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Sample records for 1h nmr-based metabolic

  1. {sup 1}H NMR-based spectroscopy detects metabolic alterations in serum of patients with early-stage ulcerative colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Lin, Lianjie; Xu, Yanbin; Lin, Yan; Jin, Yu; Zheng, Changqing

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Twenty ulcerative colitis patients and nineteen healthy controls were enrolled. •Increased 3-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, phenylalanine, and decreased lipid were found. •We report early stage diagnosis of ulcerative colitis using NMR-based metabolomics. -- Abstract: Ulcerative colitis (UC) has seriously impaired the health of citizens. Accurate diagnosis of UC at an early stage is crucial to improve the efficiency of treatment and prognosis. In this study, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR)-based metabolomic analysis was performed on serum samples collected from active UC patients (n = 20) and healthy controls (n = 19), respectively. The obtained spectral profiles were subjected to multivariate data analysis. Our results showed that consistent metabolic alterations were present between the two groups. Compared to healthy controls, UC patients displayed increased 3-hydroxybutyrate, β-glucose, α-glucose, and phenylalanine, but decreased lipid in serum. These findings highlight the possibilities of NMR-based metabolomics as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for UC.

  2. 1H NMR-based metabolic profiling for evaluating poppy seed rancidity and brewing.

    PubMed

    Jawień, Ewa; Ząbek, Adam; Deja, Stanisław; Łukaszewicz, Marcin; Młynarz, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Poppy seeds are widely used in household and commercial confectionery. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the application of metabolic profiling for industrial monitoring of the molecular changes which occur during minced poppy seed rancidity and brewing processes performed on raw seeds. Both forms of poppy seeds were obtained from a confectionery company. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) was applied as the analytical method of choice together with multivariate statistical data analysis. Metabolic fingerprinting was applied as a bioprocess control tool to monitor rancidity with the trajectory of change and brewing progressions. Low molecular weight compounds were found to be statistically significant biomarkers of these bioprocesses. Changes in concentrations of chemical compounds were explained relative to the biochemical processes and external conditions. The obtained results provide valuable and comprehensive information to gain a better understanding of the biology of rancidity and brewing processes, while demonstrating the potential for applying NMR spectroscopy combined with multivariate data analysis tools for quality control in food industries involved in the processing of oilseeds. This precious and versatile information gives a better understanding of the biology of these processes. PMID:26540222

  3. A bird's eye view of anisatin induced convulsive seizures in brain by a (1)H NMR based metabolic approach.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dan-Dan; Ge-Dong; Guo, Ping-Ping; Wang, Jun-Song; Li, Ming-Hui; Yang, Ming-Hua; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2014-11-01

    Anisatin is the main convulsant component in plants of the genus Illicium, many of which are important spices or folk medicines. The neurotoxicity of anisatin has been widely investigated, mainly focusing on its action on the γ-amino butyrate (GABA) system; however, little is known about the metabolic alterations that it causes. In this study, a NMR-based metabolomic approach was performed on the extracts of cortexes and cerebellums of mice administered with anisatin to explore the metabolic events associated with its intoxication. Orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) revealed many differential metabolites that indicated metabolic disturbance in neurotransmission and neuromodulation (GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and taurine), stress of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (ascorbate, phosphatidylcholine, choline, and ethanolamine), energy metabolism (NAD(+)i.e., nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide, lactate, citrate, fumarate, creatine/phosphocreatine, and creatinine), amino acid metabolism (leucine, isoleucine, valine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, alanine, threonine, and glycine) and nucleic acid metabolism (NAD(+), nicotinamide/niacinamide, adenosine, and guanosine). This pilot metabolomic study on anisatin intoxication should help to develop a holistic view of convulsive seizures induced by anisatin, and provide a better understanding of the mechanisms. PMID:25133938

  4. 1H NMR-Based Profiling Reveals Differential Immune-Metabolic Networks during Influenza Virus Infection in Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Milner, J. Justin; Wang, Jue; Sheridan, Patricia A.; Ebbels, Tim; Beck, Melinda A.; Saric, Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    Obese individuals are at greater risk for death from influenza virus infection. Paralleling human evidence, obese mice are also more susceptible to influenza infection mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms driving greater influenza severity in the obese remain unclear. Metabolic profiling has been utilized in infectious disease models to enhance prognostic or diagnostic methods, and to gain insight into disease pathogenesis by providing a more global picture of dynamic infection responses. Herein, metabolic profiling was used to develop a deeper understanding of the complex processes contributing to impaired influenza protection in obese mice and to facilitate generation of new explanatory hypotheses. Diet-induced obese and lean mice were infected with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolic profiling of urine, feces, lung, liver, mesenteric white adipose tissue, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum revealed distinct metabolic signatures in infected obese mice, including perturbations in nucleotide, vitamin, ketone body, amino acid, carbohydrate, choline and lipid metabolic pathways. Further, metabolic data was integrated with immune analyses to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of potential immune-metabolic interactions. Of interest, uncovered metabolic signatures in urine and feces allowed for discrimination of infection status in both lean and obese mice at an early influenza time point, which holds prognostic and diagnostic implications for this methodology. These results confirm that obesity causes distinct metabolic perturbations during influenza infection and provide a basis for generation of new hypotheses and use of this methodology in detection of putative biomarkers and metabolic patterns to predict influenza infection outcome. PMID:24844920

  5. (1)H NMR-based metabolic profiling of liver in chronic unpredictable mild stress rats with genipin treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Li; Shi, Bi-Yun; Xiang, Huan; Hou, Wen-Jing; Qin, Xue-Mei; Tian, Jun-Sheng; Du, Guan-Hua

    2015-11-10

    Genipin, a hydrolyzed metabolite of geniposide extracted from the fruit of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, has shown promise in alleviating depressive symptoms, however, the antidepressant mechanism of genipin remains unclear and incomprehensive. In this study, the metabolic profiles of aqueous and lipophilic extracts in liver of the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS)-induced rat with genipin treatment were investigated using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate data analysis. Significant differences in the metabolic profiles of rats in the CUMS model group (MS) and the control group (NS) were observed with metabolic effects including decreasing in choline, glycerol and glycogen, increasing in lactate, alanine and succinate, and a disordered lipid metabolism, while the moderate dose (50mg/kg) of genipin could significantly regulate the concentrations of glycerol, lactate, alanine, succinate and the lipid to their normal levels. These biomakers were involved in metabolism pathways such as glycolysis/gluconeogensis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and lipid metabolism, which may be helpful for understanding of antidepressant mechanism of genipin. PMID:26204246

  6. (1)H NMR-Based Metabolomics Reveals a Pedoclimatic Metabolic Imprinting in Ready-to-Drink Carrot Juices.

    PubMed

    Tomassini, Alberta; Sciubba, Fabio; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Capuani, Giorgio; Delfini, Maurizio; Aureli, Walter; Miccheli, Alfredo

    2016-06-29

    Carrots are usually consumed in their native form or processed into many different products. Carrot juice is a popular beverage consumed throughout the world and is attracting increasing attention due to its nutritional value, being a natural source of bioactive compounds. Ready-to-drink carrot juices produced in the same factory were analyzed by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The juices were made from carrot roots of the same cultivar grown in three different geographical areas in Italy. More than 30 compounds have been identified and quantified, and the data was subjected to univariate ANOVA and multivariate analyses. Clear geographical-dependent clustering was observed, and the metabolic profiles were related to the different pedoclimatic conditions. The proposed phytoprofiling approach could be employed on an industrial scale to evaluate finished products involving different sites of supply of the raw material, thus improving both the quality and uniformity of the juices. PMID:27281439

  7. 1H NMR Based Serum Metabolic Profiles Associated with Pathological Progression of Pancreatic Islet β Cell Tumor in Rip1-Tag2 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongxia; Liu, Ying; Zheng, Lingyun; Zhang, Qianqian; Gu, Quliang; Wang, Linlin; Wang, Lijing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic islet β cell tumor is the most common islet cell tumor. A well-characterized tumor progression in Rip1-Tag2 mice undergoes five stages, involving normal, hyperplasia, angiogenic islets, tumorigenesis and invasive carcinoma. 1H NMR based metabonomics was applied to identify potential biomarkers for monitoring pancreatic islet β cell tumor progression in Rip1-Tag2 mice. Multivariate analysis results showed the serum metabonome at hyperplasia stage shared the similar characteristics with the ones at normal stage as a result of slight proliferation of pancreatic islet β cells. At angiogenic islets stage, the up-regulated glycolysis, disturbed choline and phospholipid metabolism composed the metabolic signature. In addition to the changes mentioned above, several metabolites were identified as early biomarkers for tumorigenesis, including increased methionine, citrate and choline, and reduced acetate, taurine and glucose, which suggested the activated energy and amino acid metabolism. All the changes were aggravated at invasive carcinoma stage, coupled with notable changes in alanine, glutamate and glycine. Moreover, the distinct metabolic phenotype was found associated with the implanting of SV40 large T antigen in Rip1-Tag2 mice. The combined metabolic and multivariate statistics approach provides a robust method for screening the biomarkers of disease progression and examining the association between gene and metabolism. PMID:25892966

  8. mQTL.NMR: an integrated suite for genetic mapping of quantitative variations of (1)H NMR-based metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Hedjazi, Lyamine; Gauguier, Dominique; Zalloua, Pierre A; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-04-21

    High-throughput (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an increasingly popular robust approach for qualitative and quantitative metabolic profiling, which can be used in conjunction with genomic techniques to discover novel genetic associations through metabotype quantitative trait locus (mQTL) mapping. There is therefore a crucial necessity to develop specialized tools for an accurate detection and unbiased interpretability of the genetically determined metabolic signals. Here we introduce and implement a combined chemoinformatic approach for objective and systematic analysis of untargeted (1)H NMR-based metabolic profiles in quantitative genetic contexts. The R/Bioconductor mQTL.NMR package was designed to (i) perform a series of preprocessing steps restoring spectral dependency in collinear NMR data sets to reduce the multiple testing burden, (ii) carry out robust and accurate mQTL mapping in human cohorts as well as in rodent models, (iii) statistically enhance structural assignment of genetically determined metabolites, and (iv) illustrate results with a series of visualization tools. Built-in flexibility and implementation in the powerful R/Bioconductor framework allow key preprocessing steps such as peak alignment, normalization, or dimensionality reduction to be tailored to specific problems. The mQTL.NMR package is freely available with its source code through the Comprehensive R/Bioconductor repository and its own website ( http://www.ican-institute.org/tools/ ). It represents a significant advance to facilitate untargeted metabolomic data processing and quantitative analysis and their genetic mapping. PMID:25803548

  9. A (1)H HR-MAS NMR-Based Metabolomic Study for Metabolic Characterization of Rice Grain from Various Oryza sativa L. Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun-Hye; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Jeong, Jaesik; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Han-Yong; Bang, Eunjung; Hong, Young-Shick

    2016-04-20

    Rice grain metabolites are important for better understanding of the plant physiology of various rice cultivars and thus for developing rice cultivars aimed at providing diverse processed products. However, the variation of global metabolites in rice grains has rarely been explored. Here, we report the identification of intra- or intercellular metabolites in rice (Oryza sativa L.) grain powder using a (1)H high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR-based metabolomic approach. Compared with nonwaxy rice cultivars, marked accumulation of lipid metabolites such as fatty acids, phospholipids, and glycerophosphocholine in the grains of waxy rice cultivars demonstrated the distinct metabolic regulation and adaptation of each cultivar for effective growth during future germination, which may be reflected by high levels of glutamate, aspartate, asparagine, alanine, and sucrose. Therefore, this study provides important insights into the metabolic variations of diverse rice cultivars and their associations with environmental conditions and genetic backgrounds, with the aim of facilitating efficient development and the improvement of rice grain quality through inbreeding with genetic or chemical modification and mutation. PMID:27030107

  10. Pea Fiber and Wheat Bran Fiber Show Distinct Metabolic Profiles in Rats as Investigated by a 1H NMR-Based Metabolomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangmang; Xiao, Liang; Fang, Tingting; Cai, Yimin; Jia, Gang; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Jing; Chen, Xiaoling; Wu, Caimei

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of pea fiber (PF) and wheat bran fiber (WF) supplementation in rat metabolism. Rats were assigned randomly to one of three dietary groups and were given a basal diet containing 15% PF, 15% WF, or no supplemental fiber. Urine and plasma samples were analyzed by NMR-based metabolomics. PF significantly increased the plasma levels of 3-hydroxybutyrate, and myo-inositol as well as the urine levels of alanine, hydroxyphenylacetate, phenylacetyglycine, and α-ketoglutarate. However, PF significantly decreased the plasma levels of isoleucine, leucine, lactate, and pyruvate as well as the urine levels of allantoin, bile acids, and trigonelline. WF significantly increased the plasma levels of acetone, isobutyrate, lactate, myo-inositol, and lipids as well as the urine levels of alanine, lactate, dimethylglycine, N-methylniconamide, and α-ketoglutarate. However, WF significantly decreased the plasma levels of amino acids, and glucose as well as the urine levels of acetate, allantoin, citrate, creatine, hippurate, hydroxyphenylacetate, and trigonelline. Results suggest that PF and WF exposure can promote antioxidant activity and can exhibit common systemic metabolic changes, including lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, glycogenolysis and glycolysis metabolism, protein biosynthesis, and gut microbiota metabolism. PF can also decrease bile acid metabolism. These findings indicate that different fiber diet may cause differences in the biofluid profile in rats. PMID:25541729

  11. Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx)-induced abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism revealed by 1H-NMR-based metabonomics

    PubMed Central

    Dan Yue; Zhang, Yuwei; Cheng, Liuliu; Ma, Jinhu; Xi, Yufeng; Yang, Liping; Su, Chao; Shao, Bin; Huang, Anliang; Xiang, Rong; Cheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays an important role in HBV-related hepatocarcinogenesis; however, mechanisms underlying HBx-mediated carcinogenesis remain unclear. In this study, an NMR-based metabolomics approach was applied to systematically investigate the effects of HBx on cell metabolism. EdU incorporation assay was conducted to examine the effects of HBx on DNA synthesis, an important feature of nucleic acid metabolism. The results revealed that HBx disrupted metabolism of glucose, lipids, and amino acids, especially nucleic acids. To understand the potential mechanism of HBx-induced abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism, gene expression profiles of HepG2 cells expressing HBx were investigated. The results showed that 29 genes involved in DNA damage and DNA repair were differentially expressed in HBx-expressing HepG2 cells. HBx-induced DNA damage was further demonstrated by karyotyping, comet assay, Western blotting, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analyses. Many studies have previously reported that DNA damage can induce abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism. Thus, our results implied that HBx initially induces DNA damage, and then disrupts nucleic acid metabolism, which in turn blocks DNA repair and induces the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These findings further contribute to our understanding of the occurrence of HCC. PMID:27075403

  12. 1H-NMR-Based Metabolic Analysis of Human Serum Reveals Novel Markers of Myocardial Energy Expenditure in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Su, Liang; Lai, Wenyan; Wang, Peng; Xie, Zhibing; Xie, Zhiquan; Zeng, Qingchun; Ren, Hao; Xu, Dingli

    2014-01-01

    Objective Elevated myocardial energy expenditure (MEE) is related with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, and has also been documented as an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality. However, the serum small-molecule metabolite profiles and pathophysiological mechanisms of elevated MEE in heart failure (HF) are still lacking. Herein, we used 1H-NMR-based metabolomics analysis to screen for potential biomarkers of MEE in HF. Methods A total of 61 subjects were enrolled, including 46 patients with heart failure and 15 age-matched controls. Venous serum samples were collected from subjects after an 8-hour fast. An INOVA 600 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer with Carr-Purcell-Melboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence was employed for the metabolomics analysis and MEE was calculated using colored Doppler echocardiography. Metabolomics data were processed using orthogonal signal correction and regression analysis was performed using the partial least squares method. Results The mean MEE levels of HF patients and controls were 139.61±58.18 cal/min and 61.09±23.54 cal/min, respectively. Serum metabolomics varied with MEE changed, and 3-hydroxybutyrate, acetone and succinate were significantly elevated with the increasing MEE. Importantly, these three metabolites were independent of administration of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, β-receptor blockers, diuretics and statins (P>0.05). Conclusions These results suggested that in patients with heart failure, MEE elevation was associated with significant changes in serum metabolomics profiles, especially the concentration of 3-hydroxybutyrate, acetone and succinate. These compounds could be used as potential serum biomarkers to study myocardial energy mechanism in HF patients. PMID:24505394

  13. 1H HR-MAS NMR Based Metabolic Profiling of Cells in Response to Treatment with a Hexacationic Ruthenium Metallaprism as Potential Anticancer Drug

    PubMed Central

    Vermathen, Martina; Paul, Lydia E. H.; Diserens, Gaëlle

    2015-01-01

    1H high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy was applied in combination with multivariate statistical analyses to study the metabolic response of whole cells to the treatment with a hexacationic ruthenium metallaprism [1]6+ as potential anticancer drug. Human ovarian cancer cells (A2780), the corresponding cisplatin resistant cells (A2780cisR), and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293) were each incubated for 24 h and 72 h with [1]6+ and compared to untreated cells. Different responses were obtained depending on the cell type and incubation time. Most pronounced changes were found for lipids, choline containing compounds, glutamate and glutathione, nucleotide sugars, lactate, and some amino acids. Possible contributions of these metabolites to physiologic processes are discussed. The time-dependent metabolic response patterns suggest that A2780 cells on one hand and HEK-293 cells and A2780cisR cells on the other hand may follow different cell death pathways and exist in different temporal stages thereof. PMID:26024484

  14. A comparison of metabolite extraction strategies for 1H-NMR-based metabolic profiling using mature leaf tissue from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Kayla A; Barding, Gregory A; Larive, Cynthia K

    2009-12-01

    Metabolite analysis is recognized as an important facet of systems biology, however complete metabolome characterization has not been realized due to challenges in sample preparation, inherent instrumental limitations and the labor intensive task of data interpretation. This work aims to compare several commonly used metabolite extraction strategies for their effect on the (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolic profile of extracts of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Extractions were carried out on aliquots from a pool of homogenized plant tissue using CD(3)CN/D(2)O, buffered D(2)O, perchloric acid in D(2)O, CD(3)OD/D(2)O and CD(3)OD/D(2)O/CDCl(3) as the extraction solvents. The effects of lyophilization as a sample pretreatment, solvent evaporation and extract fractionation for removal of interfering species were studied. Representative spectra are presented for qualitative interpretation. Analytical reproducibility was evaluated by principal components analysis. Perchloric acid facilitated acid-catalyzed cleavage of sucrose, further complicating biological interpretation of the resulting metabolite profile. The solvent system CD(3)OD/D(2)O/CDCl(3) gave the least reproducible results in our hands. D(2)O extracts suffered from poor stability probably due to contamination by soluble enzymes, which were not denatured in this solvent. CD(3)CN/D(2)O extracts showed greater stability than D(2)O alone, but problems were encountered due to degradation of (1)H NMR spectral resolution during lengthy acquisitions due to partial phase separation. In addition, this solvent system produced spectra with significant contamination by lipids that obscured spectral regions containing the resonances of the aliphatic amino acids. These problems were solved by speedvacuuming the CD(3)CN/D(2)O extract and reconstituting in D(2)O solution. PMID:19551810

  15. Toxicity assessment of Arisaematis Rhizoma in rats by a (1)H NMR-based metabolomics approach.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ge; Wang, Junsong; Guo, Pingping; Wei, Dandan; Yang, Minghua; Kong, Lingyi

    2015-02-01

    Arisaematis Rhizoma (AR), a famous traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used in Asia over thousands of years. Documented with noticeable toxicity in ancient books, AR has been used to treat various diseases in the clinic. Therefore, it is important to assess the toxicity of AR dynamically and holistically. In this study, a (1)H NMR-based metabolomics approach complemented with serum chemistry and histopathology has been applied to investigate the toxicity of AR. Rats were intragastrically administered with AR (0, 0.5 and 1 g kg(-1) body weight) for 30 days, and serum and urine samples were collected. Their (1)H NMR profiles were analyzed by multivariate pattern recognition techniques to denote metabolic variations induced by AR, and 13 metabolites in urine and 6 metabolites in serum were significantly altered, which suggested that disturbances in energy metabolism, perturbation of the gut microflora environment, membrane damage, folate deficiency and injury of kidneys are produced by AR. Histopathology showed a slight vacuolization of the glomerular matrix and edema of renal tubular epithelial cells in kidneys of AR administered rats, which were evidenced by increased levels of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine in serum chemistry. Our results indicated that oral administration of crude AR was found to induce slight renal toxicity. Therefore, precautions should be made to monitor the potential nephrotoxicity of AR in clinical use. The metabolomics approach provided a promising tool for the study and better understanding of TCM-induced toxicity dynamically and holistically. PMID:25407163

  16. (1)H-NMR-based discrimination of thermal and vinegar treated ginseng roots.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Hyun; Hyun, Sun-Hee; Yang, Seung-Ok; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the changes in nonvolatile metabolites of thermal and/or vinegar treated ginseng (TVG), samples prepared using various treatment conditions were analyzed using an (1)H-NMR-based metabolomics technique. The processing conditions of the ginseng in this study were 100, 140, and 180 degrees C with and without vinegar and the duration of exposure to each temperature was 10, 30, and 50 min, respectively. There was a clear separation in the score plots among various treatment conditions. Major compounds contributing to the separation of 50% methanol extracts of TVG with various process conditions were valine, lactate, alanine, arginine, glucose, fructose, and sucrose. As temperature increased, valine, arginine, glucose, fructose, and sucrose concentrations decreased, whereas lactate, glucose, and fructose increased in the vinegar-treated samples compared to non-vinegar-treated samples. The present study suggests the usefulness of an (1)H-NMR-based metabolomics approach to discriminate TVG samples, subjected to different processing conditions. PMID:20722913

  17. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics of Daphnia magna responses after sub-lethal exposure to triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Vera; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2016-09-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products are a class of emerging contaminants that are present in wastewater effluents, surface water, and groundwater around the world. There is a need to determine rapid and reliable bioindicators of exposure and the toxic mode of action of these contaminants to aquatic organisms. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was used to determine the metabolic profile of Daphnia magna after exposure to a range of sub-lethal concentrations of triclosan (6.25-100μg/L), carbamazepine (1.75-14mg/L) and ibuprofen (1.75-14mg/L) for 48h. Sub-lethal triclosan exposure suggested a general oxidative stress condition and the branched-chain amino acids, glutamine, glutamate, and methionine emerged as potential bioindicators. The aromatic amino acids, serine, glycine and alanine are potential bioindicators for sub-lethal carbamazepine exposure that may have altered energy metabolism. The potential bioindicators for sub-lethal ibuprofen exposure are serine, methionine, lysine, arginine and leucine, which showed a concentration-dependent response. The differences in the metabolic changes were related to the dissimilar modes of toxicity of triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics gave an improved understanding of how these emerging contaminants impact the keystone species D. magna. PMID:26809854

  18. Study of the Cardiotoxicity of Venenum Bufonis in Rats using an 1H NMR-Based Metabolomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junsong; Guo, Pingping; Li, Minghui; Yang, Minghua; Kong, Lingyi

    2015-01-01

    Venenum Bufonis, a well-known traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used in Asia and has gained popularity in Western countries over the last decade. Venenum Bufonis has obvious side effects that have been observed in clinical settings, but few studies have reported on its cardiotoxicity. In this work, the cardiotoxicity of Venenum Bufonis was investigated using a 11H NMR-based metabolomics approach. The 1H NMR profiles of the serum, myocardial extracts and liver extracts of specific-pathogen-free rats showed that Venenum Bufonis produced significant metabolic perturbations dose-dependently with a distinct time effect, peaking at 2 hr after dosing and attenuating gradually. Clinical chemistry, electrocardiographic recordings, and histopathological evaluation provided additional evidence of Venenum Bufonis-induced cardiac damage that complemented and supported the metabolomics findings. The combined results demonstrated that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and energy metabolism perturbations were associated with the cardiac damage that results from Venenum Bufonis. PMID:25781638

  19. 1H NMR-Based Metabolite Profiling of Plasma in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju-Ae; Choi, Hyo-Jung; Kwon, Yong-Kook; Ryu, Do Hyun; Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by the gradual loss of the kidney function to excrete wastes and fluids from the blood. 1H NMR-based metabolomics was exploited to investigate the altered metabolic pattern in rats with CKD induced by surgical reduction of the renal mass (i.e., 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 Nx)), particularly for identifying specific metabolic biomarkers associated with early of CKD. Plasma metabolite profiling was performed in CKD rats (at 4- or 8-weeks after 5/6 Nx) compared to sham-operated rats. Principle components analysis (PCA), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) score plots showed a significant separation between the groups. The resulting metabolic profiles demonstrated significantly increased plasma levels of organic anions, including citrate, β-hydroxybutyrate, lactate, acetate, acetoacetate, and formate in CKD. Moreover, levels of alanine, glutamine, and glutamate were significantly higher. These changes were likely to be associated with complicated metabolic acidosis in CKD for counteracting systemic metabolic acidosis or increased protein catabolism from muscle. In contrast, levels of VLDL/LDL (CH2)n and N-acetylglycoproteins were decreased. Taken together, the observed changes of plasma metabolite profiles in CKD rats provide insights into the disturbed metabolism in early phase of CKD, in particular for the altered metabolism of acid-base and/or amino acids. PMID:24465563

  20. Combining biochemical with (1)H NMR-based metabolomics approach unravels the antidiabetic activity of genipin and its possible mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao-Li; Liu, Huan; Xiang, Huan; Qin, Xue-Mei; Du, Guan-Hua; Tian, Jun-Sheng

    2016-09-10

    Diabetes mellitus is a typical heterogeneous metabolic disorder characterized by abnormal metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. Genipin possesses a wide spectrum of biological activities including ameliorating effects on diabetes, but the definite mechanism of this effect remains unknown. To investigate the antidiabetic activities of genipin and explore the biochemical changes of serum endogenous metabolites on diabetic rats induced by alloxan, (1)H NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate data analysis was used to. All rats were randomly divided into six groups including negative control (NC) group, diabetic mellitus (DM) group, metformin hydrochloride group, high dose group of genipin, middle dose group of genipin and low dose group of genipin. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of 120mg/kg body weight of alloxan. Serum samples were collected for the (1)H NMR-based metabolomics and clinical biochemical analysis. Daily oral administration of genipin (25, 50 and 100mg/kg body weight) and metformin hydrochloride (125mg/kg) for two weeks showed beneficial effects on blood glucose level (P<0.01). Significant differences in the metabolic profile as well as the result of biochemical parameters between the diabetic group and the control group were observed. The PLS-DA scores and corresponding loading plots demonstrated that genipin significantly restored the abnormal metabolic state. Detailed analysis of the altered metabolite levels indicated that genipin significantly ameliorated the disturbance in glucose metabolism, tricarboxylic acid cycle, lipid metabolism and amino acid metabolism. Genipin showed the best anti-diabetic effects at a dose of 100mg/kg in rats. This finding indicates that chemical and metabolomic approaches could be powerful tools for the investigation of the biochemical changes in pathological conditions or drug treatment. PMID:27411170

  1. Intervention effects of puerarin on blood stasis in rats revealed by a (1)H NMR-based metabonomic approach.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhong Jie; Liu, Zhong Hua; Gong, Meng Juan; Han, Bin; Wang, Shu Mei; Liang, Sheng Wang

    2015-03-15

    Puerarin possesses a wide spectrum of biological activities including ameliorating effects on blood stasis, but the definite mechanism of this effect is still not known. In this study, a (1)H NMR-based plasma and urinary metabonomic approach was applied to comprehensively and holistically investigate the therapeutic effects of puerarin on blood stasis and its underlying mechanisms. Puerarin was injected intraperitoneally once daily for consecutive 7 days. The blood stasis rat model was established by placing the rats in ice-cold water during the time interval between two injections of adrenaline. With pattern recognition analysis, a clear separation of blood stasis model group and healthy control group was achieved and puerarin pretreatment group was located much closer to the control group than the model group, which was consistent with results of hemorheology studies. 15 and 10 potential biomarkers associated with blood stasis in plasma and urine, respectively, which were mainly involved in energy metabolism, lipid and membrane metabolisms, amino acid metabolism and gut microbiota metabolism, were identified. Puerarin could prevent blood stasis through partially regulating the disturbed metabolic pathways. This work highlights that metabonomics is a valuable tool for studying the essence of blood stasis as well as evaluating the efficacy of the corresponding drug treatment. PMID:25837270

  2. Discrimination of the geographical origin of beef by (1)H NMR-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Jung, Youngae; Lee, Jueun; Kwon, Joseph; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Ryu, Do Hyun; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2010-10-13

    The geographical origin of beef is of increasing interest to consumers and producers due to "mad cow" disease and the implementation of the Free Trade Agreement (FTA). In this study, (1)H NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analyses was used to differentiate the geographical origin of beef samples. Principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) showed significant separation between extracts of beef originating from four countries: Australia, Korea, New Zealand, and the United States. The major metabolites responsible for differentiation in OPLS-DA loading plots were succinate and various amino acids including isoleucine, leucine, methionine, tyrosine, and valine. A one-way ANOVA was performed to statistically certify the difference in metabolite levels. The data suggest that NMR-based metabolomics is an efficient method to distinguish fingerprinting difference between raw beef samples, and several metabolites including various amino acids and succinate can be possible biomarkers for discriminating the geographical origin of beef. PMID:20831251

  3. NMR-based metabolic profiling for serum of mouse exposed to source water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Weixin; Sun, Jie; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Xuxiang; Cheng, Shupei

    2011-07-01

    (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabonomic method was used to characterize the profile of low-molecular-weight endogenous metabolites in mouse (Mus musculus) serum following exposure to Taihu Lake source water for 90 days. The (1)H NMR spectra of mice sera were recoded and a total of 21 metabolites were identified. Data reduction and latent biomarkers identification were processed by pattern recognition (PR) analysis. The principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) identified differences in metabolic profiles between control and treatment groups. A number of serum metabolic perturbations were observed in sera of source water treatment mice compared to control mice, including decreased levels of acetone, pyruvate, glutamine, lysine and citrate. These results indicated that Taihu Lake source water could induce energy metabolism changes in mouse related to fatty acid β-oxidation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, citric acid cycle, and metabolism of some amino acids. (1)H NMR-based metabolic profiling provides new insight into the toxic effect of Taihu Lake source water, and suggests potential biomarkers for noninvasive monitoring of health risk. PMID:21400091

  4. 1H NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Sub-Lethal Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Exposure to the Earthworm, Eisenia fetida, in Soil.

    PubMed

    Lankadurai, Brian P; Furdui, Vasile I; Reiner, Eric J; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2013-01-01

    1H NMR-based metabolomics was used to measure the response of Eisenia fetida earthworms after exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in soil. Earthworms were exposed to a range of PFOS concentrations (five, 10, 25, 50, 100 or 150 mg/kg) for two, seven and fourteen days. Earthworm tissues were extracted and analyzed by 1H NMR. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolic response of E. fetida to PFOS exposure identified time-dependent responses that were comprised of two separate modes of action: a non-polar narcosis type mechanism after two days of exposure and increased fatty acid oxidation after seven and fourteen days of exposure. Univariate statistical analysis revealed that 2-hexyl-5-ethyl-3-furansulfonate (HEFS), betaine, leucine, arginine, glutamate, maltose and ATP are potential indicators of PFOS exposure, as the concentrations of these metabolites fluctuated significantly. Overall, NMR-based metabolomic analysis suggests elevated fatty acid oxidation, disruption in energy metabolism and biological membrane structure and a possible interruption of ATP synthesis. These conclusions obtained from analysis of the metabolic profile in response to sub-lethal PFOS exposure indicates that NMR-based metabolomics is an excellent discovery tool when the mode of action (MOA) of contaminants is not clearly defined. PMID:24958147

  5. 1H NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Sub-Lethal Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Exposure to the Earthworm, Eisenia fetida, in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Lankadurai, Brian P.; Furdui, Vasile I.; Reiner, Eric J.; Simpson, André J.; Simpson, Myrna J.

    2013-01-01

    1H NMR-based metabolomics was used to measure the response of Eisenia fetida earthworms after exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in soil. Earthworms were exposed to a range of PFOS concentrations (five, 10, 25, 50, 100 or 150 mg/kg) for two, seven and fourteen days. Earthworm tissues were extracted and analyzed by 1H NMR. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolic response of E. fetida to PFOS exposure identified time-dependent responses that were comprised of two separate modes of action: a non-polar narcosis type mechanism after two days of exposure and increased fatty acid oxidation after seven and fourteen days of exposure. Univariate statistical analysis revealed that 2-hexyl-5-ethyl-3-furansulfonate (HEFS), betaine, leucine, arginine, glutamate, maltose and ATP are potential indicators of PFOS exposure, as the concentrations of these metabolites fluctuated significantly. Overall, NMR-based metabolomic analysis suggests elevated fatty acid oxidation, disruption in energy metabolism and biological membrane structure and a possible interruption of ATP synthesis. These conclusions obtained from analysis of the metabolic profile in response to sub-lethal PFOS exposure indicates that NMR-based metabolomics is an excellent discovery tool when the mode of action (MOA) of contaminants is not clearly defined. PMID:24958147

  6. 1H NMR- based metabolomics approaches as non- invasive tools for diagnosis of endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghazi, Negar; Arjmand, Mohammad; Akbari, Ziba; Mellati, Ali Owsat; Saheb-Kashaf, Hamid; Zamani, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: So far, non-invasive diagnostic approaches such as ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, or blood tests do not have sufficient diagnostic power for endometriosis disease. Lack of a non-invasive diagnostic test contributes to the long delay between onset of symptoms and diagnosis of endometriosis. Objective: The present study focuses on the identification of predictive biomarkers in serum by pattern recognition techniques and uses partial least square discriminant analysis, multi-layer feed forward artificial neural networks (ANNs) and quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) modeling tools for the early diagnosis of endometriosis in a minimally invasive manner by 1H- NMR based metabolomics. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was done in Pasteur Institute, Iran in June 2013. Serum samples of 31 infertile women with endometriosis (stage II and III) who confirmed by diagnostic laparoscopy and 15 normal women were collected and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The model was built by using partial least square discriminant analysis, QDA, and ANNs to determine classifier metabolites for early prediction risk of disease. Results: The levels of 2- methoxyestron, 2-methoxy estradiol, dehydroepiandrostion androstendione, aldosterone, and deoxy corticosterone were enhanced significantly in infertile group. While cholesterol and primary bile acids levels were decreased. QDA model showed significant difference between two study groups. Positive and negative predict value levels obtained about 71% and 78%, respectively. ANNs provided also criteria for detection of endometriosis. Conclusion: The QDA and ANNs modeling can be used as computational tools in noninvasive diagnose of endometriosis. However, the model designed by QDA methods is more efficient compared to ANNs in diagnosis of endometriosis patients. PMID:27141542

  7. (1)H NMR based metabolomics approach to study the toxic effects of dichlorvos on goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Chen, Ting; Li, Ming-Hui; Xu, Hua-Dong; Jia, Ai-Qun; Zhang, Jian-Fa; Wang, Jun-Song

    2015-11-01

    Dichlorvos (DDVP), one of the most widely used organophosphorus pesticides (OPs), has caused serious pollution in environment. In this study, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabolomics approach combined with histopathological and immunohistochemical examination, and biochemical assays were used to investigate toxicities of DDVP on goldfish (Carassius auratus). After 10 days' exposure of DDVP at three dosages of 5.18, 2.59 and 1.73 mg/L, goldfish tissues (gill, brain, liver and kidney) and serum were collected. Histopathology revealed severe impairment of gills, livers and kidneys, and immunohistochemistry disclosed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive reactive astrocytes in brains. Orthogonal signal correction-partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OSC-PLS-DA) of NMR profiles disclosed that DDVP influenced many metabolites (glutamate, aspartate, acetylcholine, 4-aminobutyrate, glutathione, AMP and lactate in brain; glutathione, glucose, histamine in liver; BCAAs, AMP, aspartate, glutamate, riboflavin in kidney) dose-dependently, involved with imbalance of neurotransmitters, oxidative stress, and disorders of energy and amino acid metabolism. Several self-protection mechanisms concerning glutamate degradation and glutathione (GSH) redox system were found in DDVP intoxicated goldfish. PMID:26210017

  8. (1)H NMR based metabolomic profiling revealed doxorubicin-induced systematic alterations in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qian-Yun; Li, Zhen-Yu; Du, Guan-Hua; Qin, Xue-Mei

    2016-01-25

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is used as a chemotherapy drug with severe carditoxicity. In this study, an integrated echocardiography along with pathological examination and (1)H NMR analysis of multiple biological matrices (urine, serum, heart, and kidney) was employed to systemically assess the toxicity of DOX. Echocardiographic results showed that impaired left ventricular contractility and degenerative pathology lesions in DOX group, which were in consistent with pathology. The endogenous metabolites in the urine, serum, heart and kidney was identified by comparison with the data from the literature and databases. Multivariate analysis, including PCA and OPLS, revealed 8 metabolites in urine, including succinate, 2-ketoglutarate, citrate, hippurate, methylamine, benzoate, allantion, and acetate were the potential changed biomarkers. In serum, perturbed metabolites include elevation of leucine, β-glucose, O-acetyl-glycoprotein, creatine, lysine, glycerin, dimethylglycine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, myo-inositol, and N-acetyl-glycoprotein, together with level decreases of acetone, lipid, lactate, glutamate, phosphocholine, acetoacetate and pyruvate. For heart, DOX exposure caused decline of lipid, lactate, leucine, alanine, glutamate, choline, xanthine, glycerin, carnitine, and fumarate, together with elevation of glutamine, creatine, inosine, taurine and malate. Metabolic changes of kidney were mainly involved in the accumulation of α-glucose, lactate, phosphocholine, betaine, threonine, choline, taurine, glycine, urea, hypoxanthine, glutamate, and nicotinamide, coupled with reduction of asparagine, valine, methionine, tyrosine, lysine, alanine, leucine, ornithine, creatine, lipid, and acetate. In addition, alterations of urinary metabolites exhibited a time-dependent manner. Complementary evidences by multiple matrices revealed disturbed pathways concerning energy metabolism, fatty acids oxidation, amino acids and purine metabolism, choline metabolism, and gut microbiota

  9. Metabonomic Profiling of Serum and Urine by 1H NMR-Based Spectroscopy Discriminates Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuo; Mao, Shitao; Ling, Yuan; Liu, Dan; He, Xiaoyu; Wang, Xiaoge

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has seriously impacted the health of individuals and populations. In this study, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR)-based metabonomics combined with multivariate pattern recognition analysis was applied to investigate the metabolic signatures of patients with COPD. Serum and urine samples were collected from COPD patients (n = 32) and healthy controls (n = 21), respectively. Samples were analyzed by high resolution 1H NMR (600 MHz), and the obtained spectral profiles were then subjected to multivariate data analysis. Consistent metabolic differences have been found in serum as well as in urine samples from COPD patients and healthy controls. Compared to healthy controls, COPD patients displayed decreased lipoprotein and amino acids, including branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), and increased glycerolphosphocholine in serum. Moreover, metabolic differences in urine were more significant than in serum. Decreased urinary 1-methylnicotinamide, creatinine and lactate have been discovered in COPD patients in comparison with healthy controls. Conversely, acetate, ketone bodies, carnosine, m-hydroxyphenylacetate, phenylacetyglycine, pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate exhibited enhanced expression levels in COPD patients relative to healthy subjects. Our results illustrate the potential application of NMR-based metabonomics in early diagnosis and understanding the mechanisms of COPD. PMID:23755267

  10. Systemic and characteristic metabolites in the serum of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats at different stages as revealed by a (1)H-NMR based metabonomic approach.

    PubMed

    Diao, Chengfeng; Zhao, Liangcai; Guan, Mimi; Zheng, Yongquan; Chen, Minjiang; Yang, Yunjun; Lin, Li; Chen, Weijian; Gao, Hongchang

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a typical heterogeneous metabolic disorder characterized by abnormal metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. Investigating the changes in metabolic pathways during the evolution of diabetes mellitus may contribute to the understanding of its metabolic features and pathogenesis. In this study, serum samples were collected from diabetic rats and age-matched controls at different time points: 1 and 9 weeks after streptozotocin (STZ) treatment. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR)-based metabonomics with quantitative analysis was performed to study the metabolic changes. The serum samples were also subjected to clinical chemistry analysis to verify the metabolic changes observed by metabonomics. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) demonstrated that the levels of serum metabolites in diabetic rats are different from those in control rats. These findings indicate that the metabolic characteristics of the two groups are markedly different at 1 and 9 weeks. Quantitative analysis showed that the levels of some metabolites, such as pyruvate, lactate, citrate, acetone, acetoacetate, acetate, glycerol, and valine, varied in a time-dependent manner in diabetic rats. These results suggest that serum metabolites related to glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, gluconeogenesis, fatty acid β-oxidation, branched-chain amino acid metabolism, and the tyrosine metabolic pathways are involved in the evolution of diabetes. The metabolic changes represent potential features and promote a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of diabetes mellitus. This work further suggests that (1)H NMR metabonomics is a valuable approach for providing novel insights into the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and its complications. PMID:24448714

  11. A 1H-NMR-Based Metabonomic Study on the Anti-Depressive Effect of the Total Alkaloid of Corydalis Rhizoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongwei; Wang, Peng; Liu, Mengting; Tang, Liying; Fang, Jing; Zhao, Ye; Zhang, Yi; Li, Defeng; Xu, Haiyu; Yang, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Corydalis Rhizoma, named YuanHu in China, is the dried tuber of Corydalis yanhusuo W.T. Wang which is used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for pain relief and blood activation. Previous pharmacological studies showed that apart from analgesics, the alkaloids from YuanHu may be useful in the therapy of depression by acting on the GABA, dopamine and benzodiazepine receptors. In this study, the antidepressive effect of the total alkaloid of YuanHu (YHTA) was investigated in a chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rat model using 1H-NMR-based metabonomics. Plasma metabolic profiles were analyzed and multivariate data analysis was applied to discover the metabolic biomarkers in CUMS rats. Thirteen biomarkers of CUMS-introduced depression were identified, which are myo-inositol, glycerol, glycine, creatine, glutamine, glutamate, β-glucose, α-glucose, acetoacetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, leucine and unsaturated lipids (L7, L9). Moreover, a metabolic network of the potential biomarkers in plasma perturbed by CUMS was detected. After YHTA treatment, clear separation between the model group and YHTA-treated group was achieved. The levels of all the abnormal metabolites mentioned above showed a tendency of restoration to normal levels. The results demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of YHTA against depression and suggested that NMR-based metabolomics can provide a simple and easy tool for the evaluation of herbal therapeutics. PMID:26035102

  12. Early Stage Diagnosis of Oral Cancer Using 1H NMR-Based Metabolomics12

    PubMed Central

    Tiziani, Stefano; Lopes, Victor; Günther, Ulrich L

    2009-01-01

    Oral cancer is the eighth most common cancer worldwide and represents a significant disease burden. If detected at an early stage, survival from oral cancer is better than 90% at 5 years, whereas late stage disease survival is only 30%. Therefore, there is an obvious clinical utility for novel metabolic markers that help to diagnose oral cancer at an early stage and to monitor treatment response. In the current study, blood samples of oral cancer patients were analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to derive a metabolic signature for oral cancer. Using multivariate chemometric analysis, we obtained an excellent discrimination between serum samples from cancer patients and from a control group and could also discriminate between different stages of disease. The metabolic profile obtained for oral cancer is significant, even for early stage disease and relatively small tumors. This suggests a systemic metabolic response to cancer, which bears great potential for early diagnosis. PMID:19242608

  13. 1H-NMR-based profiling of organic components in leachate from animal carcasses disposal site with time.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong-Kook; Bae, Hyun-Whee; Shin, Sun Kyoung; Jeon, Tae-Wan; Seo, Jungju; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2014-09-01

    Leachate, generated by the decomposition of animal carcasses, presents many environmental, sanitary, and food safety hazards. However, research on the characteristics of leachate is lacking. In this study, we performed biochemical profiling of leachate from two animal species (pig and cattle) in two soil types (sandy loam and sandy soil) using (1)H-NMR-based profiling, followed by multivariate data analysis. The leachate was collected from a well-controlled artificial burial site over a 31-week period. Principal components analysis (PCA) of the NMR data showed similar patterns between species and soil types. Organic components, including organic acids and phenols, predominated, and their levels increased with time. The methylamine level in leachate from pig carcasses 18 weeks following burial was significantly higher than that from cattle carcasses; leachate from cattle carcasses in sandy soil 1 week after burial contained unique components (specifically ethanol, formate, alanine, N-methylation, and taurine), in contrast with those from sandy loam soil. This study suggests that a NMR-based profiling approach is useful to characterize the organic components in leachate from animal carcasses over time. PMID:24819439

  14. NMR-based metabolic profiling identifies biomarkers of liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bollard, Mary E; Contel, Nancy R; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Smith, Leon; Beckonert, Olaf; Cantor, Glenn H; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois; Holmes, Elaine C; Lindon, John C; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Keun, Hector C

    2010-01-01

    Tissue injury and repair are often overlapping consequences of disease or toxic exposure, but are not often considered as distinct processes in molecular studies. To establish the systemic metabolic response to liver regeneration, the partial hepatectomy (PH) model has been studied in the rat by an integrated metabonomics strategy, utilizing (1)H NMR spectroscopy of urine, liver and serum. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either surgical removal of approximately two-thirds of the liver, sham operated (SO) surgery, or no treatment (n = 10/group) and samples collected over a 7 day period. A number of urinary metabolic perturbations were observed in PH rats compared with SO and control animals, including elevated levels of taurine, hypotaurine, creatine, guanidinoacetic acid, betaine, dimethylglycine and bile acids. Serum betaine and creatine were also elevated after PH, while levels of triglyceride were reduced. In the liver, triglycerides, cholesterol, alanine and betaine were elevated after PH, while choline and its derivatives were reduced. Upon examining the dynamic pattern of urinary response (the 'metabolic trajectory'), several metabolites could be categorized into groups likely to reflect perturbations to different processes such as dietary intake or hepatic 1-carbon metabolism. Several of the urinary perturbations observed during the regenerative phase of the PH model have also been observed after exposure to liver toxins, indicating that hepatic regeneration may make a contribution to the systemic alterations in metabolism associated with hepatotoxicity. The observed changes in 1-carbon and lipid metabolism are consistent with the proposed role of these pathways in the activation of a regenerative response and provide further evidence regarding the utility of urinary NMR profiles in the detection of liver-specific pathology. Biofluid (1)H NMR-based metabolic profiling provides new insight into the role of metabolism of liver regeneration, and

  15. NMR-Based Metabolic Profiling Reveals Neurochemical Alterations in the Brain of Rats Treated with Sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Du, Changman; Shao, Xue; Zhu, Ruiming; Li, Yan; Zhao, Qian; Fu, Dengqi; Gu, Hui; Kong, Jueying; Luo, Li; Long, Hailei; Deng, Pengchi; Wang, Huijuan; Hu, Chunyan; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2015-11-01

    Sorafenib, an active multi-kinase inhibitor, has been widely used as a chemotherapy drug to treat advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma patients. In spite of the relative safety, sorafenib has been shown to exert a negative impact on cognitive functioning in cancer patients, specifically on learning and memory; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, an NMR-based metabolomics approach was applied to investigate the neurochemical effects of sorafenib in rats. Male rats were once daily administrated with 120 mg/kg sorafenib by gavage for 3, 7, and 28 days, respectively. NMR-based metabolomics coupled with histopathology examinations for hippocampus, prefrontal cortex (PFC), and striatum were performed. The (1)H NMR spectra data were analyzed by using multivariate pattern recognition techniques to show the time-dependent biochemical variations induced by sorafenib. Excellent separation was obtained and distinguishing metabolites were observed between sorafenib-treated and control rats. A total of 36 differential metabolites in hippocampus of rats treated with sorafenib were identified, some of which were significantly changed. Furthermore, these modified metabolites mainly reflected the disturbances in neurotransmitters, energy metabolism, membrane, and amino acids. However, only a few metabolites in PFC and striatum were altered by sorafenib. Additionally, no apparent histological changes in these three brain regions were observed in sorafenib-treated rats. Together, our findings demonstrate the disturbed metabonomics pathways, especially, in hippocampus, which may underlie the sorafenib-induced cognitive deficits in patients. This work also shows the advantage of NMR-based metabolomics over traditional approach on the study of biochemical effects of drugs. PMID:26233726

  16. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics investigation of Daphnia magna responses to sub-lethal exposure to arsenic, copper and lithium.

    PubMed

    Nagato, Edward G; D'eon, Jessica C; Lankadurai, Brian P; Poirier, David G; Reiner, Eric J; Simpson, Andre J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2013-09-01

    Metal and metalloid contamination constitutes a major concern in aquatic ecosystems. Thus it is important to find rapid and reliable indicators of metal stress to aquatic organisms. In this study, we tested the use of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) - based metabolomics to examine the response of Daphnia magna neonates after a 48h exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of arsenic (49μgL(-1)), copper (12.4μgL(-1)) or lithium (1150μgL(-1)). Metabolomic responses for all conditions were compared to a control using principal component analysis (PCA) and metabolites that contributed to the variation between the exposures and the control condition were identified and quantified. The PCA showed that copper and lithium exposures result in statistically significant metabolite variations from the control. Contributing to this variation was a number of amino acids such as: phenylalanine, leucine, lysine, glutamine, glycine, alanine, methionine and glutamine as well as the nucleobase uracil and osmolyte glycerophosphocholine. The similarities in metabolome changes suggest that lithium has an analogous mode of toxicity to that of copper, and may be impairing energy production and ionoregulation. The PCA also showed that arsenic exposure resulted in a metabolic shift in comparison to the control population but this change was not statistically significant. However, significant changes in specific metabolites such as alanine and lysine were observed, suggesting that energy metabolism is indeed disrupted. This research demonstrates that (1)H NMR-based metabolomics is a viable platform for discerning metabolomic changes and mode of toxicity of D. magna in response to metal stressors in the environment. PMID:23732010

  17. Toxicological effects of cinnabar in rats by NMR-based metabolic profiling of urine and serum

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Lai; Liao Peiqiu; Wu Huifeng; Li Xiaojing Pei Fengkui Li Weisheng; Wu Yijie

    2008-03-15

    Cinnabar, an important traditional Chinese mineral medicine, has been widely used as a Chinese patent medicine ingredient for sedative therapy. However, the pharmaceutical and toxicological effects of cinnabar, especially in the whole organism, were subjected to few investigations. In this study, an NMR-based metabolomics approach has been applied to investigate the toxicological effects of cinnabar after intragastrical administration (dosed at 0.5, 2 and 5 g/kg body weight) on male Wistar rats. Liver and kidney histopathology examinations and serum clinical chemistry analyses were also performed. The {sup 1}H NMR spectra were analyzed using multivariate pattern recognition techniques to show the time- and dose-dependent biochemical variations induced by cinnabar. The metabolic signature of urinalysis from cinnabar-treated animals exhibited an increase in the levels of creatinine, acetate, acetoacetate, taurine, hippurate and phenylacetylglycine, together with a decrease in the levels of trimethyl-N-oxide, dimethylglycine and Kreb's cycle intermediates (citrate, 2-oxoglutarate and succinate). The metabolomics analyses of serum showed elevated concentrations of ketone bodies (3-D-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate), branched-chain amino acids (valine, leucine and isoleucine), choline and creatine as well as decreased glucose, lipids and lipoproteins from cinnabar-treated animals. These findings indicated cinnabar induced disturbance in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism and gut microflora environment as well as slight injury in liver and kidney, which might indirectly result from cinnabar induced oxidative stress. This work illustrated the high reliability of NMR-based metabolomic approach on the study of the biochemical effects induced by traditional Chinese medicine.

  18. [1H-NMR based metabonomic approach to evaluate detoxification effect of vinegar-processed Euphorbia kansui].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Mei; Hui, Rong-Rong; He, Cui-Cui; Duan, Jin-Ao; Li, Jian-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Euphorbia kansui (EK) is a toxic herbal drug, and often used after vinegar-processing to reduce its toxicity. In present study, a 1H-NMR based metabonomic approach was used to evaluate the detoxification effect of vinegar-processed EK. The water extracts of EK and VEK were administered orally to male SD rats at doses of 9 g x kg(-1) x d(-1) for 1 week, respectively, and one more week observation was further conducted. The control group was orally given with saline. Histopathological studies of liver samples on the 8th and 15th day were conducted, and the metabolites of rat urine and liver were analysed by 1H-NMR. Histopathological studies of liver samples from EK and VEK treated rats showed no negative impacts. In metabonomic analyses of urines, changes of metabolites indicated liver damages, kidney lesions and imbalance of gut microbes in the second week. VEK-treated rats showed a quite lower toxicity compared with EK-treated ones. The present study revealed that the metabonomic approach might be helpful for the evaluation of toxicity of EK and detoxic effect of VEK. PMID:24761654

  19. LC-MS- and (1)H NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis and in Vitro Toxicological Assessment of 43 Aristolochia Species.

    PubMed

    Michl, Johanna; Kite, Geoffrey C; Wanke, Stefan; Zierau, Oliver; Vollmer, Guenter; Neinhuis, Christoph; Simmonds, Monique S J; Heinrich, Michael

    2016-01-22

    Species of Aristolochia are used as herbal medicines worldwide. They cause aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN), a devastating disease associated with kidney failure and renal cancer. Aristolochic acids I and II (1 and 2) are considered to be responsible for these nephrotoxic and carcinogenic effects. A wide range of other aristolochic acid analogues (AAAs) exist, and their implication in AAN may have been overlooked. An LC-MS- and (1)H NMR-based metabolomic analysis was carried out on 43 medicinally used Aristolochia species. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of 28 Aristolochia extracts were measured in human kidney (HK-2) cells. Compounds 1 and 2 were found to be the most common AAAs. However, AA IV (3), aristolactam I (4), and aristolactam BI (5) were also widespread. No correlation was found between the amounts of 1 or 2 and extract cytotoxicity against HK-2 cells. The genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of the extracts could be linked to their contents of 5, AA D (8), and AA IIIa (10). These results undermine the assumption that 1 and 2 are exclusively responsible for the toxicity of Aristolochia species. Other analogues are likely to contribute to their toxicity and need to be considered as nephrotoxic agents. These findings facilitate understanding of the nephrotoxic mechanisms of Aristolochia and have significance for the regulation of herbal medicines. PMID:26706944

  20. 1H NMR-Based Metabolomics Investigation of Copper-Laden Rat: A Model of Wilson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingjing; Jiang, Huaizhou; Li, Jinquan; Cheng, Kian-Kai; Dong, Jiyang; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Wilson’s disease (WD), also known as hepatoleticular degeneration (HLD), is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder of copper metabolism, which causes copper to accumulate in body tissues. In this study, rats fed with copper-laden diet are used to render the clinical manifestations of WD, and their copper toxicity-induced organ lesions are studied. To investigate metabolic behaviors of ‘decoppering’ process, penicillamine (PA) was used for treating copper-laden rats as this chelating agent could eliminate excess copper through the urine. To date, there has been limited metabolomics study on WD, while metabolic impacts of copper accumulation and PA administration have yet to be established. Materials and Methods A combination of 1HNMR spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis was applied to examine the metabolic profiles of the urine and blood serum samples collected from the copper-laden rat model of WD with PA treatment. Results Copper accumulation in the copper-laden rats is associated with increased lactate, creatinine, valine and leucine, as well as decreased levels of glucose and taurine in the blood serum. There were also significant changes in p-hydroxyphenylacetate (p-HPA), creatinine, alpha-ketoglutarate (α-KG), dimethylamine, N-acetylglutamate (NAG), N-acetylglycoprotein (NAC) in the urine of these rats. Notably, the changes in p-HPA, glucose, lactate, taurine, valine, leucine, and NAG were found reversed following PA treatment. Nevertheless, there were no changes for dimethylamine, α-KG, and NAC as a result of the treatment. Compared with the controls, the concentrations of hippurate, formate, alanine, and lactate were changed when PA was applied and this is probably due to its side effect. A tool named SMPDB (Small Molecule Pathway Database) is introduced to identify the metabolic pathway influenced by the copper-laden diet. Conclusion The study has shown the potential application of NMR-based metabolomic

  1. Analysis of Eisenia fetida earthworm responses to sub-lethal C60 nanoparticle exposure using (1)H-NMR based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Lankadurai, Brian P; Nagato, Edward G; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2015-10-01

    The enhanced production and environmental release of Buckminsterfullerene (C60) nanoparticles will likely increase the exposure and risk to soil dwelling organisms. We used (1)H NMR-based metabolomics to investigate the response of Eisenia fetida earthworms to sub-lethal C60 nanoparticle exposure in both contact and soil tests. Principal component analysis of (1)H NMR data showed clear separation between controls and exposed earthworms after just 2 days of exposure, however as exposure time increased the separation decreased in soil but increased in contact tests suggesting potential adaptation during soil exposure. The amino acids leucine, valine, isoleucine and phenylalanine, the nucleoside inosine, and the sugars glucose and maltose emerged as potential bioindicators of exposure to C60 nanoparticles. The significant responses observed in earthworms using NMR-based metabolomics after exposure to very low concentrations of C60 nanoparticles suggests the need for further investigations to better understand and predict their sub-lethal toxicity. PMID:26024814

  2. A 1H-NMR Based Study on Hemolymph Metabolomics in Eri Silkworm after Oral Administration of 1-Deoxynojirimycin

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ming-Jie; Lin, Xiao-Dong; Lin, Qiu-Ting; Wen, De-Fu; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Wang, Xian-Qin; Gao, Hong-Chang; Xu, Jia-Ping

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) modulates glycometabolism and has toxicity in Eri silkworm (Samia cynthia ricini, Saturniidae). In this paper, hemolymph metabolites were used to explore metabolic changes after oral administration of DNJ or mulberry latex and to characterize the biological function of DNJ at the metabolic and systemic levels. Hemolymph samples were collected from fourth-instar larvae of Eri silkworm and ex-vivo high-resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were acquired from the collected hemolymph samples. Then the obtained spectra were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and independent-samples t-test. Metabolic pattern recognition analysis of hemolymph samples indicated that the groups of 0.25% DNJ, latex, and the mixture of 0.5% DNJ and latex (1:1) were significantly different from the control group. Moreover, compared to the control group, the groups of 0.25% DNJ, latex, and the mixture of 0.5% DNJ and latex (1:1) showed the decreased levels of citrate, succinate, fumarate, malate, and glutamine in hemolymph, the groups of 0.25% DNJ and the mixture of 0.5% DNJ and latex (1:1) showed the increased levels of trehalose and lactate. In addition, mulberry leaves exude latex was highly toxic to Eri silkworm because rich unidentified high-molecular-weight factor (s) acted as toxic substances. In our results, latex caused 20 deaths among 50 fourth-instar larvae of Eri silkmoth, but DNJ or the mixture did not caused death. All these results suggest that DNJ has a positive impact on the reverse glycometabolism by modulating glycometabolism and inhibiting glucogenesis and energy metabolism. DNJ is a secure substance as a single-ingredient antidiabetic medicine due to its nontoxicity and bioactivity. PMID:26148185

  3. Geographical and climatic dependencies of green tea (Camellia sinensis) metabolites: a (1)H NMR-based metabolomics study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang-Eun; Lee, Bum-Jin; Chung, Jin-Oh; Hwang, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Sang-Jun; Lee, Cherl-Ho; Hong, Young-Shick

    2010-10-13

    The effects of climatic conditions on green tea metabolites in three different growing areas of Jeju Island, South Korea, were investigated through global metabolite profiling by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Pattern recognition methods, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection on latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), revealed clear discriminations of green teas from the three different growing areas. Variations of theanine, isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, threonine, glutamine, quinic acid, glucose, epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and caffeine levels were responsible for the discriminations. Green teas grown in an area with high temperature, long sun exposure time, and high rainfall had higher levels of theanine but lower levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, EC, EGC, EGCG, and caffeine than those grown in areas with relatively low temperature, short sun exposure time, and low rainfall. These results indicate that high temperature, long sun exposure, and high preciptation stimulate theanine synthesis in green tea during the spring season. This study highlights how metabolomics coupled with multivariate statistical analysis can illuminate the metabolic characteristics of green tea associated with climatic variables, thereby allowing for the assessment of quality strategy in green tea production. PMID:20828156

  4. 1H NMR-based metabolomics combined with HPLC-PDA-MS-SPE-NMR for investigation of standardized Ginkgo biloba preparations

    PubMed Central

    Agnolet, Sara; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W.; Verpoorte, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Commercial preparations of Ginkgo biloba are very complex mixtures prepared from raw leaf extracts by a series of extraction and prepurification steps. The pharmacological activity is attributed to a number of flavonoid glycosides and unique terpene trilactones (TTLs), with largely uncharacterized pharmacological profiles on targets involved in neurological disorders. It is therefore important to complement existing targeted analytical methods for analysis of Ginkgo biloba preparations with alternative technology platforms for their comprehensive and global characterization. In this work, 1H NMR-based metabolomics and hyphenation of high-performance liquid chromatography, photo-diode array detection, mass spectrometry, solid-phase extraction, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HPLC-PDA-MS-SPE-NMR) were used for investigation of 16 commercially available preparations of Ginkgo biloba. The standardized extracts originated from Denmark, Italy, Sweden, and United Kingdom, and the results show that 1H NMR spectra allow simultaneous assessment of the content as well as identity of flavonoid glycosides and TTLs based on a very simple sample-preparation procedure consisting of extraction, evaporation and reconstitution in acetone-d6. Unexpected or unwanted extract constituents were also easily identified in the 1H NMR spectra, which contrasts traditional methods that depend on UV absorption or MS ionizability and usually require availability of reference standards. Automated integration of 1H NMR spectral segments (buckets or bins of 0.02 ppm width) provides relative distribution plots of TTLs based on their H-12 resonances. The present study shows that 1H NMR-based metabolomics is an attractive method for non-selective and comprehensive analysis of Ginkgo extracts. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11306-009-0195-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20526353

  5. (1)H NMR-Based Metabolomics and Neurotoxicity Study of Cerebrum and Cerebellum in Rats Treated with Cinnabar, a Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lai; Xue, Rong; Zhang, Panpan; Wu, Yijie; Li, Xiaojing; Pei, Fengkui

    2015-08-01

    Cinnabar, an important traditional Chinese mineral medicine, has been widely used as a Chinese patent medicine ingredient for sedative therapy. Nevertheless, the neurotoxic effects of cinnabar have also been noted. In this study, (1)H NMR-based metabolomics, combined with multivariate pattern recognition, were applied to investigate the neurotoxic effects of cinnabar after intragastrical administration (dosed at 2 and 5 g/kg body weight) on male Wistar rats. The metabolite variations induced by cinnabar were characterized by increased levels of glutamate, glutamine, myo-inositol, and choline, as well as decreased levels of GABA, taurine, NAA, and NAAG in tissue extracts of the cerebellum and cerebrum. These findings suggested that cinnabar induced glutamate excitotoxicity, neuronal cell loss, osmotic state changes, membrane fluidity disruption, and oxidative injury in the brain. We also show here that there is a dose- and time-dependent neurotoxicity of cinnabar, and that cerebellum was more sensitive to cinnabar induction than cerebrum. This work illustrates the utility and reliability of (1)H NMR-based metabolomics approach for examining the potential neurotoxic effects of cinnabar and other traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:26110755

  6. Metabolic signatures of lung cancer in biofluids: NMR-based metabonomics of blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Cláudia M; Carrola, Joana; Barros, António S; Gil, Ana M; Goodfellow, Brian J; Carreira, Isabel M; Bernardo, João; Gomes, Ana; Sousa, Vitor; Carvalho, Lina; Duarte, Iola F

    2011-09-01

    In this work, the variations in the metabolic profile of blood plasma from lung cancer patients and healthy controls were investigated through NMR-based metabonomics, to assess the potential of this approach for lung cancer screening and diagnosis. PLS-DA modeling of CPMG spectra from plasma, subjected to Monte Carlo Cross Validation, allowed cancer patients to be discriminated from controls with sensitivity and specificity levels of about 90%. Relatively lower HDL and higher VLDL + LDL in the patients' plasma, together with increased lactate and pyruvate and decreased levels of glucose, citrate, formate, acetate, several amino acids (alanine, glutamine, histidine, tyrosine, valine), and methanol, could be detected. These changes were found to be present at initial disease stages and could be related to known cancer biochemical hallmarks, such as enhanced glycolysis, glutaminolysis, and gluconeogenesis, together with suppressed Krebs cycle and reduced lipid catabolism, thus supporting the hypothesis of a systemic metabolic signature for lung cancer. Despite the possible confounding influence of age, smoking habits, and other uncontrolled factors, these results indicate that NMR-based metabonomics of blood plasma can be useful as a screening tool to identify suspicious cases for subsequent, more specific radiological tests, thus contributing to improved disease management. PMID:21744875

  7. Distinct Metabolic Profile of Primary Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis Revealed by NMR-Based Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiming; Ren, Hong; Xie, Jingyuan; Shen, Pingyan; Lin, Donghai; Chen, Nan

    2013-01-01

    Background Primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is pathological entity which is characterized by idiopathic steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the majority of affected individuals. Currently, there is no practical noninvasive technique to predict different pathological types of glomerulopathies. In this study, the role of urinary metabolomics in the diagnosis and pathogenesis of FSGS was investigated. Methods NMR-based metabolomics was applied for the urinary metabolic profile in the patients with FSGS (n = 25), membranous nephropathy (MN, n = 24), minimal change disease (MCD, n = 14) and IgA nephropathy (IgAN, n = 26), and healthy controls (CON, n = 35). The acquired data were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) followed by orthogonal projections to latent structure discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). Model validity was verified using permutation tests. Results FSGS patients were clearly distinguished from healthy controls and other three types of glomerulopathies with good sensitivity and specificity based on their global urinary metabolic profiles. In FSGS patients, urinary levels of glucose, dimethylamine and trimethylamine increased compared with healthy controls, while pyruvate, valine, hippurate, isoleucine, phenylacetylglycine, citrate, tyrosine, 3-methylhistidine and β-hydroxyisovalerate decreased. Additionally, FSGS patients had lower urine N-methylnicotinamide levels compared with other glomerulopathies. Conclusions NMR-based metabonomic approach is amenable for the noninvasive diagnosis and differential diagnosis of FSGS as well as other glomerulopathies, and it could indicate the possible mechanisms of primary FSGS. PMID:24244321

  8. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics study on a goldfish model of Parkinson's disease induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP).

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaoguang; Wang, Junsong; Li, Minghui; Liu, Qingwang; Wei, Dandan; Yang, Minghua; Kong, Lingyi

    2014-11-01

    A goldfish (Carassius auratus) model of Parkinson's disease (PD) was constructed by a single dose of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) according to previously reported methods. Global metabolite changes in brain of the MPTP induced goldfish model of PD were investigated. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics combined with various statistical methods such as orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) and two-dimensional statistical total correlation spectroscopy (2D-STOCSY) found significant increase of leucine, isoleucine, valine, alanine, alanylalanine, creatinine, myo-inositol, 18:2 fatty acid, total fatty acids, arachic alcohol, taurine and significant decrease of N-acetylaspartate, (phospho)creatine, (phospho)choline, betaine, glutamine, 3-hexenedioate, acetamide, malonate, isocitrate, scyllo-inositol, phosphatidylcholines, cholesterols, n-3 fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in brain of MPTP induced PD goldfish. These disturbed metabolite levels were involved in oxidative stress, energy failure, neuronal cell injury and death, consistent with those observed in clinical PD patients, and rodents and primates model of PD, indicating that the acute MPTP model of goldfish was an ideal and valuable model for PD research. In addition, several unusual metabolites in brain were significantly changed between MPTP induced PD and control goldfish, which might also play an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. This study also demonstrated the applicability and potential of (1)H NMR-based metabolomics approach for evaluation of animal models of disease induced by chemicals, such as MPTP-induced PD goldfish. PMID:25242684

  9. "Omics" Prospective Monitoring of Bariatric Surgery: Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass Outcomes Using Mixed-Meal Tolerance Test and Time-Resolved (1)H NMR-Based Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Thiago I B; Geloneze, Bruno; Pareja, José C; Calixto, Antônio R; Ferreira, Márcia M C; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2016-07-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery goes beyond weight loss to induce early beneficial hormonal changes that favor glycemic control. In this prospective study, ten obese subjects diagnosed with type 2 diabetes underwent bariatric surgery. Mixed-meal tolerance test was performed before and 12 months after RYGB, and the outcomes were investigated by a time-resolved hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR)-based metabolomics. To the best of our knowledge, no previous omics-driven study has used time-resolved (1)H NMR-based metabolomics to investigate bariatric surgery outcomes. Our results presented here show a significant decrease in glucose levels after bariatric surgery (from 159.80 ± 61.43 to 100.00 ± 22.94 mg/dL), demonstrating type 2 diabetes remission (p < 0.05). The metabolic profile indicated lower levels of lactate, alanine, and branched chain amino acids for the operated subject at fasting state after the surgery. However, soon after food ingestion, the levels of these metabolites increased faster in operated than in nonoperated subjects. The lipoprotein profile achieved before and after RYGB at fasting was also significantly different, but converging 180 min after food ingestion. For example, the very low-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, N-acetyl-glycoproteins, and unsaturated lipid levels decreased after RYGB, while phosphatidylcholine and high-density lipoprotein increased. This study provides important insights on RYGB surgery and attendant type 2 diabetes outcomes using an "omics" systems science approach. Further research on metabolomic correlates of RYGB surgery in larger study samples is called for. PMID:27428253

  10. NMR based metabolomics reveals acute hippocampal metabolic fluctuations during cranial irradiation in murine model.

    PubMed

    Rana, Poonam; Gupta, Mamta; Khan, Ahmad Raza; Hemanth Kumar, B S; Roy, Raja; Khushu, Subash

    2014-07-01

    Cranial irradiation is widely used as a treatment modality or prophylactic treatment in cancer patients, but it is frequently related to neurocognitive impairment in cancer survivors. Though most of radiation-induced changes occur during early and late delayed phase of radiation sickness, recent reports have supported the evidence of impaired neurogenesis within 24-48 h of radiation exposure that may implicate changes in acute phase as well. Inspection of these acute changes could be considered important as they may have long lasting effect on cognitive development and functions. In the present study, (1)H NMR spectroscopy based metabolomic approach was used to obtain comprehensive information of hippocampus metabolic physiology during acute phase of radiation sickness in a mouse model for single dose 8 Gy cranial irradiation. The analysis demonstrated reduced metabolic activity in irradiated animals compared to controls, typically evident in citric acid cycle intermediates, glutamine/glutamate and ketone bodies metabolism thus providing strong indication that the hippocampus is metabolically responsive to radiation exposure. The data suggested reduced glucose utilization, altered intermediary and neurotransmitter metabolism in hippocampus tissue extract. To the best of our knowledge this is the first metabolomic study to document cranial irradiation induced acute metabolic changes using in vitro(1)H NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24787771

  11. High resolution 1H NMR-based metabolomics indicates a neurotransmitter cycling deficit in cerebral tissue from a mouse model of Batten disease.

    PubMed

    Pears, Michael R; Cooper, Jonathan D; Mitchison, Hannah M; Mortishire-Smith, Russell J; Pearce, David A; Griffin, Julian L

    2005-12-30

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) constitute a range of progressive neurological disorders primarily affecting children. Although six of the causative genes have been characterized, the underlying disease pathogenesis for this family of disorders is unknown. Using a metabolomics approach based on high resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy of the cortex, cerebellum, and remaining regions of the brain in conjunction with statistical pattern recognition, we report metabolic deficits associated with juvenile NCL in a Cln3 knock-out mouse model. Tissue from Cln3 null mutant mice aged 1-6 months was characterized by an increased glutamate concentration and a decrease in -amino butyric acid (GABA) concentration in aqueous extracts from the three regions of the brain. These changes are consistent with the reported altered expression of genes involved in glutamate metabolism in older mice and imply a change in neurotransmitter cycling between glutamate/glutamine and the production of GABA. Further variations in myo-inositol, creatine, and N-acetyl-aspartate were also identified. These metabolic changes were distinct from the normal aging/developmental process. Together, these changes represent the first documented pre-symptomatic symptoms of the Cln3 mouse at 1 month of age and demonstrate the versatility of 1H NMR spectroscopy as a tool for phenotyping mouse models of disease. PMID:16239221

  12. NMR-based metabonomic investigations into the metabolic profile of the senescence-accelerated mouse.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ning; Yan, Xianzhong; Zhou, Wenxia; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Hebing; Zhang, Yongxiang; Zhang, Xuemin

    2008-09-01

    In this work, metabonomic methods utilizing (1)H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate statistical technique have been applied to investigate the metabolic profiles of SAM. The serum metabolome of senescence-prone 8 (SAMP8), a murine model of age-related learning and memory deficits and Alzheimer's disease (AD), was compared with that of control, senescence-resistant 1 (SAMR1), which shows normal aging process. Serum samples were collected for study from both male and female 12-month-old SAMP8 and age matched SAMR1 ( n = 5). (1)H NMR spectra of serum were analyzed by pattern recognition using principal components analysis. The results showed that the serum metabolic patterns of SAMP8 and SAMR1 were significantly different due to strains and genders. Subtle differences in the endogenous metabolite profiles in serum between SAMP8 and SAMR1 were observed. The most important metabolite responsible for the strain separation was lack of inosine, which meant the protective function of anti-inflammation, immunomodulation and neuroprotection might be attenuated in SAMP8. Other differential metabolites observed between strains included decreased glucose, PUFA, choline, phosphocholine, HDL, LDL, D-3-hydoxybutyrate, citrate and pyruvate and increased lactate, SFA, alanine, methionine, glutamine and VLDL in serum of SAMP8 compared with those of SAMR1, suggesting perturbed glucose and lipid metabolisms in SAMP8. Besides the differences observed between the strains, an impact of gender on metabolism was also found. The females exhibited larger metabolic deviations than males and these gender differences in SAMP8 were much larger than in SAMR1. Higher levels of VLDL, lactate and amino acids and lower levels of HDL, LDL and unsaturated lipids were detected in female than in male SAMP8. These facts indicated that the metabolism disequilibrium in female and male SAMP8 was different and this may partly explain that females were more prone to AD than males. The results of this work may

  13. 1H NMR Metabolic Profiling of Biofluids from Rats with Gastric Mucosal Lesion and Electroacupuncture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingjing; Cheng, Kian-Kai; Yang, Zongbao; Wang, Chao; Shen, Guiping; Wang, Yadong; Liu, Qiong; Dong, Jiyang

    2015-01-01

    Gastric mucosal lesion (GML) is a common gastrointestinal disorder with multiple pathogenic mechanisms in clinical practice. In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), electroacupuncture (EA) treatment has been proven as an effective therapy for GML, although the underlying healing mechanism is not yet clear. Here, we used proton nuclear magnetic resonance- (1H NMR-) based metabolomic method to investigate the metabolic perturbation induced by GML and the therapeutic effect of EA treatment on stomach meridian (SM) acupoints. Clear metabolic differences were observed between GML and control groups, and related metabolic pathways were discussed by means of online metabolic network analysis toolbox. By comparing the endogenous metabolites from GML and GML-SM groups, the disturbed pathways were partly recovered towards healthy state via EA treated on SM acupoints. Further comparison of the metabolic variations induced by EA stimulated on SM and the control gallbladder meridian (GM) acupoints showed a quite similar metabolite composition except for increased phenylacetylglycine, 3,4-dihydroxymandelate, and meta-hydroxyphenylacetate and decreased N-methylnicotinamide in urine from rats with EA treated on SM acupoints. The current study showed the potential application of metabolomics in providing further insight into the molecular mechanism of acupuncture. PMID:26170882

  14. Metabolic characterization of natural and cultured Ophicordyceps sinensis from different origins by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianshuang; Zhong, Xin; Li, Shaosong; Zhang, Guren; Liu, Xin

    2015-11-10

    Ophicordyceps sinensis is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine and cultured mycelium is a substitute for wild O. sinensis. Metabolic profiles of wild O. sinensis from three geographical locations and cultivated mycelia derived from three origins were investigated using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis combined with multivariate statistical analysis. A total of 56 primary metabolites were identified and quantified from O. sinensis samples. The principle component analysis (PCA) showed significant differences between natural O. sinensis and fermentation mycelia. Seven metabolites responsible for differentiation were screened out by orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The concentrations of mannitol, trehalose, arginine, trans-4-hydroxyproline, alanine and glucitol were significantly different between wild and cultured groups. The variation in metabolic profiling among artificial mycelia was greater than that among wild O. sinensis. Furthermore, wild samples from different origins were clearly distinguished by the levels of mannitol, trehalose and some amino acids. This study indicates that (1)H NMR-based metabolomics is useful for fingerprinting and discriminating O. sinensis of different geographical regions and cultivated mycelia of different strains. The present study provided an efficient approach for investigating chemical compositions and evaluating the quality of medicine and health food derived from O. sinensis. PMID:26279370

  15. 1H-NMR-Based Metabolomic Study for Identifying Serum Profiles Associated with the Response to Etanercept in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Mariacristina; Scrivo, Rossana; Valesini, Guido; Manetti, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Objective A considerable proportion of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) do not have a satisfactory response to biological therapies. We investigated the use of metabolomics approach to identify biomarkers able to anticipate the response to biologics in RA patients. Methods Due to gender differences in metabolomic profiling, the analysis was restricted to female patients starting etanercept as the first biological treatment and having a minimum of six months’ follow-up. Each patient was evaluated by the same rheumatologist before and after six months of treatment. At this time, the clinical response (good, moderate, none) was determined according to the EUropean League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria, based on both erythrocyte sedimentation rate (EULAR-ESR) and C-reactive protein (EULAR-CRP). Sera collected prior and after six months of etanercept were analyzed by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with multivariate data analysis. Results Twenty-seven patients were enrolled: 18 had a good/moderate response and 9 were non responders according to both EULAR-ESR and EULAR-CRP after six months of etanercept. Metabolomic analysis at baseline was able to discriminate good, moderate, and non-responders with a very good predictivity (Q2 = 0.68) and an excellent sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy (100%). In good responders, we found an increase in isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, glutamine, tyrosine, and glucose levels and a decrease in 3-hydroxybutyrate levels after six months of treatment with etanercept with respect to baseline. Conclusion Our study confirms the potential of metabolomic analysis to predict the response to biological agents. Changes in metabolic profiles during treatment may help elucidate their mechanism of action. PMID:26558759

  16. A NMR-based, non-targeted multistep metabolic profiling revealed L-rhamnitol as a metabolite that characterised apples from different geographic origins.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Satoru; Nemoto, Tadashi; Matsuo, Yosuke; Shoji, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Fukuyo; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Ono, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Jun; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Sekiyama, Yasuyo

    2015-05-01

    This study utilises (1)H NMR-based metabolic profiling to characterise apples of five cultivars grown either in Japan (Fuji, Orin, and Jonagold) or New Zealand (Fuji, Jazz, and Envy). Principal component analysis (PCA) showed a clear separation between the Fuji-Orin-Jonagold class and the Jazz-Envy class, primarily corresponding to the differences in sugar signals, such as sucrose, glucose, and fructose. Multistep PCA removed the influence of dominant sugars and highlighted minor metabolites such as aspartic acid, 2-methylmalate, and an unidentified compound. These minor metabolites separated the apples into two classes according to different geographical areas. Subsequent partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) indicated the importance of the unidentified metabolite. This metabolite was isolated using charcoal chromatography, and was identified as L-rhamnitol by 2D NMR and LC/MS analyses. The remarkable contribution of L-rhamnitol to geographic discrimination suggests that apples may be characterised according to various factors, including storage duration, cultivation method, and climate. PMID:25529666

  17. Nutri-metabolomics: subtle serum metabolic differences in healthy subjects by NMR-based metabolomics after a short-term nutritional intervention with two tomato sauces.

    PubMed

    Bondia-Pons, Isabel; Cañellas, Nicolau; Abete, Itziar; Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Zulet, M Ángeles; Correig, Xavier; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2013-12-01

    Postgenomics research and development is witnessing novel intersections of omics data intensive technology and applications in health and personalized nutrition. Chief among these is the nascent field of nutri-metabolomics that harnesses metabolomics platforms to discern person-to-person variations in nutritional responses. To this end, differences in the origin and ripening stage of fruits might have a strong impact on their phytochemical composition, and consequently, on their potential nutri-metabolomics effects on health. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a 4-week cross-over nutritional intervention on the metabolic status of 24 young healthy subjects. The intervention was carried out with two tomato sauces differing in their natural lycopene content, which was achieved by using tomatoes harvested at different times. Blood samples were drawn from each subject before and after each intervention period. Aqueous and lipid extracts from serum samples were analyzed by 1H-NMR metabolic profiling combined with analysis of variance simultaneous component analysis (ASCA) and multilevel simultaneous component analysis (MSCA). These methods allowed the interpretation of the variation induced by the main factors of the study design (sauce treatment and time). The levels of creatine, creatinine, leucine, choline, methionine, and acetate in aqueous extracts were increased after the intervention with the high-lycopene content sauce, while those of ascorbic acid, lactate, pyruvate, isoleucine, alanine were increased after the normal-lycopene content sauce. In conclusion, NMR-based metabolomics of aqueous and lipid extracts allowed the detection of different metabolic changes after the nutritional intervention. This outcome might partly be due to the different ripening state of the fruits used in production of the tomato sauces. The findings presented herein collectively attest to the emergence of the field of nutri-metabolomics as a novel

  18. (1)H NMR-based metabolite profiling workflow to reduce inter-sample chemical shift variations in urine samples for improved biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Gil, Ryan B; Lehmann, Rainer; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Heinzmann, Silke S

    2016-07-01

    peaks with standard phosphate buffering and with in silico alignment. C citrate peak with additional potassium fluoride and standard phosphate buffering without in silico alignment. D citrate peaks with additional potassium fluoride and standard phosphate buffering with in silico alignment. Below the respective spectrum are displayed the percent relative standard deviation (RSD) of the respective citrate peaks. This is a measure of the positional noise of peaks within a (1)H NMR analysis. It can be seen that D performs the best in reducing positional noise of citrate peaks. E-H STOCSY analysis of correlating spectral features with the driver peak at 2.675 ppm (see red arrow) to identify structural correlations. As a, b, c, and d are known to be structurally correlated, STOCSY analysis should reveal r (2) = 1 if data is perfectly aligned and can therefore be used as a measure of peak alignment. E Strong positional noise does not allow identifying the c and d peaks of the AB system to be correlated. F, G Neither in silico alignment or KF addition alone can completely improve the alignment and therefore increase the correlations. H Highly improved alignment by combining both KF addition and in silico alignment reduces positional noise and elucidates all four citrate peaks to be strongly correlated. PMID:27178551

  19. 1H NMR-based metabonomic analysis of the serum and urine of rats following subchronic exposure to dichlorvos, deltamethrin, or a combination of these two pesticides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Ping; Liang, Yu-Jie; Sun, Ying-Jian; Chen, Jia-Xiang; Hou, Wei-Yuan; Long, Ding-Xin; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2013-05-25

    Metabonomic analysis, clinical chemical analysis and histopathology were used to investigate the toxic effects of subchronic exposure to dichlorvos, deltamethrin, and a combination of these two pesticides, in rats. Weight loss, hind limb weakness and histopathological changes in kidney tissue were only observed in rats exposed to high doses of deltamethrin, or a combination of deltamethrin and dichlorvos. Urinary metabonomic analysis indicated that exposure to a mixture of dichlorvos and deltamethrin was followed by increases in urinary lactate, dimethylamine, N-glycoprotein (NAC) and glycine similar to those observed in rats treated with either dichlorvos or deltamethrin alone. Serum metabonomic analysis suggests that dichlorvos induced an increase in lactate and alanine and a decrease in dimethylglycine (DMG), NAC and very low- and low-density lipoprotein (VLDL/LDL). High levels of lactate and low levels of NAC and VLDL/LDL were observed in the deltamethrin treatment group. Treating rats with a mixture of dichlorvos and deltamethrin caused an increase in serum lactate, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), choline and alanine, with the highest levels of these metabolites observed in those that received the highest dose. Exposure to a mixture of dichlorvos and deltamethrin also resulted in a decrease in serum acetone, DMG, NAC, and VLDL/LDL. Changes in serum TMAO, alanine, choline and acetone in this treatment group were higher than in rats treated with either dichlorvos or deltamethrin. These results suggest that exposing rats to subchronic doses of dichlorvos, deltamethrin, or a combination of these pesticides, disrupted the energy metabolism of the liver and reduced kidney function. PMID:23566885

  20. Metabolic profiling studies on the toxicological effects of realgar in rats by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Lai; Liao Peiqiu; Wu Huifeng; Li Xiaojing Pei Fengkui Li Weisheng; Wu Yijie

    2009-02-01

    The toxicological effects of realgar after intragastrical administration (1 g/kg body weight) were investigated over a 21 day period in male Wistar rats using metabonomic analysis of {sup 1}H NMR spectra of urine, serum and liver tissue aqueous extracts. Liver and kidney histopathology examination and serum clinical chemistry analyses were also performed. {sup 1}H NMR spectra and pattern recognition analyses from realgar treated animals showed increased excretion of urinary Kreb's cycle intermediates, increased levels of ketone bodies in urine and serum, and decreased levels of hepatic glucose and glycogen, as well as hypoglycemia and hyperlipoidemia, suggesting the perturbation of energy metabolism. Elevated levels of choline containing metabolites and betaine in serum and liver tissue aqueous extracts and increased serum creatine indicated altered transmethylation. Decreased urinary levels of trimethylamine-N-oxide, phenylacetylglycine and hippurate suggested the effects on the gut microflora environment by realgar. Signs of impairment of amino acid metabolism were supported by increased hepatic glutamate levels, increased methionine and decreased alanine levels in serum, and hypertaurinuria. The observed increase in glutathione in liver tissue aqueous extracts could be a biomarker of realgar induced oxidative injury. Serum clinical chemistry analyses showed increased levels of lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase as well as increased levels of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, indicating slight liver and kidney injury. The time-dependent biochemical variations induced by realgar were achieved using pattern recognition methods. This work illustrated the high reliability of NMR-based metabonomic approach on the study of the biochemical effects induced by traditional Chinese medicine.

  1. Individual Human Metabolic Phenotype Analyzed by (1)H NMR of Saliva Samples.

    PubMed

    Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Tenori, Leonardo; Mazzoleni, Antonio; Dieber-Rotheneder, Martina; Konrad, Manuela; Hofmann, Peter; Luchinat, Claudio; Turano, Paola; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    Saliva is an important physiological fluid that contains a complex mixture of analytes that may produce a characteristic individual signature. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that urine possesses a clear signature of the individual metabolic phenotype. Here NMR-based metabolomics was employed to analyze saliva from 23 healthy volunteers. About six saliva samples were collected daily from each individual for 10 consecutive days: 7 days in a real-life situation (days 1-7, Phase I) and 3 days (days 8-10, Phase II) under a standardized diet plus a physical exercise program at day 10. The result is the first demonstration of the existence of an individual metabolic phenotype in saliva. A systematic comparative analysis with urine samples from the same collection scheme demonstrates that the individual phenotype in saliva is slightly weaker than that in urine but less influenced by diet. PMID:27087681

  2. 1H NMR spectroscopy of serum reveals unique metabolic fingerprints associated with subtypes of surgically induced osteoarthritis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Maher, Anthony D; Coles, Chantal; White, Jason; Bateman, John F; Fuller, Emily S; Burkhardt, Dan; Little, Christopher B; Cake, Martin; Read, Richard; McDonagh, Matthew B; Rochfort, Simone Jane

    2012-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a highly prevalent joint disease. Its slow progressive nature and the correlation between pathological changes and clinical symptoms mean that OA is often well advanced by the time of diagnosis. In the absence of any specific pharmacological treatments, there is a pressing need to develop robust biomarkers for OA. We have adopted a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic strategy to identify molecular responses to surgically induced OA in an animal model. Sheep underwent one of three types of surgical procedure (sham (control), meniscal destabilization, MD or anterior cruciate ligament transaction, ACLT), and for every animal a serum sample was collected both pre- and postoperatively, thus, affording two types of "control" data for comparison. 1D 1H NMR spectra were acquired from each sample at 800 MHz and the digitized spectral data were analyzed using principal components analysis and partial least-squares regression discriminant analysis. Our approach, combined with the study design, allowed us to separate the metabolic responses to surgical intervention from those associated with OA. We were able to identify dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2) as being increased in MD after 4 weeks, while ACLT-induced OA exhibited increased 3-methylhistidine and decreased branched chain amino acids (BCAAs). The findings are discussed in the context of interpretation of metabolomic results in studies of human disease, and the selection of appropriate "control" data sets. PMID:22784358

  3. Metabolic Profiling and Classification of Propolis Samples from Southern Brazil: An NMR-Based Platform Coupled with Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Maraschin, Marcelo; Somensi-Zeggio, Amélia; Oliveira, Simone K; Kuhnen, Shirley; Tomazzoli, Maíra M; Raguzzoni, Josiane C; Zeri, Ana C M; Carreira, Rafael; Correia, Sara; Costa, Christopher; Rocha, Miguel

    2016-01-22

    The chemical composition of propolis is affected by environmental factors and harvest season, making it difficult to standardize its extracts for medicinal usage. By detecting a typical chemical profile associated with propolis from a specific production region or season, certain types of propolis may be used to obtain a specific pharmacological activity. In this study, propolis from three agroecological regions (plain, plateau, and highlands) from southern Brazil, collected over the four seasons of 2010, were investigated through a novel NMR-based metabolomics data analysis workflow. Chemometrics and machine learning algorithms (PLS-DA and RF), including methods to estimate variable importance in classification, were used in this study. The machine learning and feature selection methods permitted construction of models for propolis sample classification with high accuracy (>75%, reaching ∼90% in the best case), better discriminating samples regarding their collection seasons comparatively to the harvest regions. PLS-DA and RF allowed the identification of biomarkers for sample discrimination, expanding the set of discriminating features and adding relevant information for the identification of the class-determining metabolites. The NMR-based metabolomics analytical platform, coupled to bioinformatic tools, allowed characterization and classification of Brazilian propolis samples regarding the metabolite signature of important compounds, i.e., chemical fingerprint, harvest seasons, and production regions. PMID:26693586

  4. Serum metabolic signature of minimal hepatic encephalopathy by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Beatriz; Montoliu, Carmina; MacIntyre, David A; Serra, Miguel A; Wassel, Abdallah; Jover, María; Romero-Gomez, Manuel; Rodrigo, Jose M; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Felipo, Vicente

    2010-10-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) reduces quality of life of cirrhotic patients, predicts overt hepatic encephalopathy, and is associated with poor prognosis. We hypothesized that MHE arises once metabolic alterations derived from the liver reach a particular threshold. Our aim was to assess whether metabolic profiling of serum samples by high-field (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) and subsequent multivariate analyses would be useful to characterize metabolic perturbations associated with MHE and to identify potential metabolic biomarkers. Metabolic serum profiles from controls (n = 69) and cirrhotic patients without MHE (n = 62) and with MHE (n = 39) were acquired using high field NMR. Supervised modeling of the data provided perfect discrimination between healthy controls and cirrhotic patients and allowed the generation of a predictive model displaying strong discrimination between patients with and without MHE (R(2)Y = 0.68, Q(2)Y = 0.63). MHE patients displayed increased serum concentrations of glucose, lactate, methionine, TMAO, and glycerol, as well as decreased levels of choline, branch amino acids, alanine, glycine, acetoacetate, NAC, and lipid moieties. Serum metabonomics by (1)H NMR offers a useful approach for characterizing underlying metabolic differences between patients with and without MHE. This procedure shows great potential as a diagnostic tool of MHE as it objectively reflects measurable biochemical differences between the patient groups and may facilitate monitoring of both disease progression and effects of therapeutic treatments. PMID:20690770

  5. Simultaneous imaging of 13C metabolism and 1H structure: technical considerations and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeremy W; Fain, Sean B; Niles, David J; Ludwig, Kai D; Johnson, Kevin M; Peterson, Eric T

    2015-05-01

    Real-time imaging of (13)C metabolism in vivo has been enabled by recent advances in hyperpolarization. As a result of the inherently low natural abundance of endogenous (13)C nuclei, hyperpolarized (13)C images lack structural information that could be used to aid in motion detection and anatomical registration. Motion before or during the (13)C acquisition can therefore result in artifacts and misregistration that may obscure measures of metabolism. In this work, we demonstrate a method to simultaneously image both (1)H and (13)C nuclei using a dual-nucleus spectral-spatial radiofrequency excitation and a fully coincident readout for rapid multinuclear spectroscopic imaging. With the appropriate multinuclear hardware, and the means to simultaneously excite and receive on both channels, this technique is straightforward to implement requiring little to no increase in scan time. Phantom and in vivo experiments were performed with both Cartesian and spiral trajectories to validate and illustrate the utility of simultaneous acquisitions. Motion compensation of dynamic metabolic measurements acquired during free breathing was demonstrated using motion tracking derived from (1)H data. Simultaneous multinuclear imaging provides structural (1)H and metabolic (13)C images that are correlated both spatially and temporally, and are therefore amenable to joint (1)H and (13)C analysis and correction of structure-function images. PMID:25810146

  6. Identification of Metastasis-Associated Metabolic Profiles of Tumors by (1)H-HR-MAS-MRS.

    PubMed

    Gorad, Saurabh S; Ellingsen, Christine; Bathen, Tone F; Mathiesen, Berit S; Moestue, Siver A; Rofstad, Einar K

    2015-10-01

    Tumors develop an abnormal microenvironment during growth, and similar to the metastatic phenotype, the metabolic phenotype of cancer cells is tightly linked to characteristics of the tumor microenvironment (TME). In this study, we explored relationships between metabolic profile, metastatic propensity, and hypoxia in experimental tumors in an attempt to identify metastasis-associated metabolic profiles. Two human melanoma xenograft lines (A-07, R-18) showing different TMEs were used as cancer models. Metabolic profile was assessed by proton high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-HR-MAS-MRS). Tumor hypoxia was detected in immunostained histological preparations by using pimonidazole as a hypoxia marker. Twenty-four samples from 10 A-07 tumors and 28 samples from 10 R-18 tumors were analyzed. Metastasis was associated with hypoxia in both A-07 and R-18 tumors, and (1)H-HR-MAS-MRS discriminated between tissue samples with and tissue samples without hypoxic regions in both models, primarily because hypoxia was associated with high lactate resonance peaks in A-07 tumors and with low lactate resonance peaks in R-18 tumors. Similarly, metastatic and non-metastatic R-18 tumors showed significantly different metabolic profiles, but not metastatic and non-metastatic A-07 tumors, probably because some samples from the metastatic A-07 tumors were derived from tumor regions without hypoxic tissue. This study suggests that (1)H-HR-MAS-MRS may be a valuable tool for evaluating the role of hypoxia and lactate in tumor metastasis as well as for identification of metastasis-associated metabolic profiles. PMID:26585232

  7. Impact of Adenovirus infection in host cell metabolism evaluated by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Carina; P Teixeira, Ana; M Alves, Paula

    2016-08-10

    Adenovirus-based vectors are powerful vehicles for gene transfer applications in vaccination and gene therapy. Although highly exploited in the clinical setting, key aspects of the adenovirus biology are still not well understood, in particular the subversion of host cell metabolism during viral infection and replication. The aim of this work was to gain insights on the metabolism of two human cell lines (HEK293 and an amniocyte-derived cell line, 1G3) after infection with an adenovirus serotype 5 vector (AdV5). In order to profile metabolic alterations, we used (1)H-NMR spectroscopy, which allowed the quantification of 35 metabolites in cell culture supernatants with low sample preparation and in a relatively short time. Significant differences between both cell lines in non-infected cultures were identified, namely in glutamine and acetate metabolism, as well as by-product secretion. The main response to AdV5 infection was an increase in glucose consumption and lactate production rates. Moreover, cultures performed with or without glutamine supplementation confirmed the exhaustion of this amino acid as one of the main causes of lower AdV5 production at high cell densities (10- and 1.5-fold less specific yields in HEK293 and 1G3 cells, respectively), and highlighted different degrees of glutamine dependency of adenovirus replication in each cell line. The observed metabolic alterations associated with AdV5 infection and specificity of the host cell line can be useful for targeted bioprocess optimization. PMID:27215342

  8. Heteronuclear 19F-1H statistical total correlation spectroscopy as a tool in drug metabolism: study of flucloxacillin biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Keun, Hector C; Athersuch, Toby J; Beckonert, Olaf; Wang, Yulan; Saric, Jasmina; Shockcor, John P; Lindon, John C; Wilson, Ian D; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2008-02-15

    We present a novel application of the heteronuclear statistical total correlation spectroscopy (HET-STOCSY) approach utilizing statistical correlation between one-dimensional 19F/1H NMR spectroscopic data sets collected in parallel to study drug metabolism. Parallel one-dimensional (1D) 800 MHz 1H and 753 MHz 19F{1H} spectra (n = 21) were obtained on urine samples collected from volunteers (n = 6) at various intervals up to 24 h after oral dosing with 500 mg of flucloxacillin. A variety of statistical relationships between and within the spectroscopic datasets were explored without significant loss of the typically high 1D spectral resolution, generating 1H-1H STOCSY plots, and novel 19F-1H HET-STOCSY, 19F-19F STOCSY, and 19F-edited 1H-1H STOCSY (X-STOCSY) spectroscopic maps, with a resolution of approximately 0.8 Hz/pt for both nuclei. The efficient statistical editing provided by these methods readily allowed the collection of drug metabolic data and assisted structure elucidation. This approach is of general applicability for studying the metabolism of other fluorine-containing drugs, including important anticancer agents such as 5-fluorouracil and flutamide, and is extendable to any drug metabolism study where there is a spin-active X-nucleus (e.g., 13C, 15N, 31P) label present. PMID:18211034

  9. A 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach to evaluate the geographical authenticity of herbal medicine and its application in building a model effectively assessing the mixing proportion of intentional admixtures: A case study of Panax ginseng: Metabolomics for the authenticity of herbal medicine.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy Truong; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Choi, Young-Geun; Min, Jung-Eun; Yoon, Sang Jun; Yu, Yun-Hyun; Lim, Johan; Lee, Jeongmi; Kwon, Sung Won; Park, Jeong Hill

    2016-05-30

    Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng has long been the subject of adulteration, especially regarding its origins. Here, 60 ginseng samples from Korea and China initially displayed similar genetic makeup when investigated by DNA-based technique with 23 chloroplast intergenic space regions. Hence, (1)H NMR-based metabolomics with orthogonal projections on the latent structure-discrimination analysis (OPLS-DA) were applied and successfully distinguished between samples from two countries using seven primary metabolites as discrimination markers. Furthermore, to recreate adulteration in reality, 21 mixed samples of numerous Korea/China ratios were tested with the newly built OPLS-DA model. The results showed satisfactory separation according to the proportion of mixing. Finally, a procedure for assessing mixing proportion of intentionally blended samples that achieved good predictability (adjusted R(2)=0.8343) was constructed, thus verifying its promising application to quality control of herbal foods by pointing out the possible mixing ratio of falsified samples. PMID:26942336

  10. 1H NMR global metabolic phenotyping of acute pancreatitis in the emergency unit.

    PubMed

    Villaseñor, Alma; Kinross, James M; Li, Jia V; Penney, Nicholas; Barton, Richard H; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Darzi, Ara; Barbas, Coral; Holmes, Elaine

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the urinary and plasma metabolic phenotype of acute pancreatitis (AP) patients presenting to the emergency room at a single center London teaching hospital with acute abdominal pain using (1)H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate modeling. Patients were allocated to either the AP (n = 15) or non-AP patients group (all other causes of abdominal pain, n = 21) on the basis of the national guidelines. Patients were assessed for three clinical outcomes: (1) diagnosis of AP, (2) etiology of AP caused by alcohol consumption and cholelithiasis, and (3) AP severity based on the Glasgow score. Samples from AP patients were characterized by high levels of urinary ketone bodies, glucose, plasma choline and lipid, and relatively low levels of urinary hippurate, creatine and plasma-branched chain amino acids. AP could be reliably identified with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity (OPLS-DA model R(2) = 0.76 and Q(2)Y = 0.59) using panel of discriminatory biomarkers consisting of guanine, hippurate and creatine (urine), and valine, alanine and lipoproteins (plasma). Metabolic phenotyping was also able to distinguish between cholelithiasis and colonic inflammation among the heterogeneous non-AP group. This work has demonstrated that combinatorial biomarkers have a strong diagnostic and prognostic potential in AP with relevance to clinical decision making in the emergency unit. PMID:25160714

  11. The Serum Metabolite Response to Diet Intervention with Probiotic Acidified Milk in Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients Is Indistinguishable from that of Non-Probiotic Acidified Milk by 1H NMR-Based Metabonomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Simon M. M.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Andersen, Henrik J.; Olsson, Johan; Simrén, Magnus; Öhman, Lena; Svensson, Ulla; Malmendal, Anders; Bertram, Hanne C.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a probiotic acidified milk product on the blood serum metabolite profile of patients suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) compared to a non-probiotic acidified milk product was investigated using 1H NMR metabonomics. For eight weeks, IBS patients consumed 0.4 L per day of a probiotic fermented milk product or non-probiotic acidified milk. Both diets resulted in elevated levels of blood serum L-lactate and 3-hydroxybutyrate. Our results showed identical effects of acidified milk consumption independent of probiotic addition. A similar result was previously obtained in a questionnaire-based evaluation of symptom relief. A specific probiotic effect is thus absent both in the patient subjective symptom evaluations and at the blood serum metabolite level. However, there was no correspondence between symptom relief and metabolite response on the patient level. PMID:22254002

  12. Evaluation of 1H NMR metabolic profiling using biofluid mixture design.

    PubMed

    Athersuch, Toby J; Malik, Shahid; Weljie, Aalim; Newton, Jack; Keun, Hector C

    2013-07-16

    A strategy for evaluating the performance of quantitative spectral analysis tools in conditions that better approximate background variation in a metabonomics experiment is presented. Three different urine samples were mixed in known proportions according to a {3, 3} simplex lattice experimental design and analyzed in triplicate by 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Fifty-four urinary metabolites were subsequently quantified from the sample spectra using two methods common in metabolic profiling studies: (1) targeted spectral fitting and (2) targeted spectral integration. Multivariate analysis using partial least-squares (PLS) regression showed the latent structure of the spectral set recapitulated the experimental mixture design. The goodness-of-prediction statistic (Q(2)) of each metabolite variable in a PLS model was calculated as a metric for the reliability of measurement, across the sample compositional space. Several metabolites were observed to have low Q(2) values, largely as a consequence of their spectral resonances having low s/n or strong overlap with other sample components. This strategy has the potential to allow evaluation of spectral features obtained from metabolic profiling platforms in the context of the compositional background found in real biological sample sets, which may be subject to considerable variation. We suggest that it be incorporated into metabolic profiling studies to improve the estimation of matrix effects that confound accurate metabolite measurement. This novel method provides a rational basis for exploiting information from several samples in an efficient manner and avoids the use of multiple spike-in authentic standards, which may be difficult to obtain. PMID:23730812

  13. Untargeted NMR-based methodology in the study of fruit metabolites.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Anatoly Petrovich; Mannina, Luisa; Proietti, Noemi; Carradori, Simone; Daglia, Maria; Giusti, Anna Maria; Antiochia, Riccarda; Capitani, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    In this review, fundamental aspects of the untargeted NMR-based methodology applied to fruit characterization are described. The strategy to perform the structure elucidation of fruit metabolites is discussed with some examples of spectral assignments by 2D experiments. Primary ubiquitous metabolites as well as secondary species-specific metabolites, identified in different fruits using an untargeted 1H-NMR approach, are summarized in a comprehensive way. Crucial aspects regarding the quantitative elaboration of spectral data are also discussed. The usefulness of the NMR-based metabolic profiling was highlighted using some results regarding quality, adulteration, varieties and geographical origin of fruits and fruit-derived products such as juices. PMID:25749679

  14. Intermolecular interaction of voriconazole analogues with model membrane by DSC and NMR, and their antifungal activity using NMR based metabolic profiling.

    PubMed

    Kalamkar, Vaibhav; Joshi, Mamata; Borkar, Varsha; Srivastava, Sudha; Kanyalkar, Meena

    2013-11-01

    The development of novel antifungal agents with high susceptibility and increased potency can be achieved by increasing their overall lipophilicity. To enhance the lipophilicity of voriconazole, a second generation azole antifungal agent, we have synthesized its carboxylic acid ester analogues, namely p-methoxybenzoate (Vpmb), toluate (Vtol), benzoate (Vbz) and p-nitrobenzoate (Vpnb). The intermolecular interactions of these analogues with model membrane have been investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) techniques. The results indicate varying degree of changes in the membrane bilayer's structural architecture and physico-chemical characteristics which possibly can be correlated with the antifungal effects via fungal membrane. Rapid metabolite profiling of chemical entities using cell preparations is one of the most important steps in drug discovery. We have evaluated the effect of synthesized analogues on Candida albicans. The method involves real time (1)H NMR measurement of intact cells monitoring NMR signals from fungal metabolites which gives Metabolic End Point (MEP). This is then compared with Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) determined using conventional methods. Results indicate that one of the synthesized analogues, Vpmb shows reasonably good activity. PMID:24012381

  15. Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse Stomach Measured by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, M; Wang, Xiliang

    2014-12-05

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes with high capability of invasion and rapid metastasis to other organs. Malignant melanoma is the most common metastatic malignancy found in gastrointestinal tract (GI). To the best of our knowledge, previous studies of melanoma in gastrointestinal tract are all clinical case reports. In this work, 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is used to investigate the metabolite profiles differences of stomach tissue extracts of metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse and search for specific metabolite biomarker candidates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonalmore » Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to evaluate important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Both PCA and OPLS results reveal that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. Among the 50 identified metabolites, it is found that the concentrations of 19 metabolites are statistically and significantly changed with the levels of O-phosphocholine and hypoxanthine down-regulated while the levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, isobutyrate, threonine, cadaverine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, methionine, citrate, asparagine, tryptophan, glycine, serine, uracil, and formate up-regulated in the melanoma group. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in stomach.« less

  16. Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse Stomach Measured by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M; Wang, Xiliang

    2014-12-05

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes with high capability of invasion and rapid metastasis to other organs. Malignant melanoma is the most common metastatic malignancy found in gastrointestinal tract (GI). To the best of our knowledge, previous studies of melanoma in gastrointestinal tract are all clinical case reports. In this work, 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is used to investigate the metabolite profiles differences of stomach tissue extracts of metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse and search for specific metabolite biomarker candidates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to evaluate important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Both PCA and OPLS results reveal that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. Among the 50 identified metabolites, it is found that the concentrations of 19 metabolites are statistically and significantly changed with the levels of O-phosphocholine and hypoxanthine down-regulated while the levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, isobutyrate, threonine, cadaverine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, methionine, citrate, asparagine, tryptophan, glycine, serine, uracil, and formate up-regulated in the melanoma group. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in stomach.

  17. Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse Stomach Measured by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Hu, M; Liu, M; Hu, JZ

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes with high capability of invasion and rapid metastasis to other organs. Malignant melanoma is the most common metastatic malignancy found in Gastrointestinal Tract (GI). In this work, the 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is used to investigate the metabolite profile differences of stomach tissue extracts of metastatic B16-F10 melanoma and control groups in C57BL/6J mouse and to search for specific metabolite biomarker candidates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to evaluate important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Both PCA and OPLS results reveal that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. Among the 50 identified metabolites, it is found that the concentrations of 19 metabolites are significantly changed with the levels of O-phosphocholine and hypoxanthine down-regulated while the levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, isobutyrate, threonine, cadaverine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, methionine, citrate, asparagine, tryptophan, glycine, serine, uracil, and formate up-regulated in the melanoma group. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in stomach. PMID:26246958

  18. 1H NMR Metabolic Fingerprinting to Probe Temporal Postharvest Changes on Qualitative Attributes and Phytochemical Profile of Sweet Cherry Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Goulas, Vlasios; Minas, Ioannis S.; Kourdoulas, Panayiotis M.; Lazaridou, Athina; Molassiotis, Athanassios N.; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P.; Manganaris, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Sweet cherry fruits (Prunus avium cvs. ‘Canada Giant’, ‘Ferrovia’) were harvested at commercial maturity stage and analyzed at harvest and after maintenance at room temperature (storage at ∼20°C, shelf life) for 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 days, respectively. Fruit were initially analyzed for respiration rate, qualitative attributes and textural properties: ‘Canada Giant’ fruit were characterized by higher weight losses and stem browning index, being more intense over the late stages of shelf life period; meanwhile ‘Ferrovia’ possessed appreciably better performance even after extended shelf life period. A gradual decrease of respiration rate was monitored in both cultivars, culminated after 8 days at 20°C. The sweet cherry fruit nutraceutical profile was monitored using an array of instrumental techniques (spectrophotometric assays, HPLC, 1H-NMR). Fruit antioxidant capacity was enhanced with the progress of shelf life period, concomitant with the increased levels of total anthocyanin and of phenolic compounds. ‘Ferrovia’ fruit presented higher contents of neochlorogenic acid and p-coumaroylquinic acid throughout the shelf life period. We further developed an 1H-NMR method that allows the study of primary and secondary metabolites in a single running, without previous separation and isolation procedures. Diagnostic peaks were located in the aliphatic region for sugars and organic acids, in the aromatic region for phenolic compounds and at 8.2–8.6 ppm for anthocyanins. This NMR-based methodology provides a unifying tool for quantitative and qualitative characterization of metabolite changes of sweet cherry fruits; it is also expected to be further exploited for monitoring temporal changes in other fleshy fruits. PMID:26617616

  19. (1)H NMR Metabolic Fingerprinting to Probe Temporal Postharvest Changes on Qualitative Attributes and Phytochemical Profile of Sweet Cherry Fruit.

    PubMed

    Goulas, Vlasios; Minas, Ioannis S; Kourdoulas, Panayiotis M; Lazaridou, Athina; Molassiotis, Athanassios N; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P; Manganaris, George A

    2015-01-01

    Sweet cherry fruits (Prunus avium cvs. 'Canada Giant', 'Ferrovia') were harvested at commercial maturity stage and analyzed at harvest and after maintenance at room temperature (storage at ∼20°C, shelf life) for 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 days, respectively. Fruit were initially analyzed for respiration rate, qualitative attributes and textural properties: 'Canada Giant' fruit were characterized by higher weight losses and stem browning index, being more intense over the late stages of shelf life period; meanwhile 'Ferrovia' possessed appreciably better performance even after extended shelf life period. A gradual decrease of respiration rate was monitored in both cultivars, culminated after 8 days at 20°C. The sweet cherry fruit nutraceutical profile was monitored using an array of instrumental techniques (spectrophotometric assays, HPLC, (1)H-NMR). Fruit antioxidant capacity was enhanced with the progress of shelf life period, concomitant with the increased levels of total anthocyanin and of phenolic compounds. 'Ferrovia' fruit presented higher contents of neochlorogenic acid and p-coumaroylquinic acid throughout the shelf life period. We further developed an (1)H-NMR method that allows the study of primary and secondary metabolites in a single running, without previous separation and isolation procedures. Diagnostic peaks were located in the aliphatic region for sugars and organic acids, in the aromatic region for phenolic compounds and at 8.2-8.6 ppm for anthocyanins. This NMR-based methodology provides a unifying tool for quantitative and qualitative characterization of metabolite changes of sweet cherry fruits; it is also expected to be further exploited for monitoring temporal changes in other fleshy fruits. PMID:26617616

  20. Icariin reverses corticosterone-induced depression-like behavior, decrease in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and metabolic network disturbances revealed by NMR-based metabonomics in rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Meng-Juan; Han, Bin; Wang, Shu-mei; Liang, Sheng-wang; Zou, Zhong-jie

    2016-05-10

    Previously published reports have revealed the antidepressant-like effects of icariin in a chronic mild stress model of depression and in a social defeat stress model in mice. However, the therapeutic effect of icariin in an animal model of glucocorticoid-induced depression remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate antidepressant-like effect and the possible mechanisms of icariin in a rat model of corticosterone (CORT)-induced depression by using a combination of behavioral and biochemical assessments and NMR-based metabonomics. The depression model was established by subcutaneous injections of CORT for 21 consecutive days in rats, as evidenced by reduced sucrose intake and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, together with an increase in immobility time in a forced swim test (FST). Icariin significantly increased sucrose intake and hippocampal BDNF level and decreased the immobility time in FST in CORT-induced depressive rats, suggesting its potent antidepressant activity. Moreover, metabonomic analysis identified eight, five and three potential biomarkers associated with depression in serum, urine and brain tissue extract, respectively. These biomarkers are primarily involved in energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism and gut microbe metabolism. Icariin reversed the pathological process of CORT-induced depression, partially via regulation of the disturbed metabolic pathways. These results provide important mechanistic insights into the protective effects of icariin against CORT-induced depression and metabolic dysfunction. PMID:26874256

  1. (1) H NMR metabolomics analysis of renal cell carcinoma cells: Effect of VHL inactivation on metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Cormier, Kevin; Touaibia, Mohamed; Reyjal, Julie; Robichaud, Sarah; Belbraouet, Mehdi; Turcotte, Sandra

    2016-05-15

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is an onco-suppressor involved in oxygen and energy-dependent promotion of protein ubiquitination and proteosomal degradation. Loss of function mutations of VHL (VHL-cells) result in organ specific cancers with the best studied example in renal cell carcinomas. VHL has a well-established role in deactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) and in regulation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR activity. Cell culture metabolomics analysis was utilized to determined effect of VHL and HIF-1α or HIF-2α on metabolism of renal cell carcinomas (RCC). RCC cells were stably transfected with VHL or shRNA designed to silence HIF-1α or HIF-2α genes. Obtained metabolic data was analysed qualitatively, searching for overall effects on metabolism as well as quantitatively, using methods developed in our group in order to determine specific metabolic changes. Analysis of the effect of VHL and HIF silencing on cellular metabolic footprints and fingerprints provided information about the metabolic pathways affected by VHL through HIF function as well as independently of HIF. Through correlation network analysis as well as statistical analysis of significant metabolic changes we have determined effects of VHL and HIF on energy production, amino acid metabolism, choline metabolism as well as cell regulation and signaling. VHL was shown to influence cellular metabolism through its effect on HIF proteins as well as by affecting activity of other factors. PMID:26620126

  2. Identification of Metastasis-Associated Metabolic Profiles of Tumors by 1H-HR-MAS-MRS123

    PubMed Central

    Gorad, Saurabh S.; Ellingsen, Christine; Bathen, Tone F.; Mathiesen, Berit S.; Moestue, Siver A.; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2015-01-01

    Tumors develop an abnormal microenvironment during growth, and similar to the metastatic phenotype, the metabolic phenotype of cancer cells is tightly linked to characteristics of the tumor microenvironment (TME). In this study, we explored relationships between metabolic profile, metastatic propensity, and hypoxia in experimental tumors in an attempt to identify metastasis-associated metabolic profiles. Two human melanoma xenograft lines (A-07, R-18) showing different TMEs were used as cancer models. Metabolic profile was assessed by proton high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-HR-MAS-MRS). Tumor hypoxia was detected in immunostained histological preparations by using pimonidazole as a hypoxia marker. Twenty-four samples from 10 A-07 tumors and 28 samples from 10 R-18 tumors were analyzed. Metastasis was associated with hypoxia in both A-07 and R-18 tumors, and 1H-HR-MAS-MRS discriminated between tissue samples with and tissue samples without hypoxic regions in both models, primarily because hypoxia was associated with high lactate resonance peaks in A-07 tumors and with low lactate resonance peaks in R-18 tumors. Similarly, metastatic and non-metastatic R-18 tumors showed significantly different metabolic profiles, but not metastatic and non-metastatic A-07 tumors, probably because some samples from the metastatic A-07 tumors were derived from tumor regions without hypoxic tissue. This study suggests that 1H-HR-MAS-MRS may be a valuable tool for evaluating the role of hypoxia and lactate in tumor metastasis as well as for identification of metastasis-associated metabolic profiles. PMID:26585232

  3. Investigation of relative metabolic changes in the organs and plasma of rats exposed to X-ray radiation using HR-MAS (1) H NMR and solution (1) H NMR.

    PubMed

    Jang, Won Gyo; Park, Ju Yeon; Lee, Jueun; Bang, Eunjung; Kim, So Ra; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Yun, Hyun Jin; Kang, Chang-Mo; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2016-04-01

    Excess exposure to ionizing radiation generates reactive oxygen species and increases the cellular inflammatory response by modifying various metabolic pathways. However, an investigation of metabolic perturbations and organ-specific responses based on the amount of radiation during the acute phase has not been conducted. In this study, high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HR-MAS) NMR and solution NMR-based metabolic profiling were used to investigate dose-dependent metabolic changes in multiple organs and tissues - including the jejunum, spleen, liver, and plasma - of rats exposed to X-ray radiation. The organs, tissues, and blood samples were obtained 24, 48, and 72 h after exposure to low-dose (2 Gy) and high-dose (6 Gy) X-ray radiation and subjected to metabolite profiling and multivariate analyses. The results showed the time course of the metabolic responses, and many significant changes were detected in the high-dose compared with the low-dose group. Metabolites with antioxidant properties showed acute responses in the jejunum and spleen after radiation exposure. The levels of metabolites related to lipid and protein metabolism were decreased in the jejunum. In addition, amino acid levels increased consistently at all post-irradiation time points as a consequence of activated protein breakdown. Consistent with these changes, plasma levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate metabolites decreased. The liver did not appear to undergo remarkable metabolic changes after radiation exposure. These results may provide insight into the major metabolic perturbations and mechanisms of the biological systems in response to pathophysiological damage caused by X-ray radiation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26871685

  4. Investigating brain metabolism at high fields using localized 13C NMR spectroscopy without 1H decoupling.

    PubMed

    Deelchand, Dinesh Kumar; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2006-02-01

    Most in vivo 13C NMR spectroscopy studies in the brain have been performed using 1H decoupling during acquisition. Decoupling imposes significant constraints on the experimental setup (particularly for human studies at high magnetic field) in order to stay within safety limits for power deposition. We show here that incorporation of the 13C label from 13C-labeled glucose into brain amino acids can be monitored accurately using localized 13C NMR spectroscopy without the application of 1H decoupling. Using LCModel quantification with prior knowledge of one-bond and multiple-bond J(CH) coupling constants, the uncertainty on metabolites concentrations was only 35% to 91% higher (depending on the carbon resonance of interest) in undecoupled spectra compared to decoupled spectra in the rat brain at 9.4 Tesla. Although less sensitive, 13C NMR without decoupling dramatically reduces experimental constraints on coil setup and pulse sequence design required to keep power deposition within safety guidelines. This opens the prospect of safely measuring 13C NMR spectra in humans at varied brain locations (not only the occipital lobe) and at very high magnetic fields above 4 Tesla. PMID:16345037

  5. Zebrafish as a Model for Systems Medicine R&D: Rethinking the Metabolic Effects of Carrier Solvents and Culture Buffers Determined by (1)H NMR Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad T; Mushtaq, Mian Y; Verpoorte, Robert; Richardson, Michael K; Choi, Young H

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish is a frequently employed model organism in systems medicine and biomarker discovery. A crosscutting fundamental question, and one that has been overlooked in the field, is the "system-wide" (omics) effects induced in zebrafish by metabolic solvents and culture buffers. Indeed, any bioactivity or toxicity test requires that the target compounds are dissolved in an appropriate nonpolar solvent or aqueous media. It is important to know whether the solvent or the buffer itself has an effect on the zebrafish model organism. We evaluated the effects of two organic carrier solvents used in research with zebrafish, as well as in drug screening: dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol, and two commonly used aqueous buffers (egg water and Hank's balanced salt solution). The effects of three concentrations (0.01, 0.1, and 1%) of DMSO and ethanol were tested in the 5-day-old zebrafish embryo using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) based metabolomics. DMSO (1% and 0.1%, but not 0.01%) exposure significantly decreased the levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), betaine, alanine, histidine, lactate, acetate, and creatine (p < 0.05). By contrast, ethanol exposure did not alter the embryos' metabolome at any concentration tested. The two different aqueous media noted above impacted the zebrafish embryo metabolome as evidenced by changes in valine, alanine, lactate, acetate, betaine, glycine, glutamate, adenosine triphosphate, and histidine. These results show that DMSO has greater effects on the embryo metabolome than ethanol, and thus is used with caution as a carrier solvent in zebrafish biomarker research and oral medicine. Moreover, the DMSO concentration should not be higher than 0.01%. Careful attention is also warranted for the use of the buffers egg water and Hank's balanced salt solution in zebrafish. In conclusion, as zebrafish is widely used as a model organism in life sciences, metabolome changes induced by solvents and culture buffers warrant further

  6. 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Plasma Metabolic Profiling of Dairy Cows with Fatty Liver

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chuang; Sun, Ling-wei; Xia, Cheng; Zhang, Hong-you; Zheng, Jia-san; Wang, Jun-song

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver is a common metabolic disorder of dairy cows during the transition period. Historically, the diagnosis of fatty liver has involved liver biopsy, biochemical or histological examination of liver specimens, and ultrasonographic imaging of the liver. However, more convenient and noninvasive methods would be beneficial for the diagnosis of fatty liver in dairy cows. The plasma metabolic profiles of dairy cows with fatty liver and normal (control) cows were investigated to identify new biomarkers using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance. Compared with the control group, the primary differences in the fatty liver group included increases in β-hydroxybutyric acid, acetone, glycine, valine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, citrulline, and isobutyrate, and decreases in alanine, asparagine, glucose, γ-aminobutyric acid glycerol, and creatinine. This analysis revealed a global profile of endogenous metabolites, which may present potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of fatty liver in dairy cows. PMID:26732447

  7. (1)H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Plasma Metabolic Profiling of Dairy Cows with Fatty Liver.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuang; Sun, Ling-Wei; Xia, Cheng; Zhang, Hong-You; Zheng, Jia-San; Wang, Jun-Song

    2016-02-01

    Fatty liver is a common metabolic disorder of dairy cows during the transition period. Historically, the diagnosis of fatty liver has involved liver biopsy, biochemical or histological examination of liver specimens, and ultrasonographic imaging of the liver. However, more convenient and noninvasive methods would be beneficial for the diagnosis of fatty liver in dairy cows. The plasma metabolic profiles of dairy cows with fatty liver and normal (control) cows were investigated to identify new biomarkers using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance. Compared with the control group, the primary differences in the fatty liver group included increases in β-hydroxybutyric acid, acetone, glycine, valine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, citrulline, and isobutyrate, and decreases in alanine, asparagine, glucose, γ-aminobutyric acid glycerol, and creatinine. This analysis revealed a global profile of endogenous metabolites, which may present potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of fatty liver in dairy cows. PMID:26732447

  8. Metabolic fingerprinting of Leontopodium species (Asteraceae) by means of 1H NMR and HPLC–ESI-MS

    PubMed Central

    Safer, Stefan; Cicek, Serhat S.; Pieri, Valerio; Schwaiger, Stefan; Schneider, Peter; Wissemann, Volker; Stuppner, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    The genus Leontopodium, mainly distributed in Central and Eastern Asia, consists of ca. 34–58 different species. The European Leontopodium alpinum, commonly known as Edelweiss, has a long tradition in folk medicine. Recent research has resulted in the identification of prior unknown secondary metabolites, some of them with interesting biological activities. Despite this, nearly nothing is known about the Asian species of the genus. In this study, we applied proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) metabolic fingerprinting to reveal insights into the metabolic patterns of 11 different Leontopodium species, and to conclude on their taxonomic relationship. Principal component analysis (PCA) of 1H NMR fingerprints revealed two species groups. Discriminators for these groups were identified as fatty acids and sucrose for group A, and ent-kaurenoic acid and derivatives thereof for group B. Five diterpenes together with one sesquiterpene were isolated from Leontopodium franchetii roots; the compounds were described for the first time for L. franchetii: ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid, methyl-15α-angeloyloxy-ent-kaur-16-en-19-oate, methyl-ent-kaur-16-en-19-oate, 8-acetoxymodhephene, 19-acetoxy-ent-kaur-16-ene, methyl-15β–angeloyloxy-16,17-epoxy-ent-kauran-19-oate. In addition, differences in the metabolic profile between collected and cultivated species could be observed using a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). PCA of the LC–MS fingerprints revealed three groups. Discriminating signals were compared to literature data and identified as two bisabolane derivatives responsible for discrimination of group A and C, and one ent-kaurenoic acid derivative, discriminating group B. A taxonomic relationship between a previously unidentified species and L. franchetii and Leontopodium sinense could be determined by comparing NMR fingerprints. This finding supports recent molecular data

  9. Metabolic Effects of a 24-Week Energy-Restricted Intervention Combined with Low or High Dairy Intake in Overweight Women: An NMR-Based Metabolomics Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Lorenzen, Janne K.; Astrup, Arne; Larsen, Lesli H.; Yde, Christian C.; Clausen, Morten R.; Bertram, Hanne Christine

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of a 24-week energy-restricted intervention with low or high dairy intake (LD or HD) on the metabolic profiles of urine, blood and feces in overweight/obese women by NMR spectroscopy combined with ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA). A significant effect of dairy intake was found on the urine metabolome. HD intake increased urinary citrate, creatinine and urea excretion, and decreased urinary excretion of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and hippurate relative to the LD intake, suggesting that HD intake was associated with alterations in protein catabolism, energy metabolism and gut microbial activity. In addition, a significant time effect on the blood metabolome was attributed to a decrease in blood lipid and lipoprotein levels due to the energy restriction. For the fecal metabolome, a trend for a diet effect was found and a series of metabolites, such as acetate, butyrate, propionate, malonate, cholesterol and glycerol tended to be affected. Overall, even though these effects were not accompanied by a higher weight loss, the present metabolomics data reveal that a high dairy intake is associated with endogenous metabolic effects and effects on gut microbial activity that potentially impact body weight regulation and health. Moreover, ASCA has a great potential for exploring the effect of intervention factors and identifying altered metabolites in a multi-factorial metabolomic study. PMID:26907339

  10. 1H-NMR Spectroscopy Revealed Mycobacterium tuberculosis Caused Abnormal Serum Metabolic Profile of Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xuekai; Hu, Xidan; Huang, Jiong; Xu, Zhiguang; Zhang, Xiansong; Hu, Changmin; Hu, Xueying; Guo, Aizhen; Wang, Yulan; Chen, Huanchun

    2013-01-01

    To re-evaluate virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) in cattle, we experimentally infected calves with M. tb andMycobacterium bovisvia intratracheal injection at a dose of 2.0×107 CFU and observed the animals for 33 weeks. The intradermal tuberculin test and IFN-γin vitro release assay showed that both M. tb and M. bovis induced similar responses. Immunohistochemical staining of pulmonary lymph nodes indicated that the antigen MPB83 of both M. tb and M. bovis were similarly distributed in the tissue samples. Histological examinations showed all of the infected groups exhibited neutrophil infiltration to similar extents. Although the infected cattle did not develop granulomatous inflammation, the metabolic profiles changed significantly, which were characterized by a change in energy production pathways and increased concentrations of N-acetyl glycoproteins. Glycolysis was induced in the infected cattle by decreased glucose and increased lactate content, and enhanced fatty acid β-oxidation was induced by decreased TG content, and decreased gluconeogenesis indicated by the decreased concentration of glucogenic and ketogenic amino acids promoted utilization of substances other than glucose as energy sources. In addition, an increase in acute phase reactive serum glycoproteins, together with neutrophil infiltration and increased of IL-1β production indicated an early inflammatory response before granuloma formation. In conclusion, this study indicated that both M. tb and M.bovis were virulent to cattle. Therefore, it is likely that cattle with M. tb infections would be critical to tuberculosis transmission from cattle to humans. Nuclear magnetic resonance was demonstrated to be an efficient method to systematically evaluate M. tb and M. bovi sinfection in cattle. PMID:24098654

  11. Metabolic Characterization of Advanced Liver Fibrosis in HCV Patients as Studied by Serum 1H-NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Embade, Nieves; Mariño, Zoe; Diercks, Tammo; Cano, Ainara; Lens, Sabela; Cabrera, Diana; Navasa, Miquel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan M.; Caballería, Joan; Castro, Azucena; Bosch, Jaume; Mato, José M.; Millet, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Several etiologies result in chronic liver diseases including chronic hepatitis C virus infection (HCV). Despite its high incidence and the severe economic and medical consequences, liver disease is still commonly overlooked due to the lack of efficient non-invasive diagnostic methods. While several techniques have been tested for the detection of fibrosis, the available biomarkers still present severe limitations that preclude their use in clinical diagnostics. Liver diseases have also been the subject of metabolomic analysis. Here, we demonstrate the suitability of 1H NMR spectroscopy for characterizing the metabolism of liver fibrosis induced by HCV. Serum samples from HCV patients without fibrosis or with liver cirrhosis were analyzed by NMR spectroscopy and the results were submitted to multivariate and univariate statistical analysis. PLS-DA test was able to discriminate between advanced fibrotic and non-fibrotic patients and several metabolites were found to be up or downregulated in patients with cirrhosis. The suitability of the most significantly regulated metabolites was validated by ROC analysis. Our study reveals that choline, acetoacetate and low-density lipoproteins are the most informative biomarkers for predicting cirrhosis in HCV patients. Our results demonstrate that statistical analysis of 1H-NMR spectra is able to distinguish between fibrotic and non-fibrotic patients suffering from HCV, representing a novel diagnostic application for NMR spectroscopy. PMID:27158896

  12. Brain energy metabolism and neurotransmission at near-freezing temperatures: in vivo (1)H MRS study of a hibernating mammal.

    PubMed

    Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Russeth, Kevin P; Tkac, Ivan; Drewes, Lester R; Andrews, Matthew T; Gruetter, Rolf

    2007-06-01

    The brain of a hibernating mammal withstands physiological extremes that would result in cerebral damage and death in a non-hibernating species such as humans. To examine the possibility that this neuroprotection results from alterations in cerebral metabolism, we used in vivo(1)H NMR spectroscopy at high field (9.4 T) to measure the concentration of 18 metabolites (neurochemical profile) in the brain of 13-lined ground squirrels (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus) before, during, and after hibernation. Resolved in vivo(1)H NMR spectra were obtained even at low temperature in torpid hibernators ( approximately 7 degrees C). The phosphocreatine-to-creatine ratio was increased during torpor (+143%) indicating energy storage, and remained increased to a lesser extent during interbout arousal (IBA) (+83%). The total gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration was increased during torpor (+135%) and quickly returned to baseline during IBA. Glutamine (Gln) was decreased (-54%) during torpor but quickly returned to normal levels during IBA and after terminal arousal in the spring. Glutamate (Glu) was also decreased during torpor (-17%), but remained decreased during IBA (-20% compared with fall), and returned to normal level in the spring. Our observation that Glu and Gln levels are depressed in the brain of hibernators suggests that the balance between anaplerosis and loss of Glu and Gln (because of glutamatergic neurotransmission or other mechanisms) is altered in hibernation. PMID:17437538

  13. Cerebral glutamine metabolism under hyperammonemia determined in vivo by localized 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cudalbu, Cristina; Lanz, Bernard; Duarte, João MN; Morgenthaler, Florence D; Pilloud, Yves; Mlynárik, Vladimir; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Brain glutamine synthetase (GS) is an integral part of the glutamate–glutamine cycle and occurs in the glial compartment. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) allows noninvasive measurements of the concentrations and synthesis rates of metabolites. 15N MRS is an alternative approach to 13C MRS. Incorporation of labeled 15N from ammonia in cerebral glutamine allows to measure several metabolic reactions related to nitrogen metabolism, including the glutamate–glutamine cycle. To measure 15N incorporation into the position 5N of glutamine and position 2N of glutamate and glutamine, we developed a novel 15N pulse sequence to simultaneously detect, for the first time, [5-15N]Gln and [2-15N]Gln+Glu in vivo in the rat brain. In addition, we also measured for the first time in the same experiment localized 1H spectra for a direct measurement of the net glutamine accumulation. Mathematical modeling of 1H and 15N MRS data allowed to reduce the number of assumptions and provided reliable determination of GS (0.30±0.050 μmol/g per minute), apparent neurotransmission (0.26±0.030 μmol/g per minute), glutamate dehydrogenase (0.029±0.002 μmol/g per minute), and net glutamine accumulation (0.033±0.001 μmol/g per minute). These results showed an increase of GS and net glutamine accumulation under hyperammonemia, supporting the concept of their implication in cerebral ammonia detoxification. PMID:22167234

  14. NMR-based metabolic profiling in healthy individuals overfed different types of fat: links to changes in liver fat accumulation and lean tissue mass

    PubMed Central

    Elmsjö, A; Rosqvist, F; Engskog, M K R; Haglöf, J; Kullberg, J; Iggman, D; Johansson, L; Ahlström, H; Arvidsson, T; Risérus, U; Pettersson, C

    2015-01-01

    Background: Overeating different dietary fatty acids influence the amount of liver fat stored during weight gain, however, the mechanisms responsible are unclear. We aimed to identify non-lipid metabolites that may differentiate between saturated (SFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) overfeeding using a non-targeted metabolomic approach. We also investigated the possible relationships between plasma metabolites and body fat accumulation. Methods: In a randomized study (LIPOGAIN study), n=39 healthy individuals were overfed with muffins containing SFA or PUFA. Plasma samples were precipitated with cold acetonitrile and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Pattern recognition techniques were used to overview the data, identify variables contributing to group classification and to correlate metabolites with fat accumulation. Results: We previously reported that SFA causes a greater accumulation of liver fat, visceral fat and total body fat, whereas lean tissue levels increases less compared with PUFA, despite comparable weight gain. In this study, lactate and acetate were identified as important contributors to group classification between SFA and PUFA (P<0.05). Furthermore, the fat depots (total body fat, visceral adipose tissue and liver fat) and lean tissue correlated (P(corr)>0.5) all with two or more metabolites (for example, branched amino acids, alanine, acetate and lactate). The metabolite composition differed in a manner that may indicate higher insulin sensitivity after a diet with PUFA compared with SFA, but this needs to be confirmed in future studies. Conclusion: A non-lipid metabolic profiling approach only identified a few metabolites that differentiated between SFA and PUFA overfeeding. Whether these metabolite changes are involved in depot-specific fat storage and increased lean tissue mass during overeating needs further investigation. PMID:26479316

  15. Cardiac effects of MDMA on the metabolic profile determined with 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Perrine, Shane A; Michaels, Mark S; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Hyde, Elisabeth M; Tancer, Manuel E; Galloway, Matthew P

    2009-05-01

    Despite the potential for deleterious (even fatal) effects on cardiac physiology, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) abuse abounds driven mainly by its euphoric effects. Acute exposure to MDMA has profound cardiovascular effects on blood pressure and heart rate in humans and animals. To determine the effects of MDMA on cardiac metabolites in rats, MDMA (0, 5, or 10 mg/kg) was injected every 2 h for a total of four injections; animals were sacrificed 2 h after the last injection (8 h drug exposure), and their hearts removed and tissue samples from left ventricular wall dissected. High resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 11.7 T, a specialized version of MRS aptly suited for analysis of semi-solid materials such as intact tissue samples, was used to measure the cardiac metabolomic profile, including alanine, lactate, succinate, creatine, and carnitine, in heart tissue from rats treated with MDMA. MDMA effects on MR-visible choline, glutamate, glutamine, and taurine were also determined. Body temperature was measured following each MDMA administration and serotonin and norepinephrine (NE) levels were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) in heart tissue from treated animals. MDMA significantly and dose-dependently increased body temperature, a hallmark of amphetamines. Serotonin, but not NE, levels were significantly and dose-dependently decreased by MDMA in the heart wall. MDMA significantly altered the MR-visible profile with an increase in carnitine and no change in other key compounds involved in cardiomyocyte energy metabolomics. Finally, choline levels were significantly decreased by MDMA in heart. The results are consistent with the notion that MDMA has significant effects on cardiovascular serotonergic tone and disrupts the metabolic homeostasis of energy regulation in cardiac tissue, potentially increasing utilization of fatty acid metabolism. The contributions of serotonergic

  16. Cardiac effects of MDMA on the metabolic profile determined with 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the rat†

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, Shane A.; Michaels, Mark S.; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Hyde, Elisabeth M.; Tancer, Manuel E.; Galloway, Matthew P.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the potential for deleterious (even fatal) effects on cardiac physiology, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) abuse abounds driven mainly by its euphoric effects. Acute exposure to MDMA has profound cardiovascular effects on blood pressure and heart rate in humans and animals. To determine the effects of MDMA on cardiac metabolites in rats, MDMA (0, 5, or 10 mg/kg) was injected every 2 h for a total of four injections; animals were sacrificed 2 h after the last injection (8 h drug exposure), and their hearts removed and tissue samples from left ventricular wall dissected. High resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) at 11.7 T, a specialized version of MRS aptly suited for analysis of semi-solid materials such as intact tissue samples, was used to measure the cardiac metabolomic profile, including alanine, lactate, succinate, creatine, and carnitine, in heart tissue from rats treated with MDMA. MDMA effects on MR-visible choline, glutamate, glutamine, and taurine were also determined. Body temperature was measured following each MDMA administration and serotonin and norepinephrine (NE) levels were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) in heart tissue from treated animals. MDMA significantly and dose-dependently increased body temperature, a hallmark of amphetamines. Serotonin, but not NE, levels were significantly and dose-dependently decreased by MDMA in the heart wall. MDMA significantly altered the MR-visible profile with an increase in carnitine and no change in other key compounds involved in cardiomyocyte energy metabolomics. Finally, choline levels were significantly decreased by MDMA in heart. The results are consistent with the notion that MDMA has significant effects on cardiovascular serotonergic tone and disrupts the metabolic homeostasis of energy regulation in cardiac tissue, potentially increasing utilization of fatty acid metabolism. The contributions of serotonergic

  17. Metabolic Study of Breast MCF-7 Tumor Spheroids after Gamma Irradiation by 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Alessandra; Grande, Sveva; Luciani, Anna Maria; Mlynárik, Vladimír; Guidoni, Laura; Viti, Vincenza; Rosi, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are an important model system to investigate the response of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. They share more properties with the original tumor than cells cultured as 2D monolayers do, which helps distinguish the intrinsic properties of monolayer cells from those induced during cell aggregation in 3D spheroids. The paper investigates some metabolic aspects of small tumor spheroids of breast cancer and their originating MCF-7 cells, grown as monolayer, by means of high–resolution (HR) 1H NMR spectroscopy and MR microimaging before and after gamma irradiation. The spectra of spheroids were characterized by higher intensity of mobile lipids, mostly neutral lipids, and glutamine (Gln) signals with respect to their monolayer cells counterpart, mainly owing to the lower oxygen supply in spheroids. Morphological changes of small spheroids after gamma-ray irradiation, such as loss of their regular shape, were observed by MR microimaging. Lipid signal intensity increased after irradiation, as evidenced in both MR localized spectra of the single spheroid and in HR NMR spectra of spheroid suspensions. Furthermore, the intense Gln signal from spectra of irradiated spheroids remained unchanged, while the low Gln signal observed in monolayer cells increased after irradiation. Similar results were observed in cells grown in hypoxic conditions. The different behavior of Gln in 2D monolayers and in 3D spheroids supports the hypothesis that a lower oxygen supply induces both an upregulation of Gln synthetase and a downregulation of glutaminases with the consequent increase in Gln content, as already observed under hypoxic conditions. The data herein indicate that 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a useful tool for monitoring cell response to different constraints. The use of spheroid suspensions seems to be a feasible alternative to localized spectroscopy since similar effects were found after radiation treatment. PMID:27200293

  18. Quantitative 1H NMR metabolomics reveals extensive metabolic reprogramming of primary and secondary metabolism in elicitor-treated opium poppy cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zulak, Katherine G; Weljie, Aalim M; Vogel, Hans J; Facchini, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Background Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) produces a diverse array of bioactive benzylisoquinoline alkaloids and has emerged as a model system to study plant alkaloid metabolism. The plant is cultivated as the only commercial source of the narcotic analgesics morphine and codeine, but also produces many other alkaloids including the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. Modulations in plant secondary metabolism as a result of environmental perturbations are often associated with the altered regulation of other metabolic pathways. As a key component of our functional genomics platform for opium poppy we have used proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) metabolomics to investigate the interplay between primary and secondary metabolism in cultured opium poppy cells treated with a fungal elicitor. Results Metabolite fingerprinting and compound-specific profiling showed the extensive reprogramming of primary metabolic pathways in association with the induction of alkaloid biosynthesis in response to elicitor treatment. Using Chenomx NMR Suite v. 4.6, a software package capable of identifying and quantifying individual compounds based on their respective signature spectra, the levels of 42 diverse metabolites were monitored over a 100-hour time course in control and elicitor-treated opium poppy cell cultures. Overall, detectable and dynamic changes in the metabolome of elicitor-treated cells, especially in cellular pools of carbohydrates, organic acids and non-protein amino acids were detected within 5 hours after elicitor treatment. The metabolome of control cultures also showed substantial modulations 80 hours after the start of the time course, particularly in the levels of amino acids and phospholipid pathway intermediates. Specific flux modulations were detected throughout primary metabolism, including glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, nitrogen assimilation, phospholipid/fatty acid synthesis and the shikimate pathway, all of which generate secondary

  19. Metabolic profiles using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in postpartum dairy cows with ovarian inactivity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuchu; Xia, Cheng; Sun, Yuhang; Xiao, Xinhuan; Wang, Gang; Fan, Ziling; Shu, Shi; Zhang, Hongyou; Xu, Chuang; Yang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    To understand the differences in metabolic changes between cows with ovarian inactivity and estrus cows, we selected cows at 60-90 days postpartum from an intensive dairy farm. According to clinical manifestations, B-ultrasound scan, rectal examination, 10 cows were assigned to the estrus group (A) and 10 to the ovarian inactivity group (B). All plasma samples were analyzed by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to compare plasma metabolomic profiles between the groups. We used multivariate pattern recognition to screen for different metabolites in plasma of anestrus cows. Compared with normal estrous cows, there were abnormalities in 12 kinds of metabolites in postpartum cows with ovarian inactivity (|r|> 0.602), including an increase in acetic acid (r = -0.817), citric acid (r = -0.767), and tyrosine (r = -0.714), and a decrease in low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.820), very low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.828), lipids (r = 0.769), alanine (r = 0.816), pyruvate (r = 0.721), creatine (r = 0.801), choline (r = 0.639), phosphorylcholine (r = 0.741), and glycerophosphorylcholine (r = 0.881). These metabolites were closely related to abnormality of glucose, amino acid, lipoprotein and choline metabolism, which may disturb the normal estrus. The decrease in plasma creatine and the increase in tyrosine were new changes for ovarian inactivity of postpartum cows. The decrease in plasma creatine and choline and the increase in tyrosine and p-hydroxyphenylalanine in cows with ovarian inactivity provide new directions for research on the mechanism of ovarian inactivity in cows. PMID:27291083

  20. NMR-based metabolomics approach to study the chronic toxicity of crude ricin from castor bean kernels on rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pingping; Wang, Junsong; Dong, Ge; Wei, Dandan; Li, Minghui; Yang, Minghua; Kong, Lingyi

    2014-07-29

    Ricin, a large, water soluble toxic glycoprotein, is distributed majorly in the kernels of castor beans (the seeds of Ricinus communis L.) and has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) or other folk remedies throughout the world. The toxicity of crude ricin (CR) from castor bean kernels was investigated for the first time using an NMR-based metabolomic approach complemented with histopathological inspection and clinical chemistry. The chronic administration of CR could cause kidney and lung impairment, spleen and thymus dysfunction and diminished nutrient intake in rats. An orthogonal signal correction partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OSC-PLSDA) of metabolomic profiles of rat biofluids highlighted a number of metabolic disturbances induced by CR. Long-term CR treatment produced perturbations on energy metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, amino acid metabolism and kynurenine pathway, and evoked oxidative stress. These findings could explain well the CR induced nephrotoxicity and pulmonary toxicity, and provided several potential biomarkers for diagnostics of these toxicities. Such a (1)H NMR based metabolomics approach showed its ability to give a systematic and holistic view of the response of an organism to drugs and is suitable for dynamic studies on the toxicological effects of TCM. PMID:24992468

  1. Metabolic flux and metabolic network analysis of Penicillium chrysogenum using 2D [13C, 1H] COSY NMR measurements and cumulative bondomer simulation.

    PubMed

    van Winden, Wouter A; van Gulik, Walter M; Schipper, Dick; Verheijen, Peter J T; Krabben, Preben; Vinke, Jacobus L; Heijnen, Joseph J

    2003-07-01

    At present two alternative methods are available for analyzing the fluxes in a metabolic network: (1) combining measurements of net conversion rates with a set of metabolite balances including the cofactor balances, or (2) leaving out the cofactor balances and fitting the resulting free fluxes to measured (13)C-labeling data. In this study these two approaches are applied to the fluxes in the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway of Penicillium chrysogenum growing on either ammonia or nitrate as the nitrogen source, which is expected to give different pentose phosphate pathway fluxes. The presented flux analyses are based on extensive sets of 2D [(13)C, (1)H] COSY data. A new concept is applied for simulation of this type of (13)C-labeling data: cumulative bondomer modeling. The outcomes of the (13)C-labeling based flux analysis substantially differ from those of the pure metabolite balancing approach. The fluxes that are determined using (13)C-labeling data are shown to be highly dependent on the chosen metabolic network. Extending the traditional nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway with additional transketolase and transaldolase reactions, extending the glycolysis with a fructose 6-phosphate aldolase/dihydroxyacetone kinase reaction sequence or adding a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase reaction to the model considerably improves the fit of the measured and the simulated NMR data. The results obtained using the extended version of the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway model show that the transketolase and transaldolase reactions need not be assumed reversible to get a good fit of the (13)C-labeling data. Strict statistical testing of the outcomes of (13)C-labeling based flux analysis using realistic measurement errors is demonstrated to be of prime importance for verifying the assumed metabolic model. PMID:12740935

  2. Quantitative metabolic profiles of 2nd and 3rd trimester human amniotic fluid using 1H HR-MAS spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Brad R.; Zhao, Shoujun; Kornak, John; Zhang, Vickie Y.; Iman, Rahwa; Kurhanewicz, John; Vahidi, Kiarash; Yu, Jingwei; Caughey, Aaron B.; Swanson, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    Object To establish and compare normative metabolite concentrations in 2nd and 3rd trimester human amniotic fluid samples in an effort to reveal metabolic biomarkers of fetal health and development. Materials and methods Twenty-one metabolite concentrations were compared between 2nd (15–27 weeks gestation, N = 23) and 3rd (29–39 weeks gestation, N = 27) trimester amniotic fluid samples using 1H high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) spectroscopy. Data were acquired using the electronic reference to access in vivo concentrations method and quantified using a modified semi-parametric quantum estimation algorithm modified for high-resolution ex vivo data. Results Sixteen of 21 metabolite concentrations differed significantly between 2nd and 3rd trimester groups. Betaine (0.00846±0.00206 mmol/kg vs. 0.0133±0.0058 mmol/kg, P <0.002) and creatinine (0.0124±0.0058 mmol/kg vs. 0.247±0.011 mmol/kg, P <0.001) concentrations increased significantly, while glucose (5.96±1.66 mmol/kg vs. 2.41±1.69 mmol/kg, P <0.001), citrate (0.740±0.217 mmol/kg vs. 0.399±0.137 mmol/kg, P <0.001), pyruvate (0.0659±0.0103 mmol/kg vs. 0.0299±0.286 mmol/kg, P <0.001), and numerous amino acid (e.g. alanine, glutamate, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, and valine) concentrations decreased significantly with advancing gestation. A stepwise multiple linear regression model applied to 50 samples showed that gestational age can be accurately predicted using combinations of alanine, glucose and creatinine concentrations. Conclusion These results provide key normative data for 2nd and 3rd trimester amniotic fluid metabolite concentrations and provide the foundation for future development of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) biomarkers to evaluate fetal health and development. PMID:19779747

  3. Continuous-flow 13C-filtered 1H NMR spectroscopy of ethanol metabolism in rat liver perfusate.

    PubMed

    Albert, K; Sudmeier, J L; Anwer, M S; Bachovchin, W W

    1989-09-01

    Using a 188.5-microliters continuous-flow dual probe 1H[13C] spin-echo difference spectra of rat liver perfusate were acquired. The conversion of [1-13C]ethanol to [1-13C]-acetaldehyde was readily monitored as a function of time. In combination with 1-1 water nonexcitation and WALTZ 13C decoupling, this method proved to be superior in sensitivity and selectivity to direct 1H or 13C detection. PMID:2779419

  4. Depressive symptoms linked to 1-h plasma glucose concentrations during the oral glucose tolerance test in men and women with the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum-Weitzman, O.; Goldberg, R.; Hurwitz, B. E.; Llabre, M. M.; Gellman, M. D.; Gutt, M.; McCalla, J. R.; Mendez, A. J.; Schneiderman, N.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The addition of the 1-h plasma glucose concentration measure from an oral glucose tolerance test to prediction models of future Type 2 diabetes has shown to significantly strengthen their predictive power. The present study examined the relationship between severity of depressive symptoms and hyperglycaemia, focusing on the 1-h glucose concentration vs. fasting and 2-h oral glucose tolerance test glucose measures. Methods Participants included 140 adults with the metabolic syndrome and without diabetes who completed a baseline psychobiological assessment and a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test, with measurements taken every 30 min. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory. Results Multivariate linear regression revealed that higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with higher levels of 1-h plasma glucose concentrations after adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, BMI, antidepressant use and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Results were maintained after controlling for fasting glucose as well as for indices of insulin resistance and secretion. Neither fasting nor 2-h plasma glucose concentrations were significantly associated with depressive symptoms. Conclusions Elevated depressive symptoms in persons with the metabolic syndrome were associated with greater glycaemic excursion 1-h following a glucose load that was not accounted for by differences in insulin secretory function or insulin sensitivity. Consistent with previous findings, this study highlights the value of the 1-h oral glucose tolerance test plasma glucose measurement in the relation between depressive symptoms and glucose metabolism as an indicator of metabolic abnormalities not visible when focusing on fasting and 2-h post-oral glucose tolerance test measurements alone. PMID:24344735

  5. NMR-based metabonomic analysis on effect of light on production of antioxidant phenolic compounds in submerged cultures of Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weifa; Zhang, Meimei; Zhao, Yanxia; Miao, Kangjie; Jiang, Hong

    2009-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the light effect on biosynthesis of antioxidant phenolic compounds by Inonotus obliquus grown in submerged cultures using (1)H NMR spectroscopy combining multivariate pattern recognition strategies. I. obliquus were exposed to a range of light conditions and resultant data were compared to those from field-grown sclerotia and the mycelia grown in daylight. Daylight illumination inhibited biosynthesis of davallialactone and phelligridins and other hispidin analogs. Continuous darkness enhanced the formation of phelligridins, davallialactone and inoscavins. Phelligridins and davallialactone also occurred in the mycelia grown in blue and red light with levels lower than those found in darkness. In addition, polyphenols synthesized under daylight conditions showed less potential antioxidant activity than those determined with other light regimes. These findings demonstrate that light regulates biosynthesis of polyphenols in I. obliquus and their subsequent antioxidant activities, and (1)H NMR-based metabolic profiling is a cost-effective approach for evaluating light effects on fungal metabolisms. PMID:19433352

  6. Brain morphological alterations and cellular metabolic changes in patients with generalized anxiety disorder: A combined DARTEL-based VBM and (1)H-MRS study.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chung-Man; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-05-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is characterized by emotional dysregulation and cognitive deficit in conjunction with brain morphometric and metabolic alterations. This study assessed the combined neural morphological deficits and metabolic abnormality in patients with GAD. Thirteen patients with GAD and 13 healthy controls matched for age, sex, and education level underwent high-resolution T1-weighted MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 3Tesla. In this study, the combination of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and (1)H-MRS was used to assess the brain morphometric and metabolic alterations in GAD. The patients showed significantly reduced white matter (WM) volumes in the midbrain (MB), precentral gyrus (PrG), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior limb of the internal capsule (ALIC) compared to the controls. In MRS study, the choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratios in the DLPFC were significantly lower in the patients. Particularly, the WM volume variation of the DLPFC was positively correlated with both of the Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA ratios in patients with GAD. This study provides an evidence for the association between the morphometric deficit and metabolic changes in GAD. This finding would be helpful to understand the neural dysfunction and pathogenesis in connection with cognitive impairments in GAD. PMID:26708039

  7. Mapping hypoxia-induced bioenergetic rearrangements and metabolic signaling by 18O-assisted 31P NMR and 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pucar, Darko; Dzeja, Petras P; Bast, Peter; Gumina, Richard J; Drahl, Carmen; Lim, Lynette; Juranic, Nenad; Macura, Slobodan; Terzic, Andre

    2004-01-01

    Brief hypoxia or ischemia perturbs energy metabolism inducing paradoxically a stress-tolerant state, yet metabolic signals that trigger cytoprotection remain poorly understood. To evaluate bioenergetic rearrangements, control and hypoxic hearts were analyzed with 18O-assisted 31P NMR and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The 18O-induced isotope shift in the 31P NMR spectrum of CrP, betaADP and betaATP was used to quantify phosphotransfer fluxes through creatine kinase and adenylate kinase. This analysis was supplemented with determination of energetically relevant metabolites in the phosphomonoester (PME) region of 31P NMR spectra, and in both aromatic and aliphatic regions of 1H NMR spectra. In control conditions, creatine kinase was the major phosphotransfer pathway processing high-energy phosphoryls between sites of ATP consumption and ATP production. In hypoxia, creatine kinase flux was dramatically reduced with a compensatory increase in adenylate kinase flux, which supported heart energetics by regenerating and transferring beta- and gamma-phosphoryls of ATP. Activation of adenylate kinase led to a build-up of AMP, IMP and adenosine, molecules involved in cardioprotective signaling. 31P and 1H NMR spectral analysis further revealed NADH and H+ scavenging by alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (alphaGPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase contributing to maintained glycolysis under hypoxia. Hypoxia-induced accumulation of alpha-glycerophosphate and nucleoside 5'-monophosphates, through alphaGPDH and adenylate kinase reactions, respectively, was mapped within the increased PME signal in the 31P NMR spectrum. Thus, 18O-assisted 31P NMR combined with 1H NMR provide a powerful approach in capturing rearrangements in cardiac bioenergetics, and associated metabolic signaling that underlie the cardiac adaptive response to stress. PMID:14977188

  8. Cerebral metabolic changes in a depression-like rat model of chronic forced swimming studied by ex vivo high resolution 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Xia; Wang, Yaqiang; Gao, Hongchang; Pan, Wen-Ju; Xiang, Yun; Huang, Mingming; Lei, Hao

    2008-11-01

    Many previous in vivo (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies have shown that patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are associated with perturbations of cerebral metabolism of neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, we investigated the changes of cerebral metabolism in a depression-like rat model of chronic forced swimming stress (CFSS). The aims are to further understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying CFSS treatment, and to further establish the face and predictive validity of the CFSS model. The results showed that, relative to control, the CFSS rats had significantly reduced Glu, taurine and glutamate + glutamine (Glx) levels in the PFC, and significantly reduced N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) level, Glu level and Glu/GABA ratio in the hippocampus. Taking together, these results suggest that CFSS treatment can induce region-specific changes in the metabolism of Glu. The CFSS model might be used to study antidepressants specifically targeting the central glutamatergic system. PMID:18473166

  9. 1H high resolution magic-angle coil spinning (HR-MACS) μNMR metabolic profiling of whole Saccharomyces cervisiae cells: a demonstrative study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Alan; Boutin, Céline; Aguiar, Pedro M.

    2014-01-01

    The low sensitivity and thus need for large sample volume is one of the major drawbacks of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This is especially problematic for performing rich metabolic profiling of scarce samples such as whole cells or living organisms. This study evaluates a 1H HR-MAS approach for metabolic profiling of small volumes (250 nl) of whole cells. We have applied an emerging micro-NMR technology, high-resolution magic-angle coil spinning (HR-MACS), to study whole Saccharomyces cervisiae cells. We find that high-resolution high-sensitivity spectra can be obtained with only 19 million cells and, as a demonstration of the metabolic profiling potential, we perform two independent metabolomics studies identifying the significant metabolites associated with osmotic stress and aging. PMID:24971307

  10. (1)H high resolution magic-angle coil spinning (HR-MACS) μNMR metabolic profiling of whole Saccharomyces cervisiae cells: a demonstrative study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alan; Boutin, Céline; Aguiar, Pedro M

    2014-01-01

    The low sensitivity and thus need for large sample volume is one of the major drawbacks of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This is especially problematic for performing rich metabolic profiling of scarce samples such as whole cells or living organisms. This study evaluates a (1)H HR-MAS approach for metabolic profiling of small volumes (250 nl) of whole cells. We have applied an emerging micro-NMR technology, high-resolution magic-angle coil spinning (HR-MACS), to study whole Saccharomyces cervisiae cells. We find that high-resolution high-sensitivity spectra can be obtained with only 19 million cells and, as a demonstration of the metabolic profiling potential, we perform two independent metabolomics studies identifying the significant metabolites associated with osmotic stress and aging. PMID:24971307

  11. High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H-NMR Metabolic Profiling of Nanoliter Biological Tissues at High Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Ju; Hu, Jian Z.; Burton, Sarah D.; Hoyt, David W.

    2013-03-05

    It is demonstrated that a high resolution magic angle spinning 1H-NMR spectrum of biological tissue samples with volumes as small as 150 nanoliters, or 0.15 mg in weight, can be acquired in a few minutes at 21.1 T magnetic field using a commercial 1.6 mm fast-MAS probe with minor modification of the MAS rotor. The strategies of sealing the samples inside the MAS rotor to avoid fluid leakage as well as the ways of optimizing the signal to noise are discussed.

  12. NMR-Based Metabonomic Studies on Stomach Heat and Cold Syndromes and Intervention Effects of the Corresponding Formulas

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhongjie; Han, Bin; Gong, Mengjuan; Wang, Shumei; Liang, Shengwang

    2014-01-01

    Zuojin Wan (ZJW) and Lizhong Wan (LZW) have been widely used in the treatment of Stomach heat and cold syndrome (SH and SC), respectively. In this study, a proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) based metabonomic approach was developed to profile SH and SC-related metabolic perturbations in rat serum and to investigate the intervention effects of ZJW and LZW on the corresponding SH and SC. Compared to the conventional macroscopic and histopathological examinations, the metabonomic approach could enable discrimination between SH and SC based on serum metabolic profiles. Meanwhile, 17 and 15 potential biomarkers associated with SH and SC, respectively, which were mainly involved in gastric dysfunction and mucosal lesions, gut microbiotal activity, transmethylation, glucose and lipid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism, were identified. Furthermore, taking the potential biomarkers as drug targets, it was revealed that administration of ZJW and LZW could exclusively reverse the pathological process of SH and SC, respectively, through partially regulating the disturbed metabolic pathways. This work showed biological basis related to SH and SC at metabolic level and offered a new paradigm for better understanding and explanation of “Fang Zheng Dui Ying” principle in traditional Chinese medicine from a systemic view. PMID:24701240

  13. Metabolic signatures of Huntington's disease (HD): (1)H NMR analysis of the polar metabolome in post-mortem human brain.

    PubMed

    Graham, Stewart F; Kumar, Praveen K; Bjorndahl, Trent; Han, BeomSoo; Yilmaz, Ali; Sherman, Eric; Bahado-Singh, Ray O; Wishart, David; Mann, David; Green, Brian D

    2016-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal neurodegenerative disorder affecting approximately 5-10 persons per 100,000 worldwide. The pathophysiology of HD is not fully understood but the age of onset is known to be highly dependent on the number of CAG triplet repeats in the huntingtin gene. Using (1)H NMR spectroscopy this study biochemically profiled 39 brain metabolites in post-mortem striatum (n=14) and frontal lobe (n=14) from HD sufferers and controls (n=28). Striatum metabolites were more perturbed with 15 significantly affected in HD cases, compared with only 4 in frontal lobe (p<0.05; q<0.3). The metabolite which changed most overall was urea which decreased 3.25-fold in striatum (p<0.01). Four metabolites were consistently affected in both brain regions. These included the neurotransmitter precursors tyrosine and l-phenylalanine which were significantly depleted by 1.55-1.58-fold and 1.48-1.54-fold in striatum and frontal lobe, respectively (p=0.02-0.03). They also included l-leucine which was reduced 1.54-1.69-fold (p=0.04-0.09) and myo-inositol which was increased 1.26-1.37-fold (p<0.01). Logistic regression analyses performed with MetaboAnalyst demonstrated that data obtained from striatum produced models which were profoundly more sensitive and specific than those produced from frontal lobe. The brain metabolite changes uncovered in this first (1)H NMR investigation of human HD offer new insights into the disease pathophysiology. Further investigations of striatal metabolite disturbances are clearly warranted. PMID:27288730

  14. Design of a sup 13 C (1H) RF probe for monitoring the in vivo metabolism of (1- sup 13 C)glucose in primate brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, B.E.; Sacks, W.; Bigler, R.E.; Hennessy, M.J.; Sacks, S.; Fleischer, A.; Zanzonico, P.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of an RF probe suitable for obtaining proton-decoupled {sup 13}C spectra from a subhuman primate brain is described. Two orthogonal saddle coils, one tuned to the resonant frequency of {sup 13}C and the other to the resonant frequency of 1H, were used to monitor the in vivo metabolism of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose in rhesus monkey brain at 2.1 T. Difference spectra showed the appearance of {sup 13}C-enriched glutamate and glutamine 30 to 40 min after a bolus injection of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose.

  15. 1H High Resolution Magic-Angle Coil Spinning (HR-MACS) - NMR Metabolic Profiling of whole Saccharomyces cervisiae cells: A Demonstrative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Alan; Boutin, Celine; Aguiar, Pedro

    2014-06-01

    The low sensitivity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is its prime shortcoming compared to other analytical methods for metabolomic studies. It relies on large sample volume (30-50 µl for HR-MAS) for rich metabolic profiling, hindering high-throughput screening especially when the sample requires a labor-intensive preparation or is a sacred specimen. This is indeed the case for some living organisms. This study evaluates a 1H HR-MAS approach for metabolic profiling of small volume (250 nl) whole bacterial cells, Saccharomyces cervisiae, using an emerging micro-NMR technology: high-resolution magic-angle coil spinning (HR-MACS). As a demonstrative study for whole cells, we perform two independent metabolomics studies identifying the significant metabolites associated with osmotic stress and aging.

  16. Metabolic Discrimination of Catharanthus roseus Leaves Infected by Phytoplasma Using 1H-NMR Spectroscopy and Multivariate Data Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Hae; Tapias, Elisabet Casas; Kim, Hye Kyong; Lefeber, Alfons W.M.; Erkelens, Cornelis; Verhoeven, Jacobus Th.J.; Brzin, Jernej; Zel, Jana; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive metabolomic profiling of Catharanthus roseus L. G. Don infected by 10 types of phytoplasmas was carried out using one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy followed by principal component analysis (PCA), an unsupervised clustering method requiring no knowledge of the data set and used to reduce the dimensionality of multivariate data while preserving most of the variance within it. With a combination of these techniques, we were able to identify those metabolites that were present in different levels in phytoplasma-infected C. roseus leaves than in healthy ones. The infection by phytoplasma in C. roseus leaves causes an increase of metabolites related to the biosynthetic pathways of phenylpropanoids or terpenoid indole alkaloids: chlorogenic acid, loganic acid, secologanin, and vindoline. Furthermore, higher abundance of Glc, Glu, polyphenols, succinic acid, and Suc were detected in the phytoplasma-infected leaves. The PCA of the 1H-NMR signals of healthy and phytoplasma-infected C. roseus leaves shows that these metabolites are major discriminating factors to characterize the phytoplasma-infected C. roseus leaves from healthy ones. Based on the NMR and PCA analysis, it might be suggested that the biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids, together with that of phenylpropanoids, is stimulated by the infection of phytoplasma. PMID:15286294

  17. Metabolic profile of the hippocampus of Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats assessed by in vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van der Graaf, Marinette; Janssen, Susan W J; van Asten, Jack J A; Hermus, Ad R M M; Sweep, C G J; Pikkemaat, Jeroen A; Martens, Gerard J M; Heerschap, Arend

    2004-10-01

    Localized in vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to investigate metabolite levels in the brain of adult Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, an animal model for type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study focussed on the hippocampus, assumed to be one of the main brain areas affected by this disease. Together with an almost 5-fold increase in blood glucose concentration measured by glucose oxidation, significant increases were found in the hippocampal concentrations of glucose (4.93 vs 1.66 mM p < 0.001), myo-inositol (6.52 vs 4.30 mM; p < 0.05), and total creatine (12.71 vs 10.50 mM; p < 0.05) in ZDF rats (n = 5) compared with littermates (n = 5). Although no obvious alterations were detected in the hippocampal levels of other metabolites, including NAA + NAAG and choline-containing compounds in the ZDF rats, the increase in Glc and Ins levels is in line with elevated brain tissue contents of these metabolites in patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:15386626

  18. NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) based signatures of abnormal choline metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma with no prominent Warburg effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bag, Swarnendu; Banerjee, Deb Ranjan; Basak, Amit; Das, Amit Kumar; Pal, Mousumi; Banerjee, Rita; Paul, Ranjan Rashmi; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2015-04-17

    At functional levels, besides genes and proteins, changes in metabolome profiles are instructive for a biological system in health and disease including malignancy. It is understood that metabolomic alterations in association with proteomic and transcriptomic aberrations are very fundamental to unravel malignant micro-ambient criticality and oral cancer is no exception. Hence deciphering intricate dimensions of oral cancer metabolism may be contributory both for integrated appreciation of its pathogenesis and to identify any critical but yet unexplored dimension of this malignancy with high mortality rate. Although several methods do exist, NMR provides higher analytical precision in identification of cancer metabolomic signature. Present study explored abnormal signatures in choline metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analysis of serum. It has demonstrated down-regulation of choline with concomitant up-regulation of its break-down product in the form of trimethylamine N-oxide in OSCC compared to normal counterpart. Further, no significant change in lactate profile in OSCC possibly indicated that well-known Warburg effect was not a prominent phenomenon in such malignancy. Amongst other important metabolites, malonate has shown up-regulation but D-glucose, saturated fatty acids, acetate and threonine did not show any significant change. Analyzing these metabolomic findings present study proposed trimethyl amine N-oxide and malonate as important metabolic signature for oral cancer with no prominent Warburg effect. - Highlights: • NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) study of Oral Squamous cell Carcinoma Serum. • Abnormal Choline metabolomic signatures. • Up-regulation of Trimethylamine N-oxide. • Unchanged lactate profile indicates no prominent Warburg effect. • Proposed alternative glucose metabolism path through up-regulation of malonate.

  19. Evidence for altered metabolic pathways during environmental stress: (1)H-NMR spectroscopy based metabolomics and clinical studies on subjects of sea-voyage and Antarctic-stay.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anand Prakash; Chaturvedi, Shubhra; Mishra, Kamla Prasad; Pal, Sunil; Ganju, Lilly; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2014-08-01

    The Antarctic context is an analogue of space travel, with close similarity in ambience of extreme climate, isolation, constrained living spaces, disrupted sleep cycles, and environmental stress. The present study examined the impact of the harsh habitat of Antarctica on human physiology and its metabolic pathways, by analyzing human serum samples, using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy for identification of metabolites; and quantifying other physiological and clinical parameters for correlation between expression data and metabolite data. Sera from seven adult males (of median age 36years) who participated in this study, from the 28th Indian Expeditionary group to the Antarctica station Maitri, were collected in chronological sequence. These included: i) baseline control; ii) during ship journey; iii) at Antarctica, in the months of March, May, August and November; to enable study of temporal evolution of monitored physiological states. 29 metabolites in serum were identified from the 400MHz (1)H-NMR spectra. Out of these, 19 metabolites showed significant variations in levels, during the ship journey and the stay at Maitri, compared to the base-line levels. Further biochemical analysis also supported these results, indicating that the ship journey, and the long-term Antarctic exposure, affected kidney and liver functioning. Our metabolite data highlights for the first time the effect of environmental stress on the patho-physiology of the human system. Multivariate analysis tools were employed for this metabonomics study, using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24910139

  20. Urine Metabolomics by 1H-NMR Spectroscopy Indicates Associations between Serum 3,5-T2 Concentrations and Intermediary Metabolism in Euthyroid Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pietzner, Maik; Homuth, Georg; Budde, Kathrin; Lehmphul, Ina; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Nauck, Matthias; Köhrle, Josef; Friedrich, Nele

    2015-01-01

    Context 3,5-Diiodo-L-thyronine (3,5-T2) is a thyroid hormone metabolite which exhibited versatile effects in rodent models, including the prevention of insulin resistance or hepatic steatosis typically forced by a high-fat diet. With respect to euthyroid humans, we recently observed a putative link between serum 3,5-T2 and glucose but not lipid metabolism. Objective The aim of the present study was to widely screen the urine metabolome for associations with serum 3,5-T2 concentrations in healthy individuals. Study Design and Methods Urine metabolites of 715 euthyroid participants of the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-TREND) were analyzed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Multinomial logistic and multivariate linear regression models were used to detect associations between urine metabolites and serum 3,5-T2 concentrations. Results Serum 3,5-T2 concentrations were positively associated with urinary levels of trigonelline, pyroglutamate, acetone and hippurate. In detail, the odds for intermediate or suppressed serum 3,5-T2 concentrations doubled owing to a 1-standard deviation (SD) decrease in urine trigonelline levels, or increased by 29-50% in relation to a 1-SD decrease in urine pyroglutamate, acetone and hippurate levels. Conclusion Our findings in humans confirmed the metabolic effects of circulating 3,5-T2 on glucose and lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and enhanced drug metabolism as postulated before based on interventional pharmacological studies in rodents. Of note, 3,5-T2 exhibited a unique urinary metabolic profile distinct from previously published results for the classical thyroid hormones. PMID:26601079

  1. ¹H NMR-based metabolomics studies on the effect of sesamin in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Wagner, Liane; Trattner, Sofia; Pickova, Jana; Gómez-Requeni, Pedro; Moazzami, Ali A

    2014-03-15

    A (1)H NMR-based metabolomics approach was used to explore the impact of dietary sesamin on the liver and white muscle metabolic profile of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Fish were fed diets containing different n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratios (V0.5 or V1) and sesamin contents [without (S0), low (SL) 1.16 g/kg feed, and high (SH) 5.8 g/kg feed] for 4 months. Liver and white muscle extracts of aqueous polar and chloroform lipid phases were collected. Multivariate data analyses (PCA and OPLS-DA) of liver chloroform phase showed that high levels of sesamin affected the metabolic profile impartially of the n-6/n-3 ratio. In the aqueous phase, the metabolome of liver and white muscle were affected in fish fed an n-6/n-3 ratio of 1.0 and 0.5, respectively. With high inclusion of sesamin, the levels of several metabolites (e.g. glucose, glycogen, leucine, valine, creatine, carnitine, lactate, nucleosides) were increased. These metabolites are mainly associated with energy metabolism, suggesting that high sesamin inclusion affects liver and white muscle metabolism in fish. This is consistent with lower body weights found in fish fed high sesamin content. PMID:24206691

  2. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics study of earthworm Perionyx excavatus in vermifiltration process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Xulei; Laserna, Anna Karen Carrasco; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-10-01

    In this study, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics approach was used to characterize the metabolic response of the earthworm Perionyx excavatus in continuous vermifiltration for two months under hydraulic loading rates of 1m(3)m(-2)d(-1) (VF1) and 1.5m(3)m(-2)d(-1) (VF1.5). Both VF1 and VF1.5 showed higher removal of chemical oxygen demand and total nitrogen than the biofilter without earthworms. Principal component analysis of the NMR spectra of earthworm metabolites showed significant separations between those not subjected to wastewater filtration (control) and VF1 or VF1.5. Temporal variations of earthworm biomass, and the identified metabolites that are significantly different between control, VF1 and VF1.5 revealed that worms underwent increasing metabolic activity within 20days in VF1 and 14days in VF1.5, then decreasing metabolic activity. The use of NMR-based metabolomics in monitoring earthworm metabolism was demonstrated to be a novel approach in studying engineered vermifiltration systems. PMID:27469092

  3. Analysis of brain metabolism by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder suggests a generalized differential ontogenic pattern from controls.

    PubMed

    Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Londoño, Ana C; Pineda, David A; Lopera, Francisco; Palacio, Juan David; Arbelaez, Andres; Acosta, Maria T; Vélez, Jorge I; Castellanos, Francisco Xavier; Muenke, Maximilian

    2012-12-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common behavioral disorder of childhood. Preliminary studies with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) of the brain have reported differences in brain metabolite concentration-to-Cr ratios between individuals with ADHD and unaffected controls in several frontal brain regions including anterior cingulate cortex. Using multivoxel (1)H-MRS, we compared 14 individuals affected with ADHD to 20 individuals without ADHD from the same genetic isolate. After controlling by sex, age, and multiple testing, we found significant differences at the right posterior cingulate of the Glx/Cr ratio density distribution function between ADHD cases and controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we found several interactions of metabolite concentration-to-Cr ratio, age, and ADHD status: Ins/Cr and Glx/Cr ratios at the left posterior cingulate, and NAA/Cr at the splenius, right posterior cingulate, and at the left posterior cingulate. We also found a differential metabolite ratio interaction between ADHD cases and controls for Ins/Cr and NAA/Cr at the right striatum. These results show that: (1) NAA/Cr, Glx/Cr, and Ins/Cr ratios, as reported in other studies, exhibit significant differences between ADHD cases and controls; (2) differences of these metabolite ratios between ADHD cases and controls evolve in specific and recognizable patterns throughout age, a finding that replicates previous results obtained by structural MRI, where is demonstrated that brain ontogeny follows a different program in ADHD cases and controls; (3) Ins/Cr and NAA/Cr ratios, at the right striatum, interact in a differential way between ADHD cases and controls. As a whole, these results replicate previous 1H-MRS findings and add new intriguing differential metabolic and ontogeny patterns between ADHD cases and controls that warrant further pursue. PMID:23012086

  4. In vivo quantification of neuro-glial metabolism and glial glutamate concentration using 1H-[13C] MRS at 14.1T.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Bernard; Xin, Lijing; Millet, Philippe; Gruetter, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes have recently become a major center of interest in neurochemistry with the discoveries on their major role in brain energy metabolism. An interesting way to probe this glial contribution is given by in vivo (13) C NMR spectroscopy coupled with the infusion labeled glial-specific substrate, such as acetate. In this study, we infused alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats with [2-(13) C]acetate and followed the dynamics of the fractional enrichment (FE) in the positions C4 and C3 of glutamate and glutamine with high sensitivity, using (1) H-[(13) C] magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 14.1T. Applying a two-compartment mathematical model to the measured time courses yielded a glial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle rate (Vg ) of 0.27 ± 0.02 μmol/g/min and a glutamatergic neurotransmission rate (VNT ) of 0.15 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min. Glial oxidative ATP metabolism thus accounts for 38% of total oxidative metabolism measured by NMR. Pyruvate carboxylase (VPC ) was 0.09 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min, corresponding to 37% of the glial glutamine synthesis rate. The glial and neuronal transmitochondrial fluxes (Vx (g) and Vx (n) ) were of the same order of magnitude as the respective TCA cycle fluxes. In addition, we estimated a glial glutamate pool size of 0.6 ± 0.1 μmol/g. The effect of spectral data quality on the fluxes estimates was analyzed by Monte Carlo simulations. In this (13) C-acetate labeling study, we propose a refined two-compartment analysis of brain energy metabolism based on (13) C turnover curves of acetate, glutamate and glutamine measured with state of the art in vivo dynamic MRS at high magnetic field in rats, enabling a deeper understanding of the specific role of glial cells in brain oxidative metabolism. In addition, the robustness of the metabolic fluxes determination relative to MRS data quality was carefully studied. PMID:24117599

  5. Metabolic responses of willow (Salix purpurea L.) leaves to mycorrhization as revealed by mass spectrometry and 1H NMR spectroscopy metabolite profiling

    PubMed Central

    Aliferis, Konstantinos A.; Chamoun, Rony; Jabaji, Suha

    2015-01-01

    The root system of most terrestrial plants form symbiotic interfaces with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), which are important for nutrient cycling and ecosystem sustainability. The elucidation of the undergoing changes in plants' metabolism during symbiosis is essential for understanding nutrient acquisition and for alleviation of soil stresses caused by environmental cues. Within this context, we have undertaken the task of recording the fluctuation of willow (Salix purpurea L.) leaf metabolome in response to AMF inoculation. The development of an advanced metabolomics/bioinformatics protocol employing mass spectrometry (MS) and 1H NMR analyzers combined with the in-house-built metabolite library for willow (http://willowmetabolib.research.mcgill.ca/index.html) are key components of the research. Analyses revealed that AMF inoculation of willow causes up-regulation of various biosynthetic pathways, among others, those of flavonoid, isoflavonoid, phenylpropanoid, and the chlorophyll and porphyrin pathways, which have well-established roles in plant physiology and are related to resistance against environmental stresses. The recorded fluctuation in the willow leaf metabolism is very likely to provide AMF-inoculated willows with a significant advantage compared to non-inoculated ones when they are exposed to stresses such as, high levels of soil pollutants. The discovered biomarkers of willow response to AMF inoculation and corresponding pathways could be exploited in biomarker-assisted selection of willow cultivars with superior phytoremediation capacity or genetic engineering programs. PMID:26042135

  6. Automatic NMR-based identification of chemical reaction types in mixtures of co-occurring reactions.

    PubMed

    Latino, Diogo A R S; Aires-de-Sousa, João

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chemoinformatics approaches with NMR techniques and the increasing availability of data allow the resolution of problems far beyond the original application of NMR in structure elucidation/verification. The diversity of applications can range from process monitoring, metabolic profiling, authentication of products, to quality control. An application related to the automatic analysis of complex mixtures concerns mixtures of chemical reactions. We encoded mixtures of chemical reactions with the difference between the (1)H NMR spectra of the products and the reactants. All the signals arising from all the reactants of the co-occurring reactions were taken together (a simulated spectrum of the mixture of reactants) and the same was done for products. The difference spectrum is taken as the representation of the mixture of chemical reactions. A data set of 181 chemical reactions was used, each reaction manually assigned to one of 6 types. From this dataset, we simulated mixtures where two reactions of different types would occur simultaneously. Automatic learning methods were trained to classify the reactions occurring in a mixture from the (1)H NMR-based descriptor of the mixture. Unsupervised learning methods (self-organizing maps) produced a reasonable clustering of the mixtures by reaction type, and allowed the correct classification of 80% and 63% of the mixtures in two independent test sets of different similarity to the training set. With random forests (RF), the percentage of correct classifications was increased to 99% and 80% for the same test sets. The RF probability associated to the predictions yielded a robust indication of their reliability. This study demonstrates the possibility of applying machine learning methods to automatically identify types of co-occurring chemical reactions from NMR data. Using no explicit structural information about the reactions participants, reaction elucidation is performed without structure elucidation of

  7. Automatic NMR-Based Identification of Chemical Reaction Types in Mixtures of Co-Occurring Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Latino, Diogo A. R. S.; Aires-de-Sousa, João

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chemoinformatics approaches with NMR techniques and the increasing availability of data allow the resolution of problems far beyond the original application of NMR in structure elucidation/verification. The diversity of applications can range from process monitoring, metabolic profiling, authentication of products, to quality control. An application related to the automatic analysis of complex mixtures concerns mixtures of chemical reactions. We encoded mixtures of chemical reactions with the difference between the 1H NMR spectra of the products and the reactants. All the signals arising from all the reactants of the co-occurring reactions were taken together (a simulated spectrum of the mixture of reactants) and the same was done for products. The difference spectrum is taken as the representation of the mixture of chemical reactions. A data set of 181 chemical reactions was used, each reaction manually assigned to one of 6 types. From this dataset, we simulated mixtures where two reactions of different types would occur simultaneously. Automatic learning methods were trained to classify the reactions occurring in a mixture from the 1H NMR-based descriptor of the mixture. Unsupervised learning methods (self-organizing maps) produced a reasonable clustering of the mixtures by reaction type, and allowed the correct classification of 80% and 63% of the mixtures in two independent test sets of different similarity to the training set. With random forests (RF), the percentage of correct classifications was increased to 99% and 80% for the same test sets. The RF probability associated to the predictions yielded a robust indication of their reliability. This study demonstrates the possibility of applying machine learning methods to automatically identify types of co-occurring chemical reactions from NMR data. Using no explicit structural information about the reactions participants, reaction elucidation is performed without structure elucidation of the

  8. Analysis of bacterial biofilms using NMR-based metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Powers, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases can be difficult to cure, especially if the pathogen forms a biofilm. After decades of extensive research into the morphology, physiology and genomics of biofilm formation, attention has recently been directed toward the analysis of the cellular metabolome in order to understand the transformation of a planktonic cell to a biofilm. Metabolomics can play an invaluable role in enhancing our understanding of the underlying biological processes related to the structure, formation and antibiotic resistance of biofilms. A systematic view of metabolic pathways or processes responsible for regulating this ‘social structure’ of microorganisms may provide critical insights into biofilm-related drug resistance and lead to novel treatments. This review will discuss the development of NMR-based metabolomics as a technology to study medically relevant biofilms. Recent advancements from case studies reviewed in this manuscript have shown the potential of metabolomics to shed light on numerous biological problems related to biofilms. PMID:22800371

  9. 1H NMR metabolomics of earthworm responses to polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure in soil.

    PubMed

    Whitfield Åslund, Melissa L; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2011-06-01

    (1)H NMR-based metabolomics was used to examine the metabolic profile of D(2)O-buffer extracted tissues of Eisenia fetida earthworms exposed for 2 days to an artificial soil spiked with sub-lethal concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (0, 0.5, 1, 5, 10, or 25 mg/kg Aroclor 1254). Univariate statistical analysis of the identified metabolites revealed a significant increase in ATP concentration in earthworms exposed to the highest soil PCB concentration, but detected no significant changes in other metabolites. However, a multivariate approach which considers alterations in multiple metabolites simultaneously, identified a significant linear relationship between earthworm metabolic profiles and PCB concentration (cross-validated PLS-regression with 7 components, R(2)X = 0.99, R(2)Y = 0.77, Q(2)Y = 0.45, P < 0.001). Significant changes in pair-wise metabolic correlations were also detected as PCB concentration increased. For example, lysine and ATP concentrations showed no apparent correlation in control earthworms (r = 0.22, P = 0.54), but were positively correlated in earthworms from the 25 mg/kg treatment (r = 0.87, P = 0.001). Overall, the observed metabolic responses suggest that PCBs disrupted both carbohydrate (energy) metabolism and membrane (osmolytic) function in E. fetida. The ability of (1)H NMR-based metabolomics to detect these responses suggests that this method offers significant potential for direct assessment of sub-lethal PCB toxicity in soil. PMID:21424327

  10. Xanthan Gum Removal for 1H-NMR Analysis of the Intracellular Metabolome of the Bacteria Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri 306

    PubMed Central

    Pegos, Vanessa R.; Canevarolo, Rafael R.; Sampaio, Aline P.; Balan, Andrea; Zeri, Ana C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Xanthomonas is a genus of phytopathogenic bacteria, which produces a slimy, polysaccharide matrix known as xanthan gum, which involves, protects and helps the bacteria during host colonization. Although broadly used as a stabilizer and thickener in the cosmetic and food industries, xanthan gum can be a troubling artifact in molecular investigations due to its rheological properties. In particular, a cross-reaction between reference compounds and the xanthan gum could compromise metabolic quantification by NMR spectroscopy. Aiming at an efficient gum extraction protocol, for a 1H-NMR-based metabolic profiling study of Xanthomonas, we tested four different interventions on the broadly used methanol-chloroform extraction protocol for the intracellular metabolic contents observation. Lower limits for bacterial pellet volumes for extraction were also probed, and a strategy is illustrated with an initial analysis of X. citri’s metabolism by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24957023

  11. Xanthan Gum Removal for 1H-NMR Analysis of the Intracellular Metabolome of the Bacteria Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri 306.

    PubMed

    Pegos, Vanessa R; Canevarolo, Rafael R; Sampaio, Aline P; Balan, Andrea; Zeri, Ana C M

    2014-01-01

    Xanthomonas is a genus of phytopathogenic bacteria, which produces a slimy, polysaccharide matrix known as xanthan gum, which involves, protects and helps the bacteria during host colonization. Although broadly used as a stabilizer and thickener in the cosmetic and food industries, xanthan gum can be a troubling artifact in molecular investigations due to its rheological properties. In particular, a cross-reaction between reference compounds and the xanthan gum could compromise metabolic quantification by NMR spectroscopy. Aiming at an efficient gum extraction protocol, for a 1H-NMR-based metabolic profiling study of Xanthomonas, we tested four different interventions on the broadly used methanol-chloroform extraction protocol for the intracellular metabolic contents observation. Lower limits for bacterial pellet volumes for extraction were also probed, and a strategy is illustrated with an initial analysis of X. citri's metabolism by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24957023

  12. Modeling sickle cell vasoocculsion in the rat leg: Quantification of trapped sickle cells and correlation with sup 31 P metabolic and sup 1 H magnetic resonance imaging changes

    SciTech Connect

    Fabry, M.E.; Rajanayagam, V.; Fine, E.; Holland, S.; Gore, J.C.; Nagel, R.L.; Kaul, D.K. )

    1989-05-01

    The authors have developed an animal model to elucidate the acute effects of perfusion abnormalities on muscle metabolism induced by different density-defined classes of erythrocytes isolated from sickle cell anemia patients. Technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc)-labeled, saline-washed normal (AA), homozygous sickle (SS), or high-density SS (SS4) erythrocytes were injected into the femoral artery of the rat and quantitative {sup 99m}Tc imaging, {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy by surface coil at 2 teslas, and {sup 1}H magnetic resonance imaging at 0.15 tesla were performed. Between 5 and 25 {mu}l of SS4 cells was trapped in the microcirculation of the thigh. In contrast, fewer SS discocytes (SS2) or AA cells were trapped. After injection of SS4 cells an initial increase in inorganic phosphate was observed in the region of the thigh served by the femoral artery, intracellular pH decreased, and subsequently the proton relaxation time T{sub 1} reached a broad maximum at 18-28 hr. When T{sub 1} obtained at this time was plotted against the volume of cells trapped, an increase of T{sub 1} over the control value of 411 {plus minus} 48 msec was found that was proportional to the number of cells trapped. They conclude that the densest SS cells are most effective at producing vasoocclusion. The extent of the change detected by {sup 1}H magnetic resonance imaging is dependent on the amount of cells trapped in the microcirculation and the magnitude of the initial increase of inorganic phosphate.

  13. The Effect of Molecular Conformation on the Accuracy of Theoretical (1)H and (13)C Chemical Shifts Calculated by Ab Initio Methods for Metabolic Mixture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Shimbo, Yudai; Komatsu, Keiko; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-14

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analyzing metabolic mixtures. The information obtained from an NMR spectrum is in the form of physical parameters, such as chemical shifts, and construction of databases for many metabolites will be useful for data interpretation. To increase the accuracy of theoretical chemical shifts for development of a database for a variety of metabolites, the effects of sets of conformations (structural ensembles) and the levels of theory on computations of theoretical chemical shifts were systematically investigated for a set of 29 small molecules in the present study. For each of the 29 compounds, 101 structures were generated by classical molecular dynamics at 298.15 K, and then theoretical chemical shifts for 164 (1)H and 123 (13)C atoms were calculated by ab initio quantum chemical methods. Six levels of theory were used by pairing Hartree-Fock, B3LYP (density functional theory), or second order Møller-Plesset perturbation with 6-31G or aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The six average fluctuations in the (1)H chemical shift were ±0.63, ± 0.59, ± 0.70, ± 0.62, ± 0.75, and ±0.66 ppm for the structural ensembles, and the six average errors were ±0.34, ± 0.27, ± 0.32, ± 0.25, ± 0.32, and ±0.25 ppm. The results showed that chemical shift fluctuations with changes in the conformation because of molecular motion were larger than the differences between computed and experimental chemical shifts for all six levels of theory. In conclusion, selection of an appropriate structural ensemble should be performed before theoretical chemical shift calculations for development of an accurate database for a variety of metabolites. PMID:26963288

  14. Effects of donepezil on brain morphometric and metabolic changes in patients with Alzheimer's disease: A DARTEL-based VBM and (1)H-MRS.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chung-Man; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    A few studies have performed on the brain morphometric changes over the whole brain structure following donepezil treatment in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We evaluated the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volume alterations and cellular metabolic changes in patients with AD before and after donepezil treatment, and further to reveal the correlations of the scores of various neuropsychological scales with the volumetric and metabolic changes. Twenty-one subjects comprising of 11 patients with AD and 10 age-matched healthy controls participated in this study. All of the patients participated in the follow-up study 24weeks following donepezil treatment. In this study, a combination of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was used to assess the brain morphometric and metabolic alterations in AD. In the GM volumetric analysis, both of the untreated and treated patients with donepezil showed significantly reduced volumes in the hippocampus (Hip), parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), precuneus (PCu) and middle frontal gyrus compared with healthy controls. However, donepezil-treated patients showed significantly increased volumes in the Hip, PCu, fusiform gyrus and caudate nucleus compared to untreated patients. In the WM volumetric analysis, untreated and treated patients showed significant volume reductions in the posterior limb of internal capsule (PLIC), cerebral peduncle of the midbrain and PHG compared to healthy controls. However, there was no significant WM morphological change after donepezil treatment in patients with AD. In MRS study, untreated patients with AD showed decreased N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) and increased myo-inositol (mI)/Cr compared to healthy controls, while treated patients showed only decreased NAA/Cr in the same comparison. However, the treated patients showed simultaneously increased NAA/Cr and decreased mI/Cr and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios compared to untreated patients. This

  15. Assessment of metabolic fluxes in the mouse brain in vivo using 1H-[13C] NMR spectroscopy at 14.1 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Xin, Lijing; Lanz, Bernard; Lei, Hongxia; Gruetter, Rolf

    2015-05-01

    (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) combined with the administration of (13)C labeled substrates uniquely allows to measure metabolic fluxes in vivo in the brain of humans and rats. The extension to mouse models may provide exclusive prospect for the investigation of models of human diseases. In the present study, the short-echo-time (TE) full-sensitivity (1)H-[(13)C] MRS sequence combined with high magnetic field (14.1 T) and infusion of [U-(13)C6] glucose was used to enhance the experimental sensitivity in vivo in the mouse brain and the (13)C turnover curves of glutamate C4, glutamine C4, glutamate+glutamine C3, aspartate C2, lactate C3, alanine C3, γ-aminobutyric acid C2, C3 and C4 were obtained. A one-compartment model was used to fit (13)C turnover curves and resulted in values of metabolic fluxes including the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux VTCA (1.05 ± 0.04 μmol/g per minute), the exchange flux between 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate Vx (0.48 ± 0.02 μmol/g per minute), the glutamate-glutamine exchange rate V(gln) (0.20 ± 0.02 μmol/g per minute), the pyruvate dilution factor K(dil) (0.82 ± 0.01), and the ratio for the lactate conversion rate and the alanine conversion rate V(Lac)/V(Ala) (10 ± 2). This study opens the prospect of studying transgenic mouse models of brain pathologies. PMID:25605294

  16. Slow Magic Angle Sample Spinning: A Non- or Minimally Invasive Method for High- Resolution 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Metabolic Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.

    2011-05-01

    High resolution 1H magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using a sample spinning rate of several kHz or more (i.e., high resolution-magic angle spinning (hr-MAS)), is a well established method for metabolic profiling in intact tissues without the need for sample extraction. The only shortcoming with hr-MAS is that it is invasive and is thus unusable for non-destructive detections. Recently, a method called slow-MAS, using the concept of two dimensional NMR spectroscopy, has emerged as an alternative method for non- or minimal invasive metabolomics in intact tissues, including live animals, due to the slow or ultra-slow-sample spinning used. Although slow-MAS is a powerful method, its applications are hindered by experimental challenges. Correctly designing the experiment and choosing the appropriate slow-MAS method both require a fundamental understanding of the operation principles, in particular the details of line narrowing due to the presence of molecular diffusion. However, these fundamental principles have not yet been fully disclosed in previous publications. The goal of this chapter is to provide an in depth evaluation of the principles associated with slow-MAS techniques by emphasizing the challenges associated with a phantom sample consisting of glass beads and H2O, where an unusually large magnetic susceptibility field gradient is obtained.

  17. The metabolism of 2-trifluormethylaniline and its acetanilide in the rat by 19F NMR monitored enzyme hydrolysis and 1H/19F HPLC-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tugnait, M; Lenz, E M; Hofmann, M; Spraul, M; Wilson, I D; Lindon, J C; Nicholson, J K

    2003-01-01

    The urinary excretion profile and identity of the metabolites of 2-trifluoromethyl aniline (2-TFMA) and 2-trifluoromethyl acetanilide (2-TFMAc), following i.p. administration to the rat at 50 mg kg(-1), were determined using a combination of 19F NMR monitored enzyme hydrolysis, SPEC-MS and 19F/1H HPLC-NMR. A total recovery of approximately 96.4% of the dose was excreted into the urine as seven metabolites. The major routes of metabolism were N-conjugation (glucuronidation), and ring-hydroxylation followed by sulphation (and to a lesser extent glucuronidation). The major metabolites excreted into the urine for both compounds were a labile N-conjugated metabolite (a postulated N-glucuronide) and a sulphated ring-hydroxylated metabolite (a postulated 4-amino-5-trifluoromethylphenyl sulphate) following dosing of 2-TFMA. These accounted for approximately 53.0 and 31.5% of the dose, respectively. This study identifies problems on sample component instability in the preparation and analysis procedures. PMID:12467928

  18. NMR-based investigation of the Drosophila melanogaster metabolome under the influence of daily cycles of light and temperature.

    PubMed

    Gogna, Navdeep; Singh, Viveka Jagdish; Sheeba, Vasu; Dorai, Kavita

    2015-12-01

    We utilized an NMR-based metabolomic approach to profile the metabolites in Drosophila melanogaster that cycle with a daily rhythm. 1H 1D and 2D NMR experiments were performed on whole-body extracts sampled from flies that experienced strong time cues in the form of both light and temperature cycles. Multivariate and univariate statistical analysis was used to identify those metabolites whose concentrations oscillate diurnally. We compared metabolite levels at two time points twelve hours apart, one close to the end of the day and the other close to the end of the night, and identified metabolites that differed significantly in their relative concentrations. We were able to identify 14 such metabolites whose concentrations differed significantly between the two time points. The concentrations of metabolites such as sterols, fatty acids, amino acids such as leucine, valine, isoleucine, alanine and lysine as well as other metabolites such as creatine, glucose, AMP and NAD were higher close to the end of the night, whereas the levels of lactic acid, and a few amino acids such as histidine and tryptophan were higher close to the end of the day. We compared signal intensities across 12 equally spaced time points for these 14 metabolites, in order to profile the changes in their levels across the day, since the NMR metabolite peak intensity is directly proportional to its molar concentration. Through this report we establish NMR-based metabolomics combined with multivariate statistical analysis as a useful method for future studies on the interactions between circadian clocks and metabolic processes. PMID:26422411

  19. Tracing bacterial metabolism using multi-nuclear (1H, 2H, and 13C) Solid State NMR: Realizing an Idea Initiated by James Scott

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G.; Fogel, M. L.; Jin, K.; Griffen, P.; Steele, A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Approximately 6 years ago, while at the Geophysical Laboratory, James Scott became interested in the application of Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to study bacterial metabolism. As often happens, other experiments intervened and the NMR experiments were not pursued. We have revisited Jame's question and find that using a multi-nuclear approach (1H, 2H, and 13C Solid State NMR) on laboratory cell culture has some distinct advantages. Our experiments involved batch cultures of E. coli (MG1655) harvested at stationary phase. In all experiments the growth medium consisted of MOPS medium for enterobacteria, where the substrate is glucose. In one set of experiments, 10 % of the water was D2O; in another 10 % of the glucose was per-deuterated. The control experiment used both water and glucose at natural isotopic abundance. A kill control of dead E. coli immersed in pure D2O for an extended period exhibited no deuterium incorporation. In both deuterium enriched experiments, considerable incorporation of deuterium into E. coli's biomolecular constituents was detected via 2H Solid State NMR. In the case of the D2O enriched experiment, 58 % of the incorporated deuterium is observed in a sharp peak at a frequency of 0.31 ppm, consistent with D incorporation in the cell membrane lipids, the remainder is observed in a broad peak at a higher frequency (centered at 5.4 ppm, but spanning out to beyond 10 ppm) that is consistent with D incorporation into predominantly DNA and RNA. In the case of the D-glucose experiments, 61 % of the deuterium is observed in a sharp resonance peak at 0.34 ppm, also consistent with D incorporation into membrane lipids, the remainder of the D is observed at a broad resonance peak centered at 4.3 ppm, consistent with D enrichment in glycogen. Deuterium abundance in the E. coli cells grown in 10 % D2O is nearly 2X greater than that grown with 10 % D-glucose. Very subtle differences are observed in both the 1H and 13C solid

  20. Bevacizumab impairs oxidative energy metabolism and shows antitumoral effects in recurrent glioblastomas: a 31P/1H MRSI and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hattingen, Elke; Jurcoane, Alina; Bähr, Oliver; Rieger, Johannes; Magerkurth, Jörg; Anti, Sandra; Steinbach, Joachim P; Pilatus, Ulrich

    2011-12-01

    Bevacizumab shows unprecedented rates of response in recurrent glioblastomas (GBM), but the detailed mechanisms are still unclear. We employed in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether bevacizumab alters oxygen and energy metabolism and whether this effect has antitumoral activity in recurrent GBM. (31)P and (1)H MRSI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and high-resolution T2 and T2' mapping (indirect marker of oxygen extraction) were investigated in 16 patients with recurrent GBM at 3 Tesla before and 1.5-2 months after initiation of therapy with bevacizumab. Changes of metabolite concentrations and of the quantitative values in the tumor and normal appearing brain tissue were calculated. The Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was used to evaluate differences for tumor/edema versus control as well as changes before versus after commencement of therapy. Survival analyses were performed for significant parameters. Tumor T2', pH, ADC, and T2 decreased significantly in patients responding to bevacizumab therapy (n = 10). Patients with at least 25% T2' decrease during treatment showed longer progression-free and overall survival durations. Levels of high-energy metabolites were lower at baseline; these persisted under therapy. Glycerophosphoethanolamine as catabolic phospholipid metabolite increased in responders. The MRSI data support the hypothesis that bevacizumab induces relative tumor hypoxia (T2' decrease) and affects energy homeostasis in recurrent GBM, suggesting that bevacizumab impairs vascular function. The antiangiogenic effect of bevacizumab is predictive of better outcome and seems to induce antitumoral activity in the responding GBMs. PMID:21890539

  1. NMR-based metabonomic analysis of the hepatotoxicity induced by combined exposure to PCBs and TCDD in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Chunfeng; Wang Yimei; Sheng Zhiguo; Liu Gang; Fu Ze; Zhao Jing; Zhao Jun; Yan Xianzhong; Zhu Benzhan; Peng Shuangqing

    2010-11-01

    A metabonomic approach using {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy was adopted to investigate the metabonomic pattern of rat urine after oral administration of environmental endocrine disruptors (EDs) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo- p-dioxin (TCDD) alone or in combination and to explore the possible hepatotoxic mechanisms of combined exposure to PCBs and TCDD. {sup 1}H NMR spectra of urines collected 24 h before and after exposure were analyzed via pattern recognition by using principal component analysis (PCA). Serum biochemistry and liver histopathology indicated significant hepatotoxicity in the rats of the combined group. The PCA scores plots of urinary {sup 1}H NMR data showed that all the treatment groups could be easily distinguished from the control group, so could the PCBs or TCDD group and the combined group. The loadings plots of the PCA revealed remarkable increases in the levels of lactate, glucose, taurine, creatine, and 2-hydroxy-isovaleric acid and reductions in the levels of 2-oxoglutarate, citrate, succinate, hippurate, and trimethylamine-N-oxide in rat urine after exposure. These changes were more striking in the combined group. The changed metabolites may be considered possible biomarker for the hepatotoxicity. The present study demonstrates that combined exposure to PCBs and TCDD induced significant hepatotoxicity in rats, and mitochondrial dysfunction and fatty acid metabolism perturbations might contribute to the hepatotoxicity. There was good conformity between changes in the urine metabonomic pattern and those in serum biochemistry and liver histopathology. These results showed that the NMR-based metabonomic approach may provide a promising technique for the evaluation of the combined toxicity of EDs.

  2. NMR-based metabolomics approach to study the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin to goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Wang, Junsong; Lu, Zhaoguang; Wei, Dandan; Yang, Minghua; Kong, Lingyi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabolomics approach was applied to investigate the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) in goldfish (Carassius auratus). LCT showed tissue-specific damage to gill, heart, liver and kidney tissues of goldfish. NMR profiling combined with statistical methods such as orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) and two-dimensional statistical total correlation spectroscopy (2D-STOCSY) was developed to discern metabolite changes occurring after one week LCT exposure in brain, heart and kidney tissues of goldfish. LCT exposure influenced levels of many metabolites (e.g., leucine, isoleucine and valine in brain and kidney; lactate in brain, heart and kidney; alanine in brain and kidney; choline in brain, heart and kidney; taurine in brain, heart and kidney; N-acetylaspartate in brain; myo-inositol in brain; phosphocreatine in brain and heart; 2-oxoglutarate in brain; cis-aconitate in brain, and etc.), and broke the balance of neurotransmitters and osmoregulators, evoked oxidative stress, disturbed metabolisms of energy and amino acids. The implication of glutamate-glutamine-gamma-aminobutyric axis in LCT induced toxicity was demonstrated for the first time. Our findings demonstrated the applicability and potential of metabolomics approach for the elucidation of toxicological effects of pesticides and the underlying mechanisms, and the discovery of biomarkers for pesticide pollution in aquatic environment. PMID:24291083

  3. International NMR-based Environmental Metabolomics Intercomparison Exercise

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several fundamental requirements must be met so that NMR-based metabolomics and the related technique of metabonomics can be formally adopted into environmental monitoring and chemical risk assessment. Here we report an intercomparison exercise which has evaluated the effectivene...

  4. (1)H-Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolic profiling of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced adverse effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Um, So Young; Park, Jung Hyun; Chung, Myeon Woo; Choi, Ki Hwan; Lee, Hwa Jeong

    2016-09-10

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are globally prescribed, exhibit mainly anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects but also can cause adverse effects including gastrointestinal erosions, ulceration, bleeding, and perforation. The purpose of this study was to investigate surrogate biomarkers associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) damage caused by NSAID treatment using pattern recognition analysis of (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra of rat urine. Urine was collected for 5h after oral administration of the following NSAIDs at low or high doses: acetylsalicylic acid (10 or 200mgkg(-1)), diclofenac (0.5 or 15mgkg(-1)), piroxicam (1 or 10mgkg(-1)), indomethacin (1 or 25mgkg(-1)), or ibuprofen (10, or 150mgkg(-1)) as nonselective COX inhibitors and celecoxib (10 or 100mgkg(-1)) as a COX-2 selective inhibitor. The urine was analyzed using 500MHz (1)H NMR for spectral binning and targeted profiling and the level of gastric damage was examined. The nonselective COX inhibitors caused severe gastric damage while no lesions were observed in the celecoxib-treated rats. The (1)H NMR urine spectra were divided into spectral bins (0.04ppm) for global profiling, and a total of 44 endogenous metabolites were assigned for targeted profiling. Multivariate data analyses were performed to recognize the spectral pattern of endogenous metabolites related to NSAIDs using partial least square-discrimination analysis (PLS-DA). The (1)H NMR spectra clustered differently according to gastric damage score in global profiling. In targeted profiling, the endogenous metabolites of citrate, allantoin, 2-oxoglutarate, acetate, benzoate, glycine, and trimethylamine N-oxide were selected as putative biomarkers for gastric damage caused by NSAIDs. These putative biomarkers might be useful for predicting the risk of adverse effects caused by NSAIDs in the early stage of drug development process. PMID:27497650

  5. Effects of reactive oxygen species on metabolism monitored by longitudinal 1H single voxel MRS follow-up in patients with mitochondrial disease or cerebral tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constans, J. M.; Collet, S.; Guillamo, J. S.; Hossu, G.; Lacombe, S.; Gauduel, Y. A.; Houée Levin, C.; Dou, W.; Ruan, S.; Barré, L.; Rioult, F.; Derlon, J. M.; Lechapt-Zalcman, E.; Valable, S.; Chapon, F.; Courtheoux, P.; Fong, V.; Kauffmann, F.

    2011-01-01

    Free radicals, or Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), have an effect on energy and glycolytic metabolism, mitochondrial function, lipid metabolism, necrosis and apoptosis, cell proliferation, and infiltration. These changes could be monitored longitudinally (every 4 months over 6 years) in humans with glial brain tumors (low and high grade) after therapy, using conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) and MR perfusion. Some examples of early clinical data from longitudinal follow-up monitoring in humans of energy and glycolytic metabolism, lipid metabolism, necrosis, proliferation, and infiltration measured by conventional MRI, MRS and perfusion, and positron emission tomography (PET) are shown in glial brain tumors after therapy. Despite the difficulty, the variability and unknown factors, these repeated measurements give us a better insight into the nature of the different processes, tumor progression and therapeutic response.

  6. NMR-based metabonomic study of the sub-acute toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in rats after oral administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Qian; Yan, Guangyan; Deng, Pengchi; Peng, Feng; Lin, Hongjun; Xu, Youzhi; Cao, Zhixing; Zhou, Tian; Xue, Aiqin; Wang, Yanli; Cen, Xiaobo; Zhao, Ying-Lan

    2010-03-01

    As titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used commercially, their potential toxicity on human health has attracted particular attention. In the present study, the oral toxicological effects of TiO2 NPs (dosed at 0.16, 0.4 and 1 g kg - 1, respectively) were investigated using conventional approaches and metabonomic analysis in Wistar rats. Serum chemistry, hematology and histopathology examinations were performed. The urine and serum were investigated by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using principal components and partial least squares discriminant analysis. The metabolic signature of urinalysis in TiO2 NP-treated rats showed increases in the levels of taurine, citrate, hippurate, histidine, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), citrulline, α-ketoglutarate, phenylacetylglycine (PAG) and acetate; moreover, decreases in the levels of lactate, betaine, methionine, threonine, pyruvate, 3-D-hydroxybutyrate (3-D-HB), choline and leucine were observed. The metabonomics analysis of serum showed increases in TMAO, choline, creatine, phosphocholine and 3-D-HB as well as decreases in glutamine, pyruvate, glutamate, acetoacetate, glutathione and methionine after TiO2 NP treatment. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were elevated and mitochondrial swelling in heart tissue was observed in TiO2 NP-treated rats. These findings indicate that disturbances in energy and amino acid metabolism and the gut microflora environment may be attributable to the slight injury to the liver and heart caused by TiO2 NPs. Moreover, the NMR-based metabolomic approach is a reliable and sensitive method to study the biochemical effects of nanomaterials.

  7. Effects of high fructose and salt feeding on systematic metabonome probed via (1) H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxia; Zheng, Lingyun; Wang, Linlin; Wang, Shumei; Wang, Yaling; Han, Zhihui

    2015-04-01

    Diets rich in high fructose and salt are increasingly popular in our daily life. A combination consumption of excessive fructose and salt can induce insulin resistance (IR) and hypertension (HT), which are major public health problems around the world. However, the effects of high fructose and salt on systematic metabonome remain unknown, which is very important for revealing the molecular mechanism of IR and HT induced by this dietary pattern. The metabolic profiling in urine, plasma, and fecal extracts from high fructose and salt-fed rats was investigated by use of (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics approach in this study. Multivariate analysis of NMR data showed the effects of high fructose and salt on the global metabonome. The metabolite analysis in urine and fecal extracts showed the time-dependent metabolic changes, which displayed metabonomic progression axes from normal to IR and HT status. The changes of 2-oxoglutarate, creatine and creatinine, citrate, hippurate, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), and betaine in urine, together with gut microbiota disorder in feces, were observed at the preliminary formation stage of IR and HT (fourth week). At the severe stage (eighth week), the previously mentioned metabolic changes were aggravated, and the changes of lipid and choline metabolism in plasma suggested the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. These findings provide an overview of biochemistry consequences of high fructose and salt feeding and comprehensive insights into the progression of systematic metabonome for IR and HT induced by this dietary pattern. PMID:25641270

  8. Chemical Composition and Seasonality of Aromatic Mediterranean Plant Species by NMR-Based Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Scognamiglio, Monica; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Esposito, Assunta; Fiorentino, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An NMR-based metabolomic approach has been applied to analyse seven aromatic Mediterranean plant species used in traditional cuisine. Based on the ethnobotanical use of these plants, the approach has been employed in order to study the metabolic changes during different seasons. Primary and secondary metabolites have been detected and quantified. Flavonoids (apigenin, quercetin, and kaempferol derivatives) and phenylpropanoid derivatives (e.g., chlorogenic and rosmarinic acid) are the main identified polyphenols. The richness in these metabolites could explain the biological properties ascribed to these plant species. PMID:25785229

  9. Application of 1H-NMR metabolomic profiling for reef-building corals.

    PubMed

    Sogin, Emilia M; Anderson, Paul; Williams, Philip; Chen, Chii-Shiarng; Gates, Ruth D

    2014-01-01

    In light of global reef decline new methods to accurately, cheaply, and quickly evaluate coral metabolic states are needed to assess reef health. Metabolomic profiling can describe the response of individuals to disturbance (i.e., shifts in environmental conditions) across biological models and is a powerful approach for characterizing and comparing coral metabolism. For the first time, we assess the utility of a proton-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR)-based metabolomics approach in characterizing coral metabolite profiles by 1) investigating technical, intra-, and inter-sample variation, 2) evaluating the ability to recover targeted metabolite spikes, and 3) assessing the potential for this method to differentiate among coral species. Our results indicate 1H-NMR profiling of Porites compressa corals is highly reproducible and exhibits low levels of variability within and among colonies. The spiking experiments validate the sensitivity of our methods and showcase the capacity of orthogonal partial least squares discriminate analysis (OPLS-DA) to distinguish between profiles spiked with varying metabolite concentrations (0 mM, 0.1 mM, and 10 mM). Finally, 1H-NMR metabolomics coupled with OPLS-DA, revealed species-specific patterns in metabolite profiles among four reef-building corals (Pocillopora damicornis, Porites lobata, Montipora aequituberculata, and Seriatopora hystrix). Collectively, these data indicate that 1H-NMR metabolomic techniques can profile reef-building coral metabolomes and have the potential to provide an integrated picture of the coral phenotype in response to environmental change. PMID:25354140

  10. Application of 1H-NMR Metabolomic Profiling for Reef-Building Corals

    PubMed Central

    Sogin, Emilia M.; Anderson, Paul; Williams, Philip; Chen, Chii-Shiarng; Gates, Ruth D.

    2014-01-01

    In light of global reef decline new methods to accurately, cheaply, and quickly evaluate coral metabolic states are needed to assess reef health. Metabolomic profiling can describe the response of individuals to disturbance (i.e., shifts in environmental conditions) across biological models and is a powerful approach for characterizing and comparing coral metabolism. For the first time, we assess the utility of a proton-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR)-based metabolomics approach in characterizing coral metabolite profiles by 1) investigating technical, intra-, and inter-sample variation, 2) evaluating the ability to recover targeted metabolite spikes, and 3) assessing the potential for this method to differentiate among coral species. Our results indicate 1H-NMR profiling of Porites compressa corals is highly reproducible and exhibits low levels of variability within and among colonies. The spiking experiments validate the sensitivity of our methods and showcase the capacity of orthogonal partial least squares discriminate analysis (OPLS-DA) to distinguish between profiles spiked with varying metabolite concentrations (0 mM, 0.1 mM, and 10 mM). Finally, 1H-NMR metabolomics coupled with OPLS-DA, revealed species-specific patterns in metabolite profiles among four reef-building corals (Pocillopora damicornis, Porites lobata, Montipora aequituberculata, and Seriatopora hystrix). Collectively, these data indicate that 1H-NMR metabolomic techniques can profile reef-building coral metabolomes and have the potential to provide an integrated picture of the coral phenotype in response to environmental change. PMID:25354140

  11. 1H and 31P NMR and HPLC studies of mouse L1210 leukemia cell extracts: the effect of Au(I) and Cu(I) diphosphine complexes on the cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Berners-Price, S J; Sant, M E; Christopherson, R I; Kuchel, P W

    1991-03-01

    The effect of the antitumor complex [Au(dppe)2]Cl (where dppe is Ph2P(CH2)2PPh2) on the overall metabolism of cultured mouse L1210 leukemia cells was investigated by comparing 1H and 31P NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts of cells incubated for 1 h in the presence and absence of 2 microM [Au(dppe)2]Cl. There were marked (ca. two-fold) increases in the levels of lactate and almost all detectable amino acids suggesting a drug-induced increase in the rate of glycolysis and inhibition of protein synthesis. The levels of taurine and phosphorylcholine were significantly decreased and 31P NMR spectra revealed a depletion of nucleoside triphosphates (NTP). The effect on nucleotide metabolism was investigated further by separating purine and pyrimidine nucleotides and precursors by anion-exchange HPLC. NTP levels were depleted by ca. 70-90% and there was a ca. three- to four-fold increase in nucleoside di- and monophosphates. The effect is postulated to be the result of uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The Cu(I) complex [Cu(Ph2PCH = CHPPh2)2]Cl produced a similar effect on the cellular metabolism but was more potent. The water-soluble complex [Cu(Ph2P(CH2)PEt2)2]Cl caused the accumulation of cellular amino acids at a concentration that did not significantly deplete ATP levels. PMID:2062226

  12. Design and Synthesis of 2-Heterocyclyl-3-arylthio-1H-indoles as Potent Tubulin Polymerization and Cell Growth Inhibitors with Improved Metabolic Stability

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Rensen, Willeke; Coluccia, Antonio; Piscitelli, Francesco; Gatti, Valerio; Bolognesi, Alessio; Lavecchia, Antonio; Granata, Ilaria; Porta, Amalia; Maresca, Bruno; Soriani, Alessandra; Iannitto, Maria Luisa; Mariani, Marisa; Santoni, Angela; Brancale, Andrea; Ferlini, Cristiano; Dondio, Giulio; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Novellino, Ettore; Silvestri, Romano

    2011-01-01

    New arylthioindoles (ATIs) were obtained by replacing the 2-alkoxycarbonyl group with a bioisosteric 5-membered heterocycle nucleus. The new ATIs 5, 8, and 10 inhibited tubulin polymerization, reduced cell growth of a panel of human transformed cell lines, and showed higher metabolic stability than the reference ester 3. These compounds induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis at a similar level as combretastatin A-4 and vinblastine and triggered caspase-3 expression in a significant fraction of cells in both p53-proficient and p53-defective cell lines. Importantly, ATIs 5, 8, and 10 were more effective than vinorelbine, vinblastine, and paclitaxel as growth inhibitors of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing cell line NCI/ADR-RES. Compound 5 was shown to have medium metabolic stability in both human and mouse liver microsomes, in contrast to the rapidly degraded reference ester 3, and a pharmacokinetic profile in the mouse characterized by a low systemic clearance and excellent oral bioavailability. PMID:22044164

  13. Prospective evaluation of potential toxicity of repeated doses of Thymus vulgaris L. extracts in rats by means of clinical chemistry, histopathology and NMR-based metabonomic approach.

    PubMed

    Benourad, Fouzia; Kahvecioglu, Zehra; Youcef-Benkada, Mokhtar; Colet, Jean-Marie

    2014-10-01

    In the field of natural extracts, research generally focuses on the study of their biological activities for food, cosmetic, or pharmacological purposes. The evaluation of their adverse effects is often overlooked. In this study, the extracts of Thymus vulgaris L. were obtained by two different extraction methods. Intraperitoneal injections of both extracts were given daily for four days to male Wistar Han rats, at two different doses for each extract. The evaluation of the potential toxic effects included histopathological examination of liver, kidney, and lung tissues, as well as serum biochemistry of liver and kidney parameters, and (1)H-NMR-based metabonomic profiles of urine. The results showed that no histopathological changes were observed in the liver and kidney in rats treated with both extracts of thyme. Serum biochemical investigations revealed significant increases in blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and uric acid in animals treated with polyphenolic extract at both doses. In these latter groups, metabonomic analysis revealed alterations in a number of urine metabolites involved in the energy metabolism in liver mitochondria. Indeed, the results showed alterations of glycolysis, Krebs cycle, and β-oxidative pathways as evidenced by increases in lactate and ketone bodies, and decreases in citrate, α-ketoglutarate, creatinine, hippurate, dimethylglycine, and dimethyalanine. In conclusion, this work showed that i.p. injection of repeated doses of thyme extracts causes some disturbances of intermediary metabolism in rats. The metabonomic study revealed interesting data which could be further used to determine the cellular pathways affected by such treatments. PMID:24574060

  14. Impact of metal pollution on shrimp Crangon affinis by NMR-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenglong; Yu, Deliang; Wang, Qing; Li, Fei; Zhao, Jianmin; Wu, Huifeng

    2016-05-15

    Both cadmium and arsenic are the important metal/metalloid pollutants in the Bohai Sea. In this work, we sampled the dominant species, shrimp Crangon affinis, from three sites, the Middle of the Bohai Sea (MBS), the Yellow River Estuary (YRE) and the Laizhou Bay (LZB) along the Bohai Sea. The concentrations of metals/metalloids in shrimps C. affinis indicated that the YRE site was polluted by Cd and Pb, while the LZB site was contaminated by As. The metabolic differences between shrimps C. affinis from the reference site (MBS) and metal-pollution sites (YRE and LZB) were characterized using NMR-based metabolomics. Results indicated that the metal pollutions in YRE and LZB induced disturbances in osmotic regulation and energy metabolism via different metabolic pathways. In addition, a combination of alanine and arginine might be the biomarker of Cd contamination, while BCAAs and tyrosine could be the biomarkers of arsenic contamination in C. affinis. PMID:26920426

  15. Alterations in brain metabolism and function following administration of low-dose codeine phosphate: 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhen; Lin, Pei-Yin; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Ren-Hua; Xiao, Ye-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify alterations in brain function following administration of a single, low-dose of codeine phosphate in healthy volunteers using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In addition, the metabolic changes in the two sides of the frontal lobe were identified using 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). A total of 20 right-handed healthy participants (10 males, 10 females) were evaluated, and a Signa HDx 1.5T MRI scanner was used for data acquisition. An echo planar imaging sequence was used for resting-state fMRI, whereas a point resolved spectroscopy sequence was used for 1H-MRS. Regional Saturation Technique, Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI, and Statistical Parameter Mapping 8 were used to analyze the fMRI data. The 1H-MRS data were analyzed using LCModel software. At 1 h after oral administration of codeine phosphate (1.0 mg/kg), the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and regional homogeneity were altered in different brain areas. The choline content was significantly increased in the right and left frontal lobes following codeine phosphate administration (P=0.02 and P=0.03, respectively), whereas the inositol content was significantly decreased in the left frontal lobe (P=0.02). There was no change in the glutamic acid content in the frontal lobes. In conclusion, the functions of different brain regions can be affected by a single, low-dose administration of codeine phosphate. The alterations in metabolite content in the two frontal lobes may be associated with changes in brain function, whereas the ALFF in the globus pallidus may have an effect on codeine phosphate addiction. Finally, glutamic acid may be useful in the estimation of codeine dependence. PMID:27446252

  16. 7.0 T high-resolution 1H-MR spectroscopy of metabolic changes induced by chronic codeine phosphate in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen; Lin, Pei-yin; Shen, Zhi-wei; Xiao, Ye-yu; Wu, Ren-hua

    2015-09-01

    Codeine phosphate is used widely to treat cough and pain. It is actually a sedative, but is known to cause codeine dependence. The exact mechanisms of codeine dependence are not fully understood, but are generally believed to be related to drug-induced neuroadaptation. Metabolites changes can provide information for pathological processes and mechanisms before the shape change. It is very useful for the diagnosis and treatment of drug addiction. We used H NMR spectroscopy in vivo to measure the concentrations of cerebral metabolites in the hippocampus of rats subjected to repeated codeine treatment. After 2 months of codeine treatment, the concentration of N-acetylaspartate was significantly decreased in hippocampi, as was that of glutamate, choline, and taurine. Our study highlights the potential use of metabolic profiling to enhance our understanding of metabolite alteration associated with codeine dependence. PMID:26181665

  17. The effects of therapeutic hypothermia on cerebral metabolism in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: An in vivo 1H-MR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Wisnowski, Jessica L; Wu, Tai-Wei; Reitman, Aaron J; McLean, Claire; Friedlich, Philippe; Vanderbilt, Douglas; Ho, Eugenia; Nelson, Marvin D; Panigrahy, Ashok; Blüml, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has emerged as the first empirically supported therapy for neuroprotection in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) to characterize the effects of hypothermia on energy metabolites, neurotransmitters, and antioxidants. Thirty-one neonates with HIE were studied during hypothermia and after rewarming. Metabolite concentrations (mmol/kg) were determined from the thalamus, basal ganglia, cortical grey matter, and cerebral white matter. In the thalamus, phosphocreatine concentrations were increased by 20% during hypothermia when compared to after rewarming (3.49 ± 0.88 vs. 2.90 ± 0.65, p < 0.001) while free creatine concentrations were reduced to a similar degree (3.00 ± 0.50 vs. 3.74 ± 0.85, p < 0.001). Glutamate (5.33 ± 0.82 vs. 6.32 ± 1.12, p < 0.001), aspartate (3.39 ± 0.66 vs. 3.87 ± 1.19, p < 0.05), and GABA (0.92 ± 0.36 vs. 1.19 ± 0.41, p < 0.05) were also reduced, while taurine (1.39 ± 0.52 vs. 0.79 ± 0.61, p < 0.001) and glutathione (2.23 ± 0.41 vs. 2.09 ± 0.33, p < 0.05) were increased. Similar patterns were observed in other brain regions. These findings support that hypothermia improves energy homeostasis by decreasing the availability of excitatory neurotransmitters, and thereby, cellular energy demand. PMID:26661180

  18. Combined MRI and 31P-MRS Investigations of the ACTA1(H40Y) Mouse Model of Nemaline Myopathy Show Impaired Muscle Function and Altered Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gineste, Charlotte; Le Fur, Yann; Vilmen, Christophe; Le Troter, Arnaud; Pecchi, Emilie; Cozzone, Patrick J.; Hardeman, Edna C.; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is the most common disease entity among non-dystrophic skeletal muscle congenital diseases. Mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1) account for ∼25% of all NM cases and are the most frequent cause of severe forms of NM. So far, the mechanisms underlying muscle weakness in NM patients remain unclear. Additionally, recent Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies reported a progressive fatty infiltration of skeletal muscle with a specific muscle involvement in patients with ACTA1 mutations. We investigated strictly noninvasively the gastrocnemius muscle function of a mouse model carrying a mutation in the ACTA1 gene (H40Y). Skeletal muscle anatomy (hindlimb muscles and fat volumes) and energy metabolism were studied using MRI and 31Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Skeletal muscle contractile performance was investigated while applying a force-frequency protocol (from 1–150 Hz) and a fatigue protocol (80 stimuli at 40 Hz). H40Y mice showed a reduction of both absolute (−40%) and specific (−25%) maximal force production as compared to controls. Interestingly, muscle weakness was associated with an improved resistance to fatigue (+40%) and an increased energy cost. On the contrary, the force frequency relationship was not modified in H40Y mice and the extent of fatty infiltration was minor and not different from the WT group. We concluded that the H40Y mouse model does not reproduce human MRI findings but shows a severe muscle weakness which might be related to an alteration of intrinsic muscular properties. The increased energy cost in H40Y mice might be related to either an impaired mitochondrial function or an alteration at the cross-bridges level. Overall, we provided a unique set of anatomic, metabolic and functional biomarkers that might be relevant for monitoring the progression of NM disease but also for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions at a preclinical level. PMID:23613869

  19. An NMR-Based Metabolomic Approach to Investigate the Effects of Supplementation with Glutamic Acid in Piglets Challenged with Deoxynivalenol

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Hu, Jiayu; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Oso, Abimbola Oladele; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yao, Kang; Yin, Yulong; Li, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) has various toxicological effects in humans and pigs that result from the ingestion of contaminated cereal products. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effects of dietary supplementation with glutamic acid on piglets challenged with DON. A total of 20 piglets weaned at 28 d of age were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 treatments (5 piglets/treatment): 1) basal diet, negative control (NC); 2) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON (DON); 3) basal diet +2% (g/g) glutamic acid (GLU); 4) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON +2% glutamic acid (DG). A 7-d adaptation period was followed by 30 days of treatment. A metabolite analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR)-based metabolomic technology and the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities for plasma, as well as the activity of Caspase-3 and the proliferation of epithelial cells were conducted. The results showed that contents of low-density lipoprotein, alanine, arginine, acetate, glycoprotein, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), glycine, lactate, and urea, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio were higher but high-density lipoprotein, proline, citrate, choline, unsaturated lipids and fumarate were lower in piglets of DON treatment than that of NC treatment (P<0.05). Compared with DON treatment, dietary supplementation with glutamic acid increased the plasma concentrations of proline, citrate, creatinine, unsaturated lipids, and fumarate, and decreased the concentrations of alanine, glycoprotein, TMAO, glycine, and lactate, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio (P<0.05). Addition glutamic acid to DON treatment increased the plasma activities of SOD and GSH-Px and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling indexes for the jejunum and ileum (P<0.05). These novel findings indicate that glutamic acid has the potential to repair the injuries associated with oxidative stress as well as the disturbances of energy and amino

  20. An NMR-based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of supplementation with glutamic acid in piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miaomiao; Xiao, Hao; Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Hu, Jiayu; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Oso, Abimbola Oladele; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yao, Kang; Yin, Yulong; Li, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) has various toxicological effects in humans and pigs that result from the ingestion of contaminated cereal products. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effects of dietary supplementation with glutamic acid on piglets challenged with DON. A total of 20 piglets weaned at 28 d of age were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 treatments (5 piglets/treatment): 1) basal diet, negative control (NC); 2) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON (DON); 3) basal diet +2% (g/g) glutamic acid (GLU); 4) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON +2% glutamic acid (DG). A 7-d adaptation period was followed by 30 days of treatment. A metabolite analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR)-based metabolomic technology and the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities for plasma, as well as the activity of Caspase-3 and the proliferation of epithelial cells were conducted. The results showed that contents of low-density lipoprotein, alanine, arginine, acetate, glycoprotein, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), glycine, lactate, and urea, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio were higher but high-density lipoprotein, proline, citrate, choline, unsaturated lipids and fumarate were lower in piglets of DON treatment than that of NC treatment (P<0.05). Compared with DON treatment, dietary supplementation with glutamic acid increased the plasma concentrations of proline, citrate, creatinine, unsaturated lipids, and fumarate, and decreased the concentrations of alanine, glycoprotein, TMAO, glycine, and lactate, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio (P<0.05). Addition glutamic acid to DON treatment increased the plasma activities of SOD and GSH-Px and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling indexes for the jejunum and ileum (P<0.05). These novel findings indicate that glutamic acid has the potential to repair the injuries associated with oxidative stress as well as the disturbances of energy and amino

  1. An Investigation into the Antiobesity Effects of Morinda citrifolia L. Leaf Extract in High Fat Diet Induced Obese Rats Using a 1H NMR Metabolomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Gooda Sahib Jambocus, Najla; Saari, Nazamid; Ismail, Amin; Mahomoodally, Mohamad Fawzi; Abdul Hamid, Azizah

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide, with high fat diet (HFD) as one of the main contributing factors. Obesity increases the predisposition to other diseases such as diabetes through various metabolic pathways. Limited availability of antiobesity drugs and the popularity of complementary medicine have encouraged research in finding phytochemical strategies to this multifaceted disease. HFD induced obese Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with an extract of Morinda citrifolia L. leaves (MLE 60). After 9 weeks of treatment, positive effects were observed on adiposity, fecal fat content, plasma lipids, and insulin and leptin levels. The inducement of obesity and treatment with MLE 60 on metabolic alterations were then further elucidated using a 1H NMR based metabolomics approach. Discriminating metabolites involved were products of various metabolic pathways, including glucose metabolism and TCA cycle (lactate, 2-oxoglutarate, citrate, succinate, pyruvate, and acetate), amino acid metabolism (alanine, 2-hydroxybutyrate), choline metabolism (betaine), creatinine metabolism (creatinine), and gut microbiome metabolism (hippurate, phenylacetylglycine, dimethylamine, and trigonelline). Treatment with MLE 60 resulted in significant improvement in the metabolic perturbations caused obesity as demonstrated by the proximity of the treated group to the normal group in the OPLS-DA score plot and the change in trajectory movement of the diseased group towards the healthy group upon treatment. PMID:26798649

  2. An Investigation into the Antiobesity Effects of Morinda citrifolia L. Leaf Extract in High Fat Diet Induced Obese Rats Using a (1)H NMR Metabolomics Approach.

    PubMed

    Gooda Sahib Jambocus, Najla; Saari, Nazamid; Ismail, Amin; Khatib, Alfi; Mahomoodally, Mohamad Fawzi; Abdul Hamid, Azizah

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide, with high fat diet (HFD) as one of the main contributing factors. Obesity increases the predisposition to other diseases such as diabetes through various metabolic pathways. Limited availability of antiobesity drugs and the popularity of complementary medicine have encouraged research in finding phytochemical strategies to this multifaceted disease. HFD induced obese Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with an extract of Morinda citrifolia L. leaves (MLE 60). After 9 weeks of treatment, positive effects were observed on adiposity, fecal fat content, plasma lipids, and insulin and leptin levels. The inducement of obesity and treatment with MLE 60 on metabolic alterations were then further elucidated using a (1)H NMR based metabolomics approach. Discriminating metabolites involved were products of various metabolic pathways, including glucose metabolism and TCA cycle (lactate, 2-oxoglutarate, citrate, succinate, pyruvate, and acetate), amino acid metabolism (alanine, 2-hydroxybutyrate), choline metabolism (betaine), creatinine metabolism (creatinine), and gut microbiome metabolism (hippurate, phenylacetylglycine, dimethylamine, and trigonelline). Treatment with MLE 60 resulted in significant improvement in the metabolic perturbations caused obesity as demonstrated by the proximity of the treated group to the normal group in the OPLS-DA score plot and the change in trajectory movement of the diseased group towards the healthy group upon treatment. PMID:26798649

  3. NMR-based metabolomics to determine acute inhalation effects of nano- and fine-sized ZnO particles in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheng-Han; Wang, Ting-Yi; Hong, Jia-Huei; Cheng, Tsun-Jen; Lin, Ching-Yu

    2016-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) particles induce acute occupational inhalation illness in humans and rats. However, the possible molecular mechanisms of ZnO particles on the respiratory system remain unclear. In this study, metabolic responses of the respiratory system of rats inhaled ZnO particles were investigated by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic approach. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with a series of doses of nano-sized (35 nm) or fine-sized (250 nm) ZnO particles. The corresponding control groups inhaled filtered air. After 24 h, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were collected, extracted and prepared for (1)H and J-resolved NMR analysis, followed by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). PCA and PLSDA models from analysis of BALF and hydrophilic lung NMR spectra demonstrated that dose response trends were restricted to the 250 nm ZnO particle exposure group and were not observed in the 35 nm ZnO particle exposure group. Increased isoleucine and valine, as well as decreased acetate, trimethylamine n-oxide, taurine, glycine, formate, ascorbate and glycerophosphocholine, were recorded in the BALF of rats treated with moderate and high dose 250 nm ZnO exposures. Decreases in taurine and glucose, as well as an increase of phosphorylcholine-containing lipids and fatty acyl chains, were detected in the lung tissues from 250 nm ZnO-treated rats. These metabolic changes may be associated with cell anti-oxidation, energy metabolism, DNA damage and membrane stability. We also concluded that a metabolic approach provides more complete measurements and suggests potential molecular mechanisms of adverse effects. PMID:27245357

  4. Application of (1)H NMR-based serum metabolomic studies for monitoring female patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zabek, Adam; Swierkot, Jerzy; Malak, Anna; Zawadzka, Iga; Deja, Stanisław; Bogunia-Kubik, Katarzyna; Mlynarz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune-based inflammatory disease that leads to progressive joint degeneration, disability, and an increased risk of cardiovascular complications, which is the main cause of mortality in this population of patients. Although several biomarkers are routinely used in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, there is a high demand for novel biomarkers to further improve the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, stratification of patients, and the prediction of a better response to a specific therapy. In this study, the metabolomics approach was used to provide relevant biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy, define prognosis and predict and monitor treatment efficacy. The results indicated that twelve metabolites were important for the discrimination of healthy control and rheumatoid arthritis. Notably, valine, isoleucine, lactate, alanine, creatinine, GPC  APC and histidine relative levels were lower in rheumatoid arthritis, whereas 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, acetate, NAC, acetoacetate and acetone relative levels were higher. Simultaneously, the analysis of the concentration of metabolites in rheumatoid arthritis and 3 months after induction treatment revealed that L1, 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, lysine, L5, acetoacetate, creatine, GPC+APC, histidine and phenylalanine were elevated in RA, whereas leucine, acetate, betaine and formate were lower. Additionally, metabolomics tools were employed to discriminate between patients with different IL-17A genotypes. Metabolomics may provide relevant biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy, define prognosis and predict and monitor treatment efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26476882

  5. Comparison of Fruits of Forsythia suspensa at Two Different Maturation Stages by NMR-Based Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jinping; Zhang, Fusheng; Li, Zhenyu; Qin, Xuemei; Zhang, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Forsythiae Fructus (FF), the dried fruit of Forsythia suspensa, has been widely used as a heat-clearing and detoxifying herbal medicine in China. Green FF (GF) and ripe FF (RF) are fruits of Forsythia suspensa at different maturity stages collected about a month apart. FF undergoes a complex series of physical and biochemical changes during fruit ripening. However, the clinical uses of GF and RF have not been distinguished to date. In order to comprehensively compare the chemical compositions of GF and RF, NMR-based metabolomics coupled with HPLC and UV spectrophotometry methods were adopted in this study. Furthermore, the in vitro antioxidant and antibacterial activities of 50% methanol extracts of GF and RF were also evaluated. A total of 27 metabolites were identified based on NMR data, and eight of them were found to be different between the GF and RF groups. The GF group contained higher levels of forsythoside A, forsythoside C, cornoside, rutin, phillyrin and gallic acid and lower levels of rengyol and β-glucose compared with the RF group. The antioxidant activity of GF was higher than that of RF, but no significant difference was observed between the antibacterial activities of GF and RF. Given our results showing their distinct chemical compositions, we propose that NMR-based metabolic profiling can be used to discriminate between GF and RF. Differences in the chemical and biological activities of GF and RF, as well as their clinical efficacies in traditional Chinese medicine should be systematically investigated in future studies. PMID:26035103

  6. An NMR-based metabolomics study of pork from different crossbreeds and relation to sensory perception.

    PubMed

    Straadt, Ida K; Aaslyng, Margit D; Bertram, Hanne Christine

    2014-02-01

    Meat extracts from five different pig crossbreeds including Duroc/Landrace/Yorkshire (DLY), Iberian/Duroc (ID), Iberian/Duroc/Landrace (ILY), Mangalitza/Duroc (MD), and Mangalitza/Landrace/Yorkshire (MLY) were analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics. The results were compared with technological traits and sensory analyses in order to elucidate the potential of NMR-based metabolomics to highlight meat metabolites of importance for technological and sensory attributes of meat. Amino acids including alanine, carnosine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, and valine, as well as lactate, inosine monophosphate (IMP), inosine, glycerol and choline-containing compounds were found to be significantly affected by crossbreed. The breed-specific differences in the metabolome were ascribed to differences in ante mortem metabolism, differences in the membrane properties and glycolytic potential of muscle fibres and differences in lipolysis and proteolysis. A high content of carnosine in the meat was associated with a low value of many sensory attributes related to meat flavor/taste, while IMP and inosine were in general not correlated with sensory attributes related to meat flavor/taste. PMID:24200563

  7. Metabolic profile of FYX-051 (4-(5-pyridin-4-yl-1h-[1,2,4]triazol-3-yl)pyridine-2-carbonitrile) in the rat, dog, monkey, and human: identification of N-glucuronides and N-glucosides.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Takashi; Miyata, Kengo; Omura, Koichi; Iwanaga, Takashi; Nagata, Osamu

    2006-11-01

    FYX-051, 4-(5-pyridin-4-yl-1H-[1,2,4]triazol-3-yl)pyridine-2-carbonitrile, is a novel xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor that can be used for the treatment of gout and hyperuricemia. We examined the metabolism of FYX-051 in rats, dogs, monkeys, and human volunteers after the p.o. administration of this inhibitor. The main metabolites in urine were pyridine N-oxide in rats, triazole N-glucoside in dogs, and triazole N-glucuronide in monkeys and humans, respectively. Furthermore, N-glucuronidation and N-glucosidation were characterized by two types of conjugation: triazole N(1)- and N(2)-glucuronidation and N(1)- and N(2)-glucosidation, respectively. N(1)- and N(2)-glucuronidation was observed in each species, whereas N(1)- and N(2)-glucosidation was mainly observed in dogs. With regard to the position of conjugation, N(1)-conjugation was predominant; this resulted in a considerably higher amount of N(1)-conjugate in each species than N(2)-conjugate. The present results indicate that the conjugation reaction observed in FYX-051 metabolism is unique, i.e., N-glucuronidation and N-glucosidation occur at the same position of the triazole ring, resulting in the generation of four different conjugates in mammals. In addition, a urinary profile of FYX-051 metabolites in monkeys and humans was relatively similar; triazole N-glucuronides were mainly excreted in urine. PMID:16914512

  8. An Evaluation of 1-Deoxynojirimycin Oral Administration in Eri Silkworm through Fat Body Metabolomics Based on 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chao-wei; Lin, Xiao-dong; Dong, Min-jian; Deng, Ming-jie

    2016-01-01

    1-Deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), the main hypoglycemic constituent in mulberry (Morus alba) latex, has been extensively researched. Although there is considerable interest in the biological effects of DNJ, the roles of 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) in glycometabolism and energy metabolism in insects have received little attention. In this paper, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) based metabonomic was performed to study the effects of the oral supplementation of 0.25% DNJ, 0.5% DNJ, latex, and the mixture of 0.5% DNJ and latex (1 : 1) on the fat body glycometabolism and energy metabolism of the fourth-instar larvae of Eri silkworms, Samia cynthia ricini. Metabolic pattern recognition analysis (partial least square-discriminant analysis, PLS-DA) of fat body extracts indicated that the groups of 0.25% DNJ, 0.5% DNJ, latex, and the mixture of 0.5% DNJ and latex (1 : 1) were significantly different from the control group. Further, compared to the control group, the metabolites levels of lactate, trehalose, succinate, malate, and fumarate were remarkably changed in experimental groups, which were involved in glycolysis, hydrolysis of trehalose, and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Our results indicate that DNJ has a positive impact on the reverse energy metabolism of Eri silkworms and metabonomic analysis based on NMR can be used as a tool to identify potential biomarkers. PMID:27294120

  9. An Evaluation of 1-Deoxynojirimycin Oral Administration in Eri Silkworm through Fat Body Metabolomics Based on (1) H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chao-Wei; Lin, Xiao-Dong; Dong, Min-Jian; Deng, Ming-Jie

    2016-01-01

    1-Deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), the main hypoglycemic constituent in mulberry (Morus alba) latex, has been extensively researched. Although there is considerable interest in the biological effects of DNJ, the roles of 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) in glycometabolism and energy metabolism in insects have received little attention. In this paper, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) based metabonomic was performed to study the effects of the oral supplementation of 0.25% DNJ, 0.5% DNJ, latex, and the mixture of 0.5% DNJ and latex (1 : 1) on the fat body glycometabolism and energy metabolism of the fourth-instar larvae of Eri silkworms, Samia cynthia ricini. Metabolic pattern recognition analysis (partial least square-discriminant analysis, PLS-DA) of fat body extracts indicated that the groups of 0.25% DNJ, 0.5% DNJ, latex, and the mixture of 0.5% DNJ and latex (1 : 1) were significantly different from the control group. Further, compared to the control group, the metabolites levels of lactate, trehalose, succinate, malate, and fumarate were remarkably changed in experimental groups, which were involved in glycolysis, hydrolysis of trehalose, and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Our results indicate that DNJ has a positive impact on the reverse energy metabolism of Eri silkworms and metabonomic analysis based on NMR can be used as a tool to identify potential biomarkers. PMID:27294120

  10. Probing Cancer Cell Metabolism Using NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hollinshead, Kate E R; Williams, Debbie S; Tennant, Daniel A; Ludwig, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is now accepted to be at the core of many diseases including cancer. Over the past 20 years, NMR has become a core technology to study these metabolic perturbations in detail. This chapter reviews current NMR-based methods for steady-state metabolism and, in particular, the use of non-radioactive stable isotope-enriched tracers. Opportunities and challenges for each method, such as 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy and (13)C carbon-based NMR spectroscopic methods, are discussed. Ultimately, the combination of NMR and mass spectra as orthogonal technologies are required to compensate for the drawbacks of each technique when used singly are discussed. PMID:27325263

  11. Metabonomic signature analysis of cervical carcinoma and precancerous lesions in women by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hasim, Ayshamgul; Ali, Mayinuer; Mamtimin, Batur; Ma, Jun-Qi; Li, Qiao-Zhi; Abudula, Abulizi

    2012-06-01

    (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics has been used to characterize the metabolic profiles of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). Principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were used to model the systematic variation related to patients with CIN or CSCC with healthy controls. Potential metabolic biomarkers were identified using database comparisons, and the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was used to examine the significance of the metabolites. Compared with plasma obtained from the healthy controls, plasma from patients with CIN had higher levels of very-low density lipoprotein (VLDL), acetone, unsaturated lipid and carnitine, together with lower levels of creatine, lactate, isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, glutamine, histidine, glycine, acetylcysteine, myo-inositol, choline and glycoprotein. Plasma from patients with CSCC had higher levels of acetate and formate, together with lower levels of creatine, lactate, isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, glutamine, histidine and tyrosine compared with the plasma of the healthy controls. In addition, compared with the plasma of patients with CIN, the plasma of CSCC patients had higher levels of acetate, formate, lactate, isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, glutamine, histidine, tyrosine, acetylcysteine, myo-inositol, glycoprotein, α-glucose and β-glucose, together with lower levels of acetone, unsaturated lipid and carnitine. Moreover, the profiles showed high feasibility and specificity by statistical analysis with OPLS-DA compared to the Thinprep cytology test (TCT) by setting the histopathological outcome as standard. The metabolic profile obtained for cervical cancer is significant, even for the precancerous disease. This suggests a systemic metabolic response to cancer, which may be used to identify potential early diagnostic biomarkers of the cancer and to establish

  12. Metabonomic signature analysis of cervical carcinoma and precancerous lesions in women by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    HASIM, AYSHAMGUL; ALI, MAYINUER; MAMTIMIN, BATUR; MA, JUN-QI; LI, QIAO-ZHI; ABUDULA, ABULIZI

    2012-01-01

    1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics has been used to characterize the metabolic profiles of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). Principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were used to model the systematic variation related to patients with CIN or CSCC with healthy controls. Potential metabolic biomarkers were identified using database comparisons, and the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was used to examine the significance of the metabolites. Compared with plasma obtained from the healthy controls, plasma from patients with CIN had higher levels of very-low density lipoprotein (VLDL), acetone, unsaturated lipid and carnitine, together with lower levels of creatine, lactate, isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, glutamine, histidine, glycine, acetylcysteine, myo-inositol, choline and glycoprotein. Plasma from patients with CSCC had higher levels of acetate and formate, together with lower levels of creatine, lactate, isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, glutamine, histidine and tyrosine compared with the plasma of the healthy controls. In addition, compared with the plasma of patients with CIN, the plasma of CSCC patients had higher levels of acetate, formate, lactate, isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, glutamine, histidine, tyrosine, acetylcysteine, myo-inositol, glycoprotein, α-glucose and β-glucose, together with lower levels of acetone, unsaturated lipid and carnitine. Moreover, the profiles showed high feasibility and specificity by statistical analysis with OPLS-DA compared to the Thinprep cytology test (TCT) by setting the histopathological outcome as standard. The metabolic profile obtained for cervical cancer is significant, even for the precancerous disease. This suggests a systemic metabolic response to cancer, which may be used to identify potential early diagnostic biomarkers of the cancer and to establish

  13. Urinary excretion and metabolism of miglustat and valproate in patients with Niemann-Pick type C1 disease: One- and two-dimensional solution-state (1)H NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Probert, Fay; Ruiz-Rodado, Victor; Zhang, Xiaoyu; te Vruchte, Danielle; Claridge, Tim D W; Edgar, Mark; Tocchio, Anna Zonato; Lachmann, Robin H; Platt, Frances M; Grootveld, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 (NP-C1) disease is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease for which the only approved therapy is miglustat (MGS). In this study we explored the applications and value of both one- and two-dimensional high-resolution NMR analysis strategies to the detection and quantification of MGS and its potential metabolites in urine samples collected from NP-C1 disease patients (n=47), and also applied these techniques to the analysis of the anticonvulsant drug valproate and one of its major metabolites in ca. 30% of these samples (i.e. from those who were also receiving this agent for the control of epileptic seizures). A combination of high-resolution 1D and 2D TOCSY/NOESY techniques confirmed the identity of MGS in the urinary (1)H NMR profiles of NP-C1 patients treated with this agent (n=25), and its quantification was readily achievable via electronic integration of selected 1D resonance intensities. However, this analysis provided little or no evidence for its metabolism in vivo, observations consistent with those acquired in corresponding experiments performed involving an in vitro microsomal system. Contrastingly, the major valproate metabolite 1-O-valproyl-β-glucuronide was readily detectable and quantifiable in 14/47 of the urine samples investigated, despite some resonance overlap problems (identification of this agent was confirmed by experiments involving equilibration of these samples with β-glucuronidase, a process liberating free valproate). In order to facilitate and validate the detection of MGS in urine specimens, full assignments of the (1)H NMR spectra of MGS in both buffered aqueous (pH 7.10) and deuterated methanol solvent systems were also made. The pharmacological and bioanalytical significance of data acquired are discussed, with special reference to the advantages offered by high-resolution NMR analysis. PMID:26397207

  14. U1h Superstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Glen Sykes

    2000-11-01

    The U1H Shaft Project is a design build subcontract to supply the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) a 1,045 ft. deep, 20 ft. diameter, concrete lined shaft for unspecified purposes. The subcontract awarded to Atkinson Construction by Bechtel Nevada to design and construct the shaft for the DOE has been split into phases with portions of the work being released as dictated by available funding. The first portion released included the design for the shaft, permanent hoist, headframe, and collar arrangement. The second release consisted of constructing the shaft collar to a depth of 110 ft., the service entry, utility trenches, and installation of the temporary sinking plant. The temporary sinking plant included the installation of the sinking headframe, the sinking hoist, two deck winches, the shaft form, the sinking work deck, and temporary utilities required to sink the shaft. Both the design and collar construction were completed on schedule. The third release consisted of excavating and lining the shaft to the station depth of approximately 950 feet. Work is currently proceeding on this production sinking phase. At a depth of approximately 600 feet, Atkinson has surpassed production expectation and is more than 3 months ahead of schedule. Atkinson has employed the use of a Bobcat 331 excavator as the primary means of excavation. the shaft is being excavated entirely in an alluvial deposit with varying degrees of calcium carbonate cementation. Several more work packages are expected to be released in the near future. The remaining work packages include, construction of the shaft station a depth of 975 ft. and construction of the shaft sump to a depth of 1,045 ft., installation of the loading pocket and station steel and equipment, installation of the shaft steel and guides, installation of the shaft utilities, and installation of the permanent headframe, hoist, collar utilities, and facilities.

  15. Effect of organochlorine pesticides exposure on the maize root metabolome assessed using high-resolution magic-angle spinning (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Blondel, Claire; Khelalfa, Farid; Reynaud, Stéphane; Fauvelle, Florence; Raveton, Muriel

    2016-07-01

    (1)H-HRMAS NMR-based metabolomics was used to better understand the toxic effects on maize root tips of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), namely lindane (γHCH) and chlordecone (CLD). Maize seedlings were exposed to 2.5 μM γHCH (mimicking basic environmental contaminations) for 7 days and compared to 2.5 μM CLD and 25 μM γHCH for 7 days (mimicking hot spot contaminations). The (1)H-HRMAS NMR-based metabolomic profiles provided details of the changes in carbohydrates, amino acids, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates and fatty acids with a significant separation between the control and OCP-exposed root tips. First of all, alterations in the balance between glycolysis/gluconeogenesis were observed with sucrose depletion and with dose-dependent fluctuations in glucose content. Secondly, observations indicated that OCPs might inactivate the TCA cycle, with sizeable succinate and fumarate depletion. Thirdly, disturbances in the amino acid composition (GABA, glutamine/glutamate, asparagine, isoleucine) reflected a new distribution of internal nitrogen compounds under OCP stress. Finally, OCP exposure caused an increase in fatty acid content, concomitant with a marked rise in oxidized fatty acids which could indicate failures in cell integrity and vitality. Moreover, the accumulation of asparagine and oxidized fatty acids with the induction of LOX3 transcription levels under OCP exposure highlighted an induction of protein and lipid catabolism. The overall data indicated that the effect of OCPs on primary metabolism could have broader physiological consequences on root development. Therefore, (1)H-HRMAS NMR metabolomics is a sensitive tool for understanding molecular disturbances under OCP exposure and can be used to perform a rapid assessment of phytotoxicity. PMID:27131813

  16. [¹H-NMR based metabonomic approach to evaluate anti-coagulant effect of Danggui Sini decoction].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hua; Qin, Xia; Song, Hui; Tang, Chao-lin; Ruan, Jun-xiang; Zhang, Hong-ye; Lu, Shi-yin; Liang, Yong-hong; Su, Zhi-heng

    2015-10-01

    To study the anti-coagulant effect and influence of danggui Sini decoction (DSD) on rat's plasma endogenous metabolites by animal experiment and ¹H-NMR based metabolomics method. After intragastric administration of Danggui Sini Decoction for 7 days, Plasma thrombin time (TT) was measured. Rat plasma metabolic fingerprint in two groups was analyzed using ¹H-NMR, based on which the principal component analysis( PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis(OPLS-DA) models for metabonomic analysis. Potential biomarkers were screened by using variable importance in the projection (VIP) and T test. DSD could prolong TT of the rat significantly (P < 0.05). Compared with control group, six kinds of endogenous metabolites in DSD group change significantly (P < 0.05), among which isobutyrate, carnitine and phenylalanine content had an upward trend (P < 0.01) and lysine, Histidine and cholesterol content had a downward trend (P < 0.05). It is likely that carnitine, phenylalanine, Histidine and cholesterol are the potential metabolic markers in the anti-coagulant process and DSD affects the platelet aggregation and the expression of tissue factor and fiber protease by regulating the energy, amino acid and lipid metabolism. PMID:27062832

  17. Identification of metabolic biomarkers in patients with type 2 diabetic coronary heart diseases based on metabolomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinfeng; Gao, Jian; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Zhiyong; Shi, Qi; Man, Hongxue; Guo, Shuzhen; Wang, Yingfeng; Li, Zhongfeng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetic coronary heart disease (T2DM-CHD) is a kind of serious and complex disease. Great attention has been paid to exploring its mechanism; however, the detailed understanding of T2DM-CHD is still limited. Plasma samples from 15 healthy controls, 13 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, 15 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and 28 T2DM-CHD patients were analyzed in this research. The potential biomarkers of CHD and T2DM were detected and screened out by 1H NMR-based plasma metabolic profiling and multivariate data analysis. About 11 and 12 representative metabolites of CHD and T2DM were identified respectively, mainly including alanine, arginine, proline, glutamine, creatinine and acetate. Then the diagnostic model was further constructed based on the previous metabolites of CHD and T2DM to detect T2DM-CHD with satisfying sensitivity of 92.9%, specificity of 93.3% and accuracy of 93.2%, validating the robustness of 1H NMR-based plasma metabolic profiling to diagnostic strategy. The results demonstrated that the NMR-based metabolomics approach processed good performance to identify diagnostic plasma biomarkers and most identified metabolites related to T2DM and CHD could be considered as predictors of T2DM-CHD as well as the therapeutic targets for prevention, which provided new insight into diagnosing and forecasting of complex diseases. PMID:27470195

  18. Identification of metabolic biomarkers in patients with type 2 diabetic coronary heart diseases based on metabolomic approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinfeng; Gao, Jian; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Zhiyong; Shi, Qi; Man, Hongxue; Guo, Shuzhen; Wang, Yingfeng; Li, Zhongfeng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetic coronary heart disease (T2DM-CHD) is a kind of serious and complex disease. Great attention has been paid to exploring its mechanism; however, the detailed understanding of T2DM-CHD is still limited. Plasma samples from 15 healthy controls, 13 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, 15 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and 28 T2DM-CHD patients were analyzed in this research. The potential biomarkers of CHD and T2DM were detected and screened out by (1)H NMR-based plasma metabolic profiling and multivariate data analysis. About 11 and 12 representative metabolites of CHD and T2DM were identified respectively, mainly including alanine, arginine, proline, glutamine, creatinine and acetate. Then the diagnostic model was further constructed based on the previous metabolites of CHD and T2DM to detect T2DM-CHD with satisfying sensitivity of 92.9%, specificity of 93.3% and accuracy of 93.2%, validating the robustness of (1)H NMR-based plasma metabolic profiling to diagnostic strategy. The results demonstrated that the NMR-based metabolomics approach processed good performance to identify diagnostic plasma biomarkers and most identified metabolites related to T2DM and CHD could be considered as predictors of T2DM-CHD as well as the therapeutic targets for prevention, which provided new insight into diagnosing and forecasting of complex diseases. PMID:27470195

  19. Comparison of Two Different Astragali Radix by a ¹H NMR-Based Metabolomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai-Ping; Li, Zhen-Yu; Sun, Hai-Feng; Li, Ke; Qin, Xue-Mei; Du, Guan-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Astragali Radix (AR) is a commonly used herbal drug in traditional chinese medicine and is widely used for the treatment of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, nephropathy, and neuropathy. The main source of AR in China is the dried root of Astragalus membranaceus var. mongholicus (Bge.) Hsiao, and both cultivated and wild ARs are used clinically. A systematic comparison of cultivated AR (GS-AR) and wild AR (SX-AR) should be performed to ensure the clinical efficacy and safety. In this study, the chemical composition of the two different ARs, which were collected in the Shanxi (wild) and Gansu (cultivated) provinces, were compared by NMR-based metabolic fingerprint coupled with multivariate analysis. The SX-AR- and GS-AR-induced metabolic changes in the endogenous metabolites in mice were also compared. The results showed that SX-AR and GS-AR differed significantly not only in the primary metabolites but also in the secondary metabolites. However, alterations among the endogenous metabolites in the serum, lung, liver, and spleen were relatively small. This study provided a novel and valuable method for the evaluation of the consistency and diversity of herbal drugs, and further studies should be conducted on the difference in polysaccharides as well as the biological effects between the two kinds of AR. PMID:25844502

  20. NMR-based metabolomic analysis of Haliotis diversicolor exposed to thermal and hypoxic stresses.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Shi, Yanyan; Wang, Shuhong; Chen, Hao; Cai, Shuhui; Feng, Jianghua

    2016-03-01

    Haliotis diversicolor is a commercially important cultured shellfish. It is also an important marine model organism for environmental science. High temperature accompanied with hypoxia frequently induces diseases or even death to abalones. In present study, (1)H NMR spectroscopy together with pattern recognition methods was used to investigate the responses of muscle and gill of H. diversicolor to thermal and hypoxic stresses. It was found that obvious gender-, time- and tissue-specific metabolic responses were induced by thermal and hypoxic stresses. In combination with the changes of H. diversicolor in physiological features, the dual-modal stresses were suggested to mainly cause the disturbance in energy metabolism and osmotic balance in muscle and gill tissues with different mechanisms. Further, the corresponding correlation networks and metabolic pathways derived from the characteristic metabolites were used to assess the major metabolic functions of these characteristic metabolites. These findings shed some lights on the metabolic influences of environmental stresses on marine organisms. PMID:26747992

  1. Revealing Potential Biomarkers of Functional Dyspepsia by Combining 1H NMR Metabonomics Techniques and an Integrative Multi-objective Optimization Method

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiaofeng; Zou, Meng; Yang, Mingxiao; Zhou, Siyuan; Yan, Xianzhong; Sun, Bo; Wang, Yong; Chang, Shyang; Tang, Yong; Liang, Fanrong; Yu, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    Metabonomics methods have gradually become important auxiliary tools for screening disease biomarkers. However, recognition of metabolites or potential biomarkers closely related to either particular clinical symptoms or prognosis has been difficult. The current study aims to identify potential biomarkers of functional dyspepsia (FD) by a new strategy that combined hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR)-based metabonomics techniques and an integrative multi-objective optimization (LPIMO) method. First, clinical symptoms of FD were evaluated using the Nepean Dyspepsia Index (NDI), and plasma metabolic profiles were measured by 1H NMR. Correlations between the key metabolites and the NDI scores were calculated. Then, LPIMO was developed to identify a multi-biomarker panel by maximizing diagnostic ability and correlation with the NDI score. Finally, a KEGG database search elicited the metabolic pathways in which the potential biomarkers are involved. The results showed that glutamine, alanine, proline, HDL, β-glucose, α-glucose and LDL/VLDL levels were significantly altered in FD patients. Among them, phosphatidycholine (PtdCho) and leucine/isoleucine (Leu/Ile) were positively and negatively correlated with the NDI Symptom Index (NDSI) respectively. Our procedure not only significantly improved the credibility of the biomarkers, but also demonstrated the potential of further explorations and applications to diagnosis and treatment of complex disease. PMID:26743458

  2. Prediction of variability in CYP3A4 induction using a combined 1H NMR metabonomics and targeted UPLC-MS approach.

    PubMed

    Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Le Gall, Gwénaëlle; Heaton, James; Kay, Kristine L; Smith, Norman W; Colquhoun, Ian J; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Kemsley, E Kate

    2011-06-01

    The activity of Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) enzyme is associated with many adverse or poor therapeutic responses to drugs. We used (1)H NMR-based metabonomics to identify a metabolic signature associated with variation in induced CYP3A4 activity. A total of 301 female twins, aged 45--84, participated in this study. Each volunteer was administered a potent inducer of CYP3A4 (St. John's Wort) for 14 days and the activity of CYP3A4 was quantified through the metabolism of the exogenously administered probe drug quinine sulfate (300 mg). Pre- and postintervention fasting urine samples were used to obtain metabolite profiles, using (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and were analyzed using UPLC--MS to obtain a marker for CYP3A4 induction, via the ratio of 3-hydroxyquinine to quinine (3OH-Q:Q). Multiple linear regression was used to build a predictive model for 3OH-Q:Q values based on the preintervention metabolite profiles. A combination of seven metabolites and seven covariates showed a strong (r = 0.62) relationship with log(3OH-Q:Q). This regression model demonstrated significant (p < 0.00001) predictive ability when applied to an independent validation set. Our results highlight the promise of metabonomics for predicting CYP3A4-mediated drug response. PMID:21491888

  3. Systemic responses of mice to dextran sulfate sodium-induced acute ulcerative colitis using 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fangcong; Zhang, Lulu; Hao, Fuhua; Tang, Huiru; Wang, Yulan

    2013-06-01

    The interplay between genetic mutation and environmental factors is believed to contribute to the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). While focused attention has been paid to the aforementioned research, time-specific and organ-specific metabolic changes associated with IBD are still lacking. Here, we induced acute ulcerative colitis in mice by providing water containing 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) for 7 days and investigated the metabolic changes of plasma, urine, and a range of biological tissues by employing a (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics approach with complementary information on serum clinical chemistry and histopathology. We found that DSS-induced acute ulcerative colitis leads to significant elevations in the levels of amino acids in plasma and decreased levels in the membrane-related metabolites and a range of nucleotides, nucleobases, and nucleosides in the colon. In addition, acute-colitis-induced elevations in the levels of nucleotides in the liver were observed, accompanied by reduced levels of glucose. DSS-induced acute colitis also resulted in increased levels of oxidized glutathione and attenuated levels of taurine in the spleen. Furthermore, acute colitis resulted in depletion in the levels of gut microbial cometabolites in urine along with an increase in citric acid cycle intermediates. These findings suggest that DSS-induced acute colitis causes a disturbance of lipid and energy metabolism, damage to the colon and liver, a promoted antioxidative and anti-inflammatory response, and perturbed gut microbiotal communities. The information obtained here provided details of the time-dependent and holistic metabolic changes in the development of the DSS-induced acute ulcerative colitis, which could be useful in discovery of novel therapeutic targets for management of IBD. PMID:23651354

  4. Antioxidant Drug Tempol Promotes Functional Metabolic Changes in the Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jingwei; Zhang, Limin; Jones, Richard A; Correll, Jared B; Hatzakis, Emmanuel; Smith, Philip B; Gonzalez, Frank J; Patterson, Andrew D

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have identified the important role of the gut microbiota in the pathogenesis and progression of obesity and related metabolic disorders. The antioxidant tempol was shown to prevent or reduce weight gain and modulate the gut microbiota community in mice; however, the mechanism by which tempol modulates weight gain/loss with respect to the host and gut microbiota has not been clearly established. Here we show that tempol (0, 1, 10, and 50 mg/kg p.o. for 5 days) decreased cecal bacterial fermentation and increased fecal energy excretion in a dose-dependent manner. Liver (1)H NMR-based metabolomics identified a dose-dependent decrease in glycogen and glucose, enhanced glucogenic and ketogenic activity (tyrosine and phenylalanine), and increased activation of the glycolysis pathway. Serum (1)H NMR-based metabolomics indicated that tempol promotes enhanced glucose catabolism. Hepatic gene expression was significantly altered as demonstrated by an increase in Pepck and G6pase and a decrease in Hnf4a, ChREBP, Fabp1, and Cd36 mRNAs. No significant change in the liver and serum metabolomic profiles was observed in germ-free mice, thus establishing a significant role for the gut microbiota in mediating the beneficial metabolic effects of tempol. These results demonstrate that tempol modulates the gut microbial community and its function, resulting in reduced host energy availability and a significant shift in liver metabolism toward a more catabolic state. PMID:26696396

  5. High-resolution (1)H NMR investigations of the capacity of dentifrices containing a "smart" bioactive glass to influence the metabolic profile of and deliver calcium ions to human saliva.

    PubMed

    Grootveld, Martin; Silwood, Christopher J L; Winter, Walter T

    2009-10-01

    Dentifrices containing H(2)O-reactive bioactive glasses alleviate hypersensitivity in teeth via the blockage of open dentinal tubules. Here, the ability of two such products to release Ca(2+) ions into human saliva was investigated, together with their influence on the status of this biofluid's (1)H NMR-detectable biomolecules. Human salivary supernatants were equilibrated with increasing volumes of those derived from each dentifrice (5.00 min at 37 degrees C). These biofluids were also equilibrated at 37 degrees C with a preselected quantity of the intact products (samples were collected at increasing timepoints). Salivary Ca(2+) concentrations were monitored by a (1)H NMR technique involving ethylenediamine tetra-acetate addition and/or atomic absorption spectrometry. Added Ca(2+)- and dentifrice supernatant volume (DSV)-induced modifications to the salivary (1)H NMR profile were explored by spectral titration. Data acquired demonstrated added DSV-dependent increases in salivary Ca(2+) concentrations and (Ca(2+)-independent) modifications to the intensities of selected salivary (1)H NMR signals, particularly those of the malodorous amines methyl-, dimethyl-, and trimethylamines, which were diminished by up to 80% of their prior values. Time-dependent elevations in salivary Ca(2+) level were observed on equilibration with the intact dentifrices. Added Ca(2+) ions exerted a concentration-dependent influence on a range of resonances (including those of citrate, succinate, pyruvate, and lactate). These data provide valuable information regarding the mechanisms of action of the products tested. PMID:19388087

  6. [Comparison of chemical composition between raw and vinegar-baked Paeoniae Radix Alba using NMR based metabolomic approach].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Yu; Fan, Ma-Li; Qin, Xue-Mei

    2015-02-01

    To compare the chemical change of Paeoniae Radix Alba (PRA) after vinegar-baking processing, as well as the effect of vinegar types exerted on the processing, 1H NMR-based metabolomic approach combined with multivariate statistical analysis was used to investigate the different metabolites between the raw and two vinegar-baked PRA. More than thirty metabolites were identified in the 1H NMR spectrum of PRA, and the multivariate statistical analysis showed that raw and two vinegar-baked PRA could be separated obviously. After vinegar-baking, the contents of isoleucine, lactate, alanine, arginine, albiflorin, and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF) elevated, while those of sucrose, paeoniflorin and its analogues (calculated by benzoate) decreased. The chemical compositions of two vinegar-baked PRA were also different. Shanxi vinegar- baked PRA showed higher levels of leucine, isoleucine, valine, and albiflorin, while rice vinegar-baked PRA contained more sucrose and paeoniflorin's analogues (calculated by benzoate). And the chemical changes in Shanxi vinegar-baked PRA were greater than those of rice vinegar-baked PRA. The results revealed the chemical differences between raw and vinegar-baked PRA, as well as the influence of vinegar type on processing, in a holistic manner, the results obtained suggested that the correlations between the chemical change and the drug action after processing, as well as the vinegar type used in processing, should be further studied. PMID:25975031

  7. U1h shaft project

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Briggs; R. G. Musick

    2000-06-30

    The U1h shaft project is a design/build subcontract to construct one 20 foot (ft) finished diameter shaft to a depth of 1,045 ft at the Nevada Test Site. Atkinson Construction was subcontracted by Bechtel Nevada to construct the U1h Shaft for the Department of Energy. The project consists of furnishing and installing the sinking plant, construction of the 1,045 ft of concrete lined shaft, development of a shaft station at a depth of 976 ft, and construction of a loading pocket at the station. The outfitting of the shaft and installation of a new hoist may be incorporated into the project at a later date. This paper should be of interest to those involved with the construction of relatively deep shafts and underground excavations.

  8. NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Spatial Variation in Soft Corals

    PubMed Central

    He, Qing; Sun, Ruiqi; Liu, Huijuan; Geng, Zhufeng; Chen, Dawei; Li, Yinping; Han, Jiao; Lin, Wenhan; Du, Shushan; Deng, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Soft corals are common marine organisms that inhabit tropical and subtropical oceans. They are shown to be rich source of secondary metabolites with biological activities. In this work, soft corals from two geographical locations were investigated using 1H-NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis at the metabolic level. A partial least-squares discriminant analysis showed clear separation among extracts of soft corals grown in Sanya Bay and Weizhou Island. The specific markers that contributed to discrimination between soft corals in two origins belonged to terpenes, sterols and N-containing compounds. The satisfied precision of classification obtained indicates this approach using combined 1H-NMR and chemometrics is effective to discriminate soft corals collected in different geographical locations. The results revealed that metabolites of soft corals evidently depended on living environmental condition, which would provide valuable information for further relevant coastal marine environment evaluation. PMID:24686560

  9. Electronic Nose and Exhaled Breath NMR-based Metabolomics Applications in Airways Disease.

    PubMed

    Santini, Giuseppe; Mores, Nadia; Penas, Andreu; Capuano, Rosamaria; Mondino, Chiara; Trové, Andrea; Macagno, Francesco; Zini, Gina; Cattani, Paola; Martinelli, Eugenio; Motta, Andrea; Macis, Giuseppe; Ciabattoni, Giovanni; Montuschi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Breathomics, the multidimensional molecular analysis of exhaled breath, includes analysis of exhaled breath with gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and electronic noses (e-noses), and metabolomics of exhaled breath condensate (EBC), a non-invasive technique which provides information on the composition of airway lining fluid, generally by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or MS methods. Metabolomics is the identification and quantification of small molecular weight metabolites in a biofluid. Specific profiles of volatile compounds in exhaled breath and metabolites in EBC (breathprints) are potentially useful surrogate markers of inflammatory respiratory diseases. Electronic noses (e-noses) are artificial sensor systems, usually consisting of chemical cross-reactive sensor arrays for characterization of patterns of breath volatile compounds, and algorithms for breathprints classification. E-noses are handheld, portable, and provide real-time data. E-nose breathprints can reflect respiratory inflammation. E-noses and NMR-based metabolomics of EBC can distinguish patients with respiratory diseases such as asthma, COPD, and lung cancer, or diseases with a clinically relevant respiratory component including cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia, and healthy individuals. Breathomics has also been reported to identify patients affected by different types of respiratory diseases. Patterns of breath volatile compounds detected by e-nose and EBC metabolic profiles have been associated with asthma phenotypes. In combination with other -omics platforms, breathomics might provide a molecular approach to respiratory disease phenotyping and a molecular basis to tailored pharmacotherapeutic strategies. Breathomics might also contribute to identify new surrogate markers of respiratory inflammation, thus, facilitating drug discovery. Validation in newly recruited, prospective independent cohorts is essential for development of e

  10. Reversal of myo-inositol metabolic level in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of rats exposed to forced swimming test following desipramine treatment: an in vivo localized (1)H-MRS study at 4.7 T.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Young; Choi, Chi-Bong; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Lee, Sung-Ho; Woo, Dong-Cheol; Kim, Hwi-Yool; Hong, Kwan-Soo; Lee, Chul-Hyun; Choe, Bo-Young

    2010-12-01

    The forced swimming test (FST) is a useful paradigm that is relatively quick and simple to perform and has been utilized to predict antidepressant activity based on learned helplessness as a model of depression. To date, few studies have used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) to assess antidepressant effects in rats. The purpose of this study was to assess desipramine (DMI) effects on the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of the rats, which were randomly assigned to three groups (control, n=10; FST+saline, n=10; FST+DMI, n=10), using single-voxel localization technique. All (1)H-MRS experiments were performed on a Bruker 4.7-T scanner with 400 mm bore magnet, allowing for acquisition of in vivo (1)H point-resolved spectroscopy spectra (TR/TE=3000/30 ms, number of data points=2048, NEX=512, voxel volume=27 μl, scan time=25 min). Proton metabolites were quantified automatically using LCModel software and were expressed as ratios to total creatine (Cr+PCr). Major target metabolites such as N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)+N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), glutamate+glutamine (Glu+Gln), glycerophosphorylcholine+phosphorylcholine (GPC+PCho), myo-inositol (mIns) and taurine (Tau) were successfully quantified with Cramer-Rao lower boundary ≤10%. There were significantly higher mIns/(Cr+PCr) and mIns/(NAA+NAAG) ratios in the FST+saline group compared to the control group. In the FST+DMI group, both mIns/(Cr+PCr) and mIns/(NAA+NAAG) ratios were significantly decreased to the level similar to those in the control group. No other metabolite ratios were significantly different among the three groups. Our findings suggest a possible role of altered mIns level within the left DLPFC of the rat model for depression. PMID:20817439

  11. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Stambuk, Hilda E.; Wang Ya; Fury, Matthew G.; Patel, Senehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among {sup 1}H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K{sup trans}]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v{sub e}]; and redistribution rate constant [k{sub ep}]), and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG ({rho} = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v{sub e}) ({rho} = -0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k{sub ep}) ({rho} = -0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume ({rho} = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K{sup trans}) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p < 0.07). Conclusion: Pretreatment multimodality imaging using {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  12. Analysis of plasma metabolic biomarkers in the development of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide-induced oral carcinogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    KONG, XIANGLI; YANG, XIAOQIN; ZHOU, JINGLIN; CHEN, SIXIU; LI, XIAOYU; JIAN, FAN; DENG, PENGCHI; LI, WEI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify time-dependent changes in the expression of metabolic biomarkers during the various stages of oral carcinogenesis to provide an insight into the sequential mechanism of oral cancer development. An 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics approach was used to analyze the blood plasma samples of Sprague-Dawley rats exhibiting various oral lesions induced by the administration of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) in drinking water. The 1H NMR spectra were processed by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to determine the metabolic differences between the three developmental stages of oral mucosa cancer (health, oral leukoplakia [OLK] and oral squamous cell carcinoma [OSCC]). The variable importance in projection (VIP) score derived from the PLS-DA model was used to screen for important metabolites, whose significance was further verified through analysis of variance (ANOVA). Data from the present study indicated that 4NQO-induced rat oral carcinogenesis produced oral pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions and provided an effective model for analyzing sequential changes in the 1H NMR spectra of rat blood plasma. The 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach clearly differentiates between healthy, OLK and OSSC rats in the PCA and PLS-DA models. Furthermore, lactic acid, choline, glucose, proline, valine, isoleucine, aspartic acid and 2-hydroxybutyric acid demonstrated VIP>1 in the PLS-D model and P<0.05 with ANOVA. It was also identified that increases in lactic acid, choline and glucose, and decreases in proline, valine, isoleucine, aspartic acid and 2-hydroxybutyric acid may be relative to the characteristic mechanisms of oral carcinogenesis. Therefore, these plasma metabolites may serve as metabolic biomarkers in oral carcinogenesis and assist in the early diagnosis and preventive treatment of oral cancer. PMID:25435976

  13. Specific Metabolic Fingerprint of a Dietary Exposure to a Very Low Dose of Endosulfan

    PubMed Central

    Canlet, Cécile; Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Gautier, Roselyne; Molina, Jérôme; Métais, Benjamin; Blas-Y Estrada, Florence; Gamet-Payrastre, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Like other persistent organochlorine pesticides, endosulfan residues have been detected in foods including fruit, vegetables, and fish. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of a dietary exposure to low doses of endosulfan from foetal development until adult age on metabolic homeostasis in mice and to identify biomarkers of exposure using an 1H-NMR-based metabonomic approach in various tissues and biofluids. We report in both genders an increase in plasma glucose as well as changes in levels of factors involved in the regulation of liver oxidative stress, confirming the prooxidant activities of this compound. Some metabolic changes were distinct in males and females. For example in plasma, a decrease in lipid LDL and choline content was only observed in female. Lactate levels in males were significantly increased. In conclusion, our results show that metabolic changes in liver could be linked to the onset of pathologies like diabetes and insulin resistance. Moreover from our results it appears that the NMR-based metabonomic approach could be useful for the characterization in plasma of a dietary exposure to low dose of pesticide in human. PMID:23431292

  14. NMR-Based Metabonomic Analysis of Physiological Responses to Starvation and Refeeding in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Contreras, José I; García-Pérez, Isabel; Meléndez-Camargo, María E; Zepeda, L Gerardo

    2016-09-01

    Starvation is a postabsorptive condition derived from a limitation on food resources by external factors. Energy homeostasis is maintained under this condition by using sources other than glucose via adaptive mechanisms. After refeeding, when food is available, other adaptive processes are linked to energy balance. However, less has been reported about the physiological mechanisms present as a result of these conditions, considering the rat as a supraorganism. Metabolic profiling using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize the physiological metabolic differences in urine specimens collected under starved, refed, and recovered conditions. In addition, because starvation induced lack of faecal production and not all animals produced faeces during refeeding, 24 h pooled faecal water samples were also analyzed. Urinary metabolites upregulated by starvation included 2-butanamidoacetate, 3-hydroxyisovalerate, ketoleucine, methylmalonate, p-cresyl glucuronide, p-cresyl sulfate, phenylacetylglycine, pseudouridine, creatinine, taurine, and N-acetyl glycoprotein, which were related to renal and skeletal muscle function, β-oxidation, turnover of proteins and RNA, and host-microbial interactions. Food-derived metabolites, including gut microbial cometabolites, and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates were upregulated under refed and recovered conditions, which characterized anabolic urinary metabotypes. The upregulation of creatine and pantothenate indicated an absorptive state after refeeding. Fecal short chain fatty acids, 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionate, lactate, and acetoin provided additional information about the combinatorial metabolism between the host and gut microbiota. This investigation contributes to allow a deeper understanding of physiological responses associated with starvation and refeeding. PMID:27518853

  15. Toxic Markers of Matrine Determined Using 1H-NMR-Based Metabolomics in Cultured Cells In Vitro and Rats In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhonghuang; Zheng, Liang; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Guiyu; Lu, Linlin; Zhu, Lijun; Zhang, Jiajie; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2015-01-01

    Matrine is one of the main bioactive alkaloids of Sophora flavescens Aiton, which has been widely used to treat various diseases in China. These diseases include viral hepatitis, liver fibrosis, cardiac arrhythmia, skin diseases, and tumors. However, matrine is also the main toxic compound of this herb, and the available biomarkers are not reliable in detecting or quantifying matrine risk. Metabolomics is a powerful tool used to identify early toxicity biomarkers that are specific indicators of damage to biosystems. This study aimed to find the potential biomarkers of the matrine-induced toxic effects in rats and HepG2 cells. The toxicological effects of rats induced by matrine could be derived from the elevated taurine and trimethylamine N-oxide levels and the depletion in hippurate and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, such as 2-oxoglutarate, citrate, and succinate in the urine. Cell metabolomics revealed that the levels of alanine, choline, glutathione, lactate, phosphocholine, and cholesterol showed dose-dependent decreases, whereas the levels of taurine, fatty acid, and unsaturated fatty acid showed dose-dependent increases. Overall, a significant perturbation of metabolites in response to high dose of matrine was observed both in vivo and in vitro, and the selected metabolites particularly represent an attractive marker for matrine-induced toxicity. PMID:26413125

  16. 1H NMR-based lipidomics of rodent fur: species-specific lipid profiles and SCD1 inhibitor-related dermal toxicity[S

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Purnima; Stryker, Steven; Chao, Hannguang; Aranibar, Nelly; Lawrence, R. Michael; Madireddi, Malavi; Zhao, Wenjun; Chen, Luping; Reily, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    A method is described that allows noninvasive identification and quantitative assessment of lipid classes present in sebaceous excretions in rodents. The method relies on direct high-field proton NMR analysis of common group lipid protons in deuterated organic solvent extracts of fur. Extracts from as little as 15 mg of fur from rat, mouse, and hamster provided acceptable results on a 600 MHz NMR equipped with a cryogenically cooled proton-observe probe. In rats, sex- and age-related differences in lipid composition are larger than differences in fur collected from various body regions within an individual and much larger than interanimal differences in age- and sex-matched specimens. The utility of this method to noninvasively monitor drug-induced sebaceous gland atrophy in rodents is demonstrated in rats dosed with a stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) inhibitor. In this model, a 35% reduction in sebum lipids, extracted from fur, was observed. Finally, structural elucidation of cholesta-7,24-dien-3β-ol ester as the most prominent, previously unidentified sebum sterol ester in male Syrian hamsters is described. The utility of this method for drug and cosmetic safety and efficacy assessment is discussed. PMID:24755647

  17. Phenylphenalenones protect banana plants from infection by Mycosphaerella fijiensis and are deactivated by metabolic conversion.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, William; Chandran, Jima N; Menezes, Riya C; Otálvaro, Felipe; Schneider, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Phenylphenalenones, polycyclic aromatic natural products from some monocotyledonous plants, are known as phytoalexins in banana (Musa spp.). In this study, (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics along with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry were used to explore the chemical responses of the susceptible 'Williams' and the resistant 'Khai Thong Ruang' Musa varieties to the ascomycete fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis, the agent of the black leaf Sigatoka disease. Principal component analysis discriminated strongly between infected and non-infected plant tissue, mainly because of specialized metabolism induced in response to the fungus. Phenylphenalenones are among the major induced compounds, and the resistance level of the plants was correlated with the progress of the disease. However, a virulent strain of M. fijiensis was able to overcome plant resistance by converting phenylphenalenones to sulfate conjugates. Here, we report the first metabolic detoxification of fungitoxic phenylphenalenones to evade the chemical defence of Musa plants. PMID:26290378

  18. NMR-based analysis of the chemical composition of Japanese persimmon aqueous extracts.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Shoraku; Furihata, Kazuo; Koda, Masanori; Wei, Feifei; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2016-03-01

    Japanese persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) is recognized as an outstanding source of biologically active compounds relating to many health benefits. In the present study, NMR spectroscopy provided a comprehensive metabolic overview of Japanese persimmon juice. Detailed signal assignments of Japanese persimmon juice were carried out using various 2D NMR techniques incorporated with broadband water suppression enhanced through T1 effects (BB-WET) or WET sequences, and 26 components, including minor components, were identified. In addition, most components were quantitatively evaluated by the integration of signals using conventional (1) H NMR and BB-WET NMR. This is the first detailed analysis combined with quantitative characterization of chemical components using NMR for Japanese persimmon. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26482562

  19. Toxicological responses to acute mercury exposure for three species of Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum by NMR-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Linbao; You, Liping; Cong, Ming; Zhao, Jianmin; Wu, Huifeng; Li, Chenghua; Liu, Dongyan; Yu, Junbao

    2011-03-01

    The Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) has been considered a good sentinel species for metal pollution monitoring in estuarine tidal flats. Along the Bohai coast of China, there are dominantly distributed three species of clams (White, Liangdao Red and Zebra in Yantai population) endowed with distinct tolerances to environmental stressors. In this study, adductor muscle samples were collected from both control and acute mercury exposed White, Liangdao Red and Zebra clams, and the extracts were analyzed by NMR-based metabolomics to compare the metabolic profiles and responses to the acute mercury exposure to determine the most sensitive clam species capable of acting as abioindicator for heavy metal pollution monitoring. The major abundant metabolites in the White clam sample were branched-chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine), lactate, arginine, aspartate, acetylcholine, homarine and ATP/ADP, while the metabolite profile of Zebra clam sample comprised high levels of glutamine, acetoacetate, betaine, taurine and one unidentified metabolite. For the Liangdao Red clam sample, the metabolite profile relatively exhibited high amount of branched-chain amino acids, arginine, glutamate, succinate, acetylcholine, homarine and two unassigned metabolites. After 48h exposure of 20μgL(-1) Hg(2+), the metabolic profiles showed significant differences between three clam species, which included increased lactate, succinate, taurine, acetylcholine, betaine and homarine and decreased alanine, arginine, glutamine, glutamate, acetoacetate, glycine and ATP/ADP in White clam samples, and elevated succinate, taurine and acetylcholine, and declined glutamine, glycine, and aspartate in Liangdao Red clam samples, while the increased branched-chain amino acids, lactate, succinate, acetylcholine and homarine, and reduced alanine, acetoacetate, glycine and taurine were observed in the Zebra clam samples. Overall, our findings showed that White clams could be a preferable

  20. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John H Wiley and Sons; 2013: ...

  1. 1H NMR Metabolomics Analysis of Glioblastoma Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Ferguson, Dean; Culf, Adrian; Morin, Pier; Touaibia, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of malignant glioma, characterized by unpredictable clinical behaviors that suggest distinct molecular subtypes. With the tumor metabolic phenotype being one of the hallmarks of cancer, we have set upon to investigate whether GBMs show differences in their metabolic profiles. 1H NMR analysis was performed on metabolite extracts from a selection of nine glioblastoma cell lines. Analysis was performed directly on spectral data and on relative concentrations of metabolites obtained from spectra using a multivariate regression method developed in this work. Both qualitative and quantitative sample clustering have shown that cell lines can be divided into four groups for which the most significantly different metabolites have been determined. Analysis shows that some of the major cancer metabolic markers (such as choline, lactate, and glutamine) have significantly dissimilar concentrations in different GBM groups. The obtained lists of metabolic markers for subgroups were correlated with gene expression data for the same cell lines. Metabolic analysis generally agrees with gene expression measurements, and in several cases, we have shown in detail how the metabolic results can be correlated with the analysis of gene expression. Combined gene expression and metabolomics analysis have shown differential expression of transporters of metabolic markers in these cells as well as some of the major metabolic pathways leading to accumulation of metabolites. Obtained lists of marker metabolites can be leveraged for subtype determination in glioblastomas. PMID:22528487

  2. Understanding the metabolic fate and assessing the biosafety of MnO nanoparticles by metabonomic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinquan; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Feng, Jianghua; Gao, Jinhao; Chen, Zhong

    2013-11-01

    Recently, some types of MnO nanoparticle (Mn-NP) with favorable imaging capacity have been developed to improve the biocompatible profile of the existing Mn-based MRI contrast agent Mn-DPDP; however, the overall bio-effects and potential toxicity remain largely unknown. In this study, 1H NMR-based metabolic profiling, integrated with traditional biochemical analysis and histopathological examinations, was used to investigate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity of Mn-NPs as candidates for MRI contrast agent. The metabolic responses in biofluids (plasma and urine) and tissues (liver, spleen, kidney, lung and brain) from rats could be divided into four classes following Mn-NP administration: Mn biodistribution-dependent, time-dependent, dose-dependent and complicated metabolic variations. The variations of these metabolites involved in lipid, energy, amino acid and other nutrient metabolism, which disclosed the metabolic fate and biological effects of Mn-NPs in rats. The changes of metabolic profile implied that the disturbance and impairment of biological functions induced by Mn-NP exposure were correlated with the particle size and the surface chemistry of nanoparticles. Integration of metabonomic technology with traditional methods provides a promising tool to understand the toxicological behavior of biomedical nanomaterials and will result in informed decision-making during drug development.

  3. Riboflavin supplementation improves energy metabolism in mice exposed to acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y P; Wei, J Y; Yang, J J; Gao, W N; Wu, J Q; Guo, C J

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of riboflavin on energy metabolism in hypoxic mice. Kunming mice were fed diets containing riboflavin at doses of 6, 12, 24 and 48 mg/kg, respectively for 2 weeks before exposure to a simulated altitude of 6000 m for 8 h. Changes of riboflavin status and energy metabolism were assessed biochemically. Simultaneously, a (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabolomic technique was used to track the changes of plasma metabolic profiling. It was found that the content of hepatic riboflavin was decreased and erythrocyte glutathione activation coefficient was elevated significantly under hypoxic condition. Meanwhile, increased plasma pyruvate, lactate, beta-hydroxybutyrate and urea, as well as decreased plasma carnitine were observed. Riboflavin supplementation improved riboflavin status remarkably in hypoxic mice and decreased plasma levels of pyruvate, free fatty acids and beta-hydroxybutyrate significantly. Plasma carnitine was increased in response to riboflavin supplementation. Results obtained from (1)H NMR analysis were basically in line with the data from biochemical assays and remarkable changes in plasma taurine, choline and some other metabolites were also indicated. It was concluded that riboflavin requirement was increased under acute hypoxic condition and riboflavin supplementation was effective in improving energy metabolism in hypoxic mice. PMID:24564599

  4. NMR-based metabonomic in hippocampus, nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex of methamphetamine-sensitized rats.

    PubMed

    Bu, Qian; Lv, Lei; Yan, Guangyan; Deng, Pengchi; Wang, Yanli; Zhou, Jiaqing; Yang, Yanzhu; Li, Yan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2013-05-01

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy was applied to investigate the changes of cerebral metabolites in brain hippocampus, nucleus accumbens (NAC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of the rats subjected to subcutaneous twice-daily injections of 2.5mg/kg methamphetamine (MAP) for 7 days. The results indicated that MAP exposure induced significant behavioral sensitization and altered cerebral metabolites in rats. The neurotransmitters glutamate, glutamine and GABA significantly decreased in hippocampus, NAC and PFC. Specifically, increased succinic acid semialdehyde, a metabolism product of GABA, was observed in hippocampus. Additionally, decreased serotonin was observed in both NAC and PFC, whereas decreased dopamine was only observed in NAC after repeated MAP treatment. Glutathione obviously decreased in above brain regions, whereas acetylcysteine declined in hippocampus and NAC, and taurine declined in NAC and PFC. Homocysteic acid was elevated in hippocampus and NAC by repeated MAP administration. Membrane ingredients like phosphocholine elevated in response to MAP administration in NAC and PFC. N-Acetyl-aspartate, a marker of neuronal viability, decreased in the three regions; however, myo-inositol, a glial cell marker, increased in hippocampus and PFC. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate products, such as α-ketoglutarate, succinate, citrate and the methionine significantly decreased in above three brain regions after MAP administration; however, ADP decreased in hippocampus. These results indicate that repeated MAP treatment causes neurotransmitters disturbance, imbalance between oxidative stress and antioxidants, and gliosis in hippocampus, NAC and PFC. Profound metabolic changes detected across brain regions provide the first evidence of metabonomic changes in MAP-induced sensitized rats. PMID:23462569

  5. NMR-based metabolomics of prostate cancer: a protagonist in clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Gupta, Ashish; Nath, Kavindra

    2016-06-01

    Advances in the application of NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomic profiling of prostate cancer comprises a potential tactic for understanding the impaired biochemical pathways arising due to a disease evolvement and progression. This technique involves qualitative and quantitative estimation of plethora of small molecular weight metabolites of body fluids or tissues using state-of-the-art chemometric methods delivering an important platform for translational research from basic to clinical, to reveal the pathophysiological snapshot in a single step. This review summarizes the present arrays and recent advancements in NMR-based metabolomics and a glimpse of currently used medical imaging tactics, with their role in clinical diagnosis of prostate cancer. PMID:26959614

  6. Verification of the Major Metabolic Oxidation Path for the Naphthoyl Group in Chemoattractant Receptor-Homologous Molecule Expressed on Th2 Cells (CRTh2) Antagonist 2-(2-(1-Naphthoyl)-8-fluoro-3,4-dihydro-1H-pyrido[4,3-b]indol-5(2H)-yl)acetic Acid (Setipiprant/ACT-129968).

    PubMed

    Risch, Philippe; Pfeifer, Thomas; Segrestaa, Jerome; Fretz, Heinz; Pothier, Julien

    2015-10-22

    Various racemic and enantioenriched (trans)-X,Y-dihydroxy-X,Y-dihydronaphthoyl analogues as well as X-hydroxy-naphthoyl analogues of CRTh2 antagonist 2-(2-(1-naphthoyl)-8-fluoro-3,4-dihydro-1H-pyrido[4,3-b]indol-5(2H)-yl)acetic acid (1, Setipiprant/ACT-129968) were synthesized in order to gain insight into regio- and enantioselectivity of the metabolic oxidation of 1 and to verify the structures of four metabolites that were proposed earlier in a clinical ADME study. Analytical data of the synthetic standards were compared with data from samples of biological origin. The two major metabolites M7 and M9 were unambiguously verified as 2-(2-((trans)-3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydronaphthalene-1-carbonyl)- and 2-(2-((trans)-5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydronaphthalene-1-carbonyl)-8-fluoro-3,4-dihydro-1H-pyrido[4,3-b]indol-5(2H)-yl)acetic acid, respectively, each composed of two enantiomers with 68% and 44% ee in favor of (+)-(3S,4S)-M7 and (+)-(5S,6S)-M9, respectively. Likewise, minor metabolites M3 and M13 were identified as 2-(8-fluoro-2-(5-hydroxy-1-naphthoyl)- and 2-(8-fluoro-2-(4-hydroxy-1-naphthoyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indol-5-yl)acetic acid, respectively. PMID:26398218

  7. Feasibility Study of NMR Based Serum Metabolomic Profiling to Animal Health Monitoring: A Case Study on Iron Storage Disease in Captive Sumatran Rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Miki; Roth, Terri L; Bauer, Stuart J; Lane, Adam; Romick-Rosendale, Lindsey E

    2016-01-01

    A variety of wildlife species maintained in captivity are susceptible to iron storage disease (ISD), or hemochromatosis, a disease resulting from the deposition of excess iron into insoluble iron clusters in soft tissue. Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) is one of the rhinoceros species that has evolutionarily adapted to a low-iron diet and is susceptible to iron overload. Hemosiderosis is reported at necropsy in many African black and Sumatran rhinoceroses but only a small number of animals reportedly die from hemochromatosis. The underlying cause and reasons for differences in susceptibility to hemochromatosis within the taxon remains unclear. Although serum ferritin concentrations have been useful in monitoring the progression of ISD in many species, there is some question regarding their value in diagnosing hemochromatosis in the Sumatran rhino. To investigate the metabolic changes during the development of hemochromatosis and possibly increase our understanding of its progression and individual susceptibility differences, the serum metabolome from a Sumatran rhinoceros was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics. The study involved samples from female rhinoceros at the Cincinnati Zoo (n = 3), including two animals that died from liver failure caused by ISD, and the Sungai Dusun Rhinoceros Conservation Centre in Peninsular Malaysia (n = 4). Principal component analysis was performed to visually and statistically compare the metabolic profiles of the healthy animals. The results indicated that significant differences were present between the animals at the zoo and the animals in the conservation center. A comparison of the 43 serum metabolomes of three zoo rhinoceros showed two distinct groupings, healthy (n = 30) and unhealthy (n = 13). A total of eighteen altered metabolites were identified in healthy versus unhealthy samples. Results strongly suggest that NMR-based metabolomics is a valuable tool for animal health

  8. Feasibility Study of NMR Based Serum Metabolomic Profiling to Animal Health Monitoring: A Case Study on Iron Storage Disease in Captive Sumatran Rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis)

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Miki; Roth, Terri L.; Bauer, Stuart J.; Lane, Adam; Romick-Rosendale, Lindsey E.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of wildlife species maintained in captivity are susceptible to iron storage disease (ISD), or hemochromatosis, a disease resulting from the deposition of excess iron into insoluble iron clusters in soft tissue. Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) is one of the rhinoceros species that has evolutionarily adapted to a low-iron diet and is susceptible to iron overload. Hemosiderosis is reported at necropsy in many African black and Sumatran rhinoceroses but only a small number of animals reportedly die from hemochromatosis. The underlying cause and reasons for differences in susceptibility to hemochromatosis within the taxon remains unclear. Although serum ferritin concentrations have been useful in monitoring the progression of ISD in many species, there is some question regarding their value in diagnosing hemochromatosis in the Sumatran rhino. To investigate the metabolic changes during the development of hemochromatosis and possibly increase our understanding of its progression and individual susceptibility differences, the serum metabolome from a Sumatran rhinoceros was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics. The study involved samples from female rhinoceros at the Cincinnati Zoo (n = 3), including two animals that died from liver failure caused by ISD, and the Sungai Dusun Rhinoceros Conservation Centre in Peninsular Malaysia (n = 4). Principal component analysis was performed to visually and statistically compare the metabolic profiles of the healthy animals. The results indicated that significant differences were present between the animals at the zoo and the animals in the conservation center. A comparison of the 43 serum metabolomes of three zoo rhinoceros showed two distinct groupings, healthy (n = 30) and unhealthy (n = 13). A total of eighteen altered metabolites were identified in healthy versus unhealthy samples. Results strongly suggest that NMR-based metabolomics is a valuable tool for animal health

  9. NMR-based metabolomics study of the biochemical relationship between sugarcane callus tissues and their respective nutrient culture media

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Iqbal; Thapaliya, Monica; Boroujerdi, Arezue; Chowdhury, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    The culture of sugarcane leaf explant onto culture induction medium triggers the stimulation of cell metabolism into both embryogenic and non-embryogenic callus tissues. Previous analyses demonstrated that embryogenic and nonembryogenic callus tissues have distinct metabolic profiles. This study is the follow-up to understand the biochemical relationship between the nutrient media and callus tissues using one-dimensional (1D 1H) and two-dimensional (2D 1H–13C) NMR spectroscopy followed by principal component analysis (PCA). 1D 1H spectral comparisons of fresh unspent media (FM), embryogenic callus media (ECM), non-embryogenic callus media (NECM), embryogenic callus (EC), and non-embryogenic callus (NEC), showed different metabolic relationships between callus tissues and media. Based on metabolite fold change analysis, significantly changing sugar compounds such as glucose, fructose, sucrose, and maltose were maintained in large quantities by EC only. Significantly different amino acid compounds such as valine, leucine, alanine, threonine, asparagine, and glutamine and different organic acid derivatives such as lactate, 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, 4-aminobutyrate, malonate, and choline were present in EC, NEC, and NECM, which indicates that EC maintained these nutrients, while NEC either maintained or secreted the metabolites. These media and callus-specific results suggest that EC and NEC utilize and/or secrete media nutrients differently. PMID:25012359

  10. Metabolomics Reveals that Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by Environmental Chemicals Induces Systemic Metabolic Dysfunction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Limin; Hatzakis, Emmanuel; Nichols, Robert G.; Hao, Ruixin; Correll, Jared; Smith, Philip B.; Chiaro, Christopher R.; Perdew, Gary H.; Patterson, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental exposure to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds poses a significant health risk for human health. Developing a better understanding of the mechanisms of toxicity through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is likely to improve the reliability of risk assessment. In this study, the AHR-dependent metabolic response of mice exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) were assessed using global 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics and targeted metabolic profiling of extracts obtained from serum and liver. 1H NMR analyses revealed that TCDF exposure suppressed gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, stimulated lipogenesis, and triggered inflammatory gene expression in an Ahr-dependent manner. Targeted analyses using gas chromatography mass spectrometry showed TCDF treatment altered the ratio of unsaturated/saturated fatty acids. Consistent with this observation, an increase in hepatic expression of stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 was also observed. In addition, TCDF exposure resulted in inhibition of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis manifested by down-regulation of acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and palmitoyl-CoA metabolites and related mRNA levels. In contrast, no significant changes in the levels of glucose and lipid were observed in serum and liver obtained from Ahr-null mice following TCDF treatment, thus strongly supporting the important role of the AHR in mediating the metabolic effects seen following TCDF exposure. PMID:26023891

  11. Dynamic stereochemistry of erigeroside by measurement of 1H- 1H and 13C- 1H coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafazzoli, Mohsen; Ghiasi, Mina; Moridi, Mahdi

    2008-07-01

    Erigeroside was extracted from Satureja khuzistanica Jamzad (Marzeh Khuzistani in Persian, family of lamiaceae), and 1H, 13C, 13C{ 1H}, 1H- 1H COSY, HMQC and J-HMBC were obtained to identify this compound and determine a complete set of J-coupling constants ( 1JC-H, 2JC-H, 3JC-H and 3JH-H) values within the exocyclic hydroxymethyl group (CH 2OH) and anomeric center. In parallel, density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP functional and split-valance 6-311++G** basis set has been used to optimized the structures and conformers of erigeroside. In all calculations solvent effects were considered using a polarized continuum (overlapping spheres) model (PCM). The dependencies of 1J, 2J and 3J involving 1H and 13C on the C 5'-C 6' ( ω), C 6'-O 6' ( θ) and C 1'-O 1' ( φ) torsion angles in erigeroside were computed using DFT method. Complete hyper surfaces for 1JC1',H1', 2JC5',H6'R, 2JC5',H6'S, 2JC6',H5', 3JC4',H6'R, 3JC4',H6'S and 2JH6'R-H5'S as well as 3JH5',H6'R were obtained and used to derive Karplus equations to correlate these couplings to ω, θ and φ. These calculated J-couplings are in agreement with experimental values. These results confirm the reliability of DFT calculated coupling constants in aqueous solution.

  12. Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways: Identifying Metabolic Pathways Directly from a Single 2D NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhinav; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Pal, Debnath; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2015-12-15

    Identifying cellular processes in terms of metabolic pathways is one of the avowed goals of metabolomics studies. Currently, this is done after relevant metabolites are identified to allow their mapping onto specific pathways. This task is daunting due to the complex nature of cellular processes and the difficulty in establishing the identity of individual metabolites. We propose here a new method: ChemSMP (Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways), which facilitates rapid analysis by identifying the active metabolic pathways directly from chemical shifts obtained from a single two-dimensional (2D) [(13)C-(1)H] correlation NMR spectrum without the need for identification and assignment of individual metabolites. ChemSMP uses a novel indexing and scoring system comprised of a "uniqueness score" and a "coverage score". Our method is demonstrated on metabolic pathways data from the Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) and chemical shifts from the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). Benchmarks show that ChemSMP has a positive prediction rate of >90% in the presence of decluttered data and can sustain the same at 60-70% even in the presence of noise, such as deletions of peaks and chemical shift deviations. The method tested on NMR data acquired for a mixture of 20 amino acids shows a success rate of 93% in correct recovery of pathways. When used on data obtained from the cell lysate of an unexplored oncogenic cell line, it revealed active metabolic pathways responsible for regulating energy homeostasis of cancer cells. Our unique tool is thus expected to significantly enhance analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data by reducing existing impediments. PMID:26556218

  13. NMR-Based Multi Parametric Quality Control of Fruit Juices: SGF Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Spraul, Manfred; Schütz, Birk; Rinke, Peter; Koswig, Susanne; Humpfer, Eberhard; Schäfer, Hartmut; Mörtter, Monika; Fang, Fang; Marx, Ute C.; Minoja, Anna

    2009-01-01

    With SGF Profiling™ we introduce an NMR-based screening method for the quality control of fruit juices. This method has been developed in a joint effort by Bruker BioSpin GmbH and SGF International e.V. The system is fully automated with respect to sample transfer, measurement, data analysis and reporting and is set up on an Avance 400 MHz flow-injection NMR spectrometer. For each fruit juice a multitude of parameters related to quality and authenticity are evaluated simultaneously from a single data set acquired within a few minutes. This multimarker/multi-aspect NMR screening approach features low cost-per-sample and is highly competitive with conventional and targeted fruit juice quality control methods. PMID:22253974

  14. (13)C NMR-based metabolomics for the classification of green coffee beans according to variety and origin.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Furihata, Kazuo; Koda, Masanori; Hu, Fangyu; Kato, Rieko; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2012-10-10

    (13)C NMR-based metabolomics was demonstrated as a useful tool for distinguishing the species and origins of green coffee bean samples of arabica and robusta from six different geographic regions. By the application of information on (13)C signal assignment, significantly different levels of 14 metabolites of green coffee beans were identified in the classifications, including sucrose, caffeine, chlorogenic acids, choline, amino acids, organic acids, and trigonelline, as captured by multivariate analytical models. These studies demonstrate that the species and geographical origin can be quickly discriminated by evaluating the major metabolites of green coffee beans quantitatively using (13)C NMR-based metabolite profiling. PMID:22989016

  15. Enhanced Y1H Assays for Arabidopis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcription regulation plays a key role in development and response to environment. To understand this mechanism, we need to know which transcription factor (TFs) would bind to which promoter, thus regulate their target gene expression. Yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) technique can be used to map this kind...

  16. Metabolic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikov, Vladimir V.

    Analysis of the metabolome with coverage of all of the possibly detectable components in the sample, rather than analysis of each individual metabolite at a given time, can be accomplished by metabolic analysis. Targeted and/or nontargeted approaches are applied as needed for particular experiments. Monitoring hundreds or more metabolites at a given time requires high-throughput and high-end techniques that enable screening for relative changes in, rather than absolute concentrations of, compounds within a wide dynamic range. Most of the analytical techniques useful for these purposes use GC or HPLC/UPLC separation modules coupled to a fast and accurate mass spectrometer. GC separations require chemical modification (derivatization) before analysis, and work efficiently for the small molecules. HPLC separations are better suited for the analysis of labile and nonvolatile polar and nonpolar compounds in their native form. Direct infusion and NMR-based techniques are mostly used for fingerprinting and snap phenotyping, where applicable. Discovery and validation of metabolic biomarkers are exciting and promising opportunities offered by metabolic analysis applied to biological and biomedical experiments. We have demonstrated that GC-TOF-MS, HPLC/UPLC-RP-MS and HILIC-LC-MS techniques used for metabolic analysis offer sufficient metabolome mapping providing researchers with confident data for subsequent multivariate analysis and data mining.

  17. Lemna minor L. as a model organism for ecotoxicological studies performing 1H NMR fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Aliferis, Konstantinos A; Materzok, Sylwia; Paziotou, Georgia N; Chrysayi-Tokousbalides, Maria

    2009-08-01

    A validated method applying (1)H NMR fingerprinting for the study of metabolic changes caused in Lemna minor L. by various phytotoxic substances is presented. (1)H NMR spectra of crude extracts from untreated and treated colonies with the herbicides glyphosate, mesotrione, norflurazon, paraquat and the phytotoxin pyrenophorol were subjected to multivariate analyses for detecting differences between groups of treatments. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were carried out in order to discriminate and classify treatments according to the observed changes in the metabolome of the plant. Although the compounds at the concentrations used did not cause macroscopically observable symptoms of phytotoxicity, characteristic metabolic changes were detectable by analyzing (1)H NMR spectra. Analyses results revealed that metabonomics applying (1)H NMR fingerprinting is a potential method for the investigation of toxicological effects of xenobiotics on L. minor, and possibly on other duckweed species, helping in the understanding of such interactions. PMID:19443011

  18. Robustness of NMR-based metabolomics to generate comparable data sets for olive oil cultivar classification. An inter-laboratory study on Apulian olive oils.

    PubMed

    Piccinonna, Sara; Ragone, Rosa; Stocchero, Matteo; Del Coco, Laura; De Pascali, Sandra Angelica; Schena, Francesco Paolo; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2016-05-15

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a powerful technique in olive oil fingerprinting, but its analytical robustness has to be proved. Here, we report a comparative study between two laboratories on olive oil (1)H NMR fingerprinting, aiming to demonstrate the robustness of NMR-based metabolomics in generating comparable data sets for cultivar classification. Sample preparation and data acquisition were performed independently in two laboratories, equipped with different resolution spectrometers (400 and 500 MHz), using two identical sets of mono-varietal olive oils. Partial Least Squares (PLS)-based techniques were applied to compare the data sets produced by the two laboratories. Despite differences in spectrum baseline, and in intensity and shape of peaks, the amount of shared information was significant (almost 70%) and related to cultivar (same metabolites discriminated between cultivars). In conclusion, regardless of the variability due to operator and machine, the data sets from the two participating units were comparable for the purpose of classification. PMID:26776024

  19. NMR-Based Metabolomic Investigations on the Differential Responses in Adductor Muscles from Two Pedigrees of Manila Clam Ruditapes philippinarum to Cadmium and Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huifeng; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Jianmin; Yu, Junbao

    2011-01-01

    Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum is one of the most important economic species in shellfishery in China due to its wide geographic distribution and high tolerance to environmental changes (e.g., salinity, temperature). In addition, Manila clam is a good biomonitor/bioindicator in “Mussel Watch Programs” and marine environmental toxicology. However, there are several pedigrees of R. philippinarum distributed in the marine environment in China. No attention has been paid to the biological differences between various pedigrees of Manila clams, which may introduce undesirable biological variation in toxicology studies. In this study, we applied NMR-based metabolomics to detect the biological differences in two main pedigrees (White and Zebra) of R. philippinarum and their differential responses to heavy metal exposures (Cadmium and Zinc) using adductor muscle as a target tissue to define one sensitive pedigree of R. philippinarum as biomonitor for heavy metals. Our results indicated that there were significant metabolic differences in adductor muscle tissues between White and Zebra clams, including higher levels of alanine, glutamine, hypotaurine, phosphocholine and homarine in White clam muscles and higher levels of branched chain amino acids (valine, leucine and isoleucine), succinate and 4-aminobutyrate in Zebra clam muscles, respectively. Differential metabolic responses to heavy metals between White and Zebra clams were also found. Overall, we concluded that White pedigree of clam could be a preferable bioindicator/biomonitor in marine toxicology studies and for marine heavy metals based on the relatively high sensitivity to heavy metals. PMID:22131959

  20. Dynamic Metabolic Disruption in Rats Perinatally Exposed to Low Doses of Bisphenol-A

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Cabaton, Nicolas J.; Canlet, Cécile; Gautier, Roselyne; Schaeberle, Cheryl M.; Jourdan, Fabien; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Vinson, Florence; Soto, Ana M.; Zalko, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Along with the well-established effects on fertility and fecundity, perinatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals, and notably to xeno-estrogens, is strongly suspected of modulating general metabolism. The metabolism of a perinatally exposed individual may be durably altered leading to a higher susceptibility of developing metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes; however, experimental designs involving the long term study of these dynamic changes in the metabolome raise novel challenges. 1H-NMR-based metabolomics was applied to study the effects of bisphenol-A (BPA, 0; 0.25; 2.5, 25 and 250 μg/kg BW/day) in rats exposed perinatally. Serum and liver samples of exposed animals were analyzed on days 21, 50, 90, 140 and 200 in order to explore whether maternal exposure to BPA alters metabolism. Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) was independently applied to each time point, demonstrating a significant pair-wise discrimination for liver as well as serum samples at all time-points, and highlighting unequivocal metabolic shifts in rats perinatally exposed to BPA, including those exposed to lower doses. In BPA exposed animals, metabolism of glucose, lactate and fatty acids was modified over time. To further explore dynamic variation, ANOVA-Simultaneous Component Analysis (A-SCA) was used to separate data into blocks corresponding to the different sources of variation (Time, Dose and Time*Dose interaction). A-SCA enabled the demonstration of a dynamic, time/age dependent shift of serum metabolome throughout the rats’ lifetimes. Variables responsible for the discrimination between groups clearly indicate that BPA modulates energy metabolism, and suggest alterations of neurotransmitter signaling, the latter finding being compatible with the neurodevelopmental effect of this xenoestrogen. In conclusion, long lasting metabolic effects of BPA could be characterized over 200 days, despite physiological (and thus metabolic) changes connected

  1. Predictability of 1-h postload plasma glucose concentration: A 10-year retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Lifen; Huang, Zhimin; Hong, Zhenzhen; Chen, Ailing; Li, Yanbing

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Elevated 1-h postload plasma glucose concentration (1hPG) during oral glucose tolerance test has been linked to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and a poorer cardiometabolic risk profile. The present study analyzed the predictability and cut-off point of 1hPG in predicting type 2 diabetes in normal glucose regulation (NGR) subjects, and evaluated the long-term prognosis of NGR subjects with elevated 1hPG in glucose metabolism, kidney function, metabolic states and atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods A total of 116 Han Chinese classified as NGR in 2002 at the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China, were investigated. Follow-up was carried out in 2012 to evaluate the progression of glucose metabolism, kidney function, metabolic syndrome and carotid atherosclerosis. Results The areas under receiver operating characteristic curves were higher for 1hPG than FPG or 2hPG (0.858 vs 0.806 vs 0.746). The cut-off value of 1hPG with the maximal sum of sensitivity and specificity in predicting type 2 diabetes in NGR subjects was 8.85 mmol/L. The accumulative incidence of type 2 diabetes in subjects with 1hPG ≥8.85 mmol/L was higher than those <8.85 mmol/L (46.2% vs 3.3%, P = 0.000; relative risk 13.846, 95% confidence interval 4.223–45.400). On follow up, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and abnormal carotid intima-media thickness in the subjects with 1hPG ≥8.85 mmol/L tended to be higher compared with those <8.85 mmol/L. Conclusions 1hPG is a good predictor of type 2 diabetes in NGR subjects, and the best cut-off point is 8.85 mmol/L. Some tendency indicates that NGR subjects with 1hPG ≥8.85 mmol/L are more prone to metabolic syndrome and carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:26543538

  2. 1H NMR metabolomics study of age profiling in children

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Haiwei; Pan, Zhengzheng; Xi, Bowei; Hainline, Bryan E.; Shanaiah, Narasimhamurthy; Asiago, Vincent; Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Raftery, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic profiling of urine provides a fingerprint of personalized endogenous metabolite markers that correlate to a number of factors such as gender, disease, diet, toxicity, medication, and age. It is important to study these factors individually, if possible to unravel their unique contributions. In this study, age-related metabolic changes in children of age 12 years and below were analyzed by 1H NMR spectroscopy of urine. The effect of age on the urinary metabolite profile was observed as a distinct age-dependent clustering even from the unsupervised principal component analysis. Further analysis, using partial least squares with orthogonal signal correction regression with respect to age, resulted in the identification of an age-related metabolic profile. Metabolites that correlated with age included creatinine, creatine, glycine, betaine/TMAO, citrate, succinate, and acetone. Although creatinine increased with age, all the other metabolites decreased. These results may be potentially useful in assessing the biological age (as opposed to chronological) of young humans as well as in providing a deeper understanding of the confounding factors in the application of metabolomics. PMID:19441074

  3. Urinary Metabolomic Approach Provides New Insights into Distinct Metabolic Profiles of Glutamine and N-Carbamylglutamate Supplementation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangmang; Cao, Wei; Fang, Tingting; Jia, Gang; Zhao, Hua; Chen, Xiaoling; Wu, Caimei; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine and N-carbamylglutamate can enhance growth performance and health in animals, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of glutamine and N-carbamylglutamate supplementation in rat metabolism. Thirty rats were fed a control, glutamine, or N-carbamylglutamate diet for four weeks. Urine samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics, specifically high-resolution 1H NMR metabolic profiling combined with multivariate data analysis. Glutamine significantly increased the urine levels of acetamide, acetate, citrulline, creatinine, and methymalonate, and decreased the urine levels of ethanol and formate (p < 0.05). Moreover, N-carbamylglutamate significantly increased the urine levels of creatinine, ethanol, indoxyl sulfate, lactate, methymalonate, acetoacetate, m-hydroxyphenylacetate, and sarcosine, and decreased the urine levels of acetamide, acetate, citrulline, creatine, glycine, hippurate, homogentisate, N-acetylglutamate, phenylacetyglycine, acetone, and p-hydroxyphenylacetate (p < 0.05). Results suggested that glutamine and N-carbamylglutamate could modify urinary metabolome related to nitrogen metabolism and gut microbiota metabolism. Moreover, N-carbamylglutamate could alter energy and lipid metabolism. These findings indicate that different arginine precursors may lead to differences in the biofluid profile in rats. PMID:27527211

  4. NMR-based metabolomics reveals urinary metabolome modifications in female Sprague-Dawley rats by cranberry procyanidins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Tayyari, Fariba; Edison, Arthur S; Su, Zhihua; Gu, Liwei

    2016-08-01

    A (1)H NMR global metabolomics approach was used to investigate the urinary metabolome changes in female rats gavaged with partially purified cranberry procyanidins (PPCP) or partially purified apple procyanidins (PPAP). After collecting 24-h baseline urine, 24 female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly separated into two groups and gavaged with PPCP or PPAP twice using a dose of 250 mg extracts per kilogram body weight. The 24-h urine samples were collected after the gavage. Urine samples were analyzed using (1)H NMR. Multivariate analyses showed that the urinary metabolome in rats was modified after administering PPCP or PPAP compared to baseline urine metabolic profiles. 2D (1)H-(13)C HSQC NMR was conducted to assist identification of discriminant metabolites. An increase of hippurate, lactate and succinate and a decrease of citrate and α-ketoglutarate were observed in rat urine after administering PPCP. Urinary levels of d-glucose, d-maltose, 3-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)-3-hydroxypropanoic acid, p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, formate and phenol increased but citrate, α-ketoglutarate and creatinine decreased in rats after administering PPAP. Furthermore, the NMR analysis showed that the metabolome in the urine of rats administered with PPCP differed from those gavaged with PPAP. Compared to PPAP, PPCP caused an increase of urinary excretion of hippurate but a decrease of 3-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)-3-hydroxypropanoic acid, p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and phenol. These metabolome changes caused by cranberry procyanidins may help to explain its reported health benefits and identify biomarkers of cranberry procyanidin intake. PMID:27309592

  5. Application of (1)h NMR profiling to assess seed metabolomic diversity. A case study on a soybean era population.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, George G; Skogerson, Kirsten; MacIsaac, Susan; Bickel, Anna; Perez, Tim; Li, Xin

    2015-05-13

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy offers advantages in metabolite quantitation and platform robustness when applied in food metabolomics studies. This paper provides a (1)H NMR-based assessment of seed metabolomic diversity in conventional and glyphosate-resistant genetically modified (GM) soybean from a genetic lineage representing ∼35 years of breeding and differing yield potential. (1)H NMR profiling of harvested seed allowed quantitation of 27 metabolites, including free amino acids, sugars, and organic acids, as well as choline, O-acetylcholine, dimethylamine, trigonelline, and p-cresol. Data were analyzed by canonical discriminant analysis (CDA) and principal variance component analysis (PVCA). Results demonstrated that (1)H NMR spectroscopy was effective in highlighting variation in metabolite levels in the genetically diverse sample set presented. The results also confirmed that metabolite variability is influenced by selective breeding and environment, but not genetic modification. Therefore, metabolite variability is an integral part of crop improvement that has occurred for decades and is associated with a history of safe use. PMID:25940152

  6. Metabolic profiling detects early effects of environmental and lifestyle exposure to cadmium in a human population

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The 'exposome' represents the accumulation of all environmental exposures across a lifetime. Top-down strategies are required to assess something this comprehensive, and could transform our understanding of how environmental factors affect human health. Metabolic profiling (metabonomics/metabolomics) defines an individual's metabolic phenotype, which is influenced by genotype, diet, lifestyle, health and xenobiotic exposure, and could also reveal intermediate biomarkers for disease risk that reflect adaptive response to exposure. We investigated changes in metabolism in volunteers living near a point source of environmental pollution: a closed zinc smelter with associated elevated levels of environmental cadmium. Methods High-resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy (metabonomics) was used to acquire urinary metabolic profiles from 178 human volunteers. The spectral data were subjected to multivariate and univariate analysis to identify metabolites that were correlated with lifestyle or biological factors. Urinary levels of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine were also measured, using mass spectrometry, as a marker of systemic oxidative stress. Results Six urinary metabolites, either associated with mitochondrial metabolism (citrate, 3-hydroxyisovalerate, 4-deoxy-erythronic acid) or one-carbon metabolism (dimethylglycine, creatinine, creatine), were associated with cadmium exposure. In particular, citrate levels retained a significant correlation to urinary cadmium and smoking status after controlling for age and sex. Oxidative stress (as determined by urinary 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine levels) was elevated in individuals with high cadmium exposure, supporting the hypothesis that heavy metal accumulation was causing mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions This study shows evidence that an NMR-based metabolic profiling study in an uncontrolled human population is capable of identifying intermediate biomarkers of response to toxicants at true environmental concentrations, paving the way

  7. Distinctive Metabolism of Flavonoid between Cultivated and Semiwild Soybean Unveiled through Metabolomics Approach.

    PubMed

    Yun, Dae-Yong; Kang, Young-Gyu; Yun, Bohyun; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoyeon; Park, Jun Seong; Lee, John Hwan; Hong, Young-Shick

    2016-07-27

    Soybeans are an important crop for agriculture and food, resulting in an increase in the range of its application. Recently, soybean leaves have been used not only for food products but also in the beauty industry. To provide useful and global metabolite information on the development of soy-based products, we investigated the metabolic evolution and cultivar-dependent metabolite variation in the leaves of cultivated (Glycine max) and semiwild (G. gracilis) soybean, through a (1)H NMR-based metabolomics approach, as they grew from V (vegetative) 1 to R (reproductive) 7 growth stages. The levels of primary metabolites, such as sucrose, amino acids, organic acids, and fatty acids, were decreased both in the G. gracilis and G. max leaves. However, the secondary metabolites, such as pinitol, rutin, and polyphenols, were increased while synthesis of glucose was elevated as the leaves grew. When metabolite variations between G. gracilis and G. max are compared, it was noteworthy that rutin and its precursor, quercetin-3-O-glucoside, were found only in G. gracilis but not in G. max. Furthermore, levels of pinitol, proline, β-alanine, and acetic acid, a metabolite related to adaptation toward environmental stress, were different between the two soybean cultivars. These results highlight their distinct metabolism for adaptation to environmental conditions and their intrinsic metabolic phenotype. This study therefore provides important information on the cultivar-dependent metabolites of soybean leaves for better understanding of plant physiology toward the development of soy-based products. PMID:27356159

  8. Identification of key metabolic changes in renal interstitial fibrosis rats using metabonomics and pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liangcai; Dong, Minjian; Liao, Shixian; Du, Yao; Zhou, Qi; Zheng, Hong; Chen, Minjiang; Ji, Jiansong; Gao, Hongchang

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is one of the important pathways involved in end-stage renal failure. Investigating the metabolic changes in the progression of disease may enhance the understanding of its pathogenesis and therapeutic information. In this study, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics was firstly used to screen the metabolic changes in urine and kidney tissues of renal interstitial fibrotic rats induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after operation, respectively. The results revealed that reduced levels of bioenergy synthesis and branched chain amino acids (BCAAs), as well as elevated levels of indoxyl sulfate (IS) are involved in metabolic alterations of renal fibrosis rats. Next, by pharmacological treatment we found that reduction of IS levels could prevent the renal fibrotic symptoms. Therefore, we suggested that urinary IS may be used as a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of renal fibrosis, and a therapeutic target for drugs. Novel attempt combining metabonomics and pharmacology was established that have ability to provide more systematic diagnostic and therapeutic information of diseases. PMID:27256510

  9. Dynamic Metabolic and Transcriptional Profiling of Rhodococcus sp. Strain YYL during the Degradation of Tetrahydrofuran

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhixing; Yao, Yanlai

    2014-01-01

    Although tetrahydrofuran-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain YYL possesses tetrahydrofuran (THF) degradation genes similar to those of other tetrahydrofuran-degrading bacteria, a much higher degradation efficiency has been observed in strain YYL. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics analyses were performed to explore the metabolic profiling response of strain YYL to exposure to THF. Exposure to THF slightly influenced the metabolome of strain YYL when yeast extract was present in the medium. The metabolic profile of strain YYL over time was also investigated using THF as the sole carbon source to identify the metabolites associated with high-efficiency THF degradation. Lactate, alanine, glutarate, glutamate, glutamine, succinate, lysine, trehalose, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), NAD+, and CTP were significantly altered over time in strain YYL grown in 20 mM THF. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) revealed changes in the transcriptional expression levels of 15 genes involved in THF degradation, suggesting that strain YYL could accumulate several disturbances in osmoregulation (trehalose, glutamate, glutamine, etc.), with reduced glycolysis levels, an accelerated tricarboxylic acid cycle, and enhanced protein synthesis. The findings obtained through 1H NMR metabolomics analyses and the transcriptional expression of the corresponding genes are complementary for exploring the dynamic metabolic profile in organisms. PMID:24532074

  10. Identification of key metabolic changes in renal interstitial fibrosis rats using metabonomics and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liangcai; Dong, Minjian; Liao, Shixian; Du, Yao; Zhou, Qi; Zheng, Hong; Chen, Minjiang; Ji, Jiansong; Gao, Hongchang

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is one of the important pathways involved in end-stage renal failure. Investigating the metabolic changes in the progression of disease may enhance the understanding of its pathogenesis and therapeutic information. In this study, (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics was firstly used to screen the metabolic changes in urine and kidney tissues of renal interstitial fibrotic rats induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after operation, respectively. The results revealed that reduced levels of bioenergy synthesis and branched chain amino acids (BCAAs), as well as elevated levels of indoxyl sulfate (IS) are involved in metabolic alterations of renal fibrosis rats. Next, by pharmacological treatment we found that reduction of IS levels could prevent the renal fibrotic symptoms. Therefore, we suggested that urinary IS may be used as a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of renal fibrosis, and a therapeutic target for drugs. Novel attempt combining metabonomics and pharmacology was established that have ability to provide more systematic diagnostic and therapeutic information of diseases. PMID:27256510

  11. INVESTIGATING THE ENANTIOSELECTIVE TOXICITY OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES IN RAINBOW TROUT THROUGH NMR BASED METABOLOMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, metabolomics, or the quantitative measurement of a broad spectrum of metabolic responses of living systems in response to disease onset or genetic modification, has been employed to enable rapid identification of the mechanisms of toxicity for compounds of environmental...

  12. Observation of 1H-13C and 1H-1H proximities in a paramagnetic solid by NMR at high magnetic field under ultra-fast MAS.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenhui; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Zhou, Lei; Shen, Ming; Pourpoint, Frédérique; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2015-02-01

    The assignment of NMR signals in paramagnetic solids is often challenging since: (i) the large paramagnetic shifts often mask the diamagnetic shifts specific to the local chemical environment, and (ii) the hyperfine interactions with unpaired electrons broaden the NMR spectra and decrease the coherence lifetime, thus reducing the efficiency of usual homo- and hetero-nuclear NMR correlation experiments. Here we show that the assignment of (1)H and (13)C signals in isotopically unmodified paramagnetic compounds with moderate hyperfine interactions can be facilitated by the use of two two-dimensional (2D) experiments: (i) (1)H-(13)C correlations with (1)H detection and (ii) (1)H-(1)H double-quantum↔single-quantum correlations. These methods are experimentally demonstrated on isotopically unmodified copper (II) complex of l-alanine at high magnetic field (18.8 T) and ultra-fast Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) frequency of 62.5 kHz. Compared to (13)C detection, we show that (1)H detection leads to a 3-fold enhancement in sensitivity for (1)H-(13)C 2D correlation experiments. By combining (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(1)H 2D correlation experiments with the analysis of (13)C longitudinal relaxation times, we have been able to assign the (1)H and (13)C signals of each l-alanine ligand. PMID:25557861

  13. Automatic 1H-NMR Screening of Fatty Acid Composition in Edible Oils

    PubMed Central

    Castejón, David; Fricke, Pascal; Cambero, María Isabel; Herrera, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we introduce an NMR-based screening method for the fatty acid composition analysis of edible oils. We describe the evaluation and optimization needed for the automated analysis of vegetable oils by low-field NMR to obtain the fatty acid composition (FAC). To achieve this, two scripts, which automatically analyze and interpret the spectral data, were developed. The objective of this work was to drive forward the automated analysis of the FAC by NMR. Due to the fact that this protocol can be carried out at low field and that the complete process from sample preparation to printing the report only takes about 3 min, this approach is promising to become a fundamental technique for high-throughput screening. To demonstrate the applicability of this method, the fatty acid composition of extra virgin olive oils from various Spanish olive varieties (arbequina, cornicabra, hojiblanca, manzanilla, and picual) was determined by 1H-NMR spectroscopy according to this protocol. PMID:26891323

  14. 1H NMR metabolomics study of metastatic melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse spleen

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Xuan; Hu, Mary Y.; Feng, Ju; Liu, Maili; Hu, Jian Z.

    2014-04-03

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Although extensive investigations have been done to study metabolic changes in primary melanoma in vivo and in vitro, little effort has been devoted to metabolic profiling of metastatic tumors in organs other than lymph nodes. In this work, NMR-based metabolomics combined with multivariate data analysis is used to study metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse spleen. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to find important metabolites responsible formore » discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Two different strategies, i.e., spectral binning and spectral deconvolution, are used to reduce the original spectral data before statistical analysis. Spectral deconvolution is found to be superior for identifying a set of discriminatory metabolites between the control and the melanoma groups, especially when the sample size is small. OPLS results show that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. It is found that taurine, glutamate, aspartate, O-Phosphoethanolamine, niacinamide ,ATP, lipids and glycerol derivatives are decreased statistically and significantly while alanine, malate, xanthine, histamine, dCTP, GTP, thymidine, 2'-Deoxyguanosine are statistically and significantly elevated. Furthermore, these significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in spleen.« less

  15. Crystalline 1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-ylidenes

    DOEpatents

    Bertrand, Guy; Gulsado-Barrios, Gregorio; Bouffard, Jean; Donnadieu, Bruno

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides novel and stable crystalline 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes. The present invention also provides methods of making 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes. The present invention also provides methods of using 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes in catalytic reactions.

  16. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: NMR-based mapping of the active site.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Luis; Kuti, Miklos; Bishop, David F; Mezei, Mihaly; Zeng, Lei; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Desnick, Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-synthase) catalyzes the cyclization and D-ring isomerization of hydroxymethylbilane (HMB) to uroporphyrinogen (URO'gen) III, the cyclic tetrapyrrole and physiologic precursor of heme, chlorophyl, and corrin. The deficient activity of human URO-synthase results in the autosomal recessive cutaneous disorder, congenital erythropoietic porphyria. Mapping of the structural determinants that specify catalysis and, potentially, protein-protein interactions is lacking. To map the active site and assess the enzyme's possible interaction in a complex with hydroxymethylbilane-synthase (HMB-synthase) and/or uroporphyrinogen-decarboxylase (URO-decarboxylase) by NMR, an efficient expression and purification procedure was developed for these cytosolic enzymes of heme biosynthesis that enabled preparation of special isotopically-labeled protein samples for NMR characterization. Using an 800 MHz instrument, assignment of the URO-synthase backbone (13)C(alpha) (100%), (1)H(alpha) (99.6%), and nonproline (1)H(N) and (15)N resonances (94%) was achieved as well as 85% of the side-chain (13)C and (1)H resonances. NMR analyses of URO-synthase titrated with competitive inhibitors N(D)-methyl-1-formylbilane (NMF-bilane) or URO'gen III, revealed resonance perturbations of specific residues lining the cleft between the two major domains of URO synthase that mapped the enzyme's active site. In silico docking of the URO-synthase crystal structure with NMF-bilane and URO'gen III was consistent with the perturbation results and provided a 3D model of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. The absence of chemical shift changes in the (15)N spectrum of URO-synthase mixed with the homogeneous HMB-synthase holoenzyme or URO-decarboxylase precluded occurrence of a stable cytosolic enzyme complex. PMID:18004775

  17. NMR-based Structural Analysis of the Complete Rough-type Lipopolysaccharide Isolated from Capnocytophaga canimorsus*

    PubMed Central

    Zähringer, Ulrich; Ittig, Simon; Lindner, Buko; Moll, Hermann; Schombel, Ursula; Gisch, Nicolas; Cornelis, Guy R.

    2014-01-01

    We here describe the NMR analysis of an intact lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) in water with 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine as detergent. When HPLC-purified rough-type LPS of Capnocytophaga canimorsus was prepared, 13C,15N labeling could be avoided. The intact LPS was analyzed by homonuclear (1H) and heteronuclear (1H,13C, and 1H,31P) correlated one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques as well as by mass spectrometry. It consists of a penta-acylated lipid A with an α-linked phosphoethanolamine attached to C-1 of GlcN (I) in the hybrid backbone, lacking the 4′-phosphate. The hydrophilic core oligosaccharide was found to be a complex hexasaccharide with two mannose (Man) and one each of 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo), Gal, GalN, and l-rhamnose residues. Position 4 of Kdo is substituted by phosphoethanolamine, also present in position 6 of the branched ManI residue. This rough-type LPS is exceptional in that all three negative phosphate residues are “masked” by positively charged ethanolamine substituents, leading to an overall zero net charge, which has so far not been observed for any other LPS. In biological assays, the corresponding isolated lipid A was found to be endotoxically almost inactive. By contrast, the intact rough-type LPS described here expressed a 20,000-fold increased endotoxicity, indicating that the core oligosaccharide significantly contributes to the endotoxic potency of the whole rough-type C. canimorsus LPS molecule. Based on these findings, the strict view that lipid A alone represents the toxic center of LPS needs to be reassessed. PMID:24993825

  18. NMR-based platform for fragment-based lead discovery used in screening BRD4-targeted compounds

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun-lan; Chen, Tian-tian; Zhou, Chen; Lian, Fu-lin; Tang, Xu-long; Wen, Yi; Shen, Jing-kang; Xu, Ye-chun; Xiong, Bing; Zhang, Nai-xia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Fragment-based lead discovery (FBLD) is a complementary approach in drug research and development. In this study, we established an NMR-based FBLD platform that was used to screen novel scaffolds targeting human bromodomain of BRD4, and investigated the binding interactions between hit compounds and the target protein. Methods: 1D NMR techniques were primarily used to generate the fragment library and to screen compounds. The inhibitory activity of hits on the first bromodomain of BRD4 [BRD4(I)] was examined using fluorescence anisotropy binding assay. 2D NMR and X-ray crystallography were applied to characterize the binding interactions between hit compounds and the target protein. Results: An NMR-based fragment library containing 539 compounds was established, which were clustered into 56 groups (8–10 compounds in each group). Eight hits with new scaffolds were found to inhibit BRD4(I). Four out of the 8 hits (compounds 1, 2, 8 and 9) had IC50 values of 100–260 μmol/L, demonstrating their potential for further BRD4-targeted hit-to-lead optimization. Analysis of the binding interactions revealed that compounds 1 and 2 shared a common quinazolin core structure and bound to BRD4(I) in a non-acetylated lysine mimetic mode. Conclusion: An NMR-based platform for FBLD was established and used in discovery of BRD4-targeted compounds. Four potential hit-to-lead optimization candidates have been found, two of them bound to BRD4(I) in a non-acetylated lysine mimetic mode, being selective BRD4(I) inhibitors. PMID:27238211

  19. ¹H NMR-based metabonomics in brain nucleus accumbens and striatum following repeated cocaine treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Yan, G-Y; Zhou, J-Q; Bu, Q; Deng, P-C; Yang, Y-Z; Lv, L; Deng, Y; Zhao, J-X; Shao, X; Zhu, R-M; Huang, Y-N; Zhao, Y-L; Cen, X-B

    2012-08-30

    Studies have shown a few cerebral metabolites modified by cocaine in brain regions; however, endogenous metabolic profiling has been lacking. Ex vivo (1)H NMR (hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy-based metabonomic approach coupled with partial least squares was applied to investigate the changes of cerebral metabolites in nucleus accumbens (NAc) and striatum of rats subjected to cocaine treatment. Our results showed that both single and repeated cocaine treatment can induce significant changes in a couple of cerebral metabolites. The increase of neurotransmitters glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) were observed in NAc and striatum from the rats repeatedly treated with cocaine. Creatine and taurine increased in NAc whereas taurine increased and creatine decreased in striatum after repeated cocaine treatment. Elevation of N-acetylaspartate in NAc and striatum and decrease of lactate in striatum were observed, which may reflect the mitochondria dysregulation caused by cocaine; moreover, alterations of choline, phosphocholine and glycerol in NAc and striatum could be related to membrane disruption. Moreover, groups of rats with and without conditioned place preference (CPP) apparatus are presenting difference in metabolites. Collectively, our results provide the first evidence of metabonomic profiling of NAc and striatum in response to cocaine, exhibiting a regionally-specific alteration patterns. We find that repeated cocaine administration leads to significant metabolite alterations, which are involved in neurotransmitter disturbance, oxidative stress, mitochondria dysregulation and membrane disruption in brain. PMID:22609933

  20. NMR Based Cerebrum Metabonomic Analysis Reveals Simultaneous Interconnected Changes during Chick Embryo Incubation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yue; Zhu, Hang; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Xuxia; Xu, Fuqiang; Tang, Huiru; Ye, Chaohui; Liu, Maili

    2015-01-01

    To find out if content changes of the major functional cerebrum metabolites are interconnected and formed a network during the brain development, we obtained high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HR-MAS) 1H NMR spectra of cerebrum tissues of chick embryo aged from incubation day 10 to 20, and postnatal day 1, and analyzed the data with principal component analysis (PCA). Within the examined time window, 26 biological important molecules were identified and 12 of them changed their relative concentration significantly in a time-dependent manner. These metabolites are generally belonged to three categories, neurotransmitters, nutrition sources, and neuronal or glial markers. The relative concentration changes of the metabolites were interconnected among/between the categories, and, more interestingly, associated with the number and size of Nissl-positive neurons. These results provided valuable biochemical and neurochemical information to understand the development of the embryonic brain. PMID:26485040

  1. NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Huanglongbing-Asymptomatic and -Symptomatic Citrus Trees.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Deisy dos Santos; Carlos, Eduardo Fermino; Gil, Márcia Cristina Soares de Souza; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Alcantara, Glaucia Braz

    2015-09-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most severe diseases that affects citrus trees worldwide and is associated with the yet uncultured bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter spp. To assess the metabolomic differences between HLB-asymptomatic and -symptomatic tissues, extracts from leaf and root samples taken from a uniform 6-year-old commercial orchard of Valencia trees were subjected to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics. The results show that the symptomatic trees had higher sucrose content in their leaves and no variation in their roots. In addition, proline betaine and malate were detected in smaller amounts in the HLB-affected symptomatic leaves. The changes in metabolic processes of the plant in response to HLB are corroborated by the relationship between the bacterial levels and the metabolic profiles. PMID:26285838

  2. Beneficial Metabolic Effects of 2′,3′,5′-tri-acetyl-N6- (3-Hydroxylaniline) Adenosine in the Liver and Plasma of Hyperlipidemic Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chunying; Wang, Yinghong; Zhu, Haibo

    2012-01-01

    Background Pharmaceutical research of hyperlipidemia has been commonly pursued using traditional approaches. However, unbiased metabonomics attempts to explore the metabolic signature of hyperlipidemia in a high-throughput manner to understand pathophysiology of the disease process. Methodology/Principal Findings As a new way, we performed 1H NMR-based metabonomics to evaluate the beneficial effects of 2′,3′,5′-tri-acetyl-N6- (3-hydroxylaniline) adenosine (WS070117) on plasma and liver from hyperlipidemic Syrian golden hamsters. Both plasma and liver profiles provided a clearer distinction between the control and hyperlipidemic hamsters. Compared to control animals, hyperlipidemic hamsters showed a higher content of lipids (triglyceride and cholesterol), lactate and alanine together with a lower content of choline-containing compounds (e.g., phosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine, and glycerophosphocholine) and betaine. As a result, metabonomics-based findings such as the PCA and OPLS-DA plotting of metabolic state and analysis of potential biomarkers in plasma and liver correlated well to the assessment of biochemical assays, Oil Red O staining and in vivo ultrasonographic imaging suggesting that WS070117 was able to regulate lipid content and displayed more beneficial effects on plasma and liver than simvastatin. Conclusions/Significance This work demonstrates the promise of applying 1H NMR metabonomics to evaluate the beneficial effects of WS070117 which may be a good drug candidate for hyperlipidemia. PMID:22470419

  3. Evaluation of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) health during a superintensive aquaculture growout using NMR-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Schock, Tracey B; Duke, Jessica; Goodson, Abby; Weldon, Daryl; Brunson, Jeff; Leffler, John W; Bearden, Daniel W

    2013-01-01

    Success of the shrimp aquaculture industry requires technological advances that increase production and environmental sustainability. Indoor, superintensive, aquaculture systems are being developed that permit year-round production of farmed shrimp at high densities. These systems are intended to overcome problems of disease susceptibility and of water quality issues from waste products, by operating as essentially closed systems that promote beneficial microbial communities (biofloc). The resulting biofloc can assimilate and detoxify wastes, may provide nutrition for the farmed organisms resulting in improved growth, and may aid in reducing disease initiated from external sources. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic techniques were used to assess shrimp health during a full growout cycle from the nursery phase through harvest in a minimal-exchange, superintensive, biofloc system. Aberrant shrimp metabolomes were detected from a spike in total ammonia nitrogen in the nursery, from a reduced feeding period that was a consequence of surface scum build-up in the raceway, and from the stocking transition from the nursery to the growout raceway. The biochemical changes in the shrimp that were induced by the stressors were essential for survival and included nitrogen detoxification and energy conservation mechanisms. Inosine and trehalose may be general biomarkers of stress in Litopenaeus vannamei. This study demonstrates one aspect of the practicality of using NMR-based metabolomics to enhance the aquaculture industry by providing physiological insight into common environmental stresses that may limit growth or better explain reduced survival and production. PMID:23555690

  4. Recommendations and Standardization of Biomarker Quantification Using NMR-Based Metabolomics with Particular Focus on Urinary Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR-based metabolomics has shown considerable promise in disease diagnosis and biomarker discovery because it allows one to nondestructively identify and quantify large numbers of novel metabolite biomarkers in both biofluids and tissues. Precise metabolite quantification is a prerequisite to move any chemical biomarker or biomarker panel from the lab to the clinic. Among the biofluids commonly used for disease diagnosis and prognosis, urine has several advantages. It is abundant, sterile, and easily obtained, needs little sample preparation, and does not require invasive medical procedures for collection. Furthermore, urine captures and concentrates many “unwanted” or “undesirable” compounds throughout the body, providing a rich source of potentially useful disease biomarkers; however, incredible variation in urine chemical concentrations makes analysis of urine and identification of useful urinary biomarkers by NMR challenging. We discuss a number of the most significant issues regarding NMR-based urinary metabolomics with specific emphasis on metabolite quantification for disease biomarker applications and propose data collection and instrumental recommendations regarding NMR pulse sequences, acceptable acquisition parameter ranges, relaxation effects on quantitation, proper handling of instrumental differences, sample preparation, and biomarker assessment. PMID:26745651

  5. Evaluation of Pacific White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) Health during a Superintensive Aquaculture Growout Using NMR-Based Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Schock, Tracey B.; Duke, Jessica; Goodson, Abby; Weldon, Daryl; Brunson, Jeff; Leffler, John W.; Bearden, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    Success of the shrimp aquaculture industry requires technological advances that increase production and environmental sustainability. Indoor, superintensive, aquaculture systems are being developed that permit year-round production of farmed shrimp at high densities. These systems are intended to overcome problems of disease susceptibility and of water quality issues from waste products, by operating as essentially closed systems that promote beneficial microbial communities (biofloc). The resulting biofloc can assimilate and detoxify wastes, may provide nutrition for the farmed organisms resulting in improved growth, and may aid in reducing disease initiated from external sources. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic techniques were used to assess shrimp health during a full growout cycle from the nursery phase through harvest in a minimal-exchange, superintensive, biofloc system. Aberrant shrimp metabolomes were detected from a spike in total ammonia nitrogen in the nursery, from a reduced feeding period that was a consequence of surface scum build-up in the raceway, and from the stocking transition from the nursery to the growout raceway. The biochemical changes in the shrimp that were induced by the stressors were essential for survival and included nitrogen detoxification and energy conservation mechanisms. Inosine and trehalose may be general biomarkers of stress in Litopenaeus vannamei. This study demonstrates one aspect of the practicality of using NMR-based metabolomics to enhance the aquaculture industry by providing physiological insight into common environmental stresses that may limit growth or better explain reduced survival and production. PMID:23555690

  6. Application of a NMR-based untargeted quantitative metabonomic approach to screen for illicit salbutamol administration in cattle.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chaohua; Zhang, Kai; Liang, Xiaowei; Zhao, Qingyu; Zhang, Junmin

    2016-07-01

    The use of metabonomic methodologies to identify illicit salbutamol administration in cattle has not been previously investigated. In this study, a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based untargeted quantitative metabonomic approach was applied to discriminate biofluid samples (plasma and urine) obtained from cattle before and after salbutamol treatment. Six male cattle (265.7 ± 3.9 kg) were fed salbutamol (0.15 mg/kg body weight) for 21 consecutive days. Plasma and urine samples were collected before and after treatment. By the use of targeted profiling, 46 and 43 metabolites in plasma and urine, respectively, were quantified, of which 9 and 11 metabolites were significantly affected (P < 0.05) by salbutamol treatment. Partial least squares discriminant analysis showed that both plasma and urine samples collected after treatment were well separated from those before treatment, with Q (2) values of 0.56 and 0.573 for plasma and urine samples, respectively. The variable importance plot (VIP) scores of glucose and lactate in plasma, and urine, hippurate, acetate, glycine, formate, n-phenylacetyl, benzoate, and phenylacetate in urine were >1.0, which implies that these metabolites may serve as potential biomarkers for salbutamol treatment. These findings suggest the potential value of NMR-based untargeted quantitative metabonomic methodologies for plasma and urine analyses as a screening technique for detection of illicit salbutamol usage in cattle. PMID:27116419

  7. Recommendations and Standardization of Biomarker Quantification Using NMR-Based Metabolomics with Particular Focus on Urinary Analysis.

    PubMed

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Roy, Raja; McKay, Ryan T; Ryan, Danielle; Brennan, Lorraine; Tenori, Leonardo; Luchinat, Claudio; Gao, Xin; Zeri, Ana Carolina; Gowda, G A Nagana; Raftery, Daniel; Steinbeck, Christoph; Salek, Reza M; Wishart, David S

    2016-02-01

    NMR-based metabolomics has shown considerable promise in disease diagnosis and biomarker discovery because it allows one to nondestructively identify and quantify large numbers of novel metabolite biomarkers in both biofluids and tissues. Precise metabolite quantification is a prerequisite to move any chemical biomarker or biomarker panel from the lab to the clinic. Among the biofluids commonly used for disease diagnosis and prognosis, urine has several advantages. It is abundant, sterile, and easily obtained, needs little sample preparation, and does not require invasive medical procedures for collection. Furthermore, urine captures and concentrates many "unwanted" or "undesirable" compounds throughout the body, providing a rich source of potentially useful disease biomarkers; however, incredible variation in urine chemical concentrations makes analysis of urine and identification of useful urinary biomarkers by NMR challenging. We discuss a number of the most significant issues regarding NMR-based urinary metabolomics with specific emphasis on metabolite quantification for disease biomarker applications and propose data collection and instrumental recommendations regarding NMR pulse sequences, acceptable acquisition parameter ranges, relaxation effects on quantitation, proper handling of instrumental differences, sample preparation, and biomarker assessment. PMID:26745651

  8. Metallomics and NMR-based metabolomics of Chlorella sp. reveal the synergistic role of copper and cadmium in multi-metal toxicity and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenlin; Tan, Nicole G J; Fu, Baohui; Li, Sam F Y

    2015-03-01

    Industrial wastewaters often contain high levels of metal mixtures, in which metal mixtures may have synergistic or antagonistic effects on aquatic organisms. A combination of metallomics and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR)-based metabolomics was employed to understand the consequences of multi-metal systems (Cu, Cd, Pb) on freshwater microalgae. Morphological characterization, cell viability and chlorophyll a determination of metal-spiked Chlorella sp. suggested synergistic effects of Cu and Cd on growth inhibition and toxicity. While Pb has no apparent effect on Chlorella sp. metabolome, a substantial decrease of sucrose, amino acid content and glycerophospholipid precursors in Cu-spiked microalgae revealed Cu-induced oxidative stress. Addition of Cd to Cu-spiked cultures induced more drastic metabolic perturbations, hence we confirmed that Cu and Cd synergistically influenced photosynthesis inhibition, oxidative stress and membrane degradation. Total elemental analysis revealed a significant decrease in K, and an increase in Na, Mg, Zn and Mn concentrations in Cu-spiked cultures. This indicated that Cu is more toxic to Chlorella sp. as compared to Cd or Pb, and the combination of Cu and Cd has a strong synergistic effect on Chlorella sp. oxidative stress induction. Oxidative stress is confirmed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis, which demonstrated a drastic decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio solely in Cu-spiked cultures. Interestingly, we observed Cu-facilitated Cd and Pb bioconcentration in Chlorella sp. The absence of phytochelatins and an increment of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) yields in Cu-spiked cultures suggested that the mode of bioconcentration of Cd and Pb is through adsorption of free metals onto the algal EPS rather than intracellular chelation to phytochelatins. PMID:25569820

  9. Metabolic profiles in serum of mouse after chronic exposure to drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Xuxiang; Li, Aimin; Cheng, Shupei

    2011-08-01

    The toxicity of Nanjing drinking water on mouse (Mus musculus) was detected by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomic method. Three groups of mice were fed with drinking water (produced by Nanjing BHK Water Plant), 3.8 μg/L benzo(a)pyrene as contrast, and clean water as control, respectively, for 90 days. It was observed that the levels of lactate, alanine, and creatinine in the mice fed with drinking water were increased and that of valine was decreased. The mice of drinking water group were successfully separated from control. The total concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phthalates (PAEs), and other organic pollutants in the drinking water were 0.23 μg/L, 4.57 μg/L, and 0.34 μg/L, respectively. In this study, Nanjing drinking water was found to induce distinct perturbations of metabolic profiles on mouse including disorders of glucose-alanine cycle, branched-chain amino acid and energy metabolism, and dysfunction of kidney. This study suggests that metabonomic method is feasible and sensitive to evaluate potential toxic effects of drinking water. PMID:21172972

  10. A NMR-Based Carbon-Type Analysis of Diesel Fuel Blends From Various Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.

    2013-05-10

    In collaboration with participants of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Advanced Vehicle/Fuels/Lubricants (AVFL) Committee, and project AVFL-19, the characteristics of fuels from advanced and renewable sources were compared to commercial diesel fuels. The main objective of this study was to highlight similarities and differences among the fuel types, i.e. ULSD, renewables, and alternative fuels, and among fuels within the different fuel types. This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of 14 diesel fuel samples. The diesel fuel samples come from diverse sources and include four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels (ULSD), one gas-to-liquid diesel fuel (GTL), six renewable diesel fuels (RD), two shale oil-derived diesel fuels, and one oil sands-derived diesel fuel. Overall, the fuels examined fall into two groups. The two shale oil-derived samples and the oil-sand-derived sample closely resemble the four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesels, with SO1 and SO2 most closely matched with ULSD1, ULSD2, and ULSD4, and OS1 most closely matched with ULSD3. As might be expected, the renewable diesel fuels, with the exception of RD3, do not resemble the ULSD fuels because of their very low aromatic content, but more closely resemble the gas-to-liquid sample (GTL) in this respect. RD3 is significantly different from the other renewable diesel fuels in that the aromatic content more closely resembles the ULSD fuels. Fused-ring aromatics are readily observable in the ULSD, SO, and OS samples, as well as RD3, and are noticeably absent in the remaining RD and GTL fuels. Finally, ULSD3 differs from the other ULSD fuels by having a significantly lower aromatic carbon content and higher cycloparaffinic carbon content. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information regarding the various diesel fuels, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of NMR

  11. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based extracellular metabolomic analysis of multidrug resistant Tca8113 oral squamous carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HUI; CHEN, JIAO; FENG, YUN; ZHOU, WENJIE; ZHANG, JIHUA; YU, YU; WANG, XIAOQIAN; ZHANG, PING

    2015-01-01

    A major obstacle of successful chemotherapy is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in the cancer cells, which is difficult to reverse. Metabolomic analysis, an emerging approach that has been increasingly applied in various fields, is able to reflect the unique chemical fingerprints of specific cellular processes in an organism. The assessment of such metabolite changes can be used to identify novel therapeutic biomarkers. In the present study, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to analyze the extracellular metabolomic spectrum of the Tca8113 oral squamous carcinoma cell line, in which MDR was induced using the carboplatin (CBP) and pingyangmycin (PYM) chemotherapy drugs in vitro. The data were analyzed using the principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) methods. The results demonstrated that the extracellular metabolomic spectrum of metabolites such as glutamate, glycerophosphoethanol amine, α-Glucose and β-Glucose for the drug-induced Tca8113 cells was significantly different from the parental Tca8113 cell line. A number of biochemicals were also significantly different between the groups based on their NMR spectra, with drug-resistant cells presenting relatively higher levels of acetate and lower levels of lactate. In addition, a significantly higher peak was observed at δ 3.35 ppm in the spectrum of the PYM-induced Tca8113 cells. Therefore, 1H NMR-based metabolomic analysis has a high potential for monitoring the formation of MDR during clinical tumor chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26137105

  12. Effect of acute stresses on zebra fish (Danio rerio) metabolome measured by NMR-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Mian Yahya; Marçal, Rosilene Moretti; Champagne, Danielle L; van der Kooy, Frank; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2014-09-01

    We applied an acute stress model to zebra fish in order to measure the changes in the metabolome due to biological stress. This was done by submitting the fish to fifteen minutes of acute confinement (netting) stress, and then five minutes for the open field and light/dark field tests. A polar extract of the zebra fish was then subjected to (1)H nuclear magnetic spectroscopy. Multivariate data analysis of the spectra showed a clear separation associated to a wide range of metabolites between zebra fish that were submitted to open field and light/dark field tests. Alanine, taurine, adenosine, creatine, lactate, and histidine were high in zebra fish to which the light/dark field test was applied, regardless of stress, while acetate and isoleucine/lipids appeared to be higher in zebra fish exposed to the open field test. These results show that any change in the environment, even for a small period of time, has a noticeable physiological impact. This research provides an insight of how different mechanisms are activated under different environments to maintain the homeostasis of the body. It should also contribute to establish zebra fish as a model for metabolomics studies. PMID:25098933

  13. Extraction of alkaloids for NMR-based profiling: exploratory analysis of an archaic Cinchona bark collection.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ali; Nyberg, Nils T; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2012-11-01

    A museum collection of Cinchonae cortex samples (n = 117), from the period 1850-1950, was extracted with a mixture of chloroform-d1, methanol-d4, water-d2, and perchloric acid in the ratios 5 : 5 : 1 : 1. The extracts were directly analyzed using 1H NMR spectroscopy (600 MHz) and the spectra evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA) and total statistical correlation spectroscopy (STOCSY). A new method called STOCSY-CA, where CA stands for component analysis, is described, and an analysis using this method is presented. It was found that the samples had a rather homogenous content of the well-known cinchona alkaloids quinine, cinchonine, and cinchonidine without any apparent clustering. Signals from analogues were detected but not in substantial amounts. The main variation was related to the absolute amounts of extracted alkaloids, which was attributed to the evolution of the Cinchona tree cultivation during the period in which the samples were collected. PMID:23059630

  14. 1H NMR spectra part 31: 1H chemical shifts of amides in DMSO solvent.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    The (1)H chemical shifts of 48 amides in DMSO solvent are assigned and presented. The solvent shifts Δδ (DMSO-CDCl3 ) are large (1-2 ppm) for the NH protons but smaller and negative (-0.1 to -0.2 ppm) for close range protons. A selection of the observed solvent shifts is compared with calculated shifts from the present model and from GIAO calculations. Those for the NH protons agree with both calculations, but other solvent shifts such as Δδ(CHO) are not well reproduced by the GIAO calculations. The (1)H chemical shifts of the amides in DMSO were analysed using a functional approach for near ( ≤ 3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy and steric effect of the amide group for more distant protons. The chemical shifts of the NH protons of acetanilide and benzamide vary linearly with the π density on the αN and βC atoms, respectively. The C=O anisotropy and steric effect are in general little changed from the values in CDCl3. The effects of substituents F, Cl, Me on the NH proton shifts are reproduced. The electric field coefficient for the protons in DMSO is 90% of that in CDCl3. There is no steric effect of the C=O oxygen on the NH proton in an NH…O=C hydrogen bond. The observed deshielding is due to the electric field effect. The calculated chemical shifts agree well with the observed shifts (RMS error of 0.106 ppm for the data set of 257 entries). PMID:24824670

  15. New direct 11B NMR-based analysis of organoboranes through their potassium borohydrides.

    PubMed

    Medina, Jesus R; Cruz, Gabriel; Cabrera, Carlos R; Soderquist, John A

    2003-06-13

    Representative organoborane mixtures were quantitatively converted to their borohydrides through their reaction with activated KH (KH), permitting their detailed analysis by (11)B NMR. Through the treatment of commercial KH with a THF solution of lithium aluminum hydride (LAH), a dramatic change in the surface morphology results as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Energy dispersed spectroscopy (EDS) was employed to reveal that the LAH treatment deposits a significant amount of an unknown aluminum-containing species on the surface of the KH, which imparts a unique reactivity to the KH. Even highly hindered organoboranes are quantitatively converted to their borohydrides by replacing electronegative groups (e.g., OR, halogen) with hydrogen, retaining only the carbon ligation. Through this simple KH treatment, complex organoborane reaction mixtures are converted to the corresponding borohydrides whose (11)B NMR spectra normally exhibit resolved signals for the individual species present. The integration of these signals provides quantitative information on the relative amounts of each component of the mixture. New generalities for the effect of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-substituents have also been determined that provide a new, simple technique for the determination of the isomeric distribution in organoborane mixtures resulting from common organoborane processes (e.g., hydroboration). Moreover, the (1)H-coupled (11)B NMR spectra of these mixtures reveal the extent of alkylation for each species present. Representative organoboranes were examined by this new technique permitting a simple and convenient quantitative analysis of the regio- and diastereomeric composition of a variety of asymmetric organoborane processes. Previously unknown details of pinene-based hydroborations and reductions are revealed for the first time employing the KH (11)B NMR technique. PMID:12790565

  16. NMR-based metabolomics of urine in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease: identification of oxidative stress biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Akiko; Ota, Yosuke; Senoo, Yuya; Maekawa, Keiko; Okuda, Haruhiro; Kurihara, Masaaki; Okuno, Alato; Niida, Shumpei; Saito, Yoshiro; Takikawa, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of neurodegenerative dementia among elderly patients. A biomarker for the disease could make diagnosis easier and more accurate, and accelerate drug discovery. In this study, NMR-based metabolomics analysis in conjunction with multivariate statistics was applied to examine changes in urinary metabolites in transgenic AD mice expressing mutant tau and β-amyloid precursor protein. These mice showed significant changes in urinary metabolites throughout the progress of the disease. Levels of 3-hydroxykynurenine, homogentisate and allantoin were significantly higher compared to control mice in 4 months (prior to onset of AD symptoms) and reverted to control values by 10 months of age (early/middle stage of AD), which highlights the relevance of oxidative stress to this neurodegenerative disorder even prior the onset of dementia. The level of these changed metabolites at very early period may provide an indication of disease risk at asymptomatic stage. PMID:23526113

  17. Studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes-induced hepatotoxicity by NMR-based metabonomics of rat blood plasma and liver extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bencheng; Zhang, Huashan; Lin, Zhiqing; Fang, Yanjun; Tian, Lei; Yang, Honglian; Yan, Jun; Liu, Huanliang; Zhang, Wei; Xi, Zhuge

    2013-05-01

    The toxicological effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated after intratracheal instillation in male Wistar rats over a 15-day period using metabonomic analysis of 1H (nuclear magnetic resonance) NMR spectra of blood plasma and liver tissue extracts. Concurrent liver histopathology examinations and plasma clinical chemistry analyses were also performed. Significant changes were observed in clinical chemistry features, including alkaline phosphatase, total protein, and total cholesterol, and in liver pathology, suggesting that SWCNTs clearly have hepatotoxicity in the rat. 1H NMR spectra and pattern recognition analyses from nanomaterial-treated rats showed remarkable differences in the excretion of lactate, trimethylamine oxide, bilineurin, phosphocholine, amylaceum, and glycogen. Indications of amino acid metabolism impairment were supported by increased lactate concentrations and decreased alanine concentrations in plasma. The rise in plasma and liver tissue extract concentrations of choline and phosphocholine, together with decreased lipids and lipoproteins, after SWCNTs treatment indicated a disruption of membrane fluidity caused by lipid peroxidation. Energy, amino acid, and fat metabolism appeared to be affected by SWCNTs exposure. Clinical chemistry and metabonomic approaches clearly indicated liver injury, which might have been associated with an indirect mechanism involving nanomaterial-induced oxidative stress.

  18. Metabolic responses of clams, Ruditapes decussatus and Ruditapes philippinarum, to short-term exposure to lead and zinc.

    PubMed

    Aru, Violetta; Sarais, Giorgia; Savorani, Francesco; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Cesare Marincola, Flaminia

    2016-06-15

    This study investigated the effects of 48h heavy metal exposure upon the metabolic profiles of Ruditapes decussatus and Ruditapes philippinarum using (1)H NMR metabolomics. Both species were exposed to increasing concentrations of lead nitrate (10, 40, 60 and 100μg/L) and zinc chloride (20, 50, 100 and 150μg/L), under laboratory conditions. ICP-OES analysis was further performed on the clams' samples in order to verify the occurrence of heavy metal bioaccumulation. With respect to the controls, the metabolic profiles of treated R. decussatus exhibited higher levels of organic osmolytes and lower contents of free amino acids. An opposite behavior was shown by R. philippinarum. In terms of heavy metal, the exposure effects were more evident in the case of Pb rather than Zn. These findings show that NMR-based metabolomics has the required sensitivity and specificity for the identification of metabolites that can act as sensitive indicators of contaminant-induced stress. PMID:27058966

  19. Identification of Metabolic Pathways Influenced by the G-Protein Coupled Receptors GprB and GprD in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Wagner R.; Morais, Enyara Rezende; Krohn, Nadia Graciele; Savoldi, Marcela; Goldman, Maria Helena S.; Rodrigues, Fernando; Caldana, Camila; Semelka, Charles T.; Tikunov, Andrey P.; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated signaling pathways play a pivotal role in transmembrane signaling in eukaryotes. Our main aim was to identify signaling pathways regulated by A. nidulans GprB and GprD G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). When these two null mutant strains were compared to the wild-type strain, the ΔgprB mutant showed an increased protein kinase A (PKA) activity while growing in glucose 1% and during starvation. In contrast, the ΔgprD has a much lower PKA activity upon starvation. Transcriptomics and 1H NMR-based metabolomics were performed on two single null mutants grown on glucose. We noted modulation in the expression of 11 secondary metabolism gene clusters when the ΔgprB and ΔgprD mutant strains were grown in 1% glucose. Several members of the sterigmatocystin-aflatoxin gene cluster presented down-regulation in both mutant strains. The genes of the NR-PKS monodictyphenone biosynthesis cluster had overall increased mRNA accumulation in ΔgprB, while in the ΔgprD mutant strain the genes had decreased mRNA accumulation. Principal component analysis of the metabolomic data demonstrated that there was a significant metabolite shift in the ΔgprD strain. The 1H NMR analysis revealed significant expression of essential amino acids with elevated levels in the ΔgprD strain, compared to the wild-type and ΔgprB strains. With the results, we demonstrated the differential expression of a variety of genes related mainly to secondary metabolism, sexual development, stress signaling, and amino acid metabolism. We propose that the absence of GPCRs triggered stress responses at the genetic level. The data suggested an intimate relationship among different G-protein coupled receptors, fine-tune regulation of secondary and amino acid metabolisms, and fungal development. PMID:23658706

  20. Clinical Relevance of Single-Voxel 1H MRS Metabolites in Discriminating Suprasellar Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Virani, Rahul A

    2016-01-01

    Introdution Spatially resolved metabolic data obtained from Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H MRS) provides information which increases the diagnostic accuracy of imaging sequences in predicting the histology of suprasellar tumors. Aim To evaluate the role of 1H MRS in the diagnosis of various suprasellar tumors. Materials and Methods Sixty cases of various suprasellar, hypothalamic and third ventricular neoplasms were investigated with long-echo single voxel 1H -MRS using 1.5 Tesla clinical imager. Single-voxel spectroscopic examinations were guided by T1-weighted or T2-weighted images. Statistical analysis was carried out using IBM SPSS software version 19. Results We observed that whenever brain tissue was damaged or replaced by any process, NAA was markedly reduced. Extra-axial lesions which do not infiltrate brain or contain neuroglial tissue, didn’t demonstrate any NAA resonances. Cr was used as an internal standard for semi-quantitative evaluation of metabolic changes of other brain metabolites. Increased Cho was seen in processes with elevated cell-membrane turnover. Conclusion Spectra obtained from different tumors exhibit reproducible differences while histologically similar tumors yield characteristic spectra with only minor differences. Pituitary tumors were typically characterized by significant reduction of NAA, Cr peak and moderate elevation of Cho peak. Gliomas were typically characterized by decrease of NAA and Cr peaks and increase of Cho peak. Craniopharyngiomas were typically characterized by significant decrease of all metabolites.

  1. Cross Polarization for 1H NMR Image Contrast in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Toshihito; Fukunaga, Yasuhiro; Nonaka, Masayuki; Matsui, Shigeru; Inouye, Tamon

    1998-09-01

    A novel1H imaging method for solids, yielding images reflecting1H-13C dipolar interactions through cross relaxation timeTIS, is presented. Phase-alternating multiple-contact cross polarization (PAMC CP) was incorporated into the magic-echo frequency-encoding imaging scheme; the PAMC CP sequence may partly but efficiently destroy the initial1H magnetization depending on theTISvalues. A theory describing the effects of the PAMC CP sequence was developed, which was used for the assessment of the sequence as well as the analysis for the experimental results. It was demonstrated that theTIS-weighted1H image and theTISmapping for a phantom, constituted of adamantane and ferrocene, can distinguish these compounds clearly.

  2. Gender-Specific Metabolomic Profiling of Obesity in Leptin-Deficient ob/ob Mice by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Jung, Youngae; Bae, Hyun-Whee; Lee, Daeyoup; Park, Sung Goo; Lee, Chul-Ho; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Despite the numerous metabolic studies on obesity, gender bias in obesity has rarely been investigated. Here, we report the metabolomic analysis of obesity by using leptin-deficient ob/ob mice based on the gender. Metabolomic analyses of urine and serum from ob/ob mice compared with those from C57BL/6J lean mice, based on the 1H NMR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate statistical analysis, revealed clear metabolic differences between obese and lean mice. We also identified 48 urine and 22 serum metabolites that were statistically significantly altered in obese mice compared to lean controls. These metabolites are involved in amino acid metabolism (leucine, alanine, ariginine, lysine, and methionine), tricarbocylic acid cycle and glucose metabolism (pyruvate, citrate, glycolate, acetoacetate, and acetone), lipid metabolism (cholesterol and carnitine), creatine metabolism (creatine and creatinine), and gut-microbiome-derived metabolism (choline, TMAO, hippurate, p-cresol, isobutyrate, 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, methylamine, and trigonelline). Notably, our metabolomic studies showed distinct gender variations. The obese male mice metabolism was specifically associated with insulin signaling, whereas the obese female mice metabolism was associated with lipid metabolism. Taken together, our study identifies the biomarker signature for obesity in ob/ob mice and provides biochemical insights into the metabolic alteration in obesity based on gender. PMID:24098417

  3. Metabolic profiles to define the genome: can we hear the phenotypes?

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Julian L

    2004-01-01

    There is an increased reliance on genetically modified organisms as a functional genomic tool to elucidate the role of genes and their protein products. Despite this, many models do not express the expected phenotype thought to be associated with the gene or protein. There is thus an increased need to further define the phenotype resultant from a genetic modification to understand how the transcriptional or proteomic network may conspire to alter the expected phenotype. This is best typified by the description of the silent phenotype in genetic manipulations of yeast. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy provides an ideal mechanism for the profiling of metabolites within biofluids, tissue extracts or, with recent advances, intact tissues. These metabolic datasets can be readily mined using a range of pattern recognition techniques, including hierarchical cluster analysis, principal components analysis, partial least squares and neural networks, with the combined approach being termed metabolomics. This review describes the application of NMR-based metabolomics or metabonomics to genetic and chemical interventions in a number of different species, demonstrating the versatility of such an approach, as well as suggesting how it may be integrated with other "omic" technologies. PMID:15306403

  4. Discrimination of Basal Cell Carcinoma from Normal Skin Tissue Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Je-Ho; Lee, Heonho; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Shukmann

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating the metabolism of various cancers. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer. However, to our knowledge, data on metabolic profiling of BCC have not been reported in the literature. The objective of the present study was to investigate the metabolic profiling of cutaneous BCC using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity of histopathologically confirmed BCC tissues and normal skin tissue (NST) samples. The metabolic intensity normalized to the total spectral intensities in BCC and NST was compared, and multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Univariate analysis revealed 9 metabolites that showed statistically significant difference between BCC and NST. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with the HR-MAS NMR metabolic profiles revealed a clear separation of BCC from NST. The receiver operating characteristic curve generated from the results revealed an excellent discrimination of BCC from NST with an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.961. The present study demonstrated that the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity differ between BCC and NST, and that HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of BCC. PMID:26934749

  5. 1H NMR studies distinguish the water soluble metabolomic profiles of untransformed and RAS-transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Vered; Munoz, Anisleidys; Rai, Priyamvada

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomic profiling is an increasingly important method for identifying potential biomarkers in cancer cells with a view towards improved diagnosis and treatment. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a potentially noninvasive means to accurately characterize differences in the metabolomic profiles of cells. In this work, we use 1H NMR to measure the metabolomic profiles of water soluble metabolites extracted from isogenic control and oncogenic HRAS-, KRAS-, and NRAS-transduced BEAS2B lung epithelial cells to determine the robustness of NMR metabolomic profiling in detecting differences between the transformed cells and their untransformed counterparts as well as differences among the RAS-transformed cells. Unique metabolomic signatures between control and RAS-transformed cell lines as well as among the three RAS isoform-transformed lines were found by applying principal component analysis to the NMR data. This study provides a proof of principle demonstration that NMR-based metabolomic profiling can robustly distinguish untransformed and RAS-transformed cells as well as cells transformed with different RAS oncogenic isoforms. Thus, our data may potentially provide new diagnostic signatures for RAS-transformed cells. PMID:27330862

  6. Metabolite profiling of Curcuma species grown in different regions using 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Youngae; Lee, Jueun; Kim, Ho Kyoung; Moon, Byeong Cheol; Ji, Yunui; Ryu, Do Hyun; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2012-12-01

    Curcuma is used to treat skin diseases and colic inflammatory disorders, and in insect repellants and antimicrobial and antidiabetic medications. Two Curcuma species (C. aromatica and C. longa) grown in Jeju-do and Jin-do were used in this study. Methanolic extracts were analyzed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and metabolite profiling coupled with multivariate analysis was applied to characterize the differences between species or origin. PCA analysis showed significantly greater differences between species than origins, and the metabolites responsible for the differences were identified. The concentrations of sugars (glucose, fructose, and sucrose) and essential oils (eucalyptol, curdione, and germacrone) were significantly different between the two species. However, the samples from Jeju-do and Jin-do were different mainly in their concentrations of organic acids (fumarate, succinate, acetate, and formate) and sugars. This study demonstrates that NMR-based metabolomics is an efficient method for fingerprinting and determining differences between Curcuma species or those grown in different regions. PMID:23066525

  7. Identification of Gastric Cancer Biomarkers Using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gokula Krishnan; Yong, Wei Peng; Yeow, Chen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Existing gastric cancer diagnosing methods were invasive, hence, a reliable non-invasive gastric cancer diagnosing method is needed. As a starting point, we used 1H NMR for identifying gastric cancer biomarkers using a panel of gastric cancer spheroids and normal gastric spheroids. We were able to identify 8 chemical shift biomarkers for gastric cancer spheroids. Our data suggests that the cancerous and non-cancerous spheroids significantly differ in the lipid composition and energy metabolism. These results encourage the translation of these biomarkers into in-vivo gastric cancer detection methodology using MRI-MS. PMID:27611679

  8. Metabonomic Response to Milk Proteins after a Single Bout of Heavy Resistance Exercise Elucidated by 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yde, Christian Clement; Ditlev, Ditte Bruun; Reitelseder, Søren; Bertram, Hanne Christine

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, proton NMR-based metabonomics was applied on femoral arterial plasma samples collected from young male subjects (milk protein n = 12 in a crossover design; non-caloric control n = 8) at different time intervals (70, 220, 370 min) after heavy resistance training and intake of either a whey or calcium caseinate protein drink in order to elucidate the impact of the protein source on post-exercise metabolism, which is important for muscle hypertrophy. Dynamic changes in the post-exercise plasma metabolite profile consisted of fluctuations in alanine, beta-hydroxybutyrate, branched amino acids, creatine, glucose, glutamine, glutamate, histidine, lipids and tyrosine. In comparison with the intake of a non-caloric drink, the same pattern of changes in low-molecular weight plasma metabolites was found for both whey and caseinate intake. However, the study indicated that whey and caseinate protein intake had a different impact on low-density and very-low-density lipoproteins present in the blood, which may be ascribed to different effects of the two protein sources on the mobilization of lipid resources during energy deficiency. In conclusion, no difference in the effects on low-molecular weight metabolites as measured by proton NMR-based metabonomics was found between the two protein sources. PMID:24957889

  9. (1)H NMR spectroscopy in the diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Dwivedi, Mayank; Nagana Gowda, G A; Ayyagari, Archana; Mahdi, A A; Bhandari, M; Khetrapal, C L

    2005-08-01

    The utility of (1)H NMR spectroscopy is suggested and demonstrated for the diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in urinary tract infection (UTI). The specific property of P. aeruginosa of metabolizing nicotinic acid to 6-hydroxynicotinic acid (6-OHNA) is exploited. The quantity of 6-OHNA produced correlates well with the viable bacterial count. Other common bacteria causing UTI such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Enterobacter aerogenes, Acinetobacter baumanii, Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter frundii, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus gp B and Staphylococcus aureus do not metabolize nicotinic acid under similar conditions. The method provides a single-step documentation of P. aeruginosa qualitatively as well as quantitatively. The NMR method is demonstrated on urine samples from 30 patients with UTI caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:15759292

  10. Key metabolites in tissue extracts of Elliptio complanata identified using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hurley-Sanders, Jennifer L.; Levine, Jay F.; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Law, J. M.; Showers, William J.; Stoskopf, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    We used 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to describe key metabolites of the polar metabolome of the freshwater mussel, Elliptio complanata. Principal components analysis documented variability across tissue types and river of origin in mussels collected from two rivers in North Carolina (USA). Muscle, digestive gland, mantle and gill tissues yielded identifiable but overlapping metabolic profiles. Variation in digestive gland metabolic profiles between the two mussel collection sites was characterized by differences in mono- and disaccharides. Variation in mantle tissue metabolomes appeared to be associated with sex. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a sensitive means to detect metabolites in the tissues of E. complanata and holds promise as a tool for the investigation of freshwater mussel health and physiology. PMID:27293708

  11. High resolution 1H solid state NMR studies of polyethyleneterephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, T. T. P.; Gerstein, B. C.; Ryan, L. M.; Taylor, R. E.; Dybowski, D. R.

    1980-12-01

    Molecular motions and spatial properties of the solid polymer polyethyleneterephthalate have been investigated using high resolution 1H solid state NMR techniques. The longitudinal spin relaxation time T1ρ of protons (1H) in the rotating frame was measured for a spin locking field ranging from 5 to 20 G. The decay of the 1H magnetization indicated the existence of two distinct T1ρ's and their field dependence shows that they are associated with two mobile phases of the polymer. The 1H magnetization also relaxes under the dipolar narrowed Carr-Purcell (DNCP) multipulse sequence with two dintinct T1y relaxation times. The ratios T1y's and T1ρ's deviate significantly from the expected theoretical values. The combined experiment with magic angle spinning and the DNCP sequence followed by homonuclear dipolar decoupling reveals the individual T1y relaxation of the resolved methylene and aromatic protons. These two species of protons were found to relax with the same T1y's, thus implying that spin diffusion must have taken place under the homonuclear dipolar decoupling multipulse. The qualitative description of spin diffusion under homonuclear decoupling is given. The combined experiment with spin locking and the DNCP sequence yields the correspondence between the two T1ρ's and the two T1y's. The long T1ρ corresponds to the short T1y whereas the short T1ρ corresponds to the long T1y. Communication between the two spatial phases via spin diffusion was also observed in this experiment by monitoring the recovery of the 1H magnitization associated with the short T1ρ after it has been eliminated during the spin locking. The total 1H magnetization is allowed to equilibrate in the laboratory frame for a variable time much shorter than T1 after the spin locking field has been turned off. The spatial relationship between the two phases is discussed.

  12. Localized double-quantum-filtered 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. A.; Hetherington, H. P.; Meyerhoff, D. J.; Twieg, D. B.

    The image-guided in vivo spectroscopic (ISIS) pulse sequence has been combined with a double-quantum-filter scheme in order to obtain localized and water-suppressed 1H NMR spectra of J-coupled metabolites. The coherence-transfer efficiency associated with the DQ filter for AX and A 3X spin systems is described. Phantom results of carnosine, alanine, and ethanol in aqueous solution are presented. For comparison, the 1H NMR spectrum of alanine in aqueous solution with the binomial (1331, 2662) spin-echo sequence is also shown.

  13. Overexpression of ORCA3 and G10H in Catharanthus roseus Plants Regulated Alkaloid Biosynthesis and Metabolism Revealed by NMR-Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qifang; Wang, Quan; Yuan, Fang; Xing, Shihai; Zhao, Jingya; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Tian, Yuesheng; Wang, Guofeng; Tang, Kexuan

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the production of the anticancer dimeric indole alkaloids in Catharanthuse roseus, much research has been dedicated to culturing cell lines, hairy roots, and efforts to elucidate the regulation of the monoterpenoid indole alkaloid (MIA) biosynthesis. In this study, the ORCA3 (Octadecanoid-derivative Responsive Catharanthus AP2-domain) gene alone or integrated with the G10H (geraniol 10-hydroxylase) gene were first introduced into C. roseus plants. Transgenic C. roseus plants overexpressing ORCA3 alone (OR lines), or co-overexpressing G10H and ORCA3 (GO lines) were obtained by genetic modification. ORCA3 overexpression induced an increase of AS, TDC, STR and D4H transcripts but did not affect CRMYC2 and G10H transcription. G10H transcripts showed a significant increase under G10H and ORCA3 co-overexpression. ORCA3 and G10H overexpression significantly increased the accumulation of strictosidine, vindoline, catharanthine and ajmalicine but had limited effects on anhydrovinblastine and vinblastine levels. NMR-based metabolomics confirmed the higher accumulation of monomeric indole alkaloids in OR and GO lines. Multivariate data analysis of 1H NMR spectra showed change of amino acid, organic acid, sugar and phenylpropanoid levels in both OR and GO lines compared to the controls. The result indicated that enhancement of MIA biosynthesis by ORCA3 and G10H overexpression might affect other metabolic pathways in the plant metabolism of C. roseus. PMID:22916202

  14. Metabolomics in Lung Inflammation: A High Resolution 1H NMR Study of Mice Exposed to Silica Dust

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Rommereim, Donald N.; Minard, Kevin R.; Woodstock, Angie; Harrer, Bruce J.; Wind, Robert A.; Phipps, Richard P.; Sime, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the first 1H NMR metabolomics studies on excised lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from mice exposed to crystalline silica. High resolution 1H NMR metabolic profiling on intact excised lungs was performed using slow magic angle sample spinning (slow-MAS) 1H PASS (phase altered spinning sidebands) at a sample spinning rate of 80 Hz. Metabolic profiling on BALF was completed using fast magic angle spinning at 2kHz. Major findings are that the relative concentrations of choline, phosphocholine (PC) and glycerophosphocholine(GPC) were statistically significantly increased in silica-exposed mice compared to sham controls, indicating an altered membrane choline phospholipids metabolism (MCPM). The relative concentrations of glycogen/glucose, lactate and creatine were also statistically significantly increased in mice exposed to silica dust, suggesting that cellular energy pathways were affected by silica dust. Elevated levels of glycine, lysine, glutamate, proline and 4-hydroxyproline were also increased in exposed mice, suggesting the activation of a collagen pathway. Furthermore, metabolic profiles in mice exposed to silica dust were found to be spatially heterogeneous, in consistent with regional inflammation revealed by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMID:20020862

  15. Applications of 1H-NMR to Biodiesel Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel derived from vegetable oils, animal fats, or used cooking oils. It is produced by reacting these materials with an alcohol in the presence of a catalyst to give the corresponding mono-alkyl esters. 1H-NMR is a routine analytical method that has been used for...

  16. Strategies for rapid in vivo 1H and hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Sarah J.; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Li, Yan; Park, Il woo; Crane, Jason

    2013-04-01

    In vivo MRSI is an important imaging modality that has been shown in numerous research studies to give biologically relevant information for assessing the underlying mechanisms of disease and for monitoring response to therapy. The increasing availability of high field scanners and multichannel radiofrequency coils has provided the opportunity to acquire in vivo data with significant improvements in sensitivity and signal to noise ratio. These capabilities may be used to shorten acquisition time and provide increased coverage. The ability to acquire rapid, volumetric MRSI data is critical for examining heterogeneity in metabolic profiles and for relating serial changes in metabolism within the same individual during the course of the disease. In this review we discuss the implementation of strategies that use alternative k-space sampling trajectories and parallel imaging methods in order to speed up data acquisition. The impact of such methods is demonstrated using three recent examples of how these methods have been applied. These are to the acquisition of robust 3D 1H MRSI data within 5-10 min at a field strength of 3 T, to obtaining higher sensitivity for 1H MRSI at 7 T and to using ultrafast volumetric and dynamic 13C MRSI for monitoring the changes in signals that occur following the injection of hyperpolarized 13C agents.

  17. Strategies for rapid in vivo 1H and hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Sarah J; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Li, Yan; Park, Il woo; Crane, Jason

    2013-04-01

    In vivo MRSI is an important imaging modality that has been shown in numerous research studies to give biologically relevant information for assessing the underlying mechanisms of disease and for monitoring response to therapy. The increasing availability of high field scanners and multichannel radiofrequency coils has provided the opportunity to acquire in vivo data with significant improvements in sensitivity and signal to noise ratio. These capabilities may be used to shorten acquisition time and provide increased coverage. The ability to acquire rapid, volumetric MRSI data is critical for examining heterogeneity in metabolic profiles and for relating serial changes in metabolism within the same individual during the course of the disease. In this review we discuss the implementation of strategies that use alternative k-space sampling trajectories and parallel imaging methods in order to speed up data acquisition. The impact of such methods is demonstrated using three recent examples of how these methods have been applied. These are to the acquisition of robust 3D (1)H MRSI data within 5-10 min at a field strength of 3 T, to obtaining higher sensitivity for (1)H MRSI at 7 T and to using ultrafast volumetric and dynamic (13)C MRSI for monitoring the changes in signals that occur following the injection of hyperpolarized (13)C agents. PMID:23453759

  18. (1)H NMR Spectroscopy of Fecal Extracts Enables Detection of Advanced Colorectal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Amiot, Aurelien; Dona, Anthony C; Wijeyesekera, Anisha; Tournigand, Christophe; Baumgaertner, Isabelle; Lebaleur, Yann; Sobhani, Iradj; Holmes, Elaine

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a growing cause of mortality in developing countries, warranting investigation into its etiopathogenesis and earlier diagnosis. Here, we investigated the fecal metabolic phenotype of patients with advanced colorectal neoplasia and controls using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate modeling. The fecal microbiota composition was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR as well as Wif-1 methylation levels in stools, serum, and urine and correlated to the metabolic profile of each patient. The predictivity of the model was 0.507 (Q(2)Y), and the explained variance was 0.755 (R(2)Y). Patients with advanced colorectal neoplasia demonstrated increased fecal concentrations of four short-chain fatty acids (valerate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) and decreased signals relating to β-glucose, glutamine, and glutamate. The predictive accuracy of the multivariate (1)H NMR model was higher than that of the guaiac-fecal occult blood test and the Wif-1 methylation test for predicting advanced colorectal neoplasia. Correlation analysis between fecal metabolites and bacterial profiles revealed strong associations between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Clostridium leptum species with short-chain fatty acids concentration and inverse correlation between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and glucose. These preliminary results suggest that fecal metabonomics may potentially have a future role in a noninvasive colorectal screening program and may contribute to our understanding of the role of these dysregulated molecules in the cross-talk between the host and its bacterial microbiota. PMID:26211820

  19. 31P MRSI and 1H MRS at 7 T: initial results in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Klomp, Dennis W J; van de Bank, Bart L; Raaijmakers, Alexander; Korteweg, Mies A; Possanzini, Cecilia; Boer, Vincent O; van de Berg, Cornelius A T; van de Bosch, Maurice A A J; Luijten, Peter R

    2011-12-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of the noninvasive determination of important biomarkers of human (breast) tumor metabolism using high-field (7-T) MRI and MRS. (31) P MRSI at this field strength was used to provide a direct method for the in vivo detection and quantification of endogenous biomarkers. These encompass phospholipid metabolism, phosphate energy metabolism and intracellular pH. A double-tuned, dual-element transceiver was designed with focused radiofrequency fields for unilateral breast imaging and spectroscopy tuned for optimized sensitivity at 7 T. T(1) -weighted three-dimensional MRI and (1) H MRS were applied for the localization and quantification of total choline compounds. (31) P MRSI was obtained within 20 min per subject and mapped in three dimensions over the breast with pixel volumes of 10 mL. The feasibility of monitoring in vivo metabolism was demonstrated in two patients with breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy, validated by ex vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR and compared with data from an age-matched healthy volunteer. Concentrations of total choline down to 0.4 mM could be detected in the human breast in vivo. Levels of adenosine and other nucleoside triphosphates, inorganic phosphate, phosphocholine, phosphoethanolamine and their glycerol diesters detected in glandular tissue, as well as in tumor, were mapped over the entire breast. Altered levels of these compounds were observed in patients compared with an age-matched healthy volunteer; modulation of these levels occurred in breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive MRI and MRS study in patients with breast cancer, which reveals detailed information on the morphology and phospholipid metabolism from volumes as small as 10 mL. This endogenous metabolic information may provide a new method for the noninvasive assessment of prognostic and predictive biomarkers in breast cancer treatment. PMID

  20. INVESTIGATING THE ENANTIOSELECTIVE TOXICITY OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES IN RAINBOW TROUT THROUGH THE USE OF NMR BASED METABONOMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the Environmental Protection Agency's Computational Toxicology Program, metabonomics, the quantitative measurement of a broad spectrum of metabolic responses of living systems in response to disease onset or genetic modification, is being employed to enable rapid id...

  1. Hepatic lipid profiling of deer mice fed ethanol using {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy: A dose-dependent subchronic study

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.

    2012-11-01

    also mildly increased in ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 1 or 2% ethanol. Only small increases were observed for allylic and diallylic protons, FAMEs and unsaturations in ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls. PCA of NMR data showed increased clustering by gradual separation of ethanol-fed ADH{sup −} deer mice groups from their respective pair-fed control groups and corresponding ethanol-fed ADH{sup +} deer mice groups. Our data indicate that dose of ethanol and hepatic ADH deficiency are two key factors involved in initiation and progression of alcoholic fatty liver disease. Further studies on characterization of individual lipid entities and associated metabolic pathways altered in our deer mouse model after different durations of ethanol feeding could be important to delineate mechanism(s) and identify potential biomarker candidate(s) of early stage ALD. -- Highlights: ► Dose-dependent ethanol-induced fatty liver was studied in deer mouse model. ► A NMR-based lipidomic approach with histology and dry lipid weights was used. ► We used principal component analysis (PCA) to analyze the NMR lipidomic data. ► Dose-dependent clustering patterns by PCA were compared among the groups.

  2. 4D prediction of protein (1)H chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Lehtivarjo, Juuso; Hassinen, Tommi; Korhonen, Samuli-Petrus; Peräkylä, Mikael; Laatikainen, Reino

    2009-12-01

    A 4D approach for protein (1)H chemical shift prediction was explored. The 4th dimension is the molecular flexibility, mapped using molecular dynamics simulations. The chemical shifts were predicted with a principal component model based on atom coordinates from a database of 40 protein structures. When compared to the corresponding non-dynamic (3D) model, the 4th dimension improved prediction by 6-7%. The prediction method achieved RMS errors of 0.29 and 0.50 ppm for Halpha and HN shifts, respectively. However, for individual proteins the RMS errors were 0.17-0.34 and 0.34-0.65 ppm for the Halpha and HN shifts, respectively. X-ray structures gave better predictions than the corresponding NMR structures, indicating that chemical shifts contain invaluable information about local structures. The (1)H chemical shift prediction tool 4DSPOT is available from http://www.uku.fi/kemia/4dspot . PMID:19876601

  3. Serial 1H-MRS in GM2 gangliosidoses.

    PubMed

    Assadi, Mitra; Baseman, Susan; Janson, Christopher; Wang, Dah-Jyuu; Bilaniuk, Larissa; Leone, Paola

    2008-03-01

    GM2 gangliosidoses are a group of neuronal storage disorders caused by deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme hexosaminidase A. Clinically, the disease is marked by a relentless encephalopathy. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) provides in-vivo measurement of various brain metabolites including N-acetyl aspartate+N-acetyl aspartate glutamate (NAA), myo-inositol (mI), choline (Cho) and creatine (Cr). The NAA represents neuronal integrity while elevation in the mI reflects abnormal inflammation and gliosis in the brain tissue. An elevation in the Cho levels suggest cell membrane breakdown and demyelination. We report the clinical and laboratory data in two patients with GM2 gangliosidoses. Serial 1H-MRS evaluations were performed to drive metabolite ratios of NAA/Cr, mI/Cr and Cho/Cr. We acquired the data from four regions of interest (ROI) according to a standard protocol. The results documented a progressive elevation in mI/Cr in all four ROI in patient one and only one ROI (occipital gray matter) in patient 2. We also documented a decline in the NAA/Cr ratios in both cases in most ROI. These results were compared to six age-matched controls and confirmed statistically significant elevation in the mI in our cases. In conclusion, 1H-MRS alterations were suggestive of neuronal loss and inflammation in these patients. 1H-MRS may be a valuable tool in monitoring the disease progress and response to therapy in GM2 gangliosidoses. Elevation in the mI may prove to be more sensitive than the other metabolite alterations. PMID:17387512

  4. Laundering and Deinking Applications of 1H NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutunjian, P. N.; Borchardt, J. K.; Prieto, N. E.; Raney, K. H.; Ferris, J. A.

    One-dimensional 1H NMR imaging techniques are used to visualize oil removal from fabrics and paper fibers immersed in aqueous solutions of nonionic detergents. The method provides a unique approach to the study of oil-removal kinetics in nonionic detergent systems where traditional optical techniques fail due to solution turbidity. The only requirement of the NMR experiment is the use of deuterated water in order to selectively image the hydrocarbon phase. Preliminary applications to laundering and paper deinking are discussed.

  5. 1H NMR Metabolomics Study of Spleen from C57BL/6 Mice Exposed to Gamma Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, X; Hu, M; Liu, M; Hu, JZ

    2016-01-01

    Due to the potential risk of accidental exposure to gamma radiation, it’s critical to identify the biomarkers of radiation exposed creatures. In the present study, NMR based metabolomics combined with multivariate data analysis to evaluate the metabolites changed in the C57BL/6 mouse spleen after 4 days whole body exposure to 3.0 Gy and 7.8 Gy gamma radiations. Principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures analysis (OPLS) are employed for classification and identification potential biomarkers associated with gamma irradiation. Two different strategies for NMR spectral data reduction (i.e., spectral binning and spectral deconvolution) are combined with normalize to constant sum and unit weight before multivariate data analysis, respectively. The combination of spectral deconvolution and normalization to unit weight is the best way for identifying discriminatory metabolites between the irradiation and control groups. Normalized to the constant sum may achieve some pseudo biomarkers. PCA and OPLS results shown that the exposed groups can be well separated from the control group. Leucine, 2-aminobutyrate, valine, lactate, arginine, glutathione, 2-oxoglutarate, creatine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, π-methylhistidine, taurine, myoinositol, glycerol and uracil are significantly elevated while ADP is decreased significantly. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple metabolic pathways and may be potential biomarkers in the spleen exposed to gamma irradiation. PMID:27019763

  6. Proton-detected 3D 1H/13C/1H correlation experiment for structural analysis in rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS above 60 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-01

    A proton-detected 3D 1H/13C/1H chemical shift correlation experiment is proposed for the assignment of chemical shift resonances, identification of 13C-1H connectivities, and proximities of 13C-1H and 1H-1H nuclei under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning (ultrafast-MAS) conditions. Ultrafast-MAS is used to suppress all anisotropic interactions including 1H-1H dipolar couplings, while the finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used to recouple dipolar couplings among protons and the insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer technique is used to transfer magnetization between heteronuclear spins. The 3D experiment eliminates signals from non-carbon-bonded protons and non-proton-bonded carbons to enhance spectral resolution. The 2D (F1/F3) 1H/1H and 2D 13C/1H (F2/F3) chemical shift correlation spectra extracted from the 3D spectrum enable the identification of 1H-1H proximity and 13C-1H connectivity. In addition, the 2D (F1/F2) 1H/13C chemical shift correlation spectrum, incorporated with proton magnetization exchange via the fp-RFDR recoupling of 1H-1H dipolar couplings, enables the measurement of proximities between 13C and even the remote non-carbon-bonded protons. The 3D experiment also gives three-spin proximities of 1H-1H-13C chains. Experimental results obtained from powder samples of L-alanine and L-histidine ṡ H2O ṡ HCl demonstrate the efficiency of the 3D experiment.

  7. ¹H NMR-based metabonomic analysis of brain in rats of morphine dependence and withdrawal intervention.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhengtao; Deng, Yi; Hu, Chunyan; Deng, Pengchi; Bu, Qian; Yan, Guangyan; Zhou, Jiaqing; Shao, Xue; Zhao, Jinxuan; Li, Yan; Zhu, Ruiming; Xu, Youzhi; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2012-05-16

    Metabolic consequences of morphine dependence and withdrawal intervention have not been well explored. In the present study, the metabolic changes in brain hippocampus, nucleus accumbens (NAc), prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum of rats with morphine dependence and withdrawal intervention were explored by using ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance coupled with principal component analysis, partial least squares and orthogonal signal correction analysis. We found that the concentrations of neurotransmitters including glutamate, glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid changed differentially in hippocampus, NAc, PFC and striatum after repeated morphine treatment. Significant changes were also found in a number of cerebral metabolites including N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), lactic acid, creatine, myo-inositol and taurine. These findings indicate the profound disturbances of energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism and neurotransmitters caused by chronic morphine treatment. Interestingly, morphine-induced changes in lactic acid, creatine and NAA were clearly reversed by intervention of methadone or clonidine. Our study provides a comprehensive understanding of the metabolic alteration associated with morphine addiction and withdrawal therapy, which may help to develop new pharmacotherapies. PMID:22391120

  8. Proton-detected 3D 14N/14N/1H isotropic shift correlation experiment mediated through 1H-1H RFDR mixing on a natural abundant sample under ultrafast MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    In this contribution, we have demonstrated a proton detection-based approach on a natural abundant powdered L-Histidine HCl-H2O sample at ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) to accomplish 14N/14N correlation from a 3D 14N/14N/1H isotropic shift correlation experiment mediated through 1H finite-pulse radio frequency-driven recoupling (fp-RFDR). Herein the heteronuclear magnetization transfer between 14N and 1H has been achieved by HMQC experiment, whereas 14N/14N correlation is attained through enhanced 1H-1H spin diffusion process due to 1H-1H dipolar recoupling during the RFDR mixing. While the use of ultrafast MAS (90 kHz) provides sensitivity enhancement through increased 1H transverse relaxation time (T2), the use of micro-coil probe which can withstand strong 14N radio frequency (RF) fields further improves the sensitivity per unit sample volume.

  9. 1H NMR Spectroscopy and MVA Analysis of Diplodus sargus Eating the Exotic Pest Caulerpa cylindracea

    PubMed Central

    De Pascali, Sandra A.; Del Coco, Laura; Felline, Serena; Mollo, Ernesto; Terlizzi, Antonio; Fanizzi, Francesco P.

    2015-01-01

    The green alga Caulerpa cylindracea is a non-autochthonous and invasive species that is severely affecting the native communities in the Mediterranean Sea. Recent researches show that the native edible fish Diplodus sargus actively feeds on this alga and cellular and physiological alterations have been related to the novel alimentary habits. The complex effects of such a trophic exposure to the invasive pest are still poorly understood. Here we report on the metabolic profiles of plasma from D. sargus individuals exposed to C. cylindracea along the southern Italian coast, using 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis (Principal Component Analysis, PCA, Orthogonal Partial Least Square, PLS, and Orthogonal Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis, OPLS-DA). Fish were sampled in two seasonal periods from three different locations, each characterized by a different degree of algal abundance. The levels of the algal bisindole alkaloid caulerpin, which is accumulated in the fish tissues, was used as an indicator of the trophic exposure to the seaweed and related to the plasma metabolic profiles. The profiles appeared clearly influenced by the sampling period beside the content of caulerpin, while the analyses also supported a moderate alteration of lipid and choline metabolism related to the Caulerpa-based diet. PMID:26058009

  10. 1H NMR Spectroscopy and MVA Analysis of Diplodus sargus Eating the Exotic Pest Caulerpa cylindracea.

    PubMed

    De Pascali, Sandra A; Del Coco, Laura; Felline, Serena; Mollo, Ernesto; Terlizzi, Antonio; Fanizzi, Francesco P

    2015-06-01

    The green alga Caulerpa cylindracea is a non-autochthonous and invasive species that is severely affecting the native communities in the Mediterranean Sea. Recent researches show that the native edible fish Diplodus sargus actively feeds on this alga and cellular and physiological alterations have been related to the novel alimentary habits. The complex effects of such a trophic exposure to the invasive pest are still poorly understood. Here we report on the metabolic profiles of plasma from D. sargus individuals exposed to C. cylindracea along the southern Italian coast, using 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis (Principal Component Analysis, PCA, Orthogonal Partial Least Square, PLS, and Orthogonal Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis, OPLS-DA). Fish were sampled in two seasonal periods from three different locations, each characterized by a different degree of algal abundance. The levels of the algal bisindole alkaloid caulerpin, which is accumulated in the fish tissues, was used as an indicator of the trophic exposure to the seaweed and related to the plasma metabolic profiles. The profiles appeared clearly influenced by the sampling period beside the content of caulerpin, while the analyses also supported a moderate alteration of lipid and choline metabolism related to the Caulerpa-based diet. PMID:26058009

  11. Hydrogen concentration dependence of 1H Knight shift in NbH x studied by 1H MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Hayashi, Shigenobu; Hayamizu, Kikuko

    1993-08-01

    Hydrogen concentration dependence of the Knight shift of protons in NbH x(0.05≤×≤1.05) has been studied by means of 1H MAS (magic angle sample spinning) NMR. In the mixed-phase samples of the α and β phases (0.05<×≤0.7), it is found that the 1H Knight shift of β-NbH x depends on the phase fraction. The shift variation in the β phase can be correlated with the unit cell volume, being explained by the variation of the density of electronic states at the Fermi level N(0) due to the compression of the crystal lattice. On the other hand, in the single β-phase samples (0.7<×≤1.05), the 1H Knight shift becomes smaller as the hydrogen concentration increases. This variation can be explained by increase in the number of electrons in the unit cell with the hydrogen concentration, resulting in the N(0) increase.

  12. Dynamic 1H NMR Studies of Schiff Base Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köylü, M. Z.; Ekinci, A.; Böyükata, M.; Temel, H.

    2016-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 and the spin-spin relaxation time T 2 of two Schiff base derivatives, N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylidene)-1,2-diaminoethane (H2L1) and N,N'-ethylenebis (salicylidene)-1,3-diaminopropane (H2L2), in DMSO-d6 solvent were studied as a function of temperature in the range of 20-50°C using a Bruker Avance 400.132 MHz 1H NMR spectrometer. Based on the activation energy ( E a) and correlation time (τc), we believe that the Schiff base derivatives perform a molecular tumbling motion.

  13. (1)H MRS: a potential biomarker of in utero placental function.

    PubMed

    Macnaught, Gillian; Gray, Calum; Walker, Jane; Simpson, Mary; Norman, Jane; Semple, Scott; Denison, Fiona

    2015-10-01

    The placenta is a temporary organ that is essential for a healthy pregnancy. It performs several important functions, including the transport of nutrients, the removal of waste products and the metabolism of certain substances. Placental disorders have been found to account for over 50% of stillbirths. Despite this, there are currently no methods available to directly and non-invasively assess placental function in utero. The primary aim of this pilot study was to investigate the use of (1)H MRS for this purpose. (1)H MRS offers the possibility to detect several placental metabolites, including choline, lipids and the amino acids glutamine and glutamate (Glx), which are vital to fetal development and placental function. Here, in utero placental spectra were acquired from nine small for gestational age (SGA) pregnancies, a cohort who are at increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality, and from nine healthy gestation-matched pregnancies. All subjects were between 26 and 39 weeks of gestation. Placenta Glx, choline and lipids at 1.3 and 0.9 ppm were quantified as amplitude ratios to that of intrinsic H2O. Wilcoxon signed rank tests indicated a significant difference in Glx/H2O (p = 0.024) between the two groups, but not in choline/H2O (p = 0.722) or in either lipid/H2O ratio (1.3 ppm, p = 0.813; 0.9 ppm, p = 0.058). This study has demonstrated that (1)H MRS has potential for the detection of placental metabolites in utero. This warrants further investigation as a tool for the monitoring of placental function. PMID:26313636

  14. The 1H NMR Profile of Healthy Dog Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Musteata, Mihai; Nicolescu, Alina; Solcan, Gheorghe; Deleanu, Calin

    2013-01-01

    The availability of data for reference values in cerebrospinal fluid for healthy humans is limited due to obvious practical and ethical issues. The variability of reported values for metabolites in human cerebrospinal fluid is quite large. Dogs present great similarities with humans, including in cases of central nervous system pathologies. The paper presents the first study on healthy dog cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile using 1H NMR spectroscopy. A number of 13 metabolites have been identified and quantified from cerebrospinal fluid collected from a group of 10 mix breed healthy dogs. The biological variability as resulting from the relative standard deviation of the physiological concentrations of the identified metabolites had a mean of 18.20% (range between 9.3% and 44.8%). The reported concentrations for metabolites may be used as normal reference values. The homogeneity of the obtained results and the low biologic variability show that the 1H NMR analysis of the dog’s cerebrospinal fluid is reliable in designing and interpreting clinical and therapeutic trials in dogs with central nervous system pathologies. PMID:24376499

  15. High-resolution magic angle spinning 1H MRS in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Decelle, Emily A; Cheng, Leo L

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men worldwide, largely as a result of the increased use of the annual serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening test for detection. PSA screening has saved lives, but it has also resulted in the overtreatment of many patients with PCa because of a limited ability to accurately localize and characterize PCa lesions through imaging. High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) (1)H MRS has proven to be a strong potential clinical tool for PCa diagnosis and prognosis. The HRMAS technique allows valuable metabolic information to be obtained from ex vivo intact tissue samples and also enables the performance of histopathology on the same tissue specimens. Studies have found that the quantification of individual metabolite levels and metabolite ratios, as well as metabolomic profiles, shows strong potential to improve accuracy in PCa detection, diagnosis and monitoring. Ex vivo HRMAS is also a valuable tool for the interpretation of in vivo results, including the localization of tumors, and thus has the potential to improve in vivo diagnostic tests used in the clinic. Here, we primarily review publications of HRMAS (1)H MRS and its use for the study of intact human prostate tissue. PMID:23529951

  16. Broad identification of bacterial type in urinary tract infection using (1)h NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Dwivedi, Mayank; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Khetrapal, Chunni Lal; Bhandari, Mahendra

    2012-03-01

    To address the shortcomings of urine culture for the rapid identification of urinary tract infection (UTI), we applied (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as a surrogate method for fast screening of microorganisms. Study includes 682 urine samples from suspected UTI patients, 50 healthy volunteers, and commercially available standard strains of gram negative bacilli (GNB) (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia, Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter frundii) and gram positive cocci (GPC) (Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus group B, Staphylococcus saprophyticus). Acetate, lactate, ethanol, succinate, creatinine, trimethylamine (TMA), citrate, trimethylamin-N-oxide, glycine, urea, and hippurate were measured by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. All urine specimens were evaluated with culture method. Multivariate discriminant function analysis (DFA) reveals that acetate, lactate, succinate, and formate were able to differentiate, with high accuracy (99.5%), healthy controls from UTI patients. This statistical analysis was also able to classify GNB to GPC infected urine samples with high accuracy (96%). This technique appears to be a promising, rapid, and noninvasive approach to probing GNB and GPC infected urine specimens with its distinguishing metabolic profile. The determination of infection will be very important for rapidly and efficiently measuring the efficacy of a tailored treatment, leading to prompt and appropriate care of UTI patients. PMID:22292465

  17. Molecular structures of 2-arylaminomethyl-1H-benzimidazole: Spectral, electrochemical, DFT and biological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Ghani, Nour T.; Mansour, Ahmed M.

    2012-06-01

    In the present work, structural studies on (1H-benzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)-N-(4-chloro-phenyl)-amine (L1) and (1H-benzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)-N-(4-iodo-phenyl)-amine (L2) have been done extensively by a variety of physico-chemical techniques. Optimized geometrical structures, harmonic vibrational frequencies, natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis, and Frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) were obtained by DFT/B3LYP method. TD-DFT calculations help to assign the electronic transitions. The polarizable continuum model (PCM) fails to describe the experimental chemical shift associated with the NH protons as calculated by applying Gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method, but a very good correlation between the theoretical and experimental values was achieved by taking into account the specific solute-solvent interactions. DFT calculations showed a good agreement between the theoretical and observed results. These compounds exhibited a high biological activity through the inhibition of the metabolic growth of the investigated bacteria.

  18. State-of-the-Art Direct 13C and Indirect 1H-[13C] NMR Spectroscopy In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Robin A.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy in combination with 13C-labeled substrate infusion is a powerful technique to measure a large number of metabolic fluxes non-invasively in vivo. It has been used to quantify glycogen synthesis rates, establish quantitative relationships between energy metabolism and neurotransmission and evaluate the importance of different substrates. All measurements can, in principle, be performed through direct 13C NMR detection or via indirect 1H-[13C] NMR detection of the protons attached to 13C nuclei. The choice for detection scheme and pulse sequence depends on the magnetic field strength, whereas substrate selection depends on the metabolic pathways that are studied. 13C NMR spectroscopy remains a challenging technique that requires several non-standard hardware modifications, infusion of 13C-labeled substrates and sophisticated processing and metabolic modeling. Here the various aspects of direct 13C and indirect 1H-[13C] NMR are reviewed with the aim of providing a practical guide. PMID:21919099

  19. Dynamics-based selective 2D (1)H/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectroscopy under ultrafast MAS conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-05-28

    Dynamics plays important roles in determining the physical, chemical, and functional properties of a variety of chemical and biological materials. However, a material (such as a polymer) generally has mobile and rigid regions in order to have high strength and toughness at the same time. Therefore, it is difficult to measure the role of mobile phase without being affected by the rigid components. Herein, we propose a highly sensitive solid-state NMR approach that utilizes a dipolar-coupling based filter (composed of 12 equally spaced 90° RF pulses) to selectively measure the correlation of (1)H chemical shifts from the mobile regions of a material. It is interesting to find that the rotor-synchronized dipolar filter strength decreases with increasing inter-pulse delay between the 90° pulses, whereas the dipolar filter strength increases with increasing inter-pulse delay under static conditions. In this study, we also demonstrate the unique advantages of proton-detection under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning conditions to enhance the spectral resolution and sensitivity for studies on small molecules as well as multi-phase polymers. Our results further demonstrate the use of finite-pulse radio-frequency driven recoupling pulse sequence to efficiently recouple weak proton-proton dipolar couplings in the dynamic regions of a molecule and to facilitate the fast acquisition of (1)H/(1)H correlation spectrum compared to the traditional 2D NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) experiment. We believe that the proposed approach is beneficial to study mobile components in multi-phase systems, such as block copolymers, polymer blends, nanocomposites, heterogeneous amyloid mixture of oligomers and fibers, and other materials. PMID:26026440

  20. Genetic Variation in Myosin 1H Contributes to Mandibular Prognathism

    PubMed Central

    Tassopoulou-Fishell, Maria; Deeley, Kathleen; Harvey, Erika M.; Sciote, James; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several candidate loci have been suggested as influencing mandibular prognathism (1p22.1, 1p22.2, 1p36, 3q26.2, 5p13-p12, 6q25, 11q22.2-q22.3, 12q23, 12q13.13, and 19p13.2). The goal of this study was to replicate these results in a well-characterized homogeneous sample set. Methods Thirty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms spanning all candidate regions were studied in 44 prognathic and 35 Class I subjects from the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine Dental Registry and DNA Repository. The 44 mandibular prognathism subjects had an average age of 18.4 years, 31 were females and 13 males, and 24 were White, 15 African American, two Hispanic, and three Asian. The 35 Class I subjects had an average age of 17.6 years, 27 were females and 9 males, and 27 were White, six African Americans, one Hispanic, and two Asian. Skeletal mandibular prognathism diagnosis included cephalometric values indicative of Class III such as ANB smaller than two degrees, negative Witts appraisal, and positive A–B plane. Additional mandibular prognathism criteria included negative OJ and visually prognathic (concave) profile as determined by the subject's clinical evaluation. Orthognathic subjects without jaw deformations were used as a comparison group. Mandibular prognathism and orthognathic subjects were matched based on race, sex and age. Genetic markers were tested by polymerase chain reaction using TaqMan chemistry. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to determine overrepresentation of marker allele with alpha of 0.05. Results An association was unveiled between a marker in MYO1H (rs10850110) and the mandibular prognathism phenotype (p=0.03). MYO1H is a Class-I myosin that is in a different protein group than the myosin isoforms of muscle sarcomeres, which are the basis of skeletal muscle fiber typing. Class I myosins are necessary for cell motility, phagocytosis and vesicle transport. Conclusions More strict clinical definitions may increase

  1. Hydrophobization of epoxy nanocomposite surface with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane for superhydrophobic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psarski, Maciej; Marczak, Jacek; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Sobieraj, Grzegorz B.; Gumowski, Konrad; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Weimin

    2012-10-01

    Nature inspires the design of synthetic materials with superhydrophobic properties, which can be used for applications ranging from self-cleaning surfaces to microfluidic devices. Their water repellent properties are due to hierarchical (micrometer- and nanometre-scale) surface morphological structures, either made of hydrophobic substances or hydrophobized by appropriate surface treatment. In this work, the efficiency of two surface treatment procedures, with a hydrophobic fluoropolymer, synthesized and deposited from 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane (PFOTS) is investigated. The procedures involved reactions from the gas and liquid phases of the PFOTS/hexane solutions. The hierarchical structure is created in an epoxy nanocomposite surface, by filling the resin with alumina nanoparticles and micron-sized glass beads and subsequent sandblasting with corundum microparticles. The chemical structure of the deposited fluoropolymer was examined using XPS spectroscopy. The topography of the modified surfaces was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The hydrophobic properties of the modified surfaces were investigated by water contact and sliding angles measurements. The surfaces exhibited water contact angles of above 150° for both modification procedures, however only the gas phase modification provided the non-sticking behaviour of water droplets (sliding angle of 3°). The discrepancy is attributed to extra surface roughness provided by the latter procedure.

  2. Determination of relative orientation between (1)H CSA tensors from a 3D solid-state NMR experiment mediated through (1)H/(1)H RFDR mixing under ultrafast MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    To obtain piercing insights into inter and intramolecular H-bonding, and π-electron interactions measurement of (1)H chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors is gradually becoming an obvious choice. While the magnitude of CSA tensors provides unique information about the local electronic environment surrounding the nucleus, the relative orientation between these tensors can offer further insights into the spatial arrangement of interacting nuclei in their respective three-dimensional (3D) space. In this regard, we present a 3D anisotropic/anisotropic/isotropic proton chemical shift (CSA/CSA/CS) correlation experiment mediated through (1)H/(1)H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) which enhances spin diffusion through recoupled (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequency (70kHz). Relative orientation between two interacting 1H CSA tensors is obtained by fitting two-interacting (1)H CSA tensors by fitting two-dimensional (2D) (1)H/(1)H CSA/CSA spectral slices through extensive numerical simulations. To recouple (1)H CSAs in the indirect frequency dimensions of a 3D experiment we have employed γ-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence based on R-symmetry (R188(7)) with a series of phase-alternated 2700(°)-90180(°) composite-180° pulses on citric acid sample. Due to robustness of applied (1)H CSA recoupling sequence towards the presence of RF field inhomogeneity, we have successfully achieved an excellent (1)H/(1)H CSA/CSA cross-correlation efficiency between H-bonded sites of citric acid. PMID:26065628

  3. One dimensional 1H, 2H and 3H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, A. J.; Astrakharchik, G. E.; Vranješ Markić, L.; Boronat, J.

    2016-05-01

    The ground-state properties of one-dimensional electron-spin-polarized hydrogen 1H, deuterium 2H, and tritium 3H are obtained by means of quantum Monte Carlo methods. The equations of state of the three isotopes are calculated for a wide range of linear densities. The pair correlation function and the static structure factor are obtained and interpreted within the framework of the Luttinger liquid theory. We report the density dependence of the Luttinger parameter and use it to identify different physical regimes: Bogoliubov Bose gas, super-Tonks–Girardeau gas, and quasi-crystal regimes for bosons; repulsive, attractive Fermi gas, and quasi-crystal regimes for fermions. We find that the tritium isotope is the one with the richest behavior. Our results show unambiguously the relevant role of the isotope mass in the properties of this quantum system.

  4. NMR-Based Amide Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Measurements for Complex Membrane Proteins: Development and Critical Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerski, Lech; Vinogradova, Olga; Sanders, Charles R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for measuring site-specific amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates for membrane proteins in bilayers is reported and evaluated. This method represents an adaptation and extension of the approach of Dempsey and co-workers (Biophys. J. 70, 1777-1788 (1996)) and is based on reconstituting 15N-labeled membrane proteins into phospholipid bilayers, followed by lyophilization and rehydration with D2O or H2O (control). Following incubation for a time t under hydrated conditions, samples are again lyophilized and then solubilized in an organic solvent system, where 1H-15N HSQC spectra are recorded. Comparison of spectra from D2O-exposed samples to spectra from control samples yields the extent of the H-D exchange which occurred in the bilayers during time t. Measurements are site specific if specific 15N labeling is used. The first part of this paper deals with the search for a suitable solvent system in which to solubilize complex membrane proteins in an amide "exchange-trapped" form for NMR quantitation of amide peak intensities. The second portion of the paper documents application of the overall procedure to measuring site-specific amide exchange rates in diacylglycerol kinase, a representative integral membrane protein. Both the potential usefulness and the significant limitations of the new method are documented.

  5. NMR-based metabolomics and breath studies show lipid and protein catabolism during low dose chronic T1AM treatment

    PubMed Central

    Haviland, J. A.; Reiland, H.; Butz, D. E.; Tonelli, M.; Porter, W. P.; Zucchi, R.; Scanlan, T. S.; Chiellini, G.; Assadi-Porter, F. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM), an analog of thyroid hormone, is a recently discovered fast-acting endogenous metabolite. High single dose treatments of T1AM have produced rapid short-term effects, including a reduction of body temperature, bradycardia, and hyperglycemia in mice. Design and Methods The present study monitored the effect of daily low doses of T1AM (10mg/Kg) for eight-days on weight loss and metabolism in spontaneously overweight mice. The experiments were repeated twice (n=4). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of plasma and real-time analysis of exhaled 13CO2 in breath by cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) were used to detect T1M-induced lipolysis. Results CRDS detected increased lipolysis in breath shortly after T1AM administration that was associated with a significant weight loss but independent of food consumption. NMR spectroscopy revealed alterations in key metabolites in serum: valine, glycine, and 3-hydroxybutyrate, suggesting that the subchronic effects of T1AM include both lipolysis and protein breakdown. After discontinuation of T1AM treatment, mice regained only 1.8% of the lost weight in the following two weeks, indicating lasting effects of T1AM on weight maintenance. Conclusions CRDS in combination with NMR and 13C-metabolic tracing constitute a powerful method of investigation in obesity studies for identifying in vivo biochemical pathway shifts and unanticipated debilitating side effects. PMID:23512955

  6. Compatibility of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Labeling for 1H MRI Cell Tracking with 31P MRS for Bioenergetic Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoli; Hancock, Brynne; Leen, Stephanie; Ramaswamy, Sharan; Sollott, Steven J.; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Lakatta, Edward G.; Spencer, Richard G.; Fishbein, Kenneth W.

    2011-01-01

    Labeling of cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles permits cell tracking by 1H MRI while 31P MRS allows non-invasive evaluation of cellular bioenergetics. We evaluated the compatibility of these two techniques by obtaining 31P NMR spectra of iron-labeled and unlabeled immobilized C2C12 myoblast cells in vitro. Broadened but usable 31P spectra were obtained, and peak area ratios of resonances corresponding to intracellular metabolites showed no significant differences between labeled and unlabeled cell populations. We conclude that 31P NMR spectra can be obtained from cells labeled with sufficient iron to permit visualization by 1H imaging protocols and that these spectra have sufficient quality to be used in assessing metabolic status. This result introduces the possibility of using localized 31P MRS to evaluate the viability of iron-labeled therapeutic cells as well as surrounding host tissue in vivo. PMID:20853523

  7. Preliminary 1H NMR study on archaeological waterlogged wood.

    PubMed

    Maccotta, Antonella; Fantazzini, Paola; Garavaglia, Carla; Donato, Ines D; Perzia, Patrizia; Brai, Maria; Morreale, Filippa

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Relaxation (MRR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are powerful tools to obtain detailed information on the pore space structure that one is unlikely to obtain in other ways. These techniques are particularly suitable for Cultural Heritage materials, because they use water 1H nuclei as a probe. Interaction with water is one of the main causes of deterioration of materials. Porous structure in wood, for example, favours the penetration of water, which can carry polluting substances and promote mould growth. A particular case is waterlogged wood from underwater discoveries and moist sites; in fact, these finds are very fragile because of chemical, physical and biological decay from the long contact with the water. When wood artefacts are brought to the surface and directly dried in air, there is the collapse of the cellular structures, and wood loses its original form and dimensions and cannot be used for study and museum exhibits. In this work we have undertaken the study of some wood finds coming from Ercolano's harbour by MRR and MRI under different conditions, and we have obtained a characterization of pore space in wood and images of the spatial distribution of the confined water in the wood. PMID:16485652

  8. 3-hydroxy-2(1H)-pyridinone chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, K.N.; Xu, J.

    1997-04-29

    Disclosed is a series of improved metal chelating agents, which are highly effective upon both injection and oral administration; several of the most effective are of low toxicity. These chelating agents incorporate within their structure 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO) and 3-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (3,2-HOPO) moieties with a substituted carbamoyl group ortho to the hydroxy or oxo groups of the hydroxypyridinone ring. The electron-withdrawing carbamoyl group increases the acidity of the hydroxypyridinones. In the metal complexes of the chelating agents, the amide protons form very strong hydrogen bonds with its adjacent HOPO oxygen donor, making these complexes very stable at physiological conditions. The terminal N-substituents provides a certain degree of lipophilicity to the 3,2-HOPO, increasing oral activity. Also disclosed is a method of making the chelating agents and a method of producing a known compound, 3-hydroxy-1-alkyl-2(1H)pyridinone, used as a precursor to the chelating agent, safely and in large quantities. 2 figs.

  9. The Conformations and Structures of 1H-NONAFLUOROBUTANE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Joseph A.; Bohn, Robert K.; Montgomery, John A.; , Jr.

    2012-06-01

    The all trans conformers of perfluorocarbons, unlike hydrocarbons, are helical with C-C-C-C dihedral angles about 1640. Fluorocarbons with H substitution can replace chlorofluorocarbons as propellants and compressor fluids without the disadvantage of causing ozone depletion in the upper atmosphere. 1H-perfluorobutane, CHF_2CF_2CF_2CF_3, has been studied by pulsed-jet Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The spectrum is very rich. Quantum chemical calculations identify five stable conformers with relative energies up to 1.1 kcal/mol. Thus far three conformers have been characterized and many lines remain unassigned. The assigned species have CCCCanti/CCCH gauche as well as the anti/anti and gauche/anti forms. Rotational constant values are 1428.9501(2) MHz, 593.323877(6) MHz, and 546.43578(6) MHz for the anti/gauche species, 1323.664(3) MHz, 617.6051(5) MHz for the ant/anti species, and 1066.9384(4) MHz, 768.4736(4) MHz, and 671.3145(4) MHz for the gauche/anti form.

  10. 3-hydroxy-2(1H)-pyridinone chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Xu, Jide

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed is a series of improved metal chelating agents, which are highly effective upon both injection and oral administration; several of the most effective are of low toxicity. These chelating agents incorporate within their structure 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO) and 3-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (3,2-HOPO) moieties with a substituted carbamoyl group ortho to the hydroxy or oxo groups of the hydroxypyridinone ring. The electron-withdrawing carbamoyl group increases the acidity of the hydroxypyridinones. In the metal complexes of said chelating agents, the amide protons form very strong hydrogen bonds with its adjacent HOPO oxygen donor, making these complexes very stable at physiological conditions. The terminal N-substituents provides a certain degree of lipophilicity to said 3,2-HOPO, increasing oral activity. Also disclosed is a method of making the chelating agents and a method of producing a known compound, 3-hydroxy-1-alkyl-2(1H)pyridinone, used as a precursor to the chelating agent, safely and in large quantities.

  11. (1) H-NMR screening for the high-throughput determination of genotype and environmental effects on the content of asparagine in wheat grain.

    PubMed

    Corol, Delia I; Ravel, Catherine; Rakszegi, Marianna; Charmet, Gilles; Bedo, Zoltan; Beale, Michael H; Shewry, Peter R; Ward, Jane L

    2016-01-01

    Free asparagine in cereals is known to be the precursor of acrylamide, a neurotoxic and carcinogenic product formed during cooking processes. Thus, the development of crops with lower asparagine is of considerable interest to growers and the food industry. In this study, we describe the development and application of a rapid (1) H-NMR-based analysis of cereal flour, that is, suitable for quantifying asparagine levels, and hence acrylamide-forming potential, across large numbers of samples. The screen was applied to flour samples from 150 bread wheats grown at a single site in 2005, providing the largest sample set to date. Additionally, screening of 26 selected cultivars grown for two further years in the same location and in three additional European locations in the third year (2007) provided six widely different environments to allow estimation of the environmental (E) and G x E effects on asparagine levels. Asparagine concentrations in the 150 genotypes ranged from 0.32 to 1.56 mg/g dry matter in wholemeal wheat flours. Asparagine levels were correlated with plant height and therefore, due to recent breeding activities to produce semi-dwarf varieties, a negative relationship with the year of registration of the cultivar was also observed. The multisite study indicated that only 13% of the observed variation in asparagine levels was heritable, whilst the environmental contribution was 36% and the GxE component was 43%. Thus, compared to some other phenotypic traits, breeding for low asparagine wheats presents a difficult challenge. PMID:25816894

  12. Identification of a potent inhibitor of human dual-specific phosphatase, VHR, from computer-aided and NMR-based screening to cellular effects.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhe; Tabassum, Sartaj; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Jiahai; Mathur, Suvigya; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2007-11-23

    Human vaccinia H1-related phosphatase (VHR) is a dual-specific phosphatase (DSPs) that plays an important role in the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade regulation. It is also a potential drug target for diseases that are related to immune response. By combining a virtual and NMR-based ligand-screening strategy, we successfully identified four VHR inhibitors, of which GATPT ((glucosamine-aminoethoxy)triphenyltin) can bind to VHR with a K(i) value of 2.54 muM. The putative binding mode of GATPT was constructed by a molecular docking simulation to provide structural insights into the ligand-binding mechanism. Furthermore, we found that this compound can significantly inhibit the dephosphorylation of the extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs), and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) and block the G(1)-S phase transition in the cell cycle. Therefore, GATPT is a promising lead structure for designing more effective inhibitors of VHR. PMID:17933004

  13. Studies of Secondary Melanoma on C57BL/6J Mouse Liver Using 1H NMR Metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Ju; Isern, Nancy G.; Burton, Sarah D.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-10-31

    NMR metabolomics, consisting of solid state high resolution (hr) magic angle spinning (MAS) 1H NMR (1H hr-MAS), liquid state high resolution 1H-NMR, and principal components analysis (PCA) has been used to study secondary metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse liver . The melanoma group can be differentiated from its control group by PCA analysis of the absolute concentrations or by the absolute peak intensities of metabolites from either 1H hr-MAS NMR data on intact liver tissues or liquid state 1H-NMR spectra on liver tissue extracts. In particular, we found that the absolute concentrations of alanine, glutamate, creatine, creatinine, fumarate and cholesterol are elevated in the melanoma group as compared to controls, while the absolute concentrations of succinate, glycine, glucose, and the family of linear lipids including long chain fatty acids, total choline and acylglycerol are decreased. The ratio of glycerophosphocholine to phosphocholine is increased by about 1.5 fold in the melanoma group, while the absolute concentration of total choline is actually lower in melanoma mice. These results suggest the following picture in secondary melanoma metastasis: Linear lipid levels are decreased by beta oxidation in the melanoma group, which contributes to an increase in the synthesis of cholesterol, and also provides an energy source input for TCA cycle. These findings suggest a link between lipid oxidation, the TCA cycle and the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) signal pathway in tumor metastases. Thus this study indicates that the metabolic profile derived from NMR analysis can provide a valuable bio-signature of malignancy and cell hypoxia in metastatic melanoma.

  14. Application of ICA to realistically simulated 1H-MRS data

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanam, Ravi; Boutte, David; Hutchison, Kent E; Calhoun, Vince D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction 1H-MRS signals from brain tissues capture information on in vivo brain metabolism and neuronal biomarkers. This study aims to advance the use of independent component analysis (ICA) for spectroscopy data by objectively comparing the performance of ICA and LCModel in analyzing realistic data that mimics many of the known properties of in vivo data. Methods This work identifies key features of in vivo 1H-MRS signals and presents methods to simulate realistic data, using a basis set of 12 metabolites typically found in the human brain. The realistic simulations provide a much needed ground truth to evaluate performances of various MRS analysis methods. ICA is applied to collectively analyze multiple realistic spectra and independent components identified with our generative model to obtain ICA estimates. These same data are also analyzed using LCModel and the comparisons between the ground-truth and the analysis estimates are presented. The study also investigates the potential impact of modeling inaccuracies by incorporating two sets of model resonances in simulations. Results The simulated fid signals incorporating line broadening, noise, and residual water signal closely resemble the in vivo signals. Simulation analyses show that the resolution performances of both LCModel and ICA are not consistent across metabolites and that while ICA resolution can be improved for certain resonances, ICA is as effective as, or better than, LCModel in resolving most model resonances. Conclusion The results show that ICA can be an effective tool in comparing multiple spectra and complements existing approaches for providing quantified estimates. PMID:26221570

  15. NMR-Based Metabolomic Study on Isatis tinctoria: Comparison of Different Accessions, Harvesting Dates, and the Effect of Repeated Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Guldbrandsen, Niels; Kostidis, Sarantos; Schäfer, Hartmut; De Mieri, Maria; Spraul, Manfred; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Mikros, Emmanuel; Hamburger, Matthias

    2015-05-22

    Isatis tinctoria is an ancient dye and medicinal plant with potent anti-inflammatory and antiallergic properties. Metabolic differences were investigated by NMR spectroscopy of accessions from different origins that were grown under identical conditions on experimental plots. For these accessions, metabolite profiles at different harvesting dates were analyzed, and single and repeatedly harvested plants were compared. Leaf samples were shock-frozen in liquid N2 immediately after being harvested, freeze-dried, and cryomilled prior to extraction. Extracts were prepared by pressurized liquid extraction with ethyl acetate and 70% aqueous methanol. NMR spectra were analyzed using a combination of different methods of multivariate data analysis such as principal component analysis (PCA), canonical analysis (CA), and k-nearest neighbor concept (k-NN). Accessions and harvesting dates were well separated in the PCA/CA/k-NN analysis in both extracts. Pairwise statistical total correlation spectroscopy (STOCSY) revealed unsaturated fatty acids, porphyrins, carbohydrates, indole derivatives, isoprenoids, phenylpropanoids, and minor aromatic compounds as the cause of these differences. In addition, the metabolite profile was affected by the repeated harvest regime, causing a decrease of 1,5-anhydroglucitol, sucrose, unsaturated fatty acids, porphyrins, isoprenoids, and a flavonoid. PMID:25946005

  16. NMR-based metabonomic analysis of normal rat urine and faeces in response to (±)-venlafaxine treatment.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Contreras, José I; García-Pérez, Isabel; Meléndez-Camargo, María E; Zepeda-Vallejo, Luis G

    2016-05-10

    (±)-Venlafaxine, a bicyclic antidepressant of the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) class, is prescribed for the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. As is the case with other antidepressants, its precise mechanisms of action are still unknown. Pharmacometabonomic approaches allow for the detection of diverse metabolites, unlike classic methods for analysing drug interaction based on single metabolites and linear pathways. This provides a global view of the state of homeostasis during treatment and an insight into the mechanisms of action of a drug. Accordingly, the final outcome of treatment is characterised by the network of reactome pathways derived from the on-target and off-target effects of the drug. Regarding antidepressants, the drug network may be located in the gut-microbiome-brain-liver-kidney-immune-cardiovascular system axis (GMBLKICA), implying that neurotransmitters participate as signalling molecules in bidirectional communication. If their bioavailability is increased, this communication and the state of homeostasis may be disrupted. With a pharmacometabonomic approach using NMR in combination with different chemometric methods, a determination was made of subtle changes in the metabolic profile (metabotype) of urine and faeces in normal Wistar rats following a single administration of pharmacological doses of (±)-venlafaxine hydrochloride. Based on the drug-response metabotypes observed, (±)-venlafaxine had effects on gut microbial co-metabolites and osmolytes. Hence, it can be hypothesized that bidirectional communication in the multiorgan axis was perturbed by this drug, and very likely by its active metabolite, (±)-desvenlafaxine. This disrupted signalling could be related not only to therapeutic and adverse effects, but also to the lag period in treatment response. PMID:26895493

  17. Prognosis Biomarkers of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock by 1H NMR Urine Metabolomics in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Modesto-Alapont, Vicente; Gonzalez-Marrachelli, Vannina; Vento-Rehues, Rosa; Jorda-Miñana, Angela; Blanquer-Olivas, Jose; Monleon, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and patient stratification may improve sepsis outcome by a timely start of the proper specific treatment. We aimed to identify metabolomic biomarkers of sepsis in urine by 1H-NMR spectroscopy to assess the severity and to predict outcomes. Urine samples were collected from 64 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock in the ICU for a 1H NMR spectra acquisition. A supervised analysis was performed on the processed spectra, and a predictive model for prognosis (30-days mortality/survival) of sepsis was constructed using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). In addition, we compared the prediction power of metabolomics data respect the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. Supervised multivariate analysis afforded a good predictive model to distinguish the patient groups and detect specific metabolic patterns. Negative prognosis patients presented higher values of ethanol, glucose and hippurate, and on the contrary, lower levels of methionine, glutamine, arginine and phenylalanine. These metabolites could be part of a composite biopattern of the human metabolic response to sepsis shock and its mortality in ICU patients. The internal cross-validation showed robustness of the metabolic predictive model obtained and a better predictive ability in comparison with SOFA values. Our results indicate that NMR metabolic profiling might be helpful for determining the metabolomic phenotype of worst-prognosis septic patients in an early stage. A predictive model for the evolution of septic patients using these metabolites was able to classify cases with more sensitivity and specificity than the well-established organ dysfunction score SOFA. PMID:26565633

  18. 40 CFR 721.10373 - 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-. 721... Substances § 721.10373 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1H-imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)- (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10373 - 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-. 721... Substances § 721.10373 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1H-imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)- (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10373 - 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-. 721... Substances § 721.10373 1H-Imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1H-imidazole, 1-(1-methylethyl)- (PMN...

  1. 1H and 13C Solid-state NMR of Gossypium barbadense (Pima) Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interaction of water with cellulose and its influence on the nuclear spin dynamics in G. barbadense (Pima) cotton were investigated by 1H and 13C solid-state NMR techniques. 1H spin diffusion results from a Goldman-Shen experiment indicate that the water is multilayered. 1H MAS experiments pro...

  2. 1H and 13C Solid-state NMR of G. barbadense (Pima) Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interaction of water with cellulose and its influence on the nuclear spin dynamics in G. barbadense (Pima) cotton were investigated with 1H and 13C solid-state NMR techniques. 1H spin diffusion results from a Goldman-Shen experiment indicate that the water is multilayered. 1H MAS experiment...

  3. Vigorous exercise increases brain lactate and Glx (glutamate+glutamine): a dynamic 1H-MRS study.

    PubMed

    Maddock, Richard J; Casazza, Gretchen A; Buonocore, Michael H; Tanase, Costin

    2011-08-15

    Vigorous exercise increases lactate and glucose uptake by the brain in excess of the increase in brain oxygen uptake. The metabolic fate of this non-oxidized carbohydrate entering the brain is poorly understood, but accumulation of lactate in the brain and/or increased net synthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters are possible explanations. Previous proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) studies using conventional pulse sequences have not detected changes in brain lactate following exercise. This contrasts with 1H-MRS studies showing increased brain lactate when blood lactate levels are raised by an intravenous infusion of sodium lactate. Using a J-editing 1H-MRS technique for measuring lactate, we demonstrated a significant 19% increase in lactate in the visual cortex following graded exercise to approximately 85% of predicted maximum heart rate. However, the magnitude of the increase was insufficient to account for more than a small fraction of the non-oxidized carbohydrate entering the brain with exercise. We also report a significant 18% increase in Glx (combined signal from glutamate and glutamine) in visual cortex following exercise, which may represent an activity-dependent increase in glutamate. Future studies will be necessary to test the hypothesis that non-oxidized carbohydrate entering the brain during vigorous exercise is directed, in part, toward increased net synthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters. The possible relevance of these findings to panic disorder and major depression is discussed. PMID:21640838

  4. Metabolomics-Based Study of Logarithmic and Stationary Phases of Promastigotes in Leishmania major by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arjmand, Mohammad; Madrakian, Azadeh; Khalili, Ghader; Najafi, Ali; Zamani, Zahra; Akbari, Ziba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the most important parasitic diseases in humans. In this disease, one of the responsible organisms is Leishmania major, which is transmitted by sandfly vector. There are specific differences in biochemical profiles and metabolite pathways in logarithmic and stationary phases of Leishmania parasites. In the present study, 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to examine the metabolites outliers in the logarithmic and stationary phases of promastigotes in L. major to enlighten more about the transmission mechanism in metacyclogenesis of L. major. Methods: Promastigote was cultured, logarithmic and stationary phases were separated by the peanut agglutinin, and cell metabolites were extracted. 1H NMR spectroscopy was applied, and outliers were analyzed using principal component analysis. Results: The most altered metabolites in stationary and logarithmic phases were limited to citraconic acid, isopropylmalic acid, L-leucine, ornithine, caprylic acid, capric acid, and acetic acid. Conclusion: 1H NMR spectroscopy could play an important role in the characterization of metabolites in biochemical pathways during a metacyclogenesis process. These metabolites and their pathways can help in exploiting a transmission mechanism in metacyclogenesis, and outcoming data might be used in the metabolic network reconstruction of L. major modeling. PMID:26592771

  5. 1H MRSI of middle frontal gyrus in pediatric ADHD.

    PubMed

    Tafazoli, Sharwin; O'Neill, Joseph; Bejjani, Anthony; Ly, Ronald; Salamon, Noriko; McCracken, James T; Alger, Jeffry R; Levitt, Jennifer G

    2013-04-01

    Neuroimaging studies in multiple modalities have implicated the left or right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (here, middle frontal gyrus) in attentional functions, in ADHD, and in dopamine agonist treatment of ADHD. The far lateral location of this cortex in the brain, however, has made it difficult to study with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). We used the smaller voxel sizes of the magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) variant of MRS, acquired at a steep coronal-oblique angle to sample bilateral middle frontal gyrus in 13 children and adolescents with ADHD and 13 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Within a subsample of the ADHD patients, aspects of attention were also assessed with the Trail Making Task. In right middle frontal gyrus only, mean levels of N-acetyl-aspartate + N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (tNAA), creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr), choline-compounds (Cho), and myo-inositol (mI) were significantly lower in the ADHD than in the control sample. In the ADHD patients, lower right middle frontal Cr was associated with worse performance on Trails A and B (focused attention, concentration, set-shifting), while the opposite relationship held true for the control group on Trails B. These findings add to evidence implicating right middle frontal cortex in ADHD. Lower levels of these multiple species may reflect osmotic adjustment to elevated prefrontal cortical perfusion in ADHD and/or a previously hypothesized defect in astrocytic production of lactate in ADHD resulting in decelerated energetic metabolism (Cr), membrane synthesis (Cho, mI), and acetyl-CoA substrate for NAA synthesis. Lower Cr levels may indicate attentional or executive impairments. PMID:23273650

  6. Numerical simulations of localized high field 1H MR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Lana G.; Young, Karl; Matson, Gerald B.

    2008-01-01

    The limited bandwidths of volume selective RF pulses in localized in vivo MRS experiments introduce spatial artifacts that complicate spectral quantification of J-coupled metabolites. These effects are commonly referred to as a spatial interference or “4 compartment” artifacts and are more pronounced at higher field strengths. The main focus of this study is to develop a generalized approach to numerical simulations that combines full density matrix calculations with 3D localization to investigate the spatial artifacts and to provide accurate prior knowledge for spectral fitting. Full density matrix calculations with 3D localization using experimental pulses were carried out for PRESS (TE=20, 70 ms), STEAM (TE=20, 70 ms) and LASER (TE=70 ms) pulse sequences and compared to non-localized simulations and to phantom solution data at 4 Tesla. Additional simulations at 1.5 and 7 Tesla were carried out for STEAM and PRESS (TE=20 ms). Four brain metabolites that represented a range from weak to strong J-coupling networks were included in the simulations (lactate, N-acetylaspartate, glutamate and myo-inositol). For longer TE, full 3D localization was necessary to achieve agreement between the simulations and phantom solution spectra for the majority of cases in all pulse sequence simulations. For short echo time (TE=20 ms), ideal pulses without localizing gradients gave results that were in agreement with phantom results at 4 T for STEAM, but not for PRESS (TE=20). Numerical simulations that incorporate volume localization using experimental RF pulses are shown to be a powerful tool for generation of accurate metabolic basis sets for spectral fitting and for optimization of experimental parameters. PMID:18789736

  7. Intrauterine fetal brain NMR spectroscopy: 1H and 31P studies in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, T.; Kwee, I.L.; Suzuki, N.; Houkin, K. )

    1989-11-01

    Fetal brain metabolism was investigated in utero noninvasively using multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in rats at two representative prenatal stages: early (17-18 days) and late (20-21 days) stages. Phosphorus-31 (31P) spectroscopy revealed that phosphocreatine is significantly lower in the early stage and increases to the level of early neonates by the late prenatal stage. Intracellular pH at the early stage was found to be strikingly high (7.52 +/- 0.21) and decreased to a level similar to that of neonates by the late stage (7.29 +/- 0.07). Phosphomonoester levels at both stages were similar to the values reported for early neonates. Water-suppressed proton (1H) spectroscopy demonstrated a distinctive in vivo fetal brain spectral pattern characterized by low levels of N-acetyl aspartate and high levels of taurine. High-resolution proton spectroscopy and homonuclear chemical-shift correlate spectroscopy of brain perchloric acid extracts confirmed these in vivo findings. In vitro 31P spectroscopy of acidified chloroform methanol extracts showed the characteristic membrane phospholipid profiles of fetal brain. The phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)-to-phosphatidylcholine (PC) ratio (PE/PC) did not show significant changes between the two stages at 0.40 +/- 0.11, a value similar to that of early neonates.

  8. 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Metabolomic Study of Chronic Organophosphate Exposure in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Todd M.; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Alam, M. Kathleen; Volk, David E.; Ansari, G. A. Shakeel; Sarkar, Swapna; Luxon, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    1H NMR spectroscopy and chemometric analysis were used to characterize rat urine obtained after chronic exposure to either tributyl phosphate (TBP) or triphenyl phosphate (TPP). In this study, the daily dose exposure was 1.5 mg/kg body weight for TBP, or 2.0 mg/kg body weight for TPP, administered over a 15-week period. Orthogonal signal correction (OSC) -filtered partial least square discriminant analysis (OSC-PLSDA) was used to predict and classify exposure to these organophosphates. During the development of the model, the classification error was evaluated as a function of the number of latent variables. NMR spectral regions and corresponding metabolites important for determination of exposure type were identified using variable importance in projection (VIP) coefficients obtained from the OSC-PLSDA analysis. As expected, the model for classification of chronic (1.5–2.0 mg/kg body weight daily) TBP or TPP exposure was not as strong as the previously reported model developed for identifying acute (15–20 mg/kg body weight) exposure. The set of majorly impacted metabolites identified for chronic TBP or TPP exposure was slightly different than those metabolites previously identified for acute exposure. These metabolites were then mapped to different metabolite pathways and ranked, allowing the metabolic response to chronic organophosphate exposure to be addressed. PMID:24957643

  9. In vivo detection of citrate in brain tumors by 1H MRS at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Changho; Ganji, Sandeep K.; Madan, Akshay; Hulsey, Keith M.; An, Zhongxu; Zhang, Song; Pinho, Marco C.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Bachoo, Robert M.; Maher, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test whether the citrate is elevated in adult patients with gliomas using 1H MRS at 3T in vivo. Methods Thirty-four adult patients were enrolled in the study, including 6 subjects with glioblastomas, 8 subjects with astrocytomas (5 WHO grade-3 and 3 grade-2), and 20 subjects with oligodendrogliomas (5 grade-3 and 15 grade-2). Five healthy volunteers were studied for baseline citrate data. Single-voxel localized spectra were collected with PRESS TE = 35 and 97 ms and analyzed with LCModel using numerically calculated basis spectra that include the effects of the PRESS radio-frequency and gradient pulses. Results Citrate was not measurable by MRS in healthy brain, but was detected in tumor patients at both echo times. The citrate concentration was estimated to be as high as 1.8 mM with reference to water at 42 M, with CRLB as low as 5%. The mean citrate level was 0.7±0.4 mM (mean±SD, n=32) with median CRLB of ~12%. No correlation was identified between citrate concentration and tumor grade or histological type. Conclusion Citrate was increased in the majority of gliomas in adult patients. The elevated citrate in our data indicates an altered metabolic state of tumor relative to healthy brain. PMID:24123337

  10. Metabolomic analysis of the plasma of patients with high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) using 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongjun; Zhu, Junyu; Gao, Yuqi

    2012-06-01

    Upon rapid ascent to a high altitude, non-acclimatized individuals, although healthy, are highly prone to contracting high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Early diagnosis is difficult and there is no reliable biomarker available. We used proton ((1)H) NMR metabolomics to profile the altered metabolic patterns of blood plasma from HAPE patients. The plasmas of ten patients with HAPE and ten individuals without HAPE were collected and compared using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Data were evaluated with several multivariate statistical analyses, including the principal components, the orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant, and the orthogonal signal correction partial least-squares discriminant. Multivariate statistical analyses revealed a significant disparity between subjects with HAPE and those in the control group. Compared to the plasma of the controls, the HAPE patients had significant increases in valine, lysine, leucine, isoleucine, glycerol phosphoryl choline, glycine, glutamine, glutamic acid, creatinine, citrate, and methyl histidine. These were accompanied by decreases in α- and β-glucose, trimethylamine, and the metabolic products of lipids. The data demonstrate that metabolomics may be effective for the diagnosis of HAPE in the future, and can be used for further understanding HAPE pathogenesis. PMID:22498880

  11. Direct determination of phosphate sugars in biological material by (1)H high-resolution magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Diserens, Gaëlle; Vermathen, Martina; Gjuroski, Ilche; Eggimann, Sandra; Precht, Christina; Boesch, Chris; Vermathen, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The study aim was to unambiguously assign nucleotide sugars, mainly UDP-X that are known to be important in glycosylation processes as sugar donors, and glucose-phosphates that are important intermediate metabolites for storage and transfer of energy directly in spectra of intact cells, as well as in skeletal muscle biopsies by (1)H high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HR-MAS) NMR. The results demonstrate that sugar phosphates can be determined quickly and non-destructively in cells and biopsies by HR-MAS, which may prove valuable considering the importance of phosphate sugars in cell metabolism for nucleic acid synthesis. As proof of principle, an example of phosphate-sugar reaction and degradation kinetics after unfreezing the sample is shown for a cardiac muscle, suggesting the possibility to follow by HR-MAS NMR some metabolic pathways. Graphical abstract Glucose-phosphate sugars (Glc-1P and Glc-6P) detected in muscle by 1H HR-MAS NMR. PMID:27271261

  12. Morpholine Degradation Pathway of Mycobacterium aurum MO1: Direct Evidence of Intermediates by In Situ 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Combourieu, B.; Besse, P.; Sancelme, M.; Veschambre, H.; Delort, A. M.; Poupin, P.; Truffaut, N.

    1998-01-01

    Resting Mycobacterium aurum MO1 cells were incubated with morpholine, a waste from the chemical industry. The kinetics of biodegradation was monitored by using in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The incubation medium was directly analyzed by 1H NMR. This technique allowed the unambiguous identification of two intermediates of the metabolic pathway involved in the biodegradation process, glycolate and 2-(2-aminoethoxy)acetate. The latter compound, which was not commercially available, was synthesized, in three steps, from 2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethanol. Quantitative analysis of the kinetics of degradation of morpholine was performed by integrating the signals of the different metabolites in 1H-NMR spectra. Morpholine was degraded within 10 h. The intermediates increased during the first 10 h and finally disappeared after 20 h incubation. Assays of degradation were also carried out with glycolate and ethanolamine, hypothetical intermediates of the morpholine degradation pathway. They were degraded within 4 and 8 h, respectively. Until now, no tool for direct detection of intermediates or even morpholine has been available, consequently, only hypothetical pathways have been proposed. The approach described here gives both qualitative and quantitative information about the metabolic routes used in morpholine degradation by M. aurum MO1. It could be used to investigate many biodegradative processes. PMID:9435073

  13. Monitoring tumor response of prostate cancer to radiation therapy by multi-parametric 1H and hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Vickie Yi

    Radiation therapy is one of the most common curative therapies for patients with localized prostate cancer, but despite excellent success rates, a significant number of patients suffer post- treatment cancer recurrence. The accurate characterization of early tumor response remains a major challenge for the clinical management of these patients. Multi-parametric MRI/1H MR spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) has been shown to increase the diagnostic performance in evaluating the effectiveness of radiation therapy. 1H MRSI can detect altered metabolic profiles in cancerous tissue. In this project, the concentrations of prostate metabolites from snap-frozen biopsies of recurrent cancer after failed radiation therapy were correlated with histopathological findings to identify quantitative biomarkers that predict for residual aggressive versus indolent cancer. The total choline to creatine ratio was significantly higher in recurrent aggressive versus indolent cancer, suggesting that use of a higher threshold tCho/Cr ratio in future in vivo 1H MRSI studies could improve the selection and therapeutic planning for patients after failed radiation therapy. Varying radiation doses may cause a diverse effect on prostate cancer micro-environment and metabolism, which could hold the key to improving treatment protocols for individual patients. The recent development and clinical translation of hyperpolarized 13C MRI have provided the ability to monitor both changes in the tumor micro-environment and its metabolism using a multi-probe approach, [1-13C]pyruvate and 13C urea, combined with 1H Multi-parametric MRI. In this thesis, hyperpolarized 13C MRI, 1H dynamic contrast enhancement, and diffusion weighted imaging were used to identify early radiation dose response in a transgenic prostate cancer model. Hyperpolarized pyruvate to lactate metabolism significantly decreased in a dose dependent fashion by 1 day after radiation therapy, prior to any changes observed using 1H DCE and diffusion

  14. Metabolic neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - metabolic ... can be caused by many different things. Metabolic neuropathy may be caused by: A problem with the ... one of the most common causes of metabolic neuropathies. People who are at the highest risk for ...

  15. Metallothionein 1 h tumour suppressor activity in prostate cancer is mediated by euchromatin methyltransferase 1

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu-Chen; Zheng, Zhong-Liang; Zuo, Ze-Hua; Yu, Yan P; Chen, Rui; Tseng, George C; Nelson, Joel B; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a group of metal binding proteins thought to play a role in the detoxification of heavy metals. Here we showed by microarray and validation analyses that MT1h, a member of MT, is down-regulated in many human malignancies. Low expression of MT1h was associated with poor clinical outcomes in both prostate and liver cancer. We found that the promoter region of MT1h was hypermethylated in cancer and that demethylation of the MT1h promoter reversed the suppression of MT1h expression. Forced expression of MT1h induced cell growth arrest, suppressed colony formation, retarded migration, and reduced invasion. SCID mice with tumour xenografts with inducible MT1h expression had lower tumour volumes as well as fewer metastases and deaths than uninduced controls. MT1h was found to interact with euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 (EHMT1) and enhanced its methyltransferase activity on histone 3. Knocking down of EHMT1 or a mutation in MT1h that abrogates its interaction with EHMT1 abrogated MT1h tumour suppressor activity. This demonstrates tumour suppressor activity in a heavy metal binding protein that is dependent on activation of histone methylation. PMID:23355073

  16. Discovery of 3-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide activators of the M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2).

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Saunders, Michael; Pearce, Scott; Foulks, Jason M; Parnell, K Mark; Clifford, Adrianne; Nix, Rebecca N; Bullough, Jeremy; Hendrickson, Thomas F; Wright, Kevin; McCullar, Michael V; Kanner, Steven B; Ho, Koc-Kan

    2014-01-15

    Activators of the pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) are currently attracting significant interest as potential anticancer therapies. They may achieve a novel antiproliferation response in cancer cells through modulation of the classic 'Warburg effect' characteristic of aberrant metabolism. In this Letter, we describe the optimization of a weakly active screening hit to a structurally novel series of small molecule 3-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamides as potent PKM2 activators. PMID:24374270

  17. Proton 1H- and Phosphorus 31P-MR spectroscopy (MRS) in asymptomatic HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Schuettfort, Gundolf; Hattingen, Elke; Pilatus, Ulrich; Stephan, Christoph; Wolf, Timo; Goepel, Siri; Haberl, Annette; Blasel, Stella; Zanella, Freidhelm; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Bickel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection is accompanied by a variety of neurological disorders. Depression of cell-mediated immunity is followed by the development of central nervous system opportunistic infections/tumours, and frequently by the occurrence of the AIDS dementia complex (ADC). However, the pathophysiology of the emergence of neuro-AIDS is still unknown. Despite the development of cognitive impairments, the early diagnosis, objectification and quantification of the existence and extent of this impairment during infection are difficult to recognize in each individual case. To support the early diagnosis of ADC, there is a need for additional, non-invasive diagnostic methods. In this study, it is of interest to answer the clinically relevant question of whether magnetic resonance spectroscopy can detect changes in the cerebral metabolism of asymptomatic HIV-positive patients and is possibly suitable for the early diagnosis and prevention of HIV encephalopathy. Methods A group of 13 asymptomatic, HIV-positive patients with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) and 13 healthy controls were examined with 2D 1H-MRS and 3D 31P-MRS at 3T. The patients were treated with cART for at least 12 months. Changes in the absolute concentrations of phosphorylated metabolites (ATP), N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, myo-Isonitol, glutamate/glutamine and choline-containing compounds were compared with that of control subjects. Results Asymptomatic HIV-positive patients had significantly lower N-acetyl-aspartate in the white matter in a frontal and parietal target region. The other evaluated metabolites in the 1H MRS showed no significant difference between the HIV-positive patients and healthy controls. The 31P-MRS detected significant elevated values regarding the choline-containing compounds PEth, GPE and PCho. Conclusions This spectroscopic study revealed a significantly lower N-acetyl-aspartate in the white matter in a frontal and parietal cerebral target region in asymptomatic, HIV

  18. 4(1H)-Pyridone and 4(1H)-Quinolone Derivatives as Antimalarials with Erythrocytic, Exoerythrocytic, and Transmission Blocking Activities

    PubMed Central

    Monastyrskyi, Andrii; Kyle, Dennis E.; Manetsch, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the second leading cause of deaths in the world with malaria being responsible for approximately the same amount of deaths as cancer in 2012. Despite the success in malaria prevention and control measures decreasing the disease mortality rate by 45% since 2000, the development of single-dose therapeutics with radical cure potential is required to completely eradicate this deadly condition. Targeting multiple stages of the malaria parasite is becoming a primary requirement for new candidates in antimalarial drug discovery and development. Recently, 4(1H)-pyridone, 4(1H)-quinolone, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridone, and phenoxyethoxy-4(1H)-quinolone chemotypes have been shown to be antimalarials with blood stage activity, liver stage activity, and transmission blocking activity. Advancements in structure-activity relationship and structure-property relationship studies, biological evaluation in vitro and in vivo, as well as pharmacokinetics of the 4(1H)-pyridone and 4(1H)-quinolone chemotypes will be discussed. PMID:25116582

  19. Automated structure verification based on a combination of 1D (1)H NMR and 2D (1)H - (13)C HSQC spectra.

    PubMed

    Golotvin, Sergey S; Vodopianov, Eugene; Pol, Rostislav; Lefebvre, Brent A; Williams, Antony J; Rutkowske, Randy D; Spitzer, Timothy D

    2007-10-01

    A method for structure validation based on the simultaneous analysis of a 1D (1)H NMR and 2D (1)H - (13)C single-bond correlation spectrum such as HSQC or HMQC is presented here. When compared with the validation of a structure by a 1D (1)H NMR spectrum alone, the advantage of including a 2D HSQC spectrum in structure validation is that it adds not only the information of (13)C shifts, but also which proton shifts they are directly coupled to, and an indication of which methylene protons are diastereotopic. The lack of corresponding peaks in the 2D spectrum that appear in the 1D (1)H spectrum, also gives a clear picture of which protons are attached to heteroatoms. For all these benefits, combined NMR verification was expected and found by all metrics to be superior to validation by 1D (1)H NMR alone. Using multiple real-life data sets of chemical structures and the corresponding 1D and 2D data, it was possible to unambiguously identify at least 90% of the correct structures. As part of this test, challenging incorrect structures, mostly regioisomers, were also matched with each spectrum set. For these incorrect structures, the false positive rate was observed as low as 6%. PMID:17694570

  20. (1)H NMR metabolomic study of auxotrophic starvation in yeast using Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares for Pathway Analysis.

    PubMed

    Puig-Castellví, Francesc; Alfonso, Ignacio; Piña, Benjamin; Tauler, Romà

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of specific metabolic pathways constitutes the mode of action of many known toxicants and it is responsible for the adverse phenotypes associated to human genetic defects. Conversely, many industrial applications rely on metabolic alterations of diverse microorganisms, whereas many therapeutic drugs aim to selectively disrupt pathogens' metabolism. In this work we analyzed metabolic changes induced by auxotrophic starvation conditions in yeast in a non-targeted approach, using one-dimensional proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) and chemometric analyses. Analysis of the raw spectral datasets showed specific changes linked to the different stages during unrestricted yeast growth, as well as specific changes linked to each of the four tested starvation conditions (L-methionine, L-histidine, L-leucine and uracil). Analysis of changes in concentrations of more than 40 metabolites by Multivariate Curve Resolution - Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) showed the normal progression of key metabolites during lag, exponential and stationary unrestricted growth phases, while reflecting the metabolic blockage induced by the starvation conditions. In this case, different metabolic intermediates accumulated over time, allowing identification of the different metabolic pathways specifically affected by each gene disruption. This synergy between NMR metabolomics and molecular biology may have clear implications for both genetic diagnostics and drug development. PMID:27485935

  1. 1H NMR metabolomic study of auxotrophic starvation in yeast using Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares for Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Castellví, Francesc; Alfonso, Ignacio; Piña, Benjamin; Tauler, Romà

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of specific metabolic pathways constitutes the mode of action of many known toxicants and it is responsible for the adverse phenotypes associated to human genetic defects. Conversely, many industrial applications rely on metabolic alterations of diverse microorganisms, whereas many therapeutic drugs aim to selectively disrupt pathogens’ metabolism. In this work we analyzed metabolic changes induced by auxotrophic starvation conditions in yeast in a non-targeted approach, using one-dimensional proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) and chemometric analyses. Analysis of the raw spectral datasets showed specific changes linked to the different stages during unrestricted yeast growth, as well as specific changes linked to each of the four tested starvation conditions (L-methionine, L-histidine, L-leucine and uracil). Analysis of changes in concentrations of more than 40 metabolites by Multivariate Curve Resolution – Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) showed the normal progression of key metabolites during lag, exponential and stationary unrestricted growth phases, while reflecting the metabolic blockage induced by the starvation conditions. In this case, different metabolic intermediates accumulated over time, allowing identification of the different metabolic pathways specifically affected by each gene disruption. This synergy between NMR metabolomics and molecular biology may have clear implications for both genetic diagnostics and drug development. PMID:27485935

  2. NMR-Metabolic Methodology in the Study of GM Foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 1H NMR methodology used in the study of genetically modified (GM) foodstuff is discussed. The study of transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv "Luxor") over-expressing the KNAT1 gene from Arabidopsis is presented as a novel study-case. The 1H NMR metabolic profiling was carried out. Twenty-two wat...

  3. Automated data processing of { 1H-decoupled} 13C MR spectra acquired from human brain in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shic, Frederick; Ross, Brian

    2003-06-01

    In clinical 13C infusion studies, broadband excitation of 200 ppm of the human brain yields 13C MR spectra with a time resolution of 2-5 min and generates up to 2000 metabolite peaks over 2 h. We describe a fast, automated, observer-independent technique for processing { 1H-decoupled} 13C spectra. Quantified 13C spectroscopic signals, before and after the administration of [1- 13C]glucose and/or [1- 13C]acetate in human subjects are determined. Stepwise improvements of data processing are illustrated by examples of normal and pathological results. Variation in analysis of individual 13C resonances ranged between 2 and 14%. Using this method it is possible to reliably identify subtle metabolic effects of brain disease including Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy.

  4. Stereospecificity of (1) H, (13) C and (15) N shielding constants in the isomers of methylglyoxal bisdimethylhydrazone: problem with configurational assignment based on (1) H chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Andrei V; Pavlov, Dmitry V; Ushakov, Igor A; Keiko, Natalia A

    2012-07-01

    In the (13) C NMR spectra of methylglyoxal bisdimethylhydrazone, the (13) C-5 signal is shifted to higher frequencies, while the (13) C-6 signal is shifted to lower frequencies on going from the EE to ZE isomer following the trend found previously. Surprisingly, the (1) H-6 chemical shift and (1) J(C-6,H-6) coupling constant are noticeably larger in the ZE isomer than in the EE isomer, although the configuration around the -CH═N- bond does not change. This paradox can be rationalized by the C-H⋯N intramolecular hydrogen bond in the ZE isomer, which is found from the quantum-chemical calculations including Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis. This hydrogen bond results in the increase of δ((1) H-6) and (1) J(C-6,H-6) parameters. The effect of the C-H⋯N hydrogen bond on the (1) H shielding and one-bond (13) C-(1) H coupling complicates the configurational assignment of the considered compound because of these spectral parameters. The (1) H, (13) C and (15) N chemical shifts of the 2- and 8-(CH(3) )(2) N groups attached to the -C(CH(3) )═N- and -CH═N- moieties, respectively, reveal pronounced difference. The ab initio calculations show that the 8-(CH(3) )(2) N group conjugate effectively with the π-framework, and the 2-(CH(3) )(2) N group twisted out from the plane of the backbone and loses conjugation. As a result, the degree of charge transfer from the N-2- and N-8- nitrogen lone pairs to the π-framework varies, which affects the (1) H, (13) C and (15) N shieldings. PMID:22615146

  5. CHHC and 1H-1H Magnetization Exchange: Analysis by Experimental Solid-State NMR and 11-Spin Density-Matrix Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Aluas, Mihaela; Tripon, Carmen; Griffin, John M.; Filip, Xenia; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Griffin, Robert G.; Brown, Steven P.; Filip, Claudiu

    2009-01-01

    A protocol is presented for correcting the effect of non-specific cross polarization in CHHC solid-state MAS NMR experiments, thus allowing the recovery of the 1H-1H magnetization exchange functions from the mixing-time dependent buildup of experimental CHHC peak intensity. The presented protocol also incorporates a scaling procedure to take into account the effect of multiplicity of a CH2 or CH3 moiety. Experimental CHHC buildup curves are presented for L-Tyrosine.HCl samples where either all or only one in ten molecules are U-13C labeled. Good agreement between experiment and 11-spin SPINEVOLUTION simulation (including only isotropic 1H chemical shifts) is demonstrated for the initial buildup (tmix < 100 μs) of CHHC peak intensity corresponding to an intramolecular close (2.5 Å) H-H proximity. Differences in the initial CHHC buildup are observed between the 1 in 10 dilute and 100 % samples for cases where there is a close intermolecular H-H proximity in addition to a close intramolecular H-H proximity. For the dilute sample, CHHC cross peak intensities tended to significantly lower values for long mixing times (500 μs) as compared to the 100 % sample. This difference is explained as being due to the dependence of the limiting total magnetization on the ratio Nobs/Ntot between the number of protons that are directly attached to a 13C nucleus and hence contribute significantly to the observed 13C CHHC NMR signal, and the total number of 1H spins into the system. 1H-1H magnetization exchange curves extracted from CHHC spectra for the 100 % L-Tyrosine.HCl sample exhibit a clear sensitivity to the root sum squared dipolar coupling, with fast build-up being observed for the shortest intramolecular distances (2.5 Å) and slower, yet observable build-up for the longer intermolecular distances (up to 5 Å). PMID:19467890

  6. The complete genome sequence of the Arcobacter butzleri cattle isolate 7h1h

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arcobacter butzleri strain 7h1h was isolated in the UK from a clinically healthy dairy cow. The genome of this isolate was sequenced to completion. Here we present the annotation and analysis of the completed 7h1h genome, as well as comparison of this genome to the existing A. butzleri RM4018 and ED...

  7. Modelled microgravity cultivation modulates N-acylhomoserine lactone production in Rhodospirillum rubrum S1H independently of cell density.

    PubMed

    Mastroleo, Felice; Van Houdt, Rob; Atkinson, Steve; Mergeay, Max; Hendrickx, Larissa; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie

    2013-12-01

    The photosynthetic alphaproteobacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum S1H is part of the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) project that is aiming to develop a closed life support system for oxygen, water and food production to support human life in space in forthcoming long-term space exploration missions. In the present study, R. rubrum S1H was cultured in a rotating wall vessel (RWV), simulating partial microgravity conditions on Earth. The bacterium showed a significant response to cultivation in simulated microgravity at the transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic levels. In simulated microgravity conditions three N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones (C10-HSL, C12-HSL and 3-OH-C14-HSL) were detected in concentrations that were twice those detected under normal gravity, while no differences in cell density was detected. In addition, R. rubrum cultivated in modelled microgravity showed higher pigmentation than the normal gravity control, without change in culture oxygenation. When compared to randomized microgravity cultivation using a random positioning machine, significant overlap for the top differentially expressed genes and proteins was observed. Cultivation in this new artificial environment of simulated microgravity showed new properties of this well-known bacterium, including its first, to our knowledge, complete quorum-sensing-related N-acylhomoserine lactone profile. PMID:24025602

  8. Identification of 2-Fluoro-2-deoxy- D-glucose Metabolites by 19F{ 1H} Hetero-RELAY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Thomas M.; London, Robert E.

    1995-12-01

    It has been proposed that in mammalian systems the glucose analog 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is phosphoryated and subsequently converted to the corresponding mannose derivative via the action of phosphoglucose isomerase. As is generally true in metabolic studies of fluorinated molecules, the fluorine spectrum alone is suggestive, without providing definitive structural evidence, while the use of1H NMR techniques generally suffers from a lack of adequate selectivity. A1H-19F version of the hetero-RELAY experiment has been applied to this problem. Formation of the corresponding C-6 phosphorylated 2-FDG analog with hexokinase, followed by treatment of the resulting phosphorylated products with phosphoglucose isomerase, resulted in the observation of additional19F resonances consistent with the corresponding 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-mannose-6-phosphate metabolite. A more definitive product identification was obtained using the hetero-RELAY experiment, which provides a complete19F-decoupled proton spectrum for each of the fluorinated species.

  9. Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Carbohydrates are sugars. ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism NOTE: This is ...

  10. A classical approach in simple nuclear fusion reaction {sub 1}H{sup 2}+{sub 1}H{sup 3} using two-dimension granular molecular dynamics model

    SciTech Connect

    Viridi, S.; Kurniadi, R.; Waris, A.; Perkasa, Y. S.

    2012-06-06

    Molecular dynamics in 2-D accompanied by granular model provides an opportunity to investigate binding between nuclei particles and its properties that arises during collision in a fusion reaction. A fully classical approach is used to observe the influence of initial angle of nucleus orientation to the product yielded by the reaction. As an example, a simplest fusion reaction between {sub 1}H{sup 2} and {sub 1}H{sup 3} is observed. Several products of the fusion reaction have been obtained, even the unreported ones, including temporary {sub 2}He{sup 4} nucleus.

  11. Haemolymph from Mytilus galloprovincialis: Response to copper and temperature challenges studied by (1)H-NMR metabonomics.

    PubMed

    Digilio, Giuseppe; Sforzini, Susanna; Cassino, Claudio; Robotti, Elisa; Oliveri, Caterina; Marengo, Emilio; Musso, Davide; Osella, Domenico; Viarengo, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies on molluscs have been carried out to clarify the physiological roles of haemolymph serum proteins and haemocytes. However, little is known about the presence and functional role of the serum metabolites. In this study, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was used to assess whether changes of the metabolic profile of Mytilus galloprovincialis haemolymph may reflect alterations of the physiological status of the organisms due to environmental stressors, namely copper and temperature. Mussel haemolymph was taken from the posterior adductor muscle after a 4-day exposure to ambient (16°C) or high temperature (24°C) and in the absence or presence (5μg/L, 20μg/L, or 40μg/L) of sublethal copper (Cu(2+)). The total glutathione (GSH) concentration in the haemolymph of both control and treated mussels was minimal, indicating the absence of significant contaminations by muscle intracellular metabolites due to the sampling procedure. In the (1)H-NMR spectrum of haemolymph, 27 metabolites were identified unambiguously. The separate and combined effects of exposure to copper and temperature on the haemolymph metabolic profile were assessed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Ranking-PCA multivariate analysis. Changes of the metabolomic profile due to copper exposure at 16°C became detectable at a dose of 20μg/L copper. Alanine, lysine, serine, glutamine, glycogen, glucose and protein aliphatics played a major role in the classification of the metabolic changes according to the level of copper exposition. High temperature (24°C) and high copper levels caused a coherent increase of a common set of metabolites (mostly glucose, serine, and lysine), indicating that the metabolic impairment due to high temperature is enforced by the presence of copper. Overall, the results demonstrate that, as for human blood plasma, the analysis of haemolymph metabolites represents a promising tool for the diagnosis of pollutant-induced stress syndrome in marine mussels

  12. Transcriptional regulation of α1H T-type calcium channel under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sellak, Hassan; Zhou, Chun; Liu, Bainan; Chen, Hairu; Lincoln, Thomas M; Wu, Songwei

    2014-10-01

    The low-voltage-activated T-type Ca(2+) channels play an important role in mediating the cellular responses to altered oxygen tension. Among three T-type channel isoforms, α1G, α1H, and α1I, only α1H was found to be upregulated under hypoxia. However, mechanisms underlying such hypoxia-dependent isoform-specific gene regulation remain incompletely understood. We, therefore, studied the hypoxia-dependent transcriptional regulation of α1G and α1H gene promoters with the aim to identify the functional hypoxia-response elements (HREs). In rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells after hypoxia (3% O2) exposure, we observed a prominent increase in α1H mRNA at 12 h along with a significant rise in α1H-mediated T-type current at 24 and 48 h. We then cloned two promoter fragments from the 5'-flanking regions of rat α1G and α1H gene, 2,000 and 3,076 bp, respectively, and inserted these fragments into a luciferase reporter vector. Transient transfection of PASMCs and PC12 cells with these recombinant constructs and subsequent luciferase assay revealed a significant increase in luciferase activity from the reporter containing the α1H, but not α1G, promoter fragment under hypoxia. Using serial deletion and point mutation analysis strategies, we identified a functional HRE at site -1,173cacgc-1,169 within the α1H promoter region. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay using this site as a DNA probe demonstrated an increased binding activity to nuclear protein extracts from the cells after hypoxia exposure. Taken together, these findings indicate that hypoxia-induced α1H upregulation involves binding of hypoxia-inducible factor to an HRE within the α1H promoter region. PMID:25099734

  13. Transcriptional regulation of α1H T-type calcium channel under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Sellak, Hassan; Zhou, Chun; Liu, Bainan; Chen, Hairu; Lincoln, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The low-voltage-activated T-type Ca2+ channels play an important role in mediating the cellular responses to altered oxygen tension. Among three T-type channel isoforms, α1G, α1H, and α1I, only α1H was found to be upregulated under hypoxia. However, mechanisms underlying such hypoxia-dependent isoform-specific gene regulation remain incompletely understood. We, therefore, studied the hypoxia-dependent transcriptional regulation of α1G and α1H gene promoters with the aim to identify the functional hypoxia-response elements (HREs). In rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells after hypoxia (3% O2) exposure, we observed a prominent increase in α1H mRNA at 12 h along with a significant rise in α1H-mediated T-type current at 24 and 48 h. We then cloned two promoter fragments from the 5′-flanking regions of rat α1G and α1H gene, 2,000 and 3,076 bp, respectively, and inserted these fragments into a luciferase reporter vector. Transient transfection of PASMCs and PC12 cells with these recombinant constructs and subsequent luciferase assay revealed a significant increase in luciferase activity from the reporter containing the α1H, but not α1G, promoter fragment under hypoxia. Using serial deletion and point mutation analysis strategies, we identified a functional HRE at site −1,173cacgc−1,169 within the α1H promoter region. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay using this site as a DNA probe demonstrated an increased binding activity to nuclear protein extracts from the cells after hypoxia exposure. Taken together, these findings indicate that hypoxia-induced α1H upregulation involves binding of hypoxia-inducible factor to an HRE within the α1H promoter region. PMID:25099734

  14. Thy1-hAPPLond/Swe+ mouse model of Alzheimer's disease displays broad behavioral deficits in sensorimotor, cognitive and social function

    PubMed Central

    Faizi, Mehrdad; Bader, Patrick L; Saw, Nay; Nguyen, Thuy-Vi V; Beraki, Simret; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Longo, Frank M; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is an age-dependent progressive neurodegenerative disorder. β-amyloid, a metabolic product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AD. The Thy1-hAPPLond/Swe+ (line 41) transgenic mouse overexpresses human APP751 and contains the London (V717I) and Swedish (K670M/N671L) mutations. Here, we used a battery of behavioral tests to evaluate general activity, cognition, and social behavior in six-month-old male Thy1-hAPPLond/Swe+ mice. We found hyperactivity in a novel environment as well as significant deficits in spontaneous alternation behavior. In fear conditioning (FC), Thy1-hAPPLond/Swe+ mice did not display deficits in acquisition or in memory retrieval in novel context of tone-cued FC, but they showed significant memory retrieval impairment during contextual testing in an identical environment. Surprisingly, in a standard hidden platform water maze, no significant deficit was detected in mutant mice. However, a delayed-matching-to-place paradigm revealed a significant deficit in Thy1-hAPPLond/Swe+ mice. Lastly, in the social novelty session of a three-chamber test, Thy1-hAPPLond/Swe+ mice exhibited a significantly decreased interest in a novel versus a familiar stranger compared to control mice. This could possibly be explained by decreased social memory or discrimination and may parallel disturbances in social functioning in human AD patients. In conclusion, the Thy1-hAPPLond/Swe+ mouse model of AD displayed a behavioral phenotype that resembles, in part, the cognitive and psychiatric symptoms experienced in AD patients. PMID:22574282

  15. 1H NMR Metabolomics: A New Molecular Level Tool for Assessment of Organic Contaminant Bioavailability to Earthworms in Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvie, J. R.; Wolfe, D. M.; Celejewski, M. A.; Simpson, A. J.; Simpson, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    At contaminated field sites, the complete removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is rarely achieved since a portion of these compounds remain tightly bound to the soil matrix. The concentration of PAHs in soil typically decreases until a plateau is reached, at which point the remaining contaminant is considered non- bioavailable. Numerous soil extraction techniques, including cyclodextrin extraction, have been developed to estimate contaminant bioavailability. However, these are indirect methods that do not directly measure the response of organisms to chemical exposure in soil. Earthworm metabolomics offers a promising new way to directly evaluate the bioavailability and toxicity of contaminants in soil. Metabolomics involves the measurement of changes in small-molecule metabolites, including sugars and amino acids, in living organisms due to an external stress, such as contaminant exposure. The objective of this study was to compare cyclodextrin extraction of soil (a bioavailability proxy) and 1H NMR metabolomic analysis of aqueous earthworm tissue extracts as indicators of contaminant bioavailability. A 30 day laboratory experiment was conducted using phenanthrene-spiked sphagnum peat soil and the OECD recommended earthworm species for toxicity testing, Eisenia fetida. The initial phenanthrene concentration in the soil was 320 mg/kg. Rapid biodegradation of phenanthrene occurred and concentrations decreased to 16 mg/kg within 15 days. After 15 days, phenanthrene biodegradation slowed and cyclodextrin extraction of the soil suggested that phenanthrene was no longer bioavailable. Multivariate statistical analysis of the 1H NMR spectra for E. fetida tissue extracts indicated that the metabolic profile of phenanthrene exposed earthworms differed from control earthworms throughout the 30 day experiment. This suggests that the residual phenanthrene remaining in the soil after 15 days continued to elicit a metabolic response, even though it was not

  16. Quantitative 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolite Profiling as a Functional Genomics Platform to Investigate Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Opium Poppy1[W

    PubMed Central

    Hagel, Jillian M.; Weljie, Aalim M.; Vogel, Hans J.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) produces a diverse array of bioactive benzylisoquinoline alkaloids and has emerged as a versatile model system to study plant alkaloid metabolism. The plant is widely cultivated as the only commercial source of the narcotic analgesics morphine and codeine. Variations in plant secondary metabolism as a result of genetic diversity are often associated with perturbations in other metabolic pathways. As part of a functional genomics platform, we used 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolite profiling for the analysis of primary and secondary metabolism in opium poppy. Aqueous and chloroform extracts of six different opium poppy cultivars were subjected to chemometric analysis. Principle component analysis of the 1H NMR spectra for latex extracts clearly distinguished two varieties, including a low-alkaloid variety and a high-thebaine, low-morphine cultivar. Distinction was also made between pharmaceutical-grade opium poppy cultivars and a condiment variety. Such phenotypic differences were not observed in root extracts. Loading plots confirmed that morphinan alkaloids contributed predominantly to the variance in latex extracts. Quantification of 34 root and 21 latex metabolites, performed using Chenomx NMR Suite version 4.6, showed major differences in the accumulation of specific alkaloids in the latex of the low-alkaloid and high-thebaine, low-morphine varieties. Relatively few differences were found in the levels of other metabolites, indicating that the variation was specific for alkaloid metabolism. Exceptions in the low-alkaloid cultivar included an increased accumulation of the alkaloid precursor tyramine and reduced levels of sucrose, some amino acids, and malate. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of 42 genes involved in primary and secondary metabolism showed differential gene expression mainly associated with alkaloid biosynthesis. Reduced alkaloid levels in the condiment variety were associated with the

  17. 2D 1H and 3D 1H-15N NMR of zinc-rubredoxins: contributions of the beta-sheet to thermostability.

    PubMed Central

    Richie, K. A.; Teng, Q.; Elkin, C. J.; Kurtz, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    Based on 2D 1H-1H and 2D and 3D 1H-15N NMR spectroscopies, complete 1H NMR assignments are reported for zinc-containing Clostridium pasteurianum rubredoxin (Cp ZnRd). Complete 1H NMR assignments are also reported for a mutated Cp ZnRd, in which residues near the N-terminus, namely, Met 1, Lys 2, and Pro 15, have been changed to their counterparts, (-), Ala and Glu, respectively, in rubredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf Rd). The secondary structure of both wild-type and mutated Cp ZnRds, as determined by NMR methods, is essentially the same. However, the NMR data indicate an extension of the three-stranded beta-sheet in the mutated Cp ZnRd to include the N-terminal Ala residue and Glu 15, as occurs in Pf Rd. The mutated Cp Rd also shows more intense NOE cross peaks, indicating stronger interactions between the strands of the beta-sheet and, in fact, throughout the mutated Rd. However, these stronger interactions do not lead to any significant increase in thermostability, and both the mutated and wild-type Cp Rds are much less thermostable than Pf Rd. These correlations strongly suggest that, contrary to a previous proposal [Blake PR et al., 1992, Protein Sci 1:1508-1521], the thermostabilization mechanism of Pf Rd is not dominated by a unique set of hydrogen bonds or electrostatic interactions involving the N-terminal strand of the beta-sheet. The NMR results also suggest that an overall tighter protein structure does not necessarily lead to increased thermostability. PMID:8732760

  18. NMR-Based Lipidomic Approach To Evaluate Controlled Dietary Intake of Lipids in Adipose Tissue of a Rat Mammary Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Ouldamer, Lobna; Nadal-Desbarats, Lydie; Chevalier, Stephan; Body, Gilles; Goupille, Caroline; Bougnoux, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    The fatty acids composition of adipose tissue may provide information on the nutritional part of the risk or evolution of breast cancer. To determine whether (1)H NMR of adipose tissue provides information on the nature of the diet consumed, a dietary intervention with increasing percentage of polyunsaturated n-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA 22:6n-3, provided as DHASCO oil) was applied to a rat model of N-nitroso-N-methylurea-induced mammary tumors. Spectra of the lipid extracts were obtained from adipose tissues in five groups of Sprague-Dawley rats fed with a diet containing 7% peanut/rapeseed enriched with 8% (w/w) of an oil without (palm oil) or with low (1%), moderate (3%), or high (8%) DHASCO content. A control group received a basal diet with 15% peanut/rapeseed representative of the "Western" diet. After 5 months of those five controlled diets, adipose tissue was collected for analysis of the lipid extract using both (1)H NMR analysis on an 11.7 T spectrometer and gas chromatography considered as gold standard. (1)H NMR analysis showed a dose-dependent increase in DHA in the lipid extract of adipose tissues and a commensurate decrease in n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the three DHA groups, which allowed one to follow n-6/n-3 ratio changes. The highest n-6/n-3 ratio was observed in the control Western diet group compared to the other diet groups. The integrated spectral regions showed separation between groups, thereby documenting a specific NMR lipid profile corresponding to each dietary intervention. Those diet-dependent NMR lipid profiles were consistent with that obtained with gas chromatography analyses of the same samples. This study is a proof of concept highlighting the potential use of the (1)H NMR approach to evaluate dietary intervention in biopsies of adipose tissues. PMID:26754345

  19. Metabolic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body ... that produce the energy. You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or ...

  20. Intermolecular Interactions between Eosin Y and Caffeine Using (1)H-NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Okuom, Macduff O; Wilson, Mark V; Jackson, Abby; Holmes, Andrea E

    2013-12-31

    DETECHIP has been used in testing analytes including caffeine, cocaine, and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) from marijuana, as well as date rape and club drugs such as flunitrazepam, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), and methamphetamine. This study investigates the intermolecular interaction between DETECHIP sensor eosin Y (DC1) and the analyte (caffeine) that is responsible for the fluorescence and color changes observed in the actual array. Using (1)H-NMR, (1)H-COSY, and (1)H-DOSY NMR methods, a proton exchange from C-8 of caffeine to eosin Y is proposed. PMID:25018772

  1. Intermolecular Interactions between Eosin Y and Caffeine Using 1H-NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Okuom, Macduff O.; Wilson, Mark V.; Jackson, Abby; Holmes, Andrea E.

    2014-01-01

    DETECHIP has been used in testing analytes including caffeine, cocaine, and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) from marijuana, as well as date rape and club drugs such as flunitrazepam, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), and methamphetamine. This study investigates the intermolecular interaction between DETECHIP sensor eosin Y (DC1) and the analyte (caffeine) that is responsible for the fluorescence and color changes observed in the actual array. Using 1H-NMR, 1H-COSY, and 1H-DOSY NMR methods, a proton exchange from C-8 of caffeine to eosin Y is proposed. PMID:25018772

  2. Effect of Repeated 1-h Episodes of Immobilization Stress on Activity of Glucocorticoid Metabolism Enzymes in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Tseilikman, V E; Kozochkin, D A; Sinitskii, A I; Tseylikman, O B; Lapshin, M S; Kuzina, O V; Komel'kova, M V; Telesheva, I B

    2016-03-01

    Differences in corticosterone level associated with different activity of glucocorticoid-oxidizing enzymes in the liver were revealed in rats exposed to stress. Pro-inflammatory changes in the liver were associated with enhanced CYP3A-dependent monooxygenation. PMID:27021104

  3. Neurochemical changes in Huntington R6/2 mouse striatum detected by in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tkac, Ivan; Dubinsky, Janet M.; Keene, C. Dirk; Gruetter, Rolf; Low, Walter C.

    2009-01-01

    The neurochemical profile of the striatum of R6/2 Huntington's disease mice was examined at different stages of pathogenesis using in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy at 9.4 T. Between 8 and 12 weeks, R6/2 mice exhibited distinct changes in a set of 17 quantifiable metabolites compared with littermate controls. Concentrations of creatine, glycerophosphorylcholine, glutamine and glutathione increased and N-acetylaspartate decreased at 8 weeks. By 12 weeks, concentrations of phosphocreatine, taurine, ascorbate, glutamate, and myo-inositol increased and phophorylethanolamine decreased. These metabolic changes probably reflected multiple processes, including compensatory processes to maintain homeostasis, active at different stages in the development of HD. The observed changes in concentrations suggested impairment of neurotransmission, neuronal integrity and energy demand, and increased membrane breakdown, gliosis, and osmotic and oxidative stress. Comparisons between metabolite concentrations from individual animals clearly distinguished HD transgenics from non-diseased littermates and identified possible markers of disease progression. Metabolic changes in R6/2 striata were distinctly different from those observed previously in the quinolinic acid and 3NP models of HD. Longitudinal monitoring of changes in these metabolites may provide quantifiable measures of disease progression and treatment effects in both mouse models of HD and patients. PMID:17217418

  4. Identification of endogenous metabolites in human sperm cells using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Amaral, A; Rodriguez, M; Canyellas, N; Correig, X; Ballescà, J L; Ramalho-Santos, J; Oliva, R

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to contribute to the first comprehensive metabolomic characterization of the human sperm cell through the application of two untargeted platforms based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using these two complementary strategies, we were able to identify a total of 69 metabolites, of which 42 were identified using NMR, 27 using GC-MS and 4 by both techniques. The identity of some of these metabolites was further confirmed by two-dimensional (1) H-(1) H homonuclear correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and (1) H-(13) C heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectroscopy. Most of the metabolites identified are reported here for the first time in mature human spermatozoa. The relationship between the metabolites identified and the previously reported sperm proteome was also explored. Interestingly, overrepresented pathways included not only the metabolism of carbohydrates, but also of lipids and lipoproteins. Of note, a large number of the metabolites identified belonged to the amino acids, peptides and analogues super class. The identification of this initial set of metabolites represents an important first step to further study their function in male gamete physiology and to explore potential reasons for dysfunction in future studies. We also demonstrate that the application of NMR and MS provides complementary results, thus constituting a promising strategy towards the completion of the human sperm cell metabolome. PMID:25854681

  5. Dynamic interleaved 1H/31P STEAM MRS at 3 Tesla using a pneumatic force-controlled plantar flexion exercise rig

    PubMed Central

    Meyerspeer, M.; Krššák, M.; Kemp, G.J.; Roden, M.; Moser, E.

    2016-01-01

    1 Objective To develop a measurement method for interleaved acquisition of 1H and 31P STEAM localised spectra of exercising human calf muscle. 2 Materials and Methods A nonmagnetic exercise rig with a pneumatic piston and sensors for force and pedal angle was constructed to enable plantar flexion measured in the 3 Tesla MR scanner, which holds the dual tuned (1H,31P) surface coil used for signal transmission and reception. 3 Results 31P spectra acquired in interleaved mode benefit from higher SNR (factor of 1.34± 0.06 for PCr) compared to standard acquisition due to the Nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) and substantial PCr/Pi changes during exercise can be observed in 31P spectra. 1H spectral quality is equal to that in single mode experiments and allows Cr2 changes to be monitored. 4 Conclusion The feasibility of dynamic interleaved localised 1H and 31P spectroscopy during plantar flexion exercise has been demonstrated using a custom-built pneumatic system for muscle activation. This opens the possibility of studying the dynamics of metabolism with multi nuclear MRS in a single run. PMID:16320091

  6. Metabolic Profile and Root Development of Hypericum perforatum L. In vitro Roots under Stress Conditions Due to Chitosan Treatment and Culture Time

    PubMed Central

    Brasili, Elisa; Miccheli, Alfredo; Marini, Federico; Praticò, Giulia; Sciubba, Fabio; Di Cocco, Maria E.; Cechinel, Valdir Filho; Tocci, Noemi; Valletta, Alessio; Pasqua, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The responses of Hypericum perforatum root cultures to chitosan elicitation had been investigated through 1H-NMR-based metabolomics associated with morpho-anatomical analyses. The root metabolome was influenced by two factors, i.e., time of culture (associated with biomass growth and related “overcrowding stress”) and chitosan elicitation. ANOVA simultaneous component analysis (ASCA) modeling showed that these factors act independently. In response to the increase of biomass density over time, a decrease in the synthesis of isoleucine, valine, pyruvate, methylamine, etanolamine, trigonelline, glutamine and fatty acids, and an increase in the synthesis of phenolic compounds, such as xanthones, epicatechin, gallic, and shikimic acid were observed. Among the xanthones, brasilixanthone B has been identified for the first time in chitosan-elicited root cultures of H. perforatum. Chitosan treatment associated to a slowdown of root biomass growth caused an increase in DMAPP and a decrease in stigmasterol, shikimic acid, and tryptophan levels. The histological analysis of chitosan-treated roots revealed a marked swelling of the root apex, mainly due to the hypertrophy of the first two sub-epidermal cell layers. In addition, periclinal divisions in hypertrophic cortical cells, resulting in an increase of cortical layers, were frequently observed. Most of the metabolic variations as well as the morpho-anatomical alterations occurred within 72 h from the elicitation, suggesting an early response of H. perforatum roots to chitosan elicitation. The obtained results improve the knowledge of the root responses to biotic stress and provide useful information to optimize the biotechnological production of plant compounds of industrial interest. PMID:27148330

  7. Holistic Analysis Enhances the Description of Metabolic Complexity in Dietary Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Simmler, Charlotte; Kulakowski, Daniel; Lankin, David C; McAlpine, James B; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2016-01-01

    In the field of food and nutrition, complex natural products (NPs) are typically obtained from cells/tissues of diverse organisms such as plants, mushrooms, and animals. Among them, edible fruits, grains, and vegetables represent most of the human diet. Because of an important dietary dependence, the comprehensive metabolomic analysis of dietary NPs, performed holistically via the assessment of as many metabolites as possible, constitutes a fundamental building block for understanding the human diet. Both mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are important complementary analytic techniques, covering a wide range of metabolites at different concentrations. Particularly, 1-dimensional 1H-NMR offers an unbiased overview of all metabolites present in a sample without prior knowledge of its composition, thereby leading to an untargeted analysis. In the past decade, NMR-based metabolomics in plant and food analyses has evolved considerably. The scope of the present review, covering literature of the past 5 y, is to address the relevance of 1H-NMR–based metabolomics in food plant studies, including a comparison with MS-based techniques. Major applications of NMR-based metabolomics for the quality control of dietary NPs and assessment of their nutritional values are presented. PMID:27180381

  8. Characterisation of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of methylcitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Hanna; Martyniuk, Tomasz

    2007-06-01

    Methylcitric acid (MCA) was synthesised in Reformatsky reaction (2 RS, 3 RS stereoisomers) and in the nucleophilic addition (2 RS, 3 SR stereoisomers). The stereoselectivity of these reactions was analysed. 1H and 13C NMR spectra of diastereoisomers of methylcitric acid were recorded and interpreted. The values of 1H chemical shifts and 1H- 1H coupling constants were analysed. Proton-decoupled high-resolution 13C NMR spectra of MCA diastereoisomers were measured in a series of dilute water solutions of various acidities. These data may provide a basis for unequivocal determination of the presence of MCA in the urine samples of patients' suffering from propionic acidemia, methylmalonic aciduria, or holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency. NMR spectroscopy enables determination of MCA diastereoisomers in body fluids and can be a complementary and useful diagnostic tool.

  9. Regioselectively Controlled Synthesis of N-Substituted (Trifluoromethyl)pyrimidin-2(1H)-ones.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Andreia M P W; da Silva, Fabio M; Bonacorso, Helio G; Frizzo, Clarissa P; Martins, Marcos A P; Zanatta, Nilo

    2016-05-01

    A simple and regioselectively controlled method for the preparation of both 1,4- and 1,6-regioisomers of 1-substituted 4(6)-trifluoromethyl-pyrimidin-2(1H)-ones is described. Both regioisomers were synthesized from the cyclocondensation reaction of 4-substituted 1,1,1-trifluoro-4-methoxybut-3-en-2-ones: with nonsymmetric ureas for the 1-substituted 4-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidin-2(1H)-ones (1,4-isomer) and with nonsymmetric 1-substituted 2-methylisothiourea sulfates for the synthesis of 1-substituted 6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidin-2(1H)-ones (1,6-isomer). Each method furnished only the respective isomer in very good yields. The structure of the products was assigned based on the (1)H and (13)C NMR as well as 2D HMBC spectral analysis. PMID:27070191

  10. Proton-detected 3D {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H correlation experiment for structural analysis in rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS above 60 kHz

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-10-28

    A proton-detected 3D {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation experiment is proposed for the assignment of chemical shift resonances, identification of {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H connectivities, and proximities of {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H nuclei under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning (ultrafast-MAS) conditions. Ultrafast-MAS is used to suppress all anisotropic interactions including {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H dipolar couplings, while the finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used to recouple dipolar couplings among protons and the insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer technique is used to transfer magnetization between heteronuclear spins. The 3D experiment eliminates signals from non-carbon-bonded protons and non-proton-bonded carbons to enhance spectral resolution. The 2D (F1/F3) {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H and 2D {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H (F2/F3) chemical shift correlation spectra extracted from the 3D spectrum enable the identification of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H proximity and {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H connectivity. In addition, the 2D (F1/F2) {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C chemical shift correlation spectrum, incorporated with proton magnetization exchange via the fp-RFDR recoupling of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H dipolar couplings, enables the measurement of proximities between {sup 13}C and even the remote non-carbon-bonded protons. The 3D experiment also gives three-spin proximities of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H-{sup 13}C chains. Experimental results obtained from powder samples of L-alanine and L-histidine ⋅ H{sub 2}O ⋅ HCl demonstrate the efficiency of the 3D experiment.

  11. One-Pot Synthesis of Substituted Trifluoromethylated 2,3-Dihydro-1H-imidazoles.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Amrei; Jessen, Christoph; Deutsch, Carl; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Hoffmann-Röder, Anja

    2016-07-15

    An operationally simple one-pot reaction for the preparation of a novel class of racemic trifluoromethylated 2,3-dihydro-1H-imidazoles derived from electron-poor N,O-acetals and aryl Grignard reagents is described. In addition, access to highly functionalized 2-trifluoromethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-imidazoles was accomplished by reaction of N-aryl hemiaminal ethers and N-aryl trifluoroethylamines in the presence of an excess of n-butyllithium. PMID:27359260

  12. (1)H NMR foodomics reveals that the biodynamic and the organic cultivation managements produce different grape berries (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Sangiovese).

    PubMed

    Picone, Gianfranco; Trimigno, Alessia; Tessarin, Paola; Donnini, Silvia; Rombolà, Adamo Domenico; Capozzi, Francesco

    2016-12-15

    The increasing demand for natural foods and beverages, i.e. prepared by excluding synthetic chemicals along the whole production chain, has boosted the adoption of organic and biodynamic cultivation methods which are based on protocols avoiding use of synthetic pesticides. This trend is striking in viticulture, since wine production is largely shaped by the varying drinking attitudes of environment-friendly consumers. Using (1)H NMR, the compositions of grape berries, collected at harvest in 2009 and 2011, in experimental plots cultivated either with biodynamic or organic methods, were compared. Although the analysis provides a comprehensive metabolic profile of berries, the resulting distinctive pattern consists of a few molecules. Lower content of sugars, coumaric and caffeic acids, as well as higher amount of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were observed in biodynamic grapes. The (1)H NMR foodomics approach evidenced a diverse fruit metabolome that could be associated to a different physiological response of plants to the agronomic environment. PMID:27451171

  13. Determination of glucan phosphorylation using heteronuclear 1H, 13C double and 1H, 13C, 31P triple-resonance NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Peter; Nitschke, Felix; Steup, Martin; Mallow, Keven; Specker, Edgar

    2013-10-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of starch and glycogen are important for their physicochemical properties and also their physiological functions. It is therefore desirable to reliably determine the phosphorylation sites. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR-spectroscopy is in principle a straightforward analytical approach even for complex carbohydrate molecules. With heterogeneous samples from natural sources, however, the task becomes more difficult because a full assignment of the resonances of the carbohydrates is impossible to obtain. Here, we show that the combination of heteronuclear (1) H,(13) C and (1) H,(13) C,(31) P techniques and information derived from spectra of a set of reference compounds can lead to an unambiguous determination of the phosphorylation sites even in heterogeneous samples. PMID:23913630

  14. Complete 1H, 15N and 13C assignment of trappin-2 and 1H assignment of its two domains, elafin and cementoin.

    PubMed

    Loth, Karine; Alami, Soha Abou Ibrahim; Habès, Chahrazed; Garrido, Solène; Aucagne, Vincent; Delmas, Agnès F; Moreau, Thierry; Zani, Marie-Louise; Landon, Céline

    2016-04-01

    Trappin-2 is a serine protease inhibitor with a very narrow inhibitory spectrum and has significant anti-microbial activities. It is a 10 kDa cationic protein composed of two distinct domains. The N-terminal domain (38 residues) named cementoin is known to be intrinsically disordered when it is not linked to the elafin. The C-terminal domain (57 residues), corresponding to elafin, is a cysteine-rich domain stabilized by four disulfide bridges and is characterized by a flat core and a flexible N-terminal part. To our knowledge, there is no structural data available on trappin-2. We report here the complete (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignment of the recombinant trappin-2 and the (1)H assignments of cementoin and elafin, under the same experimental conditions. This is the first step towards the 3D structure determination of the trappin-2. PMID:26878852

  15. [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy of urine: diagnosis of a guanidinoacetate methyl transferase deficiency case.

    PubMed

    Tassini, Maria; Zannolli, Raffaella; Buoni, Sabrina; Engelke, Udo; Vivi, Antonio; Valensin, Gianni; Salomons, Gajja S; De Nicola, Anna; Strambi, Mirella; Monti, Lucia; Morava, Eva; Wevers, Ron A; Hayek, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    For the first time, the use of urine [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy has allowed the detection of 1 case of guanidinoacetate methyl transferase in a database sample of 1500 pediatric patients with a diagnosis of central nervous system impairment of unknown origin. The urine [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy of a 9-year-old child, having severe epilepsy and nonprogressive mental and motor retardation with no apparent cause, revealed a possible guanidinoacetic acid increase. The definitive assignment of guanidinoacetic acid was checked by addition of pure substance to the urine sample and by measuring [(1)H]-[(1)H] correlation spectroscopy. Diagnosis of guanidinoacetate methyl transferase deficiency was further confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, brain [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mutational analysis of the guanidinoacetate methyl transferase gene. The replacement therapy was promptly started and, after 1 year, the child was seizure free. We conclude that for this case, urine [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy screening was able to diagnose guanidinoacetate methyl transferase deficiency. PMID:19461121

  16. (1)H NMR and GC-MS Based Metabolomics Reveal Defense and Detoxification Mechanism of Cucumber Plant under Nano-Cu Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijuan; Huang, Yuxiong; Hu, Jerry; Zhou, Hongjun; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Keller, Arturo A

    2016-02-16

    Because copper nanoparticles are being increasingly used in agriculture as pesticides, it is important to assess their potential implications for agriculture. Concerns have been raised about the bioaccumulation of nano-Cu and their toxicity to crop plants. Here, the response of cucumber plants in hydroponic culture at early development stages to two concentrations of nano-Cu (10 and 20 mg/L) was evaluated by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based metabolomics. Changes in mineral nutrient metabolism induced by nano-Cu were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results showed that nano-Cu at both concentrations interferes with the uptake of a number of micro- and macro-nutrients, such as Na, P, S, Mo, Zn, and Fe. Metabolomics data revealed that nano-Cu at both levels triggered significant metabolic changes in cucumber leaves and root exudates. The root exudate metabolic changes revealed an active defense mechanism against nano-Cu stress: up-regulation of amino acids to sequester/exclude Cu/nano-Cu; down-regulation of citric acid to reduce the mobilization of Cu ions; ascorbic acid up-regulation to combat reactive oxygen species; and up-regulation of phenolic compounds to improve antioxidant system. Thus, we demonstrate that nontargeted (1)H NMR and GC-MS based metabolomics can successfully identify physiological responses induced by nanoparticles. Root exudates metabolomics revealed important detoxification mechanisms. PMID:26751164

  17. Higher energy electronic transitions of HC(2n+1)H+ (n=2-7) and HC(2n+1)H (n=4-7) in neon matrices.

    PubMed

    Fulara, Jan; Nagy, Adam; Garkusha, Iryna; Maier, John P

    2010-07-14

    Electronic absorption spectra of linear HC(2n+1)H(+) (n=2-7) were recorded in 6 K neon matrices following their mass-selective deposition. Four new electronic band systems are identified; the strongest E (2)Pi(g/u)<--X (2)Pi(u/g) lies in the UV and the second most intense C (2)Pi(g/u)<--X (2)Pi(u/g) is located in the visible range. The known A (2)Pi(g/u)<--X (2)Pi(u/g) absorption is an order of magnitude weaker than C (2)Pi(g/u)<--X (2)Pi(u/g). Transitions to the B and D states are also discussed. The wavelengths of the HC(2n+1)H(+) (n=2-7) electronic systems obey a linear relation as a function of the size of the cations, similar to other carbon chains. The B (3)Sigma(u)(-)<--X (3)Sigma(g)(-) transition in the UV of neutral HC(2n+1)H (n=4-7) has also been identified upon photobleaching of the cations trapped in the matrices. PMID:20632752

  18. Serum metabonomics study of the hepatoprotective effect of Corydalis saxicola Bunting on carbon tetrachloride-induced acute hepatotoxicity in rats by (1)H NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yong-Hong; Tang, Chao-Ling; Lu, Shi-Yin; Cheng, Bang; Wu, Fang; Chen, Zhao-Ni; Song, Fangming; Ruan, Jun-Xiang; Zhang, Hong-Ye; Song, Hui; Zheng, Hua; Su, Zhi-Heng

    2016-09-10

    Corydalis saxicola Bunting (CS), a traditional Chinese folk medicine, has been effectively used for treating liver disease in Zhuang nationality in South China. However, the exact hepatoprotective mechanism of CS was still looking forward to further elucidation by far. In present work, metabonomic study of biochemical changes in the serum of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced acute liver injury rats after CS treatment were performed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) analysis. Metabolic profiling by means of principal components analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) indicated that the metabolic perturbation caused by CCl4 was reduced by CS treatment. A total of 9 metabolites including isoleucine (1), lactate (2), alanine (3), glutamine (4), acetone (5), succinate (6), phosphocholine (7), d-glucose (8) and glycerol (9) were considered as potential biomarkers involved in the development of CCl4-induced acute liver injury. According to pathway analysis by metabolites identified and correlation network construction by Pearson's correlation coefficency matrix, alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism and glycerolipid metabolism were recognized as the most influenced metabolic pathways associated with CCl4 injury. As a result, notably, deviations of metabolites 1, 3, 4, 7 and 9 in the process of CCl4-induced acute liver injury were improved by CS treatment, which suggested that CS mediated synergistically abnormalities of the metabolic pathways, composed of alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism and glycerolipid metabolism. In this study, it was the first report to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of the CS based on metabonomics strategy, which may be a potentially powerful tool to interpret the action mechanism of traditional Chinese folk medicines. PMID:27399344

  19. 14N quadrupole resonance and 1H T1 dispersion in the explosive RDX.

    PubMed

    Smith, John A S; Blanz, Martin; Rayner, Timothy J; Rowe, Michael D; Bedford, Simon; Althoefer, Kaspar

    2011-12-01

    The explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine (CH2-N-NO2)3, commonly known as RDX, has been studied by 14N NQR and 1H NMR. NQR frequencies and relaxation times for the three ν+ and ν- lines of the ring 14N nuclei have been measured over the temperature range 230-330 K. The 1H NMR T1 dispersion has been measured for magnetic fields corresponding to the 1H NMR frequency range of 0-5.4 M Hz. The results have been interpreted as due to hindered rotation of the NO2 group about the N-NO2 bond with an activation energy close to 92 kJ mol(-1). Three dips in the 1H NMR dispersion near 120, 390 and 510 kHz are assigned to the ν0, ν- and ν+ transitions of the 14NO2 group. The temperature dependence of the inverse line-width parameters T2∗ of the three ν+ and ν- ring nitrogen transitions between 230 and 320 K can be explained by a distribution in the torsional oscillational amplitudes of the NO2 group about the N-NO2 bond at crystal defects whose values are consistent with the latter being mainly edge dislocations or impurities in the samples studied. Above 310 K, the 14N line widths are dominated by the rapid decrease in the spin-spin relaxation time T2 due to hindered rotation of the NO2 group. A consequence of this is that above this temperature, the 1H T1 values at the quadrupole dips are dominated by the spin mixing time between the 1H Zeeman levels and the combined 1H and 14N spin-spin levels. PMID:21978662

  20. Comparisons of parallel potential biomarkers of 1H-MRS-measured hepatic lipid content in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Kai-Lun; Su, Wei-Wen; Chang, Chia-Chu; Kor, Chew-Teng; Chou, Chen-Te; Chen, Ting-Yu; Wu, Hung-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the main cause of chronic liver disease. This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate whether parallel clinical features and serum markers are related to the severity of NAFLD. We enrolled 111 participants with different metabolic syndrome (MetS) scores (zero, n = 22; one, n = 19; two, n = 22; and ≥ three, n = 48) and used 1H-MRS to measure liver fat content. Biochemical profiles and potential biomarkers of NAFLD were measured in fasting plasma. We found that 1H-MRS-measured fat content was significantly associated with MetS score ≥1, endotoxin, and hs-CRP. Ordinal logistic regression analysis revealed that MetS score ≥2 and endotoxin were predictive of NAFLD (1H-MRS > 5%) and that endotoxin, hs-CRP, and malondialdehyde (MDA) were predictive of NAFLD with liver injury (1H-MRS > 9.67%). Endotoxin plus MetS score was shown to be the most accurate predictor of overall NAFLD (AUC = 0.854; (95% CI: 0.785–0.924), P < 0.001), and endotoxin plus hs-CRP and MDA was found to be predictive of NAFLD with liver injury (0.868; (0.801–0.936), P < 0.001). These results suggest that MetS score plus certain serum biomarkers with 1H-MRS findings may hold promise for developing an effective model for monitoring the severity of NAFLD. PMID:27079922

  1. Comparisons of parallel potential biomarkers of 1H-MRS-measured hepatic lipid content in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Shih, Kai-Lun; Su, Wei-Wen; Chang, Chia-Chu; Kor, Chew-Teng; Chou, Chen-Te; Chen, Ting-Yu; Wu, Hung-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the main cause of chronic liver disease. This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate whether parallel clinical features and serum markers are related to the severity of NAFLD. We enrolled 111 participants with different metabolic syndrome (MetS) scores (zero, n = 22; one, n = 19; two, n = 22; and ≥ three, n = 48) and used 1H-MRS to measure liver fat content. Biochemical profiles and potential biomarkers of NAFLD were measured in fasting plasma. We found that 1H-MRS-measured fat content was significantly associated with MetS score ≥1, endotoxin, and hs-CRP. Ordinal logistic regression analysis revealed that MetS score ≥2 and endotoxin were predictive of NAFLD (1H-MRS > 5%) and that endotoxin, hs-CRP, and malondialdehyde (MDA) were predictive of NAFLD with liver injury (1H-MRS > 9.67%). Endotoxin plus MetS score was shown to be the most accurate predictor of overall NAFLD (AUC = 0.854; (95% CI: 0.785-0.924), P < 0.001), and endotoxin plus hs-CRP and MDA was found to be predictive of NAFLD with liver injury (0.868; (0.801-0.936), P < 0.001). These results suggest that MetS score plus certain serum biomarkers with 1H-MRS findings may hold promise for developing an effective model for monitoring the severity of NAFLD. PMID:27079922

  2. NMR-Based Mapping of Disulfide Bridges in Cysteine-Rich Peptides: Application to the μ-Conotoxin SxIIIA*

    PubMed Central

    Walewska, Aleksandra; Skalicky, Jack J.; Davis, Darrell R.; Zhang, Min-Min; Lopez-Vera, Estuardo; Watkins, Maren; Han, Tiffany S.; Yoshikami, Doju; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    Disulfide-rich peptides represent a megadiverse group of natural products with very promising therapeutic potential. To accelerate their functional characterization, high-throughput chemical synthesis and folding methods are required, including efficient mapping of multiple disulfide bridges. Here, we describe a novel approach for such mapping and apply it to a three-disulfide bridged conotoxin, μ-SxIIIA (from the venom of Conus striolatus) whose discovery is also reported here for the first time. μ-SxIIIA was chemically synthesized with three cysteine residues labeled 100% with 15N/13C, while the remaining three cysteine residues were incorporated using a mixture of 70%:30% unlabeled:labeled Fmoc-protected residues. After oxidative folding, the major product was analyzed by NMR spectroscopy. Sequence-specific resonance assignments for the isotope-enriched Cys residues were determined with 2D versions of standard triple resonance (1H,13C,15N) NMR experiments and 2D [13C,1H] HSQC. Disulfide patterns were directly determined with cross-disulfide NOEs confirming that the oxidation product had the disulfide connectivities characteristic of μ-conotoxins. μ-SxIIIA was found to be a potent blocker of the sodium channel subtype NaV1.4 (IC50 = 7 nM). These results suggest that differential incorporation of isotope-labeled cysteine residues is an efficient strategy to map disulfides and should facilitate the discovery and structure-function studies of many bioactive peptides. PMID:18831583

  3. Does visual cortex lactate increase following photic stimulation in migraine without aura patients? A functional (1)H-MRS study.

    PubMed

    Reyngoudt, Harmen; Paemeleire, Koen; Dierickx, Anneloor; Descamps, Benedicte; Vandemaele, Pieter; De Deene, Yves; Achten, Eric

    2011-06-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) has been used in a number of studies to assess noninvasively the temporal changes of lactate (Lac) in the activated human brain. Migraine neurobiology involves lack of cortical habituation to repetitive stimuli and a mitochondrial component has been put forward. Our group has recently demonstrated a reduction in the high-energy phosphates adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatine (PCr) in the occipital lobe of migraine without aura (MwoA) patients, at least in a subgroup, in a phosphorus MRS ((31)P-MRS) study. In previous studies, basal Lac levels or photic stimulation (PS)-induced Lac levels were found to be increased in patients with migraine with aura (MwA) and migraine patients with visual symptoms and paraesthesia, paresia and/or dysphasia, respectively. The aim of this study was to perform functional (1)H-MRS at 3 T in 20 MwoA patients and 20 control subjects. Repetitive visual stimulation was applied using MR-compatible goggles with 8 Hz checkerboard stimulation during 12 min. We did not observe any significant differences in signal integrals, ratios and absolute metabolite concentrations, including Lac, between MwoA patients and controls before PS. Lac also did not increase significantly during and following PS, both for MwoA patients and controls. Subtle Lac changes, smaller than the sensitivity threshold (i.e. estimated at 0.1-0.2 μmol/g at 3 T), cannot be detected by MRS. Our study does, however, argue against a significant switch to non-aerobic glucose metabolism during long-lasting PS of the visual cortex in MwoA patients. PMID:21301922

  4. NMR-based identification of the phenolic profile of fruits of Lycium barbarum (goji berries). Isolation and structural determination of a novel N-feruloyl tyramine dimer as the most abundant antioxidant polyphenol of goji berries.

    PubMed

    Forino, Martino; Tartaglione, Luciana; Dell'Aversano, Carmela; Ciminiello, Patrizia

    2016-03-01

    Biological properties of fruits of Lycium barbarum (goji berries) have been ascribed to their high content of nutrients and phenolics. Comprehensive studies aimed at unambiguously identifying the phenolic components in goji berries are still lacking. In this paper, we report on the isolation and NMR-based identification of the major phenolics in commercially available goji berries. Together with already known phenolics, including caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, rutin, scopoletin, N-trans-feruloyl tyramine, and N-cis-feruloyl tyramine, an unreported N-feruloyl tyramine dimer was characterized as the most abundant polyphenol isolated from the berries. Usually divalent molecules show enhanced biological activities than their corresponding monomers. PMID:26471679

  5. Metabolic myopathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A.; Haller, R. G.; Barohn, R.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Metabolic myopathies are disorders of muscle energy production that result in skeletal muscle dysfunction. Cardiac and systemic metabolic dysfunction may coexist. Symptoms are often intermittent and provoked by exercise or changes in supply of lipid and carbohydrate fuels. Specific disorders of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in muscle are reviewed. Evaluation often requires provocative exercise testing. These tests may include ischemic forearm exercise, aerobic cycle exercise, and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy with exercise.

  6. The structure and properties of 5,6-dinitro-1H-benzotriazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santa María, Dolores; Claramunt, Rosa M.; Torralba, M. Carmen; Torres, M. Rosario; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2016-06-01

    5,6-Dinitro-1H-benzotriazole crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P21/c. The asymmetric unit contains the planar 1H-tautomer together with a water molecule of crystallization. Each water molecule is hydrogen bonded to three adjacent 5,6-dinitrobenzotriazoles forming a tape along the b-axis of the crystal. These tapes stack along the c-axis through hydrogen bonds involving the water molecules and one of the nitro groups leading to a bidimensional structure. Solid-state 13C and 15N CPMAS NMR allow to confirm that the tautomer present is the 1H one. In DMSO-d6 solution the results are quite different and, based on GIAO/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) calculations, lead us to conclude that the major tautomer is the 5,6-dinitro-2H-benzotriazole, a surprising result that contradicts the rule that the major tautomer in solution coincides with the one present in the crystal. An anhydrous pseudopolymorph of 5,6-dinitro-1H-benzotriazole has been obtained as a non-crystalline form and from solid-state NMR and theoretical calculations, we conclude that it is an 1H-tautomer.

  7. Hematocrit and oxygenation dependence of blood (1)H(2)O T(1) at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Grgac, Ksenija; van Zijl, Peter C M; Qin, Qin

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge of blood (1)H2O T1 is critical for perfusion-based quantification experiments such as arterial spin labeling and cerebral blood volume-weighted MRI using vascular space occupancy. The dependence of blood (1)H2O T1 on hematocrit fraction (Hct) and oxygen saturation fraction (Y) was determined at 7 T using in vitro bovine blood in a circulating system under physiological conditions. Blood (1)H2O R1 values for different conditions could be readily fitted using a two-compartment (erythrocyte and plasma) model, which are described by a monoexponential longitudinal relaxation rate constant dependence. It was found that T1 = 2171 ± 39 ms for Y = 1 (arterial blood) and 2010 ± 41 ms for Y = 0.6 (venous blood), for a typical Hct of 0.42. The blood (1)H2O T1 values in the normal physiological range (Hct from 0.35 to 0.45, and Y from 0.6 to 1.0) were determined to range from 1900 to 2300 ms. The influence of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and the effect of plasma osmolality for different anticoagulants were also investigated. It is discussed why blood (1)H2O T1 values measured in vivo for human blood may be about 10-20% larger than found in vitro for bovine blood at the same field strength. PMID:23169066

  8. A statistical approach for analyzing the development of 1H multiple-quantum coherence in solids.

    PubMed

    Mogami, Yuuki; Noda, Yasuto; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Takegoshi, K

    2013-05-21

    A novel statistical approach for analyzing (1)H multiple-quantum (MQ) spin dynamics in so-called spin-counting solid-state NMR experiments is presented. The statistical approach is based on the percolation theory with Monte Carlo methods and is examined by applying it to the experimental results of three solid samples having unique hydrogen arrangement for 1-3 dimensions: the n-alkane/d-urea inclusion complex as a one-dimensional (1D) system, whose (1)H nuclei align approximately in 1D, and magnesium hydroxide and adamantane as a two-dimensional (2D) and a three-dimensional (3D) system, respectively. Four lattice models, linear, honeycomb, square and cubic, are used to represent the (1)H arrangement of the three samples. It is shown that the MQ dynamics in adamantane is consistent with that calculated using the cubic lattice and that in Mg(OH)2 with that calculated using the honeycomb and the square lattices. For n-C20H42/d-urea, these 4 lattice models fail to express its result. It is shown that a more realistic model representing the (1)H arrangement of n-C20H42/d-urea can describe the result. The present approach can thus be used to determine (1)H arrangement in solids. PMID:23580152

  9. Specific control of BMP signaling and mesenchymal differentiation by cytoplasmic phosphatase PPM1H

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tao; Sun, Chuang; Zhang, Zhengmao; Xu, Ningyi; Duan, Xueyan; Feng, Xin-Hua; Lin, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) belong to the TGF-β superfamily of structurally related signaling proteins that regulate a wide array of cellular functions. The key step in BMP signal transduction is the BMP receptor-mediated phosphorylation of transcription factors Smad1, 5, and 8 (collectively Smad1/5/8), which leads to the subsequent activation of BMP-induced gene transcription in the nucleus. In this study, we describe the identification and characterization of PPM1H as a novel cytoplasm-localized Smad1/5/8-specific phosphatase. PPM1H directly interacts with Smad1/5/8 through its Smad-binding domain, and dephosphorylates phospho-Smad1/5/8 (P-Smad1/5/8) in the cytoplasm. Ectopic expression of PPM1H attenuates BMP signaling, whereas loss of PPM1H activity or expression greatly enhances BMP-dependent gene regulation and mesenchymal differentiation. In conclusion, this study suggests that PPM1H acts as a gatekeeper to prevent excessive BMP signaling through dephosphorylation and subsequent nuclear exclusion of P-Smad1/5/8 proteins. PMID:24732009

  10. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of 3-thiocyanato-1H-indoles as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Margiani P; da Silva, Paulo B N; da Silva, Teresinha G; Kaufman, Teodoro S; Militão, Gardenia C G; Silveira, Claudio C

    2016-08-01

    A novel series of twenty 3-thiocyanato-1H-indoles, carrying diversification at positions N-1, C-2 and C-5 of the heterocyclic core, were synthesized; their antiproliferative activity against four human cancer cell lines (HL60, HEP-2, NCI-H292 and MCF-7) was evaluated, employing doxorubicin as positive control. Indole, N-methylindole and 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-methylindole demonstrated to be essentially inactive, whereas several of their congener 3-thiocyanato-1H-indoles displayed good to excellent levels of potency (IC50 ≤ 6 μM), while being non-hemolytic. N-Phenyl-3-thiocyanato-1H-indole and 1-methyl-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-thiocyanato-1H-indole showed good to high potency against all the cell lines. On the other side, the N-(4-chlorophenyl)-, 2-(4-chlorophenyl)- and 2-phenyl- 3-thiocyanato-1H-indole derivatives were slightly less active against the test cell lines. Overall, these results suggest that the indole-3-thiocyanate motif can be suitably decorated to afford highly cytotoxic compounds and that the substituted indole can be employed as a useful scaffold toward more potent compounds. PMID:27116711

  11. Metabolic ecology.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Murray M; McCann, Kevin S

    2014-01-01

    Ecological theory that is grounded in metabolic currencies and constraints offers the potential to link ecological outcomes to biophysical processes across multiple scales of organization. The metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) has emphasized the potential for metabolism to serve as a unified theory of ecology, while focusing primarily on the size and temperature dependence of whole-organism metabolic rates. Generalizing metabolic ecology requires extending beyond prediction and application of standardized metabolic rates to theory focused on how energy moves through ecological systems. A bibliometric and network analysis of recent metabolic ecology literature reveals a research network characterized by major clusters focused on MTE, foraging theory, bioenergetics, trophic status, and generalized patterns and predictions. This generalized research network, which we refer to as metabolic ecology, can be considered to include the scaling, temperature and stoichiometric models forming the core of MTE, as well as bioenergetic equations, foraging theory, life-history allocation models, consumer-resource equations, food web theory and energy-based macroecology models that are frequently employed in ecological literature. We conclude with six points we believe to be important to the advancement and integration of metabolic ecology, including nomination of a second fundamental equation, complementary to the first fundamental equation offered by the MTE. PMID:24028511

  12. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids. PMID:26203019

  13. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  14. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  15. Dynamics-based selective 2D {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation spectroscopy under ultrafast MAS conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-05-28

    Dynamics plays important roles in determining the physical, chemical, and functional properties of a variety of chemical and biological materials. However, a material (such as a polymer) generally has mobile and rigid regions in order to have high strength and toughness at the same time. Therefore, it is difficult to measure the role of mobile phase without being affected by the rigid components. Herein, we propose a highly sensitive solid-state NMR approach that utilizes a dipolar-coupling based filter (composed of 12 equally spaced 90° RF pulses) to selectively measure the correlation of {sup 1}H chemical shifts from the mobile regions of a material. It is interesting to find that the rotor-synchronized dipolar filter strength decreases with increasing inter-pulse delay between the 90° pulses, whereas the dipolar filter strength increases with increasing inter-pulse delay under static conditions. In this study, we also demonstrate the unique advantages of proton-detection under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning conditions to enhance the spectral resolution and sensitivity for studies on small molecules as well as multi-phase polymers. Our results further demonstrate the use of finite-pulse radio-frequency driven recoupling pulse sequence to efficiently recouple weak proton-proton dipolar couplings in the dynamic regions of a molecule and to facilitate the fast acquisition of {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H correlation spectrum compared to the traditional 2D NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) experiment. We believe that the proposed approach is beneficial to study mobile components in multi-phase systems, such as block copolymers, polymer blends, nanocomposites, heterogeneous amyloid mixture of oligomers and fibers, and other materials.

  16. 40 CFR 721.1750 - 1H-Benzotriazole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)- and 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and potassium salts. 721.1750 Section 721.1750... 1H-Benzotriazole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)- and 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and potassium...-tyl-oxy)-, sodium salt (PMN P-92-35), and 1H-benzotriazole, 5-(pentyloxy)- , potassium salt (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1750 - 1H-Benzotriazole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)- and 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and potassium salts. 721.1750 Section 721.1750... 1H-Benzotriazole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)- and 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and potassium...-tyl-oxy)-, sodium salt (PMN P-92-35), and 1H-benzotriazole, 5-(pentyloxy)- , potassium salt (PMN...

  18. 40 CFR 721.1750 - 1H-Benzotriazole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)- and 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and potassium salts. 721.1750 Section 721.1750... 1H-Benzotriazole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)- and 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and potassium...-tyl-oxy)-, sodium salt (PMN P-92-35), and 1H-benzotriazole, 5-(pentyloxy)- , potassium salt (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1750 - 1H-Benzotriazole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)- and 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and potassium salts. 721.1750 Section 721.1750... 1H-Benzotriazole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)- and 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and potassium...-tyl-oxy)-, sodium salt (PMN P-92-35), and 1H-benzotriazole, 5-(pentyloxy)- , potassium salt (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.1750 - 1H-Benzotriazole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)- and 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and potassium salts. 721.1750 Section 721.1750... 1H-Benzotriazole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)- and 1H-ben-zo-tri-a-zole, 5-(pen-tyl-oxy)-, sodium and potassium...-tyl-oxy)-, sodium salt (PMN P-92-35), and 1H-benzotriazole, 5-(pentyloxy)- , potassium salt (PMN...

  1. 1H-1,2,4-diazaphospholes: Synthesis, structural characterization, and DFT calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Wen; Ding, Ling-Yan; Wang, Bing-Qiang; He, Yao-Yun; Guo, Yue; Jia, Xue-Feng; Zheng, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    A few 1H-1,2,4-diazaphospholes H[3,5-R2dp] (R = methyl (5a), p-tolyl (5b), 1-naphthyl (5c), 2-furanyl (5d), 2-thienyl (5e), and isopropyl (5f)) were prepared and structurally characterized by a substantial experimental modification of the synthetic protocol. The molecules of all compounds are linked into oligomers via the bridges of NH⋯N hydrogen bonds in solid state. The tetrameric feature of 5a, and 5d-f represents a new motif of hydrogen-bonded 1H-1,2,4-diazaphospholes in solid state. The DFT calculation at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level suggested the possible proton disorder with intermolecular solid state proton transfer (ISSPT) between 1H-1,2,4-diazaphosphole rings.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and theoretical studies of 5-(benzylthio)-1-cylopentyl-1H-tetrazole.

    PubMed

    Saglam, S; Disli, A; Erdogdu, Y; Marchewka, M K; Kanagathara, N; Bay, B; Güllüoğlu, M T

    2015-01-25

    In this study, 5-(benzylthio)-1-cylopentyl-1H-tetrazole (5B1C1HT) have been synthesized. Boiling points of the obtained compound have been determined and it has been characterized by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C-APT and LC-MS spectroscopy techniques. The FT-IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C-APT spectral measurements of the 5B1C1HT compound and complete assignment of the vibrational bands observed in spectra has been discussed. The spectra were interpreted with the aid of normal coordinate analysis following full structure optimization and force field calculations based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) at 6-311++G(**), cc-pVDZ and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The optimized geometry with 6-311++G(**) basis sets were used to determine the total energy distribution, harmonic vibrational frequencies, IR intensities. PMID:25171051

  3. Synthesis, characterization and theoretical studies of 5-(benzylthio)-1-cylopentyl-1H-tetrazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglam, S.; Disli, A.; Erdogdu, Y.; Marchewka, M. K.; Kanagathara, N.; Bay, B.; Güllüoğlu, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 5-(benzylthio)-1-cylopentyl-1H-tetrazole (5B1C1HT) have been synthesized. Boiling points of the obtained compound have been determined and it has been characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C-APT and LC-MS spectroscopy techniques. The FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C-APT spectral measurements of the 5B1C1HT compound and complete assignment of the vibrational bands observed in spectra has been discussed. The spectra were interpreted with the aid of normal coordinate analysis following full structure optimization and force field calculations based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) at 6-311++G**, cc-pVDZ and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The optimized geometry with 6-311++G** basis sets were used to determine the total energy distribution, harmonic vibrational frequencies, IR intensities.

  4. Multislice 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging: assessment of epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Michael W.; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Schuff, Norbert; Soher, Brian J.; Vermathen, Peter P.; Fein, George; Laxer, Kenneth D.

    1998-07-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H MRSI) with volume pre-selection (i.e. by PRESS) or multislice 1H MRSI was used to investigate changes in brain metabolites in Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Examples of results from several ongoing clinical studies are provided. Multislice 1H MRSI of the human brain, without volume pre-selection offers considerable advantages over previously available techniques. Furthermore, MRI tissue segmentation and completely automated spectra curve fitting greatly facilitate quantitative data analysis. Future efforts will be devoted to obtaining full brain coverage and data acquisition at short spin echo times (TE less than 30 ms) for the detection of metabolites with short T2 relaxation times.

  5. Amino­silanes derived from 1H-benzimidazole-2(3H)-thione

    PubMed Central

    Palomo-Molina, Juliana; García-Báez, Efrén V.; Contreras, Rosalinda; Pineda-Urbina, Kayim; Ramos-Organillo, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Two new mol­ecular structures, namely 1,3-bis­(tri­methyl­silyl)-1H-benzimidazole-2(3H)-thione, C13H22N2SSi2, (2), and 1-tri­methyl­silyl-1H-benzimidazole-2(3H)-thione, C10H14N2SSi, (3), are reported. Both systems were derived from 1H-benzimidazole-2(3H)-thione. Noncovalent C—H⋯π inter­actions between the centroid of the benzmidazole system and the SiMe3 groups form helicoidal arrangements in (2). Dimerization of (3) results in the formation of R 2 2(8) rings via N—H⋯S inter­actions, along with parallel π–π inter­actions between imidazole and benzene rings. PMID:26322611

  6. Metabolomic differentiation of Cannabis sativa cultivars using 1H NMR spectroscopy and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Hae; Kim, Hye Kyong; Hazekamp, Arno; Erkelens, Cornelis; Lefeber, Alfons W M; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-06-01

    The metabolomic analysis of 12 Cannabis sativa cultivars was carried out by 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis techniques. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the 1H NMR spectra showed a clear discrimination between those samples by principal component 1 (PC1) and principal component 3 (PC3) in cannabinoid fraction. The loading plot of PC value obtained from all 1)H NMR signals shows that Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) are important metabolites to differentiate the cultivars from each other. The discrimination of the cultivars could also be obtained from a water extract containing carbohydrates and amino acids. The level of sucrose, glucose, asparagine, and glutamic acid are found to be major discriminating metabolites of these cultivars. This method allows an efficient differentiation between cannabis cultivars without any prepurification steps. PMID:15217272

  7. Protein conformational exchange measured by 1H R1ρ relaxation dispersion of methyl groups.

    PubMed

    Weininger, Ulrich; Blissing, Annica T; Hennig, Janosch; Ahlner, Alexandra; Liu, Zhihong; Vogel, Hans J; Akke, Mikael; Lundström, Patrik

    2013-09-01

    Activated dynamics plays a central role in protein function, where transitions between distinct conformations often underlie the switching between active and inactive states. The characteristic time scales of these transitions typically fall in the microsecond to millisecond range, which is amenable to investigations by NMR relaxation dispersion experiments. Processes at the faster end of this range are more challenging to study, because higher RF field strengths are required to achieve refocusing of the exchanging magnetization. Here we describe a rotating-frame relaxation dispersion experiment for (1)H spins in methyl (13)CHD2 groups, which improves the characterization of fast exchange processes. The influence of (1)H-(1)H rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effects (ROE) is shown to be negligible, based on a comparison of R 1ρ relaxation data acquired with tilt angles of 90° and 35°, in which the ROE is maximal and minimal, respectively, and on samples containing different (1)H densities surrounding the monitored methyl groups. The method was applied to ubiquitin and the apo form of calmodulin. We find that ubiquitin does not exhibit any (1)H relaxation dispersion of its methyl groups at 10 or 25 °C. By contrast, calmodulin shows significant conformational exchange of the methionine methyl groups in its C-terminal domain, as previously demonstrated by (1)H and (13)C CPMG experiments. The present R 1ρ experiment extends the relaxation dispersion profile towards higher refocusing frequencies, which improves the definition of the exchange correlation time, compared to previous results. PMID:23904100

  8. Relativistic Force Field: Parametrization of (13)C-(1)H Nuclear Spin-Spin Coupling Constants.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we reported a reliable DU8 method for natural bond orbital (NBO)-aided parametric scaling of Fermi contacts to achieve fast and accurate prediction of proton-proton spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) in (1)H NMR. As sophisticated NMR experiments for precise measurements of carbon-proton SSCCs are becoming more user-friendly and broadly utilized by the organic chemistry community to guide and inform the process of structure determination of complex organic compounds, we have now developed a fast and accurate method for computing (13)C-(1)H SSCCs. Fermi contacts computed with the DU8 basis set are scaled using selected NBO parameters in conjunction with empirical scaling coefficients. The method is optimized for inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) geometries. The parametric scaling is based on a carefully selected training set of 274 ((3)J), 193 ((2)J), and 143 ((1)J) experimental (13)C-(1)H spin-spin coupling constants reported in the literature. The DU8 basis set, optimized for computing Fermi contacts, which by design had evolved from optimization of a collection of inexpensive 3-21G*, 4-21G, and 6-31G(d) bases, offers very short computational (wall) times even for relatively large organic molecules containing 15-20 carbon atoms. The most informative SSCCs for structure determination, i.e., (3)J, were computed with an accuracy of 0.41 Hz (rmsd). The new unified approach for computing (1)H-(1)H and (13)C-(1)H SSCCs is termed "DU8c". PMID:26414291

  9. Proton Fingerprints Portray Molecular Structures: Enhanced Description of the 1H NMR Spectra of Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, José G.; Lankin, David C.; McAlpine, James B.; Niemitz, Matthias; Korhonen, Samuli-Petrus; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2013-01-01

    The characteristic signals observed in NMR spectra encode essential information on the structure of small molecules. However, extracting all of this information from complex signal patterns is not trivial. This report demonstrates how computer-aided spectral analysis enables the complete interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data. The effectiveness of this approach is illustrated with a set of organic molecules, for which replicas of their 1H NMR spectra were generated. The potential impact of this methodology on organic chemistry research is discussed. PMID:24007197

  10. Fruit juice authentication by 1H NMR spectroscopy in combination with different chemometrics tools.

    PubMed

    Cuny, M; Vigneau, E; Le Gall, G; Colquhoun, I; Lees, M; Rutledge, D N

    2008-01-01

    To discriminate orange juice from grapefruit juice in a context of fraud prevention, (1)H NMR data were submitted to different treatments to extract informative variables which were then analysed using multivariate techniques. Averaging contiguous data points of the spectrum followed by logarithmic transformation improved the results of the data analysis. Moreover, supervised variable selection methods gave better rates of classification of the juices into the correct groups. Last, independent-component analysis gave better classification results than principal-component analysis. Hence, ICA may be an efficient chemometric tool to detect differences in the (1)H NMR spectra of similar samples, and so may be useful for authentication of foods. PMID:18026939

  11. Binding of Sulfonamide Antibiotics to CTABr Micelles Characterized Using (1)H NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Ashish K; Cashin, Patrick J; Balakrishnan, Vimal K; Exall, Kirsten; Buncel, Erwin; Brown, R Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Interactions of nine sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfadoxine, sulfathiazole, sulfamethoxazole, sulfamerazine, sulfadiazine, sulfamethazine, sulfacetamide, sulfaguanidine, and sulfanilamide) with cetyltrimethylamonium bromide (CTABr) micelles were examined using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Seven of the nine provided a significant change in the (1)H NMR chemical shift such that the magnitude and direction (upfield vs downfield) of the chemical shift could be used to propose a locus and orientation of the sulfonamide within the micelle structure. The magnitude of the chemical shift was used to estimate the binding constant for seven sulfonamides with CTABr micelles, providing values and an overall pattern consistent with previous studies of these sulfonamides. PMID:27391918

  12. The (1) H NMR spectrum of pyrazole in a nematic phase.

    PubMed

    Provasi, Patricio; Jimeno, María Luisa; Alkorta, Ibon; Reviriego, Felipe; Elguero, José; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2016-08-01

    The experimental (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of 1H-pyrazole was recorded in thermotropic nematic liquid crystal N-(p-ethoxybenzylidene)-p-butylaniline (EBBA) within the temperature range of 299-308 K. Two of three observable dipolar DHH -couplings appeared to be equal at each temperature because of fast prototropic tautomerism. Analysis of the Saupe orientational order parameters using fixed geometry determined by computations and experimental dipolar couplings results in a situation in which the molecular orientation relative to the magnetic field (and the liquid crystal director) can be described exceptionally by a single parameter. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26947581

  13. Detection of hydrogen dissolved in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Shin; Fujiwara, Hirotada

    2012-01-01

    Rubber materials, which are used for hydrogen gas seal, can dissolve hydrogen during exposure in high-pressure hydrogen gas. Dissolved hydrogen molecules were detected by solid state 1H NMR of the unfilled vulcanized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber. Two signals were observed at 4.5 ppm and 4.8 ppm, which were assignable to dissolved hydrogen, in the 1H NMR spectrum of NBR after being exposed 100 MPa hydrogen gas for 24 h at room temperature. These signals were shifted from that of gaseous hydrogen molecules. Assignment of the signals was confirmed by quantitative estimation of dissolved hydrogen and peak area of the signals.

  14. Seed architecture shapes embryo metabolism in oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Neuberger, Thomas; Schwender, Jörg; Heinzel, Nicolas; Sunderhaus, Stephanie; Fuchs, Johannes; Hay, Jordan O; Tschiersch, Henning; Braun, Hans-Peter; Denolf, Peter; Lambert, Bart; Jakob, Peter M; Rolletschek, Hardy

    2013-05-01

    Constrained to develop within the seed, the plant embryo must adapt its shape and size to fit the space available. Here, we demonstrate how this adjustment shapes metabolism of photosynthetic embryo. Noninvasive NMR-based imaging of the developing oilseed rape (Brassica napus) seed illustrates that, following embryo bending, gradients in lipid concentration became established. These were correlated with the local photosynthetic electron transport rate and the accumulation of storage products. Experimentally induced changes in embryo morphology and/or light supply altered these gradients and were accompanied by alterations in both proteome and metabolome. Tissue-specific metabolic models predicted that the outer cotyledon and hypocotyl/radicle generate the bulk of plastidic reductant/ATP via photosynthesis, while the inner cotyledon, being enclosed by the outer cotyledon, is forced to grow essentially heterotrophically. Under field-relevant high-light conditions, major contribution of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase-bypass to seed storage metabolism is predicted for the outer cotyledon and the hypocotyl/radicle only. Differences between in vitro- versus in planta-grown embryos suggest that metabolic heterogeneity of embryo is not observable by in vitro approaches. We conclude that in vivo metabolic fluxes are locally regulated and connected to seed architecture, driving the embryo toward an efficient use of available light and space. PMID:23709628

  15. Dichloridobis{2-[(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)meth­yl]-1H-benzimidazole-κN 3}­zinc(II)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Peng; Zhang, Jiao-Lin; Hao, Bao-Lian; Yang, Huai-Xia

    2013-01-01

    In the title complex, [ZnCl2(C10H9N5)2], the ZnII ion is coordinated by two N atoms from two 2-[(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)meth­yl]-1H-benzimidazole (tmb) ligands and by two chloride ligands in a slightly distorted tetra­hedral geometry. In the tmb ligands, the benzimidazole rings systems are essentially planar, with maximum deviations from the mean plane of 0.021 (3) and 0.030 (3) Å, and form dihedral angles of 73.2 (2) and 83.5 (2)° with the triazole rings. In the crystal, N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds link complex mol­ecules into chains along [010]. In addition, weak C—H⋯Cl and C—H⋯N hydrogen bonds complete a three-dimensional network. Two weak intra­molecular C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds are also observed. PMID:23723759

  16. Hydrogen incorporation into high temperature protonic conductors: Nuclear microprobe microanalysis by means of 1H(p, p) 1H scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, P.; Gallien, J.-P.; Khodja, H.; Daudin, L.; Berger, M.-H.; Sayir, A.

    2006-08-01

    Protonic conductivity of some solid state materials at an intermediate temperature range (400-600 °C), referred as high temperature protonic conductor (HTPC), suggests their application as electrolytes in electrochemical cells, batteries, sensors, etc. Among them, some perovskites can be protonic and electronic conductors. Several obstacles remain to achieve the full potential of these ceramic membranes, among them the lack of measurement techniques and of an unambiguous model for conductivity. A precise understanding of the transport mechanisms requires local profiling of hydrogen concentrations within the microstructure of the ceramic. We have used the nuclear microprobe of the Laboratoire Pierre SÜE to investigate quantitatively the spatial distribution of hydrogen after water heat treatment of textured perovskites, SrCe0.9Y0.1O3-δ and Sr3Ca1+xNb2-xO9-δ, x = 0.18, synthesized according to a melt-process developed at NASA GRC. A not very common method has been developed for hydrogen measurements in thin samples, 1H(p, p)1H elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry (ERCS). Early experiments have evidenced hydrogen concentration enhancement within grain boundaries.

  17. Elevated Glutamatergic Compounds in Pregenual Anterior Cingulate in Pediatric Autism Spectrum Disorder Demonstrated by 1H MRS and 1H MRSI

    PubMed Central

    Bejjani, Anthony; O'Neill, Joseph; Kim, John A.; Frew, Andrew J.; Yee, Victor W.; Ly, Ronald; Kitchen, Christina; Salamon, Noriko; McCracken, James T.; Toga, Arthur W.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Levitt, Jennifer G.

    2012-01-01

    Recent research in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has aroused interest in anterior cingulate cortex and in the neurometabolite glutamate. We report two studies of pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC) in pediatric ASD. First, we acquired in vivo single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in 8 children with ASD and 10 typically developing controls who were well matched for age, but with fewer males and higher IQ. In the ASD group in midline pACC, we found mean 17.7% elevation of glutamate + glutamine (Glx) (p<0.05) and 21.2% (p<0.001) decrement in creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr). We then performed a larger (26 subjects with ASD, 16 controls) follow-up study in samples now matched for age, gender, and IQ using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H MRSI). Higher spatial resolution enabled bilateral pACC acquisition. Significant effects were restricted to right pACC where Glx (9.5%, p<0.05), Cr (6.7%, p<0.05), and N-acetyl-aspartate + N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (10.2%, p<0.01) in the ASD sample were elevated above control. These two independent studies suggest hyperglutamatergia and other neurometabolic abnormalities in pACC in ASD, with possible right-lateralization. The hyperglutamatergic state may reflect an imbalance of excitation over inhibition in the brain as proposed in recent neurodevelopmental models of ASD. PMID:22848344

  18. Metabolic Profiling of Alpine and Ecuadorian Lichens.

    PubMed

    Mittermeier, Verena K; Schmitt, Nicola; Volk, Lukas P M; Suárez, Juan Pablo; Beck, Andreas; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Non-targeted ¹H-NMR methods were used to determine metabolite profiles from crude extracts of Alpine and Ecuadorian lichens collected from their natural habitats. In control experiments, the robustness of metabolite detection and quantification was estimated using replicate measurements of Stereocaulon alpinum extracts. The deviations in the overall metabolite fingerprints were low when analyzing S. alpinum collections from different locations or during different annual and seasonal periods. In contrast, metabolite profiles observed from extracts of different Alpine and Ecuadorian lichens clearly revealed genus- and species-specific profiles. The discriminating functions determining cluster formation in principle component analysis (PCA) were due to differences in the amounts of genus-specific compounds such as sticticin from the Sticta species, but also in the amounts of ubiquitous metabolites, such as sugar alcohols or trehalose. However, varying concentrations of these metabolites from the same lichen species e.g., due to different environmental conditions appeared of minor relevance for the overall cluster formation in PCA. The metabolic clusters matched phylogenetic analyses using nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of lichen mycobionts, as exemplified for the genus Sticta. It can be concluded that NMR-based non-targeted metabolic profiling is a useful tool in the chemo-taxonomy of lichens. The same approach could also facilitate the discovery of novel lichen metabolites on a rapid and systematical basis. PMID:26437395

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics enable detection of the effects of a whole grain rye and rye bran diet on the metabolic profile of plasma in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Moazzami, Ali A; Zhang, Jie-Xian; Kamal-Eldin, Afaf; Aman, Per; Hallmans, Göran; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Andersson, Sven-Olof

    2011-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in the Western world and the second most important cancer causing male deaths, after lung cancer, in the United States and Britain. Lifestyle and dietary changes are recommended for men diagnosed with early-stage PC. It has been shown that a diet rich in whole grain (WG) rye reduces the progression of early-stage PC, but the underlying mechanism is not clear. This study sought to identify changes in the metabolic signature of plasma in patients with early-stage PC following intervention with a diet rich in WG rye and rye bran product (RP) compared with refined white wheat product (WP) as a tool for mechanistic investigation of the beneficial health effects of RP on PC progression. Seventeen PC patients received 485 g RP or WP in a randomized, controlled, crossover design during a period of 6 wk with a 2-wk washout period. At the end of each intervention period, plasma was collected after fasting and used for (1)H NMR-based metabolomics. Multilevel partial least squares discriminant analysis was used for paired comparisons of multivariate data. A metabolomics analysis of plasma showed an increase in 5 metabolites, including 3-hydroxybutyric acid, acetone, betaine, N,N-dimethylglycine, and dimethyl sulfone, after RP. To understand these metabolic changes, fasting plasma homocysteine, leptin, adiponectin, and glucagon were measured separately. The plasma homocysteine concentration was lower (P = 0.017) and that of leptin tended to be lower (P = 0.07) after RP intake compared to WP intake. The increase in plasma 3-hydroxybutyric acid and acetone after RP suggests a shift in energy metabolism from anabolic to catabolic status, which could explain some of the beneficial health effects of WG rye, i.e., reduction in prostate-specific antigen and reduced 24-h insulin secretion. In addition, the increase in betaine and N,N-dimethylglycine and the decrease in homocysteine show a favorable shift in homocysteine metabolism after RP

  20. 40 CFR 721.9078 - 6-Methoxy-1H-benz[de]isoquinoline-2 [3H]-dione derivative (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 6-Methoxy-1H-benz isoquinoline-2... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9078 6-Methoxy-1H-benz isoquinoline-2 -dione... substance identified generically as 6-methoxy-1H-benz isoquinoline-2 -dione derivative (PMN P-00-1205)...

  1. Selective observation of biologically important 15N-labeled metabolites in isolated rat brain and liver by 1H-detected multiple-quantum-coherence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.; Parivar, Farhad

    Four cerebral metabolites of importance in neurotransmission, serotonin, L-tryptophan, L-glutamine, and N-acetyl- L-aspartate, and two hepatic urea-cycle intermediates, citrulline and urea, were found to be observable by 1H- 15N heteronuclear multiple-quantum-coherence (HMQC) spectroscopy in aqueous solution at physiological pH and temperature, through the protons spin-coupled to their indole, amide, or ureido nitrogen. Their 1H chemical shifts were well dispersed over a 5-10 ppm region while the 1J 15N- 1H values were 87-99 Hz. For [γ- 15N]glutamine, a 50- to 100-fold increase in sensitivity over direct 15N detection was achieved, in contrast to a 2-fold increase by the polarization-transfer method. In the isolated brain of portacaval-shunted rats, the amide protons of biologically 15N-enriched [γ- 15N]glutamine were observed in 2 min of acquisition, with suppression of proton signals from all other cerebral metabolites. In isolated liver of 15N-enriched control rats, [ 15NIurea protons were observed in 16 min. The HMQC method is likely to be effective for the in vivo study of cerebral and hepatic nitrogen metabolism.

  2. 32 CFR 1630.15 - Class 1-H: Registrant not subject to processing for induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for induction. 1630.15 Section 1630.15 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense... induction. In Class 1-H shall be placed any registrant who is not eligible for Class 1-A and is not currently subject to processing for induction....

  3. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively. PMID:25241007

  4. Synthesis of 1H-Indazoles from Imidates and Nitrosobenzenes via Synergistic Rhodium/Copper Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Xingwei

    2016-05-01

    Nitrosobenzenes have been used as a convenient aminating reagent for the efficient synthesis of 1H-indazoles via rhodium and copper catalyzed C-H activation and C-N/N-N coupling. The reaction occurred under redox-neutral conditions with high efficiency and functional group tolerance. Moreover, a rhodacyclic imidate complex has been identified as a key intermediate. PMID:27082502

  5. 1H NMR determination of urinary betaine in patients with premature vascular disease and mild homocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, P; Dudman, N P; Kuchel, P W; Wilcken, D E

    1995-02-01

    Urinary N,N,N-trimethylglycine (betaine) and N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG) have been identified and quantified for clinical purposes by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) measurement in previous studies. We have assessed these procedures by using both one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D NMR spectroscopy, together with pH titration of urinary extracts to help assign 1H NMR spectral peaks. The betaine calibration curve linearity was excellent (r = 0.997, P = 0.0001) over the concentration range 0.2-1.2 mmol/L, and CVs for replicate betaine analyses ranged from 7% (n = 10) at the lowest concentration to 1% (n = 9) at the highest. The detection limit for betaine was < 15 mumol/L. Urinary DMG concentrations were substantially lower than those of betaine. Urinary betaine and DMG concentrations measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy from 13 patients with premature vascular disease and 17 normal controls provided clinically pertinent data. We conclude that 1H NMR provides unique advantages as a research tool for determination of urinary betaine and DMG concentrations. PMID:7533065

  6. Synthesis of stereospecifically deuterated desoxypodophyllotoxins and 1H-nmr assignment of desoxypodophyllotoxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pullockaran, A. J.; Kingston, D. G.; Lewis, N. G.

    1989-01-01

    [4 beta- 2H1]Desoxypodophyllotoxin [3], [4 alpha- 2H1]desoxypodophyllotoxin [4], and [4, 4- 2 H2]desoxypodophyllotoxin [9] were prepared from podophyllotoxin [1] via its chloride [5]. A complete assignment of the 1H-nmr spectrum of desoxypodophyllotoxin [2] was made on the basis of the spectra of the deuterated compounds [3] and [4].

  7. Aminosilanes derived from 1H-benzimidazole-2(3H)-thione

    SciTech Connect

    Palomo-Molina, Juliana; García-Báez, Efrén V.; Pineda-Urbina, Kayim; Ramos-Organillo, Angel

    2015-08-12

    In two trimethylsilyl-substituted 1H-benzimidazole-2(3H)-thiones, noncovalent C—H⋯π interactions between the centroid of the benzmidazole system and the SiMe{sub 3} groups form helicoidal arrangements in one, and dimerization results in the formation of R{sub s} {sup 2}(8) rings via N—H⋯S interactions, along with parallel π–π interactions between imidazole and benzene rings, in the second compound. Two new molecular structures, namely 1,3-bis(trimethylsilyl)-1H-benzimidazole-2(3H)-thione, C{sub 13}H{sub 22}N{sub 2}SSi{sub 2}, (2), and 1-trimethylsilyl-1H-benzimidazole-2(3H)-thione, C{sub 10}H{sub 14}N{sub 2}SSi, (3), are reported. Both systems were derived from 1H-benzimidazole-2(3H)-thione. Noncovalent C—H⋯π interactions between the centroid of the benzmidazole system and the SiMe{sub 3} groups form helicoidal arrangements in (2). Dimerization of (3) results in the formation of R{sub 2}{sup 2}(8) rings via N—H⋯S interactions, along with parallel π–π interactions between imidazole and benzene rings.

  8. Scalable synthesis of quaterrylene: solution-phase 1H NMR spectroscopy of its oxidative dication.

    PubMed

    Thamatam, Rajesh; Skraba, Sarah L; Johnson, Richard P

    2013-10-14

    Quaterrylene is prepared in a single reaction and high yield by Scholl-type coupling of perylene, utilizing trifluoromethanesulfonic acid as catalyst and DDQ or molecular oxygen as oxidant. Dissolution in 1 M triflic acid/dichloroethane with sonication yields the aromatic quaterrylene oxidative dication, which is characterized by its (1)H NMR spectrum. PMID:23999880

  9. 1H NMR detection of small molecules in human urine with a deep cavitand synthetic receptor.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Daniel A; Rebek, Julius

    2013-02-21

    A water-soluble deep cavitand recognized alkylammonium salts, including the drug amantadine hydrochloride, in spiked samples of human urine. The signals of the guests are detected by (1)H NMR upfield of 0 ppm and so occur in a spectroscopic window that is outside of the normal region and distinct from the signals of the biofluid components. PMID:23304698

  10. Documentation of ice shapes on the main rotor of a UH-1H helicopter in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. D.; Harding, R.; Palko, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A helicopter icing flight test program in the hover mode was conducted with a UH-1H aircraft. The ice formations were documented after landing by means of silicone rubber molds, stereo photography and outline tracings for later use in aerodynamic analyses. The documentation techniques are described and the results presented for a typical flight.

  11. Mutation screen reveals novel variants and expands the phenotypes associated with DYNC1H1.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Alleene V; Schabhüttl, Maria; Offenbacher, Hans; Synofzik, Matthis; Hauser, Natalie S; Brunner-Krainz, Michaela; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Moore, Steven A; Windhager, Reinhard; Bender, Benjamin; Harms, Matthew; Klebe, Stephan; Young, Peter; Kennerson, Marina; Garcia, Avencia Sanchez Mejias; Gonzalez, Michael A; Züchner, Stephan; Schule, Rebecca; Shy, Michael E; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2015-09-01

    Dynein, cytoplasmic 1, heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1) encodes a necessary subunit of the cytoplasmic dynein complex, which traffics cargo along microtubules. Dominant DYNC1H1 mutations are implicated in neural diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity dominance (SMA-LED), intellectual disability with neuronal migration defects, malformations of cortical development, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 2O. We hypothesized that additional variants could be found in these and novel motoneuron and related diseases. Therefore, we analyzed our database of 1024 whole exome sequencing samples of motoneuron and related diseases for novel single nucleotide variations. We filtered these results for significant variants, which were further screened using segregation analysis in available family members. Analysis revealed six novel, rare, and highly conserved variants. Three of these are likely pathogenic and encompass a broad phenotypic spectrum with distinct disease clusters. Our findings suggest that DYNC1H1 variants can cause not only lower, but also upper motor neuron disease. It thus adds DYNC1H1 to the growing list of spastic paraplegia related genes in microtubule-dependent motor protein pathways. PMID:26100331

  12. Molecular Structures from [superscript 1]H NMR Spectra: Education Aided by Internet Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debska, Barbara; Guzowska-Swider, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    The article presents the way in which freeware Internet programs can be applied to teach [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopy. The computer programs described in this article are part of the educational curriculum that explores spectroscopy and spectra interpretation. (Contains 6 figures.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of 1H long lived states derived from parahydrogen induced polarization in a clinical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graafen, Dirk; Franzoni, María Belén; Schreiber, Laura M.; Spiess, Hans W.; Münnemann, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization is a powerful tool to overcome the low sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, applications are limited due to the short lifetime of this non equilibrium spin state caused by relaxation processes. This issue can be addressed by storing hyperpolarization in slowly decaying singlet spin states which was so far mostly demonstrated for non-proton spin pairs, e.g. 13C-13C. Protons hyperpolarized by parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) in symmetrical molecules, are very well suited for this strategy because they naturally exhibit a long-lived singlet state. The conversion of the NMR silent singlet spin state to observable magnetization can be achieved by making use of singlet-triplet level anticrossings. In this study, a low-power radiofrequency pulse sequence is used for this purpose, which allows multiple successive singlet-triplet conversions. The generated magnetization is used to record proton images in a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, after 3 min waiting time. Our results may open unprecedented opportunities to use the standard MRI nucleus 1H for e.g. metabolic imaging in the future.

  14. Bile acids conjugation in human bile is not random: new insights from (1)H-NMR spectroscopy at 800 MHz.

    PubMed

    Nagana Gowda, G A; Shanaiah, Narasimhamurthy; Cooper, Amanda; Maluccio, Mary; Raftery, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    Bile acids constitute a group of structurally closely related molecules and represent the most abundant constituents of human bile. Investigations of bile acids have garnered increased interest owing to their recently discovered additional biological functions including their role as signaling molecules that govern glucose, fat and energy metabolism. Recent NMR methodological developments have enabled single-step analysis of several highly abundant and common glycine- and taurine- conjugated bile acids, such as glycocholic acid, glycodeoxycholic acid, glycochenodeoxycholic acid, taurocholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and taurochenodeoxycholic acid. Investigation of these conjugated bile acids in human bile employing high field (800 MHz) (1)H-NMR spectroscopy reveals that the ratios between two glycine-conjugated bile acids and their taurine counterparts correlate positively (R2 = 0.83-0.97; p = 0.001 x 10(-2)-0.006 x 10(-7)) as do the ratios between a glycine-conjugated bile acid and its taurine counterpart (R2 = 0.92-0.95; p = 0.004 x 10(-3)-0.002 x 10(-10)). Using such correlations, concentration of individual bile acids in each sample could be predicted in good agreement with the experimentally determined values. These insights into the pattern of bile acid conjugation in human bile between glycine and taurine promise useful clues to the mechanism of bile acids' biosynthesis, conjugation and enterohepatic circulation, and may improve our understanding of the role of individual conjugated bile acids in health and disease. PMID:19373503

  15. (1) H NMR spectroscopy of glioblastoma stem-like cells identifies alpha-aminoadipate as a marker of tumor aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Rosi, Antonella; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Biffoni, Mauro; Grande, Sveva; Luciani, Anna Maria; Palma, Alessandra; Runci, Daniele; Cappellari, Marianna; De Maria, Ruggero; Guidoni, Laura; Pallini, Roberto; Viti, Vincenza

    2015-03-01

    Patients suffering from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) face a poor prognosis with median survival of about 14 months. High recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are attributed to the presence of GBM cells with stem-like properties (GSCs). Metabolite profiles of 42 GSC lines established from the tumor tissue of adult GBM patients were screened with (1) H NMR spectroscopy and compared with human neural progenitor cells from human adult olfactory bulb (OB-NPCs) and from the developing human brain (HNPCs). A first subset (n=12) of GSCs exhibited a dramatic accumulation of the metabolite α-aminoadipate (αAAD), product of the oxidation of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde catalyzed by the ALDH7A1 aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) family in lysine catabolism. αAAD was low/not detectable in a second GSC subset (n=13) with the same neural metabolic profile as well as in a third GSC subset (n=17) characterized by intense lipid signals. Likewise, αAAD was not detected in the spectra of OB-NPCs or HNPCs. Inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthase by oligomycin treatment revealed that the lysine degradative pathway leading to αAAD formation proceeds through saccharopine, as usually observed in developing brain. Survival curves indicated that high αAAD levels in GSCs significantly correlated with poor patient survival, similarly to prostate and non-small-cell-lung cancers, where activity of ALDH7A1 correlates with tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25581615

  16. Dolphin: a tool for automatic targeted metabolite profiling using 1D and 2D (1)H-NMR data.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Josep; Brezmes, Jesús; Mallol, Roger; Rodríguez, Miguel A; Vinaixa, Maria; Salek, Reza M; Correig, Xavier; Cañellas, Nicolau

    2014-12-01

    One of the main challenges in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics is to obtain valuable metabolic information from large datasets of raw NMR spectra in a high throughput, automatic, and reproducible way. To date, established software packages used to match and quantify metabolites in NMR spectra remain mostly manually operated, leading to low resolution results and subject to inconsistencies not attributable to the NMR technique itself. Here, we introduce a new software package, called Dolphin, able to automatically quantify a set of target metabolites in multiple sample measurements using an approach based on 1D and 2D NMR techniques to overcome the inherent limitations of 1D (1)H-NMR spectra in metabolomics. Dolphin takes advantage of the 2D J-resolved NMR spectroscopy signal dispersion to avoid inconsistencies in signal position detection, enhancing the reliability and confidence in metabolite matching. Furthermore, in order to improve accuracy in quantification, Dolphin uses 2D NMR spectra to obtain additional information on all neighboring signals surrounding the target metabolite. We have compared the targeted profiling results of Dolphin, recorded from standard biological mixtures, with those of two well established approaches in NMR metabolomics. Overall, Dolphin produced more accurate results with the added advantage of being a fully automated and high throughput processing package. PMID:25370160

  17. Structural and Functional Diversities of the Hexadecahydro-1H-cyclopenta[a]phenanthrene Framework, a Ubiquitous Scaffold in Steroidal Hormones.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Chinmayee; Deva Priyakumar, U; Narahari Sastry, G

    2016-04-01

    Hexadecahydro-1H-cyclopenta[a]phenanthrene framework (HHCPF) has been considered as one of the privileged scaffolds due to its versatile presence in many biologically essential molecules. In our quest to unravel the privileged nature of this framework, we undertook a systematic analysis of target binding and Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Elimination, Toxicity (ADMET)/physicochemical properties of 110 drugs containing HHCPF reported in DrugBank. Effect of number and positions of double bonds in the framework and substitutions at each carbon position on the target selectivity as well as drug like properties of these drugs were studied. Fifteen different scaffolds based on the numbers and positions of double bonds in the HHCPF were identified among these drugs. The optimum number of double bonds present in the HHCPF scaffolds was observed to be one to three, and one particular positional isomer is predominant among many scaffolds with same numbers of double bonds. Docking studies reveal the role of substituents at different positions to make specific interactions with their respective targets. Based on the docking interactions, we proposed structure based e-Pharmacophore models for seven important targets of HHCPF drugs. Good correlations were observed between the substitutions carbon positions 3 and 17 of the scaffolds and ADMET properties of the HHCPF drugs. This work enables preliminary prediction of the target selectivity and ADMET properties of a new HHCPF molecule based on the scaffold, substituents and the pharmacophoric features. PMID:27491924

  18. Non-invasive Monitoring of Lactate Dynamics in Human Forearm Muscle After Exhaustive Exercise by 1H-MRS at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jimin; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Despite its importance in energy metabolism, lactate in human skeletal muscle has been difficult to detect by non-invasive 1H MRS mainly due to interference from large water and lipid signals. Long echo-time (TE) acquisitions at 7 Tesla effectively attenuates the water and lipid signals in forearm muscle allowing direct observation of both lactate resonances, the methine at 4.09 ppm and the methyl at 1.31 ppm. Using this approach, we are able to monitor lactate dynamics at a temporal resolution of 32 sec. While lactate was not detectable at rest, immediately after an acute period of exercise to fatigue the forearm muscle, lactate rose to a level comparable to that of creatine (~30 mmol/kg wet weight). In a typical 1H MR spectrum collected using a TE of 140 ms, the lactate methine and methyl resonances both appear as doublets with an unusually large splitting of ~20 Hz due to residual dipolar coupling. During muscle recovery following exercise, the lactate signals decay rapidly with a time constant of t½ = 2.0 ± 0.6 min (n = 12 subjects). This fast and simple lactate detection method may prove valuable for monitoring lactate metabolism in cancer and in sports medicine applications. PMID:23192863

  19. NMR profiling of biomolecules at natural abundance using 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C multiplicity-separated (MS) HSQC spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Freedberg, Darón I.; Keire, David A.

    2015-02-01

    2D NMR 1H-X (X = 15N or 13C) HSQC spectra contain cross-peaks for all XHn moieties. Multiplicity-edited1H-13C HSQC pulse sequences generate opposite signs between peaks of CH2 and CH/CH3 at a cost of lower signal-to-noise due to the 13C T2 relaxation during an additional 1/1JCH period. Such CHn-editing experiments are useful in assignment of chemical shifts and have been successfully applied to small molecules and small proteins (e.g. ubiquitin) dissolved in deuterated solvents where, generally, peak overlap is minimal. By contrast, for larger biomolecules, peak overlap in 2D HSQC spectra is unavoidable and peaks with opposite phases cancel each other out in the edited spectra. However, there is an increasing need for using NMR to profile biomolecules at natural abundance dissolved in water (e.g., protein therapeutics) where NMR experiments beyond 2D are impractical. Therefore, the existing 2D multiplicity-edited HSQC methods must be improved to acquire data on nuclei other than 13C (i.e.15N), to resolve more peaks, to reduce T2 losses and to accommodate water suppression approaches. To meet these needs, a multiplicity-separated1H-X HSQC (MS-HSQC) experiment was developed and tested on 500 and 700 MHz NMR spectrometers equipped with room temperature probes using RNase A (14 kDa) and retroviral capsid (26 kDa) proteins dissolved in 95% H2O/5% D2O. In this pulse sequence, the 1/1JXH editing-period is incorporated into the semi-constant time (semi-CT) X resonance chemical shift evolution period, which increases sensitivity, and importantly, the sum and the difference of the interleaved 1JXH-active and the 1JXH-inactive HSQC experiments yield two separate spectra for XH2 and XH/XH3. Furthermore we demonstrate improved water suppression using triple xyz-gradients instead of the more widely used z-gradient only water-suppression approach.

  20. High resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance of a transmembrane peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J. H.; Auger, M.; Hodges, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Although the strong 1H-1H dipolar interaction is known to result in severe homogeneous broadening of the 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of ordered systems, in the fluid phase of biological and model membranes the rapid, axially symmetric reorientation of the molecules about the local bilayer normal projects the dipolar interaction onto the motional symmetry axis. Because the linewidth then scales as (3 cos2 theta-1)/2, where theta is the angle between the local bilayer normal and the magnetic field, the dipolar broadening has been reduced to an "inhomogeneous" broadening by the rapid axial reorientation. It is then possible to obtain high resolution 1H-NMR spectra of membrane components by using magic angle spinning (MAS). Although the rapid axial reorientation effectively eliminates the homogeneous dipolar broadening, including that due to n = 0 rotational resonances, the linewidths observed in both lipids and peptides are dominated by low frequency motions. For small peptides the most likely slow motions are either a "wobble" or reorientation of the molecular diffusion axis relative to the local bilayer normal, or the reorientation of the local bilayer normal itself through surface undulations or lateral diffusion over the curved surface. These motions render the peptide 1H-NMR lines too broad to be observed at low spinning speeds. However, the linewidths due to these slow motions are very sensitive to spinning rate, so that at higher speeds the lines become readily visible. The synthetic amphiphilic peptide K2GL20K2A-amide (peptide-20) has been incorporated into bilayers of 1,2-di-d 27-myristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC-d54) and studied by high speed 1H-MAS-NMR. The linewidths observed for this transbilayer peptide, although too broad to be observable at spinning rates below -5 kHz, are reduced to 68 Hz at a spinning speed of 14 kHz (at 500C). Further improvements in spinning speed and modifications in sample composition designed to reduce

  1. MTR and In-vivo 1H-MRS studies on mouse brain with parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Moon-Hyun; Kim, Hyeon-Jin; Chung, Jin-Yeung; Doo, Ah-Reum; Park, Hi-Joon; Kim, Seung-Nam; Choe, Bo-Young

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the changes in the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) histogram are related to specific characteristics of Parkinson's disease (PD) and to investigate whether the MTR histogram parameters are associated with neurochemical dysfunction by performing in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). MTR and in vivo 1H-MRS studies were performed on control mice (n = 10) and 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine intoxicated mice (n = 10). All the MTR and in vivo 1H-MRS experiments were performed on a 9.4 T MRI/MRS system (Bruker Biospin, Germany) using a standard head coil. The protondensity fast spin echo (FSE) images and the T2-weighted spin echo (SE) images were acquired with no gap. Outer volume suppression (OVS), combined with the ultra-short echo-time stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM), was used for the localized in-vivo 1H-MRS. The quantitative analysis of metabolites was performed from the 1H spectra obtained in vivo on the striatum (ST) by using jMRUI (Lyon, France). The peak height of the MTR histograms in the PD model group was significantly lower than that in the control group (p < 0.05). The midbrain MTR values for volume were lower in the PD group than the control group(p < 0.05). The complex peak (Glx: glutamine+glutamate+ GABA)/creatine (Cr) ratio of the right ST in the PD group was significantly increased as compared to that of the control group. The present study revealed that the peak height of the MTR histogram was significantly decreased in the ST and substantia nigra, and a significant increase in the Gl x /Cr ratio was found in the ST of the PD group, as compared with that of the control group. These findings could reflect the early phase of neuronal dysfunction of neurotransmitters.

  2. Translational diffusion in paramagnetic liquids by 1H NMR relaxometry: Nitroxide radicals in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-01-01

    For nitroxide radicals in solution one can identify three frequency regimes in which 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate of solvent molecules depend linearly on square root of the 1H resonance frequency. Combining a recently developed theory of nuclear (proton) spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of nitroxide radicals [D. Kruk et al., J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854 with properties of the spectral density function associated with translational dynamics, relationships between the corresponding linear changes of the relaxation rate (for 14N spin probes) and relative translational diffusion coefficient of the solvent and solute molecules have been derived (in analogy to 15N spin probes [E. Belorizky et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 3674 (1998)], 10.1021/jp980397h). This method allows a simple and straightforward determination of diffusion coefficients in spin-labeled systems, by means of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The approach has thoroughly been tested by applying to a large set of experimental data—1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion results for solutions of different viscosity (decalin, glycerol, propylene glycol) of 14N and 15N spin probes. The experiments have been performed versus temperature (to cover a broad range of translational diffusion coefficients) using field cycling spectrometer which covers three decades in 1H resonance frequency, 10 kHz-20 MHz. The limitations of NMR relaxometry caused by the time scale of the translational dynamics as well as electron spin relaxation have been discussed. It has been shown that for spin-labeled systems NMR relaxometry gives access to considerably faster diffusion processes than for diamagnetic systems.

  3. Mutations in the tail domain of DYNC1H1 cause dominant spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Harms, M.B.; Ori-McKenney, K.M.; Scoto, M.; Tuck, E.P.; Bell, S.; Ma, D.; Masi, S.; Allred, P.; Al-Lozi, M.; Reilly, M.M.; Miller, L.J.; Jani-Acsadi, A.; Pestronk, A.; Shy, M.E.; Muntoni, F.; Vallee, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the gene responsible for 14q32-linked dominant spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMA-LED, OMIM 158600). Methods: Target exon capture and next generation sequencing was used to analyze the 73 genes in the 14q32 linkage interval in 3 SMA-LED family members. Candidate gene sequencing in additional dominant SMA families used PCR and pooled target capture methods. Patient fibroblasts were biochemically analyzed. Results: Regional exome sequencing of all candidate genes in the 14q32 interval in the original SMA-LED family identified only one missense mutation that segregated with disease state—a mutation in the tail domain of DYNC1H1 (I584L). Sequencing of DYNC1H1 in 32 additional probands with lower extremity predominant SMA found 2 additional heterozygous tail domain mutations (K671E and Y970C), confirming that multiple different mutations in the same domain can cause a similar phenotype. Biochemical analysis of dynein purified from patient-derived fibroblasts demonstrated that the I584L mutation dominantly disrupted dynein complex stability and function. Conclusions: We demonstrate that mutations in the tail domain of the heavy chain of cytoplasmic dynein (DYNC1H1) cause spinal muscular atrophy and provide experimental evidence that a human DYNC1H1 mutation disrupts dynein complex assembly and function. DYNC1H1 mutations were recently found in a family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (type 2O) and in a child with mental retardation. Both of these phenotypes show partial overlap with the spinal muscular atrophy patients described here, indicating that dynein dysfunction is associated with a range of phenotypes in humans involving neuronal development and maintenance. PMID:22459677

  4. Achievement of 1 H-19 F heteronuclear experiments using the conventional spectrometer with a shared single high band amplifier.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Chiseko; Kurita, Jun-ichi; Furihata, Kazuo; Tashiro, Mitsuru

    2015-05-01

    The (1)H-(19) F heteronuclear NMR experiments were achieved using the conventional spectrometer equipped with a single high band amplifier and a (1)H/(19)F/(13) C double-tuned probe. Although double high band amplifiers are generally required to perform such experiments, a simple modification of pathway in the conventional spectrometer was capable of acquiring various (1)H-(19)F heteronuclear spectra. The efficiency of the present technique was demonstrated in an application for (19)F{(1)H} and (1)H{(19)F} saturation transfer difference experiments. PMID:25808615

  5. Crystal structures of the two salts 2-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium nitrate–2-methyl-1H-imidazole (1/1) and 2-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Diop, Mouhamadou Birame; Diop, Libasse; Maris, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The title salts, C4H7N2 +·NO3 −·C4H6N2, (I), and C4H7N2 +·NO3 −, (II), were obtained from solutions containing 2-methyl­imidazole and nitric acid in different concentrations. In the crystal structure of salt (I), one of the –NH H atoms of the imidazole ring shows half-occupancy, hence only every second mol­ecule is in its cationic form. The nitrate anion in this structure lies on a twofold rotation axis. The neutral 2-methyl­imidazole mol­ecule and the 2-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium cation inter­act through N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds to form [(C4H6N2)⋯(C4H7N2)+] pairs. These pairs are linked with two nitrate anions on both sides through bifurcated N—H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds into chains running parallel to [001]. In the crystal structure of salt (II), the C4H7N2 + cation and the NO3 − anion are both located on a mirror plane, leading to a statistical disorder of the methyl H atoms. The cations and anions again inter­act through bifurcated N—H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds, giving rise to the formation of chains consisting of alternating anions and cations parallel to [100]. PMID:27375869

  6. Crystal structures of the two salts 2-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium nitrate-2-methyl-1H-imidazole (1/1) and 2-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium nitrate.

    PubMed

    Diop, Mouhamadou Birame; Diop, Libasse; Maris, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    The title salts, C4H7N2 (+)·NO3 (-)·C4H6N2, (I), and C4H7N2 (+)·NO3 (-), (II), were obtained from solutions containing 2-methyl-imidazole and nitric acid in different concentrations. In the crystal structure of salt (I), one of the -NH H atoms of the imidazole ring shows half-occupancy, hence only every second mol-ecule is in its cationic form. The nitrate anion in this structure lies on a twofold rotation axis. The neutral 2-methyl-imidazole mol-ecule and the 2-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium cation inter-act through N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds to form [(C4H6N2)⋯(C4H7N2)(+)] pairs. These pairs are linked with two nitrate anions on both sides through bifurcated N-H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds into chains running parallel to [001]. In the crystal structure of salt (II), the C4H7N2 (+) cation and the NO3 (-) anion are both located on a mirror plane, leading to a statistical disorder of the methyl H atoms. The cations and anions again inter-act through bifurcated N-H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds, giving rise to the formation of chains consisting of alternating anions and cations parallel to [100]. PMID:27375869

  7. Synthesis, Biological Activity, and NMR-Based Structural Studies of Deltorphin I Analogs Modified in Message Domain with a New α,α-Disubstituted Glycines.

    PubMed

    Lasota, Anika; Frączak, Oliwia; Muchowska, Adriana; Nowakowski, Michał; Maciejczyk, Maciej; Ejchart, Andrzej; Olma, Aleksandra

    2016-06-01

    This article describes new deltorphin I analogs in which phenylalanine residues were replaced by the corresponding (R) or (S)-α-benzyl-β-azidoalanine, α-benzyl-β-(1-pyrrolidinyl)alanine, α-benzyl-β-(1-piperidinyl)alanine, and α-benzyl-β-(4-morpholinyl)-alanine residues. The potency and selectivity of the new analogs were evaluated by a competitive receptor binding assay in the rat brain using [(3) H]DAMGO (a μ ligand) and [(3) H]DELT (a δ ligand). The affinity of analogs containing (R) or (S)-α-benzyl-β-azidoalanine in position 3 to δ-receptors strongly depended on the chirality of the α,α-disubstituted residue. The conformational behavior of peptides modified with (R) or (S)-α-benzyl-β-(1-piperidinyl)Ala, which displays the opposite selectivity, was analyzed by (1) H and (13) C NMR. The μ-selective Tyr-d-Ala-(R)-α-benzyl-β-(1-piperidinyl)Ala-Asp-Val-Val-Gly-NH2 lacks the helical conformation observed in the δ-selective Tyr-d-Ala-(S)-α-benzyl-β-(1-piperidinyl)Ala-Asp-Val-Val-Gly-NH2 . Our results support the proposal that differences between δ- and μ-selective opioid peptides are attributable to the presence or absence of a spatial overlap between the N-terminal message domain and the C-terminal address domain. PMID:26808639

  8. The Development and Application of Novel IR and NMR-Based Model for the Evaluation of Carminative Effect of Artemisia judaica L. Essential Oil

    PubMed Central

    Alzweiri, Muhammed; Alrawashdeh, Ibrahim M.; Bardaweel, Sanaa K.

    2014-01-01

    Artemisia judaica L. is a medicinal plant that is traditionally used to relieve abdominal pains through its carminative activity. In this study, spectroscopic analysis was employed to investigate the carminative activity associated with A. judaica. Using infrared spectroscopy, the carminative activity was evaluated based on the first derivative of IR-characteristic stretching signal of CO2. Our results indicate that A. judaica oil effectively reduced the response of CO2 signal equivalent to thymol standard. Additionally, 1H-NMR spectroscopy was utilized to assess surface activity of A. judaica crude oil through the reduction of interfacial tension in a D2O/CDCl3 system. Apparently, 10 mg of the oil was able to solubilize water in a chloroform layer up to 4.3% (w/w). In order to correlate the observed surface activity of the oil to its actual composition, GC-MS and GC-FID structural analysis were undertaken. The results revealed that the oil composition consists of oxygenated terpenes which might be responsible for the carminative effect. Furthermore, owing to its sensitivity, our model provides a fundamental basis for the pharmacological assessment of trace amounts of oils with high precision and accuracy. PMID:25614741

  9. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone your body produces to help ... into energy for your body. If you are insulin resistant, too much sugar builds up in your ...

  10. Metabolic Myopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles. Metabolic refers to chemical reactions that provide energy, nutrients and substances necessary for health and growth. ... occur when muscle cells don’t get enough energy. Without enough energy, the muscle lacks enough fuel ...

  11. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... is not known but genetic factors, too much body fat (especially in the waist area, the most dangerous ... Metabolic Risk Factors Measurement Large amount of abdominal body fat Waist measurement of more than 40 inches (101 ...

  12. Metabolomic analysis of glycerophospholipid signatures of inflammation treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced-RAW264.7 cells using (1)H NMR and U-HPLC/Q-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xia; Cao, Han; Zhao, Lifang; Song, Jianao; She, Yuqi; Feng, Yifan

    2016-08-15

    Non-destructive proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy and highly sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (U-HPLC/Q-TOF-MS) coupled to data processing methods were applied to analyze the metabolic profiling changes of glycerophospholipids (GPLs) in RAW264.7 cells from inflammation to prognosis. Analysis of (1)H NMR was shown that the models were grouped successfully, illustrating that all of them had significant differences. Based on the highly simple, accurate, non-targeted and non-destructively advantages of (1)H NMR, it could be used as a new screening tool of anti-inflammatory drugs in the metabolic profiling of GPLs. 58 GPLs were identified by U-HPLC/Q-TOF-MS, and 19 components were firstly identified in this study compared with our previous results. In addition, ten potential biomarkers were proved, of which phosphatidylcholine (PC) (16:0/18:1) and (18:0/18:1) changed consistently in three drug-induced groups and might be the important biomarkers. Compared with (1)H NMR, U-HPLC/Q-TOF-MS showed higher sensitivity and specificity and was more suitable for the determination of biomarkers apart from the deficiency of time-consuming sample preparation steps and unambiguous metabolite identification. Therefore, it is feasible to analyze the changes of GPLs during inflammation by combining (1)H NMR spectroscopy with U-HPLC/Q-TOF-MS. The metabolic profiling of GPLs provides valuable evidence for inflammation diagnosis and prognosis, and might unravel the mechanisms involved in inflammation progression. PMID:27371817

  13. Prospective Motion Correction for Single-Voxel 1H MR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Brian; Deng, Weiran; Roddey, J. Cooper; White, Nathan; Dale, Anders; Stenger, V. Andrew; Ernst, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Head motion during 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS) acquisitions may compromise the quality and reliability of in vivo metabolite measurements. Therefore, a 3-plane image-based motion tracking module was integrated into a single-voxel 1H MRS (PRESS) sequence. A series of 3 orthogonal spiral navigator images were acquired immediately prior to the MRS water suppression module in order to estimate head motion. By applying the appropriate rotations and translations, the MRS voxel position can be updated such that it remains stationary with respect to the brain. Frequency and phase corrections were applied during post-processing to reduce line-width and restore coherent averaging. Spectra acquired during intentional head motion in 11 volunteers demonstrate reduced lipid contamination and increased spectral reproducibility when motion correction is applied. PMID:20806374

  14. Improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme for (1)H and (13)C NMR Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kapaev, Roman R; Toukach, Philip V

    2015-07-21

    The improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme has been developed for the simulation of (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra of oligo- and polysaccharides and their derivatives, including those containing noncarbohydrate constituents found in natural glycans. Besides adding the (1)H NMR calculations, we improved the accuracy and performance of prediction and optimized the mathematical model of the precision estimation. This new approach outperformed other methods of chemical shift simulation, including database-driven, neural net-based, and purely empirical methods and quantum-mechanical calculations at high theory levels. It can process structures with rarely occurring and noncarbohydrate constituents unsupported by the other methods. The algorithm is transparent to users and allows tracking used reference NMR data to original publications. It was implemented in the Glycan-Optimized Dual Empirical Spectrum Simulation (GODESS) web service, which is freely available at the platform of the Carbohydrate Structure Database (CSDB) project ( http://csdb.glycoscience.ru). PMID:26087011

  15. 1H NMR profiling as an approach to differentiate conventionally and organically grown tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Monika; Christoph, Norbert; Wachter, Helmut; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2014-08-20

    This study describes the approach of (1)H NMR profiling for the authentication of organically produced tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum). Overall, 361 tomato samples of two different cultivars and four different producers were regularly analyzed during a 7 month period. The results of principal component analysis showed a significant trend for the separation between organically and conventionally produced tomatoes (p < 0.001 using the t test). Linear discriminant analysis demonstrated good discrimination between the growing regimens, and external validation showed 100% correctly classified tomato samples. Further validation studies, however, also disclosed unexpected differences between individual producers, which interfere with the aim of predicting the cultivation method, yet the results indicate significant differences between (1)H NMR spectra of organically and conventionally grown tomatoes. PMID:25066078

  16. Exploring the 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indole scaffold as a novel antimalarial chemotype.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sofia A; Lukens, Amanda K; Coelho, Lis; Nogueira, Fátima; Wirth, Dyann F; Mazitschek, Ralph; Moreira, Rui; Paulo, Alexandra

    2015-09-18

    A series of 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indoles with building block diversity was synthesized based on a hit derived from an HTS whole-cell screen against Plasmodium falciparum. Thirty-eight compounds were obtained following a three-step synthetic approach and evaluated for anti-parasitic activity. The SAR shows that 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indole is intolerant to most N-piperidinyl modifications. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a new compound (10d) with lead-like properties (MW = 305; cLogP = 2.42), showing antimalarial activity against drug-resistant and sensitive strains (EC50 values ∼ 3 μM), selectivity for malaria parasite and no cross-resistance with chloroquine, thus representing a potential new chemotype for further optimization towards novel and affordable antimalarial drugs. PMID:26295174

  17. Generation of heteronuclear 13C 1H chemical-shift correlations using soft pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doddrell, David M.; Brooks, William; Field, James; Lynden-Bell, R. M.

    Two multipulse sequences are analyzed which can be used to generate heteronuclear 13C, 1H chemical-shift correlations without 2D NMR techniques. Both sequences utilize polarization-transfer techniques and generate the required chemical-shift correlation using a single soft proton pulse. The most useful technique is an extension of the DEPT method of polarization transfer since not only are the chemical-shift correlations generated in an easy to interpret form, but depending on the specific form of the pulse train used, the method can be employed to obtain information on the CH n group multiplicity. The methods are illustrated by applying them to generate 13C, 1H chemical-shift correlation spectra for menthol and cholesterol.

  18. Evaluation of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) adulteration with plant adulterants by (1)H NMR metabolite fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Petrakis, Eleftherios A; Cagliani, Laura R; Polissiou, Moschos G; Consonni, Roberto

    2015-04-15

    In the present work, a preliminary study for the detection of adulterated saffron and the identification of the adulterant used by means of (1)H NMR and chemometrics is reported. Authentic Greek saffron and four typical plant-derived materials utilised as bulking agents in saffron, i.e., Crocus sativus stamens, safflower, turmeric, and gardenia were investigated. A two-step approach, relied on the application of both OPLS-DA and O2PLS-DA models to the (1)H NMR data, was adopted to perform authentication and prediction of authentic and adulterated saffron. Taking into account the deficiency of established methodologies to detect saffron adulteration with plant adulterants, the method developed resulted reliable in assessing the type of adulteration and could be viable for dealing with extensive saffron frauds at a minimum level of 20% (w/w). PMID:25466103

  19. Efficient dipolar double quantum filtering under magic angle spinning without a 1H decoupling field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Joseph M.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-08-01

    We present a systematic study of dipolar double quantum (DQ) filtering in 13C-labeled organic solids over a range of magic-angle spinning rates, using the SPC-n recoupling sequence element with a range of n symmetry values from 3 to 11. We find that efficient recoupling can be achieved for values n ⩾ 7, provided that the 13C nutation frequency is on the order of 100 kHz or greater. The decoupling-field dependence was investigated and explicit heteronuclear decoupling interference conditions identified. The major determinant of DQ filtering efficiency is the decoupling interference between 13C and 1H fields. For 13C nutation frequencies greater than 75 kHz, optimal performance is observed without an applied 1H field. At spinning rates exceeding 20 kHz, symmetry conditions as low as n = 3 were found to perform adequately.

  20. Total (1)H NMR assignment of 3β-acetoxypregna-5,16-dien-20-one.

    PubMed

    Becerra-Martinez, Elvia; Ramírez-Gualito, Karla E; Pérez-Hernández, Nury; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    This work describes the total and unambiguous assignment of the 750 MHz (1)H NMR spectrum of 3β-acetoxypregna-5,16-dien-20-one or 16-DPA (1), the well-known intermediate utilized in the synthesis of biological important commercial steroids. The task was accomplished by extracting the coupling constant values in the overlapped spectrum region by HSQC, and using these values in the (1)H iterative full spin analysis integrated in the PERCH NMR software. Comparison of the experimental vicinal coupling constants of 1 with the values calculated using Altona provides an excellent correlation. The same procedure, when applied to the published data of progesterone (2) and testosterone (3), afforded an acceptable correlation for 2 and a poor correlation for 3. In the last case, this suggested the reassignment of all four vicinal coupling constants for the methylene signals at the C-15 and C-16 positions, demonstrating the utility of this methodology. PMID:26476187

  1. Study on 1H-NMR fingerprinting of Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shi-yuan; Zhou, Jiang-tao; Chen, Yan-yan; Ding, Li-qin; Jiang, Miao-miao

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) fingerprint of Rhodiola rosea medicinal materials was established, and used to distinguish the quality of raw materials from different sources. Pulse sequence for water peak inhibition was employed to acquire 1H-NMR spectra with the temperature at 298 K and spectrometer frequency of 400.13 MHz. Through subsection integral method, the obtained NMR data was subjected to similarity analysis and principal component analysis (PCA). 10 batches raw materials of Rhodiola rosea from different origins were successfully distinguished by PCA. The statistical results indicated that rhodiola glucoside, butyl alcohol, maleic acid and alanine were the main differential ingredients. This method provides an auxiliary method of Chinese quality approach to evaluate the quality of Rhodiola crenulata without using natural reference substances. PMID:26697690

  2. Digital NMR Profiles as Building Blocks: Assembling 1H Fingerprints of Steviol Glycosides

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, José G.; Simmler, Charlotte; McAlpine, James B.; Lankin, David C.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a fragment-based approach to the examination of congeneric organic compounds by NMR spectroscopy. The method combines the classic interpretation of 1D- and 2D-NMR data sets with contemporary computer-assisted NMR analysis. Characteristic NMR profiles of key structural motifs were generated by 1H iterative full spin analysis and then joined together as building blocks to recreate the 1H NMR spectra of increasingly complex molecules. To illustrate the methodology described, a comprehensive analysis of steviol (1), seven steviol glycosides (2–8) and two structurally related isosteviol compounds (9, 10) was carried out. The study also assessed the potential impact of this method on relevant aspects of natural product research including structural verification, chemical dereplication, and mixture analysis. PMID:25714117

  3. Sequential acquisition of multi-dimensional heteronuclear chemical shift correlation spectra with 1H detection

    PubMed Central

    Bellstedt, Peter; Ihle, Yvonne; Wiedemann, Christoph; Kirschstein, Anika; Herbst, Christian; Görlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2014-01-01

    RF pulse schemes for the simultaneous acquisition of heteronuclear multi-dimensional chemical shift correlation spectra, such as {HA(CA)NH & HA(CACO)NH}, {HA(CA)NH & H(N)CAHA} and {H(N)CAHA & H(CC)NH}, that are commonly employed in the study of moderately-sized protein molecules, have been implemented using dual sequential 1H acquisitions in the direct dimension. Such an approach is not only beneficial in terms of the reduction of experimental time as compared to data collection via two separate experiments but also facilitates the unambiguous sequential linking of the backbone amino acid residues. The potential of sequential 1H data acquisition procedure in the study of RNA is also demonstrated here. PMID:24671105

  4. Nonvortical Rashba Spin Structure on a Surface with C1 h Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annese, Emilia; Kuzumaki, Takuya; Müller, Beate; Yamamoto, Yuta; Nakano, Hiroto; Kato, Haruki; Araki, Atsushi; Ohtaka, Minoru; Aoki, Takashi; Ishikawa, Hirotaka; Hayashida, Takashi; Osiecki, Jacek R.; Miyamoto, Koji; Takeichi, Yasuo; Harasawa, Ayumi; Yaji, Koichiro; Shirasawa, Tetsuroh; Nittoh, Koh-ichi; Yang, Wooil; Miki, Kazushi; Oda, Tatsuki; Yeom, Han Woong; Sakamoto, Kazuyuki

    2016-07-01

    A totally anisotropic peculiar Rashba-Bychkov (RB) splitting of electronic bands was found on the Tl /Si (110 )-(1 ×1 ) surface with C1 h symmetry by angle- and spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and first-principles theoretical calculation. The constant energy contour of the upper branch of the RB split band has a warped elliptical shape centered at a k point located between Γ ¯ and the edge of the surface Brillouin zone, i.e., at a