNA. Because it is very difficult to thoroughly eradicate HBV with unique siRNAs, upgrading the immune response is the best method for fighting HBV infection. Here, we aim to explore the immune response of transgenic mice to HBV vaccination after long-term treatment with siRNAs and develop a therapeutic approach that combines siRNAs with immunopotentiators. Methodology/Principal Findings To explore the response of transgenic mice to hepatitis B vaccine, innate and acquired immunity were detected after long-term treatment with siRNAs and vaccination. Antiviral cytokines and level of anti-hepatitis B surface antigen antibody (HBsAg-Ab) were measured after three injections of hepatitis B vaccine. Results Functional analyses indicated that toll-like receptor-mediated innate immune responses were reinforced, and antiviral cytokines were significantly increased, especially in the pSilencer4.1/HBV groups. Analysis of CD80+/CD86+ dendritic cells in the mouse liver indicated that dendritic cell antigen presentation was strengthened. Furthermore, the siRNA-treated transgenic mice could produce detectable HBsAg-Ab after vaccination, especially in the CpG oligonucleotide vaccine group. Conclusions/Significance For the first time, our studies demonstrate that siRNAs with CpG HBV vaccine could strengthen the immune response and break the immune tolerance status of transgenic mice to HBV. Thus, siRNAs and HBV vaccine could provide a sharp double-edged sword against chronic HBV infection. PMID:23472088

  14. Mapping of histone modifications in episomal HBV cccDNA uncovers an unusual chromatin organization amenable to epigenetic manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Tropberger, Philipp; Mercier, Alexandre; Robinson, Margaret; Zhong, Weidong; Ganem, Don E.; Holdorf, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection affects 240 million people worldwide and is a major risk factor for liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current antiviral therapy inhibits cytoplasmic HBV genomic replication, but is not curative because it does not directly affect nuclear HBV closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the genomic form that templates viral transcription and sustains viral persistence. Novel approaches that directly target cccDNA regulation would therefore be highly desirable. cccDNA is assembled with cellular histone proteins into chromatin, but little is known about the regulation of HBV chromatin by histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Here, using a new cccDNA ChIP-Seq approach, we report, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide maps of PTMs in cccDNA-containing chromatin from de novo infected HepG2 cells, primary human hepatocytes, and from HBV-infected liver tissue. We find high levels of PTMs associated with active transcription enriched at specific sites within the HBV genome and, surprisingly, very low levels of PTMs linked to transcriptional repression even at silent HBV promoters. We show that transcription and active PTMs in HBV chromatin are reduced by the activation of an innate immunity pathway, and that this effect can be recapitulated with a small molecule epigenetic modifying agent, opening the possibility that chromatin-based regulation of cccDNA transcription could be a new therapeutic approach to chronic HBV infection. PMID:26438841

  15. Soma size and Cav1.3 channel expression in vulnerable and resistant motoneuron populations of the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Shoenfeld, Liza; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Fisher, Erika; Quinlan, Katharina A.; Tysseling, Vicki M.; Powers, Randall K.; Heckman, Charles J.; Binder, Marc D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although the loss of motoneurons is an undisputed feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in man and in its animal models (SOD1 mutant mice), how the disease affects the size and excitability of motoneurons prior to their degeneration is not well understood. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that motoneurons in mutant SOD1G93A mice exhibit an enlargement of soma size (i.e., cross‐sectional area) and an increase in Cav1.3 channel expression at postnatal day 30, well before the manifestation of physiological symptoms that typically occur at p90 (Chiu et al. 1995). We made measurements of spinal and hypoglossal motoneurons vulnerable to degeneration, as well as motoneurons in the oculomotor nucleus that are resistant to degeneration. Overall, we found that the somata of motoneurons in male SOD1G93A mutants were larger than those in wild‐type transgenic males. When females were included in the two groups, significance was lost. Expression levels of the Cav1.3 channels were not differentiated by genotype, sex, or any interaction of the two. These results raise the intriguing possibility of an interaction between male sex steroid hormones and the SOD1 mutation in the etiopathogenesis of ALS. PMID:25107988

  16. [Assessment of mother-to-child HBV transmission at the prenatal consultation in Vientiane, Laos].

    PubMed

    Xaydalasouk, K; Keomalaphet, S; Latthaphasavang, V; Souvong, V; Buisson, Y

    2016-02-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains highly endemic in Laos, mainly related to mother to child transmission. Despite the introduction of the vaccination against HBV in the Expanded Programme on Immunization in 2001 and the administration of a vaccine birth dose as part of a 3-dose schedule since 2004, infant immunization coverage remains inadequate because most mothers are not aware of the risks. A survey was conducted in early 2013 in Vientiane capital among women who undergo serologic screening for hepatitis B at the prenatal consultation, to assess their knowledge and risk factors of HBV infection. It included the administration of a standardized questionnaire divided into four parts (socio-demographic data, knowledge about hepatitis B, risk factors and immunization status) and a screening test for the HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). A total of 200 pregnant women were recruited consecutively in Mahosot hospital. They were aged 14-39 years (mean 27 ± 4.76 years), civil servants (37%) or housewives (33.5%) with a secondary or higher education level (80%). Most were multiparous (68.5%) and attended antenatal care in the third trimester of pregnancy (61%). Sixteen (8%) tested HBsAg positive. The HBsAg seroprevalence was higher in the 26-30 years age group, among women above the primary school education level and women practicing the profession of shopkeeper or civil servant, but these differences were not significant. Hepatitis B was known by a small majority (53%) but 26% could name the routes of transmission, 28% considered it as a serious illness and 24.5% were aware of the HBV vaccine. No risk factor for blood or sexual exposure to HBVinfection was significantly linked to the HBsAg carriage. In this sample of pregnant women mostly urban, educated and multiparous with access to a central hospital, the high rate of HBV infection and the low level of knowledge about the risk of mother-to-child HBV transmission reveals a major gap in information and

  17. Anti-HBV activity and mechanism of marine-derived polyguluronate sulfate (PGS) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lijuan; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoshuang; Zhao, Xia; Yu, Guangli

    2016-06-01

    Polyguluronate sulfate (PGS) is a low molecular-weight sulfated derivative, which has a structure of 2,3-O-disulfated-1,4-poly-l-guluronic acid (PG) with about 1.5 sulfate per sugar residue. Herein, our results showed that PGS effectively inhibited the expression and secretion of HBsAg and HBeAg in HepG2.2.15 cells. PGS could bind and enter into HepG2.2.15 cells to interfere with HBV transcription rather than blocking HBV DNA replication. Moreover, PGS also enhanced the production and secretion of interferon beta (IFN-β) in HepG2.2.15 cells. Cellular NF-κB and Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathways were also involved in the anti-HBV actions of PGS. Thus, PGS may inhibit HBV replication through upregulating the NF-κB and Raf/MEK/ERK pathways to enhance the interferon system. In summary, PGS merits further investigation as a novel anti-HBV agent aimed at modulating the host innate immune system in the future. PMID:27083353

  18. Humanized Murine Model for HBV and HCV Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Ling; Sullivan, Gareth J.; Sun, Pingnan; Park, In-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) results in heterogeneous outcomes from acute asymptomatic infection to chronic infection leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In vitro models using animal hepatocytes, human HCC cell lines, or in vivo transgenic mouse models have contributed invaluably to understanding the pathogenesis of HBV and HCV. A humanized mouse model made by reconstitution of human primary hepatocytes in the liver of the immunodeficient mouse provides a novel experimental opportunity which mimics the in vivo growth of the human hepatocytes. The limited access to primary human hepatocytes necessitated the search for other cellular sources, such as pluripotent stem cells. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the features of self-renewal and pluripotency and differentiate into cells of all three germ layers, including hepatocytes. Humaninduced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the patient’s or individual’s own cells provide a novel opportunity to generate hepatocyte-like cells with the defined genetic composition. Here, we will review the current perspective of the models used for HBV and HCV study, and introduce the personalized mouse model using human iPSCs. This novel mouse model will facilitate the direct investigation of HBV and HCV in human hepatocytes as well as probing the genetic influence on the susceptibility of hepatocytes to HBV and HCV. PMID:22370780

  19. Resveratrol enhances HBV replication through activating Sirt1-PGC-1α-PPARα pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yixian; Li, Yongjun; Huang, Chenjie; Ying, Lixiong; Xue, Jihua; Wu, Haicong; Chen, Zhi; Yang, Zhenggang

    2016-01-01

    The population of hepatitis B combined with a number of metabolic disorders is increasing significantly. Resveratrol (RSV) has been used as a preclinical drug for the treatment of the metabolic disorders. However, the impact of RSV on HBV replication remains unknown. In this study, the HBV-expressing hepatocelluar carcinoma cell line and mouse model created by hydrodynamic injection of viral DNA were used. We found that RSV activates Sirt1, which in turn deacetylates PGC-1α and subsequently increases the transcriptional activity of PPARα, leading to the enhanced HBV transcription and replication in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we found that this pathway is also required for fasting-induced HBV transcription. Taken together, this study identifies that RSV enhances HBV transcription and replication especially acting on the core promoter, which depends on Sirt1-PGC-1α-PPARα pathway. We conclude that RSV may exacerbate the progression of hepatitis B and that patients with hepatitis B infection should be cautious taking RSV as a dietary supplement. PMID:27098390

  20. Resveratrol enhances HBV replication through activating Sirt1-PGC-1α-PPARα pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yixian; Li, Yongjun; Huang, Chenjie; Ying, Lixiong; Xue, Jihua; Wu, Haicong; Chen, Zhi; Yang, Zhenggang

    2016-01-01

    The population of hepatitis B combined with a number of metabolic disorders is increasing significantly. Resveratrol (RSV) has been used as a preclinical drug for the treatment of the metabolic disorders. However, the impact of RSV on HBV replication remains unknown. In this study, the HBV-expressing hepatocelluar carcinoma cell line and mouse model created by hydrodynamic injection of viral DNA were used. We found that RSV activates Sirt1, which in turn deacetylates PGC-1α and subsequently increases the transcriptional activity of PPARα, leading to the enhanced HBV transcription and replication in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we found that this pathway is also required for fasting-induced HBV transcription. Taken together, this study identifies that RSV enhances HBV transcription and replication especially acting on the core promoter, which depends on Sirt1-PGC-1α-PPARα pathway. We conclude that RSV may exacerbate the progression of hepatitis B and that patients with hepatitis B infection should be cautious taking RSV as a dietary supplement. PMID:27098390

  1. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). 54... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as “Unfired Steam Boilers” except...

  2. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). 54... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as “Unfired Steam Boilers” except...

  3. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). 54... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as “Unfired Steam Boilers” except...

  4. WELLTON GOVERNMENT CAMP, PERMANENT GARAGE TYPE 1G. PLAN, ELEVATIONS, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WELLTON GOVERNMENT CAMP, PERMANENT GARAGE TYPE 1-G. PLAN, ELEVATIONS, AND SECTIONS. Drawing 50-308-4552, dated October 25, 1949. U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Yuma, Arizona - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Permanent Garage Type 1-G, 30601 Wellton-Mohawk Drive, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  5. Presence of anti-HBc is associated to high rates of HBV resolved infection and low threshold for Occult HBV Infection in HIV patients with negative HBsAg in Chile.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Jose Ignacio; Jensen, Daniela; Sarmiento, Valeska; Peirano, Felipe; Acuña, Pedro; Fuster, Felipe; Soto, Sabrina; Ahumada, Rodrigo; Huilcaman, Marco; Bruna, Mario; Jensen, Werner; Fuster, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    HBV-HIV coinfection is prevalent. Frequently, anti-HBc is the only serological marker of HBV, which can be indicative of HBV resolved infection, when found together with anti-HBs reactivity; or present as "isolated anti-HBc," related to HBV occult infection with presence of detectable DNA HBV, more prevalent in HIV-positive individuals. Regional data about this condition are scarce. Anti-HBc rapid test has been used as screening, but its performance has not been described in HIV-positive patients. The aim of this study was determine prevalence of anti-HBc in HIV-positive patients, serological pattern of HBV resolved infection and isolated anti-HBc, evaluating presence of HBV occult infection. Assess anti-HBc rapid test compared to ECLIA. Methods included measurement of anti-HBc and anti-HBs in HIV-positive patients with negative HBsAg. Serum HBV DNA quantification and HBV booster vaccination to "isolated anti-HBc" individuals. Detection of anti-HBc by rapid test and ECLIA. In 192 patients, prevalence of anti-HBc was 42.7% (82/192); associated to male gender, drug use, men-sex-men, positive-VDRL, and longer time HIV diagnosis. 34.4% (66/192) had presence of anti-HBs, mean titers of 637 ui/ml. Isolated anti-HBc in 8.3% (16/192), associated to detectable HIV viral load and no-use of HAART; in them, HBV DNA was undetectable, and 60% responded to HBV vaccination booster. Anti-HBc rapid test showed low sensibility (32.9%) compared to ECLIA. These results show that prevalence of anti-HBc in HIV-positive individuals is high, in most cases accompanied with anti-HBs as HBV resolved infection. Low prevalence of "isolated anti-HBc," with undetectable HBV DNA, and most had anamnestic response to HBV vaccination; suggest low possibility of occult HBV infection. Anti-HBc rapid test cannot be recommended as screening method for anti-HBc. PMID:26381185

  6. Inhibition of the HCV core protein on the immune response to HBV surface antigen and on HBV gene expression and replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenbo; Wu, Chunchen; Deng, Wanyu; Pei, Rongjun; Wang, Yun; Cao, Liang; Qin, Bo; Lu, Mengji; Chen, Xinwen

    2012-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is a multifunctional protein that can interfere with the induction of an immune response. It has been reported that the HCV core protein inhibits HBV replication in vitro. In this study, we test the effect of the HCV core gene on the priming of the immune response to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and on the replication of HBV in vivo. Our results showed that the full-length HCV core gene inhibits the induction of an immune response to the heterogeneous antigen, HBsAg, at the site of inoculation when HCV core (pC191) and HBsAg (pHBsAg) expression plasmids are co-administered as DNA vaccines into BALB/c mice. The observed interference effect of the HCV core occurs in the priming stage and is limited to the DNA form of the HBsAg antigen, but not to the protein form. The HCV core reduces the protective effect of the HBsAg when the HBsAg and the HCV core are co-administered as vaccines in an HBV hydrodynamic mouse model because the HCV core induces immune tolerance to the heterogeneous HBsAg DNA antigen. These results suggest that HCV core may play an important role in viral persistence by the attenuation of host immune responses to different antigens. We further tested whether the HCV core interfered with the priming of the immune response in hepatocytes via the hydrodynamic co-injection of an HBV replication-competent plasmid and an HCV core plasmid. The HCV core inhibited HBV replication and antigen expression in both BALB/c (H-2d) and C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice, the mouse models of acute and chronic hepatitis B virus infections. Thus, the HCV core inhibits the induction of a specific immune response to an HBsAg DNA vaccine. However, HCV C also interferes with HBV gene expression and replication in vivo, as observed in patients with coinfection. PMID:23024803

  7. Effect of various pyrimidines possessing the 1-[(2-hydroxy-1-(hydroxymethyl)ethoxy)methyl] moiety, able to mimic natural 2'-deoxyribose, on wild-type and mutant hepatitis B virus replication.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Semaine, Wassila; Johar, Monika; Tyrrell, D Lorne J; Agrawal, Babita

    2006-06-15

    -(hydroxymethyl) ethoxy)methyl]-5-fluorocytosine (34) showed some inhibitory activity against hepatitis C virus. Taken together, these data support our previous observations that the 5-substituted pyrimidine nucleosides containing acyclic glycosyl moieties have potential to serve as a new generation of potent, selective, and nontoxic anti-HBV agents for wild-type and lamivudine-resistant mutant HBV. PMID:16759112

  8. Evolutionary analysis of HBV "S" antigen genetic diversity in Iranian blood donors: a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Pourkarim, Mahmoud Reza; Sharifi, Zohre; Soleimani, Ali; Amini-Bavil-Olyaee, Samad; Elsadek Fakhr, Ahmed; Sijmons, Steven; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Karimi, Gharib; Lemey, Philippe; Maes, Piet; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Van Ranst, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity of the HBV S gene has a significant impact on the prophylaxis and treatment of hepatitis B infection. The effect of selective pressure on this genetic alteration has not yet been studied in Iranian blood donors. To explore HBV evolution and to analyze the effects and patterns of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) mutations on blood screening assays, 358 Iranian blood donors diagnosed as asymptomatic HBV carriers were enrolled in this nationwide study. Large S and partial S genes were amplified and sequenced. HBV (sub) genotypes and synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations were investigated. The impact of naturally occurring mutations on HBsAg ELISA results was explored. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that isolated strains were of genotype D. The dominant subgenotype/subtype was D1/ayw2. Deletions and naturally occurring stop codons in the pre-S1 and major hydrophilic region (MHR) were identified. In total, 32.8% of the studied strains harbored 195 single or multiple mutations in the MHR, the majority of which were located at the first loop of the "a determinant" domain. The ayw2 subtype showed a significant effect on the ELISA signal/cut-off value and carried fewer mutations in the MHR. Nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution value indicated that negative selection was the dominant evolutionary force in the HBV S gene. This nationwide study revealed that mutation frequency of HBsAg among Iranian blood donors was much higher than previous reports from the different local regions. These findings regarding the significant differences in reactivity of ELISA among different subtypes of HBV and its correlation with the number of mutations at the MHR will be valuable to public health authorities. PMID:24150816

  9. HIV, HBV, and HCV molecular epidemiology among trans (transvestites, transsexuals, and transgender) sex workers in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Carobene, Mauricio; Bolcic, Federico; Farías, María Sol Dos Ramos; Quarleri, Jorge; Avila, María Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Commercial sex work is frequent among male-to-female transvestites, transsexuals and transgenders in Argentina, leading to high susceptibility to HIV, HBV, and HCV among other sexually transmitted infections. In a global context of scarce data on the trans sex workers population, this study was aimed to study the genomic characterization of these viruses. Plasma presence of HIV, HBV, and HCV genomic material was evaluated in samples from 273 trans sex workers. Genomic sequences of HIV-gag, pol, and vif-vpu genes, HBV-S gene, and HCV-5'UT and NS5B genes were obtained. Molecular characterization involved phylogenetic analysis and several in silico tools. Resistance-associated mutations in HIV and HBV pol genes were also analyzed. The HIV genomic characterization in 62 trans sex workers samples showed that 54.8% of the isolates corresponded to BF intersubtype recombinants, and 38.7% to subtype B. The remaining were classified as subtypes C (4.8%) and A (1.6%). HBV and HCV co-infection prevalence among HIV positive trans sex workers yielded rates of 3.2% and 6.5% respectively. Drug resistance-associated mutations were found in 12/62 (19%) HIV pol sequences, but none among HBV. Based on phylogenetic relationships, HIV isolates characterized as subtypes BF and B appeared intermingled with those from other high-risk groups. Despite trans sex workers declared not to have received antiviral treatment, complex drug resistance-associated mutation patterns were found in several HIV isolates. Planned prevention, screening, and treatment are needed to reduce further transmission and morbidity. PMID:24123155

  10. Isolation of the neutralization ScFvs Against HBV infection from the Immunized Population.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yin; Chen, Yanmin; Zhang, Nan; Guo, Xiaochen; Zhao, Jingzhuang; Wang, Fuxiang; Xu, Pengfei; Yuan, Qingyan; Qi, Jianying; Wang, Wenfei; Li, Deshan; Ren, Guiping

    2015-01-01

    For a long time, researchers have attempted to replace human plasmaderived immunoglobulin against HBV with recombinant HBV antibodies for therapeutic purposes, but failed to develop the products. One of the reasons may be lack of high throughput antibody screening tool. In this study, we screened an antibody library from immunized subjects by a powerful bacterial display technology. The capacity of the ScFv library was 10(9), 117 individual clones against HBV pre- S1 were initially selected and sequenced, the homology of these clones ranged from 59.7% -68.7%. Ten clones were randomly selected based on florescence intensity by FACS. The ScFv antibodies were expressed in E.coli and purified to examine their neutralization ability. First, we tested the ability of these clones to block the binding of the pre-S1 polypeptide to the HBV sensitive cells Chang liver cells and HepG2 cells, then, we examined the ability of these clones to inhibit the infection of the Change liver cells by HBV released from HepG2.2.15 cells by detection of viral DNA and hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) in the supernatant of Chang liver cells. Results showed that 4 (clone 3, 7, 9 and 31) out of the ten clones could significantly reduce the binding of pre-S1 polypeptide to Chang liver cells in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with the same clones (clone 3, 7, 9 and 31) could dramatically reduce the contents of HBV DNA in the media of the infected Chang liver cells by 29.4, 7.89, 58.8, 76.9, respectively, and the amount of HBeAg by 60.2%, 32.6%, 66.1% and 68.1%, respectively. These results suggest that these clones can neutralize HBV infection and have the potential to become therapeutic antibodies against HBV infection to replace the human plasma-derived immunoglobulin. PMID:26144596

  11. Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) response in humans: characterization of HLA class II-restricted CTLs that recognize endogenously synthesized HBV envelope antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Penna, A; Fowler, P; Bertoletti, A; Guilhot, S; Moss, B; Margolskee, R F; Cavalli, A; Valli, A; Fiaccadori, F; Chisari, F V

    1992-01-01

    In this study, we show that CD4+, hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope-specific T-cell clones produced by stimulation with a particulate antigen preparation are able to recognize and kill not only autologous antigen-presenting cells incubated with exogenous HBV envelope antigens but also autologous HLA class II-positive cells expressing endogenously synthesized HBV envelope antigens following infection with recombinant vaccinia viruses or transfection with recombinant Epstein-Barr virus expression vectors. Experiments with lysosomotropic agents and brefeldin A suggest that the endosomal compartment is likely involved in the processing of endogenously synthesized viral proteins for recognition by CD4+ T cells. Our study indicates that HBV envelope-specific, HLA class II-restricted CD4+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes can potentially participate in the immune clearance of HBV-infected cells and the pathogenesis of hepatocellular injury in hepatitis B. PMID:1731098

  12. A novel hepatitis B virus (HBV) genetic element with Rev response element-like properties that is essential for expression of HBV gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Liang, T J

    1993-01-01

    Many viruses possess complex mechanisms involving multiple gene products and cis-regulatory elements in order to achieve a fine control of their gene expression at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and retroviruses share many structural and functional similarities. In this study, by genetic and biochemical analyses, we have demonstrated the existence of a novel genetic element within the HBV genome which is essential for high-level expression of viral gene products. This element is located 3' to the envelope coding region. We have shown that this genetic element is cis acting at the posttranscriptional level and that its function is exerted at the level of RNA processing as part of transcribed sequences. This RNA element is also functional in the context of a heterologous gene. Similar to the function of Rev-Rev response element interaction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1, this element appears to inhibit the splicing process and facilitate the transport and utilization of HBV transcripts. Images PMID:8246965

  13. IL6 Inhibits HBV Transcription by Targeting the Epigenetic Control of the Nuclear cccDNA Minichromosome

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Gianna Aurora; Scisciani, Cecilia; Pediconi, Natalia; Lupacchini, Leonardo; Alfalate, Dulce; Guerrieri, Francesca; Calvo, Ludovica; Salerno, Debora; Di Cocco, Silvia; Levrero, Massimo; Belloni, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is organized as a mini-chromosome in the nuclei of infected hepatocytes by histone and non-histone proteins. Transcription from the cccDNA of the RNA replicative intermediate termed pre-genome (pgRNA), is the critical step for genome amplification and ultimately determines the rate of HBV replication. Multiple evidences suggest that cccDNA epigenetic modifications, such as histone modifications and DNA methylation, participate in regulating the transcriptional activity of the HBV cccDNA. Inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, LTβ) and the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL6) inhibit hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication and transcription. Here we show, in HepG2 cells transfected with linear HBV monomers and HBV-infected NTCP-HepG2 cells, that IL6 treatment leads to a reduction of cccDNA-bound histone acetylation paralleled by a rapid decrease in 3.5kb/pgRNA and subgenomic HBV RNAs transcription without affecting cccDNA chromatinization or cccDNA levels. IL6 repressive effect on HBV replication is mediated by a loss of HNF1α and HNF4α binding to the cccDNA and a redistribution of STAT3 binding from the cccDNA to IL6 cellular target genes. PMID:26580974

  14. Management of the HBV reactivation in isolated HBcAb positive patients affected with Non Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Occult HBV infection (OBI) is defined by the persistence of HBV in the liver without serum HBsAg and HBVDNA. It represents a life-threatening event during immunosuppressive chemotherapies. An OBI occurs in approximately 18% of HBcAb + patients. International guidelines suggest surveillance for HBV markers in immunosuppressed patients. In Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL), the prevalence of OBI reactivation remains to be established. Methods In order to determine the prevalence of occult HBV reactivation in a large cohort of patients during chemotherapy for NHL, we analysed 498 NHL patients in a centre of Southern Italy. We evaluated HBV markers, NHL type, treatment type and occurrence of HBV reactivation. Results Forty % of patients were treated with monoclonal antibodies and 60.3% without. Ninety-six patients were HBcAb+, HBsAg-. HBV reactivation occurred in ten subjects of this subgroup. All of them were successfully treated with Lamivudine. None of the patients experienced liver-related death. The prevalence of OBI reactivation was of 10.42% in HBcAb + HBsAb- patients. This event occurred in 50% of patients treated with mild immunosuppressive therapies. Each reactivation was treated with Lamivudine. Discussion This report suggests that a strict surveillance is important and cost-effective in HBcAb + HBsAg- NHL patients treated with mild immunosuppressive therapies, in order to detect an occult HBV reactivation. PMID:24533834

  15. Myo1g is an active player in maintaining cell stiffness in B-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    López-Ortega, O; Ovalle-García, E; Ortega-Blake, I; Antillón, A; Chávez-Munguía, B; Patiño-López, G; Fragoso-Soriano, R; Santos-Argumedo, L

    2016-05-01

    B-lymphocytes are migrating cells that specialize in antigen presentation, antibody secretion, and endocytosis; these processes implicate the modulation of plasma membrane elasticity. Cell stiffness is a force generated by the interaction between the actin-cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane, which requires the participation of several proteins. These proteins include class I myosins, which are now considered to play a role in controlling membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. In this study, we identified the motor protein Myosin 1g (Myo1g) as a mediator of this phenomenon. The absence of Myo1g decreased the cell stiffness, affecting cell adhesion, cell spreading, phagocytosis, and endocytosis in B-lymphocytes. The results described here reveal a novel molecular mechanism by which Myo1g mediates and regulates cell stiffness in B-lymphocytes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27106882

  16. Correlation of the content of hepatitis B core antigen in peripheral blood mononuclear cells with HBV virus load.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yanzhong; Xiong, Xiaojia; Tong, Xindeng; Li, Min; Yang, Xifei; Hu, Guoxin; Geng, Yijie; Li, Jianxin

    2016-06-01

    The dysfunction of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) plays an important role in hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronic infection and tolerance. This study is aimed to explore the changes of expression and distribution of Hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) in the PBMCs of patients infected with chronic hepatitis B virus by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The levels of HBcAg in PBMCs were correlated with the HBV load in serum, and the change of HBcAg distribution in different PBMC organelles may represent various HBV infection states. HBcAg was mainly distributed in the nuclei of PBMC in the cases of immune tolerance and no inflammatory activity. Taken together, our data suggest that the measurement of HBcAg and its distribution in PBMCs using CLSM may serve as an alternative approach to monitor HBV load and the immune states of HBV infection with ease of using and improved sensitivity. PMID:26680298

  17. Examining the Gm18 and m1G Modification Positions in tRNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Mayavan; Srinivasan, Thangavelu

    2014-01-01

    The tRNA structure contains conserved modifications that are responsible for its stability and are involved in the initiation and accuracy of the translation process. tRNA modification enzymes are prevalent in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. tRNA Gm18 methyltransferase (TrmH) and tRNA m1G37 methyltransferase (TrmD) are prevalent and essential enzymes in bacterial populations. TrmH involves itself in methylation process at the 2'-OH group of ribose at the 18th position of guanosine (G) in tRNAs. TrmD methylates the G residue next to the anticodon in selected tRNA subsets. Initially, m1G37 modification was reported to take place on three conserved tRNA subsets (tRNAArg, tRNALeu, tRNAPro); later on, few archaea and eukaryotes organisms revealed that other tRNAs also have the m1G37 modification. The present study reveals Gm18, m1G37 modification, and positions of m1G that take place next to the anticodon in tRNA sequences. We selected extremophile organisms and attempted to retrieve the m1G and Gm18 modification bases in tRNA sequences. Results showed that the Gm18 modification G residue occurs in all tRNA subsets except three tRNAs (tRNAMet, tRNAPro, tRNAVal). Whereas the m1G37 modification base G is formed only on tRNAArg, tRNALeu, tRNAPro, and tRNAHis, the rest of the tRNAs contain adenine (A) next to the anticodon. Thus, we hypothesize that Gm18 modification and m1G modification occur irrespective of a G residue in tRNAs. PMID:25031570

  18. Vaccine potential of recombinant cathepsinL1G against Fasciola gigantica in mice.

    PubMed

    Changklungmoa, Narin; Phoinok, Natthacha; Yencham, Chonthicha; Sobhon, Prasert; Kueakhai, Pornanan

    2016-08-15

    In this study, we characterized and investigated the vaccine potential of FgCatL1G against Fasciola gigantica infection in mice. Recombinant mature FgCatL1G (rmFgCatL1G) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The vaccination was performed in Imprinting Control Region (ICR) mice (n=10) by subcutaneous injection with 50μg of rmFgCatL1G combined with Freund's adjuvant. Two weeks after the second boost, mice were infected with 15 metacercariae by the oral route. The percents of protection of rmFgCatL1G vaccine were estimated to be 56.5% and 58.3% when compared with non vaccinated-infected and adjuvant-infected controls, respectively. Antibodies in the immune sera of vaccinated mice were shown by immunoblot to react with the native FgCatL1s in the extract of all stages of parasites and rmFgCatL1H, recombinant pro - FgCatL1 (rpFgCatL1). By immunohistochemistry, the immune sera also reacted with FgCatL1s in the caecal epithelial cells of the parasites. The levels of IgG1 and IgG2a in the immune sera, which are indicative of Th2 and Th1 immune responses, were also increased with IgG1 predominating. The levels of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) in rmFgCatL1G-immunized group showed no significant difference from the control groups, but pathological lesions of livers in rmFgCatL1G-immunized group showed significant decrease when compared to the control groups. This study indicates that rmFgCatL1G has a vaccine potential against F. gigantica in mice, and this potential will be tested in larger livestock animals. PMID:27514897

  19. Oxygen consumption during cold exposure at 2.1 G in rats adapted to hypergravic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J.; Patterson, S.; Monson, C.

    1985-01-01

    The thermoregulation ability of rats exposed to various gravitational fields is examined. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 22 C and 1 G, and 9 C and 2.1 G in experiment one, 1 G, 2.4 G, 5.8 G and 22 + or - 1.5 C in experiment two, and 1 G, 19-22 C, and 5 C in experiment three. It is observed that the core temperature in the control rats was 36.8 + or 0.4 C at 22C and 30.8 + or - 0.6 C at 9 C, and oxygen consumption dropped from 37 + or - 0.3 C core temperature at 22 C, 36.4 + or - 0.3 C at 9 C, 0.4 oxygen consumption was 8.18 + or - 0.9 ml/min at 22 C, and 14.2 + or - 0.4 ml/min at 9 C. The data from experiment two reveal that tail temperature in the control rats peaked at 2.4 G and at 5.8 G for the acclimated rats, and in experiment three a greater decrease in core temperature is detected in the 2.1-G rats. It is noted that prior acclimation to 2.1 G enhances the thermoregulation ability when exposed to the cold.

  20. HBV and HIV co-infection: Impact on liver pathobiology and therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Mohammad Khalid

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on progression of severe liver diseases is a serious public health issue, worldwide. In the co-infection cases, about 90% of HIV-infected population is seropositive for HBV where approximately 5%-40% individuals are chronically infected. In HIV co-infected individuals, liver-related mortality is estimated over 17 times higher than those with HBV mono-infection. The spectrum of HIV-induced liver diseases includes hepatitis, steatohepatitis, endothelialitis, necrosis, granulomatosis, cirrhosis and carcinoma. Moreover, HIV co-infection significantly alters the natural history of hepatitis B, and therefore complicates the disease management. Though several studies have demonstrated impact of HIV proteins on hepatocyte biology, only a few data is available on interactions between HBV and HIV proteins. Thus, the clinical spectrum as well as the complexity of the co-infection offers challenging fronts to study the underlying molecular mechanisms, and to design effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:25625003

  1. Alteration of liver glycopatterns during cirrhosis and tumor progression induced by HBV.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yannan; Zhong, Yaogang; Ma, Tianran; Wu, Fei; Wu, Haoxiang; Yu, Hanjie; Huang, Chen; Li, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is closely correlated with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-induced liver cirrhosis. Structural changes in the glycans of serum and tissue proteins are reliable indicators of liver damage. However, little is known about the alteration of liver glycopatterns during cirrhosis and tumor progression induced by HBV infection. This study compared the differential expression of liver glycopatterns in 7 sets of normal pericarcinomatous tissues (PCTs), cirrhotic, and tumor tissues from patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC induced by HBV using lectin microarrays. Fluorescence-based lectin histochemistry and lectin blotting were further utilized to validate and assess the expression and distribution of certain glycans in 9 sets of corresponding liver tissue sections. Eight lectins (e.g., Jacalin and AAL) revealed significant difference in cirrhotic tissues versus PCTs. Eleven lectins (e.g., EEL and SJA) showed significant alteration during cirrhotic and tumor progression. The expression of Galα1-3(Fucα1-2)Gal (EEL) and fucosyltransferase 1 was mainly increasing in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes during PCTs-cirrhotic-tumor tissues progression, while the expression of T antigen (ACA and PNA) was decreased sharply in cytoplasm of tumor hepatocytes. Understanding the precision alteration of liver glycopatterns related to the development of hepatitis, cirrhosis, and tumor induced by HBV infection may help elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of chronic liver diseases and develop new antineoplastic therapeutic strategies. PMID:26833199

  2. Modeling and Analyzing the Transmission Dynamics of HBV Epidemic in Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tailei; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Xueliang

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B is an infectious disease caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV) which affects livers. In this paper, we formulate a hepatitis B model to study the transmission dynamics of hepatitis B in Xinjiang, China. The epidemic model involves an exponential birth rate and vertical transmission. For a better understanding of HBV transmission dynamics, we analyze the dynamic behavior of the model. The modified reproductive number σ is obtained. When σ < 1, the disease-free equilibrium is locally asymptotically stable, when σ > 1, the disease-free equilibrium is unstable and the disease is uniformly persistent. In the simulation, parameters are chosen to fit public data in Xinjiang. The simulation indicates that the cumulated HBV infection number in Xinjiang will attain about 600,000 cases unless there are stronger or more effective control measures by the end of 2017. Sensitive analysis results show that enhancing the vaccination rate for newborns in Xinjiang is very effective to stop the transmission of HBV. Hence, we recommend that all infants in Xinjiang receive the hepatitis B vaccine as soon as possible after birth. PMID:26422614

  3. HIV, HBV and HCV Coinfection Prevalence in Iran - A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri Amiri, Fahimeh; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Mirzazadeh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background worldwide, hepatitis C and B virus infections (HCV and HCV), are the two most common coinfections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and has become a major threat to the survival of HIV-infected persons. The review aimed to estimate the prevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV, HIV/HCV and HIV/HBV and triple coinfections in different subpopulations in Iran. Method Following PRISMA guidelines, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of reports on prevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and HIV coinfections in different subpopulations in Iran. We systematically reviewed the literature to identify eligible studies from January 1996 to March 2012 in English or Persian/Farsi databases. We extracted the prevalence of HIV antibodies (diagnosed by Elisa confirmed with Western Blot test), HCV antibodies and HBsAg (with confirmatory laboratory test) as the main primary outcome. We reported the prevalence of the three infections and coinfections as point and 95% confidence intervals. Findings HIV prevalence varied from %0.00 (95% CI: 0.00–0.003) in the general population to %17.25 (95% CI: 2.94–31.57) in people who inject drugs (PWID). HBV prevalence ranged from % 0.00 (95% CI: 0.00–7.87) in health care workers to % 30.9 (95% CI: 27.88–33.92) in PWID. HCV prevalence ranged from %0.19 (95% CI: 0.00–0.66) in health care workers to %51.46 (95% CI: 34.30–68.62) in PWID. The coinfection of HIV/HBV and also HIV/HCV in the general population and in health care workers was zero, while the most common coinfections were HIV/HCV (10.95%), HIV/HBV (1.88%) and triple infections (1.25%) in PWID. Conclusions We found that PWID are severely and disproportionately affected by HIV and the other two infections, HCV and HBV. Screenings of such coinfections need to be reinforced to prevent new infections and also reduce further transmission in their community and to others. PMID:27031352

  4. Insulin resistance and steatosis in HBV-HCV co-infected patients: Role of PNPLA3 polymorphisms and impact on liver fibrosis progression

    PubMed Central

    Zampino, Rosa; Coppola, Nicola; Cirillo, Grazia; Boemio, Adriana; Minichini, Carmine; Marrone, Aldo; Stanzione, Maria; Starace, Mario; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Sagnelli, Evangelista; Restivo, Luciano; Salzillo, Giovanna; Fascione, Maria Chiara; Nevola, Riccardo; del Giudice, Emanuele Miraglia; Adinolfi, Luigi Elio

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate steatosis, insulin resistance (IR) and patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3) and their relation to disease progression in hepatitis B and C viruses (HCV-HBV) co-infected patients. METHODS: Three hundred and thirty patients with biopsy proven chronic hepatitis were enrolled: 66 had HBV-HCV, 66 HBV and 198 HCV infection. Prevalence of steatosis, IR and PNPLA3 polymorphisms and their relation to anthropometric, biochemical, virological and histological parameters were evaluated. RESULTS: Prevalence of steatosis in group HBV-HCV was similar to that in HCV (47.0% vs 49.5%, respectively); group HBV showed the lowest steatosis (33.3%). Group HBV-HCV had a lesser degree of steatosis than HCV (P = 0.016), lower HCV RNA levels (P = 0.025) and lower prevalence and degree of IR (P = 0.01). PNPLA3 polymorphisms were associated with steatosis. Group HBV-HCV showed higher levels of liver fibrosis than group HCV (P = 0.001), but similar to that observed in HBV group. In HBV-HCV group, liver fibrosis was not associated with steatosis, IR or PNPLA3. HBV infection was the independent predictor of advanced liver fibrosis. CONCLUSION: HBV-HCV co-infected patients have lower degree of hepatic steatosis, IR and HCV RNA than HCV mono-infected; co-infected patients showed a more rapid liver fibrosis progression that seems to be due to the double infection and/or HBV dominance. PMID:25276284

  5. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  6. The function of glutamatergic synapses is not perturbed by severe knockdown of 4.1N and 4.1G expression.

    PubMed

    Wozny, Christian; Breustedt, Jörg; Wolk, Friederike; Varoqueaux, Frédérique; Boretius, Susann; Zivkovic, Aleksandar R; Neeb, Antje; Frahm, Jens; Schmitz, Dietmar; Brose, Nils; Ivanovic, Aleksandra

    2009-03-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the vertebrate brain. Their surface expression at synapses between neurons is regulated in an activity-dependent and activity-independent manner. The protein machinery that regulates synaptic targeting, anchoring and turnover of AMPA receptors consists of several types of specialized scaffolding proteins. The FERM domain scaffolding proteins 4.1G and 4.1N were previously suggested to act jointly in binding and regulating synaptic trafficking of the AMPA receptor subunits GluR1 and GluR4. To determine the functions of 4.1G and 4.1N in vivo, we generated a mutant mouse line that lacks 4.1G entirely and expresses 4.1N at 22% of wild-type levels. These mice had combined 4.1G and 4.1N protein expression in the hippocampus at 12% of wild-type levels (equivalent to 8-10% of combined GluR1 and GluR4 expression levels). They show a moderate reduction in synaptosomal expression levels of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 at 3 weeks of age, but no change in basic glutamatergic synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. Our study indicates that 4.1G and 4.1N do not have a crucial role in glutamatergic synaptic transmission and the induction and maintenance of long-term plastic changes in synaptic efficacy. PMID:19225127

  7. Summary of AH-1G flight vibration data for validation of coupled rotor-fuselage analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, R. V.; Cronkhite, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Under a NASA research program designated DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS), four U. S. helicopter industry participants (Bell Helicopter, Boeing Vertol, McDonnell Douglas Helicopter, and Sikorsky Aircraft) are to apply existing analytical methods for calculating coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations of the AH-1G helicopter for correlation with flight test data from an AH-1G Operational Load Survey (OLS) test program. Bell Helicopter, as the manufacturer of the AH-1G, was asked to provide pertinent rotor data and to collect the OLS flight vibration data needed to perform the correlations. The analytical representation of the fuselage structure is based on a NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) developed by Bell which has been extensively documented and correlated with ground vibration tests.The AH-1G FEM was provided to each of the participants for use in their coupled rotor-fuselage analyses. This report describes the AH-1G OLS flight test program and provides the flight conditions and measured vibration data to be used by each participant in their correlation effort. In addition, the mechanical, structural, inertial and aerodynamic data for the AH-1G two-bladed teetering main rotor system are presented. Furthermore, modifications to the NASTRAN FEM of the fuselage structure that are necessary to make it compatible with the OLS test article are described. The AH-1G OLS flight test data was found to be well documented and provide a sound basis for evaluating currently existing analysis methods used for calculation of coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations.

  8. Baseline characteristics of HIV & hepatitis B virus (HIV/HBV) co-infected patients from Kolkata, India

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Jayeeta; Saha, Debraj; Bandyopadhyay, Bhaswati; Saha, Bibhuti; Kedia, Deepika; Guha Mazumder, D.N.; Chakravarty, Runu; Guha, Subhasish Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HIV co-infection has variable prevalence worldwide. In comparison to HBV mono-infection, the course of chronic HBV infection is accelerated in HIV/HBV co-infected patients. The present study was carried out to analyse the baseline characteristics (clinical, biochemical, serological and virological) of treatment naïve HIV/HBV co-infected and HIV mono-infected patients. Methods: Between July 2011 and January 2013, a total number of 1331 HIV-seropositive treatment naïve individuals, enrolled in the ART Centre of Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine, Kolkata, India, were screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). A total of 1253 HIV mono-infected and 78 HIV/HBV co-infected patients were characterized. The co-infected patients were evaluated for HBeAg and anti-HBe antibody by ELISA. HIV RNA was quantified for all co-infected patients. HBV DNA was detected and quantified by real time-PCR amplification followed by HBV genotype determination. Results: HIV/HBV co-infected patients had proportionately more advanced HIV disease (WHO clinical stage 3 and 4) than HIV mono-infected individuals (37.1 vs. 19.9%). The co-infected patients had significantly higher serum bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase and ALT/platelet ratio index (APRI). CD4 count was non-significantly lower in co-infected patients. Majority (61.5%) were HBeAg positive with higher HIV RNA (P<0.05), HBV DNA (P<0.001) and APRI (P<0.05) compared to those who were HBeAg negative. HBV/D was the predominant genotype (73.2%) and D2 (43.7%) was the commonest subgenotype. Interpretation & conclusions: HIV/HBV co-infected patients had significantly higher serum bilirubin, ALT, alkaline phosphatase and lower platelet count. HBeAg positive co-infected patients had higher HIV RNA and HBV DNA compared to HBeAg negative co-infected patients. Prior to initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) all patients should be screened for HBsAg to

  9. The Early Results of a New Health Care Program Implementation in HBV Screening: an Iranian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sharifian, Afsaneh; Naderi, Nostratollah; Sanati, Azar; Mohebi, Seyed Reza; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Golmohamadi, Ali; Nori, Simin; Khanyaghma, Mahsa; Sheikhesmaeili, Farshad; Zali, Mohamad Reza

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND According to the reports of World Health Organization (WHO) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the prevalence of chronic hepatitis B infection in Iran has decreased from 2-7% in 2001 to 1.3-0.8% in children aged 2-14 years. In 2010 the Institute of Medicine recommended more comprehensive screening by primary care physicians (PCPs) for evaluation, vaccination, and management of infected patients for further decrease in the prevalence of chronic HBV infection. Thus, with contribution of the Health Department, we developed a practical flowchart for PCPs to start active screening of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in all visited patients and refer the positive cases for further evaluation and management to Taleghani Hospital. METHODS With collaboration of Health Department of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences), physicians of health centers were asked to screen all their patients for HBsAg. Positive cases were referred to Taleghani Hospital. They were first registered and educated about their disease, life style, and prevention methods. Their first degree families were screened for HBV infection too and were referred for vaccination if needed. According to the results of lab tests, appropriate management was done by a hepatologist. RESULTS Since implementation of this program, we have encountered a significant rise in patient detection (even in high risk groups). Many of them were not aware of their disease and most of those who were aware of their disease were not managed appropriately. Family screening and vaccination were inadequate and need more emphasis. CONCLUSION Although health system is active about screening of HBV infection in high risk populations, it is not perfect. It seems that health system needs to upgrade the screening and management programs of HBV infection. PMID:26609351

  10. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  11. Caspase 6 has a protective role in SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Marion C; Mitchem, Mollie R; König, Hans-Georg; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2016-06-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), it has been suggested that the process of neurodegeneration starts at the neuromuscular junction and is propagated back along axons towards motor neurons. Caspase-dependent pathways are well established as a cause of motor neuron death, and recent work in other disease models indicated a role for caspase 6 in axonal degeneration. Therefore we hypothesised that caspase 6 may be involved in motor neuron death in ALS. To investigate the role of caspase 6 in ALS we profiled protein levels of caspase-6 throughout disease progression in the ALS mouse model SOD1(G93A); this did not reveal differences in caspase 6 levels during disease. To investigate the role of caspase 6 further we generated a colony with SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice lacking caspase 6. Analysis of the transgenic SOD1(G93A); Casp6(-/-) revealed an exacerbated phenotype with motor dysfunction occurring earlier and a significantly shortened lifespan when compared to transgenic SOD1(G93A); Casp6(+/+) mice. Immunofluorescence analysis of the neuromuscular junction revealed no obvious difference between caspase 6(+/+) and caspase 6(-/-) in non-transgenic mice, while the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice showed severe degeneration compared to non-transgenic mice in both genotypes. Our data indicate that caspase-6 does not exacerbate ALS pathogenesis, but may have a protective role. PMID:26976329

  12. The combination of tacrolimus and entecavir improves the remission of HBV-associated glomerulonephritis without enhancing viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lifen; Ye, Zhiming; Liang, Huaban; Zhang, Bin; Xu, Lixia; Feng, Zhonglin; Liu, Shuangxin; Shi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tacrolimus inhibits hepatitis B virus entry into hepatocytes through targeting the HBV receptor, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Tacrolimus combined with entecavir antiviral therapy for HBV-associated glomerulonephritis patients with biopsy-proven membranous nephropathy. Method: A cohort of 42 patients was enrolled in this retrospective study. Twenty-three patients received Tacrolimus (0.05 mg/kg/day) in combination entecavir over 24 weeks, whereas the other 19 patients only received entecavir monotherapy. Results: The probability of proteinuria remission in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group was 69 and 87% after 12 and 24 weeks, whereas was only 26 and 42%, respectively, in the entecavir group. The mean time to partial or complete remission was 18.6 weeks in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group and 34.3 weeks in the entecavir group (P<0.001). A decrease in the HBV DNA titer was observed in all patients with active HBV replication. None of the HBV carriers in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group showed evidence of HBV reactivation. The serum creatinine and alanine aminotransferase levels remained stable in both groups. The Tacrolimus target trough concentration was 5-10 ng/mL. Conclusion: Tacrolimus combined with entecavir rapidly and effectively induced remission of HBV-GN in Chinese adults. Furthermore, Tacrolimus may have a synergistic antiviral effect with entecavir.

  13. Leukocyte telomere length-related rs621559 and rs398652 genetic variants influence risk of HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenting; Cheng, Guangxia; Xing, Huaixin; Shi, Juan; Lu, Chao; Wei, Jinyu; Li, Lichao; Zhou, Changchun; Yuan, Qipeng; Zhou, Liqing; Yang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified eleven leukocyte telomere length (LTL)-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Since LTL has been associated with risk of many malignancies, LTL-related SNPs may contribute to cancer susceptibility. To test this hypothesis in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we genotyped these eleven LTL-related SNPs in a case-control set including 1186 HBV-related HCC cases, 508 chronic HBV carriers and 1308 healthy controls at the discovery stage. The associations of HCC risk with these SNPs were further confirmed in an independent case-control set. We found that 1p34.2 rs621559 and 14q21 rs398652 were significantly associated with HBV-related HCC risk (both P<0.005 after Bonferroni corrections). There was no significant difference of either rs621559 or rs398652 genotypes between chronic HBV carriers and healthy controls, demonstrating that the association was not due to predisposition to HBV infection. In the pooled analyses (1806 HBV-related HCC cases and 1954 controls), we observed a decreased HCC risk, 0.72-times, associated with the 1p34.2 rs621559 AA genotype compared to the GG genotype (P = 1.6×10(-6)). Additionally, there was an increased HCC risk, 1.27-fold, associated with the rs398652 GG genotype (P = 3.3×10(-6)). A statistical joint effect between the rs621559 GG and rs398652 GG genotypes may exist in elevating risk of HBV-related HCC. We show, for the first time, that rs398652 and rs621559 might be marker genetic variants for risk of HBV-related HCC in the Chinese population. PMID:25365256

  14. The effect of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked exogenous SOD1-G93A on electrophysiological properties and intracellular calcium in cultured rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Milošević, Milena; Bataveljić, Danijela; Nikolić, Ljiljana; Bijelić, Dunja; Andjus, Pavle

    2016-01-01

    Over 150 mutations in the SOD1 gene that encodes Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause 20-25% of familial ALS, albeit without a known gain-of-function mechanism. ALS is also non-cell-autonomous, the interactions between motor neurons and their glial neighbours being implicated in disease progression. The aim here was to investigate the biophysical effects of the exogenous human mutant SOD1-G93A on rat astrocytes in culture. Primary cortical astrocyte cultures were treated with recombinant human apo- mSOD1-G93A vs. wild-type control (wtSOD1) and recorded by patch-clamp and calcium imaging. Results showed that exogenous mSOD1 as well as wtSOD1 induced a decrease of membrane resistance, the effect being persistent (up to 13 min) only for the mutant form. Similarly, whole-cell inward currents in astrocytes were augmented by both wt and mSOD1, but the effect was twice larger and only progressed continuously for the latter. Both forms of SOD1 also induced a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) activity, the effect being dependent on external Ca(2+) and again only persisted with mSOD1, becoming significantly different from wtSOD1 only at longer times (14 min). In conclusion, this study points to membrane permeability and Ca(2+) signalling as processes affected by SOD1-G93A that presents the humoral factor triggering the role of astrocytes in ALS pathophysiology. PMID:26892977

  15. Rare CFTR mutation 1525-1G>A in a Pakistani patient.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Abdul; Al Thani, G; Dawod, S T; Kambouris, M; Al Hamed, M

    2004-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is rare in non-Caucasian populations, and in such populations little is known about the spectrum of mutations and polymorphisms in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance (CFTR) gene. We report the detection of a very rare CFTR mutation 1525-1G>A in intron 9 in a 5-year-old Pakistani child with typical clinical features of CF. It remains to be seen whether mutation 1525-1G>A is characteristic of Pakistani ethnicity with CF or associated with severe phenotypic features. PMID:15088804

  16. Association of TNF-α Promoter Polymorphism with HBV Associated Disease Outcome Among HBV Infected Patients from Orissa, Southern Part of East India

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Rajesh; Sarkar, Neelakshi; Biswas, Avik; Pal, Ananya; Saha, Debraj; Singh, Shivaram P.; Panigrahi, Manas K.; Bandopadhyay, Manikanana; Chakrabarti, Sekhar; Chakravarty, Runu

    2014-01-01

    Background TNF-α promoter polymorphism has been known to be a potential predictive factor in patients with HBV infection. We therefore tried to investigate whether the TNF-α promoter polymorphism at position −238, −857 and −863 was associated with the outcome of HBV infection in a population from Orissa, southern part of East India. Methods A total of 195 patients recruited for the study were classified into 85 controls and 110 HBV infected cases, which included 34 IC, 30 CLD, 32 LC and 14 HCC patients. The polymorphisms at the respective sites were detected by a PCR-RFLP followed by statistical analysis. Results The frequency of the genotype −238 GG and the allele −238G in the cases (89.0% and 92.7% respectively) was significantly higher than that in the controls (68.2% and 82.2% respectively) (P < 0.001, OR = 3.8 and P = 0.001, OR = 2.73). Whereas the −238 GA genotype was significantly high in the control group (28.2%) when compared to the cases (7.2%) (P < 0.001, OR = 0.2). Similarly, the frequency of −863CC and the allele −863C was significantly higher among the cases (24.5% and 49.5%) compared to controls (1.17% and 34.7%), (P < 0.001, OR = 27.32 and P = 0.003, OR = 1.85), whereas the −863CA genotype was significantly high in the controls (67.0%) when compared to the cases (50.0%) (P = 0.01, OR = 0.49). Haplotype −863C/−857C/−238G in cases was significantly higher than controls (P = 0.002). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicates that the genotype −863CC bears a negative association with liver disease progression. Conclusion The present study established an association of polymorphisms at site −238 and −863 of the TNF-α promoter with the outcome HBV infection and disease progression. PMID:25755561

  17. Connexin Mutants and Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Eric C.; Ebihara, Lisa; Berthoud, Viviana M.

    2013-01-01

    The lens is a multicellular, but avascular tissue that must stay transparent to allow normal transmission of light and focusing of it on the retina. Damage to lens cells and/or proteins can cause cataracts, opacities that disrupt these processes. The normal survival of the lens is facilitated by an extensive network of gap junctions formed predominantly of connexin46 and connexin50. Mutations of the genes that encode these connexins (GJA3 and GJA8) have been identified and linked to inheritance of cataracts in human families and mouse lines. In vitro expression studies of several of these mutants have shown that they exhibit abnormalities that may lead to disease. Many of the mutants reduce or modify intercellular communication due to channel alterations (including loss of function or altered gating) or due to impaired cellular trafficking which reduces the number of gap junction channels within the plasma membrane. However, the abnormalities detected in studies of other mutants suggest that they cause cataracts through other mechanisms including gain of hemichannel function (leading to cell injury and death) and formation of cytoplasmic accumulations (that may act as light scattering particles). These observations and the anticipated results of ongoing studies should elucidate the mechanisms of cataract development due to mutations of lens connexins and abnormalities of other lens proteins. They may also contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of disease due to connexin mutations in other tissues. PMID:23596416

  18. Overview of Shipyard coast line with Piers G1, G2, G3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of Shipyard coast line with Piers G-1, G-2, G-3, G-4, and G-5 in view, view facing east-southeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Pier & Quay Walls, Entrance to Dry Dock No. 2 & Repair Wharfs, east & west sides of Dry Dock No. 2 & west side of Dry Dock No. 3, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Analysis of posture and eye movement responses to Coriolis stimulation under 1 G and microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Motoki; Takahashi, Masahiro; Iida, Masahiro

    2009-12-01

    To detect the effect of microgravity on vestibular responses, we conducted Coriolis stimulation experiments at 1 G and μ G. Five men with vision occluded were asked to tilt their head forward while rotating at 100 degrees/sec. Postural changes were recorded by a 3D linear accelerometer, and the distance of upper body movement was derived from recordings of linear acceleration. Eye movements were recorded by a CCD camera. For a second period after commencing head tilt, the upper body moved 10 cm in the direction of inertia input at 1 G, but it moved to the opposite direction at μ G, i.e., 4 cm in the direction of inertia force. Nystagmus peak slow-phase velocity immediately after head tilt and its attenuation process did not differ between 1 G and μ G. The strength of movement sensation and the severity of motion sickness were far weaker at μ G than at 1 G. It was concluded that inertia input is valid to induce postural and sensation responses only when the external reference is given Z axis by gravity. Vestibular ocular response may be maintained at μ G because the head reference is valid even after the external reference becomes arbitrary. PMID:21319014

  20. Automated Triplex (HBV, HCV and HIV) NAT Assay Systems for Blood Screening in India

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This review is confined to triplex nucleic acid testing (NAT) assays to be used on fully automated platform. Around the world, these assays are being used at various transfusion medicine centres or blood banks to screen blood units for HBV, HCV and HIV. These assay systems can screen up to 1000 blood units for HBV, HCV and HIV simultaneously in a day. This area has been dominated by mainly two manufacturers: M/s Gen-Probe-Novartis and M/s Roche Molecular Systems. The triplex NAT assay systems of both manufacturers are licensed by United States Food and Drug Administration. There is not much awareness about the technology and procedures used in these assays. The main objective of this review is to create awareness about the technology and procedure of these assays. PMID:27042485

  1. Automated Triplex (HBV, HCV and HIV) NAT Assay Systems for Blood Screening in India.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Manoj Kumar

    2016-02-01

    This review is confined to triplex nucleic acid testing (NAT) assays to be used on fully automated platform. Around the world, these assays are being used at various transfusion medicine centres or blood banks to screen blood units for HBV, HCV and HIV. These assay systems can screen up to 1000 blood units for HBV, HCV and HIV simultaneously in a day. This area has been dominated by mainly two manufacturers: M/s Gen-Probe-Novartis and M/s Roche Molecular Systems. The triplex NAT assay systems of both manufacturers are licensed by United States Food and Drug Administration. There is not much awareness about the technology and procedures used in these assays. The main objective of this review is to create awareness about the technology and procedure of these assays. PMID:27042485

  2. [Escape mutants of hepatitis B virus].

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Carlos Mario; Navas, María-Cristina

    2015-04-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a public health problem worldwide. Considering HBV morbidity and mortality and the economic consequences .of this infection, policies and strategies to control it have been implemented, especially in regions where HBV infection is endemic, with high rates of vertical and horizontal infection. One of these strategies is the development of the recombinant vaccine. A 92% of the countries in the world have implemented the vaccine with a global coverage of 69%. The escape variants of HBV correspond to isolates with mutations in the sequence coding for the "a" determinant; these mutations result in changes in the amino acid sequence of the surface antigen (HBsAg) that prevent neutralization of viral particles by antibodies generated in response to vaccination or infection. The escape variants can infect vaccinated individuals and have been identified in the population of countries with different epidemiological patterns. PMID:26065452

  3. The Impact of Gender Differences in Attitudes and Beliefs Concerning HBV Vaccination and Screening in the Lao Community.

    PubMed

    Akosionu, Odichinma; Virnig, Beth; Call, Kathleen T; Yuan, Jian-Min; Chanthanouvong, Sunny; Nguyen, Ruby H N

    2016-02-01

    Liver cancer incidence is increasing among Asian Americans. Laotians in the US have greater risk of liver cancer death compared to other Asian American groups. However, ethnicity is not the only disparity; Laotian men are at increased risk of liver cancer compared to Laotian women. Use of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination and screening is low among Laotians. The impact of gender differences in attitudes and beliefs concerning HBV vaccination and screening is unknown. This secondary analysis of a cross-sectional community-based participatory research study. Although men were more likely to believe that infection with HBV is preventable, and treatable, causes liver cancer, and that healthy persons should be vaccinated, of those who thought people should get vaccinated, women were four times more likely to receive vaccine than men (adj. OR 4.0, CI 1.2-19). Understanding and addressing gender differences may increase HBV screening and vaccination uptake, thus reducing disparities within the Laotian community. PMID:25612922

  4. Tempol moderately extends survival in a hSOD1(G93A) ALS rat model by inhibiting neuronal cell loss, oxidative damage and levels of non-native hSOD1(G93A) forms.

    PubMed

    Linares, Edlaine; Seixas, Luciana V; dos Prazeres, Janaina N; Ladd, Fernando V L; Ladd, Aliny A B L; Coppi, Antonio A; Augusto, Ohara

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive dysfunction and death of motor neurons by mechanisms that remain unclear. Evidence indicates that oxidative mechanisms contribute to ALS pathology, but classical antioxidants have not performed well in clinical trials. Cyclic nitroxides are an alternative worth exploring because they are multifunctional antioxidants that display low toxicity in vivo. Here, we examine the effects of the cyclic nitroxide tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl piperidine-1-oxyl) on ALS onset and progression in transgenic female rats over-expressing the mutant hSOD1(G93A) . Starting at 7 weeks of age, a high dose of tempol (155 mg/day/rat) in the rat´s drinking water had marginal effects on the disease onset but decelerated disease progression and extended survival by 9 days. In addition, tempol protected spinal cord tissues as monitored by the number of neuronal cells, and the reducing capability and levels of carbonylated proteins and non-native hSOD1 forms in spinal cord homogenates. Intraperitoneal tempol (26 mg/rat, 3 times/week) extended survival by 17 days. This group of rats, however, diverted to a decelerated disease progression. Therefore, it was inconclusive whether the higher protective effect of the lower i.p. dose was due to higher tempol bioavailability, decelerated disease development or both. Collectively, the results show that tempol moderately extends the survival of ALS rats while protecting their cellular and molecular structures against damage. Thus, the results provide proof that cyclic nitroxides are alternatives worth to be further tested in animal models of ALS. PMID:23405225

  5. Tempol Moderately Extends Survival in a hSOD1G93A ALS Rat Model by Inhibiting Neuronal Cell Loss, Oxidative Damage and Levels of Non-Native hSOD1G93A Forms

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Edlaine; Seixas, Luciana V.; dos Prazeres, Janaina N.; Ladd, Fernando V. L.; Ladd, Aliny A. B. L.; Coppi, Antonio A.; Augusto, Ohara

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive dysfunction and death of motor neurons by mechanisms that remain unclear. Evidence indicates that oxidative mechanisms contribute to ALS pathology, but classical antioxidants have not performed well in clinical trials. Cyclic nitroxides are an alternative worth exploring because they are multifunctional antioxidants that display low toxicity in vivo. Here, we examine the effects of the cyclic nitroxide tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl piperidine-1-oxyl) on ALS onset and progression in transgenic female rats over-expressing the mutant hSOD1G93A . Starting at 7 weeks of age, a high dose of tempol (155 mg/day/rat) in the rat´s drinking water had marginal effects on the disease onset but decelerated disease progression and extended survival by 9 days. In addition, tempol protected spinal cord tissues as monitored by the number of neuronal cells, and the reducing capability and levels of carbonylated proteins and non-native hSOD1 forms in spinal cord homogenates. Intraperitoneal tempol (26 mg/rat, 3 times/week) extended survival by 17 days. This group of rats, however, diverted to a decelerated disease progression. Therefore, it was inconclusive whether the higher protective effect of the lower i.p. dose was due to higher tempol bioavailability, decelerated disease development or both. Collectively, the results show that tempol moderately extends the survival of ALS rats while protecting their cellular and molecular structures against damage. Thus, the results provide proof that cyclic nitroxides are alternatives worth to be further tested in animal models of ALS. PMID:23405225

  6. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes. PMID:9007229

  7. Seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV, and HTLV among Pregnant Women in Southwestern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Opaleye, Oluyinka Oladele; Igboama, Magdalene C; Ojo, Johnson Adeyemi; Odewale, Gbolabo

    2016-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are major public health challenge especially in developing countries. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of Hepatitis B virus (HBV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and Human T-cell lymphotropic Virus type I (HTLV-I) among pregnant women attending antenatal clinic, in Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, and South-Western Nigeria. One hundred and eighty two randomly selected pregnant women were screened for HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV and HTLV-1 IgM antibodies using commercially available ELISA kit. Of the 182 blood samples of pregnant women screened whose age ranged from 15-49 years, 13 (7.1%), 5 (2.7%), 9 (4.9%), and 44 (24.2%) were positive for HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV, and HTLV-1 IgM antibodies, respectively. The co-infection rate of 0.5% was obtained for HBV/HCV, HBV/HIV, HIV/HTLV-1, and HCV/HTLV-1 while 1.1% and 0% was recorded for HBV/HTLV-1 and HCV/HIV co-infections, respectively. Expected risk factors such as history of surgery, circumcision, tattooing and incision showed no significant association with any of the viral STIs (P > 0.05). This study shows that there is the need for a comprehensive screening of all pregnant women for HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV and HTLV-1 to prevent mother to child transmission of these viral infections and its attending consequences. PMID:25879258

  8. Diagnostic value of serum Golgi protein 73 for HBV-related primary hepatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guosheng; Dong, Feibo; Xu, Xiaozhen; Hu, Airong; Hu, Yaoren

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels are routinely used for diagnosis and monitoring of hepatic diseases, but it has a limited value. Golgi protein 73 (GP73) has been suggested as a new marker for hepatic diseases. Objective: To explore the clinical value of serum GP73 in different diseases associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Method: Between January 2010 and August 2014, serum samples from 88 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), 78 patients with HBV-related liver cirrhosis (LC), and 194 patients with HBV-related primary hepatic cancer (PHC) were collected. Serum samples from 30 healthy volunteers were used as controls. ELISA and microparticle enzyme immunoassay were used to measure serum GP73 and AFP levels. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to analyze the diagnostic value of serum GP73 and AFP for PHC. Results: For the diagnosis of PHC, GP73 showed a sensitivity of 65.5% and specificity of 66.3%, while AFP levels showed sensitivity of 64.4% and specificity of 76.5%. Serial testing (both tests are positive) could increase the specificity (sensitivity of 45.9% and specificity of 85.5%) while parallel testing (any single positive test result) could increase the sensitivity (sensitivity of 84.0% and specificity of 57.2%). Serum GP73 and AFP levels were significantly different between Child-Pugh grades (P<0.001 for GP73 and P=0.044 for AFP). Significant differences in serum GP73 and AFP were found between TNM stages (all P<0.001). Conclusion: Serum GP73 had limited diagnostic value for HBV-related PHC. The combined use of serum GP73 and AFP levels improved the diagnostic efficacy. PMID:26617863

  9. Distinct patterns of hepcidin and iron regulation during HIV-1, HBV, and HCV infections.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Andrew E; Stacey, Andrea R; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Marshall, Elizabeth; Sturges, Pamela; Chatha, Kamaljit; Smith, Nicola M G; Huang, XiaoJie; Xu, XiaoNing; Pasricha, Sant-Rayn; Li, Ning; Wu, Hao; Webster, Craig; Prentice, Andrew M; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Norris, Phillip J; Drakesmith, Hal; Borrow, Persephone

    2014-08-19

    During HIV type-1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, altered iron balance correlates with morbidity. The liver-produced hormone hepcidin dictates systemic iron homeostasis. We measured hepcidin, iron parameters, cytokines, and inflammatory markers in three cohorts: plasma donors who developed acute HIV-1, HBV, or HCV viremia during the course of donations; HIV-1-positive individuals progressing from early to chronic infection; and chronically HIV-1-infected individuals (receiving antiretroviral therapy or untreated). Hepcidin increased and plasma iron decreased during acute HIV-1 infection, as viremia was initially detected. In patients transitioning from early to chronic HIV-1 infection, hepcidin in the first 60 d of infection positively correlated with the later plasma viral load set-point. Hepcidin remained elevated in individuals with untreated chronic HIV-1 infection and in subjects on ART. In contrast to HIV-1, there was no evidence of hepcidin up-regulation or hypoferremia during the primary viremic phases of HCV or HBV infection; serum iron marginally increased during acute HBV infection. In conclusion, hepcidin induction is part of the pathogenically important systemic inflammatory cascade triggered during HIV-1 infection and may contribute to the establishment and maintenance of viral set-point, which is a strong predictor of progression to AIDS and death. However, distinct patterns of hepcidin and iron regulation occur during different viral infections that have particular tissue tropisms and elicit different systemic inflammatory responses. The hypoferremia of acute infection is therefore a pathogen-specific, not universal, phenomenon. PMID:25092293

  10. Static structures and dynamics of hemoglobin vesicle (HBV) developed as a transfusion alternative.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takaaki; Sakai, Hiromi; Sou, Keitaro; Medebach, Martin; Glatter, Otto; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2009-06-18

    Hemoglobin vesicle (HbV) is an artificial oxygen carrier that encapsulates solution of purified and highly concentrated (ca. 38 g dL(-1)) human hemoglobin. Its exceptionally high concentration as a liposomal product (ca. 40% volume fraction) achieves an oxygen-carrying capacity comparable to that of blood. We use small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) to investigate the hierarchical structures and dynamics of HbVs in concentrated suspensions. SAXS data revealed unilamellar shell structure and internal density profile of the artificial cell membrane for Hb encapsulation. The SAXS intensity of HbV at scattering vector q > 0.5 nm(-1) manifests dissolution states of the encapsulated Hbs in the inner aqueous phase of the vesicle having ca. 240 nm diameter. The peak position as well as the height and width of static structure factor of Hb before and after encapsulation are almost identical, demonstrating the preserved protein-protein interactions in the confined space. To overcome multiple scattering from turbid samples, we employed thin layer-cell DLS combined with the so-called bruteforce and echo techniques, which allows us to observe collective diffusion dynamics of HbVs without dilution. A pronounced slowdown of the HbV diffusion and eventual emergence of dynamically arrested state in the presence of high-concentration plasma substitutes (water-soluble polymers), such as dextran, modified fluid gelatin, and hydroxylethyl starch, can be explained by depletion interaction. A significantly weaker effect of recombinant human serum albumin on HbV flocculation and viscosity enhancement than those induced by other polymers is clearly attributed to the specificity as a protein; its compact structure efficiently reduces the reservoir polymer volume fraction that determines the depth of the attractive potential between HbVs. These phenomena are technically essential for controlling the suspension rheology, which is advantageous for versatile

  11. HBV-Related Health Behaviors in a Socio-Cultural Context: Perspectives from Khmers and Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haeok; Kiang, Peter; Chea, Phala; Peou, Sonith; Tang, Shirley S.; Yang, JinHwang; Fawcett, Jacqueline; Hann, Hie-Won

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To explore factors influencing health and health care within the sociocultural context of Cambodian Americans (CAs or Khmers) and Korean Americans (KA) and to examine intergroup similarities and differences between CAs and KAs, focusing on hepatitis B virus (HBV) and liver cancer prevention behaviors. Methods The study used a qualitative design guided by the revised Network Episode Model (NEM) and informed by ethnographic analysis. Focus group interviews with key informants among CA community health leaders (CHLs, n=14) and individual interviews with key informants of KA CHLs (n=9) were audiotaped and transcribed. Results Three categories that influenced HBV and liver cancer prevention emerged from both CAs and KAs: the socio-cultural, individual, and behavioral. Four additional sub-categories (sub-themes) of sociocultural were identified as socio-history, socio-medicine, socio-linguistic, and socio-health resources. Both CAs and KAs, however, have low levels of knowledge and significant misunderstandings about HBV infection. Conclusions The study identifies and compares the social-cultural determinant for HBV and liver cancer and highlights the factors of education, intercultural communication, and interactions within socio-cultural contexts of CA and KA subgroups. In general, conceptual overlaps are apparent between Khmers (from now on, the terms, CA and Khmer, will be used interchangeably) and Koreans except for the sub-theme of socio-history. However, differences in concept-specific attributes point to the need to account for differing conceptualizations and implications of specific ethnic groups’ sociocultural contexts, and to design contextually-relevant outreach and educational interventions for targeted AAPI subgroups. PMID:24355416

  12. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-10-23

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  13. Hyperoside nanocrystals for HBV treatment: process optimization, in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Baode; Wu, Na; Shen, Chengying; Zhang, Fucheng; Wu, Yan; Xu, Pinghua; Zhang, Lihong; Wu, Wei; Lu, Yi; Han, Jin; Wang, Yonggang; Yuan, Hailong

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop hyperoside (Hyp) nanocrystals to enhance its dissolution rate, oral bioavailability and anti-HBV activity. Hyp nanocrystals were prepared using high pressure homogenization technique followed by lyophilization. A Box-Behnken design approach was employed for process optimization. The physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetics and anti-HBV activity in vivo of Hyp nanocrystal prepared with the optimized formulation were systematically investigated. Hyp nanocrystals prepared with the optimized formulation was found to be rod shaped with particle size of 384 ± 21 nm and PDI of 0.172 ± 0.027. XRPD studies suggested slight crystalline change in drug. Dissolution rate obtained from Hyp nanocrystals were markedly higher than pure Hyp. The nanocrystals exhibited enhanced Cmax (7.42 ± 0.73 versus 3.80 ± 0.66 mg/L) and AUC0 - t (193.61 ± 16.30 versus 91.92 ± 17.95 mg·h/L) with a 210.63% increase in relative bioavailability. Hyp nanocrystals exhibited significantly greater anti-HBV activity than Hyp. These results suggested that the developed nanocrystals formulation had a great potential as a viable approach to enhance the bioavailability of Hyp. PMID:27032257

  14. Immune memory responses to HBV vaccine 13-18 years after primary vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hou, L; Li, W; Wei, X; Zhou, Y; Zhuo, Y; Wu, H; Shen, B

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune memory response 13-18 years after an hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine by performing a specific in vitro stimulation experiment. Thirty healthy volunteers who had been inoculated 13-18 years ago with the HBV vaccine were collected from the physical examination center. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with 50 ng/mL recombinant HBsAg. An ELISA kit was used for the detection of antibodies that were produced by these cells in vitro. It was found that even 13-18 years after inoculation with the HBV vaccine, an anamnestic antibody response still existed, and was not correlated with the serum antibody levels (r = -0.177, P = 0.377). In conclusion, our data showed that the individuals after inoculation, including those with anti-HBs <10 IU/L as well as those individuals in whom the antibody was not detected, retained immune memory, which may be the main role of memory B cells. PMID:26345774

  15. NK cell receptor imbalance and NK cell dysfunction in HBV infection and hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cheng; Sun, Haoyu; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently the third leading cause of cancer mortality and a common poor-prognosis malignancy due to postoperative recurrence and metastasis. There is a significant correlation between chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and hepatocarcinogenesis. As the first line of host defense against viral infections and tumors, natural killer (NK) cells express a large number of immune recognition receptors (NK receptors (NKRs)) to recognize ligands on hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, stellate cells and Kupffer cells, which maintain the balance between immune response and immune tolerance of NK cells. Unfortunately, the percentage and absolute number of liver NK cells decrease significantly during the development and progression of HCC. The abnormal expression of NK cell receptors and dysfunction of liver NK cells contribute to the progression of chronic HBV infection and HCC and are significantly associated with poor prognosis for liver cancer. In this review, we focus on the role of NK cell receptors in anti-tumor immune responses in HCC, particularly HBV-related HCC. We discuss specifically how tumor cells evade attack from NK cells and how emerging understanding of NKRs may aid the development of novel treatments for HCC. Novel mono- and combination therapeutic strategies that target the NK cell receptor–ligand system may potentially lead to successful and effective immunotherapy in HCC. PMID:25308752

  16. The association between RFC1 G80A polymorphism and cancer susceptibility: Evidence from 33 studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoyi; Gao, Yisha; He, Jing; Cai, Jiao; Ta, Na; Jiang, Hui; Zhu, Jinhong; Zheng, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant folate metabolism is closely related to tumorigenesis. Genetic variations in the Reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1) may alter the progress of folate metabolism, and thereby cause the initiation and progress of the cancer. Considerable studies have performed to investigate the association between RFC1 G80A (rs1051266) polymorphism and cancer susceptibility, but the conclusions were conflicting. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to reevaluate the association of RFC1 G80A polymorphism with cancer risk. PubMed and EMBASE were searched for eligible studies. The association of RFC1 G80A polymorphism and cancer risk was evaluated by the pooled odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The significant association was found between RFC1 G80A polymorphism and hematological malignance susceptibility (A vs. G: OR=1.11, 95%CI=1.003-1.23, P=0.045; GA vs. GG: OR=1.18, 95%CI=1.06-1.31, P=0.002; AA+GA vs. GG: OR=1.18, 95%CI=1.07-1.29, P=0.001). Stratified analysis by ethnicity indicated that the association became more prominent among Caucasians (GA vs. GG: OR=1.28, 95%CI=1.12-1.45, P<0.001; AA+GA vs. GG: OR=1.21, 95%CI=1.08-1.36, P=0.001). In term of the cancer type, this polymorphism significantly increased the risk of acute lymphoblast leukemia (GA vs. GG: OR=1.13, 95%CI=1.001-1.28, P=0.048; AA+GA vs. GG: OR=1.28, 95%CI=1.13-1.46, P<0.001) and acute myeloid leukemia (GA vs. GG: OR=2.57, 95%CI=1.37-4.85, P=0.003). No significant association between RFC1 G80A polymorphism and overall solid cancer risk was observed, but a protective association with digestive cancer risk was found (GA vs. GG: OR=0.89, 95%CI= 0.81-0.99, P=0.030). The comprehensive meta-analysis encouraged the notion that RFC1 G80A polymorphism may play an important role in hematopoietic system malignance. These findings need further validation in the large multicenter investigations. PMID:26819637

  17. Construction of HBV-specific ribozyme and its recombinant with HDV and their cleavage activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Shu-Juan; Xiang, Kai-Jun; Huang, Zhen-Hua; Zhou, Rong; Qi, Xue-Zhong

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To construct the recombinant of HDV cDNA and HBV-specific ribozyme gene by recombinant PCR in order to use HDV as a transporting vector carrying HBV-specific ribozyme into liver cells for inhibiting the replication of HBV. METHODS: We separately cloned the ribozyme (RZ) gene and recombinant DVRZ (comprising HDV cDNA and HBV-specific ribozyme gene) into the downstream of T7 promoter of pTAdv-T vector and studied the in vitro cleavage activity of their transcripts (rRZ, rDVRZ) on target RNA (rBVCF) from in vitro transcription of HBV C gene fragment(BVCF). RESULTS: Both the simple (rRZ) and the recombinant ribozyme rDVRZ could efficiently catalyze the cleavage of target RNA (rBVCF) under different temperatures (37 °C, 42 °C and 55 °C) and Mg2+ concentrations (10 mmol/L, 15 mmol/L and 20 mmol/L) and their catalytic activity tended to increase as the temperature was rising. But the activity of rRZ was evidently higher than that of rDVRZ. CONCLUSION: The recombinant of HDV cDNA and ribozyme gene had the potential of being further explored and used in gene therapy of HBV infection. PMID:11819602

  18. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte activity is enhanced in tumors with low IL-10 production in HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yang Song, Qingwei; Hu, Dianhe; Zhuang, Xiaohu; Yu, Shengcai

    2015-05-22

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers and can be induced by chronic HBV infection. The role of HBV-specific immune responses in mediating tumorigenesis and HCC prognosis is debated. The effect of intratumoral microenvironment on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is also unclear. Here, we examined resected tumor tissue from 36 patients with HBV-induced HCC. We categorized study cohort based on ex vivo IL-10 secretion by tumor cells into high IL-10-secreting (Hi10) and low IL-10-secreting (Lo10) groups, and found that the Lo10 group was less sensitive to TLR ligand stimulation. TILs from the Lo10 group contained higher frequencies of HBV-specific IFN-g-producing cells and total IFN-g-producing cells, and possessed higher proliferative capacity. Moreover, the proliferative capacity of TILs from the Hi10 group was negatively correlated with IL-10 secretion from tumor cells. Together, our data demonstrated that low IL-10-producing capacity in HBV-induced HCC tumors is associated with enhanced TIL activity. - Highlights: • We examined intratumoral IL-10 production in HBV-induced HCC. • We grouped HCC tumors into Hi10 and Lo10 groups based on their IL-10 production. • Lo10 groups had better IFN-g response by TILs. • Lo10 groups had better TIL proliferative capacity. • Lo10 group tumor cells were refractory to TLR ligand stimulation.

  19. Efficacy Comparison of Tenofovir and Entecavir in HBeAg-Positive Chronic Hepatitis B Patients with High HBV DNA

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Huang, Mingxing; Lin, Guoli; Li, Xiangyong; Wu, Yuankai; Jie, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To compare entecavir (ETV) and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) effects in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients with high HBV DNA. Method. 96 patients treated initially with tenofovir (TDF group) or entecavir (ETV group) were included in this retrospective study. The following parameters were assessed: HBeAg and hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) status, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and HBV-DNA levels at weeks 4, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, and 96; time to ALT normalization, undetectable HBV-DNA levels, and HBeAg seroconversion; total duration of follow-up and adverse reactions. Results. The patients included 66 (69%) and 30 (31%) individuals administered ETV and TDF, respectively, comprising 75% males. They were 35.1 ± 4.5 and 33.7 ± 4.6 years old in ETV and TDF groups, respectively. At 36 weeks, the response rate was significantly higher in the TDF group than in ETV treated patients (90% versus 69.7%, p = 0.03). At 48 weeks, less patients administered ETV showed undetectable HBV-DNA levels compared with the TDF group (86.4% versus 96.7%), a non-statistically significant difference (p = 0.13). Only 1 ETV treated patient developed virological breakthrough at 48–96 w. No adverse reactions were found. Conclusion. ETV and TDF are comparable in efficacy and safety to suppress HBV-DNA replication in HBeAg-positive CHB patients with high HBV DNA. PMID:27034945

  20. Characterization of Treatment-Naive HIV/HBV Co-Infected Patients Attending ART Clinic of a Tertiary Healthcare Centre in Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Avik; Panigrahi, Rajesh; Sarkar, Neelakshi; Sarkar, Jayeeta; Pal, Manisha; Guha, Subhasish Kamal; Saha, Bibhuti; Chakrabarti, Sekhar; Chakravarty, Runu

    2013-01-01

    Objective The study was designed to assess the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection scenario among the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients attending a tertiary healthcare unit in eastern India. Additionally, clinical and virological characterization of these viruses, prior to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation was also done for better understanding of the disease profile. Methods Pool of ART-naive HIV/HBV co-infected and HIV mono-infected patients, participating in two different studies, were included in this study. HBV DNA was detected by nested-PCR amplification followed by HBV genotype determination and HBV reverse transcriptase (RT) region amplification and direct sequencing for detecting drug resistance. Results The prevalence of HBsAg (11.3%) was higher compared to anti-HCV (1.9%) among the HIV infected ART-naive patients. Moreover, majority of the HBeAg positive HIV/HBV co-infected patients (87.7%) had HBV DNA ≥20,000 IU/ml with median HBV DNA significantly higher than that of HBeAg negative subjects (5.7 log10 IU/ml vs. 4.2 log10 IU/ml; p<0.0001). Multivariate analysis also showed that HBeAg-positive status was independently associated with higher HBV DNA level (p = <0.001). Notably, 60.9% of the HBeAg negative co-infected subjects had HBV DNA ≥2,000 IU/ml of which 37.0% had HBV DNA ≥20,000 IU/ml. Genotype HBV/D (68.2%) was the predominant genotype followed by HBV/A (24.3%) and HBV/C (7.5%). Anti-HBV drug resistant mutations were detected in two (3.8%) of the ART-naive patients. Conclusion The prevalence of HIV/HBV co-infection was relatively higher in our study subjects. HBeAg testing might provide clue for early treatment initiation. Furthermore, HBeAg negative patients are also associated with high HBV DNA levels and therefore require appropriate medical attention. Pre-treatment screening for anti-HBV drug resistant mutations is not necessary before ART initiation. PMID:24023688

  1. Characterization of early pathogenesis in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS: part I, background and methods

    PubMed Central

    Vinsant, Sharon; Mansfield, Carol; Jimenez-Moreno, Ramon; Del Gaizo Moore, Victoria; Yoshikawa, Masaaki; Hampton, Thomas G; Prevette, David; Caress, James; Oppenheim, Ronald W; Milligan, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Charcot first described amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in 1869; however, its causes remain largely unknown and effective, long-term treatment strategies are not available. The first mouse model of ALS was developed after the identification of mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene in 1993, and accordingly most of our knowledge of the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease comes from studies carried out using this animal model. Although numerous preclinical trials have been conducted in the mutant SOD1 mouse models, the results have been disappointing because they did not positively translate to clinical trials. One explanation may be that current understanding of when and where pathogenesis begins is insufficient to accurately guide preclinical trials. Further characterization of these early events may provide insight into disease onset, help in the discovery of presymptomatic diagnostic disease markers, and identify novel therapeutic targets. Here, we describe the rationale, approach, and methods for our extensive analysis of early changes that included an ultrastructural examination of central and peripheral components of the neuromuscular system in the SOD1G93A mouse and correlated these alterations with early muscle denervation, motor dysfunction, and motoneuron death. We also provide a discussion of published work to review what is known regarding early pathology in the SOD1 mouse model of ALS. The significance of this work is that we have examined early pathology simultaneously in both the spinal cord and peripheral neuromuscular system, and the results are presented in the companion paper (Part II, Results and Discussion). Our results provide evidence as to why a thorough characterization of animal models throughout the life span is critical for a strong foundation to design preclinical trials that may produce meaningful results. PMID:24381807

  2. Antihepatitis B virus activity of a protein-enriched fraction from housefly (Musca domestica) in a stable HBV-producing cell line.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuemei; Jin, Xiaobao; Wang, Jie; Chu, Fujiang; Zhu, Jiayong

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health problem. Although several vaccines and therapeutic strategies are currently being implemented to combat HBV virus, effective antiviral therapy against HBV infection has not been fully developed. Alternative strategies and new drugs to combat this disease are urged. Insects and insect derivatives are a large and unexploited source of potentially useful compounds for modern medicine. In the present study, we investigated the first anti-HBV activity of a protein-enriched fraction (PE) from the larvae of the housefly (Musca domestica) in a stable HBV-producing cell line. HBsAg and HBeAg in the culture medium were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HBV-DNA was quantified by fluorescent quantification PCR. HBV core protein was assayed by immunofluorescent staining. Results indicate PE treatment inhibited both HBsAg, HBeAg secretion, and HBV-DNA replication. Furthermore, PE could also suppress HBV core protein expression. PE could be a potential candidate for the development of a novel and effective drug for the treatment of HBV infection. PMID:25050391

  3. Antihepatitis B Virus Activity of a Protein-Enriched Fraction from Housefly (Musca domestica) in a Stable HBV-Producing Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Fujiang; Zhu, Jiayong

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health problem. Although several vaccines and therapeutic strategies are currently being implemented to combat HBV virus, effective antiviral therapy against HBV infection has not been fully developed. Alternative strategies and new drugs to combat this disease are urged. Insects and insect derivatives are a large and unexploited source of potentially useful compounds for modern medicine. In the present study, we investigated the first anti-HBV activity of a protein-enriched fraction (PE) from the larvae of the housefly (Musca domestica) in a stable HBV-producing cell line. HBsAg and HBeAg in the culture medium were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HBV-DNA was quantified by fluorescent quantification PCR. HBV core protein was assayed by immunofluorescent staining. Results indicate PE treatment inhibited both HBsAg, HBeAg secretion, and HBV-DNA replication. Furthermore, PE could also suppress HBV core protein expression. PE could be a potential candidate for the development of a novel and effective drug for the treatment of HBV infection. PMID:25050391

  4. Watershed Modeling of Nutrient Transport Covering the Country of Sweden - Scale Transfer in HBV-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arheimer, B.; Andersson, L.

    2002-12-01

    Eutrophication of the Baltic Sea and its coastal zone is considered a serious environmental problem. The problems are mainly caused by excessive load of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). To improve the situation new policies including watershed-based water management are implemented. However, this also demands watershed-based knowledge of nutrient transport proc-esses and appropriate tools for landscape planning. A watershed model (HBV-NP) that can be applied both on the local and the national scale has thus been developed to be used both for international reporting and scenario estimates for more efficient nutrient control strategies. The P part is presently developed within the Swedish Water Management Research Program (VASTRA), in which HBV-NP will be used for evaluation of best management practices, and for communication with local stake-holders. The model has recently been applied at the national scale for calculations of flow-normalized annual average of gross load, N retention and net transport, and source apportionment of the N load reaching the sea. In this application (called TRK) several submodels with different levels of process descriptions were linked together. Dynamic and detailed models were included for arable leaching (SOIL-N model), rainfall interpolation, atmospheric deposition (MATCH model), water balance (HBV), and nutrient transformation in groundwater, rivers and lakes (HBV-N). Based on landscape information in GIS, different leaching rates and emissions were assigned to the water discharge from similar landscape elements in 1000 subbasins covering Sweden. Scale transfer was mainly achieved through up-scaling procedures and by using the conceptual model approach for watershed hydrology, including variability parameters that are calibrated for regions. The modeled river flow and N concentrations were validated against time-series from several independent-monitoring stations. A similar national system is now under development for P, including

  5. BSND and ATP6V1G3: Novel Immunohistochemical Markers for Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shinmura, Kazuya; Igarashi, Hisaki; Kato, Hisami; Koda, Kenji; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Seishiro; Otsuki, Yoshiro; Yoneda, Tatsuaki; Kawanishi, Yuichi; Funai, Kazuhito; Takayama, Tatsuya; Ozono, Seiichiro; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Differentiating between chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other RCC subtypes can be problematic using routine light microscopy. This study aimed to identify novel immunohistochemical markers useful for a differential diagnosis between chromophobe RCC and other RCC subtypes. We selected 3 genes (including BSND and ATP6V1G3) that showed specific transcriptional expression in chromophobe RCC using expression data (n = 783) from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. A subsequent immunohistochemical examination of 186 RCCs obtained in our patient series resulted in a strong diffuse positivity of BSND and ATP6V1G3 proteins (both of which are involved in the regulation of membrane transport) in all the chromophobe RCC specimens (23/23 cases, 100%) but not in the clear cell RCC specimens (0/153 cases, 0%) or the papillary RCC specimens (0/10 cases, 0%). BSND and ATP6V1G3 protein expressions were also detected in renal oncocytoma (13/14 cases, 92.9%) and in the distal nephron, including the collecting duct, in the normal kidney. A computational analysis of TCGA data suggested that DNA methylation was involved in the differential expression pattern of both genes among RCC subtypes. Finally, an immunohistochemical analysis showed lung carcinomas were negative (0/85 cases, 0%) for the expression of both proteins. These results suggest that BSND and ATP6V1G3 are excellent novel immunohistochemical markers for differentiating between chromophobe RCC and other subtypes of RCC, including clear cell and papillary RCCs.

  6. BSND and ATP6V1G3: Novel Immunohistochemical Markers for Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shinmura, Kazuya; Igarashi, Hisaki; Kato, Hisami; Koda, Kenji; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Seishiro; Otsuki, Yoshiro; Yoneda, Tatsuaki; Kawanishi, Yuichi; Funai, Kazuhito; Takayama, Tatsuya; Ozono, Seiichiro; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2015-06-01

    Differentiating between chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other RCC subtypes can be problematic using routine light microscopy. This study aimed to identify novel immunohistochemical markers useful for a differential diagnosis between chromophobe RCC and other RCC subtypes. We selected 3 genes (including BSND and ATP6V1G3) that showed specific transcriptional expression in chromophobe RCC using expression data (n = 783) from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. A subsequent immunohistochemical examination of 186 RCCs obtained in our patient series resulted in a strong diffuse positivity of BSND and ATP6V1G3 proteins (both of which are involved in the regulation of membrane transport) in all the chromophobe RCC specimens (23/23 cases, 100%) but not in the clear cell RCC specimens (0/153 cases, 0%) or the papillary RCC specimens (0/10 cases, 0%). BSND and ATP6V1G3 protein expressions were also detected in renal oncocytoma (13/14 cases, 92.9%) and in the distal nephron, including the collecting duct, in the normal kidney. A computational analysis of TCGA data suggested that DNA methylation was involved in the differential expression pattern of both genes among RCC subtypes. Finally, an immunohistochemical analysis showed lung carcinomas were negative (0/85 cases, 0%) for the expression of both proteins. These results suggest that BSND and ATP6V1G3 are excellent novel immunohistochemical markers for differentiating between chromophobe RCC and other subtypes of RCC, including clear cell and papillary RCCs. PMID:26091477

  7. Amino acids as biomarkers in the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Bame, Monica; Grier, Robert E; Needleman, Richard; Brusilow, William S A

    2014-01-01

    The development of therapies for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) has been hindered by the lack of biomarkers for both identifying early disease and for monitoring the effectiveness of drugs. The identification of ALS biomarkers in presymptomatic individuals might also provide clues to the earliest biochemical correlates of the disease. Previous attempts to use plasma metabolites as biomarkers have led to contradictory results, presumably because of heterogeneity in both the underlying genetics and the disease stage in the clinical population. To eliminate these two sources of heterogeneity we have characterized plasma amino acids and other metabolites in the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse model for ALS. Presymptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice have significant differences in concentrations of several plasma metabolites compared to wild type animals, most notably in the concentrations of aspartate, cystine/cysteine, and phosphoethanolamine, and in changes indicative of methylation defects. There are significant changes in amino acid compositions between 50 and 70days of age in both the SOD1(G93A) and wild type mice, and several of the age-related and disease-related differences in metabolite concentration were also gender-specific. Many of the SOD1(G93A)-related differences could be altered by treatment of mice with methionine sulfoximine, which extends the lifespan of this mouse, inhibits glutamine synthetase, and modifies brain methylation reactions. These studies show that assaying plasma metabolites can effectively distinguish transgenic mice from wild type, suggesting that one or more plasma metabolites might be useful biomarkers for the disease in humans, especially if genetic and longitudinal analysis is used to reduce population heterogeneity. PMID:24129262

  8. GSD-1G and MPI-DING Reference Glasses for In Situ and Bulk Isotopic Determination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jochum, K.P.; Wilson, S.A.; Abouchami, W.; Amini, M.; Chmeleff, J.; Eisenhauer, A.; Hegner, E.; Iaccheri, L.M.; Kieffer, B.; Krause, J.; McDonough, W.F.; Mertz-Kraus, R.; Raczek, I.; Rudnick, R.L.; Scholz, Donna K.; Steinhoefel, G.; Stoll, B.; Stracke, A.; Tonarini, S.; Weis, D.; Weis, U.; Woodhead, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contains the results of an extensive isotopic study of United States Geological Survey GSD-1G and MPI-DING reference glasses. Thirteen different laboratories were involved using high-precision bulk (TIMS, MC-ICP-MS) and microanalytical (LA-MC-ICP-MS, LA-ICP-MS) techniques. Detailed studies were performed to demonstrate the large-scale and small-scale homogeneity of the reference glasses. Together with previously published isotopic data from ten other laboratories, preliminary reference and information values as well as their uncertainties at the 95% confidence level were determined for H, O, Li, B, Si, Ca, Sr, Nd, Hf, Pb, Th and U isotopes using the recommendations of the International Association of Geoanalysts for certification of reference materials. Our results indicate that GSD-1G and the MPI-DING glasses are suitable reference materials for microanalytical and bulk analytical purposes. Ce document contient les r??sultats d'une importante ??tude isotopique des verres de r??f??rence USGS GSD-1G et MPI-DING. Treize laboratoires diff??rents ont particip?? au travers de techniques analytiques de haute pr??cision travaillant soit sur ??chantillon total (TIMS, MC-ICP-MS) soit par microanalyse ??in situ?? (LA-MC-ICP-MS, LA-ICP-MS). ?? 2010 The Authors. Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research ?? 2010 International Association of Geoanalysts.

  9. Oil Production from Yarrowia lipolytica Po1g Using Rice Bran Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Tsigie, Yeshitila Asteraye; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Kasim, Novy S.; Diem, Quy-Do; Huynh, Lien-Huong; Ho, Quoc-Phong; Truong, Chi-Thanh; Ju, Yi-Hsu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce microbial oil from Yarrowia lipolytica Po1g grown in defatted rice bran hydrolysate. After removing oil from rice bran by Soxhlet extraction, the bran is subjected to acid hydrolysis with various sulfuric acid concentrations (1–4% v/v), reaction times (1–8 h), and reaction temperatures (60–120°C). The optimal conditions for maximum total sugar production from the hydrolysate were found to be 3% sulfuric acid at 90°C for 6 h. Glucose was the predominant sugar (43.20 ± 0.28 g/L) followed by xylose (4.93 ± 0.03 g/L) and arabinose (2.09 ± 0.01 g/L). The hydrolysate was subsequently detoxified by neutralization to reduce the amount of inhibitors such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural to increase its potential as a medium for culturing Y. lipolytica Po1g. Dry cell mass and lipid content of Y. lipolytica Po1g grown in detoxified defatted rice bran hydrolysate (DRBH) under optimum conditions were 10.75 g/L and 48.02%, respectively. PMID:22496604

  10. Th17 Cell Response in SOD1G93A Mice following Motor Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Allen; Yang, Tao; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A.; Gutierrez, Rafael; Stubbs, Evan B.; McGuire, Susan O.; Sanders, Virginia M.; Jones, Kathryn J.; Foecking, Eileen M.; Xin, Junping

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of ALS has been reported for veterans, varsity athletes, and professional football players. The mechanism underlying the increased risk in these populations has not been identified; however, it has been proposed that motor nerve injury may trigger immune responses which, in turn, can accelerate the progression of ALS. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal immune reactions and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, but the specific immune cells involved have not been clearly defined. To understand how nerve injury and immune responses may contribute to ALS development, we investigated responses of CD4+ T cell after facial motor nerve axotomy (FNA) at a presymptomatic stage in a transgenic mouse model of ALS (B6SJL SOD1G93A). SOD1G93A mice, compared with WT mice, displayed an increase in the basal activation state of CD4+ T cells and higher frequency of Th17 cells, which were further enhanced by FNA. In conclusion, SOD1G93A mice exhibit abnormal CD4+ T cell activation with increased levels of Th17 cells prior to the onset of neurological symptoms. Motor nerve injury exacerbates Th17 cell responses and may contribute to the development of ALS, especially in those who carry genetic susceptibility to this disease. PMID:27194826

  11. H, G1, G2 photometric phase function extended to low-accuracy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, A.; Shevchenko, V. G.; Wilkman, O.; Muinonen, K.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a constrained nonlinear least-squares algorithm to be used in estimating the parameters in the H, G1, G2 phase function. As the algorithm works directly in the magnitude space, it will surpass the possible bias problem that may be present in the existing H ,G1 ,G2 fit procedure when applied to low-accuracy observations with large magnitude variations. With constraints on the photometric phase-curve shape parameters G1 and G2, it guarantees a physically reasonable phase-curve estimate. With a new data set of 93 asteroids, we re-assess the two-parameter version of the H ,G1 ,G2 function. Finally, we introduce a one-parameter version of the phase function that can give a suggestion of the asteroids taxonomic group based only on its phase curve. A statistical model selection procedure is presented that can automatically select between the different versions of the photometric phase functions. An online tool that implements these algorithms is introduced.

  12. The cytoskeletal adapter protein 4.1G organizes the internodes in peripheral myelinated nerves

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovic, Aleksandra; Horresh, Ido; Golan, Neev; Spiegel, Ivo; Sabanay, Helena; Frechter, Shahar; Ohno, Shinichi; Terada, Nobuo; Möbius, Wiebke; Rosenbluth, Jack; Brose, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Myelinating Schwann cells regulate the localization of ion channels on the surface of the axons they ensheath. This function depends on adhesion complexes that are positioned at specific membrane domains along the myelin unit. Here we show that the precise localization of internodal proteins depends on the expression of the cytoskeletal adapter protein 4.1G in Schwann cells. Deletion of 4.1G in mice resulted in aberrant distribution of both glial adhesion molecules and axonal proteins that were present along the internodes. In wild-type nerves, juxtaparanodal proteins (i.e., Kv1 channels, Caspr2, and TAG-1) were concentrated throughout the internodes in a double strand that flanked paranodal junction components (i.e., Caspr, contactin, and NF155), and apposes the inner mesaxon of the myelin sheath. In contrast, in 4.1G−/− mice, these proteins “piled up” at the juxtaparanodal region or aggregated along the internodes. These findings suggest that protein 4.1G contributes to the organization of the internodal axolemma by targeting and/or maintaining glial transmembrane proteins along the axoglial interface. PMID:22291039

  13. Oil production from Yarrowia lipolytica Po1g using rice bran hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Tsigie, Yeshitila Asteraye; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Kasim, Novy S; Diem, Quy-Do; Huynh, Lien-Huong; Ho, Quoc-Phong; Truong, Chi-Thanh; Ju, Yi-Hsu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce microbial oil from Yarrowia lipolytica Po1g grown in defatted rice bran hydrolysate. After removing oil from rice bran by Soxhlet extraction, the bran is subjected to acid hydrolysis with various sulfuric acid concentrations (1-4% v/v), reaction times (1-8 h), and reaction temperatures (60-120°C). The optimal conditions for maximum total sugar production from the hydrolysate were found to be 3% sulfuric acid at 90°C for 6 h. Glucose was the predominant sugar (43.20 ± 0.28 g/L) followed by xylose (4.93 ± 0.03 g/L) and arabinose (2.09 ± 0.01 g/L). The hydrolysate was subsequently detoxified by neutralization to reduce the amount of inhibitors such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural to increase its potential as a medium for culturing Y. lipolytica Po1g. Dry cell mass and lipid content of Y. lipolytica Po1g grown in detoxified defatted rice bran hydrolysate (DRBH) under optimum conditions were 10.75 g/L and 48.02%, respectively. PMID:22496604

  14. Some Important Aspects of Physical Modelling of Liquefaction in 1-g Shaking Table

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Md. Jahangir; Towhata, Ikuo

    2008-07-08

    Physical modeling of liquefaction in 1-g shaking table and dynamic centrifuge test become very popular to simulate the ground behavior during earthquake motion. 1-g shaking table tests require scaled down model ground which can be prepared in three methods; water sedimentation, moist tamping and dry deposition method. Moist tamping and dry deposition method need saturation of model ground which is expensive and very difficult to achieve. Some model tests were performed in 1-g shaking table to see the influence of preparation method of model ground. Wet tamping and water sedimentation method of ground preparation were compared in these tests. Behavior of level ground and slope were also examined. Slope and level ground model test increased the understanding of excess pore pressure generation in both cases. Wet tamping method has a possibility of not being fully saturated. Pore pressure transducers should be fixed vertically so that it can not settle down during shaking but can move with ground. There was insignificant difference in acceleration and excess pore pressure responses between wet tamping and water sedimentation method in case of level ground. Spiky accelerations were prominent in slope prepared by water sedimentation method. Spiky accelerations were the result of lateral displacement induced dilatancy of soil.

  15. Th17 Cell Response in SOD1(G93A) Mice following Motor Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ni, Allen; Yang, Tao; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A; Gutierrez, Rafael; Stubbs, Evan B; McGuire, Susan O; Sanders, Virginia M; Jones, Kathryn J; Foecking, Eileen M; Xin, Junping

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of ALS has been reported for veterans, varsity athletes, and professional football players. The mechanism underlying the increased risk in these populations has not been identified; however, it has been proposed that motor nerve injury may trigger immune responses which, in turn, can accelerate the progression of ALS. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal immune reactions and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, but the specific immune cells involved have not been clearly defined. To understand how nerve injury and immune responses may contribute to ALS development, we investigated responses of CD4(+) T cell after facial motor nerve axotomy (FNA) at a presymptomatic stage in a transgenic mouse model of ALS (B6SJL SOD1(G93A)). SOD1(G93A) mice, compared with WT mice, displayed an increase in the basal activation state of CD4(+) T cells and higher frequency of Th17 cells, which were further enhanced by FNA. In conclusion, SOD1(G93A) mice exhibit abnormal CD4(+) T cell activation with increased levels of Th17 cells prior to the onset of neurological symptoms. Motor nerve injury exacerbates Th17 cell responses and may contribute to the development of ALS, especially in those who carry genetic susceptibility to this disease. PMID:27194826

  16. Liver Fibrosis Regression Measured by Transient Elastography in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-Coinfected Individuals on Long-Term HBV-Active Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Audsley, Jennifer; Robson, Christopher; Aitchison, Stacey; Matthews, Gail V.; Iser, David; Sasadeusz, Joe; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Advanced fibrosis occurs more commonly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfected individuals; therefore, fibrosis monitoring is important in this population. However, transient elastography (TE) data in HIV-HBV coinfection are lacking. We aimed to assess liver fibrosis using TE in a cross-sectional study of HIV-HBV coinfected individuals receiving combination HBV-active (lamivudine and/or tenofovir/tenofovir-emtricitabine) antiretroviral therapy, identify factors associated with advanced fibrosis, and examine change in fibrosis in those with >1 TE assessment. Methods. We assessed liver fibrosis in 70 HIV-HBV coinfected individuals on HBV-active combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Change in fibrosis over time was examined in a subset with more than 1 TE result (n = 49). Clinical and laboratory variables at the time of the first TE were collected, and associations with advanced fibrosis (≥F3, Metavir scoring system) and fibrosis regression (of least 1 stage) were examined. Results. The majority of the cohort (64%) had mild to moderate fibrosis at the time of the first TE, and we identified alanine transaminase, platelets, and detectable HIV ribonucleic acid as associated with advanced liver fibrosis. Alanine transaminase and platelets remained independently advanced in multivariate modeling. More than 28% of those with >1 TE subsequently showed liver fibrosis regression, and higher baseline HBV deoxyribonucleic acid was associated with regression. Prevalence of advanced fibrosis (≥F3) decreased 12.3% (32.7%–20.4%) over a median of 31 months. Conclusions. The observed fibrosis regression in this group supports the beneficial effects of cART on liver stiffness. It would be important to study a larger group of individuals with more advanced fibrosis to more definitively assess factors associated with liver fibrosis regression. PMID:27006960

  17. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  18. Lentiviral vector encoding ubiquitinated hepatitis B core antigen induces potent cellular immune responses and therapeutic immunity in HBV transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shenglan; Zhuo, Meng; Song, Linlin; Chen, Xiaohua; Yu, Yongsheng; Zang, Guoqing; Tang, Zhenghao

    2016-07-01

    Predominant T helper cell type 1 (Th1) immune responses accompanied by boosted HBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity are essential for the clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. Ubiquitin (Ub) serves as a signal for the target protein to be recognized and degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Ubiquitinated hepatitis B core antigen (Ub-HBcAg) has been proved to be efficiently degraded into the peptides, which can be presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I resulting in stimulating cell-mediated responses. In the present study, lentiviral vectors encoding Ub-HBcAg (LV-Ub-HBcAg) were designed and constructed as a therapeutic vaccine for immunotherapy. HBcAg-specific cellular immune responses and anti-viral effects induced by LV-Ub-HBcAg were evaluated in HBV transgenic mice. We demonstrated that immunization with LV-Ub-HBcAg promoted the secretion of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), generated remarkably high percentages of IFN-γ-secreting CD8(+) T cells and CD4(+) T cells, and enhanced HBcAg-specific CTL activity in HBV transgenic mice. More importantly, vaccination with LV-Ub-HBcAg could efficiently decreased the levels of serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), HBV DNA and the expression of HBsAg and HBcAg in liver tissues of HBV transgenic mice. In addition, LV-Ub-HBcAg could upregulate the expression of T cell-specific T-box transcription factor (T-bet) and downregulate the expression of GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3) in spleen T lymphocytes. The therapeutic vaccine LV-Ub-HBcAg could break immune tolerance, and induce potent HBcAg specific cellular immune responses and therapeutic effects in HBV transgenic mice. PMID:26874581

  19. Genetic Biomarkers for ALS Disease in Transgenic SOD1G93A Mice

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Ana C.; Manzano, Raquel; Atencia-Cibreiro, Gabriela; Oliván, Sara; Muñoz, María J.; Zaragoza, Pilar; Cordero-Vázquez, Pilar; Esteban-Pérez, Jesús; García-Redondo, Alberto; Osta, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms of both familial and sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are unknown, although growing evidence suggests that skeletal muscle tissue is a primary target of ALS toxicity. Skeletal muscle biopsies were performed on transgenic SOD1G93A mice, a mouse model of ALS, to determine genetic biomarkers of disease longevity. Mice were anesthetized with isoflurane, and three biopsy samples were obtained per animal at the three main stages of the disease. Transcriptional expression levels of seventeen genes, Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbxo32, Gsr, Impa1, Mef2c, Mt2, Myf5, Myod1, Myog, Nnt, Nogo A, Pax7, Rrad, Sln and Snx10, were tested in each muscle biopsy sample. Total RNA was extracted using TRIzol Reagent according to the manufacturer's protocol, and variations in gene expression were assayed by real-time PCR for all of the samples. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine the linear correlation between transcriptional expression levels throughout disease progression and longevity. Consistent with the results obtained from total skeletal muscle of transgenic SOD1G93A mice and 74-day-old denervated mice, five genes (Mef2c, Gsr, Col19a1, Calm1 and Snx10) could be considered potential genetic biomarkers of longevity in transgenic SOD1G93A mice. These results are important because they may lead to the exploration of previously unexamined tissues in the search for new disease biomarkers and even to the application of these findings in human studies. PMID:22412900

  20. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative AFC-1D, AFC-1G and AFC-1H Irradiation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Debra J. Utterbeck; Gray Chang

    2005-09-01

    The U. S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposition and the long-term radiotoxity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. The AFC-1 irradiation experiments on transmutation fuels are expected to provide irradiation performance data on non-fertile and low-fertile fuel forms specifically, irradiation growth and swelling, helium production, fission gas release, fission product and fuel constituent migration, fuel phase equilibria, and fuel-cladding chemical interaction. Contained in this report are the to-date physics evaluations performed on three of the AFC-1 experiments; AFC-1D, AFC-1G and AFC-1H. The AFC-1D irradiation experiment consists of metallic non-fertile fuel compositions with minor actinides for potential use in accelerator driven systems and AFC-1G and AFC-1H irradiation experiments are part of the fast neutron reactor fuel development effort. These experiments are high burnup analogs to previously irradiated experiments and are to be irradiated to = 20 atom % burnup. Results of the evaluations show that AFC-1D will remain in the ATR for approximately 100 additional effective full power days (EFPDs), and AFC-1G and AFC-1H for approximately 300 additional EFPDs in order to reach the desired programmatic burnup. The specific irradiation schedule for these tests will be determined based on future physics evaluations and all results will be documented in subsequent reports.

  1. An in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction: standardisation and comparison with the Cobas Amplicor HBV monitor and Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HBV tests for the quantification of hepatitis B virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Ana Paula de Torres; Levi, José Eduardo; Lemos, Marcilio Figueiredo; Calux, Samira Julien; Oba, Isabel Takano; Moreira, Regina Célia

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to standardise an in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction (rtPCR) to allow quantification of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in serum or plasma samples, and to compare this method with two commercial assays, the Cobas Amplicor HBV monitor and the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HBV test. Samples from 397 patients from the state of São Paulo were analysed by all three methods. Fifty-two samples were from patients who were human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus positive, but HBV negative. Genotypes were characterised, and the viral load was measure in each sample. The in-house rtPCR showed an excellent success rate compared with commercial tests; inter-assay and intra-assay coefficients correlated with commercial tests (r = 0.96 and r = 0.913, p < 0.001) and the in-house test showed no genotype-dependent differences in detection and quantification rates. The in-house assay tested in this study could be used for screening and quantifying HBV DNA in order to monitor patients during therapy. PMID:26872342

  2. Investigation of difficult component effects on FEM vibration prediction for the AH-1G helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, Robert V.

    1988-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations program, a series of ground vibration tests and NASTRAN finite element model correlations were conducted on the Bell AH-1G helicopter gunship to investigate the effects of difficult components on the vibration response of the airframe. Secondary structure and damping were found to have significant effects on the frequency response of the airframe above 15 Hz. The nonlinear effects of thrust stiffening and elastomeric mounts on the low-frequency pylon modes below the main rotor were also significant.

  3. Correlation of AH-1G airframe test data with a NASTRAN mathematical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronkhite, J. D.; Berry, V. L.

    1976-01-01

    Test data was provided for evaluating a mathematical vibration model of the Bell AH-1G helicopter airframe. The math model was developed and analyzed using the NASTRAN structural analysis computer program. Data from static and dynamic tests were used for comparison with the math model. Static tests of the fuselage and tailboom were conducted to verify the stiffness representation of the NASTRAN model. Dynamic test data were obtained from shake tests of the airframe and were used to evaluate the NASTRAN model for representing the low frequency (below 30 Hz) vibration response of the airframe.

  4. TP53 Mutations and HBX Status Analysis in Hepatocellular Carcinomas from Iran: Evidence for Lack of Association between HBV Genotype D and TP53 R249S Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Gouas, Doriane; Villar, Stephanie; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Hainaut, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    High incidence of HCC is mostly due to the combination of two major risk factors, chronic infection with hepatitis B (HBV) and/or C (HCV) viruses and exposure to the mycotoxin aflatoxin B1, which induces a particular mutation at codon 249 in TP53 (R249S). Eight genotypes of HBV are diversely found in high and low incidence areas. Regardless of documented strong associations between TP53 R249S mutation and HBV genotypes B, C, A or E, there is no report of such association for genotype D despite of the presence of aflatoxin in areas with high prevalence of HBV genotype D. In Iran, 3% of the population is chronically infected with HBV, predominantly genotype D. Twenty-one histologically confirmed HCC cases from Iran were analyzed for TP53 R249S and HBV double mutations 1762T/1764A, hallmarks of more pathogenic forms of HBV. We did not detect any of these mutations. In addition, we report the only case identified so far carrying both R249S mutation and chronic HBV genotype D, a patient from The Gambia in West Africa. This paper suggests that association between HBV genotype D and aflatoxin-induced TP53 mutation is uncommon, explaining the relatively lower incidence of HCC in areas where genotype D is highly prevalent. PMID:21869931

  5. Anti-virus prophylaxis withdrawal may be feasible in liver transplant recipients whose serum HBeAg and HBV DNA are negative.

    PubMed

    Geng, Lei; Lin, Bing-Yi; Shen, Tian; Guo, Hua; Ye, Yu-Fu; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2016-06-01

    Anti-virus prophylactic therapy may be not necessary for the prevention of hepatitis B virus (HBV) recurrence after HBV-related liver transplantation (LT). However, studies on completely stopping the hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) and nucleos(t)ide analogs (NUC) after LT are few. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the safety of anti-virus prophylaxis withdrawal in liver recipients whose serum hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and HBV DNA are negative. We analyzed 190 patients undergone LT for HBV-related liver disease from 2006 to 2012 and found that 10 patients completely stopped the HBIG and NUC due to poor compliance. These patients were liver biopsied and checked monthly with serum HBV markers, HBV DNA and liver function. Among the 10 patients, 9 did not show the signs of HBV recurrence after a mean follow-up of 51.6 months (range 20-73) after withdrawal of the HBIG and NUC. The average time from LT to the withdrawal of the anti-virus drug was 23.8 (13-42) months; one patient showed hepatitis B surface antigen-positive and detectable HBV DNA after stopping anti-virus drugs and this patient was successfully treated with entecavir. Our data suggested that complete withdrawal of anti-virus prophylaxis was safe and feasible for patients whose serum HBeAg and HBV DNA were negative at the time of LT. PMID:27298109

  6. The HBV spatially distributed flash flood forecasting model - The Slovenia case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsanis, I. K.; Grillakis, M. G.; Blöschl, G.; Pogačnik, N.

    2009-04-01

    The HBV distributed flash flood forecasting model which is in operational use in northern Austria is applied to a watershed in northwest Slovenia, a case study for the FP6 project HYDRATE. The selected watershed consists of 6 sub-basins with a total area of 646 Km2. Model setup and calibration was performed in this watershed and three long duration rainfall - runoff periods were simulated in order to examine the efficiency of the model. The selected periods included rainfall events that produced high outflows on the exit of the watershed, such as the September 2007 event that caused a flash flooding and severe damages to the towns of Zali Log and Zelezniki. The model uses 1km grid rainfall and temperature data of fifteen minute time intervals in order to simulate the rainfall - runoff process. Inverse distance weighting interpolation is used in order to generate the spatially distributed rainfall and temperature while the hydrological parameters are defined for each 1km grid cell that correspond to one hydrological response units (HRU - areas with analogous hydrogeological characteristics). The basic calibration of the HBV model is based on hydrological parameters of each HRU, parameters that control the rainfall - runoff process within the basin and non HRU parameters that control the river routing between the basins. The model performance is based on seven efficiency criteria that were selected as appropriate for long simulation periods, e.g. coefficient of determination R2 and Nash Sutcliffe efficiency E. The HBV model produced satisfactory results for the three rainfall periods and could be used as an operational model in Slovenia as well.

  7. The influence of HBV model calibration on flood predictions for future climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuch, Marzena; Romanowicz, Renata

    2014-05-01

    The temporal variability of HBV rainfall-runoff model parameters was tested to address the influence of climate characteristics on the values of model optimal parameters. HBV is a conceptual model with a physically-based structure that takes into account soil moisture, snow-melt and dynamic runoff components. The model parameters were optimized by the DEGL method (Differential Evolution with Global and Local neighbours) for a set of catchments located in Poland. The methodology consisted of the calibration and cross-validation of the HBV models on a series of five-year periods within a moving window. The optimal parameter values show large temporal variability and dependence on climatic conditions described by the mean and standard deviation of precipitation, air temperature and PET. Derived regressions models between parameters and climatic indices were statistically significant at the 0.05 level. The set of model optimal values was applied to simulate future flows in a changed climate. We used the precipitation and temperature series from 6 RCM/GCM models for 2071-2100 following the A1B climate change scenario. The climatic variables were obtained from the KLIMADA project. The resulting flow series for the future climate scenario were used to derive flow indices, including the flood quantiles. Results indicate a large influence of climatic variability on flow indices. This work was partly supported by the project "Stochastic flood forecasting system (The River Vistula reach from Zawichost to Warsaw)" carried out by the Institute of Geophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences by order of the National Science Centre (contract No. 2011/01/B/ST10/06866). The rainfall and flow data were provided by the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (IMGW), Poland.

  8. Involvement of sensory innervation in the skin of SOD1(G93A) ALS mice.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Miguel A; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Vilches, Jorge J; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Sensory alterations have been described in both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and mouse models. While involvement of intraepidermal and subepidermal axons has been shown in skin biopsies of ALS patients, it is unclear if the SOD1(G93A) mouse presents similar alterations. We analyzed the epidermal and dermal innervation, based on PGP9.5 immunostaining, of SOD1(G93A) mice at different stages. The results showed a marked reduction of intraepidermal nerve fibers, Meissner's corpuscles, and subepidermal nerve density already at 4 weeks. This loss of innervation progressed over time. Dermal axonal density decreased at a later stage of the disease. There was a gradient of axonal loss, with a more severe decline in the epidermis compared with deeper structures, indicating a distal axonal neuropathy as the mechanism of degeneration. These findings suggest that the analysis of the cutaneous sensory innervation may be an accessible and useful tool to assess the neurodegeneration process in motoneuron diseases. PMID:26880731

  9. Structural Integrity Recording System (SIR) for U.S. Army AH-1G Helicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, T. G.; Johnson, R. B.; Tyler, M. C.

    1981-03-01

    A Structural Integrity Recording System (SIRS) was designed and developed to track the fatigue damage accumulation on 10 critical helicopter components for the subsequent timely replacement of such components for safer and more economical helicopter operation. SIRS comprises three discrete but interrelated subsystems: an airborne microprocessor-based recorder, a portable flight-line data retrieval unit, and a software system. The validation of SIRS, initially configured for the AH-1G helicopter, consisted of two phases. Phase I (Development Test and Evaluation - DT E) covered the design, fabrication, laboratory qualification testing, reliability analysis, and flight-testing of the prototype SIRS recorder. Phase II (Initial Operational Test and Evaluation - IOT E) covered the evaluation of the entire system operation and the resultant data acquired during a 3-month recording period with five AH-1G's, each equipped with a SIRS recorder. As the documentation of both DT E and IOT E, this report describes the characteristics and functions of the entire system and details the successful performance of the SIRS recorder in the laboratory qualification testing and the flight environment. The SIRS recorder performed as designed, operated reliably, and yielded valid data.

  10. Motoneuron differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells from SOD1G93A mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiao-Li; Ye, Cheng-Hui; Liu, Qiang; Wan, Jian-bo; Zhen, Jun; Xiang, Andy Peng; Li, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Yitao; Su, Huangxing; Lu, Xi-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder mainly affecting motor neurons. Mutations in superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) account for about 20% of familial ALS patients. A robust supply of motoneurons carrying the mutated gene would help understand the causes of motoneuron death and develop new therapeutics for the disease. Here, we established induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines from SOD1G93A mice and compared their potency in motoneuron generation with normal iPS cells and mouse embryonic stem cells (E14). Our results showed that iPS cells derived from SOD1G93A mice possessed the similar potency in neuronal differentiation to normal iPS cells and E14 cells and can be efficiently driven to motoneuron-like phenotype. These cells exhibited typical neuronal morphology, expressed key motoneuron markers, including ChAT and HB9, and generated repetitive trains of action potentials. Furthermore, these neurons highly expressed human SOD-1 and exhibited shorter neurites compared to controls. The present study provides evidence that ALS-iPS cells can be used as disease models in high-throughput screening and mechanistic studies due to their ability to efficiently differentiate into specific neuronal subtypes. PMID:23724084

  11. η collective mode as A1 g Raman resonance in cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel, X.; Kloss, T.; Pépin, C.; Benhabib, S.; Gallais, Y.; Sacuto, A.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the possible existence of a spin singlet excitation with charge ±2 (η mode) originating the A1 g Raman resonance in cuprate superconductors. This η mode relates the d -wave superconducting singlet pairing channel to a d -wave charge channel. We show that the η boson forms a particle-particle bound state below the 2 Δ threshold of the particle-hole continuum where Δ is the maximum d -wave gap. Within a generalized random phase approximation and Bethe-Salpeter approximation study, we find that this mode has energies similar to the resonance observed with inelastic neutron scattering below the superconducting (SC) coherent peak at 2 Δ in various SC cuprate compounds. We show that it is a very good candidate for the resonance observed in Raman scattering below the 2 Δ peak in the A1 g symmetry. Since the η mode sits in the S =0 channel, it may be observable via Raman, x-ray, or electron energy loss spectroscopy probes.

  12. Re-Adaptation to 1-G of Pregnant Rats Following Exposure to Spaceflight or Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. E.; Ronca, A. E.; Alberts, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Late-pregnant rat dams were flown on a 9-day Space Shuttle mission or exposed to 1.5, 1.75 or 2-g centrifugation and compared with 1 .O-g vivarium controls. Exposure to altered gravity began on the 11th day and recovery occurred on the 20th day of the dams' 22-day pregnancy. In the 1 st experiment, comparisons were made between Flight (FLT), Synchronous (SYN; identically-housed) and Vivarium (VIV) controls. In the 2nd experiment, comparisons were made between dams centrifuged at 2-G, 1.75-G, 1.5-G, Rotational controls (1.08-G) or Stationary controls (1 G). Within three hours of recovery from either spaceflight or centrifugation, the dams' locomotor behavior was videotaped for 2 min. FLT dams showed dramatically reduced movement relative to both SYN and VIV control conditions, with significantly greater amounts of locomotor activity observed in SYN as compared to VIV dams. Significantly greater locomotor activity was observed in SYN as compared to VIV controls. In the second experiment, no differences were observed between dams exposed either 1, 1.5, 1.75, or 2-G. In both studies, the dams showed similar patterns of hindlimb rearing. Together, these findings provide quantitative evidence for decreased locomotor activity during re-adaptation to 1-g following spaceflight, but not centrifugation.

  13. Diagnostic and therapeutic progress of multi-drug resistance with anti-HBV nucleos(t)ide analogues

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuo-Lun; Cui, Yu-Jun; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Teng, Da-Hong; Zheng, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Nucleos(t)ide analogues (NA) are a breakthrough in the treatment and management of chronic hepatitis B. NA could suppress the replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and control the progression of the disease. However, drug resistance caused by their long-term use becomes a practical problem, which influences the long-term outcomes in patients. Liver transplantation is the only choice for patients with HBV-related end-stage liver disease. But, the recurrence of HBV after transplantation often caused by the development of drug resistance leads to unfavorable outcomes for the recipients. Recently, the multi-drug resistance (MDR) has become a common issue raised due to the development and clinical application of a variety of NA. This may complicate the antiviral therapy and bring poorly prognostic outcomes. Although clinical evidence has suggested that combination therapy with different NA could effectively reduce the viral load in patients with MDR, the advent of new antiviral agents with high potency and high genetic barrier to resistance brings hope to antiviral therapy. The future of HBV researches relies on how to prevent the MDR occurrence and develop reasonable and effective treatment strategies. This review focuses on the diagnostic and therapeutic progress in MDR caused by the anti-HBV NA and describes some new research progress in this field. PMID:23326119

  14. Recombinant HBV vaccine enhances the rate of sustained virological response when early initiated after anti-HCV combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanafy, Amr Shaaban; Farag, Alaa Ahmad; Hassanin, Hassan Mahmoud; Hassaneen, Ahmad Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    The overall SVR rate for chronic hepatitis C genotype 4 using the Standard of care is 54.3%. HBV infection can be prevented by the administration of effective and safe vaccine. Evaluation of the vaccination-induced anti-HBs response rates in a cohort of HCV Egyptian patients after being exposed to antiviral combination therapy and the magnitude of its effect on the rate of SVR through its putative role in induction of crossed immunity. (A) 500 HCV patients who had completed the course of antiviral therapy and achieved ETR were retrospectively analyzed and received 20 μg of recombinant DNA vaccine for hepatitis B at time intervals (0, 1, and 4 months). The first dose of the vaccine was initiated one month post treatment. (B) Laboratory analysis: Included routine preliminary investigations to anti viral therapy and specific investigations as determination of anti-HBs antibodies 2 months following the third dose of vaccine. 433 patients showed protective response (86.6%), 67 patients were non-responders (13.4%) (P = 0.003). Adding HBV vaccine 1 month post-treatment increased SVR (400 patients, 80%) (χ(2)  = 40.3, P = 0.000). Diabetes affect response to HBV vaccine (P = 0.0001). Adding HBV vaccine to the post treatment care of patients with HCV after termination of antiviral therapy gain two benefits; protection from HBV and significant increase in rates of SVR. PMID:26147509

  15. Immunization with adenovirus LIGHT-engineered dendritic cells induces potent T cell responses and therapeutic immunity in HBV transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenzheng; Chen, Ran; Kong, Xiaobo; Long, Fengying; Shi, Yaru

    2014-07-31

    LIGHT, a TNF superfamily member (TNFSF14), is a type II transmembrane protein expressed on activated T cells and immature dendritic cells (DCs). However, the expression of LIGHT on mature DCs is down-regulated. Recent studies demonstrated that LIGHT provides potent costimulatory activity for T cells, enhancing proliferation and the production of Th1 cytokines independently of the B7-CD28 pathway. Here, we evaluated the effectiveness of peptide-pulsed DC-mediated antiviral immunity in HBV transgenic mice and the immunoadjuvant effect of LIGHT. The bone marrow-derived DCs were modified in vitro with an adenovirus (Ad) vector expressing mouse LIGHT (Ad-LIGHT), the expression of costimulatory molecules was up-regulated and the secretion of cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ increased. LIGHT-modified DCs enhanced allostimulation for T cells in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). HBV peptide-pulsed DCs elicited HBV specific CD8+ T cell response and reduced the level of HBsAg and HBV DNA in sera of HBV transgenic mice. Importantly, LIGHT-modified DCs could induce stronger antiviral immunity. These results support the concept that genetic modification of DCs with a recombinant LIGHT adenovirus vector may be a useful strategy for antiviral immunotherapy. PMID:24951859

  16. IL-17 and IL-22 genetic polymorphisms in HBV vaccine non- and low-responders among healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    Borzooy, Zohreh; Streinu-Cercel, Adrian; Mirshafiey, Abbass; Khamseh, Azam; Mahmoudie, Masoud Karkhaneh; Navabi, Shadi Sadat; Nosrati, Marjan; Najafi, Zahra; Hosseini, Mostafa; Jazayeri, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthcare workers constitute a population at high risk for HBV infection. Efficient vaccination options are available; however, the individual response to HBV vaccination may vary widely between subjects, potentially due to cytokine profiles and genetic variations. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between IL-17 and IL-22 gene polymorphisms versus non- and low-responsiveness to HBV vaccination in healthcare workers. Methods We selected the following IL-17 and IL-22 polymorphisms: rs4711998 (A/G) from IL-17 and rs2227501 (A/T), rs2227503 (A/G), rs1026786 (A/G) from IL-22 sequences genes. These were determined by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Results The IL-17 rs4711998 GG genotype had a significantly lower frequency in non-responders compared to low-responders (p=0.025). However, we did not identify a relationship between IL-22 rs1026780, rs2227501 and rs2227503 genotypes and the anti-HBs response following HBV vaccination. Conclusion These data suggest that genetic variation in rs4711998 polymorphisms in the IL-17 cytokine may influence vaccine-induced immune responses to HBV vaccine in healthcare workers. PMID:27019828

  17. [Whole-sequence Analyses for 12 HBV C/D Recombinants from a Population in Tibet (China)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiezhu; Shen, Liping; Yin, Wenjiao; Wang, Feng; Wang, Fuzhen; Zhang, Guomin; Zheng, Hui; Dunzhu, Duoji; Bi, Shengli; Cui, Fuqiang

    2016-03-01

    We wished to undertake molecular genetic typing and evaluate recombinants of the hepatitis-B virus (HBV) in Tibet (China). Multistage random sampling was used to collect HBsAg-positive samples. Nested polymerase chain reactions were used to amplify the whole sequence of the HBV. DNAstar, MEGA6 and SimPlot were used to assemble sequences, create phylogenetic trees, and undertake recombination analyses. Twelve whole sequences of the HBV of a Tibetan population were collected using these methods. Results showed that all 12 strains were C/D recombinants. Nine of the recombinations were at nt750, and the other three at nt1526. Therefore, the 12 strains could be divided into two types of recombinants: C/Da and C/Db. Analyses of the sequence of the whole genome revealed that the 12 strains belonged to genotype C, and that the nucleotide distance was > 4% between the 12 strains and sub-genotypes C1 to C15 in Genbank. The most likely sub-genotype was C1. Individuals with C/Da were from central and northern Tibet (e.g., Lasa, Linzhi, Ali) and those with C/Db recombinants were from Shannan in southern Tibet. These data suggest that the two types of recombinants had a good distribution in Tibet. Also, they can provide important information for studies on HBV recombination, gene features, virus evolution, as well as the control and prevention of HBV infection in Tibet. PMID:27396158

  18. Two classifiers based on serum peptide pattern for prediction of HBV-induced liver cirrhosis using MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; He, Kun; Cheng, Ming; Si, Hai-Yan; Zhang, He-Lin; Song, Wei; Li, Ai-Ling; Hu, Cheng-Jin; Wang, Na

    2013-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) is associated with the majority of cases of liver cirrhosis (LC) in China. Although liver biopsy is the reference method for evaluation of cirrhosis, it is an invasive procedure with inherent risk. The aim of this study is to discover novel noninvasive specific serum biomarkers for the diagnosis of HBV-induced LC. We performed bead fractionation/MALDI-TOF MS analysis on sera from patients with LC. Thirteen feature peaks which had optimal discriminatory performance were obtained by using support-vector-machine-(SVM-) based strategy. Based on the previous results, five supervised machine learning methods were employed to construct classifiers that discriminated proteomic spectra of patients with HBV-induced LC from those of controls. Here, we describe two novel methods for prediction of HBV-induced LC, termed LC-NB and LC-MLP, respectively. We obtained a sensitivity of 90.9%, a specificity of 94.9%, and overall accuracy of 93.8% on an independent test set. Comparisons with the existing methods showed that LC-NB and LC-MLP held better accuracy. Our study suggests that potential serum biomarkers can be determined for discriminating LC and non-LC cohorts by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. These two classifiers could be used for clinical practice in HBV-induced LC assessment. PMID:23509784

  19. CCND1 G870A polymorphism and colorectal cancer risk: An updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    XU, XIAO-MING; NI, XIAO-BING; YANG, GONG-LI; LUO, ZHI-GUO; NIU, YU-MING; SHEN, MING

    2016-01-01

    Molecular epidemiological studies have revealed a closer association between cyclin D1 (CCND1) polymorphism and the risk of colorectal cancer; however, the results were inconsistent. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to investigate the association between CCND1 G870A polymorphism and colorectal cancer risk. Online electronic databases (PubMed and Embase) were searched. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess the association between CCND1 G870A polymorphism and the risk of colorectal cancer. In addition, heterogeneity, publication bias and sensitivity analysis were performed to guarantee the statistical power. In total, 23 published case-control studies with 6,320 patients and 8,252 controls were selected. Significantly increased risks were observed in four genetic models (A vs. G: OR=1.09, 95% CI=1.00–1.18, I2=54.3%; GA vs. GG: OR=1.13, 95% CI=1.04–1.24, I2=18.2%; AA vs. GG, OR=1.17: 95% CI=1.00–1.38, I2=52.5%; GA+AA vs. GG: OR=1.14, 95% CI=1.05–1.24, I2=33.8%). Similarly, significant associations were also identified in the stratified analysis in the cancer subtype of sporadic colorectal cancer (GA vs. GG: OR=1.21, 95% CI=1.04–1.42, I2=24.1%; GA+AA vs. GG: OR=1.18, 95% CI=1.02–1.37, I2=35.0%), Caucasian population (GA vs. GG, OR=1.14, 95% CI=1.02–1.28, I2=19.8%; GA+AA vs. GG, OR=1.14, 95% CI=1.02–1.27, I2=37.5%) and other subgroups of control design and genotyping type. The present updated meta-analysis suggested that CCND1 G870A may present an increased risk for developing colorectal cancer, particularly in sporadic colorectal cancer and a Caucasian population. PMID:27284448

  20. Effects of spaceflight on rhesus quadrupedal locomotion after return to 1G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Recktenwald, M. R.; Hodgson, J. A.; Roy, R. R.; Riazanski, S.; McCall, G. E.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Washburn, D. A.; Fanton, J. W.; Edgerton, V. R.; Rumbaugh, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Effects of spaceflight on Rhesus quadrupedal locomotion after return to 1G. Locomotor performance, activation patterns of the soleus (Sol), medial gastrocnemius (MG), vastus lateralis (VL), and tibialis anterior (TA) and MG tendon force during quadrupedal stepping were studied in adult Rhesus before and after 14 days of either spaceflight (n = 2) or flight simulation at 1G (n = 3). Flight simulation involved duplication of the spaceflight conditions and experimental protocol in a 1G environment. Postflight, but not postsimulation, electromyographic (EMG) recordings revealed clonus-like activity in all muscles. Compared with preflight, the cycle period and burst durations of the primary extensors (Sol, MG, and VL) tended to decrease postflight. These decreases were associated with shorter steps. The flexor (TA) EMG burst duration postflight was similar to preflight, whereas the burst amplitude was elevated. Consequently, the Sol:TA and MG:TA EMG amplitude ratios were lower following flight, reflecting a "flexor bias." Together, these alterations in mean EMG amplitudes reflect differential adaptations in motor-unit recruitment patterns of flexors and extensors as well as fast and slow motor pools. Shorter cycle period and burst durations persisted throughout the 20-day postflight testing period, whereas mean EMG returned to preflight levels by 17 days postflight. Compared with presimulation, the simulation group showed slight increases in the cycle period and burst durations of all muscles. Mean EMG amplitude decreased in the Sol, increased in the MG and VL, and was unchanged in the TA. Thus adaptations observed postsimulation were different from those observed postflight, indicating that there was a response unique to the microgravity environment, i.e., the modulations in the nervous system controlling locomotion cannot merely be attributed to restriction of movement but appear to be the result of changes in the interpretation of load-related proprioceptive feedback

  1. A Rare HBV Subgenotype D4 with Unique Genomic Signatures Identified in North-Eastern India –An Emerging Clinical Challenge?

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Priyanka; Mondal, Rajiv Kumar; Nandi, Madhuparna; Ghosh, Sumantra; Khatun, Mousumi; Chakraborty, Nabendu; Bhattacharya, Swatilekha; RoyChoudhury, Arindam; Banerjee, Soma; Santra, Amal; Sil, Samir; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Bhaumik, Pradip; Datta, Simanti

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims HBV has been classified into ten genotypes (A–J) and multiple subgenotypes, some of which strongly influence disease outcome and their distribution also correlate with human migration. HBV infection is highly prevalent in India and its diverse population provides an excellent opportunity to study the distinctiveness of HBV, its evolution and disease biology in variegated ethnic groups. The North-East India, having international frontiers on three sides, is one of the most ethnically and linguistically diverse region of the country. Given the paucity of information on molecular epidemiology of HBV in this region, the study aimed to carry out an in-depth genetic characterization of HBV prevailing in North-East state of Tripura. Methods From sera of chronically HBV infected patients biochemical/serological tests, HBV DNA quantification, PCR-amplification, sequencing of PreS/S or full-length HBV genomes were done. HBV genotype/subgenotype determination and sequence variability were assessed by MEGA5-software. The evolutionary divergence times of different HBV subgenotypes were estimated by DNAMLK/PHYLIP program while jpHMM method was used to detect any recombination event in HBV genomes. Results HBV genotypes D (89.5%), C (6.6%) and A (3.9%) were detected among chronic carriers. While all HBV/A and HBV/C isolates belonged to subgenotype-A1 and C1 respectively, five subgenotypes of HBV/D (D1–D5) were identified including the first detection of rare D4. These non-recombinant Indian D4 (IndD4) formed a distinct phylogenetic clade, had 2.7% nucleotide divergence and recent evolutionary radiation than other global D4. Ten unique amino acids and 9 novel nucleotide substitutions were identified as IndD4 signatures. All IndD4 carried T120 and R129 in ORF-S that may cause immune/vaccine/diagnostic escape and N128 in ORF-P, implicated as compensatory Lamivudine resistance mutation. Conclusions IndD4 has potential to undermine vaccination programs or anti

  2. RNA-Seq Based Transcriptome Analysis of Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Replicon Transfected Huh-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Deepshi; Joshi, Prashant; Durgapal, Hemlata; Panda, Subrat Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is as varied as they appear similar; while HBV causes an acute and/or chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, HEV mostly causes an acute self-limiting disease. In both infections, host responses are crucial in disease establishment and/or virus clearance. In the wake of worsening prognosis described during HEV super-infection over chronic HBV hepatitis, we investigated the host responses by studying alterations in gene expression in liver cells (Huh-7 cell line) by transfection with HEV replicon only (HEV-only), HBV replicon only (HBV-only) and both HBV and HEV replicons (HBV+HEV). Virus replication was validated by strand-specific real-time RT-PCR for HEV and HBsAg ELISA of the culture supernatants for HBV. Indirect immunofluorescence for the respective viral proteins confirmed infection. Transcription profiling was carried out by RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis of the poly-A enriched RNA from the transfected cells. Averages of 600 million bases within 5.6 million reads were sequenced in each sample and ∼15,800 genes were mapped with at least one or more reads. A total of 461 genes in HBV+HEV, 408 in HBV-only and 306 in HEV-only groups were differentially expressed as compared to mock transfection control by two folds (p<0.05) or more. Majority of the significant genes with altered expression clustered into immune-associated, signal transduction, and metabolic process categories. Differential gene expression of functionally important genes in these categories was also validated by real-time RT-PCR based relative gene-expression analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of in vitro replicon transfected RNA-Seq based transcriptome analysis to understand the host responses against HEV and HBV. PMID:24505321

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Five New F-bearing Basalt Reference Materials (Fba Glasses): Quantifying the Fluorine Content of the Basaltic Glass Standards BCR-2G, BHVO-2G. GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G, GSE-1G, ML3B-G, KL2-G, and ALV-519-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggino, S. N.; Hervig, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    -, detection of low-energy negative secondary ions (-5 kV), and a mass resolution that resolved 18OH. Homogeneity of the Fba glasses was established by both SIMS and EPMA. Glasses labeled Fba-2, -3. -4, and -5 pass statistical tests for homogeneity and may be used as EPMA or SIMS standards. SIMS calibration curves were constructed using the Fba glasses and other F standards of varying silica, iron, and sodium content, including Bt-3, F-phlog, NIST 610, KE-12, and UTR-2. The calibration curves revealed large matrix effects for the analysis of F by SIMS (~ 50%) between an Fba:Bt-3 curve and a high-silica glass:F-phlog curve. The Fba:Bt-3 calibration curve was used to determine the F contents (ppm ± 1 σ) of the following nine commonly used basaltic glass standards: BCR-2G (321 ± 15), BHVO-2G (297 ± 14), GSA-1G (7 ± 0.1), GSC-1G (9 ± 0.5), GSD-1G (18 ± 1), GSE-1G (154 ± 7), ML3B-G (47 ± 2), KL2-G (82 ± 4), ALV-519-4 (76 ± 4).

  4. Correlation of AH-1G airframe flight vibration data with a coupled rotor-fuselage analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangha, K.; Shamie, J.

    1990-01-01

    The formulation and features of the Rotor-Airframe Comprehensive Analysis Program (RACAP) is described. The analysis employs a frequency domain, transfer matrix approach for the blade structural model, a time domain wake or momentum theory aerodynamic model, and impedance matching for rotor-fuselage coupling. The analysis is applied to the AH-1G helicopter, and a correlation study is conducted on fuselage vibration predictions. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the state-of-the-art in helicopter fuselage vibration prediction technology. The fuselage vibration predicted using RACAP are fairly good in the vertical direction and somewhat deficient in the lateral/longitudinal directions. Some of these deficiencies are traced to the fuselage finite element model.

  5. Seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis in blood donors in Southern Haryana.

    PubMed

    Arora, Dimple; Arora, Bharti; Khetarpal, Anshul

    2010-01-01

    Blood transfusion is an important mode of transmission of infections to recipients. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of transfusion-transmissible infections among blood donors. For this, a 3.5-year retrospective study, from October 2002 to April 2006 was conducted at the blood transfusion centre of Maharaja Agrasen Medical College, Agroha (Hisar) Haryana. Donors were screened for seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis. A total of 5849 donors were tested, out of which 4010 (68.6%) were replacement donors and 1839 (31.4%) were voluntary donors. The seroprevalence of HIV was 0.3% in the donors. No voluntary donor was found to be positive for HIV. The low sero-positivity among donors is attributed to pre-donation counseling in donor selection. The seroprevalence of HBV, HCV and syphilis was 1.7%, 1.0% and 0.9% respectively in total donors. The seroprevalence of hepatitis and syphilis was more in replacement donors as compared to voluntary donors. PMID:20551540

  6. A new lignan with anti-HBV activity from the roots of Bombax ceiba.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo Kai; Lin, Bin Bin; Rao, Rao; Zhu, Kan; Qin, Xiao Ying; Xie, Guo Yong; Qin, Min Jian

    2013-08-01

    A new lignan bombasinol A (1), together with three known compounds was obtained from the ethanol (95%) extract of roots of Bombax ceiba L. through its being subjected to silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 chromatography. Their structures were elucidated as 4-(4-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)hexahydrofuro[3,4-c]furan-1-yl)-2-methoxy-phenol (1), 5,6-dihydroxymatairesinol (2), (+)-pinoresinol (3) and matairesinol (4) on the basis of spectroscopic methods, including 1-D and 2-D NMR (HSQC and HMBC) experiments and by comparison of the data with those previously reported literatures. All these compounds were the first reported from Bombacaceae. The anti-Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) activity of all compounds isolated from B. ceiba in the research was evaluated. From the results of the HBV assay, these tested compounds showed inhibitory activity against HepG2 2.2.15 cell lines. Compounds 1-4 showed relative differences in their abilities to inhibit HBsAg secretion, with IC50 values of 118.3, 123.7, 118.9 and 218.2 mM, respectively. PMID:23140388

  7. High occurrence of HBV among STD clinic attenders in Bombay, India.

    PubMed

    Kura, M M; Hira, S; Kohli, M; Dalal, P J; Ramnani, V K; Jagtap, M R

    1998-04-01

    The pattern of sexually transmitted disease (STD) is the basis for designing surveillance of specific STD, their trends and syndromic management protocols. Two hundred and fifteen consecutive first-time STD clinic attenders at a teaching hospital in Bombay were recruited for the study in October 1995. Thorough clinical examination and the following investigations were done: wet mount, Gram stain, Giemsa stain, modified Thayer-Martin (MTM) medium culture, Fontana stain, Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL), Treponema pallidium haemagglutination test (TPHA), HBsAg and HIV. Ulcerative STD constituted 73.5% of total STD while 15.8% were discharges and 10.2% were genital growths. Ulcers in decreasing order of frequency were chancroid (51.9%), genital herpes (29.1%) and syphilis (14.5). 76.5% of genital discharges were due to gonococcal infection. The high rate of ulcerative STD is possibly an important co-factor for the high HIV prevalence of 31.2% in Bombay. Of 182 patients tested for HBV, 16 (8.8%) were reactive for HBsAg, revealing a high prevalence among STD attenders. A high co-relation of HBsAg positive with either HIV or VDRL requires urgent attention for HBV intervention strategies in this population. PMID:9598752

  8. An upconversion fluorescent resonant energy transfer biosensor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Lu, Feng; Wu, Xing-Cai; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-11-21

    A novel fluorescent resonant energy transfer (FRET) biosensor was fabricated for the detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA using poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) modified upconversion nanoparticles (NH2-UCNPs) as energy donor and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) as acceptor. The PEI modified upconversion nanoparticles were prepared directly with a simple one-pot hydrothermal method, which provides high quality amino-group functionalized UCNPs with uniform morphology and strong upconversion luminescence. Two single-stranded DNA strands, which were partially complementary to each other, were then conjugated with NH2-UCNPs and Au NPs. When DNA conjugated NH2-UCNPs and Au NPs are mixed together, the hybridization between complementary DNA sequences on UCNPs and Au NPs will lead to the quenching of the upconversion luminescence due to the FRET process. Meanwhile, upon the addition of target DNA, Au NPs will leave the surface of the UCNPs and the upconversion luminescence can be restored because of the formation of the more stable double-stranded DNA on the UCNPs. The sensor we fabricated here for target DNA detection shows good sensitivity and high selectivity, which has the potential for clinical applications in the analysis of HBV and other DNA sequences. PMID:26421323

  9. Impacts of ABCB1 (G1199A) polymorphism on resistance, uptake, and efflux to steroid drugs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Rui; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Dan-Yun

    2016-10-01

    1. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates, including steroid drugs, involve in the inter-individual differences in resistant phenotype. This study was performed to evaluate whether G1199A polymorphism in ABCB1 gene can alter the sensitivity, accumulation, and transepithelial efflux to steroids in LLC-PK1 cells. 2. The stable recombinant LLC-PK1 cell lines transfected with ABCB1 1199G and ABCB1 1199A were used to assess the sensitivity, accumulation, and transepithelial permeability to steroids. 3. The cells transfected with 1199A allele displayed stronger resistance to aldosterone, dexamethasone, and cortisol (2.5-, 2.0-, and 1.6-fold, respectively) than cells overexpressing 1199G allele, while the two types of recombinant cells showed a similar resistance to corticosterone. The accumulation of aldosterone, dexamethasone, and cortisol in recombinant 1199A cells were significantly decreased when compared to 1199G cells (2.9-, 4.4-, and 3.9-fold, respectively). The net efflux ratios of P-gp-mediated aldosterone, dexamethasone, and cortisol in cells expressing 1199A allele were apparently greater than cells transfected with 1199G allele (3.3-, 3.5-, and 4.0-fold, respectively). 4. The impacts of ABCB1 (G1199A) single nucleotide polymorphism on the efflux of P-gp substrates presented as drug-specific. Overall, the transport ability of P-gp-dependent steroid drugs in recombinant model overexpressing variant 1199A allele is stronger in comparison to cells overexpressing wild-type 1199G allele. Therefore, the ABCB1 (G1199A) polymorphism may affect effective steroids concentration in target cells by regulating the drug transport and distribution. PMID:26822676

  10. Restoration of gravitropic sensitivity in starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis by hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzelle, K. J.; Kiss, J. Z.

    2001-01-01

    Despite the extensive study of plant gravitropism, there have been few experiments which have utilized hypergravity as a tool to investigate gravisensitivity in flowering plants. Previous studies have shown that starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis are less sensitive to gravity compared to the wild-type (WT). In this report, the question addressed was whether hypergravity could restore the sensitivity of starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis. The strains examined include a WT, a starchless mutant and a reduced-starch mutant. Vertical orientation studies with dark-grown seedlings indicate that increased centrifugal acceleration improves orientation relative to the acceleration vector for all strains, even the WT. For starchless roots, growth of seedlings under constant 5 g acceleration was required to restore orientation to the level of the WT at 1 g. In contrast, approximately 10 g was required to restore the orientation of the starchless mutant hypocotyls to a WT level at 1 g. Examination of plastid position in root cap columella cells of the starchless mutant revealed that the restoration of gravitropic sensitivity was correlated with the sedimentation of plastids toward the distal cell wall. Even in WT plants, hypergravity caused greater sedimentation of plastids and improved gravitropic capability. Collectively, these experiments support the hypothesis of a statolith-based system of gravity perception in plants. As far as is known, this is the first report to use hypergravity to study the mechanisms of gravitropism in Arabidopsis.

  11. Nonchemotactic Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John B.; Adler, Julius; Dahl, Margaret M.

    1967-01-01

    We have isolated 40 mutants of Escherichia coli which are nonchemotactic as judged by their failure to swarm on semisolid tryptone plates or to make bands in capillary tubes containing tryptone broth. All the mutants have normal flagella, a fact shown by their shape and reaction with antiflagella serum. All are fully motile under the microscope and all are sensitive to the phage chi. Unlike its parent, one of the mutants, studied in greater detail, failed to show chemotaxis toward oxygen, glucose, serine, threonine, or aspartic acid. The failure to exhibit chemotaxis does not result from a failure to use the chemicals. The swimming of this mutant was shown to be random. The growth rate was normal under several conditions, and the growth requirements were unchanged. Images PMID:5335897

  12. High Prevalence of HIV, HCV, HBV and Co-Infection and Associated Risk Factors among Injecting Drug Users in Yunnan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng-Liang; Li, Hong; Jiang, Li; Zhu, Jia-Wu; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of HIV, HCV, HBV and co-infection with 2 or 3 viruses and evaluate risk factors among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Yunnan province, China. Methods 2080 IDUs were recruited from 5 regions of Yunnan Province, China to detect the infection status of HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate risk factors related to HIV, HCV and HBV infections. Results The infection rates among all participants were 25.5% for HIV, 77.7% for HCV, 19.2% for HBV, 15% for HIV/HCV, 0.3% for HIV/HBV, 7.8% for HCV/HBV and 7.1% for HIV/HCV/HBV. The prevalence of virus infection varied widely by region in Yunnan of China. Statistical analyses indicated that high prevalence of HIV and HCV among IDUs was positively associated with the duration of drug injection and sharing needles/syringes; besides, HCV infection was associated with the frequency of drug injection. Conclusions HIV, HCV, HBV infections and co-infections were still very prevalent among IDUs in Yunnan province because of drug use behaviors. PMID:22916185

  13. Wild-type Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase stabilizes mutant variants by heterodimerization.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Anna; Besemer, Anna S; Liebl, Martina; Hellmann, Nadja; Koziollek-Drechsler, Ingrid; Ip, Philbert; Decker, Heinz; Robertson, Janice; Chakrabartty, Avijit; Behl, Christian; Clement, Albrecht M

    2014-02-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are responsible for a subset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases presumably by the acquisition of as yet unknown toxic properties. Additional overexpression of wild-type SOD1 in mutant SOD1 transgenic mice did not improve but rather accelerated the disease course. Recently, it was documented that the presence of wild-type SOD1 (SOD(WT)) reduced the aggregation propensity of mutant SOD1 by the formation of heterodimers between mutant and SOD1(WT) and that these heterodimers displayed at least a similar toxicity in cellular and animal models. In this study we investigated the biochemical and biophysical properties of obligate SOD1 dimers that were connected by a peptide linker. Circular dichroism spectra indicate an increased number of unstructured residues in SOD1 mutants. However, SOD1(WT) stabilized the folding of heterodimers compared to mutant homodimers as evidenced by an increase in resistance against proteolytic degradation. Heterodimerization also reduced the affinity of mutant SOD1 to antibodies detecting misfolded SOD1. In addition, the formation of obligate dimers resulted in a detection of substantial dismutase activity even of the relatively labile SOD1(G85R) mutant. These data indicate that soluble, dismutase-active SOD1 dimers might contribute at least partially to mutant SOD1 toxicity. PMID:24200866

  14. Motility mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We describe six motility mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum in this report. They were identified among a group of temperature-sensitive growth (Tsg) mutants that had been previously isolated using an enrichment for phagocytosis-defective cells. The Tsg mutants were screened for their ability to produce tracks on gold-coated cover slips, and several strains were found that were temperature-sensitive for migration in this assay. Analysis of spontaneous Tsg+ revertants of 10 migration-defective strains identified six strains that co-reverted the Tsg and track formation phenotypes. Characterization of these six strains indicated that they were defective at restrictive temperature in track formation, phagocytosis of bacteria, and pseudopodial and filopodial activity, while retaining normal rates of oxygen consumption and viability. Because they had lost this group of motile capabilities, these strains were designated motility mutants. The Tsg+ revertants of these mutants, which coordinately recovered all of the motile activities, were found at frequencies consistent with single genetic events. Analysis of the motility mutants and their revertants suggests a relationship between the motility mutations in some of these strains and genes affecting axenic growth. PMID:7118999

  15. A Cystine-Rich Whey Supplement (Immunocal(®)) Delays Disease Onset and Prevents Spinal Cord Glutathione Depletion in the hSOD1(G93A) Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ross, Erika K; Winter, Aimee N; Wilkins, Heather M; Sumner, Whitney A; Duval, Nathan; Patterson, David; Linseman, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Depletion of the endogenous antioxidant, glutathione (GSH), underlies progression of the devastating neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Thus, strategies aimed at elevating GSH may yield new therapeutics for ALS. Here, we investigated the effects of a unique non-denatured whey protein supplement, Immunocal(®), in the transgenic Gly position 93 to Ala (G93A) mutant hSOD1 (hSOD1(G93A)) mouse model of ALS. Immunocal(®) is rich in the GSH precursor, cystine, and is therefore capable of bolstering GSH content. Transgenic hSOD1(G93A) mice receiving Immunocal(®) displayed a significant delay in disease onset compared to untreated hSOD1(G93A) controls. Additionally, Immunocal(®) treatment significantly decreased the rate of decline in grip strength and prevented disease-associated reductions in whole blood and spinal cord tissue GSH levels in end-stage hSOD1(G93A) mice. However, Immunocal(®) did not extend survival, likely due to its inability to preserve the mitochondrial GSH pool in spinal cord. Combination treatment with Immunocal(®) and the anti-glutamatergic compound, riluzole, delayed disease onset and extended survival in hSOD1(G93A) mice. These findings demonstrate that sustaining tissue GSH with Immunocal(®) only modestly delays disease onset and slows the loss of skeletal muscle strength in hSOD1(G93A) mice. Moreover, the inability of Immunocal(®) to rescue mitochondrial GSH in spinal cord provides a possible mechanism for its lack of effect on survival and is a limiting factor in the potential utility of this supplement as a therapeutic for ALS. PMID:26785244

  16. A Cystine-Rich Whey Supplement (Immunocal®) Delays Disease Onset and Prevents Spinal Cord Glutathione Depletion in the hSOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Erika K.; Winter, Aimee N.; Wilkins, Heather M.; Sumner, Whitney A.; Duval, Nathan; Patterson, David; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Depletion of the endogenous antioxidant, glutathione (GSH), underlies progression of the devastating neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Thus, strategies aimed at elevating GSH may yield new therapeutics for ALS. Here, we investigated the effects of a unique non-denatured whey protein supplement, Immunocal®, in the transgenic Gly position 93 to Ala (G93A) mutant hSOD1 (hSOD1G93A) mouse model of ALS. Immunocal® is rich in the GSH precursor, cystine, and is therefore capable of bolstering GSH content. Transgenic hSOD1G93A mice receiving Immunocal® displayed a significant delay in disease onset compared to untreated hSOD1G93A controls. Additionally, Immunocal® treatment significantly decreased the rate of decline in grip strength and prevented disease-associated reductions in whole blood and spinal cord tissue GSH levels in end-stage hSOD1G93A mice. However, Immunocal® did not extend survival, likely due to its inability to preserve the mitochondrial GSH pool in spinal cord. Combination treatment with Immunocal® and the anti-glutamatergic compound, riluzole, delayed disease onset and extended survival in hSOD1G93A mice. These findings demonstrate that sustaining tissue GSH with Immunocal® only modestly delays disease onset and slows the loss of skeletal muscle strength in hSOD1G93A mice. Moreover, the inability of Immunocal® to rescue mitochondrial GSH in spinal cord provides a possible mechanism for its lack of effect on survival and is a limiting factor in the potential utility of this supplement as a therapeutic for ALS. PMID:26785244

  17. Association of Periodontal Diseases and Liver Fibrosis in Patients With HCV and/or HBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Nagao, Yumiko; Kawahigashi, Yuji; Sata, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Background: Periodontal disease and systemic health are closely associated. However, there is no data supporting the association between periodontal disease and patients with liver diseases associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and/or hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between periodontitis and progression of liver diseases in patients with HCV and/or HBV infection. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, 351 patients with HCV- and/or HBV-related liver diseases underwent screening for periodontal disease using the Salivaster® salivary occult blood test from February 2010 to June 2014. Furthermore, we examined the prevalence of fimbrillin (fimA) genotype of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) in 28 HCV-infected patients visited at our hospital between January 2013 and June 2014. P. gingivalis with fimA genotype with types I to V was further detected using a PCR method. Results: Of 351 patients, 76 patients (group 1) had a strong positive result for salivary occult blood test and 275 patients (group 2) had weak positive or negative test results. Significant factors between the groups were obesity, level of AST, ALT, LDH, ALP, Alb, D.Bil, T.cho, AFP, platelets (Plt), IRI, HOMA-IR, current interferon (IFN) treatment and the daily frequency of tooth brushing. Between-groups analysis indicated that total protein (T.pro) level and liver fibrosis were significant factors. According to multivariate analysis, five factors were associated with periodontal disease as Plt count below 80000, brushing teeth only once a day, current IFN treatment, aged 65 years or older and obesity. The adjusted odds ratios for these five factors were 5.80, 3.46, 2.87, 2.50 and 2.33, respectively, and each was statistically significant. Twenty-eight saliva specimens had positive results for P. gingivalis with fimA genotype types I to V. The prevalence of fimA genotype II was higher in 14 patients with liver

  18. Interaction of 4.1G and cGMP-gated channels in rod photoreceptor outer segments

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Christiana L.; Molday, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In photoreceptors, the assembly of signaling molecules into macromolecular complexes is important for phototransduction and maintaining the structural integrity of rod outer segments (ROSs). However, the molecular composition and formation of these complexes are poorly understood. Using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, 4.1G was identified as a new interacting partner for the cyclic-nucleotide gated (CNG) channels in ROSs. 4.1G is a widely expressed multifunctional protein that plays a role in the assembly and stability of membrane protein complexes. Multiple splice variants of 4.1G were cloned from bovine retina. A smaller splice variant of 4.1G selectively interacted with CNG channels not associated with peripherin-2–CNG channel complex. A combination of truncation studies and domain-binding assays demonstrated that CNG channels selectively interacted with 4.1G through their FERM and CTD domains. Using immunofluorescence, labeling of 4.1G was seen to be punctate and partially colocalized with CNG channels in the ROS. Our studies indicate that 4.1G interacts with a subset of CNG channels in the ROS and implicate this protein–protein interaction in organizing the spatial arrangement of CNG channels in the plasma membrane of outer segments. PMID:24144699

  19. Surface characterization through shape oscillations of drops in microgravity and 1-g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apfel, Robert E.; Holt, R. Glynn; Tian, Yuren; Shi, Tao; Zheng, Xiao-Yu

    1994-01-01

    The goal of these experiments is to determine the rheological properties of liquid drops of single or multiple components in the presence or absence of surface active materials by exciting drops into their quadrupole resonance and observing their free decay. The resulting data coupled with appropriate theory should give a better description of the physics of the underlying phenomena, providing a better foundation than earlier empirical results could. The space environment makes an idealized geometry available (spherical drops) so that theory and experiment can be properly compared, and allows a 'clean' environment, by which is meant an environment in which no solid surfaces come in contact with the drops during the test period. Moreover, by considering the oscillations of intentionally deformed drops in microgravity, a baseline is established for interpreting surface characterization experiments done on the ground by other groups and ours. Experiments performed on the United States Microgravity Laboratory Laboratory (USML-1) demonstrated that shape oscillation experiments could be performed over a wide parameter range, and with a variety of surfactant materials. Results, however, were compromised by an unexpected, slow drop tumbling, some problems with droplet injection, and the presence of bubbles in the drop samples. Nevertheless, initial data suggests that the space environment will be useful in providing baseline data that can serve to validate theory and permit quantitative materials characterization at 1-g.

  20. Fish otolith growth in 1g and 3g depends on the gravity vector.

    PubMed

    Anken, R H; Werner, K; Breuer, J; Rahmann, H

    2000-01-01

    Size and asymmetry (size difference between the left and the right side) as well as calcium (Ca) content of inner ear otoliths of larval cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus were determined after a long-term stay at hypergravity conditions (3g; centrifuge). Both utricular and saccular otoliths (lapilli and sagittae, respectively) were significantly smaller after hyper-g exposure as compared to parallely raised 1g-control specimens and the absolute amount of otolith-Ca was diminished. The asymmetry of sagittae was significantly increased in the experimental animals, whereas the respective asymmetry concerning lapilli was markedly decreased. In the course of another experiment larvae were raised in aquarium hatch baskets, from which one was placed directly above aeration equipment which resulted in random water circulation shifting the fish around ("shifted" specimens). The lapillar asymmetry of the "stationary" specimens showed a highly significant increase during early development when larvae were forced to lay on their sides due to their prominent yolk-sacs. In later developmental stages, when they began to swim freely, a dramatic decrease in lapillar asymmetry was apparent. Taken together with own previous findings according to which otolith growth stops after vestibular nerve transaction, the results presented here suggest that the growth and the development of bilateral asymmetry of otoliths is guided by the environmental gravity vector, obviously involving a feedback loop between the brain and the inner ear. PMID:11542852

  1. Fish Otolith Growth in 1g and 3g Depends on the Gravity Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anken, R. H.; Werner, K.; Breuer, J.; Rahmann, H.

    Size and asymmetry (size difference between the left and the right side) as well as calcium (Ca) content of inner ear otoliths of larval cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus were determined after a long-term stay at hypergravity conditions (3g; centrifuge). Both utricular and saccular otoliths (lapilli and sagittae, respectively) were significantly smaller after hyper-g exposure as compared to parallely raised 1g-control specimens and the absolute amount of otolith-Ca was diminished. The asymmetry of sagittae was significantly increased in the experimental animals, whereas the respective asymmetry concerning lapilli was markedly decreased. In the course of another experiment, larvae were raised in aquarium hatch baskets, from which one was placed directly above aeration equipment, which resulted in random water circulation shifting the fish around (``shifted'' specimens). The lapillar asymmetry of the ``stationary'' specimens showed a highly significant increase during early development when larvae were forced to lay on their sides due to their prominent yolk-sacs. In later developmental stages, when they began to swim freely, a dramatic decrease in lapillar asymmetry was apparent. Taken together with own previous findings according to which otolith growth stops after vestibular nerve transection, the results presented here suggest that the growth and the development of bilateral asymmetry of otoliths is guided by the environmental gravity vector, obviously involving a feedback loop between the brain and the inner ear

  2. Relationship Between Hepatic Steatosis and the Elevation of Aminotransferases in HBV-Infected Patients With HBe-Antigen Negativity and a Low Viral Load.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Hirayuki; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Nishikawa, Hiroki; Ikeda, Naoto; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Takata, Ryo; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Nakano, Chikage; Nishimura, Takashi; Yoh, Kazunori; Ishii, Akio; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Iwata, Yoshinori; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2016-04-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has been suggested to be associated with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients with HBe antigen (HBeAg)-negativity and a low HBV-DNA level. However, few studies have evaluated the association according to histological findings of the liver.Among a total of 198 HBV-infected patients who received a percutaneous liver biopsy, we studied the histological and laboratory findings of HBeAg-negative patients without receiving nucleoside/nucleotide analogues treatment (N = 70) in order to evaluate whether hepatic steatosis and its related metabolic disorders were associated with an elevation in ALT levels in HBeAg-negative patients.In HBeAg-negative patients with a high serum HBV-DNA level (≥2000 IU/mL), the level of HBV-DNA was the only significant factor related to ALT elevation. However, in HBeAg-negative patients with a low HBV-DNA level, the serum ferritin level, and histologically observed hepatic steatosis were significantly associated factors with ALT elevation. When we evaluated 2 metabolic variables (serum ferritin and fasting insulin) that are suggested to be relevant to the presence of progressive disease in Japanese patients, we found that the rate of metabolic disorders was significantly higher among patients with a high ALT level and a low HBV-DNA level than it was among those with other conditions. The triglyceride level and the frequency of moderate or severe hepatic steatosis were significantly higher in patients with a low HBV-DNA level than in those with a high HBV-DNA level.Histologically proven hepatic steatosis and its related metabolic disorders are suggested to be involved in the elevation of aminotransferases of HBeAg-negative patients, particularly those with low HBV-DNA levels. PMID:27124068

  3. Lower than expected hepatitis B virus infection prevalence among first generation Koreans in the U.S.: results of HBV screening in the Southern California Inland Empire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is prevalent in Asian immigrants in the USA. California’s Inland Empire region has a population of approximately four million, including an estimated 19,000 first generation Koreans. Our aim was to screen these adult individuals to establish HBV serological diagnoses, educate, and establish linkage to care. Methods A community-based program was conducted in Korean churches from 11/2009 to 2/2010. Subjects were asked to complete a HBV background related questionnaire, provided with HBV education, and tested for serum HBsAg, HBsAb and HBcAb. HBsAg positive subjects were tested for HBV quantitative DNA, HBeAg and HBeAb, counseled and directed to healthcare providers. Subjects unexposed to HBV were invited to attend a HBV vaccination clinic. Results A total of 973 first generation Koreans were screened, aged 52.3y (18-93y), M/F: 384/589. Most (75%) had a higher than high school education and were from Seoul (62.2%). By questionnaire, 24.7% stated they had been vaccinated against HBV. The serological diagnoses were: HBV infected (3.0%), immune due to natural infection (35.7%), susceptible (20.1%), immune due to vaccination (40.3%), and other (0.9%). Men had a higher infection prevalence (4.9% vs. 1.7%, p = 0.004) and a lower vaccination rate (34.6% vs. 44.0%, p = 0.004) compared to women. Self-reports of immunization status were incorrect for 35.1% of subjects. Conclusions This large screening study in first generation Koreans in Southern California demonstrates: 1) a lower than expected HBV prevalence (3%), 2) a continued need for vaccination, and 3) a need for screening despite a reported history of vaccination. PMID:24884673

  4. Relationship Between Hepatic Steatosis and the Elevation of Aminotransferases in HBV-Infected Patients With HBe-Antigen Negativity and a Low Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Hirayuki; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Nishikawa, Hiroki; Ikeda, Naoto; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Takata, Ryo; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Nakano, Chikage; Nishimura, Takashi; Yoh, Kazunori; Ishii, Akio; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Iwata, Yoshinori; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has been suggested to be associated with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients with HBe antigen (HBeAg)-negativity and a low HBV-DNA level. However, few studies have evaluated the association according to histological findings of the liver. Among a total of 198 HBV-infected patients who received a percutaneous liver biopsy, we studied the histological and laboratory findings of HBeAg-negative patients without receiving nucleoside/nucleotide analogues treatment (N = 70) in order to evaluate whether hepatic steatosis and its related metabolic disorders were associated with an elevation in ALT levels in HBeAg-negative patients. In HBeAg-negative patients with a high serum HBV-DNA level (≥2000 IU/mL), the level of HBV-DNA was the only significant factor related to ALT elevation. However, in HBeAg-negative patients with a low HBV-DNA level, the serum ferritin level, and histologically observed hepatic steatosis were significantly associated factors with ALT elevation. When we evaluated 2 metabolic variables (serum ferritin and fasting insulin) that are suggested to be relevant to the presence of progressive disease in Japanese patients, we found that the rate of metabolic disorders was significantly higher among patients with a high ALT level and a low HBV-DNA level than it was among those with other conditions. The triglyceride level and the frequency of moderate or severe hepatic steatosis were significantly higher in patients with a low HBV-DNA level than in those with a high HBV-DNA level. Histologically proven hepatic steatosis and its related metabolic disorders are suggested to be involved in the elevation of aminotransferases of HBeAg-negative patients, particularly those with low HBV-DNA levels. PMID:27124068

  5. Compound heterozygous DUOX2 gene mutations (c.2335-1G>C/c.3264_3267delCAGC) associated with congenital hypothyroidism. Characterization of complex cryptic splice sites by minigene analysis.

    PubMed

    Belforte, Fiorella S; Citterio, Cintia E; Testa, Graciela; Olcese, María Cecilia; Sobrero, Gabriela; Miras, Mirta B; Targovnik, Héctor M; Rivolta, Carina M

    2016-01-01

    Iodide Organification defects (IOD) represent 10% of cases of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) being the main genes affected that of TPO (thyroid peroxidase) and DUOX2 (dual oxidasa 2). From a patient with clinical and biochemical criteria suggestive with CH associated with IOD, TPO and DUOX2 genes were analyzed by means of PCR-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism analysis and sequencing. A novel heterozygous compound to the mutations c.2335-1G>C (paternal mutation, intron 17) and c.3264_3267delCAGC (maternal mutation, exon 24) was identified in the DUOX2 gene. Ex-vivo splicing assays and subsequent RT-PCR and sequencing analyses were performed on mRNA isolated from the HeLa cells transfected with wild-type and mutant pSPL3 expression vectors. The wild-type and c.2335-1G>C mutant alleles result in the complete inclusion or exclusion of exon 18, or in the activation of an exonic cryptic 5' ss with the consequent deletion of 169 bp at the end of this exon. However, we observed only a band of the expected size in normal thyroid tissue by RT-PCR. Additionally, the c.2335-1G>C mutation activates an unusual cryptic donor splice site in intron 17, located at position -14 of the authentic intron 17/exon 18 junction site, with an insertion of the last 14 nucleotides of the intron 17 in mutant transcripts with complete and partial inclusion of exon 18. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutation, predicted with the bioinformatics NNSplice, Fsplice, SPL, SPLM and MaxEntScan programs were investigated and evaluated in relation with the experimental evidence. These analyses confirm that c.2335-1G>C mutant allele would result in the abolition of the authentic splice acceptor site. The results suggest the coexistence in our patient of four putative truncated proteins of 786, 805, 806 and 1105 amino acids, with conservation of peroxidase-like domain and loss of gp91(phox)/NOX2-like domain. In conclusion a novel heterozygous compound was identified being responsible of

  6. Liver-specific expression of carboxylesterase 1g/esterase-x reduces hepatic steatosis, counteracts dyslipidemia and improves insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Bahitham, Wesam; Watts, Russell; Nelson, Randal; Lian, Jihong; Lehner, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Ces1g/Es-x deficiency in mice results in weight gain, insulin resistance, fatty liver and hyperlipidemia through upregulation of de novo lipogenesis and oversecretion of triacylglycerol (TG)-rich lipoproteins. Here, we show that restoration of Ces1g/Es-x expression only in the liver significantly reduced hepatic TG concentration accompanied by decreased size of lipid droplets, reduced secretion of very low-density lipoproteins and improved insulin-mediated signal transduction in the liver. Collectively, these results demonstrate that hepatic Ces1g/Es-x plays a critical role in limiting hepatic steatosis, very low-density lipoprotein assembly and in augmenting insulin sensitivity. PMID:26976727

  7. [The influence to the function of cellular immunity after being infected by HBV in the PBMC in chronic hepatitis B].

    PubMed

    Xuan, S Y; Sun, Y; Zhang, J

    1997-04-01

    In this study, HBV DNA was detected by PCR from PBMC of chronic hepatitis B. A total number of 54 cases were positive and 71 cases were negative. When detecting the competence of NK cells, the subgroup of T cells the ratio of CD4/CD8, the concentration of sIL-2R in three groups, and between the two CHB groups and a normal control group, the differences between HBV DNA positive group and HBV DNA negative group and between HBVDNA positive group and the normal control group were all dramatically significant (P < 0.01). We also found that a lineal correlation of the competence of NK cells, the ratio of CD4/CD8 and the concentration of sIL-2R(P < 0.01) in the positive group, whereas in the negative group only the ratio of CD4/CD8 was consistent with the concentration of sIL-2R(P < 0.01), and the competence of NK cells did not decrease obviously. The results indicated that it was the infection of HBV in PBMC which caused the disorder of the function of cellular immunity. This finding helped us to explain the pathogenesis of hepatitis B. It could also lay a theoretical ground for the prevention and the treatment of hepatitis B. PMID:9812503

  8. Evaluation of the Procleix Ultrio Plus ID NAT assay for detection of HIV 1, HBV and HCV in blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Chowdhry, Mohit; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Antony, Minimol

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Procleix Ultrio Plusassay is a new-generation qualitative in vitro nucleic acid amplification test used to screen for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA, hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA and hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in blood donors. This study was performed to compare the Procleix Ultrio assay with the new-generation Procleix Ultrio Plus Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) assays. Materials and Methods: Ten thousand three hundred and two donor samples were run in parallel for ID NAT using the Procleix Ultrio and the Procleix Ultrio Plus assay. Simultaneously, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing was performed on an EVOLIS Walk away System for HIV, HCV, HBsAg and anti-HBc. Reactive samples were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction. Results: In the 10,302 samples tested during the study period, we identified 15 NAT yields, and all these revealed HBV DNA in the discriminatory assays. Eight of these were exclusive yields from the Ultrio Plus assay and the remaining seven cases were determined as HBV NAT yield, both by the Procleix Ultrio as well as the Ultrio Plus assays, i.e. “Combined” yields. No HCV or HIV 1 yields were detected during the study period by either of two assays. Conclusion: With an overall yield rate of 1 in 687 and an exclusive yield rate of 1 in 1287, the Procleix Ultrio Plus assay proved to be highly sensitive in detecting occult HBV infections. PMID:25722569

  9. Astershionones A-F, six new anti-HBV shionane-type triterpenes from Aster tataricus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Bing; Zeng, Guang-Zhi; Xu, Hui-Min; He, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Tan, Ning-Hua

    2014-03-01

    Six new shionane-type triterpenes, astershionones A-F (1-6), were obtained from the roots and rhizomes of Aster tataricus. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data, mainly NMR and MS data. The absolute configuration of 1 was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and CD analysis. 3 showed inhibitory activity against HBsAg and HBeAg secretion with IC50 values of 23.0 and 23.1 μM, and cytotoxicity against HepG 2.2.15 cells with a CC50 value of 170.5 μM. 3 also exhibited inhibitory activity against HBV DNA replication with an IC50 value of 22.4 μM. PMID:24393620

  10. CLMA position on HIV/HBV testing of health-care workers. Clinical Laboratory Management Association.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    In February 1991, CLMA's National Affairs Committee (NAC) developed a proposed position statement on mandatory HIV/HBV testing of health-care workers. The proposed statement was submitted to the 24-member National Affairs Reactor Panel and, based on their input, appropriate revisions were made. In May 1991, CLMA surveyed the full membership, and, as a result, the following position was adopted. Ninety-six percent of the members responding agreed with principles 1, 2, and 3; 88% agreed with 4, 5, and 6. NAC members include Royal A. Crystal, Chair; Linda D. Bielitzki, J.D., Vice Chair; Michael G. Bissell, M.D., Ph.D.; Earl C. Buck; Michael A. Maffetone, D. A.; Timothy Murray; Laurence J. Peterson; Marianne C. Watters; and Martha A. Feichter, National Affairs Analyst. PMID:10128723

  11. Calibration and Uncertainty in Scenario Simulations with the HBV-N Nitrogen Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, G.; Arheimer, B.

    2002-12-01

    The HBV model, a Swedish precipitation-runoff model has been used extensively in basins all over Sweden for 30 years. Recently, it has been complemented with routines for nitrogen transformation in groundwater, rivers and lakes. The aim is to develop a decision support tool for evaluation of nitrogen load on recipients due to different management practices and policies. The hydrological submodel has a large number of parameters, which are established by calibration, supported by experience from earlier model applications. The root zone leakage of nitrogen, used as input to the HBV model, is simulated by the SOIL-N model, a model for turnover of water, heat and nitrogen in the unsaturated zone. The nitrogen subroutines introduce additional parameters. It is clear that no unique optimum parameter set can be obtained from a single-site model calibation to runoff and nitrogen measurements. This equifinality results in a wide range of uncertainty in the scenario simulations, when studied by ordinary Monte Carlo simulation and acceptance of all parameter sets that produce a fitness criterion above a chosen limit. This is illustrated in a case study for the R”nne † basin in the agricultural region of southern Sweden. The objective of the uncertainty analysis is to explore the uncertainty in the scenario simulations, and to provide support for decision-makers to choose between measures according to expected results and the reliability of these results. However, an ordinary Monte Carlo simulation in which all parameters are simulated and combined randomly does not take advantage of the experience from earlier applications. Therefore, a method is proposed, in which parameter sets are judged not only according to the fitness to observations but also according to their agreement with earlier model applications and hydrological experience, by use of subjective likelihood weights. The range in the scenario simulations obtained from the combined approach is finally compared

  12. Epidemiological patterns of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in highly endemic areas.

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, W. J.; Medley, G. F.; Nokes, D. J.; O'Callaghan, C. J.; Whittle, H. C.; Hall, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper uses meta-analysis of published data and a deterministic mathematical model of hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission to describe the patterns of HBV infection in high endemicity areas. We describe the association between the prevalence of carriers and a simple measure of the rate of infection, the age at which half the population have been infected (A50), and assess the contribution of horizontal and perinatal transmission to this association. We found that the two main hyper-endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa and east Asia have similar prevalences of carriers and values of A50, and that there is a negative nonlinear relationship between A50 and the prevalence of carriers in high endemicity areas (Spearman's Rank, P = 0.0086). We quantified the risk of perinatal transmission and the age-dependent of infection to allow a comparison between the main hyper-endemic areas. East Asia was found to have higher prevalences of HBeAg positive mothers and a greater risk of perinatal transmission from HBeAg positive mothers than sub-Saharan Africa, though the differences were not statistically significant. However, the two areas have similar magnitudes and age-dependent rates of horizontal transmission. Results of a simple compartmental model suggest that similar rates of horizontal transmission are sufficient to generate the similar patterns between A50 and the prevalences of carriers. Interrupting horizontal transmission by mass immunization is expected to have a significant, nonlinear impact on the rate of acquisition of new carriers. PMID:8870629

  13. Chemopreventive effect of silymarin on liver pathology in HBV X protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Fang; Fu, Shu-Ling; Kao, Cheng-Heng; Yang, Chu-Wen; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Hsu, Ming-Ta; Tsai, Ting-Fen

    2008-03-15

    There are currently limited therapeutic regimens available for effective treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Silymarin is a naturally derived polyphenolic antioxidant with hepatoprotective properties and is very widely used in clinical application; however, effect of silymarin on spontaneous HCC has not been studied. Silymarin was evaluated for its efficacy against spontaneous carcinogenesis using the HBV X protein (HBx) transgenic model. Silymarin was p.o. given to the HBx transgenic mice from 4 to 6 weeks of age. Our data indicated that silymarin has therapeutic effects on the early stages of liver damage, reversing fatty changes and recovering liver histopathology in a dose-dependent manner. To study the chemopreventive effects on the later stages of carcinogenesis, the mice at 13 months were split into a precancerous group and a group with significant liver carcinogenesis. After silymarin was given to the precancerous mice from 13 to 16 months of age, in contrast to an 80% incidence of HCC development in the untreated transgenic mice, no HCC was detected in any of these mice. Nonetheless, small hyperplastic nodules were detected in 86% of these precancerous mice. In the second group with notable HCC, silymarin was unable to block cancer progression. Although silymarin did not affect HBx expression, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were decreased, cell proliferation was stimulated, and hepatocyte ultrastructure was found to significantly recover. In conclusion, silymarin exerts beneficial effects on the early stages of liver pathogenesis, preventing and delaying liver carcinogenesis. This drug should be considered as a potential chemopreventive agent for HBV-related hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:18339886

  14. Genetic variants in IL12 influence both hepatitis B virus clearance and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma development in a Chinese male population.

    PubMed

    Tan, Aihua; Gao, Yong; Yao, Ziting; Su, Shining; Jiang, Yonghua; Xie, Yuanliang; Xian, Xiaoying; Mo, Zengnan

    2016-05-01

    IL12 plays a major role not only in inducing appropriate immune responses against viral infections (including HBV) but also in the antitumor immune response. This study was conducted to investigate the relationships of genetic variants in IL12 with hepatitis B virus (HBV) clearance and development of HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We genotyped three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the IL12A (rs568406 and rs2243115) and IL12B (rs3212227) in 395 HBV-positive HCC patients, 293 persistent HBV carriers and 686 subjects with HBV natural clearance from southern China, using the improved multiplex ligase detection reaction (iMLDR) method. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, smoking, and alcohol consumption status showed that rs568408 variant genotypes were significantly associated with host HBV-related HCC risk when compared with persistent HBV carriers, and carriers of the GA + AA genotype decreased the HCC risk in comparison with GG carriers (adjusted OR = 0.53, 95 % CI 0.35-0.80, P = 0.002). No relationships between the rs2243115 and rs3212227 SNPs and HCC risk were observed (all P > 0.05). Besides, rs568408 showed an approaching significant effect on susceptibility to HBV persistent infection (adjusted OR = 1.34, 95 % CI 0.99-1.81, P = 0.057 in dominant genetic models). Furthermore, the TG haplotype was observed to be associated with a significantly increased risk of HBV-related HCC (OR = 1.42, 95 % CI 1.10-1.83, P = 0.006), while TA haplotype was associated with a decreased risk of HBV-related HCC (OR = 0.61, 95 % CI 0.45-0.83, P = 0.002). Our results reveal that the IL12A rs568408 variant may be a marker SNP for risk of both HBV clearance and HBV-related HCC development. PMID:26631030

  15. Monoaminergic control of spinal locomotor networks in SOD1G93A newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Milan, Léa; Barrière, Grégory; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe; Cazalets, Jean-René; Bertrand, Sandrine S

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the gene that encodes Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are the cause of approximately 20% of familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons. While ALS symptoms appear in adulthood, spinal motoneurons exhibit functional alterations as early as the embryonic and postnatal stages in the murine model of ALS, the SOD1 mice. Monoaminergic - i.e., dopaminergic (DA), serotoninergic (5-HT), and noradrenergic (NA) - pathways powerfully control spinal networks and contribute significantly to their embryonic and postnatal maturation. Alterations in monoaminergic neuromodulation during development could therefore lead to impairments in the motoneuronal physiology. In this study, we sought to determine whether the monoaminergic spinal systems are modified in the early stages of development in SOD1 mice. Using a post-mortem analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), monoaminergic neuromodulators and their metabolites were quantified in the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1 and wild-type (WT) mice aged one postnatal day (P1) and P10. This analysis underscores an increased content of DA in the SOD1 lumbar spinal cord compared to that of WT mice but failed to reveal any modification of the other monoaminergic contents. In a next step, we compared the efficiency of the monoaminergic compounds in triggering and modulating fictive locomotion in WT and SOD1 mice. This study was performed in P1-P3 SOD1 mice and age-matched control littermates using extracellular recordings from the lumbar ventral roots in the in vitro isolated spinal cord preparation. This analysis revealed that the spinal networks of SOD1(G93A) mice could generate normal locomotor activity in the presence of NMA-5-HT. Interestingly, we also observed that SOD1 spinal networks have an increased sensitivity to NA compared to WT spinal circuits but exhibited similar DA responses. PMID:25071458

  16. Tay-Sachs disease in Brazilian patients: prevalence of the IVS7+1g>c mutation.

    PubMed

    Rozenberg, R; Martins, A M; Micheletti, C; Mustacchi, Z; Pereira, L V

    2004-01-01

    Seven Brazilian Tay-Sachs disease cases were screened for the most frequent causative mutations. They all presented at least one copy of the IVS7+1g>c mutation. Three patients were homozygotes, three were compound heterozygotes, and in one case only the mother was tested and shown to carry the IVS7+1g>c mutation. In the second allele the compound heterozygotes presented: R178H (the DN allele), InsTATC1278 and an unidentified mutation. The IVS7+1g>c mutation has already been described in three Portuguese patients. In this study, all families were unaware of any Portuguese ancestry. Since Brazil was a Portuguese colony, the mutation most probably came from ancient common ancestry. The initial molecular analysis of Tay-Sachs disease patients in Brazil indicated a prevalence of the IVS7+1g>c mutation, possibly as a result of genetic drift. PMID:15065574

  17. Abnormal repolarization dynamics in a patient with KCNE1(G38S) who presented with torsades de pointes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Mizumaki, Koichi; Hata, Yukiko; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Risk of G38S, major KCNE1 polymorphism [KCNE1(G38S)], for long QT syndrome (LQTS) remains unclear. A 72-year-old woman was admitted with recurrent torsades de pointes (TdP). She had remarkable QT prolongation (corrected QT interval 568 ms) under conditions of hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia. After correction of this electrolytic imbalance, TdP was suppressed and metoprolol was started. The QT-RR slope in 24-hour Holter electrocardiogram was steep and this enhanced bradycardia-dependent QT prolongation was similar to that in LQTS. She carried KCNE1(G38S). Patients with KCNE1(G38S) could have similar potential risk of ventricular arrhythmia as with LQTS. Analysis of QT-RR relationship could also evaluate the latent arrhythmogenicity of KCNE1(G38S). PMID:26520166

  18. Association of CMV, HBV, or HCV co-infection with vaccine response in adults with well-controlled HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Troy, S B; Rossheim, A E B; Siik, J; Cunningham, T D; Kerry, J A

    2016-05-01

    Even after CD4 count recovery on antiretroviral therapy, HIV infection is associated with decreased response to most vaccines compared to the general population. Chronic infections with viruses such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV), which are more prevalent in HIV-infected populations, have been linked to immune dysfunction and decreased vaccine response in the general population. However, whether co-infection with these other viruses contributes to the decreased vaccine response seen in adults with well-controlled HIV infection is unknown. We conducted a secondary analysis of data and serum from adults with well-controlled HIV infection from an inactivated polio vaccine trial (224 subjects) and a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine study (128 subjects). We evaluated the association of CMV, HBV, or HCV co-infection with post-vaccination antibody levels using both univariate and multivariate analyses, controlling for factors such as age, race, CD4 count, comorbidities, smoking status, and baseline antibody levels. Ninety-three percent, 7%, and 14% of subjects were co-infected with CMV, HBV, and HCV respectively. On both univariate and multivariate analysis, neither CMV nor HCV co-infection were significantly associated with post-vaccination antibody levels to either vaccine. HBV co-infection was significantly associated with post-vaccination antibody concentrations for pneumococcal serotype 7F on univariate analysis and 6A on multivariate analysis, but the association was with higher antibody concentrations. In conclusion, co-infection with CMV, HBV, or HCV does not appear to contribute to the decreased vaccine response seen in adults with well-controlled HIV infection. PMID:26751638

  19. Chronic HBV infection in pregnant immigrants: a multicenter study of the Italian Society of Infectious and Tropical Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, Evangelista; Taliani, Gloria; Castelli, Francesco; Bartolozzi, Dario; Cacopardo, Bruno; Armignacco, Orlando; Scotto, Gaetano; Coppola, Nicola; Stroffolini, Tommaso; Sagnelli, Caterina

    2016-04-01

    The aims of the study were to estimate the clinical impact of HBV infection in pregnant immigrants and their family members and to identify a useful approach to managing the healthcare of HBsAg-positive immigrants. Included in this study were 143 HBsAg-positive pregnant immigrants of the 1,970 from countries with intermediate/high HBV endemicity who delivered in 8 Italian hospitals in 2012-2013. In addition, 172 family members of 96 HBsAg-positive pregnant immigrants were tested for serum HBsAg. The median age of the 143 HBsAg-positive pregnant immigrants was 31.0±12.1 years and the length of stay in Italy 5.0±4.1 years; 56.5% were unaware of their HBsAg positivity. HBV DNA was detected in 74.5% of the pregnant immigrants, i.e., 94.3% from Eastern Europe, 72.2% from East Asia and 58.1% from Sub-Saharan Africa. HBV DNA ≥2000 IU/mL was detected in 47.8% of pregnant immigrants, associated with ALT ≥1.5 times the upper normal value in 15% of cases. Anti-HDV was detected in 10% of cases. HBsAg was detected in 31.3% of the 172 family members. All HBsAg-positive immigrants received counseling on HBV infection and its prevention, and underwent a complete clinical evaluation. The findings validate the approach used for the healthcare management of the HBsAg-positive immigrant population. PMID:27196549

  20. A new multiparameter integrated MELD model for prognosis of HBV-related acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yue; Xu, Yun; Li, Mingming; Xie, Ya; Gong, Guozhong

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus related acute-on-chronic liver failure (HBV-ACLF) is one of the most deadly diseases. Many models have been proposed to evaluate the prognosis of it. However, these models are still controversial. In this study, we aimed to incorporate some characters into model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) to establish a new reliable and feasible model for the prognosis of HBV-ACLF.A total of 530 HBV-ACLF patients who had received antiviral therapy were enrolled into a retrospective study and divided into the training cohort (300) and validation cohort (230). Logistic regression analysis was used to establish a model to predict the 3-month mortality from the patients in the training cohort, and then, the new model was evaluated in the validation cohort.Except for MELD score, 4 other independent factors, namely degree of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), white blood cell (WBC) count, and age, were important for the new model called HBV-ACLF MELD (HAM) model: R = 0.174 × MELD + 1.106 × HE - (0.003 × AFP) + (0.237 × WBC) + (0.103 × Age) - 11.388. The areas under receiver-operating characteristic curve of HAM in the training and validation cohort were 0.894 and 0.868, respectively, which were significantly higher than those of other 7 models. With the best cut-off value of -1.191, HAM achieved higher sensitivity and negative predictive value.We developed a new model that has a great prognostic value of the 3-month mortality of patients with HBV-ACLF. PMID:27559979

  1. PCR-Based Molecular Diagnosis of Hepatitis Virus (HBV and HDV) in HCV Infected Patients and Their Biochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Raheel, Ummar; Badshah, Yasmeen; Akhtar, Hashaam; Tamanna, Kosar; Tahir, Muhammad; Sadaf Zaidi, Najam us Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Seroprevalence of HCV indicates that HCV is found in more than 10% of HBV- or HDV-infected patients worldwide leading to liver disease. Here we show HBV and HDV coinfection association with HCV infected Pakistani patients, study of disease severity, and possible interpretation of associated risk factors in coinfected patients. A total of 730 liver diseased patients were included, out of which 501 were found positive for HCV infection via PCR. 5.1% of patients were coinfected with HBV while 1% were coinfected with HBV and HDV both. LFTs were significantly altered in dually and triply infected patients as compared to single HCV infection. Mean bilirubin, AST, and ALT levels were highest (3.25 mg/dL, 174 IU/L, and 348 IU/L) in patients with triple infection while dual infection LFTs (1.6 mg/dL, 61 IU/L, and 74 IU/L) were not high as in single infection (1.9 mg/dL, 76 IU/L, and 91 IU/L). The most prominent risk factor in case of single (22%) and dual infection (27%) group was “reuse of syringes” while in triple infection it was “intravenous drug users” (60%). It is concluded that HBV and HDV coinfections are strongly associated with HCV infected Pakistani patients and in case of severe liver disease the possibility of double and triple coinfection should be kept in consideration. PMID:27366331

  2. Overexpressing the Multiple-Stress Responsive Gene At1g74450 Reduces Plant Height and Male Fertility in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Visscher, Anne M.; Belfield, Eric J.; Vlad, Daniela; Irani, Niloufer; Moore, Ian; Harberd, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    A subset of genes in Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be up-regulated in response to a wide range of different environmental stress factors. However, not all of these genes are characterized as yet with respect to their functions. In this study, we used transgenic knockout, overexpression and reporter gene approaches to try to elucidate the biological roles of five unknown multiple-stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis. The selected genes have the following locus identifiers: At1g18740, At1g74450, At4g27652, At4g29780 and At5g12010. Firstly, T-DNA insertion knockout lines were identified for each locus and screened for altered phenotypes. None of the lines were found to be visually different from wildtype Col-0. Secondly, 35S-driven overexpression lines were generated for each open reading frame. Analysis of these transgenic lines showed altered phenotypes for lines overexpressing the At1g74450 ORF. Plants overexpressing the multiple-stress responsive gene At1g74450 are stunted in height and have reduced male fertility. Alexander staining of anthers from flowers at developmental stage 12–13 showed either an absence or a reduction in viable pollen compared to wildtype Col-0 and At1g74450 knockout lines. Interestingly, the effects of stress on crop productivity are most severe at developmental stages such as male gametophyte development. However, the molecular factors and regulatory networks underlying environmental stress-induced male gametophytic alterations are still largely unknown. Our results indicate that the At1g74450 gene provides a potential link between multiple environmental stresses, plant height and pollen development. In addition, ruthenium red staining analysis showed that At1g74450 may affect the composition of the inner seed coat mucilage layer. Finally, C-terminal GFP fusion proteins for At1g74450 were shown to localise to the cytosol. PMID:26485022

  3. Detection and quantitation of HBV DNA in miniaturized samples: multi centre study to evaluate the performance of the COBAS ® AmpliPrep/COBAS ® TaqMan ® hepatitis B virus (HBV) test v2.0 by the use of plasma or serum specimens.

    PubMed

    Berger, Annemarie; Gohl, Peter; Stürmer, Martin; Rabenau, Holger Felix; Nauck, Markus; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm

    2010-11-01

    Laboratory analysis of blood specimens is an increasingly important tool for rapid diagnosis and control of therapy. So, miniaturization of test systems is needed, but reduced specimens might impair test quality. For rapid detection and quantitation of HBV DNA, the COBAS(®) AmpliPrep/COBAS(®) TaqMan(®) HBV test has proved a robust instrument in routine diagnostic services. The test system has been modified recently for application of reduced samples of blood plasma and for blood serum, too. The performance of this modified COBAS(®) AmpliPrep/COBAS(®) TaqMan(®) HBV v2.0 (HBV v2.0 (this test is currently not available in the USA)) test was evaluated by comparison with the former COBAS(®) AmpliPrep/COBAS(®) TaqMan(®) HBV v1.0 (HBV v1.0) test. In this study a platform correlation of both assay versions was done including 275 HBV DNA positive EDTA plasma samples. Comparable results were obtained (R(2)=0.97, mean difference -0.03 log(10)IU/ml). The verification of equivalency of the sample matrix (plasma vs. serum samples tested in HBV v2.0 in the same run) showed comparable results for all 278 samples with a R(2)=0.99 and a mean difference of 0.06 log(10)IU/ml. In conclusion, the new test version HBV v2.0 is highly specific and reproducible and quantifies accurately HBV DNA in EDTA plasma and serum samples from patients with chronic HBV infection. PMID:20728470

  4. Association Between IL-10 Gene Promoter Polymorphisms (-592 A/C, -819 T/C, -1082 A/G) and Susceptibility to HBV Infection in an Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Moudi, Bita; Heidari, Zahra; Mahmoudzadeh-Sagheb, Hamidreza; Hashemi, Mohammad; Metanat, Malihe; Khosravi, Soheila; Farrokh, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Background IL-10 can play a vital role in immune response against HBV. Three biallelic SNPs from the transcription start site control the transcription of the IL-10 gene. An association between susceptibility to HBV and IL-10 polymorphisms has been suggested in patients with HBV infection. Objectives The present study was designed to study the association between polymorphisms in interleukin-10 (-1082 A/G, -819 T/C and -592 A/C) promoter gene and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Patients and Methods 221 chronically infected patients and 200 healthy control subjects were enrolled in the study. Three biallelic (-1082 A/G, -819 T/C and -592 A/C) polymorphisms in the IL-10 promoter gene were determined by PCR-RFLP method. Results Persistent HBV infection was associated with IL-10-1082 AG (P = 0.001) and GG (P = 0.004) genotypes and G (P = 0.000) allele. IL-10-819 T/C and -592 A/C genotype and allele frequencies did not show any correlation with the risk of chronic hepatitis B infection. Conclusions These results suggest that polymorphisms in interleukin-10 gene promoter influence clinical outcome of HBV infection and susceptibility to HBV infection. PMID:27148384

  5. Thermophysical Property Measurements of Molten Semiconductors in 1-g and Reduced-g Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu

    1999-01-01

    , these dispersed impurities in the melts tend to substantially modify the properties of pure semiconductors. Sample levitation done in a vacuum clearly helps maintain the sample purity. However, in the 1-g environment, all gravity caused effects such as convection, sedimentation and buoyancy are still present in the sample. In addition, large forces needed to levitate a sample in the presence of the gravity can cause additional flows in the melt. The use of the High Temperature Electrostatic Levitator (HTESL) for the present research is a recent development and little is known about the flows induced by the electrostatic forces. In this ground base program, we will define the limits of HTESL technology as various thermophysical properties of molten semiconductors are measured.

  6. Long-term efficacy of nucleoside monotherapy in preventing HBV infection in HBsAg-negative recipients of anti-HBc-positive donor livers

    PubMed Central

    Chotiyaputta, Watcharasak; Pelletier, Shawn J.; Fontana, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and aim Transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection occurs in up to 87.5% of HBsAg-negative recipients of anti-HBc-positive donor livers in the absence of HBV prophylaxis. There is no standardized prophylactic regimen to prevent HBV infection in this setting. The aim of this study was to determine the long-term efficacy of nucleoside analogue to prevent HBV infection in this setting. Methods A retrospective study of HBsAg-negative patients receiving liver transplantation (LT) from anti-HBc-positive donors during a 10-year period. Results Twenty patients were studied, mean age was 50.2 ± 8.3 years, 40% were men, and 90% were Caucasian. The median MELD score at the time of LT was 18 (12–40). None of the patients received hepatitis B immune globulin. Eighteen patients received nucleoside analogue monotherapy: 10 received lamivudine and 8 received entecavir. None of these 18 patients developed HBV infection after a median follow up of 32 (1–75) months. One patient received a second course of hepatitis B vaccine 50 months after LT with anti-HBs titer above 1,000 mIU/mL. Lamivudine was discontinued and the patient remained HBsAg negative 18 months after withdrawal of lamivudine. Two patients who were anti-HBs positive before LT were not started on HBV prophylaxis after LT; both developed HBV infection after LT. Conclusions Nucleoside monotherapy is sufficient in preventing HBV infection in HBsAg-negative recipients of anti-HBc-positive donor livers. HBV prophylaxis is necessary in anti-HBs-positive recipients of anti-HBc-positive donor livers. PMID:21286341

  7. The influence of microgravity and spaceflight on columella cell ultrastructure in starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guisinger, M. M.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    The ultrastructure of root cap columella cells was studied by morphometric analysis in wild-type, a reduced-starch mutant, and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis grown in microgravity (F-microgravity) and compared to ground 1g (G-1g) and flight 1g (F-1g) controls. Seedlings of the wild-type and reduced-starch mutant that developed during an experiment on the Space Shuttle (both the F-microgravity samples and the F-lg control) exhibited a decreased starch content in comparison to the G-1g control. These results suggest that some factor associated with spaceflight (and not microgravity per se) affects starch metabolism. Elevated levels of ethylene were found during the experiments on the Space Shuttle, and analysis of ground controls with added ethylene demonstrated that this gas was responsible for decreased starch levels in the columella cells. This is the first study to use an on-board centrifuge as a control when quantifying starch in spaceflight-grown plants. Furthermore, our results show that ethylene levels must be carefully considered and controlled when designing experiments with plants for the International Space Station.

  8. PIN1 genetic polymorphisms and the susceptibility of HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma in a Guangxi population.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Mo, Zhuning; Lao, Xianjun; Zhang, Xiaolian; Liu, Yanqiong; Sui, Jingzhe; Qin, Xue; Li, Shan

    2016-05-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1 (PIN1) plays a critical role in different signaling pathways, cell cycle progression and proliferation, and gene expression, and it has been found to overexpress in many tumor tissues. Recently, researchers have found that PIN1 gene polymorphisms may alter the function of protein and be associated with the risk of cancer. The present study analyzed three common polymorphisms in promoter regions (rs2233678 and rs2233679) and in exon2 (rs2233682) of the PIN1 gene in 254 patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 235 healthy controls in a Guangxi study population to determine whether any relationship exists between the polymorphisms and the risk of HBV-related HCC. The results revealed that the rs2233679 TT genotype was associated with increased risk of HCC with HBV infection [odds ratio (OR) = 2.04, 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) = 1.13-3.69, p = 0.019]. This association was stronger in men than in women (OR = 2.17, 95 % CI = 1.09-4.34, p = 0.028) as well as in men 50 years of age and older (OR = 3.91, 95 % CI = 1.29-11.80, p = 0.016); moreover, for alcohol drinkers, being a carrier of the PIN1 rs2233679 CT genotype had a moderately increased risk of HCC (OR = 3.98, 95 % CI = 1.02-15.57, p = 0.047). In contrast, people carrying the rs2233682 GA genotype and A alleles were 0.23 times more likely to develop HCC (OR = 0.23, 95 % CI = 0.06-0.87, p = 0.031 and OR = 0.23, 95 % CI = 0.06-0.87, p = 0.030). No such associations were found in the PIN1 rs2233678 polymorphisms between the HBV-related HCC cases and the controls. In addition, the haplotype GCA was found to be a high protection factor for HCC with HBV infection (OR = 0.14, 95 % CI = 0.03-0.62, p = 0.003). In conclusion, this study's findings suggest that the PIN1 rs2233679 TT genotype, the rs2233682GA genotype, and A alleles

  9. Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Indonesia 15 Years After Adoption of a Universal Infant Vaccination Program: Possible Impacts of Low Birth Dose Coverage and a Vaccine-Escape Mutant.

    PubMed

    Purwono, Priyo Budi; Juniastuti; Amin, Mochamad; Bramanthi, Rendra; Nursidah; Resi, Erika Maria; Wahyuni, Rury Mega; Yano, Yoshihiko; Soetjipto; Hotta, Hak; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria Inge

    2016-09-01

    A universal hepatitis B vaccination program for infants was adopted in Indonesia in 1997. Before its implementation, the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive individuals in the general population was approximately 5-10%. The study aimed to investigate the hepatitis B virus (HBV) serological status and molecular profile among children, 15 years after adoption of a universal infant vaccination program in Indonesia. According to the Local Health Office data in five areas, the percentages of children receiving three doses of hepatitis B vaccine are high (73.9-94.1%), whereas the birth dose coverage is less than 50%. Among 967 children in those areas, the seropositive rate of HBsAg in preschool- and school-aged children ranged from 2.1% to 4.2% and 0% to 5.9%, respectively. Of the 61 HBV DNA-positive samples, the predominant genotype/subtype was B/adw2 Subtype adw3 was identified in genotype C for the first time in this population. Six samples (11.5%) had an amino acid substitution within the a determinant of the S gene region, and one sample had T140I that was suggested as a vaccine-escape mutant type. The low birth dose coverage and the presence of a vaccine-escape mutant might contribute to the endemicity of HBV infection among children in Indonesia. PMID:27402524

  10. Structure of Arabidopsis thaliana At1g77540 Protein, a Minimal Acetyltransferase from the COG2388 Family †,‡

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Robert C.; Bitto, Eduard; Berndsen, Christopher E.; Bingman, Craig A.; Singh, Shanteri; Lee, Min S.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Denu, John M.; Phillips, George N.; Markley, John L.

    2008-01-01

    We describe X-ray crystal and NMR solution structures of the protein coded for by Arabidopsis thaliana gene At1g77540.1 (At1g77540). The crystal structure was determined to 1.15 Å with an R factor of 14.9% (Rfree = 17.0%) by multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction using sodium bromide derivatized crystals. The ensemble of NMR conformers was determined with protein samples labeled with 15N and 13C+15N. The X-ray structure and NMR ensemble were closely similar with r.m.s.d 1.4 Å for residues 8–93. At1g77540 was found to adopt a fold similar to that of GCN5-related N-acetyltransferases. Enzymatic activity assays established that At1g77540 possesses weak acetyltransferase activity against histones H3 and H4. Chemical shift perturbations observed in 15N-HSQC spectra upon the addition of CoA indicated that the cofactor binds and identified its binding site. The molecular details of this interaction were further elucidated by solving the X-ray structure of the At1g77540–CoA complex. This work establishes that the domain family COG2388 represents a novel class of acetyltransferase and provides insight into possible mechanistic roles of the conserved Cys76 and His41 residues of this family. PMID:17128971

  11. Astaxanthin enhances ATP-binding cassette transporter A1/G1 expressions and cholesterol efflux from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Maki; Ayaori, Makoto; Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Yakushiji, Emi; Takiguchi, Shunichi; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Hisada, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Makoto; Komatsu, Tomohiro; Yogo, Makiko; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Kondo, Kazuo; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC) A1 and G1 are key molecules in cholesterol efflux from macrophages, which is an initial step of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), a major anti-atherogenic property of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Astaxanthin is one of the naturally occurring carotenoids responsible for the pink-red pigmentation in a variety of living organisms. Although astaxanthin is known to be a strong antioxidant, it remains unclear through what mechanism of action it affects cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages. We therefore investigated the effects of astaxanthin on cholesterol efflux and ABCA1/G1 expressions in macrophages. Astaxanthin enhanced both apolipoprotein (apo) A-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from RAW264.7 cells. In supporting these enhanced cholesterol efflux mechanisms, astaxanthin promoted ABCA1/G1 expression in various macrophages. In contrast, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, liver X receptor (LXR) α and LXRβ levels remained unchanged by astaxanthin. An experiment using actinomycin D demonstrated that astaxanthin transcriptionally induced ABCA1/G1 expression, and oxysterol depletion caused by overexpression of cholesterol sulfotransferase further revealed that these inductions in ABCA1/G1 were independent of LXR-mediated pathways. Finally, we performed luciferase assays using human ABCA1/G1 promoter-reporter constructs to reveal that astaxanthin activated both promoters irrespective of the presence or absence of LXR-responsive elements, indicating LXR-independence of these activations. In conclusion, astaxanthin increased ABCA1/G1 expression, thereby enhancing apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages in an LXR-independent manner. In addition to the anti-oxidative properties, the potential cardioprotective properties of astaxanthin might therefore be associated with an enhanced anti-atherogenic function of HDL. PMID:22790567

  12. Muscle Expression of SOD1G93A Modulates microRNA and mRNA Transcription Pattern Associated with the Myelination Process in the Spinal Cord of Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Bernardini, Camilla; Martini, Martina; Baranzini, Mirko; Barba, Marta; Musarò, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    A crucial system severely affected in several neuromuscular diseases is the loss of effective connection between muscle and nerve, leading to a pathological non-communication between the two tissues. One of the best examples of impaired interplay between muscle and nerve is Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, a neurodegenerative disease characterized by degeneration of motor neurons and muscle atrophy. Increasing evidences suggest that damage to motor neurons is enhanced by alterations in the neighboring non-neuronal cells and indicate that altered skeletal muscle might be the source of signals that impinge motor neuron activity and survival. Here we investigated whether muscle selective expression of SOD1G93A mutant gene modulates mRNAs and miRNAs expression at the level of spinal cord of MLC/SOD1G93A mice. Using a Taqman array, the Affymetrix Mouse Gene 2.0 ST approach and the MiRwalk 2.0 database, which provides information on miRNA and their predicted target genes, we revealed that muscle specific expression of SOD1G93A modulates relevant molecules of the genetic and epigenetic circuitry of myelin homeostasis in spinal cord of transgenic mice. Our study provides insights into the pathophysiological interplay between muscle and nerve and supports the hypothesis that muscle is a source of signals that can either positively or negatively affect the nervous system. PMID:26648847

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of HBV and HCV Screening Strategies – A Systematic Review of Existing Modelling Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Geue, Claudia; Wu, Olivia; Xin, Yiqiao; Heggie, Robert; Hutchinson, Sharon; Martin, Natasha K.; Fenwick, Elisabeth; Goldberg, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Studies evaluating the cost-effectiveness of screening for Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are generally heterogeneous in terms of risk groups, settings, screening intervention, outcomes and the economic modelling framework. It is therefore difficult to compare cost-effectiveness results between studies. This systematic review aims to summarise and critically assess existing economic models for HBV and HCV in order to identify the main methodological differences in modelling approaches. Methods A structured search strategy was developed and a systematic review carried out. A critical assessment of the decision-analytic models was carried out according to the guidelines and framework developed for assessment of decision-analytic models in Health Technology Assessment of health care interventions. Results The overall approach to analysing the cost-effectiveness of screening strategies was found to be broadly consistent for HBV and HCV. However, modelling parameters and related structure differed between models, producing different results. More recent publications performed better against a performance matrix, evaluating model components and methodology. Conclusion When assessing screening strategies for HBV and HCV infection, the focus should be on more recent studies, which applied the latest treatment regimes, test methods and had better and more complete data on which to base their models. In addition to parameter selection and associated assumptions, careful consideration of dynamic versus static modelling is recommended. Future research may want to focus on these methodological issues. In addition, the ability to evaluate screening strategies for multiple infectious diseases, (HCV and HIV at the same time) might prove important for decision makers. PMID:26689908

  14. Cell-free circulating mitochondrial DNA content and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Hann, Hie-Won; Wan, Shaogui; Hann, Richard S; Wang, Chun; Lai, Yinzhi; Ye, Xishan; Evans, Alison; Myers, Ronald E; Ye, Zhong; Li, Bingshan; Xing, Jinliang; Yang, Hushan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a potential link between circulating cell-free mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and cancers. However, there is no study evaluating the association between circulating mtDNA as a non-invasive marker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk. We conducted a nested case-control study to determine circulating mtDNA content in serum samples from 116 HBV-related HCC cases and 232 frequency-matched cancer-free HBV controls, and evaluate the retrospective association between mtDNA content and HCC risk using logistic regression and their temporal relationship using a mixed effects model. HCC cases had significantly lower circulating mtDNA content than controls (1.06 versus 2.47, P = 1.7 × 10(-5)). Compared to HBV patients with higher mtDNA content, those with lower mtDNA content had a significantly increased risk of HCC with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-3.72, P = 0.004). Quartile analyses revealed a significant dose-dependent effect (Ptrend = 0.001) for this association. In a pilot longitudinal sub-cohort of 14 matched cases-control pairs, we observed a trend of dramatically decreased mtDNA content in cases and slightly decreased mtDNA content in controls, with a significant interaction of case-control status with time (Pinteraction = 0.049). Our findings suggest that circulating mtDNA is a potential novel non-invasive biomarker of HCC risk in HBV patients. PMID:27063412

  15. Interleukin-22 Promotes Proliferation of Liver Stem/Progenitor Cells in Mice and Patients with Chronic HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Dechun; Kong, Xiaoni; Weng, Honglei; Park, Ogyi; Wang, Hua; Dooley, Steven; Gershwin, M. Eric; Gao, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Proliferation of liver stem/progenitor cells (LPCs), which can differentiate into hepatocytes or biliary epithelial cells, is often observed in chronically inflamed regions of liver in patients. We investigated how inflammation might promote proliferation of LPCs. Methods We examined the role of interleukin (IL)-22, a survival factor for hepatocytes, on proliferation of LPCs in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and in mice. Proliferation of LPCs in mice was induced by feeding a diet that contained 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC). Results Hepatic expression of IL-22 was increased in patients with HBV and correlated with the grade of inflammation and proliferation of LPCs. Mice on the DDC diet that overexpressed an IL-22 transgene specifically in liver (IL-22TG), or that were infected with an IL-22–expressing adenovirus, had increased proliferation of LPCs. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, a component of the IL-22 signaling pathway, was activated in LPCs isolated from DDC-fed IL-22TG mice. Deletion of STAT3 from livers of IL-22TG mice reduced proliferation of LPCs. Moreover, the receptors IL-22R1 and IL-10R2 were detected on EpCAM+CD45– LPCs isolated from DDC-fed wild-type mice. Culture of these cells with IL-22 activated STAT3 and led to cell proliferation, but IL-22 had no effect on proliferation of STAT3-deficient EpCAM+CD45– LPCs. IL-22 also activated STAT3 and promoted proliferation of cultured BMOL cells (a mouse LPC line). Conclusion In livers of mice and patients with chronic HBV infection, inflammatory cells produce IL-22, which promotes proliferation of LPCs via STAT3. These findings link inflammation with proliferation of LPCs in patients with HBV infection. PMID:22484119

  16. Development of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for the Detection of Treponema pallidum, HCV, HIV-1, and HBV.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Gong, Rui; Lu, Xuan; Zhang, Yi; Tang, Jingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, and hepatitis B virus (HBV) are major causes of sexually transmitted diseases passed through blood contact. The development of a sensitive and efficient method for detection is critical for early diagnosis and for large-scale screening of blood specimens in China. This study aims to establish an assay to detect these pathogens in clinical serum specimens. We established a TaqMan-locked nucleic acid (LNA) real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for rapid, sensitive, specific, quantitative, and simultaneous detection and identification. The copy numbers of standards of these 4 pathogens were quantified. Standard curves were generated by determining the mean cycle threshold values versus 10-fold serial dilutions of standards over a range of 10(6) to 10(1) copies/μL, with the lowest detection limit of the assay being 10(1) copies/μL. The assay was applied to 328 clinical specimens and compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and commercial nucleic acid testing (NAT) methods. The assay identified 39 T. pallidum-, 96 HCV-, 13 HIV-1-, 123 HBV-, 5 HBV/HCV-, 1 T. pallidum/HBV-, 1 HIV-1/HCV-, and 1 HIV-1/T. pallidum-positive specimens. The high sensitivity of the assay confers strong potential for its use as a highly reliable, cost-effective, and useful molecular diagnostic tool for large-scale screening of clinical specimens. This assay will assist in the study of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of sexually transmitted blood diseases. PMID:25866106

  17. Prevalence of HBV Infection and Knowledge of Hepatitis B Among Patients Attending Primary Care Clinics in Poland.

    PubMed

    Ganczak, Maria; Dmytrzyk-Daniłów, Gabriela; Korzeń, Marcin; Drozd-Dąbrowska, Marzena; Szych, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that community awareness of hepatitis B (HB) can lead to vaccination and testing. The study objectives were to assess the prevalence of HBV infection and knowledge of HB among adult patients attending randomly selected primary care clinics. A cross-sectional sero-survey was conducted in March 2013 in the Zgorzelec region, Poland, with the use of an investigator-developed questionnaire containing 22 questions regarding HB knowledge. Serum samples were assayed for anti-HBc total and anti-HBs with enzyme immunoassay. The prevalence of anti-HBc total among 410 participants (median age 56 years) was 10.3 % (95 % CI 7.6-13.8 %), nobody was aware of an infection. The main sources of HB knowledge were the media and medical staff. The mean knowledge score was 14.8 ± 4.9; 76.7 % of the respondents had scores >50 %. Particular gaps were detected relating to knowledge of unprotected sexual intercourse and MTCT; 45.6 % patients were not aware of the potential asymptomatic course of HBV infection, 41.2 % about chronic HB treatment. A patient's low educational level was negatively associated with a high knowledge level; the willingness for further education on HB and HBV vaccination in the past were independently associated with good knowledge. In conclusion, the HBV infection remains a public health threat in Poland, since the prevalence of infection markers in asymptomatic adult patients was high. Knowledge gaps call for awareness campaigns which may increase testing and diagnosis, audiences representing lower education level should be targeted first. Knowledge on HB might serve as an effective tool in decision making regarding vaccination. PMID:26699149

  18. The role of DCs in the immunopathogenesis of chronic HBV infection and the methods of inducing DCs maturation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hai-Hua; Zhou, Dong-Fang; Zhou, Jun-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the result of an inadequate immune response towards the virus. Dendritic cells (DCs), as the most efficient professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), possess the strongest antigen presenting the effect in the body and can stimulate the initial T cell activation and proliferation. DCs of patients with chronic HBV infection are impaired, resulting in more tolerogenic rather than immunogenic responses, which may contribute to viral persistence. Recently, numerous methods have been developed to induce DCs maturation. To date, recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) combined with interleukin-4 (rhIL-4) has been a classic culture combination to DCs. The recently classified type III interferon group interferon-λ (IFN-λ) displays antiviral, antitumor, and immunoregulatory activity. In our laboratory, we demonstrate that IFN-λ1 combined with rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4 can significantly increase the expression of DC surface molecules and the secretion of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection. In this review, we emphasize on the role of DCs in the immunopathogenesis of chronic HBV infection. Importantly, we systematic review that the latest update in the current status of knowledge on the methods of inducing DCs maturation in anti-HBV immunity. What's more, we conclude that IFN-λ1 combined with GM-CSF and IL-4 can induce DCs maturation, which could become a possibility to be applied to the autologus dendritic cell vaccine to treat chronic hepatitis B. PMID:26104380

  19. Cell-free circulating mitochondrial DNA content and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic HBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Hann, Hie-Won; Wan, Shaogui; Hann, Richard S.; Wang, Chun; Lai, Yinzhi; Ye, Xishan; Evans, Alison; Myers, Ronald E.; Ye, Zhong; Li, Bingshan; Xing, Jinliang; Yang, Hushan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a potential link between circulating cell-free mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and cancers. However, there is no study evaluating the association between circulating mtDNA as a non-invasive marker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk. We conducted a nested case-control study to determine circulating mtDNA content in serum samples from 116 HBV-related HCC cases and 232 frequency-matched cancer-free HBV controls, and evaluate the retrospective association between mtDNA content and HCC risk using logistic regression and their temporal relationship using a mixed effects model. HCC cases had significantly lower circulating mtDNA content than controls (1.06 versus 2.47, P = 1.7 × 10−5). Compared to HBV patients with higher mtDNA content, those with lower mtDNA content had a significantly increased risk of HCC with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28–3.72, P = 0.004). Quartile analyses revealed a significant dose-dependent effect (Ptrend = 0.001) for this association. In a pilot longitudinal sub-cohort of 14 matched cases-control pairs, we observed a trend of dramatically decreased mtDNA content in cases and slightly decreased mtDNA content in controls, with a significant interaction of case-control status with time (Pinteraction = 0.049). Our findings suggest that circulating mtDNA is a potential novel non-invasive biomarker of HCC risk in HBV patients. PMID:27063412

  20. Co-incubation with core proteins of HBV and HCV leads to modulation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Amogh; Samrat, Subodh K; Agrawal, Babita; Tyrrell, D Lorne J; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis B and C (HBV and HCV) are hepatotropic viruses in humans with approximately 350 and 170 million chronic carriers respectively. Since both viruses have similar modes of transmission, many people are co-infected. Co-infection is common in intravenous drug users, HIV-positive individuals, and transplant recipients. Compared to mono-infected patients, co-infected patients exhibit exacerbated liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver failure. Some of the pathogenic effects may be attributed in part to the structural core proteins of both viruses-ones that have displayed immunomodulatory properties. Yet, the effects of their combined interaction on the human immune system remain a mystery. We aimed to elucidate the combined effects of HBV and HCV core proteins on human dendritic cells' (DCs) ability to present antigens and stimulate antigen-specific T-cells. We observed that when DCs, differentiated from human peripheral blood monocytes, were co-incubated with both core proteins, IL-10 production was dramatically enhanced, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12 production was significantly reduced, and HLA-DR expression was downregulated. This instant functional and phenotypic modulation of DCs induced by a combination of HBV and HCV core proteins can allow them to behave like tolerizing DCs, inefficiently presenting antigens to CD4+ T-cells and even suppressing induction of the cellular immune response. These results reveal an important mechanism by which HBV and HCV synergistically induce immune tolerance early in infection that may be instrumental in establishing chronic, persistent infections. PMID:25148301

  1. Prevalence of occult HBV among hemodialysis patients in two districts in the northern part of the West Bank, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Dumaidi, Kamal; Al-Jawabreh, Amer

    2014-10-01

    Occult hepatitis B infection is the case with undetectable HBsAg, but positive for HBV DNA in liver tissue and/or serum. Occult hepatitis B infection among hemodialysis patients in Palestine has been understudied. In this study, 148 hemodialysis patients from 2 northern districts in Palestine, Jenin (89) and Tulkarem (59), were investigated for occult hepatitis B, HBV, HCV infections with related risk factors. ELISA and PCR were used for the detection of anti-HBc and viral DNA, respectively. The overall prevalence of occult hepatitis B infection among the study group was 12.5% (16/128). Occult hepatitis B infection is more prevalent among males with most cases (15/16) from Jenin District. About one-third (42/132) of the hemodialysis patients were anti-HBc positive. Approximately 27% of the hemodialysis patients were infected with HCV. Around 20% (28/140) were positive for HBV DNA, but only 8.2% (12/146) of the hemodialysis patients were positive for HBsAg. The comparison between hemodialysis patients with occult hepatitis B infection and those without occult hepatitis B infection for selected risk factors and parameters as liver Enzyme, age, sex, HCV infection, blood transfusion, kidney transplant, anti-HBc, and vaccination showed no statistical significance between both categories. Duration of hemodialysis significantly affected the rate of HCV infection. HCV is significantly higher in hemodialysis patients with both Diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The prevalence of occult hepatitis B infection among hemodialysis patients is high; requiring stringent control policies. HBsAg assay is insufficient test for accurate diagnosis of HBV infection among hemodialysis patients. PMID:24992542

  2. Impact of current staging systems on treatment strategy for HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaopeng; Qiu, Yudong

    2016-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. HCC incidence has increased over the last few years, with more than half of HCC cases being reported in China, where hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the main etiologic factor. The heterogeneity in HCC's worldwide distribution and the differences in its etiology in different locations may result in prognosis estimation and therapeutic decision making being more complicated for HCC patients. In the past decade, several clinical staging systems have been developed based on relevant prognostic factors. Among them, the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) and Hong Kong Liver Cancer (HKLC) staging systems are the only two classification systems that link prognostic classification to treatment indications. In this review, we mainly focus on the use of the BCLC and HKLC staging systems for guiding therapeutic decision making for HCC, the respective advantages and disadvantages of each classification system, and future perspectives for the improvement of the HKLC model. PMID:26282785

  3. HBV X protein interacts with cytoskeletal signaling proteins through SH3 binding.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huixing; Tan, Tuan Lin; Niu, Dandan; Chen, Wei Ning

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate interactions between cellular SH3-containing proteins and the proline-rich domain in Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) The proline-rich domain of HBx (amino acids 19-58) as well as the relevant site-directed mutagenesis (proline to alanine residues) were cloned into pGEX-5X-1 and expressed as GST-PXXP and GST-AXXA probes. Panomics SH3 domain arrays were probed using both GST-PXXP and GST-AXXA to identify potential interacting SH3 domain containing proteins. The specific interactions were confirmed by the immunoprecipitation of the full-length SH3 domain-containing protein. We report here the binding assay which demonstrated interaction between PXXP domain in HBx and the SH3-domain containing proteins, in particular various signaling proteins involved in cytoskeletal reorganization. Our findings were consistent with similar virus-host interactions via SH3 binding for other viruses such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Further characterization of the proline-rich binding to SH3 domains could yield important information for the design of novel therapeutic measures against downstream disease causative effects of HBx in the liver cells. PMID:20036864

  4. Estimation of instantaneous peak flow from simulated maximum daily flow using the HBV model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jie; Haberlandt, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Instantaneous peak flow (IPF) data are the foundation of the design of hydraulic structures and flood frequency analysis. However, the long discharge records published by hydrological agencies contain usually only average daily flows which are of little value for design in small catchments. In former research, statistical analysis using observed peak and daily flow data was carried out to explore the link between instantaneous peak flow (IPF) and maximum daily flow (MDF) where the multiple regression model is proved to have the best performance. The objective of this study is to further investigate the acceptability of the multiple regression model for post-processing simulated daily flows from hydrological modeling. The model based flood frequency analysis allows to consider change in the condition of the catchments and in climate for design. Here, the HBV model is calibrated on peak flow distributions and flow duration curves using two approaches. In a two -step approach the simulated MDF are corrected with a priory established regressions. In a one-step procedure the regression coefficients are calibrated together with the parameters of the model. For the analysis data from 18 mesoscale catchments in the Aller-Leine river basin in Northern Germany are used. The results show that: (1) the multiple regression model is capable to predict the peak flows with the simulated MDF data; (2) the calibrated hydrological model reproduces well the magnitude and frequency distribution of peak flows; (3) the one-step procedure outperforms the two-step procedure regarding the estimation of peak flows.

  5. Decreased antigenicity profiles of immune-escaped and drug-resistant hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) double mutants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Selective pressure from either the immune response or the use of nucleoside analogs in antiviral therapy could be driving the emergence of HBV mutants. Because of the overlap of the open reading frame (ORF) S for the HBsAg and ORF P for viral polymerase, rtM204I and rtM204V mutations in the polymerase would produce sI195M and sW196S in the HBsAg. The combined effects of immune-escaped mutations (sT118M, sG145K, sG145R) and drug-resistant mutations (rtM204I, rtM204V) on the antigenicity profiles of HBsAg has not been widely explored. Methods To determine the combined effects of immune-escaped and drug-resistant mutants on the antigenicity profiles of HBsAg, recombinant plasmids encoding HBsAg double mutants were constructed using site-directed mutagenesis. The supernatant from each plasmid transfection was analyzed for HBsAg in the western-blotting and five of the most commonly used commercial ELISA kits in China. Results Western-blotting assay showed the successful expression of each HBsAg mutant. All five ELISA kits manifested similar avidity, which were demonstrated by the slope of the curves, for the sT118M mutant, and sT118M-rtM204I (sT118M-sI195M) and sT118M-rtM204V (sT118M-sW196S) double mutants, suggesting that drug-resistant YMDD mutants caused negligible losses in the antigenicity of immune-escaped sT118M HBsAg. In contrast, the presence of the rtM204I (sI195M) mutation, but not rtM204V (sW196S) in combination with the sG145K mutation significantly reduced the avidity of sG145K HBsAg. The rtM204I (sI195M) mutation also decreased the antigenicity profiles for sG145R HBsAg. Conclusions Drug-resistant mutations rtM204I (sI195M) and rtM204V (sW196S) caused significant reduction in antigenicity for the immune-escaped HBsAg mutants sG145K and sG145R, which may hamper HBV diagnosis and disease control from HBV blood-transfusion transmissions in China. The development of ELISA kits with a greater sensitivity for drug-resistant and immune-escaped HBs

  6. Recognition of core-derived epitopes from a novel HBV-targeted immunotherapeutic by T-cells from patients infected by different viral genotypes.

    PubMed

    Godon, Ophelie; Evlachev, Alexei; Bourgine, Maryline; Meritet, Jean-François; Martin, Perrine; Inchauspe, Genevieve; Michel, Marie-Louise

    2015-08-26

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects millions of people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current therapies based on nucleos(t)ide analogs or pegylated-interferon-α lead to control of viral replication in most patients but rarely achieve cure. A potential strategy to control chronic hepatitis B is to restore or induce functional anti-HBV T-cell immune responses using HBV-specific immunotherapeutics. However, viral diversity is a challenge to the development of this class of products as HBV genotypes display a sequence diversity of up to 8%. We have developed a novel HBV-targeted immunotherapeutic, TG1050, based on a non-replicative Adenovirus vector encoding a unique and large fusion protein composed of multiple antigenic regions derived from a HBV genotype D sequence. Using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 23 patients chronically infected by five distinct genotypes (gt A, B, C, D and E) and various sets of peptides encompassing conserved versus divergent regions of HBV core we have measured ability of TG1050 genotype D core-derived peptides to be recognized by T-cells from patients infected by various genotypes. Overall, PBMCs from 78% of genotype B or C- and 100% genotype A or E-infected patients lead to detection of HBV core-specific T-cells recognizing genotype D antigenic domains located both in conserved and variable regions. This proof-of-concept study supports the clinical development of TG1050 in large patient populations independently of infecting genotypes. PMID:26209840

  7. Seroprevalence of CMV, HSV-2 and HBV among HIV-Infected Malawian Children: A Cross-sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Chris Buck, W.; Kazembe, Peter N.; Phiri, Sam; Andrianarimanana, Diavolana; Weigel, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little is known about viral co-infections in African human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children. We examined the prevalence of seromarkers for cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections among HIV-infected, antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naïve children in Lilongwe, Malawi. Methods: Ninety-one serum samples were tested for IgG and IgM antibodies to CMV, and IgG antibodies to HSV-2 and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Baseline demographic, clinical and laboratory data were abstracted from electronic records. Results: CMV IgG was the most common positive result in all age groups (in 73% of children <1 year, and 100% in all other groups). Three patients were CMV IgM positive (3.3%), suggesting acute infection. HSV-2 IgG was positive in four patients (4.4%), and HBsAg in two (2.2%). Conclusions: CMV infection occurred early in life, and few children had specific signs of CMV infection at the time of ART initiation. Unrecognized HBV infection represents opportunities for testing and treatment of HIV/HBV co-infected children. PMID:26884443

  8. The recombined cccDNA produced using minicircle technology mimicked HBV genome in structure and function closely.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoyan; Chen, Ping; Hou, Xiaohu; Xu, Wenjuan; Wang, Dan; Wang, Tian-Yan; Zhang, Liping; Zheng, Gang; Gao, Zhi-Liang; He, Cheng-Yi; Zhou, Boping; Chen, Zhi-Ying

    2016-01-01

    HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is drug-resistant and responsible for viral persistence. To facilitate the development of anti-cccDNA drugs, we developed a minicircle DNA vector (MC)-based technology to produce large quantity of recombined cccDNA (rcccDNA) resembling closely to its wild-type counterpart both in structure and function. The rcccDNA differed to the wild-type cccDNA (wtcccDNA) only in that it carried an extra 36-bp DNA recombinant product attR upstream of the preC/C gene. Using a procedure similar to standard plasmid production, milligrams of rcccDNA can be generated in common laboratories conveniently. The rcccDNA demonstrated many essential biological features of wtcccDNA, including: (1) undergoing nucleation upon nucleus entry; (2) serving as template for production of all HBV RNAs and proteins; (3) deriving virions capable of infecting tree shrew, and subsequently producing viral mRNAs, proteins, rcccDNA and infectious virions. As an example to develop anti-cccDNA drugs, we used the Crispr/Cas9 system to provide clear-cut evidence that rcccDNA was cleaved by this DNA editing tool in vitro. In summary, we have developed a convenient technology to produce large quantity of rcccDNA as a surrogate of wtcccDNA for investigating HBV biology and developing treatment to eradicate this most wide-spreading virus. PMID:27174254

  9. Pokemon siRNA Delivery Mediated by RGD-Modified HBV Core Protein Suppressed the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Liu, Xiaoping; Jia, Jianbo; Wu, Jinsheng; Wu, Ning; Chen, Jun; Fang, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly human malignant tumor that is among the most common cancers in the world, especially in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been well established as a high risk factor for hepatic malignance. Studies have shown that Pokemon is a master oncogene for HCC growth, suggesting it as an ideal therapeutic target. However, efficient delivery system is still lacking for Pokemon targeting treatment. In this study, we used core proteins of HBV, which is modified with RGD peptides, to construct a biomimetic vector for the delivery of Pokemon siRNAs (namely, RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA). Quantitative PCR and Western blot assays revealed that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA possessed the highest efficiency of Pokemon suppression in HCC cells. In vitro experiments further indicated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon-siRNA exerted a higher tumor suppressor activity on HCC cell lines, evidenced by reduced proliferation and attenuated invasiveness, than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Finally, animal studies demonstrated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA suppressed the growth of HCC xenografts in mice by a greater extent than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Based on the above results, Pokemon siRNA delivery mediated by RGD-modified HBV core protein was shown to be an effective strategy of HCC gene therapy. PMID:26356810

  10. The recombined cccDNA produced using minicircle technology mimicked HBV genome in structure and function closely

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoyan; Chen, Ping; Hou, Xiaohu; Xu, Wenjuan; Wang, Dan; Wang, Tian-yan; Zhang, Liping; Zheng, Gang; Gao, Zhi-liang; He, Cheng-Yi; Zhou, Boping; Chen, Zhi-Ying

    2016-01-01

    HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is drug-resistant and responsible for viral persistence. To facilitate the development of anti-cccDNA drugs, we developed a minicircle DNA vector (MC)-based technology to produce large quantity of recombined cccDNA (rcccDNA) resembling closely to its wild-type counterpart both in structure and function. The rcccDNA differed to the wild-type cccDNA (wtcccDNA) only in that it carried an extra 36-bp DNA recombinant product attR upstream of the preC/C gene. Using a procedure similar to standard plasmid production, milligrams of rcccDNA can be generated in common laboratories conveniently. The rcccDNA demonstrated many essential biological features of wtcccDNA, including: (1) undergoing nucleation upon nucleus entry; (2) serving as template for production of all HBV RNAs and proteins; (3) deriving virions capable of infecting tree shrew, and subsequently producing viral mRNAs, proteins, rcccDNA and infectious virions. As an example to develop anti-cccDNA drugs, we used the Crispr/Cas9 system to provide clear-cut evidence that rcccDNA was cleaved by this DNA editing tool in vitro. In summary, we have developed a convenient technology to produce large quantity of rcccDNA as a surrogate of wtcccDNA for investigating HBV biology and developing treatment to eradicate this most wide-spreading virus. PMID:27174254

  11. [Seroconversion and immune response after anti-HBV vaccination in patients on chronic hemodialysis: comparison of two vaccines].

    PubMed

    Polito, Pasquale; Di Lullo, Luca; Iannacci, Giuseppe Roberto; Cecilia, Annalisa; Galderisi, Cristina; Gorini, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    ESRD patients on hemodialysis (HD) have a high risk of HBV infections. Primary prevention through vaccination is a first choice to reduce the morbidity from HBV. Prevention can be accomplished by two types of vaccines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serological response to HBV vaccination in a population of HD patients who were randomized to Fendrix or Engerix B according to common administration protocols. Ninety-two HD patients were randomized to Fendrix or Engerix B immunization protocols. Patients in the Fendrix arm received four intramuscular administrations of 20 micron g, while patients in the Engerix arm received three intramuscular administrations of 40 micron g with an optional booster dose at two months from the last administration in nonresponders. The seroconversion rates were higher in the Fendrix group than the Engerix group, with faster responses, higher titers and longer duration of immune memory. Fendrix seems to be more effective than the older vaccine, Engerix, especially in patients at high infection risk like those making up our study population. Other crucial factors for good outcomes in patient immunization were biological and dialysis age. This underlines the importance of early immunization protocols such as already discussed by many nephrologists. PMID:22028266

  12. Protective immune barrier against hepatitis B is needed in individuals born before infant HBV vaccination program in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shigui; Yu, Chengbo; Chen, Ping; Deng, Min; Cao, Qing; Li, Yiping; Ren, Jingjing; Xu, Kaijin; Yao, Jun; Xie, Tiansheng; Wang, Chencheng; Cui, Yuanxia; Ding, Cheng; Tian, Guo; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Ruan, Bing; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B prevalence rate in adults is still at a high to intermediate level in China. Our purpose was to explore the incidence rate and protective immune barrier against hepatitis B in adults in China. A sample of 317961 participants was multi-screened for hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg) in a large-scale cohort of the National Hepatitis B Demonstration Project. A total of 5401 persons were newly-infected, representing an incidence rate of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.77-0.85) per 100 person-years after adjusted by gender and age. History of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, birth prior to 1992, coastal residence, family history of HBV, and migrant worker status were significantly associated with higher incidence, while HBV vaccination and greater exercise with lower incidence. The hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb) positive rate was negatively correlated with the incidence rate of hepatitis B (r = -0.826). Linear fitting yielded an incidence rate of 1.23 plus 0.02 multiplied by HBsAb positive rate. The study firstly identified the HBsAg incidence rate, which was reduced to 0.1 per 100 person-years after vaccination coverage of about 64%. The protective immune barrier against hepatitis B needs to be established in individuals born prior to the advent of infant HBV vaccination. PMID:26655735

  13. Protective immune barrier against hepatitis B is needed in individuals born before infant HBV vaccination program in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shigui; Yu, Chengbo; Chen, Ping; Deng, Min; Cao, Qing; Li, Yiping; Ren, Jingjing; Xu, Kaijin; Yao, Jun; Xie, Tiansheng; Wang, Chencheng; Cui, Yuanxia; Ding, Cheng; Tian, Guo; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Ruan, Bing; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B prevalence rate in adults is still at a high to intermediate level in China. Our purpose was to explore the incidence rate and protective immune barrier against hepatitis B in adults in China. A sample of 317961 participants was multi-screened for hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg) in a large-scale cohort of the National Hepatitis B Demonstration Project. A total of 5401 persons were newly-infected, representing an incidence rate of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.77–0.85) per 100 person-years after adjusted by gender and age. History of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, birth prior to 1992, coastal residence, family history of HBV, and migrant worker status were significantly associated with higher incidence, while HBV vaccination and greater exercise with lower incidence. The hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb) positive rate was negatively correlated with the incidence rate of hepatitis B (r = −0.826). Linear fitting yielded an incidence rate of 1.23 plus 0.02 multiplied by HBsAb positive rate. The study firstly identified the HBsAg incidence rate, which was reduced to 0.1 per 100 person-years after vaccination coverage of about 64%. The protective immune barrier against hepatitis B needs to be established in individuals born prior to the advent of infant HBV vaccination. PMID:26655735

  14. Arabidopsis mutants impaired in cosuppression.

    PubMed Central

    Elmayan, T; Balzergue, S; Béon, F; Bourdon, V; Daubremet, J; Guénet, Y; Mourrain, P; Palauqui, J C; Vernhettes, S; Vialle, T; Wostrikoff, K; Vaucheret, H

    1998-01-01

    Post-transcriptional gene silencing (cosuppression) results in the degradation of RNA after transcription. A transgenic Arabidopsis line showing post-transcriptional silencing of a 35S-uidA transgene and uidA-specific methylation was mutagenized using ethyl methanesulfonate. Six independent plants were isolated in which uidA mRNA accumulation and beta-glucuronidase activity were increased up to 3500-fold, whereas the transcription rate of the 35S-uidA transgene was increased only up to threefold. These plants each carried a recessive monogenic mutation that is responsible for the release of silencing. These mutations defined two genetic loci, called sgs1 and sgs2 (for suppressor of gene silencing). Transgene methylation was distinctly modified in sgs1 and sgs2 mutants. However, methylation of centromeric repeats was not affected, indicating that sgs mutants differ from ddm (for decrease in DNA methylation) and som (for somniferous) mutants. Indeed, unlike ddm and som mutations, sgs mutations were not able to release transcriptional silencing of a 35S-hpt transgene. Conversely, both sgs1 and sgs2 mutations were able to release cosuppression of host Nia genes and 35S-Nia2 transgenes. These results therefore indicate that sgs mutations act in trans to impede specifically transgene-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing. PMID:9761800

  15. DNA vaccine cocktail expressing genotype A and C HBV surface and consensus core antigens generates robust cytotoxic and antibody responses in mice and Rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Obeng-Adjei, N; Hutnick, N A; Yan, J; Chu, J S; Myles, D J F; Morrow, M P; Sardesai, N Y; Weiner, D B

    2013-12-01

    There are well over a quarter of a billion chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers across the globe. Most carriers are at high risk for development of liver cirrhosis and subsequent progression to hepatocellular carcinoma. It is therefore imperative to develop new approaches for immunotherapy against this infection. Antibodies and cytotoxic T cells to different HBV antigens are believed to be important for reducing viral load and clearing HBV-infected cells from the liver. Some of the major challenges facing current vaccine candidates have been their inability to induce both humoral and cellular immunity to multiple antigenic targets and the induction of potent immune responses against the major genotypes of HBV. In this study, highly optimized synthetic DNA plasmids against the HBV consensus core (HBc) and surface (HBs) antigens genotypes A and C were developed and evaluated for their immune potential. These plasmids, which encode the most prevalent genotypes of the virus, were observed to individually induce binding antibodies to HBs antigens and drove robust cell-mediated immunity in animal models. Similar responses to both HBc and HBs antigens were observed when mice and non-human primates were inoculated with the HBc-HBs cocktails. In addition to the cytotoxic T lymphocyte activities exhibited by the immunized mice, the vaccine-induced responses were broadly distributed across multiple antigenic epitopes. These elements are believed to be important to develop an effective therapeutic vaccine. These data support further evaluation of multivalent synthetic plasmids as therapeutic HBV vaccines. PMID:24310062

  16. The WldS gene modestly prolongs survival in the SOD1G93A fALS mouse.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Lindsey R; Culver, Deborah G; Davis, Albert A; Tennant, Philip; Wang, Minsheng; Coleman, Michael; Asress, Seneshaw; Adalbert, Robert; Alexander, Guillermo M; Glass, Jonathan D

    2005-01-01

    The "slow Wallerian degeneration" (Wld(S)) gene is neuroprotective in numerous models of axonal degeneration. Axonal degeneration is an early feature of disease progression in the SOD1G93A mouse, a widely used model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). We crossed the Wld(S) mouse with the SOD1G93A mouse to investigate whether the Wld(S) gene could prolong survival and modify neuropathology in these mice. SOD/Wld(S) mice showed levels of motor axon loss similar to that seen in SOD1G93A mice. The presence of the Wld(S) gene, however, modestly prolonged survival and delayed denervation at the neuromuscular junction. Prolonged survival was more prominent in female mice and did not depend on whether animals were heterozygous or homozygous for the Wld(S) gene. We also report that SOD1G93A mice show significant degeneration of sensory axons during the course of disease, supporting previous data from humans demonstrating that ALS is not purely a motor disorder. PMID:15837585

  17. SPLICE VARIANT SPECIFIC UPREGULATIONOF CA+2/CALMODULIN DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE 1G BY PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES IN VIVO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides induce neurotoxicity in mammals by interfering with ion channel function in excitable neuronal membranes. Previous work demonstrated dose-dependent increases in expression of Ca+2/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (Camk1g) mRNA following acute deltameth...

  18. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  19. TDP-43 modification in the hSOD1(G93A) amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cai, MuDan; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult onset disease that produces gradual motor neuron cell death in the spinal cord (SP). Recently, transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43), a critical component of insoluble ubiquitinated inclusions, has received attention in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, including frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and ALS. TDP-43 modifications, including hyperphosphorylation, truncation, and ubiquitination, have been reported in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases (NDs). However, the pathogenic mechanism of TDP-43 in ALS is unclear. To determine the association between TDP-43 and neurotoxicity in an ALS model, we characterized TDP-43 expression in hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice (Tg) as an ALS animal model. TDP-43 was expressed by astrocytes and microglial cells in the SP of hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice. In addition, the expression of phosphorylated and truncated TDP-43 increased in the SP of ALS mice compared with age-matched non-Tg. Furthermore, the serum iron concentration and expression of transferrin, a homeostasis-related iron protein, in the SP were increased relative to non-Tg. The protein expression level of HO-1 related to oxidative stress was increased in the SP of hSOD1(G93A) Tg relative to non-Tg. We show that an increase of TDP-43 modification, including phosphorylation or truncation, associates with dysfunctional iron homeostasis and an increase in oxidative stress in the SP of symptomatic hSOD1(G93A) Tg. These findings suggest that modified TDP-43 may be involved in motor neuron death in the SP of a SOD1(G93A)-expressing familial ALS (fALS) animal model. PMID:25213598

  20. A novel mutant 10Ala/Arg together with mutant 144Ser/Arg of hepatitis B virus X protein involved in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocarcinogenesis in HepG2 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ying; Wang, Junwei; Wang, Yuhe; Wang, Anna; Guo, Hongliang; Wei, Feili; Mehta, Sanjay R; Espitia, Stephen; Smith, Davey M; Liu, Longgen; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Dexi

    2016-02-28

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a major health problem worldwide. HBV X (HBx) protein is the most common open reading frame that may undergo mutations, resulting in the development of HCC. This study aimed to determine specific HBx mutations that differentiate the central- and para-tumor tissues, and identify their association with HCC development. HBx gene from HCC tumor and para-tumor tissues of 47 HCC patients was amplified, sequenced and statistically analyzed. A novel combination of 2 mutations at residues 10 and 144 was identified which might play a significant role in HCC development. Expression vectors carrying HBx with the specific mutations were constructed and transfected into HepG2 and p53-null HepG2 cells. Compared to wild type (WT) and single mutation of HBx at residue 10 or 144, the 10/144 double mutations strongly up-regulated p21 expression and prolonged G1/S transition in WT- and p53-null HepG2 cells. Apoptosis was also inhibited by HBx harboring 10/44 double-mutation. Binding of 10/144 double-mutant HBx to p53 was lower than WT HBx. Conclusively, the 10/144 double mutation of HBx might play a crucial role in HCC formation. PMID:26706415

  1. Intrahepatic Toll-Like Receptor 3 in Chronic HBV Infection Subjects: Asymptomatic Carriers, Active Chronic Hepatitis, Cirrhosis, and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jia Wen; Ping Huang, Mao; Zhong, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Background The entire disease spectrum of chronic HBV infection (CHB) includes asymptomatic carriers (AC), active chronic hepatitis (ACH), cirrhosis (Cir), and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Previous study have demonstrated that the costimulation profiles from the livers of patients influenced immune responses and played various immunological roles in AC, ACH, Cir, and HCC. In addition, activation of TLR3 signaling in the liver may contribute to HBV clearance, although some HBV components are able to block TLR3 signaling and counteract HBV clearance through positive or negative feedback loops. Previous clinical studies have demonstrated that different TLR3 expressions are present in ACH patients, but no studies investigated the expression of TLR3 proteins in the livers of patients with AC, Cir, or HCC. Objectives This study investigated intrahepatic TLR3 expression throughout the entire disease spectrum of CHB patients and assessed the interrelations between TLR3 and costimulation proteins. Patients and Methods Patients with ACH, Cir, HCC, and AC and healthy donors (HD) were recruited. TLR3 expression in the livers of patients were investigated using western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Correlations between TLR3 and costimulation proteins, including CD80, CD86, CD83, CD28, CTLA-4, CD40, and ICAM-1, were assessed. Results The TLR3 protein in the ACH group tended toward reduction although the P Value of the comparison between the ACH group and HD group was not statistically significant. The TLR3 levels in the HCC, AC, and Cir groups were higher than those in the HD and ACH groups. TLR3 was not interrelated with all costimulation proteins in the DCs and T cells in all five groups. No group presented any interrelation between TLR3 and CD40, except the AC group. Conclusions The AC, HCC, and Cir patients displayed increased levels of the intrahepatic TLR3 protein compared to the HD and AC patients. Both activation of TLR3/INF-β signaling and inhibition of

  2. Correlates of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among prison inmates and officers in Ghana: A national multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Adjei, Andrew A; Armah, Henry B; Gbagbo, Foster; Ampofo, William K; Boamah, Isaac; Adu-Gyamfi, Clement; Asare, Isaac; Hesse, Ian FA; Mensah, George

    2008-01-01

    Background Prisons are known to be high-risk environments for the spread of bloodborne and sexually transmitted infections. Prison officers are considered to have an intermittent exposure potential to bloodborne infectious diseases on the job, however there has been no studies on the prevalence of these infections in prison officers in Ghana. Methods A national multicenter cross-sectional study was undertaken on correlates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and syphilis infections in sample of prison inmates and officers from eight of ten regional central prisons in Ghana. A total of 1366 inmates and 445 officers were enrolled between May 2004 and December 2005. Subjects completed personal risk-factor questionnaire and provided blood specimens for unlinked anonymous testing for presence of antibodies to HIV, HCV and Treponema pallidum; and surface antigen of HBV (HBsAg). These data were analyzed using both univariate and multivariate techniques. Results Almost 18% (1336) of 7652 eligible inmates and 21% (445) of 2139 eligible officers in eight study prisons took part. Median ages of inmates and officers were 36.5 years (range 16–84) and 38.1 years (range 25–59), respectively. Among inmates, HIV seroprevalence was 5.9%, syphilis seroprevalence was 16.5%, and 25.5% had HBsAg. Among officers tested, HIV seroprevalence was 4.9%, HCV seroprevalence was 18.7%, syphilis seroprevalence was 7.9%, and 11.7% had HBsAg. Independent determinants for HIV, HBV and syphilis infections among inmates were age between 17–46, being unmarried, being illiterate, female gender, being incarcerated for longer than median time served of 36 months, history of homosexuality, history of intravenous drug use, history of sharing syringes and drug paraphernalia, history of participation in paid sexual activity, and history of sexually transmitted diseases. Independent determinants for HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among officers

  3. Epidemiology, Risk Factors and Genotypes of HBV in HIV-Infected Patients in the Northeast Region of Colombia: High Prevalence of Occult Hepatitis B and F3 Subgenotype Dominance

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Amorocho, Henry; Castellanos-Domínguez, Yeny Zulay; Rodríguez-Villamizar, Laura Andrea; Velandia-Cruz, Sindi Alejandra; Becerra-Peña, Jeysson Andrey; Farfán-García, Ana Elvira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. HIV-positive patients are commonly co-infected with HBV due to shared routes of transmission. Objectives Our aim was to determine the risk factors, prevalence, genotypes, and mutations of the Surface S gene of HBV, and occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) among patients infected with HIV in a northeastern Colombian city. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 275 HIV-positive patients attending an outpatient clinic in Bucaramanga, Colombia during 2009–2010. Blood samples were collected and screened for serological markers of HBV (anti-HBs, anti-HBc and HBsAg) through ELISA assay. Regardless of their serological profile, all samples were tested for the HBV S gene by nested-PCR and HBV genotypes were determined by phylogenetic inference. Clinical records were used to examine demographic, clinical, virological, immunological and antiretroviral therapy (ART) variables of HIV infection. Results Participants were on average 37±11 years old and 65.1% male. The prevalence of HIV-HBV coinfection was 12% (95%CI 8.4–16.4) of which 3.3% had active HBV infection and 8.7% OBI. The prevalence of HIV-HBV coinfection was associated with AIDS stage and ART treatment. Sequence analysis identified genotype F, subgenotype F3 in 93.8% of patients and genotype A in 6.2% of patients. A C149R mutation, which may have resulted from failure in HBsAg detection, was found in one patient with OBI. Conclusions The present study found a high prevalence of HIV-HBV coinfection with an incidence of OBI 2.6-fold higher compared to active HBV infection. These findings suggest including HBV DNA testing to detect OBI in addition to screening for HBV serological markers in HIV patients. PMID:25462190

  4. Discordant diagnostic results due to a hepatitis B virus T123A HBsAg mutant.

    PubMed

    Osiowy, Carla; Kowalec, Kaarina; Giles, Elizabeth

    2016-07-01

    HBsAg immunoassay results are occasionally discordant among primary and confirmatory assays or with respect to other markers of HBV infection. Such discordance has been observed repeatedly in Canada with samples having a mutation at HBsAg codon 123 (sT123A). Detection of recombinant expressed HBsAg protein having either sT123 or sA123 was evaluated with one manual and six automated HBsAg immunoassays. The recombinant mutant HBsAg was non-reactive by Abbott AxSYM, while the Abbott ARCHITECT Quantitative and Qualitative II, ADVIA Centaur, and VITROS ECi detection signal was reduced compared with the wild-type protein, approaching the assay cut-off for certain assays, dependent upon the level of protein. The Roche Elecsys and manual immunoassays detected both wild-type and mutant proteins comparatively. The sT123A mutation leads to loss of detection by immunoassays commonly used in Canadian diagnostic laboratories, which may produce misleading results and diagnoses. PMID:27133305

  5. Calpastatin inhibits motor neuron death and increases survival of hSOD1(G93A) mice.

    PubMed

    Rao, Mala V; Campbell, Jabbar; Palaniappan, Arti; Kumar, Asok; Nixon, Ralph A

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron disease with a poorly understood cause and no effective treatment. Given that calpains mediate neurodegeneration in other pathological states and are abnormally activated in ALS, we investigated the possible ameliorative effects of inhibiting calpain over-activation in hSOD1(G93A) transgenic (Tg) mice in vivo by neuron-specific over-expression of calpastatin (CAST), the highly selective endogenous inhibitor of calpains. Our data indicate that over-expression of CAST in hSOD1(G93A) mice, which lowered calpain activation to levels comparable to wild-type mice, inhibited the abnormal breakdown of cytoskeletal proteins (spectrin, MAP2 and neurofilaments), and ameliorated motor axon loss. Disease onset in hSOD1(G93A) /CAST mice compared to littermate hSOD1(G93A) mice is delayed, which accounts for their longer time of survival. We also find that neuronal over-expression of CAST in hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice inhibited production of putative neurotoxic caspase-cleaved tau and activation of Cdk5, which have been implicated in neurodegeneration in ALS models, and also reduced the formation of SOD1 oligomers. Our data indicate that inhibition of calpain with CAST is neuroprotective in an ALS mouse model. CAST (encoding calpastatin) inhibits hyperactivated calpain to prevent motor neuron disease operating through a cascade of events as indicated in the schematic, with relevance to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We propose that over-expression of CAST in motor neurons of hSOD1(G93A) mice inhibits activation of CDK5, breakdown of cytoskeletal proteins (NFs, MAP2 and Tau) and regulatory molecules (Cam Kinase IV, Calcineurin A), and disease-causing proteins (TDP-43, α-Synuclein and Huntingtin) to prevent neuronal loss and delay neurological deficits. In our experiments, CAST could also inhibit cleavage of Bid, Bax, AIF to prevent mitochondrial, ER and lysosome-mediated cell death mechanisms. Similarly

  6. Whole-genome DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation profiling for HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chao; Tao, Ran; Cao, Qingyi; Zhu, Danhua; Wang, Yini; Wang, Jie; Lu, Juan; Chen, Ermei; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common solid tumor worldwide with a poor prognosis. Accumulating evidence has implicated important regulatory roles of epigenetic modifications in the occurrence and progression of HCC. In the present study, we analyzed 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) levels in the tumor tissues and paired adjacent peritumor tissues (APTs) from four individual HCC patients using a (hydroxy)methylated DNA immunoprecipitation approach combined with deep sequencing [(h)MeDIP-Seq]. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the 5-mC levels in the promoter regions of 2796 genes and the 5-hmC levels in 507 genes differed significantly between HCC tissues and APTs. These differential genes were grouped into various clusters and pathways and found to be particularly enriched in the 'metabolic pathways' that include 'Glycolysis/gluconeogenesis', 'Oxidative phosphorylation' and 'Citrate cycle (TCA cycle)', implicating a potential role of metabolic alterations in HCC. Furthermore, 144 genes had both 5-mC and 5-hmC changes in HCC patients, and 10 of them (PCNA, MDM2, STAG1, E2F4, FGF4, FGF19, RHOBTB2, UBE2QL1, DCN and HSP90AA1) were enriched and interconnected in five pathways including the 'Cell cycle', 'Pathway in cancer', 'Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis', 'Melanoma' and 'Prostate cancer' pathways. The genome-wide mapping of 5-mC and 5-hmC in HCC tissues and APTs indicated that both 5-mC and 5-hmC epigenetic modifications play important roles in the regulation of HCC, and there may be some interconnections between them. Taken together, in the present study we conducted the first genome-wide mapping of DNA methylation combined with hydroxymethylation in HBV-related HCC and provided a series of potential novel epigenetic biomarkers for HCC. PMID:27221337

  7. Optical diagnostic of hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) from human blood serum using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Firdous, Shamaraz

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis is the second most common disease worldwide with half of the cases arising in the developing world. The mortality associated with hepatitis B and C can be reduced if the disease is detected at the early stages of development. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool to detect biochemical changes accompanying hepatitis progression. Raman spectra were acquired from 20 individuals with six hepatitis B infected patients, six hepatitis C infected patients and eight healthy patients in order to gain an insight into the determination of biochemical changes for early diagnostic. The human blood serum was examined at a 532 nm excitation laser source. Raman characteristic peaks were observed in normal sera at 1006, 1157 and 1513 cm-1, while in the case of hepatitis B and C these peaks were found to be blue shifted with decreased intensity. New Raman peaks appeared in HBV and HCV infected sera at 1194, 1302, 844, 905, 1065 and 1303 cm-1 respectively. A Mat lab subroutine and frequency domain filter program is developed and applied to signal processing of Raman scattering data. The algorithms have been successfully applied to remove the signal noise found in experimental scattering signals. The results show that Raman spectroscopy displays a high sensitivity to biochemical changes in blood sera during disease progression resulting in exceptional prediction accuracy when discriminating between normal and malignant. Raman spectroscopy shows enormous clinical potential as a rapid non-invasive diagnostic tool for hepatitis and other infectious diseases.

  8. Moving horizon estimation for assimilating H-SAF remote sensing data into the HBV hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Rodolfo Alvarado; Schwanenberg, Dirk; Krahe, Peter; Lisniak, Dmytro; Sensoy, Aynur; Sorman, A. Arda; Akkol, Bulut

    2016-06-01

    Remote sensing information has been extensively developed over the past few years including spatially distributed data for hydrological applications at high resolution. The implementation of these products in operational flow forecasting systems is still an active field of research, wherein data assimilation plays a vital role on the improvement of initial conditions of streamflow forecasts. We present a novel implementation of a variational method based on Moving Horizon Estimation (MHE), in application to the conceptual rainfall-runoff model HBV, to simultaneously assimilate remotely sensed snow covered area (SCA), snow water equivalent (SWE), soil moisture (SM) and in situ measurements of streamflow data using large assimilation windows of up to one year. This innovative application of the MHE approach allows to simultaneously update precipitation, temperature, soil moisture as well as upper and lower zones water storages of the conceptual model, within the assimilation window, without an explicit formulation of error covariance matrixes and it enables a highly flexible formulation of distance metrics for the agreement of simulated and observed variables. The framework is tested in two data-dense sites in Germany and one data-sparse environment in Turkey. Results show a potential improvement of the lead time performance of streamflow forecasts by using perfect time series of state variables generated by the simulation of the conceptual rainfall-runoff model itself. The framework is also tested using new operational data products from the Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management (H-SAF) of EUMETSAT. This study is the first application of H-SAF products to hydrological forecasting systems and it verifies their added value. Results from assimilating H-SAF observations lead to a slight reduction of the streamflow forecast skill in all three cases compared to the assimilation of streamflow data only. On the other hand

  9. Free-vibration characteristics of a large split-blanket solar array in a 1-g field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaker, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    Two methods for studying the free vibration characteristics of a large split blanket solar array in both a 0-g and a 1-g cantilevered configuration are presented. The 0-g configuration corresponds to an in-orbit configuration of the array; the 1-g configuration is a typical ground test configuration. The first method applies the equations of continuum mechanics to determine the mode shapes and frequencies of the array; the second method uses the Rayleigh-Ritz approach. In the Rayleigh-Ritz method the array displacements are represented by string modes and cantilevered beam modes. The results of this investigation are summarized by a series of graphs illustrating the effects of various array parameters on the mode shapes and frequencies of the system. The results of the two methods are also compared in tabular form.

  10. Numerical calculations of photoassociation of cold 85Rb2 molecules to the 1g(5P1 / 2) State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeman, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Data obtained at the University of Connecticut by Jianbing Qi, Dajun Wang, Ye Huang, H. K. Pechkis, E. E. Eyler, P. Gould and W. C. Stwalley in 2003 have been only partially analyzed and assigned. In, transitions observed by Qi et al. to the 0u+ state were presented. Ref. analyzed transitions of 87Rb2 to the 1g(P1 / 2) state, simplified by double spin polarization, observed in the D. Heinzen Laboratory. Transitions to 0g- and 1g levels without double spin polarization are more problematical. This is a preliminary report, based on data obtained by Qi et al. with a dense array of spectral lines, having certain signal:noise limitations. Supported by US NSF.

  11. Proper selection of 1 g controls in simulated microgravity research as illustrated with clinorotated plant cell suspension cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Khaled Y.; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Medina, F. Javier; Herranz, Raúl

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the physical and biological effects of the absence of gravity is necessary to conduct operations on space environments. It has been previously shown that the microgravity environment induces the dissociation of cell proliferation from cell growth in young seedling root meristems, but this source material is limited to few cells in each row of meristematic layers. Plant cell cultures, composed by a large and homogeneous population of proliferating cells, are an ideal model to study the effects of altered gravity on cellular mechanisms regulating cell proliferation and associated cell growth. Cell suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana cell line (MM2d) were exposed to 2D-clinorotation in a pipette clinostat for 3.5 or 14 h, respectively, and were then processed either by quick freezing, to be used in flow cytometry, or by chemical fixation, for microscopy techniques. After long-term clinorotation, the proportion of cells in G1 phase was increased and the nucleolus area, as revealed by immunofluorescence staining with anti-nucleolin, was decreased. Despite the compatibility of these results with those obtained in real microgravity on seedling meristems, we provide a technical discussion in the context of clinorotation and proper 1 g controls with respect to suspension cultures. Standard 1 g procedure of sustaining the cell suspension is achieved by continuously shaking. Thus, we compare the mechanical forces acting on cells in clinorotated samples, in a control static sample and in the standard 1 g conditions of suspension cultures in order to define the conditions of a complete and reliable experiment in simulated microgravity with corresponding 1 g controls.

  12. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy - 4 Swedish families with an associated PKP2 c.2146-1G>C variant

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Anneli; Åström-Aneq, Meriam; Widlund, Kjerstin Ferm; Fluur, Christina; Green, Anna; Rehnberg, Malin; Gunnarsson, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the genotype-phenotype correlations in four unrelated families with a PKP2 c.2146-1G>C gene variant were studied. Our primary aim was to determine the carriers that fulfilled the arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) diagnostic criteria of 2010. Our secondary aim was to investigate whether any specific clinical characteristics can be attributed to this particular gene variant. Index patients were assessed using next generation ARVC panel sequencing technique and their family members were assessed by Sanger sequencing targeted at the PKP2 c.2146-1G>C variant. The gene variant carriers were offered a clinical follow-up, with evaluation based on the patient’s history and a standard set of non-invasive testing. The PKP2 c.2146-1G>C gene variant was found in 23 of 41 patients who underwent the examination. Twelve of the 19 family members showed “possible ARVC”. One with “borderline ARVC” and the rest with “definite ARVC” demonstrated re-polarization disturbances, but arrhythmia was uncommon. A lethal event occurred in a 14-year-old boy. In the present study, no definitive genotype-phenotype correlations were found, where the majority of the family members carrying the PKP2 c.2146-1G>C gene variant were diagnosed with “possible ARVC”. These individuals should be offered a long-term follow-up since they are frequently symptomless but still at risk for insidious sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:27335691

  13. Reanalysis of the photoassociation spectrum of 133Cs2 (6P3/2) 1g state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jie; Li, Yu-Qing; Wu, Ji-Zhou; Fan, Qun-Chao; Feng, Hao; Sun, Wei-Guo; Xiao, Lian-Tuan; Jia, Suo-Tang

    2013-08-01

    Reanalysis of the photoassociation spectrum of the weakly binding (6S1/2 + 6P3/2) 1g133Cs2 levels, reported in the previous study [J. Mol. Spectro. 255 (2009) 106], is performed by using a Lu—Fano graph coupled to the improved LeRoy—Bernstein formula including two additional modified terms. A more accurate coefficient (c3) is obtained for the leading long-range potential (-c3/R3) of a diatomic molecule.

  14. Single 1 g dose of cefotaxime in the treatment of infections due to penicillinase-producing strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, G A; Tio, D; van den Hoek, J A; van Klingeren, B

    1983-01-01

    One hundred and two patients with an uncomplicated infection due to penicillinase-producing strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (PPNG) were treated with a single 1 g dose of cefotaxime. At follow-up within 15 days all genital and rectal infections were cured. Pharyngeal infections also seemed to respond to this treatment. A relatively high proportion (30.9%) of patients, however, developed post-gonococcal urethritis. PMID:6299449

  15. Proper selection of 1 g controls in simulated microgravity research as illustrated with clinorotated plant cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Khaled Y; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Medina, F Javier; Herranz, Raúl

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the physical and biological effects of the absence of gravity is necessary to conduct operations on space environments. It has been previously shown that the microgravity environment induces the dissociation of cell proliferation from cell growth in young seedling root meristems, but this source material is limited to few cells in each row of meristematic layers. Plant cell cultures, composed by a large and homogeneous population of proliferating cells, are an ideal model to study the effects of altered gravity on cellular mechanisms regulating cell proliferation and associated cell growth. Cell suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana cell line (MM2d) were exposed to 2D-clinorotation in a pipette clinostat for 3.5 or 14 h, respectively, and were then processed either by quick freezing, to be used in flow cytometry, or by chemical fixation, for microscopy techniques. After long-term clinorotation, the proportion of cells in G1 phase was increased and the nucleolus area, as revealed by immunofluorescence staining with anti-nucleolin, was decreased. Despite the compatibility of these results with those obtained in real microgravity on seedling meristems, we provide a technical discussion in the context of clinorotation and proper 1 g controls with respect to suspension cultures. Standard 1 g procedure of sustaining the cell suspension is achieved by continuously shaking. Thus, we compare the mechanical forces acting on cells in clinorotated samples, in a control static sample and in the standard 1 g conditions of suspension cultures in order to define the conditions of a complete and reliable experiment in simulated microgravity with corresponding 1 g controls. PMID:26177849

  16. Increased CD86 but Not CD80 and PD-L1 Expression on Liver CD68+ Cells during Chronic HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Said, Elias A.; Al-Reesi, Iman; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Naamani, Khalid; Al-Sinawi, Shadia; Al-Balushi, Mohammed S.; Koh, Crystal Y.; Al-Busaidi, Juma Z.; Idris, Mohamed A.; Al-Jabri, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The failure to establish potent anti-HBV T cell responses suggests the absence of an effective innate immune activation. Kupffer cells and liver-infiltrating monocytes/macrophages have an essential role in establishing anti-HBV responses. These cells express the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86. CD80 expression on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) induces Th1 cell differentiation, whereas CD86 expression drives the differentiation towards a Th2 profile. The relative expression of CD80, CD86 and PD-L1 on APCs, regulates T cell activation. Few studies investigated CD80 and CD86 expression on KCs and infiltrating monocytes/macrophages in HBV-infected liver and knowledge about the expression of PD-L1 on these cells is controversial. The expression of these molecules together in CD68+ cells has not been explored in HBV-infected livers. Methods Double staining immunohistochemistry was applied to liver biopsies of HBV-infected and control donors to explore CD80, CD86 and PD-L1 expression in the lobular and portal areas. Results Chronic HBV infection was associated with increased CD68+CD86+ cell count and percentage in the lobular areas, and no changes in the count and percentage of CD68+CD80+ and CD68+PD-L1+ cells, compared to the control group. While CD68+CD80+ cell count in portal areas correlated with the fibrosis score, CD68+CD80+ cell percentage in lobular areas correlated with the inflammation grade. Conclusion The upregulation of CD86 but not CD80 and PD-L1 on CD68+ cells in HBV-infected livers, suggests that these cells do not support the induction of potent Th1. Moreover, the expression of CD80 on CD68+ cells correlates with liver inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:27348308

  17. USH1G with unique retinal findings caused by a novel truncating mutation identified by genome-wide linkage analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taibah, Khalid; Bin-Khamis, Ghada; Kennedy, Shelley; Hemidan, Amal; Al-Qahtani, Faisal; Tabbara, Khalid; Mubarak, Bashayer Al; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Meyer, Brian F.; Al-Owain, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder divided into three distinct clinical subtypes based on the severity of the hearing loss, manifestation of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of retinitis pigmentosa and visual symptoms. To date, mutations in seven different genes have been reported to cause USH type 1 (USH1), the most severe form. Patients diagnosed with USH1 are known to be ideal candidates to benefit from cochlear implantation. Methods Genome-wide linkage analysis using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 10K arrays were performed in three cochlear implanted Saudi siblings born from a consanguineous marriage, clinically diagnosed with USH1 by comprehensive clinical, audiological, and ophthalmological examinations. From the linkage results, the USH1G gene was screened for mutations by direct sequencing of the coding exons. Results We report the identification of a novel p.S243X truncating mutation in USH1G that segregated with the disease phenotype and was not present in 300 ethnically matched normal controls. We also report on the novel retinal findings and the outcome of cochlear implantation in the affected individuals. Conclusions In addition to reporting a novel truncating mutation, this report expands the retinal phenotype in USH1G and presents the first report of successful cochlear implants in this disease. PMID:22876113

  18. Modifiers of mutant huntingtin aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Teuling, Eva; Bourgonje, Annika; Veenje, Sven; Thijssen, Karen; de Boer, Jelle; van der Velde, Joeri; Swertz, Morris; Nollen, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common hallmark of a number of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and polyglutamine-expansion disorders such as Huntington’s disease, but how aggregation-prone proteins lead to pathology is not known. Using a genome-wide RNAi screen in a C. elegans-model for polyglutamine aggregation, we previously identified 186 genes that suppress aggregation. Using an RNAi screen for human orthologs of these genes, we here present 26 human genes that suppress aggregation of mutant huntingtin in a human cell line. Among these are genes that have not been previously linked to mutant huntingtin aggregation. They include those encoding eukaryotic translation initiation, elongation and translation factors, and genes that have been previously associated with other neurodegenerative diseases, like the ATP-ase family gene 3-like 2 (AFG3L2) and ubiquitin-like modifier activating enzyme 1 (UBA1). Unravelling the role of these genes will broaden our understanding of the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease. PMID:21915392

  19. Gravity-dependent differentiation and root coils in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and phospholipase-A-I knockdown mutant grown on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Scherer, G F E; Pietrzyk, P

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis roots on 45° tilted agar in 1-g grow in wave-like figures. In addition to waves, formation of root coils is observed in several mutants compromised in gravitropism and/or auxin transport. The knockdown mutant ppla-I-1 of patatin-related phospholipase-A-I is delayed in root gravitropism and forms increased numbers of root coils. Three known factors contribute to waving: circumnutation, gravisensing and negative thigmotropism. In microgravity, deprivation of wild type (WT) and mutant roots of gravisensing and thigmotropism and circumnutation (known to slow down in microgravity, and could potentially lead to fewer waves or increased coiling in both WT and mutant). To resolve this, mutant ppla-I-1 and WT were grown in the BIOLAB facility in the International Space Station. In 1-g, roots of both types only showed waving. In the first experiment in microgravity, the mutant after 9 days formed far more coils than in 1-g but the WT also formed several coils. After 24 days in microgravity, in both types the coils were numerous with slightly more in the mutant. In the second experiment, after 9 days in microgravity only the mutant formed coils and the WT grew arcuated roots. Cell file rotation (CFR) on the mutant root surface in microgravity decreased in comparison to WT, and thus was not important for coiling. Several additional developmental responses (hypocotyl elongation, lateral root formation, cotyledon expansion) were found to be gravity-influenced. We tentatively discuss these in the context of disturbances in auxin transport, which are known to decrease through lack of gravity. PMID:24373011

  20. Neurovestibular adaptation in the utricular otolith in fish to hypergravity exposure and re-adaptation to 1G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, R.; Popova, Ye.; Varelas, J.; Mofrad, A.

    The inner ear utricular organ senses the sum of inertial force due to head translation and head tilt relative to the gravitational vertical. A change in gravitational force has a profound effect on how an organism maintains equilibrium, and the neural response might involve the peripheral otolith receptors, the brain or both. If the influence of G leads to adaptation and subsequent re-adaptation processes in otolith function upon return to 1G, then this raises fundamental questions: does the transfer from 1G to 3G impart the opposite effects on changes of synaptic structure and gravitational sensitivity seen following G exposure? Do the effects accompanying transfer from the 3G to the 1G conditions resemble in part (as an analog) the transfer from 1G to the G? The use of well-controlled hyper-G experiments allows us to address these questions. Adult fish were placed in groups and exposed to 3G for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 16, 24, and 32 days. Re-adaptation to 1G was studied in 3G exposure (4-and 16-day) following 1-8 day of recovery. Typically ∼60 afferents are well characterized in each fish. Directional sensitivity of each afferent defined as the vector with the magnitude measured in unit gain (imp/s/g) is determined. It allows us to consider the diagram of directional sensitivity of the whole macula. For quantitative estimates of the change of afferent sensitivity in hyper-G experiments two functions have been introduced: probability function (maximum sensitivity of each afferent is plotted as a percentage of population sensitivity whose values is less than the individual sensitivity) and the frequency function (or probability density function-PDF) of the population of afferents on the gain. These functions enable us to extract additional information about the details of evolution of gain-afferent distribution. Results to date show a biphasic pattern in reaction to 3G exposures: an initial sensitivity up-regulation (3-and 4-day) followed by a significant decrease

  1. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Risk of Compensated Cirrhosis Patients with Elevated HBV DNA Levels according to Serum Aminotransferase Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Junggyu; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jung Hee; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Kim, Hye Seung; Jung, Sin-Ho; Paik, Yong-Han; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Yoo, Byung Chul

    2015-01-01

    Sometimes, hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related cirrhotic patients with normal aminotransferase levels are closely followed-up for the elevation of aminotransferase levels instead of prompt antiviral therapy (AVT). We analyzed the long-term hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk according to the aminotransferase levels in a retrospective cohort of 1,468 treatment-naïve, HBV-related, compensated cirrhosis patients with elevated HBV DNA levels (≥2,000 IU/mL). Based on aminotransferase levels, patients were categorized into normal (< 40 U/L, n = 364) and elevated group (≥40 U/L, n = 1,104). During a median of 5.3 yr of follow-up (range: 1.0-8.2 yr), HCC developed in 296 (20%) patients. The 5-yr cumulative HCC incidence rate was higher in patients with elevated aminotransferase level, but was not low in normal aminotransferase level (17% vs. 14%, P = 0.004). During the follow-up, 270/364 (74%) patients with normal aminotransferase levels experienced elevation of aminotransferase levels, and AVT was initiated in 1,258 (86%) patients. Less patients with normal aminotransferase levels received AVT (70% vs. 91%, P < 0.001) and median time to start AVT was longer (17.9 vs. 2.4 months, P < 0.001). AVT duration was an independent factor associated with HCC, and median duration of AVT was shorter (4.0 vs. 2.6 yr, P < 0.001) in patients with normal aminotransferase levels. The HCC risk of compensated cirrhosis patients with normal aminotransferase level is not low, and AVT duration is associated with lowered HCC risk, indicating that prompt AVT should be strongly considered even for those with normal aminotransferase levels. PMID:26539006

  2. Risk of Severe Acute Exacerbation of Chronic HBV Infection Cancer Patients Who Underwent Chemotherapy and Did Not Receive Anti-Viral Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chih-An; Chen, Wen-Chi; Yu, Hsien-Chung; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Lai, Kwok-Hung; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Chen, Hui-Chun; Hsu, Ping-I

    2015-01-01

    Background Reactivation of HBV replication with an increase in serum HBV DNA and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity has been reported in 20–50% of hepatitis B carriers undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy for cancer treatment. Manifestation of HBV reactivation ranges from asymptomatic self-limiting hepatitis to severe progressive hepatic failure and fatal consequences. Aim To investigate the risk of severe acute exacerbation of chronic HBV infection in HBsAg-positive cancer patients with solid tumors or hematological malignancies who underwent chemotherapy without antiviral prophylaxis. Methods A retrospective review of charts was conducted for HBsAg-positive cancer patients in our institution who underwent chemotherapy and did not receive anti-viral prophylaxis between the periods of July 2007 to January 2013. We investigate the incidence of severe acute exacerbation of chronic HBV infection if these patients with a variety of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Results A total of 156 patients (hematological malignancies: 16; solid tumors: 140) were included. The incidence of severe acute HBV exacerbation in the patients with hematological malignancy was higher than that in solid tumors (25.0% [4/16] vs 4.3% [6/140]); P = 0.005). Additionally, patients receiving rituximab-based chemotherapy had higher acute exacerbation rate than those with non-rituximab-based chemotherapy (40.0% vs 4.1%, P = 0.001). Among the patients with solid tumors, the incidences of severe acute exacerbation of chronic HBV in hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, gynecological cancer, urological tract cancer, head/neck cancer and other solid malignancies were 2.3%, 4.0%, 7.1%, 9.0%, 16.7%, 6.7%, 0% and 0%, respectively. Conclusion Severe acute exacerbation of chronic HBV infection may occur in HBsAg-positive patients with a variety of solid tumors who received chemotherapy without adequate anti-viral prophylaxis. Hematological malignancy and

  3. Allele Specific p53 Mutant Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Vazquez, Alexei; Levine, Arnold J.; Carpizo, Darren R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Rescuing the function of mutant p53 protein is an attractive cancer therapeutic strategy. Using the NCI anticancer drug screen data, we identified two compounds from the thiosemicarbazone family that manifest increased growth inhibitory activity in mutant p53 cells, particularly for the p53R175 mutant. Mechanistic studies reveal that NSC319726 restores WT structure and function to the p53R175 mutant. This compound kills p53R172H knock-in mice with extensive apoptosis and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in a 175-allele specific mutant p53 dependent manner. This activity depends upon the zinc ion chelating properties of the compound as well as redox changes. These data identify NSC319726 as a p53R175 mutant reactivator and as a lead compound for p53 targeted drug development. PMID:22624712

  4. Mutant SOD1 Increases APP Expression and Phosphorylation in Cellular and Animal Models of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich-Toidman, Polina; Rabinovich-Nikitin, Inna; Ezra, Assaf; Barbiro, Beka; Fogel, Hilla; Slutsky, Inna; Solomon, Beka

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease and it is the most common adult onset neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons. There is currently no effective treatment for ALS and our understanding of the pathological mechanism is still far away from prevention and/or treatment of this devastating disease. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein that undergoes processing either by β-secretase or α-secretase, followed by γ-secretase. In the present study, we show that APP levels, and aberrant phosphorylation, which is associated with enhanced β-secretase cleavage, are increased in SOD1G93A ALS mouse model. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis suggests a close interaction between SOD1 and APP at hippocampal synapses. Notably, SOD1G93A mutation induces APP-SOD1 conformational changes, indicating a crosstalk between these two signaling proteins. Inhibition of APP processing via monoclonal antibody called BBS that blocks APP β-secretase cleavage site, resulted in reduction of mutant SOD1G93A levels in animal and cellular models of ALS, significantly prolonged life span of SOD1G93A mice and diminished inflammation. Beyond its effect on toxic mutant SOD1G93A, BBS treatment resulted in a reduction in the levels of APP, its processing product soluble APPβ and pro-apoptotic p53. This study demonstrates that APP and its processing products contribute to ALS pathology through several different pathways; thus BBS antibody could be a promising neuroprotective strategy for treatment of this disease. PMID:26600047

  5. Complement Factor 3 Could Be an Independent Risk Factor for Mortality in Patients with HBV Related Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Geng-lin; Zhang, Ting; Ye, Yi-nong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Xie, Chan; Peng, Liang; Gao, Zhi-liang

    2016-01-01

    The complement is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple liver disorders. However, its role in patients with HBV related acute-on-chronic liver failure (HBV-ACLF) remains unclear. Serum levels of the third and fourth complement components (C3, C4) and complement function (CH50) were examined in this prospective, observational study. Associations between their expression and disease activity were analyzed. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves. Predictors of clinical outcome were determined by Cox regression analysis. C3, C4, and CH50 levels were significantly lower in HBV-ACLF patients compared to controls. C3, C4, and CH50 levels were negatively correlated with Tbil levels but positively associated with PTA levels. C3 levels were negatively associated with MELD-Na. C3 levels were significantly lower in HBV-ACLF patients who died compared to patients who survived. In a median hospital stay of 39 days, mortality occurred in 41 patients with a progressive increase based on C3 grade (P = 0.008). The actuarial probability of developing mortality was significantly higher in patients with low C3 grade compared to those with high C3 grade (P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that C3 levels were an independent predictor of mortality. Complement played a pathogenic role in HBV-ACLF patients and C3 was an independent predictor of mortality. PMID:27144164

  6. [TLR9 expression is positively correlated with the levels of CD38, HLA-DR and CD95 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells in chronic HBV infected patients].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xuefeng; Peng, Lishan; Liu, Xian; Yang, Yang; Wang, Qihui; Wang, Dengrong; Xiao, Jian; Leng, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between the expression of TLR9 and the levels of CD38, HLA-DR and CD95 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infected patients. Methods70 chronic HBV infected patients and 12 healthy donors were enrolled in this study, and density gradient centrifugation was used to isolate PBMCs from peripheral blood with EDTA for anticoagulation. Flow cytometry was used to detect the levels of TLR9, CD38, HLA-DR and CD95 on PBMCs. Results Compared to the healthy donors, chronic HBV infected patients with low viral load or high viral load had significantly higher levels of TLR9, HLA-DR and CD95 on PMBCs. Furthermore, the co-expression rates of TLR9 and CD38, HLA-DR, CD95 on PBMCs were obviously higher than those of the healthy donors. Correlation analysis showed that the expression of TLR9 was positively correlated with CD38 (r=0.345), HLA-DR (r=0.334), CD95 (r=0.227) on PBMCs in the patients with chronic HBV infection. Conclusion The expression of TLR9 increased and was positively associated with CD38, HLA-DR and CD95 on PBMCs during chronic HBV infection. PMID:27126946

  7. Estimation of instantaneous peak flow from daily data using the HBV model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jie; Haberlandt, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    The length of the observed instantaneous peak flow (IPF) period has a great influence on the flood design whereas these high resolution flow data are not always available. Our previous research has shown that IPFs can be derived from the easier available observed long time series of mean daily flows (MDFs) using a multiple regression model. The primary aim here is to explore the possibility of deriving frequency distributions of IPFs using hydrological modelling with daily and hourly time steps in comparison. In the post-correction approach the rainfall-runoff model is operated on daily time steps , a flood frequency distribution is fitted to the simulated annual MDFs and the resulting daily quantiles are transferred into IPF quantiles using the multiple regression model. In the pre-processing approach, hourly rainfall is produced by disaggregation of daily data. Then the rainfall-runoff model is operated on hourly time steps resulting in a frequency distribution of IPFs. In addition, two calibrations strategies for the hydrological model using the hydrograph and using flow statistics, respectively, are applied for both approaches. Finally, the performances of estimating the IPFs from daily data using these two approaches are compared considering also the two different calibration strategies. The hydrological simulations are carried out with the HBV-IWW model and the case study is carried out for 18 catchments of the Aller-Leine-River basin in northern Germany. The results show that: (1) the multiple regression model is capable to predict IPFs with the simulated MDFs as well; (2) the estimation of extreme flow quantiles in summer is not as good as in winter; (3) both of the two approaches enable a reasonable estimation of IPFs; (4) if on hand the hydrological model is calibrated on the hydrograph the post-correction approach with daily simulations is superior and if on the other hand the model is calibrated on flow statistics the pre-processing with hourly

  8. Evaluating the performance of remotely sensed and reanalysed precipitation data over West Africa using HBV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jütten, Thomas; Jackisch, Dominik; Diekkrüger, Bernd; Kusche, Jürgen; Eicker, Annette; Springer, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Water is one of the most crucial natural resources in West Africa, where the livelihoods of large parts of the population rely heavily on rain-fed agriculture. Therefore, the modelling of the water balance is an important tool to aid in water resource management. Precipitation is one of most important atmospheric drivers of hydrological models. However, ground-based observation networks are sparse in Western Africa and a further decline in station numbers due to a variety of reasons such as the deterioration of stations or political unrest has been observed in recent years. In ungauged river basins, or basins with insufficiently available precipitation data, several studies have shown that remotely sensed or reanalysed precipitation data may be used to compliment or replace missing information. However, the uncertainties of these datasets over Western Africa are not well examined and a need for further studies is apparent. For validation purposes, precipitation datasets are traditionally compared to in-situ ground measurements. This is not possible in ungauged basins. A new approach to assess the quality of satellite and reanalysis data which is gaining popularity among researchers compares different precipitation datasets using hydrological models. In this so-called hydrological evaluation, ground-truth data is no longer necessary in order to validate a product. The chosen model is calibrated for different precipitation products and the simulated streamflow generated for each product is compared to the measured streamflow. Multiple state of the art satellite and reanalysis precipitation datasets with various spatial resolutions were used in this study, namely: CFSR (0.3125°), CHIRPS (0.05°), CMORPH (0.25°), PERSIANN (0.25°), RFE 2.0 (0.1°), TAMSAT (0.0375°), TRMM 3B42 v7 (0.25°) and TRMM 3B42RT (real time) (0.25°). These datasets were evaluated at the regional as well as local scale using the HBV light conceptual hydrological model for several basins

  9. Abnormal lignin in a loblolly pine mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, J.; MacKay, J.J.; Hatfield, R.D.

    1997-07-11

    Novel lignin is formed in a mutant loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) severely depleted in cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.195), which converts coniferaldehyde to coniferyl alcohol, the primary lignin precursor in pines. Dihydroconiferyl alcohol, a monomer not normally associated with the lignin biosynthetic pathway, is the major component of the mutant`s lignin, accounting for {approximately}30 percent (versus {approximately}3 percent in normal pine) of the units. The level of aldehydes, including new 2-methoxybenzaldehydes, is also increased. The mutant pines grew normally indicating that, even within a species, extensive variations in lignin composition need not disrupt the essential functions of lignin.

  10. Identifying representative drug resistant mutants of HIV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is one of the most important causes for failure of anti-AIDS treatment. During therapy, multiple mutations accumulate in the HIV genome, eventually rendering the drugs ineffective in blocking replication of the mutant virus. The huge number of possible mutants precludes experimental analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of resistance and develop improved antiviral drugs. Results In order to solve this problem, we have developed a new algorithm to reveal the most representative mutants from the whole drug resistant mutant database based on our newly proposed unified protein sequence and 3D structure encoding method. Mean shift clustering and multiple regression analysis were applied on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. This approach successfully chooses less than 100 mutants with the highest resistance to each drug out of about 10K in the whole database. When considering high level resistance to multiple drugs, the numbers reduce to one or two representative mutants. Conclusion This approach for predicting the most representative mutants for each drug has major importance for experimental verification since the results provide a small number of representative sequences, which will be amenable for in vitro testing and characterization of the expressed mutant proteins. PMID:26678327

  11. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative AFC-1D, AFC-1G and AFC-1H End of FY-06 Irradiation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative AFC-1D, AFC-1G and

    2006-09-01

    The U. S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposition and the long-term radiotoxity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. The AFC-1 irradiation experiments on transmutation fuels are expected to provide irradiation performance data on non-fertile and low-fertile fuel forms specifically, irradiation growth and swelling, helium production, fission gas release, fission product and fuel constituent migration, fuel phase equilibria, and fuel-cladding chemical interaction. Contained in this report are the to-date physics evaluations performed on three of the AFC-1 experiments; AFC-1D, AFC-1G and AFC-1H. The AFC-1D irradiation experiment consists of metallic non-fertile fuel compositions with minor actinides for potential use in accelerator driven systems and AFC-1G and AFC-1H irradiation experiments are part of the fast neutron reactor fuel development effort. The metallic fuel experiments and nitride experiment are high burnup analogs to previously irradiated experiments and are to be irradiated to = 40 at.% burnup and = 25 at.% burnup, respectively. Based on the results of the physics evaluations it has been determined that the AFC-1D experiment will remain in the ATR for approximately 4 additional cycles, the AFC-1G experiment for an additional 4-5 cycles, and the AFC-1H experiment for approximately 8 additional cycles, in order to reach the desired programmatic burnup. The specific irradiation schedule for these tests will be determined based on future physics evaluations and all results will be documented in subsequent reports.

  12. Calculation of flight vibration levels of the AH-1G helicopter and correlation with existing flight vibration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ditaranto, R. A.; Sankewitsch, V.

    1989-01-01

    Boeing Helicopters, together with other U.S. Helicopter manufacturers, participated in a finite element applications program to give the United States a superior capability to utilize finite element analysis models in support of helicopter airframe design. The program was sponsored by the NASA Langley Research Center. Under this program, an activity was sponsored to evaluate existing analysis methods applicable to calculate coupled rotor-airframe vibrations. The helicopter used in this evaluation was the AH-1G helicopter. The results of the Boeing Helicopters efforts are summarized. The planned analytical procedure is reviewed. Changes to the planned procedure are discussed, and results of the correlation study are presented.

  13. Use of the "gl1" Mutant and the "CA-rop2" Transgenic Plants of "Arabidopsis thaliana" in the Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the use of the "glabrous1 (g11)" mutant and constitutively active "(CA)-rop2" transgenic plants of "Arabidopsis thaliana" in teaching genetics laboratory for both high school and undergraduate students. The experiments provide students with F[subscript 1] and F[subscript 2] generations within a semester for genetic and…

  14. Characterization of the Contribution of Genetic Background and Gender to Disease Progression in the SOD1 G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pfohl, Stephen R.; Halicek, Martin T.; Mitchell, Cassie S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The SOD1 G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most frequently used model to examine ALS pathophysiology. There is a lack of homogeneity in usage of the SOD1 G93A mouse, including differences in genetic background and gender, which could confound the field’s results. Objective In an analysis of 97 studies, we characterized the ALS progression for the high transgene copy control SOD1 G93A mouse on the basis of disease onset, overall lifespan, and disease duration for male and female mice on the B6SJL and C57BL/6J genetic backgrounds and quantified magnitudes of differences between groups. Methods Mean age at onset, onset assessment measure, disease duration, and overall lifespan data from each study were extracted and statistically modeled as the response of linear regression with the sex and genetic background factored as predictors. Additional examination was performed on differing experimental onset and endpoint assessment measures. Results C57BL/6 background mice show delayed onset of symptoms, increased lifespan, and an extended disease duration compared to their sex-matched B6SJL counterparts. Female B6SJL generally experience extended lifespan and delayed onset compared to their male counterparts, while female mice on the C57BL/6 background show delayed onset but no difference in survival compared to their male counterparts. Finally, different experimental protocols (tremor, rotarod, etc.) for onset determination result in notably different onset means. Conclusions Overall, the observed effect of sex on disease endpoints was smaller than that which can be attributed to the genetic background. The often-reported increase in lifespan for female mice was observed only for mice on the B6SJL background, implicating a strain-dependent effect of sex on disease progression that manifests despite identical mutant SOD1 expression. PMID:26594635

  15. [Prevalence change of HGV(GBV-C) infection and its coinfection with HBV a HCV infections in haemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Klusonová, Hana; Stepánová, Vlasta; Plísková, Lenka; Stilec, Roman

    2003-01-01

    Prevalence of HGV(GBV-C) infection and its coinfection with HBV a HCV infections were studied in group of 82 haemodialysis patients. This study was realized 20 months latter again -- 16 patients from 82 were running in dialysis, 17 patients were transplanted and 49 patients died (non of this viruses was cause of their death). HGV(GBV-C) RNA was detected in serum of 22 patients, 20 months latter it was detected in serum of 3 patients; one positive was new. 20 months latter any HGV(GBV-C) RNA was not detected in serum of 4 originally positive patients. Three of ten HBsAg positive patients were coinfected by HGV(GBV-C) RNA; 20 months latter any coinfection was found. In the first we found HGV(GBV-C) RNA in serum of 5 anti-HCV positive patients and in serum of 1 HCV RNA positive patient; 20 months latter it was in serum of 1 and 1 respectively. Elevation of ALT and AST levels were found in serum of 3 from 82 patients; two patients were coinfected with HBV or HCV. Any from 2 running dialysis patients with elevation of ALT and AST levels was not HGV(GBV-C) RNA positive. This virus is not probably frequent cause of liver disease in dialysis patients and it is not necessary to routinely screen for HGV(GBV-C) infection in this group of patients. PMID:19569590

  16. CDC42-Interacting Protein 4 Gene Is Down Trans-Regulated by HBV DNA polymerase Trans Activated Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    LUN, Yongzhi; XU, Chongbo; CHI, Qing; WANG, Xuelei; SUI, Wen; JIANG, Sujuan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) DNA polymerase transactivated protein 1 (HBVDNAPTP1) is a novel protein transactivated by HBV DNA polymerase, screened by suppression subtractive hybridization technique (GenBank accession no: AY450389). The biological function of HBVDNAPTP1 was investigated in this study. Methods We constructed a vector pcDNA3.1 (-)/myc-His A-HBVDNAPTP1 and used it to transfect acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1. HBVDNAPTP1 expression was detected by western blot analysis in the cells. A cDNA library of genes transactivated by HBVDNAPTP1 in THP-1 cells was made in pGEM-T Easy using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). The cDNAs were sequenced and analyzed with BLAST search against the sequences in GenBank. Results Some sequences, such as CIP4, might be involved in apoptosis development. mRNA and protein expression of CIP4 was identified by Real time RT-PCR and western blot in THP-1 cells. HBVDNAPTP1 could down-regulate the expression of CIP4 at both transcription and translation levels. Conclusion HBVDNAPTP1 may be involved in the positive regulation on the initiation of monocyte apoptosis. The result contribute to reveal the HBVDNAPTP1 biological functions and provide new evidences for further exploration of the regulatory mechanism of HBVDNAPTP1. PMID:25988087

  17. Levamisole is a potential facilitator for the activation of Th1 responses of the subunit HBV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Du, Xiaogang; Zhao, Gang; Jin, Huali; Kang, Youmin; Xiao, Chong; Liu, Mingyu; Wang, Bin

    2009-08-01

    Chemical compounds activating innate responses may present potential adjuvants for the vaccine development. Levamisole (LMS), demonstrated as a potent adjuvant for DNA and viral killed vaccines in our previous studies, may activate such responses. To confirm this notion, LMS combined with the recombinant HBsAg (rHBsAg) was investigated. Compared to the vaccination with rHBsAg alone, LMS could up-regulate the expressions of TLR7&8, MyD88, IRF7 and their downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines including IFN-alpha and TNF-alpha, which promote DCs activation. Strikingly, we find that the combination of LMS and alum adjuvant synergistically enhances immunogenicity of rHBsAg and leads to a robust cell-mediated response demonstrated by the higher level of IgG2a/IgG1, T cell proliferation, and importantly, a high level of antigen-specific CTL and IFN-gamma production within these activated CD8(+) T cells. The achieved robust responses are at a comparative level with CpG+alum used as a positive control adjuvant in mice. The combination of LMS+alum with rHBsAg may provide a cost-effective, safe, and effective therapy to treat those individuals chronically infected by HBV, since antigen-specific cellular immunity is implicated for the clearance of HBV chronic infection. PMID:19549606

  18. Calculation of flight vibration levels of the AH-1G helicopter and correlation with existing flight vibration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sopher, R.; Twomey, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Langley is sponsoring a rotorcraft structural dynamics program with the objective to establish in the U.S. a superior capability to utilize finite element analysis models for calculations to support industrial design of helicopter airframe structures. In the initial phase of the program, teams from the major U.S. manufacturers of helicopter airframes will apply extant finite element analysis methods to calculate loads and vibrations of helicopter airframes, and perform correlations between analysis and measurements. The aforementioned rotorcraft structural dynamics program was given the acronym DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Method for Vibrations). Sikorsky's RDYNE Rotorcraft Dynamics Analysis used for the correlation study, the specifics of the application of RDYNE to the AH-1G, and comparisons of the predictions of the method with flight data for loads and vibrations on the AH-1G are described. RDYNE was able to predict trends of variations of loads and vibrations with airspeed, but in some instances magnitudes differed from measured results by factors of two or three to one. Sensitivities were studied of predictions to rotor inflow modeling, effects of torsional modes, number of blade bending modes, fuselage structural damping, and hub modal content.

  19. CCND1 G870A polymorphism is associated with toxicity of methotrexate in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yao; Rong, Liucheng; Tong, Na; Wang, Meilin; Zhang, Zhengdong; Fang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    CCND1 plays a key role in cell cycle progression and may cause methotrexate (MTX) resistance, as well as its cytotoxicity. CCND1 870A variant allele is associated with altered transcripts of this gene. We hypothesized that this polymorphism may contribute to the elimination rate and hepatotoxicity of MTX in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We genotyped the CCND1 G870A polymorphism in 125 childhood ALL patients treated with HDMTX. We found no notable associations between G870A polymorphism and the risk of delayed MTX elimination. However, this polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased risk of MTX hepatotoxicity [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 4.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.35-14.63 for AG versus GG and adjusted OR = 6.39, 95% CI = 1.82-22.43 for AA versus GG]. Our results indicated that the CCND1 G870A polymorphism may be involved in the hepatotoxicity of MTX and act as a biological marker. PMID:26617896

  20. Time-Point Dependent Activation of Autophagy and the UPS in SOD1G93A Mice Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana Cristina; Gasco, Samanta; Muñoz, María Jesús; Zaragoza, Pilar; Osta, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by a selective loss of motor neurons together with a progressive muscle weakness. Albeit the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease remain unknown, growing evidence suggests that skeletal muscle can be a target of ALS toxicity. In particular, the two main intracellular degradation mechanisms, autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome degradative system (UPS) have been poorly studied in this tissue. In this study we investigated the activation of autophagy and the UPS as well as apoptosis in the skeletal muscle from SOD1G93A mice along disease progression. Our results showed a significant upregulation of proteasome activity at early symptomatic stage, while the autophagy activation was found at presymptomatic and terminal stages. The mRNA upregulated levels of LC3, p62, Beclin1, Atg5 and E2f1 were only observed at symptomatic and terminal stages, which reinforced the time-point activation of autophagy. Furthermore, no apoptosis activation was observed along disease progression. The combined data provided clear evidence for the first time that there is a time-point dependent activation of autophagy and UPS in the skeletal muscle from SOD1G93A mice. PMID:26244336

  1. Coupled rotor/fuselage dynamic analysis of the AH-1G helicopter and correlation with flight vibrations data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, J. C.; Cronkhite, J. D.; Dompka, R. V.; Perry, K. S.; Rogers, J. P.; Sadler, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    Under a research program designated Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS (DAMVIBS), existing analytical methods are used for calculating coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations of the AH-1G helicopter for correlation with flight test data from an AH-1G Operational Load Survey (OLS) test program. The analytical representation of the fuselage structure is based on a NASTRAN finite element model (FEM), which has been developed, extensively documented, and correlated with ground vibration test. One procedure that was used for predicting coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations using the advanced Rotorcraft Flight Simulation Program C81 and NASTRAN is summarized. Detailed descriptions of the analytical formulation of rotor dynamics equations, fuselage dynamic equations, coupling between the rotor and fuselage, and solutions to the total system of equations in C81 are included. Analytical predictions of hub shears for main rotor harmonics 2p, 4p, and 6p generated by C81 are used in conjunction with 2p OLS measured control loads and a 2p lateral tail rotor gearbox force, representing downwash impingement on the vertical fin, to excite the NASTRAN model. NASTRAN is then used to correlate with measured OLS flight test vibrations. Blade load comparisons predicted by C81 showed good agreement. In general, the fuselage vibration correlations show good agreement between anslysis and test in vibration response through 15 to 20 Hz.

  2. Immunological persistence in 5 y olds previously vaccinated with hexavalent DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib at 3, 5, and 11 months of age.

    PubMed

    Silfverdal, Sven A; Assudani, Deepak; Kuriyakose, Sherine; Van Der Meeren, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The combined diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-hepatitis B-poliomyelitis/Haemophilus influenza vaccine (DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib: Infanrix™ hexa, GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines) is used for primary vaccination of infants in a range of schedules world-wide. Antibody persistence after 4 DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib doses in the first 2 y of life has been documented, but long-term persistence data following the 3, 5, 11-12 months (3-5-11) infant vaccination schedule, employed for example in Nordic countries, are limited. We assessed antibody persistence in 57 5-year-old children who had received either DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib or DTPa-IPV/Hib (Infanrix™-IPV/Hib, GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines) in the 3-5-11 schedule. Among DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib recipients, 7/12 retained seroprotective antibody concentrations for diphtheria, 10/12 for tetanus, 5/12 for hepatitis and 10/12 for Hib. Detectable antibodies were observed for 0/12 children for pertussis toxin (PT), 12/12 for filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA) and 8/12 for pertactin (PRN). Among DTPa-IPV/Hib recipients, 28/45 retained seroprotective anti-diphtheria concentrations, 34/44 for tetanus and 40/45 for Hib. Detectable antibodies were observed for 9/45 children for PT, 41/45 for FHA and 34/45 for PRN. Antibody persistence in DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib and DTPa-IPV/Hib-vaccinees appeared similar in 5 y olds to that previously observed in children of a similar age who had received 4 prior doses of DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib (or DTPa-IPV/Hib). As in subjects primed with 4 prior doses, we observed that antibodies markedly declined by 5 y of age, calling for the administration of a pre-school booster dose in order to ensure continued protection against pertussis. PMID:25483640

  3. Analysis of Risk Factors Associated with the Development of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Chronic HBV-Infected Chinese: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Xiang; Liu, Kui; Chen, Yongdi; Wang, Zhifang; Yao, Jun; Cai, Gaofeng; Jiang, Zhenggang; Wang, Zhengting; Jiang, Jianmin; Gu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in China. At present, there still are 9.3 million chronic HBV-infected Chinese. Numerous studies have explored the association between possible factors and hepatocellular carcinoma risk, however, the results remains inconsistent. Therefore, we did this pooled analysis so as to get a precise result. Here, we took the chronic HBV-infected Chinese as the object. We systematically searched for studies evaluating whether the proposed factors changed HCC risk in PubMed, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP database and Wanfang data. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by Review Manager 5.0 and publication bias was determined by Begg's test and Egger's test. In total, 3165 cases and 10,896 controls from 27 studies were included in this meta-analysis. Our results showed that pooled OR with 95% CI for each of the factors investigated were: non-antiviral treatment 2.70 (2.01, 3.62), high HBV DNA levels 2.61 (1.73, 3.94), alcohol consumption 2.19 (1.53, 3.13), a family history of HCC 3.58 (2.53, 5.06) and male gender 2.14 (1.68, 2.73), respectively. Our meta-analysis supports that high HBV DNA levels, non-antiviral treatment, alcohol consumption, a family history of HCC and male gender contributed to the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic HBV-infected Chinese from currently available evidence. Given the high prevalence of the non-antiviral treatment and alcohol drinking, behavior interventions for the two factors should be tackled first. PMID:27322300

  4. Analysis of Risk Factors Associated with the Development of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Chronic HBV-Infected Chinese: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Xiang; Liu, Kui; Chen, Yongdi; Wang, Zhifang; Yao, Jun; Cai, Gaofeng; Jiang, Zhenggang; Wang, Zhengting; Jiang, Jianmin; Gu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in China. At present, there still are 9.3 million chronic HBV-infected Chinese. Numerous studies have explored the association between possible factors and hepatocellular carcinoma risk, however, the results remains inconsistent. Therefore, we did this pooled analysis so as to get a precise result. Here, we took the chronic HBV-infected Chinese as the object. We systematically searched for studies evaluating whether the proposed factors changed HCC risk in PubMed, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP database and Wanfang data. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by Review Manager 5.0 and publication bias was determined by Begg’s test and Egger’s test. In total, 3165 cases and 10,896 controls from 27 studies were included in this meta-analysis. Our results showed that pooled OR with 95% CI for each of the factors investigated were: non-antiviral treatment 2.70 (2.01, 3.62), high HBV DNA levels 2.61 (1.73, 3.94), alcohol consumption 2.19 (1.53, 3.13), a family history of HCC 3.58 (2.53, 5.06) and male gender 2.14 (1.68, 2.73), respectively. Our meta-analysis supports that high HBV DNA levels, non-antiviral treatment, alcohol consumption, a family history of HCC and male gender contributed to the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic HBV-infected Chinese from currently available evidence. Given the high prevalence of the non-antiviral treatment and alcohol drinking, behavior interventions for the two factors should be tackled first. PMID:27322300

  5. Across-sectional study on anxiety and stress in pregnant women with chronic HBV infection in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fen; Li, Jianju; Lin, Keke; Ji, Ping; Sun, Yumei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the anxiety and pregnancy-associated stress of pregnant women with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the People’s Republic of China and analyze the relationship between anxiety and pregnancy-associated stress in the hope of finding ways to reduce the stress or improve the coping skills for these mothers-to-be during pregnancy. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted. One hundred and sixty chronic HBV-infected pregnant women (HBV group) and 160 healthy pregnant women (control group) selected from three Peking University-affiliated hospitals participated in the study, and completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Pregnancy Stress Rating Scale (PSRS) survey. Results The mean scores of STAI and PSRS for the HBV group were higher than for the control group. Factor 2 of PSRS (stress caused by worrying about mother and child’s health and safety) was the highest, and was significantly higher in the HBV group than in the control group. Correlation analysis showed STAI scores were significantly correlated with economic status and diagnosis, as well as the total score, factor 1 (stress about identifying with the role of mother), and factor 2 of PSRS, but not significantly correlated with factor 3 of PSRS (stress caused by the changes of body shape and physical activity). Conclusion Pregnant women with chronic HBV infection experienced higher levels of anxiety and stress than healthy pregnant women. Their major stress came from concerns for the health and safety of the mother and the child. PMID:26346004

  6. Naturally occurring basal core promoter A1762T/G1764A dual mutations increase the risk of HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yunfei; Xu, Qingnian; Tang, Bozong; Chen, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Basal core promoter (BCP) A1762T/G1764A dual mutations in hepatocarcinogenesis remain controversial. Published studies up to June 1, 2015 investigating the frequency of A1762T/G1764A dual mutations from chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), were systematically identified. A total of 10,240 patients with chronic HBV infection, including 3729 HCC cases, were included in 52 identified studies. HCC patients had a higher frequency of BCP A1762T/G1764A dual mutations compared with asymptomatic HBsAg carriers (ASC) and patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and liver cirrhosis (LC) (OR = 5.59, P < 0.00001; OR = 2.87, P < 0.00001; OR = 1.55, P = 0.02, respectively). No statistically significant difference was observed in the frequency of A1762T/G1764A dual mutations in cirrhotic HCC versus non-cirrhotic HCC patients (OR = 2.06, P = 0.05). Chronic HBV-infected patients and HCC patients with genotype B had a significantly lower risk of A1762T/G1764A dual mutations compared with patients with genotype C (OR = 0.30, P < 0.0001 and OR = 0.34, P = 0.04, respectively). In HBV genotype C subjects, A1762T/G1764A dual mutations contributed to significantly higher risk for HCC developing compared with non-mutation ones (OR = 3.47, P < 0.00001). In conclusion, A1762T/G1764A dual mutations increase the risk of HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma, particularly in an HBV genotype C population, even without progression to cirrhosis. PMID:26848866

  7. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation. PMID:26734569

  8. Uncaging Mutants: Moving From Menageries to Menages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The thousands of mutants of maize are a remarkable resource for study of plant physiology, phylogeny, cell biology, biochemistry, development, and molecular biology. Mutants are most often applied in research studies as "members of collections" rather than as select families of members relevant to ...

  9. Nebulin binding impedes mutant desmin filament assembly

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Laura K.; Gillis, David C.; Sharma, Sarika; Ambrus, Andy; Herrmann, Harald; Conover, Gloria M.

    2013-01-01

    Desmin intermediate filaments (DIFs) form an intricate meshwork that organizes myofibers within striated muscle cells. The mechanisms that regulate the association of desmin to sarcomeres and their role in desminopathy are incompletely understood. Here we compare the effect nebulin binding has on the assembly kinetics of desmin and three desminopathy-causing mutant desmin variants carrying mutations in the head, rod, or tail domains of desmin (S46F, E245D, and T453I). These mutants were chosen because the mutated residues are located within the nebulin-binding regions of desmin. We discovered that, although nebulin M160–164 bound to both desmin tetrameric complexes and mature filaments, all three mutants exhibited significantly delayed filament assembly kinetics when bound to nebulin. Correspondingly, all three mutants displayed enhanced binding affinities and capacities for nebulin relative to wild-type desmin. Electron micrographs showed that nebulin associates with elongated normal and mutant DIFs assembled in vitro. Moreover, we measured significantly delayed dynamics for the mutant desmin E245D relative to wild-type desmin in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in live-cell imaging experiments. We propose a mechanism by which mutant desmin slows desmin remodeling in myocytes by retaining nebulin near the Z-discs. On the basis of these data, we suggest that for some filament-forming desmin mutants, the molecular etiology of desminopathy results from subtle deficiencies in their association with nebulin, a major actin-binding filament protein of striated muscle. PMID:23615443

  10. Mutants of thermotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.J.; Fontana, D.R.; Poff, K.L.

    1982-08-01

    Amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum, strain HL50 were mutagenized with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, cloned, allowed to form pseudoplasmodia and screened for aberrant positive and negative thermotaxis. Three types of mutants were found. Mutant HO428 exhibits only positive thermotaxis over the entire temperature range (no negative thermotaxis). HO596 and HO813 exhibit weakened positive thermotaxis and normal negative thermotaxis. The weakened positive thermotactic response results in a shift toward warmer temperatures in the transition temperature from negative to positive thermotaxis. Mutant HO209 exhibits weakened positive and negative thermotactic responses and has a transition temperature similar to the 'wild type' (HL50).The two types of mutants represented by HO428, HO596 and HO813 support the model that positive and negative thermotaxis have separate pathways for temperature sensing. The type of mutants which contains HO209 suggests that those two pathways converge at some point before the response.

  11. Plasticity of Neurovestibular Systems Following Micro- and Hyper-Gravity Exposure and Readaptation to Earth's 1G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    The gravity-sensing organs sense the sum of inertial force due to head translation and head orientation relative to gravity. Normally gravity is constant, and yet the neural sensors show remarkable plasticity. When the force of gravity changes, such as in spaceflight or during centrifugation, the neurovestibular system responds by regulating its neural output, and this response is similar for the vertebrate utricular nerve afferents and for the statocyst hair cell in invertebrates. First, we examine the response of utricular afferents in toadfish following exposure to G on two orbital missions (STS-90 and 95). Within the first day after landing, magnitude of neural response to an applied acceleration was significantly elevated, and re-adaptation back to control values occurred within approximately 30 hours. Time course of return to normal approximately parallels the decrease in vestibular disorientation in astronauts following return. Next, we use well-controlled hyper-G experiments in the vertebrate model to address: If G leads to adaptation and subsequent re-adaptation neural processes, does the transfer from 1G to hyper-G impart the opposite effects and do the effects accompanying transfer from the hyper-G back to the 1G conditions resemble as an analog the transfer from 1G to the microG Results show a biphasic pattern in reaction to 3G exposures: an initial sensitivity up-regulation (3- and 4-day) followed by a significant decrease after longer exposure. Return to control values is on the order of 4-8 days. Utricular sensitivity is strongly regulated up or down by gravity load and the duration of exposure. Interestingly, we found no correlation of response and hair cell synaptic body counts despite the large gain difference between 4- and 16-Day subjects. Lastly, we examine responses of statocyst receptors in land snail following exposure to G on two unmanned Russian Orbital missions (Foton M-2 and -3). Here, we have the ability to measure the output directly

  12. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 gN Partners with gM To Modulate the Viral Fusion Machinery

    PubMed Central

    El Kasmi, Imane

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) capsids are assembled in the nucleus, where they incorporate the viral genome. They then transit through the two nuclear membranes and are wrapped by a host-derived envelope. In the process, several HSV-1 proteins are targeted to the nuclear membranes, but their roles in viral nuclear egress are unclear. Among them, glycoprotein M (gM), a known modulator of virus-induced membrane fusion, is distributed on both the inner and outer nuclear membranes at the early stages of the infection, when no other viral glycoproteins are yet present there. Later on, it is found on perinuclear virions and ultimately redirected to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), where it cycles with the cell surface. In contrast, transfected gM is found only at the TGN and cell surface, hinting at an interaction with other viral proteins. Interestingly, many herpesvirus gM analogs interact with their gN counterparts, which typically alters their intracellular localization. To better understand how HSV-1 gM localization is regulated, we evaluated its ability to bind gN and discovered it does so in both transfected and infected cells, an interaction strongly weakened by the deletion of the gM amino terminus. Functionally, while gN had no impact on gM localization, gM redirected gN from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the TGN. Most interestingly, gN overexpression stimulated the formation of syncytia in the context of an infection by a nonsyncytial strain, indicating that gM and gN not only physically but also functionally interact and that gN modulates gM's activity on membrane fusion. IMPORTANCE HSV-1 gM is an important modulator of virally induced cell-cell fusion and viral entry, a process that is likely finely modulated in time and space. Until now, little was known of the proteins that regulate gM's activity. In parallel, gM is found in various intracellular locations at different moments, ranging from nuclear membranes, perinuclear virions, the TGN, cell

  13. ALS-linked mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) alters mitochondrial protein composition and decreases protein import.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Vande Velde, Christine; Israelson, Adrian; Xie, Jing; Bailey, Aaron O; Dong, Meng-Qui; Chun, Seung-Joo; Roy, Tamal; Winer, Leah; Yates, John R; Capaldi, Roderick A; Cleveland, Don W; Miller, Timothy M

    2010-12-01

    Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) cause familial ALS. Mutant SOD1 preferentially associates with the cytoplasmic face of mitochondria from spinal cords of rats and mice expressing SOD1 mutations. Two-dimensional gels and multidimensional liquid chromatography, in combination with tandem mass spectrometry, revealed 33 proteins that were increased and 21 proteins that were decreased in SOD1(G93A) rat spinal cord mitochondria compared with SOD1(WT) spinal cord mitochondria. Analysis of this group of proteins revealed a higher-than-expected proportion involved in complex I and protein import pathways. Direct import assays revealed a 30% decrease in protein import only in spinal cord mitochondria, despite an increase in the mitochondrial import components TOM20, TOM22, and TOM40. Recombinant SOD1(G93A) or SOD1(G85R), but not SOD1(WT) or a Parkinson's disease-causing, misfolded α-synuclein(E46K) mutant, decreased protein import by >50% in nontransgenic mitochondria from spinal cord, but not from liver. Thus, altered mitochondrial protein content accompanied by selective decreases in protein import into spinal cord mitochondria comprises part of the mitochondrial damage arising from mutant SOD1. PMID:21078990

  14. Verified clinical failure with cefotaxime 1g for treatment of gonorrhoea in the Netherlands: a case report.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Alje P; van Ogtrop, Marc L; Golparian, Daniel; Mehrtens, Jan; de Vries, Henry J C; Unemo, Magnus

    2014-11-01

    We describe the first case of treatment failure of gonorrhoea with a third generation cephalosporin, cefotaxime 1g intramuscularly, in the Netherlands. The case was from a high-frequency transmitting population (men having sex with men) and was caused by the internationally spreading multidrug-resistant gonococcal NG-MAST ST1407 clone. The patient was clinically cured after treatment with ceftriaxone 500 mg intramuscularly and this is the only third generation cephalosporin that should be used for first-line empiric treatment of gonorrhoea. Increased awareness of failures with third generation cephalosporins, enhanced monitoring and appropriate verification of treatment failures including more frequent test-of-cures, and strict adherence to regularly updated treatment guidelines are essential globally. PMID:25114322

  15. HOT CORE, OUTFLOWS, AND MAGNETIC FIELDS IN W43-MM1 (G30.79 FIR 10)

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, T. K.; Qiu, K.; Li, H.; Pillai, T.; Patel, N. A.; Zhang, Q.; Rao, R.; Cortes, P.

    2014-03-10

    We present submillimeter spectral line and dust continuum polarization observations of a remarkable hot core and multiple outflows in the high-mass, star-forming region W43-MM1 (G30.79 FIR 10), obtained using the Submillimeter Array. A temperature of ∼400 K is estimated for the hot core using CH{sub 3}CN (J = 19-18) lines, with detections of 11 K-ladder components. The high temperature and the mass estimates for the outflows indicate high-mass star formation. The continuum polarization pattern shows an ordered distribution, and its orientation over the main outflow appears to be aligned with the outflow. The derived magnetic field indicates slightly super-critical conditions. While the magnetic and outflow energies are comparable, the B-field orientation appears to have changed from parsec scales to ∼0.1 pc scales during the core/star formation process.

  16. CHIP promotes proteasomal degradation of familial ALS-linked mutant SOD1 by ubiquitinating Hsp/Hsc70.

    PubMed

    Urushitani, Makoto; Kurisu, Junko; Tateno, Minako; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu; Nakayama, Kei-Ichi; Kato, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2004-07-01

    Over 100 mutants in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are reported in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, the precise mechanism by which they are degraded through a ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway (UPP) remains unclear. Here, we report that heat-shock protein (Hsp) or heat-shock cognate (Hsc)70, and the carboxyl terminus of the Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), are involved in proteasomal degradation of mutant SOD1. Only mutant SOD1 interacted with Hsp/Hsc70 in vivo, and in vitro experiments revealed that Hsp/Hsc70 preferentially interacted with apo-SOD1 or dithiothreitol (DTT)-treated holo-SOD1, compared with metallated or oxidized forms. CHIP, a binding partner of Hsp/Hsc70, interacted only with mutant SOD1 and promoted its degradation. Both Hsp70 and CHIP promoted polyubiquitination of mutant SOD1-associated molecules, but not of mutant SOD1, indicating that mutant SOD1 is not a substrate of CHIP. Moreover, mutant SOD1-associated Hsp/Hsc70, a known substrate of CHIP, was polyubiquitinated in vivo, and polyubiquitinated Hsc70 by CHIP interacted with the S5a subunit of the 26S proteasome in vitro. Furthermore, CHIP was predominantly expressed in spinal neurons, and ubiquitinated inclusions in the spinal motor neurons of hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice were CHIP-immunoreactive. Taken together, we propose a novel pathway in which ubiquitinated Hsp/Hsc70 might deliver mutant SOD1 to, and facilitate its degradation, at the proteasome. PMID:15198682

  17. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative AFC-1D, AFC-1G, and AFC-1H End of FY-07 Irradiation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Debra J Utterbeck; Gray S Chang; Misit A Lillo

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), now within the broader context of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), is to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products. Success in this undertaking could potentially dramatically decrease the volume of material requiring disposal with attendant reductions in long-term radio-toxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. One important component of the technology development is investigation of irradiation/transmutation effects on actinide-bearing metallic fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium (and possibly curium) isotopes. Goals of this initiative include addressing the limited irradiation performance data available on metallic fuels with high concentrations of Pu, Np and Am, as are envisioned for use as actinide transmutation fuels. The AFC-1 irradiation experiments of transmutation fuels are expected to provide irradiation performance data on non-fertile and low-fertile fuel forms specifically, irradiation growth and swelling, helium production, fission gas release, fission product and fuel constituent migration, fuel phase equilibria, and fuel-cladding chemical interaction. Contained in this report are the to-date physics evaluations performed on three of the AFC-1 experiments; AFC-1D, AFC-1G and AFC-1H. The AFC-1D irradiation experiment consists of metallic non-fertile fuel compositions with minor actinides for potential use in accelerator driven systems and AFC-1G and AFC-1H irradiation experiments are part of the fast neutron reactor fuel development effort. The metallic fuel experiments and nitride experiment are high burnup analogs to previously irradiated experiments and are to be irradiated to = 40 at.% burnup.

  18. LASP-1 – A nuclear hub for the UHRF1-DNMT1-G9a-Snail1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Duvall-Noelle, Nichole; Karwandyar, Ayub; Richmond, Ann; Raman, Dayanidhi

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear LASP-1 has a direct correlation with overall survival of breast cancer patients. In this study, immunohistochemical analysis of a human breast TMA showed that LASP-1 is absent in normal human breast epithelium but the expression increases with malignancy and is highly nuclear in aggressive breast cancer. We investigated whether the chemokines and growth factors present in the tumor microenvironment could trigger nuclear translocation of LASP-1.Treatment of human breast cancer cells with CXCL12, EGF and Heregulin and HMEC-CXCR2 cells with CXCL8 facilitated nuclear shuttling of LASP-1. Data from the biochemical analysis of the nuclear and cytosolic fractions further confirmed the nuclear translocation of LASP-1 upon chemokine and growth factor treatment. CXCL12-dependent nuclear import of LASP-1 could be blocked by CXCR4 antagonist, AMD-3100. Knock down of LASP-1 resulted in alterations in gene expression leading to an increased level of cell junction and extracellular matrix proteins and an altered cytokine secretory profile. Three dimensional cultures of human breast cancer cells on Matrigel revealed an altered colony growth, morphology and arborization pattern in LASP-1 knock down cells. Functional analysis of the LASP-1 knock down cells revealed increased adhesion to collagen IV and decreased invasion through the Matrigel. Proteomics analysis of immunoprecipitates of LASP-1 and subsequent validation approaches revealed that LASP-1associated with the epigenetic machinery especially UHRF1, DNMT1, G9a and the transcription factor Snail1. Interestingly, LASP-1 associated with UHRF1, G9a, Snail1 and di- and tri-methylated histoneH3 in a CXCL12-dependent manner based on immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays. LASP-1 also directly bound to Snail1 which may stabilize Snail1. Thus, nuclear LASP-1 appears to functionally serve as a hub for the epigenetic machinery. PMID:25982273

  19. Neuroprotective Effect of Bexarotene in the SOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Riancho, Javier; Ruiz-Soto, María; Berciano, María T.; Berciano, José; Lafarga, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive weakness and muscle atrophy related to the loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs) without a curative treatment. There is experimental evidence suggesting that retinoids may be involved in ALS pathogenesis. Bexarotene (Bxt) is a retinoid-X receptor agonist used in the treatment of cutaneous lymphoma with a favorable safety profile whose effects have been recently investigated in other neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we analyze the potential therapeutic effect of Bxt in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. Mice were treated with Bxt or vehicle five times per week from day 60 onward. Survival, weight, and neuromuscular function studies together with histological and biochemical analyses were performed. Bxt significantly delayed motor function deterioration, ameliorated the loss of body weight, and extended mice survival up to 30% of the symptomatic period. Histological analyses of the lumbosacral spinal cord revealed that Bxt markedly delayed the early motor-neuron degeneration occurring at presymptomatic stages in ALS-transgenic mice. Bxt treatment contributed to preserve the MN homeostasis in the SOD1G93A mice. Particularly, it reduced the neuronal loss and the chromatolytic response, induced nucleolar hypertrophy, decreased the formation of ubiquitylated inclusions, and modulated the lysosomal response. As an agonist of the retinoic-X receptor (RXR) pathway, Bxt notably increased the nuclear expression of the RXRα throughout transcriptionally active euchromatin domains. Bxt also contributed to protect the MN environment by reducing reactive astrogliosis and preserving perisomatic synapsis. Overall, these neuroprotective effects suggest that treatment with Bxt could be useful in ALS, particularly in those cases related to SOD1 mutations. PMID:26190974

  20. Comparison of dendritic calcium transients in juvenile wild type and SOD1(G93A) mouse lumbar motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Katharina A; Lamano, Jonathan B; Samuels, Julienne; Heckman, C J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of spinal motoneurons in the SOD1 mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown alterations long before disease onset, including increased dendritic branching, increased persistent Na(+) and Ca(2+) currents, and impaired axonal transport. In this study dendritic Ca(2+) entry was investigated using two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy and whole-cell patch-clamp of juvenile (P4-11) motoneurons. Neurons were filled with both Ca(2+) Green-1 and Texas Red dextrans, and line scans performed throughout. Steps were taken to account for different sources of variability, including (1) dye filling and laser penetration, (2) dendritic anatomy, and (3) the time elapsed from the start of recording. First, Ca(2+) Green-1 fluorescence was normalized by Texas Red; next, neurons were reconstructed so anatomy could be evaluated; finally, time was recorded. Customized software detected the largest Ca(2+) transients (area under the curve) from each line scan and matched it with parameters above. Overall, larger dendritic diameter and shorter path distance from the soma were significant predictors of larger transients, while time was not significant up to 2 h (data thereafter was dropped). However, Ca(2+) transients showed additional variability. Controlling for previous factors, significant variation was found between Ca(2+) signals from different processes of the same neuron in 3/7 neurons. This could reflect differential expression of Ca(2+) channels, local neuromodulation or other variations. Finally, Ca(2+) transients in SOD1(G93A) motoneurons were significantly smaller than in non-transgenic motoneurons. In conclusion, motoneuron processes show highly variable Ca(2+) transients, but these transients are smaller overall in SOD1(G93A) motoneurons. PMID:25914627

  1. Hepatitis B virus: DNA polymerase activity of deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Hong, Y B; Jung, G

    1999-02-01

    The hepadnavirus P gene product is a multifunctional protein with priming, DNA- and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, and RNase H activities. Nested N- or C-terminal deletion mutations and deletions of domain(s) in human HBV polymerase have been made. Wild-type and deletion forms of MBP-fused HBV polymerase were expressed in E. coli, purified by amylose column chromatography, and the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activities of the purified proteins were compared. Deletion of the terminal protein or spacer regions reduced enzyme activity to 70%, respectively. However, deletion of the RNase H domain affected polymerase activity more than that of the terminal protein or spacer region. The polymerase domain alone or the N-terminal deletion of the polymerase domain still exhibited enzymatic activity. In this report, it is demonstrated that the minimal domain for the polymerizing activity of the HBV polymerase is smaller than the polymerase domain. PMID:10205676

  2. Incomplete flagellar structures in Escherichia coli mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Komeda, Y

    1981-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants with defects in 29 flagellar genes identified so far were examined by electron microscopy for possession of incomplete flagellar structures in membrane-associated fractions. The results are discussed in consideration of the known transcriptional interaction of flagellar genes. Hook-basal body structures were detected in flaD, flaS, flaT, flbC, and hag mutants. The flaE mutant had a polyhook-basal body structure. An intact basal body appeared in flaK mutants. Putative precursors of the basal body were detected in mutants with defects in flaM, flaU, flaV, and flaY. No structures homologous to the flagellar basal body or its parts were detected in mutants with defects in flaA, flaB, flaC, flaG, flaH, flaI, flaL, flaN, flaO, flaP, flaQ, flaR, flaW, flaX, flbA, flbB, and flbD. One flaZ mutant had an incomplete flagellar basal body structure and another formed no significant structure, suggesting that flaZ is responsible for both basal body assembly and the transcription of the hag gene. Images PMID:7007337

  3. Kasugamycin-dependent mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dabbs, E R

    1978-01-01

    Kasugamycin-dependent mutants have been isolated from Escherichia coli B. They were obtained through mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate or nitrosoguanidine in conjunction with an antibiotic underlay technique. In the case of nitrosoguanidine, dependent mutants were obtained at a frequency of about 3% of survivors growing up in the selection. In the case of ethyl methane sulfonate, the corresponding value was 1%. Nineteen mutants showing a kasugamycin-dependent phenotype were studied. In terms of response to various temperatures and antibiotic concentrations, they were very heterogeneous, although most fell into two general classes. Genetic analysis indicated that in at least some cases, the kasugamycin-dependent phenotype was the product of two mutations. Two-dimensional gel electropherograms revealed alterations in the ribosomal proteins of seven mutants. One mutant had an alteration in protein S13, and one had an alteration in protein L14. Three showed changes in protein S9. Each of two mutants had changes in two proteins, S18 and L11. Three of these mutants additionally had protein S18 occurring in a partly altered, partly unaltered form. Images PMID:363701

  4. The Importance of Lamivudine Therapy in Liver Cirrhosis Patients Related HBV with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Receiving Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Momiyama, Koichi; Nagai, Hidenari; Ogino, Yu; Mukouzu, Takanori; Matsui, Daigo; Kogame, Michio; Matsui, Teppei; Wakui, Noritaka; Shinohara, Mie; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Sumino, Yasukiyo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously reported that continuous hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) might be more effective for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (aHCC) in patients with liver cirrhosis (LC) related to HCV infection (C-LC) or alcohol abuse (A-LC) than in patients who had LC related to HBV infection (B-LC). The aim of the present study was to retrospectively assess the efficacy of lamivudine therapy for B-LC patients with aHCC undergoing HAIC. Methods: Seventeen adult Japanese B-LC patients with aHCC were treated by HAIC with or without lamivudine (100 mg/day) between 2002 and 2008 at our hospital. Their tumors were inoperable according to computed tomography findings. HAIC (LV at 12 mg/hr, CDDP at 10 mg/hr, and 5-FU at 250 mg/22 hr) was given via the proper hepatic artery every 5 days for 4 weeks using a catheter connected to a subcutaneously implanted drug delivery system. Results: Nine of the 17 patients received lamivudine at a dose of 100 mg/day together with HAIC (LAM group), while 8 patients did not receive lamivudine and only had HAIC (non-LAM group). The response rate was 12.5 in the non-LAM group and 0.0% in the LAM group. However, the survival of the LAM group was better than that of the non-LAM group, although there was no significant difference between them. The median survival time of the LAM and non-LAM groups was 310 and 157 days, respectively. HBV-DNA levels were significantly lower after chemotherapy compared with that before chemotherapy in the LAM group. In the non-LAM group, the percentage of Th2 cells before HAIC and after HAIC was significantly higher than in the control group. However, the percentage of Th2 cells in the LAM group after HAIC was not different from that in the control group, although it was significantly higher in the LAM group than in the control group before chemotherapy. Conclusions: These results indicate that lamivudine therapy may prolong the survival of B-LC patients receiving HAIC for aHCC by reducing HBV

  5. Chemical dynamics of the CH(X2Π) + C2H4(X1A1g), CH(X2Π) + C2D4(X1A1g), and CD(X2Π) + C2H4(X1A1g) reactions studied under single collision conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangtong; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2012-01-14

    The crossed beam reactions of the methylidyne radical with ethylene (CH(X(2)Π) + C(2)H(4)(X(1)A(1g))), methylidyne with D4-ethylene (CH(X(2)Π) + C(2)D(4)(X(1)A(1g))), and D1-methylidyne with ethylene (CD(X(2)Π) + C(2)H(4)(X(1)A(1g))) were conducted at nominal collision energies of 17-18 kJ mol(-1) to untangle the chemical dynamics involved in the formation of distinct C(3)H(4) isomers methylacetylene (CH(3)CCH), allene (H(2)CCCH(2)), and cyclopropene (c-C(3)H(4)) via C(3)H(5) intermediates. By tracing the atomic hydrogen and deuterium loss pathways, our experimental data suggest indirect scattering dynamics and an initial addition of the (D1)-methylidyne radical to the carbon-carbon double bond of the (D4)-ethylene reactant forming a cyclopropyl radical intermediate (c-C(3)H(5)/c-C(3)D(4)H/c-C(3)H(4)D). The latter was found to ring-open to the allyl radical (H(2)CCHCH(2)/D(2)CCHCD(2)/H(2)CCDCH(2)). This intermediate was found to be long lived with life times of at least five times its rotational period and decomposed via atomic hydrogen/deuterium loss from the central carbon atom (C2) to form allene via a rather loose exit transition state in an overall strongly exoergic reaction. Based on the experiments with partially deuterated reactants, no compelling evidence could be provided to support the formation of the cyclopropene and methylacetylene isomers under single collision conditions. Likewise, hydrogen/deuterium shifts in the allyl radical intermediates or an initial insertion of the (D1)-methylidyne radical into the carbon-hydrogen/deuterium bond of the (D4)-ethylene reactant were found to be-if at all-of minor importance. Our experiments propose that in hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons such as Saturn's satellite Titan, the reaction of methylidyne radicals should lead predominantly to the hitherto elusive allene molecule in these reducing environments. PMID:22108533

  6. Swimming activity in dystonia musculorum mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, R; Joyal, C C; Cote, C

    1993-07-01

    Dystonia musculorum (dt) mutant mice, characterized by degeneration of spinocerebellar fibers, were evaluated in a visible platform swim test. It was found that dt mutants were slower to reach the platform than normal mice. However, the number of quadrants traversed was not higher in dt mutants. It is concluded that spinocerebellar fibers to the vermis are important in limb control during swimming but not in visuo-motor guidance (navigational skills) of the animal towards a visible goal, at least in regard to the quadrant measure. It is not excluded that a measure tracing their path may find a mild deviation from the goal. PMID:8327590

  7. Mutant SOD1 accumulation in sensory neurons does not associate with endoplasmic reticulum stress features: Implications for differential vulnerability of sensory and motor neurons to SOD1 toxicity.

    PubMed

    Taiana, Michela; Sassone, Jenny; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Previous papers showed that mutant SOD1 accumulates and undergoes misfolding in motor neurons and that the specific interaction of mutant SOD1 with derlin-1 leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Because evidence shows that mutant SOD1 expression also damages sensory neurons, we hypothesized that, similarly to motor neurons, the sensory neurons of ALS mouse model SOD1(G93A) accumulate mutant/misfolded SOD1 and suffer from ER stress and UPR activation. Our results reveal that SOD1(G93A) sensory neurons accumulate mutant/misfolded SOD1 but, surprisingly, do not suffer from ER stress and UPR activation. Moreover, the sensory neurons do not express detectable levels of the SOD1 interactor derlin-1. These results suggest a potential molecular mechanism underlying the differential vulnerability of motor and sensory neurons to mutant SOD1 toxicity. PMID:27241719

  8. Identification of plant defence regulators through transcriptional profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana cdd1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Swain, Swadhin; Singh, Nidhi; Nandi, Ashis Kumar

    2015-03-01

    A sustainable balance between defence and growth is essential for optimal fitness under pathogen stress. Plants activate immune response at the cost of normal metabolic requirements. Thus, plants that constitutively activate defence are deprived of growth. Arabidopsis thaliana mutant constitutive defence without defect in growth and development1 (cdd1) is an exception. The cdd1 mutant is constitutive for salicylic acid accumulation, signalling, and defence against biotrophic and hemibiotrophic pathogens, without having much impact on growth. Thus, cdd1 offers an ideal genetic background to identify novel regulators of plant defence. Here we report the differential gene expression profile between cdd1 and wild-type plants as obtained by microarray hybridization. Expression of several defence-related genes also supports constitutive activation of defence in cdd1. We screened T-DNA insertion mutant lines of selected genes, for resistance against virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). Through bacterial resistance, callose deposition and pathogenesis-associated expression analyses, we identified four novel regulators of plant defence. Resistance levels in the mutants suggest that At2g19810 and [rom] At5g05790 are positive regulators, whereas At1g61370 and At3g42790 are negative regulators of plant defence against bacterial pathogens. PMID:25740148

  9. Ubiquitin-hepatitis B core antigen-cytoplasmic transduction peptide enhances HBV-specific humoral and CTL immune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Song, Linlin; Zhuo, Meng; Tang, Yuyan; Chen, Xiaohua; Tang, Zhenghao; Zang, Guoqing

    2014-11-01

    Therapeutic strategies based on an enhanced hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity may eradicate HBV. We previously verified that a fusion protein ubiquitin (Ub)-hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg)-cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) can enter the cytoplasm of dendritic cells and enhance T cell response to generate HBV-specific CTLs efficiently in vitro. Ub, a marker of protein degradation, may promote the generation of peptides appropriate for major histocompatibility complex class I presentation. In the present study, the specific immune responses of the fusion protein Ub-HBcAg-CTP in BALB/c mice were evaluated and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Results showed that Ub-HBcAg-CTP increased the anti-HBcAg titer and produced the cytokines IFN-γ and IL-2. This fusion protein also induced higher percentages of IFN-γ(+)CD8(+) cells and specific CTL responses. Ub-HBcAg-CTP could also upregulate the expressions of Jak2, Tyk2, STAT1, and STAT4 in T lymphocytes. In conclusion, Ub-HBcAg-CTP enhanced cellular and humoral immune responses and induced robust HBV-specific CTL activities in BALB/c mice. PMID:25135878

  10. Suppression of USP18 Potentiates the Anti-HBV Activity of Interferon Alpha in HepG2.2.15 Cells via JAK/STAT Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Lei, Qing-song; Zhang, Shu-Jun; Kong, Ling-na; Qin, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin-specific protease 18 (USP18, also known as UBP43) has both interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) dependent and ISG15-independent functions. By silencing the expression of USP18 in HepG2.2.15 cells, we studied the effect of USP18 on the anti-HBV activity of IFN-α and demonstrated that knockdown of USP18 significantly Inhibited the HBV expression and increased the expression of ISGs. Levels of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg), HBV DNA and intracellular hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) were dramatically decreased with or without treatment of indicated dose of IFN-α. Suppression of USP18 activated the JAK/STAT signaling pathway as shown by the increased and prolonged expression of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (p-STAT1) in combination with enhanced expression of several interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). Our results indicated that USP18 modulates the anti-HBV activity of IFN-α via activation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in Hepg2.2.15 cells. PMID:27227879

  11. Prevalence, attitudes and knowledge about HIV HBV and HCV infections among inmates in prisons Prilep and Bitola--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jovanovska, Tanja; Kocic, Biljana; Stojcevska, Viktorija P

    2014-06-01

    Prisons are associates as facilities liable of high risk of infection disease, as a result of the possibility of transmission of infections in prisons surroundings. Investigations carried out in correctional facilities around the world have shown a high prevalence of blood borne hepatitis viruses and HIV. The study was aimed at confirming prevalence of HIV hepatitis B and hepatitis C among prisoners in Bitola's, and Prilep's prisons, existing of co-infection as well to assess knowledge and attitudes related to HIV, HBV and HCV infections. In this cross-sectional study 200 prisoners have participated, providing answers to structured questionnaire and in order to analyze blood for HIV, HBV and HCV, rapid blood tests in detecting antibodies has been used. Prevalence of HCV is 0.20, HBV 0.17 and HIV prevalence is 0. Co-infection prevalence of HCV/HBV is 0.07 from the total number of examinees. As for the manner of infection with HIV virus 22% are familiar with the fact that persons cannot be infected by HIV if they have only one sexual partner who is not infected and have no other partners, and for the protection of HIV and Hepatitis B by correct use of condoms-58% have given correct answers. PMID:25144968

  12. HBX Protein-Induced Downregulation of microRNA-18a is Responsible for Upregulation of Connective Tissue Growth Factor in HBV Infection-Associated Hepatocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yingjian; Wang, Ping; Wang, Hongyun; Su, Huanhuan; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Lamei

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was designed to improve our understanding of the role of miR-18a and its target (connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), which are mediators in HBX-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Material/Methods We first investigated the expression of several candidate microRNAs (miRNAs) reported to have been aberrantly expressed between HepG2 and HepG2.2.15, which is characterized by stable HBV infection, while the CTGF is identified as a target of miR-18a. Furthermore, the expression of CTGF evaluated in HepG2 was transfected with HBX, while the HepG2.2.15 was transfected with miR-18a and CTGF siRNA. We examined the cell cycle at the same time. Results We found that the expression of miR-18a was abnormally reduced in the HBV-positive HCC tissue samples compared with HBV-negative HCC samples. Through the use of a luciferase reporter system, we also identified CTGF 3′UTR (1046–1052 bp) as the exact binding site for miR-18a. We also observed a clear increase in CTGF mRNA and protein expression levels in HBV-positive HCC human tissue samples in comparison with the HBV-negative controls, indicating a possible negatively associated relationship between miR-18a and CTGF. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of HBX overexpression on miR-18a and CTGF, as well as the viability and cell cycle status of HepG2 cells. In addition, we found that HBX introduction downregulated miR-18a, upregulated CTGF, elevated the viability, and promoted cell cycle progression. We transfected HepG2.2.15 with miR-18a mimics and CTGF siRNA, finding that upregulated miR-18a and downregulated CTGF suppress the viability and cause cell cycle arrest. Conclusions Our study shows the role of the CTGF gene as a target of miR-18a, and identifies the function of HBV/HBX/miR-18a/CTGF as a key signaling pathway mediating HBV infection-induced HCC. PMID:27421245

  13. Hepatitis B (HBV), Hepatitis C (HCV) and Hepatitis Delta (HDV) Viruses in the Colombian Population—How Is the Epidemiological Situation?

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Mora, Mónica Viviana; Gutierrez Fernandez, María Fernanda; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; de Azevedo Neto, Raymundo Soares; Carrilho, Flair José; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral hepatitis B, C and delta still remain a serious problem worldwide. In Colombia, data from 1980s described that HBV and HDV infection are important causes of hepatitis, but little is known about HCV infection. The aim of this study was to determine the currently frequency of HBV, HCV and HDV in four different Colombian regions. Methodology/Principal Findings This study was conducted in 697 habitants from 4 Colombian departments: Amazonas, Chocó, Magdalena and San Andres Islands. Epidemiological data were obtained from an interview applied to each individual aiming to evaluate risk factors related to HBV, HCV or HDV infections. All samples were tested for HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs and anti-HCV markers. Samples that were positive to HBsAg and/or anti-HBc were tested to anti-HDV. Concerning the geographical origin of the samples, the three HBV markers showed a statistically significant difference: HBsAg (p = 0.033) and anti-HBc (p<0.001) were more frequent in Amazonas and Magdalena departments. Isolated anti-HBs (a marker of previous vaccination) frequencies were: Chocó (53.26%), Amazonas (32.88%), Magdalena (17.0%) and San Andrés (15.33%) - p<0.001. Prevalence of anti-HBc increased with age; HBsAg varied from 1.97 to 8.39% (p = 0.033). Amazonas department showed the highest frequency for anti-HCV marker (5.68%), while the lowest frequency was found in San Andrés Island (0.66%). Anti-HDV was found in 9 (5.20%) out of 173 anti-HBc and/or HBsAg positive samples, 8 of them from the Amazonas region and 1 from them Magdalena department. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, HBV, HCV and HDV infections are detected throughout Colombia in frequency levels that would place some areas as hyperendemic for HBV, especially those found in Amazonas and Magdalena departments. Novel strategies to increase HBV immunization in the rural population and to strengthen HCV surveillance are reinforced by these results. PMID:21559488

  14. HIV, HCV, HBV, HSV, and syphilis prevalence among female sex workers in Tehran, Iran, by using respondent-driven sampling.

    PubMed

    Moayedi-Nia, Saeedeh; Bayat Jozani, Zahra; Esmaeeli Djavid, Gholamreza; Entekhabi, Fatemeh; Bayanolhagh, Saeed; Saatian, Minoo; Sedaghat, Abbas; Nikzad, Rana; Jahanjoo Aminabad, Fatemeh; Mohraz, Minoo

    2016-04-01

    To find out the prevalence of HIV, HCV, HBV, HSV, and syphilis infections among female sex workers (FSWs) in Tehran, a cross-sectional study by using respondent-driven sampling (RDS) method was conducted. From December 2012 to April 2013 FSWs in Tehran were recruited. Inclusion criteria consisted of trading sex during the 12 months prior to this study and selling sex for at least 6 months in participants' lifetime. Among 161 consenting participants, 5% were infected with HIV. Moreover, 8.1% of FSWs were HCV positive, 37.9% were of HSV type1/type2, 1.2% of participants were infected with HBV, and none of the participants were infected with syphilis. HIV-positive participants were significantly more likely to be co-infected with HSV type1/type2, be younger, have more sexual partners and especially more clients during seven days prior to this study and report more history of having at least one of sexually transmitted infections symptoms in 12 months prior the study. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, being infected with HSV and also being under 25 years of age were found to be independently associated with HIV infection. Compared with the prevalence of HIV among general population of Tehran, relatively high prevalence of HIV and other viral infections among FSWs should be considered. All in all, it is critical to commence effective counter-measures for this high-risk group if the aim is to prevent spreading of these viruses to general population. PMID:26565671

  15. Evaluation of a novel commercial quaternary ammonium compound for eradication of Mycobacteria, HCV and HBV in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Elkholy, Yasmine Samy; Hegab, Asmaa Sayed; Ismail, Dalia Kadry; Hassan, Reem Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopes are a common source of outbreaks of healthcare-associated infections. It is therefore important to identify high-level disinfectants capable of eliminating or killing all vegetative bacteria, mycobacteria, and viruses. Aldehydebased disinfectants are most commonly used in clinical practice but resistance has recently been detected and side effects associated with these disinfectants are well documented. In this study, we evaluated Virusolve+® EDS, a novel quaternary ammonium compound formulation supplied by Amity international, against Mycobacterium bovis (ATCC-27289), hepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive serum and hepatitis B surface antigen-positive serum. We also compared its efficacy against Cidex® (glutaraldehyde 2%), an aldehyde-based disinfectant. M. bovis showed no growth after 10 weeks with either Virusolve+® or Cidex®. Virusolve+® achieved a 10(4)- fold reduction in the initial 10(6) HCV load under clean conditions (without red blood cells) for 20 min, whereas Cidex® achieved this reduction under clean and dirty conditions (without and with red blood cells, respectively) after both 10 and 20 min. Both Virusolve+® and Cidex® were able to eradicate hepatitis B virus (HBV) infectivity under clean conditions after 10 and 20 min, whereas under dirty conditions they were only able to eradicate virus infectivity after 20 min. Virusolve+® EDS when compared with Cidex® showed equal mycobactericidal activity completely eradicating M. bovis. However, both showed comparable virucidal activity against HBV, which was more effective under clean conditions, emphasizing the importance of the cleaning step in endoscope reprocessing. Cidex® was more effective at eradicating HCV under dirty conditions after a short contact time. PMID:26727900

  16. Phosphoglucomutase Mutants of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Adhya, Sankar; Schwartz, Maxime

    1971-01-01

    Bacteria with strongly depressed phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1) activity are found among the mutants of Escherichia coli which, when grown on maltose, accumulate sufficient amylose to be detectable by iodine staining. These pgm mutants grow poorly on galactose but also accumulate amylose on this carbon source. Growth on lactose does not produce high amylose but, instead, results in the induction of the enzymes of maltose metabolism, presumably by accumulation of maltose. These facts suggest that the catabolism of glucose-1-phosphate is strongly depressed in pgm mutants, although not completely abolished. Anabolism of glucose-1-phosphate is also strongly depressed, since amino acid- or glucose-grown pgm mutants are sensitive to phage C21, indicating a deficiency in the biosynthesis of uridine diphosphoglucose or uridine diphosphogalactose, or both. All pgm mutations isolated map at about 16 min on the genetic map, between purE and the gal operon. PMID:4942754

  17. Cooperative Interaction Within RNA Virus Mutant Spectra.

    PubMed

    Shirogane, Yuta; Watanabe, Shumpei; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses usually consist of mutant spectra because of high error rates of viral RNA polymerases. Growth competition occurs among different viral variants, and the fittest clones predominate under given conditions. Individual variants, however, may not be entirely independent of each other, and internal interactions within mutant spectra can occur. Examples of cooperative and interfering interactions that exert enhancing and suppressing effects on replication of the wild-type virus, respectively, have been described, but their underlying mechanisms have not been well defined. It was recently found that the cooperation between wild-type and variant measles virus genomes produces a new phenotype through the heterooligomer formation of a viral protein. This observation provides a molecular mechanism underlying cooperative interactions within mutant spectra. Careful attention to individual sequences, in addition to consensus sequences, may disclose further examples of internal interactions within mutant spectra. PMID:26162566

  18. Mutant p53: one name, many proteins

    PubMed Central

    Freed-Pastor, William A.; Prives, Carol

    2012-01-01

    There is now strong evidence that mutation not only abrogates p53 tumor-suppressive functions, but in some instances can also endow mutant proteins with novel activities. Such neomorphic p53 proteins are capable of dramatically altering tumor cell behavior, primarily through their interactions with other cellular proteins and regulation of cancer cell transcriptional programs. Different missense mutations in p53 may confer unique activities and thereby offer insight into the mutagenic events that drive tumor progression. Here we review mechanisms by which mutant p53 exerts its cellular effects, with a particular focus on the burgeoning mutant p53 transcriptome, and discuss the biological and clinical consequences of mutant p53 gain of function. PMID:22713868

  19. Rapid screening and identification of dominant B cell epitopes of HBV surface antigen by quantum dot-based fluorescence polarization assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhongji; Song, Ruihua; Chen, Yue; Zhu, Yang; Tian, Yanhui; Li, Ding; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-03-01

    A method for quickly screening and identifying dominant B cell epitopes was developed using hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen as a target. Eleven amino acid fragments from HBV surface antigen were synthesized by 9-fluorenylmethoxy carbonyl solid-phase peptide synthesis strategy, and then CdTe quantum dots were used to label the N-terminals of all peptides. After optimizing the factors for fluorescence polarization (FP) immunoassay, the antigenicities of synthetic peptides were determined by analyzing the recognition and combination of peptides and standard antibody samples. The results of FP assays confirmed that 10 of 11 synthetic peptides have distinct antigenicities. In order to screen dominant antigenic peptides, the FP assays were carried out to investigate the antibodies against the 10 synthetic peptides of HBV surface antigen respectively in 159 samples of anti-HBV surface antigen-positive antiserum. The results showed that 3 of the 10 antigenic peptides may be immunodominant because the antibodies against them existed more widely among the samples and their antibody titers were higher than those of other peptides. Using three dominant antigenic peptides, 293 serum samples were detected for HBV infection by FP assays; the results showed that the antibody-positive ratio was 51.9% and the sensitivity and specificity were 84.3% and 98.2%, respectively. In conclusion, a quantum dot-based FP assay is a very simple, rapid, and convenient method for determining immunodominant antigenic peptides and has great potential in applications such as epitope mapping, vaccine designing, or clinical disease diagnosis in the future.

  20. Arabidopsis mutants with a reduced seed dormancy.

    PubMed Central

    Léon-Kloosterziel, K M; van de Bunt, G A; Zeevaart, J A; Koornneef, M

    1996-01-01

    The development of seed dormancy is an aspect of seed maturation, the last stage of seed development. To isolate mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana that are affected in this process, we selected directly for the absence of dormancy among freshly harvested M2 seeds. The screen yielded two mutants exhibiting a reduced dormancy, rdo1 and rdo2, that are specifically affected in dormancy determined by the embryo. The rdo1 and rdo2 mutants show normal levels of abscisic acid and the same sensitivity to abscisic acid, ethylene, auxin, and cytokinin as the wild type. The rdo2 mutant but not the rdo1 mutant has a reduced sensitivity to the gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitor tetcyclacis. Double-mutant analysis suggested that the RDO1 and RDO2 genes are involved in separate pathways leading to the development of dormancy. We assume that the RDO2 gene controls a step in the induction of dormancy that is most likely induced by abscisic acid and is expressed as an increase of the gibberellin requirement for germination. PMID:8587986

  1. Adjustment of host cells for accommodation of symbiotic bacteria: vacuole defunctionalization, HOPS suppression, and TIP1g retargeting in Medicago.

    PubMed

    Gavrin, Aleksandr; Kaiser, Brent N; Geiger, Dietmar; Tyerman, Stephen D; Wen, Zhengyu; Bisseling, Ton; Fedorova, Elena E

    2014-09-01

    In legume-rhizobia symbioses, the bacteria in infected cells are enclosed in a plant membrane, forming organelle-like compartments called symbiosomes. Symbiosomes remain as individual units and avoid fusion with lytic vacuoles of host cells. We observed changes in the vacuole volume of infected cells and thus hypothesized that microsymbionts may cause modifications in vacuole formation or function. To examine this, we quantified the volumes and surface areas of plant cells, vacuoles, and symbiosomes in root nodules of Medicago truncatula and analyzed the expression and localization of VPS11 and VPS39, members of the HOPS vacuole-tethering complex. During the maturation of symbiosomes to become N2-fixing organelles, a developmental switch occurs and changes in vacuole features are induced. For example, we found that expression of VPS11 and VPS39 in infected cells is suppressed and host cell vacuoles contract, permitting the expansion of symbiosomes. Trafficking of tonoplast-targeted proteins in infected symbiotic cells is also altered, as shown by retargeting of the aquaporin TIP1g from the tonoplast membrane to the symbiosome membrane. This retargeting appears to be essential for the maturation of symbiosomes. We propose that these alterations in the function of the vacuole are key events in the adaptation of the plant cell to host intracellular symbiotic bacteria. PMID:25217511

  2. Resveratrol Ameliorates Motor Neuron Degeneration and Improves Survival in SOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lin; Zhang, Xiaojie; Li, Jia; Le, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol has recently been used as a supplemental treatment for several neurological and nonneurological diseases. It is not known whether resveratrol has neuroprotective effect on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To assess the effect of resveratrol on the disease, we tested this agent on an ALS model of SOD1G93A transgenic mouse. Rotarod measurement was performed to measure the motor function of the ALS mice. Nissl staining and SMI-32 immunofluorescent staining were used to determine motor neurons survival in the spinal cord of the ALS mice. Hematoxylin-eosin (H&E), succinic dehydrogenase (SDH), and cytochrome oxidase (COX) staining were applied to pathologically analyze the skeletal muscles of the ALS mice. We found that resveratrol treatment significantly delayed the disease onset and prolonged the lifespan of the ALS mice. Furthermore, resveratrol treatment attenuated motor neuron loss, relieved muscle atrophy, and improved mitochondrial function of muscle fibers in the ALS mice. In addition, we demonstrated that resveratrol exerted these neuroprotective effects mainly through increasing the expression of Sirt1, consequently suppressing oxidative stress and downregulating p53 and its related apoptotic pathway. Collectively, our findings suggest that resveratrol might provide a promising therapeutic intervention for ALS. PMID:25057490

  3. Human mononuclear cell function after 4 degrees C storage during 1-G and microgravity conditions of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, R.; Taylor, G.; Lionetti, F.; Neale, L.; Curren, T.

    1989-01-01

    Future space missions of long duration may require that autologous leukocytes be stored in flight for infusion to restore normal immune competence in crewmembers. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs), as leukocyte concentrates in autologous plasma and 2% dextrose, were stored in the microgravity conditions provided by the U.S. Space Shuttle Columbia (Mission 61-C). Activity of PBMNC after space flight was compared with that from a series of preflight ground control experiments, which demonstrated in culture a progressive daily loss in mitogen-stimulated protein synthesis at 24 h and thymidine uptake at 72 h after storage for 7 d at 4 degrees C. Post-storage viabilities were at least 90% as determined by trypan dye exclusion. A progressive reduction in the percentage of PBMNC expressing cell-surface phenotype markers, which was similar for monocytes, B cells, and T-cell subsets, also occurred after storage. The ability of PBMNC, stored for 8 d in Columbia's middeck, to become activated and proliferate in vitro was similar to that of cells that remained in identical flight lockers on the ground as 1-G controls, thus indicating that PBMNCs were not adversely affected by storage under microgravity conditions.

  4. Identification of an NKX3.1-G9a-UTY transcriptional regulatory network that controls prostate differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Aditya; Le Magnen, Clémentine; Mitrofanova, Antonina; Ouyang, Xuesong; Califano, Andrea; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2016-06-24

    The NKX3.1 homeobox gene plays essential roles in prostate differentiation and prostate cancer. We show that loss of function of Nkx3.1 in mouse prostate results in down-regulation of genes that are essential for prostate differentiation, as well as up-regulation of genes that are not normally expressed in prostate. Conversely, gain of function of Nkx3.1 in an otherwise fully differentiated nonprostatic mouse epithelium (seminal vesicle) is sufficient for respecification to prostate in renal grafts in vivo. In human prostate cells, these activities require the interaction of NKX3.1 with the G9a histone methyltransferase via the homeodomain and are mediated by activation of target genes such as UTY (KDM6c), the male-specific paralog of UTX (KDM6a) We propose that an NKX3.1-G9a-UTY transcriptional regulatory network is essential for prostate differentiation, and we speculate that disruption of such a network predisposes to prostate cancer. PMID:27339988

  5. Calculation of the heavy-hadron axial couplings g1, g2, and g3 using lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Will Detmold, David Lin, Stefan Meinel

    2012-06-01

    In a recent paper [arXiv:1109.2480] we have reported on a lattice QCD calculation of the heavy-hadron axial couplings g{sub 1}, g{sub 2}, and g{sub 3}. These quantities are low-energy constants of heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory (HH{chi}PT) and are related to the B*B{pi}, {Sigma}{sub b}*{Sigma}{sub b}{pi}, and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)}{Lambda}{sub b}{pi} couplings. In the following, we discuss important details of the calculation and give further results. To determine the axial couplings, we explicitly match the matrix elements of the axial current in QCD with the corresponding matrix elements in HH{chi}PT. We construct the ratios of correlation functions used to calculate the matrix elements in lattice QCD, and study the contributions from excited states. We present the complete numerical results and discuss the data analysis in depth. In particular, we demonstrate the convergence of SU(4|2) HH{chi}PT for the axial current matrix elements at pion masses up to about 400 MeV and show the impact of the nonanalytic loop contributions. Finally, we present additional predictions for strong and radiative decay widths of charm and bottom baryons.

  6. Matrix stiffness drives epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumour metastasis through a TWIST1-G3BP2 mechanotransduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Wei, Spencer C; Fattet, Laurent; Tsai, Jeff H; Guo, Yurong; Pai, Vincent H; Majeski, Hannah E; Chen, Albert C; Sah, Robert L; Taylor, Susan S; Engler, Adam J; Yang, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Matrix stiffness potently regulates cellular behaviour in various biological contexts. In breast tumours, the presence of dense clusters of collagen fibrils indicates increased matrix stiffness and correlates with poor survival. It is unclear how mechanical inputs are transduced into transcriptional outputs to drive tumour progression. Here we report that TWIST1 is an essential mechanomediator that promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in response to increasing matrix stiffness. High matrix stiffness promotes nuclear translocation of TWIST1 by releasing TWIST1 from its cytoplasmic binding partner G3BP2. Loss of G3BP2 leads to constitutive TWIST1 nuclear localization and synergizes with increasing matrix stiffness to induce EMT and promote tumour invasion and metastasis. In human breast tumours, collagen fibre alignment, a marker of increasing matrix stiffness, and reduced expression of G3BP2 together predict poor survival. Our findings reveal a TWIST1-G3BP2 mechanotransduction pathway that responds to biomechanical signals from the tumour microenvironment to drive EMT, invasion and metastasis. PMID:25893917

  7. Negative staining and immunoelectron microscopy of adhesion-deficient mutants of Streptococcus salivarius reveal that the adhesive protein antigens are separate classes of cell surface fibril.

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, A H; Handley, P S; Baars, A; Slot, J W

    1986-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of the cell wall-associated protein antigens of Streptococcus salivarius HB, which are involved in specific adhesive properties of the cells, was studied. Mutants which had lost the adhesive properties and lacked the antigens at the cell surface were compared with the parent strain. Immunoelectron microscopy of cryosections of cells labeled with affinity-purified, specific antisera and colloidal gold-protein A complexes was used to locate the antigens. Antigen C (AgC), a glycoprotein involved in attachment to host surfaces, was mainly located in the fibrillar layer outside the cell wall. A smaller amount of label was also found throughout the cytoplasmic area in the form of small clusters of gold particles, which suggests a macromolecular association. Mutant HB-7, which lacks the wall-associated AgC, accumulated AgC reactivity intracellularly. Intracellular AgC was often found associated with isolated areas of increased electron density, but sometimes seemed to fill the entire interior of the cell. Antigen B (AgB), a protein responsible for interbacterial coaggregation, was also located in the fibrillar layer, although its distribution differed from that of the wall-associated AgC since AgB was found predominantly in the peripheral areas. A very small amount of label was also found in the cytoplasmic area as discrete gold particles. Mutant HB-V5, which lacks wall-associated AgB, was not labeled in the fibrillar coat, but showed the same weak intracellular label as the parent strain. Immunolabeling with serum against AgD, another wall-associated protein but of unknown function, demonstrated its presence in the fibrillar layer of strain HB. Negatively stained preparations of whole cells of wild-type S. salivarius and mutants that had lost wall-associated AgB or AgC revealed that two classes of short fibrils are carried on the cell surface at the same time. AgB and AgC are probably located on separate classes of short, protease

  8. Novel compound heterozygous Thyroglobulin mutations c.745+1G>A/c.7036+2T>A associated with congenital goiter and hypothyroidism in a Vietnamese family. Identification of a new cryptic 5' splice site in the exon 6.

    PubMed

    Citterio, Cintia E; Morales, Cecilia M; Bouhours-Nouet, Natacha; Machiavelli, Gloria A; Bueno, Elena; Gatelais, Frédérique; Coutant, Regis; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Rivolta, Carina M; Targovnik, Héctor M

    2015-03-15

    Several patients were identified with dyshormonogenesis caused by mutations in the thyroglobulin (TG) gene. These defects are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and affected individuals are either homozygous or compound heterozygous for the mutations. The aim of the present study was to identify new TG mutations in a patient of Vietnamese origin affected by congenital hypothyroidism, goiter and low levels of serum TG. DNA sequencing identified the presence of compound heterozygous mutations in the TG gene: the maternal mutation consists of a novel c.745+1G>A (g.IVS6 + 1G>A), whereas the hypothetical paternal mutation consists of a novel c.7036+2T>A (g.IVS40 + 2T>A). The father was not available for segregation analysis. Ex-vivo splicing assays and subsequent RT-PCR analyses were performed on mRNA isolated from the eukaryotic-cells transfected with normal and mutant expression vectors. Minigene analysis of the c.745+1G>A mutant showed that the exon 6 is skipped during pre-mRNA splicing or partially included by use of a cryptic 5' splice site located to 55 nucleotides upstream of the authentic exon 6/intron 6 junction site. The functional analysis of c.7036+2T>A mutation showed a complete skipping of exon 40. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool NNSplice, Fsplice, SPL, SPLM and MaxEntScan programs were investigated and evaluated in relation with the experimental evidence. These analyses predicted that both mutant alleles would result in the abolition of the authentic splice donor sites. The c.745+1G>A mutation originates two putative truncated proteins of 200 and 1142 amino acids, whereas c.7036+2T>A mutation results in a putative truncated protein of 2277 amino acids. In conclusion, we show that the c.745+1G>A mutation promotes the activation of a new cryptic donor splice site in the exon 6 of the TG gene. The functional consequences of these mutations could be structural changes in the protein

  9. The Arabidopsis Domain of Unknown Function 1218 (DUF1218) Containing Proteins, MODIFYING WALL LIGNIN-1 and 2 (At1g31720/MWL-1 and At4g19370/MWL-2) Function Redundantly to Alter Secondary Cell Wall Lignin Content.

    PubMed

    Mewalal, Ritesh; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Coetzee, Berdine; Mansfield, Shawn D; Myburg, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    DUF1218 is a land plant-specific innovation and has previously been shown to be associated with cell wall biology, vasculature patterning and abiotic/biotic stress response. The Arabidopsis genome encodes 15 members, two of which (At1g31720 and At4g27435) are preferentially expressed in the secondary cell wall depositing inflorescence stems. To further our understanding of the roles of DUF1218-containing proteins in secondary cell wall biology, we functionally characterized At1g31720 (herein referred to as MODIFYING WALL LIGNIN-1 or MWL-1). Since related gene family members may contribute to functional redundancy, we also characterized At4g19370 (MWL-2), the most closely related gene to MWL-1 in the protein family. Subcellular localization revealed that both Arabidopsis proteins are targeted to the cell periphery. The single T-DNA knockout lines, mwl-1 and mwl-2, and independent overexpression lines showed no significant differences in plant growth or changes in total lignin content relative to wild-type (WT) control plants. However, the double homozygous mutant, mwl-1/mwl-2, had smaller rosettes with a significant decrease in rosette fresh weight and stem height relative to the WT control at four weeks and six weeks, respectively. Moreover, mwl-1/mwl-2 showed a significant reduction in total lignin content (by ca. 11% relative to WT) and an increase in syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) monomer ratio relative to the control plants. Our study has identified two additional members of the DUF1218 family in Arabidopsis as novel contributors to secondary cell wall biology, specifically lignin biosynthesis, and these proteins appear to function redundantly. PMID:26930070

  10. The Arabidopsis Domain of Unknown Function 1218 (DUF1218) Containing Proteins, MODIFYING WALL LIGNIN-1 and 2 (At1g31720/MWL-1 and At4g19370/MWL-2) Function Redundantly to Alter Secondary Cell Wall Lignin Content

    PubMed Central

    Mewalal, Ritesh; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Coetzee, Berdine; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Myburg, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    DUF1218 is a land plant-specific innovation and has previously been shown to be associated with cell wall biology, vasculature patterning and abiotic/biotic stress response. The Arabidopsis genome encodes 15 members, two of which (At1g31720 and At4g27435) are preferentially expressed in the secondary cell wall depositing inflorescence stems. To further our understanding of the roles of DUF1218-containing proteins in secondary cell wall biology, we functionally characterized At1g31720 (herein referred to as MODIFYING WALL LIGNIN-1 or MWL-1). Since related gene family members may contribute to functional redundancy, we also characterized At4g19370 (MWL-2), the most closely related gene to MWL-1 in the protein family. Subcellular localization revealed that both Arabidopsis proteins are targeted to the cell periphery. The single T-DNA knockout lines, mwl-1 and mwl-2, and independent overexpression lines showed no significant differences in plant growth or changes in total lignin content relative to wild-type (WT) control plants. However, the double homozygous mutant, mwl-1/mwl-2, had smaller rosettes with a significant decrease in rosette fresh weight and stem height relative to the WT control at four weeks and six weeks, respectively. Moreover, mwl-1/mwl-2 showed a significant reduction in total lignin content (by ca. 11% relative to WT) and an increase in syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) monomer ratio relative to the control plants. Our study has identified two additional members of the DUF1218 family in Arabidopsis as novel contributors to secondary cell wall biology, specifically lignin biosynthesis, and these proteins appear to function redundantly. PMID:26930070

  11. Effect of Marangoni Convection Generated by Voids on Segregation During Low-G and 1-G Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, M.; Fripp, A.; Rashidnia, N.; deGroh, H.

    1999-01-01

    Solidification experiments, especially microgravity solidification experiments are often hampered by the evolution of unwanted voids or bubbles in the melt. Although these voids and/or bubbles are highly undesirable, there are currently no effective means of preventing their formation or eliminating their adverse effects, particularly, during low-g experiments. Marangoni Convection caused by these voids can drastically change the transport processes in the melt and, therefore, introduce enormous difficulties in interpreting the results of the space investigations. Recent microgravity experiments by Matthiesen, Andrews, and Fripp are all good examples of how the presence of voids and bubbles affect the outcome of costly space experiments and significantly increase the level of difficulty in interpreting their results. In this work we examine mixing caused by Marangoni convection generated by voids and bubbles in the melt during both 1-g and low-g solidification experiments. The objective of the research is to perform a detailed and comprehensive combined numerical-experimental study of Marangoni convection caused by voids during the solidification process and to show how it can affect segregation and growth conditions by modifying the flow, temperature, and species concentration fields in the melt. While Marangoni convection generated by bubbles and voids in the melt can lead to rapid mixing that would negate the benefits of microgravity processing, it could be exploited in some terrestrial processing to ensure effective communication between a melt/solid interface and a gas phase stoichiometry control zone. Thus we hope that this study will not only aid us in interpreting the results of microgravity solidification experiments hampered by voids and bubbles but to guide us in devising possible means of minimizing the adverse effects of Marangoni convection in future space experiments or of exploiting its beneficial mixing features in ground-based solidification.

  12. The substrate specificity of tRNA (m1G37) methyltransferase (TrmD) from Aquifex aeolicus.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Toyooka, Takashi; Ikeuchi, Yoshiho; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Okadome, Kan; Takano, Fuyumi; Oshima, Tairo; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Endo, Yaeta; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2006-12-01

    Transfer RNA (m(1)G37) methyltransferase (TrmD) catalyzes methyl-transfer from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the N(1) atom of G37 in tRNA. In Escherichia coli cells, TrmD methylates tRNA species possessing a G36G37 sequence. It was previously believed that G36 was the positive determinant of TrmD recognition. In the current study, we demonstrate that TrmD from Aquifex aeolicus methylates tRNA transcripts possessing an A36G37 sequence as well as tRNA transcripts possessing a G36G37 sequence. In contrast, tRNA transcripts possessing pyrimidine36G37 were not methylated at all. These substrate specificities were confirmed by an in vitro kinetic assay using 16 tRNA transcripts. The modified nucleoside and the position in yeast tRNA(Phe) transcript were confirmed by LC/MS. Furthermore, nine truncated tRNA molecules were tested to clarify the additional recognition site. Unexpectedly, A. aeolicus TrmD protein efficiently methylated the micro helix corresponding to the anti-codon arm. Because the disruption of the anti-codon stem caused the complete loss of the methyl group acceptance activity, the anti-codon stem is essential for the recognition. Moreover, the existence of the D-arm structure inhibited the activity. Recently, it was reported that E. coli TrmD methylates yeast tRNA(Phe) harboring a sequence A36G37. Thus, recognition of the purine36G37 sequence is probably common to eubacteria TrmD proteins. PMID:17121543

  13. Modulation of statolith mass and grouping in white clover (Trifolium repens) growth in 1-g, microgravity and on the clinostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. D.; Todd, P.; Staehelin, L. A.

    1997-01-01

    Current models of gravity perception in higher plants focus on the buoyant weight of starch-filled amyloplasts as the initial gravity signal susceptor (statolith). However, no tests have yet determined if statolith mass is regulated to increase or decrease gravity stimulus to the plant. To this end, the root caps of white clover (Trifolium repens) grown in three gravity environments with three different levels of gravity stimulation have been examined: (i) 1-g control with normal static gravistimulation, (ii) on a slow clinostat with constant gravistimulation, and (iii) in the stimulus-free microgravity aboard the Space Shuttle. Seedlings were germinated and grown in the BioServe Fluid Processing Apparatus and root cap structure was examined at both light and electron microscopic levels, including three-dimensional cell reconstruction from serial sections. Quantitative analysis of the electron micrographs demonstrated that the starch content of amyloplasts varied with seedling age but not gravity condition. It was also discovered that, unlike in starch storage amyloplasts, all of the starch granules of statolith amyloplasts were encompassed by a fine filamentous, ribosome-excluding matrix. From light micrographic 3-D cell reconstructions, the absolute volume, number, and positional relationships between amyloplasts showed (i) that individual amyloplast volume increased in microgravity but remained constant in seedlings grown for up to three days on the clinostat, (ii) the number of amyloplasts per cell remained unchanged in microgravity but decreased on the clinostat, and (iii) the three-dimensional positions of amyloplasts were not random. Instead amyloplasts in microgravity were grouped near the cell centers while those from the clinostat appeared more dispersed. Taken together, these observations suggest that changing gravity stimulation can elicit feedback control over statolith mass by changing the size, number, and grouping of amyloplasts. These results

  14. Dendrimer-Based Responsive MRI Contrast Agents (G1-G4) for Biosensor Imaging of Redundant Deviation in Shifts (BIRDS).

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuegao; Coman, Daniel; Hyder, Fahmeed; Ali, Meser M

    2015-12-16

    Biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS) is a molecular imaging platform for magnetic resonance that utilizes unique properties of low molecular weight paramagnetic monomers by detecting hyperfine-shifted nonexchangeable protons and transforming the chemical shift information to reflect its microenvironment (e.g., via temperature, pH, etc.). To optimize translational biosensing potential of BIRDS we examined if this detection scheme observed with monomers can be extended onto dendrimers, which are versatile and biocompatible macromolecules with modifiable surface for molecular imaging and drug delivery. Here we report on feasibility of paramagnetic dendrimers for BIRDS. The results show that BIRDS is resilient with paramagnetic dendrimers up to the fourth generation (i.e., G1-G4), where the model dendrimer and chelate were based on poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA(4-)) complexed with thulium ion (Tm(3+)). Temperature sensitivities of two prominent signals of Gn-PAMAM-(TmDOTA(-))x (where n = 1-4, x = 6-39) were comparable to that of prominent signals in TmDOTA(-). Transverse relaxation times of the coalesced nonexchangeable protons on Gn-PAMAM-(TmDOTA(-))x were relatively short to provide signal-to-noise ratio that was comparable to or better than that of TmDOTA(-). A fluorescent dye, rhodamine, was conjugated to a G2-PAMAM-(TmDOTA)12 to create a dual-modality nanosized contrast agent. BIRDS properties of the dendrimer were unaltered with rhodamine conjugation. Purposely designed paramagnetic dendrimers for BIRDS in conjunction with novel macromolecular surface modification for functional ligands/drugs could potentially be used for biologically compatible theranostic sensors. PMID:26497087

  15. Dendrimer-Based Responsive MRI Contrast Agents (G1-G4) for Biosensor Imaging of Redundant Deviation in Shifts (BIRDS)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuegao; Coman, Daniel; Hyder, Fahmeed; Ali, Meser M.

    2016-01-01

    Biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS) is a molecular imaging platform for magnetic resonance that utilizes unique properties of low molecular weight paramagnetic monomers by detecting hyperfine-shifted nonexchangeable protons and transforming the chemical shift information to reflect its microenvironment (e.g., via temperature, pH, etc.). To optimize translational biosensing potential of BIRDS we examined if this detection scheme observed with monomers can be extended onto dendrimers, which are versatile and biocompatible macromolecules with modifiable surface for molecular imaging and drug delivery. Here we report on feasibility of paramagnetic dendrimers for BIRDS. The results show that BIRDS is resilient with paramagnetic dendrimers up to the fourth generation (i.e., G1-G4), where the model dendrimer and chelate were based on poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA4−) complexed with thulium ion (Tm3+). Temperature sensitivities of two prominent signals of Gn-PAMAM-(TmDOTA−)x (where n = 1–4, x = 6–39) were comparable to that of prominent signals in TmDOTA−. Transverse relaxation times of the coalesced nonexchangeable protons on Gn-PAMAM-(TmDOTA−)x were relatively short to provide signal-to-noise ratio that was comparable to or better than that of TmDOTA−. A fluorescent dye, rhodamine, was conjugated to a G2-PAMAM-(TmDOTA)12 to create a dual-modality nanosized contrast agent. BIRDS properties of the dendrimer were unaltered with rhodamine conjugation. Purposely designed paramagnetic dendrimers for BIRDS in conjunction with novel macromolecular surface modification for functional ligands/drugs could potentially be used for biologically compatible theranostic sensors. PMID:26497087

  16. 17 CFR 240.15c3-1g - Conditions for ultimate holding companies of certain brokers or dealers (Appendix G to 17 CFR 240...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Conditions for ultimate holding companies of certain brokers or dealers (Appendix G to 17 CFR 240.15c3-1). 240.15c3-1g Section 240.15c3-1g Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT...

  17. Congenital Heart Block Maternal Sera Autoantibodies Target an Extracellular Epitope on the α1G T-Type Calcium Channel in Human Fetal Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Arianna; Liu, Jie; Silverman, Earl D.; Liu, Xiaoru; Siragam, Vinayakumar; Ackerley, Cameron; Su, Brenda Bin; Yan, Jane Yuqing; Capecchi, Marco; Biavati, Luca; Accorroni, Alice; Yuen, William; Quattrone, Filippo; Lung, Kalvin; Jaeggi, Edgar T.; Backx, Peter H.; Deber, Charles M.; Hamilton, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital heart block (CHB) is a transplacentally acquired autoimmune disease associated with anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB maternal autoantibodies and is characterized primarily by atrioventricular (AV) block of the fetal heart. This study aims to investigate whether the T-type calcium channel subunit α1G may be a fetal target of maternal sera autoantibodies in CHB. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate differential mRNA expression of the T-type calcium channel CACNA1G1G gene) in the AV junction of human fetal hearts compared to the apex (18–22.6 weeks gestation). Using human fetal hearts (20–22 wks gestation), our immunoprecipitation (IP), Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence (IF) staining results, taken together, demonstrate accessibility of the α1G epitope on the surfaces of cardiomyocytes as well as reactivity of maternal serum from CHB affected pregnancies to the α1G protein. By ELISA we demonstrated maternal sera reactivity to α1G was significantly higher in CHB maternal sera compared to controls, and reactivity was epitope mapped to a peptide designated as p305 (corresponding to aa305–319 of the extracellular loop linking transmembrane segments S5–S6 in α1G repeat I). Maternal sera from CHB affected pregnancies also reacted more weakly to the homologous region (7/15 amino acids conserved) of the α1H channel. Electrophysiology experiments with single-cell patch-clamp also demonstrated effects of CHB maternal sera on T-type current in mouse sinoatrial node (SAN) cells. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results indicate that CHB maternal sera antibodies readily target an extracellular epitope of α1G T-type calcium channels in human fetal cardiomyocytes. CHB maternal sera also show reactivity for α1H suggesting that autoantibodies can target multiple fetal targets. PMID:24039792

  18. Comparison of synthetic oviductal fluid and G1/G2 medium under low-1 oxygen atmosphere on embryo production and pregnancy rates in Nelore (Bos indicus) cattle.

    PubMed

    Sanches, B V; Pontes, J H F; Basso, A C; Ferreira, C R; Perecin, F; Seneda, M M

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we evaluated whether embryo development and pregnancy rates would be affected by culturing bovine Bos indicus embryos in Synthetic Oviductal Fluid with amino acids (SOFaa) or G1/G2 sequential medium under a low-oxygen atmosphere. Using Ovum Pick Up, we obtained 1,538 oocytes, divided into G1/G2 (n = 783) and SOFaa (n = 755). No difference was observed for blastocyst development among the groups (27.8% ± 14.6 and 34.9% ± 20.0 for G1/G2 and SOFaa respectively, p > 0.05). Transferring the embryos (n = 450) from both groups to recipients resulted in similar pregnancy rates for the G1/G2 (38.4% n = 78/203) compared to the SOFaa (39.7% n = 98/247). Our findings confirm that Bos indicus embryos cultured in SOFaa and G1/G2 under low-oxygen atmosphere have similar in vitro (blastocyst rate) and in vivo (pregnancy rate) developmental capacity. However, embryos cultured in G1/G2 medium have higher cleavage than those cultured in SOFaa medium. PMID:22448771

  19. Marker vaccine potential of a foot-and-mouth disease virus with a partial VP1 G-H loop deletion.

    PubMed

    Fowler, V L; Knowles, N J; Paton, D J; Barnett, P V

    2010-04-26

    Previous work in cattle and pigs demonstrated that protection against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) could be achieved following vaccination with chimeric foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccines, in which the VP1 G-H loop had been substituted with that from another serotype. This indicated that the VP1 G-H loop may not be essential for the protection of natural hosts against FMDV. If this could be substantiated there would be potential to develop FMD marker vaccines, characterised by the absence of this region. Here, we investigate the serological responses to vaccination with a virus with a partial VP1 G-H loop deletion in order to determine the likelihood of achieving protection and the potential of this virus as a marker vaccine. Inactivated, oil adjuvanted, vaccines, consisting of chemically inactivated virus with or without a partially deleted VP1 G-H loop, were used to immunise cattle. Serum was collected on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 and antibody titres calculated using the virus neutralisation test (VNT) to estimate the likelihood of protection. We predict a good likelihood that cattle vaccinated with a vaccine characterised by a partial VP1 G-H loop would be protected against challenge with the same virus containing the VP1 G-H loop. We also present evidence on the potential of such a construct to act as a marker vaccine, when used in conjunction with a novel serological test. PMID:20199761

  20. Identification of novel attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis mutants.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jason; Pang, Ervinna; He, Haiqi; Kwang, Jimmy

    2008-06-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a major food-borne pathogen that causes nontyphoidal diarrhoea in humans. Infection of adult egg-laying hens usually results in symptomless carriage but in young chicks it may cause paratyphoid disease. It is not known whether S. Enteritidis requires genes additional to known virulence genes for systemic infection of young chickens. A transposon insertion library was created using S. Enteritidis 10/02, which yielded 1246 mutants. Of 384 mutants screened in chickens for attenuation (30.8% of insertion library), 12 (3.1%) had a 50% lethal dose at least 100 times that of the parental strain. Sequencing revealed insertions in genes involved in the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide, cell membrane, ATP biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation of virulence and the yhbC gene, which has an unknown function. Evaluation of in vitro virulence characteristics of a Delta yhbC mutant revealed that its ability to invade HeLa cells and survive within a chicken macrophage cell line (HD11) was significantly reduced. It was also less resistant to reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates and had a retarded growth rate. Chickens challenged with the Delta yhbC mutant cleared the organism from the liver and spleen 1 week faster than the parental strain and were able to develop specific serum IgG antibodies against the Delta yhbC mutant. PMID:18355292

  1. Inositol-Requiring Mutants of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Culbertson, Michael R.; Henry, Susan A.

    1975-01-01

    Fifty-two inositol-requiring mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated following mutagenesis with ethyl methanesulfonate. Complementation and tetrad analysis revealed ten major complementation classes, representing ten independently segregating loci (designated ino1 through ino10) which recombined freely with their respective centromeres. Members of any given complementation class segregated as alleles of a single locus. Thirteen complementation subclasses were identified among thirty-six mutants which behaved as alleles of the ino1 locus. The complementation map for these mutants was circular.—Dramatic cell viability losses indicative of unbalanced growth were observed in liquid cultures of representative mutants under conditions of inositol starvation. Investigation of the timing, kinetics, and extent of cell death revealed that losses in cell viability in the range of 2-4 log orders could be prevented by the addition of inositol to the medium or by disruption of protein synthesis with cycloheximide. Mutants defective in nine of the ten loci identified in this study displayed these unusual characteristics. The results suggest an important physiological role for inositol that may be related to its cellular localization and function in membrane phospholipids. The possibility is discussed that inositol deficiency initiates the process of unbalanced growth leading to cell death through the loss of normal assembly, function, or integrity of biomembranes.—Part of this work has been reported in preliminary form (Culbertson and Henry 1974). PMID:1093935

  2. Escherichia coli mutants deficient in deoxyuridine triphosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Hochhauser, S J; Weiss, B

    1978-01-01

    Mutants deficient in deoxyuridine triphosphatase (dUTPase) were identified by enzyme assays of randomly chosen heavily mutagenized clones. Five mutants of independent origin were obtained. One mutant produced a thermolabile enzyme, and it was presumed to have a mutation in the structural gene for dUTPase, designated dut. The most deficient mutant had the following associated phenotypes: less than 1% of parental dUTPase activity, prolonged generation time, increased sensitivity to 5'-fluorodeoxyuridine, increased rate of spontaneous mutation, increased rate of recombination (hyper-Rec), an inhibition of growth in the presence of 2 mM uracil, and a decreased ability to support the growth of phage P1 (but not T4 or lambda). This mutation also appeared to be incompatible with pyrE mutations. A revertant selected by its faster growth had regained dUTPase activity and lost its hyper-Rec phenotype. Many of the properties of the dut mutants are compatible with their presumed increased incorporation of uracil into DNA and the subsequent transient breakage of the DNA by excision repair. PMID:148458

  3. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

    1993-06-01

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Although some of the organic compounds are degraded under nonligninolytic conditions, most are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated or are hyperproducers or supersecretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through ultraviolet-light and gamma-rays mutagenesis we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants produced 272 units (U) of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity per liter after nine days under high nitrogen. The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 U/L and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 days.

  4. Structure of mutant human oncogene protein determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1989-01-16

    The protein encoded by a mutant human oncogene differs only slightly in structure from the native protein that initiates normal cell division, a finding that may complicate efforts to develop inhibitors of the mutant protein. Previously, the x-ray structure of the protein encoded by the normal c-Ha-ras gene, a protein believed to signal cells to start or stop dividing through its interaction with guanosine triphosphate (GTP), was reported. The structure of the protein encoded by a transforming c-Ha-ras oncogene, in which a valine codon replaces the normal glycine codon at position 12 in the gene, has now been determined. The differences in the structures of the mutant and normal proteins are located primarily in a loop that interacts with the /beta/-phosphate of a bound guanosine diphosphate (GDP) molecule.

  5. Amphid defective mutant of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    De Riso, L; Ristoratore, F; Sebastiano, M; Bazzicalupo, P

    1994-01-01

    Studies are reported on a chemoreception mutant which arose in a mutator strain. The mutant sensory neurons do not stain with fluoresceine isothiocyanate (Dyf phenotype), hence the name, dyf-1, given to the gene it identifies. The gene maps on LGI, 0.4 map units from dpy-5 on the unc-11 side. The response of mutant worms to various repellents has been studied and shown to be partially altered. Other chemoreception based behaviors are less affected. The cilia of the sensory neurons of the amphid are shorter than normal and the primary defect may be in the capacity of the sheath cells to secrete the matrix material that fills the space between cilia in the amphid channel. Progress toward the molecular cloning of the gene is also reported. Relevant results from other laboratories are briefly reviewed. PMID:7896139

  6. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Torrey, Heather L; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  7. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Torrey, Heather L.; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E.; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  8. Early gene expression changes in skeletal muscle from SOD1(G93A) amyotrophic lateral sclerosis animal model.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriela P; Maximino, Jessica R; Maschietto, Mariana; Zanoteli, Edmar; Puga, Renato D; Lima, Leandro; Carraro, Dirce M; Chadi, Gerson

    2014-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of motor neurons. Familial ALS is strongly associated to dominant mutations in the gene for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Recent evidences point to skeletal muscle as a primary target in the ALS mouse model. Wnt/PI3 K signaling pathways and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have important roles in maintenance and repair of skeletal muscle. Wnt/PI3 K pathways and EMT gene expression profile were investigated in gastrocnemius muscle from SOD1(G93A) mouse model and age-paired wild-type control in the presymptomatic ages of 40 and 80 days aiming the early neuromuscular abnormalities that precede motor neuron death in ALS. A customized cDNA microarray platform containing 326 genes of Wnt/PI3 K and EMT was used and results revealed eight up-regulated (Loxl2, Pik4ca, Fzd9, Cul1, Ctnnd1, Snf1lk, Prkx, Dner) and nine down-regulated (Pik3c2a, Ripk4, Id2, C1qdc1, Eif2ak2, Rac3, Cds1, Inppl1, Tbl1x) genes at 40 days, and also one up-regulated (Pik3ca) and five down-regulated (Cd44, Eef2 k, Fzd2, Crebbp, Piki3r1) genes at 80 days. Also, protein-protein interaction networks grown from the differentially expressed genes of 40 and 80 days old mice have identified Grb2 and Src genes in both presymptomatic ages, thus playing a potential central role in the disease mechanisms. mRNA and protein levels for Grb2 and Src were found to be increased in 80 days old ALS mice. Gene expression changes in the skeletal muscle of transgenic ALS mice at presymptomatic periods of disease gave further evidence of early neuromuscular abnormalities that precede motor neuron death. The results were discussed in terms of initial triggering for neuronal degeneration and muscle adaptation to keep function before the onset of symptoms. PMID:24442855

  9. Asteroid observations at low phase angles. IV. Average parameters for the new H, G1, G2 magnitude system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Vasilij G.; Belskaya, Irina N.; Muinonen, Karri; Penttilä, Antti; Krugly, Yurij N.; Velichko, Feodor P.; Chiorny, Vasilij G.; Slyusarev, Ivan G.; Gaftonyuk, Ninel M.; Tereschenko, Igor A.

    2016-04-01

    We present new observational data for selected main-belt asteroids of different compositional types. The detailed magnitude-phase dependences including small phase angles (<1°) were obtained for these asteroids, namely: (10) Hygiea (down to the phase angle of 0.3°, C-type), (176) Iduna (0.2°, G-type), (214) Aschera (0.2°, E-type), (218) Bianca (0.3°, S-type), (250) Bettina (0.3°, M-type), (419) Aurelia (0.1°, F-type), (596) Scheila (0.2°, D-type), (635) Vundtia (0.2°, B-type), (671) Carnegia (0.2°, P-type), (717) Wisibada (0.1°, T-type), (1021) Flammario (0.6°, B-type), and (1279) Uganda (0.5°, E-type). For several asteroids, the dependences of brightness on the phase angle were investigated in the BVRI bands. We found a great diversity in the opposition-effect behavior both in the magnitude and the width of the opposition surges, especially for low-albedo asteroids. Some low-albedo asteroids (e.g., (10) Hygiea) display a broad opposition effect with an amplitude of 0.15-0.20 mag relative to the extrapolation of the linear part of the phase curve. Other asteroids (e.g., (596) Scheila, (1021) Flammario) show linear magnitude-phase dependences down to small phase angles (0.1-0.2°). Using numerous data sets on the magnitude-phase dependences with extensive phase-angle coverage, we examined in more detail the new three-parameter H, G1, G2 magnitude system. We determined the values of the G1 and G2 parameters for magnitude phase dependences of individual asteroids and obtained the average parameters for main asteroid compositional types. The values obtained can be used for the estimation of the absolute magnitude of an asteroid from a single observed magnitude when the magnitude-phase dependency is unknown and/or to calculate a visible magnitude for the ephemerides.

  10. Association between cyclin D1 G870A polymorphism and hepatocellular carcinoma risk: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tao; Chen, Jie; Liu, Jun-Jie; Li, Hang; You, Xue-Mei; Wang, Hong-Liang; Zhu, Shao-Liang; Li, Le-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Background Cyclin D1 (CCND1) G870A polymorphism may be associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk, but the results of previous studies were inconsistent. Available evidence was meta-analyzed to assess their potential association. Methods Databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Chinese Biomedical Literature database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Google Scholar were systematically searched. Meta-analyses were performed to investigate the association of G870A polymorphism with HCC risk by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from the data of relevant case–control studies. Results Results of this meta-analysis of six case–control studies involving 1,030 cases and 1,683 controls indicate that G870A polymorphism was not associated with HCC risk in any of the five genetic models tested (recessive model: AA vs GG + AG: OR =1.38, 95% CI =0.95–2.00, P=0.09; dominant model: AG + AA vs GG: OR =1.38, 95% CI =0.87–2.20, P=0.17; homozygous model: AA vs GG: OR =1.60, 95% CI =0.87–2.94, P=0.13; heterozygous model: AG vs GG: OR =1.24, 95% CI =0.86–1.79, P=0.25; allelic model: A vs G: OR =1.30, 95% CI =0.95–1.80, P=0.10). Subgroup analyses according to ethnicity showing marginally significant association between this single nucleotide polymorphism and HCC risk indicate that G870A may be significantly associated with HCC risk in Caucasian populations (recessive model: AA vs GG + AG: OR =2.34, 95% CI =1.60–3.42, P<0.0001; dominant model: AG + AA vs GG: OR =2.44, 95% CI =1.19–4.97, P=0.01; homozygous model: AA vs GG: OR =3.42, 95% CI =1.80–6.50, P=0.0002; allelic model: A vs G: OR =2.06, 95% CI =1.31–3.24, P=0.002), but not in Asian populations. Conclusion Available evidence suggests that no significant association between G870A polymorphism and HCC risk was found in either total populations or Asian populations. However, significant association was found in Caucasian populations. These

  11. TOMATOMA: a novel tomato mutant database distributing Micro-Tom mutant collections.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takeshi; Ariizumi, Tohru; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Asamizu, Erika; Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Fukuda, Naoya; Mizoguchi, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Aoki, Koh; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-02-01

    The tomato is an excellent model for studies of plants bearing berry-type fruits and for experimental studies of the Solanaceae family of plants due to its conserved genetic organization. In this study, a comprehensive mutant tomato population was generated in the background of Micro-Tom, a dwarf, rapid-growth variety. In this and previous studies, a family including 8,598 and 6,422 M(2) mutagenized lines was produced by ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis and γ-ray irradiation, and this study developed and investigated these M(2) plants for alteration of visible phenotypes. A total of 9,183 independent M(2) families comprising 91,830 M(2) plants were inspected for phenotypic alteration, and 1,048 individual mutants were isolated. Subsequently, the observed mutant phenotypes were classified into 15 major categories and 48 subcategories. Overall, 1,819 phenotypic categories were found in 1,048 mutants. Of these mutants, 549 were pleiotropic, whereas 499 were non-pleiotropic. Multiple different mutant alleles per locus were found in the mutant libraries, suggesting that the mutagenized populations were nearly saturated. Additionally, genetic analysis of backcrosses indicated the successful inheritance of the mutations in BC(1)F(2) populations, confirming the reproducibility in the morphological phenotyping of the M(2) plants. To integrate and manage the visible phenotypes of mutants and other associated data, we developed the in silico database TOMATOMA, a relational system interfacing modules between mutant line names and phenotypic categories. TOMATOMA is a freely accessible database, and these mutant recourses are available through the TOMATOMA (http://tomatoma.nbrp.jp/index.jsp). PMID:21258066

  12. TOMATOMA: A Novel Tomato Mutant Database Distributing Micro-Tom Mutant Collections

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takeshi; Ariizumi, Tohru; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Asamizu, Erika; Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Fukuda, Naoya; Mizoguchi, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Aoki, Koh; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The tomato is an excellent model for studies of plants bearing berry-type fruits and for experimental studies of the Solanaceae family of plants due to its conserved genetic organization. In this study, a comprehensive mutant tomato population was generated in the background of Micro-Tom, a dwarf, rapid-growth variety. In this and previous studies, a family including 8,598 and 6,422 M2 mutagenized lines was produced by ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis and γ-ray irradiation, and this study developed and investigated these M2 plants for alteration of visible phenotypes. A total of 9,183 independent M2 families comprising 91,830 M2 plants were inspected for phenotypic alteration, and 1,048 individual mutants were isolated. Subsequently, the observed mutant phenotypes were classified into 15 major categories and 48 subcategories. Overall, 1,819 phenotypic categories were found in 1,048 mutants. Of these mutants, 549 were pleiotropic, whereas 499 were non-pleiotropic. Multiple different mutant alleles per locus were found in the mutant libraries, suggesting that the mutagenized populations were nearly saturated. Additionally, genetic analysis of backcrosses indicated the successful inheritance of the mutations in BC1F2 populations, confirming the reproducibility in the morphological phenotyping of the M2 plants. To integrate and manage the visible phenotypes of mutants and other associated data, we developed the in silico database TOMATOMA, a relational system interfacing modules between mutant line names and phenotypic categories. TOMATOMA is a freely accessible database, and these mutant recourses are available through the TOMATOMA (http://tomatoma.nbrp.jp/index.jsp). PMID:21258066

  13. The Diagnostic Accuracy and Clinical Utility of Three Noninvasive Models for Predicting Liver Fibrosis in Patients with HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiqiao; Wang, Gongsui; Kang, Kaifu; Wu, Guobiao; Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of the fibrosis index based on the four factors (FIB-4), aspartate aminotransferase -to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and aspartate aminotransferase–alanine aminotransferase ratio index (AAR) for predicting liver fibrosis in patients with HBV infection. Methods From January 2006 to December 2010,a total of 1543 consecutive chronic hepatitis B(CHB) patients who underwent liver biopsies were enrolled. FIB-4,APRI, and AAR were calculated.The areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUROCs) were calculated to assess the diagnostic accuracy of these models.The AUROCs of these models were compared by DeLong’s test.For further comparisons in different studies,the AUROCs were adjusted to conduct Adjusted AUROCs(ADjAUROCs) according to the prevalence of fibrosis stages using the difference between advanced and nonadvanced fibrosis (DANA). Results For prediction of significant fibrosis,severe fibrosis,and cirrhosis,the AUROCs of FIB-4 were 0.646(ADjAUROC 0.717),0.670(ADjAUROC 0.741), and 0.715(ADjAUROC 0.786) respectively;whereas it were 0.656(ADjAUROC 0.727),0.653(ADjAUROC 0.724) and 0.639(ADjAUROC 0.710) for APRI, 0.498(ADjAUROC 0.569),0.548(ADjAUROC 0.619) and 0.573(ADjAUROC 0.644) for AAR. The further comparisons demonstrated that there were no significant differences of AUROCs between FIB-4 and APRI in predicting significant and severe fibrosis(P > 0.05),while FIB-4 was superior to APRI in predicting cirrhosis(P < 0.001). Further subgroup analysis demonstrated that the diagnostic accuracy of FIB-4 and APRI in patients with normal alanine aminotransferase(ALT) were higher than that in patients with elevated ALT. Conclusions The results demonstrated that FIB-4 and APRI are useful for diagnosis of fibrosis. FIB-4 and APRI have similar diagnostic accuracy in predicting significant and severe fibrosis,while FIB-4 is superior to APRI in predicting cirrhosis. The clinical utility of FIB-4 and APRI

  14. Derived neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio predicts prognosis for patients with HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma following transarterial chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, DONGSHENG; LIANG, JIANZHONG; XU, LI; HE, FENGYING; ZHOU, ZHONGGUO; ZHANG, YAOJUN; CHEN, MINSHAN

    2016-01-01

    The derived neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (dNLR) has been proposed as an easily determinable prognostic factor for cancer patients, but the prognostic significance of the dNLR in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not been investigated. The present study aimed to validate the prognostic power of the NLR and dNLR in HCC patients undergoing transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). The data of 279 consecutive patients who underwent TACE for unresectable HBV-associated HCC between September 2009 and November 2011 at the Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center (Guangzhou, China) were retrieved from a prospective database. The cut-off values for the NLR and dNLR were determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The association between the NLR and dNLR and the clinicopathological characteristics and overall survival (OS) rates and times of patients was analyzed. The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated to evaluate the discriminatory ability of the NLR and dNLR. The median follow-up period was 446 days, the 1, 2 and 3-year OS rates were 38.8, 18.5 and 11.1% respectively, and the median OS time was 264 days. The cut-off values were determined as 2.6 and 1.8 for the NLR and dNLR, respectively. The NLR and dNLR were each associated with patient age, presence of vascular invasion, tumor size, AST level and ALP level. Multivariate analysis showed that the NLR, dNLR, ALT level and AFP level were independent prognostic factors for OS. An elevated NLR or dNLR was associated with a poor prognosis (P=0.001 and P=0.002, respectively). The prognostic power of NLR [AUC=0.539; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.423–0.656] and dNLR (AUC=0.522; 95% CI, 0.406–0.638) was similar. Elevated dNLR predicted poor prognosis for patients with HBV-associated HCC undergoing TACE, with similar prognostic power to NLR. The dNLR may be used as an alternative to the NLR, as it is easily available and inexpensive. PMID:27123051

  15. Sensitivity Analysis of a Conceptual HBV Raınfall-Runoff MODEL Using Eumetsat Snow Covered Area Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyurek, Z.; Surer, S.; Parajka, J.

    2014-12-01

    HBV is a conceptual hydrological model extensively used in operational hydrological forecasting and water balance studies. In this study, we apply the HBV model on the upper Euphrates basin in Turkey, which has 10 624 km2 area. The Euphrates basin is largely fed from snow precipitation whereby nearly two-thirds occur in winter and may remain in the form of snow for half of the year. We analyze individual sensitivity of the parameters by calibrating the model using the Multi-Objective Shuffled Complex Evolution (MOSCEM) algorithm. The calibration is performed against snow cover area (SCA) in addition to runoff data for the water years 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013. The SCA product has been developed in the framework of the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management (H-SAF) Project. The product is generated by using data from Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) instrument making observations from a geostationary satellite Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In the previous study evaluation of the model was done with commonly used statistical performance metrics (Nash-Sutcliffe) for high and low flows, volume error and root mean square error (RMSE). In this study signature metrics, which are based on the flow duration curve (FDC) are used to see the performance of the model for low flows. In order to consider a fairly balanced evaluation between high and low flow phases we divided the flow duration curve into segments of high, medium and low flow phases, and additionally into very high and very low phases. Root mean square error (RMSE) is used to evaluate the performance in these segments. The sensitivity analysis of the parameters around the calibrated optimum points showed that parameters of the soil moisture and evapotranspiration (FC, beta and LPrat) have a strong effect in the total volume error of the model. The

  16. Escherichia coli mutants deficient in exonuclease VII.

    PubMed Central

    Chase, J W; Richardson, C C

    1977-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli having reduced levels of exonuclease VII activity have been isolated by a mass screening procedure. Nine mutants, five of which are known to be of independent origin, were obtained and designated xse. The defects in these strains lie at two or more loci. One of these loci, xseA, lies in the interval between purG and purC; it is 93 to 97% co-transducible with guaA. The order of the genes in this region is purG-xseA guaA,B-purC. The available data do not allow xseA to be ordered with respect to guaA,B. Exonuclease VII purified from E. coli KLC3 xseA3 is more heat labile than exonuclease VII purified from the parent, E. coli PA610 xse+. Therefore, xseA is the structural gene for exonuclease VII. Mutants with defects in the xseA gene show increased sensitivity to nalidixic acid and have an abnormally high frequency of recombination (hyper-Rec phenotype) as measured by the procedure of Konrad and Lehlman (1974). The hyper-Rec character of xseA strains is approximately one-half that of the polAex1 mutant defective in the 5' leads to 3' hydrolytic activity of deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase I. The double mutant, polAex1 xseA7, is twice as hyper-Rec as the polAex1 mutant alone. The xseA- strains are slightly more sensitive to ultraviolet irradiation than the parent strain. Bacteriophages T7, fd, and lambdared grow normally in xseA- strains. Images PMID:320198

  17. Neurospora crassa mutants deficient in asparagine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    MacPhee, K G; Nelson, R E; Schuster, S M

    1983-01-01

    Neurospora crassa mutants deficient in asparagine synthetase were selected by using the procedure of inositol-less death. Complementation tests among the 100 mutants isolated suggested that their alterations were genetically allelic. Recombination analysis with strain S1007t, an asparagine auxotroph, indicated that the mutations were located near or within the asn gene on linkage group V. In vitro assays with a heterokaryon indicated that the mutation was dominant. Thermal instability of cell extracts from temperature-sensitive strains in an in vitro asparagine synthetase assay determined that the mutations were in the structural gene(s) for asparagine synthetase. PMID:6137480

  18. Evolutionary Mutant Models for Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Albertson, R. Craig; Cresko, William; Detrich, H. William; Postlethwait, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Although induced mutations in traditional laboratory animals have been valuable as models for human diseases, they have some important limitations. Here we propose a complementary approach to discover genes and mechanisms that might contribute to human disorders: the analysis of evolutionary mutant models whose adaptive phenotypes mimic maladaptive human diseases. If the type and mode of action of mutations favored by natural selection in wild populations are similar to those that contribute to human diseases, then studies in evolutionary mutant models have the potential to identify novel genetic factors and gene-by-environment interactions that affect human health and underlie human disease. PMID:19108930

  19. Mutant SOD1-expressing astrocytes release toxic factors that trigger motoneuron death by inducing hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Elsa; Izaurieta, Pamela; Weiss, Alexandra; Mir, Franco R; Rojas, Patricio; Gonzalez, David; Rojas, Fabiola; Brown, Robert H; Madrid, Rodolfo; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2013-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motoneurons starting in adulthood. Recent studies using cell or animal models document that astrocytes expressing disease-causing mutations of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS by releasing a neurotoxic factor(s). Neither the mechanism by which this neurotoxic factor induces motoneuron death nor its cellular site of action has been elucidated. Here we show that acute exposure of primary wild-type spinal cord cultures to conditioned medium derived from astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 (ACM-hSOD1(G93A)) increases persistent sodium inward currents (PC(Na)), repetitive firing, and intracellular calcium transients, leading to specific motoneuron death days later. In contrast to TTX, which paradoxically increased twofold the amplitude of calcium transients and killed motoneurons, reduction of hyperexcitability by other specific (mexiletine) and nonspecific (spermidine and riluzole) blockers of voltage-sensitive sodium (Na(v)) channels restored basal calcium transients and prevented motoneuron death induced by ACM-hSOD1(G93A). These findings suggest that riluzole, the only FDA-approved drug with known benefits for ALS patients, acts by inhibiting hyperexcitability. Together, our data document that a critical element mediating the non-cell-autonomous toxicity of ACM-hSOD1(G93A) on motoneurons is increased excitability, an observation with direct implications for therapy of ALS. PMID:23486205

  20. Mutant SOD1-expressing astrocytes release toxic factors that trigger motoneuron death by inducing hyperexcitability

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Elsa; Izaurieta, Pamela; Weiss, Alexandra; Mir, Franco R.; Rojas, Patricio; Gonzalez, David; Rojas, Fabiola; Brown, Robert H.; Madrid, Rodolfo

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motoneurons starting in adulthood. Recent studies using cell or animal models document that astrocytes expressing disease-causing mutations of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS by releasing a neurotoxic factor(s). Neither the mechanism by which this neurotoxic factor induces motoneuron death nor its cellular site of action has been elucidated. Here we show that acute exposure of primary wild-type spinal cord cultures to conditioned medium derived from astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 (ACM-hSOD1G93A) increases persistent sodium inward currents (PCNa), repetitive firing, and intracellular calcium transients, leading to specific motoneuron death days later. In contrast to TTX, which paradoxically increased twofold the amplitude of calcium transients and killed motoneurons, reduction of hyperexcitability by other specific (mexiletine) and nonspecific (spermidine and riluzole) blockers of voltage-sensitive sodium (Nav) channels restored basal calcium transients and prevented motoneuron death induced by ACM-hSOD1G93A. These findings suggest that riluzole, the only FDA-approved drug with known benefits for ALS patients, acts by inhibiting hyperexcitability. Together, our data document that a critical element mediating the non-cell-autonomous toxicity of ACM-hSOD1G93A on motoneurons is increased excitability, an observation with direct implications for therapy of ALS. PMID:23486205

  1. A pqr2 mutant encodes a defective polyamine transporter and is negatively affected by ABA for paraquat resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuchao; Hu, Huizhen; Wang, Youmei; Xu, Zhengdan; Zha, Yi; Cai, Xiwen; Peng, Liangcai; Feng, Shengqiu

    2016-09-01

    Despite the paraquat-resistant mutants that have been reported in plants, this study identified a novel A. thaliana mutant (pqr2) from an XVE inducible activation library based on its resistance to 2 μM paraquat. The pqr2 mutant exhibited a termination mutation in the exon of AT1G31830/PAR1/PQR2, encoded a polyamine uptake transporter AtPUT2/PAR1/PQR2. The PQR2 mutation could largely reduce superoxide accumulation and cell death in the pqr2 plants under paraquat treatment. Moreover, compared with wild type, the pqr2 mutant exhibited much reduced tolerance to putrescine, a classic polyamine compound, which confirmed that PQR2 encoded a defective polyamine transporter. Notably, co-treated with ABA and paraquat, both pqr2 mutant and wild type exhibited a lethal phenotype from seed germination, but the wild type like pqr2 mutant, could remain paraquat-resistance while co-treated with high dosage of Na2WO4, an ABA synthesis inhibitor. Gene expression analysis suggested that ABA signaling should widely regulate paraquat-responsive genes distinctively in wild type and pqr2 mutant. Hence, this study has for the first time reported about ABA negative effect on paraquat-resistance in A. thaliana, providing insight into the ABA signaling involved in the oxidative stress responses induced by paraquat in plants. PMID:27229891

  2. Human herpesvirus-6 has no apparent influence on course of HCV hepatitis, but may complicate HBV hepatitis and alcoholic liver disease. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Julieta; Simoes, Patricia; Krueger, Gerhard R F; Humberto, Cruz Ortiz; Ramon, Albert M

    2003-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) is a widespread virus with occasional reactivation and a potential hepatotropism. The present study was undertaken to investigate the frequency of HHV-6 reactivation in viral (HCV, HBV) and alcoholic liver diseases and its implication for the course of the primary disease. Serological and immunohistochemical tests were done to document viral activity, hepatocellular apoptosis or proliferation, and autoantibody formation. While the course of HCV remains apparently uninfluenced by HHV-6, HBV hepatitis and alcoholic liver disease show a higher incidence of autoantibody formation if HHV-6 is present. The data of this pilot study warrant more extensive investigations of the clinical pathology of HHV-6 in liver diseases. PMID:12655786

  3. Prevalence, correlates and pattern of Hepatitis B among antenatal clinic attenders in Yaounde-Cameroon: is perinatal transmission of HBV neglected in Cameroon?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated the prevalence of HBV in the general Cameroonian population or among antenatal attendants. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, correlates and patterns of Hepatitis B surface antigen among pregnant women attending antenatal care in Yaounde-Cameroon. Methods This was a cross-sectional multicenter study carried out in a referral hospital and two secondary hospitals in Yaounde, the capital of Cameroon. The study lasted 15 months (March 2011 to June 2012), and recruited 959 pregnant women. Patient recruitment was consecutive. The HBsAg was tested using the Monalisa HBsAg Ultra ELISA kit. Other hepatitis B markers were equally tested. We used the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) version 14.0 software to conduct a quantitative analysis of the derived data. Simple descriptive statistics such as means, standard deviations, and proportions were used to describe the data. We tested for association in categorical variables using the chi-squared (χ2) test. The odds ratio (OR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used to summarise the strength of association between specific binary exposure and outcome variables. The level of statistical significance for the study was set at p < 0.05. Results The prevalence of hepatitis B infection (HBsAg) among antenatal clinic attenders in our setting was 7.7%. Amongst these women, just 5.4% were previously aware of their HBsAg status. The rate of HBV infectivity was high, with 28% of HBsAg positive women having evidence of HBeAg in their plasma, and up to 45.8% of these women lacking antibodies against hepatitis B e antigen (anti-HBe). About 41% of the pregnant women had had previous contact with HBV as evidenced by the positive status for anti-HBc. Just 2.7% of the pregnant women had previously been vaccinated against HBV. The mean age for HBsAg positivity in our setting was 26.9 ±4.7 years, and the most affected age group was the 25 – 29

  4. Feasibility of combining adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization with nucleos(t)ide analog therapy for patients with HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    GONG, WEN-FENG; ZHONG, JIAN-HONG; XIANG, BANG-DE; LI, LE-QUN

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-associated mortalities, and its prevalence is expected to increase in future decades. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the leading cause of HCC. Although hepatectomy is the preferred curative treatment for HCC, tumor recurrence is common, which is the most frequent cause of mortality in patients with HCC. HCC recurrence may originate from the primary tumor or be associated with remnant liver tissue, and include high viral load and hepatic inflammatory activity. Adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization and postoperative nucleos(t)ide analogs therapy are the two corresponding therapies. Following systematic searching of the PubMed database, the indications for adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization and nucleos(t)ide analog therapies for HBV-related HCC after hepatectomy were acquired. Additionally, the feasibility of combining these two therapies were also reviewed. PMID:27330754

  5. TAS1 trans-acting siRNA targets are differentially regulated at low temperature, and TAS1 trans-acting siRNA mediates temperature-controlled At1g51670 expression.

    PubMed

    Kume, Kohei; Tsutsumi, Ken-Ichi; Saitoh, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    To endure considerable fluctuations in temperature, plants need precise regulation of temperature-controlled gene expression. In this study, the involvement of TAS1 trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA) in temperature-controlled gene expression was examined in Arabidopsis. The accumulation of TAS1 tasiRNA was downregulated at 4 degrees C. Concomitant with the reduction of TAS1 tasiRNA-mediated cleavage, expression of At1g51670, a target of TAS1 tasiRNA, was upregulated at 4 degrees C in the wild type but not in a dicer-like enzyme (DCL) 4 mutant (dcl4-2), which is impaired in tasiRNA biogenesis. The expression of At4g29760 and of At5g18040, further TAS1 tasiRNA targets, was upregulated both in the wild type and in dcl4-2 at 4 degrees C. However, after shifting the temperature to 22 degrees C, low-temperature-induced expression of At4g29760 rapidly dropped in the wild type, but not in dcl4-2. Thus TAS1 tasiRNA acted as a sweeper for the clearance of excess amounts of At4g29760 transcripts. Our data suggest that differential regulation of TAS1 tasiRNA targets is involved in temperature-controlled gene expression. PMID:20622450

  6. Gravitropism in a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis: implications for the starch-statolith theory of gravity sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspar, T.; Pickard, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    The starch-statolith theory of gravity reception has been tested with a mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. which, lacking plastid phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1) activity, does not synthesize starch. The hypocotyls and seedling roots of the mutant were examined by light and electron microscopy to confirm that they did not contain starch. In upright wild-type (WT) seedlings, starch-filled plastids in the starch sheath of the hypocotyl and in three of the five columellar layers of the root cap were piled on the cell floors, and sedimented to the ceilings when the plants were inverted. However, starchless plastids of the mutant were not significantly sedimented in these cells in either upright or inverted seedlings. Gravitropism of light-grown seedling roots was vigorous: e.g., 10 degrees curvature developed in mutants rotated on a clinostat following a 5 min induction at 1 g, compared with 14 degrees in the WT. Curvatures induced during intervals from 2.5 to 30 min were 70% as great in the mutant as the WT. Thus under these conditions the presence of starch and the sedimentation of plastids are unnecessary for reception of gravity by Arabidopsis roots. Gravitropism by hypocotyls of light-grown seedlings was less vigorous than that by roots, but the mutant hypocotyls exhibited an average of 70-80% as much curvature as the WT. Roots and hypocotyls of etiolated seedlings and flower stalks of mature plants were also gravitropic, although in these cases the mutant was generally less closely comparable to the WT. Thus, starch is also unnecessary for gravity reception in these tissues.

  7. Overexpression of survival motor neuron improves neuromuscular function and motor neuron survival in mutant SOD1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Bradley J.; Alfazema, Neza; Sheean, Rebecca K.; Sleigh, James N.; Davies, Kay E.; Horne, Malcolm K.; Talbot, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy results from diminished levels of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein in spinal motor neurons. Low levels of SMN also occur in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and genetic reduction of SMN levels exacerbates the phenotype of transgenic SOD1G93A mice. Here, we demonstrate that SMN protein is significantly reduced in the spinal cords of patients with sporadic ALS. To test the potential of SMN as a modifier of ALS, we overexpressed SMN in 2 different strains of SOD1G93A mice. Neuronal overexpression of SMN significantly preserved locomotor function, rescued motor neurons, and attenuated astrogliosis in spinal cords of SOD1G93A mice. Despite this, survival was not prolonged, most likely resulting from SMN mislocalization and depletion of gems in motor neurons of symptomatic mice. Our results reveal that SMN upregulation slows locomotor deficit onset and motor neuron loss in this mouse model of ALS. However, disruption of SMN nuclear complexes by high levels of mutant SOD1, even in the presence of SMN overexpression, might limit its survival promoting effects in this specific mouse model. Studies in emerging mouse models of ALS are therefore warranted to further explore the potential of SMN as a modifier of ALS. PMID:24210254

  8. [Analysis of the results of the HIV-1, HCV and HBV viral load of SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2014].

    PubMed

    Medina González, Rafael; Orta Mira, Nieves; Guna Serrano, María Del Remedio; Latorre Martínez, José-Carlos; Gopegui, Enrique Ruiz de; Rosario Ovies, María; Poveda, Marta; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2016-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral load determinations are among the most relevant markers for the follow up of patients infected with these viruses. External quality control tools are crucial to ensure the accuracy of results obtained by microbiology laboratories. This article summarizes the results obtained from the 2014 SEIMC (Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) External Quality Control Programme for HIV-1, HCV, and HBV viral loads. In the HIV-1 program, a total of 5 standards were sent. One standard consisted in seronegative human plasma, while the remaining 4 contained plasma from 3 different viremic patients, in the range of 2-5 log10 copies/mL; 2 of these standards were identical aiming to determine repeatability. A significant proportion of the laboratories (30.8% on average) obtained values out of the accepted range (mean ± 0.25 log10 copies/mL), depending on the standard and on the method used for quantification. Repeatability was excellent, with up to 95.8% of laboratories reporting results within the limits (Δ < 0.5 log10 copies/mL). The HBV and HCV program consisted of 2 standards with different viral load contents. Most of the participants, 83.7% in the case of HCV and 87.9% in the HBV, obtained all the results within the accepted range (mean ± 1.96 standard deviations log10 IU/mL). Data from this analysis reinforce the utility of proficiency programmes to ensure the quality of the results obtained by a particular laboratory, as well as the importance of the post-analytical phase on the overall quality. Due to the remarkable interlaboratory variability, it is advisable to use the same method and the same laboratory for patient follow up. PMID:27474241

  9. The Prevalence and Risk Factors of Hepatitis Delta Virus in HIV/HBV Co-Infected Patients in Shiraz, Iran, 2012.

    PubMed

    Motamedifar, Mohammad; Taheri, Mohammad; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri; Gholami, Mina; Lari, Mahmood Amini; Faramarzi, Hossein; Sarvari, Jamal

    2015-09-01

    Evidence has shown that liver disease caused by hepatitis viruses can be more aggressive and severe in HIV infected subjects. Therefore, the present cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of HDV infection among HIV/HBV co-infected clients in Shiraz, southwest Iran. In this study, 178 patients co-infected with HBV and HIV individuals were enrolled. The diagnosis of HIV infection was documented based on serological assays. The demographic and complementary data were collected by a questionnaire. HBsAg and HDV Ab were detected by commercial quantitative enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kits according to the manufacturer's instructions. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were also measured. The mean age of the participants was 37.4±7.4 years (range 22-63). 175 (98.4 %) patients were male and 3 (1.6 %) were female. Among 178 patients co-infected with HIV/HBV, 35 cases (19.7%, 95% CI: 14%-25%) were anti-HDV‏ positive and 143 (80.3%) were negative for anti-HDV. HDV exposure in HIV/HBV co-infected patients was associated with blood transfusion (P=0.002, OR: 14.3) and prison history (P=0.01, OR: 2.31) but not with age, marital status, unsafe sex contact, and injection drug abuse. Our data showed a relatively high prevalence of HDV infection in HIV infected population in Shiraz, Iran. The high frequency of HDV Ab in patients with blood transfusion and prison history reveals that HDV transmission occurs more frequently in the parental route than sexual contacts; therefore, blood screening for HDV diagnosis in the high-risk group is recommended. PMID:26379352

  10. [Analysis of the results of the HIV-1, HCV and HBV viral load of SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2013].

    PubMed

    Orta Mira, Nieves; Del Remedio Guna Serrano, María; Latorre Martínez, José-Carlos; Medina González, Rafael; Rosario Ovies, María; Poveda, Marta; Ruiz de Gopegui, Enrique; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2015-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis B (HBV) and C virus (HCV) viral load determinations are among the most relevant markers for the follow up of patients infected with these viruses. External quality control tools are crucial to ensure the accuracy of results obtained by microbiology laboratories. This article summarized the results obtained from the 2013 SEIMC External Quality Control Programme for HIV-1, HCV, and HBV viral loads. In the HIV-1 program, a total of five standards were sent. One standard consisted in seronegative human plasma, while the remaining four contained plasma from three different viremic patients, in the range of 2-5 log10 copies/mL; two of these standards were identical aiming to determine repeatability. A significant proportion of the laboratories (25% on average) obtained values out of the accepted range (mean ± 0.25 log10 copies/mL), depending on the standard and on the method used for quantification. Repeatability was excellent, with up to 98.9% of laboratories reporting results within the limits (D < 0.5 log10 copies/mL). The HBV and HCV program consisted of two standards with different viral load contents. Most of the participants, 82% in the case of HCV and 78% in the HBV, obtained all the results within the accepted range (mean ± 1.96 SD log10 UI/mL). Data from this analysis reinforce the utility of proficiency programmes to ensure the quality of the results obtained by a particular laboratory, as well as the importance of the post-analytical phase on the overall quality. Due to the remarkable interlaboratory variability, it is advisable to use the same method and the same laboratory for patient follow up. PMID:26320990

  11. Activation of the thrombopoietin receptor by mutant calreticulin in CALR-mutant myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Araki, Marito; Yang, Yinjie; Masubuchi, Nami; Hironaka, Yumi; Takei, Hiraku; Morishita, Soji; Mizukami, Yoshihisa; Kan, Shin; Shirane, Shuichi; Edahiro, Yoko; Sunami, Yoshitaka; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Komatsu, Norio

    2016-03-10

    Recurrent somatic mutations of calreticulin (CALR) have been identified in patients harboring myeloproliferative neoplasms; however, their role in tumorigenesis remains elusive. Here, we found that the expression of mutant but not wild-type CALR induces the thrombopoietin (TPO)-independent growth of UT-7/TPO cells. We demonstrated that c-MPL, the TPO receptor, is required for this cytokine-independent growth of UT-7/TPO cells. Mutant CALR preferentially associates with c-MPL that is bound to Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) over the wild-type protein. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mutant-specific carboxyl terminus portion of CALR interferes with the P-domain of CALR to allow the N-domain to interact with c-MPL, providing an explanation for the gain-of-function property of mutant CALR. We showed that mutant CALR induces the phosphorylation of JAK2 and its downstream signaling molecules in UT-7/TPO cells and that this induction was blocked by JAK2 inhibitor treatment. Finally, we demonstrated that c-MPL is required for TPO-independent megakaryopoiesis in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hematopoietic stem cells harboring the CALR mutation. These findings imply that mutant CALR activates the JAK2 downstream pathway via its association with c-MPL. Considering these results, we propose that mutant CALR promotes myeloproliferative neoplasm development by activating c-MPL and its downstream pathway. PMID:26817954

  12. Chloroplast 2010: a database for large-scale phenotypic screening of Arabidopsis mutants.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Savage, Linda J; Larson, Matthew D; Wilkerson, Curtis G; Last, Robert L

    2011-04-01

    Large-scale phenotypic screening presents challenges and opportunities not encountered in typical forward or reverse genetics projects. We describe a modular database and laboratory information management system that was implemented in support of the Chloroplast 2010 Project, an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) reverse genetics phenotypic screen of more than 5,000 mutants (http://bioinfo.bch.msu.edu/2010_LIMS; www.plastid.msu.edu). The software and laboratory work environment were designed to minimize operator error and detect systematic process errors. The database uses Ruby on Rails and Flash technologies to present complex quantitative and qualitative data and pedigree information in a flexible user interface. Examples are presented where the database was used to find opportunities for process changes that improved data quality. We also describe the use of the data-analysis tools to discover mutants defective in enzymes of leucine catabolism (heteromeric mitochondrial 3-methylcrotonyl-coenzyme A carboxylase [At1g03090 and At4g34030] and putative hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase [At2g26800]) based upon a syndrome of pleiotropic seed amino acid phenotypes that resembles previously described isovaleryl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (At3g45300) mutants. In vitro assay results support the computational annotation of At2g26800 as hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase. PMID:21224340

  13. Osteopontin and latent-TGF β binding-protein 2 as potential diagnostic markers for HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Andre Nogueira; Plymoth, Amelie; Santos-Silva, Daniela; Ortiz-Cuaran, Sandra; Camey, Suzy; Guilloreau, Paule; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Khuhaprema, Thiravud; Mendy, Maimuna; Lesi, Olufunmilayo A; Chang, Hee-Kyung; Oh, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Duk-Hee; Shin, Hai-Rim; Kirk, Gregory D; Merle, Philippe; Beretta, Laura; Hainaut, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Hepatitis B (HB) is the main risk factor for chronic liver disease (CLD) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in many low-resource countries, where diagnosis is constrained by lack of clinical, histopathological and biomarker resources. We have used proteomics to detect plasma biomarkers that outperform α-Fetoprotein (AFP), the most widely used biomarker for HCC diagnosis in low-resource contexts. Deep-plasma proteome analysis was performed in HCC patients, patients with CLD and in HB-carrier controls from Thailand (South-East Asia) and The Gambia (West-Africa). Mass spectrometry profiling identified latent-transforming growth factor β binding-protein 2 (LTBP2) and Osteopontin (OPN) as being significantly elevated in HCC versus CLD and controls. These two proteins were further analyzed by ELISA in a total of 684 plasma samples, including 183 HCC, 274 CLD and 227 asymptomatic controls. When combined, LTBP2 and OPN showed an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.85 in distinguishing HCC from CLD in subjects with AFP <20 ng/mL. In a prospective cohort of 115 CLD patients from Korea, increased plasma levels of LTBP2 and/or OPN were detected in plasma collected over 2 years prior to diagnosis in 21 subjects who developed HCC. Thus, the combination of LTBP2 and OPN outperformed AFP for dia