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Sample records for 1h solid-state nmr

  1. Spatially resolved solid-state 1H NMR for evaluation of gradient-composition polymeric libraries.

    PubMed

    Leisen, Johannes; Gomez, Ismael J; Roper, John A; Meredith, J Carson; Beckham, Haskell W

    2012-07-01

    Polyurethane libraries consisting of films with composition gradients of aliphatic polyisocyanate and hydroxy-terminated polyacrylate resin were characterized using methods of (1)H NMR microimaging (i.e., magnetic resonance imaging, (MRI)) and solid-state NMR. Molecular mobilities and underlying structural information were extracted as a function of the relative content of each of the two components. Routine NMR microimaging using the spin-echo sequence only allows investigations of transverse relaxation of magnetization at echo times >2 ms. A single-exponential decay was found, which is likely due to free, noncross-linked polymer chains. The mobility of these chains decreases with increasing content of the aliphatic polyisocyanate. The concept of a 1D NMR profiler is introduced as a novel modality for library screening, which allows the convenient measurement of static solid-state NMR spectra as a function of spatial location along a library sample that is repositioned in the rf coil between experiments. With this setup the complete transverse relaxation function was measured using Bloch decays and spin echoes. For all positions within the gradient-composition film, relaxation data consisted of at least three components that were attributed to a rigid highly cross-linked resin, an intermediate cross-linked but mobile constituent, and the highly mobile free polymer chains (the latter is also detectable by MRI). Analysis of this overall relaxation function measured via Bloch decays and spin echoes revealed only minor changes in the mobilities of the individual fractions. Findings with respect to the most mobile components are consistent with the results obtained by NMR microimaging. The major effect is the significant increase in the rigid-component fraction with the addition of the hydroxy-terminated polyacrylate resin. PMID:22676634

  2. (1)H-detected solid-state NMR of proteins entrapped in bioinspired silica: a new tool for biomaterials characterization.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Enrico; Cerofolini, Linda; Martelli, Tommaso; Louka, Alexandra; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Proton-detection in solid-state NMR, enabled by high magnetic fields (>18 T) and fast magic angle spinning (>50 kHz), allows for the acquisition of traditional (1)H-(15)N experiments on systems that are too big to be observed in solution. Among those, proteins entrapped in a bioinspired silica matrix are an attractive target that is receiving a large share of attention. We demonstrate that (1)H-detected SSNMR provides a novel approach to the rapid assessment of structural integrity in proteins entrapped in bioinspired silica. PMID:27279168

  3. 1H-detected solid-state NMR of proteins entrapped in bioinspired silica: a new tool for biomaterials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravera, Enrico; Cerofolini, Linda; Martelli, Tommaso; Louka, Alexandra; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    Proton-detection in solid-state NMR, enabled by high magnetic fields (>18 T) and fast magic angle spinning (>50 kHz), allows for the acquisition of traditional 1H-15N experiments on systems that are too big to be observed in solution. Among those, proteins entrapped in a bioinspired silica matrix are an attractive target that is receiving a large share of attention. We demonstrate that 1H-detected SSNMR provides a novel approach to the rapid assessment of structural integrity in proteins entrapped in bioinspired silica.

  4. 1H-detected solid-state NMR of proteins entrapped in bioinspired silica: a new tool for biomaterials characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ravera, Enrico; Cerofolini, Linda; Martelli, Tommaso; Louka, Alexandra; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Proton-detection in solid-state NMR, enabled by high magnetic fields (>18 T) and fast magic angle spinning (>50 kHz), allows for the acquisition of traditional 1H-15N experiments on systems that are too big to be observed in solution. Among those, proteins entrapped in a bioinspired silica matrix are an attractive target that is receiving a large share of attention. We demonstrate that 1H-detected SSNMR provides a novel approach to the rapid assessment of structural integrity in proteins entrapped in bioinspired silica. PMID:27279168

  5. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids. PMID:26203019

  6. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  7. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  8. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  9. Solid state 1H NMR studies of cell wall materials of potatoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Huiru; Belton, Peter S.; Ng, Annie; Waldron, Keith W.; Ryden, Peter

    1999-04-01

    Cell wall materials from potatoes ( Solanum tuberosum) prepared by two different methods have been studied using NMR proton relaxation times. Spin lattice relaxation in both the rotating and laboratory frames as well as transverse relaxation have been measured over a range of temperatures and hydration levels. It was observed that the sample prepared using a DMSO extraction showed anomalous behaviour of spin lattice relaxation in the laboratory frame probably due to residual solvent in the sample. Spin lattice relaxation in the laboratory frame is the result of hydroxymethyl rotation and another unidentified high frequency motion. In the rotating frame relaxation is adequately explained by hydroxymethyl rotation alone. In neither experiment is methyl group rotation observed, calculation suggests that this is due to the low density of methyl groups in the sample. Non-freezing water in potato cell walls, α-cellulose and pectin was found about 0.2, 0.04 and 0.18 g per gram dry matter, indicating preferable hydration of pectin compared to cellulose. The effects of hydration are most noticeable in the measurements that reflect low frequency motions, particularly transverse relaxation, where both second moments and the relative intensity of signals arising from immobile material are reduced by hydration.

  10. Accurate determination of order parameters from 1H,15N dipolar couplings in MAS solid-state NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2009-10-01

    A reliable site-specific estimate of the individual N-H bond lengths in the protein backbone is the fundamental basis of any relaxation experiment in solution and in the solid-state NMR. The N-H bond length can in principle be influenced by hydrogen bonding, which would result in an increased N-H distance. At the same time, dynamics in the backbone induces a reduction of the experimental dipolar coupling due to motional averaging. We present a 3D dipolar recoupling experiment in which the (1)H,(15)N dipolar coupling is reintroduced in the indirect dimension using phase-inverted CP to eliminate effects from rf inhomogeneity. We find no variation of the N-H dipolar coupling as a function of hydrogen bonding. Instead, variations in the (1)H,(15)N dipolar coupling seem to be due to dynamics of the protein backbone. This is supported by the observed correlation between the H(N)-N dipolar coupling and the amide proton chemical shift. The experiment is demonstrated for a perdeuterated sample of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain. Perdeuteration is a prerequisite to achieve high accuracy. The average error in the analysis of the H-N dipolar couplings is on the order of +/-370 Hz (+/-0.012 A) and can be as small as 150 Hz, corresponding to a variation of the bond length of +/-0.005 A.

  11. Rapid measurement of multidimensional 1H solid-state NMR spectra at ultra-fast MAS frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yue Qi; Malon, Michal; Martineau, Charlotte; Taulelle, Francis; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2014-02-01

    A novel method to realize rapid repetition of 1H NMR experiments at ultra-fast MAS frequencies is demonstrated. The ultra-fast MAS at 110 kHz slows the 1H-1H spin diffusion, leading to variations of 1H T1 relaxation times from atom to atom within a molecule. The different relaxation behavior is averaged by applying 1H-1H recoupling during relaxation delay even at ultra-fast MAS, reducing the optimal relaxation delay to maximize the signal to noise ratio. The way to determine optimal relaxation delay for arbitrary relaxation curve is shown. The reduction of optimal relaxation delay by radio-frequency driven recoupling (RFDR) was demonstrated on powder samples of glycine and ethenzamide with one and multi-dimensional NMR measurements.

  12. Critical Effect of Segmental Dynamics in Polybutadiene / Clay Nanocomposites Characterized by Solid State 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Rongchun; Sun, Pingchuan; Winter, H. Henning; Xue, Gi

    2014-03-01

    The segmental dynamics of rigid, intermediate, and mobile molecular components in end-functionalized polybutadiene (PB) / organo-clay systems was characterized by fully refocused 1H NMR FID. In addition, 1H DQ NMR experiments allowed to semi- quantitatively monitor changes in segmental dynamics near the interface. Both methods suggested a critical concentration of end-functionalized polybutadiene, indicating a saturation effect for the surface-adsorbed polymer. The critical concentration depended on molecular weight of PB and PB-clay interaction. Based on the 1H NMR results, a tentative model was proposed to illustrate the evolution of the structure and segmental dynamics in PB/organo-clay nanocomposites. This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants: 21174062).

  13. Local environment and composition of magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides determined from solid-state 1H and 71Ga NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Line B.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Zorin, Vadim; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2014-11-01

    Ordering of gallium(III) in a series of magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides (LDH’s), [Mg1-xGax(OH)2(NO3)x yH2O], was determined using solid-state 1H and 71Ga NMR spectroscopy. Depletion of Ga in these LDH’s is demonstrated to be the result of soluble [Ga(OH)4]-complexes formed during synthesis.

  14. Local environment and composition of magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides determined from solid-state {sup 1}H and {sup 71}Ga NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Line Boisen; Lipton, Andrew S.; Zorin, Vadim; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2014-11-15

    Ordering of gallium(III) in a series of magnesium gallium (MgGa) layered double hydroxides (LDHs), [Mg{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}(OH){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub x}·yH{sub 2}O] was investigated using solid-state {sup 1}H and {sup 71}Ga NMR spectroscopy as well as powder X-ray diffraction. Three different proton environments from Mg{sub 3}-OH, Mg{sub 2}Ga-OH and intergallery water molecules were assigned and quantified using ({sup 1}H,{sup 71}Ga) HETCOR and {sup 1}H MAS NMR. A single {sup 71}Ga site originating from the unique Ga site in the MgGa LDH's was observed in {sup 71}Ga MAS and 3QMAS NMR spectra. Both {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra recorded at 21.1 T (900 MHz) and elemental analysis show that the synthesized MgGa LDH's had a lower Mg:Ga ratio than that of the starting reactant solution. The origin of this is the formation of soluble [Ga(OH){sub 4}]{sup −} complexes formed during synthesis, and not due to formation of insoluble gallium (oxy)hydroxides. No sign of Ga-O-Ga connectivities or defects were detected for the MgGa LDH's. - Graphical abstract: Two types of hydroxides groups are observed in magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides revealing an ordering of Ga in the cation layer. - Highlights: • Ga is ordered in our magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides. • Ga depletion due to formation of soluble Ga complexes during synthesis. • No sign of Ga rich regions in magnesium gallium LDHs. • Solid state {sup 1}H and {sup 71}Ga give detailed insight into the structure.

  15. The use of a selective saturation pulse to suppress t1 noise in two-dimensional (1)H fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Aiden J; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Marsh, Andrew; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Brown, Steven P

    2015-11-01

    A selective saturation pulse at fast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies (60+kHz) suppresses t1 noise in the indirect dimension of two-dimensional (1)H MAS NMR spectra. The method is applied to a synthetic nucleoside with an intense methyl (1)H signal due to triisopropylsilyl (TIPS) protecting groups. Enhanced performance in terms of suppressing the methyl signal while minimising the loss of signal intensity of nearby resonances of interest relies on reducing spin diffusion--this is quantified by comparing two-dimensional (1)H NOESY-like spin diffusion spectra recorded at 30-70 kHz MAS. For a saturation pulse centred at the methyl resonance, the effect of changing the nutation frequency at different MAS frequencies as well as the effect of changing the pulse duration is investigated. By applying a pulse of duration 30 ms and nutation frequency 725 Hz at 70 kHz MAS, a good compromise of significant suppression of the methyl resonance combined with the signal intensity of resonances greater than 5 ppm away from the methyl resonance being largely unaffected is achieved. The effectiveness of using a selective saturation pulse is demonstrated for both homonuclear (1)H-(1)H double quantum (DQ)/single quantum (SQ) MAS and (14)N-(1)H heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) two-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments.

  16. Solid state {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR structural investigation of a poly(ethylene oxide) hydrogel

    SciTech Connect

    Badiger, M.V.; Graham, N.B.; Law, R.V.; Snape, C.E.

    1993-12-31

    A cross-linked poly (ethylene oxide)/polyurethane hydrogel cross-linked with 1,2,6 hexane-triol and designated PEG4050/1HT [measured M{sup n} of 4050 for poly (ethylene oxide) glycol (PEG) and a mole ratio of 1:1 for the PEG to the 1,2,6 hexane-triol] has been characterized by high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR. {sup 1}H thermal (T{sub 1}) and rotating frame (T{sub 1{rho}}) and {sup 13}CT{sub 1} relaxation times were determined for the powdered dry and swollen hydrogel with the standard variants of the cross-polarization pulse sequence which was used in conjunction with magic-angle spinning (MAS). The rotating frame relaxation measurements confirmed that crystalline and amorphous regions were present in the dry hydrogel but showed unabiguously that the crystalline regions are confined to the poly (ethylene oxide) chains, Upon hydration, there is a decrease in the cross polarization efficiency from the enhanced mobility by the poly (ethylene oxide) chains are affected to a much greater extent that the urethane and hexane segments, the characteristic time constant, T{sub CH} increasing by more than order of magnitude compared to no more than a factor of two for the latter. Clearly, the hydration involves hydrogen bonding between the water and principally the oxygens in the poly (ethylene oxide) chains. The {sup 1}H MAS spectra of the dry and hydrated samples confirmed that considerable averaging of the dipolar interactions occurs on hydration to give a well-resolved spectrum.

  17. Tracing bacterial metabolism using multi-nuclear (1H, 2H, and 13C) Solid State NMR: Realizing an Idea Initiated by James Scott

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G.; Fogel, M. L.; Jin, K.; Griffen, P.; Steele, A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Approximately 6 years ago, while at the Geophysical Laboratory, James Scott became interested in the application of Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to study bacterial metabolism. As often happens, other experiments intervened and the NMR experiments were not pursued. We have revisited Jame's question and find that using a multi-nuclear approach (1H, 2H, and 13C Solid State NMR) on laboratory cell culture has some distinct advantages. Our experiments involved batch cultures of E. coli (MG1655) harvested at stationary phase. In all experiments the growth medium consisted of MOPS medium for enterobacteria, where the substrate is glucose. In one set of experiments, 10 % of the water was D2O; in another 10 % of the glucose was per-deuterated. The control experiment used both water and glucose at natural isotopic abundance. A kill control of dead E. coli immersed in pure D2O for an extended period exhibited no deuterium incorporation. In both deuterium enriched experiments, considerable incorporation of deuterium into E. coli's biomolecular constituents was detected via 2H Solid State NMR. In the case of the D2O enriched experiment, 58 % of the incorporated deuterium is observed in a sharp peak at a frequency of 0.31 ppm, consistent with D incorporation in the cell membrane lipids, the remainder is observed in a broad peak at a higher frequency (centered at 5.4 ppm, but spanning out to beyond 10 ppm) that is consistent with D incorporation into predominantly DNA and RNA. In the case of the D-glucose experiments, 61 % of the deuterium is observed in a sharp resonance peak at 0.34 ppm, also consistent with D incorporation into membrane lipids, the remainder of the D is observed at a broad resonance peak centered at 4.3 ppm, consistent with D enrichment in glycogen. Deuterium abundance in the E. coli cells grown in 10 % D2O is nearly 2X greater than that grown with 10 % D-glucose. Very subtle differences are observed in both the 1H and 13C solid-state

  18. Simultaneous cross polarization to 13C and 15N with 1H detection at 60 kHz MAS solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bibhuti B.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe high resolution MAS solid-state NMR experiments that utilize 1H detection with 60 kHz magic angle spinning; simultaneous cross-polarization from 1H to 15N and 13C nuclei; bidirectional cross-polarization between 13C and 15N nuclei; detection of both amide nitrogen and aliphatic carbon 1H; and measurement of both 13C and 15N chemical shifts through multi-dimensional correlation experiments. Three-dimensional experiments correlate amide 1H and alpha 1H selectively with 13C or 15N nuclei in a polypeptide chain. Two separate three-dimensional spectra correlating 1Hα/13Cα/1HN and 1HN/15N/1Hα are recorded simultaneously in a single experiment, demonstrating that a twofold savings in experimental time is potentially achievable. Spectral editing using bidirectional coherence transfer pathways enables simultaneous magnetization transfers between 15N, 13Cα(i) and 13C‧(i-1), facilitating intra- and inter-residue correlations for sequential resonance assignment. Non-uniform sampling is integrated into the experiments, further reducing the length of experimental time.

  19. Joint Experimental and Computational 17O and 1H Solid State NMR Study of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A structural characterization of the hydrated form of the brownmillerite-type phase Ba2In2O5, Ba2In2O4(OH)2, is reported using experimental multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) energy and GIPAW NMR calculations. When the oxygen ions from H2O fill the inherent O vacancies of the brownmillerite structure, one of the water protons remains in the same layer (O3) while the second proton is located in the neighboring layer (O2) in sites with partial occupancies, as previously demonstrated by Jayaraman et al. (Solid State Ionics2004, 170, 25−32) using X-ray and neutron studies. Calculations of possible proton arrangements within the partially occupied layer of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 yield a set of low energy structures; GIPAW NMR calculations on these configurations yield 1H and 17O chemical shifts and peak intensity ratios, which are then used to help assign the experimental MAS NMR spectra. Three distinct 1H resonances in a 2:1:1 ratio are obtained experimentally, the most intense resonance being assigned to the proton in the O3 layer. The two weaker signals are due to O2 layer protons, one set hydrogen bonding to the O3 layer and the other hydrogen bonding alternately toward the O3 and O1 layers. 1H magnetization exchange experiments reveal that all three resonances originate from protons in the same crystallographic phase, the protons exchanging with each other above approximately 150 °C. Three distinct types of oxygen atoms are evident from the DFT GIPAW calculations bare oxygens (O), oxygens directly bonded to a proton (H-donor O), and oxygen ions that are hydrogen bonded to a proton (H-acceptor O). The 17O calculated shifts and quadrupolar parameters are used to assign the experimental spectra, the assignments being confirmed by 1H–17O double resonance experiments. PMID:26321789

  20. Improved 1H amide resonance line narrowing in oriented sample solid-state NMR of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, George J.; Park, Sang Ho; Opella, Stanley J.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate 1H amide resonance line widths <300 Hz in 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra of membrane proteins in aligned phospholipid bilayers. This represents a substantial improvement over typically observed line widths of ˜1 kHz. Furthermore, in a proton detected local field (PDLF) version of the experiment that measures heteronuclear dipolar couplings, line widths <130 Hz are observed. This dramatic line narrowing of 1H amide resonances enables many more individual signals to be resolved and assigned from uniformly 15N labeled membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions of temperature and pH. Finding that the decrease in line widths occurs only for membrane proteins that undergo fast rotational diffusion around the bilayer normal, but not immobile molecules, such as peptide single crystals, identifies a potential new direction for pulse sequence development that includes overall molecular dynamics in their design.

  1. Conformational stability and thermal pathways of relaxation in triclosan (antibacterial/excipient/contaminant) in solid-state: combined spectroscopic ((1)H NMR) and computational (periodic DFT) study.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Tomczak, Marzena Agnieszka; Medycki, Wojciech

    2015-05-21

    The mechanism of molecular dynamics in the antibacterial/antifungal agent, triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2',4'-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol), in solid state was studied by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Temperature dependencies of the proton spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) in the ranges 86-293 and 90-250 K (at 15 and 24.667 MHz, respectively) and the second moment (M2) of the (1)H NMR resonant line in the range 103-300 K were measured. Two minima in the temperature dependence of T1 revealed a classical Arrhenius governed activation processes. The low temperature shallow minimum T1(T) of 71 s at 115 K, 15 MHz, which shifts with frequency, was assigned to classical hindered jumps of hydroxyl group around OC axis and with respect to a 5-chloro-2-phenol ring. The activation energy of this motion estimated on the basis of the fit of the theoretical model to the experimental points is 9.68 kJ/mol. The pointed high temperature minimum T1(T) of 59 s at 190 K, 15 MHz, which also shifts with frequency, was assigned to the small angle librations by Θlib= ± 9° between two positions of equilibrium differing in energy by 7.42 kJ/mol. The activation energy of this motion estimated on the basis of the fit of the theoretical model to the experimental points is 31.1 kJ/mol. Both motions result in a negligible reduction in the (1)H NMR line second moment, thus the second moment delivers an irrelevant description of the molecular motions in triclosan.

  2. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  3. A chelate-stabilized ruthenium(sigma-pyrrolato) complex: resolving ambiguities in nuclearity and coordination geometry through 1H PGSE and 31P solid-state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Heather M; Bryce, David L; Fogg, Deryn E

    2006-12-11

    Reaction of RuCl2(PPh3)3 with LiNN' (NN' = 2-[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]pyrrolide) affords a single product, with the empirical formula RuCl[(2,6-iPr2C6H3)N=CHC4H3N](PPh3)2. We identify this species as a sigma-pyrrolato complex, [Ru(NN')(PPh3)2]2(mu-Cl)2 (3b), rather than mononuclear RuCl(NN')(PPh3)2 (3a), on the basis of detailed 1D and 2D NMR characterization in solution and in the solid state. Retention of the chelating, sigma-bound iminopyrrolato unit within 3b, despite the presence of labile (dative) chloride and PPh3 donors, indicates that the chelate effect is sufficient to inhibit sigma --> pi isomerization of 3b to a piano-stool, pi-pyrrolato structure. 2D COSY, SECSY, and J-resolved solid-state 31P NMR experiments confirm that the PPh3 ligands on each metal center are magnetically and crystallographically inequivalent, and 31P CP/MAS NMR experiments reveal the largest 99Ru-31P spin-spin coupling constant (1J(99Ru,31P) = 244 +/- 20 Hz) yet measured. Finally, 31P dipolar-chemical shift spectroscopy is applied to determine benchmark phosphorus chemical shift tensors for phosphine ligands in hexacoordinate ruthenium complexes.

  4. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR of Anisotropically Mobile Molecules Under Very Low Power 1H Decoupling and Moderate Magic-Angle Spinning

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Tim; Hong, Mei

    2011-01-01

    We show that for observing high-resolution heteronuclear NMR spectra of anisotropically mobile systems with order parameters less than 0.25, moderate magic-angle spinning (MAS) rates of ∼11 kHz combined with 1H decoupling at 1-2 kHz are sufficient. Broadband decoupling at this low 1H nutation frequency is achieved by composite pulse sequences such as WALTZ-16. We demonstrate this moderate MAS low-power decoupling technique on hydrated POPC lipid membranes, and show that 1 kHz 1H decoupling yields spectra with the same resolution and sensitivity as spectra measured under 50 kHz 1H decoupling when the same acquisition times (∼ 50 ms) are used, but the low-power decoupled spectra give higher resolution and sensitivity when longer acquisition times (> 150 ms) are used, which are not possible with high-power decoupling. The limits of validity of this approach are explored for a range of spinning rates and molecular mobilities using more rigid membrane systems such as POPC/cholesterol mixed bilayers. Finally, we show 15N and 13C spectra of a uniaxially diffusing membrane peptide assembly, the influenza A M2 transmembrane domain, under 11 kHz MAS and 2 kHz 1H decoupling. The peptide 15N and 13C intensities at low power decoupling are 70-80% of the high-power decoupled intensities. Therefore, it is possible to study anisotropically mobile lipids and membrane peptides using liquid-state NMR equipment, relatively large rotors, and moderate MAS frequencies. PMID:19501003

  5. Determination of the tautomeric equilibria of pyridoyl benzoyl β-diketones in the liquid and solid state through the use of deuterium isotope effects on (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts and spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Borisov, Eugeny V; Lindon, John C

    2015-02-01

    The tautomeric equilibria for 2-pyridoyl-, 3-pyridoyl-, and 4-pyridoyl-benzoyl methane have been investigated using deuterium isotope effects on (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts both in the liquid and the solid state. Equilibria are established both in the liquid and the solid state. In addition, in the solution state the 2-bond and 3-bond J((1)H-(13)C) coupling constants have been used to confirm the equilibrium positions. The isotope effects due to deuteriation at the OH position are shown to be superior to chemical shift in determination of equilibrium positions of these almost symmetrical -pyridoyl-benzoyl methanes. The assignments of the NMR spectra are supported by calculations of the chemical shifts at the DFT level. The equilibrium positions are shown to be different in the liquid and the solid state. In the liquid state the 4-pyridoyl derivative is at the B-form (C-1 is OH), whereas the 2-and 3-pyridoyl derivatives are in the A-form. In the solid state all three compounds are on the B-form. The 4-pyridoyl derivative shows unusual deuterium isotope effects in the solid, which are ascribed to a change of the crystal structure of the deuteriated compound. PMID:24070650

  6. Determination of relative orientation between (1)H CSA tensors from a 3D solid-state NMR experiment mediated through (1)H/(1)H RFDR mixing under ultrafast MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    To obtain piercing insights into inter and intramolecular H-bonding, and π-electron interactions measurement of (1)H chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors is gradually becoming an obvious choice. While the magnitude of CSA tensors provides unique information about the local electronic environment surrounding the nucleus, the relative orientation between these tensors can offer further insights into the spatial arrangement of interacting nuclei in their respective three-dimensional (3D) space. In this regard, we present a 3D anisotropic/anisotropic/isotropic proton chemical shift (CSA/CSA/CS) correlation experiment mediated through (1)H/(1)H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) which enhances spin diffusion through recoupled (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequency (70kHz). Relative orientation between two interacting 1H CSA tensors is obtained by fitting two-interacting (1)H CSA tensors by fitting two-dimensional (2D) (1)H/(1)H CSA/CSA spectral slices through extensive numerical simulations. To recouple (1)H CSAs in the indirect frequency dimensions of a 3D experiment we have employed γ-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence based on R-symmetry (R188(7)) with a series of phase-alternated 2700(°)-90180(°) composite-180° pulses on citric acid sample. Due to robustness of applied (1)H CSA recoupling sequence towards the presence of RF field inhomogeneity, we have successfully achieved an excellent (1)H/(1)H CSA/CSA cross-correlation efficiency between H-bonded sites of citric acid. PMID:26065628

  7. Atomic structure and dehydration mechanism of amorphous silica: Insights from 29Si and 1H solid-state MAS NMR study of SiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Na; Lee, Sung Keun

    2013-11-01

    Detailed knowledge of the atomic structure of hydrous species on surface of amorphous silica and the effect of temperature and particle size on their atomic configurations are essential to understand the nature of fluids-amorphous silicates interactions and the dehydration processes in the amorphous oxides. Here, we report the 29Si, 1H MAS, and 1H-29Si heteronuclear correlation (HetCor) NMR spectra of 7 nm and 14 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles—a model system for natural amorphous silica—where previously unknown details of changes in their atomic structures with varying dehydration temperature and particle size are revealed. Diverse hydroxyl groups with varying atomic configurations and molecular water apparently show distinct dehydration trends. The dehydration (i.e., removal of water) of amorphous silica nanoparticles mostly results in the increase of isolated silanol by removing water molecules from hydrogen-bonded silanols associated water molecules. With further increase in dehydration temperature, the intensity of isolated silanol peak decreases above ˜873 K, suggesting that the condensation of isolated silanol may occur mainly above ˜873 K. The entire dehydration (and dehydroxylation) process completes at ˜1473 K. Both the water (i.e., physisorbed water and hydrogen-bonded water) and hydrogen-bonded silanol species show a dramatic change in the slope of intensity variation at ˜873 K, indicating that most of silanols is hydrogen-bonded to water rather than to other silanols. The fraction of hydrogen-bonded proton species is also much smaller in 14 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles than in 7 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles mainly due to the presences of larger fractions of water and hydrogen-bonded silanol species. 29Si NMR results show that with increasing dehydration temperature, the fraction of Q4 species apparently increases at the expense of Q2 and Q3 species. The fractions of Q2 and Q3 structures in 7 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles are

  8. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  9. Beckmann rearrangement of 15N-cyclohexanone oxime on zeolites silicalite-1, H-ZSM-5, and H-[B]ZSM-5 studied by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marthala, V R Reddy; Jiang, Yijiao; Huang, Jun; Wang, Wei; Gläser, Roger; Hunger, Michael

    2006-11-22

    By means of solid-state 15N NMR spectroscopy, evidence for the formation of nitrilium ions as intermediates of the Beckmann rearrangement of 15N-cyclohexanone oxime to epsilon-caprolactam on silicalite-1, H-ZSM-5, and H-[B]ZSM-5 is reported. The zeolites under study are characterized by different acid strengths (silicalite-1 < H-[B]ZSM-5 < H-ZSM-5). Depending on the nature of catalytically active surface OH groups, reactant and product molecules exist in the nonprotonated or protonated state. In addition, formation of byproducts such as 5-cyano-1-pentene and epsilon-aminocapric acid as a result of dehydration and hydrolysis of the reactant and product molecules, respectively, were observed.

  10. An innovative method for the non-destructive identification of photodegradation products in solid state: 1H-14N NMR-NQR and DFT/QTAIM study of photodegradation of nifedipine (anti-hypertensive) to nitrosonifedipine (potential anti-oxidative).

    PubMed

    Latosińska, J N; Latosińska, M; Seliger, J; Zagar, V

    2012-08-30

    Stability of the antihypertensive drug nifedipine (NIF) has been studied experimentally in solid state by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR double resonance (NQDR) and theoretically by the Density Functional Theory (DFT). Photodegradation of NIF to its metabolite in vivo nitrosonifedipine, NO-NIF (antioxidative agent) upon long term daylight exposure was detected and the changes in the molecular structure of NIF were analysed. The photoconversion of NIF to NO-NIF in solid was found to be accompanied with the electron density redistribution at nitrogen sites (NH to N and NO(2) to NO) and proved to be successfully detected with identification of photoproducts by (1)H-(14)N NQDR and DFT methods. The increase in the e(2)qQ/h and η describing EFG tendency towards non-spherical symmetry was significantly greater upon the reduction of NO(2) site than upon hydrogen abstraction from NH site. The level of sensitivity of detection of the photodegradation product was about 1% of the original sample. The Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) analysis has been found useful in predicting photoreactive sites in the molecules and finding the explanation of differences in reactivity between parent NIF and its photoproduct NO-NIF. Using NIF as a model, this study demonstrates the suitability of NQDR supported by DFT for non-destructive determination of the photodegradation products in solid state.

  11. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    An accessory for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  12. Microscopic structure of heterogeneous lipid-based formulations revealed by 13C high-resolution solid-state and 1H PFG NMR methods.

    PubMed

    Guillermo, Armel; Gerbaud, Guillaume; Bardet, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Lipid-based formulations such as lip glosses that are very alike on the base of their components may have significant differences in their expected macroscopic properties as cosmetics. To differentiate such formulations, high-resolution (13)C NMR was performed under magic angle spinning to investigate the properties at both molecular and microscopic levels. Temperature studies were carried out and no polymorphism in the solid domains could be evidenced after the thermal treatment performed for obtaining the commercial lip glosses. (13)C NMR spectra also showed that some waxes remain partially solubilized in the oils of formulations. The microscopic structure of the wax-oil liquid domains was worked out on the basis of restricted diffusion properties obtained with proton pulsed-field gradient NMR. Changing a single wax component, in two identical formulations, yields significant morphological differences. In the first one the liquid phase appears as a continuum whereas in the second one, the liquid phase is fractionated into micrometric droplets.

  13. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  14. (1)H-(13)C-(29)Si triple resonance and REDOR solid-state NMR-A tool to study interactions between biosilica and organic molecules in diatom cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wisser, Dorothea; Brückner, Stephan I; Wisser, Florian M; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Getzschmann, Jürgen; Kaskel, Stefan; Brunner, Eike

    2015-01-01

    Triple resonance solid-state NMR experiments using the spin combination (1)H-(13)C-(29)Si are still rarely found in the literature. This is due to the low natural abundance of the two heteronuclei. Such experiments are, however, increasingly important to study hybrid materials such as biosilica and others. A suitable model substance, ideally labeled with both (13)C and (29)Si, is thus very useful to optimize the experiments before applying them to studies of more complex samples such as biosilica. Tetraphenoxysilane could be synthesized in an easy, two-step synthesis including double isotope labelling. Using tetraphenoxysilane, we established a (1)H-(13)C-(29)Si double CP-based HETCOR experiment and applied it to diatom biosilica from the diatom species Thalassiosira pseudonana. Furthermore, we carried out (1)H-(13)C{(29)Si} CP-REDOR experiments in order to estimate the distance between the organic matrix and the biosilica. Our experiments on diatom biosilica strongly indicate a close contact between polyamine-containing parts of the organic matrix and the silica. This corroborates the assumption that the organic matrix is essential for the control of the cell wall formation.

  15. Investigating albendazole desmotropes by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chattah, Ana K; Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Pfund, Laura Y; Longhi, Marcela R; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Garnero, Claudia

    2015-03-01

    Characterization of the molecular structure and physicochemical solid-state properties of the solid forms of pharmaceutical compounds is a key requirement for successful commercialization as potential active ingredients in drug products. These properties can ultimately have a critical effect on the solubility and bioavailability of the final drug product. Here, the desmotropy of Albendazole forms I and II was investigated at the atomic level. Ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, together with powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, were performed on polycrystalline samples of the two solids in order to fully characterize and distinguish the two forms. High-resolution one-dimensional (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N together with two-dimensional (1)H/(1)H single quantum-single quantum, (1)H/(1)H single quantum-double quantum, and (1)H/(13)C chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR experiments under MAS conditions were extensively used to decipher the intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions present in both solid forms. These experiments enabled the unequivocal identification of the tautomers of each desmotrope. Our results also revealed that both solid forms may be described as dimeric structures, with different intermolecular hydrogen bonds connecting the tautomers in each dimer. PMID:25584993

  16. Characterization of polysulfone and polysulfone/vanillin microcapsules by 1H NMR spectroscopy, solid-state 13C CP/MAS-NMR spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption-desorption analyses.

    PubMed

    Peña, Brisa; de Ménorval, Louis-Charles; Garcia-Valls, Ricard; Gumí, Tània

    2011-11-01

    Textile detergent and softener industries have incorporated perfume microencapsulation technology to improve their products. Perfume encapsulation allows perfume protection until use and provides a long-lasting fragrance release. But, certain industrial microcapsules show low encapsulation capacity and low material stability. Polysulfone capsules have been already proposed to solve these drawbacks. Among them, PSf/Vanillin capsules were considered as a desirable system. They present both good material stability and high encapsulation capacity. However, several factors such as the final location of the perfume in the polymeric matrix, the aggregation state that it has in the capsule and its interaction with the capsule components have not been studied yet. These factors can provide vast information about the capsule performance and its improvement. With the aim to characterize these parameters, the physical and chemical properties of PSf/Vanillin capsules have been investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and N(2) adsorption-desorption measurements. AFM micrograph and N(2) isotherms confirm that the presence of vanillin modify the physical structure of PSf/Vanillin microcapsules as it is trapped in the capsule porosity. NMR results show that vanillin is present in solid state in PSf/Vanillin microcapsules.

  17. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered. PMID:26974032

  18. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered.

  19. Model-free estimation of the effective correlation time for C-H bond reorientation in amphiphilic bilayers: 1H-13C solid-state NMR and MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Tiago Mendes; Ollila, O. H. Samuli; Pigliapochi, Roberta; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Topgaard, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give atomically detailed information on structure and dynamics in amphiphilic bilayer systems on timescales up to about 1 μs. The reorientational dynamics of the C-H bonds is conventionally verified by measurements of 13C or 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) longitudinal relaxation rates R1, which are more sensitive to motional processes with correlation times close to the inverse Larmor frequency, typically around 1-10 ns on standard NMR instrumentation, and are thus less sensitive to the 10-1000 ns timescale motion that can be observed in the MD simulations. We propose an experimental procedure for atomically resolved model-free estimation of the C-H bond effective reorientational correlation time τe, which includes contributions from the entire range of all-atom MD timescales and that can be calculated directly from the MD trajectories. The approach is based on measurements of 13C R1 and R1ρ relaxation rates, as well as 1H-13C dipolar couplings, and is applicable to anisotropic liquid crystalline lipid or surfactant systems using a conventional solid-state NMR spectrometer and samples with natural isotopic composition. The procedure is demonstrated on a fully hydrated lamellar phase of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine, yielding values of τe from 0.1 ns for the methyl groups in the choline moiety and at the end of the acyl chains to 3 ns for the g1 methylene group of the glycerol backbone. MD simulations performed with a widely used united-atom force-field reproduce the τe-profile of the major part of the acyl chains but underestimate the dynamics of the glycerol backbone and adjacent molecular segments. The measurement of experimental τe-profiles can be used to study subtle effects on C-H bond reorientational motions in anisotropic liquid crystals, as well as to validate the C-H bond reorientation dynamics predicted in MD simulations of amphiphilic bilayers such as lipid membranes.

  20. Applications of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy in food science.

    PubMed

    Bertocchi, Fabio; Paci, Maurizio

    2008-10-22

    The principal applications of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy, in the field of food science, are reviewed, after a short general introduction, mainly focusing on the potential of these investigations, which are, today, routine tools for resolving technological problems. Selected examples of the applications in the field of food science of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy both in (13)C and in (1)H NMR particularly illustrative of the results obtainable are reported in some detail.

  1. Lithium Polymer Electrolytes and Solid State NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkeley, Emily R.

    2004-01-01

    Research is being done at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) developing new kinds of batteries that do not depend on a solution. Currently, batteries use liquid electrolytes containing lithium. Problems with the liquid electrolyte are (1) solvents used can leak out of the battery, so larger, more restrictive, packages have to be made, inhibiting the diversity of application and decreasing the power density; (2) the liquid is incompatible with the lithium metal anode, so alternative, less efficient, anodes are required. The Materials Department at GRC has been working to synthesize polymer electrolytes that can replace the liquid electrolytes. The advantages are that polymer electrolytes do not have the potential to leak so they can be used for a variety of tasks, small or large, including in the space rover or in space suits. The polymers generated by Dr. Mary Ann Meador's group are in the form of rod -coil structures. The rod aspect gives the polymer structural integrity, while the coil makes it flexible. Lithium ions are used in these polymers because of their high mobility. The coils have repeating units of oxygen which stabilize the positive lithium by donating electron density. This aids in the movement of the lithium within the polymer, which contributes to higher conductivity. In addition to conductivity testing, these polymers are characterized using DSC, TGA, FTIR, and solid state NMR. Solid state NMR is used in classifying materials that are not soluble in solvents, such as polymers. The NMR spins the sample at a magic angle (54.7') allowing the significant peaks to emerge. Although solid state NMR is a helpful technique in determining bonding, the process of preparing the sample and tuning it properly are intricate jobs that require patience; especially since each run takes about six hours. The NMR allows for the advancement of polymer synthesis by showing if the expected results were achieved. Using the NMR, in addition to looking at polymers, allows for

  2. Polymorphism and disorder in natural active ingredients. Low and high-temperature phases of anhydrous caffeine: Spectroscopic ((1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR/(14)N NQR) and solid-state computational modelling (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) study.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Apih, Tomaž; Gregorovič, Alan; Latosińska, Magdalena; Olejniczak, Grzegorz Andrzej; Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia

    2016-03-31

    The polymorphism of anhydrous caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine; 1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-(3H,7H)-dione) has been studied by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) double resonance and pure (14)N NQR (Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) followed by computational modelling (Density Functional Theory, supplemented Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules with Reduced Density Gradient) in solid state. For two stable (phase II, form β) and metastable (phase I, form α) polymorphs the complete NQR spectra consisting of 12 lines were recorded. The assignment of signals detected in experiment to particular nitrogen sites was verified with the help of DFT. The shifts of the NQR frequencies, quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters at each nitrogen site due to polymorphic transition were evaluated. The strongest shifts were observed at N(3) site, while the smallest at N(9) site. The commercial pharmaceutical sample was found to contain approximately 20-25% of phase I and 75-80% of phase II. The orientational disorder in phase II with a local molecular arrangement mimics that in phase I. Substantial differences in the intermolecular interaction phases I and II of caffeine were analysed using computational (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) approach. The analysis of local environment of each nitrogen nucleus permitted drawing some conclusions on the topology of interactions in both polymorphs. For the most stable orientations in phase I and phase II the maps of the principal component qz of EFG tensor and its asymmetry parameter at each point of the molecular system were calculated and visualized. The relevant maps calculated for both phases I and II indicates small variation in electrostatic potential upon phase change. Small differences between packings in phases slightly disturb the neighbourhood of the N(1) and N(7) nitrogens, thus are meaningless from the biological point of view. The composition of two phases in pharmaceutical material

  3. Solid state NMR study of bone mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.

    1992-01-01

    In high field (9.4 T) CP MASS (cross polarization magic angle sample spinning) studies, in contrast to the scheme in the literature that infers the presence of minor constituents in spectra, we developed a new scheme to suppress the main part of the spectra to show the minor constituents. In order to perform in vivo solid state NMR studies, a double tuned two port surface coil probe was constructed. This probe is a modified version of the traditional Cross probe, which utilizes two 1/4 wave length 50 ohm transmission line, one with open ended and the other with shorted end, to isolate the high and low frequency circuits. The two resonance frequencies in Cross probe were proton and carbon. Our probe is designed to resonate at the proton and phosphorus frequencies, which are much closer to each other and hence more difficult to be tuned and matched simultaneously. Our approach to solve this problem is that instead of using standard 50 ohm transmission lines, we constructed a low capacity open end coaxial transmission line and low inductance shorted end coaxial transmission line. The Q of the phosphorus channel is high. We developed a short contact time cross polarization technique for non-MASS spectroscopy which reduces the signal of the major component of bone mineral to emphasize the minor component. By applying this technique on intact pork bone samples with our home made surface coil, we observed the wide line component, acid phosphate, for the first time. Hydroxyapatite, brushite and octacalcium are considered in the literature to be the model compounds for bone mineral. Cross polarization dynamics has been studied on hydroxyapatite and brushite, which yielded an NMR value for the distance between proton and phosphorus. One and two dimensional CP MASS spectroscopy of octacalcium phosphate were also studied, which revealed the different cross polarization rates and anisotropic channel shifts of acid phosphate and phosphate ions in octacalcium phosphate.

  4. Natural-abundance solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy at high magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Mann, Sam E; Iuga, Dinu; Hughes, Colan E; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2011-06-01

    High-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR spectroscopy provides a method for measuring (1)H NMR chemical shifts in solids and is advantageous over the direct measurement of high-resolution solid-state (1)H NMR spectra, as it requires only the application of routine magic angle sample spinning (MAS) and routine (1)H decoupling methods, in contrast to the requirement for complex pulse sequences for homonuclear (1)H decoupling and ultrafast MAS in the case of high-resolution solid-state (1)H NMR. However, a significant obstacle to the routine application of high-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR is the very low natural abundance of (2)H, with the consequent problem of inherently low sensitivity. Here, we explore the feasibility of measuring (2)H MAS NMR spectra of various solids with natural isotopic abundances at high magnetic field (850 MHz), focusing on samples of amino acids, peptides, collagen, and various organic solids. The results show that high-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR can be used successfully to measure isotropic (1)H chemical shifts in favorable cases, particularly for mobile functional groups, such as methyl and -N(+)H(3) groups, and in some cases phenyl groups. Furthermore, we demonstrate that routine (2)H MAS NMR measurements can be exploited for assessing the relative dynamics of different functional groups in a molecule and for assessing whole-molecule motions in the solid state. The magnitude and field-dependence of second-order shifts due to the (2)H quadrupole interaction are also investigated, on the basis of analysis of simulated and experimental (1)H and (2)H MAS NMR spectra of fully deuterated and selectively deuterated samples of the α polymorph of glycine at two different magnetic field strengths.

  5. Protein structure determination with paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2013-09-17

    Many structures of the proteins and protein assemblies that play central roles in fundamental biological processes and disease pathogenesis are not readily accessible via the conventional techniques of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the other hand, many of these challenging biological systems are suitable targets for atomic-level structural and dynamic analysis by magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that has far less stringent limitations on the molecular size and crystalline state. Over the past decade, major advances in instrumentation and methodology have prompted rapid growth in the field of biological solid-state NMR. However, despite this progress, one challenge for the elucidation of three-dimensional (3D) protein structures via conventional MAS NMR methods is the relative lack of long-distance data. Specifically, extracting unambiguous interatomic distance restraints larger than ∼5 Å from through-space magnetic dipole-dipole couplings among the protein (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei has proven to be a considerable challenge for researchers. It is possible to circumvent this problem by extending the structural studies to include several analogs of the protein of interest, intentionally modified to contain covalently attached paramagnetic tags at selected sites. In these paramagnetic proteins, the hyperfine couplings between the nuclei and unpaired electrons can manifest themselves in NMR spectra in the form of relaxation enhancements of the nuclear spins that depend on the electron-nucleus distance. These effects can be significant for nuclei located up to ∼20 Å away from the paramagnetic center. In this Account, we discuss MAS NMR structural studies of nitroxide and EDTA-Cu(2+) labeled variants of a model 56 amino acid globular protein, B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1), in the microcrystalline solid phase. We used a set of six EDTA-Cu(2

  6. Solid-State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid-state NMR techniques and technology.

  7. Picoliter 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minard, Kevin R.; Wind, Robert A.

    2002-02-01

    In this study, a 267-μm-diameter solenoid transceiver is used to acquire localized 1H NMR spectra and the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at 500 MHz is shown to be within 20-30% of theoretical limits formulated by considering only its resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-μm-diameter globule of triacylglycerols (∼900 mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus laevis frogs and a water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live mammalian cells (∼33 mM). In chemical shift imaging (CSI) experiments performed using a few thousand total scans, the choline methyl line is shown to have an acceptable SNR in resolved volume elements containing only 50 pL of sample, and localized spectra are resolved from just 5 pL in the Xenopus globule. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of performing 1H NMR on picoliter-scale sample volumes in biological cells and tissues and illustrate how the achieved SNR in spectroscopic images can be predicted with reasonable accuracy at microscopic spatial resolutions.

  8. Solid-state NMR structures of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR is unique for its ability to obtain three-dimensional structures and to measure atomic-resolution structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins in native lipid bilayers. An increasing number and complexity of integral membrane protein structures have been determined by solid-state NMR using two main methods. Oriented sample solid-state NMR uses macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers to obtain orientational restraints that define secondary structure and global fold of embedded peptides and proteins and their orientation and topology in lipid bilayers. Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR uses unoriented rapidly spinning samples to obtain distance and torsion angle restraints that define tertiary structure and helix packing arrangements. Details of all current protein structures are described, highlighting developments in experimental strategy and other technological advancements. Some structures originate from combining solid- and solution-state NMR information and some have used solid-state NMR to refine X-ray crystal structures. Solid-state NMR has also validated the structures of proteins determined in different membrane mimetics by solution-state NMR and X-ray crystallography and is therefore complementary to other structural biology techniques. By continuing efforts in identifying membrane protein targets and developing expression, isotope labelling and sample preparation strategies, probe technology, NMR experiments, calculation and modelling methods and combination with other techniques, it should be feasible to determine the structures of many more membrane proteins of biological and biomedical importance using solid-state NMR. This will provide three-dimensional structures and atomic-resolution structural information for characterising ligand and drug interactions, dynamics and molecular mechanisms of membrane proteins under physiological lipid bilayer conditions.

  9. Solid-state NMR structures of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR is unique for its ability to obtain three-dimensional structures and to measure atomic-resolution structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins in native lipid bilayers. An increasing number and complexity of integral membrane protein structures have been determined by solid-state NMR using two main methods. Oriented sample solid-state NMR uses macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers to obtain orientational restraints that define secondary structure and global fold of embedded peptides and proteins and their orientation and topology in lipid bilayers. Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR uses unoriented rapidly spinning samples to obtain distance and torsion angle restraints that define tertiary structure and helix packing arrangements. Details of all current protein structures are described, highlighting developments in experimental strategy and other technological advancements. Some structures originate from combining solid- and solution-state NMR information and some have used solid-state NMR to refine X-ray crystal structures. Solid-state NMR has also validated the structures of proteins determined in different membrane mimetics by solution-state NMR and X-ray crystallography and is therefore complementary to other structural biology techniques. By continuing efforts in identifying membrane protein targets and developing expression, isotope labelling and sample preparation strategies, probe technology, NMR experiments, calculation and modelling methods and combination with other techniques, it should be feasible to determine the structures of many more membrane proteins of biological and biomedical importance using solid-state NMR. This will provide three-dimensional structures and atomic-resolution structural information for characterising ligand and drug interactions, dynamics and molecular mechanisms of membrane proteins under physiological lipid bilayer conditions. PMID:26857803

  10. SOLID STATE NMR AS A PROBE OF AMYLOID STRUCTURE

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has developed into one of the most informative and direct experimental approaches to the characterization of the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils, including those associated with Alzheimer's disease. In this article, essential aspects of solid state NMR methods are described briefly and results obtained to date regarding the supramolecular organization of amyloid fibrils and the conformations of peptides within amyloid fibrils are reviewed. PMID:16515450

  11. A Solid-State NMR Investigation of MQ Silicone Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, Sergey G; Volkov, Vitaly I; Tatarinova, Elena A; Muzafarov, Aziz M

    2013-01-01

    The structure of MQ copolymers of the general chemical formula [(CH3)3SiO0.5]m [SiO2]n was characterized by means of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The MQ copolymers are highly branched polycyclic compounds (densely cross-linked nanosized networks). MQ copolymers were prepared by hydrolytic polycondensation in active medium. (29)Si NMR spectra were obtained by single pulse excitation (or direct polarization, DP) and cross-polarization (CP) (29)Si{(1)H} techniques in concert with MAS. It was shown that material consist of monofunctional M (≡SiO Si (CH3)3) and two types of tetrafunctional Q units: Q(4) ((≡SiO)4 Si) and Q(3) ((≡SiO)3 SiOH). Spin-lattice relaxation times T 1 measurements of (29)Si nuclei and analysis of (29)Si{(1)H} variable contact time signal intensities allowed us to obtain quantitative data on the relative content of different sites in copolymers. These investigations indicate that MQ copolymers represent dense structure with core and shell. PMID:23914072

  12. Solid State NMR Studies of the Aluminum Hydride Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Graetz, Jason; Reilly, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Several solid state NMR techniques including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various AlH3 samples. MAS-NMR spectra for the 1H and 27Al nuclei have been obtained on a variety of AlH3 samples that include the (beta)- and (gamma)- phases as well as the most stable (alpha)-phase. While the dominant components in these NMR spectra correspond to the aluminum hydride phases, other species were found that include Al metal, molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as peaks that can be assigned to Al-O species in different configurations. The occurrence and concentration of these extraneous components are dependent upon the initial AlH3 phase composition and preparation procedures. Both the (beta)-AlH3 and (gamma)-AlH3 phases were found to generate substantial amounts of Al metal when the materials were stored at room temperature while the (alpha)-phase materials do not exhibit these changes.

  13. Ultra-wideline solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schurko, Robert W

    2013-09-17

    Although solid-state NMR (SSNMR) provides rich information about molecular structure and dynamics, the small spin population differences between pairs of spin states that give rise to NMR transitions make it an inherently insensitive spectroscopic technique in terms of signal acquisition. Scientists have continuously addressed this issue via improvements in NMR hardware and probes, increases in the strength of the magnetic field, and the development of innovative pulse sequences and acquisition methodologies. As a result, researchers can now study NMR-active nuclides previously thought to be unobservable or too unreceptive for routine examination via SSNMR. Several factors can make it extremely challenging to detect signal or acquire spectra using SSNMR: (i) low gyromagnetic ratios (i.e., low Larmor frequencies), (ii) low natural abundances or dilution of the nuclide of interest (e.g., metal nuclides in proteins or in organometallic catalysts supported on silica), (iii) inconvenient relaxation characteristics (e.g., very long longitudinal or very short transverse relaxation times), and/or (iv) extremely broad powder patterns arising from large anisotropic NMR interactions. Our research group has been particularly interested in efficient acquisition of broad NMR powder patterns for a variety of spin-1/2 and quadrupolar (spin > 1/2) nuclides. Traditionally, researchers have used the term "wideline" NMR to refer to experiments yielding broad (1)H and (2)H SSNMR spectra ranging from tens of kHz to ∼250 kHz in breadth. With modern FT NMR hardware, uniform excitation in these spectral ranges is relatively easy, allowing for the acquisition of high quality spectra. However, spectra that range in breadth from ca. 250 kHz to tens of MHz cannot be uniformly excited with conventional, high-power rectangular pulses. Rather, researchers must apply special methodologies to acquire such spectra, which have inherently low S/N because the signal intensity is spread across such

  14. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  15. The development of solid-state NMR of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Most biological functions are carried out in supramolecular assemblies. As a result of their slow reorientation in solution, these assemblies have been resistant to the widely employed solution NMR approaches. The development of solid-state NMR to first of all overcome the correlation time problem and then obtain informative high-resolution spectra of proteins in supramolecular assemblies, such as virus particles and membranes, is described here. High resolution solid-state NMR is deeply intertwined with the history of NMR, and the seminal paper was published in 1948. Although the general principles were understood by the end of the 1950s, it has taken more than fifty years for instrumentation and experimental methods to become equal to the technical problems presented by the biological assemblies of greatest interest. It is now possible to obtain atomic resolution structures of viral coat proteins in virus particles and membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers by oriented sample solid-state NMR methods. The development of this aspect of the field of solid-state NMR is summarized in this review article. PMID:26069880

  16. Solid-State NMR Characterization of Aluminum Oxide Nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, Jennifer L; Tuttle, Ricky W; Ramsier, Rex D; Espe, Mathew

    2006-07-24

    Aluminum oxide nanofibers have been generated by an electrospinning process, creating fibers with diameters on the nanometer scale and aspect ratios greater than a thousand. These nanofibers have the potential of providing enhanced catalytic properties, due to their large surface area and controllable compositions. Solid-state NMR is being used to investigate both the bulk and surface properties of these materials. 27Al NMR has shown that no chemistry occurs during the electrospinning process, even though potentials in excess of 20 kV are applied to the sample. Thermal treatment of the fibers to convert them to alumina results in the formation of different phases, with the phases identified by the relative populations of 4-, 5-, and 6-coordinate alumina sites. Heating to 525°C or 1200°C produces a species similar to the catalytically active gamma-phase or conversion of the nanofibers into the thermodynamically stable alumina phase, respectively. 1H-27Al CP/MAS has shown that the alumina phase has a low population of surface hydroxyls, whereas the “gamma-alumina” form has a much higher fraction of 5-coordinate sites, compared to materials synthesized by traditional techniques. Organophosphates are being used as molecular probes in the characterization of the nanofiber surfaces. 31P CP/MAS data has revealed the presence of mono-, bi- and tri-denate bound phosphate groups on the surface, with the onset of surface alumina dissolution with sample heating. The application of 1H-31P HETCOR shows that the three different types of bound organophosphates are intermixed, rather than there being separate domains for each type. 31P-27Al CP is also being used to distinguish the types of surface alumina sites bound to the phosphate species.

  17. Solid-State NMR Characterization of Mixed Phosphonic Acid Ligand Binding and Organization on Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Davidowski, Stephen K; Holland, Gregory P

    2016-04-01

    As ligand functionalization of nanomaterials becomes more complex, methods to characterize the organization of multiple ligands on surfaces is required. In an effort to further the understanding of ligand-surface interactions, a combination of multinuclear ((1)H, (29)Si, (31)P) and multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques was utilized to characterize the phosphonic acid functionalization of fumed silica nanoparticles using methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). (1)H → (29)Si cross-polarization (CP)-magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR was used to selectively detect silicon atoms near hydrogen atoms (primarily surface species); these results indicate that geminal silanols are preferentially depleted during the functionalization with phosphonic acids. (1)H → (31)P CP-MAS solid-state NMR measurements on the functionalized silica nanoparticles show three distinct resonances shifted upfield (lower ppm) and broadened compared to the resonances of the crystalline ligands. Quantitative (31)P MAS solid-state NMR measurements indicate that ligands favor a monodentate binding mode. When fumed silica nanoparticles were functionalized with an equal molar ratio of MPA and PPA, the MPA bound the nanoparticle surface preferentially. Cross-peaks apparent in the 2D (1)H exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) NMR measurements of the multiligand sample at short mixing times indicate that the MPA and PPA are spatially close (≤5 Å) on the surface of the nanostructure. Furthermore, (1)H-(1)H double quantum-single quantum (DQ-SQ) back-to-back (BABA) 2D NMR spectra further confirmed that MPA and PPA are strongly dipolar coupled with observation of DQ intermolecular contacts between the ligands. DQ experimental buildup curves and simulations indicate that the average distance between MPA and PPA is no further than 4.2 ± 0.2 Å. PMID:26914738

  18. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnun, Jacob J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Brown, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy finds growing application to inorganic and organic materials, biological samples, polymers, proteins, and cellular membranes. However, this technique is often neither included in laboratory curricula nor typically covered in undergraduate courses. On the other hand, spectroscopy and…

  19. Coherent and stochastic averaging in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzorov, Alexander A.

    2014-12-01

    A new approach for calculating solid-state NMR lineshapes of uniaxially rotating membrane proteins under the magic-angle spinning conditions is presented. The use of stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) allows one to account for both coherent sample rotation and stochastic motional averaging of the spherical dipolar powder patterns by uniaxial diffusion of the spin-bearing molecules. The method is illustrated via simulations of the dipolar powder patterns of rigid samples under the MAS conditions, as well as the recent method of rotational alignment in the presence of both MAS and rotational diffusion under the conditions of dipolar recoupling. It has been found that it is computationally more advantageous to employ direct integration over a spherical grid rather than to use a full angular basis set for the SLE solution. Accuracy estimates for the bond angles measured from the recoupled amide 1H-15N dipolar powder patterns have been obtained at various rotational diffusion coefficients. It has been shown that the rotational alignment method is applicable to membrane proteins approximated as cylinders with radii of approximately 20 Å, for which uniaxial rotational diffusion within the bilayer is sufficiently fast and exceeds the rate 2 × 105 s-1.

  20. Arabidopsis thalianafrom Polarization Transfer Solid-State NMR

    SciTech Connect

    White, Paul B; Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2014-07-23

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water 1H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent 1H–1H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide 13C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water–pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water–cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water–polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water–pectin spin diffusion precedes water–cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins.

  1. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported.

  2. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  3. Mechanism of dilute-spin-exchange in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-03-28

    In the stationary, aligned samples used in oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR, {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings are not attenuated as they are in magic angle spinning solid-state NMR; consequently, they are available for participation in dipolar coupling-based spin-exchange processes. Here we describe analytically the pathways of {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N spin-exchange mediated by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings. The mixed-order proton-relay mechanism can be differentiated from the third spin assisted recoupling mechanism by setting the {sup 1}H to an off-resonance frequency so that it is at the “magic angle” during the spin-exchange interval in the experiment, since the “magic angle” irradiation nearly quenches the former but only slightly attenuates the latter. Experimental spectra from a single crystal of N-acetyl leucine confirm that this proton-relay mechanism plays the dominant role in {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N dilute-spin-exchange in OS solid-state NMR in crystalline samples. Remarkably, the “forbidden” spin-exchange condition under “magic angle” irradiation results in {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N cross-peaks intensities that are comparable to those observed with on-resonance irradiation in applications to proteins. The mechanism of the proton relay in dilute-spin-exchange is crucial for the design of polarization transfer experiments.

  4. Parallel β-Sheet Structure of Alanine Tetrapeptide in the Solid State As Studied by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo; Naito, Akira

    2016-09-01

    The structural analysis of alanine oligopeptides is important for understanding the crystalline region in silks from spiders and wild silkworms and also the mechanism of cellular toxicity of human diseases arising from expansion in polyalanine sequences. The atomic-level structures of alanine tripeptide and tetrapeptide with antiparallel β-sheet structures (AP-Ala3 and AP-Ala4, respectively) together with alanine tripeptide with parallel β-sheet structures (P-Ala3) have been determined, but alanine tetrapeptide with a parallel β-sheet structure (P-Ala4) has not been reported yet. In this article, first, we established the preparation protocol of P-Ala4 from more stable AP-Ala4. Second, complete assignments of the (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H solid-state NMR spectra were performed with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled Ala4 samples using several solid-state NMR techniques. Then, the structural constraints were obtained, for example, the amide proton peaks of P-Ala4 in the (1)H double-quantum magic-angle spinning NMR spectrum were heavily overlapped and observed at about 7.4 ppm, which was a much higher field than that of 8.7-9.1 ppm observed for AP-Ala4, indicating that the intermolecular hydrogen-bond lengths across strands (N-H···O═C) were considerably longer for P-Ala4, that is, 2.21-2.34 Å, than those reported for AP-Ala4, that is, 1.8-1.9 Å. The structural model was proposed for P-Ala4 by NMR results and MD calculations. PMID:27482868

  5. Solid-state NMR studies of theophylline co-crystals with dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Pindelska, Edyta; Sokal, Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-11-01

    In this work, three polycrystalline materials containing co-crystals of theophylline with malonic, maleic, and glutaric acids were studied using (13)C, (15)N and (1)H solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The NMR assignments were supported by gauge including projector augmented waves (GIPAW) calculations of chemical shielding, performed using X-ray determined geometry. The experimental (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR results and the calculated isotropic chemical shifts were in excellent agreement. A rapid and convenient method for theophylline co-crystals crystal structure analysis has been proposed for co-crystals, which are potentially new APIs.

  6. Spatially resolved solid-state MAS-NMR-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Scheler, U; Schauss, G; Blümich, B; Spiess, H W

    1996-07-01

    A comprehensive account of spatially resolved solid-state MAS NMR of 13C is given. A device generating field gradients rotating synchronously with the magic angle spinner is described. Spatial resolution and sensitivity are compared for phase and frequency encoding of spatial information. The suppression of spinning sidebands is demonstrated for both cases. Prior knowledge about the involved materials can be used for the reduction of data from spatially resolved spectra to map chemical structure. Indirect detection via 13C NMR gives access to the information about mobility from proton-wideline spectra. Two-dimensional solid-state spectroscopy with spatial resolution is demonstrated for a rotor synchronized MAS experiment which resolves molecular order as a function of space. By comparison of different experiments the factors affecting the spatial resolution are investigated.

  7. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines—independent of their ability to crystallize— and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies. PMID:25960310

  8. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shangjin; Han, Yun; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Yan, Si; Siglin, Amanda E.; Williams, John C.; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are vital for many biological processes. These interactions often result in the formation of protein assemblies that are large in size, insoluble and difficult to crystallize, and therefore are challenging to study by structure biology techniques, such as single crystal X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a promising technique for studies of such protein assemblies because it is not limited by molecular size, solubility or lack of long-range order. In the past several years, we have applied magic angle spinning SSNMR based methods to study several protein complexes. In this chapter, we discuss the general solid-state NMR methodologies employed for structural and dynamics analyses of protein complexes with specific examples from our work on thioredoxin reassemblies, HIV-1 capsid protein assemblies and microtubule-associated protein assemblies. We present protocols for sample preparation and characterization, pulse sequences, SSNMR spectra collection and data analysis. PMID:22167681

  9. Solid-State NMR Studies of Chemically Lithiated CFx

    PubMed Central

    Leifer, N. D.; Johnson, V. S.; Ben-Ari, R.; Gan, H.; Lehnes, J. M.; Guo, R.; Lu, W.; Muffoletto, B. C.; Reddy, T.; Stallworth, P. E.; Greenbaum, S. G.

    2010-01-01

    Three types of fluorinated carbon, all in their original form and upon sequential chemical lithiations via n-butyllithium, were investigated by 13C and 19F solid-state NMR methods. The three starting CFx materials [where x = 1 (nominally)] were fiber based, graphite based, and petroleum coke based. The aim of the current study was to identify, at the atomic/molecular structural level, factors that might account for differences in electrochemical performance among the different kinds of CFx. Differences were noted in the covalent F character among the starting compounds and in the details of LiF production among the lithiated samples. PMID:20676233

  10. Solid-State NMR Studies of Chemically Lithiated CF.

    PubMed

    Leifer, N D; Johnson, V S; Ben-Ari, R; Gan, H; Lehnes, J M; Guo, R; Lu, W; Muffoletto, B C; Reddy, T; Stallworth, P E; Greenbaum, S G

    2010-01-01

    Three types of fluorinated carbon, all in their original form and upon sequential chemical lithiations via n-butyllithium, were investigated by (13)C and (19)F solid-state NMR methods. The three starting CF(x) materials [where x = 1 (nominally)] were fiber based, graphite based, and petroleum coke based. The aim of the current study was to identify, at the atomic/molecular structural level, factors that might account for differences in electrochemical performance among the different kinds of CF(x). Differences were noted in the covalent F character among the starting compounds and in the details of LiF production among the lithiated samples.

  11. A Hall effect angle detector for solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamone, Salvatore; Dorsch, André; Johannessen, Ole G.; Naik, Manoj V.; Madhu, P. K.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a new method for independent monitoring of the angle between the spinning axis and the magnetic field in solid-state NMR. A Hall effect magnetic flux sensor is fixed to the spinning housing, so that a change in the stator orientation leads to a change in the angle between the Hall plane and the static magnetic field. This leads to a change in the Hall voltage generated by the sensor when an electric current is passed through it. The Hall voltage may be measured externally by a precision voltmeter, allowing the spinning angle to be measured non-mechanically and independent of the NMR experiment. If the Hall sensor is mounted so that the magnetic field is approximately parallel to the Hall plane, the Hall voltage becomes highly sensitive to the stator orientation. The current angular accuracy is around 10 millidegrees. The precautions needed to achieve higher angular accuracy are described.

  12. A Hall effect angle detector for solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Mamone, Salvatore; Dorsch, André; Johannessen, Ole G; Naik, Manoj V; Madhu, P K; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2008-01-01

    We describe a new method for independent monitoring of the angle between the spinning axis and the magnetic field in solid-state NMR. A Hall effect magnetic flux sensor is fixed to the spinning housing, so that a change in the stator orientation leads to a change in the angle between the Hall plane and the static magnetic field. This leads to a change in the Hall voltage generated by the sensor when an electric current is passed through it. The Hall voltage may be measured externally by a precision voltmeter, allowing the spinning angle to be measured non-mechanically and independent of the NMR experiment. If the Hall sensor is mounted so that the magnetic field is approximately parallel to the Hall plane, the Hall voltage becomes highly sensitive to the stator orientation. The current angular accuracy is around 10 millidegrees. The precautions needed to achieve higher angular accuracy are described.

  13. Monitoring Cocrystal Formation via In Situ Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Mandala, Venkata S; Loewus, Sarel J; Mehta, Manish A

    2014-10-01

    A detailed understanding of the mechanism of organic cocrystal formation remains elusive. Techniques that interrogate a reacting system in situ are preferred, though experimentally challenging. We report here the results of a solid-state in situ NMR study of the spontaneous formation of a cocrystal between a pharmaceutical mimic (caffeine) and a coformer (malonic acid). Using (13)C magic angle spinning NMR, we show that the formation of the cocrystal may be tracked in real time. We find no direct evidence for a short-lived, chemical shift-resolved amorphous solid intermediate. However, changes in the line width and line center of the malonic acid methylene resonance, in the course of the reaction, provide subtle clues to the mode of mass transfer that underlies cocrystal formation.

  14. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of {sup 29}Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The {sup 29}Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  15. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state [sup 13]C and [sup 29]Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS [sup 13]C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of [sup 29]Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The [sup 29]Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  16. Protein structure by solid-state NMR of oriented systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    A method for determining protein backbone structure from angular information obtainable by solid state NMR spectroscopy is presented. Various spin interactions including quadrupole, dipole, and chemical shift interactions and nuclei including /sup 14/N, /sup 15/N, /sup 13/C, and /sup 2/H may be observed. Angularly dependent measurements can be made when the sample has at least one direction of order along the externally applied magnetic field. Several NMR parameters are used to determine the orientation of each peptide plane with respect to the magnetic field vector, B/sub O/, to within a few symmetry related possibilities. The computer program Totlink can then be used to perform the necessary coordinate transformations and to evaluate the possible backbone structures and select for the most chemically reasonable. Experimental /sup 14/N NMR structural studies of the model peptides n-acetyl-d,l-valine, n-acetyl-l-valyl-l-leucine, and l-alanyl-glycyl-glycine and preliminary /sup 14/N NMR results on a large single crystal of orthorhombic lysozyme are presented.

  17. Ultra fast magic angle spinning solid - state NMR spectroscopy of intact bone.

    PubMed

    Singh, Chandan; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Kayastha, Arvind M; Sinha, Neeraj

    2016-02-01

    Ultra fast magic angle spinning (MAS) has been a potent method to significantly average out homogeneous/inhomogeneous line broadening in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) spectroscopy. It has given a new direction to ssNMR spectroscopy with its different applications. We present here the first and foremost application of ultra fast MAS (~60 kHz) for ssNMR spectroscopy of intact bone. This methodology helps to comprehend and elucidate the organic content in the intact bone matrix with resolution and sensitivity enhancement. At this MAS speed, amino protons from organic part of intact bone start to appear in (1) H NMR spectra. The experimental protocol of ultra-high speed MAS for intact bone has been entailed with an additional insight achieved at 60 kHz.

  18. Environmentally friendly flame retardants. A detailed solid-state NMR study of melamine orthophosphate.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Andreas; Litvinov, Victor M; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2007-12-01

    We used solid-state NMR spectroscopy to gain detailed information about the proton positions, proximities and the hydrogen-bonding network in the environmentally friendly flame retardant melamine orthophosphate (MP). High-resolution proton one- and two-dimensional solid-state NMR spectra were obtained at high external magnetic field in combination with fast magic angle spinning of the sample. Furthermore, we recorded homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra of types (15)N–(15)N, (1)H–(13)C, (1)H–(15)N and (1)H–(31)P. In addition, we determined the geometry of the NH and NH(2) groups in MP by (15)N–(1)H heteronuclear recoupling experiments.We were able to completely assign the different isotropic chemical shifts in MP. Furthermore, we could identify the protonation of the melamine and orthophosphate moieties. The experimental results are discussed in connection with the structural model obtained by powder X-ray diffraction together with a combined molecular modeling-Rietveld refinement approach (De Ridder et al. Helv. Chim. Acta 2004; 87: 1894). We show that the geometry of the NH2 groups can only be successfully estimated by solid-state NMR. PMID:18157843

  19. Reorientation phenomena in imidazolium methyl sulfonate as probed by advanced solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Goward, Gillian R; Saalwächter, Kay; Fischbach, Ingrid; Spiess, Hans Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for reorientation of imidazolium rings in imidazolium methylsulfonate is demonstrated using solid-state NMR. This material is a model system for exciting new proton-conducting materials based on imidazole. Two advanced NMR methods, including 1H-13C and 1H-15N recoupled polarization transfer with dipolar sideband pattern analysis and analysis of the coalescence of 13C lineshapes are used to characterize the ring reorientation. The process is found to occur at temperatures well below the melting point of the salt, between 240 and 380 K, and is described by a single activation energy, of 38+/-5 kJ/mol. This material is considered as a model system for quantifying the ring reorientation process, which is often proposed to be the rate-limiting step in proton transport in imidazole-based proton conducting materials.

  20. Development of solid-state NMR techniques for the characterisation of pharmaceutical compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatton, Andrew S.

    Structural characterisation in the solid state is an important step in understanding the physical and chemical properties of a material. Solid-state NMR techniques applied to solid delivery forms are presented as an alternative to more established structural characterisation methods. The effect of homonuclear decoupling upon heteronuclear couplings is investigated using a combination of experimental and density-matrix simulation results acquired from a 13C-1H spinecho pulse sequence, modulated by scalar couplings. It is found that third-order cross terms under MAS and homonuclear decoupling contribute to strong dephasing effects in the NMR signal. Density-matrix simulations allow access to parameters currently unattainable in experiment, and demonstrate that higher homonuclear decoupling rf nutation frequencies reduce the magnitude of third-order cross terms. 15N-1H spinecho experiments were applied to pharmaceutically relevant samples to differentiate between the number of directly attached protons. Using this method, proton transfer in an acid-base reaction is proven in pharmaceutical salts. The indirect detection of 14N lineshapes via protons obtained using 2D 14N-1H HMQC experiments is presented, where coherence transfer is achieved via heteronuclear through-space dipolar couplings. The importance of fast MAS frequencies is demonstrated, and it is found that increasing the recoupling duration reveals longer range NH proximities. The 2D 14N-1H HMQC method is used to demonstrate the presence of specific hydrogen bonding interactions, and thus aid in identifying molecular association in a cocrystal and an amorphous dispersion. In addition, hydrogen bonding motifs were identified by observing the changes in the 14N quadrupolar parameters between individual molecular components relative to the respective solid delivery form. First-principles calculations of NMR chemical shifts and quadrupolar parameters using the GIPAW method were combined with 14N-1H experimental

  1. High-resolution solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy of polymorphs of glycine.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Mann, Sam E; Rahman, Aisha S; McMillan, Paul F; Corà, Furio; Iuga, Dinu; Hughes, Colan E; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2011-11-10

    High-resolution solid-state (2)H MAS NMR studies of the α and γ polymorphs of fully deuterated glycine (glycine-d(5)) are reported. Analysis of spinning sideband patterns is used to determine the (2)H quadrupole interaction parameters, and is shown to yield good agreement with the corresponding parameters determined from single-crystal (2)H NMR measurements (the maximum deviation in quadrupole coupling constants determined from these two approaches is only 1%). From analysis of simulated (2)H MAS NMR sideband patterns as a function of reorientational jump frequency (κ) for the -N(+)D(3) group in glycine-d(5), the experimentally observed differences in the (2)H MAS NMR spectrum for the -N(+)D(3) deutrons in the α and γ polymorphs is attributed to differences in the rate of reorientation of the -N(+)D(3) group. These simulations show severe broadening of the (2)H MAS NMR signal in the intermediate motion regime, suggesting that deuterons undergoing reorientational motions at rates in the range κ ≈ 10(4)-10(6) s(-1) are likely to be undetectable in (2)H MAS NMR measurements for materials with natural isotopic abundances. The (1)H NMR chemical shifts for the α and γ polymorphs of glycine have been determined from the (2)H MAS NMR results, taking into account the known second-order shift. Further quantum mechanical calculations of (2)H quadrupole interaction parameters and (1)H chemical shifts reveal the structural dependence of these parameters in the two polymorphs and suggest that the existence of two short intermolecular C-H···O contacts for one of the H atoms of the >CH(2) group in the α polymorph have a significant influence on the (2)H quadrupole coupling and (1)H chemical shift for this site. PMID:21939265

  2. Three Structural Roles for Water in Bone Observed by Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Erin E.; Awonusi, Ayorinde; Morris, Michael D.; Kohn, David H.; Tecklenburg, Mary M. J.; Beck, Larry W.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen-bearing species in the bone mineral environment were investigated using solid-state NMR spectroscopy of powdered bone, deproteinated bone, and B-type carbonated apatite. Using magic-angle spinning and cross-polarization techniques three types of structurally-bound water were observed in these materials. Two of these water types occupy vacancies within the apatitic mineral crystal in synthetic carbonated apatite and deproteinated bone and serve to stabilize these defect-containing crystals. The third water was observed at the mineral surface in unmodified bone but not in deproteinated bone, suggesting a role for this water in mediating mineral-organic matrix interactions. Direct evidence of monohydrogen phosphate in a 1H NMR spectrum of unmodified bone is presented for the first time. We obtained clear evidence for the presence of hydroxide ion in deproteinated bone by 1H MAS NMR. A 1H-31P heteronuclear correlation experiment provided unambiguous evidence for hydroxide ion in unmodified bone as well. Hydroxide ion in both unmodified and deproteinated bone mineral was found to participate in hydrogen bonding with neighboring water molecules and ions. In unmodified bone mineral hydroxide ion was found, through a 1H-31P heteronuclear correlation experiment, to be confined to a small portion of the mineral crystal, probably the internal portion. PMID:16500963

  3. Restoring Resolution in Biological Solid-State NMR under Conditions of Off-Magic-Angle Spinning.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Rodriguez Camargo, Diana C; Pintacuda, Guido; Reif, Bernd

    2015-12-17

    Spin-state-selective excitation (S3E) experiments allow the selection of individual transitions in a coupled two spin system. We show that in the solid state, the dipole-dipole interaction (DD) between (15)N and (1)H in a (1)H-(15)N bond and the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) of (15)N in an amide moiety mutually cancel each other for a particular multiplet component at high field, when the sample is spun off the magic angle (Arctan [√2] = 54.74°). The accuracy of the adjustment of the spinning angle is crucial in conventional experiments. We demonstrate that for S3E experiments, the requirement to spin the sample exactly at the magic angle is not mandatory. Applications of solid state NMR in narrow bore magnets will be facilitated where the adjustment of the magic angle is often difficult. The method opens new perspectives for the development of schemes to determine distances and to quantify dynamics in the solid state.

  4. Solid-state 17O NMR of pharmaceutical compounds: salicylic acid and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xianqi; Shan, Melissa; Terskikh, Victor; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Wu, Gang

    2013-08-22

    We report solid-state NMR characterization of the (17)O quadrupole coupling (QC) and chemical shift (CS) tensors in five site-specifically (17)O-labeled samples of salicylic acid and o-acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin). High-quality (17)O NMR spectra were obtained for these important pharmaceutical compounds under both static and magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions at two magnetic fields, 14.0 and 21.1 T. A total of 14 (17)O QC and CS tensors were experimentally determined for the seven oxygen sites in salicylic acid and Aspirin. Although both salicylic acid and Aspirin form hydrogen bonded cyclic dimers in the solid state, we found that the potential curves for the concerted double proton transfer in these two compounds are significantly different. In particular, while the double-well potential curve in Aspirin is nearly symmetrical, it is highly asymmetrical in salicylic acid. This difference results in quite different temperature dependencies in (17)O MAS spectra of the two compounds. A careful analysis of variable-temperature (17)O MAS NMR spectra of Aspirin allowed us to obtain the energy asymmetry (ΔE) of the double-well potential, ΔE = 3.0 ± 0.5 kJ/mol. We were also able to determine a lower limit of ΔE for salicylic acid, ΔE > 10 kJ/mol. These asymmetrical features in potential energy curves were confirmed by plane-wave DFT computations, which yielded ΔE = 3.7 and 17.8 kJ/mol for Aspirin and salicylic acid, respectively. To complement the solid-state (17)O NMR data, we also obtained solid-state (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra for salicylic acid and Aspirin. Using experimental NMR parameters obtained for all magnetic nuclei present in salicylic acid and Aspirin, we found that plane-wave DFT computations can produce highly accurate NMR parameters in well-defined crystalline organic compounds.

  5. A Solid-State NMR Study of Selenium Substitution into Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Kolmas, Joanna; Kuras, Marzena; Oledzka, Ewa; Sobczak, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    The substitution of selenium oxyanions in the hydroxyapatite structure was examined using multinuclear solid-state resonance spectroscopy (ssNMR). The study was supported by powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD) and wavelength dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF). Samples of pure hydroxyapatite (HA300) and selenate (HA300-1.2SeO4) or selenite (HA300-1.2SeO3) substituted hydroxyapatites were synthesized using the standard wet method and heated at 300 °C to remove loosely bonded water. PXRD data showed that all samples are single-phase, nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite. The incorporation of selenite and selenate ions affected the lattice constants. In selenium-containing samples the concentration of Se was very similar and amounted to 9.55% and 9.64%, for HA300-1.2SeO4 and HA300-1.2SeO3, respectively. PXRD and ssNMR data showed that the selenite doping significantly decreases the crystallite size and crystallinity degree. 31P and 1H NMR experiments demonstrated the developed surface hydrated layer in all samples, especially in HA300-1.2SeO3. 1H NMR studies showed the dehydroxylation of HA during the selenium oxyanions substitution and the existence of hydrogen bonding in structural hydroxyl group channels. 1H→77Se cross polarization NMR experiments indicated that selenites and selenates are located in the crystal lattice and on the crystal surface. PMID:25997001

  6. Structure determination in "shiftless" solid state NMR of oriented protein samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yuanyuan; Nevzorov, Alexander A.

    2011-09-01

    An efficient formalism for calculating protein structures from oriented-sample NMR data in the torsion-angle space is presented. Angular anisotropies of the NMR observables are treated by utilizing an irreducible spherical basis of rotations. An intermediate rotational transformation is introduced that greatly speeds up structural fitting by rendering the dependence on the torsion angles Φ and Ψ in a purely diagonal form. Back-calculation of the simulated solid-state NMR spectra of protein G involving 15N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), and 1H- 15N and 1H α- 13C α dipolar couplings was performed by taking into account non-planarity of the peptide linkages and experimental uncertainty. Even a relatively small (to within 1 ppm) random variation in the CSA values arising from uncertainties in the tensor parameters yields the RMSD's of the back-calculated structures of more than 10 Å. Therefore, the 15N CSA has been substituted with heteronuclear dipolar couplings which are derived from the highly conserved bond lengths and bond angles associated with the amino-acid covalent geometry. Using the additional 13C α- 15N and 13C'- 15N dipolar couplings makes it possible to calculate protein structures entirely from "shiftless" solid-state NMR data. With the simulated "experimental" uncertainty of 15 Hz for protein G and 120 Hz for a helical hairpin derived from bacteriorhodopsin, back-calculation of the synthetic dipolar NMR spectra yielded a converged set of solutions. The use of distance restraints dramatically improves structural convergence even if larger experimental uncertainties are assumed.

  7. integrating Solid State NMR and Computations in Membrane Protein Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Helical membrane protein structures are influenced by their native environment. Therefore the characterization of their structure in an environment that models as closely as possible their native environment is critical for achieving not only structural but functional understanding of these proteins. Solid state NMR spectroscopy in liquid crystalline lipid bilayers provides an excellent tool for such characterizations. Two classes of restraints can be obtained - absolute restraints that constrain the structure to a laboratory frame of reference when using uniformly oriented samples (approximately 1° of mosaic spread) and relative restraints that restrain one part of the structure with respect to another part such as torsional and distance restraints. Here, I will discuss unique restraints derived from uniformly oriented samples and the characterization of initial structures utilizing both restraint types, followed by restrained molecular dynamics refinement in the same lipid bilayer environment as that used for the experimental restraint collection. Protein examples will be taken from Influenza virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. When available comparisons of structures to those obtained using different membrane mimetic environments will be shown and the causes for structural distortions explained based on an understanding of membrane biophysics and its sophisticated influence on membrane proteins.

  8. Internal dynamics of DNA - a solid state deuterium NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wen-Chang.

    1989-01-01

    In this dissertation, solid state {sup 2}H NMR spectroscopy has been used to investigate the dynamics of the sodium salt oligonucleotide, (d(CGCGAATTCGCG)){sub 2}, which contains the Eco R1 binding site. Deuterium quadrupole echo line shape and spin-lattice relaxation times were obtained as a function of hydration on three different deuterated samples. In the first sample, (d{sub 12}-(d(CG*CG*A*A*TTCG*CG*)){sub 2}), the C8 proton of all purine in the self-complementary dodecamer were exchanged for deuterons. Specifically labeled thymidine (C6 deuterated) was also synthetically incorporated at the seventh position (counting 5{prime} to 3{prime}) in the sequence (d{sub 2}-(d(CGCGAAT*TCGCG)){sub 2}). In the third sample the C2{double prime} position of the furanose ring of adenosine at the fifth and sixth positions in the same sequence (d{sub 4}-(d(CGCGA*A*TTCGCG)){sub 2}) was deuterium labeled. The static quadrupole coupling constant (e{sup 2}qQ/h) and asymmetry parameter ({eta}) were obtained through the analysis of appropriative motional models from the corresponding monomers studies.

  9. Multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Phyo, Pyae; Hong, Mei

    2016-09-01

    Plant biomass has become an important source of bio-renewable energy in modern society. The molecular structure of plant cell walls is difficult to characterize by most atomic-resolution techniques due to the insoluble and disordered nature of the cell wall. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is uniquely suited for studying native hydrated plant cell walls at the molecular level with chemical resolution. Significant progress has been made in the last five years to elucidate the molecular structures and interactions of cellulose and matrix polysaccharides in plant cell walls. These studies have focused on primary cell walls of growing plants in both the dicotyledonous and grass families, as represented by the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana, Brachypodium distachyon, and Zea mays. To date, these SSNMR results have shown that 1) cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins form a single network in the primary cell wall; 2) in dicot cell walls, the protein expansin targets the hemicellulose-enriched region of the cellulose microfibril for its wall-loosening function; and 3) primary wall cellulose has polymorphic structures that are distinct from the microbial cellulose structures. This article summarizes these key findings, and points out future directions of investigation to advance our fundamental understanding of plant cell wall structure and function.

  10. Multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Phyo, Pyae; Hong, Mei

    2016-09-01

    Plant biomass has become an important source of bio-renewable energy in modern society. The molecular structure of plant cell walls is difficult to characterize by most atomic-resolution techniques due to the insoluble and disordered nature of the cell wall. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is uniquely suited for studying native hydrated plant cell walls at the molecular level with chemical resolution. Significant progress has been made in the last five years to elucidate the molecular structures and interactions of cellulose and matrix polysaccharides in plant cell walls. These studies have focused on primary cell walls of growing plants in both the dicotyledonous and grass families, as represented by the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana, Brachypodium distachyon, and Zea mays. To date, these SSNMR results have shown that 1) cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins form a single network in the primary cell wall; 2) in dicot cell walls, the protein expansin targets the hemicellulose-enriched region of the cellulose microfibril for its wall-loosening function; and 3) primary wall cellulose has polymorphic structures that are distinct from the microbial cellulose structures. This article summarizes these key findings, and points out future directions of investigation to advance our fundamental understanding of plant cell wall structure and function. PMID:27552739

  11. Multinuclear Solid-State NMR Investigation of Hexaniobate and Hexatantalate Compounds.

    PubMed

    Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Coelho-Diogo, Cristina; Chagnes, Alexandre; Cote, Gérard; Smith, Mark E; Hanna, John V; Iuga, Dinu; Bonhomme, Christian

    2016-06-20

    This work determines the potential of solid-state NMR techniques to probe proton, alkali, and niobium environments in Lindqvist salts. Na7HNb6O19·15H2O (1), K8Nb6O19·16H2O (2), and Na8Ta6O19·24.5H2O (3) have been studied by solid-state static and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR at high and ultrahigh magnetic field (16.4 and 19.9 T). (1)H MAS NMR was found to be a convenient and straightforward tool to discriminate between protonated and nonprotonated clusters AxH8-xM6O19·nH2O (A = alkali ion; M = Nb, Ta). (93)Nb MAS NMR studies at different fields and MAS rotation frequencies have been performed on 1. For the first time, the contributions of NbO5Oμ2H sites were clearly distinguished from those assigned to NbO6 sites in the hexaniobate cluster. The strong broadening of the resonances obtained under MAS was interpreted by combining chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) with quadrupolar effects and by using extensive fitting of the line shapes. In order to obtain the highest accuracy for all NMR parameters (CSA and quadrupolar), (93)Nb WURST QCPMG spectra in the static mode were recorded at 16.4 T for sample 1. The (93)Nb NMR spectra were interpreted in connection with the XRD data available in the literature (i.e., fractional occupancies of the NbO5Oμ2H sites). 1D (23)Na MAS and 2D (23)Na 3QMAS NMR studies of 1 revealed several distinct sodium sites. The multiplicity of the sites was again compared to structural details previously obtained by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The (23)Na MAS NMR study of 3 confirmed the presence of a much larger distribution of sodium sites in accordance with the 10 sodium sites predicted by XRD. Finally, the effect of Nb/Ta substitutions in 1 was also probed by multinuclear MAS NMR ((1)H, (23)Na, and (93)Nb).

  12. Multinuclear Solid-State NMR Investigation of Hexaniobate and Hexatantalate Compounds.

    PubMed

    Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Coelho-Diogo, Cristina; Chagnes, Alexandre; Cote, Gérard; Smith, Mark E; Hanna, John V; Iuga, Dinu; Bonhomme, Christian

    2016-06-20

    This work determines the potential of solid-state NMR techniques to probe proton, alkali, and niobium environments in Lindqvist salts. Na7HNb6O19·15H2O (1), K8Nb6O19·16H2O (2), and Na8Ta6O19·24.5H2O (3) have been studied by solid-state static and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR at high and ultrahigh magnetic field (16.4 and 19.9 T). (1)H MAS NMR was found to be a convenient and straightforward tool to discriminate between protonated and nonprotonated clusters AxH8-xM6O19·nH2O (A = alkali ion; M = Nb, Ta). (93)Nb MAS NMR studies at different fields and MAS rotation frequencies have been performed on 1. For the first time, the contributions of NbO5Oμ2H sites were clearly distinguished from those assigned to NbO6 sites in the hexaniobate cluster. The strong broadening of the resonances obtained under MAS was interpreted by combining chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) with quadrupolar effects and by using extensive fitting of the line shapes. In order to obtain the highest accuracy for all NMR parameters (CSA and quadrupolar), (93)Nb WURST QCPMG spectra in the static mode were recorded at 16.4 T for sample 1. The (93)Nb NMR spectra were interpreted in connection with the XRD data available in the literature (i.e., fractional occupancies of the NbO5Oμ2H sites). 1D (23)Na MAS and 2D (23)Na 3QMAS NMR studies of 1 revealed several distinct sodium sites. The multiplicity of the sites was again compared to structural details previously obtained by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The (23)Na MAS NMR study of 3 confirmed the presence of a much larger distribution of sodium sites in accordance with the 10 sodium sites predicted by XRD. Finally, the effect of Nb/Ta substitutions in 1 was also probed by multinuclear MAS NMR ((1)H, (23)Na, and (93)Nb). PMID:27245403

  13. Hexameric Capsules Studied by Magic Angle Spinning Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Identifying Solvent Molecules in Pyrogallol[4]arene Capsules.

    PubMed

    Avram, Liat; Goldbourt, Amir; Cohen, Yoram

    2016-01-18

    Powders of pyrogallol[4]arene hexamers were produced by evaporation from organic solvents and were studied, for the first time, by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR (MAS ssNMR). Evaporation selectively removed non-encapsulated solvent molecules leaving stable hexameric capsules encapsulating solvent molecules. After exposure of the powder to solvent vapors, (1)H/(13)C heteronuclear correlation MAS ssNMR experiments were used to assign the signals of the external and encapsulated solvent molecules. The formed capsules were stable for months and the process of solvent encapsulation was reversible. According to the ssNMR experiments, the encapsulated solvent molecules occupy different sites and those sites differ in their mobility. The presented approach paves the way for studying guest exchange, guest affinity, and gas storage in hexamers of this type in the solid state.

  14. Molecular ordering of mixed surfactants in mesoporous silicas: A solid-state NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Mao, Kanmi; Wang, Shy-Guey; Lin, Victor S.-Y.; Pruski, Marek

    2011-02-17

    The use of mixed surfactants in the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) is of importance in the context of adjusting pore structures, sizes and morphologies. In the present study, the arrangement of molecules in micelles produced from a mixture of two surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) was detailed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Proximities of methyl protons in the trimethylammonium headgroup of CTAB and protons in the pyridinium headgroup of CPB were observed under fast magic angle spinning (MAS) by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H double quantum (DQ) MAS NMR and NOESY. This result suggested that CTAB and CPB co-exist in the pores without forming significant monocomponent domain structures. {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR showed that protons in the headgroups of CTAB are in closer proximity to the silica surface than those in the CPB headgroups. The structural information obtained in this investigation leads to better understanding of the mechanisms of self-assembly and their role in determining the structure and morphology of mesoporous materials.

  15. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Kazuyuki Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-14

    The effect of {sup 1}H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951–6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the {sup 1}H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  16. Application and Reliability of Solid-State NMR in Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2010-05-01

    technique increases the sensitivity of 13C by magnetization transfer from the 1H to the 13C spin system during a contact time tc. However, one has to bear in mind that some molecular properties may obscure quantification. Thus, for carbons with large C-H internuclear distances (bigger than four bonds, i.e in graphite structures) and for C in groups with high molecular mobility (i.e. gas) the proton-dipolar interactions are weakened and the polarization transfer may be incomplete. The observed intensity can also be affected by interactions of the protons with paramagnetic compounds. To circumvent this problem, the samples are often demineralized with hydrofluoric acid. Alternatively, the Bloch decay, a technique in which the 13C is directly excited is used. Here, on the other hand, one has to consider long relaxation times which may lead to saturation effects. Nevertheless, as it will be discussed within the presentation those quantification problems can be solved for most soil samples and then solid-state NMR spectroscopy represents a powerful tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis. Special techniques, such as dipolar dephasing or the proton spin relaxation editing can be used to extract additional information about chemical properties or mobility. A more detailed examination of the cross polarization behavior can be used to analyze the interaction of organic matter and paramagnetics but also for obtaining revealing properties on a molecular level. Applications involving isotopic labeling combined with both 13C and/or 15N NMR allows to follow the fate of a specific compound i.e. in a natural matrix and- if the enrichment is high enough - the use of 2D solid-state NMR techniques. In particular with respect to environmental chemistry, this combination of isotopic labeling with the use of corresponding NMR spectroscopy shows great potential for a better understanding of the kind of interaction between pollutants and natural organic matter.

  17. Solid-state NMR characterization of tri-ethyleneglycol grafted polyisocyanopeptides.

    PubMed

    Zinkevich, T; Venderbosch, B; Jaspers, M; Kouwer, P H J; Rowan, A E; van Eck, E R H; Kentgens, A P M

    2016-04-01

    In aqueous media, ethylene glycol substituted polyisocyanopeptides (PICPs) change their state (undergo a sol-to-gel transition) as a response to temperature. This makes them promising materials for various biomedical applications, for instance, for controlled drug release and non-damaging wound dressing. To utilize PICP in biomedical applications, understanding of the origin of the gelation process is needed, but this is experimentally difficult because of the notoriously low gelator concentration in combination with the slow polymer dynamics in the sample. This paper describes a detailed characterization of the dried state of PICPs by solid-state NMR measurements. Both the (13) C and the (1) H NMR resonances were assigned using a combination of 1D cross-polarization magic angle spinning, 2D (13) C-(1) H heteronuclear correlation spectra and (1) H-(1) H single quantum-double quantum experiments. In addition, the chemical groups involved in dipolar interaction with each other were used to discuss the dynamics and spatial conformation of the polymer. In contrast to other PICP polymers, two resonances for the backbone carbon are observed, which are present in equal amounts. The possible origin of these resonances is discussed in the last section of this work. The data obtained during the current studies will be further used in elucidating mechanisms of the bundling and gelation. A comprehensive picture will make it possible to tailor polymer properties to meet specific needs in different applications. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Solid-state NMR investigation of effect of fluorination and methylation on prednisolone conformation.

    PubMed

    Carillo, Kathleen D; Arco, Susan; Wang, Cheng-Chung; Tzou, Der-Lii M

    2015-12-01

    Prednisolone (Prd) is a polymorphous synthetic corticosteroid that has three crystalline forms mediated by different solvents. In this study, we have demonstrated that solid-state {(1)H}(13)C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectroscopy is able to resolve the effects of methylation and fluorination on the conformation of the steroidal rings in Prd. Two compounds were chosen for the study, 6-α-methylprednisolone (Prd-6M) and 6-α-fluoroprednisolone (Prd-6F). The (13)C signals of Prd-6F showed primarily doublet patterns, with splittings of 40-380 Hz, indicating multiple ring conformations, whereas the (13)C signals of Prd and Prd-6M exhibited a singlet pattern, indicating a unique conformation. Using evidence from chemical shift deviation and anisotropy analysis, we have demonstrated by solid-state NMR that Prd-6F adopts two different steroidal ring conformations that are different from that of Prd-6M, and less similar to that of unsubstituted Prd.

  19. Preparation of RNA samples with narrow line widths for solid state NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Bardaro, Michael F.; Varani, Gabriele; Drobny, Gary P.

    2012-10-01

    Solid state NMR can provide detailed structural and dynamic information on biological systems that cannot be studied under solution conditions, and can investigate motions which occur with rates that cannot be fully studied by solution NMR. This approach has successfully been used to study proteins, but the application of multidimensional solid state NMR to RNA has been limited because reported line widths have been too broad to execute most multidimensional experiments successfully. A reliable method to generate spectra with narrow line widths is necessary to apply the full range of solid state NMR spectroscopic approaches to RNA. Using the HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA as a model, we present an approach based on precipitation with polyethylene glycol that improves the line width of 13C signals in TAR from >6 ppm to about 1 ppm, making solid state 2D NMR studies of selectively enriched RNAs feasible at ambient temperature.

  20. Polymorphs of Theophylline Characterized by DNP Enhanced Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Pinon, Arthur C; Rossini, Aaron J; Widdifield, Cory M; Gajan, David; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-11-01

    We show how dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be used to characterize polymorphs and solvates of organic solids. We applied DNP to three polymorphs and one hydrated form of the asthma drug molecule theophylline. For some forms of theophylline, sample grinding and impregnation with the radical-containing solution, which are necessary to prepare the samples for DNP, were found to induce polymorphic transitions or desolvation between some forms. We present protocols for sample preparation for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) DNP experiments that avoid the polymorphic phase transitions in theophylline. These protocols include cryogrinding, grinding under inert atmosphere, and the appropriate choice of the impregnating liquid. By applying these procedures, we subsequently demonstrate that two-dimensional correlation experiments, such as (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N HETCOR or (13)C-(13)C INADEQUATE, can be obtained at natural isotopic abundance in reasonable times, thus enabling more advanced structural characterization of polymorphs.

  1. Structural diversity of solid dispersions of acetylsalicylic acid as seen by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Policianova, Olivia; Brus, Jiri; Hruby, Martin; Urbanova, Martina; Zhigunov, Alexander; Kredatusova, Jana; Kobera, Libor

    2014-02-01

    Solid dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients are of increasing interest due to their versatile use. In the present study polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)-metacrylamide] (pHPMA), poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOx), and polyethylene glycol (PEG), each in three Mw, were used to demonstrate structural diversity of solid dispersions. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) was used as a model drug. Four distinct types of the solid dispersions of ASA were created using a freeze-drying method: (i) crystalline solid dispersions containing nanocrystalline ASA in a crystalline PEG matrix; (ii) amorphous glass suspensions with large ASA crystallites embedded in amorphous pHPMA; (iii) solid solutions with molecularly dispersed ASA in rigid amorphous PVP; and (iv) nanoheterogeneous solid solutions/suspensions containing nanosized ASA clusters dispersed in a semiflexible matrix of PEOx. The obtained structural data confirmed that the type of solid dispersion can be primarily controlled by the chemical constitutions of the applied polymers, while the molecular weight of the polymers had no detectable impact. The molecular structure of the prepared dispersions was characterized using solid-state NMR, wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). By applying various (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(1)H correlation experiments combined with T1((1)H) and T1ρ((1)H) relaxation data, the extent of the molecular mixing was determined over a wide range of distances, from intimate intermolecular contacts (0.1-0.5 nm) up to the phase-separated nanodomains reaching ca. 500 nm. Hydrogen-bond interactions between ASA and polymers were probed by the analysis of (13)C and (15)N CP/MAS NMR spectra combined with the measurements of (1)H-(15)N dipolar profiles. Overall potentialities and limitations of individual experimental techniques were thoroughly evaluated.

  2. Solid-state NMR studies of biomineralization peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Roehrich, Adrienne; Drobny, Gary

    2013-09-17

    unanswered. This is largely due to a lack of methods capable of providing high-resolution structural information for proteins adsorbed to material surfaces under physiologically relevant conditions. In this Account, we highlight recent work that is providing insight into the structure and crystal recognition mechanisms of a salivary protein model system, as well as the structure and interactions of a peptide that catalyzes the formation of biosilica composites. To develop a better understanding of the structure and interactions of proteins in biomaterials, we have used solid-state NMR techniques to determine the molecular structure and dynamics of proteins and peptides adsorbed onto inorganic crystal surfaces and embedded within biomineral composites. This work adds to the understanding of the structure and crystal recognition mechanisms of an acidic human salivary phosphoprotein, statherin.

  3. Solid State FT-IR and (31)P NMR Spectral Features of Phosphate Compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solid-state spectroscopic techniques, including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid-state 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopies, are powerful tools for evaluating metal speciation and transformation mechanisms of P compounds in the environment. Studie...

  4. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  5. Natural abundance 14N and 15N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs

    DOE PAGES

    Veinberg, Stanislav L.; Johnston, Karen E.; Jaroszewicz, Michael J.; Kispal, Brianna M.; Mireault, Christopher R.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W.

    2016-06-08

    14N ultra-wideline (UW), 1H{15N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and 15N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 14N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. Here, a case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW 14N SSNMR spectra of stationarymore » samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R"NH+ and RR'NH2+) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments.« less

  6. Probes for High Field Solid-state NMR of Lossy Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Christopher V.; Wu, Chin H.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2010-01-01

    In solid-state NMR exphydrated samples biopolymers are susceptible to radio-frequency heating and have a significant impact on probe tuning frequency and performance parameters such as sensitivity. These considerations are increasingly important as magnetic field strengths increase with improved magnet technology. Recent developments in the design, construction, and performance of probes for solid-state NMR experiments on stationary lossy biological samples at high magnetic fields are reviewed. PMID:20435493

  7. Molecular structure of amyloid fibrils: insights from solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert

    2006-02-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have made major contributions to our understanding of the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils, including fibrils formed by the beta-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, by proteins associated with fungal prions, and by a variety of other polypeptides. Because solid-state NMR techniques can be used to determine interatomic distances (both intramolecular and intermolecular), place constraints on backbone and side-chain torsion angles, and identify tertiary and quaternary contacts, full molecular models for amyloid fibrils can be developed from solid-state NMR data, especially when supplemented by lower-resolution structural constraints from electron microscopy and other sources. In addition, solid-state NMR data can be used as experimental tests of various proposals and hypotheses regarding the mechanisms of amyloid formation, the nature of intermediate structures, and the common structural features within amyloid fibrils. This review introduces the basic experimental and conceptual principles behind solid-state NMR methods that are applicable to amyloid fibrils, reviews the information about amyloid structures that has been obtained to date with these methods, and discusses how solid-state NMR data provide insights into the molecular interactions that stabilize amyloid structures, the generic propensity of polypeptide chains to form amyloid fibrils, and a number of related issues that are of current interest in the amyloid field.

  8. Optimized multiple quantum MAS lineshape simulations in solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, William J.; Davis, Michael C.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2009-10-01

    The majority of nuclei available for study in solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance have half-integer spin I>1/2, with corresponding electric quadrupole moment. As such, they may couple with a surrounding electric field gradient. This effect introduces anisotropic line broadening to spectra, arising from distinct chemical species within polycrystalline solids. In Multiple Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (MQMAS) experiments, a second frequency dimension is created, devoid of quadrupolar anisotropy. As a result, the center of gravity of peaks in the high resolution dimension is a function of isotropic second order quadrupole and chemical shift alone. However, for complex materials, these parameters take on a stochastic nature due in turn to structural and chemical disorder. Lineshapes may still overlap in the isotropic dimension, complicating the task of assignment and interpretation. A distributed computational approach is presented here which permits simulation of the two-dimensional MQMAS spectrum, generated by random variates from model distributions of isotropic chemical and quadrupole shifts. Owing to the non-convex nature of the residual sum of squares (RSS) function between experimental and simulated spectra, simulated annealing is used to optimize the simulation parameters. In this manner, local chemical environments for disordered materials may be characterized, and via a re-sampling approach, error estimates for parameters produced. Program summaryProgram title: mqmasOPT Catalogue identifier: AEEC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3650 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 73 853 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C, OCTAVE Computer: UNIX

  9. Solid-state NMR studies of collagen-based parchments and gelatin.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E

    2005-03-01

    Historical collagen-based parchments have been studied by solid-state NMR. In addition, new parchment (produced according to traditional methods) and gelatin from bovine skin were also studied. Wideline 1H and MAS 13C measurements were carried out directly on intact parchments. A simple approach is proposed for evaluation of the extent of parchment degradation based on the linewidth changes in the 13C CPMAS spectra relative to new parchment and gelatin. Structural (bound) water content was estimated from wideline 1H NMR lineshape and relaxation time measurements. It was found that the relative water content in parchments correlates linearly with 13C MAS linewidths. Its decrease on parchment degradation indicates that structural water molecules are of primary importance in stabilizing higher order collagen structures. Backbone and side chain dynamics of collagen in parchments were compared to those of gelatin based on the 13C dipolar-dephased experiments. Carbonyl 13C chemical shift anisotropies were measured to deduce the geometry of the collagen backbone motion. Unlike previous studies, we found that the collagen backbone motion is similar to that found in other proteins and occurs primarily via small-angle librations about internal bond directions.

  10. Structural investigation of aluminium doped ZnO nanoparticles by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Avadhut, Yamini S; Weber, Johannes; Hammarberg, Elin; Feldmann, Claus; Schmedt auf der Günne, Jörn

    2012-09-01

    The electrical conductivity of aluminium doped zinc oxide (AZO, ZnO:Al) materials depends on doping induced defects and grain structure. This study aims at relating macroscopic electrical conductivity of AZO nanoparticles with their atomic structure, which is non-trivial because the derived materials are heavily disordered and heterogeneous in nature. For this purpose we synthesized AZO nanoparticles with different doping levels and narrow size distribution by a microwave assisted polyol method followed by drying and a reductive treatment with forming gas. From these particles electrically conductive, optically transparent films were obtained by spin-coating. Characterization involved energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, wet chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, which provided a basis for a detailed structural solid-state NMR study. A multinuclear ((27)Al, (13)C, (1)H) spectroscopic investigation required a number of 1D MAS NMR and 2D MAS NMR techniques (T(1)-measurements, (27)Al-MQMAS, (27)Al-(1)H 2D-PRESTO-III heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy), which were corroborated by quantum chemical calculations with an embedded cluster method (EEIM) at the DFT level. From the combined data we conclude that only a small part of the provided Al is incorporated into the ZnO structure by substitution of Zn. The related (27)Al NMR signal undergoes a Knight shift when the material is subjected to a reductive treatment with forming gas. At higher (formal) doping levels Al forms insulating (Al, H and C containing) side-phases, which cover the surface of the ZnO:Al particles and increase the sheet resistivity of spin-coated material. Moreover, calculated (27)Al quadrupole coupling constants serve as a spectroscopic fingerprint by which previously suggested point-defects can be identified and in their great majority be ruled out. PMID:22801707

  11. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26460094

  12. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Timothy A.; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins.

  14. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Cross, Timothy A; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins.

  15. Solid-State Quantitative (1)H and (31)P MRI of Cortical Bone in Humans.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Alan C; Wehrli, Felix W

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a pivotal role for assessment of the musculoskeletal system. It is currently the clinical modality of choice for evaluation of soft tissues including cartilage, ligaments, tendons, muscle, and bone marrow. By comparison, the study of calcified tissue by MRI is still in its infancy. In this article, we review the potential of the modality for assessment of cortical bone properties known to be affected in degenerative bone disease, with focus on parameters related to matrix and mineral densities, and porosity, by means of emerging solid-state (1)H and (31)P MRI techniques. In contrast to soft tissues, the MRI signal in calcified tissues has very short lifetime, on the order of 100 μs to a few milliseconds, demanding customized imaging approaches that allow capture of the signal almost immediately after excitation. The technologies described are suited for quantitatively imaging human cortical bone in specimens as well as in vivo in patients on standard clinical imagers, yielding either concentrations in absolute units when measured against a reference standard, or more simply, in the form of surrogate biomarkers. The two major water fractions in cortical bone are those of collagen-bound and pore water occurring at an approximately 3:1 ratio. Collagen-bound water density provides a direct quantitative measure of osteoid density. While at an earlier stage of development, quantification of mineral phosphorus by (31)P MRI yields mineral density and, together with knowledge of matrix density, should allow quantification of the degree of bone mineralization. PMID:27048472

  16. Structure and backbone dynamics of a microcrystalline metalloprotein by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Knight, Michael J; Pell, Andrew J; Bertini, Ivano; Felli, Isabella C; Gonnelli, Leonardo; Pierattelli, Roberta; Herrmann, Torsten; Emsley, Lyndon; Pintacuda, Guido

    2012-07-10

    We introduce a new approach to improve structural and dynamical determination of large metalloproteins using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with (1)H detection under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS). The approach is based on the rapid and sensitive acquisition of an extensive set of (15)N and (13)C nuclear relaxation rates. The system on which we demonstrate these methods is the enzyme Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), which coordinates a Cu ion available either in Cu(+) (diamagnetic) or Cu(2+) (paramagnetic) form. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements are obtained from the difference in rates measured in the two forms and are employed as structural constraints for the determination of the protein structure. When added to (1)H-(1)H distance restraints, they are shown to yield a twofold improvement of the precision of the structure. Site-specific order parameters and timescales of motion are obtained by a gaussian axial fluctuation (GAF) analysis of the relaxation rates of the diamagnetic molecule, and interpreted in relation to backbone structure and metal binding. Timescales for motion are found to be in the range of the overall correlation time in solution, where internal motions characterized here would not be observable.

  17. A Solid-State NMR Experiment: Analysis of Local Structural Environments in Phosphate Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stanley E.; Saiki, David; Eckert, Hellmut; Meise-Gresch, Karin

    2004-01-01

    An experiment that can be used to directly study the local chemical environments of phosphorus in solid amorphous materials is demonstrated. The experiment aims at familiarizing the students of chemistry with the principles of solid-state NMR, by having them synthesize a simple phosphate glass, and making them observe the (super 31)P NMR spectrum,…

  18. 1020MHz single-channel proton fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Zhang, Rongchun; Hashi, Kenjiro; Ohki, Shinobu; Nishijima, Gen; Matsumoto, Shinji; Noguchi, Takashi; Deguchi, Kenzo; Goto, Atsushi; Shimizu, Tadashi; Maeda, Hideaki; Takahashi, Masato; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Yamazaki, Toshio; Iguchi, Seiya; Tanaka, Ryoji; Nemoto, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Tetsuo; Suematsu, Hiroto; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Miki, Takashi; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-12-01

    This study reports a first successful demonstration of a single channel proton 3D and 2D high-throughput ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR techniques in an ultra-high magnetic field (1020MHz) NMR spectrometer comprised of HTS/LTS magnet. High spectral resolution is well demonstrated.

  19. Instrumentation for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization with magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Rosay, Melanie; Blank, Monica; Engelke, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation and methodology have been key factors in the recent growth of solid-state DNP NMR applications. We review the current state of the art of solid-state DNP NMR instrumentation primarily based on available commercial platforms. We start with a general system overview, including options for microwave sources and DNP NMR probes, and then focus on specific developments for DNP at 100K with magic angle spinning (MAS). Gyrotron microwave sources, passive components to transmit microwaves, the DNP MAS probe, a cooling device for low-temperature MAS, and sample preparation procedures including radicals for DNP are considered. PMID:26920834

  20. A stable amorphous statin: solid-state NMR and dielectric studies on dynamic heterogeneity of simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Teresa G; Viciosa, M Teresa; Correia, Natália T; Danède, F; Nunes, Rita G; Diogo, Hermínio P

    2014-03-01

    Statins have been widely used as cholesterol-lowering agents. However, low aqueous solubility of crystalline statins and, consequently, reduced biovailability require seeking for alternative forms and formulations to ensure an accurate therapeutic window. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the stability of amorphous simvastatin by probing molecular dynamics using two nondestructive techniques: solid-state NMR and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. Glassy simvastatin was obtained by the melt quench technique. (13)C cross-polarization/magic-angle-spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectra and (1)H MAS NMR spectra were obtained from 293 K up to 333 K (Tg ≈ 302 K). The (13)C spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame, T1ρ, were measured as a function of temperature, and the correlation time and activation energy data obtained for local motions in different frequency scales revealed strong dynamic heterogeneity, which appears to be essential for the stability of the amorphous form of simvastatin. In addition, the (1)H MAS measurements presented evidence for mobility of the hydrogen atoms in hydroxyl groups which was assigned to noncooperative secondary relaxations. The complex dielectric permittivity of simvastatin was monitored in isochronal mode at five frequencies (from 0.1 to 1000 kHz), by carrying out a heating/cooling cycle allowing to obtain simvastatin in the supercooled and glassy states. The results showed that no dipolar moment was lost due to immobilization, thus confirming that no crystallization had taken place. Complementarily, the present study focused on the thermal stability of simvastatin using thermogravimetric analysis while the thermal events were followed up by differential scanning calorimetry and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. Overall, the results confirm that the simvastatin in the glass form reveals a potential use in the solid phase formulation on the pharmaceutical industry.

  1. 13C solid-state NMR analysis of heterogeneous structure of beeswax in native state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2005-12-01

    I investigated the molecular structure of natural wax from Japanese bees (Apis cerana japonica) in its native state (neither purified nor recrystallized) by 13C and 1H solid-state NMR. Two strong 13C peaks at 32.9 and 34.0 ppm were attributed to signals from internal-chain methylene carbons [int-(CH2)] in two types of crystal form. The peak at 32.9 ppm was assigned to an orthorhombic crystal form, and that at 34.0 ppm was assigned to a triclinic or monoclinic form. In both crystalline regions, bi-exponential decay of 13C spin-lattice relaxation [T1(C)] for the crystalline peaks due to chain diffusion was observed. 1H spin-lattice relaxation [T1(H)] values for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the crystalline and amorphous regions were identical; this was interpreted as being due to averaging of the T1(H) relaxation rates via spin diffusion. In contrast, although the T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) decay curves for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the amorphous and orthorhombic forms were almost identical, those of the triclinic or monoclinic forms were different. This unhomogeneous character of T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) was interpreted as resulting from differences in the molecular composition of each crystal form. Moreover, two components with long and short 1H spin-spin relaxation [T2(H)] values, arising from the mobile and rigid phases, respectively, were observed at above about -30 °C.

  2. Is solid-state NMR enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization?

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    The recent trend of high-field (~5-20 T), low-temperature (~100 K) ssNMR combined with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions is analyzed. A brief overview of the current theory of hyperpolarization for so-called MAS-DNP experiments is given, along with various reasons why the DNP-enhancement, the ratio of the NMR signal intensities obtained in the presence and absence of microwave irradiation suitable for hyperpolarization, should not be used alone to gauge the value of performing MAS-DNP experiments relative to conventional ssNMR. This is demonstrated through a dissection of the current conditions required for MAS-DNP with particular attention to resulting absolute sensitivities and spectral resolution. Consequently, sample preparation methods specifically avoiding the surplus of glass-forming solvents so as to improve the absolute sensitivity and resolution are discussed, as are samples that are intrinsically pertinent for MAS-DNP studies (high surface area, amorphous, and porous). Owing to their pertinence, examples of recent applications on these types of samples where chemically-relevant information has been obtained that would have been impossible without the sensitivity increases bestowed by MAS-DNP are also detailed. Additionally, a promising further implementation for MAS-DNP is exampled, whereby the sensitivity improvements shown for (correlation) spectroscopy of nuclei at low natural isotopic abundance, facilitate internuclear distance measurements, especially for long distances (absence of dipolar truncation). Finally, we give some speculative perspectives for MAS-DNP.

  3. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators.

    PubMed

    Nonappa; Kolehmainen, E

    2016-07-13

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples. PMID:27374054

  4. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators.

    PubMed

    Nonappa; Kolehmainen, E

    2016-07-13

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples.

  5. Natural abundance (14)N and (15)N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Veinberg, Stanislav L; Johnston, Karen E; Jaroszewicz, Michael J; Kispal, Brianna M; Mireault, Christopher R; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W

    2016-06-29

    (14)N ultra-wideline (UW), (1)H{(15)N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and (15)N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (14)N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. A case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW (14)N SSNMR spectra of stationary samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R''NH(+) and RR'NH2(+)) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments. Directly-excited (14)N NMR spectra were acquired using the WURST-CPMG pulse sequence, which incorporates WURST (wideband, uniform rate, and smooth truncation) pulses and a CPMG (Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill) refocusing protocol. In certain cases, spectra were acquired using (1)H → (14)N broadband cross-polarization, via the BRAIN-CP (broadband adiabatic inversion - cross polarization) pulse sequence. These spectra provide (14)N electric field gradient (EFG) tensor parameters and orientations that are particularly sensitive to variations in local structure and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. The (1)H{(15)N} idHETCOR spectra, acquired under conditions of fast magic-angle spinning (MAS), used CP transfers to provide (1)H-(15)N chemical shift correlations for all nitrogen environments, except for two sites in acebutolol and nicardipine. One of these two sites (RR'NH2(+) in acebutolol) was successfully detected using the DNP-enhanced (15)N{(1)H} CP/MAS measurement, and one (RNO2 in nicardipine) remained elusive due to the absence of

  6. Narrow carbonyl resonances in proton-diluted proteins facilitate NMR assignments in the solid-state.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    HNCO/HNCACO type correlation experiments are an alternative for assignment of backbone resonances in extensively deuterated proteins in the solid-state, given the fact that line widths on the order of 14-17 Hz are achieved in the carbonyl dimension without the need of high power decoupling. The achieved resolution demonstrates that MAS solid-state NMR on extensively deuterated proteins is able to compete with solution-state NMR spectroscopy if proteins are investigated with correlation times tau(c) that exceed 25 ns. PMID:20232230

  7. Mechanism of Solid-State Thermolysis of Ammonia Boraine: 15N NMR Study Using Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Gupta, Shalabh; Caporini, Marc A; Pecharsky, Vitalij K; Pruski, Marek

    2014-08-28

    The solid-state thermolysis of ammonia borane (NH3BH3, AB) was explored using state-of-the-art 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy, including 2D indirectly detected 1H{15N} heteronuclear correlation and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced 15N{1H} cross-polarization experiments as well as 11B NMR. The complementary use of 15N and 11B NMR experiments, supported by density functional theory calculations of the chemical shift tensors, provided insights into the dehydrogenation mechanism of AB—insights that have not been available by 11B NMR alone. Specifically, highly branched polyaminoborane derivatives were shown to form from AB via oligomerization in the “head-to-tail” manner, which then transform directly into hexagonal boron nitride analog through the dehydrocyclization reaction, bypassing the formation of polyiminoborane.

  8. Liquid- and solid-state high-resolution NMR methods for the investigation of aging processes of silicone breast implants.

    PubMed

    Birkefeld, Anja Britta; Bertermann, Rüdiger; Eckert, Hellmut; Pfleiderer, Bettina

    2003-01-01

    To investigate aging processes of silicone gel breast implants, which may include migration of free unreacted material from the gel and rubber to local (e.g. connective tissue capsule) or distant sites in the body, chemical alteration of the polymer and infiltration of body compounds, various approaches of multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments (29Si, 13C, 1H) were evaluated. While 29Si, 13C, and 1H solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR techniques performed on virgin and explanted envelopes of silicone prostheses provided only limited information, high-resolution liquid-state NMR techniques of CDCl(3) extracts were highly sensitive analytical tools for the detection of aging related changes in the materials. Using 2D 1H, 1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and 29Si, 1H heteronuclear multiple bond coherence (HMBC) experiments with gradient selection, it was possible to detect lipids (mainly phospholipids) as well as silicone oligomer species in explanted envelopes and gels. Silicone oligomers were also found in connective tissue capsules, indicating that cyclic polysiloxanes can migrate from intact implants to adjacent and distant sites. Furthermore, lipids can permeate the implant and modify its chemical composition.

  9. A solid state NMR study of layered double hydroxides intercalated with para-amino salicylate, a tuberculosis drug.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Nicholai Daugaard; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2016-09-01

    Para-amino salicylate (PAS), a tuberculosis drug, was intercalated in three different layered double hydroxides (MgAl, ZnAl, and CaAl-LDH) and the samples were studied by multi-nuclear ((1)H, (13)C, and (27)Al) solid state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy in combination with powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), elemental analysis and IR-spectroscopy to gain insight into the bulk and atomic level structure of these LDHs especially with a view to the purity of the LDH-PAS materials and the concentration of impurities. The intercalations of PAS in MgAl-, ZnAl-, and CaAl-LDH's were confirmed by (13)C SSNMR and PXRD. Moreover, (13)C MAS NMR and infrared spectroscopy show that PAS did not decompose during synthesis. Large amounts (20-41%) of amorphous aluminum impurities were detected in the structure using (27)Al single pulse and 3QMAS NMR spectra, which in combination with (1)H single and double quantum experiments also showed that the M(II):Al ratio was higher than predicted from the bulk metal composition of MgAl-PAS and ZnAl-PAS. Moreover, the first high-resolution (1)H SSNMR spectra of a CaAl LDH is reported and assigned using (1)H single and double quantum experiments in combination with (27)Al{(1)H} HETCOR.

  10. (13)C NMR assignments of regenerated cellulose from solid-state 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Idström, Alexander; Schantz, Staffan; Sundberg, Johan; Chmelka, Bradley F; Gatenholm, Paul; Nordstierna, Lars

    2016-10-20

    From the assignment of the solid-state (13)C NMR signals in the C4 region, distinct types of crystalline cellulose, cellulose at crystalline surfaces, and disordered cellulose can be identified and quantified. For regenerated cellulose, complete (13)C assignments of the other carbon regions have not previously been attainable, due to signal overlap. In this study, two-dimensional (2D) NMR correlation methods were used to resolve and assign (13)C signals for all carbon atoms in regenerated cellulose. (13)C-enriched bacterial nanocellulose was biosynthesized, dissolved, and coagulated as highly crystalline cellulose II. Specifically, four distinct (13)C signals were observed corresponding to conformationally different anhydroglucose units: two signals assigned to crystalline moieties and two signals assigned to non-crystalline species. The C1, C4 and C6 regions for cellulose II were fully examined by global spectral deconvolution, which yielded qualitative trends of the relative populations of the different cellulose moieties, as a function of wetting and drying treatments. PMID:27474592

  11. A "special perspectives" issue: Recent achievements and new directions in biomolecular solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Twenty years ago, applications of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods to real problems involving biological systems or biological materials were few and far between. Starting in the 1980s, a small number of research groups had begun to explore the possibility of obtaining structural and dynamical information about peptides, proteins, and other biopolymers from solid state NMR spectra. Progress was initially slow due to the relatively primitive state of solid state NMR probes, spectrometers, sample preparation methods, and pulse sequence techniques, coupled with the small number of people contributing to this research area. By the early 1990s, with the advent of new ideas about pulse sequence techniques such as dipolar recoupling, improvements in techniques for orienting membrane proteins and in technology for magic-angle spinning (MAS), improvements in the capabilities of commercial NMR spectrometers, and general developments in multidimensional spectroscopy, it began to appear that biomolecular solid state NMR might have a viable future. It was not until 1993 that the annual number of publications in this area crept above twenty.

  12. Teaching 1H NMR Spectrometry Using Computer Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habata, Yoichi; Akabori, Sadatoshi

    2001-01-01

    Molecular modeling by computer is used to display stereochemistry, molecular orbitals, structure of transition states, and progress of reactions. Describes new ideas for teaching 1H NMR spectroscopy using computer modeling. (Contains 12 references.) (ASK)

  13. Lipid-Protein Correlations in Nanoscale Phospholipid Bilayers by Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kijac, Aleksandra; Shih, Amy Y.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Schulten, Klaus; Sligar, Stephen G.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-01-01

    Nanodiscs are an example of discoidal nanoscale lipid/protein particles that have been extremely useful for the biochemical and biophysical characterization of membrane proteins. They are discoidal lipid bilayer fragments encircled and stabilized by two amphipathic helical proteins named membrane scaffolding protein (MSP), ~10 nm in size. Nanodiscs are homogeneous, easily prepared with reproducible success, amenable to preparations with a variety of lipids, and stable under a range of temperatures. Here we present solid-state NMR (SSNMR) studies on lyophilized, rehydrated POPC Nanodiscs prepared with uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled MSP1D1 (Δ1-11 truncated MSP). Under these conditions, by SSNMR we directly determine the gel-to-liquid crystal lipid phase transition to be at 3 ± 2 °C. Above this phase transition, the lipid 1H signals have slow transverse relaxation, enabling filtering experiments as previously demonstrated for lipid vesicles. We incorporate this approach into two- and three-dimensional heteronuclear SSNMR experiments to examine the MSP1D1 residues interfacing with the lipid bilayer. These 1H-13C and 1H-13C-13C correlation spectra are used to identify and quantify the number of lipid-correlated and solvent-exposed residues by amino acid type, which furthermore is compared with molecular dynamics studies of MSP1D1 in Nanodiscs. This study demonstrates the utility of SSNMR experiments with Nanodiscs for examining lipid-protein interfaces and has important applications for future structural studies of membrane proteins in physiologically relevant formulations. PMID:20804175

  14. Application of solid state NMR for the study of surface bound species and fossil fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althaus, Stacey

    Recent advances in solid state NMR have been utilized to study a variety of systems. These advancements have allowed for the acquisition of sequences previously only available for solution state detection. The protocol for the measurement of coals and other carbonaceous materials was updated to incorporate the recent advancements in fast magic angle spinning (MAS) and high magnetic fields. Argonne Premium Coals were used to test the sensitivity and resolution of the experiments preformed at high field and fast MAS. The higher field spectra were shown to be slightly less sensitive than the traditional lower field spectra, however, the new high field fast MAS spectra had better resolution. This increased resolution allowed for the separation of a variety of different functional groups, thereby allowing the composition of the coal to be determined. The use of 1 H detection allowed for 2D spectra of coals for the first time. These spectra could be filtered to examine either through-space or through-bond correlations. Indirect detection via 1 H was also pivotal in the detection of natural abundance 15 N spectra. Through-space and through-bond 2D spectra of natural abundance bulk species are shown with a sensitivity increase of 15 fold over traditional detection. This sensitivity enhancement allowed for the detection of natural abundance 15 N surface bound species in 2D, something that could not be acquired via traditional methods. The increased efficiency of the through-space magnetization transfer, Cross polarization, at fast MAS compared to the slower MAS rates is shown. The through-bond magnetization transfer via INEPT was examined and the effect of J-coupling is confirmed. Solid State NMR can be utilized to help improve catalytic interactions. Solid state NMR was used to examine the aldol condensation between p-nitrobenzaldehyde and acetone. The formation of a stable intermediate with p-nitrobenzaldehyde was found on the primary functionalized amine mesoporous

  15. Investigation of Local Structures in Layered Niobates by Solid-state NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting

    Research on ion-exchangeable layered niobates has attracted great attention due to their unique structures and corresponding variations in properties and applications, such as ion conductors, solid acids, and water splitting catalysts. Families of layered niobates include double-layered or triple-layered Dion-Jacobson type perovskites (ALaNb2O7, A = Cs, Rb, K, H; AM2Nb3O10, A = Rb, K, H; M = Sr, Ca), layered niobates with both edge and corner sharing of NbO6 octahedra (KNb3O8, HNb3O6, Nb 6O17 and H4Nb6O17) and many others. Lately, more developments in the layered niobates through a variety of topochemical manipulations have been achieved. The topochemical reactions include ion exchange, exfoliation, substitution, and etc. As a result, many new materials have been successfully prepared, for example, solid solutions (ALa2NbTi2O10, ACaLaNb2TiO 10 and ACa2Nb3-xTaxO10, etc.), nanosheets (HNb3O8, H4Nb6O17, HLaNb2O7, HCa2Nb3O10, etc., to intercalate with organic molecules such as tetrabutylammonium hydroxide or n-butylamines), and nanoscrolls (from H2K2Nb 6O17). While these structural modifications often induce improvements in properties, the fundamental mechanisms of improvements in properties upon the modifications, especially local structural arrangements are poorly understood, which is often limited by structural characterizations. Particularly, the characterizations of the exfoliated nanosheets can be difficult by conventional X-ray diffraction (XRD) method due to disordered structures. Alternatively, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool to study local structures in solids. The structural information can be extracted by examining intrinsic interactions, such as quadrupolar, chemical shielding, and dipolar interactions, which are all associated with local environments surrounding a specific nucleus, 1H or 93Nb in layered niobates. The ultimate goal of this dissertation is to understand the relationships between local structures of

  16. Directly and indirectly detected through-bond heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectroscopy under fast MAS

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Kanmi; Pruski, Marek

    2009-09-10

    Two-dimensional through-bond {sup 1}H({sup 13}C) solid-state NMR experiments utilizing fast magic angle spinning (MAS) and homonuclear multipulse {sup 1}H decoupling are presented. Remarkable efficiency of polarization transfer can be achieved at MAS rates exceeding 40 kHz, which is instrumental in these measurements. Schemes utilizing direct and indirect detection of heteronuclei are compared in terms of resolution and sensitivity. A simple procedure for optimization of {sup 1}H homonuclear decoupling sequences under these conditions is proposed. The capabilities of these techniques were confirmed on two naturally abundant solids, tripeptide N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (f-MLF-OH) and brown coal.

  17. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a new approach to study humic material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike; Lange, Sascha; van Rossum, Barth; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Compared to solution NMR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectra suffer from broad resonance lines and low resolution. This could be overcome by the use of 2-dimenstional solid-state NMR pulse sequences. Until recently, this approach has been unfeasible as a routine tool in soil chemistry, mainly because of the low NMR sensitivity of the respective samples. A possibility to circumvent those sensitivity problems represents high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy (Barnes et al., 2008), allowing considerable signal enhancements (Akbey et al., 2010). This is achieved by a microwave-driven transfer of polarization from a paramagnetic center to nuclear spins. Application of DNP to MAS spectra of biological systems (frozen solutions) showed enhancements of the factor 40 to 50 (Hall et al., 1997). Enhancements of this magnitude, thus may enable the use of at least some of the 2D solid-state NMR techniques that are presently already applied for pure proteins but are difficult to apply to soil peptides in their complex matrix. After adjusting the required acquisition parameters to the system "soil organic matter", lower but still promising enhancement factors were achieved. Additional optimization was performed and allowed the acquisition of 2D 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra of humified 13C and 15N enriched plant residues. Within the present contribution, the first solid-state DNP NMR spectra of humic material are presented. Those data demonstrate the great potential of this approach which certainly opens new doors for a better understanding of biochemical processes in soils, sediments and water. Akbey, Ü., Franks, W.T., Linden, A., Lange, S., Griffin, R.G., van Rossum, B.-J., Oschkinat, H., 2010. Dynamic nuclear polarization of deuterated proteins. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49, 7803-7806. Barnes, A.B., De Paëpe, G., van der Wel, P.C.A., Hu, K.N., Joo, C.G., Bajaj, V.S., Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L., Sirigiri, J.R., Herzfeld, J

  18. Solid-state /sup 13/C NMR and X-ray diffraction of dermatan sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, W.T.; Taylor, M.G.; Stevens, E.S.; Morris, E.R.; Rees, D.A.

    1986-05-29

    Dermatan sulfate in the solid state has been studied by /sup 13/C CP/MAS nmr and X-ray diffraction in order to establish the ring conformation of the L-iduronate moiety. The solid state nmr spectrum is similar to the solution spectrum obtained previously, indicating that a ring conformation at least approximating to /sup 1/C/sub 4/ predominates in the solid state. X-ray powder diffraction data from the same sample indicate the presence of the 8-fold helix form previously observed by fiber diffraction, and interpreted in terms of a /sup 4/C/sub 1/ ring form. A likely explanation of the results is that a distorted /sup 1/C/sub 4/ L-iduronate ring conformation, not considered in the initial X-ray analysis, may emerge to provide a satisfactory interpretation of all available physical-chemical data.

  19. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  20. Rapid assignment of solution 31P NMR spectra of large proteins by solid-state spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iuga, Adriana; Spoerner, Michael; Ader, Christian; Brunner, Eike; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2006-07-21

    The application of the (31)P NMR spectroscopy to large proteins or protein complexes in solution is hampered by a relatively low intrinsic sensitivity coupled with large line widths. Therefore, the assignment of the phosphorus signals by two-dimensional NMR methods in solution is often extremely time consuming. In contrast, the quality of solid-state NMR spectra is not dependent on the molecular mass and the solubility of the protein. For the complex of Ras with the GTP-analogue GppCH(2)p we show solid-state (31)P NMR methods to be more sensitive by almost one order of magnitude than liquid-state NMR. Thus, solid-state NMR seems to be the method of choice for obtaining the resonance assignment of the phosphorus signals of protein complexes in solution. Experiments on Ras.GDP complexes show that the microcrystalline sample can be substituted by a precipitate of the sample and that unexpectedly the two structural states observed earlier in solution are present in crystals as well.

  1. High resolution heteronuclear correlation NMR spectroscopy between quadrupolar nuclei and protons in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbourt, A.; Vinogradov, E.; Goobes, G.; Vega, S.

    2004-08-01

    A high resolution two-dimensional solid state NMR experiment is presented that correlates half-integer quadrupolar spins with protons. In this experiment the quadrupolar nuclei evolve during t1 under a split-t1, FAM-enhanced MQMAS pulse scheme. After each t1 period ending at the MQMAS echo position, single quantum magnetization is transferred, via a cross polarization process in the mixing time, from the quadrupolar nuclei to the protons. High-resolution proton signals are then detected in the t2 time domain during wPMLG5* homonuclear decoupling. The experiment has been demonstrated on a powder sample of sodium citrate and 23Na- 1H 2D correlation spectra have been obtained. From the HETCOR spectra and the regular MQMAS spectrum, the three crystallographically inequivalent Na + sites in the asymmetric unit were assigned. This MQMAS- wPMLG HETCOR pulse sequence can be used for spectral editing of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei coupled to protons.

  2. Distinguishing polymorphs of the semiconducting pigment copper phthalocyanine by solid-state NMR and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shaibat, Medhat A; Casabianca, Leah B; Siberio-Pérez, Diana Y; Matzger, Adam J; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2010-04-01

    Cu(II)(phthalocyanine) (CuPc) is broadly utilized as an archetypal molecular semiconductor and is the most widely used blue printing pigment. CuPc crystallizes in six different forms; the chemical and physical properties are substantially modulated by its molecular packing among these polymorphs. Despite the growing importance of this system, spectroscopic identification of different polymorphs for CuPc has posed difficulties. This study presents the first example of spectroscopic distinction of alpha- and beta-forms of CuPc, the most widely used polymorphs, by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and Raman spectroscopy. (13)C high-resolution SSNMR spectra of alpha- and beta-CuPc using very-fast magic angle spinning (VFMAS) at 20 kHz show that hyperfine shifts sensitively reflect polymorphs of CuPc. The experimental results were confirmed by ab initio chemical shift calculations. (13)C and (1)H SSNMR relaxation times of alpha- and beta-CuPc under VFMAS also showed marked differences, presumably because of the difference in electronic spin correlation times in the two forms. Raman spectroscopy also provided another reliable method of differentiation between the two polymorphs.

  3. Distinguishing Polymorphs of the Semiconducting Pigment Copper Phthalocyanine by Solid-state NMR and Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shaibat, Medhat A.; Casabianca, Leah B.; Siberio-Pérez, Diana Y.; Matzger, Adam J; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2010-01-01

    Cu(II)(phthalocyanine) (CuPc) is broadly utilized as an archetypal molecular semiconductor and is the most widely used blue printing pigment. CuPc crystallizes in six different forms; the chemical and physical properties are substantially modulated by its molecular packing among these polymorphs. Despite the growing importance of this system, spectroscopic identification of different polymorphs for CuPc has posed difficulties. This study presents the first example of spectroscopic distinction of α- and β-forms of CuPc, the most widely used polymorphs, by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and Raman spectroscopy. 13C high-resolution SSNMR spectra of α- and β-CuPc using very-fast magic angle spinning (VFMAS) at 20 kHz show that hyperfine shifts sensitively reflect polymorphs of CuPc. The experimental results were confirmed by ab initio chemical shift calculations. 13C and 1H SSNMR relaxation times of α- and β-CuPc under VFMAS also showed marked differences, presumably because of the difference in electronic spin correlation times in the two forms. Raman spectroscopy also provided another reliable method of differentiation between the two polymorphs. PMID:20225842

  4. 15N solid-state NMR provides a sensitive probe of oxidized flavin reactive sites.

    PubMed

    Koder, Ronald L; Walsh, Joseph D; Pometun, Maxim S; Dutton, P Leslie; Wittebort, Richard J; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2006-11-29

    Flavins are central to the reactivity of a wide variety of enzymes and electron transport proteins. There is great interest in understanding the basis for the different reactivities displayed by flavins in different protein contexts. We propose solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) as a tool for directly observing reactive positions of the flavin ring and thereby obtaining information on their frontier orbitals. We now report the SS-NMR signals of the redox-active nitrogens N1 and N5, as well as that of N3. The chemical shift tensor of N5 is over 720 ppm wide, in accordance with the predictions of theory and our calculations. The signal of N3 can be distinguished on the basis of coupling to 1H absent for N1 and N5, as well as the shift tensor span of only 170 ppm, consistent with N3's lower aromaticity and lack of a nonbonding lone pair. The isotropic shifts and spans of N5 and N1 reflect two opposite extremes of the chemical shift range for "pyridine-type" N's, consistent with their electrophilic and nucleophilic chemical reactivities, respectively. Upon flavin reduction, N5's chemical shift tensor contracts dramatically to a span of less than 110 ppm, and the isotropic chemical shift changes by approximately 300 ppm. Both are consistent with loss of N5's nonbonding lone pair and decreased aromaticity, and illustrate the responsiveness of the 15N chemical shift principal values to electronic structure. Thus. 15N chemical shift principal values promise to be valuable tools for understanding electronic differences that underlie variations in flavin reactivity, as well as the reactivities of other heterocyclic cofactors. PMID:17117871

  5. 113Cd solid-state NMR for probing the coordination sphere in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Kuttatheyil, Anusree Viswanath; Handke, Marcel; Bergmann, Jens; Lässig, Daniel; Lincke, Jörg; Haase, Jürgen; Bertmer, Marko; Krautscheid, Harald

    2015-01-12

    Spectroscopic techniques are a powerful tool for structure determination, especially if single-crystal material is unavailable. (113)Cd solid-state NMR is easy to measure and is a highly sensitive probe because the coordination number, the nature of coordinating groups, and the geometry around the metal ion is reflected by the isotropic chemical shift and the chemical-shift anisotropy. Here, a detailed investigation of a series of 27 cadmium coordination polymers by (113)Cd solid-state NMR is reported. The results obtained demonstrate that (113)Cd NMR is a very sensitive tool to characterize the cadmium environment, also in non-single-crystal materials. Furthermore, this method allows the observation of guest-induced phase transitions supporting understanding of the structural flexibility of coordination frameworks.

  6. Solid-state NMR in macromolecular systems: insights on how molecular entities move.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Michael Ryan; Graf, Robert; Spiess, Hans Wolfgang

    2013-09-17

    The function of synthetic and natural macromolecularsystems critically depends on the packing and dynamics of the individual components of a given system. Not only can solid-state NMR provide structural information with atomic resolution, but it can also provide a way to characterize the amplitude and time scales of motions over broad ranges of length and time. These movements include molecular dynamics, rotational and translational motions of the building blocks, and also the motion of the functional species themselves, such as protons or ions. This Account examines solid-state NMR methods for correlating dynamics and function in a variety of chemical systems. In the early days, scientists thought that the rotationalmotions reflected the geometry of the moving entities. They described these phenomena as jumps about well-defined axes, such as phenyl flips, even in amorphous polymers. Later, they realized that conformational transitions in macromolecules happen in a much more complex way. Because the individual entities do not rotate around well-defined axes, they require much less space. Only recently researchers have appreciated the relative importance of large angle fluctuations of polymers over rotational jumps. Researchers have long considered that cooperative motions might be at work, yet only recently they have clearly detected these motions by NMR in macromolecular and supramolecular systems. In correlations of dynamics and function, local motions do not always provide the mechanism of long-range transport. This idea holds true in ion conduction but also applies to chain transport in polymer melts and semicrystalline polymers. Similar chain motions and ion transport likewise occur in functional biopolymers, systems where solid-state NMR studies are also performed. In polymer science, researchers have appreciated the unique information on molecular dynamics available from advanced solid-state NMR at times, where their colleagues in the biomacromolecular

  7. Structural Evolution and Li Dynamics in Nanophase Li3PS4 by Solid-State and Pulsed Field Gradient NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Gobet, Mallory; Greenbaum, Steve; Sahu, Gayatri; Liang, Chengdu

    2014-01-01

    The ceramic lithium ion conductor -Li3PS4 has a disordered and nanoporous structure that leads to an enhancement in ionic conductivity by some three orders of magnitude compared to the crystalline phase. The phase is prepared by thermal treatment of an inorganic-organic complex based on Li3PS4 and THF. Multinuclear (1H, 6,7Li, 31P) solid state NMR spectroscopy is used to characterize the structural phase evolution of the starting material at various steps in the thermal treatment. The phase formed after high temperature treatment is recognized as spectroscopically distinct from the bulk -Li3PS4 compound. Also formed is an amorphous lithium thiophosphate phase that is metastable as verified by annealing over an extended period. Lithium ion self-diffusion coefficients are measurable by standard pulsed gradient NMR methods at 100oC and with values consistent with the high ionic conductivity previously reported for this material.

  8. Acceleration of Natural-Abundance Solid-State MAS NMR Measurements on Bone by Paramagnetic Relaxation from Gadolinium-DTPA

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans. PMID:24881032

  9. Unraveling the complexity of protein backbone dynamics with combined (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lamley, Jonathan M; Lougher, Matthew J; Sass, Hans Juergen; Rogowski, Marco; Grzesiek, Stephan; Lewandowski, Józef R

    2015-09-14

    Typically, protein dynamics involve a complex hierarchy of motions occurring on different time scales between conformations separated by a range of different energy barriers. NMR relaxation can in principle provide a site-specific picture of both the time scales and amplitudes of these motions, but independent relaxation rates sensitive to fluctuations in different time scale ranges are required to obtain a faithful representation of the underlying dynamic complexity. This is especially pertinent for relaxation measurements in the solid state, which report on dynamics in a broader window of time scales by more than 3 orders of magnitudes compared to solution NMR relaxation. To aid in unraveling the intricacies of biomolecular dynamics we introduce (13)C spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) as a probe of backbone nanosecond-microsecond motions in proteins in the solid state. We present measurements of (13)C'R1ρ rates in fully protonated crystalline protein GB1 at 600 and 850 MHz (1)H Larmor frequencies and compare them to (13)C'R1, (15)N R1 and R1ρ measured under the same conditions. The addition of carbon relaxation data to the model free analysis of nitrogen relaxation data leads to greatly improved characterization of time scales of protein backbone motions, minimizing the occurrence of fitting artifacts that may be present when (15)N data is used alone. We also discuss how internal motions characterized by different time scales contribute to (15)N and (13)C relaxation rates in the solid state and solution state, leading to fundamental differences between them, as well as phenomena such as underestimation of picosecond-range motions in the solid state and nanosecond-range motions in solution.

  10. Synthesis and solid-state NMR characterization of cubic mesoporous silica SBA-1 functionalized with sulfonic acid groups.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Hsu Gavin; Chiu, Po-Jui; Jheng, Guang-Liang; Ting, Chun-Chiang; Pan, Yu-Chi; Kao, Hsien-Ming

    2011-07-01

    Well-ordered cubic mesoporous silicas SBA-1 functionalized with sulfonic acid groups have been synthesized through in situ oxidation of mercaptopropyl groups with H(2)O(2) via co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) templated by cetyltriethylammonium bromide (CTEABr) under strong acidic conditions. Various synthesis parameters such as the amounts of H(2)O(2) and MPTMS on the structural ordering of the resultant materials were systematically investigated. The materials thus obtained were characterized by a variety of techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), multinuclear solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, (29)Si{(1)H} 2D HETCOR (heteronuclear correlation) NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and nitrogen sorption measurements. By using (13)C CPMAS NMR technique, the status of the incorporated thiol groups and their transformation to sulfonic acid groups can be monitored and, as an extension, to define the optimum conditions to be used for the oxidation reaction to be quantitative. In particular, (29)Si{(1)H} 2D HETCOR NMR revealed that the protons in sulfonic acid groups are in close proximity to the silanol Q(3) species, but not close enough to form a hydrogen bond.

  11. Protein Folding and Amyloid Formation: Good Questions for Solid State NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2005-03-01

    Recent results from two ongoing projects will be described. These projects illustrate the expanding capability of solid state NMR spectroscopy to provide unique information about the molecular structure of complex biochemical systems that are of current interest in the biophysical and biomedical research communities. Methodological advances that facilitate progress on these projects will be discussed briefly. In the area of protein folding, we are using solid state NMR spectroscopy to characterize the distributions of molecular structures in unfolded and partially folded states of relatively simple model proteins. The measurements are carried out on frozen glassy solutions at low temperatures. Initial results for the chemical denaturation of the 35-residue helical protein HP35 show that unfolding does not occur by a simple two-state process and that local conformational distributions in the unfolded state are remarkably non-uniform. In the area of amyloid fibrils, we are using solid state NMR to develop experimentally-based models for the molecular structure of peptide fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease and other amyloid diseases, and to develop an understanding of the interactions that stabilize amyloid fibril structures in general. The NMR data also reveal molecular-level polymorphism in amyloid fibrils, with implications for biomedical issues such as the etiological role of fibrils in amyloid diseases and the structural basis for strains in prion diseases.

  12. Solid-state NMR spectra of lipid-anchored proteins under magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kaoru; Harada, Erisa; Sugase, Kenji; Shimamoto, Keiko

    2014-03-01

    Solid-state NMR is a promising tool for elucidating membrane-related biological phenomena. We achieved the measurement of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra for a lipid-anchored protein embedded in lipid bilayers under magic angle spinning (MAS). To date, solid-state NMR measurements of lipid-anchored proteins have not been accomplished due to the difficulty in supplying sufficient amount of stable isotope labeled samples in the overexpression of lipid-anchored proteins requiring complex posttranslational modification. We designed a pseudo lipid-anchored protein in which the protein component was expressed in E. coli and attached to a chemically synthesized lipid-anchor mimic. Using two types of membranes, liposomes and bicelles, we demonstrated different types of insertion procedures for lipid-anchored protein into membranes. In the liposome sample, we were able to observe the cross-polarization and the (13)C-(13)C chemical shift correlation spectra under MAS, indicating that the liposome sample can be used to analyze molecular interactions using dipolar-based NMR experiments. In contrast, the bicelle sample showed sufficient quality of spectra through scalar-based experiments. The relaxation times and protein-membrane interaction were capable of being analyzed in the bicelle sample. These results demonstrated the applicability of two types of sample system to elucidate the roles of lipid-anchors in regulating diverse biological phenomena.

  13. Isotope labeling of eukaryotic membrane proteins in yeast for solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Emami, Sanaz; Munro, Rachel; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) is a rapidly developing technique for exploring structure and dynamics of membrane proteins, but its progress is hampered by its low sensitivity. Despite the latest technological advances, routine ssNMR experiments still require several milligrams of isotopically labeled protein. While production of bacterial membrane proteins on this scale is usually feasible, obtaining such quantities of eukaryotic membrane proteins is often impossible or extremely costly. We have demonstrated that, by using isotopic labeling in yeast Pichia pastoris, one can inexpensively produce milligram quantities of doubly labeled functional samples, which yield multidimensional ssNMR spectra of high resolution suitable for detailed structural investigation. This was achieved by combining protocols of economical isotope labeling of soluble proteins previously used for solution NMR with protocols of expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins successfully employed for other methods. We review two cases of such isotope labeling, of fungal rhodopsin from Leptosphaeria maculans and human aquaporin-1. PMID:26577733

  14. Isotope labeling of eukaryotic membrane proteins in yeast for solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Emami, Sanaz; Munro, Rachel; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) is a rapidly developing technique for exploring structure and dynamics of membrane proteins, but its progress is hampered by its low sensitivity. Despite the latest technological advances, routine ssNMR experiments still require several milligrams of isotopically labeled protein. While production of bacterial membrane proteins on this scale is usually feasible, obtaining such quantities of eukaryotic membrane proteins is often impossible or extremely costly. We have demonstrated that, by using isotopic labeling in yeast Pichia pastoris, one can inexpensively produce milligram quantities of doubly labeled functional samples, which yield multidimensional ssNMR spectra of high resolution suitable for detailed structural investigation. This was achieved by combining protocols of economical isotope labeling of soluble proteins previously used for solution NMR with protocols of expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins successfully employed for other methods. We review two cases of such isotope labeling, of fungal rhodopsin from Leptosphaeria maculans and human aquaporin-1.

  15. Solid-state NMR, electrophysiology and molecular dynamics characterization of human VDAC2.

    PubMed

    Gattin, Zrinka; Schneider, Robert; Laukat, Yvonne; Giller, Karin; Maier, Elke; Zweckstetter, Markus; Griesinger, Christian; Benz, Roland; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-04-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the most abundant protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane and constitutes the major pathway for the transport of ADP, ATP, and other metabolites. In this multidisciplinary study we combined solid-state NMR, electrophysiology, and molecular dynamics simulations, to study the structure of the human VDAC isoform 2 in a lipid bilayer environment. We find that the structure of hVDAC2 is similar to the structure of hVDAC1, in line with recent investigations on zfVDAC2. However, hVDAC2 appears to exhibit an increased conformational heterogeneity compared to hVDAC1 which is reflected in broader solid-state NMR spectra and less defined electrophysiological profiles.

  16. Direct observation of zeolite a synthesis by in situ solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, J.; Anderson, M.W.; Carr, S.W.

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes the use of in situ solid-state NMR and X-ray powder diffraction to study the real-time synthesis of zeolite. In particular {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si are used to monitor the growth in situ X-ray diffraction study was used to investigate the development of long range order of the material. Conclusions concerning the mechanism of the formation of zeolite A are proposed. 28 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Probing membrane protein structure using water polarization transfer solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan K.; Hong, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected 1H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins.

  18. Following Metabolism in Living Microorganisms by Hyperpolarized (1)H NMR.

    PubMed

    Dzien, Piotr; Fages, Anne; Jona, Ghil; Brindle, Kevin M; Schwaiger, Markus; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-09-21

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dDNP) is used to enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), enabling monitoring of metabolism and specific enzymatic reactions in vivo. dDNP involves rapid sample dissolution and transfer to a spectrometer/scanner for subsequent signal detection. So far, most biologically oriented dDNP studies have relied on hyperpolarizing long-lived nuclear spin species such as (13)C in small molecules. While advantages could also arise from observing hyperpolarized (1)H, short relaxation times limit the utility of prepolarizing this sensitive but fast relaxing nucleus. Recently, it has been reported that (1)H NMR peaks in solution-phase experiments could be hyperpolarized by spontaneous magnetization transfers from bound (13)C nuclei following dDNP. This work demonstrates the potential of this sensitivity-enhancing approach to probe the enzymatic process that could not be suitably resolved by (13)C dDNP MR. Here we measured, in microorganisms, the action of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and pyruvate formate lyase (PFL)-enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of pyruvate to form acetaldehyde and formate, respectively. While (13)C NMR did not possess the resolution to distinguish the starting pyruvate precursor from the carbonyl resonances in the resulting products, these processes could be monitored by (1)H NMR at 500 MHz. These observations were possible in both yeast and bacteria in minute-long kinetic measurements where the hyperpolarized (13)C enhanced, via (13)C → (1)H cross-relaxation, the signals of protons binding to the (13)C over the course of enzymatic reactions. In addition to these spontaneous heteronuclear enhancement experiments, single-shot acquisitions based on J-driven (13)C → (1)H polarization transfers were also carried out. These resulted in higher signal enhancements of the (1)H resonances but were not suitable for multishot kinetic studies. The potential of these (1)H-based approaches for

  19. Solid-State NMR Studies Reveal Native-like β-Sheet Structures in Transthyretin Amyloid.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang Hun; Dasari, Anvesh K R; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Kelly, Jeffery W; Wright, Peter E; Wemmer, David E

    2016-09-20

    Structural characterization of amyloid rich in cross-β structures is crucial for unraveling the molecular basis of protein misfolding and amyloid formation associated with a wide range of human disorders. Elucidation of the β-sheet structure in noncrystalline amyloid has, however, remained an enormous challenge. Here we report structural analyses of the β-sheet structure in a full-length transthyretin amyloid using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR was employed to investigate native-like β-sheet structures in the amyloid state using selective labeling schemes for more efficient solid-state NMR studies. Analyses of extensive long-range (13)C-(13)C correlation MAS spectra obtained with selectively (13)CO- and (13)Cα-labeled TTR reveal that the two main β-structures in the native state, the CBEF and DAGH β-sheets, remain intact after amyloid formation. The tertiary structural information would be of great use for examining the quaternary structure of TTR amyloid. PMID:27589034

  20. LARGE SCALE PRODUCTION, PURIFICATION, AND 65CU SOLID STATE NMR OF AZURIN

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, A.; Heck, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper details a way to produce azurin with an effi ciency over 10 times greater than previously described and demonstrates the fi rst solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of 65Cu(I) in a metalloprotein. A synthetic gene for azurin based upon the DNA sequence from Pseudomonas aeruginosa including the periplasmic targeting sequence was subcloned into a T7 overexpression vector to create the plasmid pGS-azurin, which was transformed into BL21 (DE3) competent cells. The leader sequence on the expressed protein causes it to be exported to the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli. Bacteria grown in a fermentation unit were induced to overexpress the azurin, which was subsequently purifi ed through an endosmotic shock procedure followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). 1,500 mg of azurin were purifi ed per liter of culture. 65Cu(II) was added to apo-azurin and then reduced. The 65Cu metal cofactor in azurin was observed with solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine any structural variations that accompanied copper reduction. This is the fi rst solid state NMR spectra of a copper(I) metalloprotein. Analysis of the NMR spectra is being used to complement hypotheses set forth by x-ray diffraction and computational calculations of electron transfer mechanisms in azurin.

  1. Monitoring the Electrochemical Processes in the Lithium–Air Battery by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A multi-nuclear solid-state NMR approach is employed to investigate the lithium–air battery, to monitor the evolution of the electrochemical products formed during cycling, and to gain insight into processes affecting capacity fading. While lithium peroxide is identified by 17O solid state NMR (ssNMR) as the predominant product in the first discharge in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) based electrolytes, it reacts with the carbon cathode surface to form carbonate during the charging process. 13C ssNMR provides evidence for carbonate formation on the surface of the carbon cathode, the carbonate being removed at high charging voltages in the first cycle, but accumulating in later cycles. Small amounts of lithium hydroxide and formate are also detected in discharged cathodes and while the hydroxide formation is reversible, the formate persists and accumulates in the cathode upon further cycling. The results indicate that the rechargeability of the battery is limited by both the electrolyte and the carbon cathode stability. The utility of ssNMR spectroscopy in directly detecting product formation and decomposition within the battery is demonstrated, a necessary step in the assessment of new electrolytes, catalysts, and cathode materials for the development of a viable lithium–oxygen battery. PMID:24489976

  2. Quantitative produced water analysis using mobile 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Lisabeth; Kalli, Chris; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; May, Eric F.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Graham, Brendan F.; Carroll, Matthew R. J.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-10-01

    Measurement of oil contamination of produced water is required in the oil and gas industry to the (ppm) level prior to discharge in order to meet typical environmental legislative requirements. Here we present the use of compact, mobile 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in combination with solid phase extraction (SPE), to meet this metrology need. The NMR hardware employed featured a sufficiently homogeneous magnetic field, such that chemical shift differences could be used to unambiguously differentiate, and hence quantitatively detect, the required oil and solvent NMR signals. A solvent system consisting of 1% v/v chloroform in tetrachloroethylene was deployed, this provided a comparable 1H NMR signal intensity for the oil and the solvent (chloroform) and hence an internal reference 1H signal from the chloroform resulting in the measurement being effectively self-calibrating. The measurement process was applied to water contaminated with hexane or crude oil over the range 1-30 ppm. The results were validated against known solubility limits as well as infrared analysis and gas chromatography.

  3. Immobilization of soluble protein complexes in MAS solid-state NMR: Sedimentation versus viscosity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Mainz, Andi; Busi, Baptiste; Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Kranz, Maximilian; Hofmann, Thomas; Reif, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, MAS solid-state NMR has emerged as a technique for the investigation of soluble protein complexes. It was found that high molecular weight complexes do not need to be crystallized in order to obtain an immobilized sample for solid-state NMR investigations. Sedimentation induced by sample rotation impairs rotational diffusion of proteins and enables efficient dipolar coupling based cross polarization transfers. In addition, viscosity contributes to the immobilization of the molecules in the sample. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have very high viscosities, and can replace water in living organisms. We observe a considerable amount of cross polarization transfers for NADES solvents, even though their molecular weight is too low to yield significant sedimentation. We discuss how viscosity and sedimentation both affect the quality of the obtained experimental spectra. The FROSTY/sedNMR approach holds the potential to study large protein complexes, which are otherwise not amenable for a structural characterization using NMR. We show that using this method, backbone assignments of the symmetric proteasome activator complex (1.1MDa), and high quality correlation spectra of non-symmetric protein complexes such as the prokaryotic ribosome 50S large subunit binding to trigger factor (1.4MDa) are obtained. PMID:27017576

  4. Quantitative identification of metastable magnesium carbonate minerals by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy K; Surface, J Andrew; Brenner, Allison; Wang, Louis S; Skemer, Philip; Conradi, Mark S; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-01-01

    In the conversion of CO2 to mineral carbonates for the permanent geosequestration of CO2, there are multiple magnesium carbonate phases that are potential reaction products. Solid-state (13)C NMR is demonstrated as an effective tool for distinguishing magnesium carbonate phases and quantitatively characterizing magnesium carbonate mixtures. Several of these mineral phases include magnesite, hydromagnesite, dypingite, and nesquehonite, which differ in composition by the number of waters of hydration or the number of crystallographic hydroxyl groups. These carbonates often form in mixtures with nearly overlapping (13)C NMR resonances which makes their identification and analysis difficult. In this study, these phases have been investigated with solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy, including both static and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments. Static spectra yield chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) lineshapes that are indicative of the site-symmetry variations of the carbon environments. MAS spectra yield isotropic chemical shifts for each crystallographically inequivalent carbon and spin-lattice relaxation times, T1, yield characteristic information that assist in species discrimination. These detailed parameters, and the combination of static and MAS analyses, can aid investigations of mixed carbonates by (13)C NMR.

  5. Immobilization of soluble protein complexes in MAS solid-state NMR: Sedimentation versus viscosity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Mainz, Andi; Busi, Baptiste; Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Kranz, Maximilian; Hofmann, Thomas; Reif, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, MAS solid-state NMR has emerged as a technique for the investigation of soluble protein complexes. It was found that high molecular weight complexes do not need to be crystallized in order to obtain an immobilized sample for solid-state NMR investigations. Sedimentation induced by sample rotation impairs rotational diffusion of proteins and enables efficient dipolar coupling based cross polarization transfers. In addition, viscosity contributes to the immobilization of the molecules in the sample. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have very high viscosities, and can replace water in living organisms. We observe a considerable amount of cross polarization transfers for NADES solvents, even though their molecular weight is too low to yield significant sedimentation. We discuss how viscosity and sedimentation both affect the quality of the obtained experimental spectra. The FROSTY/sedNMR approach holds the potential to study large protein complexes, which are otherwise not amenable for a structural characterization using NMR. We show that using this method, backbone assignments of the symmetric proteasome activator complex (1.1MDa), and high quality correlation spectra of non-symmetric protein complexes such as the prokaryotic ribosome 50S large subunit binding to trigger factor (1.4MDa) are obtained.

  6. Rapid measurement of pseudocontact shifts in metalloproteins by proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Knight, Michael J; Felli, Isabella C; Pierattelli, Roberta; Bertini, Ivano; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2012-09-12

    Pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) arise in paramagnetic systems in which the susceptibility tensor is anisotropic. PCSs depend upon the distance from the paramagnetic center and the position relative to the susceptibility tensor, and they can be used as structural restraints in protein structure determination. We show that the use of (1)H-detected solid-state correlations provides facile and rapid detection and assignment of site-specific PCSs, including resolved (1)H PCSs, in a large metalloprotein, Co(2+)-substituted superoxide dismutase (Co(2+)-SOD). With only 3 mg of sample and a small set of experiments, several hundred PCSs were measured and assigned, and these PCSs were subsequently used in combination with (1)H-(1)H distance and dihedral angle restraints to determine the protein backbone geometry with a precision paralleling those of state-of-the-art liquid-state determinations of diamagnetic proteins, including a well-defined active site.

  7. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVSCARD filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers. PMID:26733681

  8. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    He, Lichun; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-19

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVS(CARD) filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers.

  9. Interaction of epicatechin gallate with phospholipid membranes as revealed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uekusa, Yoshinori; Kamihira-Ishijima, Miya; Sugimoto, Osamu; Ishii, Takeshi; Kumazawa, Shigenori; Nakamura, Kozo; Tanji, Ken-ichi; Naito, Akira; Nakayama, Tsutomu

    2011-06-01

    Epicatechin gallate (ECg), a green tea polyphenol, has various physiological effects. Our previous nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) study using solution NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that ECg strongly interacts with the surface of phospholipid bilayers. However, the dynamic behavior of ECg in the phospholipid bilayers has not been clarified, especially the dynamics and molecular arrangement of the galloyl moiety, which supposedly has an important interactive role. In this study, we synthesized [13C]-ECg, in which the carbonyl carbon of the galloyl moiety was labeled by 13C isotope, and analyzed it by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state 31P NMR analysis indicated that ECg changes the gel-to-liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature of DMPC bilayers as well as the dynamics and mobility of the phospholipids. In the solid-state 13C NMR analysis under static conditions, the carbonyl carbon signal of the [13C]-ECg exhibited an axially symmetric powder pattern. This indicates that the ECg molecules rotate about an axis tilting at a constant angle to the bilayer normal. The accurate intermolecular-interatomic distance between the labeled carbonyl carbon of [13C]-ECg and the phosphorus of the phospholipid was determined to be 5.3±0.1 Å by 13C-(31)P rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) measurements. These results suggest that the galloyl moiety contributes to increasing the hydrophobicity of catechin molecules, and consequently to high affinity of galloyl-type catechins for phospholipid membranes, as well as to stabilization of catechin molecules in the phospholipid membranes by cation-π interaction between the galloyl ring and quaternary amine of the phospholipid head-group. PMID:21352801

  10. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the quadrupolar halogens: chlorine-35/37, bromine-79/81, and iodine-127.

    PubMed

    Bryce, David L; Sward, Gregory D

    2006-04-01

    A thorough review of 35/37Cl, 79/81Br, and 127I solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) data is presented. Isotropic chemical shifts (CS), quadrupolar coupling constants, and other available information on the magnitude and orientation of the CS and electric field gradient (EFG) tensors for chlorine, bromine, and iodine in diverse chemical compounds is tabulated on the basis of over 200 references. Our coverage is through July 2005. Special emphasis is placed on the information available from the study of powdered diamagnetic solids in high magnetic fields. Our survey indicates a recent notable increase in the number of applications of solid-state quadrupolar halogen NMR, particularly 35Cl NMR, as high magnetic fields have become more widely available to solid-state NMR spectroscopists. We conclude with an assessment of possible future directions for research involving 35/37Cl, 79/81Br, and 127I solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Solid state 13C NMR investigation of impact of annealing in lyophilized glasses.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Suman A; Pikal, Michael J; Utz, Marcel

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of annealing on molecular mobility in lyophilized glasses, composed of a saccharide excipient and a small concentration of aspartame as a model "drug." Changes in molecular dynamics during annealing were monitored through carbon ((13)C) T(1) and T(1 rho) nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of the aspartame and the saccharides. Two different saccharides were studied, sucrose and trehalose. The local mobility of the aspartame guest was found to correlate closely with the overall structural relaxation monitored through calorimetric methods in the aspartame: sucrose formulation. In general terms, annealing leads to longer NMR relaxation times, indicating a slowing of the local dynamics. By contrast, annealing had only a minimal effect on the NMR relaxation times in aspartame: trehalose. Specificity of solid state NMR in detecting molecular mobility in guest and host molecules showed that sucrose provided a homogenous matrix for the guest drug as compared to the trehalose.

  12. Interaction of electrolyte molecules with carbon materials of well-defined porosity: characterization by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Borchardt, Lars; Oschatz, Martin; Paasch, Silvia; Kaskel, Stefan; Brunner, Eike

    2013-09-28

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs or supercapacitors) are of special potential interest with respect to energy storage. Nearly all EDLCs make use of porous carbons as electrode materials. Further tuning of their performance in EDLC applications requires a better understanding of their properties. In particular, the understanding of the interactions between carbon-based materials and electrolyte solutions is of fundamental interest with respect to future applications. Since the capacitance of carbon-based electrode materials is known to depend on the pore size, we have studied different porous carbon materials of well-defined, variable pore size loaded with 1 M TEABF4 in acetonitrile or with pure acetonitrile using solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) (1)H, (11)B, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. PMID:23925570

  13. Solid-State NMR Studies of Fossil Fuels using One- and Two-Dimensional Methods at High Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Althaus, Stacey M.; Mao, Kanmi; Kennedy, Gordon J.; Pruski, Marek

    2012-06-24

    We examine the opportunities offered by advancements in solid-state NMR (SSNMR) methods, which increasingly rely on the use of high magnetic fields and fast magic angle spinning (MAS), in the studies of coals and other carbonaceous materials. The sensitivity of one- and two-dimensional experiments tested on several Argonne Premium coal samples is only slightly lower than that of traditional experiments performed at low magnetic fields in large MAS rotors, since higher receptivity per spin and the use of 1H detection of low-gamma nuclei can make up for most of the signal loss due to the small rotor size. The advantages of modern SSNMR methodology in these studies include improved resolution, simplicity of pulse sequences, and the possibility of using J-coupling during mixing.

  14. Interaction of electrolyte molecules with carbon materials of well-defined porosity: characterization by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Borchardt, Lars; Oschatz, Martin; Paasch, Silvia; Kaskel, Stefan; Brunner, Eike

    2013-09-28

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs or supercapacitors) are of special potential interest with respect to energy storage. Nearly all EDLCs make use of porous carbons as electrode materials. Further tuning of their performance in EDLC applications requires a better understanding of their properties. In particular, the understanding of the interactions between carbon-based materials and electrolyte solutions is of fundamental interest with respect to future applications. Since the capacitance of carbon-based electrode materials is known to depend on the pore size, we have studied different porous carbon materials of well-defined, variable pore size loaded with 1 M TEABF4 in acetonitrile or with pure acetonitrile using solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) (1)H, (11)B, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

  15. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of protein in heterogeneous membranes: the baseplate antenna complex of Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Kulminskaya, Natalia V; Pedersen, Marie Ø; Bjerring, Morten; Underhaug, Jarl; Miller, Mette; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Nielsen, Jakob T; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2012-07-01

    A clever combination: an in situ solid-state NMR analysis of CsmA proteins in the heterogeneous environment of the photoreceptor of Chlorobaculum tepidum is reported. Using different combinations of 2D and 3D solid-state NMR spectra, 90 % of the CsmA resonances are assigned and provide on the basis of chemical shift data information about the structure and conformation of CsmA in the CsmA-bacteriochlorophyll a complex.

  16. Conformation and topology of diacylglycerol kinase in E.coli membranes revealed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanke; Zhang, Zhengfeng; Tang, Xinqi; Li, Jianping; Glaubitz, Clemens; Yang, Jun

    2014-05-26

    Solid-state NMR is a powerful tool for studying membrane proteins in a native-like lipid environment. 3D magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR was employed to characterize the structure of E.coli diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) reconstituted into its native E.coli lipid membranes. The secondary structure and topology of DAGK revealed by solid-state NMR are different from those determined by solution-state NMR and X-ray crystallography. This study provides a good example for demonstrating the influence of membrane environments on the structure of membrane proteins.

  17. Sensitivity and resolution enhancement of oriented solid-state NMR: Application to membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, T.; Mote, Kaustubh R.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    Oriented solid-state NMR (O-ssNMR) spectroscopy is a major technique for the high-resolution analysis of the structure and topology of transmembrane proteins in native-like environments. Unlike magic angle spinning (MAS) techniques, O-ssNMR spectroscopy requires membrane protein preparations that are uniformly oriented (mechanically or magnetically) so that anisotropic NMR parameters, such as dipolar and chemical shift interactions, can be measured to determine structure and orientation of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers. Traditional sample preparations involving mechanically aligned lipids often result in short relaxation times which broaden the 15N resonances and encumber the manipulation of nuclear spin coherences. The introduction of lipid bicelles as membrane mimicking systems has changed this scenario, and the more favorable relaxation properties of membrane protein 15N and 13C resonances make it possible to develop new, more elaborate pulse sequences for higher spectral resolution and sensitivity. Here, we describe our recent progress in the optimization of O-ssNMR pulse sequences. We explain the theory behind these experiments, demonstrate their application to small and medium size proteins, and describe the technical details for setting up these new experiments on the new generation of NMR spectrometers. PMID:24160761

  18. Proton-detected 2D radio frequency driven recoupling solid-state NMR studies on micelle-associated cytochrome-b5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Im, Sangchoul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-05-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is increasingly used in the high-resolution structural studies of membrane-associated proteins and peptides. Most such studies necessitate isotopically labeled (13C, 15N and 2H) proteins/peptides, which is a limiting factor for some of the exciting membrane-bound proteins and aggregating peptides. In this study, we report the use of a proton-based slow magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiment that exploits the unaveraged 1H-1H dipolar couplings from a membrane-bound protein. We have shown that the difference in the buildup rates of cross-peak intensities against the mixing time - obtained from 2D 1H-1H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments on a 16.7-kDa micelle-associated full-length rabbit cytochrome-b5 (cytb5) - can provide insights into protein dynamics and could be useful to measure 1H-1H dipolar couplings. The experimental buildup curves compare well with theoretical simulations and are used to extract relaxation parameters. Our results show that due to fast exchange of amide protons with water in the soluble heme-containing domain of cyb5, coherent 1H-1H dipolar interactions are averaged out for these protons while alpha and side chain protons show residual dipolar couplings that can be obtained from 1H-1H RFDR experiments. The appearance of resonances with distinct chemical shift values in 1H-1H RFDR spectra enabled the identification of residues (mostly from the transmembrane region) of cytb5 that interact with micelles.

  19. Toxin-induced conformational changes in a potassium channel revealed by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Adam; Giller, Karin; Hornig, Sönke; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2006-04-01

    The active site of potassium (K+) channels catalyses the transport of K+ ions across the plasma membrane-similar to the catalytic function of the active site of an enzyme-and is inhibited by toxins from scorpion venom. On the basis of the conserved structures of K+ pore regions and scorpion toxins, detailed structures for the K+ channel-scorpion toxin binding interface have been proposed. In these models and in previous solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies using detergent-solubilized membrane proteins, scorpion toxins were docked to the extracellular entrance of the K+ channel pore assuming rigid, preformed binding sites. Using high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy, here we show that high-affinity binding of the scorpion toxin kaliotoxin to a chimaeric K+ channel (KcsA-Kv1.3) is associated with significant structural rearrangements in both molecules. Our approach involves a combined analysis of chemical shifts and proton-proton distances and demonstrates that solid-state NMR is a sensitive method for analysing the structure of a membrane protein-inhibitor complex. We propose that structural flexibility of the K+ channel and the toxin represents an important determinant for the high specificity of toxin-K+ channel interactions.

  20. Operator-based triple-mode Floquet theory in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Ingo; Meier, Beat H; Ernst, Matthias

    2007-11-28

    Many solid-state NMR experiments exploit interference effects between time dependencies in the system Hamiltonian to design an effective time-independent Hamiltonian with the desired properties. Effective Hamiltonians can be designed such that they contain only selected parts of the full system Hamiltonian while all other parts are averaged to zero. A general theoretical description of such experiments has to accommodate several time-dependent perturbations with incommensurate frequencies. We describe an extension of the analytical operator-based Floquet description of NMR experiments to situations with three incommensurate frequencies. Experiments with three time dependencies are quite common in solid-state NMR. Examples include experiments which combine magic-angle spinning and radio-frequency irradiation on two nuclei or asynchronous multiple-pulse sequences on a single spin species. The Floquet description is general in the sense that the resulting effective Hamiltonians can be calculated without a detailed knowledge of the spin-system Hamiltonian and can be expressed fully as a function of the Fourier components of the time-dependent Hamiltonian. As a prototype experiment we treat the application of two continuous-wave (cw) radio-frequency fields under magic-angle spinning. Experiments that are included in such a description are Hartmann-Hahn cross polarization or rotary-resonance recoupling experiments with simultaneous cw decoupling. PMID:18052439

  1. Motion-adapted pulse sequences for oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR of biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Lu, George J; Opella, Stanley J

    2013-08-28

    One of the main applications of solid-state NMR is to study the structure and dynamics of biopolymers, such as membrane proteins, under physiological conditions where the polypeptides undergo global motions as they do in biological membranes. The effects of NMR radiofrequency irradiations on nuclear spins are strongly influenced by these motions. For example, we previously showed that the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence yields spectra with resonance line widths about half of those observed using the conventional pulse sequence when applied to membrane proteins undergoing rapid uniaxial rotational diffusion in phospholipid bilayers. In contrast, the line widths were not changed in microcrystalline samples where the molecules did not undergo global motions. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and describe analytically how some Hamiltonian terms are susceptible to sample motions, and it is their removal through the critical π/2 Z-rotational symmetry that confers the "motion adapted" property to the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence. This leads to the design of separated local field pulse sequence "Motion-adapted SAMPI4" and is generalized to an approach for the design of decoupling sequences whose performance is superior in the presence of molecular motions. It works by cancelling the spin interaction by explicitly averaging the reduced Wigner matrix to zero, rather than utilizing the 2π nutation to average spin interactions. This approach is applicable to both stationary and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments.

  2. Solid-State NMR/Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of Polypeptides in Planar Supported Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Salnikov, Evgeniy S; Sarrouj, Hiba; Reiter, Christian; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Purea, Armin; Aussenac, Fabien; Ouari, Olivier; Tordo, Paul; Fedotenko, Illya; Engelke, Frank; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2015-11-19

    Dynamic nuclear polarization has been developed to overcome the limitations of the inherently low signal intensity of NMR spectroscopy. This technique promises to be particularly useful for solid-state NMR spectroscopy where the signals are broadened over a larger frequency range and most investigations rely on recording low gamma nuclei. To extend the range of possible investigations, a triple-resonance flat-coil solid-state NMR probe is presented with microwave irradiation capacities allowing the investigation of static samples at temperatures of 100 K, including supported lipid bilayers. The probe performance allows for two-dimensional separated local field experiments with high-power Lee-Goldberg decoupling and cross-polarization under simultaneous irradiation from a gyrotron microwave generator. Efficient cooling of the sample turned out to be essential for best enhancements and line shape and necessitated the development of a dedicated cooling chamber. Furthermore, a new membrane-anchored biradical is presented, and the geometry of supported membranes was optimized not only for good membrane alignment, handling, stability, and filling factor of the coil but also for heat and microwave dissipation. Enhancement factors of 17-fold were obtained, and a two-dimensional PISEMA spectrum of a transmembrane helical peptide was obtained in less than 2 h. PMID:26487390

  3. Solid-State NMR Studies of HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yun; Ahn, Jinwoo; Concel, Jason; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Yang, Jun; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2010-02-17

    In mature HIV-1 virions, the 26.6 kDa CA protein is assembled into a characteristic cone-shaped core (capsid) that encloses the RNA viral genome. The assembled capsid structure is best described by a fullerene cone model that is made up from a hexameric lattice containing a variable number of CA pentamers, thus allowing for closure of tubular or conical structures. In this paper, we present a solid-state NMR analysis of the wild-type HIV-1 CA protein, prepared as conical and spherical assemblies that are stable and are not affected by magic angle spinning of the samples at frequencies between 10 and 25 kHz. Multidimensional homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra of CA assemblies of uniformly 13C,15Nlabeled CA exhibit narrow lines, indicative of the conformational homogeneity of the protein in these assemblies. For the conical assemblies, partial residue-specific resonance assignments were obtained. Analysis of the NMR spectra recorded for the conical and spherical assemblies indicates that the CA protein structure is not significantly different in the different morphologies. The present results demonstrate that the assemblies of CA protein are amenable to detailed structural analysis by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  4. Solid-State NMR Studies of HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yun; Ahn, Jinwoo; Concel, Jason; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Yang, Jun; Polenova, Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    In mature HIV-1 virions, a 26.6 kDa CA protein is assembled into a characteristic cone shaped core (capsid) that encloses the RNA viral genome. The assembled capsid structure is best described by a fullerene cone model that is made up from a hexameric lattice containing a variable number of CA pentamers, thus allowing for closure of tubular or conical structures. In this report, we present a solid-state NMR analysis of the wild type HIV-1 CA protein, prepared as conical and spherical assemblies that are stable and are not affected by magic angle spinning of the samples at frequencies between 10 and 25 kHz. Multidimensional homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra of CA assemblies of uniformly 13C,15N-labelled CA exhibit narrow lines, indicative of conformational homogeneity of the protein in these assemblies. For the conical assemblies, partial residue-specific resonance assignments were obtained. Analysis of the NMR spectra recorded for the conical and spherical assemblies indicates that the CA protein structure is not significantly different in the different morphologies. The present results demonstrate that the assemblies of CA protein are amenable to detailed structural analysis by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. PMID:20092249

  5. Computer-intensive simulation of solid-state NMR experiments using SIMPSON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošner, Zdeněk; Andersen, Rasmus; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Conducting large-scale solid-state NMR simulations requires fast computer software potentially in combination with efficient computational resources to complete within a reasonable time frame. Such simulations may involve large spin systems, multiple-parameter fitting of experimental spectra, or multiple-pulse experiment design using parameter scan, non-linear optimization, or optimal control procedures. To efficiently accommodate such simulations, we here present an improved version of the widely distributed open-source SIMPSON NMR simulation software package adapted to contemporary high performance hardware setups. The software is optimized for fast performance on standard stand-alone computers, multi-core processors, and large clusters of identical nodes. We describe the novel features for fast computation including internal matrix manipulations, propagator setups and acquisition strategies. For efficient calculation of powder averages, we implemented interpolation method of Alderman, Solum, and Grant, as well as recently introduced fast Wigner transform interpolation technique. The potential of the optimal control toolbox is greatly enhanced by higher precision gradients in combination with the efficient optimization algorithm known as limited memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno. In addition, advanced parallelization can be used in all types of calculations, providing significant time reductions. SIMPSON is thus reflecting current knowledge in the field of numerical simulations of solid-state NMR experiments. The efficiency and novel features are demonstrated on the representative simulations.

  6. Motion-adapted pulse sequences for oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR of biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    One of the main applications of solid-state NMR is to study the structure and dynamics of biopolymers, such as membrane proteins, under physiological conditions where the polypeptides undergo global motions as they do in biological membranes. The effects of NMR radiofrequency irradiations on nuclear spins are strongly influenced by these motions. For example, we previously showed that the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence yields spectra with resonance line widths about half of those observed using the conventional pulse sequence when applied to membrane proteins undergoing rapid uniaxial rotational diffusion in phospholipid bilayers. In contrast, the line widths were not changed in microcrystalline samples where the molecules did not undergo global motions. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and describe analytically how some Hamiltonian terms are susceptible to sample motions, and it is their removal through the critical π/2 Z-rotational symmetry that confers the “motion adapted” property to the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence. This leads to the design of separated local field pulse sequence “Motion-adapted SAMPI4” and is generalized to an approach for the design of decoupling sequences whose performance is superior in the presence of molecular motions. It works by cancelling the spin interaction by explicitly averaging the reduced Wigner matrix to zero, rather than utilizing the 2π nutation to average spin interactions. This approach is applicable to both stationary and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments. PMID:24006989

  7. Solid-State NMR Reveals the Hydrophobic-Core Location of Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimers in Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Pieter E. S.; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Dürr, Ulrich H. N.; Xu, Jiadi; Mullen, Douglas G.; Banaszak Holl, Mark M.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2010-01-01

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer nanobiotechnology shows great promise in targeted drug delivery and gene therapy. Because of the involvement of cell membrane lipids with the pharmacological activity of dendrimer nanomedicines, the interactions between dendrimers and lipids are of particular relevance to the pharmaceutical applications of dendrimers. In this study, solid-state NMR was used to obtain a molecular image of the complex of generation 5 PAMAM dendrimer with the lipid bilayer. Using 1H radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) and 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) techniques, we show that dendrimers are thermodynamically stable when inserted into zwitterionic lipid bilayers. 14N and 31P NMR experiments on static samples and measurements of the mobility of C–H bonds using a 2D proton detected local field protocol under MAS corroborate these results. The localization of dendrimers in the hydrophobic core of lipid bilayers restricts the motion of bilayer lipid tails, with the smaller G5 dendrimer having more of an effect than the larger G7 dendrimer. Fragmentation of the membrane does not occur at low dendrimer concentrations in zwitterionic membranes. Because these results show that the amphipathic dendrimer molecule can be stably incorporated in the interior of the bilayer (as opposed to electrostatic binding at the surface), they are expected to be useful in the design of dendrimer-based nanobiotechnologies. PMID:20481633

  8. Solid-state (19)F-NMR of peptides in native membranes.

    PubMed

    Koch, Katja; Afonin, Sergii; Ieronimo, Marco; Berditsch, Marina; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-01-01

    To understand how membrane-active peptides (MAPs) function in vivo, it is essential to obtain structural information about them in their membrane-bound state. Most biophysical approaches rely on the use of bilayers prepared from synthetic phospholipids, i.e. artificial model membranes. A particularly successful structural method is solid-state NMR, which makes use of macroscopically oriented lipid bilayers to study selectively isotope-labelled peptides. Native biomembranes, however, have a far more complex lipid composition and a significant non-lipidic content (protein and carbohydrate). Model membranes, therefore, are not really adequate to address questions concerning for example the selectivity of these membranolytic peptides against prokaryotic vs eukaryotic cells, their varying activities against different bacterial strains, or other related biological issues.Here, we discuss a solid-state (19)F-NMR approach that has been developed for structural studies of MAPs in lipid bilayers, and how this can be translated to measurements in native biomembranes. We review the essentials of the methodology and discuss key objectives in the practice of (19)F-labelling of peptides. Furthermore, the preparation of macroscopically oriented biomembranes on solid supports is discussed in the context of other membrane models. Two native biomembrane systems are presented as examples: human erythrocyte ghosts as representatives of eukaryotic cell membranes, and protoplasts from Micrococcus luteus as membranes from Gram-positive bacteria. Based on our latest experimental experience with the antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S, the benefits and some implicit drawbacks of using such supported native membranes in solid-state (19)F-NMR analysis are discussed.

  9. Solid state 77Se NMR investigations on arsenic-selenium glasses and crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, Bruno; Troles, Johann; LeFloch, Marie; Smektala, Frédéric; Silly, Gilles; Lucas, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Some resolved solid state 77Se NMR spectra are presented in the As xSe 1- x glass family at ambient temperature. They exhibit three different kinds of Se environments. A comparison with the parent crystalline phases permits to assign the lines to Se- Se-Se, Se- Se-As and As- Se-As Se atom neighborhoods. The measurements of the relative intensities of the lines prove the validity of the intermediate range order structural model known as the "chains crossing model" which is based on AsSe 3 pyramids homogeneously distributed among the divalent Se atoms network. In particular, any scenario involving a selenium clustering process is refuted.

  10. 6-Aminopenicillanic acid revisited: A combined solid state NMR and in silico refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Daniel Lima Marques de; San Gil, Rosane Aguiar da Silva; Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca de; Souza, Eugenio Furtado de; Borré, Leandro Bandeira; Vaiss, Viviane da Silva; Leitão, Alexandre Amaral

    2016-09-01

    13C/15N (experimental and ab initio) solid-state NMR was used to achieve an affordable way to improve hydrogen refinement of 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) structure. The lattice effect on the isotropic chemical shifts was probed by using two different magnetic shielding calculations: isolated molecules and periodic crystal structure. The electron density difference maps of optimized and non-optimized structures were calculated in order to investigate the interactions inside the 6-APA unit cell. The 13C and 15N chemical shifts assignments were unambiguously stablished. In addition, some of the literature 13C resonances ambiguities could be properly solved.

  11. Structural modeling of Vpu from HIV-1 based on solid-state NMR observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, SeonJoo; Lim, GyuTae; Nam, Seungyoon; Lee, Jinhyuk

    2014-04-01

    Vpu is one of the accessory proteins of HIV-1, and is involved in viral particle release. Viral particle release is enhanced by two proposed functions of Vpu: (i) tetherin interaction and (ii) membrane polarization. Two Vpu functions in viral particle release are still controversial. Here, we investigated the proposed functions by extensive structural modeling of Vpu based on solid-state NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) observables. We found that Vpu can co-exist in two structural forms: left-handed and right-handed conformation. The co-existence of the two conformations provides a clue to reconcile the controversial issue of its two functions in virus particle release.

  12. On the predictions of the 11B solid state NMR parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernek, Jiří; Brus, Jiří

    2016-07-01

    The set of boron containing compounds has been subject to the prediction of the 11B solid state NMR spectral parameters using DFT-GIPAW methods properly treating the solid phase effects. The quantification of the differences between measured and theoretical values has been presented, which is directly applicable in structural studies involving 11B nuclei. In particular, a simple scheme has been proposed, which is expected to provide for an estimate of the 11B chemical shift within ±2.0 ppm from the experimental value. The computer program, INFOR, enabling the visualization of concomitant Euler rotations related to the tensorial transformations has been presented.

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of nitroxide-based oligoradicals for low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Yau, Wai-Ming; Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2014-07-01

    We describe the synthesis of new nitroxide-based biradical, triradical, and tetraradical compounds and the evaluation of their performance as paramagnetic dopants in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with magic-angle spinning (MAS). Under our experimental conditions, which include temperatures in the 25-30 K range, a 9.4 T magnetic field, MAS frequencies of 6.2-6.8 kHz, and microwave irradiation at 264.0 GHz from a 800 mW extended interaction oscillator source, the most effective compounds are triradicals that are related to the previously-described compound DOTOPA-TEMPO (see Thurber et al., 2010), but have improved solubility in glycerol/water solvent near neutral pH. Using these compounds at 30 mM total nitroxide concentration, we observe DNP enhancement factors of 92-128 for cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals from (15)N,(13)C-labeled melittin in partially protonated glycerol/water, and build-up times of 2.6-3.8s for (1)H spin polarizations. Net sensitivity enhancements with biradical and tetraradical dopants, taking into account absolute (13)C NMR signal amplitudes and build-up times, are approximately 2-4 times lower than with the best triradicals. PMID:24887201

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of nitroxide-based oligoradicals for low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization in solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, Wai-Ming; Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-07-01

    We describe the synthesis of new nitroxide-based biradical, triradical, and tetraradical compounds and the evaluation of their performance as paramagnetic dopants in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with magic-angle spinning (MAS). Under our experimental conditions, which include temperatures in the 25-30 K range, a 9.4 T magnetic field, MAS frequencies of 6.2-6.8 kHz, and microwave irradiation at 264.0 GHz from a 800 mW extended interaction oscillator source, the most effective compounds are triradicals that are related to the previously-described compound DOTOPA-TEMPO (see Thurber et al., 2010), but have improved solubility in glycerol/water solvent near neutral pH. Using these compounds at 30 mM total nitroxide concentration, we observe DNP enhancement factors of 92-128 for cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled melittin in partially protonated glycerol/water, and build-up times of 2.6-3.8 s for 1H spin polarizations. Net sensitivity enhancements with biradical and tetraradical dopants, taking into account absolute 13C NMR signal amplitudes and build-up times, are approximately 2-4 times lower than with the best triradicals.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of nitroxide-based oligoradicals for low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization in solid state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Wai-Ming; Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of new nitroxide-based biradical, triradical, and tetraradical compounds and the evaluation of their performance as paramagnetic dopants in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with magic-angle spinning (MAS). Under our experimental conditions, which include temperatures in the 25–30 K range, a 9.4 T magnetic field, MAS frequencies of 6.2–6.8 kHz, and microwave irradiation at 264.0 GHz from a 800 mW extended interaction oscillator source, the most effective compounds are triradicals that are related to the previously-described compound DOTOPA-TEMPO (see Thurber et al., 2010), but have improved solubility in glycerol/water solvent near neutral pH. Using these compounds at 30 mM total nitroxide concentration, we observe DNP enhancement factors of 92–128 for cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled melittin in partially protonated glycerol/water, and build-up times of 2.6–3.8 s for 1H spin polarizations. Net sensitivity enhancements with biradical and tetraradical dopants, taking into account absolute 13C NMR signal amplitudes and build-up times, are approximately 2–4 times lower than with the best triradicals. PMID:24887201

  16. Chemical structures of manure from conventional and phytase transgenic pigs investigated by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jingdong; Ajakaiye, Ayodele; Lan, Yeqing; Olk, Dan C; Ceballos, Michael; Zhang, Tiequan; Fan, Ming Z; Forsberg, Cecil W

    2008-03-26

    Nonpoint phosphorus (P) pollution from animal manure is becoming a serious global problem. The current solution for the swine industry includes the enzyme phytase as a component in oil meal and cereal grain-based swine diets. A long-term approach is the production of transgenic phytase pigs that express phytase in the salivary glands and secrete it in the saliva. This study provides a detailed comparison of chemical structures of manure from conventional pigs and transgenic pigs that express phytase under growing and finishing phases using new solid-state NMR techniques. Spectral editing techniques and quantitative NMR techniques were used to identify and quantify specific functional groups. Two-dimensional (1)H- (13)C heteronuclear correlation NMR was used to detect their connectivity. Manure from conventional and transgenic pigs had similar peptide, carbohydrate, and fatty acid components, while those from transgenic pigs contained more carbohydrates and fewer nonpolar alkyls. There was no consistent effect from diets with or without supplemental phosphate or growth stages. PMID:17973446

  17. The Stoichiometry of Synthetic Alunite as a Function of Hydrothermal Aging Investigated by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy, Powder X-ray Diffraction and Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grube, Elisabeth; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2015-05-01

    The stoichiometry of a series of synthetic alunite [nominally KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6] samples prepared by hydrothermal methods as a function of reaction time (1–31 days) has been investigated by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as well as solid-state 1H and 27Al magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 1H MAS NMR spectra recorded at high magnetic field (21.1 T, 900 MHz) allowed for a clear separation of the different proton environments and for quantitative determination of the aluminum vacancy concentration as a function of time. The concentration of structural defects determined from, i.e., aluminum vacancies was reduced from 4 to 1 %, as the reaction time was extended from one to 31 days based on 1H MAS NMR. This was further supported by an increase of the unit cell parameter c, which is indicative of the relative concentration of potassium defects present, from 17.261(1) to 17.324(5) Å. Solid-state 27Al MAS NMR revealed a decrease in the defect concentration as a function of time and showed the presence of 7–10 % impurities in the samples.

  18. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions. PMID:27187211

  19. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  20. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  1. STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF BIOMATERIALS USING DOUBLE-QUANTUM SOLID-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Drobny, Gary P.; Long, J. R.; Karlsson, T.; Shaw, Wendy J.; Popham, Jennifer M.; Oyler, N.; Bower, Paula M.; Stringer, J.; Gregory, D.; Mehta, M.; Stayton, Patrick S.

    2004-10-31

    Proteins directly control the nucleation and growth of biominerals, but the details of molecular recognition at the protein-biomineral interface remain poorly understood. The elucidation of recognition mechanisms at this interface may provide design principles for advanced materials development in medical and ceramic composites technologies. Here, we describe both the theory and practice of double-quantum solid-stateNMR(ssNMR) structure-determination techniques, as they are used to determine the secondary structures of surface-adsorbed peptides and proteins. In particular, we have used ssNMR dipolar techniques to provide the first high-resolution structural and dynamic characterization of a hydrated biomineralization protein, salivary statherin, adsorbed to its biologically relevant hydroxyapatite (HAP) surface. Here, we also review NMR data on peptides designed to adsorb from aqueous solutions onto highly porous hydrophobic surfaces with specific helical secondary structures. The adsorption or covalent attachment of biological macromolecules onto polymer materials to improve their biocompatibility has been pursued using a variety of approaches, but key to understanding their efficacy is the verification of the structure and dynamics of the immobilized biomolecules using double-quantum ssNMR spectroscopy.

  2. Solid-state 29Si MAS NMR studies of diatoms: structural characterization of biosilica deposits.

    PubMed

    Bertermann, R; Kröger, N; Tacke, R

    2003-03-01

    Four different diatom species (Chaetoceros debilis, Chaetoceros didymum, Cylindrotheca fusiformis, Nitzschia angularis) were studied by solid-state (29)Si MAS NMR spectroscopy. To determine the Q(2):Q(3):Q(4) ratios in the biosilica deposits of the diatoms, quantitative (29)Si MAS NMR experiments were performed. This analysis did not reveal any differences regarding the molecular architecture of the silica (i.e. the degree of condensation of the SiOH units (2 identical with SiOH --> identical with Si-O-Si identical with + H(2)O)) from the different diatom species. However, complete cells showed significantly smaller Q(4):Q(3) ratios (1.8-1.9) than extracted cell walls (2.5-2.8), indicating the existence of intracellular pools of less condensed silica.

  3. Labeling strategies for 13C-detected aligned-sample solid-state NMR of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipp, Fabian V.; Sinha, Neeraj; Jairam, Lena; Bradley, Joel; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-12-01

    13C-detected solid-state NMR experiments have substantially higher sensitivity than the corresponding 15N-detected experiments on stationary, aligned samples of isotopically labeled proteins. Several methods for tailoring the isotopic labeling are described that result in spatially isolated 13C sites so that dipole-dipole couplings among the 13C are minimized, thus eliminating the need for homonuclear 13C- 13C decoupling in either indirect or direct dimensions of one- or multi-dimensional NMR experiments that employ 13C detection. The optimal percentage for random fractional 13C labeling is between 25% and 35%. Specifically labeled glycerol and glucose can be used at the carbon sources to tailor the isotopic labeling, and the choice depends on the resonances of interest for a particular study. For investigations of the protein backbone, growth of the bacteria on [2- 13C]-glucose-containing media was found to be most effective.

  4. HCN polymers characterized by solid state NMR: Chains and sheets formed in the neat liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamajanov, Irena; Herzfeld, Judith

    2009-04-01

    Hydrogen cyanide polymerizes readily under a variety of conditions and significant prebiotic roles have been suggested for these polymers due to the abundance of HCN in universe. However, the structures of HCN polymers have been more speculative than grounded in experimental data. Here we show that C13 and N15 solid state NMR spectra of polymers formed in neat HCN are inconsistent with the previously proposed structures and suggest instead that the polymers are formed by simple monomer addition, first in head-to-tail fashion to form linear, conjugated chains, and then laterally to form saturated two-dimensional networks. This interpretation of the NMR spectra finds support in other information about the polymerization of neat HCN, including the presence of free radicals. As expected from the literature, formation of the HCN tetramer, diaminomaleonitrile, is also observed, but only when the reaction is catalyzed exclusively by base and then in crystalline form.

  5. 23Na and 1H NMR Microimaging of Intact Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olt, Silvia; Krötz, Eva; Komor, Ewald; Rokitta, Markus; Haase, Axel

    2000-06-01

    23Na NMR microimaging is described to map, for the first time, the sodium distribution in living plants. As an example, the response of 6-day-old seedlings of Ricinus communis to exposure to sodium chloride concentrations from 5 to 300 mM was observed in vivo using 23Na as well as 1H NMR microimaging. Experiments were performed at 11.75 T with a double resonant 23Na-1H probehead. The probehead was homebuilt and equipped with a climate chamber. T1 and T2 of 23Na were measured in the cross section of the hypocotyl. Within 85 min 23Na images with an in-plane resolution of 156 × 156 μm were acquired. With this spatial information, the different types of tissue in the hypocotyl can be discerned. The measurement time appears to be short compared to the time scale of sodium uptake and accumulation in the plant so that the kinetics of salt stress can be followed. In conclusion, 23Na NMR microimaging promises great potential for physiological studies of the consequences of salt stress on the macroscopic level and thus may become a unique tool for characterizing plants with respect to salt tolerance and salt sensitivity.

  6. Resolution and measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings of a noncrystalline protein immobilized in a biological supramolecular assembly by proton-detected MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Ho; Yang, Chen; Opella, Stanley J.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional 15N chemical shift/1H chemical shift and three-dimensional 1H-15N dipolar coupling/15N chemical shift/1H chemical shift MAS solid-state NMR correlation spectra of the filamentous bacteriophage Pf1 major coat protein show single-site resolution in noncrystalline, intact-phage preparations. The high sensitivity and resolution result from 1H detection at 600 MHz under 50 kHz magic angle spinning using ∼0.5 mg of perdeuterated and uniformly 15N-labeled protein in which the exchangeable amide sites are partially or completely back-exchanged (reprotonated). Notably, the heteronuclear 1H-15N dipolar coupling frequency dimension is shown to select among 15N resonances, which will be useful in structural studies of larger proteins where the resonances exhibit a high degree of overlap in multidimensional chemical shift correlation spectra.

  7. A multinuclear solid state NMR spectroscopic study of the structural evolution of disordered calcium silicate sol-gel biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhongjie; Jones, Julian R; Hanna, John V; Smith, Mark E

    2015-01-28

    Disordered sol-gel prepared calcium silicate biomaterials show significant, composition dependent ability to bond with bone. Bone bonding is attributed to rapid hydroxycarbonate apatite (HCA) formation on the glass surface after immersion in body fluid (or implantation). Atomic scale details of the development of the structure of (CaO)x(SiO2)1-x (x = 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5) under heat treatment and subsequent dissolution in simulated body fluid (SBF) are revealed through a multinuclear solid state NMR approach using one-dimensional (17)O, (29)Si, (31)P and (1)H. Central to this study is the combination of conventional static and magic angle spinning (MAS) and two-dimensional (2D) triple quantum (3Q) (17)O NMR experiments that can readily distinguish and quantify the bridging (BOs) and non-bridging (NBOs) oxygens in the silicate network. Although soluble calcium is present in the sol, the (17)O NMR results reveal that the sol-gel produced network structure is initially dominated by BOs after gelation, aging and drying (e.g. at 120 °C), indicating a nanoscale mixture of the calcium salt and a predominantly silicate network. Only once the calcium salt is decomposed at elevated temperatures do the Ca(2+) ions become available to break BO. Apatite forming ability in SBF depends strongly on the surface OH and calcium content. The presence of calcium aids HCA formation via promotion of surface hydration and the ready availability of Ca(2+) ions. (17)O NMR shows the rapid loss of NBOs charge balanced by calcium as it is leached into the SBF. The formation of nanocrystalline, partially ordered HCA can be detected via(31)P NMR. This data indicates the importance of achieving the right balance of BO/NBO for optimal biochemical response and network properties.

  8. A multinuclear solid state NMR spectroscopic study of the structural evolution of disordered calcium silicate sol-gel biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhongjie; Jones, Julian R; Hanna, John V; Smith, Mark E

    2015-01-28

    Disordered sol-gel prepared calcium silicate biomaterials show significant, composition dependent ability to bond with bone. Bone bonding is attributed to rapid hydroxycarbonate apatite (HCA) formation on the glass surface after immersion in body fluid (or implantation). Atomic scale details of the development of the structure of (CaO)x(SiO2)1-x (x = 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5) under heat treatment and subsequent dissolution in simulated body fluid (SBF) are revealed through a multinuclear solid state NMR approach using one-dimensional (17)O, (29)Si, (31)P and (1)H. Central to this study is the combination of conventional static and magic angle spinning (MAS) and two-dimensional (2D) triple quantum (3Q) (17)O NMR experiments that can readily distinguish and quantify the bridging (BOs) and non-bridging (NBOs) oxygens in the silicate network. Although soluble calcium is present in the sol, the (17)O NMR results reveal that the sol-gel produced network structure is initially dominated by BOs after gelation, aging and drying (e.g. at 120 °C), indicating a nanoscale mixture of the calcium salt and a predominantly silicate network. Only once the calcium salt is decomposed at elevated temperatures do the Ca(2+) ions become available to break BO. Apatite forming ability in SBF depends strongly on the surface OH and calcium content. The presence of calcium aids HCA formation via promotion of surface hydration and the ready availability of Ca(2+) ions. (17)O NMR shows the rapid loss of NBOs charge balanced by calcium as it is leached into the SBF. The formation of nanocrystalline, partially ordered HCA can be detected via(31)P NMR. This data indicates the importance of achieving the right balance of BO/NBO for optimal biochemical response and network properties. PMID:25494341

  9. Solid-state NMR analyses of the structure and dynamics of polymers in the different states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Fumitaka; Kaji, Hironori; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Kuwabara, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Kenji; Tai, Toshihiro

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews our recent investigations of the structure and molecular motions of synthetic polymers in the different states, which were mainly carried out by solid-state 13C or 2H NMR spectroscopy. First, the crystalline-noncrystalline structure is characterized in detail for metallocene-catalyzed linear low density polyethylene, which was isothermally crystallized from the melt. Secondly, the characteristic chain conformation, the alternate trans and rapid trans-gauche exchange conformation, is revealed for the spacer methylene sequence in the frozen liquid crystalline region for thermotropic liquid crystalline polyurethane, which was crystallized from the isotropic phase through the nematic liquid crystalline phase. Thirdly, different types of splittings of CH resonance lines, which will be induced mainly by the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the triad sequence, are shown in the frozen solution states for poly(vinyl alcohol) samples with different tacticities. It is finally pointed out by solid-state 2H NMR analyses that both distributions in flip frequency and in flip angle should be taken into account for the precise characterization of the phenylene flip motion in glassy poly(ethylene terephthalate).

  10. Probing Quadrupolar Nuclei by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Christian; Pruski, Marek

    2011-06-08

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of quadrupolar nuclei has recently undergone remarkable development of capabilities for obtaining structural and dynamic information at the molecular level. This review summarizes the key achievements attained during the last couple of decades in solid-state NMR of both integer spin and half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei. We provide a concise description of the first- and second-order quadrupolar interactions, and their effect on the static and magic angle spinning (MAS) spectra. Methods are explained for efficient excitation of single- and multiple-quantum coherences, and acquisition of spectra under low- and high-resolution conditions. Most of all, we present a coherent, comparative description of the high-resolution methods for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei, including double rotation (DOR), dynamic angle spinning (DAS), multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS), and satellite transition magic angle spinning (STMAS). Also highlighted are methods for processing and analysis of the spectra. Finally, we review methods for probing the heteronuclear and homonuclear correlations between the quadrupolar nuclei and their quadrupolar or spin-1/2 neighbors.

  11. β-Helical architecture of cytoskeletal bactofilin filaments revealed by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Vasa, Suresh; Lin, Lin; Shi, Chaowei; Habenstein, Birgit; Riedel, Dietmar; Kühn, Juliane; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a widespread class of bacterial filament-forming proteins, which serve as cytoskeletal scaffolds in various cellular pathways. They are characterized by a conserved architecture, featuring a central conserved domain (DUF583) that is flanked by variable terminal regions. Here, we present a detailed investigation of bactofilin filaments from Caulobacter crescentus by high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy. De novo sequential resonance assignments were obtained for residues Ala39 to Phe137, spanning the conserved DUF583 domain. Analysis of the secondary chemical shifts shows that this core region adopts predominantly β-sheet secondary structure. Mutational studies of conserved hydrophobic residues located in the identified β-strand segments suggest that bactofilin folding and polymerization is mediated by an extensive and redundant network of hydrophobic interactions, consistent with the high intrinsic stability of bactofilin polymers. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a propensity of bactofilin to form filament bundles as well as sheet-like, 2D crystalline assemblies, which may represent the supramolecular arrangement of bactofilin in the native context. Based on the diffraction pattern of these 2D crystalline assemblies, scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements of the mass per length of BacA filaments, and the distribution of β-strand segments identified by solid-state NMR, we propose that the DUF583 domain adopts a β-helical architecture, in which 18 β-strand segments are arranged in six consecutive windings of a β-helix. PMID:25550503

  12. New structural information on a humic acid from two-dimensional 1H-13C correlation solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Mao, J D; Xing, B; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2001-05-15

    New information on the chemical structure of a peat humic acid has been obtained using a series of two-dimensional 1H-13C heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR (HETCOR) experiments with different contact times and with spectral editing by dipolar dephasing and 13C transverse relaxation filtering. Carbon-bonded methyl groups (C-CH3) are found to be near both aliphatic and O-alkyl but not aromatic groups. The spectra prove that most OCH3 groups are connected directly with the aromatic rings, as is typical in lignin. As a result, about one-third of the aromatic C-O groups is not phenolic C-OH but C-OCH3. Both protonated and unprotonated anomeric O-C-O carbons are identified in the one- and two-dimensional spectra. COO groups are found predominantly in OCHn-COO environments, but some are also bonded to aromatic rings and aliphatic groups. All models of humic acids in the literature lack at least some of the features observed here. Compositional heterogeneity was studied by introducing 1H spin diffusion into the HETCOR experiment. Comparison with data for a synthetic polymer, polycarbonate, indicates that the separation between O-alkyl and aromatic groups in the humic acid is less than 1.5 nm. However, transverse 13C relaxation filtering under 1H decoupling reveals heterogeneity on a nanometer scale, with the slow-relaxing component being rich in lignin-like aromatic-C-O-CH3 moieties and poor in COO groups.

  13. Chemical structure and heterogeneity differences of two lignins from loblolly pine as investigated by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advanced solid-state NMR was employed to investigate differences in chemical structure and heterogeneity between milled wood lignin (MWL) and residual enzyme lignin (REL). Wiley and conventional milled woods were also studied. The advanced NMR techniques included 13C quantitative direct polarization...

  14. Dynamic 1H NMR Studies of Schiff Base Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köylü, M. Z.; Ekinci, A.; Böyükata, M.; Temel, H.

    2016-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 and the spin-spin relaxation time T 2 of two Schiff base derivatives, N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylidene)-1,2-diaminoethane (H2L1) and N,N'-ethylenebis (salicylidene)-1,3-diaminopropane (H2L2), in DMSO-d6 solvent were studied as a function of temperature in the range of 20-50°C using a Bruker Avance 400.132 MHz 1H NMR spectrometer. Based on the activation energy ( E a) and correlation time (τc), we believe that the Schiff base derivatives perform a molecular tumbling motion.

  15. Solid-state and unilateral NMR study of deterioration of a Dead Sea Scroll fragment.

    PubMed

    Masic, A; Chierotti, M R; Gobetto, R; Martra, G; Rabin, I; Coluccia, S

    2012-02-01

    Unilateral and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses were performed on a parchment fragment of the Dead Sea Scroll (DSS). The analyzed sample belongs to the collection of non-inscribed and nontreated fragments of known archaeological provenance from the John Rylands University Library in Manchester. Therefore, it can be considered as original DSS material free from any contamination related to the post-discovery period. Considering the paramount significance of the DSS, noninvasive approaches and portable in situ nondestructive methods are of fundamental importance for the determination of composition, structure, and chemical-physical properties of the materials under study. NMR studies reveal low amounts of water content associated with very short proton relaxation times, T(1), indicating a high level of deterioration of collagen molecules within scroll fragments. In addition, (13)C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy shows characteristic peaks of lipids whose presence we attribute to the production technology that did not involve liming. Extraction with chloroform led to the reduction of both lipid and protein signals in the (13)C CPMAS spectrum indicating probable involvement of lipids in parchment degradation processes. NMR absorption and relaxation measurements provide nondestructive, discriminative, and sensitive tools for studying the deterioration effects on the organization and properties of water and collagen within ancient manuscripts.

  16. Solid-State NMR Imaging by Tetrahedral-Magic-Echo Time-Suspension Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, S.; Uraoka, A.; Inouye, T.

    A new approach to solid-state imaging using tetrahedral magic echoes (TME) is proposed and compared with the previously reported modified-magic-echo (MME) approaches. The comparison has shown that for common organic solids, where the homonuclear 1H- 1H dipolar interaction is dominant, the degree of TME line narrowing is nearly the same as that of time-suspended MME line narrowing; however, the TME narrowing is substantially superior to the MME narrowing for solids where the heteronuclear dipolar interaction between 1H and a second spin species is comparable in magnitude to the homonuclear 1H- 1H dipolar interaction. This superiority stems from the fact that the homonuclear and hereronuclear interactions do not commute with each other. The TME approach further possesses certain practical advantages over the MME approaches. For example, the optional application of gradient pulses during the RF irradiation periods in the TME sequences increases the scaling factor of the gradient amplitude from {1}/{4} to {1}/{2}, making the gradient switching easier. No apparent deterioration of the TME line-narrowing by the optional gradient application was noted.

  17. Characterization of zeolite structure and fluorocarbon reactivity using solid state NMR and x-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciraolo, Michael Frank

    reactions. The preference between these two reactions should be related to the relative importance of the interactions with the basic oxygen atoms and the cations. RbX is considered a basic zeolite while ZnX should have more acidic character, which should be reflected in differences in product distribution. The positions of the exchanged cations and the residual sodium cations of both exchanged zeolites have been located and the products formed during reaction have been identified. To investigate possible methods to achieve high levels of cation substitution, NH4Y has been ion exchanged with solid Rb2CO3 to form RbY. This process has been followed with x-ray powder diffraction, mass spectrometry and NMR. It has been shown that exchange begins on grinding and no rubidium oxide or new carbonate phases were observed to form during the exchange. The positions of the cations of the final exchanged RbY product have been located with Rietveld analysis. It has also been shown that 1H and 87Rb MAS NMR is very sensitive to the level of hydration of the zeolite and has been used to follow the solid state exchange process.

  18. Solid-state NMR analysis of membrane proteins and protein aggregates by proton detected spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Comellas, Gemma; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Tang, Ming; Shah, Gautam J.; Brea, Elliott J.; Lemkau, Luisel R.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state NMR has emerged as an important tool for structural biology and chemistry, capable of solving atomic-resolution structures for proteins in membrane-bound and aggregated states. Proton detection methods have been recently realized under fast magic-angle spinning conditions, providing large sensitivity enhancements for efficient examination of uniformly labeled proteins. The first and often most challenging step of protein structure determination by NMR is the site-specific resonance assignment. Here we demonstrate resonance assignments based on high-sensitivity proton-detected three-dimensional experiments for samples of different physical states, including a fully-protonated small protein (GB1, 6 kDa), a deuterated microcrystalline protein (DsbA, 21 kDa), a membrane protein (DsbB, 20 kDa) prepared in a lipid environment, and the extended core of a fibrillar protein (α-synuclein, 14 kDa). In our implementation of these experiments, including CONH, CO(CA)NH, CANH, CA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and CBCA(CO)NH, dipolar-based polarization transfer methods have been chosen for optimal efficiency for relatively high protonation levels (full protonation or 100 % amide proton), fast magic-angle spinning conditions (40 kHz) and moderate proton decoupling power levels. Each H–N pair correlates exclusively to either intra- or inter-residue carbons, but not both, to maximize spectral resolution. Experiment time can be reduced by at least a factor of 10 by using proton detection in comparison to carbon detection. These high-sensitivity experiments are especially important for membrane proteins, which often have rather low expression yield. Proton-detection based experiments are expected to play an important role in accelerating protein structure elucidation by solid-state NMR with the improved sensitivity and resolution. PMID:22986689

  19. Solid state NMR and LVSEM studies on the hardening of latex modified tile mortar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rottstegge, J.; Arnold, M.; Herschke, L.; Glasser, G.; Wilhelm, M.; Spiess, H.W. . E-mail: spiess@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Hergeth, W.D.

    2005-12-15

    Construction mortars contain a broad variety of both inorganic and organic additives beside the cement powder. Here we present a study of tile mortar systems based on portland cement, quartz, methyl cellulose and different latex additives. As known, the methyl cellulose stabilizes the freshly prepared cement paste, the latex additive enhances final hydrophobicity, flexibility and adhesion. Measurements were performed by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and low voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) to probe the influence of the latex additives on the hydration, hardening and the final tile mortar properties. While solid state NMR enables monitoring of the bulk composition, scanning electron microscopy affords visualization of particles and textures with respect to their shape and the distribution of the different phases. Within the alkaline cement paste, the poly(vinyl acetate) (VAc)-based latex dispersions stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were found to be relatively stable against hydrolysis. The influence of the combined organic additives methyl cellulose, poly(vinyl alcohol) and latexes stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) on the final silicate structure of the cement hydration products is small. But even small amounts of additives result in an increased ratio of ettringite to monosulfate within the final hydrated tile mortar as monitored by {sup 27}Al NMR. The latex was found to be adsorbed to the inorganic surfaces, acting as glue to the inorganic components. For similar latex water interfaces built up by poly(vinyl alcohol), a variation in the latex polymer composition results in modified organic textures. In addition to the networks of the inorganic cement and of the latex, there is a weak network build up by thin polymer fibers, most probably originating from poly(vinyl alcohol). Besides the weak network, polymer fibers form well-ordered textures covering inorganic crystals such as portlandite.

  20. Advanced solid-state NMR characterization of marine dissolved organic matter isolated using the coupled reverse osmosis/electrodialysis method.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jingdong; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Pignatello, Joseph J; Perdue, E Michael

    2012-06-01

    Advanced (13)C solid-state techniques were employed to investigate the major structural characteristics of two surface-seawater dissolved organic matter (DOM) samples isolated using the novel coupled reverse osmosis/electrodialysis method. The NMR techniques included quantitative (13)C direct polarization/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) and DP/MAS with recoupled dipolar dephasing, (13)C cross-polarization/total sideband suppression (CP/TOSS), (13)C chemical shift anisotropy filter, CH, CH(2), and CH(n) selection, two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation NMR (2D HETCOR), 2D HETCOR combined with dipolar dephasing, and (15)N cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS). The two samples (Coastal and Marine DOM) were collected at the mouth of the Ogeechee River and in the Gulf Stream, respectively. The NMR results indicated that they were structurally distinct. Coastal DOM contained significantly more aromatic and carbonyl carbons whereas Marine DOM was markedly enriched in alkoxy carbon (e.g., carbohydrate-like moieties). Both samples contained significant amide N, but Coastal DOM had nitrogen bonded to aromatic carbons. Our dipolar-dephased spectra indicated that a large fraction of alkoxy carbons were not protonated. For Coastal DOM, our NMR results were consistent with the presence of the major structural units of (1) carbohydrate-like moieties, (2) lignin residues, (3) peptides or amino sugars, and (4) COO-bonded alkyls. For Marine DOM, they were (1) carbohydrate-like moieties, (2) peptides or amino sugars, and (3) COO-bonded alkyls. In addition, both samples contained significant amounts of nonpolar alkyl groups. The potential sources of the major structural units of DOM were discussed in detail. Nonprotonated O-alkyl carbon content was proposed as a possible index of humification. PMID:22553962

  1. The 1H NMR Profile of Healthy Dog Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Musteata, Mihai; Nicolescu, Alina; Solcan, Gheorghe; Deleanu, Calin

    2013-01-01

    The availability of data for reference values in cerebrospinal fluid for healthy humans is limited due to obvious practical and ethical issues. The variability of reported values for metabolites in human cerebrospinal fluid is quite large. Dogs present great similarities with humans, including in cases of central nervous system pathologies. The paper presents the first study on healthy dog cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile using 1H NMR spectroscopy. A number of 13 metabolites have been identified and quantified from cerebrospinal fluid collected from a group of 10 mix breed healthy dogs. The biological variability as resulting from the relative standard deviation of the physiological concentrations of the identified metabolites had a mean of 18.20% (range between 9.3% and 44.8%). The reported concentrations for metabolites may be used as normal reference values. The homogeneity of the obtained results and the low biologic variability show that the 1H NMR analysis of the dog’s cerebrospinal fluid is reliable in designing and interpreting clinical and therapeutic trials in dogs with central nervous system pathologies. PMID:24376499

  2. Using solid-state NMR to monitor the molecular consequences of Cryptococcus neoformans melanization with different catecholamine precursors.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Frases, Susana; Itin, Boris; Casadevall, Arturo; Stark, Ruth E

    2012-08-01

    Melanins are a class of natural pigments associated with a wide range of biological functions, including microbial virulence, energy transduction, and protection against solar radiation. Because of their insolubility and structural heterogeneity, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides an unprecedented means to define the molecular architecture of these enigmatic pigments. The requirement of obligatory catecholamines for melanization of the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans also offers unique opportunities for investigating melanin development. In the current study, pigments produced with L-dopa, methyl-L-dopa, epinephrine, and norepinephrine precursors are compared structurally using (13)C and (1)H magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR. Striking structural differences were observed for both aromatic and aliphatic molecular constituents of the mature fungal pigment assemblies, thus making it possible to redefine the molecular prerequisites for formation of the aromatic domains of insoluble indole-based biopolymers, to rationalize their distinctive physical characteristics, and to delineate the role of cellular constituents in assembly of the melanized macromolecules with polysaccharides and fatty acyl chain-containing moieties. By achieving an augmented understanding of the mechanisms of C. neoformans melanin biosynthesis and cellular assembly, such studies can guide future drug discovery efforts related to melanin-associated virulence, resistance to tumor therapy, and production of melanin mimetics under cell-free conditions.

  3. Using Solid-state NMR to Monitor the Molecular Consequences of Cryptococcus neoformans Melanization with Different Catecholamine Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Frases, Susana; Itin, Boris; Casadevall, Arturo; Stark, Ruth E.

    2012-01-01

    Melanins are a class of natural pigments associated with a wide range of biological functions, including microbial virulence, energy transduction, and protection against solar radiation. Because of their insolubility and structural heterogeneity, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides an unprecedented means to define the molecular architecture of these enigmatic pigments. The requirement of obligatory catecholamines for melanization of the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans also offers unique opportunities for investigating melanin development. In the current study, pigments produced with L-dopa, methyl-L-dopa, epinephrine, and norepinephrine precursors are compared structurally using 13C and 1H magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR. Striking structural differences were observed for both aromatic and aliphatic molecular constituents of the mature fungal pigment assemblies, thus making it possible to redefine the molecular prerequisites for formation of the aromatic domains of insoluble indole-based biopolymers, to rationalize their distinctive physical characteristics, and to delineate the role of cellular constituents in assembly of the melanized macromolecules with polysaccharides and fatty acyl chain-containing moieties. By achieving an augmented understanding of the mechanisms of C. neoformans melanin biosynthesis and cellular assembly, such studies can guide future drug discovery efforts related to melanin-associated virulence, resistance to tumor therapy, and production of melanin mimetics under cell-free conditions. PMID:22765382

  4. Tacrine derivatives-acetylcholinesterase interaction: 1H NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Delfini, Maurizio; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Piccioni, Fabiana; Porcelli, Fernando; Borioni, Anna; Rodomonte, Andrea; Del Giudice, Maria Rosaria

    2007-06-01

    Two acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors structurally related to Tacrine, 6-methoxytacrine (1a) and 9-heptylamino-6-methoxytacrine (1b), and their interaction with Electrophorus Electricus AChE were investigated. The complete assignment of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 1a and 1b was performed by mono-dimensional and homo- and hetero-correlated two-dimensional NMR experiments. This study was undertaken to elucidate the interaction modes between AChE and 1a and 1b in solution, using NMR. The interaction between the two inhibitors and AChE was studied by the analysis of the motional parameters non-selective and selective spin-lattice relaxation times, thereby allowing the motional state of 1a and 1b, both free and bound with AChE, to be defined. The relaxation data pointed out the ligands molecular moiety most involved in the binding with AChE. The relevant ligand/enzyme interaction constants were also evaluated for both compounds and resulted to be 859 and 5412M(-1) for 1a and1b, respectively.

  5. Solid state NMR study of SEI formation in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dachun

    Recently, rechargeable lithium ion batteries, which offer high energy density and long cycle life, are in great demand as power sources for our mobile electronic society. The formation of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the surface of electrodes in lithium ion batteries plays an essential role in their performance. This thesis presents solid state NMR and MAS NMR results on the SEI, which contribute to our understanding of SEI formation on both cathodes and anodes. This thesis is organized as following: Chapter 1 surveys the history of batteries and the challenges to further development of the lithium ion battery. Fundamental aspects and SEI formation mechanisms are also included in Chapter l. Chapter 2 deals with the principles and experimental techniques of solid state NMR. Chapter 3 presents studies of SEI formation on anode and cathode in lithium ion batteries using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and NMR. The results provide EIS and NMR evidence that cells containing electrolytes with high EC content display less irreversible capacity after high temperature storage. The irreversible capacity is attributed to SEI growth on electrode surfaces. NMR results on cathodes, on the other hand, imply that the presence of Ni in the cathode may reduce cell performance due to the oxidation of Ni 3+ to Ni4+. Our simulations show that a lower EC/DMC ratio is associated with a smaller SEI intensity for the cathode and higher intensity for the anode. Chapter 4 discusses the effect of temperature on SEI formation on anodes and cathodes. NMR measurements show that MCMB graphite based anodes exhibit high stability no chemical shift is evident over a wide temperature range. On cathodes, however, NMR does reveal changes in SEI intensity as a function of temperature. These changes are believed to be the result of decomposition of the SEI. Evidently, then, changes in the performance of the cell as a factor of temperature are, at least in part, due to changes in

  6. The interaction of small molecules with phospholipid membranes studied by 1H NOESY NMR under magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, Holger A; Huster, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of small molecules with lipid membranes and the exact knowledge of their binding site and bilayer distribution is of great pharmacological importance and represents an active field of current biophysical research. Over the last decade, a highly resolved 1H solid-state NMR method has been developed that allows measuring localization and distribution of small molecules in membranes. The classical solution 1H NMR NOESY technique is applied to lipid membrane samples under magic-angle spinning (MAS) and NOESY cross-relaxation rates are determined quantitatively. These rates are proportional to the contact probability between molecular segments and therefore an ideal tool to study intermolecular interactions in membranes. Here, we review recent 1H MAS NOESY applications that were carried out to study lateral lipid organization in mixed membranes and the interaction of membranes with water, ethanol, small aromatic compounds, peptides, fluorescence labels, and lipophilic nucleosides.

  7. Action of the multifunctional peptide BP100 on native biomembranes examined by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Misiewicz, Julia; Afonin, Sergii; Grage, Stephan L; van den Berg, Jonas; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-04-01

    Membrane composition is a key factor that regulates the destructive activity of antimicrobial peptides and the non-leaky permeation of cell penetrating peptides in vivo. Hence, the choice of model membrane is a crucial aspect in NMR studies and should reflect the biological situation as closely as possible. Here, we explore the structure and dynamics of the short multifunctional peptide BP100 using a multinuclear solid-state NMR approach. The membrane alignment and mobility of this 11 amino acid peptide was studied in various synthetic lipid bilayers with different net charge, fluidity, and thickness, as well as in native biomembranes harvested from prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. (19)F-NMR provided the high sensitivity and lack of natural abundance background that are necessary to observe a labelled peptide even in protoplast membranes from Micrococcus luteus and in erythrocyte ghosts. Six selectively (19)F-labeled BP100 analogues gave remarkably similar spectra in all of the macroscopically oriented membrane systems, which were studied under quasi-native conditions of ambient temperature and full hydration. This similarity suggests that BP100 has the same surface-bound helical structure and high mobility in the different biomembranes and model membranes alike, independent of charge, thickness or cholesterol content of the system. (31)P-NMR spectra of the phospholipid components did not indicate any bilayer perturbation, so the formation of toroidal wormholes or micellarization can be excluded as a mechanism of its antimicrobial or cell penetrating action. However, (2)H-NMR analysis of the acyl chain order parameter profiles showed that BP100 leads to considerable membrane thinning and thereby local destabilization.

  8. Cellular Solid-State NMR Investigation of a Membrane Protein Using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Caporini, Marc A.; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    While an increasing number of structural biology studies successfully demonstrate the power of high-resolution structures and dynamics of membrane proteins in fully understanding their function, there is considerable interest in developing NMR approaches to obtain such information in a cellular setting. As long as the proteins inside the living cell tumble rapidly in the NMR timescale, recently developed in-cell solution NMR approaches can be applied towards the determination of 3D structural information. However, there are numerous challenges that need to be overcome to study membrane proteins inside a cell. Research in our laboratory is focused on developing a combination of solid-state NMR and biological approaches to overcome these challenges with a specific emphasis on obtaining high-resolution structural insights into electron transfer biological processes mediated by membrane-bound proteins like mammalian cytochrome b5, cytochrome P450 and cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using the signal-enhancement rendered by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy for in-cell studies on a membrane-anchored protein. Our experimental results obtained from 13C-labeled membrane-anchored cytochrome b5 in native Escherichia coli cells show a ~16-fold DNP signal enhancement (ε). Further, results obtained from a 2D 13C/13C chemical shift correlation MAS experiment demonstrates that it is highly possible to suppress the background signals from other cellular contents for high-resolution structural studies on membrane proteins. We believe that this study would pave new avenues for high-resolution 3D structural studies on a variety of membrane-associated proteins and their complexes in the cellular context to fully understand their functional roles in physiological processes. PMID:25017802

  9. Application of Solid-State NMR Relaxometry for Characterization and Formulation Optimization of Grinding-Induced Drug Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Keisuke; Higashi, Kenjirou; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2016-03-01

    The formation mechanism of drug nanoparticles was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for the efficient discovery of an optimized nanoparticle formulation. The cogrinding of nifedipine (NIF) with polymers, including hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was performed to prepare the NIF nanoparticle formulations. Then, solid-state NMR relaxometry was used for the nanometer-order characterization of NIF in the polymer matrix. Solid-state NMR measurements revealed that the crystal size of NIF was reduced to several tens of nanometers with amorphization of NIF by cogrinding with HPMC and SDS for 100 min. Similarly, the size of the NIF crystal was reduced to less than 90 nm in the 40 min ground mixture of NIF/PVP/SDS. Furthermore, 100 min grinding of NIF/PVP/SDS induced amorphization of almost all the NIF crystals followed by nanosizing. The hydrogen bond between NIF and PVP led to the efficient amorphization of NIF in the NIF/PVP/SDS system compared with NIF/HPMC/SDS system. The efficient nanosizing of the NIF crystal in the solid state, revealed by the solid-state NMR relaxation time measurements, enabled the formation of large amounts of NIF nanoparticles in water followed by the polymer dissolution. In contrast, excess amorphization of the NIF crystals failed to efficiently prepare the NIF nanoparticles. The solid-state characterization of the crystalline NIF revealed good correlation with the NIF nanoparticles formation during aqueous dispersion. Furthermore, the solid-state NMR measurements including relaxometry successfully elucidated the nanometer-order dispersion state of NIF in polymer matrix, leading to the discovery of optimized conditions for the preparation of suitable drug nanoparticles.

  10. Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chaowei; Fricke, Pascal; Lin, Lin; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Wegstroth, Melanie; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR-derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed β helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 Å precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra.

  11. Acidity characterization of heterogeneous catalysts by solid-state NMR spectroscopy using probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the surface acidic properties of solid acid catalysts is a key issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Important acid features of solid acids, such as their type (Brønsted vs. Lewis acid), distribution and accessibility (internal vs. external sites), concentration (amount), and strength of acid sites are crucial factors dictating their reactivity and selectivity. This short review provides information on different solid-state NMR techniques used for acidity characterization of solid acid catalysts. In particular, different approaches using probe molecules containing a specific nucleus of interest, such as pyridine-d5, 2-(13)C-acetone, trimethylphosphine, and trimethylphosphine oxide, are compared. Incorporation of valuable information (such as the adsorption structure, deprotonation energy, and NMR parameters) from density functional theory (DFT) calculations can yield explicit correlations between the chemical shift of adsorbed probe molecules and the intrinsic acid strength of solid acids. Methods that combine experimental NMR data with DFT calculations can therefore provide both qualitative and quantitative information on acid sites.

  12. Solid-state NMR applied to photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Anjali; de Groot, Huub J M

    2012-03-01

    This short review describes how solid-state NMR has provided a mechanistic and electronic picture of pigment-protein and pigment-pigment interactions in photosynthetic antenna complexes. NMR results on purple bacterial antenna complexes show how the packing of the protein and the pigments inside the light-harvesting oligomers induces mutual conformational stress. The protein scaffold produces deformation and electrostatic polarization of the BChl macrocycles and leads to a partial electronic charge transfer between the BChls and their coordinating histidines, which can tune the light-harvesting function. In chlorosome antennae assemblies, the NMR template structure reveals how the chromophores can direct their self-assembly into higher macrostructures which, in turn, tune the light-harvesting properties of the individual molecules by controlling their disorder, structural deformation, and electronic polarization without the need for a protein scaffold. These results pave the way for addressing the next challenge, which is to resolve the functional conformational dynamics of the lhc antennae of oxygenic species that allows them to switch between light-emitting and light-energy dissipating states.

  13. Polymorphs of Theophylline Characterized by DNP Enhanced Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We show how dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be used to characterize polymorphs and solvates of organic solids. We applied DNP to three polymorphs and one hydrated form of the asthma drug molecule theophylline. For some forms of theophylline, sample grinding and impregnation with the radical-containing solution, which are necessary to prepare the samples for DNP, were found to induce polymorphic transitions or desolvation between some forms. We present protocols for sample preparation for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) DNP experiments that avoid the polymorphic phase transitions in theophylline. These protocols include cryogrinding, grinding under inert atmosphere, and the appropriate choice of the impregnating liquid. By applying these procedures, we subsequently demonstrate that two-dimensional correlation experiments, such as 1H–13C and 1H–15N HETCOR or 13C–13C INADEQUATE, can be obtained at natural isotopic abundance in reasonable times, thus enabling more advanced structural characterization of polymorphs. PMID:26393368

  14. Methodology for solid state NMR off-resonance study of molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems.

    PubMed

    Jurga, Kazimierz; Woźniak-Braszak, Aneta; Baranowski, Mikołaj

    2015-10-01

    Methodology for the study of dynamics in heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame was described in the previous paper [1]. Now the methodology for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the rotating frame is presented. The solid state NMR off-resonance experiments were carried out on a homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz for protons. This spectrometer includes a specially designed probe which contains two independently tuned and electrically isolated coils installed in the coaxial position on the dewar. A unique probe design allows working at three slightly differing frequencies off and on resonance for protons and at the frequency of 28.411 MHz for fluorine nuclei with complete absence of their electrical interference. The probe allows simultaneously creating rf magnetic fields at off-resonance frequencies within the range of 30.2-30.6 MHz and at the frequency of 28.411 MHz. Presented heteronuclear cross-relaxation off-resonance experiments in the rotating frame provide information about molecular dynamics.

  15. Structural Characterization of Humic Materials Using ^13C NMR Techniques: A Comparison of Solution- and Solid-State Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clewett, Catherine; Alam, Todd; Osantowski, Eric; Pullin, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The analysis of the carbon type distribution and chemical structure of natural organic matter (NOM) by ^13C NMR spectroscopy is an important technique for understanding its origins and reactivity. While prior work has used solution-state NMR techniques, solid-state NMR has the potential to provide this information using less instrument time and sample manipulation, while providing an array of advanced filtering techniques. Analyses of four isolated humic materials with ^13C solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR techniques are described, including three commercially available samples and one fulvic acid sample isolated from the Rio Grande in New Mexico. This study demonstrates the utility of solid-state ^13C NMR for aquatic NOM structural characterization, comparing these results to the existing solution-state determinations. The solid-state ^13C MAS NMR results are used to determine % carbon distribution, estimates of elemental composition (%C, %H, %(O+N)), aromatic fraction (fa), nonprotonated aromatic fraction (faN), an estimate of aromatic cluster size, and ratio of sp^2 to sp^3 carbons. A Gaussian deconvolution method is introduced that allows for a detailed analysis of carbon type.

  16. Solid state and solution 43Ca NMR of calcium peroxides involved in the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide by calcium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Trokiner, Arlette; Bessière, Aurélie; Thouvenot, René; Hau, Damien; Marko, Jean; Nardello, Véronique; Pierlot, Christel; Aubry, Jean-Marie

    2004-06-01

    In order to get some insight into the mechanism of the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by calcium hydroxide, 43Ca NMR spectra of enriched samples of calcium peroxides and of their precursors have been studied in both solution and solid state. This study demonstrates that no well-defined peroxidized calcium species are formed in solution, showing that the catalytic role of calcium is likely restricted to the solid state. Most of the calcium compounds that could be involved in the catalytic process have been investigated with solid state NMR. The shift and quadrupolar parameters of Ca(OH)2, CaO2.8H2O and CaO2.2H2O2 are reported for the first time. These parameters are different enough to allow the quantitative analysis of a complex mixture of these compounds by NMR.

  17. Monitoring the evolution of crystallization processes by in-situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kenneth D M; Hughes, Colan E; Williams, P Andrew

    2015-02-01

    Crystallization processes play a crucial role in many aspects of biological and physical sciences. Progress in deepening our fundamental understanding of such processes relies, to a large extent, on the development and application of new experimental strategies that allow direct in-situ monitoring of the process. In this paper, we give an overview of an in-situ solid-state NMR strategy that we have developed in recent years for monitoring the time-evolution of different polymorphic forms (or other solid forms) that arise as the function of time during crystallization from solution. The background to the strategy is described and several examples of the application of the technique are highlighted, focusing on both the evolution of different polymorphs during crystallization and the discovery of new polymorphs.

  18. Structural studies of methyl brevifolincarboxylate in solid state by means of NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolniak, Michał; Tomczyk, Michał; Gudej, Jan; Wawer, Iwona

    2006-12-01

    Methyl brevifolincarboxylate isolated from the herb of Potentilla argentea L. (Rosaceae) is a representative of the naturally occurring polyphenols. The compound is of pharmaceutical interest mainly because of its antiviral and antioxidant properties. 13C NMR spectra were recorded for solution and solid phase. 13C CPMAS spectra were assigned by comparison with solution data, dipolar dephasing and short contact time experiments. The correctness of assignments was verified by GIAO DFT calculations of shielding constants. The differences between the solution and solid state chemical shift values were explained in terms of orientation of OH groups and intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The splitting of the C1 dbnd O resonance shows that there exists a polymorphism in the solid phase, which might be due to the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bond involving carbonyl or methoxy oxygen (i.e. C10 sbnd OH⋯O dbnd C or C10 sbnd OH⋯OCH 3).

  19. Solid-state NMR studies of proteins immobilized on inorganic surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-10-29

    Solid state NMR is the primary tool for studying the quantitative, site-specific structure, orientation, and dynamics of biomineralization proteins under biologically relevant conditions. Two calcium phosphate proteins, statherin and leucine rich amelogenin protein (LRAP), have been studied in depth and have different features, challenging our ability to extract design principles. More recent studies of the significantly larger full-length amelogenin represent a challenging but necessary step to ultimately investigate the full diversity of biomineralization proteins. Interactions of amino acids and silaffin peptide with silica are also being studied, along with qualitative studies of proteins interacting with calcium carbonate. Dipolar recoupling techniquesmore » have formed the core of the quantitative studies, yet, the need for isolated spin pairs makes this approach costly and time intensive. The use of multi-dimensional techniques is advancing, methodology which, despite its challenges with these difficult-to-study proteins, will continue to drive future advancements in this area.« less

  20. Solid-state NMR studies of proteins immobilized on inorganic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-10-29

    Solid state NMR is the primary tool for studying the quantitative, site-specific structure, orientation, and dynamics of biomineralization proteins under biologically relevant conditions. Two calcium phosphate proteins, statherin and leucine rich amelogenin protein (LRAP), have been studied in depth and have different features, challenging our ability to extract design principles. More recent studies of the significantly larger full-length amelogenin represent a challenging but necessary step to ultimately investigate the full diversity of biomineralization proteins. Interactions of amino acids and silaffin peptide with silica are also being studied, along with qualitative studies of proteins interacting with calcium carbonate. Dipolar recoupling techniques have formed the core of the quantitative studies, yet, the need for isolated spin pairs makes this approach costly and time intensive. The use of multi-dimensional techniques is advancing, methodology which, despite its challenges with these difficult-to-study proteins, will continue to drive future advancements in this area.

  1. Solid-State NMR Comparison of Various Spiders’ Dragline Silk Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Creager, Melinda S.; Jenkins, Janelle E; Thagard-Yeaman, Leigh A.; Brooks, Amanda E.; Jones, Justin A.; Lewis, Randolph V.; Holland, Gregory P.; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2010-01-01

    Major ampullate (dragline) spider silk is a coveted biopolymer due to its combination of strength and extensibility. The dragline silk of different spiders have distinct mechanical properties that can be qualitatively correlated to the protein sequence. This study uses amino acid analysis and carbon-13 solid-state NMR to compare the molecular composition, structure and dynamics of major ampullate dragline silk of four orb-web spider species (Nephila clavipes, Araneus gemmoides, Argiope aurantia and Argiope argentata) and one cobweb species (Latrodectus hesperus). The mobility of the protein backbone and amino acid side chains in water exposed silk fibers is shown to correlate to the proline content. This implies that regions of major ampullate spidroin 2 protein, which is the only dragline silk protein with any significant proline content, become significantly hydrated in dragline spider silk. PMID:20593757

  2. Molecular dynamics of neutral polymer bonding agent (NPBA) as revealed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Su, Yongchao; Zhou, Lei; Pang, Aimin; Cai, Rulin; Ma, Xingang; Li, Shenhui

    2014-01-22

    Neutral polymer bonding agent (NPBA) is one of the most promising polymeric materials, widely used in nitrate ester plasticized polyether (NEPE) propellant as bonding agent. The structure and dynamics of NPBA under different conditions of temperatures and sample processing are comprehensively investigated by solid state NMR (SSNMR). The results indicate that both the main chain and side chain of NPBA are quite rigid below its glass transition temperature (Tg). In contrast, above the Tg, the main chain remains relatively immobilized, while the side chains become highly flexible, which presumably weakens the interaction between bonding agent and the binder or oxidant fillers and in turn destabilizes the high modulus layer formed around the oxidant fillers. In addition, no obvious variation is found for the microstructure of NPBA upon aging treatment or soaking with acetone. These experimental results provide useful insights for understanding the structural properties of NPBA and its interaction with other constituents of solid composite propellants under different processing and working conditions.

  3. A solid-state NMR method to determine domain sizes in multi-component polymer formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlagnitweit, Judith; Tang, Mingxue; Baias, Maria; Richardson, Sara; Schantz, Staffan; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-12-01

    Polymer domain sizes are related to many of the physical properties of polymers. Here we present a solid-state NMR experiment that is capable of measuring domain sizes in multi-component mixtures. The method combines selective excitation of carbon magnetization to isolate a specific component with proton spin diffusion to report on domain size. We demonstrate the method in the context of controlled release formulations, which represents one of today's challenges in pharmaceutical science. We show that we can measure domain sizes of interest in the different components of industrial pharmaceutical formulations at natural isotopic abundance containing various (modified) cellulose derivatives, such as microcrystalline cellulose matrixes that are film-coated with a mixture of ethyl cellulose (EC) and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC).

  4. Solid-state NMR study of geopolymer prepared by sol-gel chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yi-Ling; Hanna, John V.; Lee, Yuan-Ling; Smith, Mark E.; Chan, Jerry C.C.

    2010-12-15

    Geopolymers are a new class of materials formed by the condensation of aluminosilicates and silicates obtained from natural minerals or industrial wastes. In this work, the sol-gel method is used to synthesize precursor materials for the preparation of geopolymers. The geopolymer samples prepared by our synthetic route have been characterized by a series of physical techniques, including Fourier-transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, and multinuclear solid-state NMR. The results are very similar to those obtained for the geopolymers prepared from natural kaolinite. We believe that our synthetic approach can offer a good opportunity for the medical applications of geopolymer. -- Graphical abstract: Geopolymer prepared by the sol-gel route has the same spectroscopic properties as the sample prepared from the natural kaolinite. Display Omitted

  5. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    Electrochemical cells, in the form of batteries (or supercapacitors) and fuel cells, are efficient devices for energy storage and conversion. These devices show considerable promise for use in portable and static devices to power electronics and various modes of transport and to produce and store electricity both locally and on the grid. For example, high power and energy density lithium-ion batteries are being developed for use in hybrid electric vehicles where they improve the efficiency of fuel use and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To gain insight into the chemical reactions involving the multiple components (electrodes, electrolytes, interfaces) in the electrochemical cells and to determine how cells operate and how they fail, researchers ideally should employ techniques that allow real-time characterization of the behavior of the cells under operating conditions. This Account reviews the recent use of in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that probes local structure and dynamics, to study these devices. In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. The battery is placed inside the NMR coil, leads are connected to a potentiostat, and the NMR spectra are recorded as a function of state of charge. (7)Li is used for many of these experiments because of its high sensitivity, straightforward spectral interpretation, and relevance to these devices. For example, (7)Li spectroscopy was used to detect intermediates formed during electrochemical cycling such as LixC and LiySiz species in batteries with carbon and silicon anodes, respectively. It was also used to observe and quantify the formation and growth of metallic lithium microstructures, which can cause short circuits and battery failure. This approach can be utilized to identify conditions that promote dendrite formation and whether different electrolytes and additives can help

  6. Chemical reactivity of graphene oxide towards amines elucidated by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacchi, Isabella A.; Spinato, Cinzia; Raya, Jésus; Bianco, Alberto; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2016-07-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by amidation. We also prove that there is a negligible amount of carboxylic acid groups in two GO samples obtained by a different synthesis process, hence eliminating the possibility of amidation reactions with amine derivatives. This work brings additional insights into the chemical reactivity of GO, which is fundamental to control its functionalization, and highlights the major role of MAS NMR spectroscopy for a comprehensive characterization of derivatized GO.Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by

  7. Sparse (13)C labelling for solid-state NMR studies of P. pastoris expressed eukaryotic seven-transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Chang; Fan, Ying; Munro, Rachel A; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S; Wang, Shenlin

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel sparse (13)C labelling approach for methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris expression system, towards solid-state NMR studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins. The labelling scheme was achieved by co-utilizing natural abundance methanol and specifically (13)C labelled glycerol as carbon sources in the expression medium. This strategy improves the spectral resolution by 1.5 fold, displays site-specific labelling patterns, and has advantages for collecting long-range distance restraints for structure determination of large eukaryotic membrane proteins by solid-state NMR.

  8. Solid-State NMR Identification and Quantification of Newly Formed Aluminosilicate Phases in Weathered Kaolinite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Crosson, Garry S.; Choi, Sunkyung; Chorover, Jon; Amistadi, Mary K.; O'Day, Peggy A.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-01-19

    The weathering of a specimen kaolinite clay was studied over the course of 369 d via solid-state 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-field 27Al MAS NMR. The chosen baseline solution conditions (0.05 mol kg-1 of Al, 2 mol kg-1 of Na+, 1 mol kg-1 of NO3 -, 1 mol kg-1 of OH-, and pH ~13.8) approximate those of solutions leaking from waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Nonradioactive Cs and Sr cations were added to this synthetic tank waste leachate (STWL) solution at concentrations of 10-3, 10-4, and 10-5 molal (m) to represent their radionuclide counterparts. The transformations of silicon- and aluminum-containing solid phase species were monitored quantitatively by using NMR spectroscopy, with the resulting spectra directly reporting the influence of the initial Cs and Sr on formation and transformation of the neo-formed solids. At the lowest concentration of Cs and Sr employed (10-5 m in each cation) peaks consistent with the formation of zeolite-like minerals were detected via 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR as early as 33 d. At concentrations of 10-3 m in each cation, new silicon species are not detected until 93 d, although neophases containing four-coordinate aluminum were detectable at earlier reaction times via 27Al MAS NMR. At the highest magnetic field strengths employed in this NMR study, deconvolutions of resonances detected in the tetrahedral region of the 27Al MAS spectra yielded multiple components, indicating the existence of at least four new aluminum-containing phases. Two of these phases are identified as sodalite and cancrinite through comparison with diffuse-reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectra and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, while a third phase may correlate with a previously detected aluminum-rich chabazite phase. All measurable solid reaction products have been quantified via their 27Al MAS resonances acquired at high magnetic field strengths (17.6 T), and the quantitative

  9. Study of aqueous humour by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkadlecová, Marcela; Havlíček, Jaroslav; Volka, Karel; Souček, Petr; Karel, Ivan

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the composition of the samples of human aqueous humour including the protein content. Using 1H NMR spectroscopy many compounds (proteins, glucose, lactate, citrate and other metabolites) can be identified and their concentrations evaluated using the internal standard. While the concentrations of non-proteins in aqueous humour were relatively stable, the amount of proteins differed much more. In most of the spectra, the signals of proteins were hardly distinguishable from the baseline. For some samples a significantly higher protein content (more than 1 mg/ml) was found. The total protein concentration expressed in albumin equivalents can be determined by comparing the spectra measured by S2PUL (standard measurement) and CPMG (protein suppression) pulse sequentions. For comparison, the spectra of rabbit and bovine aqueous humour are also given.

  10. Solid state NMR method development and studies of biological and biomimetic nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanyan

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes application and development of advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for complex materials, in particular organic-inorganic nanocomposites and thermoelectric tellurides. The apatite-collagen interface, essential for understanding the biomineralization process in bone and engineering the interface for controlled bio-mimetic synthesis and optimized mechanical properties, is buried within the nanocomposite of bone. We used multinuclear solid-state NMR to study the composition and structure of the interface. Citrate has been identified as the main organic molecule strongly bound to the apatite surface with a density of 1/(2 nm)2, covering 1/6 of the total surface area in bovine bone. Citrate provides more carboxylate groups, one of the key functional groups found to affect apatite nucleation and growth, than all the non-collagenous proteins all together in bone; thus we propose that citrate stabilizes apatite crystals at a very small thickness of ~3 nm (4 unit cells) to increase bone fracture tolerance. The hypothesis has been confirmed in vitro by adding citrate in the bio-mimetic synthesis of polymerhydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The results have shown that the size of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals decreases as increasing citrate concentration. With citrate concentrations comparable to that in body fluids, similar-sized nanocrystals as in bone have been produced. Besides the dimensions of the apatite crystals, the composition of bone also affects its biofunctional and macroscopic mechanical properties; therefore, our team also extended its effort to enhance the inorganic portion in our bio-mimetic synthesis from originally 15 wt% to current 50 wt% compared to 65 wt% in bovine bone, by using Lysine-Leucine hydroxyapatite nucleating diblock co-polypeptide, which forms a gel at very low concentration. In this thesis, various advanced solid state NMR techniques have been employed to characterize nanocomposites

  11. SIMPSON: A general simulation program for solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Mads; Rasmussen, Jimmy T.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2011-12-01

    A computer program for fast and accurate numerical simulation of solid-state NMR experiments is described. The program is designed to emulate a NMR spectrometer by letting the user specify high-level NMR concepts such as spin systems, nuclear spin interactions, RF irradiation, free precession, phase cycling, coherence-order filtering, and implicit/explicit acquisition. These elements are implemented using the Tel scripting language to ensure a minimum of programming overhead and direct interpretation without the need for compilation, while maintaining the flexibility of a full-featured programming language. Basicly, there are no intrinsic limitations to the number of spins, types of interactions, sample conditions (static or spinning, powders, uniaxially oriented molecules, single crystals, or solutions), and the complexity or number of spectral dimensions for the pulse sequence. The applicability ranges from simple ID experiments to advanced multiple-pulse and multiple-dimensional experiments, series of simulations, parameter scans, complex data manipulation/visualization, and iterative fitting of simulated to experimental spectra. A major effort has been devoted to optimizing the computation speed using state-of-the-art algorithms for the time-consuming parts of the calculations implemented in the core of the program using the C programming language. Modification and maintenance of the program are facilitated by releasing the program as open source software (General Public License) currently at http://nmr.imsb.au.dk. The general features of the program are demonstrated by numerical simulations of various aspects for REDOR, rotational resonance, DRAMA, DRAWS, HORROR, C7, TEDOR, POST-C7, CW decoupling, TPPM, F-SLG, SLF, SEMA-CP, PISEMA, RFDR, QCPMG-MAS, and MQ-MAS experiments.

  12. SIMPSON: A General Simulation Program for Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Mads; Rasmussen, Jimmy T.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2000-12-01

    A computer program for fast and accurate numerical simulation of solid-state NMR experiments is described. The program is designed to emulate a NMR spectrometer by letting the user specify high-level NMR concepts such as spin systems, nuclear spin interactions, RF irradiation, free precession, phase cycling, coherence-order filtering, and implicit/explicit acquisition. These elements are implemented using the Tcl scripting language to ensure a minimum of programming overhead and direct interpretation without the need for compilation, while maintaining the flexibility of a full-featured programming language. Basicly, there are no intrinsic limitations to the number of spins, types of interactions, sample conditions (static or spinning, powders, uniaxially oriented molecules, single crystals, or solutions), and the complexity or number of spectral dimensions for the pulse sequence. The applicability ranges from simple 1D experiments to advanced multiple-pulse and multiple-dimensional experiments, series of simulations, parameter scans, complex data manipulation/visualization, and iterative fitting of simulated to experimental spectra. A major effort has been devoted to optimizing the computation speed using state-of-the-art algorithms for the time-consuming parts of the calculations implemented in the core of the program using the C programming language. Modification and maintenance of the program are facilitated by releasing the program as open source software (General Public License) currently at http://nmr.imsb.au.dk. The general features of the program are demonstrated by numerical simulations of various aspects for REDOR, rotational resonance, DRAMA, DRAWS, HORROR, C7, TEDOR, POST-C7, CW decoupling, TPPM, F-SLG, SLF, SEMA-CP, PISEMA, RFDR, QCPMG-MAS, and MQ-MAS experiments.

  13. Investigations of adsorption sites on oxide surfaces using solid-state NMR and TPD-IGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombeck, Rebecca A.

    The number and chemical identity of reactive sites on surfaces of glass affects the processing, reliability, and lifetime of a number of important commercial products. Surface site densities, distributions, and structural identities are closely tied to the formation and processing of the glass surface, and exert a direct influence on strength and coating performance. The surface of a glass sample may vary markedly from the composition and chemistry of the bulk glass. We are taking a physicochemical approach to understanding adsorption sites on pristine multicomponent glass fibers surfaces, directly addressing the effect of processing on surface reactivity. This project aimed to understand the energy distributions of surface adsorption sites, the chemical/structural identity of those sites, and the relationship of these glasses to glass composition, thermal history, and in future work, surface coatings. We have studied the bulk and surface structure as well as the surface reactivity of the glass fibers with solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, inverse gas chromatography (IGC), and computational chemistry methods. These methods, solid-state NMR and IGC, typically require high surface area materials; however, by using probe molecules for NMR experiments or packing a column at high density for IGC measurements, lower surface area materials, such as glass fibers, can be investigated. The glasses used within this study were chosen as representative specimens of fibers with potentially different reactive sites on their surfaces. The two glass compositions were centered around a nominal E-glass, which contains very little alkali cations and mainly alkaline earth cations, and wool glass, which contains an abundance of alkali cations. The concentration of boron was varied from 0 to 8 mole % in both fiber compositions. Fibers were drawn from each composition at a variety of temperatures and draw speeds to provide a range of glass samples with varying

  14. Preparation of uniformly isotope labeled KcsA for solid state NMR: Expression, purification, reconstitution into liposomes and functional assay

    PubMed Central

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Wylie, Benjamin J.; Thompson, Ameer; Tian, Lin; Nimigean, Crina; McDermott, Ann E.

    2013-01-01

    We report the expression, purification, liposome reconstitution and functional validation of uniformly 13C and 15N isotope labeled KcsA, a bacterial potassium channel that has high homology with mammalian channels, for solid-state NMR studies. The expression and purification is optimized for an average yield of ~ 35–40 milligrams per liter of M9 media in a time-efficient way. The protein purity is confirmed by gel electrophoresis and the protein concentration is quantified by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Protocols to efficiently reconstitute KcsA into liposomes are also presented. The presence of liposomes is confirmed by cryo-electron microscopy images and the effect of magic angle spinning on liposome packing is shown. High-resolution solid-state NMR spectra of uniformly isotope labeled KcsA in these liposomes reveal that our protocol yields to a very homogenous KcsA sample with high signal to noise and several well-resolved residues in NMR spectra. Electrophysiology of our samples before and after solid-state NMR show that channel function and selectivity remain intact after the solid-state NMR. PMID:23916531

  15. A Modified Alderman-Grant Coil makes possible an efficient cross-coil probe for high field solid-state NMR of lossy biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Christopher V.; Yang, Yuan; Glibowicka, Mira; Wu, Chin H.; Park, Sang Ho; Deber, Charles M.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-11-01

    The design, construction, and performance of a cross-coil double-resonance probe for solid-state NMR experiments on lossy biological samples at high magnetic fields are described. The outer coil is a Modified Alderman-Grant Coil (MAGC) tuned to the 1H frequency. The inner coil consists of a multi-turn solenoid coil that produces a B 1 field orthogonal to that of the outer coil. This results in a compact nested cross-coil pair with the inner solenoid coil tuned to the low frequency detection channel. This design has several advantages over multiple-tuned solenoid coil probes, since RF heating from the 1H channel is substantially reduced, it can be tuned for samples with a wide range of dielectric constants, and the simplified circuit design and high inductance inner coil provides excellent sensitivity. The utility of this probe is demonstrated on two electrically lossy samples of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) that are particularly difficult for conventional NMR probes. The 72-residue polypeptide embedding the transmembrane helices 3 and 4 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) (residues 194-241) requires a high salt concentration in order to be successfully reconstituted in phospholipid bicelles. A second application is to paramagnetic relaxation enhancement applied to the membrane-bound form of Pf1 coat protein in phospholipid bicelles where the resistance to sample heating enables high duty cycle solid-state NMR experiments to be performed.

  16. Aromatic spectral editing techniques for magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of uniformly (13)C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan K; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Hong, Mei

    2015-11-01

    The four aromatic amino acids in proteins, namely histidine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, have strongly overlapping (13)C chemical shift ranges between 100 and 160ppm, and have so far been largely neglected in solid-state NMR determination of protein structures. Yet aromatic residues play important roles in biology through π-π and cation-π interactions. To better resolve and assign aromatic residues' (13)C signals in magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectra, we introduce two spectral editing techniques. The first method uses gated (1)H decoupling in a proton-driven spin-diffusion (PDSD) experiment to remove all protonated (13)C signals and retain only non-protonated carbon signals in the aromatic region of the (13)C spectra. The second technique uses chemical shift filters and (1)H-(13)C dipolar dephasing to selectively detect the Cα, Cβ and CO cross peaks of aromatic residues while suppressing the signals of all aliphatic residues. We demonstrate these two techniques on amino acids, a model peptide, and the microcrystalline protein GB1, and show that they significantly simplify the 2D NMR spectra and both reveal and permit the ready assignment of the aromatic residues' signals.

  17. Optimizing Oriented Planar-Supported Lipid Samples for Solid-State Protein NMR

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, Jan K.; Sykes, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    Sample orientation relative to the static magnetic field of an NMR spectrometer allows study of membrane proteins in the lipid bilayer setting. The straightforward preparation and handling of extremely thin mica substrates with consistent surface properties has prompted us to examine oriented phospholipid bilayer and hexagonal phases on mica. The spectral characteristics of oriented lipid samples formed on mica are as good as or better than those on glass. Nine solvents with varying dielectric constants were used to cast lipid films or for vesicle spreading; film characteristics were then compared, and static solid-state 31P-NMR was used to characterize the degree of orientation of the hydrated lipid species. Lipids with four headgroup chemistries were tested: 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG), 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (DOPA), and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE). Solvent affected orientation of POPG, DOPA, and DOPE, but not POPC. Film characteristics varied with solvent, with ramifications for producing homogeneous oriented lipid samples. POPC was used to optimize the amount of lipid per substrate and compare hydration methods. POPG did not orient reproducibly, whereas POPG-POPC mixtures did. DOPA showed 1–2 oriented states depending upon hydration level and deposition method. DOPE formed an oriented hexagonal phase that underwent a reversible temperature-induced phase transition to the oriented bilayer phase. PMID:16085766

  18. Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chaowei; Fricke, Pascal; Lin, Lin; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Wegstroth, Melanie; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR–derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed β helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 Å precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra. PMID:26665178

  19. Comparison among Magnus/Floquet/Fer expansion schemes in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegoshi, K.; Miyazawa, Norihiro; Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P. K.

    2015-04-01

    We here revisit expansion schemes used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the calculation of effective Hamiltonians and propagators, namely, Magnus, Floquet, and Fer expansions. While all the expansion schemes are powerful methods there are subtle differences among them. To understand the differences, we performed explicit calculation for heteronuclear dipolar decoupling, cross-polarization, and rotary-resonance experiments in solid-state NMR. As the propagator from the Fer expansion takes the form of a product of sub-propagators, it enables us to appreciate effects of time-evolution under Hamiltonians with different orders separately. While 0th-order average Hamiltonian is the same for the three expansion schemes with the three cases examined, there is a case that the 2nd-order term for the Magnus/Floquet expansion is different from that obtained with the Fer expansion. The difference arises due to the separation of the 0th-order term in the Fer expansion. The separation enables us to appreciate time-evolution under the 0th-order average Hamiltonian, however, for that purpose, we use a so-called left-running Fer expansion. Comparison between the left-running Fer expansion and the Magnus expansion indicates that the sign of the odd orders in Magnus may better be reversed if one would like to consider its effect in order.

  20. Chemical reactivity of graphene oxide towards amines elucidated by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vacchi, Isabella A; Spinato, Cinzia; Raya, Jésus; Bianco, Alberto; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2016-07-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by amidation. We also prove that there is a negligible amount of carboxylic acid groups in two GO samples obtained by a different synthesis process, hence eliminating the possibility of amidation reactions with amine derivatives. This work brings additional insights into the chemical reactivity of GO, which is fundamental to control its functionalization, and highlights the major role of MAS NMR spectroscopy for a comprehensive characterization of derivatized GO. PMID:27411370

  1. Comparison among Magnus/Floquet/Fer expansion schemes in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Takegoshi, K. Miyazawa, Norihiro; Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P. K.

    2015-04-07

    We here revisit expansion schemes used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the calculation of effective Hamiltonians and propagators, namely, Magnus, Floquet, and Fer expansions. While all the expansion schemes are powerful methods there are subtle differences among them. To understand the differences, we performed explicit calculation for heteronuclear dipolar decoupling, cross-polarization, and rotary-resonance experiments in solid-state NMR. As the propagator from the Fer expansion takes the form of a product of sub-propagators, it enables us to appreciate effects of time-evolution under Hamiltonians with different orders separately. While 0th-order average Hamiltonian is the same for the three expansion schemes with the three cases examined, there is a case that the 2nd-order term for the Magnus/Floquet expansion is different from that obtained with the Fer expansion. The difference arises due to the separation of the 0th-order term in the Fer expansion. The separation enables us to appreciate time-evolution under the 0th-order average Hamiltonian, however, for that purpose, we use a so-called left-running Fer expansion. Comparison between the left-running Fer expansion and the Magnus expansion indicates that the sign of the odd orders in Magnus may better be reversed if one would like to consider its effect in order.

  2. Solid-State 17O NMR Study of Benzoic Acid Adsorption On Metal Oxide Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Chen, Banghao; Jiao, Jian; Parsons, Williams

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state 17O NMR spectra of 17O-labeled benzoic and anisic acids are reported and benzoic acid is used to probe the surface of metal oxides. Complexes formed when benzoic acid is dry-mixed with mesoporous silica, and nonporous titania and alumina are characterized. Chemical reactions with silica are not observed. The nature of benzoic acid on silica is a function of the water content of the oxide. The acid disperses in the pores of the silica if the silica is in equilibrium with ambient laboratory humidity. The acid displays high mobility as evidenced by a liquid-like, Lorentzian resonance. Excess benzoic acid remains as the crystalline hydrogen-bonded dimer. Benzoic acid reacts with titania and alumina surfaces in equilibrium with laboratory air to form the corresponding titanium and aluminum benzoates. In both materials the oxygen of the 17O-labeled acid is bound to the metal, showing the reaction proceeds by bond formation between oxygen deficient metal sites and the oxygen of the carboxylic acid. 27Al MAS NMR confirms this mechanism for the reaction on alumina. Dry mixing of benzoic acid with alumina rapidly quenches pentacoordinate aluminum sites, excellent evidence that these sites are confined to the surface of the alumina particles.

  3. Structural Analysis of Nanoscale Self-Assembled Discoidal Lipid Bilayers by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Kijac, Aleksandra Z.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2006-01-01

    Nanodiscs are an example of discoidal nanoscale self-assembled lipid/protein particles similar to nascent high-density lipoproteins, which reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. The major protein component of high-density lipoproteins is human apolipoprotein A-I, and the corresponding protein component of Nanodiscs is membrane scaffold protein 1 (MSP1), a 200-residue lipid-binding domain of human apolipoprotein A-I. Here we present magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR studies of uniformly 13C,15N-labeled MSP1 in polyethylene glycol precipitated Nanodiscs. Two-dimensional MAS 13C-13C correlation spectra show excellent microscopic order of MSP1 in precipitated Nanodiscs. Secondary isotropic chemical shifts throughout the protein are consistent with a predominantly helical structure. Moreover, the backbone conformations of prolines derived from their 13C chemical shifts are consistent with the molecular belt model but not the picket fence model of lipid-bound MSP1. Overall comparison of experimental spectra and 13C chemical shifts predicted from several structural models also favors the belt model. Our study thus supports the belt model of Nanodisc structure and demonstrates the utility of MAS NMR to study the structure of high molecular weight lipid-protein complexes. PMID:16905610

  4. Transient states in [2 + 2] photodimerization of cinnamic acid: correlation of solid-state NMR and X-ray analysis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mujeeb; Brunklaus, Gunther; Enkelmann, Volker; Spiess, Hans-Wolfgang

    2008-02-01

    13C-CPMAS and other solid-state NMR methods have been applied to monitor the solid-state reactions of trans-cinnamic acid derivatives, which are the pioneer and model compounds in the field of topochemistry previously studied by X-ray diffraction, AFM, and vibrational spectroscopy. Single-crystal X-ray analyses of photoirradiated alpha-trans-cinnamic acid where the monomers are arranged in a head-to-tail manner have revealed the formation of a centrosymmetric alpha-truxillic acid photodimer. For a centrosymmetric dimer, however, two cyclobutane carbon signals and one carbonyl carbon signal were expected apart from other aromatic carbon signals. Instead, four cyclobutane and two carbonyl carbon signals were observed suggesting the formation of a non-centrosymmetric photodimer. Removing hydrogen bonds from the system by esterfication of alpha-truxillic acid yield a centrosymmetric photodimer. Careful analysis of the obtained products via solid-state NMR clearly showed that the observed peak splittings in the 13C-CPMAS spectra did not originate from packing effects but rather result from asymmetric hydrogen bonds distorting the local symmetry. Further evidence of this rather dynamic hydrogen-bonding stems from high-temperature X-ray data revealing that only the joint approach of both X-ray analysis and solid-state NMR at similar temperatures allows for the successful characterization of dynamic processes occurring in topochemical reactions, thus, providing detailed insight into the reaction mechanism of organic solid-state transformations.

  5. Solid-state NMR study and assignments of the KcsA potassium ion channel of S. lividans.

    PubMed

    Varga, Krisztina; Tian, Lin; McDermott, Ann E

    2007-12-01

    The extraordinary efficiency and selectivity of potassium channels have made them ideal systems for biophysical and functional studies of ion conduction. We carried out solid-state NMR studies of the selectivity filter region of the protein. Partial site-specific assignments of the NMR signals were obtained based on high field multidimensional solid-state NMR spectra of uniformly (13)C, (15)N enriched KcsA potassium channel from Streptomyces lividans. Both backbone and sidechain atoms were assigned for residues V76-D80 and P83-L90, in and near the selectivity filter region of the protein; this region exhibits good dispersion and useful chemical shift fingerprints. This study will enable structure, dynamic and mechanistic studies of ion conduction by NMR.

  6. Identification of lithium-sulfur battery discharge products through 6Li and 33S solid-state MAS and 7Li solution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Laura A.; Rapp, Jennifer L.; Baughman, Jessi A.; Rinaldi, Peter L.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    6Li and 33S solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to identify the discharge products in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery cathodes. Cathodes were stopped at different potentials throughout battery discharge and measured ex-situ to obtain chemical shifts and T2 relaxation rates of the products formed. The chemical shifts in the spectra of both 6Li and 33S NMR demonstrate that long-chain, soluble lithium polysulfide species formed at the beginning of discharge are indistinguishable from each other (similar chemical shifts), while short-chain, insoluble polysulfide species that form at the end of discharge (presumably Li2S2 and Li2S) have a different chemical shift, thus distinguishing them from the soluble long-chain products. T2 relaxation measurements of discharged cathodes were also performed which resulted in two groupings of T2 rates that follow a trend and support the previous conclusions that long-chain polysulfide species are converted to shorter chain species during discharge. Through the complementary techniques of 1-D 6Li and 33S solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy, solution 7Li and 1H NMR spectroscopy, and T2 relaxation rate measurements, structural information about the discharge products of Li-S batteries is obtained.

  7. Solid-state NMR studies of the dynamics and structure of mouse keratin intermediate filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.W.; Torchia, D.A.; Steinert, P.M.

    1988-07-26

    The molecular dynamics and structural organization of mouse epidermal keratin intermediate filaments (IF) have been studied via solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed on IF labeled both in vivo and in vitro with isotopically enriched amino acids. As a probe of the organization of the peripheral glycine-rich end domains of the IF, carbon-13 NMR experiments have been performed on subfilamentous forms (prekeratin) and on IF reassembled in vitro that had been labeled with either (1-/sup 13/C)glycine or (2-/sup 13/C)glycine, as more than 90% of the glycines of the keratins are located in the end domains. Measurements of carbon relaxation times, nuclear Overhauser enhancements, and signal intensities show that the motions of the peptide backbone in the end domains are effectively isotropic. These results indicate that the end domains of IF are remarkably flexible and have little or no structural order. To probe the structural organization of the coiled-coil rod domains of the IF, separate samples of native keratin IF, raised in primary tissue culture, were labeled with L-(1-/sup 13/C)leucine, L-(/sup 2/H/sub 10/)leucine, or L-(2,3,3-/sup 2/H/sub 3/)leucine, as greater than 90% of the leucyl residues of the keratin IF types studied are located in the coiled coils which form the central core of IF. Deuterium NMR experiments performed on IF labeled with deuteriated leucines indeed reveal a marked degree of peptide backbone rigidity within the coiled coils, confirming the initial conclusions of the carbon-13 data. These data, demonstrating relative peptide backbone rigidity yet side-chain flexibility, are interpreted to mean that the coiled coils of these keratin IF are not tightly packed together but rather form a somewhat looser structure which permits a significant degree of side-chain mobility.

  8. Sensitivity-enhanced solid-state NMR detection of expansin's target in plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Caporini, Marc A.; Rosay, Melanie; Zhong, Linghao; Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Hong, Mei

    2013-08-29

    Structure determination of protein binding to noncrystalline macromolecular assemblies such as plant cell walls (CWs) poses a significant structural biology challenge. CWs are loosened during growth by expansin proteins, which weaken the noncovalent network formed by cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins, but the CW target of expansins has remained elusive because of the minute amount of the protein required for activity and the complex nature of the CW. Using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, combined with sensitivity-enhancing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and differential isotopic labeling of expansin and polysaccharides, we have now determined the functional binding target of expansin in the Arabidopsis thaliana CW. By transferring the electron polarization of a biradical dopant to the nuclei, DNP allowed selective detection of 13C spin diffusion from trace concentrations of 13C, 15N-labeled expansin in the CW to nearby polysaccharides. From the spin diffusion data of wild-type and mutant expansins, we conclude that to loosen the CW, expansin binds highly specific cellulose domains enriched in xyloglucan, whereas more abundant binding to pectins is unrelated to activity. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate short 13C-13C distances of 4–6 Å between a hydrophobic surface of the cellulose microfibril and an aromatic motif on the expansin surface, consistent with the observed NMR signals. DNP-enhanced 2D 13C correlation spectra further reveal that the expansin-bound cellulose has altered conformation and is enriched in xyloglucan, thus providing unique insight into the mechanism of CW loosening. DNP-enhanced NMR provides a powerful, generalizable approach for investigating protein binding to complex macromolecular targets.

  9. Sensitivity-enhanced solid-state NMR detection of expansin's target in plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Caporini, Marc A; Rosay, Melanie; Zhong, Linghao; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2013-10-01

    Structure determination of protein binding to noncrystalline macromolecular assemblies such as plant cell walls (CWs) poses a significant structural biology challenge. CWs are loosened during growth by expansin proteins, which weaken the noncovalent network formed by cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins, but the CW target of expansins has remained elusive because of the minute amount of the protein required for activity and the complex nature of the CW. Using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, combined with sensitivity-enhancing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and differential isotopic labeling of expansin and polysaccharides, we have now determined the functional binding target of expansin in the Arabidopsis thaliana CW. By transferring the electron polarization of a biradical dopant to the nuclei, DNP allowed selective detection of (13)C spin diffusion from trace concentrations of (13)C, (15)N-labeled expansin in the CW to nearby polysaccharides. From the spin diffusion data of wild-type and mutant expansins, we conclude that to loosen the CW, expansin binds highly specific cellulose domains enriched in xyloglucan, whereas more abundant binding to pectins is unrelated to activity. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate short (13)C-(13)C distances of 4-6 Å between a hydrophobic surface of the cellulose microfibril and an aromatic motif on the expansin surface, consistent with the observed NMR signals. DNP-enhanced 2D (13)C correlation spectra further reveal that the expansin-bound cellulose has altered conformation and is enriched in xyloglucan, thus providing unique insight into the mechanism of CW loosening. DNP-enhanced NMR provides a powerful, generalizable approach for investigating protein binding to complex macromolecular targets.

  10. Thermal degradation in a trimodal PDMS network by 1H Multiple Quantum NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, J R; Gjersing, E L; Chinn, S C; Jones, T V; Wilson, T S; Alviso, C T; Herberg, J L; Pearson, M A; Maxwell, R S

    2007-06-06

    Thermal degradation of a filled, crosslinked siloxane material synthesized from PDMS chains of three different average molecular weights and with two different crosslinking species has been studied by {sup 1}H Multiple Quantum (MQ) NMR methods. Multiple domains of polymer chains were detected by MQ NMR exhibiting Residual Dipolar Coupling (<{Omega}{sub d}>) values of 200 Hz and 600 Hz, corresponding to chains with high average molecular weight between crosslinks and chains with low average molecular weight between crosslinks or near the multifunctional crosslinking sites. Characterization of the <{Omega}{sub d}> values and changes in <{Omega}{sub d}> distributions present in the material were studied as a function of time at 250 C and indicates significant time dependent degradation. For the domains with low <{Omega}{sub d}>, a broadening in the distribution was observed with aging time. For the domain with high <{Omega}{sub d}>, increases in both the mean <{Omega}{sub d}> and the width in <{Omega}{sub d}> were observed with increasing aging time. Isothermal Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) reveals a 3% decrease in weight over 20 hours of aging at 250 C. Degraded samples also were analyzed by traditional solid state {sup 1}H NMR techniques and offgassing products were identified by Solid Phase MicroExtraction followed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (SPME GC-MS). The results, which will be discussed here, suggest that thermal degradation proceeds by complex competition between oxidative chain scissioning and post-curing crosslinking that both contribute to embrittlement.

  11. Selective detection and complete identification of triglycerides in cortical bone by high-resolution (1)H MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mroue, Kamal H; Xu, Jiadi; Zhu, Peizhi; Morris, Michael D; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-07-28

    Using (1)H-based magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we report an atomistic-level characterization of triglycerides in compact cortical bone. By suppressing contributions from immobile molecules present in bone, we show that a (1)H-based constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak (CTUC) two-dimensional COSY-type experiment that correlates the chemical shifts of protons can selectively detect a mobile triglyceride layer as the main component of small lipid droplets embedded on the surface of collagen fibrils. High sensitivity and resolution afforded by this NMR approach could be potentially utilized to investigate the origin of triglycerides and their pathological roles associated with bone fractures, diseases, and aging. PMID:27374353

  12. Static solid-state (14)N NMR and computational studies of nitrogen EFG tensors in some crystalline amino acids.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, Luke A; Schurko, Robert W

    2009-08-28

    The recently reported direct enhancement of integer spin magnetization (DEISM) methodology for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR of integer spins has been used to obtain static (14)N powder patterns from alpha-glycine, L-leucine and L-proline in relatively short experimental times at 9.4 T, allowing accurate determination of the quadrupolar parameters. Proton decoupling and deuteration of the nitrogen sites were used to reduce the (1)H-(14)N dipolar contribution to the transverse relaxation time allowing more echoes to be acquired per scan. In addition, ab initio calculations using molecular clusters (Gaussian 03) and the full crystal lattice (CASTEP) have been employed to confirm these results, to obtain the orientation of the electric field gradient (EFG) tensors in the molecular frame, and also to correctly assign the two sets of parameters for L-leucine. The (14)N EFG tensor is shown to be highly sensitive to the surrounding environment, particularly to nearby hydrogen bonding.

  13. Solid-state NMR Study Reveals Collagen I Structural Modifications of Amino Acid Side Chains upon Fibrillogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    De Sa Peixoto, Paulo; Laurent, Guillaume; Azaïs, Thierry; Mosser, Gervaise

    2013-01-01

    In vivo, collagen I, the major structural protein in human body, is found assembled into fibrils. In the present work, we study a high concentrated collagen sample in its soluble, fibrillar, and denatured states using one and two dimensional {1H}-13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We interpret 13C chemical shift variations in terms of dihedral angle conformation changes. Our data show that fibrillogenesis increases the side chain and backbone structural complexity. Nevertheless, only three to five rotameric equilibria are found for each amino acid residue, indicating a relatively low structural heterogeneity of collagen upon fibrillogenesis. Using side chain statistical data, we calculate equilibrium constants for a great number of amino acid residues. Moreover, based on a 13C quantitative spectrum, we estimate the percentage of residues implicated in each equilibrium. Our data indicate that fibril formation greatly affects hydroxyproline and proline prolyl pucker ring conformation. Finally, we discuss the implication of these structural data and propose a model in which the attractive force of fibrillogenesis comes from a structural reorganization of 10 to 15% of the amino acids. These results allow us to further understand the self-assembling process and fibrillar structure of collagen. PMID:23341452

  14. Structural features of a bituminous coal and their changes during low-temperature oxidation and loss of volatiles investigated by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mao, J.-D.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Hatcher, P.G.; Li, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative and advanced 13C solid-state NMR techniques were employed to investigate (i) the chemical structure of a high volatile bituminous coal, as well as (ii) chemical structural changes of this coal after evacuation of adsorbed gases, (iii) during oxidative air exposure at room temperature, and (iv) after oxidative heating in air at 75 ??C. The solid-state NMR techniques employed in this study included quantitative direct polarization/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) at a high spinning speed of 14 kHz, cross polarization/total sideband suppression (CP/TOSS), dipolar dephasing, CH, CH2, and CHn selection, 13C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) filtering, two-dimensional (2D) 1H-13C heteronuclear correlation NMR (HETCOR), and 2D HETCOR with 1H spin diffusion. With spectral editing techniques, we identified methyl CCH 3, rigid and mobile methylene CCH2C, methine CCH, quaternary Cq, aromatic CH, aromatic carbons bonded to alkyls, small-sized condensed aromatic moieties, and aromatic C-O groups. With direct polarization combined with spectral-editing techniques, we quantified 11 different types of functional groups. 1H-13C 2D HETCOR NMR experiments indicated spatial proximity of aromatic and alkyl moieties in cross-linked structures. The proton spin diffusion experiments indicated that the magnetization was not equilibrated at a 1H spin diffusion time of 5 ms. Therefore, the heterogeneity in spatial distribution of different functional groups should be above 2 nm. Recoupled C-H long-range dipolar dephasing showed that the fraction of large charcoal-like clusters of polycondensed aromatic rings was relatively small. The exposure of this coal to atmospheric oxygen at room temperature for 6 months did not result in obvious chemical structural changes of the coal, whereas heating at 75 ??C in air for 10 days led to oxidation of coal and generated some COO groups. Evacuation removed most volatiles and caused a significant reduction in aliphatic signals in its DP

  15. Fast magic-angle sample spinning solid-state NMR at 60-100kHz for natural abundance samples.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-09-01

    In spite of tremendous progress made in pulse sequence designs and sophisticated hardware developments, methods to improve sensitivity and resolution in solid-state NMR (ssNMR) are still emerging. The rate at which sample is spun at magic angle determines the extent to which sensitivity and resolution of NMR spectra are improved. To this end, the prime objective of this article is to give a comprehensive theoretical and experimental framework of fast magic angle spinning (MAS) technique. The engineering design of fast MAS rotors based on spinning rate, sample volume, and sensitivity is presented in detail. Besides, the benefits of fast MAS citing the recent progress in methodology, especially for natural abundance samples are also highlighted. The effect of the MAS rate on (1)H resolution, which is a key to the success of the (1)H inverse detection methods, is described by a simple mathematical factor named as the homogeneity factor k. A comparison between various (1)H inverse detection methods is also presented. Moreover, methods to reduce the number of spinning sidebands (SSBs) for the systems with huge anisotropies in combination with (1)H inverse detection at fast MAS are discussed.

  16. Solid-state 13C NMR study of na-cellulose complexes.

    PubMed

    Porro, Fabrizio; Bédué, Olivier; Chanzy, Henri; Heux, Laurent

    2007-08-01

    The interaction of microcrystalline cellulose from cotton and aqueous sodium hydroxide was investigated by 13C NMR solid-state spectroscopy as a function of temperature and sodium hydroxide concentration. When the concentration of NaOH was increased, the initial cellulose spectrum was replaced successively by that of Na-cellulose I followed by that of Na-cellulose II. In Na-cellulose I, each carbon atom occurred as a singlet, thus implying that one glucosyl moiety was the independent magnetic residue in the structure of this allomorph. In addition, the occurrence of the C6 near 62 ppm is an indication of a gt conformation for the hydroxymethyl group of Na-cellulose I. In Na-cellulose II, the analysis of the resonances of C1 and C6 points toward a structure based on a cellotriosyl moiety as the independent magnetic residue, in agreement with the established X-ray analysis that has shown that for this allomorph, the fiber repeat was also that of a cellotriosyl residue. For Na-cellulose II, the occurrence of the C6 in the 60 ppm region indicates an overall gg conformation for the hydroxymethyl groups. A comparison of the spectra recorded at 268 K and at room temperature confirms the stronger interaction of NaOH with cellulose when the temperature is lowered. In the Q region, corresponding to NaOH concentrations of around 9% and temperatures below 277 K, most of the sample was dissolved and no specific solid-state 13C NMR spectrum could be recorded, except for that of a small fraction of undissolved cellulose I. The same experiment run on a wood pulp sample leads to a new spectrum, with spectral characteristics different from those of Na-cellulose I and Na-cellulose II. This new spectrum is assigned to the Q phase, which appears to result from topological constraints that are present in whole wood pulp fibers but not in microcrystalline cellulose. A spectrum recorded for samples in the Na-cellulose III conditions resembled that of Na-cellulose II but of lower

  17. Variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR study of the molecular structure of honeybee wax and silk.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tsunenori; Tamada, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate the native-state crystal structure of beeswax from the Japanese bee, Apis cerana japonica, we determined the relationship between temperature and the 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift of methylene carbon of beeswax, with comparison to n-alkanes and polyethylene in the orthorhombic, monoclinic, or triclinic crystal form. Variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR observations of n-alkanes and polyethylene revealed that the chemical shifts of methylene carbon in the orthorhombic crystal form increased linearly with increasing temperature, that of the triclinic form decreased, and that of the monoclinic form was unaltered. These relations were compared with results of variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR observation of beeswax. Results clarified that the two crystal forms comprising the beeswax in the native state are orthorhombic and monoclinic. The variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR observations were also applied to interpret the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) curve of beeswax. They were used to clarify the structural changes of beeswax for widely various temperatures. For beeswax secreted by the Japanese bee, the transition from the orthorhombic form to the rotator phase occurred at 36 degrees C, that is from the crystalline to the intermediate state at 45 degrees C. Moreover, the variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR spectrum of honeybee silk in the native state was observed. Results demonstrated that the secondary structures of honeybee silk proteins in the native state comprised coexisting alpha-helix and beta-sheet conformations and that the amount of alpha-helices was greater. The alpha-helix content of honeybee silk was compared with that of hornet silk produced by Vespa larvae.

  18. Protein-ice interaction of an antifreeze protein observed with solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Siemer, Ansgar B; Huang, Kuo-Ying; McDermott, Ann E

    2010-10-12

    NMR on frozen solutions is an ideal method to study fundamental questions of macromolecular hydration, because the hydration shell of many biomolecules does not freeze together with bulk solvent. In the present study, we present previously undescribed NMR methods to study the interactions of proteins with their hydration shell and the ice lattice in frozen solution. We applied these methods to compare solvent interaction of an ice-binding type III antifreeze protein (AFP III) and ubiquitin a non-ice-binding protein in frozen solution. We measured (1)H-(1)H cross-saturation and cross-relaxation to provide evidence for a molecular contact surface between ice and AFP III at moderate freezing temperatures of -35 °C. This phenomenon is potentially unique for AFPs because ubiquitin shows no such cross relaxation or cross saturation with ice. On the other hand, we detected liquid hydration water and strong water-AFP III and water-ubiquitin cross peaks in frozen solution using relaxation filtered (2)H and HETCOR spectra with additional (1)H-(1)H mixing. These results are consistent with the idea that ubiquitin is surrounded by a hydration shell, which separates it from the bulk ice. For AFP III, the water cross peaks indicate that only a portion of its hydration shell (i.e., at the ice-binding surface) is in contact with the ice lattice. The rest of AFP III's hydration shell behaves similarly to the hydration shell of non-ice-interacting proteins such as ubiquitin and does not freeze together with the bulk water.

  19. Studies of Secondary Melanoma on C57BL/6J Mouse Liver Using 1H NMR Metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Ju; Isern, Nancy G.; Burton, Sarah D.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-10-31

    NMR metabolomics, consisting of solid state high resolution (hr) magic angle spinning (MAS) 1H NMR (1H hr-MAS), liquid state high resolution 1H-NMR, and principal components analysis (PCA) has been used to study secondary metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse liver . The melanoma group can be differentiated from its control group by PCA analysis of the absolute concentrations or by the absolute peak intensities of metabolites from either 1H hr-MAS NMR data on intact liver tissues or liquid state 1H-NMR spectra on liver tissue extracts. In particular, we found that the absolute concentrations of alanine, glutamate, creatine, creatinine, fumarate and cholesterol are elevated in the melanoma group as compared to controls, while the absolute concentrations of succinate, glycine, glucose, and the family of linear lipids including long chain fatty acids, total choline and acylglycerol are decreased. The ratio of glycerophosphocholine to phosphocholine is increased by about 1.5 fold in the melanoma group, while the absolute concentration of total choline is actually lower in melanoma mice. These results suggest the following picture in secondary melanoma metastasis: Linear lipid levels are decreased by beta oxidation in the melanoma group, which contributes to an increase in the synthesis of cholesterol, and also provides an energy source input for TCA cycle. These findings suggest a link between lipid oxidation, the TCA cycle and the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) signal pathway in tumor metastases. Thus this study indicates that the metabolic profile derived from NMR analysis can provide a valuable bio-signature of malignancy and cell hypoxia in metastatic melanoma.

  20. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of fully protonated proteins at slow to moderate magic-angle spinning frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, Kaustubh R.; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K.

    2015-12-01

    1H -detection offers a substitute to the sensitivity-starved experiments often used to characterize biomolecular samples using magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (MAS-ssNMR). To mitigate the effects of the strong 1H -1H dipolar coupled network that would otherwise severely broaden resonances, high MAS frequencies (>40 kHz) are often employed. Here, we have explored the alternative of stroboscopic 1H -detection at moderate MAS frequencies of 5-30 kHz using windowed version of supercycled-phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg homonuclear decoupling. We show that improved resolution in the 1H dimension, comparable to that obtainable at high spinning frequencies of 40-60 kHz without homonuclear decoupling, can be obtained in these experiments for fully protonated proteins. Along with detailed analysis of the performance of the method on the standard tri-peptide f-MLF, experiments on micro-crystalline GB1 and amyloid- β aggregates are used to demonstrate the applicability of these pulse-sequences to challenging biomolecular systems. With only two parameters to optimize, broadbanded performance of the homonuclear decoupling sequence, linear dependence of the chemical-shift scaling factor on resonance offset and a straightforward implementation under experimental conditions currently used for many biomolecular studies (viz. spinning frequencies and radio-frequency amplitudes), we expect these experiments to complement the current 13C -detection based methods in assignments and characterization through chemical-shift mapping.

  1. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of fully protonated proteins at slow to moderate magic-angle spinning frequencies.

    PubMed

    Mote, Kaustubh R; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K

    2015-12-01

    (1)H-detection offers a substitute to the sensitivity-starved experiments often used to characterize biomolecular samples using magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (MAS-ssNMR). To mitigate the effects of the strong (1)H-(1)H dipolar coupled network that would otherwise severely broaden resonances, high MAS frequencies (>40kHz) are often employed. Here, we have explored the alternative of stroboscopic (1)H-detection at moderate MAS frequencies of 5-30kHz using windowed version of supercycled-phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg homonuclear decoupling. We show that improved resolution in the (1)H dimension, comparable to that obtainable at high spinning frequencies of 40-60kHz without homonuclear decoupling, can be obtained in these experiments for fully protonated proteins. Along with detailed analysis of the performance of the method on the standard tri-peptide f-MLF, experiments on micro-crystalline GB1 and amyloid-β aggregates are used to demonstrate the applicability of these pulse-sequences to challenging biomolecular systems. With only two parameters to optimize, broadbanded performance of the homonuclear decoupling sequence, linear dependence of the chemical-shift scaling factor on resonance offset and a straightforward implementation under experimental conditions currently used for many biomolecular studies (viz. spinning frequencies and radio-frequency amplitudes), we expect these experiments to complement the current (13)C-detection based methods in assignments and characterization through chemical-shift mapping.

  2. Solid-state NMR spectroscopic study of chromophore-protein interactions in the Pr ground state of plant phytochrome A.

    PubMed

    Song, Chen; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2012-05-01

    Despite extensive study, the molecular structure of the chromophore-binding pocket of phytochrome A (phyA), the principal photoreceptor controlling photomorphogenesis in plants, has not yet been successfully resolved. Here, we report a series of two-dimensional (2-D) magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments on the recombinant N-terminal, 65-kDa PAS-GAF-PHY light-sensing module of phytochrome A3 from oat (Avena sativa), assembled with uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled phycocyanobilin (u-[13C,15N]-PCB-As.phyA3). The Pr state of this protein was studied regarding the electronic structure of the chromophore and its interactions with the proximal amino acids. Using 2-D 13C-13C and 1H-15N experiments, a complete set of 13C and 15N assignments for the chromophore were obtained. Also, a large number of 1H-13C distance restraints between the chromophore and its binding pocket were revealed by interfacial heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy. 13C doublings of the chromophore A-ring region and the C-ring carboxylate moiety, together with the observation of two Pr isoforms, Pr-I and Pr-II, demonstrate the local mobility of the chromophore and the plasticity of its protein environment. It appears that the interactions and dynamics in the binding pocket of phyA in the Pr state are remarkably similar to those of cyanobacterial phytochrome (Cph1). The N-terminus of the region modeled (residues 56-66 of phyA) is highly mobile. Differences in the regulatory processes involved in plant and Cph1 phytochromes are discussed. PMID:22419823

  3. Calcination products of gibbsite studied by X-ray diffraction, XPS and solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Malki, A.; Mekhalif, Z.; Detriche, S.; Fonder, G.; Boumaza, A.; Djelloul, A.

    2014-07-01

    The changes caused by heat treatment of gibbsite powder at 300–1473 K were studied using the X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoemission (XPS) spectra and {sup 27}Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 27}Al MAS NMR). XRD analysis indicates that the transformation sequence involves the formation of κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as an intermediate phase between χ- and α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The crystallite size of χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is as small as 10 nm. XPS analysis indicates that the ratio of aluminium atoms to oxygen atoms in χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} increases, whereas the expected ratio is observed in α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The percentage of AlO{sub 4} units in the transition aluminas follows the same behaviour as the ratio of Al/O. - Graphical abstract: The percentage of AlO{sub 4} units in transition aluminas follows the same behaviour as the ratio of Al/O. - Highlights: • Calcination products of gibbsite studied by XRD, XPS and solid-state NMR. • The crystallite size of χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is as small as 10 nm. • The Al/O atomic ratio determined by XPS is larger than 2/3 in χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • The percentage of AlO{sub 4} in the aluminas follows the same behaviour as the Al/O atomic ratio.

  4. High-Resolution NMR of Quadrupolar Nuclei in the Solid State

    SciTech Connect

    Gann, Sheryl Lee

    1995-11-30

    This dissertation describes recent developments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for the most part involving the use of dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) NMR to study quadrupolar nuclei. Chapter 1 introduces some of the basic concepts and theory that will be referred to in later chapters, such as the density operator, product operators, rotations, coherence transfer pathways, phase cycling, and the various nuclear spin interactions, including the quadrupolar interaction. Chapter 2 describes the theory behind motional averaging experiments, including DAS, which is a technique where a sample is spun sequentially about two axis oriented at different angles with respect to the external magnetic field such that the chemical shift and quadrupolar anisotropy are averaged to zero. Work done on various rubidium-87 salts is presented as a demonstration of DAS. Chapter 3 explains how to remove sidebands from DAS and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments, which result from the time-dependence of the Hamiltonian under sample spinning conditions, using rotor-synchronized {pi}-pulses. Data from these experiments, known as DAH-180 and MAH-180, respectively, are presented for both rubidium and lead salts. In addition, the applicability of this technique to double rotation (DOR) experiments is discussed. Chapter 4 concerns the addition of cross-polarization to DAS (CPDAS). The theory behind spin locking and cross polarizing quadrupolar nuclei is explained and a method of avoiding the resulting problems by performing cross polarization at 0{sup o} (parallel) with respect to the magnetic field is presented. Experimental results are shown for a sodium-23 compound, sodium pyruvate, and for oxygen-17 labeled L-akmine. In Chapter 5, a method for broadening the Hartmann-Hahn matching condition under MAS, called variable effective field cross-polarization (VEFCI?), is presented, along with experimental work on adamantane and polycarbonate.

  5. Structural Changes Associated with Transthyretin Misfolding and Amyloid Formation Revealed by Solution and Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang Hun; Dasari, Anvesh K R; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Kelly, Jeffery W; Wemmer, David E

    2016-04-01

    Elucidation of structural changes involved in protein misfolding and amyloid formation is crucial for unraveling the molecular basis of amyloid formation. Here we report structural analyses of the amyloidogenic intermediate and amyloid aggregates of transthyretin using solution and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our solution NMR results show that one of the two main β-sheet structures (CBEF β-sheet) is maintained in the aggregation-competent intermediate, while the other DAGH β-sheet is more flexible on millisecond time scales. Magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR revealed that AB loop regions interacting with strand A in the DAGH β-sheet undergo conformational changes, leading to the destabilized DAGH β-sheet. PMID:26998642

  6. Multinuclear Solid-State NMR and DFT Studies on Phosphanido-Bridged Diplatinum Complexes.

    PubMed

    Mastrorilli, Piero; Todisco, Stefano; Bagno, Alessandro; Gallo, Vito; Latronico, Mario; Fortuño, Consuelo; Gudat, Dietrich

    2015-06-15

    Multinuclear ((31)P, (195)Pt, (19)F) solid-state NMR experiments on (nBu4N)2[(C6F5)2Pt(μ-PPh2)2Pt(C6F5)2] (1), [(C6F5)2Pt(μ-PPh2)2Pt(C6F5)2](Pt-Pt) (2), and cis-Pt(C6F5)2(PHPh2)2 (3) were carried out under cross-polarization/magic-angle-spinning conditions or with the cross-polarization/Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence. Analysis of the principal components of the (31)P and (195)Pt chemical shift (CS) tensors of 1 and 2 reveals that the variations observed comparing the isotropic chemical shifts of 1 and 2, commonly referred to as "ring effect", are mainly due to changes in the principal components oriented along the direction perpendicular to the Pt2P2 plane. DFT calculations of (31)P and (195)Pt CS tensors confirmed the tensor orientation proposed from experimental data and symmetry arguments and revealed that the different values of the isotropic shieldings stem from differences in the paramagnetic and spin-orbit contributions.

  7. First solid-state NMR spectroscopy evaluation of complexes of benznidazole with cyclodextrin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Priotti, Josefina; Ferreira, M João G; Lamas, Maria C; Leonardi, Darío; Salomon, Claudio J; Nunes, Teresa G

    2015-10-20

    Complexation of benznidazole (BZL), a drug of choice for the treatment of Chagas'neglected disease, with cyclodextrin (CD) derivatives was analyzed by solid-state NMR. (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning spectra were recorded from BZL and from BZL:β-CD, BZL:methyl β-CD and BZL:hydroxypropyl β-CD complexes, which were obtained by the solvent evaporation technique. No significant evidence was obtained on BZL inclusion complexes involving either β-CD or hydroxypropyl β-CD. Conversely, BZL:methyl β-CD displayed BZL resonances characteristic of an amorphous drug and data analysis confirmed the presence of stable BZL:methyl β-CD inclusion complexes, with benzene encapsulated into the host cavity. Further evidences on complex structure and dynamics were obtained from proton and carbon spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame. These data are consistent with a common guest-host spin reservoir. The BZL interaction with methyl β-CD provided a route to stabilize amorphous BZL. Physical mixtures with identical BZL and CD compositions were also studied for comparison. PMID:26256164

  8. Membrane Interactions of Phylloseptin-1, -2, and -3 Peptides by Oriented Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Jarbas M.; Verly, Rodrigo M.; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Cesar, Amary; Bertani, Philippe; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Phylloseptin-1, -2, and -3 are three members of the family of linear cationic antimicrobial peptides found in tree frogs. The highly homologous peptides encompass 19 amino acids, and only differ in the amino acid composition and charge at the six most carboxy-terminal residues. Here, we investigated how such subtle changes are reflected in their membrane interactions and how these can be correlated to their biological activities. To this end, the three peptides were labeled with stable isotopes, reconstituted into oriented phospholipid bilayers, and their detailed topology determined by a combined approach using 2H and 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Although phylloseptin-2 and -3 adopt perfect in-plane alignments, the tilt angle of phylloseptin-1 deviates by 8° probably to assure a more water exposed localization of the lysine-17 side chain. Furthermore, different azimuthal angles are observed, positioning the amphipathic helices of all three peptides with the charged residues well exposed to the water phase. Interestingly, our studies also reveal that two orientation-dependent 2H quadrupolar splittings from methyl-deuterated alanines and one 15N amide chemical shift are sufficient to unambiguously determine the topology of phylloseptin-1, where quadrupolar splittings close to the maximum impose the most stringent angular restraints. As a result of these studies, a strategy is proposed where the topology of a peptide structure can be determined accurately from the labeling with 15N and 2H isotopes of only a few amino acid residues. PMID:25140425

  9. Exploring Dynamics and Cage-Guest Interactions in Clathrate Hydrates Using Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Suvrajit; Guo, Jin; Janda, Kenneth C; Martin, Rachel W

    2015-12-17

    Interactions between guest molecules and the water cages in clathrates are dominated by isotropic van der Waals forces at low temperatures because the cage structures satisfy the hydrogen bonding propensity of the water. However, above 200 K the water molecules become more labile and may interact strongly with the guests through hydrogen bonding. In this work we compare the dynamics of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and cyclopentane (CP) guests in the hydrate cages above 200 K. Since THF can form hydrogen bonds while CP cannot, the dynamics provide insight into host-guest hydrogen bonding. We use magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to measure proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the guests as a function of temperature and find that the activation barrier to the motion of THF molecules is 4.7 kcal/mol (19.7 kJ/mol) at temperatures above 200 K. This is almost 5 times higher than the barrier at lower temperatures. In contrast, the barrier to guest motion in CP hydrate is found to be about 0.67 kcal/mol (2.8 kJ/mol), which agrees well with data at lower temperatures. These results demonstrate that hydrogen bonding interactions between the THF guest and the clathrate cage are significant above 200 K due to the host lattice mobility. PMID:26583257

  10. A structural model for Alzheimer's -amyloid fibrils based on experimental constraints from solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Aneta T.; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Balbach, John J.; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Leapman, Richard D.; Delaglio, Frank; Tycko, Robert

    2002-12-01

    We present a structural model for amyloid fibrils formed by the 40-residue -amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease (A1-40), based on a set of experimental constraints from solid state NMR spectroscopy. The model additionally incorporates the cross- structural motif established by x-ray fiber diffraction and satisfies constraints on A1-40 fibril dimensions and mass-per-length determined from electron microscopy. Approximately the first 10 residues of A1-40 are structurally disordered in the fibrils. Residues 12-24 and 30-40 adopt -strand conformations and form parallel -sheets through intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Residues 25-29 contain a bend of the peptide backbone that brings the two -sheets in contact through sidechain-sidechain interactions. A single cross- unit is then a double-layered -sheet structure with a hydrophobic core and one hydrophobic face. The only charged sidechains in the core are those of D23 and K28, which form salt bridges. Fibrils with minimum mass-per-length and diameter consist of two cross- units with their hydrophobic faces juxtaposed.

  11. Solid state field-cycling NMR relaxometry: instrumental improvements and new applications.

    PubMed

    Fujara, Franz; Kruk, Danuta; Privalov, Alexei F

    2014-10-01

    The paper reviews recent progress in field cycling (FC) NMR instrumentation and its application to solid state physics. Special emphasis is put on our own work during the last 15years on instrumentation, theory and applications. As far as instrumentation is concerned we report on our development of two types of electronical FC relaxometers, a mechanical FC relaxometer and a combination of FC and one-dimensional microimaging. Progress has been achieved with respect to several parameters such as the accessible field and temperature range as well as the incorporation of sample spinning. Since an appropriate analysis of FC data requires a careful consideration of relaxation theory, we include a theory section discussing the most relevant aspects of relaxation in solids which are related to residual dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. The most important limitations of relaxation theory are also discussed. With improved instrumentation and with the help of relaxation theory we get access to interesting new applications such as ionic motion in solid electrolytes, structure determination in molecular crystals, ultraslow polymer dynamics and rotational resonance phenomena.

  12. High resolution 13C-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a deuterated protein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming; Comellas, Gemma; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution 13C-detected solid-state NMR spectra of the deuterated beta-1 immunoglobulin binding domain of the protein G (GB1) have been collected to show that all 15N, 13C′, 13Cα and 13Cβ sites are resolved in 13C–13C and 15N–13C spectra, with significant improvement in T2 relaxation times and resolution at high magnetic field (750 MHz). The comparison of echo T2 values between deuterated and protonated GB1 at various spinning rates and under different decoupling schemes indicates that 13Cα T2′ times increase by almost a factor of two upon deuteration at all spinning rates and under moderate decoupling strength, and thus the deuteration enables application of scalar-based correlation experiments that are challenging from the standpoint of transverse relaxation, with moderate proton decoupling. Additionally, deuteration in large proteins is a useful strategy to selectively detect polar residues that are often important for protein function and protein–protein interactions. PMID:20803233

  13. Complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for ten phenylpiperazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhihui; Yuan, Mu; Zhang, Si; Wu, Jun; Qi, Shuhua; Li, Qingxin

    2005-10-01

    Ten phenylpiperazine derivatives were designed and synthesized. The first complete assignments of (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts for these phenylpiperazine derivatives were achieved by means of 1D and 2D NMR techniques, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra.

  14. Complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for 10 phenylethanoid glycosides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Huang, Jianshe; Xiao, Qiang; Zhang, Si; Xiao, Zhihui; Li, Qingxin; Long, Lijuan; Huang, Liangmin

    2004-07-01

    Ten phenylethanoid glycosides, including two new ones, isolated from the aerial parts of the mangrove plant Acanthus ilicifolius were identified. The first complete assignments of the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts for these glycosides were achieved by means of 2D NMR techniques, including 1H-1H COSY, TOCSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra.

  15. Solid-state C-13 and H-1 NMR imaging stdies of the accelerated-sulfur cured high vinyl polybutadiene. [NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Solid-state [sup 13]C NMR and [sup 1]H Imaging methods have been used to follow the progress of accelerated-sulfur vulcanization of unfilled high vinyl polybutadiene. Different NMR pulse sequences have been used to characterize the micro-network structures present in the bulk of the finally cured rubber samples. These studies were made as a function of formulation and processing variables. The time-resolved, integrated rubber network. Mono-sulfidic as well as the residual accelerator fragments were differentiated from the polysulfidic crosslinks in a finally cured material. Dynamic studies of these network structures were made using spin-spin relaxation (T[sub 2c]) measurements. The activation energies calculated based on T[sub 2] were used to verify different carbons, directly attached to the sulfur atoms. A swelling method based on Flory-Rehner's equation was also used to determine the crosslink densities and the number-average molecular weight between the nodal junctions in different formulations. Different spatially resolved structural features have been detected in the swollen samples using NMR imaging method. The voids, no-voids and other impurities were differentiated on the basis of magnetic susceptibility differences. Cyclohexane was used as a swelling solvent to probe the morphological defects in these materials. The T[sub 2]-weighted images were used to evaluate the crosslink densities in different samples. The quantitative estimations based on histogram was also employed to determine the average volume per crosslink region. The contrast based on H-1 spin-density or mobility was highlighted in T[sub 2]-weighted images. The variations were found to be closely related to variation in both concentration and mobility of the network.

  16. Solid-State NMR and DFT Studies on the Formation of Well-Defined Silica-Supported Tantallaaziridines: From Synthesis to Catalytic Application.

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, Bilel; Pelletier, Jérémie D A; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Chen, Yin; El Eter, Mohamed; Chermak, Edrisse; Cavallo, Luigi; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-02-24

    Single-site, well-defined, silica-supported tantallaaziridine intermediates [≡Si-O-Ta(η(2) -NRCH2 )(NMe2 )2 ] [R=Me (2), Ph (3)] were prepared from silica-supported tetrakis(dimethylamido)tantalum [≡Si-O-Ta(NMe2 )4 ] (1) and fully characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and (1) H,(13) C HETCOR and DQ TQ solid-state (SS) NMR spectroscopy. The formation mechanism, by β-H abstraction, was investigated by SS NMR spectroscopy and supported by DFT calculations. The C-H activation of the dimethylamide ligand is favored for R=Ph. The results from catalytic testing in the hydroaminoalkylation of alkenes were consistent with the N-alkyl aryl amine substrates being more efficient than N-dialkyl amines. PMID:26875939

  17. Solution and solid state NMR approaches to draw iron pathways in the ferritin nanocage.

    PubMed

    Lalli, Daniela; Turano, Paola

    2013-11-19

    Ferritins are intracellular proteins that can store thousands of iron(III) ions as a solid mineral. These structures autoassemble from four-helix bundle subunits to form a hollow sphere and are a prototypical example of protein nanocages. The protein acts as a reservoir, encapsulating iron as ferric oxide in its central cavity in a nontoxic and bioavailable form. Scientists have long known the structural details of the protein shell, owing to very high resolution X-ray structures of the apoform. However, the atomic level mechanism governing the multistep biomineralization process remained largely elusive. Through analysis of the chemical behavior of ferritin mutants, chemists have found the role of some residues in key reaction steps. Using Mössbauer and XAS, they have identified some di-iron intermediates of the catalytic reaction trapped by rapid freeze quench. However, structural information about the iron interaction sites remains scarce. The entire process is governed by a number of specific, but weak, interactions between the protein shell and the iron species moving across the cage. While this situation may constitute a major problem for crystallography, NMR spectroscopy represents an optimal tool to detect and characterize transient species involving soluble proteins. Regardless, NMR analysis of the 480 kDa ferritin represents a real challenge. Our interest in ferritin chemistry inspired us to use an original combination of solution and solid state approaches. While the highly symmetric structure of the homo-24-mer frog ferritin greatly simplifies the spectra, the large protein size hinders the efficient coherence transfer in solution, thus preventing the sequence specific assignments. In contrast, extensive (13)C-spin diffusion makes the solution (13)C-(13)C NOESY experiment our gold standard to monitor protein side chains both in the apoprotein alone and in its interaction with paramagnetic iron species, inducing line broadening on the resonances of

  18. Spin dynamics in the modulation frame: application to homonuclear recoupling in magic angle spinning solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    De Paëpe, Gaël; Lewandowski, Józef R; Griffin, Robert G

    2008-03-28

    We introduce a family of solid-state NMR pulse sequences that generalizes the concept of second averaging in the modulation frame and therefore provides a new approach to perform magic angle spinning dipolar recoupling experiments. Here, we focus on two particular recoupling mechanisms-cosine modulated rotary resonance (CMpRR) and cosine modulated recoupling with isotropic chemical shift reintroduction (COMICS). The first technique, CMpRR, is based on a cosine modulation of the rf phase and yields broadband double-quantum (DQ) (13)C recoupling using >70 kHz omega(1,C)/2pi rf field for the spinning frequency omega(r)/2=10-30 kHz and (1)H Larmor frequency omega(0,H)/2pi up to 900 MHz. Importantly, for p>or=5, CMpRR recouples efficiently in the absence of (1)H decoupling. Extension to lower p values (3.51)H irradiation (<0.25 omega(r)/2pi). This phenomenon is explained through higher order cross terms including a homonuclear third spin assisted recoupling mechanism among protons. CMpRR mitigates the heating effects of simultaneous high power (13)C recoupling and (1)H decoupling. The second technique, COMICS, involves low power (13)C irradiation that induces simultaneous recoupling of the (13)C DQ dipolar and isotropic chemical shift terms. In contrast to CMpRR, where the DQ bandwidth (approximately 30 kHz at omega(0,H)/2pi=750 MHz) covers the entire (13)C spectral width, COMICS recoupling, through the reintroduction of the isotropic chemical shift, is selective with respect to the carrier frequency, having a typical bandwidth of approximately 100 Hz. This approach is intended as a general frequency selective method circumventing dipolar truncation (supplementary to R(2) experiments). These new gamma-encoded sequences with attenuated rf requirements extend the applicability of homonuclear recoupling techniques to new regimes--high spinning and Larmor frequencies--and therefore should be of major

  19. Thermal decomposition of t-butylamine borane studied by in situ solid state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Feigerle, J.; Smyrl, N. R.; Morrell, J. S.; Stowe, A. C.

    2010-03-18

    of the amine borane fuel more feasible [22]. In the present study, tert-butylamine borane is investigated by heteronuclear in situ solid state NMR to understand hydrogen release from a hydrocarbon containing amine borane. tbutylamine borane has similar physical properties to amine borane with a melting point of 96 C. A single proton has been replaced with a t-butylamine group resulting in a weakening of the dihydrogen bonding framework. t-butylamine borane has a theoretical gravimetric hydrogen density of 15.1%; however, isobutane can also be evolved rather than hydrogen. If decomposition yields one mole isobutane and two moles hydrogen, 4.5 wt% H2 gas will be evolved. More importantly for the present work, the resulting spent fuel should be comprised of both (BNH)n and (CBNH)n polyimidoboranes.

  20. A strip-shield improves the efficiency of a solenoid coil in probes for high field solid-state NMR of lossy biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin H.; Grant, Christopher V.; Cook, Gabriel A.; Park, Sang Ho; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-01-01

    A strip-shield inserted between a high inductance double-tuned solenoid coil and the glass tube containing the sample improves the efficiency of probes used for high-field solid-state NMR experiments on lossy aqueous samples of proteins and other biopolymers. A strip-shield is a coil liner consisting of thin copper strips layered on a PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) insulator. With lossy samples, the shift in tuning frequency is smaller, the reduction in Q, and RF-induced heating are all significantly reduced when the strip-shield is present. The performance of 800 MHz 1H/15N and 1H/13C double-resonance probes is demonstrated on aqueous samples of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:19559634

  1. Elastic deformation and area per lipid of membranes: atomistic view from solid-state deuterium NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kinnun, Jacob J; Mallikarjunaiah, K J; Petrache, Horia I; Brown, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the application of solid-state ²H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for investigating the deformation of lipid bilayers at the atomistic level. For liquid-crystalline membranes, the average structure is manifested by the segmental order parameters (SCD) of the lipids. Solid-state ²H NMR yields observables directly related to the stress field of the lipid bilayer. The extent to which lipid bilayers are deformed by osmotic pressure is integral to how lipid-protein interactions affect membrane functions. Calculations of the average area per lipid and related structural properties are pertinent to bilayer remodeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of membranes. To establish structural quantities, such as area per lipid and volumetric bilayer thickness, a mean-torque analysis of ²H NMR order parameters is applied. Osmotic stress is introduced by adding polymer solutions or by gravimetric dehydration, which are thermodynamically equivalent. Solid-state NMR studies of lipids under osmotic stress probe membrane interactions involving collective bilayer undulations, order-director fluctuations, and lipid molecular protrusions. Removal of water yields a reduction of the mean area per lipid, with a corresponding increase in volumetric bilayer thickness, by up to 20% in the liquid-crystalline state. Hydrophobic mismatch can shift protein states involving mechanosensation, transport, and molecular recognition by G-protein-coupled receptors. Measurements of the order parameters versus osmotic pressure yield the elastic area compressibility modulus and the corresponding bilayer thickness at an atomistic level. Solid-state ²H NMR thus reveals how membrane deformation can affect protein conformational changes within the stress field of the lipid bilayer.

  2. Structure of the Dimerization Interface in the Mature HIV-1 Capsid Protein Lattice from Solid State NMR of Tubular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bayro, Marvin J; Tycko, Robert

    2016-07-13

    The HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) forms the capsid shell that encloses RNA within a mature HIV-1 virion. Previous studies by electron microscopy have shown that the capsid shell is primarily a triangular lattice of CA hexamers, with variable curvature that destroys the ideal symmetry of a planar lattice. The mature CA lattice depends on CA dimerization, which occurs through interactions between helix 9 segments of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of CA. Several high-resolution structures of the CTD-CTD dimerization interface have been reported, based on X-ray crystallography and multidimensional solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with significant differences in amino acid side chain conformations and helix 9-helix 9 orientations. In a structural model for tubular CA assemblies based on cryogenic electron microscopy (cryoEM) [Zhao et al. Nature, 2013, 497, 643-646], the dimerization interface is substantially disordered. The dimerization interface structure in noncrystalline CA assemblies and the extent to which this interface is structurally ordered within a curved lattice have therefore been unclear. Here we describe solid state NMR measurements on the dimerization interface in tubular CA assemblies, which contain the curved triangular lattice of a mature virion, including quantitative measurements of intermolecular and intramolecular distances using dipolar recoupling techniques, solid state NMR chemical shifts, and long-range side chain-side chain contacts. When combined with restraints on the distance and orientation between helix 9 segments from the cryoEM study, the solid state NMR data lead to a unique high-resolution structure for the dimerization interface in the noncrystalline lattice of CA tubes. These results demonstrate that CA lattice curvature is not dependent on disorder or variability in the dimerization interface. This work also demonstrates the feasibility of local structure determination within large noncrystalline assemblies formed by high

  3. Fine refinement of solid state structure of racemic form of phospho-tyrosine employing NMR Crystallography approach.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Piotr; Pawlak, Tomasz; Oszajca, Marcin; Lasocha, Wieslaw; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2015-02-01

    We present step by step facets important in NMR Crystallography strategy employing O-phospho-dl-tyrosine as model sample. The significance of three major techniques being components of this approach: solid state NMR (SS NMR), X-ray diffraction of powdered sample (PXRD) and theoretical calculations (Gauge Invariant Projector Augmented Wave; GIPAW) is discussed. Each experimental technique provides different set of structural constraints. From the PXRD measurement the size of the unit cell, space group and roughly refined molecular structure are established. SS NMR provides information about content of crystallographic asymmetric unit, local geometry, molecular motion in the crystal lattice and hydrogen bonding pattern. GIPAW calculations are employed for validation of quality of elucidation and fine refinement of structure. Crystal and molecular structure of O-phospho-dl-tyrosine solved by NMR Crystallography is deposited at Cambridge Crystallographic Data Center under number CCDC 1005924.

  4. Visualization and processing of computed solid-state NMR parameters: MagresView and MagresPython.

    PubMed

    Sturniolo, Simone; Green, Timothy F G; Hanson, Robert M; Zilka, Miri; Refson, Keith; Hodgkinson, Paul; Brown, Steven P; Yates, Jonathan R

    2016-09-01

    We introduce two open source tools to aid the processing and visualisation of ab-initio computed solid-state NMR parameters. The Magres file format for computed NMR parameters (as implemented in CASTEP v8.0 and QuantumEspresso v5.0.0) is implemented. MagresView is built upon the widely used Jmol crystal viewer, and provides an intuitive environment to display computed NMR parameters. It can provide simple pictorial representation of one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra as well as output a selected spin-system for exact simulations with dedicated spin-dynamics software. MagresPython provides a simple scripting environment to manipulate large numbers of computed NMR parameters to search for structural correlations. PMID:27435606

  5. Visualization and processing of computed solid-state NMR parameters: MagresView and MagresPython.

    PubMed

    Sturniolo, Simone; Green, Timothy F G; Hanson, Robert M; Zilka, Miri; Refson, Keith; Hodgkinson, Paul; Brown, Steven P; Yates, Jonathan R

    2016-09-01

    We introduce two open source tools to aid the processing and visualisation of ab-initio computed solid-state NMR parameters. The Magres file format for computed NMR parameters (as implemented in CASTEP v8.0 and QuantumEspresso v5.0.0) is implemented. MagresView is built upon the widely used Jmol crystal viewer, and provides an intuitive environment to display computed NMR parameters. It can provide simple pictorial representation of one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra as well as output a selected spin-system for exact simulations with dedicated spin-dynamics software. MagresPython provides a simple scripting environment to manipulate large numbers of computed NMR parameters to search for structural correlations.

  6. Fine refinement of solid state structure of racemic form of phospho-tyrosine employing NMR Crystallography approach.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Piotr; Pawlak, Tomasz; Oszajca, Marcin; Lasocha, Wieslaw; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2015-02-01

    We present step by step facets important in NMR Crystallography strategy employing O-phospho-dl-tyrosine as model sample. The significance of three major techniques being components of this approach: solid state NMR (SS NMR), X-ray diffraction of powdered sample (PXRD) and theoretical calculations (Gauge Invariant Projector Augmented Wave; GIPAW) is discussed. Each experimental technique provides different set of structural constraints. From the PXRD measurement the size of the unit cell, space group and roughly refined molecular structure are established. SS NMR provides information about content of crystallographic asymmetric unit, local geometry, molecular motion in the crystal lattice and hydrogen bonding pattern. GIPAW calculations are employed for validation of quality of elucidation and fine refinement of structure. Crystal and molecular structure of O-phospho-dl-tyrosine solved by NMR Crystallography is deposited at Cambridge Crystallographic Data Center under number CCDC 1005924. PMID:25240460

  7. Solid-state NMR/NQR and first-principles study of two niobium halide cluster compounds.

    PubMed

    Perić, Berislav; Gautier, Régis; Pickard, Chris J; Bosiočić, Marko; Grbić, Mihael S; Požek, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Two hexanuclear niobium halide cluster compounds with a [Nb6X12](2+) (X=Cl, Br) diamagnetic cluster core, have been studied by a combination of experimental solid-state NMR/NQR techniques and PAW/GIPAW calculations. For niobium sites the NMR parameters were determined by using variable Bo field static broadband NMR measurements and additional NQR measurements. It was found that they possess large positive chemical shifts, contrary to majority of niobium compounds studied so far by solid-state NMR, but in accordance with chemical shifts of (95)Mo nuclei in structurally related compounds containing [Mo6Br8](4+) cluster cores. Experimentally determined δiso((93)Nb) values are in the range from 2,400 to 3,000 ppm. A detailed analysis of geometrical relations between computed electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors with respect to structural features of cluster units was carried out. These tensors on niobium sites are almost axially symmetric with parallel orientation of the largest EFG and the smallest CS principal axes (Vzz and δ33) coinciding with the molecular four-fold axis of the [Nb6X12](2+) unit. Bridging halogen sites are characterized by large asymmetry of EFG and CS tensors, the largest EFG principal axis (Vzz) is perpendicular to the X-Nb bonds, while intermediate EFG principal axis (Vyy) and the largest CS principal axis (δ11) are oriented in the radial direction with respect to the center of the cluster unit. For more symmetrical bromide compound the PAW predictions for EFG parameters are in better correspondence with the NMR/NQR measurements than in the less symmetrical chlorine compound. Theoretically predicted NMR parameters of bridging halogen sites were checked by (79/81)Br NQR and (35)Cl solid-state NMR measurements.

  8. Complete 1H NMR spectral analysis of ten chemical markers of Ginkgo biloba

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, José G.; Lankin, David C.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2013-01-01

    The complete and unambiguous 1H NMR assignments of ten marker constituents of Ginkgo biloba are described. The comprehensive 1H NMR profiles (fingerprints) of ginkgolide A, ginkgolide B, ginkgolide C, ginkgolide J, bilobalide, quercetin, kaempferol, isorhamnetin, isoquercetin, and rutin in DMSO-d6 were obtained through the examination of 1D 1H NMR and 2D 1H,1H-COSY data, in combination with 1H iterative Full Spin Analysis (HiFSA). The computational analysis of discrete spin systems allowed a detailed characterization of all the 1H NMR signals in terms of chemical shifts (δH) and spin-spin coupling constants (JHH), regardless of signal overlap and higher order coupling effects. The capability of the HiFSA-generated 1H fingerprints to reproduce experimental 1H NMR spectra at different field strengths was also evaluated. As a result of this analysis, a revised set of 1H NMR parameters for all ten phytoconstituents was assembled. Furthermore, precise 1H NMR assignments of the sugar moieties of isoquercetin and rutin are reported for the first time. PMID:22730238

  9. Rheological and solid-state NMR assessments of copovidone/clotrimazole model solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fengyuan; Su, Yongchao; Zhu, Lei; Brown, Chad D; Rosen, Lawrence A; Rosenberg, Kenneth J

    2016-03-16

    This study aims to assess several model solid dispersions by using dynamic oscillatory rheology, solid-state NMR and other solid phase characterization techniques, and correlate their viscoelastic responses with processing methods and microstructures. A model active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), clotrimazole, was compounded with copovidone to form solid dispersions via various techniques with different mixing capabilities. Physicochemical characterizations of the resulting solid dispersions demonstrated that simple physical mixing led to a poorly mixed blend manifested by existence of large API crystalline content and heterogeneous distribution. Cryogenic milling significantly improved mixing of two components as a result of reduced particle size and increased contact surface area, but produced limited amorphous content. In contrast, hot melt extrusion (HME) processing resulted in a homogenous amorphous solid dispersion because of its inherent mixing efficiency. Storage modulus and viscosities versus frequency of different solid dispersions indicated that the incorporation of API into the polymer matrix resulted in a plasticizing effect which reduced the viscosity. The crystalline/aggregated forms of API also exhibited more elastic response than its amorphous/dispersed counterpart. Temperature ramps of the physical mixture with high API concentration captured a critical temperature, at which a bump was observed in damping factor. This bump was attributed to the dissolution of crystalline API into the polymer. In addition, heating-cooling cycles of various solid dispersions suggested that cryomilling and HME processing could form a homogeneous solid dispersion at low API content, whereas high drug concentration led to a relatively unstable dispersion due to supersaturation of API in the polymer.

  10. 13C solid-state NMR chemical shift anisotropy analysis of the anomeric carbon in carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Ying; Luo, Shun-Yuan; Hung, Shang-Cheng; Chan, Sunney I; Tzou, Der-Lii M

    2005-03-21

    (13)C NMR solid-state structural analysis of the anomeric center in carbohydrates was performed on six monosaccharides: glucose (Glc), mannose (Man), galactose (Gal), galactosamine hydrochloride (GalN), glucosamine hydrochloride (GlcN), and N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc). In the 1D (13)C cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) spectrum, the anomeric center C-1 of these carbohydrates revealed two well resolved resonances shifted by 3-5ppm, which were readily assigned to the anomeric alpha and beta forms. From this experiment, we also extracted the (13)C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor elements of the two forms from their spinning sideband intensities, respectively. It was found out that the chemical shift tensor for the alpha anomer was more axially symmetrical than that of the beta form. A strong linear correlation was obtained when the ratio of the axial asymmetry of the (13)C chemical shift tensors of the two anomeric forms was plotted in a semilogarithmic plot against the relative population of the two anomers. Finally, we applied REDOR spectroscopy to discern whether or not there were any differences in the sugar ring conformation between the anomers. Identical two-bond distances of 2.57A (2.48A) were deduced for both the alpha and beta forms in GlcNAc (GlcN), suggesting that the two anomers have essentially identical sugar ring scaffolds in these sugars. In light of these REDOR distance measurements and the strong correlation observed between the ratio of the axial asymmetry parameters of the (13)C chemical shift tensors and the relative population between the two anomeric forms, we concluded that the anomeric effect arises principally from interaction of the electron charge clouds between the C-1-O-5 and the C-1-O-1 bonds in these monosaccharides.

  11. On The Potential of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Diamonds in Solid-State and Dissolution (13) C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Christian O; Akbey, Ümit; Aussenac, Fabien; Olsen, Greg L; Feintuch, Akiva; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a versatile option to improve the sensitivity of NMR and MRI. This versatility has elicited interest for overcoming potential limitations of these techniques, including the achievement of solid-state polarization enhancement at ambient conditions, and the maximization of (13) C signal lifetimes for performing in vivo MRI scans. This study explores whether diamond's (13) C behavior in nano- and micro-particles could be used to achieve these ends. The characteristics of diamond's DNP enhancement were analyzed for different magnetic fields, grain sizes, and sample environments ranging from cryogenic to ambient temperatures, in both solution and solid-state experiments. It was found that (13) C NMR signals could be boosted by orders of magnitude in either low- or room-temperature solid-state DNP experiments by utilizing naturally occurring paramagnetic P1 substitutional nitrogen defects. We attribute this behavior to the unusually long electronic/nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times characteristic of diamond, coupled with a time-independent cross-effect-like polarization transfer mechanism facilitated by a matching of the nitrogen-related hyperfine coupling and the (13) C Zeeman splitting. The efficiency of this solid-state polarization process, however, is harder to exploit in dissolution DNP-enhanced MRI contexts. The prospects for utilizing polarized diamond approaching nanoscale dimensions for both solid and solution applications are briefly discussed. PMID:27416769

  12. On The Potential of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Diamonds in Solid-State and Dissolution (13) C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Christian O; Akbey, Ümit; Aussenac, Fabien; Olsen, Greg L; Feintuch, Akiva; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a versatile option to improve the sensitivity of NMR and MRI. This versatility has elicited interest for overcoming potential limitations of these techniques, including the achievement of solid-state polarization enhancement at ambient conditions, and the maximization of (13) C signal lifetimes for performing in vivo MRI scans. This study explores whether diamond's (13) C behavior in nano- and micro-particles could be used to achieve these ends. The characteristics of diamond's DNP enhancement were analyzed for different magnetic fields, grain sizes, and sample environments ranging from cryogenic to ambient temperatures, in both solution and solid-state experiments. It was found that (13) C NMR signals could be boosted by orders of magnitude in either low- or room-temperature solid-state DNP experiments by utilizing naturally occurring paramagnetic P1 substitutional nitrogen defects. We attribute this behavior to the unusually long electronic/nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times characteristic of diamond, coupled with a time-independent cross-effect-like polarization transfer mechanism facilitated by a matching of the nitrogen-related hyperfine coupling and the (13) C Zeeman splitting. The efficiency of this solid-state polarization process, however, is harder to exploit in dissolution DNP-enhanced MRI contexts. The prospects for utilizing polarized diamond approaching nanoscale dimensions for both solid and solution applications are briefly discussed.

  13. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to β-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil → helix-like → β-sheet-like → β-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of β-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  14. Solid-state 13C NMR and molecular modeling studies of acetyl aleuritolic acid obtained from Croton cajucara Benth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva San Gil, Rosane Aguiar; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; da Cunha Pinto, Angelo; do Espírito Santo Gomes, Fabiano; de Castro Dantas, Tereza Neuma; Maciel, Maria Aparecida Medeiros

    2008-08-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance ( 13C NMR) with magic-angle spinning (MAS) and with cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) spectra, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques were used to obtain structural data from a sample of acetyl aleuritolic acid (AAA) extracted from the stem bark of Croton cajucara Benth. (Euphorbiaceae) and recrystallized from acetone. Since solid-state 13C NMR results suggested the presence of more than one molecule in the unitary cell for the AAA, DSC analysis and molecular modeling calculations were used to access this possibility. The absence of phase transition peaks in the DSC spectra and the dimeric models of AAA simulated using the semi-empirical PM3 method are in agreement with that proposal.

  15. Membrane orientation of the Na,K-ATPase regulatory membrane protein CHIF determined by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Franzin, Carla M.; Teriete, Peter; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2010-01-01

    Corticosteroid hormone-induced factor (CHIF) is a major regulatory subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, and a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of membrane proteins that regulate the function of the enzyme complex in a tissue-specific and physiological-state-specific manner. Here we present the structure of CHIF oriented in the membrane, determined by solid-state NMR orientation-dependent restraints. Because CHIF adopts a similar structure in lipid micelles and bilayers, it is possible to assign the solid-state NMR spectrum measured for 15N-labeled CHIF in oriented bilayers from the structure determined in micelles, to obtain the global orientation of the protein in the membrane. PMID:18098352

  16. Development of qualitative and quantitative analysis methods in pharmaceutical application with new selective signal excitation methods for 13 C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance using 1 H T1rho relaxation time.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Mamiko; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Most pharmaceutical drug substances and excipients in formulations exist in a crystalline or amorphous form, and an understanding of their state during manufacture and storage is critically important, particularly in formulated products. Carbon 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is useful for studying the chemical and physical state of pharmaceutical solids in a formulated product. We developed two new selective signal excitation methods in (13) C solid-state NMR to extract the spectrum of a target component from such a mixture. These methods were based on equalization of the proton relaxation time in a single domain via rapid intraproton spin diffusion and the difference in proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame ((1) H T1rho) of individual components in the mixture. Introduction of simple pulse sequences to one-dimensional experiments reduced data acquisition time and increased flexibility. We then demonstrated these methods in a commercially available drug and in a mixture of two saccharides, in which the (13) C signals of the target components were selectively excited, and showed them to be applicable to the quantitative analysis of individual components in solid mixtures, such as formulated products, polymorphic mixtures, or mixtures of crystalline and amorphous phases. PMID:23147444

  17. Quantitative determination of lead in mixtures of lead(II) halidesusing solid-state 207pb nmr spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Glatfelter, Alicia; Stephenson, Nicole; Bai, Shi; Dybowski,Cecil; Perry, Dale L.

    2006-11-01

    A multi-spectrum technique for facile, quantitativedetermination of lead in solid materials using solid-state 207Pb NMR thatavoids the major problem of uniform excitation across a wide spectralrange has been demonstrated. The method can be employed without chemicalseparation or other chemical manipulations and without any prior samplepreparation, resulting in a non-destructive analysis, and producingresults that are in agreement with gravimetric analyses of mixed samplesof the lead halides.

  18. Solid-State ¹⁷O NMR studies of organic and biological molecules: Recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang

    2016-02-01

    This Trends article highlights the recent advances published between 2012 and 2015 in solid-state (17)O NMR for organic and biological molecules. New developments in the following areas are described: (1) new oxygen-containing functional groups, (2) metal organic frameworks, (3) pharmaceuticals, (4) probing molecular motion in organic solids, (5) dynamic nuclear polarization, and (6) paramagnetic coordination compounds. For each of these areas, the author offers his personal views on important problems to be solved and possible future directions.

  19. In situ solid-state NMR study of methanol-to-gasoline chemistry in zeolite HZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, E.J.; Kheir, A.A.; Lazo, N.D.; Haw, J.F.

    1992-09-17

    This paper uses {sup 13}C solid-state NMR to study the chemistry of a variety of absorbates related to the methanol-to-gasoline process. This study has resulted in a better understanding of the chemical reaction occurring inside the zeolite HZSM-5 used in this process. It is shown that ethylene is the first olefin formed and ethyl methyl ether is also formed during this hydrocarbon synthesis on zeolite HZSM-5.

  20. Solid-state NMR as an effective method of polymorphic analysis: solid dosage forms of clopidogrel hydrogensulfate.

    PubMed

    Pindelska, Edyta; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Mazurek, Andrzej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2015-01-01

    Clopidogrel hydrogensulfate (HSCL) is an antiplatelet agent, one of top-selling drugs in the world. In this paper, we have described a rapid and convenient method of verification which polymorph of HSCL is present in its final solid dosage form. Our methodology based on solid-state NMR spectroscopy and ab initio gauge-including projector-augmented wave calculations of NMR shielding constants is appropriate for currently available commercial solid dosage forms of HSCL. Furthermore, such structural characterization can assist with the development of new pharmaceutical products containing HSCL and also be useful in the identification of counterfeit drugs.

  1. Solid-state NMR as an effective method of polymorphic analysis: solid dosage forms of clopidogrel hydrogensulfate.

    PubMed

    Pindelska, Edyta; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Mazurek, Andrzej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2015-01-01

    Clopidogrel hydrogensulfate (HSCL) is an antiplatelet agent, one of top-selling drugs in the world. In this paper, we have described a rapid and convenient method of verification which polymorph of HSCL is present in its final solid dosage form. Our methodology based on solid-state NMR spectroscopy and ab initio gauge-including projector-augmented wave calculations of NMR shielding constants is appropriate for currently available commercial solid dosage forms of HSCL. Furthermore, such structural characterization can assist with the development of new pharmaceutical products containing HSCL and also be useful in the identification of counterfeit drugs. PMID:25393324

  2. Structural Dynamics and Conformational Equilibria of SERCA Regulatory Proteins in Membranes by Solid-State NMR Restrained Simulations

    PubMed Central

    De Simone, Alfonso; Mote, Kaustubh R.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is emerging as a powerful approach to determine structure, topology, and conformational dynamics of membrane proteins at the atomic level. Conformational dynamics are often inferred and quantified from the motional averaging of the NMR parameters. However, the nature of these motions is difficult to envision based only on spectroscopic data. Here, we utilized restrained molecular dynamics simulations to probe the structural dynamics, topology and conformational transitions of regulatory membrane proteins of the calcium ATPase SERCA, namely sarcolipin and phospholamban, in explicit lipid bilayers. Specifically, we employed oriented solid-state NMR data, such as dipolar couplings and chemical shift anisotropy measured in lipid bicelles, to refine the conformational ensemble of these proteins in lipid membranes. The samplings accurately reproduced the orientations of transmembrane helices and showed a significant degree of convergence with all of the NMR parameters. Unlike the unrestrained simulations, the resulting sarcolipin structures are in agreement with distances and angles for hydrogen bonds in ideal helices. In the case of phospholamban, the restrained ensemble sampled the conformational interconversion between T (helical) and R (unfolded) states for the cytoplasmic region that could not be observed using standard structural refinements with the same experimental data set. This study underscores the importance of implementing NMR data in molecular dynamics protocols to better describe the conformational landscapes of membrane proteins embedded in realistic lipid membranes. PMID:24940774

  3. Lipid bilayer preparations of membrane proteins for oriented and magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR samples

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nabanita; Murray, Dylan T; Cross, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has been used successfully for characterizing the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins as well as their interactions with other proteins in lipid bilayers. such an environment is often necessary for achieving native-like structures. sample preparation is the key to this success. Here we present a detailed description of a robust protocol that results in high-quality membrane protein samples for both magic-angle spinning and oriented-sample solid-state NMR. the procedure is demonstrated using two proteins: CrgA (two transmembrane helices) and rv1861 (three transmembrane helices), both from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. the success of this procedure relies on two points. First, for samples for both types of NMR experiment, the reconstitution of the protein from a detergent environment to an environment in which it is incorporated into liposomes results in ‘complete’ removal of detergent. second, for the oriented samples, proper dehydration followed by rehydration of the proteoliposomes is essential. By using this protocol, proteoliposome samples for magic-angle spinning NMR and uniformly aligned samples (orientational mosaicity of <1°) for oriented-sample NMR can be obtained within 10 d. PMID:24157546

  4. 250 GHz CW Gyrotron Oscillator for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in Biological Solid State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hornstein, Melissa K.; Kreischer, Kenneth E.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Woskov, Paul P.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator, a critical component of an integrated system for magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at 9T, corresponding to 380 MHz 1H frequency. The 250 GHz gyrotron is the first gyro-device designed with the goal of seamless integration with an NMR spectrometer for routine DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy and has operated under computer control for periods of up to 21 days with a 100% duty cycle. Following a brief historical review of the field, we present studies of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) using DNP-enhanced multidimensional NMR. These results include assignment of active site resonances in [U-13C,15N]-bR and demonstrate the utility of DNP for studies of membrane proteins. Next, we review the theory of gyro-devices from quantum mechanical and classical viewpoints and discuss the unique considerations that apply to gyrotron oscillators designed for DNP experiments. We then characterize the operation of the 250 GHz gyrotron in detail, including its long-term stability and controllability. We have measured the spectral purity of the gyrotron emission using both homodyne and heterodyne techniques. Radiation intensity patterns from the corrugated waveguide that delivers power to the NMR probe were measured using two new techniques to confirm pure mode content: a thermometric approach based on the temperature-dependent color of liquid crystalline media applied to a substrate and imaging with a pyroelectric camera. We next present a detailed study of the mode excitation characteristics of the gyrotron. Exploration of the operating characteristics of several fundamental modes reveals broadband continuous frequency tuning of up to 1.8 GHz as a function of the magnetic field alone, a feature that may be exploited in future tunable gyrotron designs. Oscillation of the 250 GHz gyrotron at the second harmonic of cyclotron resonance begins at extremely low beam currents (as low

  5. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We report solid state 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, 1H and cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations. PMID:24832263

  6. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, (1)H and cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals from (15)N,(13)C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations. PMID:24832263

  7. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-01

    We report solid state 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, 1H and cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  8. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, (1)H and cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals from (15)N,(13)C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  9. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Thurber, Kent R. Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, {sup 1}H and cross-polarized {sup 13}C NMR signals from {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T{sub 1e} is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  10. Powder-XRD and (14) N magic angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of some metal nitrides.

    PubMed

    Kempgens, Pierre; Britton, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Some metal nitrides (TiN, ZrN, InN, GaN, Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 ) have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and (14) N magic angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 , no (14) N NMR signal was observed. Low speed (νr  = 2 kHz for TiN, ZrN, and GaN; νr  = 1 kHz for InN) and 'high speed' (νr  = 15 kHz for TiN; νr  = 5 kHz for ZrN; νr  = 10 kHz for InN and GaN) MAS NMR experiments were performed. For TiN, ZrN, InN, and GaN, powder-XRD was used to identify the phases present in each sample. The number of peaks observed for each sample in their (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectrum matches perfectly well with the number of nitrogen-containing phases identified by powder-XRD. The (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectra are symmetric and dominated by the quadrupolar interaction. The envelopes of the spinning sidebands manifold are Lorentzian, and it is concluded that there is a distribution of the quadrupolar coupling constants Qcc 's arising from structural defects in the compounds studied.

  11. Solid state NMR studies of photoinduced polarization in photosynthetic reaction centers: mechanism and simulations.

    PubMed

    McDermott, A; Zysmilich, M G; Polenova, T

    1998-03-01

    We simulate Photo-Chemically Induced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in the 15N-solid-state NMR of 15N-labeled photosynthetic reaction centers using a Radical Pair Mechanism (RPM). According to the experimental data, the directly polarized nuclei include all eight nitrogens in the ground state of the bacteriochlorophyll special pair (P), and N-II in the bacteriopheophytin acceptor (H) [M.G. Zysmilich, A.E. McDermott, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 116 (1994) 8362-8363.] [M.G. Zysmilich, A. McDermott, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 118 (1996) 5867-5873.] [M.G. Zysmilich, A. McDermott, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 93 (1996) 6857-6860.]; other signals are polarized in nonspecifically labeled samples, but the polarization apparently results from magnetization exchange with neighboring polarized nitrogens, and these are not treated in this work. Two quantitative models for the polarization associated with the RPM are presented and are used to test the validity of the proposal that this mechanism is cooperative in the reaction centers. The kinetic models can treat the steady state polarizations as well as the approach to steady state, and in principle could be expanded to include anisotropic effects, or pulse-probe experiments. Several features of the detailed simulations of the steady-state amplitudes and the kinetics of the approach to steady-state are compared with our data, including the signs and approximate absolute magnitudes of the polarization on the nitrogen nuclei in P and H(L), and the changes in the relative amplitudes with the change in the lifetime of the molecular triplet, photoaccumulation time, nuclear relaxation rate and illumination intensity. The simulations demonstrate that the polarization intensities are in qualitative agreement with those predicted for the RPM, including the curious observation of strong polariza-tion on the pheophytin acceptor for certain experimental conditions. However, this agreement requires efficient relaxation of the nitrogens on H(L) by 3P, due

  12. Solid state NMR characterization of structural and motional parameter distributions in polyamidoammonium dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyarenko, Dariya Ivanovna

    The characterization of narrow distributions of structural and motional parameters, and their evolution during the broad glass transition, is performed for deuterated PAMAM dendrimer salts using solid state NMR. The broadening of deuteron quadrupole echo (QE) lineshapes is consistent with the presence of narrow hydrogen bond length distribution (σr < 0.25 Å) at the spacer amide and branching tertiary amine sites. The temperature dependent averaging of the experimental lineshapes is explained on the basis of fast planar librations in the dendrimer interior, and fast rotation and intermediate regime libration (in an asymmetric cone) of the dendrimer termini. The amplitudes of libration are temperature dependent and higher for low generation dendrimers, while librational rates show Arrhenius behavior only within the glass transition region. In this region, the width of log-normal distribution of rates increases with temperature at sites associated with chlorine counterions. The largest distributions are still less than one order of magnitude wide, unlike the dendrimer in solution or the linear polymers. Interpenetrated low generations (G < 3), uniform intermediate generations (G = 3-5) with surface network, and backfolded high generations (G > 5), are distinguished by interior and termini dynamics. In the regime of fast motion QE lineshapes are highly sensitive to the presence of narrow structural and motional parameter distributions, and provide constraints on motional geometry independent of rates. The precise characterization of narrow log-normal rate distributions in the intermediate regime can be done using 2H magic angle spinning (MAS). Deuteron inversion-recovery techniques provide quantitative information on the rates of fast motion. For PAMAM salts, the influence of narrow distributions of structural and motional parameters, and fast planar libration, is negligible for distance determination using Rotational Echo Double Resonance (REDOR). The discrimination

  13. Coal structure at reactive sites by sup 1 H- sup 13 C- sup 19 F double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, E.W.; Woody, M.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The solid state NMR technique, {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C-{sup 31}P double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy, uses the direct dipolar interaction between {sup 13}C-{sup 31}P spin pairs in organophosphorus substances to identify the subset of carbons within a spherical volume element of 0.4 nm radius centered on the {sup 31}P atom. In combination with chemical manipulation of coals designed to introduce phosphorus containing functionality into the organic matrix, the NMR experiment becomes a method to examine selectively the carbon bonding network at the reactive sites in the coal. This approach generates a statistical structure description of the coal at the reaction centers in contrast to bulk carbon characterization using conventional {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. 3 refs.

  14. Investigation of Ti-doped NaAlH4 by solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R; Majzoub, E; Herberg, J

    2003-11-24

    In recent years, the development of Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4} as a hydrogen storage material has gained attention because of its large weight percentage of hydrogen ({approx}5%) compared to traditional interstitial hydrides. The addition of transition-metal dopants, in the form of Ti-halides, such as TiCl{sub 3}, dramatically improves the kinetics of the absorption and desorption of hydrogen from NaAlH{sub 4}. However, the role that Ti plays in enhancing the absorption and desorption of H{sub 2} is still unknown. In the present study, {sup 27}Al, {sup 23}Na, and {sup 1}H MAS (Magic Angle Spinning) NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) has been performed to understand the titanium speciation in Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4}. All experiments were performed on a sample of crushed single crystals exposed to Ti during growth, a sample of solvent-mixed 4TiCl{sub 3} + 112NaAlH{sub 4}, a reacted sample of solvent-mixed TiCl{sub 3} + {sup 3}NaAlH{sub 4} with THF, and a reacted sample of ball-milled TiCl3 + 3NaAlH{sub 4}. The {sup 27}Al MAS NMR has shown differences in compound formation between solvent-mixed TiCl{sub 3} + 3NaAlH{sub 4} with THF and the mechanically ball-milled TiCl{sub 3} + 3NaAlH{sub 4}. {sup 27}Al MAS NMR of the mechanically ball-milled mixture of fully-reacted TiCl{sub 3} + 3NaAlH{sub 4} showed spectral signatures of TiAl{sub 3} while, the solvent-mixed 4TiCl{sub 3} + 112NaAlH{sub 4}, which is totally reacted, does not show the presences of TiAl{sub 3}, but shows the existence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  15. Chemical and nanometer-scale structure of kerogen and its change during thermal maturation investigated by advanced solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mao, J.; Fang, X.; Lan, Y.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Xu, L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used advanced and quantitative solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate structural changes in a series of type II kerogen samples from the New Albany Shale across a range of maturity (vitrinite reflectance R0 from 0.29% to 1.27%). Specific functional groups such as CH3, CH2, alkyl CH, aromatic CH, aromatic C-O, and other nonprotonated aromatics, as well as "oil prone" and "gas prone" carbons, have been quantified by 13C NMR; atomic H/C and O/C ratios calculated from the NMR data agree with elemental analysis. Relationships between NMR structural parameters and vitrinite reflectance, a proxy for thermal maturity, were evaluated. The aromatic cluster size is probed in terms of the fraction of aromatic carbons that are protonated (???30%) and the average distance of aromatic C from the nearest protons in long-range H-C dephasing, both of which do not increase much with maturation, in spite of a great increase in aromaticity. The aromatic clusters in the most mature sample consist of ???30 carbons, and of ???20 carbons in the least mature samples. Proof of many links between alkyl chains and aromatic rings is provided by short-range and long-range 1H-13C correlation NMR. The alkyl segments provide most H in the samples; even at a carbon aromaticity of 83%, the fraction of aromatic H is only 38%. While aromaticity increases with thermal maturity, most other NMR structural parameters, including the aromatic C-O fractions, decrease. Aromaticity is confirmed as an excellent NMR structural parameter for assessing thermal maturity. In this series of samples, thermal maturation mostly increases aromaticity by reducing the length of the alkyl chains attached to the aromatic cores, not by pronounced growth of the size of the fused aromatic ring clusters. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tannin fingerprinting in vegetable tanned leather by solid state NMR spectroscopy and comparison with leathers tanned by other processes.

    PubMed

    Romer, Frederik H; Underwood, Andrew P; Senekal, Nadine D; Bonnet, Susan L; Duer, Melinda J; Reid, David G; van der Westhuizen, Jan H

    2011-01-28

    Solid state ¹³C-NMR spectra of pure tannin powders from four different sources--mimosa, quebracho, chestnut and tara--are readily distinguishable from each other, both in pure commercial powder form, and in leather which they have been used to tan. Groups of signals indicative of the source, and type (condensed vs. hydrolyzable) of tannin used in the manufacture are well resolved in the spectra of the finished leathers. These fingerprints are compared with those arising from leathers tanned with other common tanning agents. Paramagnetic chromium (III) tanning causes widespread but selective disappearance of signals from the spectrum of leather collagen, including resonances from acidic aspartyl and glutamyl residues, likely bound to Cr (III) structures. Aluminium (III) and glutaraldehyde tanning both cause considerable leather collagen signal sharpening suggesting some increase in molecular structural ordering. The ²⁷Al-NMR signal from the former material is consistent with an octahedral coordination by oxygen ligands. Solid state NMR thus provides easily recognisable reagent specific spectral fingerprints of the products of vegetable and some other common tanning processes. Because spectra are related to molecular properties, NMR is potentially a powerful tool in leather process enhancement and quality or provenance assurance.

  17. Tannin fingerprinting in vegetable tanned leather by solid state NMR spectroscopy and comparison with leathers tanned by other processes.

    PubMed

    Romer, Frederik H; Underwood, Andrew P; Senekal, Nadine D; Bonnet, Susan L; Duer, Melinda J; Reid, David G; van der Westhuizen, Jan H

    2011-01-01

    Solid state ¹³C-NMR spectra of pure tannin powders from four different sources--mimosa, quebracho, chestnut and tara--are readily distinguishable from each other, both in pure commercial powder form, and in leather which they have been used to tan. Groups of signals indicative of the source, and type (condensed vs. hydrolyzable) of tannin used in the manufacture are well resolved in the spectra of the finished leathers. These fingerprints are compared with those arising from leathers tanned with other common tanning agents. Paramagnetic chromium (III) tanning causes widespread but selective disappearance of signals from the spectrum of leather collagen, including resonances from acidic aspartyl and glutamyl residues, likely bound to Cr (III) structures. Aluminium (III) and glutaraldehyde tanning both cause considerable leather collagen signal sharpening suggesting some increase in molecular structural ordering. The ²⁷Al-NMR signal from the former material is consistent with an octahedral coordination by oxygen ligands. Solid state NMR thus provides easily recognisable reagent specific spectral fingerprints of the products of vegetable and some other common tanning processes. Because spectra are related to molecular properties, NMR is potentially a powerful tool in leather process enhancement and quality or provenance assurance. PMID:21278677

  18. Solid-state (13)C NMR reveals effects of temperature and hydration on elastin.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Ashlee; Stypa, Michael P; Tenn, Brandon K; Kumashiro, Kristin K

    2002-01-01

    Elastin is the principal protein component of the elastic fiber in vertebrate tissue. The waters of hydration in the elastic fiber are believed to play a critical role in the structure and function of this largely hydrophobic, amorphous protein. (13)C CPMAS NMR spectra are acquired for elastin samples with different hydration levels. The spectral intensities in the aliphatic region undergo significant changes as 70% of the water in hydrated elastin is removed. In addition, dramatic differences in the CPMAS spectra of hydrated, lyophilized, and partially dehydrated elastin samples over a relatively small temperature range (-20 degrees C to 37 degrees C) are observed. Results from other experiments, including (13)C T(1) and (1)H T(1 rho) measurements, direct polarization with magic-angle spinning, and static CP of the hydrated and lyophilized elastin preparations, also support the model that there is significant mobility in fully hydrated elastin. Our results support models in which water plays an integral role in the structure and proper function of elastin in vertebrate tissue. PMID:11806948

  19. Exploration of structure and function in biomolecules through solid-state NMR and computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heider, Elizabeth M.

    Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations are powerful analysis tools. Leveraged independently, each method yields important nuclear and molecular information. Used in concert, SSNMR and computational techniques provide complementary data about the structure of solids. These methods are particularly useful in characterizing the structures of microcrystalline organic compounds and revealing mechanisms of biological activity. Such applications may possess special relevance in analysis of pharmaceutical products; 90% of all pharmaceuticals are marketed as solids and bioactivity is strongly linked with molecular conformation. Accordingly, this dissertation employs both SSNMR and quantum mechanical computation to study three bioactive molecules: citrinin, two forms of Atrasentan (Abt-627), and paclitaxel (Taxol RTM). First, a computational study is utilized to determine the mechanism for unusual antioxidant activity in citrinin. Here, molecular geometries and bond dissociation enthalpies (BDE) of the citrinin O--H groups are calculated from first principles (ab initio). The total molecular Hamiltonian is determined by approximating the individual contributors to energy including electronic energy and contributions from modes of molecular vibration. This study of citrinin clearly identifies specific reaction sites in the active form, establishing the central role of intramolecular hydrogen bonding in this activity. Notably, it is discovered that citrinin itself is not the active species. Instead, a pair of hydrated Michael addition products of citrinin act as radical scavengers via O--H bond dissociation. Next, two separate compounds of the anticancer drug Abt-627 (form I and form II) are examined via SSNMR. The three principal values of the 13C diagonalized chemical shift tensor are acquired through the high resolution 2D experiment, FIREMAT. Isotropic chemical shift assignments are made utilizing both dipolar

  20. Characterization of Al30 in commercial poly-aluminum chlorohydrate by solid-state (27)Al NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Brian L; Vaughn, John S; Smart, Scott; Pan, Long

    2016-08-15

    Investigation of commercially produced hydrolysis salts of aluminum by solid-state (27)Al NMR spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) reveals well-defined and distinct Al environments that can be related to physicochemical properties. (27)Al MAS and MQ-MAS NMR spectroscopic data show that the local structure of the solids is dominated by moieties that closely resemble the Al30 polyoxocation (Al30O8(OH)56(H2O)26(18+)), accounting for 72-85% of the total Al. These Al30-like clusters elute as several size fractions by SEC. Comparison of the SEC and NMR results indicates that the Al30-like clusters includes intact isolated clusters, moieties of larger polymers or aggregates, and possibly fragments resembling δ-Al13 Keggin clusters. The coagulation efficacy of the solids appears to correlate best with the abundance of intact Al30-like clusters and of smaller species available to promote condensation reactions. PMID:27232539

  1. High resolution solid-state 29Si NMR spectroscopy of silicone gels used to fill breast prostheses.

    PubMed

    Dorne, L; Alikacem, N; Guidoin, R; Auger, M

    1995-10-01

    We have used 29Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study the chemical structure of the silicone gels in virgin and explanted breast prostheses. Despite evidences of alteration in the morphological appearance of the silicone gel inside the breast prosthesis, our results do not reveal changes in the chemical nature and structure of the silicone gels after implantation. In addition to the main 29Si resonance peak at -22.26 ppm that corresponds to the resonance frequency of the D repeat unit of the polysiloxane chains, the high sensitivity of our NMR technique allows the detection of very low concentrations of silicone compounds. Within our experimental detection limit of 0.2%, no signal between -90 ppm and -150 ppm are observed. This indicates that no silica products are present inside the gel of the prostheses. Furthermore, our 29Si NMR spectra indicate differences in the chemical compositions of the silicone gels from different manufacturers.

  2. Potential role of body fluid 1H NMR metabonomics as a prognostic and diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2007-11-01

    This review briefly handles the use of (1)H NMR spectroscopy in lipoprotein subclass analytics. Potential diagnostic uses of (1)H NMR metabonomics of human serum for coronary heart disease, diabetic nephropathy and cancer are also discussed. In addition, miscellaneous recent applications of NMR metabonomics (e.g., a pharmacometabonomic tactic to personalize drug treatment) as well as multi-organ, multispecies and multi-omics approaches to molecular systems biology are featured. Some related experimental and data analysis methodologies are briefly introduced with respect to the biochemical rationales. Critical considerations on the potential diagnostic value of in vitro (1)H NMR are presented together with optimism toward the usage of body fluid (1)H NMR metabonomics in disease risk assessment and as an aid for personalized medicine.

  3. Ab Initio Quality NMR Parameters in Solid-State Materials Using a High-Dimensional Neural-Network Representation.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Jérôme; Xie, Yu; Pickard, Chris J; Hassanali, Ali A

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most powerful experimental tools to probe the local atomic order of a wide range of solid-state compounds. However, due to the complexity of the related spectra, in particular for amorphous materials, their interpretation in terms of structural information is often challenging. These difficulties can be overcome by combining molecular dynamics simulations to generate realistic structural models with an ab initio evaluation of the corresponding chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. However, due to computational constraints, this approach is limited to relatively small system sizes which, for amorphous materials, prevents an adequate statistical sampling of the distribution of the local environments that is required to quantitatively describe the system. In this work, we present an approach to efficiently and accurately predict the NMR parameters of very large systems. This is achieved by using a high-dimensional neural-network representation of NMR parameters that are calculated using an ab initio formalism. To illustrate the potential of this approach, we applied this neural-network NMR (NN-NMR) method on the (17)O and (29)Si quadrupolar coupling and chemical shift parameters of various crystalline silica polymorphs and silica glasses. This approach is, in principal, general and has the potential to be applied to predict the NMR properties of various materials. PMID:26730889

  4. Ab Initio Quality NMR Parameters in Solid-State Materials Using a High-Dimensional Neural-Network Representation.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Jérôme; Xie, Yu; Pickard, Chris J; Hassanali, Ali A

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most powerful experimental tools to probe the local atomic order of a wide range of solid-state compounds. However, due to the complexity of the related spectra, in particular for amorphous materials, their interpretation in terms of structural information is often challenging. These difficulties can be overcome by combining molecular dynamics simulations to generate realistic structural models with an ab initio evaluation of the corresponding chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. However, due to computational constraints, this approach is limited to relatively small system sizes which, for amorphous materials, prevents an adequate statistical sampling of the distribution of the local environments that is required to quantitatively describe the system. In this work, we present an approach to efficiently and accurately predict the NMR parameters of very large systems. This is achieved by using a high-dimensional neural-network representation of NMR parameters that are calculated using an ab initio formalism. To illustrate the potential of this approach, we applied this neural-network NMR (NN-NMR) method on the (17)O and (29)Si quadrupolar coupling and chemical shift parameters of various crystalline silica polymorphs and silica glasses. This approach is, in principal, general and has the potential to be applied to predict the NMR properties of various materials.

  5. Probing polymorphism and reactivity in the organic solid state using 13C NMR spectroscopy: Studies of p-Formyl- trans-cinnamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Thomas, John M.

    1991-09-01

    p-Formyl- trans-cinnamic acid (p-FCA) is known to exist in two different crystal phases (denoted β and γ). When crystals of the β phase of p-FCA are exposed to UV radiation, a solid state dimerization reaction occurs to produce 4,4'-diformyl-β-truxinic acid. In contrast, crystals of the γ phase of p-FCA are photostable. It is shown in this paper that high resolution solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy is a sensitive technique for distinguishing the β and γ phases of p-FCA, and can be used to investigate, in detail, the chemical transformation that occurs upon UV irradiation of the β phase. Specifically, the 13C NMR spectra presented here were recorded using the TOSS (total suppression of sidebands) pulse sequence; this is based upon the standard 13C CPMAS (cross polarization/magic angle sample spinning/high power 1H decoupling) method, but has the additional feature that all orders of spinning sidebands are eliminated from the spectrum. The photoproduct obtained from UV irradiation of β-p-FCA contains a significant noncrystalline component (assessed via powder X-ray diffraction), and our NMR studies suggest that this noncrystalline component of the photoproduct contains some amount of the γ phase of the monomer p-FCA. A mechanism is proposed to explain the fact that UV irradiation of β-p-FCA can generate, in addition to the expected photodimer, an impurity amount of the γ phase of p-FCA.

  6. Protein secondary structure of Green Lynx spider dragline silk investigated by solid-state NMR and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dian; Shi, Xiangyan; Thompson, Forrest; Weber, Warner S; Mou, Qiushi; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the secondary structure of the major ampullate silk from Peucetia viridans (Green Lynx) spiders is characterized by X-ray diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. From X-ray diffraction measurement, β-sheet nanocrystallites were observed and found to be highly oriented along the fiber axis, with an orientational order, fc≈0.98. The size of the nanocrystallites was determined to be on average 2.5nm×3.3nm×3.8nm. Besides a prominent nanocrystalline region, a partially oriented amorphous region was also observed with an fa≈0.89. Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C through-space and through-bond solid-state NMR experiments were employed to elucidate structure details of P. viridans silk proteins. It reveals that β-sheet nanocrystallites constitutes 40.0±1.2% of the protein and are dominated by alanine-rich repetitive motifs. Furthermore, based upon the NMR data, 18±1% of alanine, 60±2% glycine and 54±2% serine are incorporated into helical conformations.

  7. The topology of lysine-containing amphipathic peptides in bilayers by circular dichroism, solid-state NMR, and molecular modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, B; Ducarme, P; Schinzel, S; Brasseur, R; Bechinger, B

    2000-01-01

    In order to better understand the driving forces that determine the alignment of amphipathic helical polypeptides with respect to the surface of phospholipid bilayers, lysine-containing peptide sequences were designed, prepared by solid-phase chemical synthesis, and reconstituted into membranes. CD spectroscopy indicates that all peptides exhibit a high degree of helicity in the presence of SDS micelles or POPC small unilamellar vesicles. Proton-decoupled (31)P-NMR solid-state NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that in the presence of peptides liquid crystalline phosphatidylcholine membranes orient well along glass surfaces. The orientational distribution and dynamics of peptides labeled with (15)N at selected sites were investigated by proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Polypeptides with a single lysine residue adopt a transmembrane orientation, thereby locating this polar amino acid within the core region of the bilayer. In contrast, peptides with > or = 3 lysines reside along the surface of the membrane. With 2 lysines in the center of an otherwise hydrophobic amino acid sequence the peptides assume a broad orientational distribution. The energy of lysine discharge, hydrophobic, polar, and all other interactions are estimated to quantitatively describe the polypeptide topologies observed. Furthermore, a molecular modeling algorithm based on the hydrophobicities of atoms in a continuous hydrophilic-hydrophobic-hydrophilic potential describes the experimentally observed peptide topologies well. PMID:11053137

  8. Protein secondary structure of Green Lynx spider dragline silk investigated by solid-state NMR and X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dian; Shi, Xiangyan; Thompson, Forrest; Weber, Warner S.; Mou, Qiushi; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the secondary structure of the major ampullate silk from Peucetia viridans (Green Lynx) spiders is characterized by X-ray diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. From X-ray diffraction measurement, β-sheet nanocrystallites were observed and found to be highly oriented along the fiber axis, with an orientational order, fc ≈ 0.98. The size of the nanocrystallites was determined to be on average 2.5 nm × 3.3 nm × 3.8 nm. Besides a prominent nanocrystalline region, a partially oriented amorphous region was also observed with an fa ≈ 0.89. Two-dimensional 13C–13C through-space and through-bond solid-state NMR experiments were employed to elucidate structure details of P. viridans silk proteins. It reveals that β-sheet nanocrystallites constitutes 40.0 ± 1.2% of the protein and are dominated by alanine-rich repetitive motifs. Furthermore, based upon the NMR data, 18 ± 1% of alanine, 60 ± 2% glycine and 54 ± 2% serine are incorporated into helical conformations. PMID:26226457

  9. Solid-State (17)O NMR of Oxygen-Nitrogen Singly Bonded Compounds: Hydroxylammonium Chloride and Sodium Trioxodinitrate (Angeli's Salt).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-23

    We report a solid-state NMR study of (17)O-labeled hydroxylammonium chloride ([H(17)O-NH3]Cl) and sodium trioxodinitrate monohydrate (Na2[(17)ONNO2]·H2O, Angeli's salt). The common feature in these two compounds is that they both contain oxygen atoms that are singly bonded to nitrogen. For this class of oxygen-containing functional groups, there is very limited solid-state (17)O NMR data in the literature. In this work, we experimentally measured the (17)O chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. With the aid of plane-wave DFT computation, the (17)O NMR tensor orientations were determined in the molecular frame of reference. We found that the characteristic feature of an O-N single bond is that the (17)O nucleus exhibits a large quadrupolar coupling constant (13-15 MHz) but a rather small chemical shift anisotropy (100-250 ppm), in sharp contrast with the nitroso (O═N) functional group for which both quantities are very large (e.g., 16 MHz and 3000 ppm, respectively). PMID:26107984

  10. Combining solid-state and solution-state 31P NMR to study in vivo phosphorus metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Cholli, A L; Yamane, T; Jelinski, L W

    1985-01-01

    Otherwise unavailable information concerning the distribution of phosphorylated compounds in biological systems is obtained by a combined solid-state/solution-state NMR approach, illustrated here for oocytes from Rana pipiens. General methodology is developed, and further extensions are proposed. The following conclusions pertain to the specific system under examination. (i) Nucleoside phosphates can be observed by magic-angle sample spinning of the lyophilized material. (ii) The solid-state NMR technique of dipolar decoupling provides no additional resolution of the phospholipid and phosphoprotein components of the yolk. However, cellular death produces sufficient pH changes to cause the phospholipid and protein phosphate peaks to become resolvable. The concentration of nucleoside phosphates also decreases. (iii) The phospholipid and phosphoprotein components are shown by computer simulation to be present in a ratio of 40:60, respectively. (iv) The amounts of inorganic phosphate, nucleoside phosphates, and sugar phosphates are determined by solution-state NMR observation of the perchloric acid extract of the oocytes. PMID:3871524

  11. Solid-State (17)O NMR of Oxygen-Nitrogen Singly Bonded Compounds: Hydroxylammonium Chloride and Sodium Trioxodinitrate (Angeli's Salt).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-23

    We report a solid-state NMR study of (17)O-labeled hydroxylammonium chloride ([H(17)O-NH3]Cl) and sodium trioxodinitrate monohydrate (Na2[(17)ONNO2]·H2O, Angeli's salt). The common feature in these two compounds is that they both contain oxygen atoms that are singly bonded to nitrogen. For this class of oxygen-containing functional groups, there is very limited solid-state (17)O NMR data in the literature. In this work, we experimentally measured the (17)O chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. With the aid of plane-wave DFT computation, the (17)O NMR tensor orientations were determined in the molecular frame of reference. We found that the characteristic feature of an O-N single bond is that the (17)O nucleus exhibits a large quadrupolar coupling constant (13-15 MHz) but a rather small chemical shift anisotropy (100-250 ppm), in sharp contrast with the nitroso (O═N) functional group for which both quantities are very large (e.g., 16 MHz and 3000 ppm, respectively).

  12. Bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches for bacterial biofilm matrix composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-04-01

    The genomics and proteomics revolutions have been enormously successful in providing crucial "parts lists" for biological systems. Yet, formidable challenges exist in generating complete descriptions of how the parts function and assemble into macromolecular complexes and whole-cell assemblies. Bacterial biofilms are complex multicellular bacterial communities protected by a slime-like extracellular matrix that confers protection to environmental stress and enhances resistance to antibiotics and host defenses. As a non-crystalline, insoluble, heterogeneous assembly, the biofilm extracellular matrix poses a challenge to compositional analysis by conventional methods. In this perspective, bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches are described for defining chemical composition in complex macrosystems. The "sum-of-the-parts" bottom-up approach was introduced to examine the amyloid-integrated biofilms formed by Escherichia coli and permitted the first determination of the composition of the intact extracellular matrix from a bacterial biofilm. An alternative top-down approach was developed to define composition in Vibrio cholerae biofilms and relied on an extensive panel of NMR measurements to tease out specific carbon pools from a single sample of the intact extracellular matrix. These two approaches are widely applicable to other heterogeneous assemblies. For bacterial biofilms, quantitative parameters of matrix composition are needed to understand how biofilms are assembled, to improve the development of biofilm inhibitors, and to dissect inhibitor modes of action. Solid-state NMR approaches will also be invaluable in obtaining parameters of matrix architecture.

  13. Bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches for bacterial biofilm matrix composition.

    PubMed

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-04-01

    The genomics and proteomics revolutions have been enormously successful in providing crucial "parts lists" for biological systems. Yet, formidable challenges exist in generating complete descriptions of how the parts function and assemble into macromolecular complexes and whole-cell assemblies. Bacterial biofilms are complex multicellular bacterial communities protected by a slime-like extracellular matrix that confers protection to environmental stress and enhances resistance to antibiotics and host defenses. As a non-crystalline, insoluble, heterogeneous assembly, the biofilm extracellular matrix poses a challenge to compositional analysis by conventional methods. In this perspective, bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches are described for defining chemical composition in complex macrosystems. The "sum-of-the-parts" bottom-up approach was introduced to examine the amyloid-integrated biofilms formed by Escherichia coli and permitted the first determination of the composition of the intact extracellular matrix from a bacterial biofilm. An alternative top-down approach was developed to define composition in Vibrio cholerae biofilms and relied on an extensive panel of NMR measurements to tease out specific carbon pools from a single sample of the intact extracellular matrix. These two approaches are widely applicable to other heterogeneous assemblies. For bacterial biofilms, quantitative parameters of matrix composition are needed to understand how biofilms are assembled, to improve the development of biofilm inhibitors, and to dissect inhibitor modes of action. Solid-state NMR approaches will also be invaluable in obtaining parameters of matrix architecture. PMID:25797008

  14. Protein secondary structure of Green Lynx spider dragline silk investigated by solid-state NMR and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dian; Shi, Xiangyan; Thompson, Forrest; Weber, Warner S; Mou, Qiushi; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the secondary structure of the major ampullate silk from Peucetia viridans (Green Lynx) spiders is characterized by X-ray diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. From X-ray diffraction measurement, β-sheet nanocrystallites were observed and found to be highly oriented along the fiber axis, with an orientational order, fc≈0.98. The size of the nanocrystallites was determined to be on average 2.5nm×3.3nm×3.8nm. Besides a prominent nanocrystalline region, a partially oriented amorphous region was also observed with an fa≈0.89. Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C through-space and through-bond solid-state NMR experiments were employed to elucidate structure details of P. viridans silk proteins. It reveals that β-sheet nanocrystallites constitutes 40.0±1.2% of the protein and are dominated by alanine-rich repetitive motifs. Furthermore, based upon the NMR data, 18±1% of alanine, 60±2% glycine and 54±2% serine are incorporated into helical conformations. PMID:26226457

  15. Bottom-Up and Top-Down Solid-State NMR Approaches for Bacterial Biofilm Matrix Composition

    PubMed Central

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    The genomics and proteomics revolutions have been enormously successful in providing crucial “parts lists” for biological systems. Yet, formidable challenges exist in generating complete descriptions of how the parts function and assemble into macromolecular complexes and whole-cell assemblies. Bacterial biofilms are complex multicellular bacterial communities protected by a slime-like extracellular matrix that confers protection to environmental stress and enhances resistance to antibiotics and host defenses. As a non-crystalline, insoluble, heterogeneous assembly, the biofilm extracellular matrix poses a challenge to compositional analysis by conventional methods. In this Perspective, bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches are described for defining chemical composition in complex macrosystems. The “sum-of-theparts” bottom-up approach was introduced to examine the amyloid-integrated biofilms formed by E. coli and permitted the first determination of the composition of the intact extracellular matrix from a bacterial biofilm. An alternative top-down approach was developed to define composition in V. cholerae biofilms and relied on an extensive panel of NMR measurements to tease out specific carbon pools from a single sample of the intact extracellular matrix. These two approaches are widely applicable to other heterogeneous assemblies. For bacterial biofilms, quantitative parameters of matrix composition are needed to understand how biofilms are assembled, to improve the development of biofilm inhibitors, and to dissect inhibitor modes of action. Solid-state NMR approaches will also be invaluable in obtaining parameters of matrix architecture. PMID:25797008

  16. Direct Comparison of (19)F qNMR and (1)H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin; He, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR ((1)H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR ((19)F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both (19)F and (1)H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that (19)F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to (1)H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from (19)F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. (19)F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  17. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  18. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes.

  19. 1H NMR spectra part 31: 1H chemical shifts of amides in DMSO solvent.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    The (1)H chemical shifts of 48 amides in DMSO solvent are assigned and presented. The solvent shifts Δδ (DMSO-CDCl3 ) are large (1-2 ppm) for the NH protons but smaller and negative (-0.1 to -0.2 ppm) for close range protons. A selection of the observed solvent shifts is compared with calculated shifts from the present model and from GIAO calculations. Those for the NH protons agree with both calculations, but other solvent shifts such as Δδ(CHO) are not well reproduced by the GIAO calculations. The (1)H chemical shifts of the amides in DMSO were analysed using a functional approach for near ( ≤ 3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy and steric effect of the amide group for more distant protons. The chemical shifts of the NH protons of acetanilide and benzamide vary linearly with the π density on the αN and βC atoms, respectively. The C=O anisotropy and steric effect are in general little changed from the values in CDCl3. The effects of substituents F, Cl, Me on the NH proton shifts are reproduced. The electric field coefficient for the protons in DMSO is 90% of that in CDCl3. There is no steric effect of the C=O oxygen on the NH proton in an NH…O=C hydrogen bond. The observed deshielding is due to the electric field effect. The calculated chemical shifts agree well with the observed shifts (RMS error of 0.106 ppm for the data set of 257 entries). PMID:24824670

  20. Proton clouds to measure long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Sinnige, Tessa; Daniëls, Mark; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2014-03-26

    We show that selective labeling of proteins with protonated amino acids embedded in a perdeuterated matrix, dubbed 'proton clouds', provides general access to long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in proton-detected solid-state NMR, which is important to study protein tertiary structure. Proton-cloud labeling significantly improves spectral resolution by simultaneously reducing proton line width and spectral crowding despite a high local proton density in clouds. The approach is amenable to almost all canonical amino acids. Our method is demonstrated on ubiquitin and the β-barrel membrane protein BamA.

  1. Untangling a Repetitive Amyloid Sequence: Correlating Biofilm-Derived and Segmentally Labeled Curli Fimbriae by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schubeis, Tobias; Yuan, Puwei; Ahmed, Mumdooh; Nagaraj, Madhu; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Ritter, Christiane

    2015-12-01

    Curli are functional bacterial amyloids produced by an intricate biogenesis machinery. Insights into their folding and regulation can advance our understanding of amyloidogenesis. However, gaining detailed structural information of amyloids, and their tendency for structural polymorphisms, remains challenging. Herein we compare high-quality solid-state NMR spectra from biofilm-derived and recombinantly produced curli and provide evidence that they adopt a similar, well-defined β-solenoid arrangement. Curli subunits consist of five sequence repeats, resulting in severe spectral overlap. Using segmental isotope labeling, we obtained the unambiguous sequence-specific resonance assignments and secondary structure of one repeat, and demonstrate that all repeats are most likely structurally equivalent.

  2. Characterization of Non-Innocent Metal Complexes Using Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: o-Dioxolene Vanadium Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Pabitra B.; Goncharov-Zapata, Olga; Quinn, Laurence L.; Hou, Guangjin; Hamaed, Hiyam; Schurko, Robert W.; Polenova, Tatyana; Crans, Debbie C.

    2012-01-01

    51V solid-state NMR (SSNMR) studies of a series of non-innocent vanadium(V) catechol complexes have been conducted to evaluate the possibility that 51V NMR observables, quadrupolar and chemical shift anisotropies, and electronic structures of such compounds can be used to characterize these compounds. The vanadium(V) catechol complexes described in these studies have relatively small quadrupolar coupling constants, which cover a surprisingly small range from 3.4 to 4.2 MHz. On the other hand, isotropic 51V NMR chemical shifts cover a wide range from −200 ppm to 400 ppm in solution and from −219 to 530 ppm in the solid state. A linear correlation of 51V NMR isotropic solution and solid-state chemical shifts of complexes containing non-innocent ligands is observed. These experimental results provide the information needed for the application of 51V SSNMR spectroscopy in characterizing the electronic properties of a wide variety of vanadium-containing systems, and in particular those containing non-innocent ligands and that have chemical shifts outside the populated range of −300 ppm to −700 ppm. The studies presented in this report demonstrate that the small quadrupolar couplings covering a narrow range of values reflect the symmetric electronic charge distribution, which is also similar across these complexes. These quadrupolar interaction parameters alone are not sufficient to capture the rich electronic structure of these complexes. In contrast, the chemical shift anisotropy tensor elements accessible from 51V SSNMR experiments are a highly sensitive probe of subtle differences in electronic distribution and orbital occupancy in these compounds. Quantum chemical (DFT) calculations of NMR parameters for [VO(hshed)(Cat)] yield 51V CSA tensor in reasonable agreement with the experimental results, but surprisingly, the calculated quadrupolar coupling constant is significantly greater than the experimental value. The studies demonstrate that substitution of the

  3. Triple resonance experiments for aligned sample solid-state NMR of 13C and 15N labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Neeraj; Grant, Christopher V.; Park, Sang Ho; Brown, Jonathan Miles; Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    Initial steps in the development of a suite of triple-resonance 1H/13C/15N solid-state NMR experiments applicable to aligned samples of 13C and 15N labeled proteins are described. The experiments take advantage of the opportunities for 13C detection without the need for homonuclear 13C/13C decoupling presented by samples with two different patterns of isotopic labeling. In one type of sample, the proteins are ~20% randomly labeled with 13C in all backbone and side chain carbon sites and ~100% uniformly 15N labeled in all nitrogen sites; in the second type of sample, the peptides and proteins are 13C labeled at only the α-carbon and 15N labeled at the amide nitrogen of a few residues. The requirement for homonuclear 13C/13C decoupling while detecting 13C signals is avoided in the first case because of the low probability of any two 13C nuclei being bonded to each other; in the second case, the labeled 13Cα sites are separated by at least three bonds in the polypeptide chain. The experiments enable the measurement of the 13C chemical shift and 1H–13C and 15N–13C heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies associated with the 13Cα and 13C′ backbone sites, which provide orientation constraints complementary to those derived from the 15N labeled amide backbone sites. 13C/13C spin-exchange experiments identify proximate carbon sites. The ability to measure 13C–15N dipolar coupling frequencies and correlate 13C and 15N resonances provides a mechanism for making backbone resonance assignments. Three-dimensional combinations of these experiments ensure that the resolution, assignment, and measurement of orientationally dependent frequencies can be extended to larger proteins. Moreover, measurements of the 13C chemical shift and 1H–13C heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies for nearly all side chain sites enable the complete three-dimensional structures of proteins to be determined with this approach. PMID:17293139

  4. A Novel High-Resolution and Sensitivity-Enhanced Three-Dimensional Solid-State NMR Experiment Under Ultrafast Magic Angle Spinning Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Although magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR is a powerful technique to obtain atomic-resolution insights into the structure and dynamics of a variety of chemical and biological solids, poor sensitivity has severely limited its applications. In this study, we demonstrate an approach that suitably combines proton-detection, ultrafast-MAS and multiple frequency dimensions to overcome this limitation. With the utilization of proton-proton dipolar recoupling and double quantum (DQ) coherence excitation/reconversion radio-frequency pulses, very high-resolution proton-based 3D NMR spectra that correlate single-quantum (SQ), DQ and SQ coherences of biological solids have been obtained successfully for the first time. The proposed technique requires a very small amount of sample and does not need multiple radio-frequency (RF) channels. It also reveals information about the proximity between a spin and a certain other dipolar-coupled pair of spins in addition to regular SQ/DQ and SQ/SQ correlations. Although (1)H spectral resolution is still limited for densely proton-coupled systems, the 3D technique is valuable to study dilute proton systems, such as zeolites, small molecules, or deuterated samples. We also believe that this new methodology will aid in the design of a plethora of multidimensional NMR techniques and enable high-throughput investigation of an exciting class of solids at atomic-level resolution. PMID:26138791

  5. Unexpected solvent impact in the crystallinity of praziquantel/poly(vinylpyrrolidone) formulations. A solubility, DSC and solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Costa, Emanuel D; Priotti, Josefina; Orlandi, Silvina; Leonardi, Darío; Lamas, María C; Nunes, Teresa G; Diogo, Hermínio P; Salomon, Claudio J; Ferreira, M João

    2016-09-25

    The saturation solubility of PVP:PZQ physical mixtures (PMs) and solid dispersions (SDs) prepared from ethanol (E/E) or ethanol/water (E/W) by the solvent evaporation method at 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1 ratio (w/w) was determined. The presence of PVP improves the solubility of PZQ (0.31±0.01mg/mL). A maximum of 1.29±0.03mg/mL of PZQ in solution was achieved for the 3:1 SD (E/E). The amount of PZQ in solution depends on the amount of polymer and on the preparation method. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) and DSC were used to understand this behavior. Results show that PMs are a mixture of crystalline PZQ with the polymer, while SDs show different degrees of drug amorphization depending on the solvent used. For E/W SDs, PZQ exists in amorphous and crystalline states, with no clear correlation between the amount of crystalline PZQ and the amount of PVP. For E/E SDs, formulations with a higher percentage of PZQ are amorphous with the components miscible in domains larger than 3nm ((1)H ssNMR relaxation measurements). Albeit its higher saturation solubility, the 3:1 E/E PVP:PZQ sample has a significant crystalline content, probably due to the water introduced by the polymer. High PVP content and small crystal size account for this result.

  6. Dynamic nuclear polarization solid-state NMR in heterogeneous catalysis research

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Perras, Frédéric A.; Slowing, Igor I.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-10-20

    In this study, a revolution in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is taking place, attributable to the rapid development of high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a technique yielding sensitivity improvements of 2–3 orders of magnitude. This higher sensitivity in SSNMR has already impacted materials research, and the implications of new methods on catalytic sciences are expected to be profound.

  7. Evaluation of bone mineral density using three-dimensional solid state phosphorus-31 NMR projection imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Ackerman, J L; Chesler, D A; Li, J; Neer, R M; Wang, J; Glimcher, M J

    1998-06-01

    A solid state magnetic resonance imaging technique is used to measure true three-dimensional mineral density of synthetic hydroxyapatite phantoms and specimens of bone ex vivo. The phosphorus-31 free induction decay at 2.0 T magnetic field strength is sampled following application of a short, hard radiofrequency excitation pulse in the presence of a fixed amplitude magnetic field gradient. Multiple gradient directions covering the unit sphere are used in an efficient spherical polar to Cartesian interpolation and Fourier transform projection reconstruction scheme to image the three-dimensional distribution of phosphorus within the specimen. Using 3-6 Gauss/cm magnetic field gradients, a spatial resolution of 0.2 cm over a field of view of 10 cm is achieved in an imaging time of 20-35 minutes. Comparison of solid state magnetic resonance imaging with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), gravimetric analysis, and chemical analysis of calcium and phosphorus demonstrates good quantitative accuracy. Direct measurement of bone mineral by solid state magnetic resonance opens up the possibility of imaging variations in mineral composition as well as density. Advantages of the solid state magnetic resonance technique include avoidance of ionizing radiation; direct measurement of a constituent of the mineral without reliance on assumptions about, or models of, tissue composition; the absence of shielding, beam hardening, or multiple scattering artifacts; and its three-dimensional character. Disadvantages include longer measurement times and lower spatial resolution than DXA and computed tomography, and the inability to scan large areas of the body in a single measurement, although spatial resolution is sufficient to resolve cortical from trabecular bone for the purpose of measuring bone mineral density. PMID:9576979

  8. Dynamic nuclear polarization solid-state NMR in heterogeneous catalysis research

    DOE PAGES

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Perras, Frédéric A.; Slowing, Igor I.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-10-20

    In this study, a revolution in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is taking place, attributable to the rapid development of high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a technique yielding sensitivity improvements of 2–3 orders of magnitude. This higher sensitivity in SSNMR has already impacted materials research, and the implications of new methods on catalytic sciences are expected to be profound.

  9. Probing the interaction of U(vi) with phosphonate-functionalized mesoporous silica using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Eva C; Mason, Harris E; Shusterman, Jennifer A; Bruchet, Anthony; Nitsche, Heino

    2016-06-21

    The fundamental interaction of U(vi) with diethylphosphatoethyl triethoxysilane functionalized SBA-15 mesoporous silica is studied by macroscopic batch experiments and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. DPTS-functionalized silica has been shown to extract U(vi) from nitric acid solutions at or above pH 3. Extraction is dependent on pH and ionic strength. Single-pulse (31)P NMR on U(vi) contacted samples revealed that U(vi) only interacts with a fraction of the ligands present on the surface. At pH 4 the U(vi) extraction capacity of the material is limited to 27-37% of the theoretical capacity, based on ligand loading. We combined single pulse (31)P NMR on U(vi)-contacted samples with batch studies to measure a ligand-to-metal ratio of approximately 2 : 1 at pH 3 and 4. Batch studies and cross-polarization NMR measurements reveal that U(vi) binds to deprotonated phosphonate and/or silanol sites. We use (31)P-(31)P DQ-DRENAR NMR studies to compare the average dipolar coupling between phosphorus spins for both U(vi)-complexed and non-complexed ligand environments. These measurements reveal that U(vi) extraction is not limited by inadequate surface distribution of ligands, but rather by low stability of the surface phosphonate complex. PMID:27265020

  10. Solid State NMR Measurements for Preliminary Lifetime Assessments in gamma-Irradiated and Thermally Aged Siloxane Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Herberg, J L; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S

    2004-11-29

    Siloxanes have a wide variety of applications throughout the aerospace industry which take advantage of their exceptional insulating and adhesive properties and general resilience. They also offer a wide range of tailorable engineering properties with changes in composition and filler content. They are, however, subject to degradation in radiatively and thermally harsh environments. We are using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to investigate changes in network and interfacial structure in siloxane elastomers and their correlations to changes in engineering performance in a series of degraded materials. NMR parameters such as transverse ( T{sub 2}) relaxation times, cross relaxation rates, and residual dipolar coupling constants provide excellent probes of changes crosslink density and motional dynamics of the polymers caused by multi-mechanism degradation. The results of NMR studies on aged siloxanes are being used in conjunction with other mechanical tests to provide insight into component failure and degradation kinetics necessary for preliminary lifetime assessments of these materials as well as into the structure-property relationships of the polymers. NMR and MRI results obtained both from high resolution NMR spectrometers as well as low resolution benchtop NMR screening tools will be presented.

  11. Solid State NMR Measurements for Preliminary Lifetime Assessments in (gamma)-Irradiated and Thermally Aged Siloxane Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Herberg, J L; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S

    2005-02-03

    Siloxanes have a wide variety of applications throughout the aerospace industry which take advantage of their exceptional insulating and adhesive properties and general resilience. They also offer a wide range of tailorable engineering properties with changes in composition and filler content. They are, however, subject to degradation in radiatively and thermally harsh environments. We are using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to investigate changes in network and interfacial structure in siloxane elastomers and their correlations to changes in engineering performance in a series of degraded materials. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters such as transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation times, cross relaxation rates, and residual dipolar coupling constants provide excellent probes of changes crosslink density and motional dynamics of the polymers caused by multi-mechanism degradation. The results of NMR studies on aged siloxanes are being used in conjunction with other mechanical tests to provide insight into component failure and degradation kinetics necessary for preliminary lifetime assessments of these materials as well as into the structure-property relationships of the polymers. NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results obtained both from high resolution NMR spectrometers as well as low resolution benchtop NMR screening tools will be presented.

  12. Probing the interaction of U(VI) with phosphonate-functionalized mesoporous silica using solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Uribe, Eva C.; Mason, Harris E.; Shusterman, Jennifer A.; Bruchet, Anthony; Nitsche, Heino

    2016-05-30

    The fundamental interaction of U(VI) with diethylphosphatoethyl triethoxysilane functionalized SBA-15 mesoporous silica is studied by macroscopic batch experiments and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. DPTS-functionalized silica has been shown to extract U(VI) from nitric acid solutions at or above pH 3. Extraction is dependent on pH and ionic strength. Single-pulse 31P NMR on U(VI) contacted samples revealed that U(VI)only interacts with a fraction of the ligands present on the surface. At pH 4 the U(VI) extraction capacity of the material is limited to 27–37% of the theoretical capacity, based on ligand loading. We combined single pulse 31P NMR on U(VI)-contacted samples withmore » batch studies to measure a ligand-to-metal ratio of approximately 2 : 1 at pH 3 and 4. Batch studies and cross-polarization NMR measurements reveal that U(VI) binds to deprotonated phosphonate and/or silanol sites. We use 31P–31P DQ-DRENAR NMR studies to compare the average dipolar coupling between phosphorus spins for both U(VI)-complexed and non-complexed ligand environments. Furthermore, these measurements reveal that U(VI) extraction is not limited by inadequate surface distribution of ligands, but rather by low stability of the surface phosphonate complex.« less

  13. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from 31P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    PubMed Central

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M.J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and 31P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse 31P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO43− ν1 bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO32− range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the 31P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν1 band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. PMID:24273344

  14. Characterization of the Mobility and Reactivity of Water Molecules on TiO2 Nanoparticles by 1H Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zhu, Lili; Sun, Pingchuan; Zhou, Dongshan; Xue, Gi

    2015-03-01

    Understanding interfacial water behavior is essential to improving our understanding of the surface chemistry and interfacial properties of nanomaterials. Here using 1H solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (1H SSNMR), we successfully monitored ligand exchange reaction between oleylamine (OLA) and adsorbed water on titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs). Three different types of interfacial waters with different reactivities were distinguished. The mobility of the adsorbed water molecules was characterized by dipolar filtered 1H SSNMR. Our experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water can be categorized into three different layers: rigid water species with restricted mobility closest to the surface of TiO2 NPs; less mobile water species weakly confined on TiO2 NPs; and water molecules with high mobility. Water in the third layer could be replaced by OLA, while water in the first and second layers remained intact. The finding that the interfacial water with the highest mobility has the strongest reactivity has guiding significance for tailoring the hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of TiO2 NPs. We gratefully acknowledge support from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21174062).

  15. Tungsten(VI) Carbyne/Bis(carbene) Tautomerization Enabled by N-Donor SBA15 Surface Ligands: A Solid-State NMR and DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, Anissa; Sofack-Kreutzer, Julien; Minenkov, Yury; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Hamzaoui, Bilel; Werghi, Baraa; Anjum, Dalaver H; Cavallo, Luigi; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-09-01

    Designing supported well-defined bis(carbene) complexes remains a key challenge in heterogeneous catalysis. The reaction of W(≡CtBu)(CH2 tBu)3 with amine-modified mesoporous SBA15 silica, which has vicinal silanol/silylamine pairs [(≡SiOH)(≡SiNH2 )], leads to [(≡SiNH2 -)(≡SiO-)W(≡CHtBu)(CH2 tBu)2 ] and [(≡SiNH2 -)(≡SiO-)W(=CHtBu)2 (CH2 tBu). Variable temperature, (1) H-(1) H 2D double-quantum, (1) H-(13) C HETCOR, and HETCOR with spin diffusion solid-state NMR spectroscopy demonstrate tautomerization between the alkyl alkylidyne and the bis(alkylidene) on the SBA15 surface. Such equilibrium is possible through the coordination of W to the surface [(≡Si-OH)(≡Si-NH2 )] groups, which act as a [N,O] pincer ligand. DFT calculations provide a rationalization for the surface-complex tautomerization and support the experimental results. This direct observation of such a process shows the strong similarity between molecular mechanisms in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. In propane metathesis (at 150 °C), the tungsten bis(carbene) tautomer is favorable, with a turnover number (TON) of 262. It is the highest TON among all the tungsten alkyl-supported catalysts.

  16. Tungsten(VI) Carbyne/Bis(carbene) Tautomerization Enabled by N-Donor SBA15 Surface Ligands: A Solid-State NMR and DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, Anissa; Sofack-Kreutzer, Julien; Minenkov, Yury; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Hamzaoui, Bilel; Werghi, Baraa; Anjum, Dalaver H; Cavallo, Luigi; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-09-01

    Designing supported well-defined bis(carbene) complexes remains a key challenge in heterogeneous catalysis. The reaction of W(≡CtBu)(CH2 tBu)3 with amine-modified mesoporous SBA15 silica, which has vicinal silanol/silylamine pairs [(≡SiOH)(≡SiNH2 )], leads to [(≡SiNH2 -)(≡SiO-)W(≡CHtBu)(CH2 tBu)2 ] and [(≡SiNH2 -)(≡SiO-)W(=CHtBu)2 (CH2 tBu). Variable temperature, (1) H-(1) H 2D double-quantum, (1) H-(13) C HETCOR, and HETCOR with spin diffusion solid-state NMR spectroscopy demonstrate tautomerization between the alkyl alkylidyne and the bis(alkylidene) on the SBA15 surface. Such equilibrium is possible through the coordination of W to the surface [(≡Si-OH)(≡Si-NH2 )] groups, which act as a [N,O] pincer ligand. DFT calculations provide a rationalization for the surface-complex tautomerization and support the experimental results. This direct observation of such a process shows the strong similarity between molecular mechanisms in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. In propane metathesis (at 150 °C), the tungsten bis(carbene) tautomer is favorable, with a turnover number (TON) of 262. It is the highest TON among all the tungsten alkyl-supported catalysts. PMID:27514022

  17. Solid-state NMR and computational investigation of solvent molecule arrangement and dynamics in isostructural solvates of droperidol.

    PubMed

    Bērziņš, Agris; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2015-02-01

    (13)C, (15)N and (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy have been used to rationalize arrangement and dynamics of solvent molecules in a set of isostructural solvates of droperidol. The solvent molecules are determined to be dynamically disordered in the methanol and ethanol solvates, while they are ordered in the acetonitrile and nitromethane solvates. (2)H NMR spectra of deuterium-labelled samples allowed the characterization of the solvent molecule dynamics in the alcohol solvates and the non-stoichiometric hydrate. The likely motion of the alcohol molecules is rapid libration within a site, plus occasional exchange into an equivalent site related by the inversion symmetry, while the water molecules are more strongly disordered. DFT calculations strongly suggest that the differences in dynamics between the solvates are related to differences in the energetic penalty for reversing the orientation of a solvent molecule. PMID:25282618

  18. Humic acids from particulate organic matter in the Saguenay Fjord and the St. Lawrence Estuary investigated by advanced solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.-D.; Tremblay, L.; Gagné, J.-P.; Kohl, S.; Rice, J.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2007-11-01

    Detailed structural information on two humic acids extracted from two sinking particulate matter samples at a water depth of 20 m in the Saguenay Fjord (F-20-HA) and the St. Lawrence Estuary (E-20-HA) (Canada), was obtained by advanced solid-state NMR. Spectral-editing analyses provided numerous structural details rarely reported in geochemical studies. The NMR data account almost quantitatively for the elemental compositions. The two humic acids were found to be quite similar, consisting of four main structural components: peptides (ca. 39 ± 3% vs. 34 ± 3% of all C for E-20-HA and F-20-HA, respectively); aliphatic chains, 14-20 carbons long (ca. 25 ± 5% vs. 17 ± 5% of all C); aromatic structures (ca. 17 ± 2% vs. 26 ± 2% of all C); and sugar rings (14 ± 2% vs. 15 ± 2% of all C). Peptides were identified by 13C{ 14N} SPIDER NMR, which selects signals of carbons bonded to nitrogen, and by dipolar DEPT, which selects CH-group signals, in particular the NCH band of peptides. The SPIDER spectra also indicate that heterocycles constitute a significant fraction of the aromatic structures. The aliphatic (CH 2) n chains, which are highly mobile, contain at least one double bond per two chains and end in methyl groups. 1H spin diffusion NMR experiments showed that these mobile aliphatic chains are in close (<10 nm) proximity to the other structural components. A major bacterial contribution to these two samples could explain why the samples, which have different dominant organic matter sources (terrestrial vs. marine), are similar to each other as well as to degraded algae and particles from other waters. The NMR data suggest structures containing mobile lipids in close proximity to peptides and carbohydrates (e.g., peptidoglycan) as found in bacterial cell walls. Measured yields of muramic acid and D-amino acids confirmed the presence of bacterial cell wall components in the studied samples.

  19. αB-Crystallin. A Hybrid Solid-State/Solution-State NMR Investigation Reveals Structural Aspects of the Heterogeneous Oligomer

    SciTech Connect

    Jehle, Stefan; van Rossum, Barth; Stout, Joseph R.; Noguchi, Satoshi M.; Falber, Katja; Rehbein, Kristina; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Klevit, Rachel E.; Rajagopal, Ponni

    2008-11-14

    Atomic-level structural information on αB-Crystallin (αB), a prominent member of the small heat-shock protein family, has been a challenge to obtain due its polydisperse oligomeric nature. We show that magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR can be used to obtain high-resolution information on an ~580-kDa human αB assembled from 175-residue 20-kDa subunits. An ~100-residue α-crystallin domain is common to all small heat-shock proteins, and solution-state NMR was performed on two different α- crystallin domain constructs isolated from αB. In vitro, the chaperone-like activities of full-length αB and the isolated α-crystallin domain are identical. Chemical shifts of the backbone and Cβ resonances have been obtained for residues 64–162 (α-crystallin domain plus part of the C-terminus) in αB and the isolated α-crystallin domain by solid-state and solution-state NMR, respectively. Both sets of data strongly predict six β-strands in the α-crystallin domain. A majority of residues in the α-crystallin domain have similar chemical shifts in both solid-state and solution-state, indicating similar structures for the domain in its isolated and oligomeric forms. Sites of intersubunit interaction are identified from chemical shift differences that cluster to specific regions of the α-crystallin domain. Multiple signals are observed for the resonances of M68 in the oligomer, identifying the region containing this residue as existing in heterogeneous environments within αB. Evidence for a novel dimerization motif in the human α-crystallin domain is obtained by a comparison of (i) solid-state and solution-state chemical shift data and (ii) 1H–15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra as a function of pH. The isolated α-crystallin domain undergoes a dimer–monomer transition over the pH range 7.5–6.8. This steep pHdependent switch may be important for αB to function optimally (e.g., to preserve the filament integrity

  20. Complete Assignment of (1)H-NMR Resonances of the King Cobra Neurotoxin CM-11.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu-Xi; Liu, Wei-Dong; Liu, Ai-Zhuo; Pei, Feng-Kui

    1997-01-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus Hannah) neurotoxin CM-Il is long-chain peptide with 72 amino acid residues. Its complete assignment of (1)H-NMR resonances was obtained using various 2D-NMR technologies, including DQF-COSY, clean-TOCSY and NOESY.

  1. Specification and visualization of anisotropic interaction tensors in polypeptides and numerical simulations in biological solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bak, Mads; Schultz, Robert; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2002-01-01

    Software facilitating numerical simulation of solid-state NMR experiments on polypeptides is presented. The Tcl-controlled SIMMOL program reads in atomic coordinates in the PDB format from which it generates typical or user-defined parameters for the chemical shift, J coupling, quadrupolar coupling, and dipolar coupling tensors. The output is a spin system file for numerical simulations, e.g., using SIMPSON (Bak, Rasmussen, and Nielsen, J. Magn. Reson. 147, 296 (2000)), as well as a 3D visualization of the molecular structure, or selected parts of this, with user-controlled representation of relevant tensors, bonds, atoms, peptide planes, and coordinate systems. The combination of SIMPSON and SIMMOL allows straightforward simulation of the response of advanced solid-state NMR experiments on typical nuclear spin interactions present in polypeptides. Thus, SIMMOL may be considered a "sample changer" to the SIMPSON "computer spectrometer" and proves to be very useful for the design and optimization of pulse sequences for application on uniformly or extensively isotope-labeled peptides where multiple-spin interactions need to be considered. These aspects are demonstrated by optimization and simulation of novel DCP and C7 based 2D N(CO)CA, N(CA)CB, and N(CA)CX MAS correlation experiments for multiple-spin clusters in ubiquitin and by simulation of PISA wheels from PISEMA spectra of uniaxially oriented bacteriorhodopsin and rhodopsin under conditions of finite RF pulses and multiple spin interactions.

  2. Up to 100% Improvement in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Solid-State NMR Sensitivity Enhancement of Polymers by Removing Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Le, Dao; Ziarelli, Fabio; Phan, Trang N T; Mollica, Giulia; Thureau, Pierre; Aussenac, Fabien; Ouari, Olivier; Gigmes, Didier; Tordo, Paul; Viel, Stéphane

    2015-08-01

    High-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has emerged as a powerful technique for improving the sensitivity of solid-state NMR (SSNMR), yielding significant sensitivity enhancements for a variety of samples, including polymers. Overall, depending upon the type of polymer, the molecular weight, and the DNP sample preparation method, sensitivity enhancements between 5 and 40 have been reported. These promising enhancements remain, however, far from the theoretical maximum (>1000). Crucial to the success of DNP SSNMR is the DNP signal enhancement (εDNP ), which is the ratio of the NMR signal intensities with and without DNP. It is shown here that, for polymers exhibiting high affinity toward molecular oxygen (e.g., polystyrene), removing part of the absorbed (paramagnetic) oxygen from the solid-state samples available as powders (instead of dissolved or dispersed in a solvent) increases proton nuclear relaxation times and εDNP, hereby providing up to a two-fold sensitivity increase (i.e., a four-fold reduction in experimental time).

  3. (31)P Solid-State NMR study of the chemical setting process of a dual-paste injectable brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Legrand, A P; Sfihi, H; Lequeux, N; Lemaître, J

    2009-10-01

    The composition and evolution of a brushite-type calcium phosphate cement was investigated by Solid-State NMR and X-ray during the setting process. The cement is obtained by mixing beta-tricalcium phosphate [Ca(3)(PO(4))(2), beta-TCP] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [Ca(H(2)PO(4))(2).H(2)O, MCPM] in presence of water, with formation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate or brushite [CaHPO(2).2H(2)O, DCPD]. Analysis of the initial beta-TCP paste has shown the presence of beta-calcium pyrophosphate [Ca(2)P(2)O(7), beta-CPy] and that of the initial MCPM a mixture of MCPM and dicalcium phosphate [CaHPO(4), DCP]. Follow-up of the chemical composition by (31)P Solid-State NMR enables to show that the chemical setting process appeared to reach an end after 20 min. The constant composition observed at the end of the process was similarly determined.

  4. Proton-detected scalar coupling based assignment strategies in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy applied to perdeuterated proteins.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    Assignment of proteins in MAS (magic angle spinning) solid-state NMR relies so far on correlations among heteronuclei. This strategy is based on well dispersed resonances in the (15)N dimension. In many complex cases like membrane proteins or amyloid fibrils, an additional frequency dimension is desirable in order to spread the amide resonances. We show here that proton detected HNCO, HNCA, and HNCACB type experiments can successfully be implemented in the solid-state. Coherences are sufficiently long lived to allow pulse schemes of a duration greater than 70 ms before incrementation of the first indirect dimension. The achieved resolution is comparable to the resolution obtained in solution-state NMR experiments. We demonstrate the experiments using a triply labeled sample of the SH3 domain of chicken alpha-spectrin, which was re-crystallized in H(2)O/D(2)O using a ratio of 1/9. We employ paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) using EDTA chelated Cu(II) to enable rapid data acquisition. PMID:18462963

  5. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from {sup 31}P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M.Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M.J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-10-15

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and {sup 31}P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse {sup 31}P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}ν{sub 1} bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the {sup 31}P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν{sub 1} band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. - Graphical abstract: Carbonated apatite shows an abrupt change in spectral (NMR, Raman) and morphological (AFM) properties at a composition of about one carbonate substitution per unit cell. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystallinity (XRD), particle size (AFM) of carbonated apatites and bone mineral. • Linear relationships among crystallinity, {sup 31}P NMR and Raman inverse bandwidths. • Low and high carbonated apatites use different charge-balancing ion-loss mechanism.

  6. Preliminary 1H NMR study on archaeological waterlogged wood.

    PubMed

    Maccotta, Antonella; Fantazzini, Paola; Garavaglia, Carla; Donato, Ines D; Perzia, Patrizia; Brai, Maria; Morreale, Filippa

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Relaxation (MRR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are powerful tools to obtain detailed information on the pore space structure that one is unlikely to obtain in other ways. These techniques are particularly suitable for Cultural Heritage materials, because they use water 1H nuclei as a probe. Interaction with water is one of the main causes of deterioration of materials. Porous structure in wood, for example, favours the penetration of water, which can carry polluting substances and promote mould growth. A particular case is waterlogged wood from underwater discoveries and moist sites; in fact, these finds are very fragile because of chemical, physical and biological decay from the long contact with the water. When wood artefacts are brought to the surface and directly dried in air, there is the collapse of the cellular structures, and wood loses its original form and dimensions and cannot be used for study and museum exhibits. In this work we have undertaken the study of some wood finds coming from Ercolano's harbour by MRR and MRI under different conditions, and we have obtained a characterization of pore space in wood and images of the spatial distribution of the confined water in the wood. PMID:16485652

  7. Preliminary 1H NMR study on archaeological waterlogged wood.

    PubMed

    Maccotta, Antonella; Fantazzini, Paola; Garavaglia, Carla; Donato, Ines D; Perzia, Patrizia; Brai, Maria; Morreale, Filippa

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Relaxation (MRR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are powerful tools to obtain detailed information on the pore space structure that one is unlikely to obtain in other ways. These techniques are particularly suitable for Cultural Heritage materials, because they use water 1H nuclei as a probe. Interaction with water is one of the main causes of deterioration of materials. Porous structure in wood, for example, favours the penetration of water, which can carry polluting substances and promote mould growth. A particular case is waterlogged wood from underwater discoveries and moist sites; in fact, these finds are very fragile because of chemical, physical and biological decay from the long contact with the water. When wood artefacts are brought to the surface and directly dried in air, there is the collapse of the cellular structures, and wood loses its original form and dimensions and cannot be used for study and museum exhibits. In this work we have undertaken the study of some wood finds coming from Ercolano's harbour by MRR and MRI under different conditions, and we have obtained a characterization of pore space in wood and images of the spatial distribution of the confined water in the wood.

  8. Syntheses, structures, and 1H, 13C{1H} and 119Sn{1H} NMR chemical shifts of a family of trimethyltin alkoxide, amide, halide and cyclopentadienyl compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Lichtscheidl, Alejandro G.; Janicke, Michael T.; Scott, Brian L.; Nelson, Andrew T.; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L.

    2015-08-21

    The synthesis and full characterization, including Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data (1H, 13C{1H} and 119Sn{1H}), for a series of Me3SnX (X = O-2,6-tBu2C6H3 (1), (Me3Sn)N(2,6-iPr2C6H3) (3), NH-2,4,6-tBu3C6H2 (4), N(SiMe3)2 (5), NEt2, C5Me5 (6), Cl, Br, I, and SnMe3) compounds in benzene-d6, toluene-d8, dichloromethane-d2, chloroform-d1, acetonitrile-d3, and tetrahydrofuran-d8 are reported. The X-ray crystal structures of Me3Sn(O-2,6-tBu2C6H3) (1), Me3Sn(O-2,6-iPr2C6H3) (2), and (Me3Sn)(NH-2,4,6-tBu3C6H2) (4) are also presented. As a result, these compiled data complement existing literature data and ease the characterization of these compounds by routine NMR experiments.

  9. Rapid and accurate determination of the lignin content of lignocellulosic biomass by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; McCallum, Scott A; Miao, Jianjun; Hart, Courtney; Tudryn, Gregory J; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2015-02-01

    Biofuels and biomaterials, produced from lignocellulosic feedstock, require facile access to cellulose and hemicellulose to be competitive with petroleum processing and sugar-based fermentation. Physical-chemical barriers resulting from lignin complicates the hydrolysis biomass into fermentable sugars. Thus, the amount of lignin within a substrate is critical in determining biomass processing. The application of (13)C cross-polarization, magic-angle spinning, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance for the direct quantification of lignin content in biomass is examined. Using a standard curve constructed from pristine lignin and cellulose, the lignin content of a biomass sample is accurately determined through direct measurement without chemical or enzymatic pre-treatment.

  10. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for the cyanine dyes SYBR Safe and thiazole orange.

    PubMed

    Evenson, William E; Boden, Lauren M; Muzikar, Katy A; O'Leary, Daniel J

    2012-12-01

    Analysis of (1)H and (13)C NMR and mass spectral data for the fluorescent nucleic acid stain SYBR Safe indicates that it contains a cyanine-based cationic core structure identical to thiazole orange. The difference between these two compounds is the type of N-substitution on the quinolinium ring system (SYBR Safe, n-Pr; thiazole orange, Me). The (1)H and (13)C NMR resonances for both compounds were assigned on the basis of one- and two-dimensional (COSY, ROESY, HSQC, and HMBC) experiments. The preferred conformation of these compounds was computed by ab initio methods and found to be consistent with the NMR data.

  11. Identification of Li-Ion Battery SEI Compounds through (7)Li and (13)C Solid-State MAS NMR Spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huff, Laura A; Tavassol, Hadi; Esbenshade, Jennifer L; Xing, Wenting; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-13

    Solid-state (7)Li and (13)C MAS NMR spectra of cycled graphitic Li-ion anodes demonstrate SEI compound formation upon lithiation that is followed by changes in the SEI upon delithiation. Solid-state (13)C DPMAS NMR shows changes in peaks associated with organic solvent compounds (ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate, EC/DMC) upon electrochemical cycling due to the formation of and subsequent changes in the SEI compounds. Solid-state (13)C NMR spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time measurements of lithiated Li-ion anodes and reference poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) powders, along with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry results, indicate that large-molecular-weight polymers are formed in the SEI layers of the discharged anodes. MALDI-TOF MS and NMR spectroscopy results additionally indicate that delithiated anodes exhibit a larger number of SEI products than is found in lithiated anodes. PMID:26653886

  12. Structure and Dynamics of Extracellular Loops in Human Aquaporin-1 from Solid-State NMR and Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenlin; Ing, Christopher; Emami, Sanaz; Jiang, Yunjiang; Liang, Hongjun; Pomès, Régis; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2016-09-22

    Multiple moderate-resolution crystal structures of human aquaporin-1 have provided a foundation for understanding the molecular mechanism of selective water translocation in human cells. To gain insight into the interfacial structure and dynamics of human aquaporin-1 in a lipid environment, we performed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Using magic angle spinning solid-state NMR, we report a near complete resonance assignment of the human aquaporin-1. Chemical shift analysis of the secondary structure identified pronounced deviations from crystallographic structures in extracellular loops A and C, including the cis Y37-P38 bond in loop A, as well as ordering and immobilization of loop C. Site-specific H/D exchange measurements identify a number of protected nitrogen-bearing side chains and backbone amide groups, involved in stabilizing the loops. A combination of molecular dynamics simulations with NMR-derived restraints and filtering based on solvent accessibility allowed for the determination of a structural model of extracellular loops largely consistent with NMR results. The simulations reveal loop stabilizing interactions that alter the extracellular surface of human AQP1, with possible implications for water transport regulation through the channel. Modulation of water permeation may occur as a result of rearrangement of side chains from loop C in the extracellular vestibule of hAQP1, affecting the aromatic arginine selectivity filter. PMID:27583975

  13. Intermolecular Interactions between Eosin Y and Caffeine Using 1H-NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Okuom, Macduff O.; Wilson, Mark V.; Jackson, Abby; Holmes, Andrea E.

    2014-01-01

    DETECHIP has been used in testing analytes including caffeine, cocaine, and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) from marijuana, as well as date rape and club drugs such as flunitrazepam, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), and methamphetamine. This study investigates the intermolecular interaction between DETECHIP sensor eosin Y (DC1) and the analyte (caffeine) that is responsible for the fluorescence and color changes observed in the actual array. Using 1H-NMR, 1H-COSY, and 1H-DOSY NMR methods, a proton exchange from C-8 of caffeine to eosin Y is proposed. PMID:25018772

  14. Intermolecular Interactions between Eosin Y and Caffeine Using (1)H-NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Okuom, Macduff O; Wilson, Mark V; Jackson, Abby; Holmes, Andrea E

    2013-12-31

    DETECHIP has been used in testing analytes including caffeine, cocaine, and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) from marijuana, as well as date rape and club drugs such as flunitrazepam, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), and methamphetamine. This study investigates the intermolecular interaction between DETECHIP sensor eosin Y (DC1) and the analyte (caffeine) that is responsible for the fluorescence and color changes observed in the actual array. Using (1)H-NMR, (1)H-COSY, and (1)H-DOSY NMR methods, a proton exchange from C-8 of caffeine to eosin Y is proposed. PMID:25018772

  15. 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR lipid profiles of human renal tissues.

    PubMed

    Tugnoli, V; Bottura, G; Fini, G; Reggiani, A; Tinti, A; Trinchero, A; Tosi, M R

    2003-01-01

    Lipids from human renal tissues are studied by means of (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. The total lipid fractions obtained from healthy kidneys, malignant renal cell carcinomas, and benign oncocytomas are characterized and analyzed to elucidate the main differences between the functional and neoplastic tissues. In all cases the lipid components are well identified. The healthy kidney is characterized by high amounts of triglycerides and the presence of cholesterol in its free form. On the contrary, renal cell carcinomas contain high amounts of cholesterol that are almost completely esterified as oleate, suggesting an intracellular localization of the cholesteryl esters synthesis. Cholesteryl esters are considered markers of renal cell carcinomas, thus supporting recent theories that these compounds play a leading role in cell proliferation. Oncocytomas are particularly rich in phosphatidylcholine and, analogous to the healthy kidney, are completely lacking in cholesteryl esters. Healthy kidneys and oncocytomas appear to have other similarities if compared with renal cell carcinomas: a very high fatty acyl/cholesterol ratio, the presence of dolichols, and a higher grade of unsaturation. The (13)C data suggest a new method for the direct evaluation of the saturated/unsaturated fatty acyl ratio.

  16. Solid-state NMR analysis of coals and shales from the Mesaverde Group, Green River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.; MacGowan, D.B.

    1993-08-01

    Samples of coals and shales from the Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming were analyzed using solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of cross polarization with magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS). The samples were taken from a present-day depth of burial ranging from {approximately}3,000 to {approximately}15,000 ft. In addition, CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR measurements were made on residues from the hydrous pyrolysis of Almond coal. The hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted isothermally for 72 hr in the temperature range of 290 to 360{degree}C (554 to 680{degree}F). In general, the maturation trends observed by NMR for the naturally and artificially matured samples were in agreement with results obtained from other geochemical analyses. The NMR spectra of the naturally matured shale samples showed only a small aliphatic component at depths greater than about 12,000 ft, indicating little capacity for hydrocarbon generation at depths greater than this. Vitrinite reflectance measurements placed the oil window at between 4,500 and 14,500 ft. NMR measurements of the hydrous pyrolysis residues showed a clear loss of aliphatic carbon, relative to the aromatic carbon, with temperature. For the residue obtained from the highest study temperature (360{degree}C/680{degree}F), there was a 60% depletion of the hydrocarbon-producing aliphatic components. The trends in loss of aliphatic carbon with temperature suggested a means of defining a geochemical transformation ratio in terms of the loss of the aliphatic carbon fraction. A good correlation was found between the NMR transformation ratio and the production index determined by Rock-Eval pyrolysis measurements.

  17. Solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation and isolated-molecule and cluster electronic structure calculations in organic molecular solids: The relationship between structure and methyl group and t-butyl group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianlong E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu; Mallory, Frank B.; Mallory, Clelia W.; Odhner, Hosanna R.; Beckmann, Peter A. E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu

    2014-05-21

    We report ab initio density functional theory electronic structure calculations of rotational barriers for t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups both in the isolated molecules and in central molecules in clusters built from the X-ray structure in four t-butyl aromatic compounds. The X-ray structures have been reported previously. We also report and interpret the temperature dependence of the solid state {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz in one of the four compounds. Such experiments for the other three have been reported previously. We compare the computed barriers for methyl group and t-butyl group rotation in a central target molecule in the cluster with the activation energies determined from fitting the {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation data. We formulate a dynamical model for the superposition of t-butyl group rotation and the rotation of the t-butyl group's constituent methyl groups. The four compounds are 2,7-di-t-butylpyrene, 1,4-di-t-butylbenzene, 2,6-di-t-butylnaphthalene, and 3-t-butylchrysene. We comment on the unusual ground state orientation of the t-butyl groups in the crystal of the pyrene and we comment on the unusually high rotational barrier of these t-butyl groups.

  18. Digital NMR Profiles as Building Blocks: Assembling 1H Fingerprints of Steviol Glycosides

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, José G.; Simmler, Charlotte; McAlpine, James B.; Lankin, David C.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a fragment-based approach to the examination of congeneric organic compounds by NMR spectroscopy. The method combines the classic interpretation of 1D- and 2D-NMR data sets with contemporary computer-assisted NMR analysis. Characteristic NMR profiles of key structural motifs were generated by 1H iterative full spin analysis and then joined together as building blocks to recreate the 1H NMR spectra of increasingly complex molecules. To illustrate the methodology described, a comprehensive analysis of steviol (1), seven steviol glycosides (2–8) and two structurally related isosteviol compounds (9, 10) was carried out. The study also assessed the potential impact of this method on relevant aspects of natural product research including structural verification, chemical dereplication, and mixture analysis. PMID:25714117

  19. Investigations of the structure and "interfacial" surface chemistry of Bioglass (RTM) materials by solid-state multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Gautam

    Bioactive materials such as BioglassRTM 45S5 (45% SiO 2, 24.5% CaO, 24.5% Na2O, and 6% P2O5 by weight) are sodium-phosphosilicate glasses containing independent three-dimensional silicate and phosphate networks and Na+ and Ca2+ ions as modifying cations. Due to their bioactivity, these materials are currently used as implants and for other surgical and clinical applications. The bioactivity of BioglassesRTM is due to their unique capability to form chemical bonds to tissues through an octacalciumphosphate (OCP)- and/or hydroxyapatite-like (HA) "interfacial" matrix. The formation of OCP and/or HA is preceded by the formation of a silica-rich surface layer and the subsequent growth of an amorphous calcium phosphate (a-CP) layer. Structural characterization of a series of commercial and synthesized Bioglass materials 45S5 52S, 55S, 60S, and synthesized 17O-labelled "Bioglass materials 45S, 52S, 55S and 60S" have been obtained using solid-state single-pulse magic-angle spinning (SP/MAS) 17O, 23Na, 29Si and 31P NMR. The 17O NMR isotropic chemical shifts and estimates of the quadrupole coupling constants (Cq) [at fixed asymmetry parameter ( hQ ) values of zero] have been obtained from solid-state spin-echo 17O SP/MAS NMR spectra of 17O-labelled "Bioglasses". The simulation results of these spectra reveal the presence of both bridging-oxygens (BO, i.e. ≡ Si-17OSi ≡ ) and non-bridging oxygens (NBO, i.e. ≡ Si-17O-Na+/Ca2+ ) in the silicate networks in these materials. 17O NMR spectra of these Bioglass materials do not show any direct evidence for the presence of BO and NBO atoms in the phosphate units; however, they are expected to be present in small amounts. In vitro reactions of BioglassRTM 45S5, 60S and 77S powders have been used to study the "interfacial" surface chemistry of these materials in simulated body-fluid (SBF, Kyoto or K9 solution) and/or 17O-enriched tris-buffer solution. 29Si and 31P SP/MAS NMR have been used to identify and quantify the extent of

  20. The first metal phosphate incorporating isonicotinate ligand: synthesis, crystal structure, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of Zn(HINT)(HPO 4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Min; Chuang, Shiuan-Ting; Chuang, Ya-Lan; Kao, Hsien-Ming; Lii, Kwang-Hwa

    2004-04-01

    The first metal phosphate incorporating isonicotinate ligand, Zn(HINT)(HPO 4), was hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. This compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2 1/ c with cell parameters a=20.5643(8) Å, b=8.5169(4) Å, c=10.3928(4) Å, β=97.466(1)°, and Z=8. The structure consists of 2D neutral sheets of zinc hydrogen phosphate with the dipolar isonicotinate ligand being coordinated to zinc as a pendent group. Adjacent sheets are connected by hydrogen bonding. The 1H magic angle spinning NMR spectrum exhibits three resonances at 15.5, 8.1, and 4.8 ppm with an intensity ratio close to 1:4:1, corresponding to two different types of protons in isonicotinate ligand and one type of protons in hydrogen phosphate groups. The peak at 15.5 ppm can be assigned to the proton bonded to the pyridine nitrogen atom, which confirms the presence of +HNC 5H 4COO -.

  1. Catalytic Roles of βLys87 in Tryptophan Synthase: 15N Solid State NMR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Caulkins, Bethany G.; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2015-01-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4′ for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-15N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. PMID:25688830

  2. Rapid and accurate determination of the lignin content of lignocellulosic biomass by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; McCallum, Scott A; Miao, Jianjun; Hart, Courtney; Tudryn, Gregory J; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2015-02-01

    Biofuels and biomaterials, produced from lignocellulosic feedstock, require facile access to cellulose and hemicellulose to be competitive with petroleum processing and sugar-based fermentation. Physical-chemical barriers resulting from lignin complicates the hydrolysis biomass into fermentable sugars. Thus, the amount of lignin within a substrate is critical in determining biomass processing. The application of (13)C cross-polarization, magic-angle spinning, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance for the direct quantification of lignin content in biomass is examined. Using a standard curve constructed from pristine lignin and cellulose, the lignin content of a biomass sample is accurately determined through direct measurement without chemical or enzymatic pre-treatment. PMID:25404762

  3. Rapid and accurate determination of the lignin content of lignocellulosic biomass by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Li; McCallum, Scott A.; Miao, Jianjun; Hart, Courtney; Tudryn, Gregory J.; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Biofuels and biomaterials, produced from lignocellulosic feedstock, require facile access to cellulose and hemicellulose to be competitive with petroleum processing and sugar-based fermentation. Physical-chemical barriers resulting from lignin complicates the hydrolysis biomass into fermentable sugars. Thus, the amount of lignin within a substrate is critical in determining biomass processing. The application of 13C cross-polarization, magic-angle spinning, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance for the direct quantification of lignin content in biomass is examined. Using a standard curve constructed from pristine lignin and cellulose, the lignin content of a biomass sample is accurately determined through direct measurement without chemical or enzymatic pre-treatment. PMID:25404762

  4. New in situ solid-state NMR techniques for probing the evolution of crystallization processes: pre-nucleation, nucleation and growth.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Colan E; Williams, P Andrew; Keast, Victoria L; Charalampopoulos, Vasileios G; Edwards-Gau, Gregory R; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2015-01-01

    The application of in situ techniques for investigating crystallization processes promises to yield significant new insights into fundamental aspects of crystallization science. With this motivation, we recently developed a new in situ solid-state NMR technique that exploits the ability of NMR to selectively detect the solid phase in heterogeneous solid-liquid systems (of the type that exist during crystallization from solution), with the liquid phase "invisible" to the measurement. As a consequence, the technique allows the first solid particles produced during crystallization to be observed and identified, and allows the evolution of different solid phases (e.g., polymorphs) present during the crystallization process to be monitored as a function of time. This in situ solid-state NMR strategy has been demonstrated to be a powerful approach for establishing the sequence of solid phases produced during crystallization and for the discovery of new polymorphs. The most recent advance of the in situ NMR methodology has been the development of a strategy (named "CLASSIC NMR") that allows both solid-state NMR and liquid-state NMR spectra to be measured (essentially simultaneously) during the crystallization process, yielding information on the complementary changes that occur in both the solid and liquid phases as a function of time. In this article, we present new results that highlight the application of our in situ NMR techniques to successfully unravel different aspects of crystallization processes, focusing on: (i) the application of a CLASSIC NMR approach to monitor competitive inclusion processes in solid urea inclusion compounds, (ii) exploiting liquid-state NMR to gain insights into co-crystal formation between benzoic acid and pentafluorobenzoic acid, and (iii) applications of in situ solid-state NMR for the discovery of new solid forms of trimethylphosphine oxide and L-phenylalanine. Finally, the article discusses a number of important fundamental issues

  5. Urinary metabolic fingerprint of acute intermittent porphyria analyzed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carichon, Mickael; Pallet, Nicolas; Schmitt, Caroline; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Gouya, Laurent; Talbi, Neila; Deybach, Jean Charles; Beaune, Philippe; Vasos, Paul; Puy, Hervé; Bertho, Gildas

    2014-02-18

    (1)H NMR is a nonbiased technique for the quantification of small molecules that could result in the identification and characterization of potential biomarkers with prognostic value and contribute to better understand pathophysiology of diseases. In this study, we used (1)H NMR spectroscopy to analyze the urinary metabolome of patients with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an inherited metabolic disorder of heme biosynthesis in which an accumulation of the heme precursors 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) promotes sudden neurovisceral attacks, which can be life-threatening. Our objectives were (1) to demonstrate the usefulness of (1)H NMR to identify and quantify ALA and PBG in urines from AIP patients and (2) to identify metabolites that would predict the response to AIP crisis treatment and reflect differential metabolic reprogramming. Our results indicate that (1)H NMR can help to diagnose AIP attacks based on the identification of ALA and PBG. We also show that glycin concentration increases in urines from patients with frequent recurrences at the end of the treatment, after an initial decrease, whereas PBG concentration remains low. Although the reasons for this altered are elusive, these findings indicate that a glycin metabolic reprogramming occurs in AIPr patients and is associated with recurrence. Our results validate the proof of concept of the usefulness of (1)H NMR spectroscopy in clinical chemistry for the diagnosis of acute attack of AIP and identify urinary glycin as a potential marker of recurrence of AIP acute attacks. PMID:24437734

  6. Solid State NMR Investigations of Chain Dynamics and Network Order in Model Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, J P; Mayer, B P; Wilson, T S; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S

    2010-12-09

    This work is at a relatively early stage, however it has been demonstrated that we can reliably probe basic network architectures using the MQ-NMR technique. The initial results are in good agreement with what is known from standard network theory and will serve as a basis for the study of progressively increasing structural complexity in Siloxane network systems.

  7. Humic acids as proxies for assessing different Mediterranean forest soils signatures using solid-state CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Regina M B O; Fernández-Getino, Ana P; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-06-01

    Humic acids (HAs) of four representative forest soils profiles from Central Spain (two with different vegetation - pine and oak - but same parent material - granitie, and two with same vegetation - holm oak - but different parent material - granite and limestone) were investigated by solid-state cross polarization with magic angle spinning (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The objectives included the investigation of the impact of different forest properties on HA composition, assessing how the structural characteristics of the HA vary with soil depth, and evaluating the role of HA as surrogates for mapping the different forest soils signatures using structural data derived from (13)C NMR spectroscopy. On average, alkyl C is the dominant C constituent (38-48% of the total NMR peak area) in all HA samples, followed by aromatic (12-22%) and O-alkyl C (12-19%), and finally carboxyl C (7.0-10%). The NMR data also indicated that HA composition is likely to be differently affected by the soil physico-chemical properties and type of forest vegetation. The structural characteristics of the HA from soil under oak did not differ broadly downward in the profile, whereas soil HA under pine forest exhibits a somewhat higher recalcitrant nature as a consequence of a higher degree of decomposition. The soil HA from holm oak forests differed from the other two forest soils, exhibiting a progressive decomposition of the alkyl C structures with increasing depth, while the carbohydrate-like indicator (O-alkyl C) is apparently being protected from mineralization in the horizons below the ground level. Overall, these differences in soil HA NMR signatures are an important diagnostic tool for understanding the role of different soil environmental factors on the structural composition of HA from Mediterranean forest soils. PMID:23332874

  8. Humic acids as proxies for assessing different Mediterranean forest soils signatures using solid-state CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Regina M B O; Fernández-Getino, Ana P; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-06-01

    Humic acids (HAs) of four representative forest soils profiles from Central Spain (two with different vegetation - pine and oak - but same parent material - granitie, and two with same vegetation - holm oak - but different parent material - granite and limestone) were investigated by solid-state cross polarization with magic angle spinning (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The objectives included the investigation of the impact of different forest properties on HA composition, assessing how the structural characteristics of the HA vary with soil depth, and evaluating the role of HA as surrogates for mapping the different forest soils signatures using structural data derived from (13)C NMR spectroscopy. On average, alkyl C is the dominant C constituent (38-48% of the total NMR peak area) in all HA samples, followed by aromatic (12-22%) and O-alkyl C (12-19%), and finally carboxyl C (7.0-10%). The NMR data also indicated that HA composition is likely to be differently affected by the soil physico-chemical properties and type of forest vegetation. The structural characteristics of the HA from soil under oak did not differ broadly downward in the profile, whereas soil HA under pine forest exhibits a somewhat higher recalcitrant nature as a consequence of a higher degree of decomposition. The soil HA from holm oak forests differed from the other two forest soils, exhibiting a progressive decomposition of the alkyl C structures with increasing depth, while the carbohydrate-like indicator (O-alkyl C) is apparently being protected from mineralization in the horizons below the ground level. Overall, these differences in soil HA NMR signatures are an important diagnostic tool for understanding the role of different soil environmental factors on the structural composition of HA from Mediterranean forest soils.

  9. Distinguishing bicontinuous lipid cubic phases from isotropic membrane morphologies using (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Yao, Hongwei; Hong, Mei

    2015-04-16

    Nonlamellar lipid membranes are frequently induced by proteins that fuse, bend, and cut membranes. Understanding the mechanism of action of these proteins requires the elucidation of the membrane morphologies that they induce. While hexagonal phases and lamellar phases are readily identified by their characteristic solid-state NMR line shapes, bicontinuous lipid cubic phases are more difficult to discern, since the static NMR spectra of cubic-phase lipids consist of an isotropic (31)P or (2)H peak, indistinguishable from the spectra of isotropic membrane morphologies such as micelles and small vesicles. To date, small-angle X-ray scattering is the only method to identify bicontinuous lipid cubic phases. To explore unique NMR signatures of lipid cubic phases, we first describe the orientation distribution of lipid molecules in cubic phases and simulate the static (31)P chemical shift line shapes of oriented cubic-phase membranes in the limit of slow lateral diffusion. We then show that (31)P T2 relaxation times differ significantly between isotropic micelles and cubic-phase membranes: the latter exhibit 2 orders of magnitude shorter T2 relaxation times. These differences are explained by the different time scales of lipid lateral diffusion on the cubic-phase surface versus the time scales of micelle tumbling. Using this relaxation NMR approach, we investigated a DOPE membrane containing the transmembrane domain (TMD) of a viral fusion protein. The static (31)P spectrum of DOPE shows an isotropic peak, whose T2 relaxation times correspond to that of a cubic phase. Thus, the viral fusion protein TMD induces negative Gaussian curvature, which is an intrinsic characteristic of cubic phases, to the DOPE membrane. This curvature induction has important implications to the mechanism of virus-cell fusion. This study establishes a simple NMR diagnostic probe of lipid cubic phases, which is expected to be useful for studying many protein-induced membrane remodeling phenomena

  10. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and elemental analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, S.M.; Chen, C.R.; Xu, Z.H.; Nelson, P.N.; Boyd, S.E.; Meszaros, I.; Chan, K.Y.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state {sup 13}C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  11. Visualising substrate-fingermark interactions: Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of amino acid reagent development on cellulose substrates.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Xanthe; Shimmon, Ronald; Roux, Claude; Lennard, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Most spectroscopic studies of the reaction products formed by ninhydrin, 1,2-indanedione-zinc (Ind-Zn) and 1,8-diazafluoren-9-one (DFO) when reacted with amino acids or latent fingermarks on paper substrates are focused on visible absorption or luminescence spectroscopy. In addition, structural elucidation studies are typically limited to solution-based mass spectrometry or liquid nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which does not provide an accurate representation of the fingermark development process on common paper substrates. The research presented in this article demonstrates that solid-state carbon-13 magic angle spinning NMR ((13)C-MAS-NMR) is a technique that can not only be utilised for structural studies of fingermark enhancement reagents, but is a promising technique for characterising the effect of paper chemistry on fingermark deposition and enhancement. The latter opens up a research area that has been under-explored to date but has the potential to improve our understanding of how fingermark secretions and enhancement reagents interact with paper substrates. PMID:25766739

  12. Hydration water dynamics in bovine serum albumin at low temperatures as studied by deuterium solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyatou, Tatsuya; Araya, Takashi; Ohashi, Ryutaro; Ida, Tomonori; Mizuno, Motohiro

    2016-10-01

    Solid state 2H NMR was used to investigate changes in the structure and dynamics of hydration waters of bovine serum albumin (BSA) due to glass transitions. The 2H NMR spectra were separated into fast and slow components based on differences in spin-lattice relaxation time T1. The fast components corresponded to water molecules interacting with protein while the slow components were the water molecules similar to bulk water and deuterons of the protein backbone. Simulation analysis of the 2H NMR spectra of the fast components was used to assess the mode and rate of motions of hydration waters around the protein. At low temperatures, the water molecules underwent a 180° flip and slow reorientation in the tetrahedral sites. The distribution of the rate of the 180° flip and the D-O-D angle of water molecules were clarified. The distribution of the D-O-D angle of water molecules spread with decreasing temperature. The marked slowing down in the reorientation of water molecules was observed at a glass transition of around 200 K, which is linked to the disordered region of the protein. In contrast, the 180° flip of water molecules occurred frequently, even below 200 K. A freeze of the 180° flip of water molecules was observed around the glass transition temperature of 110 K, where primary hydrate water formed a direct hydrogen bond with the protein, making it perfectly immobile.

  13. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy as a tool supporting optimization of MALDI-TOF MS analysis of polylactides.

    PubMed

    Sroka-Bartnicka, Anna; Olejniczak, Sebastian; Sochacki, Marek; Biela, Tadeusz; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2009-01-01

    We report systematic structural studies of poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) employing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR data for 1,8-dihydroxy-9-anthracenone (DT), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), 2-(4-hydroxyphenylazo)-benzoic acid (HABA), and trans-3-indoleacrylic acid (IAA), four matrices commonly used in MALDI-TOF analysis of polymers, were analyzed to test the influence of crystallization conditions (solvent, inorganic salt) on sample morphology. (13)C principal elements of chemical shift tensor (CST) and line-shape analyses were employed to study of the nature of hydrogen bonding and to evaluate the crystallinity and amorphicity of the pure polymer. NMR parameters for PLLA were compared with data for polylactide crystallized with the four matrices under different conditions with the addition of two inorganic salts as cationization agents. This study revealed that the semicrystalline structure of the polymer does not change when it is embedded in the matrix. PMID:18926725

  14. Acid properties of solid acid catalysts characterized by solid-state 31P NMR of adsorbed phosphorous probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Huang, Shing-Jong; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2011-09-01

    A brief review is presented on acidity characterization of solid acid catalysts by means of solid-state phosphor-31 magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P MAS NMR) spectroscopy using phosphor-containing molecules as probes. It is emphasized that such a simple approach using (31)P MAS NMR of adsorbed phosphorous probe molecules, namely trimethylphosphine (TMP) and trialkylphosphine oxides (R(3)PO), represents a unique technique in providing detailed qualitative and quantitative features, viz. type, strength, distribution, and concentration of acid sites in solid acid catalysts. In particular, it will be shown that when applied with a proper choice of probe molecules with varied sizes and results obtained from elemental analysis, the amounts and locations (intracrystalline vs. extracrystalline) of different types (Brønsted vs. Lewis) of acid sites may be determined. In addition, by incorporating the NMR results with that obtained from theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations, correlations between the (31)P chemical shifts (δ(31)P) and acidic strengths of Brønsted and Lewis acid sites may also be derived, facilitating a suitable acidity scale for solid acid catalysts.

  15. Solid-State NMR, Crystallographic, and Computational Investigation of Bisphosphonates and Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase-Bisphosphonate Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Mao,J.; Mukherjee, S.; Zhang, Y.; Cao, R.; Sanders, J.; Song, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Meints, G.; Gao, Y.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are a class of molecules in widespread use in treating bone resorption diseases and are also of interest as immunomodulators and anti-infectives. They function by inhibiting the enzyme farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS), but the details of how these molecules bind are not fully understood. Here, we report the results of a solid-state {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, and {sup 31}P magic-angle sample spinning (MAS) NMR and quantum chemical investigation of several bisphosphonates, both as pure compounds and when bound to FPPS, to provide information about side-chain and phosphonate backbone protonation states when bound to the enzyme. We then used computational docking methods (with the charges assigned by NMR) to predict how several bisphosphonates bind to FPPS. Finally, we used X-ray crystallography to determine the structures of two potent bisphosphonate inhibitors, finding good agreement with the computational results, opening up the possibility of using the combination of NMR, quantum chemistry and molecular docking to facilitate the design of other, novel prenytransferase inhibitors.

  16. Hydration properties of regioselectively etherified celluloses monitored by 2H and 13C solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Schöbitz, Michael; Schaller, Jens

    2012-06-20

    The hydration properties of 2,3-O-hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) and 2,3-O-hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) were analyzed by multi-nuclear solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy. By 13C single-pulse (SP) MAS and cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, differences between the immobile regions and all parts of the polysaccharides were detected as a function of hydration. Complementary information about the water environments was observed by 2H MAS NMR. By this approach it was demonstrated that side chains in 2,3-O-HPC and 2,3-O-HEC were easier to hydrate than the cellulose backbone. Furthermore the motion of water was more restricted (slower) in 2,3-O-HPC than in 2,3-O-HEC. For both polysaccharides the hydration could be explained by a two-step process: in step one increased ordering of the immobile regions occurs after which the entire polymer is hydrated in step two.

  17. Solid-state NMR analysis of the {beta}-strand orientation of the protofibrils of amyloid {beta}-protein

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Takashi; Masuda, Yuichi; Irie, Kazuhiro; Akagi, Ken-ichi; Monobe, Youko; Imazawa, Takayoshi; Takegoshi, K.

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supramolecular structure of A{beta}42 protofibrils was analyzed by solid-state NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala-21 residue in the A{beta}42 protofibrils is included in a slightly disordered {beta}-strand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The A{beta}42 protofibrils do not form intermolecular in-register parallel {beta}-sheets. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is caused by abnormal deposition (fibrillation) of a 42-residue amyloid {beta}-protein (A{beta}42) in the brain. During the process of fibrillation, the A{beta}42 takes the form of protofibrils with strong neurotoxicity, and is thus believed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of AD. To elucidate the supramolecular structure of the A{beta}42 protofibrils, the intermolecular proximity of the Ala-21 residues in the A{beta}42 protofibrils was analyzed by {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C rotational resonance experiments in the solid state. Unlike the A{beta}42 fibrils, an intermolecular {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation was not found in the A{beta}42 protofibrils. This result suggests that the {beta}-strands of the A{beta}42 protofibrils are not in an in-register parallel orientation. A{beta}42 monomers would assemble to form protofibrils with the {beta}-strand conformation, then transform into fibrils by forming intermolecular parallel {beta}-sheets.

  18. Reassessment of MxiH subunit orientation and fold within native Shigella T3SS needles using surface labelling and solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Verasdonck, Joeri; Shen, Da-Kang; Treadgold, Alexander; Arthur, Christopher; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H.; Blocker, Ariel J.

    2015-01-01

    T3SSs are essential virulence determinants of many Gram-negative bacteria, used to inject bacterial effectors of virulence into eukaryotic host cells. Their major extracellular portion, a ∼50 nm hollow, needle-like structure, is essential to host cell sensing and the conduit for effector secretion. It is formed of a small, conserved subunit arranged as a helical polymer. The structure of the subunit has been studied by electron cryomicroscopy within native polymers and by solid-state NMR in recombinant polymers, yielding two incompatible atomic models. To resolve this controversy, we re-examined the native polymer used for electron cryomicroscopy via surface labelling and solid-state NMR. Our data show the orientation and overall fold of the subunit within this polymer is as established by solid-state NMR for recombinant polymers. PMID:26439285

  19. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear coherence transfer using phase and amplitude modulated rf irradiation at the Hartmann Hahn sideband conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2003-12-01

    An improved variant of the popular double cross-polarization (DCP) experiment for heteronuclear dipolar recoupling in solid-state NMR spectroscopy under magic-angle-spinning is introduced. By simple phase and amplitude modulation of the rf irradiation at the Hartman-Hahn sideband conditions, the new pulse sequence, dubbed iDCP, enables broadband excitation with the high efficiency of γ-encoded coherence transfer. The efficiency and robustness of iDCP toward isotropic chemical shift variations and chemical shift anisotropies, in the order typically applying for the backbone atoms in uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled proteins, is demonstrated numerically and experimentally by 15N to 13C coherence transfer for 15N-labeled N-Ac- L-valyl- L-leucine and 13C, 15N-labeled- L-threonine.

  20. An efficient method and device for transfer of semisolid materials into solid-state NMR spectroscopy rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisao, Grant S.; Harland, Michael A.; Brown, Robert A.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Wilson, Thomas E.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-04-01

    The study of mass-limited biological samples by magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy critically relies upon the high-yield transfer of material from a biological preparation into the MAS rotor. This issue is particularly important for maintaining biological activity and hydration of semi-solid samples such as membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, pharmaceutical formulations, microcrystalline proteins and protein fibrils. Here we present protocols and designs for rotor-packing devices specifically suited for packing hydrated samples into Pencil-style 1.6 mm, 3.2 mm standard, and 3.2 mm limited speed MAS rotors. The devices are modular and therefore readily adaptable to other rotor and/or ultracentrifugation tube geometries.

  1. The structure, dynamics and orientation of antimicrobial peptides in membranes by multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bechinger, B

    1999-12-15

    Linear peptide antibiotics have been isolated from amphibians, insects and humans and used as templates to design cheaper and more potent analogues for medical applications. Peptides such as cecropins or magainins are < or = 40 amino acids in length. Many of them have been prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis with isotopic labels incorporated at selected sites. Structural analysis by solid-state NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques indicates that these peptide antibiotics strongly interact with lipid membranes. In bilayer environments they exhibit amphipathic alpha-helical conformations and alignments of the helix axis parallel to the membrane surface. This contrasts the transmembrane orientations observed for alamethicin or gramicidin A. Models that have been proposed to explain the antibiotic and pore-forming activities of membrane-associated peptides, as well as other experimental results, include transmembrane helical bundles, wormholes, carpets, detergent-like effects or the in-plane diffusion of peptide-induced bilayer instabilities.

  2. Untangling a Repetitive Amyloid Sequence: Correlating Biofilm-Derived and Segmentally Labeled Curli Fimbriae by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schubeis, Tobias; Yuan, Puwei; Ahmed, Mumdooh; Nagaraj, Madhu; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Ritter, Christiane

    2015-12-01

    Curli are functional bacterial amyloids produced by an intricate biogenesis machinery. Insights into their folding and regulation can advance our understanding of amyloidogenesis. However, gaining detailed structural information of amyloids, and their tendency for structural polymorphisms, remains challenging. Herein we compare high-quality solid-state NMR spectra from biofilm-derived and recombinantly produced curli and provide evidence that they adopt a similar, well-defined β-solenoid arrangement. Curli subunits consist of five sequence repeats, resulting in severe spectral overlap. Using segmental isotope labeling, we obtained the unambiguous sequence-specific resonance assignments and secondary structure of one repeat, and demonstrate that all repeats are most likely structurally equivalent. PMID:26474178

  3. Solid-state proton NMR of paramagnetic metal complexes: DANTE spin echoes for selective excitation in inhomogeneously broadened lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Diego; Perez Linde, A. J.; Bauer, Gerald; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2013-08-01

    The paramagnetic complex bis(oxazolinylphenyl)amine-Fe(III)Cl2 is investigated by means of solid-state proton NMR at 18.8 T (800 MHz) using magic-angle spinning at 65 kHz. Spin echoes that are excited and refocused by combs of rotor-synchronized pulses in the manner of 'Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation' (DANTE) allow one to characterize different chemical environments that severely overlap in conventional MAS spectra. Such sequences combine two apparently contradictory features: an overall bandwidth exceeding several MHz, and very selective irradiation of a few kHz within inhomogeneously broadened sidebands. The experimental hyperfine interactions correlate well with DFT calculations.

  4. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy Reveals That Water is Nonessential to the Core Structure of Alpha-Synuclein Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Kloepper, Kathryn D.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2008-01-01

    Protein aggregation is implicated in the etiology of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. An understanding of aggregation mechanisms is enhanced by atomic-resolution structural information, of which relatively little is currently available. Lewy bodies, the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease, contain large quantities of fibrillar alpha-synuclein (AS). Here we present solid-state NMR spectroscopy studies of dried AS fibrils. The spectra have high resolution and sensitivity, and the site-resolved chemical shifts agree very well with those previously observed for hydrated fibrils. The conserved chemical shifts indicate that bulk water is nonessential to the fibril core structure. Moreover, the sample preparation procedure yields major improvements in spectral sensitivity, without compromising spectral resolution. This advance will greatly assist atomic-resolution structural analysis of AS fibrils. PMID:17985869

  5. Demonstration of a common indole-based aromatic core in natural and synthetic eumelanins by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Tan, Sindy; Itin, Boris; Casadevall, Arturo; Stark, Ruth E

    2014-09-14

    Despite the essential functions of melanin pigments in diverse organisms and their roles in inspiring designed nanomaterials for electron transport and drug delivery, the structural frameworks of the natural materials and their biomimetic analogs remain poorly understood. To overcome the investigative challenges posed by these insoluble heterogeneous pigments, we have used l-tyrosine or dopamine enriched with stable (13)C and (15)N isotopes to label eumelanins metabolically in cell-free and Cryptococcus neoformans cell systems and to define their molecular structures and supramolecular architectures. Using high-field two-dimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), our study directly evaluates the assumption of structural commonality between synthetic melanin models and the corresponding natural pigments, demonstrating a common indole-based aromatic core in the products from contrasting synthetic protocols for the first time.

  6. Rapidly-frozen polypeptide samples for characterization of high definition dynamics by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lazo, N D; Hu, W; Lee, K C; Cross, T A

    1993-12-15

    A method is described for defining anisotropic local dynamics in polypeptides by solid-state NMR. To avoid conformational heterogeneity introduced by large hexagonal ice crystals in low temperature hydrated samples, a fast-freezing technique is used for sample preparation. For a demonstration of this approach, the backbone librational motions of the gramicidin A channel conformation are studied in hydrated DMPC bilayers. The static 15N chemical shift tensor is characterized at 123 K for the Ala3 site. The temperature dependence of this tensor yields a determination of the librational amplitude and anisotropy of the motionally sampled space. This amplitude represents the sum of nanosecond and picosecond time-frame motions, both of which have a significant amplitude.

  7. Investigation of gamma-irradiated vegetable seeds with high-resolution solid-state 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Michel; Maron, Sébastien; Foray, Marie Françoise; Berger, Maurice; Guillermo, Armel

    2004-04-01

    13C solid-state NMR was used to investigate the effects of gamma radiation on vegetable seeds, Pisum sativum and Latuca sativa, at absorbed doses that inhibit their germination. By combining single-pulse excitation and cross-polarization experiments under magic angle spinning, both liquid and solid domains of seeds can be characterized. We showed that the liquid domains, mostly made of triacylglycerols (TAG), of vegetable seeds are not sensitive to radiation. The main structural changes have been observed in the embryonic axes of seeds when the seeds are water-imbibed before irradiation. These results rule out a starting hypothesis concerning the potential role of TAG contained in oil bodies as a potential source of aldehydes that could further react with DNA moiety.

  8. Solid state 13C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy of the cocoon silk of two common spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramanti, Emilia; Catalano, Donata; Forte, Claudia; Giovanneschi, Mario; Masetti, Massimo; Veracini, Carlo Alberto

    2005-11-01

    The structure of the silk from cocoons of two common spiders, Araneus diadematus (family Araneidae) and Achaearanea tepidariorum (family Theridiidae) was investigated by means of 13C solid state NMR and FT-IR spectroscopies. The combined use of these two techniques allowed us to highlight differences in the two samples. The cocoon silk of Achaearanea tepidariorum is essentially constituted by helical and β-sheet structures, whereas that of Araneus diadematus shows a more complex structure, containing also β-strands and β-turns. Moreover, the former silk is essentially crystalline while the latter contains more mobile domains. The structural differences of the two cocoon silks are ascribed to the different habitat of the two species.

  9. Tripeptides on Gold Nanoparticles: Structural Differences between Two Reverse Sequences as Determined by Solid-State NMR and DFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Karki, Ichhuk; Wang, Hong; Geise, Natalie R; Wilson, Brendan W; Lewis, James P; Gullion, Terry

    2015-09-10

    The reverse-sequence peptides CysAlaAla and AlaAlaCys may attach to gold nanoparticles through the thiol group, and they differ primarily by whether the charged amino or the carboxylate group is proximal to the sulfur. Alanine residues in these peptides are not expected to interact significantly with the gold surface and serve to place a large separation between the amino and carboxylate groups. Solid-state NMR experiments and DFT calculations were performed to explore the structural differences between CysAlaAla on gold nanoparticles and AlaAlaCys on gold nanoparticles. It is found that the relative positions between the thiol, amino, and carboxylate groups strongly influences the structures of the peptide-gold systems. CysAlaAla orients parallel to the gold surface in a monolayer fashion, whereas AlaAlaCys forms an interdigitating bilayer-like structure that is oriented upright relative to the gold surface.

  10. Homogeneous nanoparticles to enhance the efficiency of a hydrophobic drug, antihyperlipidemic probucol, characterized by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Io, Takeshi; Fukami, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Suzuki, Toyofumi; Xu, Jiadi; Tomono, Kazuo; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2010-02-01

    A low absorption in the gastrointestinal tract of hydrophobic pharmaceutical compounds in use today considerably limits their bioavailability, and therefore they are taken in large doses in order to reach the therapeutic plasma concentration, which inevitably results in undesired side effects. In this study, we demonstrate a new nanoparticle approach to overcome this problem, and our experimental results show that this approach has a high efficiency of drug loading and is easily adaptable to industrial scale. Characterization of nanoparticles containing a cholesterol-lowering hydrophobic drug, probucol, using a variety of biophysical techniques revealed higher homogeneity of these particles compared to those prepared using other approaches. Intermolecular interactions of these nanoparticles are probed at high resolution by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments.

  11. Mechanisms of Peptide-Induced Pore Formation in Lipid Bilayers Investigated by Oriented 31P Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bertelsen, Kresten; Dorosz, Jerzy; Hansen, Sara Krogh; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    There is a considerable interest in understanding the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), but the details of their mode of action is not fully understood. This motivates extensive efforts in determining structural and mechanistic parameters for AMP’s interaction with lipid membranes. In this study we show that oriented-sample 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be used to probe the membrane perturbations and -disruption by AMPs. For two AMPs, alamethicin and novicidin, we observe that the majority of the lipids remain in a planar bilayer conformation but that a number of lipids are involved in the peptide anchoring. These lipids display reduced dynamics. Our study supports previous studies showing that alamethicin adopts a transmembrane arrangement without significant disturbance of the surrounding lipids, while novicidin forms toroidal pores at high concentrations leading to more extensive membrane disturbance. PMID:23094079

  12. Low temperature solid-state NMR experiments of half-integer quadrupolar nuclides: caveats and data analysis.

    PubMed

    Lipton, Andrew S; Heck, Robert W; Sears, Jesse A; Ellis, Paul D

    2004-05-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of half-integer quadrupolar nuclides has received a lot of interest recently with the advent of new methodologies and higher magnetic fields. We present here the extension of our previous low temperature method to an 18.8T system. This new probe entailed a total redesign including a cross coil and variable capacitors that are operational at cryogenic temperatures. The limitations to sensitivity are also discussed; including a new diode network, the utilization of a cryogenic band pass filter, and the consequences of the RF profiles of the coil. Further, details of the spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei in a protein are discussed, such as the observation of the outer transitions and how to distinguish them from the desired +/-1/2 transition.

  13. Pf1 bacteriophage hydration by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeyev, Ivan V.; Bahri, Salima; Day, Loren A.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2014-12-01

    High resolution two- and three-dimensional heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy (1H-13C, 1H-15N, and 1H-13C-13C HETCOR) has provided a detailed characterization of the internal and external hydration water of the Pf1 virion. This long and slender virion (2000 nm × 7 nm) contains highly stretched DNA within a capsid of small protein subunits, each only 46 amino acid residues. HETCOR cross-peaks have been unambiguously assigned to 25 amino acids, including most external residues 1-21 as well as residues 39-40 and 43-46 deep inside the virion. In addition, the deoxyribose rings of the DNA near the virion axis are in contact with water. The sets of cross-peaks to the DNA and to all 25 amino acid residues were from the same hydration water 1H resonance; some of the assigned residues do not have exchangeable side-chain protons. A mapping of the contacts onto structural models indicates the presence of water "tunnels" through a highly hydrophobic region of the capsid. The present results significantly extend and modify results from a lower resolution study, and yield a comprehensive hydration surface map of Pf1. In addition, the internal water could be distinguished from external hydration water by means of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The internal water population may serve as a conveniently localized magnetization reservoir for structural studies.

  14. Effect of Ca:Mg ratio on precipitated P species identified using 31P solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manimel Wadu, M.

    2009-04-01

    M.C.W. Manimel Wadu1, O.O Akinremi1, S. Kroeker2 1Department of Soil Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 2N2, Canada 2Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 2N2, Canada Agronomic efficiency of added P fertilizer is reduced by the precipitation reactions with the exchangeable Ca and Mg in calcareous soils. We hypothesized that the ratio of Ca to Mg on the soil exchange complex will affect the species of P that is precipitated and its solubility in the soil. A laboratory experiment was conducted using a model calcareous soil system which was composed of resin (Amberlite IRP69) and sand coated with CaCO3 packed into a column. The resin was pre saturated with Ca and Mg in order to achieve five different saturation ratios of Ca:Mg approximately as 100:0, 70:30, 50:50, 30:70 and 0:100. Monoammonium Phosphate was applied to the soil surface to simulate one-dimensional diffusive transport. The column was then incubated for 2 weeks. Chemical analysis for water and acid soluble P, pH, NH4, Ca and Mg was performed on 2mm sections of the soil to a depth of 10 cm. This paper will present and discuss the distribution of P along the soil column. Unlike similar studies that have speculated on the precipitation of P, this study will identify and quantify the P species that is formed using 31P solid state NMR technique. Such knowledge will be helpful in understanding the effect of Ca and Mg on P availability in calcareous system and the role of each cation on P precipitation. Key words: P fertilizers, Ca, Mg, model system, solid state NMR

  15. Uncovering the triggers for GPCR activation using solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, Naoki; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2015-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) span cell membranes with seven transmembrane helices and respond to a diverse array of extracellular signals. Crystal structures of GPCRs have provided key insights into the architecture of these receptors and the role of conserved residues. However, the question of how ligand binding induces the conformational changes that are essential for activation remains largely unanswered. Since the extracellular sequences and structures of GPCRs are not conserved between receptor subfamilies, it is likely that the initial molecular triggers for activation vary depending on the specific type of ligand and receptor. In this article, we describe NMR studies on the rhodopsin subfamily of GPCRs and propose a mechanism for how retinal isomerization switches the receptor to the active conformation. These results suggest a general approach for determining the triggers for activation in other GPCR subfamilies using NMR spectroscopy.

  16. Solid-state NMR of nanomachines involved in photosynthetic energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Alia, A; Buda, Francesco; de Groot, Huub J M; Matysik, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning NMR, often in combination with photo-CIDNP, is applied to determine how photosynthetic antennae and reaction centers are activated in the ground state to perform their biological function upon excitation by light. Molecular modeling resolves molecular mechanisms by way of computational integration of NMR data with other structure-function analyses. By taking evolutionary historical contingency into account, a better biophysical understanding is achieved. Chlorophyll cofactors and proteins go through self-assembly trajectories that are engineered during evolution and lead to highly homogeneous protein complexes optimized for exciton or charge transfer. Histidine-cofactor interactions allow biological nanomachines to lower energy barriers for light harvesting and charge separation in photosynthetic energy conversion. In contrast, in primordial chlorophyll antenna aggregates, excessive heterogeneity is paired with much less specific characteristics, and both exciton and charge-transfer character are encoded in the ground state.

  17. Cation substitution in β-tricalcium phosphate investigated using multi-nuclear, solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigg, Andrew T.; Mee, Martin; Mallinson, Phillip M.; Fong, Shirley K.; Gan, Zhehong; Dupree, Ray; Holland, Diane

    2014-04-01

    The substitution of aluminium, gallium and sodium cations into β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP; Ca3(PO4)2) has been investigated, and the Ca sites involved successfully determined, using a combination of 1D 31P, 27Al, 71Ga, 23Na and 43Ca (natural abundance) NMR and 2D 27Al{31P}, 71Ga{31P} and 23Na{31P} rotary-resonance-recoupled heteronuclear multiple-quantum correlation (R3-HMQC) NMR. Over the compositional range studied, substitution of Ca2+ by Al3+ or Ga3+ was observed only on the Ca(5) site, whilst substitution by Na+ was confined to the Ca(4) site. Some AlPO4 or GaPO4 second phase was observed at the highest doping levels in the Al3+ and Ga3+ substituted samples.

  18. Biomolecular solid state NMR with magic-angle spinning at 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A magic-angle spinning (MAS) probe has been constructed which allows the sample to be cooled with helium, while the MAS bearing and drive gases are nitrogen. The sample can be cooled to 25 K using roughly 3 liters/hour of liquid helium, while the 4 mm diameter rotor spins at 6.7 kHz with good stability (±5 Hz) for many hours. Proton decoupling fields up to at least 130 kHz can be applied. This helium-cooled MAS probe enables a variety of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments on biomolecular solids and other materials at low temperatures, with signal-to-noise proportional to 1/T. We show examples of low-temperature 13C NMR data for two biomolecular samples, namely the peptide Aβ14–23 in the form of amyloid fibrils and the protein HP35 in frozen glycerol/water solution. Issues related to temperature calibration, spin-lattice relaxation at low temperatures, paramagnetic doping of frozen solutions, and 13C MAS NMR linewidths are discussed. PMID:18922715

  19. Solid State 2H NMR Analysis of Furanose Ring Dynamics in DNA Containing Uracil

    PubMed Central

    Kinde-Carson, Monica N.; Ferguson, Crystal; Oyler, Nathan A.; Harbison, Gerard S.; Meints, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage has been implicated in numerous human diseases, particularly cancer, and the aging process. Single-base lesions, such as uracil, in DNA can be cytotoxic or mutagenic and are recognized by a DNA glycosylase during the process of base excision repair. Increased dynamic properties in lesion-containing DNAs have been suggested to assist recognition and specificity. Deuterium solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) has been used to directly observe local dynamics of the furanose ring within a uracil: adenine (U:A) base pair and compared to a normal thymine:adenine (T:A) base pair. Quadrupole echo lineshapes, ⟨T1Z⟩, and ⟨T2e⟩ relaxation data were collected, and computer modeling was performed. The results indicate that the relaxation times are identical within the experimental error, the solid lineshapes are essentially indistinguishable above the noise level, and our lineshapes are best fit with a model that does not have significant local motions. Therefore, U:A base pair furanose rings appear to have essentially identical dynamic properties as a normal T:A base pair, and the local dynamics of the furanose ring are unlikely to be the sole arbiter for uracil recognition and specificity in U:A base pairs. PMID:20151717

  20. Membrane proteins in their native habitat as seen by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins play many critical roles in cells, mediating flow of material and information across cell membranes. They have evolved to perform these functions in the environment of a cell membrane, whose physicochemical properties are often different from those of common cell membrane mimetics used for structure determination. As a result, membrane proteins are difficult to study by traditional methods of structural biology, and they are significantly underrepresented in the protein structure databank. Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SSNMR) has long been considered as an attractive alternative because it allows for studies of membrane proteins in both native-like membranes composed of synthetic lipids and in cell membranes. Over the past decade, SSNMR has been rapidly developing into a major structural method, and a growing number of membrane protein structures obtained by this technique highlights its potential. Here we discuss membrane protein sample requirements, review recent progress in SSNMR methodologies, and describe recent advances in characterizing membrane proteins in the environment of a cellular membrane. PMID:25973959

  1. Catalytic roles of βLys87 in tryptophan synthase: (15)N solid state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Caulkins, Bethany G; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F; Mueller, Leonard J

    2015-09-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4' for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-¹⁵N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using ¹⁵N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. Guest Editors: Andrea Mozzarelli and Loredano Pollegioni.

  2. A unified heteronuclear decoupling strategy for magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Equbal, Asif; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr. E-mail: ncn@inano.au.dk; Madhu, P. K. E-mail: ncn@inano.au.dk

    2015-05-14

    A unified strategy of two-pulse based heteronuclear decoupling for solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance is presented. The analysis presented here shows that different decoupling sequences like two-pulse phase-modulation (TPPM), X-inverse-X (XiX), and finite pulse refocused continuous wave (rCW{sup A}) are basically specific solutions of a more generalized decoupling scheme which incorporates the concept of time-modulation along with phase-modulation. A plethora of other good decoupling conditions apart from the standard, TPPM, XiX, and rCW{sup A} decoupling conditions are available from the unified decoupling approach. The importance of combined time- and phase-modulation in order to achieve the best decoupling conditions is delineated. The consequences of different indirect dipolar interactions arising from cross terms comprising of heteronuclear and homonuclear dipolar coupling terms and also those between heteronuclear dipolar coupling and chemical-shift anisotropy terms are presented in order to unfold the effects of anisotropic interactions under different decoupling conditions. Extensive numerical simulation results are corroborated with experiments on standard amino acids.

  3. Characterization of pyrogenic organic matter by 2-dimenstional HETeronucleus CORelation solid-state 13C NMR (HETCOR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, increasing evidences are provided that the common view of charcoal as a polyaromatic network is too much simplified. Experiments with model compounds indicated that it represents a heterogeneous mixture of thermally altered biomacromolecules with N, O and likely also S substitutions as common features. If produced from a N-rich feedstock, the so called black nitrogen (BN) has to be considered as an integral part of the aromatic charcoal network. In order to study this network one-dimensional (1D) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is often applied. However, this technique suffers from broad resonance lines and low resolution. Applying 2D techniques can help but until recently, this was unfeasible for natural organic matter (NOM) due to sensitivity problems and the high complexity of the material. On the other hand, during the last decade, the development of stronger magnetic field instruments and advanced pulse sequences has put them into reach for NOM research. Although 2D NMR spectroscopy has many different applications, all pulse sequences are based on the introduction of a preparation time during which the magnetization of a spin system is adjusted into a state appropriate to whatever properties are to be detected in the indirect dimension. Then, the spins are allowed to evolve with the given conditions and after their additional manipulation during a mixing period the modulated magnetization is detected. Assembling several 1D spectra with incrementing evolution time creates a data set which is two-dimensional in time (t1, t2). Fourier transformation of both dimensions leads to a 2D contour plot correlating the interactions detected in the indirect dimension t1 with the signals detected in the direct dimension t2. The so called solid-state heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR spectroscopy represents a 2D technique allows the determination which protons are interacting with which carbons. In the present work this

  4. Helium-cooling and -spinning dynamic nuclear polarization for sensitivity-enhanced solid-state NMR at 14 T and 30 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuki, Yoh; Ueda, Keisuke; Idehara, Toshitaka; Ikeda, Ryosuke; Ogawa, Isamu; Nakamura, Shinji; Toda, Mitsuru; Anai, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2012-12-01

    We describe a 1H polarization enhancement via dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at very low sample temperature T ≈ 30 K under magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions for sensitivity-enhanced solid-state NMR measurement. Experiments were conducted at a high external field strength of 14.1 T. For MAS DNP experiments at T ≪ 90 K, a new probe system using cold helium gas for both sample-cooling and -spinning was developed. The novel system can sustain a low sample temperature between 30 and 90 K for a period of time >10 h under MAS at νR ≈ 3 kHz with liquid He consumption of ≈6 L/h. As a microwave source, we employed a high-power, continuously frequency-tunable gyrotron. At T ≈ 34 K, 1H DNP enhancement factors of 47 and 23 were observed with and without MAS, respectively. On the basis of these observations, a discussion on the total NMR sensitivity that takes into account the effect of sample temperature and external field strength used in DNP experiments is presented. It was determined that the use of low sample temperature and high external field is generally rewarding for the total sensitivity, in spite of the slower polarization buildup at lower temperature and lower DNP efficiency at higher field. These findings highlight the potential of the current continuous-wave DNP technique also at very high field conditions suitable to analyze large and complex systems, such as biological macromolecules.

  5. Structural Polymorphism of Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Fibrils as Controlled by an E22 Switch: A Solid-State NMR Study.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Matthew R; Wang, Tuo; Nick, Mimi; Jo, Hyunil; Lemmin, Thomas; Prusiner, Stanley B; DeGrado, William F; Stöhr, Jan; Hong, Mei

    2016-08-10

    The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide of Alzheimer's disease (AD) forms polymorphic fibrils on the micrometer and molecular scales. Various fibril growth conditions have been identified to cause polymorphism, but the intrinsic amino acid sequence basis for this polymorphism has been unclear. Several single-site mutations in the center of the Aβ sequence cause different disease phenotypes and fibrillization properties. The E22G (Arctic) mutant is found in familial AD and forms protofibrils more rapidly than wild-type Aβ. Here, we use solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the structure, dynamics, hydration and morphology of Arctic E22G Aβ40 fibrils. (13)C, (15)N-labeled synthetic E22G Aβ40 peptides are studied and compared with wild-type and Osaka E22Δ Aβ40 fibrils. Under the same fibrillization conditions, Arctic Aβ40 exhibits a high degree of polymorphism, showing at least four sets of NMR chemical shifts for various residues, while the Osaka and wild-type Aβ40 fibrils show a single or a predominant set of chemical shifts. Thus, structural polymorphism is intrinsic to the Arctic E22G Aβ40 sequence. Chemical shifts and inter-residue contacts obtained from 2D correlation spectra indicate that one of the major Arctic conformers has surprisingly high structural similarity with wild-type Aβ42. (13)C-(1)H dipolar order parameters, (1)H rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation times and water-to-protein spin diffusion experiments reveal substantial differences in the dynamics and hydration of Arctic, Osaka and wild-type Aβ40 fibrils. Together, these results strongly suggest that electrostatic interactions in the center of the Aβ peptide sequence play a crucial role in the three-dimensional fold of the fibrils, and by inference, fibril-induced neuronal toxicity and AD pathogenesis. PMID:27414264

  6. (1) H NMR analysis of O-methyl-inositol isomers: a joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    De Almeida, Mauro V; Couri, Mara Rubia C; De Assis, João Vitor; Anconi, Cleber P A; Dos Santos, Hélio F; De Almeida, Wagner B

    2012-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (1) H NMR chemical shifts for l-quebrachitol isomers were performed using the B3LYP functional employing the 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311 + G(2d,p) basis sets. The effect of the solvent on the B3LYP-calculated NMR spectrum was accounted for using the polarizable continuum model. Comparison is made with experimental (1) H NMR spectroscopic data, which shed light on the average uncertainty present in DFT calculations of chemical shifts and showed that the best match between experimental and theoretical B3LYP (1) H NMR profiles is a good strategy to assign the molecular structure present in the sample handled in the experimental measurements. Among four plausible O-methyl-inositol isomers, the l-quebrachitol 2a structure was unambiguously assigned based only on the comparative analysis of experimental and theoretical (1) H NMR chemical shift data. The B3LYP infrared (IR) spectrum was also calculated for the four isomers and compared with the experimental data, with analysis of the theoretical IR profiles corroborating assignment of the 2a structure. Therefore, it is confirmed in this study that a combined experimental/DFT spectroscopic investigation is a powerful tool in structural/conformational analysis studies. PMID:22865668

  7. (1) H NMR analysis of O-methyl-inositol isomers: a joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    De Almeida, Mauro V; Couri, Mara Rubia C; De Assis, João Vitor; Anconi, Cleber P A; Dos Santos, Hélio F; De Almeida, Wagner B

    2012-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (1) H NMR chemical shifts for l-quebrachitol isomers were performed using the B3LYP functional employing the 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311 + G(2d,p) basis sets. The effect of the solvent on the B3LYP-calculated NMR spectrum was accounted for using the polarizable continuum model. Comparison is made with experimental (1) H NMR spectroscopic data, which shed light on the average uncertainty present in DFT calculations of chemical shifts and showed that the best match between experimental and theoretical B3LYP (1) H NMR profiles is a good strategy to assign the molecular structure present in the sample handled in the experimental measurements. Among four plausible O-methyl-inositol isomers, the l-quebrachitol 2a structure was unambiguously assigned based only on the comparative analysis of experimental and theoretical (1) H NMR chemical shift data. The B3LYP infrared (IR) spectrum was also calculated for the four isomers and compared with the experimental data, with analysis of the theoretical IR profiles corroborating assignment of the 2a structure. Therefore, it is confirmed in this study that a combined experimental/DFT spectroscopic investigation is a powerful tool in structural/conformational analysis studies.

  8. Fruit juice authentication by 1H NMR spectroscopy in combination with different chemometrics tools.

    PubMed

    Cuny, M; Vigneau, E; Le Gall, G; Colquhoun, I; Lees, M; Rutledge, D N

    2008-01-01

    To discriminate orange juice from grapefruit juice in a context of fraud prevention, (1)H NMR data were submitted to different treatments to extract informative variables which were then analysed using multivariate techniques. Averaging contiguous data points of the spectrum followed by logarithmic transformation improved the results of the data analysis. Moreover, supervised variable selection methods gave better rates of classification of the juices into the correct groups. Last, independent-component analysis gave better classification results than principal-component analysis. Hence, ICA may be an efficient chemometric tool to detect differences in the (1)H NMR spectra of similar samples, and so may be useful for authentication of foods.

  9. Unexpected solvent impact in the crystallinity of praziquantel/poly(vinylpyrrolidone) formulations. A solubility, DSC and solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Costa, Emanuel D; Priotti, Josefina; Orlandi, Silvina; Leonardi, Darío; Lamas, María C; Nunes, Teresa G; Diogo, Hermínio P; Salomon, Claudio J; Ferreira, M João

    2016-09-25

    The saturation solubility of PVP:PZQ physical mixtures (PMs) and solid dispersions (SDs) prepared from ethanol (E/E) or ethanol/water (E/W) by the solvent evaporation method at 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1 ratio (w/w) was determined. The presence of PVP improves the solubility of PZQ (0.31±0.01mg/mL). A maximum of 1.29±0.03mg/mL of PZQ in solution was achieved for the 3:1 SD (E/E). The amount of PZQ in solution depends on the amount of polymer and on the preparation method. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) and DSC were used to understand this behavior. Results show that PMs are a mixture of crystalline PZQ with the polymer, while SDs show different degrees of drug amorphization depending on the solvent used. For E/W SDs, PZQ exists in amorphous and crystalline states, with no clear correlation between the amount of crystalline PZQ and the amount of PVP. For E/E SDs, formulations with a higher percentage of PZQ are amorphous with the components miscible in domains larger than 3nm ((1)H ssNMR relaxation measurements). Albeit its higher saturation solubility, the 3:1 E/E PVP:PZQ sample has a significant crystalline content, probably due to the water introduced by the polymer. High PVP content and small crystal size account for this result. PMID:27506511

  10. Cation substitution in β-tricalcium phosphate investigated using multi-nuclear, solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, Andrew T.; Mee, Martin; Mallinson, Phillip M.; Fong, Shirley K.; Gan, Zhehong; Dupree, Ray; Holland, Diane

    2014-04-01

    The substitution of aluminium, gallium and sodium cations into β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP; Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}) has been investigated, and the Ca sites involved successfully determined, using a combination of 1D {sup 31}P, {sup 27}Al, {sup 71}Ga, {sup 23}Na and {sup 43}Ca (natural abundance) NMR and 2D {sup 27}Al({sup 31}P), {sup 71}Ga({sup 31}P) and {sup 23}Na({sup 31}P) rotary-resonance-recoupled heteronuclear multiple-quantum correlation (R{sup 3}-HMQC) NMR. Over the compositional range studied, substitution of Ca{sup 2+} by Al{sup 3+} or Ga{sup 3+} was observed only on the Ca(5) site, whilst substitution by Na{sup +} was confined to the Ca(4) site. Some AlPO{sub 4} or GaPO{sub 4} second phase was observed at the highest doping levels in the Al{sup 3+} and Ga{sup 3+} substituted samples. - Graphical abstract: 2D contour plots with skyline projections showing recoupling of {sup 27}Al, {sup 71}Ga and {sup 23}Na to different {sup 31}P sites. - Highlights: • β-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} has been prepared pure and also with Al{sup 3+}, Ga{sup 3+} and Na{sup +} substituents. • Multi-nuclear 1D NMR and heteronuclear X({sup 31}P) recoupling have been used. • Models for substitution correctly predict site preference and occupancy. • Progressive changes in {sup 31}P spectra have been explained. • Al{sup 3+} and Ga{sup 3+} substitute onto the Ca(5) site, and Na{sup +} onto the Ca(4) site.

  11. The Kagomé topology of the gallium and indium metal-organic framework types with a MIL-68 structure: synthesis, XRD, solid-state NMR characterizations, and hydrogen adsorption.

    PubMed

    Volkringer, Christophe; Meddouri, Mohamed; Loiseau, Thierry; Guillou, Nathalie; Marrot, Jérôme; Férey, Gérard; Haouas, Mohamed; Taulelle, Francis; Audebrand, Nathalie; Latroche, Michel

    2008-12-15

    The vanadium-based terephthalate analogs of MIL-68 have been obtained with gallium and indium (network composition: M(OH)(O(2)C-C(6)H(4)-CO(2)), M = Ga or In) by using a solvothermal synthesis technique using N,N-dimethylformamide as a solvent (10 and 48 h, for Ga and In, respectively, at 100 degrees C). They have been characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis; vibrational spectroscopy; and solid-state (1)H and (1)H-(1)H radio-frequency-driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR), (1)H-(1)H double quantum correlation (DQ), and (13)C{(1)H} cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy. The three-dimensional network with a Kagomé-like lattice is built up from the connection of infinite trans-connected chains of octahedral units MO(4)(OH)(2) (M = Ga or In), linked to each other through the terephthalate ligands in order to generate triangular and hexagonal one-dimensional channels. The presence of DMF molecules with strong interactions within the channels as well as their departure upon calcination (150 degrees C under a primary vacuum) of the materials has been confirmed by subjecting MIL-68 (Ga) to solid-state (1)H MAS NMR. The (1)H-(1)H RFDR and (1)H-(1)H DQ spectra revealed important information on the spatial arrangement of the guest species with respect to the hybrid organic-inorganic network. (13)C{(1)H} CPMAS NMR of activated samples provided crystallographically independent sites in agreement with X-ray diffraction structure determination. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas are 1117(24) and 746(31) m(2) g(-1) for MIL-98 (Ga) and MIL-68 (In), respectively. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms have been measured at 77 K, and the storage capacities are found to be 2.46 and 1.98 wt % under a saturated pressure of 4 MPa for MIL-68 (Ga) and MIL-68 (In), respectively. For comparison, the hydrogen uptake for the aluminum trimesate MIL-110, which has an open framework with 16 A channels, is 3 wt % under 4 MPa.

  12. Measurements of heavy-atom isotope effects using 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pabis, Anna; Kamiński, Rafał; Ciepielowski, Grzegorz; Jankowski, Stefan; Paneth, Piotr

    2011-10-01

    A novel method for measuring heavy-atom KIEs for magnetically active isotopes using (1)H NMR is presented. It takes advantage of the resonance split of the protons coupled with the heavy atom in the (1)H spectrum. The method is validated by the example of the (13)C-KIE on the hydroamination of styrene with aniline, catalyzed by phosphine-ligated palladium triflates.

  13. Solid-state NMR and density functional theory studies of ionization states of thiamin.

    PubMed

    Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Balakrishnan, Anand; Dmitrenko, Olga; Godert, Amy; Begley, Tadhg P; Jordan, Frank; Polenova, Tatyana

    2011-02-01

    Thiamin diphosphate (ThDP) is a key coenzyme in sugar metabolism. The 4'-aminopyrimidine ring of ThDP cycles through several ionization and tautomeric states during enzyme catalysis, but it is not fully understood which states are adopted during the individual steps of the catalytic cycle. Thiamin has been synthesized with labels selectively inserted into the C2 and C6' positions, as well as into the amino group, creating [C2, C6'-(13)C(2)] thiamin and [N4'-(15)N] thiamin. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been employed to record the (13)C and (15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors for C2, C6', and N4' atoms. Our results indicate that the isotropic chemical shifts as well as the principal components of the (13)C and (15)N CSA tensors are very sensitive to the protonation states in these compounds and, therefore, permit differentiating between the two ionization states, 4-aminopyrimidine and 4-aminopyrimidinium. Using density functional theory (DFT), we have calculated the magnetic shielding anisotropy tensors of C2, C6', and N4' and found excellent agreement between the computed and the experimental tensors. Our findings indicate that MAS NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with DFT calculations is a sensitive probe of ionization states in the thiamin cofactor. The results of this study will serve as a guide for characterization of ionization and tautomeric states of thiamin in complexes with thiamin-dependent enzymes.

  14. Identification of different oxygen species in oxide nanostructures with 17O solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Wu, Xin-Ping; Zheng, Sujuan; Zhao, Li; Li, Lei; Shen, Li; Gao, Yuxian; Xue, Nianhua; Guo, Xuefeng; Huang, Weixin; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Yu, Zhiwu; Ke, Xiaokang; Ding, Weiping; Gong, Xue-Qing; Grey, Clare P.; Peng, Luming

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured oxides find multiple uses in a diverse range of applications including catalysis, energy storage, and environmental management, their higher surface areas, and, in some cases, electronic properties resulting in different physical properties from their bulk counterparts. Developing structure-property relations for these materials requires a determination of surface and subsurface structure. Although microscopy plays a critical role owing to the fact that the volumes sampled by such techniques may not be representative of the whole sample, complementary characterization methods are urgently required. We develop a simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategy to detect the first few layers of a nanomaterial, demonstrating the approach with technologically relevant ceria nanoparticles. We show that the 17O resonances arising from the first to third surface layer oxygen ions, hydroxyl sites, and oxygen species near vacancies can be distinguished from the oxygen ions in the bulk, with higher-frequency 17O chemical shifts being observed for the lower coordinated surface sites. H217O can be used to selectively enrich surface sites, allowing only these particular active sites to be monitored in a chemical process. 17O NMR spectra of thermally treated nanosized ceria clearly show how different oxygen species interconvert at elevated temperature. Density functional theory calculations confirm the assignments and reveal a strong dependence of chemical shift on the nature of the surface. These results open up new strategies for characterizing nanostructured oxides and their applications. PMID:26601133

  15. Solid-state /sup 15/N NMR of oriented lipid bilayer bound gramicidin A'

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, L.K.; Moll, F.; Mixon, T.E.; LoGrasso, P.V.; Lay, J.C.; Cross, T.A.

    1987-10-20

    Highly oriented samples of lipid and gramicidin A' (8:1 molar ratio) have been prepared with the samples extensively hydrated (approximately 70% water v/w). These preparations have been shown to be completely in a bilayer phase with a transition temperature of 28/sup 0/C, and evidence is presented indicating that the gramicidin is in the channel conformation. An estimate of the disorder in the alignment of the bilayers parallel with the glass plates used to align the bilayers can be made from the asymmetry of the nuclear magnetic resonances (NMR). Such an analysis indicates a maximal range of disorder of +-3/sup 0/. Uniformly /sup 15/N-labeled gramicidin has been biosynthesized by Bacillus brevis grown in a media containing /sup 15/N-labeled Escherichia coli cells as the only nitrogen source. When prepared with labeled gramicidin, the oriented samples result in high-resolution /sup 15/N NMR spectra showing 12 resonances for the 20 nitrogen sites of the polypeptide. The frequency of the three major multiple resonance peaks has been interpreted to yield the approximate orientation of the N-H bonds in the peptide linkages with respect to the magnetic field. The bond orientations are only partially consistent with the extant structural models of gramicidin.

  16. Importance of Purity Evaluation and the Potential of Quantitative 1H NMR as a Purity Assay

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In any biomedical and chemical context, a truthful description of chemical constitution requires coverage of both structure and purity. This qualification affects all drug molecules, regardless of development stage (early discovery to approved drug) and source (natural product or synthetic). Purity assessment is particularly critical in discovery programs and whenever chemistry is linked with biological and/or therapeutic outcome. Compared with chromatography and elemental analysis, quantitative NMR (qNMR) uses nearly universal detection and provides a versatile and orthogonal means of purity evaluation. Absolute qNMR with flexible calibration captures analytes that frequently escape detection (water, sorbents). Widely accepted structural NMR workflows require minimal or no adjustments to become practical 1H qNMR (qHNMR) procedures with simultaneous qualitative and (absolute) quantitative capability. This study reviews underlying concepts, provides a framework for standard qHNMR purity assays, and shows how adequate accuracy and precision are achieved for the intended use of the material. PMID:25295852

  17. Probing degradation in complex engineering silicones by 1H multiple quantum NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R S; Chinn, S C; Giuliani, J; Herberg, J L

    2007-09-05

    Static {sup 1}H Multiple Quantum Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MQ NMR) has recently been shown to provide detailed insight into the network structure of pristine silicon based polymer systems. The MQ NMR method characterizes the residual dipolar couplings of the silicon chains that depend on the average molecular weight between physical or chemical constraints. Recently, we have employed MQ NMR methods to characterize the changes in network structure in a series of complex silicone materials subject to numerous degradation mechanisms, including thermal, radiative, and desiccative. For thermal degradation, MQ NMR shows that a combination of crosslinking due to post-curing reactions as well as random chain scissioning reactions occurs. For radiative degradation, the primary mechanisms are via crosslinking both in the network and at the interface between the polymer and the inorganic filler. For samples stored in highly desiccating environments, MQ NMR shows that the average segmental dynamics are slowed due to increased interactions between the filler and the network polymer chains.

  18. Handling the influence of chemical shift in amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Basse, Kristoffer; Shankar, Ravi; Bjerring, Morten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Nielsen, Anders B

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of chemical shifts on amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling experiments in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The method is demonstrated using the Rotor Echo Short Pulse IRrAdiaTION mediated Cross-Polarization ((RESPIRATION)CP) experiment as an example. By going into the pulse sequence rf interaction frame and employing a quintuple-mode operator-based Floquet approach, we describe how chemical shift offset and anisotropic chemical shift affect the efficiency of heteronuclear polarization transfer. In this description, it becomes transparent that the main attribute leading to non-ideal performance is a fictitious field along the rf field axis, which is generated from second-order cross terms arising mainly between chemical shift tensors and themselves. This insight is useful for the development of improved recoupling experiments. We discuss the validity of this approach and present quaternion calculations to determine the effective resonance conditions in a combined rf field and chemical shift offset interaction frame transformation. Based on this, we derive a broad-banded version of the (RESPIRATION)CP experiment. The new sequence is experimentally verified using SNNFGAILSS amyloid fibrils where simultaneous (15)N → (13)CO and (15)N → (13)Cα coherence transfer is demonstrated on high-field NMR instrumentation, requiring great offset stability. PMID:27608995

  19. Solid-state NMR investigations of cellulose structure and interactions with matrix polysaccharides in plant primary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, the 3D architecture of plant cell walls was poorly understood due to the lack of high-resolution techniques for characterizing the molecular structure, dynamics, and intermolecular interactions of the wall polysaccharides in these insoluble biomolecular mixtures. We introduced multidimensional solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy, coupled with (13)C labelling of whole plants, to determine the spatial arrangements of macromolecules in near-native plant cell walls. Here we review key evidence from 2D and 3D correlation NMR spectra that show relatively few cellulose-hemicellulose cross peaks but many cellulose-pectin cross peaks, indicating that cellulose microfibrils are not extensively coated by hemicellulose and all three major polysaccharides exist in a single network rather than two separate networks as previously proposed. The number of glucan chains in the primary-wall cellulose microfibrils has been under active debate recently. We show detailed analysis of quantitative (13)C SSNMR spectra of cellulose in various wild-type (WT) and mutant Arabidopsis and Brachypodium primary cell walls, which consistently indicate that primary-wall cellulose microfibrils contain at least 24 glucan chains.

  20. Handling the influence of chemical shift in amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basse, Kristoffer; Shankar, Ravi; Bjerring, Morten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Nielsen, Anders B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of chemical shifts on amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling experiments in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The method is demonstrated using the Rotor Echo Short Pulse IRrAdiaTION mediated Cross-Polarization (RESPIRATIONCP) experiment as an example. By going into the pulse sequence rf interaction frame and employing a quintuple-mode operator-based Floquet approach, we describe how chemical shift offset and anisotropic chemical shift affect the efficiency of heteronuclear polarization transfer. In this description, it becomes transparent that the main attribute leading to non-ideal performance is a fictitious field along the rf field axis, which is generated from second-order cross terms arising mainly between chemical shift tensors and themselves. This insight is useful for the development of improved recoupling experiments. We discuss the validity of this approach and present quaternion calculations to determine the effective resonance conditions in a combined rf field and chemical shift offset interaction frame transformation. Based on this, we derive a broad-banded version of the RESPIRATIONCP experiment. The new sequence is experimentally verified using SNNFGAILSS amyloid fibrils where simultaneous 15N → 13CO and 15N → 13Cα coherence transfer is demonstrated on high-field NMR instrumentation, requiring great offset stability.

  1. Quantitative analysis of Bordeaux red wine precipitates by solid-state NMR: Role of tartrates and polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Shipra; Iturmendi, Nerea; Grelard, Axelle; Moine, Virginie; Dufourc, Erick

    2016-05-15

    Stability of wines is of great importance in oenology matters. Quantitative estimation of dark red precipitates formed in Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon wine from Bordeaux region for vintages 2012 and 2013 was performed during the oak barrel ageing process. Precipitates were obtained by placing wine at -4°C or 4°C for 2-6 days and monitored by periodic sampling during a one-year period. Spectroscopic identification of the main families of components present in the precipitate powder was performed with (13)C solid-state CPMAS NMR and 1D and 2D solution NMR of partially water re-solubilized precipitates. The study revealed that the amount of precipitate obtained is dependent on vintage, temperature and grape variety. Major components identified include potassium bitartrate, polyphenols, polysaccharides, organic acids and free amino acids. No evidence was found for the presence of proteins. The influence of main compounds found in the precipitates is discussed in relation to wine stability. PMID:26775965

  2. Quantitative analysis of Bordeaux red wine precipitates by solid-state NMR: Role of tartrates and polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Shipra; Iturmendi, Nerea; Grelard, Axelle; Moine, Virginie; Dufourc, Erick

    2016-05-15

    Stability of wines is of great importance in oenology matters. Quantitative estimation of dark red precipitates formed in Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon wine from Bordeaux region for vintages 2012 and 2013 was performed during the oak barrel ageing process. Precipitates were obtained by placing wine at -4°C or 4°C for 2-6 days and monitored by periodic sampling during a one-year period. Spectroscopic identification of the main families of components present in the precipitate powder was performed with (13)C solid-state CPMAS NMR and 1D and 2D solution NMR of partially water re-solubilized precipitates. The study revealed that the amount of precipitate obtained is dependent on vintage, temperature and grape variety. Major components identified include potassium bitartrate, polyphenols, polysaccharides, organic acids and free amino acids. No evidence was found for the presence of proteins. The influence of main compounds found in the precipitates is discussed in relation to wine stability.

  3. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, S M; Chen, C R; Xu, Z H; Nelson, P N; Boyd, S E; Meszaros, I; Chan, K Y

    2013-11-01

    Using solid state (13)C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  4. A solid-state NMR study of phase structure, molecular interactions, and mobility in blends of citric acid and paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Schantz, S; Hoppu, P; Juppo, A M

    2009-05-01

    Citric acid anhydrate (CAA) and paracetamol (PARA), prepared as crystalline physical mixtures and as amorphous blends, were studied using (13)C solid-state cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR. Amorphous blends showed significant line broadening from the conformational distribution as compared to the crystalline samples. Also, chemical shift variations were observed between crystalline and amorphous blends, which were attributed to differences in intermolecular interactions. Averaging of proton rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1rho)) probed via different (13)C sites in the amorphous blends confirmed molecular level mixing. For some, initially amorphous, sample compositions the onset of crystallization was evident directly from spectra and from the significantly longer T(1rho) relaxations. Thus, crystallization caused phase separation with properties of the two phases resembling those of pure CAA and PARA, respectively. (13)C spectra of amorphous 50/50 (w/w, %) CAA/PARA recorded from above the glass transition temperature broadened as the temperature increased to a maximum at T approximately T(g) + 33 K. This was the result of a dynamic interference between the line narrowing techniques being applied and the time scale of molecular reorientation in the miscible melt. The derived average correlation time was found to correspond well with previous results from melt rheology. We conclude that the underlying reasons for physical instability (i.e., crystallization from the miscible melt, including molecular interactions and dynamics) of this class of amorphous binary mixtures can be effectively evaluated using NMR spectroscopy.

  5. Probing physical and chemical changes in cortical bone due to osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Donghua; Taylor, Amanda; Rendina, Beth; Smith, Brenda; Department of Physics Collaboration; Department of Nutritional Sciences Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Approximately 1.5 million fractures occur each year in the U.S. due to osteoporosis, which is characterized by decreased bone mineral density and deterioration of bone micro-architecture. On the other hand, type 2 diabetes also significantly increases fracture risks, despite having a normal or even higher bone mineral density. Solid-state NMR has been applied to bone tissues from normal and disease-inflicted mouse models to study structural and chemical dynamics as the disease progresses. Proton relaxation experiments were performed to measure water populations in the bone matrix and pores. Collagen-bound water has strong influence on bone resilience, while water content in the pores reveals amount and size of pores from micro- to millimeter range. Other biochemical and atomic-scale structural alterations in the mineral and organic phases and their interface were investigated by proton, phosphorus, and carbon NMR spectroscopy. Experiments were designed to individually detect different types of phosphorus environments: near the mineral surface, similar to hydroxyapatite, and deficient of hydrogens due to substitution of the hydroxyl group by other ions. A new method was also developed for accurate quantification of each phosphorus species. The authors appreciate financial support for this project from the College of Human Sciences and the College of Arts and Sciences, Oklahoma State University.

  6. Solid-state NMR and SAXS studies provide a structural basis for the activation of αB-crystallin oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Jehle, Stefan; Rajagopal, Ponni; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Markovic, Stefan; Kühne, Ronald; Stout, Joseph R; Higman, Victoria A; Klevit, Rachel E; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    The small heat shock protein αB-crystallin (αB) contributes to cellular protection against stress. For decades, high-resolution structural studies on oligomeric αB have been confounded by its polydisperse nature. Here, we present a structural basis of oligomer assembly and activation of the chaperone using solid-state NMR and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The basic building block is a curved dimer, with an angle of ~121° between the planes of the β-sandwich formed by α-crystallin domains. The highly conserved IXI motif covers a substrate binding site at pH 7.5. We observe a pH-dependent modulation of the interaction of the IXI motif with β4 and β8, consistent with a pH-dependent regulation of the chaperone function. N-terminal region residues Ser59-Trp60-Phe61 are involved in intermolecular interaction with β3. Intermolecular restraints from NMR and volumetric restraints from SAXS were combined to calculate a model of a 24-subunit αB oligomer with tetrahedral symmetry. PMID:20802487

  7. DNP-enhanced ultrawideline solid-state NMR spectroscopy: Studies of platinum in metal–organic frameworks

    DOE PAGES

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Perras, Frederic A.; Goh, Tian Wei; Metz, Tanner L.; Huang, Wenyu; Pruski, Marek

    2016-06-06

    Ultrawideline dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced 195Pt solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy and theoretical calculations are used to determine the coordination of atomic Pt species supported within the pores of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). The 195Pt SSNMR spectra, with breadths reaching 10,000 ppm, were obtained by combining DNP with broadbanded cross-polarization and CPMG acquisition. Although the DNP enhancements in static samples are lower than those typically observed under magic-angle spinning conditions, the presented measurements would be very challenging using the conventional SSNMR methods. The DNP-enhanced ultrawideline NMR spectra served to separate signals from cis- and trans-coordinated atomic Pt2+ species supported on the UiO-66-NH2more » MOF. Here, the data revealed a dominance of kinetic effects in the formation of Pt2+ complexes and the thermodynamic effects in their reduction to nanoparticles. A single cis-coordinated Pt2+ complex was confirmed in MOF-253.« less

  8. Determination of peptide backbone torsion angles using double-quantum dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Manish A; Eddy, Matthew T; McNeill, Seth A; Mills, Frank D; Long, Joanna R

    2008-02-20

    Several approaches for utilizing dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR (ssNMR) techniques to determine local structure at high resolution in peptides and proteins have been developed. However, many of these techniques measure only one torsion angle or are accurate for only certain classes of secondary structure. Additionally, the efficiency with which these dipolar recoupling experiments suppress the deleterious effects of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) at high magnetic field strengths varies. Dipolar recoupling with a windowless sequence (DRAWS) has proven to be an effective pulse sequence for exciting double-quantum (DQ) coherences between adjacent carbonyl carbons along the peptide backbone. By allowing this DQ coherence to evolve, it is possible to measure the relative orientations of the CSA tensors and subsequently use this information to determine the Ramachandran torsion angles phi and psi. Here, we explore the accuracies of the assumptions made in interpreting DQ-DRAWS data and demonstrate their fidelity in measuring torsion angles corresponding to a variety of secondary structures irrespective of hydrogen-bonding patterns. It is shown how a simple choice of isotopic labels and experimental conditions allows accurate measurement of backbone secondary structures without any prior knowledge. This approach is considerably more sensitive for determining structure in helices and has comparable accuracy for beta-sheet and extended conformations relative to other methods. We also illustrate the ability of DQ-DRAWS to distinguish between structures in heterogeneous samples.

  9. Solid-state NMR characterization of pyrene-cuticular matter interactions.

    PubMed

    Sachleben, Joseph R; Chefetz, Benny; Deshmukh, Ashish; Hatcher, Patrick G

    2004-08-15

    One- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments were performed on Agave americana cutan and tomato cutin to examine the interactions between a hydrophobic pollutant, pyrene, and cuticular material. Variable-temperature NMR experiments show that cutan, an acid- and base-resistant cuticular biopolymer, undergoes the characteristic melting behavior of "polyethylene-like" crystallites, while the tomato cutin does not. The melting point of A. americana cutan was found to be approximately 360 K, which is consistent with the thickness of the polyethylene crystallites of 30-40 methylene units. Sorption models predict that the sorption behavior of hydrophobic pollutants should depend on the phase of the cuticular material. 13C NMR experiments on labeled pyrene were performed. The 13C T1 of pyrene decreases significantly from that of crystalline pyrene upon sorption to both tomato fruit cutin and A. americana cutan, indicating that the pyrene is mobile upon sorption. Magic angle spinning experiments at low spinning frequencies (2-4 kHz) provided the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters delta, the anisotropy, and eta, the asymmetry parameter, for crystalline and sorbed pyrene. For crystalline pyrene, two types of crystallographically distinctive pyrenes were observed. The first had delta = -97.4+/-0.5 ppm and eta = 0.934+/-0.006, while the second had delta = -98.1+/-0.5 ppm and eta = 0.823+/-0.008. After sorption to cutan, these CSA parameters were found to be delta = -78.9+/-5.3 ppm and eta < 0.70 independent of the length of time since completion of the sorption procedure. In tomato cutin, the CSA parameters were found to be dependent upon the time since completion of the sorption procedure. One and one-half months after sorption, delta was found to have a value of -30.4 ppm < delta < 0.0 ppm and eta was undeterminable, while after 22 months these values become delta = -80.0 +/-3.3 ppm and eta< 0.42. These changes in the CSA parameters

  10. Solid state NMR and IR characterization of wood polymer structure in relation to tree provenance.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Ilaria; Callone, Emanuela; Sandak, Anna; Sandak, Jakub; Dirè, Sandra

    2015-03-01

    (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance and mid-infrared spectroscopies were used for characterizing changes in the chemical structure of wood polymers (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in relation to the tree growth location. Samples of three provenances in Europe (Finland, Poland and Italy) were selected for studies. The requirement was to use untreated solid wood samples to minimize any manipulation to the nanostructure of native wood. The results confirm that the chemical and physical properties of samples belonging to the same wood species (Picea abies Karst.) differ due to the origin. Both FT-IR and dynamic NMR spectroscopies were able to correctly discriminate samples originating from three different provenances in Europe. Such methods might be very useful for both, research and understanding of wood microstructure and its variability due to the growth conditions. PMID:25498692

  11. Solid state NMR and IR characterization of wood polymer structure in relation to tree provenance.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Ilaria; Callone, Emanuela; Sandak, Anna; Sandak, Jakub; Dirè, Sandra

    2015-03-01

    (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance and mid-infrared spectroscopies were used for characterizing changes in the chemical structure of wood polymers (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in relation to the tree growth location. Samples of three provenances in Europe (Finland, Poland and Italy) were selected for studies. The requirement was to use untreated solid wood samples to minimize any manipulation to the nanostructure of native wood. The results confirm that the chemical and physical properties of samples belonging to the same wood species (Picea abies Karst.) differ due to the origin. Both FT-IR and dynamic NMR spectroscopies were able to correctly discriminate samples originating from three different provenances in Europe. Such methods might be very useful for both, research and understanding of wood microstructure and its variability due to the growth conditions.

  12. Low temperature probe for dynamic nuclear polarization and multiple-pulse solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Cho, HyungJoon; Baugh, Jonathan; Ryan, Colm A; Cory, David G; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    2007-08-01

    Here, we describe the design and performance characteristics of a low temperature probe for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments, which is compatible with demanding multiple-pulse experiments. The competing goals of a high-Q microwave cavity to achieve large DNP enhancements and a high efficiency NMR circuit for multiple-pulse control lead to inevitable engineering tradeoffs. We have designed two probes-one with a single-resonance RF circuit and a horn-mirror cavity configuration for the microwaves and a second with a double-resonance RF circuit and a double-horn cavity configuration. The advantage of the design is that the sample is in vacuum, the RF circuits are locally tuned, and the microwave resonator has a large internal volume that is compatible with the use of RF and gradient coils.

  13. Simultaneous 19F-1H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02 mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5 mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a 1H Larmor frequency of 43.32 MHz and 40.68 MHz for 19F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating 19F and 1H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500 MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02 mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ (1H) = 0.335 mol L-1 and LOQ (19F) = 0.130 mol L-1 for trifluoroethanol in

  14. Simultaneous (19)F-(1)H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-10-18

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a (1)H Larmor frequency of 43.32MHz and 40.68MHz for (19)F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating (19)F and (1)H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ ((1)H)=0.335molL(-1) and LOQ ((19)F)=0.130molL(-1) for trifluoroethanol

  15. Synthesis of stereospecifically deuterated desoxypodophyllotoxins and 1H-nmr assignment of desoxypodophyllotoxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pullockaran, A. J.; Kingston, D. G.; Lewis, N. G.

    1989-01-01

    [4 beta- 2H1]Desoxypodophyllotoxin [3], [4 alpha- 2H1]desoxypodophyllotoxin [4], and [4, 4- 2 H2]desoxypodophyllotoxin [9] were prepared from podophyllotoxin [1] via its chloride [5]. A complete assignment of the 1H-nmr spectrum of desoxypodophyllotoxin [2] was made on the basis of the spectra of the deuterated compounds [3] and [4].

  16. Molecular Structures from [superscript 1]H NMR Spectra: Education Aided by Internet Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debska, Barbara; Guzowska-Swider, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    The article presents the way in which freeware Internet programs can be applied to teach [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopy. The computer programs described in this article are part of the educational curriculum that explores spectroscopy and spectra interpretation. (Contains 6 figures.)

  17. Sudan dyes in adulterated saffron (Crocus sativus L.): Identification and quantification by (1)H NMR.

    PubMed

    Petrakis, Eleftherios A; Cagliani, Laura R; Tarantilis, Petros A; Polissiou, Moschos G; Consonni, Roberto

    2017-02-15

    Saffron, the dried red stigmas of Crocus sativus L., is considered as one of the most expensive spices worldwide, and as such, it is prone to adulteration. This study introduces an NMR-based approach to identify and determine the adulteration of saffron with Sudan I-IV dyes. A complete (1)H and (13)C resonance assignment for Sudan I-IV, achieved by two-dimensional homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR experiments, is reported for the first time. Specific different proton signals for the identification of each Sudan dye in adulterated saffron can be utilised for quantitative (1)H NMR (qHNMR), a well-established method for quantitative analysis. The quantification of Sudan III, as a paradigm, was performed in varying levels (0.14-7.1g/kg) by considering the NMR signal occurring at 8.064ppm. The high linearity, accuracy and rapidity of investigation enable high resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy to be used for evaluation of saffron adulteration with Sudan dyes.

  18. Sudan dyes in adulterated saffron (Crocus sativus L.): Identification and quantification by (1)H NMR.

    PubMed

    Petrakis, Eleftherios A; Cagliani, Laura R; Tarantilis, Petros A; Polissiou, Moschos G; Consonni, Roberto

    2017-02-15

    Saffron, the dried red stigmas of Crocus sativus L., is considered as one of the most expensive spices worldwide, and as such, it is prone to adulteration. This study introduces an NMR-based approach to identify and determine the adulteration of saffron with Sudan I-IV dyes. A complete (1)H and (13)C resonance assignment for Sudan I-IV, achieved by two-dimensional homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR experiments, is reported for the first time. Specific different proton signals for the identification of each Sudan dye in adulterated saffron can be utilised for quantitative (1)H NMR (qHNMR), a well-established method for quantitative analysis. The quantification of Sudan III, as a paradigm, was performed in varying levels (0.14-7.1g/kg) by considering the NMR signal occurring at 8.064ppm. The high linearity, accuracy and rapidity of investigation enable high resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy to be used for evaluation of saffron adulteration with Sudan dyes. PMID:27664653

  19. Solid-state NMR characterization of amphomycin effects on peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acid biosyntheses in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manmilan; Chang, James; Coffman, Lauryn; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Amphomycin and MX-2401 are cyclic lipopeptides exhibiting bactericidal activities against Gram-positive pathogens. Amphomycin and MX-2401 share structural similarities with daptomycin, but unlike daptomycin they do not target bacterial membrane. In this study, we investigate in vivo modes of action for amphomycin and MX-2401 in intact whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus by measuring the changes of peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acid compositions using solid-state NMR. S. aureus were grown in a defined media containing isotope labels [1-13C]glycine and L-[ε-15N]lysin, L-[1-13C]lysine and D-[15N]alanine, or D-[1-13C]alanine and [15N]glycine, to selectively 13C-15N pair label peptidoglycan bridge-link, stem-link, and cross-link, respectively. 13C{15N} and 15N{13C} rotational-echo double resonance NMR measurements determined that cyclic lipopeptide-treated S. aureus exhibited thinning of the cell wall, accumulation of Park’s nucleotide, inhibition of glycine utilization for purine biosynthesis, reduction of ester-linked D-Ala in teichoic acids, and reduction of peptidoglycan cross-linking. Whole cell NMR analysis also revealed that S. aureus, in presence of amphomycin and MX-2401, maintained the incorporation of D-Ala during peptidoglycan biosynthesis while the incorporation of D-Ala into teichoic acids was inhibited. These effects are consistent with amphomycin’s dual inhibition of both peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acid biosyntheses in S. aureus. PMID:27538449

  20. Structure and Transformation of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate: A Solid-State 43Ca NMR and Computational Molecular Dynamics Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Jared W.; Yazaydin, A. O.; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.; Bowers, Geoffrey M.

    2012-05-22

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a metastable precursor to crystalline CaCO{sub 3} phases that precipitates by aggregation of ion pairs and prenucleation clusters. We use {sup 43}Ca solid-state NMR spectroscopy to probe the local structure and transformation of ACC synthesized from seawater-like solutions with and without Mg{sup 2+} and computational molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to provide more detailed molecular-scale understanding of the ACC structure. The {sup 43}Ca NMR spectra of ACC collected immediately after synthesis consist of broad, featureless resonances with Gaussian line shapes (FWHH = 27.6 {+-} 1 ppm) that do not depend on Mg{sup 2+} or H{sub 2}O content. A correlation between {sup 43}Ca isotropic chemical shifts and mean Ca-O bond distances for crystalline hydrous and anhydrous calcium carbonate phases indicates indistinguishable maximum mean Ca-O bond lengths of {approx}2.45 {angstrom} for all our samples. This value is near the upper end of the published Ca-O bond distance range for biogenic and synthetic ACCs obtained by Ca-X-ray absorption spectroscopy. It is slightly smaller than the values from the structural model of Mgfree ACC by Goodwin et al. obtained from reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling of X-ray scattering data and our own computational molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based on this model. An MD simulation starting with the atomic positions of the Goodwin et al. RMC model using the force field of Raiteri and Gale shows significant structural reorganization during the simulation and that the interconnected carbonate/water-rich channels in the Goodwin et al. model shrink in size over the 2 ns simulation time. The distribution of polyhedrally averaged Ca-O bond distances from the MD simulation is in good agreement with the {sup 43}Ca NMR peak shape, suggesting that local structural disorder dominates the experimental line width of ACC.

  1. Dipole tensor-based atomic-resolution structure determination of a nanocrystalline protein by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Franks, W Trent; Wylie, Benjamin J; Schmidt, Heather L Frericks; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J; Mayrhofer, Rebecca-Maria; Shah, Gautam J; Graesser, Daniel T; Rienstra, Chad M

    2008-03-25

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques have emerged in recent years for solving complete structures of uniformly labeled proteins lacking macroscopic order. Strategies used thus far have relied primarily on semiquantitative distance restraints, analogous to the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) routinely used in solution NMR. Here, we present a complementary approach for using relative orientations of molecular fragments, determined from dipolar line shapes. Whereas SSNMR distance restraints typically have an uncertainty of approximately 1 A, the tensor-based experiments report on relative vector (pseudobond) angles with precision of a few degrees. By using 3D techniques of this type, vector angle (VEAN) restraints were determined for the majority of the 56-residue B1 immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G [protein GB1 (a total of 47 HN-HN, 49 HN-HC, and 12 HA-HB restraints)]. By using distance restraints alone in the structure calculations, the overall backbone root-mean-square deviation (bbRMSD) was 1.01 +/- 0.13 A (1.52 +/- 0.12 A for all heavy atoms), which improved to 0.49 +/- 0.05 A (1.19 +/- 0.07 A) on the addition of empirical chemical shift [torsion angle likelihood obtained from shift and sequence similarity (TALOS)] restraints. VEAN restraints further improved the ensemble to 0.31 +/- 0.06 A bbRMSD (1.06 +/- 0.07 A); relative to the structure with distances alone, most of the improvement remained (bbRMSD 0.64 +/- 0.09 A; 1.29 +/- 0.07 A) when TALOS restraints were removed before refinement. These results represent significant progress toward atomic-resolution protein structure determination by SSNMR, capabilities that can be applied to a large range of membrane proteins and fibrils, which are often not amenable to solution NMR or x-ray crystallography.