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Sample records for 1h resonance frequency

  1. Resonance frequency in ferromagnetic superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Rong-ke; Huang, An-dong; Li, Da; Zhang, Zhi-dong

    2011-10-01

    The resonance frequency in two-layer and three-layer ferromagnetic superlattices is studied, using the Callen's Green function method, the Tyablikov decoupling approximation and the Anderson-Callen decoupling approximation. The effects of interlayer exchange coupling, anisotropy, external magnetic field and temperature on the resonance frequency are investigated. It is found that the resonance frequencies increase with increasing external magnetic field. In a parameter region of the asymmetric system, each sublayer corresponds to its own resonance frequency. The anisotropy of a sublayer affects only the resonance frequency corresponding to this sublayer. The stronger the anisotropy, the higher is the resonance frequency. The interlayer exchange coupling affects only the resonance frequencies belonging to the sublayers connected by it. The stronger the interlayer exchange coupling, the higher are the resonance frequencies. All the resonance frequencies decrease as the reduced temperature increases. The results direct the method to enhance and adjust the resonance frequency of magnetic multilayered materials with a wide band.

  2. Double tuned 23Na 1H nuclear magnetic resonance birdcage for application on mice in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, Titus; Ruff, Jan; Weisser, Alexander; Haase, Axel

    2001-05-01

    The design and the characterization of a double tuned nuclear magnetic birdcage resonator is presented. It abandons quadrature drive and uses the two orthogonal modes of the birdcage for two different frequencies. In order to tune the birdcage to frequencies that are far apart, the number of legs is reduced to only four. This limits the homogeneity of the rf field, but enables the birdcage to be tuned to very different frequencies without further B1 field distortions. Following a brief explanation of the theory of the coil design, a 23Na 1H four leg birdcage for in vivo measurements on mice is presented. The performance of the coil is demonstrated in experiments on both a phantom and a mouse.

  3. Resonance beyond frequency-matching: multidimensional resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Mingzhe; Wang, Ruifang

    2017-03-01

    Resonance, conventionally defined as the oscillation of a system when the temporal frequency of an external stimulus matches a natural frequency of the system, is important in both fundamental physics and applied disciplines. However, the spatial character of oscillation is not considered in this definition. We reveal the creation of spatial resonance when the stimulus matches the space pattern of a normal mode in an oscillating system. The complete resonance, which we call multidimensional resonance, should be a combination of both the temporal and the spatial resonance. We further elucidate that the spin wave produced by multidimensional resonance drives considerably faster reversal of the vortex core in a magnetic nanodisc. Multidimensional resonance provides insight into the nature of wave dynamics and opens the door to novel applications.

  4. Negative-Frequency Resonant Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, E.; McLenaghan, J.; Kehr, S. C.; Belgiorno, F.; Townsend, D.; Rohr, S.; Kuklewicz, C. E.; Leonhardt, U.; König, F.; Faccio, D.

    2012-06-01

    Optical solitons or solitonlike states shed light to blueshifted frequencies through a resonant emission process. We predict a mechanism by which a second propagating mode is generated. This mode, called negative resonant radiation, originates from the coupling of the soliton mode to the negative-frequency branch of the dispersion relation. Measurements in both bulk media and photonic-crystal fibers confirm our predictions.

  5. Complete Assignment of (1)H-NMR Resonances of the King Cobra Neurotoxin CM-11.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu-Xi; Liu, Wei-Dong; Liu, Ai-Zhuo; Pei, Feng-Kui

    1997-01-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus Hannah) neurotoxin CM-Il is long-chain peptide with 72 amino acid residues. Its complete assignment of (1)H-NMR resonances was obtained using various 2D-NMR technologies, including DQF-COSY, clean-TOCSY and NOESY.

  6. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  7. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  8. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  9. Discussion of human resonant frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownjohn, James M. W.; Zheng, Xiahua

    2001-06-01

    Human bodies are often exposed to vertical vibrations when they are in the workplace or on vehicles. Prolonged exposure may cause undue stress and discomfort in the human body especially at its resonant frequency. By testing the response of the human body on a vibrating platform, many researchers found the human whole-body fundamental resonant frequency to be around 5 Hz. However, in recent years, an indirect method has been prosed which appears to increase the resonant frequency to approximately 10 Hz. To explain this discrepancy, experimental work was carried out in NTU. The study shows that the discrepancy lies in the vibration magnitude used in the tests. A definition of human natural frequency in terms of vibration magnitude is proposed.

  10. Implementation of a modified birdcage resonator for 19F/1H MRI at low fields (0.14 T).

    PubMed

    Samaratunga, R C; Pratt, R G; Zhu, Y; Massoth, R J; Thomas, S R

    1994-05-01

    Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance of perfluorinated blood substitute materials provides a method for determination of oxygen tension (pO2) in vivo. Use of a double resonant 19F/1H radio frequency coil allows convenient correlation between the high resolution anatomic presentation of proton images and the fluorine distribution. However, quantitative 19F measurements require an RF coil with good H1 field homogeneity over the image volume and a high quality factor (Q) to minimize errors caused by the low signal-to-noise levels available in in vivo imaging and image nonuniformities introduced by the large chemical shift of fluorocarbons. The birdcage coil design provides a high Q structure with optimum H1 field uniformity and fill factor. However, at low resonance frequencies, the inherently low inductance of the birdcage geometry requires the use of a large number of chip capacitors giving rise to unwieldy coil fabrication and increased cost. This communication describes a modification to the birdcage design that reduces the chip capacitor requirement by at least a factor of 4 for a given dimension, yet retains the essential characteristics of the birdcage design. The modified structure was tuned for double resonance at 5.7/6.0 MHz for 19F/1H magnetic resonance imaging at 0.14 T. For a coil with a length to diameter ratio of 1.67, an H1 uniformity of +/- 2% for the 19F resonance was obtained over a cylindrical region with radius approximately 0.6r (r = radius of coil) and length approximately 1.8r within the coil.

  11. Measurement of rates of transport across erythrocyte membranes by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Robert D.; Tahir Razi, M.; Rabenstein, Dallas L.

    The use of 1H NMR to monitor the transport of small molecules across the membrane of erythrocytes is evaluated. Cells are separated, as a function of time, from a suspension medium containing the small molecule of interest, and then analyzed for the small molecule by 1H NMR. 1H NMR spectra of either the intact cells or cell lysate are measured by the protein saturation pulse/Fourier transform (PSP/FT) technique. With this technique, interfering hemoglobin resonances are suppressed with a selective presaturation pulse and high-resolution spectra are obtained for small molecules. The detection limit is on the order of 0. 10 m M Membrane transport rates were measured for alanine, penicillamine, N-acetylpenicillamine, and S-methylcysteine.

  12. Multislice 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging: assessment of epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Michael W.; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Schuff, Norbert; Soher, Brian J.; Vermathen, Peter P.; Fein, George; Laxer, Kenneth D.

    1998-07-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H MRSI) with volume pre-selection (i.e. by PRESS) or multislice 1H MRSI was used to investigate changes in brain metabolites in Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Examples of results from several ongoing clinical studies are provided. Multislice 1H MRSI of the human brain, without volume pre-selection offers considerable advantages over previously available techniques. Furthermore, MRI tissue segmentation and completely automated spectra curve fitting greatly facilitate quantitative data analysis. Future efforts will be devoted to obtaining full brain coverage and data acquisition at short spin echo times (TE less than 30 ms) for the detection of metabolites with short T2 relaxation times.

  13. A Large Volume Double Channel 1H-X RF Probe for Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance at 0.0475 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Shchepin, Roman V.; Wilkens, Ken; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we describe a large volume 340 mL 1H-X magnetic resonance (MR) probe for studies of hyperpolarized compounds at 0.0475 T. 1H/13C and 1H/15N probe configurations are demonstrated with the potential for extension to 1H/129Xe. The primary applications of this probe are preparation and quality assurance of 13C and 15N hyperpolarized contrast agents using PASADENA (parahydrogen and synthesis allow dramatically enhanced nuclear alignment) and other parahydrogen-based methods of hyperpolarization. The probe is efficient and permits 62 μs 13C excitation pulses at 5.3 Watts, making it suitable for portable operation. The sensitivity and detection limits of this probe, tuned to 13C, are compared with a commercial radio frequency (RF) coil operating at 4.7 T. We demonstrate that low field MR of hyperpolarized contrast agents could be as sensitive as conventional high field detection and outline potential improvements and optimization of the probe design for preclinical in vivo MRI. PASADENA application of this low-power probe is exemplified with 13C hyperpolarized 2-hydroxyethyl propionate-1-13C,2,3,3-d3. PMID:22706029

  14. Acoustic resonance frequency locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-09-09

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell, the acoustic source having a source frequency; repeatedly and continuously sweeping the source frequency across the resonance frequency at a sweep rate; and employing an odd-harmonic of the source frequency sweep rate to maintain the source frequency sweep centered on the resonance frequency.

  15. Classification of iron-sulfur cores in ferredoxins by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, K; Ozaki, Y; Kyogoku, Y; Hase, T; Matsubara, H

    1983-09-01

    A 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study was carried out on various ferredoxins which possess one of three types of iron-sulfur clusters, (2Fe-2S), (3Fe-3S), or (4Fe-4S). In the isolated form, (2Fe-2S) ferredoxins from spinach (Spinacea oleracia), pokeweed (Phytolacca americana), a blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis), and a halobacterium (Halobacterium halobium) exhibited two broad resonances common in chemical shift at the region downfield of 10 ppm. In their reduced forms, seven contact-shifted resonances appeared spread over 30 ppm. Although the positions of the contact-shifted resonances in the reduced state differed among the four, a common trend in the temperature dependence of their resonance positions was recognized. Two (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins from Bacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus exhibited almost indistinguishable spectral patterns in both the oxidized and reduced forms. The ferricyanide-treated ferredoxins of B. stearothermophilus and B. thermoproteolyticus showed characteristic contact-shifted resonances distinct from the spectra of the original (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins. This corresponds to the recent finding of the interconversion of (4Fe-4S) and (3Fe-3S) clusters with ferricyanide in the ferredoxin. Based on our data together with reported NMR data on other ferredoxins, contact-shift resonances of three types of clusters were tabulated. The reliability of NMR classification increases when we compare the NMR spectra of a ferredoxin with the classification standards at the two redox states. Moreover, not only the absolute values of the chemical shifts of contact-shifted resonances but also their temperature dependence give distinctive information applicable to iron core identification.

  16. The morphology of C–S–H: Lessons from {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry

    SciTech Connect

    Valori, A.; McDonald, P.J.; Scrivener, K.L.

    2013-07-15

    {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance has been applied to cement pastes, and in particular calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H), for the characterisation of porosity and pore water interactions for over three decades. However, there is now renewed interest in the method, given that it has been shown to be non-invasive, non-destructive and fully quantitative. It is possible to make measurements of pore size distribution, specific surface area, C–S–H density and water fraction and water dynamics over 6 orders of magnitude from nano- to milli-seconds. This information comes in easily applied experiments that are increasingly well understood, on widely available equipment. This contribution describes the basic experiments for a cement audience new to the field and reviews three decades of work. It concludes with a summary of the current state of understanding of cement pore morphology from the perspective of {sup 1}H NMR.

  17. Key metabolites in tissue extracts of Elliptio complanata identified using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hurley-Sanders, Jennifer L; Levine, Jay F; Nelson, Stacy A C; Law, J M; Showers, William J; Stoskopf, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    We used (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to describe key metabolites of the polar metabolome of the freshwater mussel, Elliptio complanata. Principal components analysis documented variability across tissue types and river of origin in mussels collected from two rivers in North Carolina (USA). Muscle, digestive gland, mantle and gill tissues yielded identifiable but overlapping metabolic profiles. Variation in digestive gland metabolic profiles between the two mussel collection sites was characterized by differences in mono- and disaccharides. Variation in mantle tissue metabolomes appeared to be associated with sex. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a sensitive means to detect metabolites in the tissues of E. complanata and holds promise as a tool for the investigation of freshwater mussel health and physiology.

  18. Key metabolites in tissue extracts of Elliptio complanata identified using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hurley-Sanders, Jennifer L.; Levine, Jay F.; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Law, J. M.; Showers, William J.; Stoskopf, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    We used 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to describe key metabolites of the polar metabolome of the freshwater mussel, Elliptio complanata. Principal components analysis documented variability across tissue types and river of origin in mussels collected from two rivers in North Carolina (USA). Muscle, digestive gland, mantle and gill tissues yielded identifiable but overlapping metabolic profiles. Variation in digestive gland metabolic profiles between the two mussel collection sites was characterized by differences in mono- and disaccharides. Variation in mantle tissue metabolomes appeared to be associated with sex. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a sensitive means to detect metabolites in the tissues of E. complanata and holds promise as a tool for the investigation of freshwater mussel health and physiology. PMID:27293708

  19. Simultaneous dual frequency 1H and 19F open coil imaging of arthritic rabbit knee at 3T.

    PubMed

    Hockett, Franklin D; Wallace, Kirk D; Schmieder, Anne H; Caruthers, Shelton D; Pham, Christine T N; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The combination of sensitive magnetic resonance techniques with a selective site-targeted nanoparticle contrast agent has a demonstrated utility for molecular imaging studies. By detecting a unique signature of the contrast agent, this approach can be employed to identify specific bio-molecular markers and observe cellular-level processes within a large and complex organism (e.g., in vivo rabbit). The objective of the present investigation was to design, fabricate and characterize a radio-frequency (RF) coil for the dual frequency ((1)H and (19)F) simultaneous collection of both nuclei images in a 3T field, in order to facilitate studies of arthritic knee degradation in rabbits. The coil supports both transmit and receive modes. The supporting activities included: 1) establishing a technical database for calculating the required coil parameters, 2) selection of a favorable coil geometry, and 3) adaption of existing RF measurement techniques to the design, development and electrical evaluation of the coil. The coil is used in conjunction with a Philips Medical Systems clinical MRI scanner, requiring all RF simultaneous dual frequency ((1)H and (19)F) coils to operate in both transmit and receive modes. A commercial version of SPICE (simulation program with integrated circuit emphasis) was used to estimate significant operational parameters prior to fabricating the imaging coil. Excellent images were obtained with the fabricated coil and no operational problems were observed that would limit the use of other coil geometries and field strengths.

  20. Dual resonant birdcage coils for 1H detected 13C microscopic imaging at 11.7 T.

    PubMed

    Hudson, A M; Köckenberger, W; Bowtell, R W

    2000-06-01

    Liquid state, rotating frame cross polarisation experiments are very sensitive to RF field inhomogeneity. In this work, we present an easily fabricated, co-resident high- and low-pass linear birdcage resonator, optimised to perform liquid state rotating frame polarisation transfer at 1H and 13C frequencies. Both the RF fields have been experimentally mapped, and used to validate the spatial signal dependence of a proton detected, 13C image. The predicted performance was then confirmed using PRAWN-based, cyclic J-cross polarisation (CYCLCROP) imaging. A novel variant of a B(1)-field mapping approach is also presented, using the signal enhancement of the CYCLCROP sequence to generate proton detected, 13C field maps.

  1. Determination of glucan phosphorylation using heteronuclear 1H, 13C double and 1H, 13C, 31P triple-resonance NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Peter; Nitschke, Felix; Steup, Martin; Mallow, Keven; Specker, Edgar

    2013-10-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of starch and glycogen are important for their physicochemical properties and also their physiological functions. It is therefore desirable to reliably determine the phosphorylation sites. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR-spectroscopy is in principle a straightforward analytical approach even for complex carbohydrate molecules. With heterogeneous samples from natural sources, however, the task becomes more difficult because a full assignment of the resonances of the carbohydrates is impossible to obtain. Here, we show that the combination of heteronuclear (1) H,(13) C and (1) H,(13) C,(31) P techniques and information derived from spectra of a set of reference compounds can lead to an unambiguous determination of the phosphorylation sites even in heterogeneous samples.

  2. High-Frequency (1)H NMR Chemical Shifts of Sn(II) and Pb(II) Hydrides Induced by Relativistic Effects: Quest for Pb(II) Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Vícha, Jan; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2016-10-17

    The role of relativistic effects on (1)H NMR chemical shifts of Sn(II) and Pb(II) hydrides is investigated by using fully relativistic DFT calculations. The stability of possible Pb(II) hydride isomers is studied together with their (1)H NMR chemical shifts, which are predicted in the high-frequency region, up to 90 ppm. These (1)H signals are dictated by sizable relativistic contributions due to spin-orbit coupling at the heavy atom and can be as large as 80 ppm for a hydrogen atom bound to Pb(II). Such high-frequency (1)H NMR chemical shifts of Pb(II) hydride resonances cannot be detected in the (1)H NMR spectra with standard experimental setup. Extended (1)H NMR spectral ranges are thus suggested for studies of Pb(II) compounds. Modulation of spin-orbit relativistic contribution to (1)H NMR chemical shift is found to be important also in the experimentally known Sn(II) hydrides. Because the (1)H NMR chemical shifts were found to be rather sensitive to the changes in the coordination sphere of the central metal in both Sn(II) and Pb(II) hydrides, their application for structural investigation is suggested.

  3. Novel 1H low field nuclear magnetic resonance applications for the field of biodiesel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biodiesel production has increased dramatically over the last decade, raising the need for new rapid and non-destructive analytical tools and technologies. 1H Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) applications, which offer great potential to the field of biodiesel, have been developed by the Phyto Lipid Biotechnology Lab research team in the last few years. Results Supervised and un-supervised chemometric tools are suggested for screening new alternative biodiesel feedstocks according to oil content and viscosity. The tools allowed assignment into viscosity groups of biodiesel-petrodiesel samples whose viscosity is unknown, and uncovered biodiesel samples that have residues of unreacted acylglycerol and/or methanol, and poorly separated and cleaned glycerol and water. In the case of composite materials, relaxation time distribution, and cross-correlation methods were successfully applied to differentiate components. Continuous distributed methods were also applied to calculate the yield of the transesterification reaction, and thus monitor the progress of the common and in-situ transesterification reactions, offering a tool for optimization of reaction parameters. Conclusions Comprehensive applied tools are detailed for the characterization of new alternative biodiesel resources in their whole conformation, monitoring of the biodiesel transesterification reaction, and quality evaluation of the final product, using a non-invasive and non-destructive technology that is new to the biodiesel research area. A new integrated computational-experimental approach for analysis of 1H LF-NMR relaxometry data is also presented, suggesting improved solution stability and peak resolution. PMID:23590829

  4. A dual-tuned transceive resonator for (13) C{(1) H} MRS: two open coils in one.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Atiyah; De Zanche, Nicola; Allen, Peter S

    2013-05-01

    Proton-decoupled, (13) C nuclear MRS experiments require a RF coil that operates at the Larmor frequencies of both (13) C and (1) H. In this work, we designed, built and tested a single-unit, dual-tuned coil based on a half-birdcage open coil design. It was constructed as a low-pass network with a resonant trap in series with each leg. Traps are tuned in alternate legs such that the two resonant modes arise from currents on alternate legs. The coil performance was compared with that of a dual-tuned coil consisting of two proton surface coils operating in quadrature and a single surface coil for (13) C transmission and reception. The half-birdcage coil was shown to produce a more homogeneous RF field at each frequency and was more sensitive to a (13) C signal arising from regions further from the coil surface. The applicability of the coil in vivo was demonstrated by acquiring a proton decoupled, natural abundance (13) C glycogen signal from the calf of a normal volunteer.

  5. MUSIC in triple-resonance experiments: amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations

    PubMed

    Schubert; Smalla; Schmieder; Oschkinat

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH(2) or XH(3) (X can be (15)N or (13)C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  6. MUSIC in Triple-Resonance Experiments: Amino Acid Type-Selective 1H- 15N Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Mario; Smalla, Maika; Schmieder, Peter; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective 1H-15N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH2 or XH3 (X can be 15N or 13C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains.

  7. Application of diffusion ordered-1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to quantify sucrose in beverages.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruge; Nonaka, Airi; Komura, Fusae; Matsui, Toshiro

    2015-03-15

    This work focuses on a quantitative analysis of sucrose using diffusion ordered-quantitative (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (DOSY-qNMR), where an analyte can be isolated from interference based on its characteristic diffusion coefficient (D) in gradient magnetic fields. The D value of sucrose in deuterium oxide at 30°C was 4.9 × 10(-10)m(2)/s at field gradient pulse from 5.0 × 10(-2) to 3.0 × 10(-1)T/m, separated from other carbohydrates (glucose and fructose). Good linearity (r(2)=0.9999) was obtained between sucrose (0.5-20.0 g/L) and the resonance area of target glucopyranosyl-α-C1 proton normalised to that of cellobiose C1 proton (100.0 g/L, as an internal standard) in 1D sliced DOSY spectrum. The DOSY-qNMR method was successfully applied to quantify sucrose in orange juice (36.1 ± 0.5 g/L), pineapple juice (53.5 ± 1.1g/L) and a sports drink (24.7 ± 0.6g/L), in good agreement with the results obtained by an F-kit method.

  8. Microwave Frequency Discriminator With Sapphire Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, David G.; Dick, G. John

    1994-01-01

    Cooled sapphire resonator provides ultralow phase noise. Apparatus comprises microwave oscillator operating at nominal frequency of about 8.1 GHz, plus frequency-discriminator circuit measuring phase fluctuations of oscillator output. One outstanding feature of frequency discriminator is sapphire resonator serving as phase reference. Sapphire resonator is dielectric ring resonator operating in "whispering-gallery" mode. Functions at room temperature, but for better performance, typically cooled to operating temperature of about 80 K. Similar resonator described in "Sapphire Ring Resonator for Microwave Oscillator" (NPO-18082).

  9. 1H and 13C resonance designation of antimycin A1 by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.; Adams, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    Complete 1H and 13C resonance assignments of antimycin A1 were accomplished by two-dimensional NMR techniques, viz. 1H homonuclear COSY correlation, heteronuclear 13C-1H chemical shift correlation and long-range heteronuclear 13C-1H COLOC correlation. Antimycin A1 was found to consist of two isomeric components in a 2:1 ratio based on NMR spectroscopic evidence. The structure of the major component was newly assigned as the 8-isopentanoic acid ester. The spectra of the minor component were consistent with the known structure of antimycin A1.

  10. Selective inversion of 1H resonances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: Use of double-DANTE pulse sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithu, Venus Singh; Tan, Kong Ooi; Madhu, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    We here present a method based on DANTE pulses and homonuclear dipolar decoupling scheme to invert selectively any desired resonance in a proton spin system under magic-angle spinning. Experimental results are reported on a sample of L-histidine·HCl·H2O at magic-angle spinning frequencies of 15 and 60 kHz. The results are also substantiated numerically.

  11. Selective inversion of 1H resonances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: Use of double-DANTE pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Mithu, Venus Singh; Tan, Kong Ooi; Madhu, P K

    2013-12-01

    We here present a method based on DANTE pulses and homonuclear dipolar decoupling scheme to invert selectively any desired resonance in a proton spin system under magic-angle spinning. Experimental results are reported on a sample of L-histidine·HCl·H2O at magic-angle spinning frequencies of 15 and 60kHz. The results are also substantiated numerically.

  12. Magic angle spinning NMR of proteins: high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization and (1)H detection.

    PubMed

    Su, Yongchao; Andreas, Loren; Griffin, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of amyloid and membrane proteins and large macromolecular complexes are an important new approach to structural biology. However, the applicability of these experiments, which are based on (13)C- and (15)N-detected spectra, would be enhanced if the sensitivity were improved. Here we discuss two advances that address this problem: high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and (1)H-detected MAS techniques. DNP is a sensitivity enhancement technique that transfers the high polarization of exogenous unpaired electrons to nuclear spins via microwave irradiation of electron-nuclear transitions. DNP boosts NMR signal intensities by factors of 10(2) to 10(3), thereby overcoming NMR's inherent low sensitivity. Alternatively, it permits structural investigations at the nanomolar scale. In addition, (1)H detection is feasible primarily because of the development of MAS rotors that spin at frequencies of 40 to 60 kHz or higher and the preparation of extensively (2)H-labeled proteins.

  13. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The Community College Division is pleased to report progress of NASA funded research at West Virginia State College. During this reporting period, the project research group has continued with activities to develop instrumentation capability designed to monitor resonant cavity frequencies in the atmospheric region between the Earth's surface and the ionosphere. In addition, the project's principal investigator, Dr. Craig Spaniol, and NASA technical officer, Dr. John Sutton, have written and published technical papers intended to expand the scientific and technical framework needed for project research. This research continues to provide an excellent example of government and education working together to provide significant research in the college environment. This cooperative effort has provided many students with technical project work which compliments their education.

  14. Hypoxic encephalopathy after near-drowning studied by quantitative 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Kreis, R; Arcinue, E; Ernst, T; Shonk, T K; Flores, R; Ross, B D

    1996-01-01

    Early prediction of outcome after global hypoxia of the brain requires accurate determination of the nature and extent of neurological injury and is cardinal for patient management. Cerebral metabolites of gray and white matter were determined sequentially after near-drowning using quantitative 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in 16 children. Significant metabolite abnormalities were demonstrated in all patients compared with their age-matched normal controls. Severity of brain damage was quantified from metabolite concentrations and ratios. Loss of N-acetylaspartate, a putative neuronal marker, from gray matter preceded that observed in white matter and was more severe. Total creatine decreased, while lactate and glutamine/glutamate concentrations increased. Changes progressed with time after injury. A spectroscopic prognosis index distinguished between good outcome (n = 5) and poor outcome (n = 11) with one false negative (bad outcome after borderline MRS result) and no false positive results (100% specificity). The distinction was made with 90% sensitivity early (after 48 h) and became 100% later (by days 3 and 4). This compared with 50-75% specificity and 70-100% sensitivity based upon single clinical criteria. MRS performed sequentially in occipital gray matter provides useful objective information which can significantly enhance the ability to establish prognosis after near-drowning. PMID:8636425

  15. Regional age-related effects in the monkey brain measured with 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ronen, Itamar; Fan, Xiaoying; Schettler, Steve; Jain, Sahil; Murray, Donna; Kim, Dae-Shik; Killiany, Ronald; Rosene, Douglas

    2011-06-01

    The rhesus monkey is a useful model for examining age-related effects on the brain, because of the extensive neuroanatomical homology between the monkey and the human brain, the tight control for neurological diseases as well as the possibility of obtaining relevant behavioral data and post-mortem tissue for histological analyses. Here, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was used together with high-resolution anatomical MRI images to carefully assess regional concentrations of brain metabolites in a group of 20 rhesus monkeys. In an anterior volume of interest (VOI) that covered frontal and prefrontal areas, significant positive correlations of myo-inositol and of total creatine concentrations with age were detected, whereas N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and choline compounds (Cho) were not significantly correlated with age. In an occipito-parietal VOI, all metabolites showed no statistically significant age-dependent trend. Strong correlations were found between NAA concentration and gray matter fraction in the VOIs as well as between choline compounds and white matter fraction.

  16. Serum Metabolomic Profiling of Sulphur Mustard-Exposed Individuals Using (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Zahra; Ghanei, Mostafa; Panahi, Yunus; Arjmand, Mohammad; Sadeghi, Sedigheh; Mirkhani, Fatemeh; Parvin, Shahram; Salehi, Maryam; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Vahabi, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Sulphur mustard is an alkylating agent that reacts with different cellular components, causing acute and delayed complications that may remain for decades after exposure. This study aimed to identify differentially expressed metabolites between mustard-exposed individuals suffering from chronic complications compared with unexposed individuals as the control group. Serum samples were obtained from 15 mustard-exposed individuals and 15 apparently healthy unexposed individuals. Metabolomic profiling was performed using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and analyses were carried out using Chenomex and MATLAB softwares. Metabolites were identified using Human Metabolome Database, and the main metabolic pathways were identified using MetaboAnalyst software. Chemometric analysis of serum samples identified 11 differentially expressed metabolites between mustard-exposed and unexposed groups. The main pathways that were influenced by sulphur mustard exposure were related to vitamin B6 (down-regulation), bile acid (up-regulation) and tryptophan (down-regulation) metabolism. Metabolism of vitamin B6, bile acids and tryptophan are the most severely impaired pathways in individuals suffering from chronic mustard-induced complications. These findings may find implications in the monitoring of exposed patients and identification of new therapeutic approaches.

  17. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics study of earthworm Perionyx excavatus in vermifiltration process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Xulei; Laserna, Anna Karen Carrasco; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-10-01

    In this study, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics approach was used to characterize the metabolic response of the earthworm Perionyx excavatus in continuous vermifiltration for two months under hydraulic loading rates of 1m(3)m(-2)d(-1) (VF1) and 1.5m(3)m(-2)d(-1) (VF1.5). Both VF1 and VF1.5 showed higher removal of chemical oxygen demand and total nitrogen than the biofilter without earthworms. Principal component analysis of the NMR spectra of earthworm metabolites showed significant separations between those not subjected to wastewater filtration (control) and VF1 or VF1.5. Temporal variations of earthworm biomass, and the identified metabolites that are significantly different between control, VF1 and VF1.5 revealed that worms underwent increasing metabolic activity within 20days in VF1 and 14days in VF1.5, then decreasing metabolic activity. The use of NMR-based metabolomics in monitoring earthworm metabolism was demonstrated to be a novel approach in studying engineered vermifiltration systems.

  18. Fertility-associated metabolites in bull seminal plasma and blood serum: 1H nuclear magnetic resonance analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajeet; Kroetsch, Tom; Blondin, Patrick; Anzar, Muhammad

    2015-02-01

    Early estimation of bull fertility is highly desirable for the conservation of male genetics of endangered species and for the exploitation of genetically superior sires in artificial insemination programs. The present work was conducted as a proof-of-principle study to identify fertility-associated metabolites in dairy bull seminal plasma and blood serum using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). Semen and blood samples were collected from high- and low-fertility breeding bulls (n = 5 each), stationed at Semex, Guelph, Canada. NMR spectra of serum and seminal plasma were recorded at a resonance frequency of 500.13 MHz on a Bruker Avance-500 spectrometer equipped with an inverse triple resonance probe (TXI, 5 mm). Spectra were phased manually, baseline corrected, and calibrated against 3-(trimethylsilyl) propionic-2,2,3,3-d4 acid at 0.0 parts per million (ppm). Spectra were converted to an appropriate format for analysis using Prometab software running within MATLAB. Principal component analysis was used to examine intrinsic variation in the NMR data set, and to identify trends and to exclude outliers. Partial least square-discriminant analysis was performed to identify the significant features between fertility groups. The fertility-associated metabolites with variable importance in projections (VIP) scores >2 were citrate (2.50 ppm), tryptamine/taurine (3.34-3.38 ppm), isoleucine (0.74 ppm), and leucine (0.78 ppm) in the seminal plasma; and isoleucine (1.14 ppm), asparagine (2.90-2.94 ppm), glycogen (3.98 ppm), and citrulline (1.54 ppm) in the serum. These metabolites showed identifiable peaks, and thus can be used as biomarkers of fertility in breeding bulls.

  19. Resonant frequencies of the hydrodynamic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, H. S.

    We study the sound perturbation of the hydrodynamic vortex geometry and present an exact expression for the resonant frequencies (quasispectrum) of this geometry. Exact solution for the radial part of the covariant Klein-Gordon equation in this spacetime is obtained, and is given in terms of the double confluent Heun functions. We found that the resonant frequencies are complex number.

  20. Pressure dependent resonant frequency of micromechanical drumhead resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, D. R.; Craighead, H. G.; Parpia, J. M.

    2009-05-25

    We examine the relationship between squeeze film effects and resonance frequency in drum-type resonators. We find that the resonance frequency increases linearly with pressure as a result of the additional restoring force contribution from compression of gas within the drum cavity. We demonstrate trapping of the gas by squeeze film effects and geometry. The pressure sensitivity is shown to scale inversely with cavity height and sound radiation is found to be the predominant loss mechanism near and above atmospheric pressure. Drum resonators exhibit linearity and sensitivity suitable to barometry from below 10 Torr up to several atmospheres.

  1. Xenobiotic monitoring in plants by sup 19 F and sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, A.; Barber, J.; Wood, B. ); Elliott, R. )

    1989-12-01

    {sup 19}F and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy have been used to monitor the uptake of trifluoroacetic acid in stems and leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum. The movement and location of a xenobiotic have been demonstrated in vivo by a noninvasive technique.

  2. Kinetics of the in vivo31P 1H nuclear overhauser effect of the human-calf-muscle phosphocreatine resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachert, Peter; Bellemann, Matthias E.

    In 31P 1H double-resonance experiments in a 1.5 T whole-body MR system, we observed in vivo the truncated driven, transient, and steady-state 31P- 1H nuclear Overhauser effect of the phosphocreatine resonance in 31P MR spectra of human gastrocnemius muscle. Maximum signal enhancements of 0.52 ± 0.01, 0.20 ± 0.01, and 0.79 ± 0.02 were measured, respectively. Fitting the data with theoretical functions which solve the multispin Solomon equations for N protons (S spins) dipolar coupled to a 31P nucleus (I spin) yields cross-relaxation times {2}/{[Σ i=1-N σIS(i) ] } in the order of 20 s. In vivo experiments are feasible for studying relaxation mechanisms in coupled 31P 1H spin systems in intact tissue.

  3. Gene mutation profiling of primary glioblastoma through multiple tumor biopsy guided by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chao; Guo, Jun; Chen, Hong; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Wang, Yin; Tang, Wei-Jun; Ren, Guang; Yao, Yu; Wu, Jin-Song; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mutation has served as the biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, intra-tumor heterogeneity may interfere with personalized treatment strategies based on mutation analysis. This study aimed to characterize somatic mutation profiling of GBM. We collected 33 samples from 7 patients with the primary GBM associated with different Choline (Cho) to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) index (CNI) through the frameless proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) guided biopsies and investigated multiple somatic mutations profi ling using the AmpliSeq cancer hotspot panel V2. We identifi ed 53 missense or nonsense mutations in 27 genes including some novel mutations such as APC and IDH2. The mutations in EGFR, TP53, PTEN, PIK3CA genes were presented with different frequency and the majority of the mutated gene was only shared by 1-2 samples from one patient. Moreover, we found the association of CNI with histological grade, but there was no signifi cant change of CNI in the presence of TP53, EGFR and PTEN mutations. These data suggest that gene mutations constitute a heterogeneous marker for primary GBM which may be independent of intra-tumor morphological phenotypes of GBM; therefore, gene mutation markers could not be determined from a small number of needle biopsies or only confi ned to the high-grade region. PMID:26191234

  4. Gene mutation profiling of primary glioblastoma through multiple tumor biopsy guided by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chao; Guo, Jun; Chen, Hong; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Wang, Yin; Tang, Wei-Jun; Ren, Guang; Yao, Yu; Wu, Jin-Song; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mutation has served as the biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, intra-tumor heterogeneity may interfere with personalized treatment strategies based on mutation analysis. This study aimed to characterize somatic mutation profiling of GBM. We collected 33 samples from 7 patients with the primary GBM associated with different Choline (Cho) to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) index (CNI) through the frameless proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) guided biopsies and investigated multiple somatic mutations profiling using the AmpliSeq cancer hotspot panel V2. We identified 53 missense or nonsense mutations in 27 genes including some novel mutations such as APC and IDH2. The mutations in EGFR, TP53, PTEN, PIK3CA genes were presented with different frequency and the majority of the mutated gene was only shared by 1-2 samples from one patient. Moreover, we found the association of CNI with histological grade, but there was no significant change of CNI in the presence of TP53, EGFR and PTEN mutations. These data suggest that gene mutations constitute a heterogeneous marker for primary GBM which may be independent of intra-tumor morphological phenotypes of GBM; therefore, gene mutation markers could not be determined from a small number of needle biopsies or only confined to the high-grade region.

  5. Application of Single Voxel 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Hepatic Benign and Malignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zifeng; Sun, Shiqiang; Chen, Yuanli; Li, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Background To quantify the metabolite changes in hepatic tumors by single-voxel 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 3.0 T and explore the application value of 1HMRS in the diagnosis of hepatic benign and malignant lesions. Material/Methods A total of 45 patients (55 lesions) diagnosed with hepatic lesions by ultrasound and/or computer topography (CT) from November 2006 to March 2007 were included in this study. All patients underwent 3D-dynamic enhanced scan with liver acquisition with acceleration volume acquisition (LAVA) sequence and single-voxel 1HMRS imaging with PRESS (point-resolved spectroscopy) sequence. The metabolite concentrations such as choline (Cho) and lipids (Lip) were measured. Results There was significant difference regarding the occurrence rate of the obvious elevated Cho peaks between benign and malignant tumors (7/27 vs. 21/28, p=0.000). There was statistical significant differences regarding the Cho/Lip ratios in hepatic benign (0.0686±0.0283, 95% CI: 0.0134–0.1245) and malignant (0.1266±0.1124, 95% CI: 0.0937–0.2203) lesions (p<0.05). When compared with the pathological results, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and overall accuracy were 85.7% (24/28), 92.6% (25/27), 92.3% (24/26), 86.2% (25/29), and 89.1% (49/55) respectively for the MRI assessment, and 92.6% (26/28), 88.9% (24/27), 89.7 (26/29), 92.3 (24/26), and 90.9% (50/55) respectively for 1HMRS combined with MRI assessment. Conclusions Single Cho peaks or Lip peaks cannot be used for the diagnosis of hepatic benign and malignant lesions. Combined use of 1HMRS and MRI can greatly improve the application value of MRI assessment in the diagnosis of hepatic benign and malignant lesions with a higher sensitivity, negative predictive value, and overall accuracy. PMID:27992399

  6. Sodium-23 magnetic resonance imaging during and after transient cerebral ischemia: multinuclear stroke protocols for double-tuned 23Na/1H resonator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Ansar, Saema; Handwerker, Eva

    2012-11-01

    A double-tuned 23Na/1H resonator system was developed to record multinuclear MR image data during and after transient cerebral ischemia. 1H-diffusion-, 1H perfusion, 1H T2-, 1H arterial blood flow- and 23Na spin density-weighted images were then acquired at three time points in a rodent stroke model: (I) during 90 min artery occlusion, (II) directly after arterial reperfusion and (III) one day after arterial reperfusion. Normal 23Na was detected in hypoperfused stroke tissue which exhibited a low 1H apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and no changes in 1H T2 relaxation time during transient ischemia, while 23Na increased and ADC values recovered to normal values directly after arterial reperfusion. For the first time, a similar imaging protocol was set-up on a clinical 3T MRI site in conjunction with a commercial double-tuned 1H/23Na birdcage resonator avoiding a time-consuming exchange of resonators or MRI systems. Multinuclear 23Na/1H MRI data sets were obtained from one stroke patient during both the acute and non-acute stroke phases with an aquisition time of 22 min. The lesion exhibiting low ADC was found to be larger compared to the lesion with high 23Na at 9 h after symptom onset. It is hoped that the presented pilot data demonstrate that fast multinuclear 23Na/1H MRI preclinical and clinical protocols can enable a better understanding of how temporal and regional MRI parameter changes link to pathophysiological variations in ischemic stroke tissue.

  7. A program for semi-automatic sequential resonance assignments in protein 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billeter, M.; Basus, V. J.; Kuntz, I. D.

    A new approach to the sequential resonance assignment of protein 1H NMR spectra based on a computer program is presented. Two main underlying concepts were used in the design of this program. First, it considers at any time all possible assignments that are consistent with the currently available data. If new information is added then assignments that have become inconsistent are eliminated. Second, the process of the assignment is split into formal steps that follow strictly from the available data and steps that involve the interpretation of ambiguous NMR data. The first kind of step is safe in the sense that it never leads to false assignments provided that the input does not contain any error; these steps are executed automatically by the program when the input files are read and whenever new data have been entered interactively. The second kind of step is left to the user: An interactive dialog provides detailed information on the current situation of the assignment and indicates what kind of new data would be most promising for further assignment. The user then provides new data to the program and restarts the automatic part which will attempt to draw logical conclusions from the joint use of the new data and the earlier available information and will eliminate assignments that have become inconsistent. Results of test problems using simulated NMR data for proteins consisting of up to 99 residues as well as the application of the program to obtain the complete assignment of α-bungarotoxin, a 74-residue snake neurotoxin, are reported.

  8. Direct and simultaneous quantification of ATP, ADP and AMP by (1)H and (31)P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yakun; Jiang, Hua; Feng, Jinzhou; Wang, Xiaoyan; Hou, Xiandeng; Deng, Pengchi

    2016-04-01

    ATP, ADP and AMP are energy substances with vital biological significance. Based on the structural differences, a simple, rapid and comprehensive method has been established by (1)H and (31)P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H-NMR and (31)P-NMR) spectroscopies. Sodium 3-(trimethylsilyl) propionate-2,2,3,3-d4 (TMSP) and anhydrous disodium hydrogen phosphate (Na2HPO4) were selected as internal standards for (1)H-NMR and (31)P-NMR, respectively. Those three compounds and corresponding internal standards can be easily distinguished both by (1)H-NMR and (31)P-NMR. In addition, they all have perfect linearity in a certain range: 0.1-100mM for (1)H-NMR and 1-75 mM for (31)P-NMR. To validate the precision of this method, mixed samples of different concentrations were measured. Recovery experiments were conducted in serum (91-113% by (1)H-NMR and 89-113% by (31)P-NMR).

  9. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively.

  10. Nanofilm thickness measurement by resonant frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Latyshev, A V; Yushkanov, A A

    2015-03-31

    We report a theoretical investigation of monochromatic laser light – thin metal film interaction. The dependences of transmission, reflection and absorption coefficients of an electromagnetic wave on the incidence angle, layer thickness and effective electron collision frequency are obtained. The above coefficients are analysed in the region of resonant frequencies. The resulting formula for the transmission, reflection and absorption coefficients are found to be valid for any angles of incidence. The case of mirror boundary conditions is considered. A formula is derived for contactless measurement of the film thickness by the observed resonant frequencies. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  11. On Frequency Combs in Monolithic Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Maleki, L.

    2016-06-01

    Optical frequency combs have become indispensable in astronomical measurements, biological fingerprinting, optical metrology, and radio frequency photonic signal generation. Recently demonstrated microring resonator-based Kerr frequency combs point the way towards chip scale optical frequency comb generator retaining major properties of the lab scale devices. This technique is promising for integrated miniature radiofrequency and microwave sources, atomic clocks, optical references and femtosecond pulse generators. Here we present Kerr frequency comb development in a historical perspective emphasizing its similarities and differences with other physical phenomena. We elucidate fundamental principles and describe practical implementations of Kerr comb oscillators, highlighting associated solved and unsolved problems.

  12. Quantification of (1) H-MRS signals based on sparse metabolite profiles in the time-frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Parto Dezfouli, Mohammad Ali; Parto Dezfouli, Mohsen; Ahmadian, Alireza; Frangi, Alejandro F; Esmaeili Rad, Melika; Saligheh Rad, Hamidreza

    2017-02-01

    MRS is an analytical approach used for both quantitative and qualitative analysis of human body metabolites. The accurate and robust quantification capability of proton MRS ((1) H-MRS) enables the accurate estimation of living tissue metabolite concentrations. However, such methods can be efficiently employed for quantification of metabolite concentrations only if the overlapping nature of metabolites, existing static field inhomogeneity and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are taken into consideration. Representation of (1) H-MRS signals in the time-frequency domain enables us to handle the baseline and noise better. This is possible because the MRS signal of each metabolite is sparsely represented, with only a few peaks, in the frequency domain, but still along with specific time-domain features such as distinct decay constant associated with T2 relaxation rate. The baseline, however, has a smooth behavior in the frequency domain. In this study, we proposed a quantification method using continuous wavelet transformation of (1) H-MRS signals in combination with sparse representation of features in the time-frequency domain. Estimation of the sparse representations of MR spectra is performed according to the dictionaries constructed from metabolite profiles. Results on simulated and phantom data show that the proposed method is able to quantify the concentration of metabolites in (1) H-MRS signals with high accuracy and robustness. This is achieved for both low SNR (5 dB) and low signal-to-baseline ratio (-5 dB) regimes.

  13. Sequence-specific sup 1 H and sup 15 N resonance assignments for human dihydrofolate reductase in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.; Nirmala, N.R.; Wagner, G. ); Delcamp, T.J.; DeYarman, M.T.; Freisheim, J.H. )

    1992-01-14

    Dihydrofolate reductase is an intracellular target enzyme for folate antagonists, including the anticancer drug methotrexate. In order to design novel drugs with altered binding properties, a detailed description of protein-drug interactions in solution is desirable to understand the specificity of drug binding. As a first step in this process, heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy has been used to make sequential resonance assignments for more than 90% of the residues in human dihydrofolate reductase complexed with methotrexate. Uniform enrichment of the 21.5-kDa protein with {sup 15}N was required to obtain the resonance assignments via heteronuclear 3D NMR spectroscopy since homonuclear 2D spectra did not provide sufficient {sup 1}H resonance dispersion. Medium- and long-range NOE's have been used to characterize the secondary structure of the binary ligand-enzyme complex in solution.

  14. Rod Driven Frequency Entrainment and Resonance Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Salchow, Christina; Strohmeier, Daniel; Klee, Sascha; Jannek, Dunja; Schiecke, Karin; Witte, Herbert; Nehorai, Arye; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A controversy exists on photic driving in the human visual cortex evoked by intermittent photic stimulation. Frequency entrainment and resonance phenomena are reported for frequencies higher than 12 Hz in some studies while missing in others. We hypothesized that this might be due to different experimental conditions, since both high and low intensity light stimulation were used. However, most studies do not report radiometric measurements, which makes it impossible to categorize the stimulation according to photopic, mesopic, and scotopic vision. Low intensity light stimulation might lead to scotopic vision, where rod perception dominates. In this study, we investigated photic driving for rod-dominated visual input under scotopic conditions. Twelve healthy volunteers were stimulated with low intensity light flashes at 20 stimulation frequencies, leading to rod activation only. The frequencies were multiples of the individual alpha frequency (α) of each volunteer in the range from 0.40 to 2.30∗α. Three hundred and six-channel whole head magnetoencephalography recordings were analyzed in time, frequency, and spatiotemporal domains with the Topographic Matching Pursuit algorithm. We found resonance phenomena and frequency entrainment for stimulations at or close to the individual alpha frequency (0.90–1.10∗α) and half of the alpha frequency (0.40–0.55∗α). No signs of resonance and frequency entrainment phenomena were revealed around 2.00∗α. Instead, on-responses at the beginning and off-responses at the end of each stimulation train were observed for the first time in a photic driving experiment at frequencies of 1.30–2.30∗α, indicating that the flicker fusion threshold was reached. All results, the resonance and entrainment as well as the fusion effects, provide evidence for rod-dominated photic driving in the visual cortex. PMID:27588002

  15. Rod Driven Frequency Entrainment and Resonance Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Salchow, Christina; Strohmeier, Daniel; Klee, Sascha; Jannek, Dunja; Schiecke, Karin; Witte, Herbert; Nehorai, Arye; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A controversy exists on photic driving in the human visual cortex evoked by intermittent photic stimulation. Frequency entrainment and resonance phenomena are reported for frequencies higher than 12 Hz in some studies while missing in others. We hypothesized that this might be due to different experimental conditions, since both high and low intensity light stimulation were used. However, most studies do not report radiometric measurements, which makes it impossible to categorize the stimulation according to photopic, mesopic, and scotopic vision. Low intensity light stimulation might lead to scotopic vision, where rod perception dominates. In this study, we investigated photic driving for rod-dominated visual input under scotopic conditions. Twelve healthy volunteers were stimulated with low intensity light flashes at 20 stimulation frequencies, leading to rod activation only. The frequencies were multiples of the individual alpha frequency (α) of each volunteer in the range from 0.40 to 2.30(∗)α. Three hundred and six-channel whole head magnetoencephalography recordings were analyzed in time, frequency, and spatiotemporal domains with the Topographic Matching Pursuit algorithm. We found resonance phenomena and frequency entrainment for stimulations at or close to the individual alpha frequency (0.90-1.10(∗)α) and half of the alpha frequency (0.40-0.55(∗)α). No signs of resonance and frequency entrainment phenomena were revealed around 2.00(∗)α. Instead, on-responses at the beginning and off-responses at the end of each stimulation train were observed for the first time in a photic driving experiment at frequencies of 1.30-2.30(∗)α, indicating that the flicker fusion threshold was reached. All results, the resonance and entrainment as well as the fusion effects, provide evidence for rod-dominated photic driving in the visual cortex.

  16. Identification of Gastric Cancer Biomarkers Using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Wei Peng; Yeow, Chen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Existing gastric cancer diagnosing methods were invasive, hence, a reliable non-invasive gastric cancer diagnosing method is needed. As a starting point, we used 1H NMR for identifying gastric cancer biomarkers using a panel of gastric cancer spheroids and normal gastric spheroids. We were able to identify 8 chemical shift biomarkers for gastric cancer spheroids. Our data suggests that the cancerous and non-cancerous spheroids significantly differ in the lipid composition and energy metabolism. These results encourage the translation of these biomarkers into in-vivo gastric cancer detection methodology using MRI-MS. PMID:27611679

  17. Application of cryoprobe 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate analysis for the verification of corsican honey.

    PubMed

    Donarski, James A; Jones, Stephen A; Charlton, Adrian J

    2008-07-23

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) and multivariate analysis techniques have been used to classify honey into two groups by geographical origin. Honey from Corsica (Miel de Corse) was used as an example of a protected designation of origin product. Mathematical models were constructed to determine the feasibility of distinguishing between honey from Corsica and that from other geographical locations in Europe, using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Honey from 10 different regions within five countries was analyzed. (1)H NMR spectra were used as input variables for projection to latent structures (PLS) followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and genetic programming (GP). Models were generated using three methods, PLS-LDA, two-stage GP, and a combination of PLS and GP (PLS-GP). The PLS-GP model used variables selected by PLS for subsequent GP calculations. All models were generated using Venetian blind cross-validation. Overall classification rates for the discrimination of Corsican and non-Corsican honey of 75.8, 94.5, and 96.2% were determined using PLS-LDA, two-stage GP, and PLS-GP, respectively. The variables utilized by PLS-GP were related to their (1)H NMR chemical shifts, and this led to the identification of trigonelline in honey for the first time.

  18. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a tool to measure dehydration in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Matthew; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Colucci, Lina A; Cima, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Dehydration is a prevalent pathology, where loss of bodily water can result in variable symptoms. Symptoms can range from simple thirst to dire scenarios involving loss of consciousness. Clinical methods exist that assess dehydration from qualitative weight changes to more quantitative osmolality measurements. These methods are imprecise, invasive, and/or easily confounded, despite being practiced clinically. We investigate a non-invasive, non-imaging (1)H NMR method of assessing dehydration that attempts to address issues with existing clinical methods. Dehydration was achieved by exposing mice (n = 16) to a thermally elevated environment (37 °C) for up to 7.5 h (0.11-13% weight loss). Whole body NMR measurements were made using a Bruker LF50 BCA-Analyzer before and after dehydration. Physical lean tissue, adipose, and free water compartment approximations had NMR values extracted from relaxation data through a multi-exponential fitting method. Changes in before/after NMR values were compared with clinically practiced metrics of weight loss (percent dehydration) as well as blood and urine osmolality. A linear correlation between tissue relaxometry and both animal percent dehydration and urine osmolality was observed in lean tissue, but not adipose or free fluids. Calculated R(2) values for percent dehydration were 0.8619 (lean, P < 0.0001), 0.5609 (adipose, P = 0.0008), and 0.0644 (free fluids, P = 0.3445). R(2) values for urine osmolality were 0.7760 (lean, P < 0.0001), 0.5005 (adipose, P = 0.0022), and 0.0568 (free fluids, P = 0.3739). These results suggest that non-imaging (1)H NMR methods are capable of non-invasively assessing dehydration in live animals.

  19. Reduced Brain GABA in Primary Insomnia: Preliminary Data from 4T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H-MRS)

    PubMed Central

    Winkelman, John W.; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Jensen, J. Eric; Benson, Kathleen L.; O'Connor, Shawn P.; Wang, Wei; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Both basic and clinical data suggest a potential significant role for GABA in the etiology and maintenance of primary insomnia (PI). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) can non-invasively determine GABA levels in human brain. Our objective was to assess GABA levels in unmedicated individuals with PI, using 1H-MRS. Design and Setting: Matched-groups, cross-sectional study conducted at two university-based hospitals. Participants: Sixteen non-medicated individuals (8 women) with PI (mean age = 37.3 +/− 8.1) and 16 (7 women) well-screened normal sleepers (mean age = 37.6 +/− 4.5). Methods and Measurements: PI was established with an unstructured clinical interview, a Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID), sleep diary, actigraphy and polysomnography (PSG). 1H-MRS data were collected on a Varian 4 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging/spectroscopy scanner. Global brain GABA levels were averaged from samples in the basal ganglia, thalamus, and temporal, parietal, and occipital white-matter and cortex. Results: Average brain GABA levels were nearly 30% lower in patients with PI (.18 +/− .06) compared to controls (.25 +/− .11). GABA levels were negatively correlated with wake after sleep onset (WASO) on two independent PSGs (r = −0.71, p = 0.0024 and −0.70, p = 0.0048). Conclusions: Our preliminary finding of a global reduction in GABA in non-medicated individuals with PI is the first demonstration of a neurochemical difference in the brains of those with PI compared to normal sleeping controls. 1H-MRS is a valuable tool to assess GABA in vivo, and may provide a means to shed further light on the neurobiology of insomnia. Citation: Winkelman JW; Buxton OM; Jensen JE; Benson KL; O'Connor SP; Wang W; Renshaw PF. Reduced brain GABA in primary insomnia: preliminary data from 4T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). SLEEP 2008;31(11):1499–1506. PMID:19014069

  20. Broadband electron spin resonance at low frequency without resonant cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Z.; Suh, B.; Corti, M.; Cattaneo, L.; Hajny, D.; Borsa, F.; Luban, M.

    2008-04-09

    We have developed a nonconventional broadband electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer operating continuously in the frequency range from 0.5 to 9 GHz. Dual antenna structure and the microwave absorbing environment differentiate the setup from the conventional one and enable broadband operation with any combination of frequency or magnetic field modulation and frequency or magnetic field sweeping. Its performance has been tested with the measurements on a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) sample and with the measurements on the single molecular magnet, V6, in solid state at low temperature.

  1. A Hyperpolarizable 1H Magnetic Resonance Probe for Signal Detection 15 Minutes after Spin Polarization Storage

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumya S.; Norcott, Philip; Rayner, Peter J.; Green, Gary G. R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are two extremely important techniques with applications ranging from molecular structure determination to human imaging. However, in many cases the applicability of NMR and MRI are limited by inherently poor sensitivity and insufficient nuclear spin lifetime. Here we demonstrate a cost‐efficient and fast technique that tackles both issues simultaneously. We use the signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) technique to hyperpolarize the target 1H nuclei and store this polarization in long‐lived singlet (LLS) form after suitable radiofrequency (rf) pulses. Compared to the normal scenario, we achieve three orders of signal enhancement and one order of lifetime extension, leading to 1H NMR signal detection 15 minutes after the creation of the detected states. The creation of such hyperpolarized long‐lived polarization reflects an important step forward in the pipeline to see such agents used as clinical probes of disease. PMID:27862799

  2. In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in young-adult daily marijuana users☆

    PubMed Central

    Muetzel, Ryan L.; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Collins, Paul F.; Becker, Mary P.; Valabrègue, Romain; Auerbach, Edward J.; Lim, Kelvin O.; Luciana, Monica

    2013-01-01

    To date, there has been little work describing the neurochemical profile of young, heavy marijuana users. In this study, we examined 27 young-adult marijuana users and 26 healthy controls using single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy on a 3 T scanner. The voxel was placed in the dorsal striatum, and estimated concentrations of glutamate + glutamine, myo-inositol, taurine + glucose, total choline and total N-acetylaspartate were examined between groups. There were no overall group effects, but two metabolites showed group by sex interactions. Lower levels of glutamate + glutamine (scaled to total creatine) were observed in female, but not male, marijuana users compared to controls. Higher levels of myo-inositol were observed in female users compared to female non-users and to males in both groups. Findings are discussed in relation to patterns of corticostriatal connectivity and function, in the context of marijuana abuse. PMID:23956957

  3. Bipolar disorder comorbid with alcoholism: a 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Nery, Fabiano G; Stanley, Jeffrey A; Chen, Hua-Hsuan; Hatch, John P; Nicoletti, Mark A; Monkul, E Serap; Lafer, Beny; Soares, Jair C

    2010-04-01

    Alcoholism is highly prevalent among bipolar disorder (BD) patients, and its presence is associated with a worse outcome and refractoriness to treatment of the mood disorder. The neurobiological underpinnings that characterize this comorbidity are unknown. We sought to investigate the neurochemical profile of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of BD patients with comorbid alcoholism. A short-TE, single-voxel (1)H spectroscopy acquisition at 1.5T from the left DLFPC of 22 alcoholic BD patients, 26 non-alcoholic BD patients and 54 healthy comparison subjects (HC) were obtained. Absolute levels of N-acetyl aspartate, phosphocreatine plus creatine, choline-containing compounds, myo-inositol, glutamate plus glutamine (Glu+Gln) and glutamate were obtained using the water signal as an internal reference. Analysis of co-variance was used to compare metabolite levels among the three groups. In the primary comparison, non-alcoholic BD patients had higher glutamate concentrations compared to alcoholic BD patients. In secondary comparisons integrating interactions between gender and alcoholism, non-alcoholic BD patients presented significantly higher glutamate plus glutamine (Glu+Gln) than alcoholic BD patients and HC. These results appeared to be driven by differences in male subjects. Alcoholic BD patients with additional drug use disorders presented significantly lower myo-inositol than BD patients with alcoholism alone. The co-occurrence of BD and alcoholism may be characterized by neurochemical abnormalities related to the glutamatergic system and to the inositol second messenger system and/or in glial pathology. These abnormalities may be the neurochemical correlate of an increased risk to develop alcoholism in BD, or of a persistently worse clinical and functional status in BD patients in remission from alcoholism, supporting the clinical recommendation that efforts should be made to prevent or early diagnose and treat alcoholism in BD patients.

  4. Functional dynamics of hippocampal glutamate during associative learning assessed with in vivo (1)H functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jeffrey A; Burgess, Ashley; Khatib, Dalal; Ramaseshan, Karthik; Arshad, Muzamil; Wu, Helen; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A

    2017-03-29

    fMRI has provided vibrant characterization of regional and network responses associated with associative learning and memory; however, their relationship to functional neurochemistry is unclear. Here, we introduce a novel application of in vivo proton functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H fMRS) to investigate the dynamics of hippocampal glutamate during paired-associated learning and memory in healthy young adults. We show that the temporal dynamics of glutamate differed significantly during processes of memory consolidation and retrieval. Moreover, learning proficiency was predictive of the temporal dynamics of glutamate such that fast learners were characterized by a significant increase in glutamate levels early in learning, whereas this increase was only observed later in slow learners. The observed functional dynamics of glutamate provides a novel in vivo marker of brain function. Previously demonstrated N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor mediated synaptic plasticity during associative memory formation may be expressed in glutamate dynamics, which the novel application of (1)H MRS is sensitive to. The novel application of (1)H fMRS can provide highly innovative vistas for characterizing brain function in vivo, with significant implications for studying glutamatergic neurotransmission in health and disorders such as schizophrenia.

  5. Hyphenation of gas chromatography to microcoil 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grynbaum, Marc David; Kreidler, Diana; Rehbein, Jens; Purea, Armin; Schuler, Paul; Schaal, Walter; Czesla, Harri; Webb, Andrew; Schurig, Volker; Albert, Klaus

    2007-04-01

    Whereas the hyphenation of gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry is of great importance, little is known about the coupling to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The investigation of this technique is an attractive proposition because of the valuable information given by NMR on molecular structure. The experiments shown here are to our knowledge the first hyphenating capillary GC to microcoil NMR. In contrast to liquids, gases have rarely been investigated by NMR, mainly due to the experimental difficulties in handling gases and the low signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of the NMR signal obtained at atmospheric pressure. With advances in NMR sensitivity (higher magnetic fields and solenoidal microprobes), this limitation can be largely overcome. In this paper, we describe the use of a custom-built solenoidal NMR microprobe with an active volume of 2 microL for the NMR detection of several compounds at 400 MHz, first in a mixture, and then with full coupling to capillary GC to identify them separately. The injected amounts of each analyte in the hyphenated experiments are in the range of 15-50 micromol, resulting in reasonable SNR for sample masses of 1-2 microg.

  6. Monitoring Dendritic Cell Migration using 19F / 1H Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Waiczies, Helmar; Guenther, Martin; Skodowski, Julia; Lepore, Stefano; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf; Waiczies, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Continuous advancements in noninvasive imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have greatly improved our ability to study physiological or pathological processes in living organisms. MRI is also proving to be a valuable tool for capturing transplanted cells in vivo. Initial cell labeling strategies for MRI made use of contrast agents that influence the MR relaxation times (T1, T2, T2*) and lead to an enhancement (T1) or depletion (T2*) of signal where labeled cells are present. T2* enhancement agents such as ultrasmall iron oxide agents (USPIO) have been employed to study cell migration and some have also been approved by the FDA for clinical application. A drawback of T2* agents is the difficulty to distinguish the signal extinction created by the labeled cells from other artifacts such as blood clots, micro bleeds or air bubbles. In this article, we describe an emerging technique for tracking cells in vivo that is based on labeling the cells with fluorine (19F)-rich particles. These particles are prepared by emulsifying perfluorocarbon (PFC) compounds and then used to label cells, which subsequently can be imaged by 19F MRI. Important advantages of PFCs for cell tracking in vivo include (i) the absence of carbon-bound 19F in vivo, which then yields background-free images and complete cell selectivityand(ii) the possibility to quantify the cell signal by 19F MR spectroscopy. PMID:23542739

  7. Frequency division using a micromechanical resonance cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qalandar, K. R.; Strachan, B. S.; Gibson, B.; Sharma, M.; Ma, A.; Shaw, S. W.; Turner, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    A coupled micromechanical resonator array demonstrates a mechanical realization of multi-stage frequency division. The mechanical structure consists of a set of N sequentially perpendicular microbeams that are connected by relatively weak elastic elements such that the system vibration modes are localized to individual microbeams and have natural frequencies with ratios close to 1:2:⋯:2N. Conservative (passive) nonlinear inter-modal coupling provides the required energy transfer between modes and is achieved by finite deformation kinematics. When the highest frequency beam is excited, this arrangement promotes a cascade of subharmonic resonances that achieve frequency division of 2j at microbeam j for j = 1, …, N. Results are shown for a capacitively driven three-stage divider in which an input signal of 824 kHz is passively divided through three modal stages, producing signals at 412 kHz, 206 kHz, and 103 kHz. The system modes are characterized and used to delineate the range of AC input voltages and frequencies over which the cascade occurs. This narrow band frequency divider has simple design rules that are scalable to higher frequencies and can be extended to a larger number of modal stages.

  8. Quantification of ethanol methyl 1H magnetic resonance signal intensity following intravenous ethanol administration in primate brain

    PubMed Central

    Flory, Graham S.; O’Malley, Jean; Grant, Kathleen A.; Park, Byung; Kroenke, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be used to directly monitor brain ethanol. Previously, studies of human subjects have lead to the suggestion that the ethanol methyl 1H MRS signal intensity relates to tolerance to ethanol’s intoxicating effects. More recently, the ethanol 1H MRS signal intensity has been recognized to vary between brain gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) due to differences in T2 within these environments. The methods presented here extend ethanol MRS techniques to nonhuman primate subjects. Twelve monkeys were administered ethanol while sedated and positioned within a 3T MRI system. Chemical shift imaging (CSI) measurements were performed following intravenous infusion of 1g/kg ethanol. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were also recorded for each monkey to provide volume fractions of GM, WM, and CSF for each CSI spectrum. To estimate co-variance of ethanol MRS intensity with GM, WM, and CSF volume fractions, the relative contribution of each tissue subtype was determined following corrections for radiofrequency pulse profile non-uniformity, chemical shift artifacts, and differences between the point spread function in the CSI data and the imaging data. The ethanol MRS intensity per unit blood ethanol concentration was found to differ between GM, WM, and CSF. Individual differences in MRS intensity were larger in GM than WM. This methodology demonstrates the feasibility of ethanol MRS experiments and analysis in nonhuman primate subjects, and suggests GM may be a site of significant variation in ethanol MRS intensity between individuals. PMID:20018244

  9. (1)H NMR at Larmor frequencies down to 3Hz by means of Field-Cycling techniques.

    PubMed

    Kresse, B; Becher, M; Privalov, A F; Hofmann, M; Rössler, E A; Vogel, M; Fujara, F

    2017-04-01

    Field-Cycling (FC) NMR experiments were carried out at (1)H Larmor frequencies down to about 3Hz. This could be achieved by fast switching a high polarizing magnetic field down to a low evolution field which is tilted with respect to the polarization field. Then, the low frequency Larmor precession of the nuclear spin magnetization about this evolution field is registered by means of FIDs in a high detection field. The crucial technical point of the experiment is the stabilization of the evolution field, which is achieved by compensating for temporal magnetic field fluctuations of all three spatial components. The paper reports on some other basic low field experiments such as the simultaneous measurement of the Larmor frequency and the spin-lattice relaxation time in such small fields as well as the irradiation of oscillating transversal magnetic field pulses at very low frequencies as a novel method for field calibration in low field FC NMR. The potential of low field FC is exemplified by the (1)H relaxation dispersion of water at frequencies below about 2kHz stemming from the slow proton exchange process.

  10. Purity assessment of ginsenoside Rg1 using quantitative (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bao-Ming; Xiao, Sheng-Yuan; Chen, Ting-Bo; Xie, Ying; Luo, Pei; Liu, Liang; Zhou, Hua

    2017-05-30

    Ginseng herbs comprise a group of the most popular herbs, including Panax ginseng, P. notoginseng and P. quinquefolius (Family Araliaceae), which are used as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and are some of the best-selling natural products in the world. The accurate quantification of ginsenoside Rg1 is one of the major aspects of its quality control. However, the purity of the commercial Rg1 chemical reference substance (CRS) is often measured with high-performance chromatography coupled with an ultraviolet detector (HPLC-UV), which is a selective detector with unequal responses to different compounds; thus, this detector introduces probable error to purity assessments. In the present study, quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR), due to its absolute quantification ability, was applied to accurately assess the purity of Rg1 CRS. Phenylmethyl phthalate was used as the internal standard (IS) to calibrate the purity of Rg1 CRS. The proton signal of Rg1 CRS in methanol-d4 at 4.37ppm was selected to avoid interfering signals, enabling accurate quantitative analysis. The relaxation delay, number of scans, and NMR windowing were optimized for data acquisition. For post-processing, the Lorentz/Gauss deconvolution method was employed to increase the signal accuracy by separating the impurities and noise in the integrated region of the quantitative proton. The method validation showed that the developed method has acceptable sensitivity, linearity, precision, and accuracy. The purity of the commercial Rg1 CRS examined with the method developed in this research was 90.34±0.21%, which was obviously lower than that reported by the manufacturer (>98.0%, HPLC-UV). The cross-method validation shows that the commonly used HPLC-UV, HPLC-ELSD (evaporative light scattering detector) and even LC-MS (mass spectrometry) methods provide significantly higher purity values of Rg1 CRS compared with the qNMR method, and the accuracy of these LC-based methods largely depend on the

  11. Frequency shifts in gravitational resonance spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Baeßler, S.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Pignol, G.; ...

    2015-02-25

    Quantum states of ultracold neutrons in a gravitational field are characterized through gravitational resonance spectroscopy. This paper discusses systematic effects that appear in the spectroscopic measurements. The discussed frequency shifts-which we call the Stern-Gerlach shift, interference shift, and spectator-state shift-appear in conceivable measurement schemes and have general importance. Lastly, these shifts have to be taken into account in precision experiments.

  12. (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments for the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-36α.

    PubMed

    Goradia, Nishit; Wißbrock, Amelie; Wiedemann, Christoph; Bordusa, Frank; Ramachandran, Ramadurai; Imhof, Diana; Ohlenschläger, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-36α (IL-36α) is a recently characterised member of the interleukin-1 superfamily. It is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis in one third of psoriasis patients. By binding of IL-36α to its receptor IL-36R via the NF-κB pathway other cytokines involved in inflammatory and apoptotic cascade are activated. The efficacy of complex formation is controlled by N-terminal processing. To obtain a more detailed view on the structure function relationship we performed a heteronuclear multidimensional NMR investigation and here report the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments for the backbone and side chain nuclei of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-36α.

  13. Stereospecific assignment of 1H resonances through chemical shift calculation and their use in structure determination by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Timothy S.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    1995-04-01

    Understanding of the factors which influence proton chemical shifts in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of proteins has advanced steadily as the number of proteins, for which assignments in conjunction with high resolution structures have been obtained, has increased. Progress has been made in both the calculation of chemical shifts from given coordinates, both empirically for 1H (Williamson & Asakura J. Magn. Reson. (1991) 94, 557) and using ab initio approaches for calculation of 13C (De Dios et al. Science (1993) 260, 1491). Concomitantly Wishart et al. (J. Mol. Biol. (1992) 222, 311), using statistical methods have clarified the relationship between Hα chemical shift and regular secondary structure in proteins to a high degree of accuracy. We recently demonstrated the significant amount of structural information present in the Hα chemical shift through the use of chemical shift restrained molecular dynamics simulations (Harvey & van Gunsteren Techniques in Protein Chemistry IV (1993) 615, Academic Press). Here we apply a similar methodology to the stereospecific assignment of methylene and methyl proton resonances in proteins. Stereospecific assignment of such 1H resonances dramatically increases the degree of precision of ensembles of structures derived from NMR data. However, this is often a cumbersome process, requiring detailed analysis of large amounts of data. Furthermore, experimental considerations such as poor signal-to-noise ratios, spectral overlap and spin diffusion combine to make this process somewhat unreliable. We present calculations of the chemical shifts for the known structures of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (Mw 6.5 kDa) and the α-amylase inhibitor tendamistat (Mw 8 kDa), for which stereospecific assignments and high resolution structures from both NMR and crystallographic studies are available. The methods described are also applied to the ensemble of structures obtained for protein S (Mw 19 kDa) for both structure

  14. (1)H-Nuclear magnetic resonance-based plasma metabolic profiling of dairy cows with clinical and subclinical ketosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, L W; Zhang, H Y; Wu, L; Shu, S; Xia, C; Xu, C; Zheng, J S

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the metabolic profile of plasma samples from cows with clinical and subclinical ketosis. According to clinical signs and 3-hydroxybutyrate plasma levels, 81 multiparous Holstein cows were selected from a dairy farm 7 to 21 d after calving. The cows were divided into 3 groups: cows with clinical ketosis, cows with subclinical ketosis, and healthy control cows. (1)H-Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics was used to assess the plasma metabolic profiles of the 3 groups. The data were analyzed by principal component analysis, partial least squares discriminant analysis, and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis. The differences in metabolites among the 3 groups were assessed. The orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis model differentiated the 3 groups of plasma samples. The model predicted clinical ketosis with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100%. In the case of subclinical ketosis, the model had a sensitivity of 97.0% and specificity of 95.7%. Twenty-five metabolites, including acetoacetate, acetone, lactate, glucose, choline, glutamic acid, and glutamine, were different among the 3 groups. Among the 25 metabolites, 4 were upregulated, 7 were downregulated, and 14 were both upregulated and downregulated. The results indicated that plasma (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics, coupled with pattern recognition analytical methods, not only has the sensitivity and specificity to distinguish cows with clinical and subclinical ketosis from healthy controls, but also has the potential to be developed into a clinically useful diagnostic tool that could contribute to a further understanding of the disease mechanisms.

  15. Retinal metabolic changes in an experimental model of optic nerve transection by ex vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Huang, Mingming; Wang, Xinghua; Wang, Xuxia; Chen, Fei; Lei, Hao; Jiang, Fagang

    2011-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the retinal metabolic processes in a rat axotomy model. Retinal metabolic changes in optic nerve transection (ONT) rat model were analyzed by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS). Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) densities were assessed from retinal whole mounts. The retina was stained immunohistochemically with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The results showed that the retina in ONT rats had significantly decreased concentrations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), taurine (Tau), creatine (Cr) and increased concentrations of alanine (Ala) compared with control. Examination of glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln) and Glx (Glu + Gln) concentrations disclosed no significant differences. The mean density of RGCs reduced from 2,249 ± 87 cells/mm(2) in control group to 320 ± 56 cells/mm(2) in ONT group. GFAP immunoreactivity was markedly higher in ONT group than that in control group. The retinal metabolism after ONT was associated with neurotransmitter recycling/production perturbation, as well as other metabolic disequilibrium.

  16. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance-based extracellular metabolomic analysis of multidrug resistant Tca8113 oral squamous carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Jiao; Feng, Yun; Zhou, Wenjie; Zhang, Jihua; Yu, Y U; Wang, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Ping

    2015-06-01

    A major obstacle of successful chemotherapy is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in the cancer cells, which is difficult to reverse. Metabolomic analysis, an emerging approach that has been increasingly applied in various fields, is able to reflect the unique chemical fingerprints of specific cellular processes in an organism. The assessment of such metabolite changes can be used to identify novel therapeutic biomarkers. In the present study, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to analyze the extracellular metabolomic spectrum of the Tca8113 oral squamous carcinoma cell line, in which MDR was induced using the carboplatin (CBP) and pingyangmycin (PYM) chemotherapy drugs in vitro. The data were analyzed using the principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) methods. The results demonstrated that the extracellular metabolomic spectrum of metabolites such as glutamate, glycerophosphoethanol amine, α-Glucose and β-Glucose for the drug-induced Tca8113 cells was significantly different from the parental Tca8113 cell line. A number of biochemicals were also significantly different between the groups based on their NMR spectra, with drug-resistant cells presenting relatively higher levels of acetate and lower levels of lactate. In addition, a significantly higher peak was observed at δ 3.35 ppm in the spectrum of the PYM-induced Tca8113 cells. Therefore, (1)H NMR-based metabolomic analysis has a high potential for monitoring the formation of MDR during clinical tumor chemotherapy in the future.

  17. Alterations in brain metabolism and function following administration of low-dose codeine phosphate: (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen; Lin, Pei-Yin; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Ren-Hua; Xiao, Ye-Yu

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify alterations in brain function following administration of a single, low-dose of codeine phosphate in healthy volunteers using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In addition, the metabolic changes in the two sides of the frontal lobe were identified using (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS). A total of 20 right-handed healthy participants (10 males, 10 females) were evaluated, and a Signa HDx 1.5T MRI scanner was used for data acquisition. An echo planar imaging sequence was used for resting-state fMRI, whereas a point resolved spectroscopy sequence was used for (1)H-MRS. Regional Saturation Technique, Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI, and Statistical Parameter Mapping 8 were used to analyze the fMRI data. The (1)H-MRS data were analyzed using LCModel software. At 1 h after oral administration of codeine phosphate (1.0 mg/kg), the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and regional homogeneity were altered in different brain areas. The choline content was significantly increased in the right and left frontal lobes following codeine phosphate administration (P=0.02 and P=0.03, respectively), whereas the inositol content was significantly decreased in the left frontal lobe (P=0.02). There was no change in the glutamic acid content in the frontal lobes. In conclusion, the functions of different brain regions can be affected by a single, low-dose administration of codeine phosphate. The alterations in metabolite content in the two frontal lobes may be associated with changes in brain function, whereas the ALFF in the globus pallidus may have an effect on codeine phosphate addiction. Finally, glutamic acid may be useful in the estimation of codeine dependence.

  18. Alterations in brain metabolism and function following administration of low-dose codeine phosphate: 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhen; Lin, Pei-Yin; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Ren-Hua; Xiao, Ye-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify alterations in brain function following administration of a single, low-dose of codeine phosphate in healthy volunteers using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In addition, the metabolic changes in the two sides of the frontal lobe were identified using 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). A total of 20 right-handed healthy participants (10 males, 10 females) were evaluated, and a Signa HDx 1.5T MRI scanner was used for data acquisition. An echo planar imaging sequence was used for resting-state fMRI, whereas a point resolved spectroscopy sequence was used for 1H-MRS. Regional Saturation Technique, Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI, and Statistical Parameter Mapping 8 were used to analyze the fMRI data. The 1H-MRS data were analyzed using LCModel software. At 1 h after oral administration of codeine phosphate (1.0 mg/kg), the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and regional homogeneity were altered in different brain areas. The choline content was significantly increased in the right and left frontal lobes following codeine phosphate administration (P=0.02 and P=0.03, respectively), whereas the inositol content was significantly decreased in the left frontal lobe (P=0.02). There was no change in the glutamic acid content in the frontal lobes. In conclusion, the functions of different brain regions can be affected by a single, low-dose administration of codeine phosphate. The alterations in metabolite content in the two frontal lobes may be associated with changes in brain function, whereas the ALFF in the globus pallidus may have an effect on codeine phosphate addiction. Finally, glutamic acid may be useful in the estimation of codeine dependence. PMID:27446252

  19. Integration of 3D 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy data into neuronavigation systems for tumor biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanberoglu, Berkay; Moore, Nina Z.; Frakes, David; Karam, Lina J.; Debbins, Josef P.; Preul, Mark C.

    2013-03-01

    Many important applications in clinical medicine can benefit from the fusion of spectroscopy data with anatomical images. For example, the correlation of metabolite profiles with specific regions of interest in anatomical tumor images can be useful in characterizing and treating heterogeneous tumors that appear structurally homogeneous. Such applications can build on the correlation of data from in-vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging (1HMRSI) with data from genetic and ex-vivo Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. To establish that correlation, tissue samples must be neurosurgically extracted from specifically identified locations with high accuracy. Toward that end, this paper presents new neuronavigation technology that enhances current clinical capabilities in the context of neurosurgical planning and execution. The proposed methods improve upon the current state-of-the-art in neuronavigation through the use of detailed three dimensional (3D) 1H-MRSI data. MRSI spectra are processed and analyzed, and specific voxels are selected based on their chemical contents. 3D neuronavigation overlays are then generated and applied to anatomical image data in the operating room. Without such technology, neurosurgeons must rely on memory and other qualitative resources alone for guidance in accessing specific MRSI-identified voxels. In contrast, MRSI-based overlays provide quantitative visual cues and location information during neurosurgery. The proposed methods enable a progressive new form of online MRSI-guided neuronavigation that we demonstrate in this study through phantom validation and clinical application.

  20. High-resolution mono- and multidimensional magic angle spinning 1H nuclear magnetic resonance of membrane peptides in nondeuterated lipid membranes and H2O.

    PubMed Central

    Le Guernevé, C; Seigneuret, M

    1996-01-01

    High-speed (14 kHz) solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) 1H NMR has been applied to several membrane peptides incorporated into nondeuterated dilauroyl or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes suspended in H2O. It is shown that solvent suppression methods derived from solution NMR, such as presaturation or jump-return, can be used to reduce water resonance, even at relatively high water content. In addition, regioselective excitation of 1H peptide resonances promotes an efficient suppression of lipid resonances, even in cases where these are initially two orders of magnitude more intense. As a consequence, 1H MAS spectra of the peptide low-field region are obtained without interference from water and lipid signals. These display resonances from amide and other exchangeable 1H as well as from aromatic nonexchangeable 1H. The spectral resolution depends on the specific types of resonance and membrane peptide. For small amphiphilic or hydrophobic oligopeptides, resolution of most individual amide resonance is achieved, whereas for the transmembrane peptide gramicidin A, an unresolved amide spectrum is obtained. Partial resolution of aromatic 1H occurs in all cases. Multidimensional 1H-MAS spectra of membrane peptides can also be obtained by using water suppression and regioselective excitation. For gramicidin A, F2-regioselective 2D nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) spectra are dominated by intermolecular through-space connectivities between peptide aromatic or formyl 1H and lipid 1H. These appear to be compatible with the known structure and topography of the gramicidin pore. On the other hand, for the amphiphilic peptide leucine-enkephalin, F2-regioselective NOESY spectra mostly display cross-peaks originating from though-space proximities of amide or aromatic 1H with themselves and with aliphatic 1H. F3-regioselective 3D NOESY-NOESY spectra can be used to obtain through-space correlations within aliphatic 1H. Such intrapeptide proximities should

  1. High frequency properties of resonant tunneling diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, H. Y.; Sinkkonen, J.

    The small signal analysis for the resonant tunneling diode (RTD) is carried out by using a semiclassical transport theory. Multiple scattering effects are accounted for in an optical approximation by using a complex mean free path. An analytical expression for the conduction current is given. The results show that the negative differential conductance prevails up to the frequency f0 limited by the quantum well transit time. The imaginary part of the admittance can be presented by a series inductance as has been recently found experimentally. In addition, the equivalent circuit has a capacitor in parallel with the conductance-inductance branch. Above f0 the admittance shows an oscillatory behaviour. The oscillations are associated with the quantum well transit time resonances.

  2. Low-frequency quadrature mode birdcage resonator.

    PubMed

    Borsboom, H M; Claasen-Vujcić, T; Gaykema, H J; Mehlkopf, T

    1997-03-01

    The birdcage resonator is frequently used in conventional MRI because of its excellent attributes. Its use in low-field MRI is restricted to field strengths higher than, for example, 0.1 T, dependent on the size of the coil. This is because of the intrinsically low inductance value of the birdcage coils. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the birdcage at low field strengths is significantly lower when compared to, for example, the solenoid. Both problems can be overcome with the multiturn technique and a novel wound birdcage coil. The quadrature mode wound birdcage coil presented in this paper can be used at frequencies as low as 100 kHz. Its sensitivity is also increased when compared to the conventional strip-ring birdcage. Homogeneity, effective volume, and methods to increase the resonator bandwidth to match the signal bandwidth are left intact. The latter is a typical low-field problem.

  3. A phytochemical comparison of saw palmetto products using gas chromatography and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolomic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Anthony; Suter, Andy; Krnjic, Ana; Strassel, Brigitte; Zloh, Mire; Said, Mazlina; Heinrich, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Preparations containing saw palmetto berries are used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). There are many products on the market, and relatively little is known about their chemical variability and specifically the composition and quality of different saw palmetto products notwithstanding that in 2000, an international consultation paper from the major urological associations from the five continents on treatments for BPH demanded further research on this topic. Here, we compare two analytical approaches and characterise 57 different saw palmetto products. Methods An established method – gas chromatography – was used for the quantification of nine fatty acids, while a novel approach of metabolomic profiling using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used as a fingerprinting tool to assess the overall composition of the extracts. Key findings The phytochemical analysis determining the fatty acids showed a high level of heterogeneity of the different products in the total amount and of nine single fatty acids. A robust and reproducible 1H NMR spectroscopy method was established, and the results showed that it was possible to statistically differentiate between saw palmetto products that had been extracted under different conditions but not between products that used a similar extraction method. Principal component analysis was able to determine those products that had significantly different metabolites. Conclusions The metabolomic approach developed offers novel opportunities for quality control along the value chain of saw palmetto and needs to be followed further, as with this method, the complexity of a herbal extract can be better assessed than with the analysis of a single group of constituents. PMID:24417505

  4. Structural studies on Desulfovibrio gigas cytochrome c3 by two-dimensional 1H-nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Piçarra-Pereira, M A; Turner, D L; LeGall, J; Xavier, A V

    1993-01-01

    Several aromatic amino acid residues and haem resonances in the fully reduced form of Desulfovibrio gigas cytochrome c3 are assigned, using two-dimensional 1H n.m.r., on the basis of the interactions between the protons of the aromatic amino acids and the haem protons as well as the intrahaem distances known from the X-ray structure [Kissinger (1989) Ph.D. Thesis, Washington State University]. The interhaem interactions observed in the n.m.r. spectra are in full agreement with the D. gigas X-ray structure and also with the n.m.r. data from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) [Turner, Salgueiro, LeGall and Xavier (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 210, 931-936]. The good correlation between the calculated ring-current shifts and the observed chemical shifts strongly supports the present assignments. Observation of the two-dimensional nuclear-Overhauser-enhancement spectra of the protein in the reduced, intermediate and fully oxidized stages led to the ordering of the haems in terms of their midpoint redox potentials and their identification in the X-ray structure. The first haem to oxidize is haem I, followed by haems II, III and IV, numbered according to the Cys ligand positions in the amino acid sequences [Mathews (1985) Prog. Biophys. Mol. Biol. 54, 1-56]. Although the haem core architecture is the same for the different Desulfovibrio cytochromes c3, the order of redox potentials is different. PMID:8397514

  5. Calcium silicate hydrates investigated by solid-state high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Meducin, Fabienne . E-mail: meducin@cnrs-orleans.fr; Bresson, Bruno; Lequeux, Nicolas; Noirfontaine, Marie-Noelle de; Zanni, Helene

    2007-05-15

    This work focuses on phases formed during cement hydration under high pressure and temperature: portlandite Ca(OH){sub 2} (CH); hillebrandite Ca{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2} ({beta}-dicalcium silicate hydrate); calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H); jaffeite Ca{sub 6}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})(OH){sub 6} (tricalcium silicate hydrate); {alpha}-C{sub 2}SH Ca{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2} ({alpha}-dicalcium silicate hydrate); xonotlite Ca{sub 6}(Si{sub 6}O{sub 17})(OH){sub 2} and kilchoanite Ca{sub 6}(SiO{sub 4})(Si{sub 3}O{sub 10}). Portlandite and hillebrandite were synthesized and characterised by high resolution solid-state {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. In addition, information from the literature concerning the last five phases was gathered. In certain cases, a schematic 3D-structure could be determined. These data allow identification of the other phases present in a mixture. Their morphology was also observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

  6. Facile Preparation of a New Gadofullerene-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent with High 1H Relaxivity

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chunying; Corwin, Frank D.; Zhang, Jianfei; Chen, Zhijian; Reid, Jonathan E.; Sun, Minghao; Xu, Wei; Sim, Jae Hyun; Wang, Chunru; Fatouros, Panos P.; Esker, Alan R.; Gibson, Harry W.; Dorn, Harry C.

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on the trimetallic nitride templated (TNT) metallofullerene, Gd3N@C80, was synthesized by a facile method in high yield. The observed longitudinal and transverse relaxivities, r1 and r2, for water hydrogens in the presence of the water-soluble gadofullerene 2, Gd3N@C80(OH)~26(CH2CH2COOM)~16 (M = Na or H), are 207 and 282 mM-1s-1 (per C80 cage) at 2.4 T, respectively; these values are 50 times larger than those of Gd3+ poly(aminocarboxylate) complexes, such as commercial Omniscan® and Magnevist®. This high 1H relaxivity for this new hydroxylated and carboxylated gadofullerene derivative provides high signal enhancement at significantly lower Gd concentration as demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo MRI studies. Dynamic light scattering data reveal a unimodal size distribution with an average hydrodynamic radius of ca. 78 nm in pure water (pH = 7), which is significantly different from other hydroxylated or carboxylated fullerene and metallofullerene derivatives reported to date. Agarose gel infusion results indicate that the gadofullerene 2 displayed diffusion properties different from that of commercial Omniscan® and those of PEG5000 modified Gd3N@C80. The reactive carboxyl functionality present on this highly efficient contrast agent may also serve as a precursor for biomarker tissue-targeting purposes. PMID:19445504

  7. Structural studies on Desulfovibrio gigas cytochrome c3 by two-dimensional 1H-nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Piçarra-Pereira, M A; Turner, D L; LeGall, J; Xavier, A V

    1993-09-15

    Several aromatic amino acid residues and haem resonances in the fully reduced form of Desulfovibrio gigas cytochrome c3 are assigned, using two-dimensional 1H n.m.r., on the basis of the interactions between the protons of the aromatic amino acids and the haem protons as well as the intrahaem distances known from the X-ray structure [Kissinger (1989) Ph.D. Thesis, Washington State University]. The interhaem interactions observed in the n.m.r. spectra are in full agreement with the D. gigas X-ray structure and also with the n.m.r. data from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) [Turner, Salgueiro, LeGall and Xavier (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 210, 931-936]. The good correlation between the calculated ring-current shifts and the observed chemical shifts strongly supports the present assignments. Observation of the two-dimensional nuclear-Overhauser-enhancement spectra of the protein in the reduced, intermediate and fully oxidized stages led to the ordering of the haems in terms of their midpoint redox potentials and their identification in the X-ray structure. The first haem to oxidize is haem I, followed by haems II, III and IV, numbered according to the Cys ligand positions in the amino acid sequences [Mathews (1985) Prog. Biophys. Mol. Biol. 54, 1-56]. Although the haem core architecture is the same for the different Desulfovibrio cytochromes c3, the order of redox potentials is different.

  8. Chemical purity using quantitative 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance: a hierarchical Bayesian approach for traceable calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toman, Blaza; Nelson, Michael A.; Lippa, Katrice A.

    2016-10-01

    Chemical purity assessment using quantitative 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a method based on ratio references of mass and signal intensity of the analyte species to that of chemical standards of known purity. As such, it is an example of a calculation using a known measurement equation with multiple inputs. Though multiple samples are often analyzed during purity evaluations in order to assess measurement repeatability, the uncertainty evaluation must also account for contributions from inputs to the measurement equation. Furthermore, there may be other uncertainty components inherent in the experimental design, such as independent implementation of multiple calibration standards. As such, the uncertainty evaluation is not purely bottom up (based on the measurement equation) or top down (based on the experimental design), but inherently contains elements of both. This hybrid form of uncertainty analysis is readily implemented with Bayesian statistical analysis. In this article we describe this type of analysis in detail and illustrate it using data from an evaluation of chemical purity and its uncertainty for a folic acid material.

  9. Quantitative, In Situ Visualization of Metal‐Ion Dissolution and Transport Using 1H Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Joshua M.; Davenport, Alison J.; Ryder, Karl S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Quantitative mapping of metal ions freely diffusing in solution is important across a diverse range of disciplines and is particularly significant for dissolution processes in batteries, metal corrosion, and electroplating/polishing of manufactured components. However, most current techniques are invasive, requiring sample extraction, insertion of an electrode, application of an electric potential or the inclusion of a molecular sensor. Thus, there is a need for techniques to visualize the distribution of metal ions non‐invasively, in situ, quantitatively, in three dimensions (3D) and in real time. Here we have used 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to make quantitative 3D maps showing evolution of the distribution of Cu2+ ions, not directly visible by MRI, during the electrodissolution of copper, with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. The images are sensitive to the speciation of copper, the depletion of dissolved O2 in the electrolyte and show the dissolution of Cu2+ ions is not uniform across the anode. PMID:27329307

  10. Investigation of local symmetry in LiH3(SeO3)2 single crystals by 1H and 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2013-10-01

    The local environments of 1H and 7Li nuclei in LiH3(SeO3)2 crystals were investigated using FT NMR. The 7Li spectrum does changes from three resonance lines to one resonance line near Tm (=383 K). The variation in the splitting of the 7Li resonance lines with temperature indicates that the EFG at the Li sites produced by the (SeO3)2- groups varies with temperature. The changes in the temperature dependence of the intensity, line width, and spin-lattice relaxation time T1 near Tm for the 1H and 7Li nuclei coincide with the distortion of the structural framework surrounding each 1H and 7Li ion. Finally, the NMR results obtained here are compared to MH3(SeO3)2 (M = Na, K, and Cs) crystals previously reported.

  11. Complete assignment of the 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of French bean plastocyanin. Application of an integrated approach to spin system identification in proteins.

    PubMed

    Chazin, W J; Rance, M; Wright, P E

    1988-08-05

    The identification of the spin systems that comprise the 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of French bean Cu(I) plastocyanin (Mr 10,600) has been made using an approach that integrates a wide range of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. A very large percentage of these assignments has been obtained in spectra acquired from 1H2O solution using a backbone amide-based strategy. The spin systems of 91 of the 99 residues have been assigned to the appropriate amino acid, thereby providing an ample basis for obtaining sequence-specific assignments, as described in the accompanying paper.

  12. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1993-06-01

    The West Virginia State College Community College Division NASA Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) study is described. During this contract period, the two most significant and professionally rewarding events were the presentation of the research activity at the Sir Isaac Newton Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the second Day of Discovery Conference, focusing on economic recovery in West Virginia. An active antenna concept utilizing a signal feedback principle similar to regenerative receivers used in early radio was studied. The device has potential for ELF research and other commercial applications for improved signal reception. Finally, work continues to progress on the development of a prototype monitoring station. Signal monitoring, data display, and data storage are major areas of activity. In addition, we plan to continue our dissemination of research activity through presentations at seminars and other universities.

  13. Resonant frequency method for bearing ball inspection

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.; Hsieh, Chung-Kao

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides for an inspection system and method for detecting defects in test objects which includes means for generating expansion inducing energy focused upon the test object at a first location, such expansion being allowed to contract, thereby causing pressure wave within and on the surface of the test object. Such expansion inducing energy may be provided by, for example, a laser beam or ultrasonic energy. At a second location, the amplitudes and phases of the acoustic waves are detected and the resonant frequencies' quality factors are calculated and compared to predetermined quality factor data, such comparison providing information of whether the test object contains a defect. The inspection system and method also includes means for mounting the bearing ball for inspection.

  14. Resonant frequency method for bearing ball inspection

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chungkao Hsieh.

    1993-11-02

    The present invention provides for an inspection system and method for detecting defects in test objects which includes means for generating expansion inducing energy focused upon the test object at a first location, such expansion being allowed to contract, thereby causing pressure wave within and on the surface of the test object. Such expansion inducing energy may be provided by, for example, a laser beam or ultrasonic energy. At a second location, the amplitudes and phases of the acoustic waves are detected and the resonant frequencies' quality factors are calculated and compared to predetermined quality factor data, such comparison providing information of whether the test object contains a defect. The inspection system and method also includes means for mounting the bearing ball for inspection. 5 figures.

  15. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1993-01-01

    The West Virginia State College Community College Division NASA Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) study is described. During this contract period, the two most significant and professionally rewarding events were the presentation of the research activity at the Sir Isaac Newton Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the second Day of Discovery Conference, focusing on economic recovery in West Virginia. An active antenna concept utilizing a signal feedback principle similar to regenerative receivers used in early radio was studied. The device has potential for ELF research and other commercial applications for improved signal reception. Finally, work continues to progress on the development of a prototype monitoring station. Signal monitoring, data display, and data storage are major areas of activity. In addition, we plan to continue our dissemination of research activity through presentations at seminars and other universities.

  16. Measuring frequency response of surface-micromachined resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Bright, Victor M.; Dalton, George C.

    1997-09-01

    Resonator structures offer a unique mechanism for characterizing MEMS materials, but measuring the resonant frequency of microstructures is challenging. In this effort a network analyzer system was used to electrically characterize surface-micromachined resonator structures in a carefully controlled pressure and temperature environment.A microscope laser interferometer was used to confirm actual device deflections.Cantilever, comb, and piston resonators fabricated in the DARPA-sponsored MUMPs process were extensively tested. Measured resonator frequency results show reasonable agreement with analytic predictions computed using manufacturer measured film thickness and residual material stress. Alternatively the measured resonant frequency data can be used to extract materials data. Tuning of resonant frequency with DC bias was also investigated. Because the tested devices vary widely in complexity, form a simple cantilever beam to a comb resonator, the data collected is especially well suited for validation testing of MEMS modeling codes.

  17. 13C and 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Glycogen Futile Cycling in Strains of the Genus Fibrobacter

    PubMed Central

    Matheron, Christelle; Delort, Anne-Marie; Gaudet, Geneviève; Forano, Evelyne; Liptaj, Tibor

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the carbon metabolism of three strains of Fibrobacter succinogenes and one strain of Fibrobacter intestinalis. The four strains produced the same amounts of the metabolites succinate, acetate, and formate in approximately the same ratio (3.7/1/0.3). The four strains similarly stored glycogen during all growth phases, and the glycogen-to-protein ratio was close to 0.6 during the exponential growth phase. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of [1-13C]glucose utilization by resting cells of the four strains revealed a reversal of glycolysis at the triose phosphate level and the same metabolic pathways. Glycogen futile cycling was demonstrated by 13C NMR by following the simultaneous metabolism of labeled [13C]glycogen and exogenous unlabeled glucose. The isotopic dilutions of the CH2 of succinate and the CH3 of acetate when the resting cells were metabolizing [1-13C]glucose and unlabeled glycogen were precisely quantified by using 13C-filtered spin-echo difference 1H NMR spectroscopy. The measured isotopic dilutions were not the same for succinate and acetate; in the case of succinate, the dilutions reflected only the contribution of glycogen futile cycling, while in the case of acetate, another mechanism was also involved. Results obtained in complementary experiments are consistent with reversal of the succinate synthesis pathway. Our results indicated that for all of the strains, from 12 to 16% of the glucose entering the metabolic pathway originated from prestored glycogen. Although genetically diverse, the four Fibrobacter strains studied had very similar carbon metabolism characteristics. PMID:12033219

  18. Cardiac effects of MDMA on the metabolic profile determined with 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Perrine, Shane A; Michaels, Mark S; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Hyde, Elisabeth M; Tancer, Manuel E; Galloway, Matthew P

    2009-05-01

    Despite the potential for deleterious (even fatal) effects on cardiac physiology, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) abuse abounds driven mainly by its euphoric effects. Acute exposure to MDMA has profound cardiovascular effects on blood pressure and heart rate in humans and animals. To determine the effects of MDMA on cardiac metabolites in rats, MDMA (0, 5, or 10 mg/kg) was injected every 2 h for a total of four injections; animals were sacrificed 2 h after the last injection (8 h drug exposure), and their hearts removed and tissue samples from left ventricular wall dissected. High resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 11.7 T, a specialized version of MRS aptly suited for analysis of semi-solid materials such as intact tissue samples, was used to measure the cardiac metabolomic profile, including alanine, lactate, succinate, creatine, and carnitine, in heart tissue from rats treated with MDMA. MDMA effects on MR-visible choline, glutamate, glutamine, and taurine were also determined. Body temperature was measured following each MDMA administration and serotonin and norepinephrine (NE) levels were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) in heart tissue from treated animals. MDMA significantly and dose-dependently increased body temperature, a hallmark of amphetamines. Serotonin, but not NE, levels were significantly and dose-dependently decreased by MDMA in the heart wall. MDMA significantly altered the MR-visible profile with an increase in carnitine and no change in other key compounds involved in cardiomyocyte energy metabolomics. Finally, choline levels were significantly decreased by MDMA in heart. The results are consistent with the notion that MDMA has significant effects on cardiovascular serotonergic tone and disrupts the metabolic homeostasis of energy regulation in cardiac tissue, potentially increasing utilization of fatty acid metabolism. The contributions of serotonergic

  19. Cardiac effects of MDMA on the metabolic profile determined with 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the rat†

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, Shane A.; Michaels, Mark S.; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Hyde, Elisabeth M.; Tancer, Manuel E.; Galloway, Matthew P.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the potential for deleterious (even fatal) effects on cardiac physiology, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) abuse abounds driven mainly by its euphoric effects. Acute exposure to MDMA has profound cardiovascular effects on blood pressure and heart rate in humans and animals. To determine the effects of MDMA on cardiac metabolites in rats, MDMA (0, 5, or 10 mg/kg) was injected every 2 h for a total of four injections; animals were sacrificed 2 h after the last injection (8 h drug exposure), and their hearts removed and tissue samples from left ventricular wall dissected. High resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) at 11.7 T, a specialized version of MRS aptly suited for analysis of semi-solid materials such as intact tissue samples, was used to measure the cardiac metabolomic profile, including alanine, lactate, succinate, creatine, and carnitine, in heart tissue from rats treated with MDMA. MDMA effects on MR-visible choline, glutamate, glutamine, and taurine were also determined. Body temperature was measured following each MDMA administration and serotonin and norepinephrine (NE) levels were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) in heart tissue from treated animals. MDMA significantly and dose-dependently increased body temperature, a hallmark of amphetamines. Serotonin, but not NE, levels were significantly and dose-dependently decreased by MDMA in the heart wall. MDMA significantly altered the MR-visible profile with an increase in carnitine and no change in other key compounds involved in cardiomyocyte energy metabolomics. Finally, choline levels were significantly decreased by MDMA in heart. The results are consistent with the notion that MDMA has significant effects on cardiovascular serotonergic tone and disrupts the metabolic homeostasis of energy regulation in cardiac tissue, potentially increasing utilization of fatty acid metabolism. The contributions of serotonergic

  20. Metabolic profiles using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in postpartum dairy cows with ovarian inactivity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuchu; Xia, Cheng; Sun, Yuhang; Xiao, Xinhuan; Wang, Gang; Fan, Ziling; Shu, Shi; Zhang, Hongyou; Xu, Chuang; Yang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    To understand the differences in metabolic changes between cows with ovarian inactivity and estrus cows, we selected cows at 60-90 days postpartum from an intensive dairy farm. According to clinical manifestations, B-ultrasound scan, rectal examination, 10 cows were assigned to the estrus group (A) and 10 to the ovarian inactivity group (B). All plasma samples were analyzed by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to compare plasma metabolomic profiles between the groups. We used multivariate pattern recognition to screen for different metabolites in plasma of anestrus cows. Compared with normal estrous cows, there were abnormalities in 12 kinds of metabolites in postpartum cows with ovarian inactivity (|r|> 0.602), including an increase in acetic acid (r = -0.817), citric acid (r = -0.767), and tyrosine (r = -0.714), and a decrease in low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.820), very low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.828), lipids (r = 0.769), alanine (r = 0.816), pyruvate (r = 0.721), creatine (r = 0.801), choline (r = 0.639), phosphorylcholine (r = 0.741), and glycerophosphorylcholine (r = 0.881). These metabolites were closely related to abnormality of glucose, amino acid, lipoprotein and choline metabolism, which may disturb the normal estrus. The decrease in plasma creatine and the increase in tyrosine were new changes for ovarian inactivity of postpartum cows. The decrease in plasma creatine and choline and the increase in tyrosine and p-hydroxyphenylalanine in cows with ovarian inactivity provide new directions for research on the mechanism of ovarian inactivity in cows.

  1. Creatine and cyclocreatine treatment of human colon adenocarcinoma xenografts: 31P and 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, C A; Askenasy, N; Jain, R K; Koretsky, A P

    1999-01-01

    Creatine (Cr) and cyclocreatine (cyCr) have been shown to inhibit the growth of a variety of human and murine tumours. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumour effect of these molecules in relation to drug accumulation, energy metabolism, tumour water accumulation and toxicity. Nude mice carrying a human colon adenocarcinoma (LS174T) with a creatine kinase (CK) activity of 2.12 units mg−1 protein were fed Cr (2.5% or 5%) or cyCr (0.025%, 0.1% or 0.5%) for 2 weeks and compared with controls fed standard diet. Cr concentrations of 2.5% and 5% significantly inhibited tumour growth, as did 0.1% and 0.5% cyCr. In vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) after 2 weeks of treatment showed an increase in [phosphocreatine (PCr)+phosphocyclocreatine (PcyCr)]/nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) with increasing concentrations of dietary Cr and cyCr, without changes in absolute NTP contents. The antiproliferative effect of the substrates of CK was not related to energy deficiency but was associated with acidosis. Intratumoral substrate concentrations (measured by 1H-MRS) of 4.8 μmol g−1 wet weight Cr (mice fed 2.5% Cr) and 6.2 μmol g−1 cyCr (mice fed 0.1% cyCr) induced a similar decrease in growth rate, indicating that both substrates were equally potent in tumour growth inhibition. The best correlant of growth inhibition was the total Cr or (cyCr+Cr) concentrations in the tissue. In vivo, these agents did not induce excessive water accumulation and had no systemic effects on the mice (weight loss, hypoglycaemia) that may have caused growth inhibition. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:9888469

  2. Myoinositol as a Biomarker in Recurrent Glioblastoma Treated with Bevacizumab: A 1H-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Pilatus, Ulrich; Hattingen, Elke; Steinbach, Joachim P.; Zanella, Friedhelm; Ronellenfitsch, Michael W.; Bähr, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background Antiangiogenic treatment of glioblastomas with Bevacizumab lacks predictive markers. Myoinositol (MI) is an organic osmolyte, with intracellular concentration changes depending on the extracellular osmolality. Since Bevacizumab markedly reduces tumor edema and influences the tumor microenvironment, we investigated whether the MI concentration in the tumor changes during therapy. Methods We used 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure the MI concentrations in the tumor and contralateral control tissue of 39 prospectively recruited patients with recurrent glioblastomas before and 8–12 weeks after starting therapy. 30 patients received Bevacizumab and 9 patients were treated with CCNU/VM26 as control. We performed a survival analysis to evaluate MI as a predictive biomarker for Bevacizumab therapy. Results MI concentrations increased significantly during Bevacizumab therapy in tumor (p < .001) and control tissue (p = .001), but not during CCNU/VM26 treatment. For the Bevacizumab cohort, higher MI concentrations in the control tissue at baseline (p = .021) and higher differences between control and tumor tissue (delta MI, p = .011) were associated with longer survival. A Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a median OS of 164 days for patients with a deltaMI < 1,817 mmol/l and 275 days for patients with a deltaMI > 1,817 mmol/l. No differences were observed for the relative changes or the post treatment concentrations. Additionally calculated creatine concentrations showed no differences in between subgroups or between pre and post treatment measurements. Conclusion Our data suggest that recurrent glioblastoma shows a strong metabolic reaction to Bevacizumab. Further, our results support the hypothesis that MI might be a marker for early tumor cell invasion. Pre-therapeutic MI concentrations are predictive of overall survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with Bevacizumab. PMID:28033329

  3. Measurement of the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies by the solid effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.

    2008-07-01

    1H- 14N nuclear quadrupole double resonance using magnetic field cycling between high and low magnetic field and solid effect in the low magnetic field is analyzed in details. The transition probabilities per unit time for the solid-effect transitions are calculated. The double resonance spectra are calculated in the limiting cases of fast and slow nitrogen spin-lattice relaxation. The double resonance spectra are measured in histamine and quinolinic acid. The experimental spectra are analyzed and the 14N NQR frequencies are determined.

  4. Age-related changes in a patient with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease determined by repeated 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tatsuo; Mori, Kenji; Ito, Hiromichi; Goji, Aya; Miyazaki, Masahito; Harada, Masafumi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Kagami, Shoji

    2014-02-01

    A boy with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease underwent repeated evaluations by 3-Tesla (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). The patient showed overlap of the PLP1. Individuals selected as normal controls for (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy consisted of healthy age-matched children. For (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the center of a voxel was positioned in the right parietal lobe. (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed when the patient was 2, 6, 14, and 25 months old. γ-Aminobutyric acid concentration in early childhood was increased compared with that in normal controls. However, the γ-aminobutyric acid concentration in the Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease patient was normalized at 14 and 25 months. No remarkable changes were observed in choline-containing compounds concentration at any time. These results suggest that the changes in metabolite concentrations during growth can reflect the pathological condition of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease. Furthermore, the lack of change in the choline-containing compounds concentration can be useful for differentiating Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease from other white matter disorders.

  5. Urinary (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolomic Fingerprinting Reveals Biomarkers of Pulse Consumption Related to Energy-Metabolism Modulation in a Subcohort from the PREDIMED study.

    PubMed

    Madrid-Gambin, Francisco; Llorach, Rafael; Vázquez-Fresno, Rosa; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Almanza-Aguilera, Enrique; Garcia-Aloy, Mar; Estruch, Ramon; Corella, Dolores; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina

    2017-04-07

    Little is known about the metabolome fingerprint of pulse consumption. The study of robust and accurate biomarkers for pulse dietary assessment has great value for nutritional epidemiology regarding health benefits and their mechanisms. To characterize the fingerprinting of dietary pulses (chickpeas, lentils, and beans), spot urine samples from a subcohort from the PREDIMED study were stratified using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Urine samples of nonpulse consumers (≤4 g/day of pulse intake) and habitual pulse consumers (≥25 g/day of pulse intake) were analyzed using a (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics approach combined with multi- and univariate data analysis. Pulse consumption showed differences through 16 metabolites coming from (i) choline metabolism, (ii) protein-related compounds, and (iii) energy metabolism (including lower urinary glucose). Stepwise logistic regression analysis was applied to design a combined model of pulse exposure, which resulted in glutamine, dimethylamine, and 3-methylhistidine. This model was evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC > 90% in both training and validation sets). The application of NMR-based metabolomics to reported pulse exposure highlighted new candidates for biomarkers of pulse consumption and the impact on energy metabolism, generating new hypotheses on energy modulation. Further intervention studies will confirm these findings.

  6. Magnetodielectric effect of Mn-Zn ferrite at resonant frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengfei, Pan; Ning, Zhang

    2016-10-01

    The dielectric properties and the magnetodielectric effect in Mn-Zn ferrite at resonant frequency have been studied in this paper. Dimensional-resonance-induced abnormal dielectric spectrum was observed at f≈1 MHz. The relatively large magnetodielectric ratio of 4500% in a magnetic field of 3.5 kOe was achieved from the Mn-Zn ferrite sample with the initial permeability of 15 K at resonant frequency at room temperature. Theoretical analysis suggests that the large MD effect at resonant frequency is attributed to the enhanced magnetostriction effect.

  7. Improved atomic resonance gas cell for use in frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggett, G. R.

    1968-01-01

    Atomic resonance gas cell maintains a stable operating frequency in the presence of pressure fluctuations in the ambient atmosphere. The new cell includes an envelope which is transparent to radiation in the optical region and to microwave energy at the atomic resonance frequency of the alkali-metal vapor within the envelope.

  8. Radio frequency quadrupole resonator for linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Moretti, Alfred

    1985-01-01

    An RFQ resonator for a linear accelerator having a reduced level of interfering modes and producing a quadrupole mode for focusing, bunching and accelerating beams of heavy charged particles, with the construction being characterized by four elongated resonating rods within a cylinder with the rods being alternately shorted and open electrically to the shell at common ends of the rods to provide an LC parallel resonant circuit when activated by a magnetic field transverse to the longitudinal axis.

  9. Comments on "theoretical model for an MRI radio frequency resonator".

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Zanche; Vermeulen, Fred E; Allen, Peter S

    2002-05-01

    In contrast to a previous report [Baertlein et al. (2000)], the transverse electomagnetic resonator used in magnetic resonance imaging is shown to be similar to the high-pass "birdcage" resonator in having an electric field minimum in correspondence with the maximum of the magnetic field. The noise performance of each resonator will, in consequence, be comparable, since at high frequencies patient conductive losses are predominant.

  10. Variable frequency iteration MPPT for resonant power converters

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Qian; Bataresh, Issa; Chen, Lin

    2015-06-30

    A method of maximum power point tracking (MPPT) uses an MPPT algorithm to determine a switching frequency for a resonant power converter, including initializing by setting an initial boundary frequency range that is divided into initial frequency sub-ranges bounded by initial frequencies including an initial center frequency and first and second initial bounding frequencies. A first iteration includes measuring initial powers at the initial frequencies to determine a maximum power initial frequency that is used to set a first reduced frequency search range centered or bounded by the maximum power initial frequency including at least a first additional bounding frequency. A second iteration includes calculating first and second center frequencies by averaging adjacent frequent values in the first reduced frequency search range and measuring second power values at the first and second center frequencies. The switching frequency is determined from measured power values including the second power values.

  11. High-Frequency Resonance in the Gerbil Medial Superior Olive

    PubMed Central

    Mikiel-Hunter, Jason; Kotak, Vibhakar; Rinzel, John

    2016-01-01

    A high-frequency, subthreshold resonance in the guinea pig medial superior olive (MSO) was recently linked to the efficient extraction of spatial cues from the fine structure of acoustic stimuli. We report here that MSO neurons in gerbil also have resonant properties and, based on our whole-cell recordings and computational modeling, that a low-voltage-gated potassium current, IKLT, underlies the resonance. We show that resonance was lost following dynamic clamp replacement of IKLT with a leak conductance and in the model when voltage-gating of IKLT was suppressed. Resonance was characterized using small amplitude sinusoidal stimuli to generate impedance curves as typically done for linear systems analysis. Extending our study into the nonlinear, voltage-dependent regime, we increased stimulus amplitude and found, experimentally and in simulations, that the subthreshold resonant frequency (242Hz for weak stimuli) increased continuously to the resonant frequency for spiking (285Hz). The spike resonance of these phasic-firing (type III excitable) MSO neurons and of the model is of particular interest also because previous studies of resonance typically involved neurons/models (type II excitable, such as the standard Hodgkin-Huxley model) that can fire tonically for steady inputs. To probe more directly how these resonances relate to MSO neurons as slope-detectors, we presented periodic trains of brief, fast-rising excitatory post-synaptic potentials (EPSCs) to the model. While weak subthreshold EPSC trains were essentially low-pass filtered, resonance emerged as EPSC amplitude increased. Interestingly, for spike-evoking EPSC trains, the threshold amplitude at spike resonant frequency (317Hz) was lower than the single ESPC threshold. Our finding of a frequency-dependent threshold for repetitive brief EPSC stimuli and preferred frequency for spiking calls for further consideration of both subthreshold and suprathreshold resonance to fast and precise temporal processing

  12. Resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); Cantrell, Sean A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope and methodology called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features.

  13. Selective Detection of 1H NMR Resonances of 13CH n Groups Using Two-Dimensional Maximum-Quantum Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Farrant, R. D.; Nicholson, J. K.; Lindon, J. C.

    Methods for editing spectra based upon maximum-quantum filtering in two-dimensional 1H NMR are presented (MAXY NMR). Separation of 1H resonances from 13CH, 13CH 2, and 13CH 3 groups is demonstrated, using the coherence of the attached natural-abundance 13C spin. Two-dimensional correlation pulse sequences based on J connectivity (MAXY-COSY), total J connectivity (MAXY-TOCSY), and NOE and exchange processes (MAXY-NOESY) are given and exemplified using dexamethasone as a model compound. In addition, an improved form of a 13CH 2 only COSY spectrum (gem-COSY) is shown, and the application of z magnetic-field gradients is demonstrated as an alternative to phase cycling. The approach should have utility in the assignment of complex 1H NMR spectra which arise from peptides or complex mixtures such as biofluids.

  14. Selective Detection of 1H NMR Resonances of CH n Groups Using a Heteronuclear Maximum-Quantum Filter and Pulsed Field Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Farrant, R. D.; Nicholson, J. K.; Lindon, J. C.

    A number of approaches are described for the provision of separate one-dimensional 1H NMR spectra of CH, CH 2, and CH 3 groups utilizing the natural-abundance 13C spins and based upon the selection of the maximum multiple-quantum coherences of the various groups, This sequence is termed edited maximum-quantum proton spectroscop y (MAXY) spectroscopy, The replacement of phase cycling with the application of z magnetic field gradient pulses is also demonstrated, The editing approach is demonstrated using the 1H NMR spectrum of dexamethasone in DMSO- d6 solution, Extension to a complex mixture biofluid is exemplified by the CH 3-only 1H NMR spectrum of human seminal plasma. This aid to the assignment of endogenous metabolite resonances is demonstrated to result in dramatic spectral simplification.

  15. Detection of poly(ethylene glycol) residues from nonionic surfactants in surface water by1h and13c nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Brown, P.A.; Noyes, T.I.

    1991-01-01

    ??? Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) residues were detected in organic solute isolates from surface water by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), 13C NMR spectrometry, and colorimetric assay. PEG residues were separated from natural organic solutes in Clear Creek, CO, by a combination of methylation and chromatographic procedures. The isolated PEG residues, characterized by NMR spectrometry, were found to consist of neutral and acidic residues that also contained poly(propylene glycol) moieties. The 1H NMR and the colorimetric assays for poly(ethylene glycol) residues were done on samples collected in the lower Mississippi River and tributaries between St. Louis, MO, and New Orleans, LA, in July-August and November-December 1987. Aqueous concentrations for poly(ethylene glycol) residues based on colorimetric assay ranged from undetectable to ???28 ??g/L. Concentrations based on 1H NMR spectrometry ranged from undetectable to 145 ??g/L.

  16. Characterization of the structure and redox behaviour of cytochrome c3 from Desulfovibrio baculatus by 1H-nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, I B; Turner, D L; LeGall, J; Xavier, A V

    1993-01-01

    Complete assignment of the aromatic and haem proton resonances in the cytochromes c3 isolated from Desulfovibrio baculatus strains (Norway 4, DSM 1741) and (DSM 1743) was achieved using one- and two-dimensional 1H n.m.r. Nuclear Overhauser enhancements observed between haem and aromatic resonances and between resonances due to different haems, together with the ring-current contributions to the chemical shifts of haem resonances, support the argument that the haem core architecture is conserved in the various cytochromes c3, and that the X-ray structure of the D. baculatus cytochrome c3 is erroneous. The relative orientation of the haems for both cytochromes was determined directly from n.m.r. data. The n.m.r. structures have a resolution of approximately 0.25 nm and are found to be in close agreement with the X-ray structure from D. vulgaris cytochrome c3. The proton assignments were used to relate the highest potential to a specific haem in the three-dimensional structure by monitoring the chemical-shift variation of several haem resonances throughout redox titrations followed by 1H n.m.r. The haem with highest redox potential is not the same as that in other cytochromes c3. PMID:8397513

  17. High Frequency Resonant Electromagnetic Generation and Detection of Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Katsuhiro; Wright, Oliver; Hyoguchi, Takao

    1994-05-01

    High frequency resonant mode electromagnetic ultrasonic generation and detection in metals is demonstrated at frequencies up to ˜150 MHz with various metal sheet samples. Using a unified theory of the generation and detection process, it is shown how various physical quantities can be measured. The sound velocity or thickness of the sheets can be derived from the resonant frequencies. At resonance the detected amplitude is inversely proportional to the ultrasonic attenuation of the sample, whereas the resonance half-width is proportional to this attenuation. We derive the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient from the half-width, and show how the grain size of the material can be probed. In addition we present results for thin bonded sheets, and show how a measure of the bonding or delamination can be obtained. This high frequency resonant method shows great promise for the non-destructive evaluation of thin sheets and coatings in the sub- 10-µm to 1-mm thickness range.

  18. Low-frequency noise in gallium nitride nanowire mechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jason M.; Bertness, Kris A.; Sanford, Norman A.; Rogers, Charles T.

    2012-12-01

    We report on the low-frequency 1/f (flicker) parameter noise displayed by the resonance frequency of doubly clamped c-axis gallium nitride nanowire (NW) mechanical resonators. The resonators are electrostatically driven and their mechanical response is electronically detected via NW piezoresistance. With an applied dc voltage bias, a NW driven near its mechanical resonance generates a dc and Lorentzian rf current that both display 1/f noise. The rf current noise is proportional to the square of the derivative of the Lorentzian lineshape with a magnitude highly dependent on NW dc bias voltage conditions, consistent with a model wherein noise in the NW's electrical impedance leads to temperature noise from local Joule heating, which in turn generates resonance frequency noise via thermal expansion and the temperature-dependent Young's modulus. An example device with a 27.8 MHz resonance frequency experiences an approximate resonance frequency shift of -1.4 Hz/nW. The resonance frequency noise increases as the square of the bias voltage, indicating specific operating conditions that optimize the signal-to-noise ratio in proposed NW sensors.

  19. {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance study of proton-irradiated KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Se-Hun; Lee, Kyu Won; Oh, B. H.; Lee, Cheol Eui; Hong, K. S.

    2007-11-01

    We have studied the microscopic structure and dynamics in a proton-irradiated KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} single crystal. Our {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance measurements indicate that proton irradiation gives rise to a decrease in the local dipolar order of the rigid lattice protons and an increase in interstitial protons as well as structural distortion of the PO{sub 4} tetrahedra.

  20. 1H-NMR study of diamagnetic cytochrome P450cam: assignment of heme resonances and substrate dependance of one cysteinate beta proton.

    PubMed

    Mouro, C; Bondon, A; Simonneaux, G; Jung, C

    1997-09-08

    The 1H-NMR study of diamagnetic cytochrome P450cam FeII-CO has been performed for the first time. Chemical shifts of the cysteinate fifth ligand protons and of several heme protons have been assigned through 1- and 2-dimensional spectra at 500 MHz. A substrate dependance has been observed for the resonance of the cysteinate proton detected in the high-field region.

  1. Identification and quantification by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of seven plasticizers in PVC medical devices.

    PubMed

    Genay, Stéphanie; Feutry, Frédéric; Masse, Morgane; Barthélémy, Christine; Sautou, Valérie; Odou, Pascal; Décaudin, Bertrand; Azaroual, Nathalie

    2017-02-01

    Medical devices are generally made of polyvinyl chloride plasticized by six authorized plasticizers as alternatives to di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) classified as reprotoxic class 1b. These are acetyl tri-n-butyl citrate (ATBC), di-(2-ethylhexy) adipate (DEHA), di-(2-ethylhexyl) terephthalate (DEHT), di-isononyl cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate (DINCH), di-isononyl phthalate (DINP), and tri-octyl trimellitate (TOTM). The main objective of this study was to propose a new method using (1)H NMR spectroscopy to determine and quantify these seven plasticizers in PVC sheets, standard infusion tubings, and commercially available medical devices. Two techniques were compared: dissolution in deuterated tetrahydrofuran and extraction by deuterated chloroform. Plasticizer (1)H NMR spectra were very similar in both deuterated solvents; dissolution and extraction provided similar results. The sensitivity of this method enabled us to detect and quantify the presence of minor plasticizers in PVC. In nine commercially available samples, the major plasticizer was identified and quantified by (1)H NMR. In six samples, one, two, or three minor plasticizers were identified and also quantified. DEHP was detected in only one tubing. NMR is therefore very convenient for studying plasticizers contained in medical devices. Only small quantities of solvents and sample are required. It is not necessary to dilute samples to enter a quantification range, and it is sufficiently sensitive to detect contaminants.

  2. A guide to the metabolic pathways and function of metabolites observed in human brain 1H magnetic resonance spectra.

    PubMed

    Rae, Caroline D

    2014-01-01

    The current knowledge of the normal biochemistry of compounds that give rise to resonances in human brain proton magnetic resonance spectra measureable at readily available field strengths (i.e. ≤3 T) is reviewed. Molecules covered include myo- and scyllo-inositol, glycerophospho- and phospho-choline and choline, creatine and phosphocreatine, N-acetylaspartate, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, glutamate, glutamine, γ-aminobutyrate, glucose, glutathione and lactate. The factors which influence changes in the levels of these compounds are discussed. As most proton resonances in the brain at low field are derived from a combination of moieties whose biochemistry is complex and interrelated, an understanding of the mechanisms underlying why these species change is crucial to meaningful interpretation of human brain spectra.

  3. Ethanol-induced fatty liver in the rat examined by in vivo 1H chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging and localized spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Ling, M; Brauer, M

    1992-01-01

    In vivo 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), chemical shift selective imaging (CSI), and localized (VOSY) 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) were used to study fatty infiltration in the livers of rats chronically fed an ethanol-containing all-liquid DeCarli-Lieber diet. Conventional total proton MRI showed a somewhat hyperintense liver for ethanol-fed rats, compared with pair-fed controls. CSI showed a dramatic increase in the fat signal intensity for ethanol-treated rats that was fairly homogeneous throughout the liver. However, CSI also showed a substantial decrease in the water signal intensity for the ethanol-treated rats compared to pair-fed control rats. 1H VOSY MR spectra also showed a 5.5-fold increase in the methylene resonance (1.3 ppm) of fat and a 50-70% decrease in the water resonance (4.8 ppm). Relative in vivo proton T1 and T2 relaxation times for the water resonance separate from the fat resonance, determined from modified VOSY experiments, were found to tend to increase and decrease, respectively, for ethanol-treated rat livers compared with controls. The decrease in hepatic water signal intensity could be accounted for by the decrease in T2 and decrease in water density due to the presence of accumulated hepatic fat (approximately 25 mg/g wet weight of liver). When ethanol was withdrawn from the chronically treated rats, fatty infiltration was observed by both CSI and VOSY spectra to revert toward control values with a half-life of 2-4 days. By day 16, however, the signal intensity for hepatic fat was still significantly higher than control levels. In vitro 1H MRS studies of chloroform-methanol extracts confirmed the 5.5-fold increase in total hepatic fat induced by the chronic ethanol treatment, and showed further that triacylglycerols were increased 7.7-fold, cholesterol was increased fourfold, and phospholipids were increased 3.3-fold, compared with liver extracts from pair-fed control rats.

  4. Method and apparatus for resonant frequency waveform modulation

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S [Richland, WA

    2011-06-07

    A resonant modulator device and process are described that provide enhanced resonant frequency waveforms to electrical devices including, e.g., laser devices. Faster, larger, and more complex modulation waveforms are obtained than can be obtained by use of conventional current controllers alone.

  5. Low-frequency noise in gallium nitride nanowire mechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jason; Bertness, Kris; Sanford, Norman; Rogers, Charles

    2012-02-01

    We report on the low-frequency 1/f (flicker) parameter noise displayed by the resonance frequency and resistance of doubly clamped c-axis gallium nitride nanowire (NW) mechanical resonators. The resonators are electrostatically driven and their mechanical response is electronically detected via NW piezoresistance. With an applied dc voltage bias, an NW driven near its mechanical resonance generates a dc and Lorentzian rf current that both display 1/f noise. The rf current noise is proportional to the square of the derivative of the Lorentzian lineshape with a magnitude highly dependent on NW dc bias voltage conditions, consistent with noise in the NW's resistance leading to temperature noise from local Joule heating, which in turn generates resonance frequency noise. An example device with a 27.8 MHz resonance frequency and 220 kφ resistance experiences an approximate resonance frequency shift of -5.8 Hz/nW. In terms of NW resistance change, this corresponds with shifts of 0.1 Hz/φ and 2.6 Hz/φ at 1 V bias and 4 V bias, respectively, with an average resistance fluctuation of 1 kφ in a 1-second bandwidth.

  6. Cortical Resonance Frequencies Emerge from Network Size and Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lea-Carnall, Caroline A.; Montemurro, Marcelo A.; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson J.; Parkes, Laura M.; El-Deredy, Wael

    2016-01-01

    Neural oscillations occur within a wide frequency range with different brain regions exhibiting resonance-like characteristics at specific points in the spectrum. At the microscopic scale, single neurons possess intrinsic oscillatory properties, such that is not yet known whether cortical resonance is consequential to neural oscillations or an emergent property of the networks that interconnect them. Using a network model of loosely-coupled Wilson-Cowan oscillators to simulate a patch of cortical sheet, we demonstrate that the size of the activated network is inversely related to its resonance frequency. Further analysis of the parameter space indicated that the number of excitatory and inhibitory connections, as well as the average transmission delay between units, determined the resonance frequency. The model predicted that if an activated network within the visual cortex increased in size, the resonance frequency of the network would decrease. We tested this prediction experimentally using the steady-state visual evoked potential where we stimulated the visual cortex with different size stimuli at a range of driving frequencies. We demonstrate that the frequency corresponding to peak steady-state response inversely correlated with the size of the network. We conclude that although individual neurons possess resonance properties, oscillatory activity at the macroscopic level is strongly influenced by network interactions, and that the steady-state response can be used to investigate functional networks. PMID:26914905

  7. Decrease in Middle Ear Resonance Frequency During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dag, Emine Kutlu; Gulumser, Cagri; Erbek, Seyra

    2016-04-20

    Many physiological changes occur during pregnancy. The aim of the study was to reveal whether there is a change in middle ear resonance frequency during pregnancy. A prospective case-control study was designed at a tertiary referral center. The study included 46 pregnant women at the third trimester (27-40 weeks) and 43 nonpregnant voluntary women. All the study subjects underwent pure-tone audiometry and multifrequency tympanometry. Pure-tone hearing levels at frequencies of 250 to 8000 Hz and resonance frequency values were compared between pregnant and nonpregnant women. Impact of age, side of the tested ear, and weight gained in pregnancy on resonance frequency were evaluated. Air conduction threshold values at frequencies of 250 Hz and 500 Hz were significantly higher in pregnant women than in the control group (P<0.001). Middle ear resonance frequency values of both ears in pregnant women were found to be significantly lower than those in control group (P<0.001). There was no statistically significant relation of middle ear resonance frequency values to age or side of the tested ear in both groups (P>0.05). A negative correlation between weight gained in pregnancy and middle ear resonance frequency values was determined for the left ear (correlation coefficient for left ears: -0.348, P=0.018). The results of this study suggest that resonance frequency may be decreased during the pregnancy. More comprehensive studies in which many pregnant women followed regularly before and after pregnancy are needed to have more certain links.

  8. Decrease in Middle Ear Resonance Frequency During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dag, Emine Kutlu; Gulumser, Cagri; Erbek, Seyra

    2016-01-01

    Many physiological changes occur during pregnancy. The aim of the study was to reveal whether there is a change in middle ear resonance frequency during pregnancy. A prospective case-control study was designed at a tertiary referral center. The study included 46 pregnant women at the third trimester (27-40 weeks) and 43 nonpregnant voluntary women. All the study subjects underwent pure-tone audiometry and multifrequency tympanometry. Pure-tone hearing levels at frequencies of 250 to 8000 Hz and resonance frequency values were compared between pregnant and nonpregnant women. Impact of age, side of the tested ear, and weight gained in pregnancy on resonance frequency were evaluated. Air conduction threshold values at frequencies of 250 Hz and 500 Hz were significantly higher in pregnant women than in the control group (P<0.001). Middle ear resonance frequency values of both ears in pregnant women were found to be significantly lower than those in control group (P<0.001). There was no statistically significant relation of middle ear resonance frequency values to age or side of the tested ear in both groups (P>0.05). A negative correlation between weight gained in pregnancy and middle ear resonance frequency values was determined for the left ear (correlation coefficient for left ears: –0.348, P=0.018). The results of this study suggest that resonance frequency may be decreased during the pregnancy. More comprehensive studies in which many pregnant women followed regularly before and after pregnancy are needed to have more certain links. PMID:27588163

  9. In vivo39K, 23Na and 1H MR imaging using a triple resonant RF coil setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augath, Mark; Heiler, Patrick; Kirsch, Stefan; Schad, Lothar R.

    2009-09-01

    The maintenance of a gradient of potassium and sodium ions across the cell membranes is essential for the physiological function of the mammal organism. The measurement of the spatial distribution of pathologically changing ion concentrations of 23Na and 39K with magnetic resonance imaging offers a promising approach in clinical diagnostics to measure tissue viability. Existing studies were focused mainly on 23Na imaging as well as spectroscopy with only one post-mortem study for 39K imaging. In this paper a triple resonant RF coil setup for the rat head at 9.4 T is presented for imaging of both nuclei (23Na and 39K) and the acquisition of anatomical proton images in the same experiment without moving the subject or the RF coil. In vivo MR images of 39K and 23Na in the rat brain were acquired as well as anatomical proton images in the same scanning session.

  10. Identification of endogenous metabolites in human sperm cells using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Amaral, A; Rodriguez, M; Canyellas, N; Correig, X; Ballescà, J L; Ramalho-Santos, J; Oliva, R

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to contribute to the first comprehensive metabolomic characterization of the human sperm cell through the application of two untargeted platforms based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using these two complementary strategies, we were able to identify a total of 69 metabolites, of which 42 were identified using NMR, 27 using GC-MS and 4 by both techniques. The identity of some of these metabolites was further confirmed by two-dimensional (1) H-(1) H homonuclear correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and (1) H-(13) C heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectroscopy. Most of the metabolites identified are reported here for the first time in mature human spermatozoa. The relationship between the metabolites identified and the previously reported sperm proteome was also explored. Interestingly, overrepresented pathways included not only the metabolism of carbohydrates, but also of lipids and lipoproteins. Of note, a large number of the metabolites identified belonged to the amino acids, peptides and analogues super class. The identification of this initial set of metabolites represents an important first step to further study their function in male gamete physiology and to explore potential reasons for dysfunction in future studies. We also demonstrate that the application of NMR and MS provides complementary results, thus constituting a promising strategy towards the completion of the human sperm cell metabolome.

  11. Frequency control of photonic crystal membrane resonators by monolayer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauf, S.; Rakher, M. T.; Carmeli, I.; Hennessy, K.; Meier, C.; Badolato, A.; DeDood, M. J. A.; Petroff, P. M.; Hu, E. L.; Gwinn, E. G.; Bouwmeester, D.

    2006-01-01

    We study the response of GaAs photonic crystal membrane resonators to thin-film deposition. Slow spectral shifts of the cavity mode of several nanometers are observed at low temperatures, caused by cryo-gettering of background molecules. Heating the membrane resets the drift and shielding will prevent drift altogether. In order to explore the drift as a tool to detect surface layers, or to intentionally shift the cavity resonance frequency, we studied the effect of self-assembled monolayers of polypeptide molecules attached to the membranes. The 2-nm-thick monolayers lead to a discrete step in the resonance frequency and partially passivate the surface.

  12. Frequency comb transferred by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiao Tao; Chun, Byung Jae; Seo, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kwanyong; Yoon, Hana; Kim, Dong-Eon; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seungchul

    2016-02-22

    Frequency combs, millions of narrow-linewidth optical modes referenced to an atomic clock, have shown remarkable potential in time/frequency metrology, atomic/molecular spectroscopy and precision LIDARs. Applications have extended to coherent nonlinear Raman spectroscopy of molecules and quantum metrology for entangled atomic qubits. Frequency combs will create novel possibilities in nano-photonics and plasmonics; however, its interrelation with surface plasmons is unexplored despite the important role that plasmonics plays in nonlinear spectroscopy and quantum optics through the manipulation of light on a subwavelength scale. Here, we demonstrate that a frequency comb can be transformed to a plasmonic comb in plasmonic nanostructures and reverted to the original frequency comb without noticeable degradation of <6.51 × 10(-19) in absolute position, 2.92 × 10(-19) in stability and 1 Hz in linewidth. The results indicate that the superior performance of a well-defined frequency comb can be applied to nanoplasmonic spectroscopy, quantum metrology and subwavelength photonic circuits.

  13. Frequency comb transferred by surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiao Tao; Chun, Byung Jae; Seo, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kwanyong; Yoon, Hana; Kim, Dong-Eon; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seungchul

    2016-01-01

    Frequency combs, millions of narrow-linewidth optical modes referenced to an atomic clock, have shown remarkable potential in time/frequency metrology, atomic/molecular spectroscopy and precision LIDARs. Applications have extended to coherent nonlinear Raman spectroscopy of molecules and quantum metrology for entangled atomic qubits. Frequency combs will create novel possibilities in nano-photonics and plasmonics; however, its interrelation with surface plasmons is unexplored despite the important role that plasmonics plays in nonlinear spectroscopy and quantum optics through the manipulation of light on a subwavelength scale. Here, we demonstrate that a frequency comb can be transformed to a plasmonic comb in plasmonic nanostructures and reverted to the original frequency comb without noticeable degradation of <6.51 × 10−19 in absolute position, 2.92 × 10−19 in stability and 1 Hz in linewidth. The results indicate that the superior performance of a well-defined frequency comb can be applied to nanoplasmonic spectroscopy, quantum metrology and subwavelength photonic circuits. PMID:26898307

  14. Soybean biodiesel methyl esters, free glycerin and acid number quantification by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Coral, Natasha; Rodrigues, Elizabeth; Rumjanek, Victor; Zamian, José Roberto; da Rocha Filho, Geraldo Narciso; da Costa, Carlos Emmerson Ferreira

    2013-02-01

    Production of alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, from transesterification of vegetable oil driven by heterogeneous catalysts is a promising alternative to fossil diesel. However, achieving a successful substitution for a new renewable fuel depends on several quality parameters. (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the amount of methyl esters, free glycerin and acid number in the transesterification of soybean oil with methanol in the presence of hydrotalcite-type catalyst to produce biodiesel. Reaction parameters, such as temperature and time, were used to evaluate soybean oil methyl esters rate conversion. Temperatures of 100 to 180 °C and times of 20 to 240 min were tested on a 1 : 12 molar ratio soybean oil/methanol reaction. At 180 °C/240 min conditions, a rate of 94.5 wt% of methyl esters was obtained, where free glycerin and free fatty acids were not detected.

  15. YBCO superconducting ring resonators at millimeter-wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chorey, Christopher M.; Kong, Keon-Shik; Bhasin, Kul B.; Warner, J. D.; Itoh, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Microstrip ring resonators operating at 35 GHz were fabricated from laser ablated YBCO films deposited on lanthanum aluminate substrates. They were measured over a range of temperatures and their performances compared to identical resonators made of evaporated gold. Below 60 Kelvin the superconducting strip performed better than the gold, reaching an unloaded Q approximately 1.5 times that of gold at 25 K. A shift in the resonant frequency follows the form predicted by the London equations. The Phenomenological Loss Equivalence Method is applied to the ring resonator and the theoretically calculated Q values are compared to the experimental results.

  16. Vibrational resonances in biological systems at microwave frequencies.

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Robert K

    2002-01-01

    Many biological systems can be expected to exhibit resonance behavior involving the mechanical vibration of system elements. The natural frequencies of such resonances will, generally, be in the microwave frequency range. Some of these systems will be coupled to the electromagnetic field by the charge distributions they carry, thus admitting the possibility that microwave exposures may generate physiological effects in man and other species. However, such microwave excitable resonances are expected to be strongly damped by interaction with their aqueous biological environment. Although those dissipation mechanisms have been studied, the limitations on energy transfers that follow from the limited coupling of these resonances to the electromagnetic field have not generally been considered. We show that this coupling must generally be very small and thus the absorbed energy is so strongly limited that such resonances cannot affect biology significantly even if the systems are much less strongly damped than expected from basic dissipation models. PMID:11867434

  17. Excitation of dark multipolar plasmonic resonances at terahertz frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Wei, YuMing; Zang, XiaoFei; Zhu, YiMing; Zhuang, SongLin

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally observe the excitation of dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances in a hybrid structure consisting of a corrugated metallic disk coupled with a C-shaped dipole resonator. The uncoupled corrugated metallic disk only supports a dipolar resonance in the transmission spectrum due to perfect symmetry of the structure. However, the dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances emerge when coupled with a bright C-shaped resonator which is placed in the vicinity of the corrugated metallic disk. These excited multipolar resonances show minimum influence on the coupling distance between the C-shaped resonator and corrugated metallic disk. The resonance frequencies of the radiative modes are controlled by varying the angle of the C-shaped resonator and the inner disk radius, both of which play dominant roles in the excitation of the spoof localized surface plasmons. Observation of such a transition from the dark to radiative nature of multipolar spoof localized plasmon resonances would find potential applications in terahertz based resonant plasmonic and metamaterial devices. PMID:26903382

  18. Excitation of dark multipolar plasmonic resonances at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Wei, Yuming; Zang, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yiming; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally observe the excitation of dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances in a hybrid structure consisting of a corrugated metallic disk coupled with a C-shaped dipole resonator. The uncoupled corrugated metallic disk only supports a dipolar resonance in the transmission spectrum due to perfect symmetry of the structure. However, the dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances emerge when coupled with a bright C-shaped resonator which is placed in the vicinity of the corrugated metallic disk. These excited multipolar resonances show minimum influence on the coupling distance between the C-shaped resonator and corrugated metallic disk. The resonance frequencies of the radiative modes are controlled by varying the angle of the C-shaped resonator and the inner disk radius, both of which play dominant roles in the excitation of the spoof localized surface plasmons. Observation of such a transition from the dark to radiative nature of multipolar spoof localized plasmon resonances would find potential applications in terahertz based resonant plasmonic and metamaterial devices.

  19. High glycolytic activity in rat glioma demonstrated in vivo by correlation peak 1H magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, A; von Kienlin, M; Décorps, M; Rémy, C

    2001-07-15

    High-grade brain tumors are known to have a high rate of glucose (Glc) consumption. Postmortem measurements have suggested that Glc content in experimental brain tumors is relatively low. We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate this, in vivo, in the brains of seven rats bearing intracerebral C6 gliomas. We combined the high spectral resolution allowed by two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance with spatial encoding by magnetic field gradient pulses to obtain in vivo maps of Glc, alanine, hypotaurine, aspartate, phosphoethanolamine, Glu/Gln, N-acetylaspartate (NAA), phosphocreatine/creatine (PCr/Cr), choline-containing compounds, and lactate (Lac) (some of which are involved in energy metabolism). Compared with normal brain tissue, the main differences found in the gliomas were that Glc, NAA, PCr/Cr, and aspartate concentrations were much lower, whereas concentrations of alanine, hypotaurine, phosphoethanolamine, and Lac were higher, whatever the extent of necrosis. A striking observation is the similarity of the NAA and Glc images: the concentrations of both metabolites are lower in the tumor than they are in the contralateral brain. If Glc was completely absent from the tumor tissue, and if the residual Glc level was due only to a partial volume effect like that for NAA, a neuronal marker, the ratio [Glc]tumor/[Glc]contralateral tissue, should be similar to that found for NAA. The ratio for Glc was 0.48 +/- 0.22 (+/- SD; n = 6), a ratio similar to that found for PCr/Cr (0.50 +/- 0.19) but significantly higher than that obtained for NAA (0.29 +/- 0.07). This observation indicates that a measurable Glc concentration is still present in the tumor tissue. Intense glycolysis in tumor cells may explain the increased production of Lac and alanine and decreased amount of Glc. These nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of metabolite concentrations are complementary to positron emission tomography, which measures Glc consumption.

  20. 1H, 15N and 13C backbone resonance assignments of the archetypal serpin α1-antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Nyon, Mun Peak; Kirkpatrick, John; Cabrita, Lisa D; Christodoulou, John; Gooptu, Bibek

    2012-10-01

    Alpha(1)-antitrypsin is a 45-kDa (394-residue) serine protease inhibitor synthesized by hepatocytes, which is released into the circulatory system and protects the lung from the actions of neutrophil elastase via a conformational transition within a dynamic inhibitory mechanism. Relatively common point mutations subvert this transition, causing polymerisation of α(1)-antitrypsin and deficiency of the circulating protein, predisposing carriers to severe lung and liver disease. We have assigned the backbone resonances of α(1)-antitrypsin using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. These assignments provide the starting point for a detailed solution state characterization of the structural properties of this highly dynamic protein via NMR methods.

  1. Circular High-Q Resonating Isotropic Strain Sensors with Large Shift of Resonance Frequency under Stress

    PubMed Central

    Melik, Rohat; Unal, Emre; Perkgoz, Nihan Kosku; Puttlitz, Christian; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2009-01-01

    We present circular architecture bioimplant strain sensors that facilitate a strong resonance frequency shift with mechanical deformation. The clinical application area of these sensors is for in vivo assessment of bone fractures. Using a rectangular geometry, we obtain a resonance shift of 330 MHz for a single device and 170 MHz for its triplet configuration (with three side-by-side resonators on chip) under an applied load of 3,920 N. Using the same device parameters with a circular isotropic architecture, we achieve a resonance frequency shift of 500 MHz for the single device and 260 MHz for its triplet configuration, demonstrating substantially increased sensitivity. PMID:22303132

  2. Sequence-specific 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of Art v 1: a proline-rich allergen of Artemisia vulgaris pollen.

    PubMed

    Razzera, Guilherme; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Almeida, Marcius S; Ferreira, Fatima; Almeida, Fabio C L; Valente, Ana Paula

    2009-06-01

    Art v 1 is the major allergen of Artemisia vulgaris. The IgE raised against Art v 1 not only can cross-react with other proteins from the Asteraceae family members but also with components of various forms of food. Art v 1 is an important target for immunotherapy strategies, including vaccination with hypoallergenic derivatives or chimeras. We report the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of the recombinant Art v 1 and identification of secondary structures based on (13)C chemical shifts.

  3. Reexamination of the Energy Levels of 15F by 14O + 1H ElasticResonance Scattering with BEARS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, F.Q.; Powell, J.; Lee, D.W.; Leitner, D.; McMahan, M.A.; Moltz, D.M.; O'Neil, J.P.; Perajarvi, K.; Phair, L.; Ramsey, C.A.; Xu,X.J.; Cerny, Joseph

    2005-05-30

    The energy levels of 15F have been measured by the p(14O,p)14O reaction. The 120 MeV 14O radioactive ion beam was produced by the BEARS coupled cyclotron system at an intensity averaging 1x104 particles/second on target. Energy calibration was obtained using resonances from the p(14N,p)14N reaction. The two lowest resonances in 15F were fitted with an R-matrix calculation. The fit to the ground state had Jp = 1/2+ at 1.23+-0.05 MeV (width 0.5-0.84 MeV), and the first excited state was Jp=5/2+ at 2.81+-0.02 MeV (width 0.30+-0.06 MeV), both relative to the mass-energy of the proton and 14O. The 15F ground state energy supports the disappearance of the Z=8 proton magic number for odd Z, Tz=-3/2 nuclei.

  4. (1)H-Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolic profiling of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced adverse effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Um, So Young; Park, Jung Hyun; Chung, Myeon Woo; Choi, Ki Hwan; Lee, Hwa Jeong

    2016-09-10

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are globally prescribed, exhibit mainly anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects but also can cause adverse effects including gastrointestinal erosions, ulceration, bleeding, and perforation. The purpose of this study was to investigate surrogate biomarkers associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) damage caused by NSAID treatment using pattern recognition analysis of (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra of rat urine. Urine was collected for 5h after oral administration of the following NSAIDs at low or high doses: acetylsalicylic acid (10 or 200mgkg(-1)), diclofenac (0.5 or 15mgkg(-1)), piroxicam (1 or 10mgkg(-1)), indomethacin (1 or 25mgkg(-1)), or ibuprofen (10, or 150mgkg(-1)) as nonselective COX inhibitors and celecoxib (10 or 100mgkg(-1)) as a COX-2 selective inhibitor. The urine was analyzed using 500MHz (1)H NMR for spectral binning and targeted profiling and the level of gastric damage was examined. The nonselective COX inhibitors caused severe gastric damage while no lesions were observed in the celecoxib-treated rats. The (1)H NMR urine spectra were divided into spectral bins (0.04ppm) for global profiling, and a total of 44 endogenous metabolites were assigned for targeted profiling. Multivariate data analyses were performed to recognize the spectral pattern of endogenous metabolites related to NSAIDs using partial least square-discrimination analysis (PLS-DA). The (1)H NMR spectra clustered differently according to gastric damage score in global profiling. In targeted profiling, the endogenous metabolites of citrate, allantoin, 2-oxoglutarate, acetate, benzoate, glycine, and trimethylamine N-oxide were selected as putative biomarkers for gastric damage caused by NSAIDs. These putative biomarkers might be useful for predicting the risk of adverse effects caused by NSAIDs in the early stage of drug development process.

  5. Squeezing Alters Frequency Tuning of WGM Optical Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohageg, Makan; Maleki, Lute

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical squeezing has been found to alter the frequency tuning of a whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonator that has an elliptical shape and is made of lithium niobate. It may be possible to exploit this effect to design reconfigurable optical filters for optical communications and for scientific experiments involving quantum electrodynamics. Some background information is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the squeezing-induced alteration of frequency tuning: The spectrum of a WGM resonator is represented by a comblike plot of intensity versus frequency. Each peak of the comblike plot corresponds to an electromagnetic mode represented by an integer mode number, and the modes are grouped into sets represented by integer mode indices. Because lithium niobate is an electro-optically active material, the WGM resonator can be tuned (that is, the resonance frequencies can be shifted) by applying a suitable bias potential. The frequency shift of each mode is quantified by a tuning rate defined as the ratio between the frequency shift and the applied potential. In the absence of squeezing, all modes exhibit the same tuning rate. This concludes the background information. It has been demonstrated experimentally that when the resonator is squeezed along part of either of its two principal axes, tuning rates differ among the groups of modes represented by different indices (see figure). The differences in tuning rates could be utilized to configure the resonance spectrum to obtain a desired effect; for example, through a combination of squeezing and electrical biasing, two resonances represented by different mode indices could be set at a specified frequency difference something that could not be done through electrical biasing alone.

  6. Dissipation and resonance frequency shift of a resonator magnetically coupled to a semiclassical spin

    PubMed Central

    de Voogd, J. M.; Wagenaar, J. J. T.; Oosterkamp, T. H.

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the change of the properties of a resonator, when coupled to a semiclassical spin by means of the magnetic field. Starting with the Lagrangian of the complete system, we provide an analytical expression for the linear response function for the motion in the case of a mechanical resonator and the current for the case of an electromagnetic resonator, thereby considering the influence of the resonator on the spin and vice versa. This analysis shows that the resonance frequency and effective dissipation factor can change significantly due to the relaxation times of the spin. We first derive this for a system consisting of a spin and mechanical resonator and thereafter apply the same calculations to an electromagnetic resonator. Moreover, the applicability of the method is generalized to a resonator coupled to two-level systems and more, providing a key to understand some of the problems of two-level systems in quantum devices. PMID:28186145

  7. Dissipation and resonance frequency shift of a resonator magnetically coupled to a semiclassical spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Voogd, J. M.; Wagenaar, J. J. T.; Oosterkamp, T. H.

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the change of the properties of a resonator, when coupled to a semiclassical spin by means of the magnetic field. Starting with the Lagrangian of the complete system, we provide an analytical expression for the linear response function for the motion in the case of a mechanical resonator and the current for the case of an electromagnetic resonator, thereby considering the influence of the resonator on the spin and vice versa. This analysis shows that the resonance frequency and effective dissipation factor can change significantly due to the relaxation times of the spin. We first derive this for a system consisting of a spin and mechanical resonator and thereafter apply the same calculations to an electromagnetic resonator. Moreover, the applicability of the method is generalized to a resonator coupled to two-level systems and more, providing a key to understand some of the problems of two-level systems in quantum devices.

  8. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for Escherichia coli ytfP, a member of the broadly conserved UPF0131 protein domain family

    SciTech Connect

    Aramini, James M.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Huang, Yuanpeng; Rajan, Paranji K.; Xiao, Rong; Shastry, Ritu; Acton, Thomas; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    Protein ytfP from Escherichia coli (Swiss-Prot ID: YTFP-ECOLI; NESG target ID: ER111; Wunderlich et al., 2004) is a 113-residue member of the UPF0131 protein family (Pfam ID: PF03674) of unknown function. This domain family is found in organisms from all three kingdoms, archaea, eubacteria and eukaryotes. Using triple resonance NMR techniques, we have determined 97% of backbone and 91% of side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments. The chemical shift and 3J(HN?Ha) scalar coupling data reveal a mixed a/b topology,????????. BMRB deposit with Accession No. 6448. Reference: Wunderlich et al. (2004) Proteins, 56, 181?187.

  9. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for the protein coded by gene locus BB0938 of Bordetella bronchiseptica

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Paolo; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Xiao, Rong; Ho, Chi K.; Ma, LiChung; Acton, Thomas; Kennedy, Michael A.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    The product of gene locus BB0938 from Bordetella bronchiseptica (Swiss-Prot ID: Q7WNU7-BORBR; NESG target ID: BoR11; Wunderlich et al., 2004; Pfam ID: PF03476) is a 128-residue protein of unknown function. This broadly conserved protein family is found in eubacteria and eukaryotes. Using triple resonance NMR techniques, we have determined 98% of backbone and 94% of side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments. The chemical shift and 3J(HN?Ha) scalar coupling data reveal a b topology with a seven-residue helical insert, ??????????. BMRB deposit with accession number 6693. Reference: Wunderlich et al. (2004) Proteins, 56, 181?187.

  10. Chemical characterization of a prominent phosphomonoester resonance from mammalian brain. 31P and 1H NMR analysis at 4.7 and 14.1 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Kopp, S. J.; Dadok, J.; Minshew, N. J.; Feliksik, J. M.; Glonek, T.; Cohen, M. M.

    A prominent 31P NMR resonance at 3.84 ppm in mammalian brain has been identified as ethanolamine phosphate. The identification was based on 1H and 31P NMR findings (including pH titrations) at 4.7 and 14.1 T, as well as thin-layer chromatography studies. We previously incorrectly assigned the 3.84 ppm resonance to ribose-5-phosphate. The incorrect assignment occurred because the two compounds have very similar 31P chemical shifts, and because we did not carefully consider the effects of counter ions and ionic strengths when interpreting the 31P chemical shifts. In separate preliminary studies we have demonstrated ethanolamine phosphate to be high in immature developing brain and in the degenerating brain of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease patients. Ethanolamine phosphate may therefore serve as a sensitive marker of membrane phospholipid turnover for both in vitro and in vivo31P NMR studies.

  11. Whole-brain patterns of 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Su, L; Blamire, A M; Watson, R; He, J; Hayes, L; O'Brien, J T

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has demonstrated metabolite changes in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB); however, their pattern and relationship to clinical symptoms is unclear. To determine whether the spatial patterns of brain-metabolite changes in AD and DLB are regional or diffused, and to examine whether the key metabolite levels are associated with cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms, we acquired whole-brain spatially resolved 3T magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data from subjects with AD (N=36), DLB (N=35) and similarly aged controls (N=35). Voxel-wise measurement of N-acetylaspartate to creatine (NAA/Cr), choline to Cr (Cho/Cr), myo-inositol to Cr (mI/Cr) as well as glutamate and glutamine to Cr (Glx/Cr) ratios were determined using MRSI. Compared with controls, AD and DLB groups showed a significant decrease in most brain metabolites, with NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and mI/Cr levels being reduced in posterior cingulate, thalamus, frontotemporal areas and basal ganglia. The Glx/Cr level was more widely decreased in DLB (posterior cingulate, hippocampus, temporal regions and caudate) than in AD (only in posterior cingulate). DLB was also associated with increased levels of Cho/Cr, NAA/Cr and mI/Cr in occipital regions. Changes in metabolism in the brain were correlated with cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms in the DLB but not in the AD group. The different patterns between AD and DLB may have implications for improving diagnosis, better understanding disease-specific neurobiology and targeting therapeutics. In addition, the study raised important questions about the role of occipital neuroinflammation and glial activation as well as the glutamatergic treatment in DLB. PMID:27576166

  12. 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Predicts Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Subset of Patients With Liver Cirrhosis: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Li, Yuehua

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the utility of H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-MRS) to quantify the differences in liver metabolites. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used as a means of predicting the probability of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with liver cirrhosis secondary to chronic hepatitis B.This study included 20 healthy volunteers, 20 patients with liver cirrhosis secondary to chronic hepatitis B (cirrhosis group), and 20 patients with small HCC secondary to cirrhosis liver parenchyma (HCC group). All patients underwent routine MRI and H-MRS scanning. LCModel software was used to quantify Cho (Choline), Lip (lipid), and Cho/Lip in the 3 groups, and a one-way ANOVA was used to compare the differences in these metabolites between groups.Choline levels were significantly different between the control and HCC group and between the cirrhosis group and the HCC group (all P < 0.001). There was also a significant difference in Lip levels between the control and cirrhosis group and the control and HCC groups (all P < 0.001). There were also differences in Cho/Lip between the control and cirrhosis groups, the control and HCC groups, and the cirrhosis and HCC groups (all P < 0.001).H-MRS followed by the analysis with LCModel can be used to measure changes in hepatic metabolite levels in patients with liver cirrhosis secondary to chronic hepatitis B and HCC. Thus, H-MRS may be helpful in monitoring HCC and liver cirrhosis development.

  13. Direct and real-time quantification of tenofovir release from ph-sensitive microparticles into simulated biological fluids using (1)h nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Tao; Oyler, Nathan A; Youan, Bi-Botti C

    2014-04-01

    In vitro drug release evaluation is a very important step toward the quality control of nano- or micro-particular drug delivery systems. However, most quantitative techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography requires a dialysis membrane to separate the released free drug from these delivery systems, thus are not capable of direct detection and real-time quantification of the drug release kinetics. This study describes, for the first time, a rapid, specific, and direct method for the real-time quantification of in vitro tenofovir (TNF) release from pH-sensitive microparticles using a Varian 400 MHz (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectrometer. Various analytical performance parameters such as linearity, precision, accuracy, limit of quantification, limit of detection, and robustness were validated according to International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines. The in vitro release of TNF from microparticles in both simulated vaginal fluid (VFS) and the mixture of VFS and simulated semen fluid was monitored and quantified in real time using (1)H-NMR. The capability of real-time quantification of in vitro drug release from microparticles not only provides a more accurate prediction of its biological behavior in vivo, but is also independent of potential interference from the dialysis membrane.

  14. Taurine detected using high-resolution magic angle spinning 1H nuclear magnetic resonance: A potential indicator of early myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    YANG, YUNLONG; YANG, LIN; ZHANG, YUE; GU, XINGHUA; XU, DANLING; FANG, FANG; SUN, AIJUN; WANG, KEQIANG; YU, YIHUA; ZUO, JI; GE, JUNBO

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a unique non-invasive method for detecting cardiac metabolic changes. However, MRS in cardiac diagnosis is limited due to insensitivity and low efficiency. Taurine (Tau) is the most abundant free amino acid in the myocardium. We hypothesized that Tau levels may indicate myocardial ischemia and early infarction. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into seven groups according to different time points during the course of myocardial ischemia, which was induced by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. Infarcted myocardial tissue was obtained for high-resolution magic angle spinning 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Results were validated via high-performance liquid chromatography. The Tau levels in the ischemic myocardial tissue were reduced significantly within 5 min compared with those in the control group (relative ratio from 20.27±6.48 to 8.81±0.04, P<0.05) and were maintained for 6 h post-ischemia. Tau levels declined more markedly (56.5%) than creatine levels (48.5%) at 5 min after ligation. This suggests that Tau may have potential as an indicator in the early detection of myocardial ischemia by 1H MRS. PMID:23408155

  15. Protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes studied using 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Davis, Mark F; Gennett, Thomas; Dillon, Anne C; Jones, Kim M; Heben, Michael J

    2005-12-14

    The reversible protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in sulfuric acid and Nafion was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) was used to obtain high-resolution 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization (CP) NMR spectra. The 13C NMR chemical shifts are reported for bulk SWNTs, H2SO4-treated SWNTs, SWNT-Nafion polymer composites, SWNT-AQ55 polymer composites, and SWNTs in contact with water. Protonation occurs without irreversible oxidation of the nanotube substrate via a charge-transfer process. This is the first report of a chemically induced change in a SWNT 13C resonance brought about by a reversible interaction with an acidic proton, providing additional evidence that carbon nanotubes behave as weak bases. Cross polarization was found to be a powerful technique for providing an additional contrast mechanism for studying nanotubes in contact with other chemical species. The CP studies confirmed polarization transfer from nearby protons to nanotube carbon atoms. The CP technique was also applied to investigate water adsorbed on carbon nanotube surfaces. Finally, the degree of bundling of the SWNTs in Nafion films was probed with the 1H-13C CP-MAS technique.

  16. 1H, 13C, and 15N backbone and side chain resonance assignments of thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus cyclophilin-A

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, Michael; Zhang, Fengli; Isern, Nancy G.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2014-04-01

    Cyclophilins catalyze the reversible peptidyl-prolyl isomerization of their substrates and are present across all kingdoms of life from humans to bacteria. Although numerous biological roles have now been discovered for cyclophilins, their function was initially ascribed to their chaperone-like activity in protein folding where they catalyze the often rate-limiting step of proline isomerization. This chaperone-like activity may be especially important under extreme conditions where cyclophilins are often over expressed, such as in tumors for human cyclophilins {Lee, 2010 #1167}, but also in organisms that thrive under extreme conditions, such as theromophilic bacteria. Moreover, the reversible nature of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerization reaction catalyzed by cyclophilins has allowed these enzymes to serve as model systems for probing the role of conformational changes during catalytic turnover {Eisenmesser, 2002 #20;Eisenmesser, 2005 #203}. Thus, we present here the resonance assignments of a thermophilic cyclophilin from Geobacillus kaustophilus derived from deep-sea sediment {Takami, 2004 #1384}. This thermophilic cyclophilin may now be studied at a variety of temperatures to provide insight into the comparative structure, dynamics, and catalytic mechanism of cyclophilins.

  17. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignment of the cytosolic dithiol glutaredoxin 1 from the pathogen Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Monica; Sturlese, Mattia; Manta, Bruno; Löhr, Frank; Mammi, Stefano; Comini, Marcelo; Bellanda, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosomatids are parasites responsible for several tropical and subtropical diseases, such as Chaga's disease, sleeping sickness and Leishmaniasis. In contrast to the mammalian host, the thiol-redox metabolism of these pathogens depends on trypanothione [bis-glutathionylspermidine, T(SH)2] instead of glutathione (GSH) providing a set of lineage-specific proteins as drug target candidates. Glutaredoxins (Grx) are ubiquitous small thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases that belong to the thioredoxin-fold family. They play a central role in redox homeostasis and iron sulfur-cluster biogenesis. Each species, including trypanosomes, possesses its own set of isoforms distributed in different subcellular compartments. The genome of trypanosomatids encodes for two class I (dithiolic) Grxs named 2-C-Grx1 and 2-C-Grx2. Both proteins were shown to efficiently reduce different disulfides at the expenses of T(SH)2 using a mechanism that involves the two cysteines in the active site. Moreover, the cytosolic Trypanosoma brucei 2-C-Grx1 but not the mitochondrial 2-C-Grx2 was able to coordinate an iron-sulfur cluster with T(SH)2 or GSH as ligand. As a first step to unravel the structural basis for the specificity observed in the trypanosomal glutaredoxins, we present here the NMR resonance assignment of 2-C-Grx1 from the parasite T. brucei brucei.

  18. A high frequency resonance gravity gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bagaev, S. N.; Kvashnin, N. L.; Skvortsov, M. N.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Krysanov, V. A.; Oreshkin, S. I.; Motylev, A. M.; Popov, S. M.; Samoilenko, A. A.; Yudin, I. S.; Rudenko, V. N.

    2014-06-15

    A new setup OGRAN—the large scale opto-acoustical gravitational detector is described. As distinguished from known gravitational bar detectors it uses the optical interferometrical readout for registering weak variations of gravity gradient at the kilohetz frequency region. At room temperature, its sensitivity is limited only by the bar Brownian noise at the bandwidth close to 100 Hz. It is destined for a search for rare events—gravitational pulses coincident with signals of neutrino scintillator (BUST) in the deep underground of Baksan Neutrino Observatory of INR RAS.

  19. A high frequency resonance gravity gradiometer.

    PubMed

    Bagaev, S N; Bezrukov, L B; Kvashnin, N L; Krysanov, V A; Oreshkin, S I; Motylev, A M; Popov, S M; Rudenko, V N; Samoilenko, A A; Skvortsov, M N; Yudin, I S

    2014-06-01

    A new setup OGRAN--the large scale opto-acoustical gravitational detector is described. As distinguished from known gravitational bar detectors it uses the optical interferometrical readout for registering weak variations of gravity gradient at the kilohetz frequency region. At room temperature, its sensitivity is limited only by the bar Brownian noise at the bandwidth close to 100 Hz. It is destined for a search for rare events--gravitational pulses coincident with signals of neutrino scintillator (BUST) in the deep underground of Baksan Neutrino Observatory of INR RAS.

  20. Multiplexed infrared photodetection using resonant radio-frequency circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R.; Lu, R.; Gong, S.; Wasserman, D.; Roberts, C.; Allen, J. W.; Allen, M. S.; Wenner, B. R.

    2016-02-08

    We demonstrate a room-temperature semiconductor-based photodetector where readout is achieved using a resonant radio-frequency (RF) circuit consisting of a microstrip split-ring resonator coupled to a microstrip busline, fabricated on a semiconductor substrate. The RF resonant circuits are characterized at RF frequencies as function of resonator geometry, as well as for their response to incident IR radiation. The detectors are modeled analytically and using commercial simulation software, with good agreement to our experimental results. Though the detector sensitivity is weak, the detector architecture offers the potential for multiplexing arrays of detectors on a single read-out line, in addition to high speed response for either direct coupling of optical signals to RF circuitry, or alternatively, carrier dynamics characterization of semiconductor, or other, material systems.

  1. Multiplexed infrared photodetection using resonant radio-frequency circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R.; Lu, R.; Roberts, C.; Gong, S.; Allen, J. W.; Allen, M. S.; Wenner, B. R.; Wasserman, D.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a room-temperature semiconductor-based photodetector where readout is achieved using a resonant radio-frequency (RF) circuit consisting of a microstrip split-ring resonator coupled to a microstrip busline, fabricated on a semiconductor substrate. The RF resonant circuits are characterized at RF frequencies as function of resonator geometry, as well as for their response to incident IR radiation. The detectors are modeled analytically and using commercial simulation software, with good agreement to our experimental results. Though the detector sensitivity is weak, the detector architecture offers the potential for multiplexing arrays of detectors on a single read-out line, in addition to high speed response for either direct coupling of optical signals to RF circuitry, or alternatively, carrier dynamics characterization of semiconductor, or other, material systems.

  2. Design of MEMS piezoelectric harvesters with electrostatically adjustable resonance frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madinei, H.; Khodaparast, H. Haddad; Adhikari, S.; Friswell, M. I.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper the analytical analysis of an adaptively tuned piezoelectric vibration based energy harvester is presented. A bimorph piezoelectric energy harvester is suspended between two electrodes, subjected to a same DC voltage. The resonance frequency of the system is controllable by the applied DC voltage, and the harvested power is maximized by controlling the natural frequency of the system to cope with vibration sources which have varying excitation frequencies. The nonlinear governing differential equation of motion is derived based on Euler Bernoulli theory, and due to the softening nonlinearity of the electrostatic force, the harvester is capable of working over a broad frequency range. The steady state harmonic solution is obtained using the harmonic balance method and results are verified numerically. The results show that the harvester can be tuned to give a resonance response over a wide range of frequencies, and shows the great potential of this hybrid system.

  3. Metabolic Signatures of Lung Cancer in Sputum and Exhaled Breath Condensate Detected by 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Naseer; Bezabeh, Tedros; Ijare, Omkar B.; Myers, Renelle; Alomran, Reem; Aliani, Michel; Nugent, Zoann; Banerji, Shantanu; Kim, Julian; Qing, Gefei; Bshouty, Zoheir

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers. Currently, there are no biomarkers for early detection, monitoring treatment response, and detecting recurrent lung cancer. We undertook this study to determine if 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of sputum and exhaled breath condensate (EBC), as a noninvasive tool, can identify metabolic biomarkers of lung cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sputum and EBC samples were collected from 20 patients, comprising patients with pathologically confirmed non-small cell lung cancer (n = 10) and patients with benign respiratory conditions (n = 10). Both sputum and EBC samples were collected from 18 patients; 2 patients provided EBC samples only. 1H MR spectra were obtained on a Bruker Avance 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer. Sputum samples were further confirmed cytologically to distinguish between true sputum and saliva. RESULTS In the EBC samples, median concentrations of propionate, ethanol, acetate, and acetone were higher in lung cancer patients compared to the patients with benign conditions. Median concentration of methanol was lower in lung cancer patients (0.028 mM) than in patients with benign conditions (0.067 mM; P = 0.028). In the combined sputum and saliva and the cytologically confirmed sputum samples, median concentrations of N-acetyl sugars, glycoprotein, propionate, lysine, acetate, and formate were lower in the lung cancer patients than in patients with benign conditions. Glucose was found to be consistently absent in the combined sputum and saliva samples (88%) as well as in the cytologically confirmed sputum samples (86%) of lung cancer patients. CONCLUSION Absence of glucose in sputum and lower concentrations of methanol in EBC of lung cancer patients discerned by 1H MRS may serve as metabolic biomarkers of lung cancer for early detection, monitoring treatment response, and detecting recurrence. PMID:27891048

  4. Radio-frequency dressing of multiple Feshbach resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, A. M.; Anderson, R. P.; Hanna, Thomas M.; Tiesinga, E.; Julienne, P. S.; Hall, D. S.

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrate and theoretically analyze the dressing of several proximate Feshbach resonances in R87b using radio-frequency (rf) radiation. We present accurate measurements and characterizations of the resonances, and the dramatic changes in scattering properties that can arise through the rf dressing. Our scattering theory analysis yields quantitative agreement with the experimental data. We also present a simple interpretation of our results in terms of rf-coupled bound states interacting with the collision threshold.

  5. Characterisation and evaluation of paramagnetic fluorine labelled glycol chitosan conjugates for (19)F and (1)H magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Elena; Harvey, Peter; Chalmers, Kirsten H; Mishra, Anurag; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Wilson, J Ian; Botta, Mauro; Fekete, Marianna; Blamire, Andrew M; Parker, David

    2014-02-01

    Medium molecular weight glycol chitosan conjugates have been prepared, linked by an amide bond to paramagnetic Gd(III), Ho(III) and Dy(III) macrocyclic complexes in which a trifluoromethyl reporter group is located 6.5 Å from the paramagnetic centre. The faster relaxation of the observed nucleus allows modified pulse sequences to be used with shorter acquisition times. The polydisperse materials have been characterised by gel permeation chromatography, revealing an average molecular weight on the order of 13,800 (Gd), 14,600 (Dy) and 16,200 (Ho), consistent with the presence of 8.5, 9.5 and 13 complexes, respectively. The gadolinium conjugate was prepared for both a q = 1 monoamide tricarboxylate conjugate (r1p 11.2 mM(-1) s(-1), 310 K, 1.4 T) and a q = 0 triphosphinate system, and conventional contrast-enhanced proton MRI studies at 7 T were undertaken in mice bearing an HT-29 or an HCT-116 colorectal tumour xenograft (17 μmol/kg). Enhanced contrast was observed following injection in the tail vein in tumour tissue, with uptake also evident in the liver and kidney with a tumour-to-liver ratio of 2:1 at 13 min, and large amounts in the kidney and bladder consistent with predominant renal clearance. Parallel experiments observing the (19)F resonance in the holmium conjugate complex using a surface coil did not succeed owing to its high R2 value (750 Hz, 7 T). However, the fluorine signal in the dysprosium triphosphinate chitosan conjugate [R1/R2 = 0.6 and R1 = 145 Hz (7 T)] was sharper and could be observed in vivo at -65.7 ppm, following intravenous tail vein injection of a dose of 34 μmol/kg.

  6. Circularly split-ring-resonator-based frequency-reconfigurable antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. A.; Faruque, M. R. I.; Islam, M. T.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an antenna with frequency configurability in light of a circularly split-ring resonator (CSRR) is introduced. The proposed reconfigurable monopole antenna consists of a microstrip-fed hook-shaped structure and a CSRR having single reconfigurable split only. A new band of radiation unlike the band radiated from monopole only is observed due to magnetic coupling between the CSRR and the monopole antenna. The resonance frequency of the CSRR can be arbitrarily chosen by varying the dimension and relative position of its gap with the monopole, which leads the antenna to become reconfigurable one. By using a single switch with perfect electric conductor at the gap of CSRR cell, the effect of CSRR can be deactivated and, hence, it is possible to suppress the corresponding resonance, resulting in a frequency-reconfigurable antenna. Commercially available Computer Simulation Technology microwave studio based on finite integration technique was adopted throughout the study.

  7. WGM Resonators for Terahertz-to-Optical Frequency Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov,Dmitry; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Nu, Nan

    2008-01-01

    Progress has been made toward solving some practical problems in the implementation of terahertz-to-optical frequency converters utilizing whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators. Such frequency converters are expected to be essential parts of non-cryogenic terahertz- radiation receivers that are, variously, under development or contemplated for a variety of applications in airborne and spaceborne instrumentation for astronomical and military uses. In most respects, the basic principles of terahertz-to-optical frequency conversion in WGM resonators are the same as those of microwave (sub-terahertz)-to-optical frequency conversion in WGM resonators, various aspects of which were discussed in the three preceeding articles. To recapitulate: In a receiver following this approach, a preamplified incoming microwave signal (in the present case, a terahertz signal) is up-converted to an optical signal by a technique that exploits the nonlinearity of the electromagnetic response of a whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonator made of LiNbO3 or another suitable electro-optical material. Upconversion takes place by three-wave mixing in the resonator. To ensure the required interaction among the optical and terahertz signals, the WGM resonator must be designed and fabricated to function as an electro-optical modulator while simultaneously exhibiting (1) resonance at the required microwave and optical operating frequencies and (2) phase matching among the microwave and optical signals circulating in the resonator. Downstream of the WGM resonator, the up-converted signal is processed photonically by use of a tunable optical filter or local oscillator and is then detected. The practical problems addressed in the present development effort are the following: Satisfaction of the optical and terahertz resonance-frequency requirement is a straightforward matter, inasmuch as the optical and terahertz spectra can be measured. However, satisfaction of the phase-matching requirement is

  8. Modeling sickle cell vasoocculsion in the rat leg: Quantification of trapped sickle cells and correlation with sup 31 P metabolic and sup 1 H magnetic resonance imaging changes

    SciTech Connect

    Fabry, M.E.; Rajanayagam, V.; Fine, E.; Holland, S.; Gore, J.C.; Nagel, R.L.; Kaul, D.K. )

    1989-05-01

    The authors have developed an animal model to elucidate the acute effects of perfusion abnormalities on muscle metabolism induced by different density-defined classes of erythrocytes isolated from sickle cell anemia patients. Technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc)-labeled, saline-washed normal (AA), homozygous sickle (SS), or high-density SS (SS4) erythrocytes were injected into the femoral artery of the rat and quantitative {sup 99m}Tc imaging, {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy by surface coil at 2 teslas, and {sup 1}H magnetic resonance imaging at 0.15 tesla were performed. Between 5 and 25 {mu}l of SS4 cells was trapped in the microcirculation of the thigh. In contrast, fewer SS discocytes (SS2) or AA cells were trapped. After injection of SS4 cells an initial increase in inorganic phosphate was observed in the region of the thigh served by the femoral artery, intracellular pH decreased, and subsequently the proton relaxation time T{sub 1} reached a broad maximum at 18-28 hr. When T{sub 1} obtained at this time was plotted against the volume of cells trapped, an increase of T{sub 1} over the control value of 411 {plus minus} 48 msec was found that was proportional to the number of cells trapped. They conclude that the densest SS cells are most effective at producing vasoocclusion. The extent of the change detected by {sup 1}H magnetic resonance imaging is dependent on the amount of cells trapped in the microcirculation and the magnitude of the initial increase of inorganic phosphate.

  9. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance titration curves and microenvironments of aromatic residues in bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A.

    PubMed

    Tanokura, M

    1983-07-01

    The aromatic region of the NMR spectrum of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A was analyzed in order to clarify the nature of the microenvironments surrounding the individual histidine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine residues and the interactions with inhibitors. The NMR titration curves of ring protons of six tyrosine and three phenylalanine residues as well as four histidine residues were determined at 37 degrees C between pH 1.5 and pH 11.5 under various conditions. The titration curves were analyzed on the basis of a scheme of a simple proton dissociation sequence and the most probable values were obtained for the macroscopic pK values and intrinsic chemical shifts. The microenvironments surrounding the residues and the effects of inhibitors are discussed on the basis of these results. Based on the titration curves of ring protons, the six tyrosine residues were classified into the following four groups: (1) titratable and different chemical shifts for C(delta) and C(epsilon) protons (two tyrosine residues), (2) titratable but similar chemical shifts for C(delta) and C(epsilon) protons (two tyrosine residues), (3) not titratable and different chemical shifts for C(delta) and C(epsilon) protons (one tyrosine residues), and (4) not titratable and similar chemical shifts for C(delta) and C(epsilon) protons (one tyrosine residue). The resonance signals of ring protons were tentatively assigned to tyrosine and phenylalanine residues. The NMR titration curves of His-48 ring protons were continuous in solution containing 0.2 M sodium acetate but were discontinuous in solution containing 0.3 M NaCl because the NMR signals disappeared at pH values between 5 and 6.5. The effects of addition of formate, acetate, propionate, and ethanol were investigated in order to elucidate the mechanism of the continuity of the titration curves of His-48 in the presence of acetate ion. The NMR signal of His-48 C(2) protons was observed at pH 6 in the presence of acetate and propionate ions

  10. Relationship between wingbeat frequency and resonant frequency of the wing in insects.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ngoc San; Truong, Quang Tri; Goo, Nam Seo; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we experimentally studied the relationship between wingbeat frequency and resonant frequency of 30 individuals of eight insect species from five orders: Odonata (Sympetrum flaveolum), Lepidoptera (Pieris rapae, Plusia gamma and Ochlodes), Hymenoptera (Xylocopa pubescens and Bombus rupestric), Hemiptera (Tibicen linnei) and Coleoptera (Allomyrina dichotoma). The wingbeat frequency of free-flying insects was measured using a high-speed camera while the natural frequency was determined using a laser displacement sensor along with a Bruel and Kjaer fast Fourier transform analyzer based on the base excitation method. The results showed that the wingbeat frequency was related to body mass (m) and forewing area (Af), following the proportionality f ~ m(1/2)/Af, while the natural frequency was significantly correlated with area density (f0 ~ mw/Af, mw is the wing mass). In addition, from the comparison of wingbeat frequency to natural frequency, the ratio between wingbeat frequency and natural frequency was found to be, in general, between 0.13 and 0.67 for the insects flapping at a lower wingbeat frequency (less than 100 Hz) and higher than 1.22 for the insects flapping at a higher wingbeat frequency (higher than 100 Hz). These results suggest that wingbeat frequency does not have a strong relation with resonance frequency: in other words, insects have not been evolved sufficiently to flap at their wings' structural resonant frequency. This contradicts the general conclusion of other reports--that insects flap at their wings' resonant frequency to take advantage of passive deformation to save energy.

  11. Artificial excitation of ELF waves with frequency of Schumann resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Guido, T.; Tulegenov, B.; Labenski, J.; Chang, C.-L.

    2014-11-01

    We report results from the experiment aimed at the artificial excitation of extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves with frequencies corresponding to the frequency of Schumann resonance. Electromagnetic waves with these frequencies can form a standing pattern inside the spherical cavity formed by the surface of the Earth and the ionosphere. In the experiment the ELF waves were excited by heating the ionosphere with X-mode HF electromagnetic waves generated at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. The experiment demonstrates that heating of the ionosphere can excite relatively large-amplitude electromagnetic waves with frequencies in the range 7.8-8.0 Hz when the ionosphere has a strong F layer, the frequency of the HF radiation is in the range 3.20-4.57 MHz, and the electric field greater than 5 mV/m is present in the ionosphere.

  12. Frequency-tunable superconducting resonators via nonlinear kinetic inductance

    SciTech Connect

    Vissers, M. R.; Hubmayr, J.; Sandberg, M.; Gao, J.; Chaudhuri, S.; Bockstiegel, C.

    2015-08-10

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a frequency-tunable high-Q superconducting resonator made from a niobium titanium nitride film. The frequency tunability is achieved by injecting a DC through a current-directing circuit into the nonlinear inductor whose kinetic inductance is current-dependent. We have demonstrated continuous tuning of the resonance frequency in a 180 MHz frequency range around 4.5 GHz while maintaining the high internal quality factor Q{sub i} > 180 000. This device may serve as a tunable filter and find applications in superconducting quantum computing and measurement. It also provides a useful tool to study the nonlinear response of a superconductor. In addition, it may be developed into techniques for measurement of the complex impedance of a superconductor at its transition temperature and for readout of transition-edge sensors.

  13. Resonance breakdown of dielectric resonator antennas on ground plane at visible frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chengjun; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Zou, Longfang; Fumeaux, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscale dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs) are promising elements for constructing the next generation of efficient and compact optical devices. Their efficient light manipulation capability underpinned by electric and magnetic resonances at visible frequencies is appealing for optical metasurfaces with various functions such as anomalous re ection, polarization conversion and surface plasmon coupling. To realize these functions, the resonance properties of the individual DRA elements are of critical importance. In this paper, we study the resonance breakdown of nanoscale cylindrical DRAs on metallic substrates. By gradually increasing the relative permittivity of DRAs on a metallic ground plane from low to high values, we observe two types of resonance breakdown and on that basis we can define a permittivity range for efficient resonance. More specifically, the resonance breakdown occuring at low DRA permittivities is a result of weak confinement and excessive radiation loss. The resonance breakdown at high DRA permittivities is a result of an elevated plasmonic loss at the metal- dielectric interface when the negative permittivity of the metal and the positive permittivity of the dielectric material have matched in their absolute values. The latter breakdown can be avoided by inserting a thin dielectric spacer with a low permittivity between the metal and dielectric. This study suggests important considerations for designing dielectric resonator metasurfaces at the visible frequencies.

  14. Effects of Meandering on Dipole Antenna Resonant Frequency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    predicted to be 238.3 MHz using (1) from [12] (1) Shifting the resonant frequency of an antenna downwards is generally a method to improve the radiation...geometry constant during mea- surement. The XEPS is transparent at microwave frequencies and thus does not measurably perturb the antenna impedance... Methods for modeling wire antennas loaded with shielded networks,” IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 961–968, Apr. 2004. [4] E. W

  15. Ionospheric nf sub H resonances: Frequency shifts versus plasma conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    The Alouette 2 resonances observed near the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency f sub H reveal frequency shifts (relative to the n(f sub H) values derived from model field calculations) which can be interpreted in terms of plasma wave dispersion effects. These effects are observed on the 2(f sub H) resonance when it is near the resonance observed close to the upper hybrid frequency f sub T. The observations suggest that an oblique echo model may be required to give a proper interpretation of the 2(f sub H) resonance. Cyclotron damping can be ignored only when the angle between the propagation vector and the direction perpendicular to the earth's magnetic field B is less than a few degrees for the 2(f sub H) wave, and less than a few tenths of a degree for the n(f sub H) waves with n 2. The negative offset of the absolute value of B inferred from the plasma resonance observations is consistent with expectations based on recent OGO 3 and OGO 5 rubidium magnetometer observations at higher altitudes in the equatorial regions.

  16. Frequency behavior of coherent random lasing in diffusive resonant media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Anjani Kumar; Uppu, Ravitej; Mujumdar, Sushil

    2012-10-01

    We investigate diffusive propagation of light and consequent random lasing in an amplifying medium comprising resonant spherical scatterers. A Monte-Carlo calculation based on photon propagation via three-dimensional random walks is employed to obtain the dwell-times of light in the system. We compare the inter-scatterer and intra-scatterer dwell-times for representative resonant and non-resonant wavelengths. Our results show that more efficient random lasing, with intense coherent modes, is obtained for a system with intra-scatterer gain. This is also coupled with a larger reduction in frequency fluctuations. We find that such a system can yield almost thresholdless random lasing. Inspired by these results, we discuss a possible practical situation, based on a monodisperse aerosol, wherein frequency controlled coherent random lasing can be obtained. Since our analysis essentially investigates transport of intensity, the results are relevant to coherent random lasers under nonresonant feedback.

  17. Dual-frequency resonance-tracking atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Brian J.; Callahan, Clint; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Proksch, Roger

    2007-11-01

    A dual-excitation method for resonant-frequency tracking in scanning probe microscopy based on amplitude detection is developed. This method allows the cantilever to be operated at or near resonance for techniques where standard phase locked loops are not possible. This includes techniques with non-acoustic driving where the phase of the driving force is frequency and/or position dependent. An example of the latter is piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), where the resonant frequency of the cantilever is strongly dependent on the contact stiffness of the tip-surface junction and the local mechanical properties, but the spatial variability of the drive phase rules out the use of a phase locked loop. Combined with high-voltage switching and imaging, dual-frequency, resonance-tracking PFM allows reliable studies of electromechanical and elastic properties and polarization dynamics in a broad range of inorganic and biological systems, and is illustrated using lead zirconate-titanate, rat tail collagen, and native and switched ferroelectric domains in lithium niobate.

  18. Influence of fat and phytosterols concentration in margarines on their degradation at high temperature. A study by (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Sopelana, P; Ibargoitia, María L; Guillén, María D

    2016-04-15

    The objective of this work was to study the influence of several factors, especially fat and phytosterols concentration, on the behavior of margarine under thermo-oxidative conditions. For this purpose, margarines with similar compositions in acyl groups, but differing in the concentration of both fat and phytosterols, were heated at 180°C. The changes in the main components of margarine lipids and the formation of new compounds throughout the thermal treatment were monitored by (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The results show that the presence of high concentrations of phytosterols seems to have an antioxidant effect, since it slows down the thermo-oxidation rate of margarine and, consequently, the generation rate and concentrations of secondary oxidation products such as some aldehydes, epoxides and alcohols. The oil-water ratio also seems to have an important effect on margarine behavior, in such a way that the lower the fat concentration is, the higher its thermo-oxidation rate.

  19. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the RodA hydrophobin from the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Pille, Ariane; Kwan, Ann H; Cheung, Ivan; Hampsey, Matthew; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Delepierre, Muriel; Latge, Jean-Paul; Sunde, Margaret; Guijarro, J Iñaki

    2015-04-01

    Hydrophobins are fungal proteins characterised by their amphipathic properties and an idiosyncratic pattern of eight cysteine residues involved in four disulphide bridges. The soluble form of these proteins spontaneously self-assembles at hydrophobic/hydrophilic interfaces to form an amphipathic monolayer. The RodA hydrophobin of the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus forms an amyloid layer with a rodlet morphology that covers the surface of fungal spores. This rodlet layer bestows hydrophobicity to the spores facilitating their dispersal in the air and rendering the conidia inert relative to the human immune system. As a first step in the analysis of the solution structure and self-association of RodA, we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the soluble monomeric form of RodA.

  20. Analysis of brain metabolism by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder suggests a generalized differential ontogenic pattern from controls.

    PubMed

    Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Londoño, Ana C; Pineda, David A; Lopera, Francisco; Palacio, Juan David; Arbelaez, Andres; Acosta, Maria T; Vélez, Jorge I; Castellanos, Francisco Xavier; Muenke, Maximilian

    2012-12-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common behavioral disorder of childhood. Preliminary studies with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) of the brain have reported differences in brain metabolite concentration-to-Cr ratios between individuals with ADHD and unaffected controls in several frontal brain regions including anterior cingulate cortex. Using multivoxel (1)H-MRS, we compared 14 individuals affected with ADHD to 20 individuals without ADHD from the same genetic isolate. After controlling by sex, age, and multiple testing, we found significant differences at the right posterior cingulate of the Glx/Cr ratio density distribution function between ADHD cases and controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we found several interactions of metabolite concentration-to-Cr ratio, age, and ADHD status: Ins/Cr and Glx/Cr ratios at the left posterior cingulate, and NAA/Cr at the splenius, right posterior cingulate, and at the left posterior cingulate. We also found a differential metabolite ratio interaction between ADHD cases and controls for Ins/Cr and NAA/Cr at the right striatum. These results show that: (1) NAA/Cr, Glx/Cr, and Ins/Cr ratios, as reported in other studies, exhibit significant differences between ADHD cases and controls; (2) differences of these metabolite ratios between ADHD cases and controls evolve in specific and recognizable patterns throughout age, a finding that replicates previous results obtained by structural MRI, where is demonstrated that brain ontogeny follows a different program in ADHD cases and controls; (3) Ins/Cr and NAA/Cr ratios, at the right striatum, interact in a differential way between ADHD cases and controls. As a whole, these results replicate previous 1H-MRS findings and add new intriguing differential metabolic and ontogeny patterns between ADHD cases and controls that warrant further pursue.

  1. An Evaluation of 1-Deoxynojirimycin Oral Administration in Eri Silkworm through Fat Body Metabolomics Based on 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chao-wei; Lin, Xiao-dong; Dong, Min-jian; Deng, Ming-jie

    2016-01-01

    1-Deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), the main hypoglycemic constituent in mulberry (Morus alba) latex, has been extensively researched. Although there is considerable interest in the biological effects of DNJ, the roles of 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) in glycometabolism and energy metabolism in insects have received little attention. In this paper, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) based metabonomic was performed to study the effects of the oral supplementation of 0.25% DNJ, 0.5% DNJ, latex, and the mixture of 0.5% DNJ and latex (1 : 1) on the fat body glycometabolism and energy metabolism of the fourth-instar larvae of Eri silkworms, Samia cynthia ricini. Metabolic pattern recognition analysis (partial least square-discriminant analysis, PLS-DA) of fat body extracts indicated that the groups of 0.25% DNJ, 0.5% DNJ, latex, and the mixture of 0.5% DNJ and latex (1 : 1) were significantly different from the control group. Further, compared to the control group, the metabolites levels of lactate, trehalose, succinate, malate, and fumarate were remarkably changed in experimental groups, which were involved in glycolysis, hydrolysis of trehalose, and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Our results indicate that DNJ has a positive impact on the reverse energy metabolism of Eri silkworms and metabonomic analysis based on NMR can be used as a tool to identify potential biomarkers. PMID:27294120

  2. Comparison of the meat metabolite composition of Linwu and Pekin ducks using 600 MHz 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangrong; Fang, Chengkun; He, Jianhua; Dai, Qiuzhong; Fang, Rejun

    2017-01-01

    In an effort to further understand of the differences of meat flavor and texture between Linwu ducks and Pekin ducks at market age, we investigated the meat metabolite composition of the two breeds of ducks using 600 MHz (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Comprehensive multivariate data analysis including principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and orthogonal projection to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were applied to analyze the (1)H-NMR profiling data to identify the distinguishing metabolites of breast meat between two breeds of ducks. Compared with 42-d-old Pekin duck meat, breast from 72-d-old Linwu duck has higher concentration of anserine, carnosine, homocarnosine, and nicotinamide, but significantly lower concentration of succinate, creatine, and myo-inositol. These results contribute to a better understanding of the differences in meat metabolite composition between 72-d-old Linwu and 42-d-old Pekin ducks, which could be used to help assess the quality of duck meat as a food.

  3. Near-complete 1H, 13C, 15N resonance assignments of dimethylsulfoxide-denatured TGFBIp FAS1-4 A546T.

    PubMed

    Kulminskaya, Natalia V; Yoshimura, Yuichi; Runager, Kasper; Sørensen, Charlotte S; Bjerring, Morten; Andreasen, Maria; Otzen, Daniel E; Enghild, Jan J; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Mulder, Frans A A

    2016-04-01

    The transforming growth factor beta induced protein (TGFBIp) is a major protein component of the human cornea. Mutations occurring in TGFBIp may cause corneal dystrophies, which ultimately lead to loss of vision. The majority of the disease-causing mutations are located in the C-terminal domain of TGFBIp, referred as the fourth fascilin-1 (FAS1-4) domain. In the present study the FAS1-4 Ala546Thr, a mutation that causes lattice corneal dystrophy, was investigated in dimethylsulfoxide using liquid-state NMR spectroscopy, to enable H/D exchange strategies for identification of the core formed in mature fibrils. Isotope-labeled fibrillated FAS1-4 A546T was dissolved in a ternary mixture 95/4/1 v/v/v% dimethylsulfoxide/water/trifluoroacetic acid, to obtain and assign a reference 2D (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum for the H/D exchange analysis. Here, we report the near-complete assignments of backbone and aliphatic side chain (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonances for unfolded FAS1-4 A546T at 25 °C.

  4. Evaluation of Metabolomic Changes as a Biomarker of Chondrogenic Differentiation in 3D-cultured Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Proton (1H) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Moo-Young; Chun, Song-I; Mun, Chi-Woong; Hong, Kwan Soo; Shin, Jung-Woog

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the metabolomic changes in 3D-cultured human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in alginate beads, so as to identify biomarkers during chondrogenesis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Materials and Methods hMSCs (2×106 cells/mL) were seeded into alginate beads, and chondrogenesis was allowed to progress for 15 days. NMR spectra of the chondrogenic hMSCs were obtained at 4, 7, 11, and 15 days using a 14.1-T (600-MHz) NMR with the water suppression sequence, zgpr. Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to confirm that that the hMSCs differentiated into chondrocytes and to analyze the metabolomic changes indicated by the NMR spectra. Results During chondrogenesis, changes were detected in several metabolomes as hMSC chondrogenesis biomarkers, e.g., fatty acids, alanine, glutamate, and phosphocholine. The metabolomic changes were compared with the Real-Time PCR results, and significant differences were determined using statistical analysis. We found that changes in metabolomes were closely related to biological reactions that occurred during the chondrogenesis of hMSCs. Conclusions In this study, we confirm that metabolomic changes detected by 1H-NMR spectroscopy during chondrogenic differentiation of 3D-cultured hMSCs in alginate beads can be considered as biomarkers of stem cell differentiation. PMID:24205199

  5. Neuronal morphology generates high-frequency firing resonance.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Szapiro, Germán; Schwartz, Eric; Barbour, Boris; Brunel, Nicolas; Hakim, Vincent

    2015-05-06

    The attenuation of neuronal voltage responses to high-frequency current inputs by the membrane capacitance is believed to limit single-cell bandwidth. However, neuronal populations subject to stochastic fluctuations can follow inputs beyond this limit. We investigated this apparent paradox theoretically and experimentally using Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, a motor structure that benefits from rapid information transfer. We analyzed the modulation of firing in response to the somatic injection of sinusoidal currents. Computational modeling suggested that, instead of decreasing with frequency, modulation amplitude can increase up to high frequencies because of cellular morphology. Electrophysiological measurements in adult rat slices confirmed this prediction and displayed a marked resonance at 200 Hz. We elucidated the underlying mechanism, showing that the two-compartment morphology of the Purkinje cell, interacting with a simple spiking mechanism and dendritic fluctuations, is sufficient to create high-frequency signal amplification. This mechanism, which we term morphology-induced resonance, is selective for somatic inputs, which in the Purkinje cell are exclusively inhibitory. The resonance sensitizes Purkinje cells in the frequency range of population oscillations observed in vivo.

  6. Characterizing a Superconducting Resonator with Frequency-Compensated Tunable Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenner, James; Campbell, B.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Hoi, I.-C.; Kelly, J.; Megrant, A.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Vainsencher, A.; White, T. C.; Barends, R.; Chen, Y.; Fowler, A. G.; Jeffrey, E.; Mutus, J. Y.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Martinis, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Deterministic quantum state transfer between devices on different chips requires the ability to transfer quantum states between traveling qubits and fixed logic qubits. Reflections must be minimized to avoid energy loss and phase interference; this requires tunable coupling to an inter-chip line while the two devices are at equal frequencies. To achieve this, we present a 6GHz superconducting coplanar resonator with tunable coupling to a 50 Ohm transmission line. We compensate for the resulting shift in resonator frequency by simultaneously tuning a second SQUID. We further demonstrate the device coherence and the ability both to release a single-frequency shaped pulse into the transmission line and to efficiently capture a shaped pulse, prerequisites for efficient inter-chip deterministic quantum state transfer.

  7. Sodium-23 magnetic resonance imaging during and after transient cerebral ischemia: multinuclear stroke protocols for double-tuned (23)Na/(1)H resonator systems.

    PubMed

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Ansar, Saema; Handwerker, Eva

    2012-11-07

    A double-tuned ²³Na/¹H resonator system was developed to record multinuclear MR image data during and after transient cerebral ischemia. ¹H-diffusion-, (¹H perfusion, ¹H T₂-, ¹H arterial blood flow- and ²³Na spin density-weighted images were then acquired at three time points in a rodent stroke model: (I) during 90 min artery occlusion, (II) directly after arterial reperfusion and (III) one day after arterial reperfusion. Normal ²³Na was detected in hypoperfused stroke tissue which exhibited a low ¹H apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and no changes in ¹H T₂ relaxation time during transient ischemia, while ²³Na increased and ADC values recovered to normal values directly after arterial reperfusion. For the first time, a similar imaging protocol was set-up on a clinical 3T MRI site in conjunction with a commercial double-tuned ¹H/²³Na birdcage resonator avoiding a time-consuming exchange of resonators or MRI systems. Multinuclear ²³Na/¹H MRI data sets were obtained from one stroke patient during both the acute and non-acute stroke phases with an aquisition time of 22 min. The lesion exhibiting low ADC was found to be larger compared to the lesion with high ²³Na at 9 h after symptom onset. It is hoped that the presented pilot data demonstrate that fast multinuclear ²³Na/¹H MRI preclinical and clinical protocols can enable a better understanding of how temporal and regional MRI parameter changes link to pathophysiological variations in ischemic stroke tissue.

  8. Detection of electron paramagnetic resonance absorption using frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Kuyama, Toshifumi; Ono, Mitsuhiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2003-10-01

    A frequency modulation (FM) method was developed to measure electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) absorption. The first-derivative spectrum of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) powder was measured with this FM method. Frequency modulation of up to 1.6 MHz (peak-to-peak) was achieved at a microwave carrier frequency of 1.1 GHz. This corresponds to a magnetic field modulation of 57microT (peak-to-peak) at 40.3 mT. By using a tunable microwave resonator and automatic control systems, we achieved a practical continuous-wave (CW) EPR spectrometer that incorporates the FM method. In the present experiments, the EPR signal intensity was proportional to the magnitude of frequency modulation. The background signal at the modulation frequency (1 kHz) for EPR detection was also proportional to the magnitude of frequency modulation. An automatic matching control (AMC) system reduced the amplitude of noise in microwave detection and improved the baseline stability. Distortion of the spectral lineshape was seen when the spectrometer settings were not appropriate, e.g., with a lack of the open-loop gain in automatic tuning control (ATC). FM is an alternative to field modulation when the side-effect of field modulation is detrimental for EPR detection. The present spectroscopic technique based on the FM scheme is useful for measuring the first derivative with respect to the microwave frequency in investigations of electron-spin-related phenomena.

  9. Mapping extracellular pH in rat brain gliomas in vivo by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging: comparison with maps of metabolites.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, M L; Hérigault, G; Rémy, C; Farion, R; Ballesteros, P; Coles, J A; Cerdán, S; Ziegler, A

    2001-09-01

    The value of extracellular pH (pH(e)) in tumors is an important factor in prognosisand choice of therapy. We demonstrate here that pH(e) can be mappedin vivo in a rat brain glioma by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (SI) of the pH buffer (+/-)2-imidazole-1-yl-3-ethoxycarbonylpropionic acid (IEPA). (1)H SI also allowed us to map metabolites, and, to better understand the determinants of pH(e), we compared maps of pH(e), metabolites, and the distribution of the contrast agent gadolinium1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N",N"'-tetraaceticacid (Gd-DOTA). C6 cells injected in caudate nuclei of four Wistar rats gave rise to gliomas of approximately 10 mm in diameter. Three mmols of IEPA were injected in the right jugular vein from t = 0 to t = 60 min. From t = 50 min to t = 90 min, spin-echo (1)H SI was performed with an echo time of 40 ms in a 2.5-mm slice including the glioma (nominal voxel size, 2.2 microl). IEPA resonances were detected only within the glioma and were intense enough for pH(e) to be calculated from the chemical shift of the H2 resonance in almost all voxels of the glioma. (1)H spectroscopic images with an echo time of 136 ms were then acquired to map metabolites: lactate, choline-containing compounds (tCho), phosphocreatine/creatine, and N-acetylaspartate. Finally, T(1)-weighted imaging after injection of a bolus of Gd-DOTA gave a map indicative of extravasation. On average, the gradient of pH(e) (measured where sufficient IEPA was present) from the center to the periphery was not statistically significant. Mean pH(e) was calculated for each of the four gliomas, and the average was 7.084 +/- 0.017 (+/- SE; n = 4 rats), which is acid with respect to pH(e) of normal tissue. After normalization of spectra to their water peak, voxel-by-voxel comparisons of peak areas showed that N-acetylaspartate, a marker of neurons, correlated negatively with IEPA (P < 0.0001) and lactate (P < 0.05), as expected of a glioma surrounded by normal tissue. t

  10. PT -symmetric spectral singularity and negative-frequency resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendharker, Sarang; Guo, Yu; Khosravi, Farhad; Jacob, Zubin

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum consists of a bath of balanced and symmetric positive- and negative-frequency fluctuations. Media in relative motion or accelerated observers can break this symmetry and preferentially amplify negative-frequency modes as in quantum Cherenkov radiation and Unruh radiation. Here, we show the existence of a universal negative-frequency-momentum mirror symmetry in the relativistic Lorentzian transformation for electromagnetic waves. We show the connection of our discovered symmetry to parity-time (PT ) symmetry in moving media and the resulting spectral singularity in vacuum fluctuation-related effects. We prove that this spectral singularity can occur in the case of two metallic plates in relative motion interacting through positive- and negative-frequency plasmonic fluctuations (negative-frequency resonance). Our work paves the way for understanding the role of PT -symmetric spectral singularities in amplifying fluctuations and motivates the search for PT symmetry in novel photonic systems.

  11. Long-range surface-induced water structures and the effect of 1-butanol studied by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Totland, Christian; Lewis, Rhiannon T; Nerdal, Willy

    2013-09-03

    Thin films of water between glass plates were investigated in this study with regard to water structure and dynamics in the temperature range of 278-313 K. We further investigated how addition of 1-butanol (0.05 and 0.5 M) affects the range and properties of the surface-induced water structures. From the observation of two (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) water resonances and two relaxation components, it was found that the interfacial water exists in a two-state mixture in dynamic equilibrium, with the respective structures interpreted as being high-density water (HDW) and low-density water (LDW). In the absence of 1-butanol, the LDW state is more pronounced, with a further shift in equilibrium toward the LDW state with an increase in temperature. However, in water film samples containing 1-butanol, the HDW state dominates at low temperatures while the LDW state becomes more visible at higher temperatures. Furthermore, the addition of 1-butanol significantly increased the extent of the surface-induced water structures. NMR relaxation shows that the dynamics of water in the HDW state is significantly affected by the presence of 1-butanol and further indicates that the distribution of values for the enthalpy of activation associated with translational motion of water molecules in the HDW state is narrower in the 0.05 M 1-butanol sample than in the 0.5 M 1-butanol sample.

  12. Analytical investigation into the resonance frequencies of a curling probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshadi, Ali; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2016-08-01

    The term ‘active plasma resonance spectroscopy’ (APRS) denotes a class of closely related plasma diagnostic methods which utilize the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency {ω\\text{pe}} ; an electrical radio frequency signal (in the GHz range) is coupled into the plasma via an antenna or a probe, the spectral response is recorded and a mathematical model is employed to determine plasma parameters such as the plasma density and the electron temperature. The curling probe, recently invented by Liang et al (2011 Appl. Phys. Express 4 066101), is a novel realization of the APRS concept which has many practical advantages. In particular, it can be miniaturized and flatly embedded into the chamber wall, thus allowing the monitoring of plasma processes without contamination nor disturbance. Physically, the curling probe can be understood as a ‘coiled’ form of the hairpin probe (Stenzel 1976 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 47 603). Assuming that the spiralization of the probe has little electrical effect, this paper investigates the characteristcs of a ‘straightened’ curling probe by modeling it as an infinite slot-type resonator that is in direct contact with the plasma. The diffraction of an incident plane wave at the slot is calculated by solving the cold plasma model and Maxwell’s equations simultaneously. The resonance frequencies of the probe are derived and are found to be in good agreement with the numerical results of the probe inventors.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging at frequencies below 1 kHz.

    PubMed

    Hilschenz, Ingo; Körber, Rainer; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Fedele, Tommaso; Albrecht, Hans-Helge; Mario Cassará, Antonino; Hartwig, Stefan; Trahms, Lutz; Haase, Jürgen; Burghoff, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Within the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) community the trend is going to higher and higher magnetic fields, ranging from 1.5 T to 7 T, corresponding to Larmor frequencies of 63.8-298 MHz. Since for high-field MRI the magnetization increases with the applied magnetic field, the signal-to-noise-ratio increases as well, thus enabling higher image resolutions. On the other hand, MRI is possible also at ultra-low magnetic fields, as was shown by different groups. The goal of our development was to reach a Larmor frequency range of the low-field MRI system corresponding to the frequency range of human brain activities ranging from near zero-frequency (near-DC) to over 1 kHz. Here, first 2D MRI images of phantoms taken at Larmor frequencies of 100 Hz and 731 Hz will be shown and discussed. These frequencies are examples of brain activity triggered by electrostimulation of the median nerve. The method will allow the magnetic fields of the brain currents to influence the magnetic resonance image, and thus lead to a direct functional imaging modality of neuronal currents.

  14. Resonant-frequency discharge in a multi-cell radio frequency cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Popović, S.; Upadhyay, J.; Nikolić, M.; Vušković, L.; Mammosser, J.

    2014-11-07

    We are reporting experimental results on a microwave discharge operating at resonant frequency in a multi-cell radio frequency (RF) accelerator cavity. Although the discharge operated at room temperature, the setup was constructed so that it could be used for plasma generation and processing in fully assembled active superconducting radio-frequency cryo-module. This discharge offers a mechanism for removal of a variety of contaminants, organic or oxide layers, and residual particulates from the interior surface of RF cavities through the interaction of plasma-generated radicals with the cavity walls. We describe resonant RF breakdown conditions and address the issues related to resonant detuning due to sustained multi-cell cavity plasma. We have determined breakdown conditions in the cavity, which was acting as a plasma vessel with distorted cylindrical geometry. We discuss the spectroscopic data taken during plasma removal of contaminants and use them to evaluate plasma parameters, characterize the process, and estimate the volatile contaminant product removal.

  15. High-frequency microstrip cross resonators for circular polarization electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J J; Ramsey, C M; Quddusi, H M; del Barco, E

    2008-07-01

    In this article we discuss the design and implementation of a novel microstrip resonator which allows absolute control of the microwaves polarization degree for frequencies up to 30 GHz. The sensor is composed of two half-wavelength microstrip line resonators, designed to match the 50 Omega impedance of the lines on a high dielectric constant GaAs substrate. The line resonators cross each other perpendicularly through their centers, forming a cross. Microstrip feed lines are coupled through small gaps to three arms of the cross to connect the resonator to the excitation ports. The control of the relative magnitude and phase between the two microwave stimuli at the input ports of each line allows for tuning the degree and type of polarization of the microwave excitation at the center of the cross resonator. The third (output) port is used to measure the transmitted signal, which is crucial to work at low temperatures, where reflections along lengthy coaxial lines mask the signal reflected by the resonator. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra recorded at low temperature in an S=5/2 molecular magnet system show that 82% fidelity circular polarization of the microwaves is achieved over the central area of the resonator.

  16. Charge Transfer Plasmons: Optical Frequency Conductances and Tunable Infrared Resonances.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fangfang; Zhang, Yue; Gottheim, Samuel; King, Nicholas S; Zhang, Yu; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2015-06-23

    A charge transfer plasmon (CTP) appears when an optical-frequency conductive pathway between two metallic nanoparticles is established, enabling the transfer of charge between nanoparticles when the plasmon is excited. Here we investigate the properties of the CTP in a nanowire-bridged dimer geometry. Varying the junction geometry controls its conductance, which modifies the resonance energies and scattering intensities of the CTP while also altering the other plasmon modes of the nanostructure. Reducing the junction conductance shifts this resonance to substantially lower energies in the near- and mid-infrared regions of the spectrum. The CTP offers both a high-information probe of optical frequency conductances in nanoscale junctions and a new, unique approach to controllably engineering tunable plasmon modes at infrared wavelengths.

  17. Biochemical assessment of red blood cells during storage by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Identification of a biomarker of their level of protection against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Casali, Emanuela; Lindner, Luisa; Spisni, Alberto; Baricchi, Roberto; Berni, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood transfusion is an established therapeutic practice. The characteristics of blood components at different storage times are expected to affect the efficacy of transfusion therapy. Metabolic profiling by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy requires little or no sample treatment and allows identification of more than 50 soluble metabolites in a single experiment. The aim of this study was to assess the metabolic behaviour of red blood cells during 42 days of storage in blood bank conditions. Materials and methods Red blood cells (RBC), collected from eight healthy male donors, aged 25–50 years, were prepared as prestorage leukoreduced erythrocyte concentrates and stored under standard blood bank conditions. Samples taken at various storage times were separated in two fractions: the supernatant, recovered after centrifugation, and the red blood cell lysate obtained after protein depletion by ultrafiltration. The metabolic profile of the red blood cells was determined from analysis of 1H-NMR spectra. Results The red blood cell supernatant was studied to track the consumption of the preservative additives and to detect and quantify up to 30 metabolites excreted by the erythrocytes. The NMR spectra of the RBC lysate provided complementary information on some biochemical pathways and set the basis for building a time-dependent red blood cell metabolic profile. Discussion We proved the analytical power of 1H-NMR spectroscopy to study red blood cell metabolism under blood bank conditions. A potential biomarker able to provide information on the level of cellular oxidative stress protection was identified. Our data support the hypothesis that a more detailed knowledge of metabolic modifications during storage opens the way to the development of new and more effective protocols for red blood cell conservation and patient-oriented transfusion therapy. PMID:24960643

  18. Quantitative 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolite Profiling as a Functional Genomics Platform to Investigate Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Opium Poppy1[W

    PubMed Central

    Hagel, Jillian M.; Weljie, Aalim M.; Vogel, Hans J.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) produces a diverse array of bioactive benzylisoquinoline alkaloids and has emerged as a versatile model system to study plant alkaloid metabolism. The plant is widely cultivated as the only commercial source of the narcotic analgesics morphine and codeine. Variations in plant secondary metabolism as a result of genetic diversity are often associated with perturbations in other metabolic pathways. As part of a functional genomics platform, we used 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolite profiling for the analysis of primary and secondary metabolism in opium poppy. Aqueous and chloroform extracts of six different opium poppy cultivars were subjected to chemometric analysis. Principle component analysis of the 1H NMR spectra for latex extracts clearly distinguished two varieties, including a low-alkaloid variety and a high-thebaine, low-morphine cultivar. Distinction was also made between pharmaceutical-grade opium poppy cultivars and a condiment variety. Such phenotypic differences were not observed in root extracts. Loading plots confirmed that morphinan alkaloids contributed predominantly to the variance in latex extracts. Quantification of 34 root and 21 latex metabolites, performed using Chenomx NMR Suite version 4.6, showed major differences in the accumulation of specific alkaloids in the latex of the low-alkaloid and high-thebaine, low-morphine varieties. Relatively few differences were found in the levels of other metabolites, indicating that the variation was specific for alkaloid metabolism. Exceptions in the low-alkaloid cultivar included an increased accumulation of the alkaloid precursor tyramine and reduced levels of sucrose, some amino acids, and malate. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of 42 genes involved in primary and secondary metabolism showed differential gene expression mainly associated with alkaloid biosynthesis. Reduced alkaloid levels in the condiment variety were associated with the

  19. Optimizations of ozone generator at low resonance frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garamoon, A. A.; Elakshar, F. F.; Elsawah, M.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of the frequency on the different parameters of ozone generation in the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has been investigated. It is found that at low frequency, (f0 = 325 Hz), an electric resonance can be obtained in the electric circuit. The onset voltage, at which the ozone starts to build up, was reduced from 3.25 kV at 50 Hz to 1.57 kV at 325 Hz. The efficiency has been increased from nearly zero at 50 Hz to 232.94 g/kW h at 200 Hz under applied voltage of 2.025 kV. in here

  20. Detection and classification of hyperfine-shifted 1H, 2H, and 15N resonances of the Rieske ferredoxin component of toluene 4-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Xia, B; Pikus, J D; Xia, W; McClay, K; Steffan, R J; Chae, Y K; Westler, W M; Markley, J L; Fox, B G

    1999-01-12

    T4MOC is a 12.3 kDa soluble Rieske ferredoxin that is obligately required for electron transfer between the oxidoreductase and diiron hydroxylase components of toluene 4-monooxygenase from Pseudomonas mendocina KR1. Our preliminary 1H NMR studies of oxidized and reduced T4MOC [Markley, J. L., Xia, B., Chae, Y. K., Cheng, H., Westler, W. M., Pikus, J. D., and Fox, B. G. (1996) in Protein Structure Function Relationships (Zaidi, Z., and Smith, D., Eds.) pp 135-146, Plenum Press, London] revealed the presence of hyperfine-shifted 1H resonances whose short relaxation times made it impractical to use nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) measurements for assignment purposes. We report here the use of selective isotopic labeling to analyze the hyperfine-shifted 1H, 2H, and 15N signals from T4MOC. Selective deuteration led to identification of signals from the four Hbeta atoms of cluster ligands C45 and C64 in the oxidized and reduced forms of T4MOC. In the reduced state, the Curie temperature dependence of the Hbeta protons corresponded to that predicted from the simple vector spin-coupling model for nuclei associated with the localized ferric site. The signal at 25.5 ppm in the 1H spectrum of reduced T4MOC was assigned on the basis of selective 2H labeling to the His Hepsilon1 atom of one of the cluster ligands (H47 or H67). This assignment was corroborated by a one bond 1H-13C correlation (at 25.39 ppm 1H and 136.11 ppm 13C) observed in spectra of [U-13C]T4MOC with a 1H-13C coupling constant of approximately 192 Hz. The carbon chemical shift and one bond coupling constant are those expected for 1Hepsilon1-13Cepsilon1 in the imidazolium ring of histidine and are inconsistent with values expected for cysteine 1Halpha-13Calpha. The His Hepsilon1 proton exhibited weak Curie temperature dependence from 283 to 303 K, contrary to the anti-Curie temperature dependence predicted from the spin coupling model for nuclei associated with the localized ferrous site. A 1H peak at -12.3 ppm

  1. Assessment of Stability of Craniofacial Implants by Resonant Frequency Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ivanjac, Filip; Konstantinović, Vitomir S; Lazić, Vojkan; Dordević, Igor; Ihde, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Implant stability is a principal precondition for the success of implant therapy. Extraoral implants (EO) are mainly used for anchoring of maxillofacial epithesis. However, assessment of implant stability is mostly based on principles derived from oral implants. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical stability of EO craniofacial disk implants (single, double, and triple) by resonance frequency analysis at different stages of the bone's healing. Twenty patients with orbital (11), nasal (5), and auricular (4) defects with 50 EO implants placed for epithesis anchorage were included. Implant stability was measured 3 times; after implant placement, at 3 months and at least after 6 months. A significant increase in implant stability values was noted between all of the measurements, except for triple-disk implants between third and sixth months, and screw implants between 0 and third months. Disk implants showed lower implant stability quotient (ISQ) values compared with screw implants. Triple-disk implants showed better stability compared with single and double-disk implants. Based on resonance frequency analysis values, disk implants could be safely loaded when their ISQ values are 38 (single disks), 47 (double disks), and 48 (triple disks). According to resonance frequency analysis, disk implant stability increased over time, which showed good osseointegration and increasing mineralization. Although EO screw implants showed higher ISQ values than disk implants, disk-type implants can be safely loaded even if lower values of stability are measured.

  2. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. In Vivo{sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Lactate in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Quynh-Thu Koong, Albert; Lieskovsky, Yee Yie; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian; Graves, Edward; Pinto, Harlan; Brown, J. Martin; Spielman, Daniel

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate in vivo{sup 1}H magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging of lactate for assessing tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancers and to determine its utility in predicting the response and outcomes. Methods and Materials: Volume-localized lactate-edited {sup 1}H magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 1.5 T was performed in vivo on involved neck nodes and control subcutaneous tissues in 36 patients with Stage IV head and neck cancer. The signal intensities (SIs) of lactate, choline, and creatine and the choline/creatine ratio were measured. The tumor partial pressure of oxygen (pO{sub 2}) was obtained in the same lymph node before MRS. Patients were treated with either two cycles of induction chemotherapy (tirapazamine, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) followed by simultaneous chemoradiotherapy or the same regimen without tirapazamine. The lactate SI and the choline/creatine ratio correlated with the tumor pO{sub 2}, nodal response, and locoregional control. Results: The lactate SI was greater for the involved nodes (median, 0.25) than for the subcutaneous tissue (median, 0.04; p = 0.07). No significant correlation was found between the lactate SI and tumor pO{sub 2} (mean, 0.46 {+-} 0.10 for hypoxic nodes [pO{sub 2} {<=}10 mm Hg, n = 15] vs. 0.36 {+-} 0.07 for nonhypoxic nodes [pO{sub 2} >10 mm Hg, n = 21], p = 0.44). A significant correlation was found between the choline/creatine ratios and tumor pO{sub 2} (mean, 2.74 {+-} 0.34 for hypoxic nodes vs. 1.78 {+-} 0.31 for nonhypoxic nodes, p = 0.02). No correlation was found between the lactate SI and the complete nodal response (p = 0.52) or locoregional control rates. Conclusions: The lactate SI did not correlate with tumor pO{sub 2}, treatment response, or locoregional control. Additional research is needed to refine this technique.

  4. Effect of off-frequency sampling in magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Curtis L; Chen, Danchin D; Olivero, William C; Sutton, Bradley P; Georgiadis, John G

    2012-02-01

    In magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), shear waves at a certain frequency are encoded through bipolar gradients that switch polarity at a controlled encoding frequency and are offset in time to capture wave propagation using a controlled sampling frequency. In brain MRE, there is a possibility that the mechanical actuation frequency is different from the vibration frequency, leading to a mismatch with encoding and sampling frequencies. This mismatch can occur in brain MRE from causes both extrinsic and intrinsic to the brain, such as scanner bed vibrations or active damping in the head. The purpose of this work was to investigate how frequency mismatch can affect MRE shear stiffness measurements. Experiments were performed on a dual-medium agarose gel phantom, and the results were compared with numerical simulations to quantify these effects. It is known that off-frequency encoding alone results in a scaling of wave amplitude, and it is shown here that off-frequency sampling can result in two main effects: (1) errors in the overall shear stiffness estimate of the material on the global scale and (2) local variations appearing as stiffer and softer structures in the material. For small differences in frequency, it was found that measured global stiffness of the brain could theoretically vary by up to 12.5% relative to actual stiffness with local variations of up to 3.7% of the mean stiffness. It was demonstrated that performing MRE experiments at a frequency other than that of tissue vibration can lead to artifacts in the MRE stiffness images, and this mismatch could explain some of the large-scale scatter of stiffness data or lack of repeatability reported in the brain MRE literature.

  5. Slow magic angle sample spinning: a non- or minimally invasive method for high-resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolic profiling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution (1)H magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using a sample spinning rate of several kilohertz or more (i.e., high-resolution magic angle spinning (hr-MAS)), is a well-established method for metabolic profiling in intact tissues without the need for sample extraction. The only shortcoming with hr-MAS is that it is invasive and is thus unusable for non-destructive detections. Recently, a method called slow MAS, using the concept of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, has emerged as an alternative method for non- or minimally invasive metabolomics in intact tissues, including live animals, due to the slow or ultra-slow sample spinning used. Although slow MAS is a powerful method, its applications are hindered by experimental challenges. Correctly designing the experiment and choosing the appropriate slow MAS method both require a fundamental understanding of the operation principles, in particular the details of line narrowing due to the presence of molecular diffusion. However, these fundamental principles have not yet been fully disclosed in previous publications. The goal of this chapter is to provide an in-depth evaluation of the principles associated with slow MAS techniques by emphasizing the challenges associated with a phantom sample consisting of glass beads and H(2)O, where an unusually large magnetic susceptibility field gradient is obtained.

  6. Application of polymer based stationary phases in high performance liquid chromatography and capillary high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to microcoil 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grynbaum, Marc David; Meyer, Christoph; Putzbach, Karsten; Rehbein, Jens; Albert, Klaus

    2007-07-13

    The increased demand for chromatographic materials that are able to achieve a fast separation of large quantities of structure analogues is a great challenge. It is known that polymer based chromatographic materials have a higher loadability, compared to silica based sorbents. Unfortunately these polymer materials cannot be used under high pressure which is necessary in order to obtain high flow rates, and hence long times are needed to perform a separation. However, by immobilizing a polymer on a mechanically stable porous silica core, this problem can be circumvented and higher flows become feasible on these materials. Especially for capillary liquid chromatography hyphenated with nuclear magnetic resonance a high loadability is of great importance in order to obtain sharp, resolved, and concentrated peaks thus resulting in a good signal to noise ratio in the NMR experiment. Therefore, a highly shape selective chromatographic sorbent was developed by covalently immobilizing a poly(ethylene-co-acrylic) acid copolymer (-CH(2)CH(2)-)(x)[CH(2)CH(CO(2)H)-](y) (x=119, y=2.4) with a mass fraction of acrylic acid of 5% as stationary phase on silica via a spacer molecule (3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane). First, the loadability of this sorbent compared to C(30) is demonstrated by the HPLC separation of two xanthophyll isomers. Subsequently, it has been successfully employed in the hyphenation of capillary HPLC with microcoil (1)H NMR spectroscopy by separating and identifying a highly concentrated solution of the tocopherol homologues.

  7. High-resolution magic angle spinning (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy detects choline as a biomarker in a swine obstructive chronic pancreatitis model at an early stage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gaofeng; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Jian; Ma, Chao; Shao, Chengwei; Hao, Jun; Zheng, Jianming; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Zuo, Changjing

    2014-03-04

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammatory and fibrotic disease of the pancreas which encompasses a variety of clinical syndromes ranging from mild to life-threatening complications. Metabolomics has increasingly been applied to identify biomarkers for disease diagnosis with particular interest in diseases at an early stage. In this study, we tested a swine obstructive CP model by subtotal ligation of the main pancreatic duct, and the metabolic profiles of the Bama miniature swine pancreas were investigated using high-resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR MAS (1)H MRS) combined with principal components analysis (PCA). Increases in lactate and choline for mild CP and decreases in glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, betaine and glycine were observed from normal pancreas to mild, moderate and severe CP. PCA results showed visual separations among the groups. The increase of choline at an early stage of CP and the decrease of glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, betaine and glycine reveal the pathogenesis of CP at a molecular level. The MRS results presented here demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiles in discriminating a normal pancreas from different stages of CP, which may be used to achieve CP early diagnosis and timely intervention to prevent irreversible destruction of the pancreas.

  8. In vivo brain macromolecule signals in healthy and glioblastoma mouse models: 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, post-processing and metabolite quantification at 14.1 T.

    PubMed

    Craveiro, Mélanie; Clément-Schatlo, Virginie; Marino, Denis; Gruetter, Rolf; Cudalbu, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    In (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, macromolecule signals underlay metabolite signals, and knowing their contribution is necessary for reliable metabolite quantification. When macromolecule signals are measured using an inversion-recovery pulse sequence, special care needs to be taken to correctly remove residual metabolite signals to obtain a pure macromolecule spectrum. Furthermore, since a single spectrum is commonly used for quantification in multiple experiments, the impact of potential macromolecule signal variability, because of regional differences or pathologies, on metabolite quantification has to be assessed. In this study, we introduced a novel method to post-process measured macromolecule signals that offers a flexible and robust way of removing residual metabolite signals. This method was applied to investigate regional differences in the mouse brain macromolecule signals that may affect metabolite quantification when not taken into account. However, since no significant differences in metabolite quantification were detected, it was concluded that a single macromolecule spectrum can be generally used for the quantification of healthy mouse brain spectra. Alternatively, the study of a mouse model of human glioma showed several alterations of the macromolecule spectrum, including, but not limited to, increased mobile lipid signals, which had to be taken into account to avoid significant metabolite quantification errors.

  9. Use of the 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra signals from polyphenols and acids for chemometric characterization of cider apple juices.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Gloria; Santos, J Ignacio; Iturriza, Nuria; Berregi, Iñaki; Munduate, Arantxa

    2006-04-19

    The low field region (5.8-9.0 ppm) corresponding to aromatic protons and the region 1.8-3.0 ppm of the (1)H NMR spectra were used for characterization and chemometric differentiation of 52 apple juices obtained from six cider apple varieties. The data set consisted of 14 integrated areas corresponding to resonances from acids and phenolic compounds. Multivariate procedures based on hierarchical cluster and discriminant analysis were performed on selected signals of the spectra to determine whether it was possible to distinguish the different juices. Cluster analysis was able to satisfactorily classify the six apple varieties. Discriminant analysis, by means of stepwise procedure for variables selection and leave-one-out for cross-validation, was applied to 40 samples from the year 2001, obtaining recognition and prediction abilities of 100%. The most discriminant variables corresponded to poliphenols, (-)-epicatechin, phloridzin-phloretin, and p-coumaric, chlorogenic, and malic acids. The classification model was applied to 12 samples from apples harvested in the years 2002 and 2003, and the prediction ability was 91.7%.

  10. Resonance Frequency of Optical Microbubble Resonators: Direct Measurements and Mitigation of Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Cosci, Alessandro; Berneschi, Simone; Giannetti, Ambra; Farnesi, Daniele; Cosi, Franco; Baldini, Francesco; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Soria, Silvia; Barucci, Andrea; Righini, Giancarlo; Pelli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    This work shows the improvements in the sensing capabilities and precision of an Optical Microbubble Resonator due to the introduction of an encaging poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) box. A frequency fluctuation parameter σ was defined as a score of resonance stability and was evaluated in the presence and absence of the encaging system and in the case of air- or water-filling of the cavity. Furthermore, the noise interference introduced by the peristaltic and the syringe pumping system was studied. The measurements showed a reduction of σ in the presence of the encaging PMMA box and when the syringe pump was used as flowing system. PMID:27589761

  11. Frequency selective detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, Samuel D.; Jakobsson, Andreas; Smith, John A. S.; Althoefer, Kaspar A.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) technique that can be used to detect the presence of quadrupolar nuclei, such as the 14N nucleus prevalent in many explosives and narcotics. The technique has been hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and is further aggravated by the presence of RF interference (RFI). To ensure accurate detection, proposed detectors should exploit the rich form of the NQR signal. Furthermore, the detectors should also be robust to any remaining residual interference, left after suitable RFI mitigation has been employed. In this paper, we propose a new NQR data model, particularly for the realistic case where multiple pulse sequences are used to generate trains of spin echoes. Furthermore, we refine two recently proposed approximative maximum likelihood (AML) detectors, enabling the algorithm to optimally exploit the data model of the entire echo train and also incorporate knowledge of the temperature dependent spin-echo decay time. The AML-based detectors ensure accurate detection and robustness against residual RFI, even when the temperature of the sample is not precisely known, by exploiting the dependencies of the NQR resonant lines on temperature. Further robustness against residual interference is gained as the proposed detector is frequency selective; exploiting only those regions of the spectrum where the NQR signal is expected. Extensive numerical evaluations based on both simulated and measured NQR data indicate that the proposed Frequency selective Echo Train AML (FETAML) detector offers a significant improvement as compared to other existing detectors.

  12. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gyüre, B.; Márkus, B. G.; Bernáth, B.; Simon, F.; Murányi, F.

    2015-09-15

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation.

  13. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyüre, B.; Márkus, B. G.; Bernáth, B.; Murányi, F.; Simon, F.

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation.

  14. Resonant behavior of a fractional oscillator with fluctuating frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soika, Erkki; Mankin, Romi; Ainsaar, Ain

    2010-01-01

    The long-time behavior of the first moment for the output signal of a fractional oscillator with fluctuating frequency subjected to an external periodic force is considered. Colored fluctuations of the oscillator eigenfrequency are modeled as a dichotomous noise. The viscoelastic type friction kernel with memory is assumed as a power-law function of time. Using the Shapiro-Loginov formula, exact expressions for the response to an external periodic field and for the complex susceptibility are presented. On the basis of the exact formulas it is demonstrated that interplay of colored noise and memory can generate a variety of cooperation effects, such as multiresonances versus the driving frequency and the friction coefficient as well as stochastic resonance versus noise parameters. The necessary and sufficient conditions for the cooperation effects are also discussed. Particularly, two different critical memory exponents have been found, which mark dynamical transitions in the behavior of the system.

  15. Singly resonant second-harmonic-generation frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, T.; Leo, F.; Erkintalo, M.; Coen, S.; Ricciardi, I.; De Rosa, M.; Wabnitz, S.

    2017-01-01

    We consider frequency comb generation in dispersive singly resonant second-harmonic-generation cavity systems. Using a single temporal mean-field equation for the fundamental field that features a noninstantaneous nonlinear response function, we model the temporal and spectral dynamics and analyze comb generation, continuous wave bistability, and modulational instability. It is found that, owing to the significant temporal walk-off between the fundamental and second-harmonic fields, modulational instability can occur even in the complete absence of group-velocity dispersion. We further consider the relation of our model to a previously proposed modal expansion approach, and present a derivation of a general system of coupled mode equations. We show that the two models provide very similar predictions and become exactly equivalent in the limit that absorption losses and group-velocity dispersion at the fundamental frequency are neglected. Finally, we perform numerical simulations that show examples of the variety of comb states that are possible in phase-matched quadratic resonators, and discuss the dynamics of the comb formation process.

  16. Resonant-frequency discharge in a multi-cell radio frequency cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, S; Upadhyay, J; Mammosser, J; Nikolic, M; Vuskovic, L

    2014-11-07

    We are reporting experimental results on microwave discharge operating at resonant frequency in a multi-cell radio frequency (RF) accelerator cavity. Although the discharge operated at room temperature, the setup was constructed so that it could be used for plasma generation and processing in fully assembled active superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cryomodule (in situ operation). This discharge offers an efficient mechanism for removal of a variety of contaminants, organic or oxide layers, and residual particulates from the interior surface of RF cavities through the interaction of plasma-generated radicals with the cavity walls. We describe resonant RF breakdown conditions and address the problems related to generation and sustaining the multi-cell cavity plasma, which are breakdown and resonant detuning. We have determined breakdown conditions in the cavity, which was acting as a plasma vessel with distorted cylindrical geometry. We discuss the spectroscopic data taken during plasma removal of contaminants and use them to evaluate plasma parameters, characterize the process, and estimate the volatile contaminant product removal.

  17. Variable Resonance Frequency Selection for Fishbone-Shaped Microelectromechanical System Resonator Based on Multi-Physics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Shinjiro; Suzuki, Naoya; Tanigawa, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kenichiro

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present and demonstrate the principle of variable resonance frequency selection by using a fishbone-shaped microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator. To analyze resonator displacement caused by an electrostatic force, a multi-physics simulation, which links the applied voltage load to the mechanical domain, is carried out. The simulation clearly shows that resonators are operated by three kinds of electrostatic force exerted on the beam. A new frequency selection algorithm that selects only one among various resonant modes is also presented. The conversion matrix that transforms the voltages applied to each driving electrode into the resonant beam displacement at each resonant mode is first derived by experimental measurements. Following this, the matrix is used to calculate a set of voltages for maximizing the rejection ratio in each resonant mode. This frequency selection method is applied in a fishbone-shaped MEMS resonator with five driving electrodes and the frequency selection among the 1st resonant mode to the 5th resonant mode is successfully demonstrated. From a fine adjustment of the voltage set, a 42 dB rejection ratio is obtained.

  18. CHRONICLE: Conference on Nonlinear Resonant Conversion of Laser Radiation Frequency, Tashkent, October 3-5, 1979

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhramov, S. A.; Tartakovskiĭ, G. Kh

    1981-03-01

    A brief review is given of the papers presented at a conference on nonlinear resonant frequency conversion. Attention is concentrated on the following four topics: optically pumped lasers, nonlinear resonant frequency conversion, Raman converters, and physical processes in nonlinear resonant interactions.

  19. Resonant frequency calculations using a hybrid perturbation-Galerkin technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geer, James F.; Andersen, Carl M.

    1991-01-01

    A two-step hybrid perturbation Galerkin technique is applied to the problem of determining the resonant frequencies of one or several degree of freedom nonlinear systems involving a parameter. In one step, the Lindstedt-Poincare method is used to determine perturbation solutions which are formally valid about one or more special values of the parameter (e.g., for large or small values of the parameter). In step two, a subset of the perturbation coordinate functions determined in step one is used in Galerkin type approximation. The technique is illustrated for several one degree of freedom systems, including the Duffing and van der Pol oscillators, as well as for the compound pendulum. For all of the examples considered, it is shown that the frequencies obtained by the hybrid technique using only a few terms from the perturbation solutions are significantly more accurate than the perturbation results on which they are based, and they compare very well with frequencies obtained by purely numerical methods.

  20. Nonlinear frequency mixing in a resonant cavity: numerical simulations in a bubbly liquid.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé; Sinha, Dipen N

    2014-12-01

    The study of nonlinear frequency mixing for acoustic standing waves in a resonator cavity is presented. Two high frequencies are mixed in a highly nonlinear bubbly liquid filled cavity that is resonant at the difference frequency. The analysis is carried out through numerical experiments, and both linear and nonlinear regimes are compared. The results show highly efficient generation of the difference frequency at high excitation amplitude. The large acoustic nonlinearity of the bubbly liquid that is responsible for the strong difference-frequency resonance also induces significant enhancement of the parametric frequency mixing effect to generate second harmonic of the difference frequency.

  1. Theoretical analyses of resonant frequency shift in anomalous dispersion enhanced resonant optical gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Liu, Jiaming; Zhang, Hao; Li, Wenxiu; Zhao, Lu; Jin, Junjie; Huang, Anping; Zhang, Xiaofu; Xiao, Zhisong

    2016-12-01

    Rigorous expressions of resonant frequency shift (RFS) in anomalous dispersion enhanced resonant optical gyroscopes (ADEROGs) are deduced without making approximation, which provides a precise theoretical guidance to achieve ultra-sensitive ADEROGs. A refractive index related modification factor is introduced when considering special theory of relativity (STR). We demonstrate that the RFS will not be ”infinitely large” by using critical anomalous dispersion (CAD) and negative modification does not exist, which make the mechanism of anomalous dispersion enhancement clear and coherent. Although step change of RFS will happen when the anomalous dispersion condition varies, the amplification of RFS is limited by attainable variation of refractive index in practice. Moreover, it is shown that the properties of anomalous dispersion will influence not only the amplification of RFS, but also the detection range of ADEROGs.

  2. Theoretical analyses of resonant frequency shift in anomalous dispersion enhanced resonant optical gyroscopes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian; Liu, Jiaming; Zhang, Hao; Li, Wenxiu; Zhao, Lu; Jin, Junjie; Huang, Anping; Zhang, Xiaofu; Xiao, Zhisong

    2016-01-01

    Rigorous expressions of resonant frequency shift (RFS) in anomalous dispersion enhanced resonant optical gyroscopes (ADEROGs) are deduced without making approximation, which provides a precise theoretical guidance to achieve ultra-sensitive ADEROGs. A refractive index related modification factor is introduced when considering special theory of relativity (STR). We demonstrate that the RFS will not be ”infinitely large” by using critical anomalous dispersion (CAD) and negative modification does not exist, which make the mechanism of anomalous dispersion enhancement clear and coherent. Although step change of RFS will happen when the anomalous dispersion condition varies, the amplification of RFS is limited by attainable variation of refractive index in practice. Moreover, it is shown that the properties of anomalous dispersion will influence not only the amplification of RFS, but also the detection range of ADEROGs. PMID:27941897

  3. Theoretical analyses of resonant frequency shift in anomalous dispersion enhanced resonant optical gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Liu, Jiaming; Zhang, Hao; Li, Wenxiu; Zhao, Lu; Jin, Junjie; Huang, Anping; Zhang, Xiaofu; Xiao, Zhisong

    2016-12-12

    Rigorous expressions of resonant frequency shift (RFS) in anomalous dispersion enhanced resonant optical gyroscopes (ADEROGs) are deduced without making approximation, which provides a precise theoretical guidance to achieve ultra-sensitive ADEROGs. A refractive index related modification factor is introduced when considering special theory of relativity (STR). We demonstrate that the RFS will not be "infinitely large" by using critical anomalous dispersion (CAD) and negative modification does not exist, which make the mechanism of anomalous dispersion enhancement clear and coherent. Although step change of RFS will happen when the anomalous dispersion condition varies, the amplification of RFS is limited by attainable variation of refractive index in practice. Moreover, it is shown that the properties of anomalous dispersion will influence not only the amplification of RFS, but also the detection range of ADEROGs.

  4. Piezoelectric-Crystal-Resonator High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Generation and Synchro-Resonance Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.; Woods, R. Clive; Li, Fangyu

    2006-01-01

    Here we show the generation of high-frequency-gravitational-waves (HFGWs) utilizing piezoelectric elements such as the ubiquitous Film-Bulk-Acoustic-Resonators (FBARs), found in cell phones, as energized by inexpensive magnetrons, found in microwave ovens, generating GWs having a frequency of about 4.9GHz and their detection by means of new synchro-resonance techniques developed in China. In the 1960s Weber suggested piezoelectric crystals for gravitational-wave (GW) generation. Since then researchers have proposed specific designs. The major obstacle has been the cost of procuring, installing, and energizing a sufficient number of such resonators to generate sufficiently powerful GWs to allow for detection. Recent mass-production techniques, spurred on by the production of cell phones, have driven the cost of resonators down. The new Chinese detector for detecting the 4.9×109Hz HFGW is a coupling-system of fractal membranes-beam-splitters and a narrow, 6.1 cm-radius, pulsed-Gaussian-laser or continuous-Gaussian detection beam passing through a static 15T-magnetic field. The detector is sensitive to GW amplitudes of ~10-30 to be generated with signal-to-noise ratios greater than one. It is concluded that a cost-effective HFGW generation and detection apparatus can now be fabricated and operated in the laboratory. If the two groups or clusters of magnetrons and FBARs were space borne and at lunar distance (e.g., at the Moon and at the lunar L3 libration point) and the quadrupole formalism approximately holds for GW radiators (the FBAR clusters) many GW wavelengths apart, then the HFGW power would be about 420 W and the flux about 2×105 Wm-2 (or more than one hundred times greater than the solar radiation flux at the Earth) focused at the focal spot, or remote-HFGW-emitter, anywhere in the Earth's environs - on or below the Earth's surface.

  5. A resonance phenomenon observed in a swept frequency experiment on a mother-daughter ionospheric rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkestad, K.; Troim, J.

    1974-01-01

    The report presents observations obtained in a swept frequency experiment conducted in a mother-daughter rocket flight at auroral latitudes. The discussion is essentially restricted to the possible interpretation of the experimental signal structures noted at and in the vicinity of a resonance frequency where signal components apparently are generated by nonlinear mechanisms. Various resonance frequencies have been considered in attempts to identify this multichannel response frequency. It is concluded that of all the possibilities invoked, the best consistency is provided by identifying the frequency concerned with the cone resonance frequency demonstrated experimentally in the case of a laboratory plasma by Fisher and Gould (1971).

  6. Collisionless dissociation of SF6 using two resonant frequency CO2 laser fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gower, M. C.; Gustafson, T. K.

    1977-01-01

    The collisionless dissociation of SF6 has been studied using simultaneous irradiation by two frequencies from a CO2 laser which are both nearly resonant with the SF6nu3 absorption band. It was found that the dissociation was enhanced, and occurred over a wider frequency range, than for single frequency dissociation. No threshold effect was observed for a weak resonant and a much higher energy field pumping slightly off-resonance. For such two frequency irradiation, the peak in the dissociation curve was found to be shifted to lower frequencies with respect to that for single frequency dissociation.

  7. Proton-detected 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H correlation experiment for structural analysis in rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS above 60 kHz.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-28

    A proton-detected 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H chemical shift correlation experiment is proposed for the assignment of chemical shift resonances, identification of (13)C-(1)H connectivities, and proximities of (13)C-(1)H and (1)H-(1)H nuclei under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning (ultrafast-MAS) conditions. Ultrafast-MAS is used to suppress all anisotropic interactions including (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings, while the finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used to recouple dipolar couplings among protons and the insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer technique is used to transfer magnetization between heteronuclear spins. The 3D experiment eliminates signals from non-carbon-bonded protons and non-proton-bonded carbons to enhance spectral resolution. The 2D (F1/F3) (1)H/(1)H and 2D (13)C/(1)H (F2/F3) chemical shift correlation spectra extracted from the 3D spectrum enable the identification of (1)H-(1)H proximity and (13)C-(1)H connectivity. In addition, the 2D (F1/F2) (1)H/(13)C chemical shift correlation spectrum, incorporated with proton magnetization exchange via the fp-RFDR recoupling of (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings, enables the measurement of proximities between (13)C and even the remote non-carbon-bonded protons. The 3D experiment also gives three-spin proximities of (1)H-(1)H-(13)C chains. Experimental results obtained from powder samples of L-alanine and L-histidine ⋅ H2O ⋅ HCl demonstrate the efficiency of the 3D experiment.

  8. Proton-detected 3D 1H/13C/1H correlation experiment for structural analysis in rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS above 60 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-01

    A proton-detected 3D 1H/13C/1H chemical shift correlation experiment is proposed for the assignment of chemical shift resonances, identification of 13C-1H connectivities, and proximities of 13C-1H and 1H-1H nuclei under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning (ultrafast-MAS) conditions. Ultrafast-MAS is used to suppress all anisotropic interactions including 1H-1H dipolar couplings, while the finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used to recouple dipolar couplings among protons and the insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer technique is used to transfer magnetization between heteronuclear spins. The 3D experiment eliminates signals from non-carbon-bonded protons and non-proton-bonded carbons to enhance spectral resolution. The 2D (F1/F3) 1H/1H and 2D 13C/1H (F2/F3) chemical shift correlation spectra extracted from the 3D spectrum enable the identification of 1H-1H proximity and 13C-1H connectivity. In addition, the 2D (F1/F2) 1H/13C chemical shift correlation spectrum, incorporated with proton magnetization exchange via the fp-RFDR recoupling of 1H-1H dipolar couplings, enables the measurement of proximities between 13C and even the remote non-carbon-bonded protons. The 3D experiment also gives three-spin proximities of 1H-1H-13C chains. Experimental results obtained from powder samples of L-alanine and L-histidine ṡ H2O ṡ HCl demonstrate the efficiency of the 3D experiment.

  9. Backbone (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N NMR resonance assignments of the Krüppel-like factor 4 activation domain.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Brigid S; Weiss, Emma R; Smith, Steven P; Langelaan, David N

    2017-04-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a transcription factor involved in diverse biological processes, including development, cellular differentiation and proliferation, and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. KLF4 has also been associated with disease states, such as cardiovascular disease and several cancers. KLF4 contains an activation domain, repression domain, and a structurally characterized C-terminal zinc finger domain that mediates its binding to DNA. The structurally uncharacterized KLF4 activation domain is critical for transactivation by KLF4 and mediates its binding to the transcriptional coactivator CBP/p300. Here, we report the (1)H, (15)N, (13)CO, (13)Cα and (13)Cβ NMR chemical shift assignments of KLF41-130, which contains the KLF4 activation domain. Narrow chemical shift dispersion in the (1)H dimension of the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum suggests that the KLF41-130 fragment is intrinsically disordered.

  10. Detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in thin metal plates by low frequency resonant model analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, B.; Namkung, M.; Birt, E. A.

    1992-01-01

    Low-frequency resonant model analysis, a technique for the detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in thin metal plates, which could be adapted to rapid scan or large area testing, is considered. Experimental data displaying a direct correlation between fatigue crack geometry and resonance frequency for the second vibrational plate mode are presented. FEM is used to calculate the mechanical behavior of the plates, and provides a comparison basis for the experimentally determined resonance frequency values. The waveform of the acoustic emission generated at the resonant frequency is examined; it provides the basis for a model of the interaction of fatigue crack faces during plate vibration.

  11. Glioma residual or recurrence versus radiation necrosis: accuracy of pentavalent technetium-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid [Tc-99m (V) DMSA] brain SPECT compared to proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS): initial results.

    PubMed

    Amin, Amr; Moustafa, Hosna; Ahmed, Ebaa; El-Toukhy, Mohamed

    2012-02-01

    We compared pentavalent technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (Tc-99m (V) DMSA) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) for the detection of residual or recurrent gliomas after surgery and radiotherapy. A total of 24 glioma patients, previously operated upon and treated with radiotherapy, were studied. SPECT was acquired 2-3 h post-administration of 555-740 MBq of Tc-99m (V) DMSA. Lesion to normal (L/N) delayed uptake ratio was calculated as: mean counts of tumor ROI (L)/mean counts of normal mirror symmetric ROI (N). (1)H-MRS was performed using a 1.5-T scanner equipped with a spectroscopy package. SPECT and (1)H-MRS results were compared with pathology or follow-up neuroimaging studies. SPECT and (1)H-MRS showed concordant residue or recurrence in 9/24 (37.5%) patients. Both were true negative in 6/24 (25%) patients. SPECT and (1)H-MRS disagreed in 9 recurrences [7/9 (77.8%) and 2/9 (22.2%) were true positive by SPECT and (1)H-MRS, respectively]. Sensitivity of SPECT and (1)H-MRS in detecting recurrence was 88.8 and 61.1% with accuracies of 91.6 and 70.8%, respectively. A positive association between the delayed L/N ratio and tumor grade was found; the higher the grade, the higher is the L/N ratio (r = 0.62, P = 0.001). Tc-99m (V) DMSA brain SPECT is more accurate compared to (1)H-MRS for the detection of tumor residual tissues or recurrence in glioma patients with previous radiotherapy. It allows early and non-invasive differentiation of residual tumor or recurrence from irradiation necrosis.

  12. Monitoring tumor response of prostate cancer to radiation therapy by multi-parametric 1H and hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Vickie Yi

    Radiation therapy is one of the most common curative therapies for patients with localized prostate cancer, but despite excellent success rates, a significant number of patients suffer post- treatment cancer recurrence. The accurate characterization of early tumor response remains a major challenge for the clinical management of these patients. Multi-parametric MRI/1H MR spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) has been shown to increase the diagnostic performance in evaluating the effectiveness of radiation therapy. 1H MRSI can detect altered metabolic profiles in cancerous tissue. In this project, the concentrations of prostate metabolites from snap-frozen biopsies of recurrent cancer after failed radiation therapy were correlated with histopathological findings to identify quantitative biomarkers that predict for residual aggressive versus indolent cancer. The total choline to creatine ratio was significantly higher in recurrent aggressive versus indolent cancer, suggesting that use of a higher threshold tCho/Cr ratio in future in vivo 1H MRSI studies could improve the selection and therapeutic planning for patients after failed radiation therapy. Varying radiation doses may cause a diverse effect on prostate cancer micro-environment and metabolism, which could hold the key to improving treatment protocols for individual patients. The recent development and clinical translation of hyperpolarized 13C MRI have provided the ability to monitor both changes in the tumor micro-environment and its metabolism using a multi-probe approach, [1-13C]pyruvate and 13C urea, combined with 1H Multi-parametric MRI. In this thesis, hyperpolarized 13C MRI, 1H dynamic contrast enhancement, and diffusion weighted imaging were used to identify early radiation dose response in a transgenic prostate cancer model. Hyperpolarized pyruvate to lactate metabolism significantly decreased in a dose dependent fashion by 1 day after radiation therapy, prior to any changes observed using 1H DCE and diffusion

  13. Lower "N"-Acetyl-Aspartate Levels in Prefrontal Cortices in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: A (Superscript 1]H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caetano, Sheila C.; Olvera, Rene L.; Hatch, John P.; Sanches, Marsal; Chen, Hua Hsuan; Nicoletti, Mark; Stanley, Jeffrey A.; Fonseca, Manoela; Hunter, Kristina; Lafer, Beny; Pliszka, Steven R.; Soares, Jair C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The few studies applying single-voxel [superscript 1]H spectroscopy in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder (BD) have reported low "N"-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) levels in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and high myo-inositol/phosphocreatine plus creatine (PCr+Cr) ratios in the anterior cingulate. The aim of this study…

  14. Metabolic profiling and predicting the free radical scavenging activity of guava (Psidium guajava L.) leaves according to harvest time by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Hyun; Cho, Somi K; Hyun, Sun-Hee; Park, Hae-Eun; Kim, Young-Suk; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon

    2011-01-01

    Guava leaves were classified and the free radical scavenging activity (FRSA) evaluated according to different harvest times by using the (1)H-NMR-based metabolomic technique. A principal component analysis (PCA) of (1)H-NMR data from the guava leaves provided clear clusters according to the harvesting time. A partial least squares (PLS) analysis indicated a correlation between the metabolic profile and FRSA. FRSA levels of the guava leaves harvested during May and August were high, and those leaves contained higher amounts of 3-hydroxybutyric acid, acetic acid, glutamic acid, asparagine, citric acid, malonic acid, trans-aconitic acid, ascorbic acid, maleic acid, cis-aconitic acid, epicatechin, protocatechuic acid, and xanthine than the leaves harvested during October and December. Epicatechin and protocatechuic acid among those compounds seem to have enhanced FRSA of the guava leaf samples harvested in May and August. A PLS regression model was established to predict guava leaf FRSA at different harvesting times by using a (1)H-NMR data set. The predictability of the PLS model was then tested by internal and external validation. The results of this study indicate that (1)H-NMR-based metabolomic data could usefully characterize guava leaves according to their time of harvesting.

  15. A dual-mode microwave resonator for double electron-electron spin resonance spectroscopy at W-band microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkach, Igor; Sicoli, Giuseppe; Höbartner, Claudia; Bennati, Marina

    2011-04-01

    We present a dual-mode resonator operating at/near 94 GHz (W-band) microwave frequencies and supporting two microwave modes with the same field polarization at the sample position. Numerical analysis shows that the frequencies of both modes as well as their frequency separation can be tuned in a broad range up to GHz. The resonator was constructed to perform pulsed ELDOR experiments with a variable separation of "pump" and "detection" frequencies up to Δ ν = 350 MHz. To examine its performance, test ESE/PELDOR experiments were performed on a representative biradical system.

  16. Changing resonator geometry to boost sound power decouples size and song frequency in a small insect.

    PubMed

    Mhatre, Natasha; Montealegre-Z, Fernando; Balakrishnan, Rohini; Robert, Daniel

    2012-05-29

    Despite their small size, some insects, such as crickets, can produce high amplitude mating songs by rubbing their wings together. By exploiting structural resonance for sound radiation, crickets broadcast species-specific songs at a sharply tuned frequency. Such songs enhance the range of signal transmission, contain information about the signaler's quality, and allow mate choice. The production of pure tones requires elaborate structural mechanisms that control and sustain resonance at the species-specific frequency. Tree crickets differ sharply from this scheme. Although they use a resonant system to produce sound, tree crickets can produce high amplitude songs at different frequencies, varying by as much as an octave. Based on an investigation of the driving mechanism and the resonant system, using laser Doppler vibrometry and finite element modeling, we show that it is the distinctive geometry of the crickets' forewings (the resonant system) that is responsible for their capacity to vary frequency. The long, enlarged wings enable the production of high amplitude songs; however, as a mechanical consequence of the high aspect ratio, the resonant structures have multiple resonant modes that are similar in frequency. The drive produced by the singing apparatus cannot, therefore, be locked to a single frequency, and different resonant modes can easily be engaged, allowing individual males to vary the carrier frequency of their songs. Such flexibility in sound production, decoupling body size and song frequency, has important implications for conventional views of mate choice, and offers inspiration for the design of miniature, multifrequency, resonant acoustic radiators.

  17. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lilehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A novel scanning probe microscope methodology has been developed that employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever fundamental resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of embedded nanoscale features.

  18. Note: A frequency modulated wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droit, C.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S.; Friedt, J.-M.

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the wireless conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation by radio frequency resonators as means of accurately determining the resonance frequency of passive acoustoelectronic sensors. The emitted frequency modulated radio frequency pulses are generated by a pulsed radar for probing a surface acoustic wave based sensor. The sharp sign transition of the amplitude modulated received signal provides a signal on which a feedback loop is locked to monitor the resonance signal. The strategy is demonstrated using a full software implementation on a generic hardware, resulting in 2 Hz resolution at 1 s integration time limited by the proportional feedback loop.

  19. Note: A frequency modulated wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement.

    PubMed

    Droit, C; Martin, G; Ballandras, S; Friedt, J-M

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the wireless conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation by radio frequency resonators as means of accurately determining the resonance frequency of passive acoustoelectronic sensors. The emitted frequency modulated radio frequency pulses are generated by a pulsed radar for probing a surface acoustic wave based sensor. The sharp sign transition of the amplitude modulated received signal provides a signal on which a feedback loop is locked to monitor the resonance signal. The strategy is demonstrated using a full software implementation on a generic hardware, resulting in 2 Hz resolution at 1 s integration time limited by the proportional feedback loop.

  20. The Tracking Resonance Frequency Method for Photoacoustic Measurements Based on the Phase Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchenek, Mariusz

    2017-04-01

    One of the major issues in the use of the resonant photoacoustic cell is the resonance frequency of the cell. The frequency is not stable, and its changes depend mostly on temperature and gas mixture. This paper presents a new method for tracking resonance frequency, where both the amplitude and phase are calculated from the input samples. The stimulating frequency can be adjusted to the resonance frequency of the cell based on the phase. This method was implemented using a digital measurement system with an analog to digital converter, field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a microcontroller. The resonance frequency was changed by the injection of carbon dioxide into the cell. A theoretical description and experimental results are also presented.

  1. Radio-frequency energy quantification in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, Leeor

    Mapping of radio frequency (RF) energy deposition has been challenging for 50+ years, especially, when scanning patients in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment. As result, electromagnetic simulation software is often used for estimating the specific absorption rate (SAR), the rate of RF energy deposition in tissue. The thesis work presents challenges associated with aligning information provided by electromagnetic simulation and MRI experiments. As result of the limitations of simulations, experimental methods for the quantification of SAR were established. A system for quantification of the total RF energy deposition was developed for parallel transmit MRI (a system that uses multiple antennas to excite and image the body). The system is capable of monitoring and predicting channel-by-channel RF energy deposition, whole body SAR and capable of tracking potential hardware failures that occur in the transmit chain and may cause the deposition of excessive energy into patients. Similarly, we demonstrated that local RF power deposition can be mapped and predicted for parallel transmit systems based on a series of MRI temperature mapping acquisitions. Resulting from the work, we developed tools for optimal reconstruction temperature maps from MRI acquisitions. The tools developed for temperature mapping paved the way for utilizing MRI as a diagnostic tool for evaluation of RF/microwave emitting device safety. Quantification of the RF energy was demonstrated for both MRI compatible and non-MRI-compatible devices (such as cell phones), while having the advantage of being noninvasive, of providing millimeter resolution and high accuracy.

  2. High-frequency nano-optomechanical disk resonators in liquids.

    PubMed

    Gil-Santos, E; Baker, C; Nguyen, D T; Hease, W; Gomez, C; Lemaître, A; Ducci, S; Leo, G; Favero, I

    2015-09-01

    Nano- and micromechanical resonators are the subject of research that aims to develop ultrasensitive mass sensors for spectrometry, chemical analysis and biomedical diagnosis. Unfortunately, their merits generally diminish in liquids because of an increased dissipation. The development of faster and lighter miniaturized devices would enable improved performances, provided the dissipation was controlled and novel techniques were available to drive and readout their minute displacement. Here we report a nano-optomechanical approach to this problem using miniature semiconductor disks. These devices combine a mechanical motion at high frequencies (gigahertz and above) with an ultralow mass (picograms) and a moderate dissipation in liquids. We show that high-sensitivity optical measurements allow their Brownian vibrations to be resolved directly, even in the most-dissipative liquids. We investigate their interaction with liquids of arbitrary properties, and analyse measurements in light of new models. Nano-optomechanical disks emerge as probes of rheological information of unprecedented sensitivity and speed, which opens up applications in sensing and fundamental science.

  3. Spiral resonators for on-chip laser frequency stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hansuek; Suh, Myoung-Gyun; Chen, Tong; Li, Jiang; Diddams, Scott A.; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2013-01-01

    Frequency references are indispensable to radio, microwave and time keeping systems, with far reaching applications in navigation, communication, remote sensing and basic science. Over the past decade, there has been an optical revolution in time keeping and microwave generation that promises to ultimately impact all of these areas. Indeed, the most precise clocks and lowest noise microwave signals are now based on a laser with short-term stability derived from a reference cavity. In spite of the tremendous progress, these systems remain essentially laboratory devices and there is interest in their miniaturization, even towards on-chip systems. Here we describe a chip-based optical reference cavity that uses spatial averaging of thermorefractive noise to enhance resonator stability. Stabilized fibre lasers exhibit relative Allan deviation of 3.9 × 10−13 at 400 μs averaging time and an effective linewidth <100 Hz by achieving over 26 dB of phase-noise reduction. PMID:24043134

  4. Viscoelastic effects on frequency tuning of a dielectric elastomer membrane resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianyou; Jiang, Liying; Khayat, Roger E.

    2014-03-01

    As a recent application of dielectric elastomers (DEs), DE resonators have become an alternative to conventional silicon-based resonators used in MEMS and have attracted much interest from the research community. However, most existing modeling works for the DE resonators ignore the intrinsic viscoelastic effect of the material that may strongly influence their dynamic performance. Based on the finite-deformation viscoelasticity theory for dielectrics, this paper theoretically examines the in-plane oscillation of a DE membrane resonator to demonstrate how the material viscoelasticity affects the actuation and frequency tuning processes of the resonator. From the simulation results, it is concluded that not only the applied voltage can change the natural frequency of the resonator, but also the inelastic deformation contributes to frequency tuning. Due to the viscoelasticity of the material, the electrical loading rate influences the actuation process of the DE resonator, while it has little effect on the final steady frequency tuned by the prescribed voltage within the safety range. With the consideration of the typical failure modes of the resonator and the evolution process of the material, the tunable frequency range and the safe range of the applied voltage of the DE membrane resonator with different dimension parameters are determined in this work, which are found to be dependent on the electrical loading rate. This work is expected to provide a better understanding on the frequency tuning of viscoelastic DE membrane resonators and a guideline for the design of DE devices.

  5. Viscoelastic effects on frequency tuning of a dielectric elastomer membrane resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianyou; Jiang, Liying Khayat, Roger E.

    2014-03-28

    As a recent application of dielectric elastomers (DEs), DE resonators have become an alternative to conventional silicon-based resonators used in MEMS and have attracted much interest from the research community. However, most existing modeling works for the DE resonators ignore the intrinsic viscoelastic effect of the material that may strongly influence their dynamic performance. Based on the finite-deformation viscoelasticity theory for dielectrics, this paper theoretically examines the in-plane oscillation of a DE membrane resonator to demonstrate how the material viscoelasticity affects the actuation and frequency tuning processes of the resonator. From the simulation results, it is concluded that not only the applied voltage can change the natural frequency of the resonator, but also the inelastic deformation contributes to frequency tuning. Due to the viscoelasticity of the material, the electrical loading rate influences the actuation process of the DE resonator, while it has little effect on the final steady frequency tuned by the prescribed voltage within the safety range. With the consideration of the typical failure modes of the resonator and the evolution process of the material, the tunable frequency range and the safe range of the applied voltage of the DE membrane resonator with different dimension parameters are determined in this work, which are found to be dependent on the electrical loading rate. This work is expected to provide a better understanding on the frequency tuning of viscoelastic DE membrane resonators and a guideline for the design of DE devices.

  6. Discrimination of three Pegaga (Centella) varieties and determination of growth-lighting effects on metabolites content based on the chemometry of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    H, Maulidiani; Khatib, Alfi; Shaari, Khozirah; Abas, Faridah; Shitan, Mahendran; Kneer, Ralf; Neto, Victor; Lajis, Nordin H

    2012-01-11

    The metabolites of three species of Apiaceae, also known as Pegaga, were analyzed utilizing (1)H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) resolved the species, Centella asiatica, Hydrocotyle bonariensis, and Hydrocotyle sibthorpioides, into three clusters. The saponins, asiaticoside and madecassoside, along with chlorogenic acids were the metabolites that contributed most to the separation. Furthermore, the effects of growth-lighting condition to metabolite contents were also investigated. The extracts of C. asiatica grown in full-day light exposure exhibited a stronger radical scavenging activity and contained more triterpenes (asiaticoside and madecassoside), flavonoids, and chlorogenic acids as compared to plants grown in 50% shade. This study established the potential of using a combination of (1)H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analyses in differentiating three closely related species and the effects of growth lighting, based on their metabolite contents and identification of the markers contributing to their differences.

  7. Exploring the Frequency Stability Limits of Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators for Metrological Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chembo, Yanne K.; Baumgartel, Lukas; Grudinin, Ivan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Thompson, Robert; Yu, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode resonators are attracting increasing interest as promising frequency reference cavities. Unlike commonly used Fabry-Perot cavities, however, they are filled with a bulk medium whose properties have a significant impact on the stability of its resonance frequencies. In this context that has to be reduced to a minimum. On the other hand, a small monolithic resonator provides opportunity for better stability against vibration and acceleration. this feature is essential when the cavity operates in a non-laboratory environment. In this paper, we report a case study for a crystalline resonator, and discuss the a pathway towards the inhibition of vibration-and acceleration-induced frequency fluctuations.

  8. Resonance Frequency Analysis for Osseointegration in Four Surgical Conditions of Dental Implants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Abstract-The establishment of osseointegration following dental implant placement is a major contributing factor to the clinical success and long...period. Our results showed that there was an increase in resonance frequency related to stiffness increment during osseointegration. Keywords – dental ...implant, osseointegration, resonance frequency, stability I. INTRODUCTION Dental implants are being used increasingly to provide support and retention

  9. Higher-order vibrational mode frequency tuning utilizing fishbone-shaped microelectromechanical systems resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Naoya; Tanigawa, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kenichiro

    2013-04-01

    Resonators based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have received considerable attention for their applications for wireless equipment. The requirements for this application include small size, high frequency, wide bandwidth and high portability. However, few MEMS resonators with wide-frequency tuning have been reported. A fishbone-shaped resonator has a resonant frequency with a maximum response that can be changed according to the location and number of several exciting electrodes. Therefore, it can be expected to provide wide-frequency tuning. The resonator has three types of electrostatic forces that can be generated to deform a main beam. We evaluate the vibrational modes caused by each exciting electrodes by comparing simulated results with measured ones. We then successfully demonstrate the frequency tuning of the first to fifth resonant modes by using the algorithm we propose here. The resulting frequency tuning covers 178 to 1746 kHz. In addition, we investigate the suppression of the anchor loss to enhance the Q-factor. An experiment shows that tapered-shaped anchors provide a higher Q-factor than rectangular-shaped anchors. The Q-factor of the resonators supported by suspension beams is also discussed. Because the suspension beams cause complicated vibrational modes for higher frequencies, the enhancement of the Q-factor for high vibrational modes cannot be obtained here. At present, the tapered-anchor resonators are thought to be most suitable for frequency tuning applications.

  10. Automatic frequency alignment and quantitation of single resonances in multiple magnetic resonance spectra via complex principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Huffel, Sabine; Wang, Yu; Vanhamme, Leentje; Van Hecke, Paul

    2002-09-01

    Several algorithms for automatic frequency alignment and quantitation of single resonances in multiple magnetic resonance (MR) spectra are investigated. First, a careful comparison between the complex principal component analysis (PCA) and the Hankel total least squares-based methods for quantifying the resonances in the spectral sets of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) spectra is presented. Afterward, we discuss a method based on complex PCA plus linear regression and a method based on cross correlation of the magnitude spectra for correcting frequency shifts of resonances in sets of MR spectra. Their advantages and limitations are demonstrated on simulated MR data sets as well as on an in vivo MRSI data set of the human brain.

  11. Resonance of a Metal Drop under the Effect of Amplitude-Modulated High Frequency Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiahong; Lei, Zuosheng; Zhu, Hongda; Zhang, Lijie; Magnetic Hydrodynamics(Siamm) Team; Magnetic Mechanics; Engineering(Smse) Team

    2016-11-01

    The resonance of a sessile and a levitated drop under the effect of high frequency amplitude-modulated magnetic field (AMMF) is investigated experimentally and numerically. It is a new method to excite resonance of a metal drop, which is different from the case in the presence of a low-frequency magnetic field. The transient contour of the drop is obtained in the experiment and the simulation. The numerical results agree with the experimental results fairly well. At a given frequency and magnetic flux density of the high frequency AMMF, the edge deformations of the drop with an azimuthal wave numbers were excited. A stability diagram of the shape oscillation of the drop and its resonance frequency spectrum are obtained by analysis of the experimental and the numerical data. The results show that the resonance of the drop has a typical character of parametric resonance. The National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51274237 and 11372174).

  12. Radio-frequency quadrupole resonator for linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Moretti, A.

    1982-10-19

    An RFQ resonator for a linear accelerator having a reduced level of interfering modes and producing a quadrupole mode for focusing, bunching and accelerating beams of heavy charged particles, with the construction being characterized by four elongated resonating rods within a cylinder with the rods being alternately shorted and open electrically to the shell at common ends of the rods to provide an LC parallel resonant circuit when activated by a magnetic field transverse to the longitudinal axis.

  13. Frequency resonances in a two-mode He--Ne/I/sub 2/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gonchukov, S.A.; Kireev, S.V.; Protsenko, E.D.

    1984-09-01

    The first results are given of investigations of frequency resonances of a /sup 3/He--/sup 20/Ne//sup 127/I/sub 2/ laser (0.63 ..mu.. wavelength) emitting two modes with parallel polarizations. Investigations were made of the resolution, of the amplitudes of the frequency resonances and their shifts, and of the influence of the temperature on the frequency pedestal. It is shown that the high signal-to-noise ratio makes frequency resonances promising for use in laser spectroscopy.

  14. Insertion torque, resonance frequency, and removal torque analysis of microimplants.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yu-Chuan; Ting, Chun-Chan; Du, Je-Kang; Chen, Chun-Ming; Wu, Ju-Hui; Chen, Hong-Sen

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to compare the insertion torque (IT), resonance frequency (RF), and removal torque (RT) among three microimplant brands. Thirty microimplants of the three brands were used as follows: Type A (titanium alloy, 1.5-mm × 8-mm), Type B (stainless steel, 1.5-mm × 8-mm), and Type C (titanium alloy, 1.5-mm × 9-mm). A synthetic bone with a 2-mm cortical bone and bone marrow was used. Each microimplant was inserted into the synthetic bone, without predrilling, to a 7 mm depth. The IT, RF, and RT were measured in both vertical and horizontal directions. One-way analysis of variance and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient tests were used for intergroup and intragroup comparisons, respectively. In the vertical test, the ITs of Type C (7.8 Ncm) and Type B (7.5 Ncm) were significantly higher than that of Type A (4.4 Ncm). The RFs of Type C (11.5 kHz) and Type A (10.2 kHz) were significantly higher than that of Type B (7.5 kHz). Type C (7.4 Ncm) and Type B (7.3 Ncm) had significantly higher RTs than did Type A (4.1 Ncm). In the horizontal test, both the ITs and RTs were significantly higher for Type C, compared with Type A. No significant differences were found among the groups, and the study hypothesis was accepted. Type A had the lowest inner/outer diameter ratio and widest apical facing angle, engendering the lowest IT and highest RF values. However, no significant correlations in the IT, RF, and RT were observed among the three groups.

  15. In vitro quantitative ((1))H and ((19))F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging studies of fluvastatin™ in Lescol® XL tablets in a USP-IV dissolution cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qilei; Gladden, Lynn; Avalle, Paolo; Mantle, Michael

    2011-12-20

    Swellable polymeric matrices are key systems in the controlled drug release area. Currently, the vast majority of research is still focused on polymer swelling dynamics. This study represents the first quantitative multi-nuclear (((1))H and ((19))F) fast magnetic resonance imaging study of the complete dissolution process of a commercial (Lescol® XL) tablet, whose formulation is based on the hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) polymer under in vitro conditions in a standard USP-IV (United States Pharmacopeia apparatus IV) flow-through cell that is incorporated into high field superconducting magnetic resonance spectrometer. Quantitative RARE ((1))H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ((19))F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging methods have been used to give information on: (i) dissolution media uptake and hydrodynamics; (ii) active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) mobilisation and dissolution; (iii) matrix swelling and dissolution and (iv) media activity within the swelling matrix. In order to better reflect the in vivo conditions, the bio-relevant media Simulated Gastric Fluid (SGF) and Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FaSSIF) were used. A newly developed quantitative ultra-fast MRI technique was applied and the results clearly show the transport dynamics of media penetration and hydrodynamics along with the polymer swelling processes. The drug dissolution and mobility inside the gel matrix was characterised, in parallel to the ((1))H measurements, by ((19))F NMR spectroscopy and MRI, and the drug release profile in the bulk solution was recorded offline by UV spectrometer. We found that NMR spectroscopy and 1D-MRI can be uniquely used to monitor the drug dissolution/mobilisation process within the gel layer, and the results from ((19))F NMR spectra indicate that in the gel layer, the physical mobility of the drug changes from "dissolved immobilised drug" to "dissolved mobilised drug".

  16. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments and secondary structure analysis of translation initiation factor 1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Alejandra; Hu, Yanmei; Palmer, Stephanie O; Silva, Aaron; Bullard, James; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen and a primary cause of infection in humans. P. aeruginosa can acquire resistance against multiple groups of antimicrobial agents, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones, and multidrug resistance is increasing in this organism which makes treatment of the infections difficult and expensive. This has led to the unmet need for discovery of new compounds distinctly different from present antimicrobials. Protein synthesis is an essential metabolic process and a validated target for the development of new antibiotics. Translation initiation factor 1 from P. aeruginosa (Pa-IF1) is the smallest of the three initiation factors that acts to establish the 30S initiation complex to initiate translation during protein biosynthesis, and its structure is unknown. Here we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shift assignments of Pa-IF1 as the basis for NMR structure determination and interaction studies. Secondary structure analyses deduced from the NMR chemical shift data have identified five β-strands with an unusually extended β-strand at the C-terminal end of the protein and one short α-helix arranged in the sequential order β1-β2-β3-α1-β4-β5. This is further supported by (15)N-{(1)H} hetero NOEs. These secondary structure elements suggest the Pa-IF1 adopts the typical β-barrel structure and is composed of an oligomer-binding motif.

  17. Frequency-selective control of ferromagnetic resonance linewidth in magnetic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, S.; Pachauri, N.; Mewes, C. K. A.; Mewes, T.; Kaiser, C.; Leng, Q.; Pakala, M.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a frequency-specific linewidth broadening of the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) mode of a NiFe free layer within a magnetic multilayer stack. The FMR studies reveal a significant broadening of the FMR linewidth of the free layer at frequencies where this resonance is degenerate with FMR modes stemming from other layers within the multilayer stack. By pinning part of the magnetic multilayer to an antiferromagnet, we tailor a ferromagnetic linewidth behavior that is anisotropic for a specific frequency.

  18. Voltage dependence of subthreshold resonance frequency in layer II of medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Shay, Christopher F; Boardman, Ian S; James, Nicholas M; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2012-08-01

    The resonance properties of individual neurons in entorhinal cortex (EC) may contribute to their functional properties in awake, behaving rats. Models propose that entorhinal grid cells could arise from shifts in the intrinsic frequency of neurons caused by changes in membrane potential owing to depolarizing input from neurons coding velocity. To test for potential changes in intrinsic frequency, we measured the resonance properties of neurons at different membrane potentials in neurons in medial and lateral EC. In medial entorhinal neurons, the resonant frequency of individual neurons decreased in a linear manner as the membrane potential was depolarized between -70 and -55 mV. At more hyperpolarized membrane potentials, cells asymptotically approached a maximum resonance frequency. Consistent with the previous studies, near resting potential, the cells of the medial EC possessed a decreasing gradient of resonance frequency along the dorsal to ventral axis, and cells of the lateral EC lacked resonant properties, regardless of membrane potential or position along the medial to lateral axis within lateral EC. Application of 10 μM ZD7288, the H-channel blocker, abolished all resonant properties in MEC cells, and resulted in physiological properties very similar to lateral EC cells. These results on resonant properties show a clear change in frequency response with depolarization that could contribute to the generation of grid cell firing properties in the medial EC.

  19. High-frequency EPR applications of open nonradiative resonators.

    PubMed

    Annino, G; Fittipaldi, M; Martinelli, M; Moons, H; Van Doorslaer, S; Goovaerts, E

    2009-09-01

    A new class of open single-mode cavities, the nonradiative (NR) resonators, has recently been proposed in order to overcome the limitations of standard cylindrical cavities and Fabry-Perot resonators at millimeter wavelengths. This paper presents the first applications of a NR resonator in W-band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. It consists of a cylindrical cavity having a lateral aperture that represents about 35% of its total height. Electron-spin-echo measurements performed on different samples show that the signal-to-noise ratio and the optimal pulse length obtained with the proposed device are comparable to those obtained with the closed cavity used in the commercial W-band spectrometer, at both cryogenic and room temperature. Similar results have been obtained for paramagnetic species optically activated by means of an optical fiber inserted in the aperture of the resonator. The insertion losses estimated for the probe employed with the NR resonator are higher than those of the commercial probe, hence, demonstrating that the proposed cavity holds the promise of improved resonator performance.

  20. Wheat germ 5S ribosomal RNA common arm fragment conformations observed by sup 1 H and sup 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiejun; Marshall, A.G. )

    1990-02-20

    The nonexchangeable protons of the common arm fragment of wheat germ (Triticum aestivum) ribosomal 5S RNA have been observed by means of high-resolution 500-MHz {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy in D{sub 2}O solution. Although NMR studies on the exchangeable protons support the presence of two distinct solution structures of the common arm fragment (and of the same base-paired segment in intact 5S rRNA), only a single conformation is manifested in the {sup 1}H NMR behavior of all of the H6 and H5 pyrimidine and most of the H8/H2 purine protons under the same salt conditions. The nonexchangeable protons near the base-paired helix have been assigned by a sequential strategy. Conformational features such as the presence of a cytidine-uridine (C{center dot}U) pair at the loop-helix junction and base stacking into the hairpin loop are evaluated from nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY) data. Double-quantum filtered correlation spectroscopy (DQF-COSY) experiments show that most of the 26 riboses are in the C3{prime}-endo conformation. Finally, backbone conformational changes induced by Mg{sup 2+} and heating have been monitored by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy. The results show that the common arm RNA segment can assume two conformations which produce distinguishably different NMR environments at the base-pair hydrogen-bond imino protons but not at nonexchangeable base or ribose proton or backbone phosphate sites.

  1. Correlation between structure and fluidity of coal tar pitch fractions studied by ambient {sup 13}C and high temperature in-situ {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, J.M.; Schober, H.H.; Rusinko, F.J. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    The unique properties of coal tar pitches have resulted in numerous applications for carbon products, such as binders for carbon artifacts. However, as the number of by-product coke ovens is diminishing, the design of superior binders from alternative materials or processes is sought by the carbon industry. Accordingly, structural characterization of coal tar pitches and their solvent fractions, using quantitative analytical techniques is required to successfully obtain this goal. Quantitative solid state {sup 13}C NMR has previously been shown to be a powerful technique to study the overall aromatic ring-size for coal tar pitches and their toluene insoluble (TI) fractions. The TI fraction can further be separated into its quinoline soluble part (beta-resin) and insoluble fraction (QI). Both these fractions affect the overall coking yield and especially the fluidity of the pitches. The assessment of fluidity interactions between coal tar pitch solvent fractions during heating is therefore important for the future design of pitches from untraditional sources or processes. High temperature {sup 1}H NMR is a useful technique to investigate the fluid and rigid components of pitches, especially with its interaction with coal and to quantify mesophase. However, very little work has been performed to correlate the overall fluidity behavior of pitch with the mobility of its different solubility fractions and their structure. Accordingly, this paper addresses the fluidity interactions between different pitch solvent fractions (TS, beta-resin and QI) by high temperature {sup 1}H NMR. Particularly, the fluidity studies on the beta-resin alone can verify whether this fraction becomes plastic during heating.

  2. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments and secondary structure analysis of translation initiation factor 1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Alejandra; Hu, Yanmei; Palmer, Stephanie O.; Silva, Aaron; Bullard, James; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen and a primary cause of infection in humans. P. aeruginosa can acquire resistance against multiple groups of antimicrobial agents, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones, and multidrug resistance is increasing in this organism which makes treatment of the infections difficult and expensive. This has led to the unmet need for discovery of new compounds distinctly different from present antimicrobials. Protein synthesis is an essential metabolic process and a validated target for the development of new antibiotics. Translation initiation factor 1 from P. aeruginosa (Pa-IF1) is the smallest of the three initiation factors that acts to establish the 30S initiation complex to initiate translation during protein biosynthesis, and its structure is unknown. Here we report the 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shift assignments of Pa-IF1 as the basis for NMR structure determination and interaction studies. Secondary structure analyses deduced from the NMR chemical shift data have identified five β-strands with an unusually extended β-strand at the C-terminal end of the protein and one short α-helix arranged in the sequential order β1–β2–β3–α1–β4–β5. This is further supported by 15N–{1H} hetero NOEs. These secondary structure elements suggest the Pa-IF1 adopts the typical β-barrel structure and is composed of an oligomer-binding motif. PMID:26983940

  3. Parametric frequency mixing in a magnetoelastically driven linear ferromagnetic-resonance oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. L.; Lomonosov, A. M.; Janusonis, J.; Vlasov, V. S.; Temnov, V. V.; Tobey, R. I.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate the linear frequency conversion of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency by optically excited elastic waves in a thin metallic film on dielectric substrates. Time-resolved probing of the magnetization directly witnesses magnetoelastically driven parametric second-harmonic generation, sum- and difference-frequency mixing from two distinct frequencies, as well as excitation of parametric resonances. Starting from the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations, we derive an analytical equation of an elastically driven (nonlinear) parametric oscillator and show that frequency mixing is dominated by the parametric modulation of the linear FMR oscillator.

  4. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance study of low-temperature water dynamics in a water-soaked perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer Nafion film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jun Hee; Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2017-01-01

    We have employed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in order to study the low-temperature water dynamics in a water-soaked perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer Nafion (NR-211) film. According to the recent models, Nafion may comprise water strongly bound to the sulfonic acid group, hydration water, and condensed water species. In this work, three separate NMR peaks from the water species revealing distinct behaviors were identified. A significant portion of the "bound" water remained unfrozen down to 200 K, whereas a slow-to-fast motional limit transition was observed at TM=220 K from the relaxation measurements.

  5. Resonance frequencies of lipid-shelled microbubbles in the regime of nonlinear oscillations.

    PubMed

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Haac, Jillian F; Dayton, Paul A

    2009-02-01

    Knowledge of resonant frequencies of contrast microbubbles is important for the optimization of ultrasound contrast imaging and therapeutic techniques. To date, however, there are estimates of resonance frequencies of contrast microbubbles only for the regime of linear oscillation. The present paper proposes an approach for evaluating resonance frequencies of contrast agent microbubbles in the regime of nonlinear oscillation. The approach is based on the calculation of the time-averaged oscillation power of the radial bubble oscillation. The proposed procedure was verified for free bubbles in the frequency range 1-4 MHz and then applied to lipid-shelled microbubbles insonified with a single 20-cycle acoustic pulse at two values of the acoustic pressure amplitude, 100 kPa and 200 kPa, and at four frequencies: 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 MHz. It is shown that, as the acoustic pressure amplitude is increased, the resonance frequency of a lipid-shelled microbubble tends to decrease in comparison with its linear resonance frequency. Analysis of existing shell models reveals that models that treat the lipid shell as a linear viscoelastic solid appear may be challenged to provide the observed tendency in the behavior of the resonance frequency at increasing acoustic pressure. The conclusion is drawn that the further development of shell models could be improved by the consideration of nonlinear rheological laws.

  6. FTIR and 1H MAS NMR investigations on the correlation between the frequency of stretching vibration and the chemical shift of surface OH groups of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Eike; Karge, H. G.; Pfeifer, H.

    1992-03-01

    The study of surface hydroxyl groups of solids, especially of zeolites, belongs to the 'classical' topics of IR spectroscopy since physico-chemical information may be derived from the wavenumber (nu) OH of the stretching vibration of the different hydroxyls. On the other hand, the last decade has seen the development of high resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy and through the use of the so-called magic-angle-spinning technique (MAS) the signals of different hydroxyl species can be resolved in the 1H NMR spectra of solids. The chemical shift (delta) H describing the position of these lines may be used as well as (nu) OH to characterize quantitatively the strength of acidity of surface OH groups of solids. In a first comparison of (nu) OH with (delta) H for several types of surface OH groups, a linear correlation between them could be found. The aim of this paper was to prove the validity of this correlation for a wide variety of hydroxyls. The IR measurements were carried out on a Perkin-Elmer FTIR spectrometer 1800 at the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Berlin, and the 1H MAS NMR spectra were recorded on a Bruker MSL- 300 at the University of Leipzig.

  7. Measurement of the partial cross sections σTT, σLT, and (σT+ ɛσL) of the 1H(e,e'π+)n reaction in the Δ(1232) resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. M.; Sparveris, N. F.; Nakagawa, I.; Bernstein, A. M.; Alarcon, R.; Bertozzi, W.; Botto, T.; Bourgeois, P.; Calarco, J.; Casagrande, F.; Distler, M. O.; Dow, K.; Farkondeh, M.; Georgakopoulos, S.; Gilad, S.; Hicks, R.; Holtrop, A.; Hotta, A.; Jiang, X.; Karabarbounis, A.; Kowalski, S.; Milner, R.; Miskimen, R.; Papanicolas, C. N.; Sarty, A. J.; Sato, Y.; Širca, S.; Shaw, J.; Six, E.; Stave, S.; Stiliaris, E.; Tamae, T.; Tsentalivich, G.; Tschalaer, C.; Turchinetz, W.; Zhou, Z.-L.; Zwart, T.

    2011-08-01

    We report precision 1H(e,e'π+)n measurements in the Δ(1232) resonance at Q2=0.127(GeV/c)2 obtained at the MIT-Bates out-of-plane scattering facility. These are the lowest, but nonzero, Q2 measurements in the π+ channel. The data offer tests of the theoretical calculations, particularly of the background amplitude contributions. The chiral effective field theory and Sato-Lee model calculations are not in agreement with this experiment.

  8. NMR study of non-structural proteins--part I: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of macro domain from Mayaro virus (MAYV).

    PubMed

    Melekis, Efstathios; Tsika, Aikaterini C; Lichière, Julie; Chasapis, Christos T; Margiolaki, Irene; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Coutard, Bruno; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-04-01

    Macro domains are ADP-ribose-binding modules present in all eukaryotic organisms, bacteria and archaea. They are also found in non-structural proteins of several positive strand RNA viruses such as alphaviruses. Here, we report the high yield expression and preliminary structural analysis through solution NMR spectroscopy of the macro domain from New World Mayaro Alphavirus. The recombinant protein was well-folded and in a monomeric state. An almost complete sequence-specific assignment of its (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonances was obtained and its secondary structure determined by TALOS+.

  9. 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance and kinetic studies of the active site structure of chloroplast CF1 ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Devlin, C C; Grisham, C M

    1990-07-03

    The interaction of nucleotides and nucleotide analogues and their metal complexes with Mn2+ bound to both the latent and dithiothreitol-activated CF1 ATP synthase has been examined by means of steady-state kinetics, water proton relaxation rate (PRR) measurements, and 1H and 31P nuclear relaxation measurements. Titration of both the latent and activated Mn(2+)-CF1 complexes with ATP, ADP, Pi, Co(NH3)4ATP, Co(NH3)4ADP, and Co(NH3)4AMPPCP leads to increases in the water relaxation enhancement, consistent with enhanced metal binding and a high ternary complex enhancement. Steady-state kinetic studies are consistent with competitive inhibition of CF1 by Co(NH3)4AMPPCP with respect to CaATP. The data are consistent with a Ki for Co(NH3)4AMPPCP of 650 microM, in good agreement with a previous Ki of 724 microM for Cr(H2O)4ATP [Frasch, W., & Selman, B. (1982) Biochemistry 21, 3636-3643], and a best fit KD of 209 microM from the water PRR measurements. 1H and 31P nuclear relaxation measurements in solutions of CF1 and Co(NH3)4AMPPCP were used to determine the conformation of the bound substrate analogue and the arrangement with respect to this structure of high- and low-affinity sites for Mn2+. The bound nucleotide analogue adopts a bent conformation, with the low-affinity Mn2+ site situated between the adenine and triphosphate moieties and the high-affinity metal site located on the far side of the triphosphate chain. The low-affinity metal forms a distorted inner-sphere complex with the beta-P and gamma-P of the substrate. The distances from Mn2+ to the triphosphate chain are too large for first coordination sphere complexes but are appropriate for second-sphere complexes involving, for example, intervening hydrogen-bonded water molecules or residues from the protein.

  10. sup 1 H and sup 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance and kinetic studies of the active site structure of chloroplast CF sub 1 ATP synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, C.C.; Grisham, C.M. )

    1990-07-03

    The interaction of nucleotides and nucleotide analogues and their complexes with Mn{sup 2+} bound to both the latent and dithiothreitol-activated CF{sub 1} ATP synthase has been examined by means of steady-state kinetics, water proton relaxation rate (PRR) measurements, and {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear relaxation measurements. Titration of both the latent and activated Mn{sup 2+}-CF{sub 1} complexes with ATP, ADP, P{sub i}, Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}ATP, Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}ADP, and Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}AMPPCP leads to increases in the water relaxation enhancement, consistent with enhanced metal binding and a high ternary complex enhancement. Steady-state kinetic studies are consistent with competitive inhibition of CF{sub 1} by Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}AMPPCP with respect to CaATP. {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear relaxation measurements in solutions of CF{sub 1} and Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}AMPPCP were used to determine the conformation of the bound substrate analogue and the arrangement with respect to this structure of high- and low-affinity sites for Mn{sup 2+}. The bound nucleotide analogue adopts a bent conformation, with the low-affinity sites for Mn{sup 2+}. The bound nucleotide analogue adopts a bent conformation, with the low-affinity Mn{sup 2+} site situated between the adenine and triphosphate moieties and the high-affinity metal site located on the far side of the triphosphate chain. The low-affinity metal forms a distorted inner-sphere complex with the {beta}-P and {gamma}-P of the substrate. The distances from Mn{sup 2+} to the triphosphate chain are too large for first coordination sphere complexes but are appropriate for second-sphere complexes involving, for example, intervening hydrogen-bonded water molecules or residues from the protein.

  11. Investigation of the neuroprotective effects of bee-venom acupuncture in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease by using immunohistochemistry and In-vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 9.4 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Moon-Hyun; Lee, Do-Wan; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Chung, Jin-Yeung; Doo, Ah-Reum; Park, Hi-Joon; Kim, Seung-Nam; Choe, Bo-Young

    2013-01-01

    Neuroprotective therapeutics slows down the degeneration process in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD). The neuronal survival in PD animal models is often measured by using immunohistochemistry. However, dynamic changes in the pathology of the brain cannot be explored with this technique. Application of in-vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) can cover this shortcoming, as these techniques are non-invasive and can be repeated over time in the same animal. Thus, the sensitivity of both techniques to measure changes in the PD pathology was explored in an experiment studying the neuroprotective effects of the vigilance enhancer bee-venom (BV) in a mouse model of PD. The mice were pre-treated with 0.02-ml BV administered to the acupuncture point GB34 (Yangneungcheon) once every 3 days for 2 weeks. Three groups were classified as control, MPTP-intoxicated PD model and BV-treated mice. Outer volume suppression combined with the ultra-short echo-time STEAM (TE = 2.2 ms, TM = 20 ms, TR = 5000 ms) was used for localized in-vivo 1H MRS. Based on the 1H MRS spectral analysis, substantial changes of the neurochemical profiles were evaluated in the three investigated groups. In particular, the glutamate complex (Glx)/creatine (Cr) ratio (7.72 ± 1.25) in the PD group was significantly increased compared to that in the control group (3.93 ± 2.21, P = 0.001). Compared to the baseline values, the Glx/Cr ratio of the BV-treated group was significantly decreased 2 weeks after MPTP intoxication (one-way ANOVA, p < 0.05). In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that neurochemical alterations occurred in the three groups and that the neuroprotective effects of the BV acupuncture in a mouse model of PD could be quantified by using immunohistochemistry and 1H MRS.

  12. 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of light organ-associated fatty acid-binding protein of Taiwanese fireflies.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kai-Li; Lee, Yi-Zong; Chen, Yun-Ru; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2016-04-01

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are a family of proteins that modulate the transfer of various fatty acids in the cytosol and constitute a significant portion in many energy-consuming cells. The ligand binding properties and specific functions of a particular type of FABP seem to be diverse and depend on the respective binding cavity as well as the cell type from which this protein is derived. Previously, a novel FABP (lcFABP; lc: Luciola cerata) was identified in the light organ of Taiwanese fireflies. The lcFABP was proved to possess fatty acids binding capabilities, especially for fatty acids of length C14-C18. However, the structural details are unknown, and the structure-function relationship has remained to be further investigated. In this study, we finished the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of (15)N/(13)C-enriched lcFABP by solution NMR spectroscopy. In addition, the secondary structure distribution was revealed based on the backbone N, H, Cα, Hα, C and side chain Cβ assignments. These results can provide the basis for further structural exploration of lcFABP.

  13. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments and secondary structure analysis of CmPI-II, a serine protease inhibitor isolated from marine snail Cenchritis muricatus.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Alonso-del-Rivero Antigua, Maday; Pires, José Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    A protease inhibitor (CmPI-II) (UNIPROT: IPK2_CENMR) from the marine mollusc Cenchritis muricatus, has been isolated and characterized. It is the first member of a new group (group 3) of non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors. CmPI-II is a tight-binding inhibitor of serine proteases: trypsin, human neutrophil elastase (HNE), subtilisin A and pancreatic elastase. This specificity is exceptional in the members of Kazal-type inhibitor family. Several models of three-dimensional structure of CmPI-II have been constructed by homology with other inhibitors of the family but its structure has not yet been solved experimentally. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of CmPI-II as basis for NMR structure determination and interaction studies. Secondary structure analyses deduced from the NMR chemical shift data have identified three β-strands β1: residues 14-19, β2: 23-35 and β3: 43-45 and one helix α1: 28-37 arranged in the sequential order β1-β2-α1-β3. These secondary structure elements suggest that CmPI-II adopts the typical scaffold of a Kazal-type inhibitor.

  14. Transferred nuclear Overhauser effect analyses of membrane-bound enkephalin analogues by sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance: Correlation between activities and membrane-bound conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Milon, Alain; Miyazawa, Tatsuo; Higashijima, Tsutomu )

    1990-01-09

    Leu-enkephalin, (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, and (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalinamide (agonists) and (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin (inactive analogue) bind to lipid bilayer consisting of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine. The conformations that these compounds assume, once bound to perdeuterated phospholipid bilayer, have been shown to be unique, as shown by the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (TRNOE) of {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. In addition, their location in the bilayer was analyzed by TRNOE in the presence of spin-labeled phospholipids. These analyses showed a clear relationship between the activity and the peptide-membrane interaction. The three active peptides, when bound to membranes, adopt the same conformation, characterized by a type II{prime} {beta}-turn around Gly{sup 3}-Phe and a {gamma}-turn around Gly{sup 2} (or D-Ala{sup 2}). The inactive analogue, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, displayed a completely different TRNOE pattern corresponding to a different conformation in the membrane-bound state. The tyrosine residue of the active compounds is not inserted into the interior of membrane, but it is inserted into the bilayer for the L-Ala{sup 2} analogue. According to these results, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin may be explained to be inactive because the mode of binding to the membranes is different from that of active compounds.

  15. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments and second structure information of Fag s 1: Fagales allergen from Fagus sylvatica.

    PubMed

    Moraes, A H; Asam, C; Batista, A; Almeida, F C L; Wallner, M; Ferreira, F; Valente, A P

    2016-04-01

    Fagales allergens belonging to the Bet v 1 family account responsible for the majority of spring pollinosis in the temperate climate zones in the Northern hemisphere. Among them, Fag s 1 from beech pollen is an important trigger of Fagales pollen associated allergic reactions. The protein shares high similarity with birch pollen Bet v 1, the best-characterized member of this allergen family. Of note, recent work on Bet v 1 and its homologues found in Fagales pollen demonstrated that not all allergenic members of this family have the capacity to induce allergic sensitization. Fag s 1 was shown to bind pre-existing IgE antibodies most likely primarily directed against other members of this multi-allergen family. Therefore, it is especially interesting to compare the structures of Bet v 1-like pollen allergens, which have the potential to induce allergic sensitization with allergens that are mainly cross-reactive. This in the end will help to identify allergy eliciting molecular pattern on Bet v 1-like allergens. In this work, we report the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C NMR assignment of beech pollen Fag s 1 as well as the secondary structure information based on backbone chemical shifts.

  16. Membrane resonance in bursting pacemaker neurons of an oscillatory network is correlated with network frequency.

    PubMed

    Tohidi, Vahid; Nadim, Farzan

    2009-05-20

    Network oscillations typically span a limited range of frequency. In pacemaker-driven networks, including many central pattern generators (CPGs), this frequency range is determined by the properties of bursting pacemaker neurons and their synaptic connections; thus, factors that affect the burst frequency of pacemaker neurons should play a role in determining the network frequency. We examine the role of membrane resonance of pacemaker neurons on the network frequency in the crab pyloric CPG. The pyloric oscillations (frequency of approximately 1 Hz) are generated by a group of pacemaker neurons: the anterior burster (AB) and the pyloric dilator (PD). We examine the impedance profiles of the AB and PD neurons in response to sinusoidal current injections with varying frequency and find that both neuron types exhibit membrane resonance, i.e., demonstrate maximal impedance at a given preferred frequency. The membrane resonance frequencies of the AB and PD neurons fall within the range of the pyloric network oscillation frequency. Experiments with pharmacological blockers and computational modeling show that both calcium currents I(Ca) and the hyperpolarization-activated inward current I(h) are important in producing the membrane resonance in these neurons. We then demonstrate that both the membrane resonance frequency of the PD neuron and its suprathreshold bursting frequency can be shifted in the same direction by either direct current injection or by using the dynamic-clamp technique to inject artificial conductances for I(h) or I(Ca). Together, these results suggest that membrane resonance of pacemaker neurons can be strongly correlated with the CPG oscillation frequency.

  17. Frequency dependence in seismoacoustic imaging of shallow free gas due to gas bubble resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Zsuzsanna; Spiess, Volkhard; Keil, Hanno

    2015-12-01

    Shallow free gas is investigated in seismoacoustic data in 10 frequency bands covering a frequency range between 0.2 and 43 kHz. At the edge of a gassy patch in the Bornholm Basin (Baltic Sea), compressional wave attenuation caused by free gas is estimated from reflection amplitudes beneath the gassy sediment layer. Imaging of shallow free gas is considerably influenced by gas bubble resonance, because in the resonance frequency range attenuation is significantly increased. At the resonance frequency of the largest bubbles between 3 and 5 kHz, high scattering causes complete acoustic blanking beneath the top of the gassy sediment layer. In the wider resonance frequency range between 3 and 15 kHz, the effect of smaller bubbles becomes dominant and the attenuation slightly decreases. This allows acoustic waves to be transmitted and reflections can be observed beneath the gassy sediment layer for higher frequencies. Above resonance beginning at ˜19 kHz, attenuation is low and the presence of free gas can be inferred from the decreased reflection amplitudes beneath the gassy layer. Below the resonance frequency range (<1 kHz), attenuation is generally very low and not dependent on frequency. Using the geoacoustic model of Anderson and Hampton, the observed frequency boundaries suggest gas bubble sizes between 1 and 4-6 mm, and gas volume fractions up to 0.02% in a ˜2 m thick sediment layer, whose upper boundary is the gas front. With the multifrequency acoustic approach and the Anderson and Hampton model, quantification of free gas in shallow marine environments is possible if the measurement frequency range allows the identification of the resonance frequency peak. The method presented is limited to places with only moderate attenuation, where the amplitudes of a reflection can be analyzed beneath the gassy sediment layer.

  18. Safety of implantable coronary stents during 1H-magnetic resonance imaging at 1.0 and 1.5 T.

    PubMed

    Strohm, O; Kivelitz, D; Gross, W; Schulz-Menger, J; Liu, X; Hamm, B; Dietz, R; Friedrich, M G

    1999-01-01

    The safety of most available implantable intracoronary stents during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has not been sufficiently tested. Minor, but possibly clinically significant, increases in temperature have not been excluded. We measured temperature changes of 14 different stents clinically in use or currently tested for release on the world market. Stents were examined in 1.0- and 1.5-T MR scanners with multiple sequences used in routine cardiac and thoracic MRI examinations ("clinical worst case") and after implantation of the stents into the coronary arteries of excised pig hearts (1.5-T scanner only). We used a highly sensitive infrared camera with a thermal resolution of 10 mK and did not see significant heating of any stent during the examinations. We conclude that MRI is safe in patients with the currently available intracoronary stents.

  19. 1H, 15N, 13C resonance assignment of 9.7 M urea-denatured state of the GTPase effector domain (GED) of dynamin.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Jeetender; Sharma, Shilpy; Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2009-06-01

    The GTPase effector domain (GED) of dynamin, a multi-domain protein involved in endocytosis, forms a megadalton-sized self-assembly (even at micromolar concentrations) in native conditions in vitro. While such large assemblies have remained inaccessible to detailed NMR structural characterization, till date, a significant recent achievement has been the elucidation of the GED association pathway starting from a Gdn-HCl denatured monomer. Since, the nature of the denaturant has a strong influence on the conformational preferences in the denatured states, and hence on the association pathways, or even on the final assembly, we report here the NMR resonance assignment of 9.7 M urea-denatured GED from Homo sapiens. This will form the basis for the characterization of the association pathways and the final assembly driven by urea dilution.

  20. Amide proton exchange in the. cap alpha. -amylase polypeptide inhibitor tendamistat studied by two-dimensional /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, O.; Kline, A.D.; Wuethrich, K.

    1987-10-06

    The individual amide proton exchange rates in Tendamistat at pH 3.0 and 50/sup 0/C were measured by using two-dimensional ..cap alpha..H nuclear magnetic resonance. Overall, it was found that the distribution of exchange rates along the sequence is dominated by the interstrand hydrogen bonds of the ..beta..-sheet structures. The slowly exchanging protons in the core of the two ..beta..-sheets were shown to exchange via an EX2 mechanism. Further analysis of the data indicates that different large-scale structure fluctuations are responsible for the exchange from the two ..beta..-sheets, even though the three-dimensional structure of Tendamistat appears to consist of a single structural domain.

  1. Sequence-specific {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments for intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein complexed with palmitate (15.4 kDA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hodsdon, M.E.; Toner, J.J.; Cistola, D.P.

    1994-12-01

    Intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein (I-FABP) belongs to a family of soluble, cytoplasmic proteins that are thought to function in the intracellular transport and trafficking of polar lipids. Individual members of this protein family have distinct specificities and affinities for fatty acids, cholesterol, bile salts, and retinoids. We are comparing several retinol- and fatty-acid-binding proteins from intestine in order to define the factors that control molecular recognition in this family of proteins. We have established sequential resonance assignments for uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-enriched I-FABP complexed with perdeuterated palmitate at pH7.2 and 37{degrees}C. The assignment strategy was similar to that introduced for calmodulin. We employed seven three-dimensional NMR experiments to establish scalar couplings between backbone and sidechain atoms. Backbone atoms were correlated using triple-resonance HNCO, HNCA, TOCSY-HMQC, HCACO, and HCA(CO)N experiments. Sidechain atoms were correlated using CC-TOCSY, HCCH-TOCSY, and TOCSY-HMQC. The correlations of peaks between three-dimensional spectra were established in a computer-assisted manner using NMR COMPASS (Molecular Simulations, Inc.) Using this approach, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments have been established for 120 of the 131 residues of I-FABP. For 18 residues, amide {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances were unobservable, apparently because of the rapid exchange of amide protons with bulk water at pH 7.2. The missing amide protons correspond to distinct amino acid patterns in the protein sequence, which will be discussed. During the assignment process, several sources of ambiguity in spin correlations were observed. To overcome this ambiguity, the additional inter-residue correlations often observed in the HNCA experiment were used as cross-checks for the sequential backbone assignments.

  2. Cryptococcus neoformans Chemotyping by Quantitative Analysis of 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectra of Glucuronoxylomannans with a Computer-Simulated Artificial Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Cherniak, Robert; Valafar, Homayoun; Morris, Laura C.; Valafar, Faramarz

    1998-01-01

    The complete assignment of the proton chemical shifts obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of de-O-acetylated glucuronoxylomannans (GXMs) from Cryptococcus neoformans permitted the high-resolution determination of the total structure of any GXM. Six structural motifs based on an α-(1→3)-mannotriose substituted with variable quantities of 2-O-β- and 4-O-β-xylopyranosyl and 2-O-β-glucopyranosyluronic acid were identified. The chemical shifts of only the anomeric protons of the mannosyl residues served as structure reporter groups (SRG) for the identification and quantitation of the six triads present in any GXM. The assigned protons for the mannosyl residues resonated at clearly distinguishable positions in the spectrum and supplied all the information essential for the assignment of the complete GXM structure. This technique for assigning structure is referred to as the SRG concept. The SRG concept was used to analyze the distribution of the six mannosyl triads of GXMs obtained from 106 isolates of C. neoformans. The six mannosyl triads occurred singularly or in combination with one or more of the other triads. The identification and quantitation of the SRG were simplified by using a computer-simulated artificial neural network (ANN) to automatically analyze the SRG region of the one-dimensional proton NMR spectra. The occurrence and relative distribution of the six mannosyl triads were used to chemotype C. neoformans on the basis of subtle variations in GXM structure determined by analysis of the SRG region of the proton NMR spectrum by the ANN. The data for the distribution of the six SRGs from GXMs of 106 isolates of C. neoformans yielded eight chemotypes, Chem1 through Chem8. PMID:9521136

  3. Combination and simultaneous resonances of gas bubbles oscillating in liquids under dual-frequency acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Zhang, Yuning; Li, Shengcai

    2017-03-01

    The multi-frequency acoustic excitation has been employed to enhance the effects of oscillating bubbles in sonochemistry for many years. In the present paper, nonlinear dynamic oscillations of bubble under dual-frequency acoustic excitation are numerically investigated within a broad range of parameters. By investigating the power spectra and the response curves of oscillating bubbles, two unique features of bubble oscillations under dual-frequency excitation (termed as "combination resonance" and "simultaneous resonance") are revealed and discussed. Specifically, the amplitudes of the combination resonances are quantitatively compared with those of other traditional resonances (e.g. main resonances, harmonics). The influences of several paramount parameters (e.g., the bubble radius, the acoustic pressure amplitude, the energy allocation between two component waves) on nonlinear bubble oscillations are demonstrated.

  4. MEMS switching of contour-mode aluminum nitride resonators for switchable and reconfigurable radio frequency filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordquist, Christopher D.; Branch, Darren W.; Pluym, Tammy; Choi, Sukwon; Nguyen, Janet H.; Grine, Alejandro; Dyck, Christopher W.; Scott, Sean M.; Sing, Molly N.; Olsson, Roy H., III

    2016-10-01

    Switching of transducer coupling in aluminum nitride contour-mode resonators provides an enabling technology for future tunable and reconfigurable filters for multi-function RF systems. By using microelectromechanical capacitive switches to realize the transducer electrode fingers, coupling between the metal electrode finger and the piezoelectric material is modulated to change the response of the device. On/off switched width extensional resonators with an area of  <0.2 mm2 demonstrate a Q of 2000, K 2 of 0.72, and  >24 dB switching ratio at a resonator center frequency of 635 MHz. Other device examples include a 63 MHz resonator with switchable impedance and a 470 MHz resonator with 127 kHz of fine center frequency tuning accomplished by mass loading of the resonator with the MEMS switches.

  5. Locally resonant periodic structures with low-frequency band gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhibao; Shi, Zhifei; Mo, Y. L.; Xiang, Hongjun

    2013-07-01

    Presented in this paper are study results of dispersion relationships of periodic structures composited of concrete and rubber, from which the frequency band gap can be found. Two models with fixed or free boundary conditions are proposed to approximate the bound frequencies of the first band gap. Studies are conducted to investigate the low-frequency and directional frequency band gaps for their application to engineering. The study finds that civil engineering structures can be designed to block harmful waves, such as earthquake disturbance.

  6. Surface plasmon optical antennae in the infrared region with high resonant efficiency and frequency selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kosei; Sun, Quan; Mino, Masahiro; Itoh, Takumi; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2016-08-08

    Infrared light has received attention for sensor applications, including fingerprint spectroscopy, in the bioengineering and security fields. Surface plasmon physics enables the operation of a light harvesting optical antenna. Gold nanochains exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the infrared region with high frequency selectivity. However, a feasible design for optical antennae with a higher resonant efficiency and frequency selectivity as a function of structural design and periodicity is still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between the resonant efficiency and frequency selectivity as a function of the structural design of gold nanochains and explored structural periodicity for obtaining highly frequency-selective optical antennae. An optical antenna design with higher resonant efficiency is proposed on the basis of its efficient interaction with non-polarized light.

  7. Effects of size, shape, and frequency on the antiferromagnetic resonance linewidth of MnF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    The research concerning the properties and application of solid state materials at submillimeter frequencies is summarized. Work reported includes: far infrared Fourier spectroscopy; studies of the antiferromagnetic resonance line in MnF2 at millimeter wavelengths; numerical solution of the equations of motion of a general two-sublattice antiferromagnet; study of antiferromagnetic resonance line in NiO powder; and resonance investigations of several indium thisospinels at millimeter wavelengths.

  8. Electrostatically tunable resonance frequency beam utilizing a stress-sensitive film

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Wachter, Eric A.; Davis, J. Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for detecting particular frequencies of acoustic vibration utilize an electrostatically-tunable beam element having a stress-sensitive coating and means for providing electrostatic force to controllably deflect the beam element thereby changing its stiffness and its resonance frequency. It is then determined from the response of the electrostatically-tunable beam element to the acoustical vibration to which the beam is exposed whether or not a particular frequency or frequencies of acoustic vibration are detected.

  9. Magnetically tunable resonance frequency beam utilizing a stress-sensitive film

    DOEpatents

    Davis, J. Kenneth; Thundat, Thomas G.; Wachter, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for detecting particular frequencies of vibration utilize a magnetically-tunable beam element having a stress-sensitive coating and means for providing magnetic force to controllably deflect the beam element thereby changing its stiffness and its resonance frequency. It is then determined from the response of the magnetically-tunable beam element to the vibration to which the beam is exposed whether or not a particular frequency or frequencies of vibration are detected.

  10. Resonance propagation of electrons through three-barrier structures in a two-frequency electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Pashkovskii, A. B.

    2011-06-15

    The solution of the Schroedinger equation that describes resonance transitions between three equidistant quantum levels in asymmetric three-barrier resonance-tunnel structures in a high one-frequency electric field is extended to the case of differently separated levels and a two-frequency field, with the frequencies corresponding to resonance transitions in each of the coupled quantum wells. It is shown that, in the conditions of coherent electron transport, irrespective of the parameters of the structure, for any amplitude of the high resonance field in one well, there exists an amplitude of the resonance field in the other well such that the structure is absolutely transparent and most electrons (in the limiting case, all electrons) incident on the upper resonance level can emit two photons with different frequencies and leave the structure through the lower level with no intermediate interaction with phonons. The probability of the transitions substantially depends on the amplitudes of the fields and does not depend on the phase difference between the fields. It is found that the possibility exists of almost complete blocking of resonance transitions in one of the wells by a high-frequency field in the other well.

  11. Early increase in marker of neuronal integrity with antidepressant treatment of major depression: 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of N-acetyl-aspartate

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Matthew J.; Godlewska, Beata R.; Norbury, Ray; Selvaraj, Sudhakar; Near, Jamie; Cowen, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing interest surrounds potential neuroprotective or neurotrophic actions of antidepressants. While growing evidence points to important early clinical and neuropsychological effects of antidepressants, the time-course of any effect on neuronal integrity is unclear. This study used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to assess effects of short-term treatment with escitalopram on N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), a marker of neuronal integrity. Thirty-nine participants with major depression were randomly assigned to receive either 10 mg escitalopram or placebo daily in a double-blind, parallel group design. On the seventh day of treatment, PRESS data were obtained from a 30×30×20 mm voxel placed in medial frontal cortex. Age and gender-matched healthy controls who received no treatment were also scanned. Levels of NAA were significantly higher in patients treated with escitalopram than in either placebo-treated patients (p<0.01) or healthy controls (p<0.01). Our findings are consistent with the proposition that antidepressant treatment in depressed patients can produce early changes in neuronal integrity. PMID:22449253

  12. Early increase in marker of neuronal integrity with antidepressant treatment of major depression: 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of N-acetyl-aspartate.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Matthew J; Godlewska, Beata R; Norbury, Ray; Selvaraj, Sudhakar; Near, Jamie; Cowen, Philip J

    2012-11-01

    Increasing interest surrounds potential neuroprotective or neurotrophic actions of antidepressants. While growing evidence points to important early clinical and neuropsychological effects of antidepressants, the time-course of any effect on neuronal integrity is unclear. This study used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to assess effects of short-term treatment with escitalopram on N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), a marker of neuronal integrity. Thirty-nine participants with major depression were randomly assigned to receive either 10 mg escitalopram or placebo daily in a double-blind, parallel group design. On the seventh day of treatment, PRESS data were obtained from a 30×30×20 mm voxel placed in medial frontal cortex. Age and gender-matched healthy controls who received no treatment were also scanned. Levels of NAA were significantly higher in patients treated with escitalopram than in either placebo-treated patients (p<0.01) or healthy controls (p<0.01). Our findings are consistent with the proposition that antidepressant treatment in depressed patients can produce early changes in neuronal integrity.

  13. Nonlinear series resonance and standing waves in dual-frequency capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, De-Qi; Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Wang, You-Nian

    2017-01-01

    It is well-known that the nonlinear series resonance in a high frequency capacitive discharge enhances the electron power deposition and also creates standing waves which produce radially center-high rf voltage profiles. In this work, the dynamics of series resonance and wave effects are examined in a dual-frequency driven discharge, using an asymmetric radial transmission line model incorporating a Child law sheath. We consider a cylindrical argon discharge with a conducting electrode radius of 15 cm, gap length of 3 cm, with a base case having a 60 MHz high frequency voltage of 250 V and a 10 MHz low frequency voltage of 1000 V, with a high frequency phase shift {φ\\text{H}}=π between the two frequencies. For this phase shift there is only one sheath collapse, and the time-averaged spectral peaks of the normalized current density at the center are mainly centered on harmonic numbers 30 and 50 of the low frequency, corresponding to the first standing wave resonance frequency and the series resonance frequency, respectively. The effects of the waves on the series resonance dynamics near the discharge center give rise to significant enhancements in the electron power deposition, compared to that near the discharge edge. Adjusting the phase shift from π to 0, or decreasing the low frequency from 10 to 2 MHz, results in two or more sheath collapses, respectively, making the dynamics more complex. The sudden excitation of the perturbed series resonance current after the sheath collapse results in a current oscillation amplitude that is estimated from analytical and numerical calculations. Self-consistently determining the dc bias and including the conduction current is found to be important. The subsequent slow time variation of the high frequency oscillation is analyzed using an adiabatic theory.

  14. Capillary liquid chromatography-microcoil 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry for on-line structure elucidation of isoflavones in Radix astragali.

    PubMed

    Xiao, H B; Krucker, M; Putzbach, K; Albert, K

    2005-03-04

    Miniaturization and hyphenation of chromatographic separation techniques to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is being increasingly demanded in the field of biomedical, drug metabolite and natural product analysis. Herein, capillary liquid chromatography was coupled on-line to microcoil 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (capLC-NMR) equipped with a 1.5 microL solenoidal probe for structure elucidation of isoflavones in Radix astragali. The extract was screened by HPLC-UV-MS as the preliminary step and four major peaks were identified tentatively by ion trap mass spectrometry molecular weights and characteristic fragments. Then, stopped-flow capLC-UV-NMR was performed using 33 microg extract injected on-column. The four peaks were parked manually in the micro probe one by one and corresponding 1H NMR spectra were recorded with good resolutions under the applied capLC-NMR conditions (120 and 220 ng injected on-column for peaks 2 and 4, respectively). All aromatic regions of 1H NMR spectra correlated well to the characteristic signals of isoflavone aglycone protons. And the signal corresponding to the anomeric proton of the glucopyranoside of isoflavone glycoside was also obtained for peak 1. Therefore, these four peaks are determined as calycosin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1), ononin (2), calycosin (3) and formononetin (4) unambiguously. The capLC-NMR results indicate that this hyphenated technique could be used for the determination of a great variety of natural products from small sample amounts, e.g., only 5 g R. astragali in this study.

  15. Electrostatic energy harvesting device with dual resonant structure for wideband random vibration sources at low frequency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulong; Wang, Tianyang; Zhang, Ai; Peng, Zhuoteng; Luo, Dan; Chen, Rui; Wang, Fei

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present design and test of a broadband electrostatic energy harvester with a dual resonant structure, which consists of two cantilever-mass subsystems each with a mass attached at the free edge of a cantilever. Comparing to traditional devices with single resonant frequency, the proposed device with dual resonant structure can resonate at two frequencies. Furthermore, when one of the cantilever-masses is oscillating at resonance, the vibration amplitude is large enough to make it collide with the other mass, which provides strong mechanical coupling between the two subsystems. Therefore, this device can harvest a decent power output from vibration sources at a broad frequency range. During the measurement, continuous power output up to 6.2-9.8 μW can be achieved under external vibration amplitude of 9.3 m/s(2) at a frequency range from 36.3 Hz to 48.3 Hz, which means the bandwidth of the device is about 30% of the central frequency. The broad bandwidth of the device provides a promising application for energy harvesting from the scenarios with random vibration sources. The experimental results indicate that with the dual resonant structure, the vibration-to-electricity energy conversion efficiency can be improved by 97% when an external random vibration with a low frequency filter is applied.

  16. Relationship between fractional anisotropy of cerebral white matter and metabolite concentrations measured using (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Wijtenburg, S A; McGuire, S A; Rowland, L M; Sherman, P M; Lancaster, J L; Tate, D F; Hardies, L J; Patel, B; Glahn, D C; Hong, L E; Fox, P T; Kochunov, P

    2013-02-01

    Fractional anisotropy (FA) of water diffusion in cerebral white matter (WM), derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), is a sensitive index of microscopic WM integrity. Physiological and metabolic factors that explain intersubject variability in FA values were evaluated in two cohorts of healthy adults of different age spans (N=65, range: 28-50years; and N=25, age=66.6±6.2, range: 57-80years). Single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to measure N-acetylaspartate (NAA), total choline-containing compounds, and total creatine, bilaterally in an associative WM tract: anterior corona radiata (ACR). FA values were calculated for the underlying, proximal and two distal WM regions. Two-stage regression analysis was used to calculate the proportion of variability in FA values explained by spectroscopy measurements, at the first stage, and subject's age, at the second stage. WM NAA concentration explained 23% and 66% of intersubject variability (p<0.001) in the FA of the underlying WM in the younger and older cohorts, respectively. WM NAA concentration also explained a significant proportion of variability in FA of the genu of corpus callosum (CC), a proximal WM tract where some of the fibers contained within the spectroscopic voxel decussate. NAA concentrations also explained a significant proportion of variability in the FA values in the splenium of CC, a distal WM tract that also carries associative fibers, in both cohorts. These results suggest that MRS measurements explained a significant proportion of variability in FA values in both proximal and distal WM tracts that carry similar fiber-types.

  17. The simultaneous binding of lanthanide and N-acetylglucosamine inhibitors to hen egg-white lysozyme in solution by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, S J; Johnson, L N; Phillips, D C; Dwek, R A

    1981-01-01

    Lanthanide ions and the N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) sugars are able to bind simultaneously to hen egg-white lysozyme (EC 3.2.1.17). The present study characterizes the properties of the ternary complexes with lysozyme, which involve up to seven paramagnetic lanthanides and two diamagnetic lanthanides, together with alpha GlcNAc, beta GlcNAc, alpha MeGlcNAc and beta MeGlcNAc. pH titrations and binding titrations of the GlcNAc sugars with lysozyme-La(III) complexes show that the GlcNAc sugars bind to at least two independent sites and that one of them competes with La(III) for binding to lysozyme. Given the known binding site of lanthanides at Asp-52 and Glu-35, the competitive binding site of GlcNAc is identified as subsite E. A simple analysis of the paramagnetic-lanthanide-induced shifts shows that the GlcNAc sugar binds in subsite C, in accordance with crystallographic results [Perkins, Johnson, Machin & Phillips (1979) Biochem. J. 181, 21-36]. This finding was refined by several computer analyses of the lanthanide-induced shifts of 17 proton and carbon resonances of beta MeGlcNAc. Good fits were obtained for all the signals, except for two that were affected by exchange broadening phenomena. No distinction could be made between a fit for a two-position model of Ln(III) binding with axial symmetry to lysozyme, according to the crystallographic result, or a one-position model with axial symmetry where the Ln(III) is positioned mid-way between Asp-52 and Glu-35. Although this work establishes the feasibility of lanthanide shift reagents for study of protein-ligand complexes, further work is required to establish the manner in which lanthanides bind to lysozyme in solution. PMID:7305947

  18. Exceeding natural resonance frequency limit of monodisperse Fe3O4 nanoparticles via superparamagnetic relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ning-Ning; Yang, Hai-Tao; Liu, Hao-Liang; Ren, Xiao; Ding, Hao-Feng; Zhang, Xiang-Qun; Cheng, Zhao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted much research interest in the past decades due to their potential applications in microwave devices. Here, we adopted a novel technique to tune cut-off frequency exceeding the natural resonance frequency limit of monodisperse Fe3O4 nanoparticles via superparamagnetic relaxation. We observed that the cut-off frequency can be enhanced from 5.3 GHz for Fe3O4 to 6.9 GHz forFe3O4@SiO2 core-shell structure superparamagnetic nanoparticles, which are much higher than the natural resonance frequency of 1.3 GHz for Fe3O4 bulk material. This finding not only provides us a new approach to enhance the resonance frequency beyond the Snoek's limit, but also extend the application for superparamagnetic nanoparticles to microwave devices. PMID:24196377

  19. The Role of High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Predicting the Invasive Component in Patients with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Diagnosed on Preoperative Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Eun Young; Kim, Suhkmann; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Siwon; Shim, Ye Eun; Kim, Hak Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Choi, Woo Jung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hee Jin; Gong, Gyungyub

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed on preoperative biopsy. We investigated whether the metabolic profiling of tissue samples using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy could be used to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. Our institutional review board approved this combined retrospective and prospective study. Tissue samples were collected from 30 patients with pure DCIS and from 30 with DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. All patients were diagnosed with DCIS by preoperative core-needle biopsy and underwent surgical resection. The metabolic profiling of tissue samples was performed by HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. All observable metabolite signals were identified and quantified in all tissue samples. Metabolite intensity normalized by total spectral intensities was compared according to the tumor type using the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal projections to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). By univariate analysis, the metabolite concentrations of choline-containing compounds obtained with HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy did not differ significantly between the pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma groups. However, the GPC/PC ratio was higher in the pure DCIS group than in the DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma group (p = 0.004, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.064), as well as the concentration of myo-inositol and succinate. By multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MR metabolic profiles could clearly discriminate between pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. Our preliminary results suggest that HR-MAS MR metabolomics on breast tissue may be able to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. PMID:27560937

  20. Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry at the Cyclotron Frequency.

    PubMed

    Nagornov, Konstantin O; Kozhinov, Anton N; Tsybin, Yury O

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon of ion cyclotron resonance allows for determining mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of an ensemble of ions by means of measurements of their cyclotron frequency, ω c . In Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), the ω c quantity is usually unavailable for direct measurements: the resonant state is located close to the reduced cyclotron frequency (ω+), whereas the ω c and the corresponding m/z values may be calculated via theoretical derivation from an experimental estimate of the ω+ quantity. Here, we describe an experimental observation of a new resonant state, which is located close to the ω c frequency and is established because of azimuthally-dependent trapping electric fields of the recently developed ICR cells with narrow aperture detection electrodes. We show that in mass spectra, peaks close to ω+ frequencies can be reduced to negligible levels relative to peaks close to ω c frequencies. Due to reduced errors with which the ω c quantity is obtained, the new resonance provides a means of cyclotron frequency measurements with precision greater than that achieved when ω+ frequency peaks are employed. The described phenomenon may be considered for a development into an FT-ICR MS technology with increased mass accuracy for applications in basic research, life, and environmental sciences. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. Resonant frequency and hysteresis of a stack actuator made of single crystal (PMN-29PT) layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, K. S.; Lee, H. Y.; Kim, Y.; Park, H. C.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we have presented the dynamic behavior of a piezoelectric stack actuator made of forty layers of single-crystal (PMN-29PT) with an area of 10 × 10 mm2 and thickness of 1 mm. To conduct a dynamic test of the actuator, we built a test apparatus with dummy weights that was placed over the top of the actuator to measure the actuation displacement. The resonant frequencies of the actuator with and without the dummy weight were determined as the excitation frequencies where a significant increase in the actuation displacement could be observed. We also proposed an analytical multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) model of the actuator to analytically predict the resonant frequency. Finite element analyses were conducted to validate the analytically predicted and measured resonant frequencies. With no dummy weight, the resonant frequency of the actuator was measured at 730.00 Hz, which was 0.70% higher than the one calculated by the MDOF model and 0.10% smaller than that of the finite element model. With a dummy weight, the measured resonant frequency was lower than 730.00 Hz and close enough to those computed by the MDOF model and the finite element model. The hysteresis curves of the actuator at various frequencies indicated that the actuator might incur a small energy loss.

  2. Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry at the Cyclotron Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2017-02-01

    The phenomenon of ion cyclotron resonance allows for determining mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of an ensemble of ions by means of measurements of their cyclotron frequency, ω c . In Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), the ω c quantity is usually unavailable for direct measurements: the resonant state is located close to the reduced cyclotron frequency (ω+), whereas the ω c and the corresponding m/z values may be calculated via theoretical derivation from an experimental estimate of the ω+ quantity. Here, we describe an experimental observation of a new resonant state, which is located close to the ω c frequency and is established because of azimuthally-dependent trapping electric fields of the recently developed ICR cells with narrow aperture detection electrodes. We show that in mass spectra, peaks close to ω+ frequencies can be reduced to negligible levels relative to peaks close to ω c frequencies. Due to reduced errors with which the ω c quantity is obtained, the new resonance provides a means of cyclotron frequency measurements with precision greater than that achieved when ω+ frequency peaks are employed. The described phenomenon may be considered for a development into an FT-ICR MS technology with increased mass accuracy for applications in basic research, life, and environmental sciences.

  3. Point-Wise Phase Matching for Nonlinear Frequency Generation in Dielectric Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Nan (Inventor); Strekalov, Dmitry V. (Inventor); Lin, Guoping (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An optical resonator fabricated from a uniaxial birefringent crystal, such as beta barium borate. The crystal is cut with the optical axis not perpendicular to a face of the cut crystal. In some cases the optical axis lies in the plane of the cut crystal face. An incident (input) electromagnetic signal (which can range from the infrared through the visible to the ultraviolet) is applied to the resonator. An output signal is recovered which has a frequency that is an integer multiple of the frequency of the input signal. In some cases a prism is used to evanescently couple the input and the output signals to the resonator.

  4. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified as primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance to wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C ratio

  5. Performance and modeling of superconducting ring resonators at millimeter-wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Chorey, C. M.; Warner, J. D.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Heinen, V. O.; Kong, K. S.; Lee, H. Y.; Itoh, T.

    1990-01-01

    Microstrip ring resonators operating at 35 GHz were fabricated from laser ablated YBCO thin films deposited on lanthanum aluminate substrates. They were measured over a range of temperatures and their performance compared to identical resonators made of evaporated gold. Below 60 Kelvin the superconducting strip performed better than the gold, reaching an unloaded Q approximately 1.5 times that of gold at 25 K. A shift in the resonant frequency follows the form predicted by the London equations. The Phenomenological Loss Equivalence Method is applied to the ring resonator and the theoretically calculated Q values are compared to the experimental results.

  6. Ultraclean wafer-level vacuum-encapsulated silicon ring resonators for timing and frequency references

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xereas, George; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.

    2016-07-01

    We present the design and development of breath-mode silicon ring resonators fabricated using a commercial pure-play microfabrication process that provides ultraclean wafer-level vacuum-encapsulation. The micromechanical resonators are fabricated in MEMS integrated design for inertial sensors process that is developed by Teledyne DALSA Semiconductor Inc. The ring resonators are designed to operate with a relatively low DC polarization voltage, starting at 5 V, while providing a high frequency-quality factor product. We study the quality of the vacuum packaging using an automated testing setup over an extended time period. We study the effect of motional resistance on the performance of MEMS resonators. The fabricated devices had a resonant frequency of 10 MHz with the quality factor exceeding 8.4×104.

  7. Lower Bounds on the Frequency Estimation Error in Magnetically Coupled MEMS Resonant Sensors.

    PubMed

    Paden, Brad E

    2016-02-01

    MEMS inductor-capacitor (LC) resonant pressure sensors have revolutionized the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. In contrast to electrostatically driven MEMS resonators, these magnetically coupled devices are wireless so that they can be permanently implanted in the body and can communicate to an external coil via pressure-induced frequency modulation. Motivated by the importance of these sensors in this and other applications, this paper develops relationships among sensor design variables, system noise levels, and overall system performance. Specifically, new models are developed that express the Cramér-Rao lower bound for the variance of resonator frequency estimates in terms of system variables through a system of coupled algebraic equations, which can be used in design and optimization. Further, models are developed for a novel mechanical resonator in addition to the LC-type resonators.

  8. Asymmetric resonance frequency analysis of in-plane electrothermal silicon cantilevers for nanoparticle sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertke, Maik; Hamdana, Gerry; Wu, Wenze; Marks, Markus; Suryo Wasisto, Hutomo; Peiner, Erwin

    2016-10-01

    The asymmetric resonance frequency analysis of silicon cantilevers for a low-cost wearable airborne nanoparticle detector (Cantor) is described in this paper. The cantilevers, which are operated in the fundamental in-plane resonance mode, are used as a mass-sensitive microbalance. They are manufactured out of bulk silicon, containing a full piezoresistive Wheatstone bridge and an integrated thermal heater for reading the measurement output signal and stimulating the in-plane excitation, respectively. To optimize the sensor performance, cantilevers with different cantilever geometries are designed, fabricated and characterized. Besides the resonance frequency, the quality factor (Q) of the resonance curve has a high influence concerning the sensor sensitivity. Because of an asymmetric resonance behaviour, a novel fitting function and method to extract the Q is created, different from that of the simple harmonic oscillator (SHO). For testing the sensor in a long-term frequency analysis, a phase- locked loop (PLL) circuit is employed, yielding a frequency stability of up to 0.753 Hz at an Allan variance of 3.77 × 10-6. This proposed asymmetric resonance frequency analysis method is expected to be further used in the process development of the next-generation Cantor.

  9. Quantitative comparison of post-processing methods for reduction of frequency modulation sidebands in non-water suppression 1H MRS.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jyh-Miin; Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Shang-Yueh

    2013-04-01

    Non-water suppression MRS (NWS MRS) has several advantages. First, the unsuppressed water signal can be used as internal calibration for metabolite quantification and as a reliable frequency/phase reference for retrospective motion correction. Second, it avoids the potential artifacts caused by incomplete water suppression (WS) and extra radiofrequency deposition from WS pulses. However, the frequency modulation (FM) sidebands originating from a large water signal will distort the spectrum. Among the methods proposed to solve the problems caused by FM sidebands, post-acquisition processing methods are superior in flexibility for general use compared with experimental methods. In this study, we propose two algorithms based on advanced matrix decomposition to remove the FM sidebands. These methods, the simultaneous diagonalization (QZ) algorithm and its subsequent variant, the simultaneously generalized Schur decomposition (SGSD) algorithm, were numerically evaluated using computer simulations. In addition, we quantitatively compared the performance of these methods and the modulus method in an in vitro experiment and in vivo NWS MRS against conventional WS data. Our results show that the proposed SGSD algorithm can reduce the FM sidebands to achieve superior estimation of concentration on three major metabolites. This method can be applied directly to spectra pre-acquired under various experimental conditions without modifying the acquisition sequences.

  10. Frequency chirping for resonance-enhanced electron energy during laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D. N.; Suk, H.

    2006-04-01

    The model given by Singh-Tripathi [Phys. Plasmas 11, 743 (2004)] for laser electron acceleration in a magnetic wiggler is revisited by including the effect of laser frequency chirping. Laser frequency chirp helps to maintain the resonance condition longer, which increases the electron energy gain. A significant enhancement in electron energy gain during laser acceleration is observed.

  11. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Stambuk, Hilda E.; Wang Ya; Fury, Matthew G.; Patel, Senehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among {sup 1}H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K{sup trans}]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v{sub e}]; and redistribution rate constant [k{sub ep}]), and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG ({rho} = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v{sub e}) ({rho} = -0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k{sub ep}) ({rho} = -0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume ({rho} = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K{sup trans}) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p < 0.07). Conclusion: Pretreatment multimodality imaging using {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  12. Frequency-dependent conductivity contrast for tissue characterization using a dual-frequency range conductivity mapping magnetic resonance method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Chauhan, Munish; Kim, Min-Oh; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kim, Hyung Joong; Sersa, Igor; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-02-01

    Electrical conductivities of biological tissues show frequency-dependent behaviors, and these values at different frequencies may provide clinically useful diagnostic information. MR-based tissue property mapping techniques such as magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) and magnetic resonance electrical property tomography (MREPT) are widely used and provide unique conductivity contrast information over different frequency ranges. Recently, a new method for data acquisition and reconstruction for low- and high-frequency conductivity images from a single MR scan was proposed. In this study, we applied this simultaneous dual-frequency range conductivity mapping MR method to evaluate its utility in a designed phantom and two in vivo animal disease models. Magnetic flux density and B(1)(+) phase map for dual-frequency conductivity images were acquired using a modified spin-echo pulse sequence. Low-frequency conductivity was reconstructed from MREIT data by the projected current density method, while high-frequency conductivity was reconstructed from MREPT data by B(1)(+) mapping. Two different conductivity phantoms comprising varying ion concentrations separated by insulating films with or without holes were used to study the contrast mechanism of the frequency-dependent conductivities related to ion concentration and mobility. Canine brain abscess and ischemia were used as in vivo models to evaluate the capability of the proposed method to identify new electrical properties-based contrast at two different frequencies. The simultaneous dual-frequency range conductivity mapping MR method provides unique contrast information related to the concentration and mobility of ions inside tissues. This method has potential to monitor dynamic changes of the state of disease.

  13. Frequency-selective propagation of localized spoof surface plasmons in a graded plasmonic resonator chain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Shastri, Kunal Krishnaraj; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    Localized spoof surface plasmon polaritons (spoof-SPPs) in a graded spoof-plasmonic resonator chain with linearly increasing spacing are experimentally investigated at microwave frequencies. Transmission measurements and direct near-field mappings on this graded chain show that the propagation of localized spoof-SPPs can be cutoff at different positions along the graded chain under different frequencies due to the graded coupling between adjacent resonators. This mechanism can be used to guide localized spoof-SPPs in the graded chain to specific positions depending on the frequency and thereby implement a device that can work as a selective switch in integrated plasmonic circuits. PMID:27149656

  14. Graphene-hexagonal boron nitride resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Gaskell, J.; Fromhold, T. M.; Greenaway, M. T.; Eaves, L.; Novoselov, K. S.; Mishchenko, A.; Geim, A. K.

    2015-09-07

    We assess the potential of two-terminal graphene-hexagonal boron nitride-graphene resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators, using self-consistent quantum transport and electrostatic simulations to determine the time-dependent response of the diodes in a resonant circuit. We quantify how the frequency and power of the current oscillations depend on the diode and circuit parameters including the doping of the graphene electrodes, device geometry, alignment of the graphene lattices, and the circuit impedances. Our results indicate that current oscillations with frequencies of up to several hundred GHz should be achievable.

  15. Advanced simulation methods to detect resonant frequency stack up in focal plane design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Craig; Malone, Neil R.; Torres, Raymond; Fajardo, Armando; Vampola, John; Drechsler, William; Parlato, Russell; Cobb, Christopher; Randolph, Max; Chiourn, Surath; Swinehart, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Wire used to connect focal plane electrical connections to external electrical circuitry can be modeled using the length, diameter and loop height to determine the resonant frequency. The design of the adjacent electric board and mounting platform can also be analyzed. The combined resonant frequency analysis can then be used to decouple the different component resonant frequencies to eliminate the potential for metal fatigue in the wires. It is important to note that the nominal maximum stress values that cause metal fatigue can be much less than the ultimate tensile stress limit or the yield stress limit and are degraded further at resonant frequencies. It is critical that tests be done to qualify designs that are not easily simulated due to material property variation and complex structures. Sine wave vibration testing is a critical component of qualification vibration and provides the highest accuracy in determining the resonant frequencies which can be reduced or uncorrelated improving the structural performance of the focal plane assembly by small changes in design damping or modern space material selection. Vibration flow down from higher levels of assembly needs consideration for intermediary hardware, which may amplify or attenuate the full up system vibration profile. A simple pass through of vibration requirements may result in over test or missing amplified resonant frequencies that can cause system failure. Examples are shown of metal wire fatigue such as discoloration and microscopic cracks which are visible at the submicron level by the use of a scanning electron microscope. While it is important to model and test resonant frequencies the Focal plane must also be constrained such that Coefficient of Thermal expansion mismatches are allowed to move and not overstress the FPA.

  16. Off-resonance frequency operation for power transfer in a loosely coupled air core transformer

    DOEpatents

    Scudiere, Matthew B

    2012-11-13

    A power transmission system includes a loosely coupled air core transformer having a resonance frequency determined by a product of inductance and capacitance of a primary circuit including a primary coil. A secondary circuit is configured to have a substantially same product of inductance and capacitance. A back EMF generating device (e.g., a battery), which generates a back EMF with power transfer, is attached to the secondary circuit. Once the load power of the back EMF generating device exceeds a certain threshold level, which depends on the system parameters, the power transfer can be achieved at higher transfer efficiency if performed at an operating frequency less than the resonance frequency, which can be from 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency.

  17. Precise rainbow trapping for low-frequency acoustic waves with micro Mie resonance-based structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Yuan, Baoguo; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    We have realized the acoustic rainbow trapping in the low frequency region (200-500 Hz) through micro Mie resonance-based structures. The structure has eight channels with a high refractive index obtained by coiling space, that can excite strong interactions with incident waves and support various orders of multipoles due to the Mie resonances of the microstructure. By utilizing the structure, the precise spatial modulation of the acoustic wave is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. The effect of trapping broadband acoustic waves and spatially separating different frequency components are ascribed to the monopolar Mie resonances of the structures. The trapping frequency is derived and the trapping positions can be tuned arbitrarily. With enhanced wave-structure interactions and tailored frequency responses, such micro structures show precise spectral-spatial control of acoustic waves and open a diverse venue for high performance acoustic wave detection, sensing, filtering, and a nondestructive test.

  18. A frequency up-converting harvester based on internal resonance in 2-DOF nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yipeng; Qiu, Jinhao; Ji, Hongli

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the design and experimental testing of a novel frequency up- converting piezoelectric energy harvester. The harvester is firstly approximated as a 2-degree- of-freedom cubic nonlinear system instead of the general Duffing systems. A 1:3 internal resonance innovatively applied in the frequency up-conversion approach is thoroughly investigated. Finally, the theoretical dynamic model confirmed by the experimental results clearly shows the effect of the frequency up-conversion.

  19. Diode-laser frequency stabilization based on the resonant Faraday effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The authors present the results of a method for frequency stabilizing laser diodes based on the resonant Faraday effects. A Faraday cell in conjunction with a polarizer crossed with respect to the polarization of the laser diode comprises the intracavity frequency selective element. In this arrangement, a laser pull-in range of 9 A was measured, and the laser operated at a single frequency with a linewidth less than 6 MHz.

  20. Center Frequency Stabilization in Planar Dual-Mode Resonators during Mode-Splitting Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, Adham; Soliman, Mina H.

    2017-03-01

    Shape symmetry in dual-mode planar electromagnetic resonators results in their ability to host two degenerate resonant modes. As the designer enforces a controllable break in the symmetry, the degeneracy is removed and the two modes couple, exchanging energy and elevating the resonator into its desirable second-order resonance operation. The amount of coupling is controlled by the degree of asymmetry introduced. However, this mode coupling (or splitting) usually comes at a price. The centre frequency of the perturbed resonator is inadvertently drifted from its original value prior to coupling. Maintaining centre frequency stability during mode splitting is a nontrivial geometric design problem. In this paper, we analyse the problem and propose a novel method to compensate for this frequency drift, based on field analysis and perturbation theory, and we validate the solution through a practical design example and measurements. The analytical method used works accurately within the perturbational limit. It may also be used as a starting point for further numerical optimization algorithms, reducing the required computational time during design, when larger perturbations are made to the resonator. In addition to enabling the novel design example presented, it is hoped that the findings will inspire akin designs for other resonator shapes, in different disciplines and applications.

  1. Center Frequency Stabilization in Planar Dual-Mode Resonators during Mode-Splitting Control

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Adham; Soliman, Mina H.

    2017-01-01

    Shape symmetry in dual-mode planar electromagnetic resonators results in their ability to host two degenerate resonant modes. As the designer enforces a controllable break in the symmetry, the degeneracy is removed and the two modes couple, exchanging energy and elevating the resonator into its desirable second-order resonance operation. The amount of coupling is controlled by the degree of asymmetry introduced. However, this mode coupling (or splitting) usually comes at a price. The centre frequency of the perturbed resonator is inadvertently drifted from its original value prior to coupling. Maintaining centre frequency stability during mode splitting is a nontrivial geometric design problem. In this paper, we analyse the problem and propose a novel method to compensate for this frequency drift, based on field analysis and perturbation theory, and we validate the solution through a practical design example and measurements. The analytical method used works accurately within the perturbational limit. It may also be used as a starting point for further numerical optimization algorithms, reducing the required computational time during design, when larger perturbations are made to the resonator. In addition to enabling the novel design example presented, it is hoped that the findings will inspire akin designs for other resonator shapes, in different disciplines and applications. PMID:28272422

  2. Ultra-Narrow Bandwidth Optical Resonators for Integrated Low Frequency Noise Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Daryl T.

    The development of narrowband resonators has far reaching applications in integrated optics. As a precise reference of wavelength, filters can be used in sensors, metrology, nonlinear optics, microwave photonics, and laser stabilization. In this work, we develop record high quality factor (Q) Si 3N4 waveguide resonators, and utilize them to stabilize a heterogeneously integrated Si/III V laser. To increase the Q factor of waveguide resonators, particular attention is given to loss mechanisms. Propagation loss of <0.1 dB/m is demonstrated on the ultra low loss waveguide platform, a low index contrast, high aspect ratio Si3N4 waveguide geometry fabricated with high quality materials and high temperature anneals. Ideality in the directional couplers used for coupling to the resonators is studied and losses are reduced such that 81 million intrinsic Q factor is achieved. Additional results include 1x16 resonant splitters, low ? narrowband gratings, and a dual layer waveguide technology for low loss and low bend radius in separate regions of the same device layer. We then combine an ultra high Q resonator and a heterogeneous Si/III V laser in a Pound Drever Hall (PDH) frequency stabilization system to yield narrow linewidth characteristics for a stable on chip laser reference. The high frequency noise filtering is performed with Si resonant mirrors in the laser cavity. A 30 million Q factor Si3N4 resonator is used with electrical feedback to reduce close in noise and frequency walk off. The laser shows high frequency noise levels of 60x103 Hz2/Hz corresponding to 160 kHz linewidth, and the low frequency noise is suppressed 33 dB to 103 Hz2/Hz with the PDH system.

  3. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side chain NMR resonance assignments for E73 from Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus ragged hills, a hyperthermophilic crenarchaeal virus from Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Casey; Menon, Smita; Lawrence, C Martin; Copié, Valérie

    2009-12-01

    Crenarchaeal viruses are commonly found in hyperthermal acidic environments such as those of Yellowstone National Park. These remarkable viruses not only exhibit unusual morphologies, but also display extreme genetic diversity. However, little is known about crenarchaeal viral life cycles, virus-host interactions, and their adaptation to hyperthermophilic environments. In an effort to better understand the functions of crenarchaeal viruses and the proteins encoded by their genomes, we have undertaken detailed structural and functional studies of gene products encoded in the open reading frames of Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus ragged hills. Herein, we report ((15)N, (13)C, (1)H) resonance assignments of backbone and side chain atoms of a 19.1 kDa homodimeric E73 protein of SSVRH.

  4. NMR study of non-structural proteins--part II: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of macro domain from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV).

    PubMed

    Makrynitsa, Garyfallia I; Ntonti, Dioni; Marousis, Konstantinos D; Tsika, Aikaterini C; Lichière, Julie; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Coutard, Bruno; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-10-01

    Macro domains consist of 130-190 amino acid residues and appear to be highly conserved in all kingdoms of life. Intense research on this field has shown that macro domains bind ADP-ribose and other similar molecules, but their exact function still remains intangible. Macro domains are highly conserved in the Alphavirus genus and the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a member of this genus that causes fatal encephalitis to equines and humans. In this study we report the high yield recombinant expression and preliminary solution NMR study of the macro domain of VEEV. An almost complete sequence-specific assignment of its (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonances was obtained and its secondary structure predicted by TALOS+. The protein shows a unique mixed α/β-fold.

  5. Designing a 25-kilowatt high frequency series resonant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robson, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of processing 25 kW of power with a single, transistorized, 20 kHz, series resonant converter stage has been demonstrated by the successful design, development, fabrication, and testing of such a device. It employs four Westinghouse D7ST transistors in a full-bridge configuration and operates from a 250-to-350-Vdc input bus. The unit has an overall worst-case efficiency of 93.5% at its full rated output of 1000 V and 25 A dc. A solid-state dc input circuit breaker and output-transient-current limiters are included in and integrated into the design. Circuit details of the converter are presented along with test data.

  6. High Speed Laser with 100 Ghz Resonance Frequency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-28

    practical limit occurs when the detuned master laser encounters the next-order laser modes (i.e. Fabry - Perot modes). Our current DFB slave laser...lasers and vertical- cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), showing the broad applicability of the technique and that the coupling Q (optical quality...Q-factor, and also increases as the injection power and optical frequency increase. Additionally, we show that lasers with very different cavity

  7. (1)H, (15)N, (13)C backbone resonance assignments of human soluble catechol O-methyltransferase in complex with S-adenosyl-L-methionine and 3,5-dinitrocatechol.

    PubMed

    Czarnota, Sylwia; Baxter, Nicola J; Cliff, Matthew J; Waltho, Jonathan P; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2017-04-01

    Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an enzyme that plays a major role in catechol neurotransmitter deactivation. Inhibition of COMT can increase neurotransmitter levels, which provides a means of treatment for Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and depression. COMT exists as two isozymes: a soluble cytoplasmic form (S-COMT), expressed in the liver and kidneys and a membrane-bound form (MB-COMT), found mostly in the brain. Here we report the backbone (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of S-COMT in complex with S-adenosyl-L-methionine, 3,5-dinitrocatechol and Mg(2+). Assignments were obtained by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. In total, 97 % of all backbone resonances were assigned in the complex, with 205 out of a possible 215 residues assigned in the (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectrum. Prediction of solution secondary structure from a chemical shift analysis using the TALOS+ webserver is in good agreement with published X-ray crystal structures.

  8. Proton-detected 3D {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H correlation experiment for structural analysis in rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS above 60 kHz

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-10-28

    A proton-detected 3D {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation experiment is proposed for the assignment of chemical shift resonances, identification of {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H connectivities, and proximities of {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H nuclei under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning (ultrafast-MAS) conditions. Ultrafast-MAS is used to suppress all anisotropic interactions including {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H dipolar couplings, while the finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used to recouple dipolar couplings among protons and the insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer technique is used to transfer magnetization between heteronuclear spins. The 3D experiment eliminates signals from non-carbon-bonded protons and non-proton-bonded carbons to enhance spectral resolution. The 2D (F1/F3) {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H and 2D {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H (F2/F3) chemical shift correlation spectra extracted from the 3D spectrum enable the identification of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H proximity and {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H connectivity. In addition, the 2D (F1/F2) {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C chemical shift correlation spectrum, incorporated with proton magnetization exchange via the fp-RFDR recoupling of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H dipolar couplings, enables the measurement of proximities between {sup 13}C and even the remote non-carbon-bonded protons. The 3D experiment also gives three-spin proximities of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H-{sup 13}C chains. Experimental results obtained from powder samples of L-alanine and L-histidine ⋅ H{sub 2}O ⋅ HCl demonstrate the efficiency of the 3D experiment.

  9. Far-field subwavelength imaging with near-field resonant metalens scanning at microwave frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ren; Wang, Bing-Zhong; Gong, Zhi-Shuang; Ding, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    A method for far-field subwavelength imaging at microwave frequencies using near-field resonant metalens scanning is proposed. The resonant metalens is composed of switchable split-ring resonators (SRRs). The on-SRR has a strong magnetic coupling ability and can convert evanescent waves into propagating waves using the localized resonant modes. In contrast, the off-SRR cannot achieve an effective conversion. By changing the switch status of each cell, we can obtain position information regarding the subwavelength source targets from the far field. Because the spatial response and Green’s function do not need to be measured and evaluated and only a narrow frequency band is required for the entire imaging process, this method is convenient and adaptable to various environment. This method can be used for many applications, such as subwavelength imaging, detection, and electromagnetic monitoring, in both free space and complex environments. PMID:26053074

  10. Resonant oscillation modes of sympathetically cooled ions in a radio-frequency trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Taro; Shimizu, Tadao

    2002-12-01

    Sympathetic cooling of Ca{sup +}, Zn{sup +}, Sr{sup +}, Ba{sup +}, and Yb{sup +} as guest ions with laser-cooled {sup 24}Mg{sup +} as host ions in a rf ion trap is carried out, and resonant frequencies of their motion in the trap potential are measured. Various oscillation modes of the sympathetically cooled ions are observed. The resonant frequency of the oscillation mode is different from the frequency of either the collective oscillation frequency of the trapped ions or the oscillation frequency of each ion without host ions. This difference is well explained by a theoretical model in which coupled equations of motion of the host ion cloud with a single guest ion are considered.

  11. Neural Network Model Of The PXIE RFQ Cooling System and Resonant Frequency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Edelen, Auralee; Biedron, Sandra; Bowring, Daniel; Chase, Brian; Edelen, Jonathan; Milton, Stephen; Steimel, Jim

    2016-06-01

    As part of the PIP-II Injector Experiment (PXIE) accel-erator, a four-vane radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerates a 30-keV, 1-mA to 10-mA H' ion beam to 2.1 MeV. It is designed to operate at a frequency of 162.5 MHz with arbitrary duty factor, including continuous wave (CW) mode. The resonant frequency is controlled solely by a water-cooling system. We present an initial neural network model of the RFQ frequency response to changes in the cooling system and RF power conditions during pulsed operation. A neural network model will be used in a model predictive control scheme to regulate the resonant frequency of the RFQ.

  12. Resonant frequency detection and adjustment method for a capacitive transducer with differential transformer bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.; Bai, Y. Z. Zhou, Z. B. Li, Z. X.; Luo, J.

    2014-05-15

    The capacitive transducer with differential transformer bridge is widely used in ultra-sensitive space accelerometers due to their simple structure and high resolution. In this paper, the front-end electronics of an inductive-capacitive resonant bridge transducer is analyzed. The analysis result shows that the performance of this transducer depends upon the case that the AC pumping frequency operates at the resonance point of the inductive-capacitive bridge. The effect of possible mismatch between the AC pumping frequency and the actual resonant frequency is discussed, and the theoretical analysis indicates that the output voltage noise of the front-end electronics will deteriorate by a factor of about 3 due to either a 5% variation of the AC pumping frequency or a 10% variation of the tuning capacitance. A pre-scanning method to determine the actual resonant frequency is proposed followed by the adjustment of the operating frequency or the change of the tuning capacitance in order to maintain expected high resolution level. An experiment to verify the mismatching effect and the adjustment method is provided.

  13. A small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester using a resonant frequency-down conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Kyung Ho; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Jae Eun

    2014-10-15

    While environmental vibrations are usually in the range of a few hundred Hertz, small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters will have higher resonant frequencies due to the structural size effect. To address this issue, we propose a resonant frequency-down conversion based on the theory of dynamic vibration absorber for the design of a small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester. The proposed energy harvester consists of two frequency-tuned elastic components for lowering the first resonant frequency of an integrated system but is so configured that an energy harvesting beam component is inverted with respect to the other supporting beam component for a small form factor. Furthermore, in order to change the unwanted modal characteristic of small separation of resonant frequencies, as is the case with an inverted configuration, a proof mass on the supporting beam component is slightly shifted toward a second proof mass on the tip of the energy harvesting beam component. The proposed small-form-factor design capability was experimentally verified using a fabricated prototype with an occupation volume of 20 × 39 × 6.9 mm{sup 3}, which was designed for a target frequency of as low as 100 Hz.

  14. A small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester using a resonant frequency-down conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kyung Ho; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Jae Eun

    2014-10-01

    While environmental vibrations are usually in the range of a few hundred Hertz, small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters will have higher resonant frequencies due to the structural size effect. To address this issue, we propose a resonant frequency-down conversion based on the theory of dynamic vibration absorber for the design of a small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester. The proposed energy harvester consists of two frequency-tuned elastic components for lowering the first resonant frequency of an integrated system but is so configured that an energy harvesting beam component is inverted with respect to the other supporting beam component for a small form factor. Furthermore, in order to change the unwanted modal characteristic of small separation of resonant frequencies, as is the case with an inverted configuration, a proof mass on the supporting beam component is slightly shifted toward a second proof mass on the tip of the energy harvesting beam component. The proposed small-form-factor design capability was experimentally verified using a fabricated prototype with an occupation volume of 20 × 39 × 6.9 mm3, which was designed for a target frequency of as low as 100 Hz.

  15. Resonant frequency detection and adjustment method for a capacitive transducer with differential transformer bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, M.; Bai, Y. Z.; Zhou, Z. B.; Li, Z. X.; Luo, J.

    2014-05-01

    The capacitive transducer with differential transformer bridge is widely used in ultra-sensitive space accelerometers due to their simple structure and high resolution. In this paper, the front-end electronics of an inductive-capacitive resonant bridge transducer is analyzed. The analysis result shows that the performance of this transducer depends upon the case that the AC pumping frequency operates at the resonance point of the inductive-capacitive bridge. The effect of possible mismatch between the AC pumping frequency and the actual resonant frequency is discussed, and the theoretical analysis indicates that the output voltage noise of the front-end electronics will deteriorate by a factor of about 3 due to either a 5% variation of the AC pumping frequency or a 10% variation of the tuning capacitance. A pre-scanning method to determine the actual resonant frequency is proposed followed by the adjustment of the operating frequency or the change of the tuning capacitance in order to maintain expected high resolution level. An experiment to verify the mismatching effect and the adjustment method is provided.

  16. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging of Nanocomposites via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lillehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope methodology, called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), has been developed. The method employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope engages the sample top surface. The cantilever is driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave at the sample surface generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create amplitude and phase-generated images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features. RDF-AFUM phase images of LaRC-CP2 polyimide polymer containing embedded nanostructures are presented. A RDF-AFUM micrograph of a 12.7 micrometer thick film of LaRC-CP2 containing a monolayer of gold nanoparticles embedded 7 micrometers below the specimen surface reveals the occurrence of contiguous amorphous and crystalline phases within the bulk of the polymer and a preferential growth of the crystalline phase in the vicinity of the gold nanoparticles. A RDF-AFUM micrograph of LaRC-CP2 film containing randomly dispersed carbon nanotubes reveals the growth of an interphase region at certain nanotube-polymer interfaces.

  17. Influence of shell composition on the resonance frequency of microbubble contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Dicker, Stephen; Mleczko, Michał; Siepmann, Monica; Wallace, Nicole; Sunny, Youhan; Bawiec, Christopher R; Schmitz, Georg; Lewin, Peter; Wrenn, Steven P

    2013-07-01

    The effect of variations in microbubble shell composition on microbubble resonance frequency is revealed through experiment. These variations are achieved by altering the mole fraction and molecular weight of functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the microbubble phospholipid monolayer shell and measuring the microbubble resonance frequency. The resonance frequency is measured via a chirp pulse and identified as the frequency at which the pressure amplitude loss of the ultrasound wave is the greatest as a result of passing through a population of microbubbles. For the shell compositions used herein, we find that PEG molecular weight has little to no influence on resonance frequency at an overall PEG mole fraction (0.01) corresponding to a mushroom regime and influences the resonance frequency markedly at overall PEG mole fractions (0.050-0.100) corresponding to a brush regime. Specifically, the measured resonance frequency was found to be 8.4, 4.9, 3.3 and 1.4 MHz at PEG molecular weights of 1000, 2000, 3000 and 5000 g/mol, respectively, at an overall PEG mole fraction of 0.075. At an overall PEG mole fraction of just 0.01, on the other hand, resonance frequency exhibited no systematic variation, with values ranging from 5.7 to 4.9 MHz. Experimental results were analyzed using the Sarkar bubble dynamics model. With the dilatational viscosity held constant (10(-8) N·s/m) and the elastic modulus used as a fitting parameter, model fits to the pressure amplitude loss data resulted in elastic modulus values of 2.2, 2.4, 1.6 and 1.8 N/m for PEG molecular weights of 1000, 2000, 3000 and 5000 g/mol, respectively, at an overall PEG mole fraction of 0.010 and 4.2, 1.4, 0.5 and 0.0 N/m, respectively, at an overall PEG mole fraction of 0.075. These results are consistent with theory, which predicts that the elastic modulus is constant in the mushroom regime and decreases with PEG molecular weight to the inverse 3/5 power in the brush regime. Additionally, these results

  18. Investigation of frequency response of microwave active ring resonator based on ferrite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, M. I.; Nikitin, A. A.; Ustinov, A. B.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    2016-11-01

    The complex transmission coefficient of active ring resonators based on ferrite-film delay lines was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Influence of the parameters of the delay line on the transmission coefficients was investigated. It was shown that the resonant frequencies of the ring depend on the ferrite film thickness and the distance between spin-wave antennae. These dependences give possibility to control the shape of the transmission coefficient that in combination with magnetic tuning provide flexibility for microwave applications.

  19. High frequency resonant waveguide grating imager for assessing drug-induced cardiotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrie, Ann M.; Wu, Qi; Deichmann, Oberon D.; Fang, Ye

    2014-05-01

    We report a high-frequency resonant waveguide grating imager for assessing compound-induced cardiotoxicity. The imager sweeps the wavelength range from 823 nm to 838 nm every 3 s to identify and monitor compound-induced shifts in resonance wavelength and then switch to the intensity-imaging mode to detect the beating rhythm and proarrhythmic effects of compounds on induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. This opens possibility to study cardiovascular biology and compound-induced cardiotoxicity.

  20. Enhancing the low frequency THz resonances (< 1 THz) of organic molecules via electronegative atom substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Jyotirmayee; Ray, Shaumik; Pesala, Bala

    2015-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology is an active area of research with various applications in non-intrusive imaging and spectroscopy. Very few organic molecules have significant resonances below 1 THz. Understanding the origin of low frequency THz modes in these molecules and their absence in other molecules could be extremely important in design and engineering molecules with low frequency THz resonances. These engineered molecules can be used as THz tags for anti-counterfeiting applications. Studies show that low frequency THz resonances are commonly observed in molecules having higher molecular mass and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds. In this paper, we have explored the possibility of enhancing the strength of THz resonances below 1 THz through electronegative atom substitution. Adding an electronegative atom helps in achieving higher hydrogen bond strength to enhance the resonances below 1 THz. Here acetanilide has been used as a model system. THz-Time Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) results show that acetanilide has a small peak observed below 1 THz. Acetanilide can be converted to 2-fluoroacetanilide by adding an electronegative atom, fluorine, which doesn't have any prominent peak below 1 THz. However, by optimally choosing the position of the electronegative atom as in 4-fluoroacetanilide, a significant THz resonance at 0.86 THz is observed. The origin of low frequency resonances can be understood by carrying out Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulations of full crystal structure. These studies show that adding an electronegative atom to the organic molecules at an optimized position can result in significantly enhanced resonances below 1 THz.

  1. The lower subsidiary diffuse plasma resonances and the classification of radio emissions below the plasma frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Benson, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Using previusly published data and newly scaled ionograms from the Alouette 2 and ISIS 1 experiments, the diffuse ionospheric resonances Dn, stimulated by topside sounders Dn, are classified. The classification also includes the lower subsidiary resonances Dn(-) (n = 1, 2, 3, and 4). It is shown that the Dn(-) frequencies are related to f(Dn) and f(H) by the expression f(Dn)- = sq rt of (f(Dn)-squared - f(H)-squared).

  2. Cellular-foam polypropylene ferroelectrets with increased film thickness and reduced resonance frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sborikas, Martynas; Wegener, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Ferroelectrets are piezoelectric materials suitable for acoustic applications such as airborne ultrasonic transducers. Typical ferroelectrets exhibit resonance frequencies in the high kHz to low MHz range. In order to decrease the transducer resonance frequencies to the low kHz range, processes such as gas-diffusion expansion and electric charging were adjusted to cellular films which are initially twice as thick as in earlier studies. The demonstrated film expansion and electric charging lead to mechanically soft cellular structures which show high piezoelectric activities with coefficients up to 130 pC/N. Due to the simultaneously increased film thicknesses, the resonance frequencies are lowered down to about 233 kHz.

  3. Bat and rat neurons differ in theta-frequency resonance despite similar coding of space.

    PubMed

    Heys, James G; MacLeod, Katrina M; Moss, Cynthia F; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2013-04-19

    Both bats and rats exhibit grid cells in medial entorhinal cortex that fire as they visit a regular array of spatial locations. In rats, grid-cell firing field properties correlate with theta-frequency rhythmicity of spiking and membrane-potential resonance; however, bat grid cells do not exhibit theta rhythmic spiking, generating controversy over the role of theta rhythm. To test whether this discrepancy reflects differences in rhythmicity at a cellular level, we performed whole-cell patch recordings from entorhinal neurons in both species to record theta-frequency resonance. Bat neurons showed no theta-frequency resonance, suggesting grid-cell coding via different mechanisms in bats and rats or lack of theta rhythmic contributions to grid-cell firing in either species.

  4. Frequency stabilization of spin-torque-driven oscillations by coupling with a magnetic nonlinear resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, Kiwamu Suto, Hirofumi; Nagasawa, Tazumi; Mizushima, Koichi; Sato, Rie

    2014-10-28

    The fundamental function of any oscillator is to produce a waveform with a stable frequency. Here, we show a method of frequency stabilization for spin-torque nano-oscillators (STNOs) that relies on coupling with an adjacent nanomagnet through the magnetic dipole–dipole interaction. It is numerically demonstrated that highly stable oscillations occur as a result of mutual feedback between an STNO and a nanomagnet. The nanomagnet acts as a nonlinear resonator for the STNO. This method is based on the nonlinear behavior of the resonator and can be considered as a magnetic analogue of an optimization scheme in nanoelectromechanical systems. The oscillation frequency is most stabilized when the nanomagnet is driven at a special feedback point at which the feedback noise between the STNO and resonator is completely eliminated.

  5. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments of an enzymatically active domain from the catalytic component (CDTa, residues 216-420) of a binary toxin from Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Roth, Braden M; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Varney, Kristen M; Rustandi, Richard R; Weber, David J

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterial pathogen and is the most commonly reported source of nosocomial infection in industrialized nations. Symptoms of C. difficile infection (CDI) include antibiotic-associated diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis, sepsis and death. Over the last decade, rates and severity of hospital infections in North America and Europe have increased dramatically and correlate with the emergence of a hypervirulent strain of C. difficile characterized by the presence of a binary toxin, CDT (C. difficile toxin). The binary toxin consists of an enzymatic component (CDTa) and a cellular binding component (CDTb) that together form the active binary toxin complex. CDTa harbors a pair of structurally similar but functionally distinct domains, an N-terminal domain (residues 1-215; (1-215)CDTa) that interacts with CDTb and a C-terminal domain (residues 216-420; (216-420)CDTa) that harbors the intact ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) active site. Reported here are the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the 23 kDa, 205 amino acid C-terminal enzymatic domain of CDTa, termed (216-420)CDTa. These NMR resonance assignments for (216-420)CDTa represent the first for a family of ART binary toxins and provide the framework for detailed characterization of the solution-state protein structure determination, dynamic studies of this domain, as well as NMR-based drug discovery efforts.

  6. (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the full-length 40 kDa S. acidocaldarius Y-family DNA polymerase, dinB homolog.

    PubMed

    Moro, Sean L; Cocco, Melanie J

    2015-10-01

    The dinB homolog (Dbh) is a member of the Y-family of translesion DNA polymerases, which are specialized to accurately replicate DNA across from a wide variety of lesions in living cells. Lesioned bases block the progression of high-fidelity polymerases and cause detrimental replication fork stalling; Y-family polymerases can bypass these lesions. The active site of the translesion synthesis polymerase is more open than that of a replicative polymerase; consequently Dbh polymerizes with low fidelity. Bypass polymerases also have low processivity. Short extension past the lesion allows the high-fidelity polymerase to switch back onto the site of replication. Dbh and the other Y-family polymerases have been used as structural models to investigate the mechanisms of DNA polymerization and lesion bypass. Many high-resolution crystal structures of Y-family polymerases have been reported. NMR dynamics studies can complement these structures by providing a measure of protein motions. Here we report the (15)N, (1)H, and (13)C backbone resonance assignments at two temperatures (35 and 50 °C) for Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Dbh polymerase. Backbone resonance assignments have been obtained for 86 % of the residues. The polymerase active site is assigned as well as the majority of residues in each of the four domains.

  7. Onflow liquid chromatography at critical conditions coupled to (1)H and (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance as powerful tools for the separation of poly(methylmethacrylate) according to isotopic composition.

    PubMed

    Hehn, Mathias; Sinha, Pritish; Pasch, Harald; Hiller, Wolf

    2015-03-27

    The present work addresses a major challenge in polymer chromatography by developing a method to separate and analyze polymers with identical molar masses, chemical structures and tacticities that is solely based on differences in isotope composition. For the first time, liquid chromatography at critical conditions (LCCC) was used to separate PMMA regarding the H and D isotopes. At critical conditions of H-PMMA, D-PMMA eluted in the adsorption mode and vice versa. By online onflow LCCC-NMR, both PMMA species were clearly identified. Different from other detectors, NMR can distinguish between H and D. Onflow LCCC-H/NMR and LCCC-D/NMR measurements were carried out and the H/D-blend components were detected. (1)H and (13)C NMR provided the tacticity of protonated PMMA. Double resonance (13)C{H} and triple resonance (13)C{H,D} provided the tacticity of the deuterated samples. Samples with similar tacticities were used to ensure that separation occurs solely regarding the isotope labeling.

  8. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (NASA-MEIRF Project)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During this current reporting period, the project has focused on completing Phase 1 of the field monitoring work and documenting research results. Highlights of these efforts include presentations of papers at the annual joint meeting of the American Physical Society/American Association of Physics Teachers, April 18-22, 1994, in Crystal City, Virginia, and at the International Space, Time, and Gravitation Conference and Etoiles de L'Ecole Polytechnique Symposium, May 23-28, 1994, in St. Petersburg, Russia. Field measurements of the background ultra low frequency (ULF) electromagnetic spectrum in the New Mexico and Texas regions show interesting differences. Included are papers entitled 'Triplet Solution of the Twin Paradox' and 'Classical Electron Mass and Fields, Part 3.'

  9. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  10. A generalized equation for the resonance frequencies of a fluid-filled crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yuta; Kumagai, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Although a model of the resonance of a rectangular fluid-filled crack (crack model) is one of the most frequently used source models of long-period seismic events at volcanoes, there has been no analytical solution for the resonance frequencies. We previously proposed an empirical expression for the resonance frequencies as a mathematical function of the crack length, aperture, and properties of the fluid and the surrounding elastic medium. However, the expression contained an empirical constant that had to be investigated numerically for each crack aspect ratio and oscillation mode, a requirement that prevented widespread use of the expression. In the present study, we examined the theoretical basis for the expression. We assumed that the ratio of the crack wall displacement to the fluid pressure near each crack edge varied as the square root of the distance from the edge. Using this assumption, we showed theoretically that the previously proposed empirical analytical expression was a good approximation (difference ≤ 2%) to another more complete expression. This theoretical expression is a closed form of a mathematical function of the crack model parameters and oscillation mode number; there are no empirical constants to be determined numerically. The expression thus enabled us to analytically compute the resonance frequencies for arbitrary rectangular cracks, and the results were in good agreement (difference ≤ 5%) with numerical solutions. Resonance frequencies of cracks can be very easily predicted using this expression. This predictive ability may enhance our quantitative understanding of the processes that generate long-period events at volcanoes.

  11. Piezoelectrically tunable resonance frequency beam utilizing a stress-sensitive film

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Wachter, Eric A.

    2002-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for detecting particular frequencies of acoustic vibration utilize a piezoelectrically-tunable beam element having a piezoelectric layer and a stress sensitive layer and means for providing an electrical potential across the piezoelectric layer to controllably change the beam's stiffness and thereby change its resonance frequency. It is then determined from the response of the piezoelectrically-tunable beam element to the acoustical vibration to which the beam element is exposed whether or not a particular frequency or frequencies of acoustic vibration are detected.

  12. Stimulated Brillouin laser and frequency comb generation in high-Q microbubble resonators.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijing; Liu, Sheng; Wu, Xiang; Liu, Liying; Xu, Lei

    2016-04-15

    We report on the stimulated Brillouin laser (SBL) and over-dense frequency comb generation in high-Q microbubble resonators (MBRs). Both first-order and cascaded SBL are achieved due to the rich high-order axial modes in the MBRs, although the free spectral range (FSR) of azimuthal mode of the MBR is severely mismatched with the Brillouin shift. The SBL is also generated by varying the internal pressure of MBR at fixed initially non-resonant pump light wavelength. In addition, over-dense frequency combs are realized with comb spacings that are one and two FSRs of aixal mode.

  13. Tissue specific resonance frequencies of water and metabolites within the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadzynski, Grzegorz L.; Bender, Benjamin; Groeger, Adriane; Erb, Michael; Klose, Uwe

    2011-09-01

    Chemical shift imaging (CSI) without water suppression was used to examine tissue-specific resonance frequencies of water and metabolites within the human brain. The aim was to verify if there are any regional differences in those frequencies and to determine the influence of chemical shift displacement in slice-selection direction. Unsuppressed spectra were acquired at 3 T from nine subjects. Resonance frequencies of water and after water signal removal of total choline, total creatine and NAA were estimated. Furthermore, frequency distances between the water and those resonances were calculated. Results were corrected for chemical shift displacement. Frequency distances between water and metabolites were consistent and greater for GM than for WM. The highest value of WM to GM difference (14 ppb) was observed for water to NAA frequency distance. This study demonstrates that there are tissue-specific differences between frequency distances of water and metabolites. Moreover, the influence of chemical shift displacement in slice-selection direction is showed to be negligible.

  14. Redistribution of light frequency by multiple scattering in a resonant atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, João Carlos de A.; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de Souza; Passerat de Silans, T.

    2015-05-01

    The propagation of light in a resonant atomic vapor can a priori be thought of as a multiple scattering process, in which each scattering event redistributes both the direction and the frequency of the photons. Particularly, the frequency redistribution may result in Lévy flights of photons, directly affecting the transport properties of light in a resonant atomic vapor and turning this propagation into a superdiffusion process. Here, we report on a Monte Carlo simulation developed to study the evolution of the spectrum of the light in a resonant thermal vapor. We observe the gradual change of the spectrum and its convergence towards a regime of complete frequency redistribution as the number of scattering events increases. We also analyze the probability density function of the step length of photons between emissions and reabsorptions in the vapor, which governs the statistics of the light diffusion. We observe two different regimes in the light transport: superdiffusion when the vapor is excited near the line center and normal diffusion for excitation far from the line center. The regime of complete frequency redistribution is not reached for excitation far from resonance even after many absorption and reemission cycles due to correlations between emitted and absorbed frequencies.

  15. Stabilization of a laser on a large-detuned atomic-reference frequency by resonant interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, Priscila M. T.; Nascimento, Guilherme G.; Araújo, Michelle O.; da Silva, Cícero M.; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de S.; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; Passerat de Silans, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    We report a simple technique for stabilization of a laser frequency at the wings of an atomic resonance. The reference signal used for stabilization issues from interference effects obtained in a low-quality cavity filled with a resonant atomic vapour. For a frequency detuned 2.6 GHz from the 133Cs D2 6S{}1/2 F = 4 to 6P{}3/2 F’ = 5 transition, the fractional frequency Allan deviation is 10-8 for averaging times of 300 s, corresponding to a frequency deviation of 4 MHz. Adequate choice of the atomic density and of the cell thickness allows locking the laser at detunings larger than 10 GHz. Such a simple technique does not require magnetic fields or signal modulation.

  16. Tunable resonance frequency of FeNi films by oblique sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Zhenkun; Zhang, Yi; Xi, Li; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2012-09-01

    FeNi thin films were fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering on Si(1 1 1). Dynamic properties at remanence of the films were systematically investigated in a wide frequency range from 100 MHz to 5 GHz. The results show that both thickness of FeNi films and oblique angle have important effects on the magnetic properties of the films, the magnetic resonant frequency of the films can also be adjusted by the two factors. The in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy field can be adjusted from 82 Oe to 220 Oe by increasing the oblique angle. As a consequence, the magnetic resonant frequency of the films increased from 2.7 GHz to 4.2 GHz.

  17. Analysis of Glass-Reinforced Epoxy Material for Radio Frequency Resonator

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. T.; Misran, N.; Yatim, Baharudin

    2014-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) resonator using glass-reinforced epoxy material for C and X band is proposed in this paper. Microstrip line technology for RF over glass-reinforced epoxy material is analyzed. Coupling mechanism over RF material and parasitic coupling performance is explained utilizing even and odd mode impedance with relevant equivalent circuit. Babinet's principle is deployed to explicate the circular slot ground plane of the proposed resonator. The resonator is designed over four materials from different backgrounds which are glass-reinforced epoxy, polyester, gallium arsenide (GaAs), and rogers RO 4350B. Parametric studies and optimization algorithm are applied over the geometry of the microstrip resonator to achieve dual band response for C and X band. Resonator behaviors for different materials are concluded and compared for the same structure. The final design is fabricated over glass-reinforced epoxy material. The fabricated resonator shows a maximum directivity of 5.65 dBi and 6.62 dBi at 5.84 GHz and 8.16 GHz, respectively. The lowest resonance response is less than −20 dB for C band and −34 dB for X band. The resonator is prototyped using LPKF (S63) drilling machine to study the material behavior. PMID:24977230

  18. Analysis of glass-reinforced epoxy material for radio frequency resonator.

    PubMed

    Zaman, M R; Islam, M T; Misran, N; Yatim, Baharudin

    2014-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) resonator using glass-reinforced epoxy material for C and X band is proposed in this paper. Microstrip line technology for RF over glass-reinforced epoxy material is analyzed. Coupling mechanism over RF material and parasitic coupling performance is explained utilizing even and odd mode impedance with relevant equivalent circuit. Babinet's principle is deployed to explicate the circular slot ground plane of the proposed resonator. The resonator is designed over four materials from different backgrounds which are glass-reinforced epoxy, polyester, gallium arsenide (GaAs), and rogers RO 4350B. Parametric studies and optimization algorithm are applied over the geometry of the microstrip resonator to achieve dual band response for C and X band. Resonator behaviors for different materials are concluded and compared for the same structure. The final design is fabricated over glass-reinforced epoxy material. The fabricated resonator shows a maximum directivity of 5.65 dBi and 6.62 dBi at 5.84 GHz and 8.16 GHz, respectively. The lowest resonance response is less than -20 dB for C band and -34 dB for X band. The resonator is prototyped using LPKF (S63) drilling machine to study the material behavior.

  19. High-throughput backbone resonance assignment of small 13C, 15N-labeled proteins by a triple-resonance experiment with four sequential connectivity pathways using chemical shift-dependent, apparent 1J ( 1H, 13C): HNCACB codedHAHB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegan, Scott; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon; Riek, Roland

    2003-12-01

    The proposed three-dimensional triple-resonance experiment HNCACB codedHAHB correlates sequential 15N, 1H moieties via the chemical shifts of 13C α, 13C β, 1H α, and 1H β. The four sequential correlation pathways are achieved by the incorporation of the concept of chemical shift-coding [J. Biomol. NMR 25 (2003) 281] to the TROSY-HNCACB experiment. The monitored 1H α and 1H β chemical shifts are then coded in the line shape of the cross-peaks of 13C α, 13C β along the 13C dimension through an apparent residual scalar coupling, the size of which depends on the attached hydrogen chemical shift. The information of four sequential correlation pathways enables a rapid backbone assignment. The HNCACB codedHAHB experiment was applied to ˜85% labeled 13C, 15N-labeled amino-terminal fragment of Vaccinia virus DNA topoisomerase I comprising residues 1-77. After one day of measurement on a Bruker Avance 700 MHz spectrometer and 8 h of manual analysis of the spectrum 93% of the backbone assignment was achieved.

  20. Morphology of human sweat ducts observed by optical coherence tomography and their frequency of resonance in the terahertz frequency region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Saroj R.; Miyata, Eisuke; Ishai, Paul Ben; Kawase, Kodo

    2015-03-01

    It is crucial to understand the various biological effects induced by terahertz (THz) electromagnetic waves with the rapid development of electronic and photonic devices operating in the THz frequency region. The presence of sweat glands plays an important role in THz wave interactions with human skin. We investigated the morphological features of sweat ducts using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to further understand such phenomena. We observed remarkable features of the ducts, such as their clear helical structure. The intersubject and intrasubject variations in the diameter of sweat ducts were considerably smaller than the variations in other structural parameters, such as length and number of turns. Based on the sweat duct dimensions and THz dielectric properties of skin measured using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), we calculated the resonating frequency of the sweat duct under the assumption of it functioning as a helical antenna. Here, we show that the resonance frequency in the axial mode of operation lies in the THz wave region with a centre frequency of 0.44 +/- 0.07 THz. We expect that these findings will further our understanding of the various health consequences of the interaction of THz waves with human beings.

  1. Morphology of human sweat ducts observed by optical coherence tomography and their frequency of resonance in the terahertz frequency region

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Saroj R.; Miyata, Eisuke; Ishai, Paul Ben; Kawase, Kodo

    2015-01-01

    It is crucial to understand the various biological effects induced by terahertz (THz) electromagnetic waves with the rapid development of electronic and photonic devices operating in the THz frequency region. The presence of sweat glands plays an important role in THz wave interactions with human skin. We investigated the morphological features of sweat ducts using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to further understand such phenomena. We observed remarkable features of the ducts, such as their clear helical structure. The intersubject and intrasubject variations in the diameter of sweat ducts were considerably smaller than the variations in other structural parameters, such as length and number of turns. Based on the sweat duct dimensions and THz dielectric properties of skin measured using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), we calculated the resonating frequency of the sweat duct under the assumption of it functioning as a helical antenna. Here, we show that the resonance frequency in the axial mode of operation lies in the THz wave region with a centre frequency of 0.44 ± 0.07 THz. We expect that these findings will further our understanding of the various health consequences of the interaction of THz waves with human beings. PMID:25766116

  2. Resonance frequency and mass identification of zeptogram-scale nanosensor based on the nonlocal beam theory.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Fang; Tang, Guo-Jin; Shen, Zhi-Bin; Lee, Kang Yong

    2015-01-01

    Free vibration and mass detection of carbon nanotube-based sensors are studied in this paper. Since the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes possess a size effect, the nonlocal beam model is used to characterize flexural vibration of nanosensors carrying a concentrated nanoparticle, where the size effect is reflected by a nonlocal parameter. For nanocantilever or bridged sensor, frequency equations are derived when a nanoparticle is carried at the free end or the middle, respectively. Exact resonance frequencies are numerically determined for clamped-free, simply-supported, and clamped-clamped resonators. Alternative approximations of fundamental frequency are given in closed form within the relative error less than 0.4%, 0.6%, and 1.4% for cantilever, simply-supported, and bridged sensors, respectively. Mass identification formulae are derived in terms of the frequency shift. Identified masses via the present approach coincide with those using the molecular mechanics approach and reach as low as 10(-24)kg. The obtained results indicate that the nonlocal effect decreases the resonance frequency except for the fundamental frequency of nanocantilever sensor. These results are helpful to the design of micro/nanomechanical zeptogram-scale biosensor.

  3. Resonant modal group theory of membrane-type acoustical metamaterials for low-frequency sound attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng

    2015-09-01

    In order to overcome the influence of the structural resonance on the continuous structures and obtain a lightweight thin-layer structure which can effectively isolate the low-frequency noises, an elastic membrane structure was proposed. In the low-frequency range below 500 Hz, the sound transmission loss (STL) of this membrane type structure is greatly higher than that of the current sound insulation material EVA (ethylene-vinyl acetate copo) of vehicle, so it is possible to replace the EVA by the membrane-type metamaterial structure in practice engineering. Based on the band structure, modal shapes, as well as the sound transmission simulation, the sound insulation mechanism of the designed membrane-type acoustic metamaterials was analyzed from a new perspective, which had been validated experimentally. It is suggested that in the frequency range above 200 Hz for this membrane-mass type structure, the sound insulation effect was principally not due to the low-level locally resonant mode of the mass block, but the continuous vertical resonant modes of the localized membrane. So based on such a physical property, a resonant modal group theory is initially proposed in this paper. In addition, the sound insulation mechanism of the membrane-type structure and thin plate structure were combined by the membrane/plate resonant theory.

  4. Dual-frequency ferromagnetic resonance to measure spin current coupling in multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Wang, Hailong; Manuilov, Sergei A.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2014-08-01

    Spin pumping is a method for injecting a pure spin current into a non-magnetic metal (NM) by inducing precession of a neighboring ferromagnet (FM) at its ferromagnetic resonance frequency. A popular method to detect spin current uses the Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) to convert the spin current to a detectable charge current and hence a voltage. In order to better understand the role of time independent and high frequency contributions to spin pumping, we sought to detect we attempt to detect spin currents by using a second microwave frequency to detect changes in linewidth of a second ferromagnet due to the spin-torque induced by the spin current from the first ferromagnet. This dual resonance is achieved by pairing a custom broadband coplanar transmission line with the high-Q resonant cavity of a commercial electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer. This technique is general enough that it should enable the investigation of spin currents in any FM-NM-FM system, for any orientation of external field, and is not sensitive to voltage artifacts often found in ISHE measurements. We find that the condition for simultaneous resonance generates a dc spin current that is too small to produce a measurable change in linewidth of the second ferromagnet, confirming the dominance of ac spin currents in linewidth enhancement measurements.

  5. Identification of two cracks in a rod by minimal resonant and antiresonant frequency data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, Lourdes; Fernández-Sáez, José; Morassi, Antonino

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we consider the identification of two cracks of equal severity in a uniform free-free rod under longitudinal vibration. Each crack is simulated by a translational spring connecting the two adjacent segments of the rod and the cracks are considered to be small. We show that the inverse problem can be formulated and solved in terms of three frequency data only, corresponding to a suitable set of low resonant and antiresonant frequencies. Closed-form expressions of the damage parameters in terms of the measured frequency shifts are obtained. The paper improves existing results available in the literature, since the use of antiresonant frequencies allows us to exclude all the symmetrical crack locations occurring when only natural frequency are used as data. The analysis also explains why the use of high frequency data introduces spurious damage locations in the inverse problem solution. Numerical simulations show that if accurate input data are available then damage identification leads to satisfactory results.

  6. Negative-index metamaterial at visible frequencies based on high order plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Cong, Jiawei; Yun, Binfeng; Cui, Yiping

    2012-05-01

    A type of negative-index metamaterial composed of periodic arrays of SRRs is proposed and numerically investigated in the visible frequencies. Employing the high order magnetic resonance to induce negative permeability, negative refractive index is obtained between 395 THz and 430 THz with the maximum FOM=4.59. The effective permeability exhibits a rapid convergence with increasing number of metamaterial layers. Different responses from the electric and magnetic resonances to the changing geometric parameters are compared and analyzed in terms of the field distribution. Simulation results show that the high order magnetic resonance can be greatly enhanced at visible frequencies as well as effectively tuned over a wide spectral range without notably altering the coupling between unit cells.

  7. A study of the high frequency limitations of series resonant converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, T. A.; King, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A transformer induced oscillation in series resonant (SR) converters is studied. It may occur in the discontinuous current mode. The source of the oscillation is an unexpected resonant circuit formed by normal resonance components in series with the magnetizing inductance of the output transformers. The methods for achieving cyclic stability are: to use a half bridge SR converter where q0.5. Q should be as close to 1.0 as possible. If 0.5q1.0, the instability will be avoided if psi2/3q-1/3. The second objective was to investigate a power field effect transistor (FET) version of the SR converter capable of operating at frequencies above 100 KHz, to study component stress and losses at various frequencies.

  8. Effects of Dielectric Substrates and Ground Planes on Resonance Frequency of Archimedean Spirals.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Jerris W; Ramaswamy, Vijaykumar; Arora, Rajendra K; Edison, Arthur S; Brey, William W

    2016-04-01

    Superconducting self-resonant spiral structures are of current interest for applications both in metamaterials and as probe coils for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for high-sensitivity chemical analysis. Accurate spiral models are available in the literature for behavior of a spiral below and up to self-resonance. However, knowledge of the higher modes is also important. We present the relationships between the spiral parameters and the multiple mode frequencies of single sided spirals on dielectric substrates as modeled by method of moments simulation. In the absence of a ground plane, we find that the mode frequency has a linear though not necessarily harmonic dependence on the mode number. The effect of a thick substrate can be approximated by an effective dielectric constant. But when the thickness is less than 20% of the spiral trace width (router - rinner) this approximation is no longer accurate. We have developed a simple empirical formula to predict the higher modes.

  9. Ultra-thin wideband magnetic-type metamaterial absorber based on LC resonator at low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linbo; Zhou, Peiheng; Chen, Haiyan; Lu, Haipeng; Xie, Jianliang; Deng, Longjiang

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we propose to realize a broad absorption band in the frequency regimes of 2-6 GHz based on multiple resonances. A magnetic-type metamaterial absorber with cross-arrow pattern is further demonstrated numerically and experimentally. Two absorption resonances are generated by LC resonance, leading to bandwidth expansion. The equivalent circuit theory and the surface current distributions of the proposed absorber are discussed to analyze the physical mechanism. Moreover, the broad bandwidth can be maintained as incident angle up to 30° for transverse electric polarization and 45° for transverse magnetic polarization. Finally, experimental results show that the proposed absorber with the total thickness of 2.4 mm exhibits a -10 dB absorption bandwidth by more than 70 %. The low-frequency absorber has potential applications in the area of eliminating microwave energy.

  10. Anomalous Resonance Frequency Shift of a Microelectromechanical Oscillator in Superfluid ^3 He-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, P.; Jiang, W. G.; Barquist, C. S.; Lee, Y.; Chan, H. B.

    2017-02-01

    A superfluid ^3 He film with a thickness of 1.25 μm was studied using a microelectromechanical oscillator at various pressures of 9.2, 18.2, 25.2, and 28.6 bars. The oscillator was driven in the linear damping regime where the damping coefficient is independent of the velocity of the oscillator. The resonance frequency shows weak temperature and pressure dependences in the low temperature limit. An inertia coefficient of ≈ 0.1 was obtained in the ballistic regime. When the temperature rose from the lowest temperature, the resonance frequency of the resonator exhibited an unusual behavior, a rapid increase beyond the intrinsic value as temperature increases, for 9.2 and 18.2 bars.

  11. Frequency, Prognosis and Surgical Treatment of Structural Abnormalities Seen with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Childhood Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Anne T.; Mathern, Gary W.; Bronen, Richard A.; Fulbright, Robert K.; DiMario, Francis; Testa, Francine M.; Levy, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    The epidemiology of lesions identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), along with the use of pre-surgical evaluations and surgery in childhood-onset epilepsy patients has not previously been described. In a prospectively identified community-based cohort of children enrolled from 1993 to 1997, we examined (i) the frequency of lesions…

  12. Characterization of heroin samples by 1H NMR and 2D DOSY 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Balayssac, Stéphane; Retailleau, Emmanuel; Bertrand, Geneviève; Escot, Marie-Pierre; Martino, Robert; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Gilard, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-four samples of heroin from different illicit drug seizures were analyzed using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H NMR) and two-dimensional diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (2D DOSY) (1)H NMR. A careful assignment and quantification of (1)H signals enabled a comprehensive characterization of the substances present in the samples investigated: heroin, its main related impurities (6-acetylmorphine, acetylcodeine, morphine, noscapine and papaverine) and cutting agents (caffeine and acetaminophen in nearly all samples as well as lactose, lidocaine, mannitol, piracetam in one sample only), and hence to establish their spectral signatures. The good agreement between the amounts of heroin, noscapine, caffeine and acetaminophen determined by (1)H NMR and gas chromatography, the reference method in forensic laboratories, demonstrates the validity of the (1)H NMR technique. In this paper, 2D DOSY (1)H NMR offers a new approach for a whole characterization of the various components of these complex mixtures.

  13. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  14. Numerical and experimental investigation of a low-frequency measurement technique: differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianguo; Tang, Genyang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Wang, Shangxu

    2016-06-01

    Differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) has been developed to determine the elastic properties of saturated rocks within the kHz frequency range. This laboratory technique is based on considerations from perturbation theory, wherein the resonance frequencies of the resonant cavity with and without a perturbation sample are used to estimate the acoustic properties of the test sample. In order to better understand the operating mechanism of DARS and therefore optimize the procedure, it is important to develop an accurate and efficient numerical model. Accordingly, this study presents a new multiphysics model by coupling together considerations from acoustics, solid mechanics, and electrostatics. The numerical results reveal that the newly developed model can successfully simulate the acoustic pressure field at different resonance modes, and that it can accurately reflect the measurement process. Based on the understanding of the DARS system afforded by the numerical simulation, we refine the system configuration by utilizing cavities of different lengths and appropriate radii to broaden the frequency bandwidth and ensure testing accuracy. Four synthetic samples are measured to test the performance of the optimized DARS system, in conjunction with ultrasonic and static measurements. For nonporous samples, the estimated bulk moduli are shown to be independent of the different measurement methods (i.e. DARS or ultrasonic techniques). In contrast, for sealed porous samples, the differences in bulk moduli between the low- and high-frequency techniques can be clearly observed; this discrepancy is attributed to frequency dispersion. In summary, the optimized DARS system with an extended frequency range of 500-2000 Hz demonstrates considerable utility in investigating the frequency dependence of the acoustic properties of reservoir rocks.

  15. The lower subsidiary diffuse plasma resonances and the classification of radio emissions below the plasma frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Osherovich, V.A.; Benson, R.F. )

    1991-11-01

    The diffuse ionospheric resonances D{sub n}, stimulated by topside sounders, have been studied for over 2 decades. These resonances are observed below the plasma frequency f{sub N} between the harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency f{sub H}. The D{sub n} resonances are often accompanied by upper and lower subsidiary branches. The present paper concentrates on the classification of diffuse resonances, one motivation being the possible application to the interpretation of naturally occurring radio emissions in the magnetosphere. Osherovich has shown that the D{sub n} resonances are characterized by a nonequally spaced spectrum of frequencies f{sub D{sub n}} = f{sub Ds}n{sup 1/2} (n = 1, 2, 3, and 4), where f{sub D{sub s}} = 0.95(f{sub N}f{sub H}){sup 1/2}, and that the upper subsidiary resonances D{sub n}{sup +} = (f{sup 2}{sub D{sub n}} + f{sup 2}{sub H}){sup 1/2}. This classification is here extended to include the lower subsidiary resonances D{sub n}{sup minus} (n = 1, 2, 3, and 4), and it is shown that their frequencies are related to f{sub D{sub n}} and f{sub H} by the expression f{sub D{sub n}} = (f{sup 2}{sub D{sub n}} - f{sup 2}{sub H}){sup 1/2}. This result is based on a combination of previously published data and newly scaled ionograms from the Alouette 2 and ISIS 1 topside sounder experiments.

  16. Spectral and angular characteristics of dielectric resonator metasurface at optical frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Longfang; López-García, Martin; Oulton, Ruth; Klemm, Maciej; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Fumeaux, Christophe; Shah, Charan M.; Mitchell, Arnan; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Sriram, Sharath

    2014-11-10

    The capability of manipulating light at subwavelength scale has fostered the applications of flat metasurfaces in various fields. Compared to metallic structure, metasurfaces made of high permittivity low-loss dielectric resonators hold the promise of high efficiency by avoiding high conductive losses of metals at optical frequencies. This letter investigates the spectral and angular characteristics of a dielectric resonator metasurface composed of periodic sub-arrays of resonators with a linearly varying phase response. The far-field response of the metasurface can be decomposed into the response of a single grating element (sub-array) and the grating arrangement response. The analysis also reveals that coupling between resonators has a non-negligible impact on the angular response. Over a wide wavelength range, the simulated and measured angular characteristics of the metasurface provide a definite illustration of how different grating diffraction orders can be selectively suppressed or enhanced through antenna sub-array design.

  17. Effect of thin silicon dioxide layers on resonant frequency in infrared metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Shelton, D J; Peters, D W; Sinclair, M B; Brener, I; Warne, L K; Basilio, L I; Coffey, K R; Boreman, G D

    2010-01-18

    Infrared metamaterials fabricated on semiconductor substrates exhibit a high degree of sensitivity to very thin (as small as 2 nm) layers of low permittivity materials between the metallic elements and the underlying substrate. We have measured the resonant frequencies of split ring resonators and square loops fabricated on Si wafers with silicon dioxide thicknesses ranging from 0 to 10 nm. Resonance features blue shift with increasing silicon dioxide thickness. These effects are explained by the silicon dioxide layer forming a series capacitance to the fringing field across the elements. Resonance coupling to the Si-O vibrational absorption has been observed. Native oxide layers which are normally ignored in numerical simulations of metamaterials must be accounted for to produce accurate predictions.

  18. Operation of the CAPRICE electron cyclotron resonance ion source applying frequency tuning and double frequency heating.

    PubMed

    Maimone, F; Tinschert, K; Celona, L; Lang, R; Mäder, J; Rossbach, J; Spädtke, P

    2012-02-01

    The properties of the electromagnetic waves heating the electrons of the ECR ion sources (ECRIS) plasma affect the features of the extracted ion beams such as the emittance, the shape, and the current, in particular for higher charge states. The electron heating methods such as the frequency tuning effect and the double frequency heating are widely used for enhancing the performances of ECRIS or even for the routine operation during the beam production. In order to better investigate these effects the CAPRICE ECRIS has been operated using these techniques. The ion beam properties for highly charged ions have been measured with beam diagnostic tools. The reason of the observed variations of this performance can be related to the different electromagnetic field patterns, which are changing inside the plasma chamber when the frequency is varying.

  19. Evaluation of radio frequency microcoils as nuclear magnetic resonance detectors in low-homogeneity high-field superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. C.; Neideen, T. A.; Magin, R. L.; Norcross, J. A.

    1998-11-01

    We describe here experiments evaluating the performance of solenoidal radio frequency probes having submillimeter dimensions (microcoils) as detectors for liquid nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in very low-homogeneity (100 ppm/cm) magnetic fields. Performance is based on the measured H2O linewidth. A series of solenoidal microcoils having sample volumes 8, 53, and 593 nl were filled with distilled H2O and evaluated for smallest obtainable unshimmed NMR spectral linewidths in a vertical bore superconducting magnet, stabilized at 5.9 T (1H frequency=250 MHz). The smallest microcoil (472 μm diameter) gave a smallest H2O linewidth of 525 Hz, 25 times smaller than that from a standard 5.7 mm probe. Linewidth increased approximately as the square root of sample volume. For comparison, shimmed H2O linewidths using the same microcoils in a high-homogeneity (0.1 ppm/cm) NMR magnet were also measured. Shimmed linewidths in the high-homogeneity magnet were two orders of magnitude smaller and exhibited a similar dependence on volume. The results demonstrate that by using microcoils the volume over which the polarizing magnetic field must meet a specified homogeneity can be significantly reduced, which would be advantageous for smaller, less expensive NMR systems.

  20. FREQUENCY SHIFTS OF RESONANT MODES OF THE SUN DUE TO NEAR-SURFACE CONVECTIVE SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, J.; Hanasoge, S.; Antia, H. M.

    2015-06-20

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modeled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the “surface term.” The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modeling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelengths (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun. We show that the full oscillation equations, in the presence of temporally stationary three-dimensional (3D) flows, can be reduced to an effective “quiet-Sun” wave equation with altered sound speed, Brünt–Väisäla frequency, and Lamb frequency. We derive the modified equation and relations for the appropriate averaging of 3D flows and thermal quantities to obtain the properties of this effective medium. Using flows obtained from 3D numerical simulations of near-surface convection, we quantify their effect on solar oscillation frequencies and find that they are shifted systematically and substantially. We argue therefore that consistent interpretations of resonant frequencies must include modifications to the wave equation that effectively capture the impact of vigorous hydrodynamic convection.

  1. Frequency shifts of resonant modes of the Sun due to near-surface convective scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, J.; Hanasoge, S. M.; Antia, H. M.

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modeled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the ``surface term.'' The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modeling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelengths (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun. We show that the full oscillation equations, in the presence of temporally stationary 3D flows, can be reduced to an effective ``quiet-Sun'' wave equation with altered sound speed, Brünt-Väisäla frequency, and Lamb frequency. We derive the modified equation and relations for the appropriate averaging of 3D flows and thermal quantities to obtain the properties of this effective medium. Using flows obtained from 3D numerical simulations of near-surface convection, we quantify their effect on solar oscillation frequencies and find that they are shifted systematically and substantially. We argue therefore that consistent interpretations of resonant frequencies must include modifications to the wave equation that effectively capture the impact of vigorous hydrodynamic convection.

  2. Single-frequency, fully integrated, miniature DPSS laser based on monolithic resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudzik, G.; Sotor, J.; Krzempek, K.; Soboń, G.; Abramski, K. M.

    2014-02-01

    We present a single frequency, stable, narrow linewidth, miniature laser sources operating at 532 nm (or 1064 nm) based on a monolithic resonators. Such resonators utilize birefringent filters formed by YVO4 beam displacer and KTP or YVO4 crystals to force single frequency operation at 532 nm or 1064 nm, respectively. In both configurations Nd:YVO4 gain crystal is used. The resonators dimensions are 1x1x10.5 mm3 and 1x1x8.5 mm3 for green and infrared configurations, respectively. Presented laser devices, with total dimensions of 40x52x120 mm3, are fully equipped with driving electronics, pump diode, optical and mechanical components. The highly integrated (36x15x65 mm3) low noise driving electronics with implemented digital PID controller was designed. It provides pump current and resonator temperature stability of ±30 μA@650 mA and ±0,003ºC, respectively. The laser parameters can be set and monitored via the USB interface by external application. The developed laser construction is universal. Hence, the other wavelengths can be obtained only by replacing the monolithic resonator. The optical output powers in single frequency regime was at the level of 42 mW@532 nm and 0.5 W@1064 nm with the long-term fluctuations of ±0.85 %. The linewidth and the passive frequency stability under the free running conditions were Δν < 100 kHz and 3ṡ10-9@1 s integration time, respectively. The total electrical power supply consumption of laser module was only 4 W. Presented compact, single frequency laser operating at 532 nm and 1064 nm may be used as an excellent source for laser vibrometry, interferometry or seed laser for fiber amplifiers.

  3. Solitons and frequency combs in silica microring resonators: Interplay of the Raman and higher-order dispersion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milián, C.; Gorbach, A. V.; Taki, M.; Yulin, A. V.; Skryabin, D. V.

    2015-09-01

    The influence of Raman scattering and higher order dispersions on solitons and frequency comb generation in silica microring resonators is investigated. The Raman effect introduces a threshold value in the resonator quality factor above which the frequency-locked solitons cannot exist, and instead, a rich dynamics characterized by generation of self-frequency-shifting solitons and dispersive waves is observed. A mechanism for broadening the Cherenkov radiation through Hopf instability of the frequency-locked solitons is also reported.

  4. Controllable frequency comb generation in a tunable superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, J. Q.; Wang, Shuaipeng; Wang, Yipu; Zhang, Dengke; Luo, Xiaoqing; Chen, Zhen; Li, Tiefu

    Frequency combs have attracted considerable interest because they are extremely useful in a wide range of applications, such as optical metrology and high precision spectroscopy. Here we report the design and characterization of a controllable frequency comb generated in a tunable superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator in the microwave regime. Both the center frequency and teeth density of the comb are precisely controllable. The teeth spacing can be adjusted from Hz to MHz. The experimental results can be well explained via theoretical analysis. This work is supported by the NSAF Grant No. U1330201, the NSFC Grant No. 91421102, and the MOST 973 Program Grant Nos. 2014CB848700 and 2014CB921401.

  5. CFAVC scheme for high frequency series resonant inverter-fed domestic induction heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Booma; Reddy Sathi, Rama

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the investigations on the constant frequency asymmetric voltage cancellation control in the AC-AC resonant converter-fed domestic induction heating system. Conventional fixed frequency control techniques used in the high frequency converters lead to non-zero voltage switching operation and reduced output power. The proposed control technique produces higher output power than the conventional fixed-frequency control strategies. In this control technique, zero-voltage-switching operation is maintained during different duty cycle operation for reduction in the switching losses. Complete analysis of the induction heating power supply system with asymmetric voltage cancellation control is discussed in this article. Simulation and experimental study on constant frequency asymmetric voltage cancellation (CFAVC)-controlled full bridge series resonant inverter is performed. Time domain simulation results for the open and closed loop of the system are obtained using MATLAB simulation tool. The simulation results prove the control of voltage and power in a wide range. PID controller-based closed loop control system achieves the voltage regulation of the proposed system for the step change in load. Hardware implementation of the system under CFAVC control is done using the embedded controller. The simulation and experimental results validate the performance of the CFAVC control technique for series resonant-based induction cooking system.

  6. High-frequency current oscillations in graphene-boron nitride resonant tunnel diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenaway, Mark; Gaskell, Jenn; Eaves, Laurence; Novoselov, Kostya; Mishchenko, Artem; Geim, Andre; Fromhold, Mark

    The successful realisation of multilayer graphene-hBN-graphene resonant tunnelling diodes (graphene- RTDs) with negative differential conductance (NDC) and MHz current oscillations offers the exciting possibility of exploiting them as high-frequency oscillators and mixers. In this paper, we examine their potential for generating higher frequencies by simulating the oscillations in the tunnel current and charge that arise when the device is biased in the NDC region and placed in a resonant circuit. Using the Bardeen transfer Hamiltonian method, we examine the effect on the device characteristics of the twist angle, θ, between the two graphene electrodes, the hBN barrier thickness and of the carrier density in the graphene electrodes, which can be adjusted by chemical doping or by an applied bias voltage. The simulations accurately reproduce our recently-reported measurements on these RTDs (Fig. 4,). The results of simulations show that frequencies of tens of GHz are achievable by optimising the device parameters. Leverhulme Trust, UK.

  7. Potential of ion cyclotron resonance frequency current drive via fast waves in DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Ye O.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Lerche, E.; Ongena, J.

    2015-02-01

    For the continuous operation of future tokamak-reactors like DEMO, non-inductively driven toroidal plasma current is needed. Bootstrap current, due to the pressure gradient, and current driven by auxiliary heating systems are currently considered as the two main options. This paper addresses the current drive (CD) potential of the ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating system in DEMO-like plasmas. Fast wave CD scenarios are evaluated for both the standard midplane launch and an alternative case of exciting the waves from the top of the machine. Optimal ICRF frequencies and parallel wave numbers are identified to maximize the CD efficiency. Limitations of the high frequency ICRF CD operation are discussed. A simplified analytical method to estimate the fast wave CD efficiency is presented, complemented with the discussion of its dependencies on plasma parameters. The calculated CD efficiency for the ICRF system is shown to be similar to those for the negative neutral beam injection and electron cyclotron resonance heating.

  8. The use of a selective saturation pulse to suppress t1 noise in two-dimensional 1H fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Aiden J.; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Marsh, Andrew; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Brown, Steven P.

    2015-11-01

    A selective saturation pulse at fast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies (60+ kHz) suppresses t1 noise in the indirect dimension of two-dimensional 1H MAS NMR spectra. The method is applied to a synthetic nucleoside with an intense methyl 1H signal due to triisopropylsilyl (TIPS) protecting groups. Enhanced performance in terms of suppressing the methyl signal while minimising the loss of signal intensity of nearby resonances of interest relies on reducing spin diffusion - this is quantified by comparing two-dimensional 1H NOESY-like spin diffusion spectra recorded at 30-70 kHz MAS. For a saturation pulse centred at the methyl resonance, the effect of changing the nutation frequency at different MAS frequencies as well as the effect of changing the pulse duration is investigated. By applying a pulse of duration 30 ms and nutation frequency 725 Hz at 70 kHz MAS, a good compromise of significant suppression of the methyl resonance combined with the signal intensity of resonances greater than 5 ppm away from the methyl resonance being largely unaffected is achieved. The effectiveness of using a selective saturation pulse is demonstrated for both homonuclear 1H-1H double quantum (DQ)/single quantum (SQ) MAS and 14N-1H heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) two-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments.

  9. The use of a selective saturation pulse to suppress t1 noise in two-dimensional (1)H fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Aiden J; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Marsh, Andrew; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Brown, Steven P

    2015-11-01

    A selective saturation pulse at fast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies (60+kHz) suppresses t1 noise in the indirect dimension of two-dimensional (1)H MAS NMR spectra. The method is applied to a synthetic nucleoside with an intense methyl (1)H signal due to triisopropylsilyl (TIPS) protecting groups. Enhanced performance in terms of suppressing the methyl signal while minimising the loss of signal intensity of nearby resonances of interest relies on reducing spin diffusion--this is quantified by comparing two-dimensional (1)H NOESY-like spin diffusion spectra recorded at 30-70 kHz MAS. For a saturation pulse centred at the methyl resonance, the effect of changing the nutation frequency at different MAS frequencies as well as the effect of changing the pulse duration is investigated. By applying a pulse of duration 30 ms and nutation frequency 725 Hz at 70 kHz MAS, a good compromise of significant suppression of the methyl resonance combined with the signal intensity of resonances greater than 5 ppm away from the methyl resonance being largely unaffected is achieved. The effectiveness of using a selective saturation pulse is demonstrated for both homonuclear (1)H-(1)H double quantum (DQ)/single quantum (SQ) MAS and (14)N-(1)H heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) two-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments.

  10. 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance determination of the enantiomeric purity of aliphatic primary amines, β-aminoalcohols, β-diamines and α-amino-acids with 1 R-(-)-myrtenal: scope and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufrasne, François; Gelbcke, Michel; Nève, Jean

    2003-04-01

    1 R-(-)-myrtenal was tested as a chiral derivatising agent for the determination of the enantiomeric purity of aliphatic primary amines, β-aminoalcohols, β-diamines and α-amino-acids. Derivatisation procedure consists in mixing one equivalent each of the amine and 1 R-(-)-myrtenal directly into the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tube before addition of the appropriate deuterated solvent and, for α-amino-acids, one equivalent of NaOH was added to neutralise the acidic function. Diastereoisomeric imines were completely formed after 12 h and analysed by 1H-NMR except for N-methyl β-diamines for which imidazolidines were obtained. The method gave satisfactory results only for α- and β-arylalkylamines for which CDCl 3 could be advantageously replaced by C 6D 6 or pyridine- d5 in order to increase the difference between the chemical shifts. The main advantage of the procedure is its simplicity as it does not involve steps such as activation, heating, solvent evaporation and isolation of the product. Its limitations are the limited series of compounds susceptible to be analysed and the small difference between the chemical shifts of the diastereoisomeric imines obtained.

  11. Resonances observed on mother-daughter rocket flights in the ionosphere. [signal frequency enhancement in auroral zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkestad, K.; Troeim, J.

    1973-01-01

    Resonance phenomena have been observed in swept frequency experiments carried out on two mother-daughter Nike-Tomahawk rocket flights at auroral latitudes. The experimental method is briefly described and characteristic samples of the results are presented. A possible interpretation of some main resonances is offered, involving cold plasma cone resonances.

  12. U1h Superstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Glen Sykes

    2000-11-01

    The U1H Shaft Project is a design build subcontract to supply the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) a 1,045 ft. deep, 20 ft. diameter, concrete lined shaft for unspecified purposes. The subcontract awarded to Atkinson Construction by Bechtel Nevada to design and construct the shaft for the DOE has been split into phases with portions of the work being released as dictated by available funding. The first portion released included the design for the shaft, permanent hoist, headframe, and collar arrangement. The second release consisted of constructing the shaft collar to a depth of 110 ft., the service entry, utility trenches, and installation of the temporary sinking plant. The temporary sinking plant included the installation of the sinking headframe, the sinking hoist, two deck winches, the shaft form, the sinking work deck, and temporary utilities required to sink the shaft. Both the design and collar construction were completed on schedule. The third release consisted of excavating and lining the shaft to the station depth of approximately 950 feet. Work is currently proceeding on this production sinking phase. At a depth of approximately 600 feet, Atkinson has surpassed production expectation and is more than 3 months ahead of schedule. Atkinson has employed the use of a Bobcat 331 excavator as the primary means of excavation. the shaft is being excavated entirely in an alluvial deposit with varying degrees of calcium carbonate cementation. Several more work packages are expected to be released in the near future. The remaining work packages include, construction of the shaft station a depth of 975 ft. and construction of the shaft sump to a depth of 1,045 ft., installation of the loading pocket and station steel and equipment, installation of the shaft steel and guides, installation of the shaft utilities, and installation of the permanent headframe, hoist, collar utilities, and facilities.

  13. Frequency-Temperature Compensation Techniques for High-Q Microwave Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, John G.; Tobar, Michael E.

    Low-noise high-stability resonator oscillators based on high-Q monolithic sapphire ``Whispering Gallery'' (WG)-mode resonators have become important devices for telecommunication, radar and metrological applications. The extremely high quality factor of sapphire, of 2 x10^5 at room temperature, 5 x10^7 at liquid nitrogen temperature and 5 x10^9 at liquid helium temperature has enabled the lowest phase noise and highly frequency-stable oscillators in the microwave regime to be constructed. To create an oscillator with exceptional frequency stability, the resonator must have its frequency-temperature dependence annulled at some temperature, as well as a high quality factor. The Temperature Coefficient of Permittivity (TCP) for sapphire is quite large, at 10-100parts per million/K above 77K. This mechanism allows temperature fluctuations to transform to resonator frequency fluctuations.A number of research groups worldwide have investigated various methods of compensating the TCP of a sapphire dielectric resonator at different temperatures. The usual electromagnetic technique of annulment involves the use of paramagnetic impurities contributing an opposite temperature coefficient of the magnetic susceptibility to the TCP. This technique has only been realized successfully in liquid helium environments. Near 4K the thermal expansion and permittivity effects are small and only small quantities of the paramagnetic ions are necessary to compensate the mode frequency. Compensation is due to impurity ions that were incidentally left over from the manufacturing process.Recently, there has been an effort to dispense with the need for liquid helium and make a compact flywheel oscillator for the new generation of primary frequency standards such as the cesium fountain at the Laboratoire Primaire du Temps et des Fréquences (LPTF), France. To achieve the stability limit imposed

  14. Dielectric measurements of nanoliter liquids with a photonic crystal resonator at terahertz frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Hanham, S. M. Watts, C.; Klein, N.; Otter, W. J.; Lucyszyn, S.

    2015-07-20

    We present a highly sensitive technique for determining the complex permittivity of nanoliter liquid samples in the terahertz band based on a photonic crystal resonator and microcapillary. Liquids are characterized by using a capillary tube to introduce a ∼4 nl liquid sample into the electromagnetic field of a resonant mode confined by an L3 resonant cavity in a high-resistivity silicon photonic crystal slab. Monitoring the perturbation of the resonant frequency and unloaded Q-factor of the resonant mode at 100 GHz and ∼5800, respectively, allows a sample's permittivity to be calculated. An analytical model describing the system response based on perturbation theory and quasi-static analysis of the electric field within the capillary is also presented and found to agree well with FEM simulations and experimental measurements of ethanol-water mixtures of various concentrations for low to moderate loss tangents of the liquid samples. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by measuring the complex permittivity of several bioliquids, including suspensions of red and white blood cells. These results represent a step towards a lab-on-a-chip device for the analysis of extremely small quantities of biological, toxic, explosive, and other liquid types at terahertz frequencies.

  15. Dielectric measurements of nanoliter liquids with a photonic crystal resonator at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanham, S. M.; Watts, C.; Otter, W. J.; Lucyszyn, S.; Klein, N.

    2015-07-01

    We present a highly sensitive technique for determining the complex permittivity of nanoliter liquid samples in the terahertz band based on a photonic crystal resonator and microcapillary. Liquids are characterized by using a capillary tube to introduce a ˜4 nl liquid sample into the electromagnetic field of a resonant mode confined by an L3 resonant cavity in a high-resistivity silicon photonic crystal slab. Monitoring the perturbation of the resonant frequency and unloaded Q-factor of the resonant mode at 100 GHz and ˜5800, respectively, allows a sample's permittivity to be calculated. An analytical model describing the system response based on perturbation theory and quasi-static analysis of the electric field within the capillary is also presented and found to agree well with FEM simulations and experimental measurements of ethanol-water mixtures of various concentrations for low to moderate loss tangents of the liquid samples. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by measuring the complex permittivity of several bioliquids, including suspensions of red and white blood cells. These results represent a step towards a lab-on-a-chip device for the analysis of extremely small quantities of biological, toxic, explosive, and other liquid types at terahertz frequencies.

  16. Repetition rate multiplication of frequency comb using all-pass fiber resonator.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijun; Yang, Honglei; Zhang, Hongyuan; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2016-09-01

    We propose a stable method for repetition rate multiplication of a 250-MHz Er-fiber frequency comb by a phase-locked all-pass fiber ring resonator, whose phase-locking configuration is simple. The optical path length of the fiber ring resonator is automatically controlled to be accurately an odd multiple of half of the original cavity length using an electronical phase-locking unit with an optical delay line. As for shorter cavity length of the comb, high-order odd multiple is preferable. Because the power loss depends only on the net-attenuation of the fiber ring resonator, the energetic efficiency of the proposed method is high. The input and output optical spectrums show that the spectral width of the frequency comb is clearly preserved. Besides, experimental results show less pulse intensity fluctuation and 35 dB suppression ratio of side-modes while providing a good long-term and short-term frequency stability. Higher-order repetition rate multiplication to several GHz can be obtained by using several fiber ring resonators in cascade configuration.

  17. Repetition rate multiplication of frequency comb using all-pass fiber resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lijun; Yang, Honglei; Zhang, Hongyuan; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2016-09-01

    We propose a stable method for repetition rate multiplication of a 250-MHz Er-fiber frequency comb by a phase-locked all-pass fiber ring resonator, whose phase-locking configuration is simple. The optical path length of the fiber ring resonator is automatically controlled to be accurately an odd multiple of half of the original cavity length using an electronical phase-locking unit with an optical delay line. As for shorter cavity length of the comb, high-order odd multiple is preferable. Because the power loss depends only on the net-attenuation of the fiber ring resonator, the energetic efficiency of the proposed method is high. The input and output optical spectrums show that the spectral width of the frequency comb is clearly preserved. Besides, experimental results show less pulse intensity fluctuation and 35 dB suppression ratio of side-modes while providing a good long-term and short-term frequency stability. Higher-order repetition rate multiplication to several GHz can be obtained by using several fiber ring resonators in cascade configuration.

  18. Subnanometer absolute displacement measurement using a frequency comb referenced dual resonance tracking Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minhao; Wei, Haoyun; Zhao, Shijie; Wu, Xuejian; Li, Yan

    2015-05-10

    Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometry is a traceable high-resolution method for displacement metrology that has no nonlinearity. Compared with the single resonance tracking F-P interferometry, the dual resonance tracking (DRT) F-P interferometer system is able to realize tens of millimeters measurement range while maintaining the intrinsic high resolution. A DRT F-P system is thus developed for absolute displacement measurement in metrology applications. Two external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) are simultaneously locked to two resonances of a high-finesse F-P cavity using the Pound-Drever-Hall locking scheme. The absolute optical frequencies of the locked ECDLs are measured using a reference diode laser, with the frequency stabilized and controlled by an optical frequency comb. The absolute cavity resonance order numbers are investigated. The measurement range is experimentally tested to achieve 20 mm, while the resolution reaches ~10 pm level, mainly limited by the mechanical stability of the F-P cavity. Compared with the measurement results from a self-developed displacement-angle heterodyne interferometer, the displacement residuals are within 10 nm in the range of 20 mm. This high-resolution interferometer may become a candidate for length metrology such as in Watt balance or Joule balance projects.

  19. A novel radio frequency coil for veterinary magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Bin; Huang, Kai-Wen; Wang, Wei-Min

    2010-07-01

    In this article, a novel designed radio frequency (RF) coil is designed and built for the imaging of puppies in a V-shape permanent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Two sets of Helmholtz coil pairs with a V-shape structure are used to improve the holding of an animal in the coil. The homogeneity and the sensitivity of the RF field in the coil are analysed by theoretical calculation. The size and the shape of the new coil are optimized and validated by simulation through using the finite element method (FEM). Good magnetic resonance (MR) images are achieved on a shepherd dog.

  20. Frequency, amplitude, and phase measurements in contact resonance atomic force microscopies.

    PubMed

    Stan, Gheorghe; Solares, Santiago D

    2014-01-01

    The resonance frequency, amplitude, and phase response of the first two eigenmodes of two contact-resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) configurations, which differ in the method used to excite the system (cantilever base vs sample excitation), are analyzed in this work. Similarities and differences in the observables of the cantilever dynamics, as well as the different effect of the tip-sample contact properties on those observables in each configuration are discussed. Finally, the expected accuracy of CR-AFM using phase-locked loop detection is investigated and quantification of the typical errors incurred during measurements is provided.

  1. Mechanical Generation of Radio-Frequency Fields in Nuclear-Magnetic-Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, J. J. T.; den Haan, A. M. J.; Donkersloot, R. J.; Marsman, F.; de Wit, M.; Bossoni, L.; Oosterkamp, T. H.

    2017-02-01

    We present a method for magnetic-resonance force microscopy (MRFM) with ultralow dissipation, by using the higher modes of the mechanical detector as a radio-frequency (rf) source. This method allows MRFM on samples without the need to be close to a conventional electrically driven rf source. Furthermore, since conventional electrically driven rf sources require currents that give dissipation, our method enables nuclear-magnetic-resonance experiments at ultralow temperatures. Removing the need for an on-chip rf source is an important step towards an MRFM which can be widely used in condensed matter physics.

  2. Finite size effect on spread of resonance frequencies in arrays of coupled vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Andreas; Drews, André; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2011-01-25

    Dynamical properties of magnetic vortices in arrays of magnetostatically coupled ferromagnetic disks are studied by means of a broadband ferromagnetic-resonance (FMR) setup. Magnetic force microscopy and magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy are used to image the core polarizations and the chiralities which are both found to be randomly distributed. The resonance frequency of vortex-core motion strongly depends on the magnetostatic coupling between the disks. The parameter describing the relative broadening of the absorption peak observed in the FMR transmission spectra for a given normalized center-to-center distance between the elements is shown to depend on the size of the array.

  3. Performance of field-emitting resonating carbon nanotubes as radio-frequency demodulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, P.; Poncharal, P.; Barois, T.; Perisanu, S.; Gouttenoire, V.; Frachon, H.; Lazarus, A.; de Langre, E.; Minoux, E.; Charles, M.; Ziaei, A.; Guillot, D.; Choueib, M.; Ayari, A.; Purcell, S. T.

    2011-04-01

    We report on a systematic study of the use of resonating nanotubes in a field emission (FE) configuration to demodulate radio frequency signals. We particularly concentrate on how the demodulation depends on the variation of the field amplification factor during resonance. Analytical formulas describing the demodulation are derived as functions of the system parameters. Experiments using AM and FM demodulations in a transmission electron microscope are also presented with a determination of all the pertinent experimental parameters. Finally we discuss the use of CNTs undergoing FE as nanoantennae and the different geometries that could be used for optimization and implementation.

  4. Nonresonant corrections for the optical resonance frequency measurements in the hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Labzowsky, Leonti; Schedrin, Gavriil; Solovyev, Dmitrii; Chernovskaya, Evgenia; Plunien, Guenter; Karshenboim, Savely

    2009-05-15

    The deviation of the natural spectral line profile from the Lorentz shape for the optical resonant frequency measurements is considered. This deviation leads to an asymmetry, which is mainly due to nonresonant correction to the resonant Lorentz profile. The nonresonant corrections are studied for the different types of the atomic resonant experiments. The most accurate recent optical resonance experiments are analyzed, i.e., the two-photon 1s-2s resonance excitation of the hydrogen atom with the delayed decay in the external electric field. The description of the nonresonant correction in the latter case requires the employment of QED with different in and out Hamiltonians. The nonresonant corrections for this experiment are investigated and found to be about 10{sup -5} Hz, while the recent experimental uncertainty is 34 Hz and in the near feature is expected to be a few hertz. The projected 1s-2s resonance excitation experiment with the three-photon ionization detection (which is now in progress) is also considered.

  5. Two Novel Measurements for the Drive-Mode Resonant Frequency of a Micromachined Vibratory Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ancheng; Hu, Xiaoping; Luo, Bing; Jiang, Mingming; He, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kanghua

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the drive-mode resonance frequency of a micromachined vibratory gyroscope (MVG), one needs to measure it accurately and efficiently. The conventional approach to measure the resonant frequency is by performing a sweep frequency test and spectrum analysis. The method is time-consuming and inconvenient because of the requirements of many test points, a lot of data storage and off-line analyses. In this paper, we propose two novel measurement methods, the search method and track method, respectively. The former is based on the magnitude-frequency characteristics of the drive mode, utilizing a one-dimensional search technique. The latter is based on the phase-frequency characteristics, applying a feedback control loop. Their performances in precision, noise resistivity and efficiency are analyzed through detailed simulations. A test system is implemented based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and experiments are carried out. By comparing with the common approach, feasibility and superiorities of the proposed methods are validated. In particular, significant efficiency improvements are achieved whereby the conventional frequency method consumes nearly 5,000 s to finish a measurement, while only 5 s is needed for the track method and 1 s for the search method. PMID:24256977

  6. Coupling of Helmholtz resonators to improve acoustic liners for turbofan engines at low frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted to evaluate means for increasing the effectiveness of low frequency sound absorbing liners for aircraft turbine engines. Three schemes for coupling low frequency absorber elements were considered. These schemes were analytically modeled and their impedance was predicted over a frequency range of 50 to 1,000 Hz. An optimum and two off-optimum designs of the most promising, a parallel coupled scheme, were fabricated and tested in a flow duct facility. Impedance measurements were in good agreement with predicted values and validated the procedure used to transform modeled parameters to hardware designs. Measurements of attenuation for panels of coupled resonators were consistent with predictions based on measured impedance. All coupled resonator panels tested showed an increase in peak attenuation of about 50% and an increase in attenuation bandwidth of one one-third octave band over that measured for an uncoupled panel. These attenuation characteristics equate to about 35% greater reduction in source perceived noise level (PNL), relative to the uncoupled panel, or a reduction in treatment length of about 24% for constant PNL reduction. The increased effectiveness of the coupled resonator concept for attenuation of low frequency broad spectrum noise is demonstrated.

  7. Self-Oscillation-Based Frequency Tracking for the Drive and Detection of Resonance Magnetometers.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zheng; Ren, Dahai; You, Zheng

    2016-05-21

    This paper reports a drive and detection method for Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS)-based Lorentz-force resonance magnetometers. Based on the proposed MEMS magnetometer, a drive and detection method was developed by using self-oscillation to adjust the mismatch between the mechanical resonance frequency and the coil drive frequency as affected by temperature fluctuations and vibration amplitude changes. Not only was the signal-to-noise ratio enhanced by the proposed method compared to the traditional method, but the test system automatically reached resonance frequency very rapidly when powered on. Moreover, the linearity and the measurement range were improved by the magnetic feedback generated by the coil. Test results indicated that the sensitivity of the proposed magnetometer is 59.6 mV/μT and its noise level is 0.25 μT. When operating in ±65 μT, its nonlinearity is 2.5‰-only one-tenth of the former prototype. Its power consumption is only about 250 mW and its size is only 28 mm × 28 mm × 10 mm, or about one-eighth of the original sensor; further, unlike the former device, it can distinguish both positive and negative magnetic fields. The proposed method can also be applied in other MEMS sensors such as gyroscopes and micromirrors to enhance their frequency tracking ability.

  8. Self-Oscillation-Based Frequency Tracking for the Drive and Detection of Resonance Magnetometers

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zheng; Ren, Dahai; You, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a drive and detection method for Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS)-based Lorentz-force resonance magnetometers. Based on the proposed MEMS magnetometer, a drive and detection method was developed by using self-oscillation to adjust the mismatch between the mechanical resonance frequency and the coil drive frequency as affected by temperature fluctuations and vibration amplitude changes. Not only was the signal-to-noise ratio enhanced by the proposed method compared to the traditional method, but the test system automatically reached resonance frequency very rapidly when powered on. Moreover, the linearity and the measurement range were improved by the magnetic feedback generated by the coil. Test results indicated that the sensitivity of the proposed magnetometer is 59.6 mV/μT and its noise level is 0.25 μT. When operating in ±65 μT, its nonlinearity is 2.5‰—only one-tenth of the former prototype. Its power consumption is only about 250 mW and its size is only 28 mm × 28 mm × 10 mm, or about one-eighth of the original sensor; further, unlike the former device, it can distinguish both positive and negative magnetic fields. The proposed method can also be applied in other MEMS sensors such as gyroscopes and micromirrors to enhance their frequency tracking ability. PMID:27213401

  9. Resonance properties of Ag-ZnO nanostructures at terahertz frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, John E.; Díaz de León, Ramón; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando; González, Gabriel; José-Yacaman, Miguel; Ponce, Arturo; González, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Nanoantennas have been fabricated by scaling down traditional antenna designs using nanolithographic techniques and testing them at different optical wavelengths, these particular nanoantennas have shown responses in a broad range of frequencies going from visible wavelengths to the range of the terahertz. Some self-assembled nanostructures exist that exhibit similar shapes and properties to those of traditional antenna structures. In this work the emission and absorption properties of self-assembled nanostructures made of zinc oxide nanorods on silver nanowires, which resemble traditional dipole antennas, were measured and simulated in order to test their antenna performance. These structures show resonant properties in the 10-120 THz range, with the main resonance at 60 THz. The radiation pattern of these nanostructures was also obtained by numerical simulations, and it is shown that it can be tailored to increase or decrease its directivity as a function of the location of the energy source of excitation. Experimental measurements were performed by Raman spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) in order to show existing vibrational frequencies at the resonant frequencies of the nanostructures, measurements were made from ~9 to 103 THz and the results were in agreement with the simulations. These characteristics make these metal-semiconductor Ag/ZnO nanostructures useful as self-assembled nanoantennas in applications such as terahertz spectroscopy and sensing at terahertz frequencies. PMID:26406710

  10. Displacement sensing based on resonant frequency monitoring of electrostatically actuated curved micro beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakover, Naftaly; Ilic, B. Robert; Krylov, Slava

    2016-11-01

    The ability to control nonlinear interactions of suspended mechanical structures offers a unique opportunity to engineer rich dynamical behavior that extends the dynamic range and ultimate device sensitivity. We demonstrate a displacement sensing technique based on resonant frequency monitoring of curved, doubly clamped, bistable micromechanical beams interacting with a movable electrode. In this configuration, the electrode displacement influences the nonlinear electrostatic interactions, effective stiffness and frequency of the curved beam. Increased sensitivity is made possible by dynamically operating the beam near the snap-through bistability onset. Various in-plane device architectures were fabricated from single crystal silicon and measured under ambient conditions using laser Doppler vibrometry. In agreement with the reduced order Galerkin-based model predictions, our experimental results show a significant resonant frequency reduction near critical snap-through, followed by a frequency increase within the post-buckling configuration. Interactions with a stationary electrode yield a voltage sensitivity up to  ≈560 Hz V-1 and results with a movable electrode allow motion sensitivity up to  ≈1.5 Hz nm-1. Our theoretical and experimental results collectively reveal the potential of displacement sensing using nonlinear interactions of geometrically curved beams near instabilities, with possible applications ranging from highly sensitive resonant inertial detectors to complex optomechanical platforms providing an interface between the classical and quantum domains.

  11. HIGHER MODE FREQUENCY EFFECTS ON RESONANCE IN MACHINERY, STRUCTURES, AND PIPE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.

    2010-05-02

    The complexities of resonance in multi-degree of freedom systems (multi-DOF) may be clarified using graphic presentations. Multi-DOF systems represent actual systems, such as beams or springs, where multiple, higher order, natural frequencies occur. Resonance occurs when a cyclic load is applied to a structure, and the frequency of the applied load equals one of the natural frequencies. Both equations and graphic presentations are available in the literature for single degree of freedom (SDOF) systems, which describe the response of spring-mass-damper systems to harmonically applied, or cyclic, loads. Loads may be forces, moments, or forced displacements applied to one end of a structure. Multi-DOF systems are typically described only by equations in the literature, and while equations certainly permit a case by case analysis for specific conditions, graphs provide an overall comprehension not gleaned from single equations. In fact, this collection of graphed equations provides novel results, which describe the interactions between multiple natural frequencies, as well as a comprehensive description of increased vibrations near resonance.

  12. High-frequency rolloff in a cochlear model without critical-layer resonance.

    PubMed

    Lewis, E R

    1984-09-01

    Zwislocki's original cochlear model, incorporating axial fluid inertia and shunt basilar-membrane stiffness and viscous resistance, possesses an operating regime not previously emphasized in the literature. Even in the absence of basilar-membrane mass and the consequent critical-layer resonance, this regime provides extraordinarily steep high-frequency rolloff. That rolloff is not associated with a critical frequency at which energy flow velocity goes to zero, but is attributable instead to a combination of two effects; (1) frequency-dependent energy coupling to the basilar-membrane viscous resistance, leading to local attenuation of the traveling wave at a rate (Np/cycle) that is directly proportional to frequency, and (2) wavelength that decreases with increasing frequency, thus increasing the number of cycles per unit length of basilar membrane. This combination leads to local attenuation of the traveling-wave amplitude (hence energy absorption from the traveling wave) that is strongly dependent on frequency, the rate (Np/cm) being proportional to the square of frequency in the long-wave mode. In Ranke's (two-dimensional, short-wave mode) version of the model, the same operating regime leads to attenuation that is even more intensely dependent on frequency, the rate being proportional to the cube of frequency.

  13. Two-dimensional sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance study of AaH IT, an anti-insect toxin from the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector. Sequential resonance assignments and folding of the polypeptide chain

    SciTech Connect

    Darbon, H. ); Weber, C.; Braun, W. )

    1991-02-19

    Sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments for the polypeptide backbone and for most of the amino acid side-chain protons, as well as the general folding of AaH IT, are described. AaH IT is a neurotoxin purified from the venom of the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector and is specifically active on the insect nervous system. The secondary structure and the hydrogen-bonding patterns in the regular secondary structure elements are deduced from nuclear Overhauser effects and the sequence locations of the slowly exchanging amide protons. The backbone folding is determined by distance geometry calculations with the DISMAN program. The regular secondary structure includes two and a half turns of {alpha}-helix running from residues 21 to 30 and a three-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet including peptides 3-5, 34-38, and 41-46. Two tight turns are present, one connecting the end of the {alpha}-helix to an external strand of the {beta}-sheet, i.e., turn 31-34, and another connecting this same strand to the central one, i.e., turn 38-41. The differences in the specificity of these related proteins, which are able to discriminate between mammalian and insect voltage-dependent sodium channels of excitable tissues, are most probably brought about by the position of the C-terminal peptide with regard to a hydrophobic surface common to all scorpion toxins examined thus far. Thus, the interaction of a given scorpion toxin with its receptor might well be governed by the presence of this solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface, whereas adjacent areas modulate the specificity of the interaction.

  14. Effect of resonance in external radio-frequency circuit on very high frequency plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, Shahid; Chen Zhigang; Collins, Ken

    2010-05-15

    A fully electromagnetic plasma model for an asymmetric capacitively coupled plasma discharge is used to understand the interaction between the external radio-frequency (rf) distributed circuit and the plasma. The plasma is excited using a 150 MHz rf source connected to the top electrode, the bottom electrode is connected to a shorted transmission line, and the electrodes are separated from the chamber walls through dielectric rings. Under typical conditions, the electron density peaks in the center of the plasma chamber due to the standing electromagnetic wave and the rf current from the top electrode primarily returns through the bottom electrode. When the electrical length of the bottom transmission line is adjusted such that it presents a large (open-circuit) impedance at the plasma chamber interface, the rf return current shifts from the bottom electrode to the chamber wall. As a consequence, the peak in electron density also moves from the center of the chamber toward its outer periphery.

  15. Resonance Cone Interaction With a Self-Consistent Radio-Frequency Sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2008-11-07

    We study the propagation of lower-hybrid-type resonance cones in a tenuous magnetized plasma, and, in particular, their interaction with, and reflection from, the plasma sheath near a conducting wall. The sheath is modeled as a vacuum gap whose width is given by the Child-Langmuir law. The application of interest is when the resonance cones are launched (parasitically) by an ion-cyclotron radio-frequency antenna in a typical rf-heated tokamak fusion experiment. We calculate the fraction of launched voltage in the resonance cones that is transmitted to the sheath, and show that it has a sensitive thresholdlike turn on when a critical parameter reaches order unity. Above threshold, the fractional voltage transmitted to the sheath is order unity, leading to strong and potentially deleterious rf-wall interactions in tokamak rf heating experiments. Below threshold, these interactions can be avoided.

  16. Spin evolution in a radio frequency field studied through muon spin resonance.

    PubMed

    Clayden, Nigel J; Cottrell, Stephen P; McKenzie, Iain

    2012-01-01

    The application of composite inversion pulses to a novel area of magnetic resonance, namely muon spin resonance, is demonstrated. Results confirm that efficient spin inversion can readily be achieved using this technique, despite the challenging experimental setup required for beamline measurements and the short lifetime (≈2.2μs) associated with the positive muon probe. Intriguingly, because the muon spin polarisation is detected by positron emission, the muon magnetisation can be monitored during the radio-frequency (RF) pulse to provide a unique insight into the effect of the RF field on the spin polarisation. This technique is used to explore the application of RF inversion sequences under the non-ideal conditions typically encountered when setting up pulsed muon resonance experiments.

  17. Inverse Bloch-oscillator: Strong Thz-photocurrent resonances at the Bloch frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Unterrainer, K.; Keay, B.J.; Wanke, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    We have observed resonant changes in the current-voltage characteristics of miniband semiconductor superlattices when the Bloch frequency is resonant with a terahertz field and its harmonics: the inverse Bloch oscillator effect. The resonant feature consists of a peak in the current which grows with increasing laser intensity accompanied by a decrease of the current at the low bias side. The peak position moves linearly with the laser frequency. When the intensity is increased further the first peak starts to decrease and a second peak at about twice the voltage of the first peak is observed due to a two photon resonance. At the highest intensities we observe up to a four photon resonance. A superlattice is expected to show negative differential conductance due to the strong nonparabolicity of the miniband. In this situation the carriers should undergo Bloch oscillations with a frequency {omega}{sub B} = eEd/h. Transient Bloch oscillations of photo excited carriers have been observed in time resolved Thz emission measurements. However, the possibility of Thz generation form a DC voltage biased superlattice is still under discussion. We have approached this problem by exploring the inverse Bloch oscillator effect in a superlattice excited by the Thz radiation form the UCSB FEL. The superlattice consists of 40 periods of 80{angstrom} GaAs wells and 20{angstrom} Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As barriers. To couple the electric field of the Terahertz radiation parallel to the growth direction a coplanar bowtie antenna has been employed. Our results show clearly that the external radiation couples to Bloch oscillations in contrary to theoretical suggestions that Thz radiation would not couple to a uniform Wannier Stark ladder. We conclude that this result is intimately related to dissipation and line broadening of the otherwise identical states in the ladder: absorption appears above the Wannier Stark splitting ({omega}{sub B}<{omega}) and gain below ({omega}{sub B}>{omega}).

  18. Wide frequency tuning in resonant-tunneling-diode terahertz oscillator using forward-biased varactor diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Seiichirou; Ogino, Kota; Suzuki, Safumi; Asada, Masahiro

    2017-04-01

    We report wide frequency tuning in a resonant-tunneling-diode (RTD) terahertz oscillator with a small change in the forward bias of a varactor diode integrated with the RTD. The obtained frequency change is 600–730 GHz with the voltage change of 0.4–0.8 V. The rate of this frequency change with bias voltage is much higher than that in the previously reported reverse-bias operation (680–600 GHz with ‑4 to +0.4 V in the present device). The result is well explained by theoretical analysis using equivalent circuits of the varactor diode and air bridge. The possibility of wider frequency tuning is also discussed.

  19. Excitation of low frequency waves by streaming ions via anomalous cyclotron resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Dillenburg, D.; Gaffey, J. D., Jr.; Ziebell, L. F.; Goedert, J.; Freund, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of a small population of streaming ions on low-frequency waves with frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency is analyzed for three modes of interest: Alfven waves, magnetosonic waves, and ion-cyclotron waves. The instability mechanism is the anomalous cyclotron resonance of the waves with the streaming ions. Conditions for excitation of the three types of waves are derived and expressions for the growth rates are obtained. Excitation of Alfven waves is possible even if the ratio of the densities of the streaming ions to the thermal ions is very small. For magnetosonic waves, excitation can easily occur if waves are propagating parallel or nearly parallel to the ambient magnetic field. As for ion-cyclotron waves, it is found that for the ion-whistler branch the excitation is suppressed over a broader range of wave frequencies than for the fast magnetosonic branch.

  20. Frequency stabilization and transverse mode discrimination in injection-seeded unstable resonator TEA CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancellet, G. M.; Menzies, R. T.; Brothers, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    Longitudinal mode selection by injection has been demonstrated as a viable technique for TEA-CO2 lasers with pulse energies of a Joule or greater. Once reliable generation of single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) pulses is obtained, the characteristics and the causes of intrapulse frequency variation can be studied. These include the effect of the decaying plasma, the thermal gradient due to the energy dissipation associated with the laser mechanism itself, and the pressure shift of the center frequency of the laser transition. The use of the positive-branch unstable resonator as an efficient means of coupling a discharge with large spatial dimensions to an optical cavity mode introduces another concern: namely, what can be done to emphasize transverse mode discrimination in an unstable resonator cavity while maintaining high coupling efficiency. These issues are discussed in this paper, and relevant experimental results are included.

  1. Generation of XUV light by resonant frequency tripling in a two-wiggler FEL amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, R.; Desalvosouza, L.; Pierini, P.; Scharlemann, E. T.

    FEL operation at short wavelength is limited by electron beam quality, by the availability of mirrors for oscillators, and by the availability of input sources for FEL amplifiers. It is possible to use and FEL amplifier as a resonant frequency tripling device, generating light and strong bunching at the 3rd harmonic of a conventional input source in an initial section of wiggler, then using a second section of wiggler resonant at the tripled frequency to amplify the short wavelength light. Neither mirrors nor a short-wavelength input source are required, and some relaxation of electron beam quality appears to be possible. We illustrate the scheme with a one-dimensional model and then with NUTMEG simulations of an 80 nm FEL amplifier initiated by a 240 nm input signal, in which an efficiency of conversion of electron beam power to 80 nm light of nearly 10(exp -4) was obtained.

  2. Generation of XUV light by resonant frequency tripling in a two-wiggler FEL amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Bonifacio, R.; de Salvo Souza, L.; Pierini, P. . Dipt. di Fisica Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan ); Scharlemann, E.T. )

    1989-01-01

    FEL operation at short wavelength is limited by electron beam quality, by the availability of mirrors for oscillators, and by the availability of input sources for FEL amplifiers. It is possible to use and FEL amplifier as a resonant frequency tripling device, generating light and strong bunching at the 3rd harmonic of a conventional input source in an initial section of wiggler, then using a second section of wiggler resonant at the tripled frequency to amplify the short wavelength light. Neither mirrors nor a short-wavelength input source are required, and some relaxation of electron beam quality appears to be possible. We illustrate the scheme with a one-dimensional model and then with NUTMEG simulations of an 80 nm FEL amplifier initiated by a 240 nm input signal, in which an efficiency of conversion of electron beam power to 80 nm light of nearly 10{sup -4} was obtained. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Generation of XUV light by resonant frequency tripling in a two-wiggler FEL amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, R.; De Salvo Souza, L.; Pierini, P.; Scharlemann, E. T.

    1990-10-01

    FEL operation at short wavelengths is limited by electron-beam quality, by the availability of mirrors for oscillators and by the availability of input sources for FEL amplifiers. It is possible to use an FEL amplifier as a resonant-frequency tripling device, generating light and strong bunching at the third harmonic of a conventional input source in an initial wiggler section, then using a second wiggler section resonant at the tripled frequency to amplify the short-wavelength light. Neither mirrors nor a short-wavelength input source are required, and some relaxation of the electron-beam quality appears to be possible. We illustrate the scheme with a one-dimensional model and then with NUTMEG simulations of an 80 nm FEL amplifier initiated by a 240 nm input signal, in which an efficiency of the electron-beam power conversion to 80 nm light of nearly 10-4 was obtained.

  4. Vibration energy harvester with low resonant frequency based on flexible coil and liquid spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Zhao, L.; Tang, Y.; Shkel, A.; Kim, E. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports an electromagnetic vibration-energy harvester with low resonant frequency based on liquid spring composed of ferrofluid. Cylinder magnet array formed by four disc NdFeB magnets is suspended by ferrofluid in a laser-machined acrylic tube which is wrapped by flexible planar coil fabricated with microfabrication process. The magnet array and coil are aligned automatically by the ferrofluid. Restoring force when the magnet array is deviated from the balance position is proportional to the deviated distance, which makes the ferrofluid work as a liquid spring obeying Hook's law. Experimental results show that the electromagnetic energy harvester occupying 1.8 cc and weighing 5 g has a resonant frequency of 16 Hz and generates an induced electromotive force of Vrms = 2.58 mV (delivering 79 nW power into matched load of 21 Ω) from 3 g acceleration at 16 Hz.

  5. Pulsed excitation system to measure the resonant frequency of magnetoelastic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hong; Chai, Yating; Horikawa, Shin; Wikle, Howard C.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2014-05-01

    An electrical circuit was designed and tested to measure the resonant frequency of micron-scale magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors using a pulsed wave excitation technique. In this circuit, a square pulse current is applied to an excitation coil to excite the vibration of ME biosensors and a pick-up coil is used to sense the ME biosensor's mechanical vibration and convert it to an electrical output signal. The output signal is filtered and amplified by a custom designed circuit to allow the measurement of the resonant frequency of the ME biosensor from which the detection of specific pathogens can be made. As a proof-in-concept experiment, JRB7 phage-coated ME biosensors were used to detect different concentrations of Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain spores. A statistically significant difference was observed for concentrations of 5 × 102 spore/ml and above.

  6. Two configurations of the four-ring birdcage coil for 1H imaging and 1H-decoupled 31P spectroscopy of the human head.

    PubMed

    Murphy-Boesch, J; Srinivasan, R; Carvajal, L; Brown, T R

    1994-02-01

    The four-ring birdcage resonator, a new class of dual-tuned birdcage resonators, is described. We report two configurations of the coil: the low-pass, high-pass (LP-HP) and the low-pass, low-pass (LP-LP), both of which can be operated in dual quadrature mode at 1.5 T. As head coils, both configurations exhibit greatly reduced tuning interactions between frequencies, permitting rapid, noniterative tuning. Compared with single-tuned, two-ring birdcage resonators of similar volume, the sensitivity and transmitter efficiencies of the resonators are better than 85% for the proton frequency and the same to within 5% for the phosphorus frequency. Circuit models have been developed to refine coil tuning and aid the calculation of B1 field contour plots. Both configurations have been used for integrated examinations involving acquisition of high-quality 1H images and 1H-decoupled 31P CSI spectra of the human head. A scaled-down version of the LP-LP configuration has been demonstrated for use with the human calf.

  7. Two Configurations of the Four-Ring Birdcage Coil for 1H Imaging and 1H-Decoupled 31P Spectroscopy of the Human Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphyboesch, J.; Srinivasan, R.; Carvajal, L.; Brown, T. R.

    The four-ring birdcage resonator, a new class of dual-tuned birdeage resonators, is described. We report two configurations of the coil: the low-pass, high-pass (LP-HP) and the low-pass, low-pass (LP-LP), both of which can be operated in dual quadrature mode at 1.5 T. As head coils, both configurations exhibit greatly reduced tuning interactions between frequencies, permitting rapid, noniterative tuning. Compared with single-tuned, two-ring birdcage resonators of similar volume, the sensitivity and transmitter efficiencies of the resonators are better than 85% for the proton frequency and the same to within 5% for the phosphorus frequency. Circuit models have been developed to refine coil tuning and aid the calculation of B1 field contour plots. Both configurations have been used for integrated examinations involving acquisition of high-quality 1H images and 1H-decoupled 31P CSI spectra of the human head. A scaled-down version of the LP-LP configuration has been demonstrated for use with the human calf.

  8. Resonant instability near the two-ion crossover frequency in the Io plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, R. M.; Moses, J. J.

    1985-07-01

    Thorne and Scarf (1984) have presented evidence for the existence of intense low-frequency fluctuating electric fields in the Io plasma torus. Two distinct mechanisms have been proposed for this phenomenon, namely, ion cyclotron instability which occurs at intermediate latitude, and whistler instability near the equator. The present investigation is concerned with a quantitative appraisal of each of these mechanisms, taking into account an evaluation of the net convective growth rate of waves along ray paths which traverse the Io torus. Aspects of wave propagation near the crossover frequency are considered along with questions regarding the resonant interaction with energetic particles.

  9. Fractal frequency spectrum in laser resonators and three-dimensional geometric topology of optical coherent waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, J. C.; Tuan, P. H.; Liang, H. C.; Huang, K. F.; Chen, Y. F.

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically verify that the symmetry breaking in spherical resonators can result in a fractal frequency spectrum that is full of numerous new accidental degeneracies to cluster around the unperturbed degenerate cavity. We further experimentally discover that the fractal frequency spectrum excellently reflects the intimate connection between the emission power and the degenerate mode numbers. It is observed that the wave distributions of lasing modes at the accidental degeneracies are strongly concentrated on three-dimensional (3D) geometric topology. Considering the overlapping effect, the wave representation of the coherent states is analytically derived to manifest the observed 3D geometric surfaces.

  10. Fully-resonant, tunable, monolithic frequency conversion as a coherent UVA source.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Joanna A; Zukauskas, Andrius; Canalias, Carlota; Noyan, Mehmet A; Mitchell, Morgan W

    2017-01-23

    We demonstrate a monolithic frequency converter incorporating up to four tuning degrees of freedom, three temperature and one strain, allowing resonance of pump and generated wavelengths simultaneous with optimal phase-matching. With a Rb-doped periodically-poled potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) implementation, we demonstrate efficient continuous-wave second harmonic generation from 795 to 397, with low-power efficiency of 72% and high-power slope efficiency of 4.5%. The measured performance shows good agreement with theoretical modeling of the device. We measure optical bistability effects, and show how they can be used to improve the stability of the output against pump frequency and amplitude variations.

  11. Time-of-flight detection of ultra-cold atoms using resonant frequency modulation imaging.

    PubMed

    Hardman, K S; Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Manju, P; Kuhn, C C N; Robins, N P

    2016-06-01

    Resonant frequency modulation imaging is used to detect free falling ultra-cold atoms. A theoretical comparison of fluorescence imaging (FI) and frequency modulation imaging (FMI) is made, indicating that for low optical depth clouds, FMI accomplished a higher signal-to-noise ratio under conditions necessary for a 200 μm spatially resolved atom interferometer. A 750 ms time-of-flight measurement reveals near atom shot-noise limited number measurements of 2×106 Bose-condensed Rb87 atoms. The detection system is applied to high precision spinor BEC based atom interferometer.

  12. Electron cyclotron harmonic resonances in high-frequency heating of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2013-09-15

    Electron acceleration by upper hybrid waves under cyclotron harmonic resonance interaction is studied. Theory is formulated; the analytical solutions in the second and fourth harmonic cyclotron resonance cases are obtained, and in the third harmonic case, a first order differential equation governing the evolution of the electron energy is derived. The theory is applied for explaining the generation of artificial ionization layers observed in high-frequency (HF) ionospheric heating experiments. The upper hybrid waves are assumed to be excited parametrically by the O-mode HF heating wave. As the decay mode is the lower hybrid wave, the excited upper hybrid waves have wavelengths ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 m, which are short enough to effectively incorporate the finite Larmour radius effect for the harmonic cyclotron resonance interactions as well as have a frequency bandwidth of about 20 kHz, which provides an altitude region of about 10 km for continuous harmonic cyclotron resonance interaction between electrons and descending waves in the slightly inhomogeneous geomagnetic field. The numerical results on electron acceleration show that electron fluxes with energies larger than 14 eV are generated in the three harmonic cases. These energetic electrons cause impact ionizations, which are descending to form artificial ionization layers at the bottom of the ionospheric F region.

  13. Far off-resonance laser frequency stabilization using multipass cells in Faraday rotation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Quan, Wei; Li, Yang; Li, Rujie; Shang, Huining; Fang, Zishan; Qin, Jie; Wan, Shuangai

    2016-04-01

    We propose a far off-resonance laser frequency stabilization method by using multipass cells in Rb Faraday rotation spectroscopy. Based on the detuning equation, if multipass cells with several meters optical path length are used in the conventional Faraday spectroscopy, the detuning of the lock point can be extended much further from the alkali metal resonance. A plate beam splitter was used to generate two different Faraday signals at the same time. The transmitted optical path length was L=50  mm and the reflected optical path length was 2L=100  mm. When the optical path length doubled, the detuning of the lock points moved further away from the atomic resonance. The temperature dependence of the detuning of the lock point was also analyzed. A temperature-insensitive lock point was found near resonance when the cell temperature was between 110°C and 130°C. We achieved an rms fluctuation of 0.9 MHz/23 h at a detuning of 0.5 GHz. A frequency drift of 16 MHz/h at a detuning of -5.6  GHz and 4 MHz/h at a detuning of -5.2  GHz were also obtained for the transmitted and reflected light Faraday signal.

  14. Microwave and RF applications for micro-resonator based frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thach G.; Shoeiby, Mehrdad; Ferrera, Marcello; Pasquazi, Alessia; Peccianti, Marco; Chu, Sai T.; Little, Brent E.; Morandotti, Roberto; Mitchell, Arnan; Moss, David J.

    2016-02-01

    Photonic integrated circuits that exploit nonlinear optics in order to generate and process signals all-optically have achieved performance far superior to that possible electronically - particularly with respect to speed. We review the recent achievements based in new CMOS-compatible platforms that are better suited than SOI for nonlinear optics, focusing on radio frequency (RF) and microwave based applications that exploit micro-resonator based frequency combs. We highlight their potential as well as the challenges to achieving practical solutions for many key applications. These material systems have opened up many new capabilities such as on-chip optical frequency comb generation and ultrafast optical pulse generation and measurement. We review recent work on a photonic RF Hilbert transformer for broadband microwave in-phase and quadrature-phase generation based on an integrated frequency optical comb. The comb is generated using a nonlinear microring resonator based on a CMOS compatible, high-index contrast, doped-silica glass platform. The high quality and large frequency spacing of the comb enables filters with up to 20 taps, allowing us to demonstrate a quadrature filter with more than a 5-octave (3 dB) bandwidth and an almost uniform phase response.

  15. Differential frequency-dependent antidromic resonance of the Schaffer collaterals and mossy fibers.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luis M; Beltrán, Jesús Q; Tapia, Jesús A; Ortiz, Franco; Manjarrez, Elías; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    To better understand information transfer along the hippocampal pathways and its plasticity, here we studied the antidromic responses of the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 to activation of the mossy fibers and Schaffer collaterals, respectively, in hippocampal slices from naïve and epileptic rats. We applied trains of 600 electrical stimuli at functionally meaningful frequencies (θ, β/γ and γ). The responses of the DG to θ frequency trains underwent rapid potentiation that lasted about 400 stimuli, after which they progressively returned to control value. At β/γ and γ frequencies, however, the initial potentiation was followed by a strong frequency-dependent depression within the first 50 stimuli. In kindled animals, the initial potentiation was stronger than in control preparations and the resonant phase at θ frequency lasted longer. In contrast, CA3 responses were exponentially depressed at all frequencies, but depression was significantly less intense at θ frequency in epileptic preparations. Failure of fibers to fire action potentials could account for some of the aforementioned characteristics, but waveforms of the intracellular action potentials also changed as the field responses did, i.e., half-duration and time-to-peak increased in both structures along the stimulation trains. Noteworthy, block of glutamate and GABA ionotropic receptors prevented resonance and reduced the depression of antidromic responses to β/γ and γ stimulation recorded in the DG, but not in CA3. We show that the different behavior in the information transfer along these pathways depends on the frequency at which action potentials are generated, excitability history and anatomical features, including myelination and tortuosity. In addition, the mossy fibers are endowed with ionotropic receptors and terminal active properties conferring them their sui generis non-passive antidromic responses.

  16. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System for Computing the Resonant Frequency of Circular Microstrip Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    Use of Artificial Neural Networks,” Microwave and Optical Technology Letters, Vol.14, pp. 89-93, 1997. [41] S. Sagiroglu, K. Guney, and M. Erler ...Computer-Aided Engineering, Vol. 8, pp. 270- 277, 1998. [42] S. Sagiroglu, K. Guney, and M. Erler , “Calculation of Bandwidth for Electrically Thin and...S. Sagiroglu, and M. Erler , “Neural Computation of Resonant Frequency of Electrically Thin and Thick Rectangular Microstrip Antennas,” IEE. Proc

  17. Power conversion distribution system using a resonant high-frequency AC link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sood, P. K.; Lipo, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    Static power conversion systems based on a resonant high frequency (HF) link offers a significant reduction in the size and weight of the equipment over that achieved with conventional approaches, especially when multiple sources and loads are to be integrated. A faster system response and absence of audible noise are the other principal characteristics of such systems. A conversion configuration based on a HF link which is suitable for applications requiring distributed power is proposed.

  18. Narrow band, large angular width resonant reflection from a periodic high index grid at terahertz frequency.

    PubMed

    Parriaux, Olivier; Kämpfe, Thomas; Garet, Frédéric; Coutaz, Jean-Louis

    2012-12-17

    The property of a thin silicon membrane with periodic air slits of definite depth and width to exhibit under normal incidence a close to 100% ultra-narrow band reflection peak is demonstrated experimentally in the terahertz frequency range on a single-crystal silicon grid fabricated by submillimeter microsystem technology. An analysis based on the true modes supported by the grid reveals the nature of such resonances and permits to sort out those exhibiting ultra-narrow band.

  19. Effective side length formula for resonant frequency of equilateral triangular microstrip antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guney, Kerim; Kurt, Erhan

    2016-02-01

    A novel and accurate expression is obtained by employing the differential evolution algorithm for the effective side length (ESL) of the equilateral triangular microstrip antenna (ETMA). This useful formula allows the antenna engineers to accurately calculate the ESL of the ETMA. The computed resonant frequencies (RFs) show very good agreement with the experimental RFs when this accurate ESL formula is utilised for the computation of the RFs for the first five modes.

  20. Active Flutter Suppression Using Cooperative, High Frequency, Dynamic-Resonant Aero-Effectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-13

    Final 06/15/03-09/14/06 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa . CONTRACT NUMBER Active Flutter Suppression Using Cooperative, High Frequency, Dynamic Resonant Aero...maneuvering performance. Conventional active vibration control and flutter suppression systems are servo -hydraulic. Conventional servo -hydraulic...technology is burdened by a set of undesirable characteristics that effectively restrict their use to large aircraft. The servo -hydraulic based systems have

  1. Structural topology optimization on sound radiation at resonance frequencies in thermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, XiongWei; Li, YueMing

    2015-03-01

    Thermal and acoustic environments pose severe challenges to the structural design of hypersonic vehicles. One of them is to find optimal design that exhibits ideal acoustic characteristics in a frequency band, which is discussed in this paper through topology optimization aiming at resonance sound radiation in thermal environments. The sound radiation at resonance frequencies is the main component of response, minimization on which is likely to provide a satisfactory design. A bi-material plate subjected to uniform temperature rise and excited by harmonic loading is studied here. Thermal stress is first evaluated and considered as pre stress in the following dynamic analysis; radiated sound power is then calculated through Rayleigh integral. Sensitivity analysis is carried out through adjoint method considering the complicated relationship between stress-induced geometric stiffness and design variables. As the resonance frequency is constantly changing during the optimization, its sensitivity should be considered. It is also noticed that mode switching may occur, so mode tracking technique is employed in this work. Some numerical examples are finally discussed.

  2. Enhancement of exchange bias and ferromagnetic resonance frequency by using multilayer antidot arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuoc, Nguyen N.; Lim, S. L.; Xu, F.; Ma, Y. G.; Ong, C. K.

    2008-11-01

    A systematic investigation of the dependences of the exchange bias and the ferromagnetic resonance frequency on the pore size of the antidot arrays fabricated by depositing Permalloy-FeMn multilayer thin films onto self-organized porous anodic aluminum oxide membranes was carried out. The magnetic and microwave properties of the antidot arrays with different pore sizes ranging from 30 to 80 nm are characterized and compared with that of the continuous thin films. It was found that the exchange bias field and the ferromagnetic resonance frequency are increased with the increase of the pore size, which may tentatively be interpreted in the framework of the random field model. It was also found that by using the antidot arrays in the best condition (the FeNi thickness is 20 nm and the pore size is 80 nm), one can enhance the exchange bias field from 65 to 135 Oe and the ferromagnetic resonance frequency from 3.1 to 4.1 GHz accordingly.

  3. Analytical Modeling for the Bending Resonant Frequency of Multilayered Microresonators with Variable Cross-Section

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-May, Agustín L.; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz A.; Plascencia-Mora, Hector; Rodríguez-Morales, Ángel L.; Lu, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Multilayered microresonators commonly use sensitive coating or piezoelectric layers for detection of mass and gas. Most of these microresonators have a variable cross-section that complicates the prediction of their fundamental resonant frequency (generally of the bending mode) through conventional analytical models. In this paper, we present an analytical model to estimate the first resonant frequency and deflection curve of single-clamped multilayered microresonators with variable cross-section. The analytical model is obtained using the Rayleigh and Macaulay methods, as well as the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. Our model is applied to two multilayered microresonators with piezoelectric excitation reported in the literature. Both microresonators are composed by layers of seven different materials. The results of our analytical model agree very well with those obtained from finite element models (FEMs) and experimental data. Our analytical model can be used to determine the suitable dimensions of the microresonator’s layers in order to obtain a microresonator that operates at a resonant frequency necessary for a particular application. PMID:22164071

  4. Experimental measurements of lung resonant frequencies in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finneran, James J.

    2003-04-01

    An acoustic backscatter technique was used to estimate in vivo whole-lung resonant frequencies in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and a white whale (Delphinapterus leucas). Subjects were trained to submerge and position themselves near an underwater sound projector and a receiving hydrophone. Acoustic pressure measurements were made near the subjects' lungs while insonified with pure tones at frequencies from 16 to 100 Hz. Whole-lung resonant frequencies were estimated by comparing pressures measured near the subjects' lungs to those measured from the same location without the subject present. Experimentally measured resonant frequencies and damping ratios were much higher than those predicted using equivalent volume spherical air bubble models. The experimental technique, data analysis method, and discrepancy between the observed and predicted values will be discussed. The potential effects of depth on the resonance frequencies will also be discussed.

  5. Tire-road friction coefficient estimation based on the resonance frequency of in-wheel motor drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Bian, Mingyuan; Luo, Yugong; Qin, Zhaobo; Li, Keqiang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a resonance frequency-based tire-road friction coefficient (TRFC) estimation method is proposed by considering the dynamics performance of the in-wheel motor drive system under small slip ratio conditions. A frequency response function (FRF) is deduced for the drive system that is composed of a dynamic tire model and a simplified motor model. A linear relationship between the squared system resonance frequency and the TFRC is described with the FRF. Furthermore, the resonance frequency is identified by the Auto-Regressive eXogenous model using the information of the motor torque and the wheel speed, and the TRFC is estimated thereafter by a recursive least squares filter with the identified resonance frequency. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated through simulations and experimental tests on different road surfaces.

  6. Carbon Nanofiber-Based, High-Frequency, High-Q, Miniaturized Mechanical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Epp, Larry W.; Bagge, Leif

    2011-01-01

    High Q resonators are a critical component of stable, low-noise communication systems, radar, and precise timing applications such as atomic clocks. In electronic resonators based on Si integrated circuits, resistive losses increase as a result of the continued reduction in device dimensions, which decreases their Q values. On the other hand, due to the mechanical construct of bulk acoustic wave (BAW) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators, such loss mechanisms are absent, enabling higher Q-values for both BAW and SAW resonators compared to their electronic counterparts. The other advantages of mechanical resonators are their inherently higher radiation tolerance, a factor that makes them attractive for NASA s extreme environment planetary missions, for example to the Jovian environments where the radiation doses are at hostile levels. Despite these advantages, both BAW and SAW resonators suffer from low resonant frequencies and they are also physically large, which precludes their integration into miniaturized electronic systems. Because there is a need to move the resonant frequency of oscillators to the order of gigahertz, new technologies and materials are being investigated that will make performance at those frequencies attainable. By moving to nanoscale structures, in this case vertically oriented, cantilevered carbon nanotubes (CNTs), that have larger aspect ratios (length/thickness) and extremely high elastic moduli, it is possible to overcome the two disadvantages of both bulk acoustic wave (BAW) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators. Nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) that utilize high aspect ratio nanomaterials exhibiting high elastic moduli (e.g., carbon-based nanomaterials) benefit from high Qs, operate at high frequency, and have small force constants that translate to high responsivity that results in improved sensitivity, lower power consumption, and im - proved tunablity. NEMS resonators have recently been demonstrated using topdown

  7. Electron density and collision frequency of microwave resonant cavity produced discharges. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McColl, W.; Brooks, C.; Brake, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    This progress report consists of an article, the abstract of which follows, and apparently the references and vita from a proposal. A review of perturbation diagnostics applied to microwave resonant cavity discharges is presented. The classical microwave perturbation technique examines the shift in the resonant frequency and cavity quality factor of the resonant cavity caused by low electron density discharges. However, modifications presented here allow the analysis to be applied to discharges with electron densities beyond the limit predicted by perturbation theory. An {open_quote}exact{close_quote} perturbation analysis is presented which models the discharge as a separate dielectric, thereby removing the restrictions on electron density imposed by the classical technique. The {open_quote}exact{close_quote} method also uses measurements of the shifts in the resonant conditions of the cavity. Thirdly, an electromagnetic analysis is presented which uses a characteristic equation, based upon Maxwell`s laws, and predicts the discharge conductivity based upon measurements of a complex axial wave number. By allowing the axial wave number of the electromagnetic fields to be complex, the fields are experimentally and theoretically shown to be spatially attenuated. The diagnostics are applied to continuous-wave microwave (2.45 GHz) discharges produced in an Asmussen resonant cavity. Double Langmuir probes, placed directly in the discharge at the point where the radial electric field is zero, act as a comparison with the analytic diagnostics. Microwave powers ranging from 30 to 100 watts produce helium and nitrogen discharges with pressures ranging from 0.5 to 6 torr. Analysis of the data predicts electron temperatures from 5 to 20 eV, electron densities from 10{sup 11} to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}, and collision frequencies from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 11} sec{sup {minus}1}.

  8. Dynamic field-frequency lock for tracking magnetic field fluctuations in electron spin resonance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Abraham; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Lyon, Stephen

    Global magnetic field fluctuations present significant challenges to pulsed electron spin resonance experiments on systems with long spin coherence times. We will discuss results from experiments in which we follow instantaneous changes in magnetic field by locking to the free induction decay of a proton NMR signal using a phase-locked loop. We extend conventional field-frequency locking techniques used in NMR to follow slow magnetic field drifts by using a modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence in which the phase of the pi-pulses follows the phase of the proton spins at all times. Hence, we retain the ability of the CPMG pulse sequence to refocus local magnetic field inhomogeneities without refocusing global magnetic field fluctuations. In contrast with conventional field-frequency locking techniques, our experiments demonstrate the potential of this method to dynamically track global magnetic field fluctuations on timescales of about 2 seconds and with rates faster than a kHz. This frequency range covers the dominant noise frequencies in our electron spin resonance experiments as previously reported.

  9. Input impedance matching of acoustic transducers operating at off-resonant frequencies.

    PubMed

    Son, Kyu Tak; Lee, Chin C

    2010-12-01

    The input impedance matching technique of acoustic transducers at off-resonant frequencies is reported. It uses an inherent impedance property of transducers and thus does not need an external electric matching circuit or extra acoustic matching section. The input electrical equivalent circuit includes a radiation component and a dielectric capacitor. The radiation component consists of a radiation resistance and a radiation reactance. The total reactance is the sum of the radiation reactance and the dielectric capacitive reactance. This reactance becomes zero at two frequencies where the impedance is real. The transducer size can be properly chosen so that the impedance at one of the zero-crossing frequencies is close to 50 Ω, the output impedance of signal generators. At this off-resonant operating frequency, the reflection coefficient of the transducer is minimized without using any matching circuit. Other than the size, the impedance can also be fine tuned by adjusting the thickness of material that bonds the transducer plate to the substrates. The acoustic impedance of the substrate and that of the bonding material can also be used as design elements in the transducer structure to achieve better transducer matching. Lead titanate piezoelectric plates were bonded on Lucite, liquid crystal polymer (LCP), and bismuth (Bi) substrates to produce various transducer structures. Their input impedance was simulated using a transducer model and compared with measured values to illustrate the matching principle.

  10. Recent developments in phyroshock simulation using fixtures with tunable resonant frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Davie, N.T.; Bateman, V.I.

    1994-02-01

    Pyroshock is a potentially severe environment produced by the detonation of explosively actuated components and stage separation hardware. Electronic components exposed to pyroshock events during flight or deployment can be damaged by this high frequency, high G shock. Flight qualification of these components may be accomplished using one of many existing techniques to simulate the pyroshock environment in the laboratory. Two new techniques developed at Sandia National Laboratories allow larger components to be tested to a wide variety of pyroshock environments. The frequency content and amplitude of the simulated pyroshock can be easily controlled in a predictable manner. The pyroshock environment is produced by the resonant response of a test fixture that has been excited by a mechanical impact. The resonant fixture has a dominant frequency that can be continuously adjusted over a frequency range that is typically found in most pyroshock environments. The test apparatus and techniques utilized by each method will be described in this paper. Experimental results will be presented which illustrate the capabilities of each method.

  11. A new resonance-frequency based electrical impedance spectroscopy and its application in biomedical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhurjaty, Sreeram; Qiu, Yuchen; Tan, Maxine; Zheng, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) has shown promising results for differentiating between malignant and benign tumors, which exhibit different dielectric properties. However, the performance of current EIS systems has been inadequate and unacceptable in clinical practice. In the last several years, we have been developing and testing a new EIS approach using resonance frequencies for detection and classification of suspicious tumors. From this experience, we identified several limitations of current technologies and designed a new EIS system with a number of new characteristics that include (1) an increased A/D (analog-to-digital) sampling frequency, 24 bits, and a frequency resolution of 100 Hz, to increase detection sensitivity (2) automated calibration to monitor and correct variations in electronic components within the system, (3) temperature sensing and compensation algorithms to minimize impact of environmental change during testing, and (4) multiple inductor-switching to select optimum resonance frequencies. We performed a theoretical simulation to analyze the impact of adding these new functions for improving performance of the system. This system was also tested using phantoms filled with variety of liquids. The theoretical and experimental test results are consistent with each other. The experimental results demonstrated that this new EIS device possesses the improved sensitivity and/or signal detection resolution for detecting small impedance or capacitance variations. This provides the potential of applying this new EIS technology to different cancer detection and diagnosis tasks in the future.

  12. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stress variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by an expandable ring embedded in the noise radiating element. Excitation of the ring causes expansion or contraction of the ring, thereby varying the stress in the noise radiating element. The ring is actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the ring, causing the ring to expand or contract. Instead of a single ring embedded in the noise radiating panel, a first expandable ring can be bonded to one side of the noise radiating element, and a second expandable ring can be bonded to the other side.

  13. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through variable ring loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of noise radiating structure is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating structure is tuned by a plurality of drivers arranged to contact the noise radiating structure. Excitation of the drivers causes expansion or contraction of the drivers, thereby varying the edge loading applied to the noise radiating structure. The drivers are actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the drivers, causing them to expand or contract. The noise radiating structure may be either the outer shroud of the engine or a ring mounted flush with an inner wall of the shroud or disposed in the interior of the shroud.

  14. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stiffness variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by a plurality of force transmitting mechanisms which contact the noise radiating element. Each one of the force transmitting mechanisms includes an expandable element and a spring in contact with the noise radiating element so that excitation of the element varies the spring force applied to the noise radiating element. The elements are actuated by a controller which receives input of a signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the elements and causes the spring force applied to the noise radiating element to be varied. The force transmitting mechanisms can be arranged to either produce bending or linear stiffness variations in the noise radiating element.

  15. Capabilities, performance, and future possibilities of high frequency polyphase resonant converters

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, W. A.; Baca, D. M.; Bradley, J. T. , III; Hardek, T. W.; Kwon, S. I.; Lynch, M. T.; Rees, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    High Frequency Polyphase Resonant Power Conditioning (PRPC) techniques developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are now being utilized for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator klystron RF amplifier power systems. Three different styles of polyphase resonant converter modulators were developed for the SNS application. The various systems operate up to 140 kV, or 11 MW pulses, or up to 1.1 MW average power, all from a DC input of +/- 1.2 kV. Component improvements realized with the SNS effort coupled with new applied engineering techniques have resulted in dramatic changes in RF power conditioning topology. As an example, the high-voltage transformers are over 100 times smaller and lighter than equivalent 60 Hz versions. With resonant conversion techniques, load protective networks are not required. A shorted load de-tunes the resonance and little power transfer can occur. This provides for power conditioning systems that are inherently self-protective, with automatic fault 'ride-through' capabilities. By altering the Los Alamos design, higher power and CW power conditioning systems can be realized without further demands of the individual component voltage or current capabilities. This has led to designs that can accommodate 30 MW long pulse applications and megawatt class CW systems with high efficiencies. The same PRPC techniques can also be utilized for lower average power systems ({approx}250 kW). This permits the use of significantly higher frequency conversion techniques that result in extremely compact systems with short pulse (10 to 100 us) capabilities. These lower power PRPC systems may be suitable for medical Linacs and mobile RF systems. This paper will briefly review the performance achieved for the SNS accelerator and examine designs for high efficiency megawatt class CW systems and 30 MW peak power applications. The devices and designs for compact higher frequency converters utilized for short

  16. Freely designable optical frequency conversion in Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jian; Katsuragawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear optical processes are governed by the relative-phase relationships among the relevant electromagnetic fields in these processes. In this Report, we describe the physics of arbitrary manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process by artificial control of relative phases. As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely. In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm. PMID:25748023

  17. Exploring the accessible frequency range of phase-resolved ferromagnetic resonance detected with x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnicke, P.; Knut, R.; Wahlström, E.; Karis, O.; Bailey, W. E.; Arena, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    We present time- and element-resolved measurements of the magnetization dynamics in a ferromagnetic trilayer structure. A pump-probe scheme was utilized with a microwave magnetic excitation field phase-locked to the photon bunches and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism in transmission geometry. Using a relatively large photon bunch length with a full width at half maximum of 650 ps, the precessional motion of the magnetization was resolved up to frequencies of 2.5 GHz, thereby enabling sampling at frequencies significantly above the inverse bunch length. By simulating the experimental data with a numerical model based on a forced harmonic oscillator, we obtain good correlation between the two. The model, which includes timing jitter analysis, is used to predict the accessible frequency range of x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance.

  18. Observation of resonant energy transfer between identical-frequency laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Afeyan, B. B.; Cohen, B. I.; Estabrook, K. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Moody, J. D.; Wharton, K. B.

    1998-12-09

    Enhanced transmission of a low intensity laser beam is observed when crossed with an identical-frequency beam in a plasma with a flow velocity near the ion sound speed. The time history of the enhancement and the dependence on the flow velocity strongly suggest that this is due to energy transfer between the beams via a resonant ion wave with zero frequency in the laboratory frame. The maximum energy transfer has been observed when the beams cross in a region with Mach 1 flow. The addition of frequency modulation on the crossing beams is seen to reduce the energy transfer by a factor of two. Implications for indirect-drive fusion schemes are discussed.

  19. Resonant tube for measurement of sound absorption in gases at low frequency/pressure ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Griffin, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes a resonant tube for measuring sound absorption in gases, with specific emphasis on the vibrational relaxation peak of N2, over a range of frequency/pressure ratios from 0.1 to 2500 Hz/atm. The experimental background losses measured in argon agree with the theoretical wall losses except at few isolated frequencies. Rigid cavity terminations, external excitation, and a differential technique of background evaluation were used to minimize spurious contributions to the background losses. Room temperature measurements of sound absorption in binary mixtures of N2-CO2 in which both components are excitable resulted in the maximum frequency/pressure ratio in Hz/atm of 0.063 + 123m for the N2 vibrational relaxation peak, where m is mole percent of added CO2; the maximum ratio for the CO2 peak was 34,500 268m where m is mole percent of added N2.

  20. Multi-frequency Operation of a MEMS Vibration Energy Harvester by Accessing Five Orders of Parametric Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Yan, J.; Soga, K.; Seshia, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    The mechanical amplification effect of parametric resonance has the potential to outperform direct resonance by over an order of magnitude in terms of power output. However, the excitation must first overcome the damping-dependent initiation threshold amplitude prior to accessing this more profitable region. In addition to activating the principal (1st order) parametric resonance at twice the natural frequency ω0, higher orders of parametric resonance may be accessed when the excitation frequency is in the vicinity of 2ω0/n for integer n. Together with the passive design approaches previously developed to reduce the initiation threshold to access the principal parametric resonance, vacuum packaging (< 10 torr) is employed to further reduce the threshold and unveil the higher orders. A vacuum packaged MEMS electrostatic harvester (0.278 mm3) exhibited 4 and 5 parametric resonance peaks at room pressure and vacuum respectively when scanned up to 10 g. At 5.1 ms-2, a peak power output of 20.8 nW and 166 nW is recorded for direct and principal parametric resonance respectively at atmospheric pressure; while a peak power output of 60.9 nW and 324 nW is observed for the respective resonant peaks in vacuum. Additionally, unlike direct resonance, the operational frequency bandwidth of parametric resonance broadens with lower damping.

  1. The mass load effect on the resonant acoustic frequencies of colloidal semiconductor nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Adrien; Saviot, Lucien; Pedetti, Silvia; Tessier, Mickaël D.; Margueritat, Jérémie; Gehan, Hélène; Mahler, Benoit; Dubertret, Benoit; Mermet, Alain

    2016-07-01

    Resonant acoustic modes of ultrathin CdS and CdSe colloidal nanoplatelets (NPLs) with varying thicknesses were probed using low frequency Raman scattering. The spectra are dominated by an intense band ascribed to the thickness breathing mode of the 2D nanostructures. The measured Raman frequencies show strong deviations with respect to the values expected for simple bare plates, all the more so as the thickness is reduced. The deviation is shown to arise from the additional mass of the organic ligands that are bound to the free surfaces of the nanoplatelets. The calculated eigen frequencies of vibrating platelets weighed down by the mass of the organic ligands are in very good agreement with the observed experimental behaviours. This finding opens up a new possibility of nanomechanical sensing such as nanobalances.Resonant acoustic modes of ultrathin CdS and CdSe colloidal nanoplatelets (NPLs) with varying thicknesses were probed using low frequency Raman scattering. The spectra are dominated by an intense band ascribed to the thickness breathing mode of the 2D nanostructures. The measured Raman frequencies show strong deviations with respect to the values expected for simple bare plates, all the more so as the thickness is reduced. The deviation is shown to arise from the additional mass of the organic ligands that are bound to the free surfaces of the nanoplatelets. The calculated eigen frequencies of vibrating platelets weighed down by the mass of the organic ligands are in very good agreement with the observed experimental behaviours. This finding opens up a new possibility of nanomechanical sensing such as nanobalances. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR07383A

  2. Vibrational modes of hydraulic fractures: Inference of fracture geometry from resonant frequencies and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovsky, Bradley P.; Dunham, Eric M.

    2015-02-01

    Oscillatory seismic signals arising from resonant vibrations of hydraulic fractures are observed in many geologic systems, including volcanoes, glaciers and ice sheets, and hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs. To better quantify the physical dimensions of fluid-filled cracks and properties of the fluids within them, we study wave motion along a thin hydraulic fracture waveguide. We present a linearized analysis, valid at wavelengths greater than the fracture aperture, that accounts for quasi-static elastic deformation of the fracture walls, as well as fluid viscosity, inertia, and compressibility. In the long-wavelength limit, anomalously dispersed guided waves known as crack or Krauklis waves propagate with restoring force from fracture wall elasticity. At shorter wavelengths, the waves become sound waves within the fluid channel. Wave attenuation in our model is due to fluid viscosity, rather than seismic radiation from crack tips or fracture wall roughness. We characterize viscous damping at both low frequencies, where the flow is always fully developed, and at high frequencies, where the flow has a nearly constant velocity profile away from viscous boundary layers near the fracture walls. Most observable seismic signals from resonating fractures likely arise in the boundary layer crack wave limit, where fluid-solid coupling is pronounced and attenuation is minimal. We present a method to estimate the aperture and length of a resonating hydraulic fracture using both the seismically observed quality factor and characteristic frequency. Finally, we develop scaling relations between seismic moment and characteristic frequency that might be useful when interpreting the statistics of hydraulic fracture events.

  3. The super-low frequency resonances at magnetospheric boundaries versus geostationary and ionospheric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Sergey; Surjalal Sharma, A.; Pilipenko, Viacheslav; Marcucci, Maria Federica; Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana; Consolini, Giuseppe; Belakhovsky, Vladimir; Kozak, Ludmila; Blecki, Jan; Kronberg, Elena

    2016-07-01

    We do a multi-point study of the influence of the lowest frequency resonances (0.02-10 mHz) at the outer magnetospheric boundaries on the fluctuations inside the magnetosphere and ionosphere presented. The correlations of the dynamic pressure data from CLUSTER, DOUBLE STAR, GEOTAIL, ACE/ WIND, particle data from LANL, GOES with the magnetic data from polar ionospheric stations on March 27, 2005, show that: i) the waves generated by boundary resonances and their harmonics penetrate inside the magnetosphere and reach the ionosphere; ii) correlations between the dynamic pressure fluctuations at the magnetospheric boundaries and magnetospheric/ ionospheric disturbances, including indices such as AE and SYM-H, can exceed 80%; iii) the new resonance frequencies are lower by an order of magnitude compared with our previous studies, which are as low as 0.02 mHz. Furthermore, such resonances are characteristic also for the night-side geostationary/ionospheric data and for the middle tail, i.e., they are global magnetospheric features. Analysis of different types of correlations yields the unexpected result that in ~48% of the cases with pronounced maximum in the correlation function the geostationary/ ionospheric response is seen before the magnetosheath (MSH) response. We propose that some global magnetospheric resonances (e.g. membrane bow shock surface (0.2-0.5 mHz) and/or magnetopause (0.5-0.9 mHz) modes along with the cavity MHS/ cusp (3-10 mHz) and magnetospheric global modes (0.02-0.09mHz)) can account for the data presented. The multiple jets at the sampled MSH locations can be a consequence of the resonances, while an initial disturbance (e.g. through the interplanetary shocks, Hot Flow Anomalies, foreshock irregularities etc., were not observed by particular spacecraft in MSH because they were localized in the plane perpendicular to the Sun-Earth line. So, in the explorations of the solar wind - magnetosphere interactions one should take into account these

  4. Non-destructive testing of ceramic balls using high frequency ultrasonic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Petit, S; Duquennoy, M; Ouaftouh, M; Deneuville, F; Ourak, M; Desvaux, S

    2005-12-01

    Although ceramic balls are used more and more for bearings in the aerospace and space industries, defects in this type of ceramic material could be dangerous, particularly if such defects are located close to the surface. In this paper, we propose a non-destructive testing method for silicon nitride balls, based on ultrasonic resonance spectroscopy. Through the theoretical study of their elastic vibrations, it is possible to characterize the balls using a vibration mode that is similar to surface wave propagation. The proposed methodology can both excite spheroidal vibrations in the ceramic balls and detect such vibrations over a large frequency range. Studying their resonance spectrums allows the balls' elastic parameters be characterized. Ours is an original method that can quickly estimate the velocity of surface waves using high frequency resonances, which permits surface and sub-surface areas to be tested specifically. Two applications are described in this paper. Both use velocity measurements to achieve their different goals, the first to differentiate between flawless balls from different manufacturing processes, and the second to detect small defects, such as cracks. Our method is rapid and permits the entire ceramic ball to be tested in an industrial context.

  5. All-dielectric frequency selective surface design based on dielectric resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng-Bin, Wang; Chao, Gao; Bo, Li; Zhi-Hang, Wu; Hua-Mei, Zhang; Ye-Rong, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we propose an all-dielectric frequency selective surface (FSS) composed of periodically placed high-permittivity dielectric resonators and a three-dimensional (3D) printed supporter. Mie resonances in the dielectric resonators offer strong electric and magnetic dipoles, quadrupoles, and higher order terms. The re-radiated electric and magnetic fields by these multipoles interact with the incident fields, which leads to total reflection or total transmission in some special frequency bands. The measured results of the fabricated FSS demonstrate a stopband fractional bandwidth (FBW) of 22.2%, which is consistent with the simulated result. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61201030, 61372045, 61472045, and 61401229), the Science and Technology Project of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BE2015002), the Open Research Program of the State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves, China (Grant Nos. K201616 and K201622), and the Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications Scientific Foundation, China (Grant No. NY214148).

  6. Magic angle Lee-Goldburg frequency offset irradiation improves the efficiency and selectivity of SPECIFIC-CP in triple-resonance MAS solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin H; De Angelis, Anna A; Opella, Stanley J

    2014-09-01

    The efficiency and selectivity of SPECIFIC-CP, a widely used method for selective double cross-polarization in triple-resonance magic angle spinning solid-state NMR, is improved by performing the tangential-shaped (13)C irradiation at an offset frequency that meets the Lee-Goldburg condition (LG-SPECIFIC-CP). This is demonstrated on polycrystalline samples of uniformly (13)C, (15)N labeled N-acetyl-leucine and N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-OH (MLF) at 700MHz and 900MHz (1)H resonance frequencies, respectively. For the single (13)Cα of N-acetyl-leucine, relative to conventional broad band cross-polarization, the SPECIFIC-CP signal has 47% of the intensity. Notably, the LG-SPECIFIC-CP signal has 72% of the intensity, essentially the theoretical maximum. There were no other changes in the experimental parameters. The three (13)Cα signals in MLF show some variation in intensities, reflecting the relatively narrow bandwidth of a frequency-offset procedure, and pointing to future developments for this class of experiment.

  7. Quanty for core level spectroscopy - excitons, resonances and band excitations in time and frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the material and edge under consideration, core level spectra manifest themselves as local excitons with multiplets, edge singularities, resonances, or the local projected density of states. Both extremes, i.e., local excitons and non-interacting delocalized excitations are theoretically well under control. Describing the intermediate regime, where local many body interactions and band-formation are equally important is a challenge. Here we discuss how Quanty, a versatile quantum many body script language, can be used to calculate a variety of different core level spectroscopy types on solids and molecules, both in the frequency as well as the time domain. The flexible nature of Quanty allows one to choose different approximations for different edges and materials. For example, using a newly developed method merging ideas from density renormalization group and quantum chemistry [1-3], Quanty can calculate excitons, resonances and band-excitations in x-ray absorption, photoemission, x-ray emission, fluorescence yield, non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and many more spectroscopy types. Quanty can be obtained from: http://www.quanty.org.

  8. A Novel Piezoresistive Accelerometer with SPBs to Improve the Tradeoff between the Sensitivity and the Resonant Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu; Zhao, Libo; Jiang, Zhuangde; Ding, Jianjun; Peng, Niancai; Zhao, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    For improving the tradeoff between the sensitivity and the resonant frequency of piezoresistive accelerometers, the dependency between the stress of the piezoresistor and the displacement of the structure is taken into consideration in this paper. In order to weaken the dependency, a novel structure with suspended piezoresistive beams (SPBs) is designed, and a theoretical model is established for calculating the location of SPBs, the stress of SPBs and the resonant frequency of the whole structure. Finite element method (FEM) simulations, comparative simulations and experiments are carried out to verify the good agreement with the theoretical model. It is demonstrated that increasing the sensitivity greatly without sacrificing the resonant frequency is possible in the piezoresistive accelerometer design. Therefore, the proposed structure with SPBs is potentially a novel option for improving the tradeoff between the sensitivity and the resonant frequency of piezoresistive accelerometers. PMID:26861343

  9. A simple setup to simultaneously measure the resonant frequency and the absolute dissipation factor of a quartz crystal microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodahl, Michael; Kasemo, Bengt

    1996-09-01

    An experimental setup is described that can simultaneously measure the absolute dissipation factor and the resonant frequency of a short-circuited quartz crystal microbalance. The crystal is driven at approximately its resonant frequency by a signal generator which is intermittently disconnected by a relay, causing the crystal oscillation amplitude to decay exponentially. The decay is measured using a ferrite toroid transformer. One of the crystal leads is fed through the center of the ferrite toroid and thereby acts as the primary winding of the transformer. The secondary winding of the transformer is connected to a digitizing oscilloscope which records the decay of the crystal oscillation. From the recorded decay curve, the absolute dissipation factor (calculated from the decay time constant) and the series resonant frequency of the freely oscillating crystal are obtained. Alternatively, the dissipation factor and resonant frequency can be measured for the crystal oscillating under open-circuit conditions, i.e., in the parallel mode. The measurements are automated.

  10. Translational diffusion in paramagnetic liquids by 1H NMR relaxometry: nitroxide radicals in solution.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Korpała, A; Kubica, A; Meier, R; Rössler, E A; Moscicki, J

    2013-01-14

    For nitroxide radicals in solution one can identify three frequency regimes in which (1)H spin-lattice relaxation rate of solvent molecules depend linearly on square root of the (1)H resonance frequency. Combining a recently developed theory of nuclear (proton) spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of nitroxide radicals [D. Kruk et al., J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)] with properties of the spectral density function associated with translational dynamics, relationships between the corresponding linear changes of the relaxation rate (for (14)N spin probes) and relative translational diffusion coefficient of the solvent and solute molecules have been derived (in analogy to (15)N spin probes [E. Belorizky et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 3674 (1998)]). This method allows a simple and straightforward determination of diffusion coefficients in spin-labeled systems, by means of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The approach has thoroughly been tested by applying to a large set of experimental data-(1)H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion results for solutions of different viscosity (decalin, glycerol, propylene glycol) of (14)N and (15)N spin probes. The experiments have been performed versus temperature (to cover a broad range of translational diffusion coefficients) using field cycling spectrometer which covers three decades in (1)H resonance frequency, 10 kHz-20 MHz. The limitations of NMR relaxometry caused by the time scale of the translational dynamics as well as electron spin relaxation have been discussed. It has been shown that for spin-labeled systems NMR relaxometry gives access to considerably faster diffusion processes than for diamagnetic systems.

  11. Translational diffusion in paramagnetic liquids by 1H NMR relaxometry: Nitroxide radicals in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-01-01

    For nitroxide radicals in solution one can identify three frequency regimes in which 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate of solvent molecules depend linearly on square root of the 1H resonance frequency. Combining a recently developed theory of nuclear (proton) spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of nitroxide radicals [D. Kruk et al., J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854 with properties of the spectral density function associated with translational dynamics, relationships between the corresponding linear changes of the relaxation rate (for 14N spin probes) and relative translational diffusion coefficient of the solvent and solute molecules have been derived (in analogy to 15N spin probes [E. Belorizky et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 3674 (1998)], 10.1021/jp980397h). This method allows a simple and straightforward determination of diffusion coefficients in spin-labeled systems, by means of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The approach has thoroughly been tested by applying to a large set of experimental data—1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion results for solutions of different viscosity (decalin, glycerol, propylene glycol) of 14N and 15N spin probes. The experiments have been performed versus temperature (to cover a broad range of translational diffusion coefficients) using field cycling spectrometer which covers three decades in 1H resonance frequency, 10 kHz-20 MHz. The limitations of NMR relaxometry caused by the time scale of the translational dynamics as well as electron spin relaxation have been discussed. It has been shown that for spin-labeled systems NMR relaxometry gives access to considerably faster diffusion processes than for diamagnetic systems.

  12. Influence of the Basset force on the resonant behavior of an oscillator with fluctuating frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Rekker, A. Mankin, R.

    2015-10-28

    The influence of hydrodynamic interactions, such as Stokes and Basset forces, on the dynamics of a harmonically trapped Brownian tracer is considered. A generalized Langevin equation is used to describe the tracer’s response to an external periodic force and to dichotomous fluctuations of the stiffness of the trapping potential. Relying on the Shapiro-Loginov formula, exact expressions for the complex susceptibility and for the response function are presented. On the basis of these exact formulas, it is demonstrated that interplay of a multiplicative colored noise and the Basset force induced memory effects can generate a variety of cooperation effects, such as multiresonance versus the driving frequency, as well as stochastic resonance versus noise parameters. In particular, in certain parameter regions the response function exhibits a resonance-like enhancement at intermediate values of the intensity of the Basset force. Conditions for the appearance of these effects are also discussed.

  13. Chip Scale Atomic Resonator Frequency Stabilization System With Ultra-Low Power Consumption for Optoelectronic Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianye; Zhang, Yaolin; Lu, Haoyuan; Hou, Dong; Zhang, Shuangyou; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    We present a long-term chip scale stabilization scheme for optoelectronic oscillators (OEOs) based on a rubidium coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic resonator. By locking a single mode of an OEO to the (85)Rb 3.035-GHz CPT resonance utilizing an improved phase-locked loop (PLL) with a PID regulator, we achieved a chip scale frequency stabilization system for the OEO. The fractional frequency stability of the stabilized OEO by overlapping Allan deviation reaches 6.2 ×10(-11) (1 s) and  ∼ 1.45 ×10 (-11) (1000 s). This scheme avoids a decrease in the extra phase noise performance induced by the electronic connection between the OEO and the microwave reference in common injection locking schemes. The total physical package of the stabilization system is [Formula: see text] and the total power consumption is 400 mW, which provides a chip scale and portable frequency stabilization approach with ultra-low power consumption for OEOs.

  14. Two-dimensional resonance frequency tuning approach for vibration-based energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lin; Prasad, M. G.; Fisher, Frank T.

    2016-06-01

    Vibration-based energy harvesting seeks to convert ambient vibrations to electrical energy and is of interest for, among other applications, powering the individual nodes of wireless sensor networks. Generally it is desired to match the resonant frequencies of the device to the ambient vibration source to optimize the energy harvested. This paper presents a two-dimensionally (2D) tunable vibration-based energy harvesting device via the application of magnetic forces in two-dimensional space. These forces are accounted for in the model separately, with the transverse force contributing to the transverse stiffness of the system while the axial force contributes to a change in axial stiffness of the beam. Simulation results from a COMSOL magnetostatic 3D model agree well with the analytical model and are confirmed with a separate experimental study. Furthermore, analysis of the three possible magnetization orientations between the fixed and tuning magnets shows that the transverse parallel magnetization orientation is the most effective with regards to the proposed 2D tuning approach. In all cases the transverse stiffness term is in general significantly larger than the axial stiffness contribution, suggesting that from a tuning perspective it may be possible to use these stiffness contributions for coarse and fine frequency tuning, respectively. This 2D resonant frequency tuning approach extends earlier 1D approaches and may be particularly useful in applications where space constraints impact the available design space of the energy harvester.

  15. Principles and promise of Fabry-Perot resonators at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braakman, R.; Blake, G. A.

    2011-03-01

    Fabry-Perot resonators have tremendous potential to enhance the sensitivity of spectroscopic systems at terahertz (THz) frequencies. Increasing sensitivity will be of benefit in compensating for the relatively low power of current high resolution continuous wave THz radiation techniques, and to fully express the potential of THz spectroscopy as source power increases. Improved sensitivities, and thus scanning speeds, will allow detailed studies of the complex vibration-rotation-tunneling dynamics that large molecules show at THz wavelengths, and will be especially important in studying more elusive, transient species such as those present in planetary atmospheres and the interstellar medium. Coupling radiation into the cavity presents unique challenges at THz frequencies, however, meaning that the cavity configurations common in neighboring frequency domains cannot simply be translated. Instead, novel constructions are needed. Here we present a resonator design in which wire-grid polarizers serve as the input and output coupling mirrors. Using this configuration, Q-factors of a few times 105 are achieved near 0.3 THz. To aid future investigations, the parameter space that limits the quality of the cavity is explored and paths to improved performance highlighted. Lastly, the performance of polarizer cavity-based Fourier transform (FT) THz spectrometers is discussed, in particular those design optimizations that should allow for the construction of THz instrumentation that rivals and eventually surpasses the sensitivities achieved with modern FT-microwave cavity spectrometers.

  16. Frequency flicker of 2.3 GHz AlN-sapphire high-overtone bulk acoustic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudot, Rodolphe; Martin, Gilles; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Rubiola, Enrico

    2016-12-01

    We report the detailed characterization of 2.3 GHz AlN-Sapphire high-overtone bulk acoustic resonators (HBARs), with a typical loaded Q-factor of 25-30 × 103, 15-20 dB insertion loss, and resonances separated by about 10 MHz. The temperature coefficient of frequency of HBARs is measured to be about -25 ppm/K. We observe at high-input microwave power a significant distortion of the HBAR resonance lineshape, attributed to non-linear effects. The power-induced fractional frequency variation of the HBAR resonance is measured to be about -5 × 10-10/μW. The residual phase noise of a HBAR is measured in the range of -110 to -130 dBrad2/Hz at 1 Hz Fourier frequency, yielding resonator fractional frequency fluctuations at the level of -205 to -225 dB/Hz at 1 Hz and an ultimate HBAR-limited oscillator Allan deviation about 7 × 10-12 at 1 s integration time. The 1/f noise of the HBAR resonator is found to increase with the input microwave power. A HBAR resonator is used for the development of a low phase noise 2.3 GHz oscillator. An absolute phase noise of -60, -120, and -145 dBrad2/Hz for offset frequencies of 10 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz, respectively, in excellent agreement with the Leeson effect, is measured.

  17. Exchange coupling controlled ferrite with dual magnetic resonance and broad frequency bandwidth in microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jingguo; Liu, Chuyang; Ma, Ning; Han, Gaorong; Weng, Wenjian; Du, Piyi

    2013-08-01

    Ti-doped barium ferrite powders BaFe12-x Ti x O19 (x = 0, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7 and 0.8) were synthesized by the sol-gel method. The phase structure and morphology were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The powders were also studied for their magnetic properties and microwave absorption. Results show that the Ti-doped barium ferrites (BFTO) exist in single phase and exhibit hexagonal plate-like structure. The anisotropy field Ha of the BFTO decreases almost linearly with the increase in Ti concentration, which leads to a shift of the natural resonance peak toward low frequency. Two natural resonance peaks appear, which can be assigned to the double values of the Landé factor g that are found to be ∼2.0 and ∼2.3 in the system and can be essentially attributed to the existence of Fe(3+) ions and the exchange coupling effect between Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) ions, respectively. Such a dual resonance effect contributes a broad magnetic loss peak and thus a high attenuation constant, and leads to a dual reflection loss (RL) peak over the frequency range between 26.5 and 40 GHz. The high attenuation constants are between 350 and 500 at peak position. The optimal RL reaches around -45 dB and the practicable frequency bandwidth is beyond 11 GHz. This suggests that the BFTO powders could be used as microwave absorbing materials with extraordinary properties.

  18. Exchange coupling controlled ferrite with dual magnetic resonance and broad frequency bandwidth in microwave absorption

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jingguo; Liu, Chuyang; Ma, Ning; Han, Gaorong; Weng, Wenjian; Du, Piyi

    2013-01-01

    Ti-doped barium ferrite powders BaFe12−xTixO19 (x = 0, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7 and 0.8) were synthesized by the sol–gel method. The phase structure and morphology were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The powders were also studied for their magnetic properties and microwave absorption. Results show that the Ti-doped barium ferrites (BFTO) exist in single phase and exhibit hexagonal plate-like structure. The anisotropy field Ha of the BFTO decreases almost linearly with the increase in Ti concentration, which leads to a shift of the natural resonance peak toward low frequency. Two natural resonance peaks appear, which can be assigned to the double values of the Landé factor g that are found to be ∼2.0 and ∼2.3 in the system and can be essentially attributed to the existence of Fe3+ ions and the exchange coupling effect between Fe3+ and Fe2+ ions, respectively. Such a dual resonance effect contributes a broad magnetic loss peak and thus a high attenuation constant, and leads to a dual reflection loss (RL) peak over the frequency range between 26.5 and 40 GHz. The high attenuation constants are between 350 and 500 at peak position. The optimal RL reaches around −45 dB and the practicable frequency bandwidth is beyond 11 GHz. This suggests that the BFTO powders could be used as microwave absorbing materials with extraordinary properties. PMID:27877595

  19. Taste Sensing Based on Frequency Characteristics of Quartz Resonator with Oleic Acid Film Electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Keiichi; Misawa, Kenji; Kitama, Masataka; Yamashita, Masaji; Arisawa, Junij

    In this paper, we studied a possibility of a taste sensing using a quartz crystal microbalance (hereafter cited as QCM) sensor. We modified oleic acid film to Au electrode of the quartz resonator by an electrodeposition method. The electrodeposition film was used as the adsorber for taste substances. We consider that oscillation frequency decreases with the mass changes due to adsorption. Frequency characteristics differed in each basic taste solution. Their characteristics were based on chemical nature of taste substances. Ions or organic molecules were attached to electrodeposition film by electrostatic interaction or hydrophobic interaction respectively. Moreover, we studied the taste evaluation of sweetness solutions and sourness solutions. As a result, in case of sweetness solutions, the frequency changes correlated with Brix (%) (r = -0.98). In case of sourness solutions, especially, the frequency changes correlated in pH (r = 0.89) of organic acids. Differences of the frequency changes depended on the amount of undissociated molecule in the acid solutions. Additionally, taste evaluation by the QCM sensor related to gustatory sense of human. Therefore, we suggested the validity of the QCM sensor for evaluation of the taste solutions.

  20. Virtual Resonance and Frequency Difference Generation by van der Waals Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetard, L.; Passian, A.; Eslami, S.; Jalili, N.; Farahi, R. H.; Thundat, T.

    2011-05-01

    The ability to explore the interior of materials for the presence of inhomogeneities was recently demonstrated by mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy [L. Tetard, A. Passian, and T. Thundat, Nature Nanotech. 5, 105 (2009).NNAABX1748-338710.1038/nnano.2009.454]. Proposing a semiempirical nonlinear force, we show that difference frequency ω- generation, regarded as the simplest synthesized mode, occurs optimally when the force is tuned to van der Waals form. From a parametric study of the probe-sample excitation, we show that the predicted ω- oscillation agrees well with experiments. We then introduce the concept of virtual resonance to show that probe oscillations at ω- can efficiently be enhanced.

  1. Electrically Conductive Photopatternable Silver Paste for High-Frequency Ring Resonator and Band-Pass Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umarji, Govind; Qureshi, Nilam; Gosavi, Suresh; Mulik, Uttam; Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Taesung; Amalnerkar, Dinesh

    2017-02-01

    In conventional thick-film technology, there are often problems associated with poor edges, rough surfaces, and reproducibility due to process limitations, especially for high-frequency applications. These difficulties can be circumvented by using thin-film technology, but process cost and complexity remain major concerns. In this context, photopatternable thick-film technology can offer a viable alternative due to its Newtonian rheology, which can facilitate formation of the required sharp edges. We present herein a unique attempt to formulate a photopatternable silver paste with organic (photosensitive polymer) to inorganic (silver and glass) ratio of 30:70, developed in-house by us for fabrication of thick-film-based ring resonator and band-pass filter components. The ring resonator and band-pass component structures were realized by exposing screen-printed film to ultraviolet light at wavelength of 315 nm to 400 nm for 30 s to crosslink the photosensitive polymer. The pattern was subsequently developed using 1% sodium carbonate aqueous solution. For comparison, conventional silver and silver-palladium thick films were produced using in-house formulations. The surface topology and microstructural features were examined by stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The smoothness and edge definition of the film were assessed by profilometry. The resistivity of the samples was observed and remained in the range from 3.4 μΩ cm to 3.6 μΩ cm. The electrical properties were compared by measuring the insertion loss characteristics. The results revealed that the ring resonator fabricated using the photopatternable silver paste exhibited better high-frequency properties compared with components based on conventional silver or silver-palladium paste, especially in terms of the resonant frequency of 10.1 GHz (versus 10 GHz designed) with bandwidth of 80 MHz. Additionally, the band-pass filter fabricated using the photopatternable silver paste displayed better

  2. Analytical solutions in rotating linear dilaton black holes: Resonant frequencies, quantization, greybody factor, and Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.

    2016-10-01

    Charged massive scalar field perturbations are studied in the gravitational, electromagnetic, dilaton, and axion fields of rotating linear dilaton black holes. In this geometry, we separate the covariant Klein-Gordon equation into radial and angular parts and obtain the exact solutions of both the equations in terms of the confluent Heun functions. Using the radial solution, we study the problems of resonant frequencies, entropy/area quantization, and greybody factor. We also analyze the behavior of the wave solutions near the event horizon of the rotating linear dilaton black hole and derive its Hawking temperature via the Damour-Ruffini-Sannan method.

  3. Laser-induced resonance states as dynamic suppressors of ionization in high-frequency short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Barash, Danny; Orel, Ann E.; Baer, Roi

    2000-01-01

    An adiabatic-Floquet formalism is used to study the suppression of ionization in short laser pulses. In the high-frequency limit the adiabatic equations involve only the pulse envelope where transitions are purely ramp effects. For a short-ranged potential having a single-bound state we show that ionization suppression is caused by the appearance of a laser-induced resonance state, which is coupled by the pulse ramp to the ground state and acts to trap ionizing flux. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  4. An Empirical Expression to Predict the Resonant Frequencies of Archimedean Spirals

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Jerris W.; Ramaswamy, Vijaykumar; Arora, Rajendra K.; Edison, Arthur S.; Withers, Richard S.; Nast, Robert E.; Brey, William W.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an empirical formula to accurately determine the frequencies of the fundamental and higher order resonances of an Archimedean spiral in a uniform dielectric medium in the absence of a ground plane. The formula is based on method-of-moments simulations which have been experimentally validated. This empirical formula is widely applicable to a broad range of spirals from thin-ring to disk-shaped (ratio of inner to outer radii 0 to 1), with 10 or more turns. PMID:26556910

  5. Realization of acoustic wave directivity at low frequencies with a subwavelength Mie resonant structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gengxi; Ding, Erliang; Wang, Yangyang; Peng, Xiuyuan; Cui, Jun; Liu, Xiaozhou; Liu, Xiaojun

    2017-03-01

    We realized high-efficiency acoustic directivity at low frequencies based on monopolar Mie resonance. This is caused by micro structures that have a high refractive index relative to the background medium. The structures can strongly control the radiation pattern though the acoustic wavelength is much larger than its dimensions. We herein discuss how to enhance the directivity through modifying the structure's parameters. Furthermore, our structure is proposed for use in obtaining an acoustic collimated beam without sidelobes. The structure characteristics and applications are demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. Potential applications of our structures include acoustic device miniaturization, noise control, and medical ultrasonics.

  6. Spin-torque diode radio-frequency detector with voltage tuned resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Skowroński, Witold Frankowski, Marek; Stobiecki, Tomasz; Wrona, Jerzy; Ogrodnik, Piotr; Barnaś, Józef

    2014-08-18

    We report on a voltage-tunable radio-frequency (RF) detector based on a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). The spin-torque diode effect is used to excite and/or detect RF oscillations in the magnetic free layer of the MTJ. In order to reduce the overall in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the free layer, we take advantage of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at the interface between ferromagnetic and insulating layers. The applied bias voltage is shown to have a significant influence on the magnetic anisotropy, and thus on the resonance frequency of the device. This influence also depends on the voltage polarity. The obtained results are accounted for in terms of the interplay of spin-transfer-torque and voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy effects.

  7. Resonant scattering of energetic electrons by unusual low-frequency hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Binbin; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M.; Bortnik, Jacob; Ma, Qianli; Chen, Lunjin; Kletzing, Craig A.; Kurth, William S.; Hospodarsky, George B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.; Bernard Blake, J.; Fennell, Joseph F.; Claudepierre, Seth G.

    2014-03-01

    We quantify the resonant scattering effects of the unusual low-frequency dawnside plasmaspheric hiss observed on 30 September 2012 by the Van Allen Probes. In contrast to normal (~100-2000 Hz) hiss emissions, this unusual hiss event contained most of its wave power at ~20-200 Hz. Compared to the scattering by normal hiss, the unusual hiss scattering speeds up the loss of ~50-200 keV electrons and produces more pronounced pancake distributions of ~50-100 keV electrons. It is demonstrated that such unusual low-frequency hiss, even with a duration of a couple of hours, plays a particularly important role in the decay and loss process of energetic electrons, resulting in shorter electron lifetimes for ~50-400 keV electrons than normal hiss, and should be carefully incorporated into global modeling of radiation belt electron dynamics during periods of intense injections.

  8. Planar Lithographed Superconducting LC Resonators for Frequency-Domain Multiplexed Readout Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotermund, K.; Barch, B.; Chapman, S.; Hattori, K.; Lee, A.; Palaio, N.; Shirley, I.; Suzuki, A.; Tran, C.

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments are increasing the number of transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers to increase sensitivity. In order to maintain low thermal loading of the sub-Kelvin stage, the frequency-domain multiplexing (FDM) factor has to increase accordingly. FDM is achieved by placing TES bolometers in series with inductor-capacitor (LC) resonators, which select the readout frequency. The multiplexing factor can be raised with a large total readout bandwidth and small frequency spacing between channels. The inductance is kept constant to maintain a uniform readout bandwidth across detectors, while the maximum acceptable value is determined by bolometer stability. Current technology relies on commercially available ceramic chip capacitors. These have high scatter in their capacitance thereby requiring large frequency spacing. Furthermore, they have high equivalent series resistance (ESR) at higher frequencies and are time consuming and tedious to hand assemble via soldering. A solution lies in lithographed, planar spiral inductors (currently in use by some experiments) combined with interdigitated capacitors on a silicon (Si) substrate. To maintain reasonable device dimensions, we have reduced trace and gap widths of the LCs to 4 \\upmu m. We increased the inductance from 16 to 60 \\upmu H to achieve a higher packing density, a requirement for FDM systems with large multiplexing factors. Additionally, the Si substrate yields low ESR values across the entire frequency range and lithography makes mass production of LC pairs possible. We reduced mutual inductance between inductors by placing them in a checkerboard pattern with the capacitors, thereby increasing physical distances between adjacent inductors. We also reduce magnetic coupling of inductors with external sources by evaporating a superconducting ground plane onto the backside of the substrate. We report on the development of lithographed LCs in the 1-5 MHz range for use

  9. Yb-fiber laser pumped high-power, broadly tunable, single-frequency red source based on a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Mukesh Kumar; Maji, Partha Sona; Das, Ritwick

    2016-07-01

    We present an efficient and tunable source generating multi-watt single-frequency red radiation by intra-cavity frequency doubling of the signal in a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 (MgO:PPLN)-based singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO). By optimally designing the SRO cavity in a six-mirror configuration, we generate ≈276  nm tunable idler radiation in mid-infrared with a maximum power of Pi=2.05  W at a pump power of Pp=14.0  W. The resonant signal is frequency doubled using a 10 mm-long BiB3O6 (BiBO) crystal which resulted in tunability of a red beam from ≈753 to 780 nm band with maximum power Pr≈4.0  W recorded at λr≈756  nm. The deployment of a six-mirror SRO ensures single-frequency generation of red across the entire tuning range by inducing additional losses to Raman modes of LiNbO3 and, thus, inhibiting their oscillation. Using a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI), nominal linewidth of the red beam is measured to ≈3  MHz which changes marginally over the entire tuning range. Long-term (over 1 h) peak-to-peak frequency fluctuation of the generated red beam is estimated to be about 3.3 GHz under free-running conditions at Pp=14.0  W. The generated red beam is delivered in a TEM00 mode profile with M2≤1.32 at maximum power in a red beam.

  10. AC Resonant charger with charge rate unrelated to primary power frequency

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Harold

    1982-01-01

    An AC resonant charger for a capacitive load, such as a PFN, is provided with a variable repetition rate unrelated to the frequency of a multi-phase AC power source by using a control unit to select and couple the phase of the power source to the resonant charger in order to charge the capacitive load with a phase that is the next to begin a half cycle. For optimum range in repetition rate and increased charging voltage, the resonant charger includes a step-up transformer and full-wave rectifier. The next phase selected may then be of either polarity, but is always selected to be of a polarity opposite the polarity of the last phase selected so that the transformer core does not saturate. Thyristors are used to select and couple the correct phase just after its zero crossover in response to a sharp pulse generated by a zero-crossover detector. The thyristor that is turned on then automatically turns off after a full ha