Science.gov

Sample records for 1h t1 relaxation

  1. Measurement of T1/T2 relaxation times in overlapped regions from homodecoupled 1H singlet signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañar, Laura; Nolis, Pau; Virgili, Albert; Parella, Teodor

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of the HOmodecoupled Band-Selective (HOBS) technique in the conventional Inversion-Recovery and CPMG-based PROJECT experiments is described. The achievement of fully homodecoupled signals allows the distinction of overlapped 1H resonances with small chemical shift differences. It is shown that the corresponding T1 and T2 relaxation times can be individually measured from the resulting singlet lines using conventional exponential curve-fitting methods.

  2. Analysis of amorphous solid dispersions using 2D solid-state NMR and (1)H T(1) relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tran N; Watson, Simon A; Edwards, Andrew J; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S; Strohmeier, Mark; Vogt, Frederick G

    2010-10-04

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) can provide detailed structural information about amorphous solid dispersions of pharmaceutical small molecules. In this study, the ability of SSNMR experiments based on dipolar correlation, spin diffusion, and relaxation measurements to characterize the structure of solid dispersions is explored. Observation of spin diffusion effects using the 2D (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) experiment is shown to be a useful probe of association between the amorphous drug and polymer that is capable of directly proving glass solution formation. Dispersions of acetaminophen and indomethacin in different polymers are examined using this approach, as well as (1)H double-quantum correlation experiments to probe additional structural features. (1)H-(19)F CP-HETCOR serves a similar role for fluorinated drug molecules such as diflunisal in dispersions, providing a rapid means to prove the formation of a glass solution. Phase separation is detected using (13)C, (19)F, and (23)Na-detected (1)H T(1) experiments in crystalline and amorphous solid dispersions that contain small domains. (1)H T(1) measurements of amorphous nanosuspensions of trehalose and dextran illustrate the ability of SSNMR to detect domain size effects in dispersions that are not glass solutions via spin diffusion effects. Two previously unreported amorphous solid dispersions involving up to three components and containing voriconazole and telithromycin are analyzed using these experiments to demonstrate the general applicability of the approach.

  3. High-field 1H T1 and T2 NMR relaxation time measurements of H2O in homeopathic preparations of quartz, sulfur, and copper sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Stephan; Wolf, Martin; Skrabal, Peter; Bangerter, Felix; Heusser, Peter; Thurneysen, André; Wolf, Ursula

    2009-09-01

    Quantitative meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials investigating the specific therapeutic efficacy of homeopathic remedies yielded statistically significant differences compared to placebo. Since the remedies used contained mostly only very low concentrations of pharmacologically active compounds, these effects cannot be accounted for within the framework of current pharmacology. Theories to explain clinical effects of homeopathic remedies are partially based upon changes in diluent structure. To investigate the latter, we measured for the first time high-field (600/500 MHz) 1H T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of H2O in homeopathic preparations with concurrent contamination control by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Homeopathic preparations of quartz (10 c-30 c, n = 21, corresponding to iterative dilutions of 100-10-100-30), sulfur (13 x-30 x, n = 18, 10-13-10-30), and copper sulfate (11 c-30 c, n = 20, 100-11-100-30) were compared to n = 10 independent controls each (analogously agitated dilution medium) in randomized and blinded experiments. In none of the samples, the concentration of any element analyzed by ICP-MS exceeded 10 ppb. In the first measurement series (600 MHz), there was a significant increase in T1 for all samples as a function of time, and there were no significant differences between homeopathic potencies and controls. In the second measurement series (500 MHz) 1 year after preparation, we observed statistically significant increased T1 relaxation times for homeopathic sulfur preparations compared to controls. Fifteen out of 18 correlations between sample triplicates were higher for controls than for homeopathic preparations. No conclusive explanation for these phenomena can be given at present. Possible hypotheses involve differential leaching from the measurement vessel walls or a change in water molecule dynamics, i.e., in rotational correlation time and/or diffusion. Homeopathic preparations

  4. 1H relaxation dispersion in solutions of nitroxide radicals: influence of electron spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Korpała, A; Kubica, A; Kowalewski, J; Rössler, E A; Moscicki, J

    2013-03-28

    The work presents a theory of nuclear ((1)H) spin-lattice relaxation dispersion for solutions of (15)N and (14)N radicals, including electron spin relaxation effects. The theory is a generalization of the approach presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)]. The electron spin relaxation is attributed to the anisotropic part of the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine interaction modulated by rotational dynamics of the paramagnetic molecule, and described by means of Redfield relaxation theory. The (1)H relaxation is caused by electron spin-proton spin dipole-dipole interactions which are modulated by relative translational motion of the solvent and solute molecules. The spectral density characterizing the translational dynamics is described by the force-free-hard-sphere model. The electronic relaxation influences the (1)H relaxation by contributing to the fluctuations of the inter-molecular dipolar interactions. The developed theory is tested against (1)H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion data for glycerol solutions of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(15)N and 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(14)N covering the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz. The studies are carried out as a function of temperature starting at 328 K and going down to 290 K. The theory gives a consistent overall interpretation of the experimental data for both (14)N and (15)N systems and explains the features of (1)H relaxation dispersion resulting from the electron spin relaxation.

  5. 1H relaxation dispersion in solutions of nitroxide radicals: Influence of electron spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-03-01

    The work presents a theory of nuclear (1H) spin-lattice relaxation dispersion for solutions of 15N and 14N radicals, including electron spin relaxation effects. The theory is a generalization of the approach presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854. The electron spin relaxation is attributed to the anisotropic part of the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine interaction modulated by rotational dynamics of the paramagnetic molecule, and described by means of Redfield relaxation theory. The 1H relaxation is caused by electron spin-proton spin dipole-dipole interactions which are modulated by relative translational motion of the solvent and solute molecules. The spectral density characterizing the translational dynamics is described by the force-free-hard-sphere model. The electronic relaxation influences the 1H relaxation by contributing to the fluctuations of the inter-molecular dipolar interactions. The developed theory is tested against 1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion data for glycerol solutions of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-15N and 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-14N covering the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz. The studies are carried out as a function of temperature starting at 328 K and going down to 290 K. The theory gives a consistent overall interpretation of the experimental data for both 14N and 15N systems and explains the features of 1H relaxation dispersion resulting from the electron spin relaxation.

  6. A subzero 1H NMR relaxation investigation of water dynamics in tomato pericarp.

    PubMed

    Foucat, Loïc; Lahaye, Marc

    2014-09-01

    (1)H NMR relaxation times (T1 and T2) were measured at low field (0.47 T) in pericarp tissues of three tomato genotypes (Ferum, LA0147 and Levovil) at subzero temperature (-20 °C) and two ripening stages (mature green and red). The unfrozen water dynamics was characterised by two T1 and three T2 components. The relaxation time values and their associated relative populations allowed differentiating the ripening stage of only LA0147 and Levovil lines. But the three genotypes were unequivocally discriminated at the red ripe stage. The unfrozen water distribution was discussed in terms of specific interactions, especially with sugars, in relation with their osmoprotectant effects.

  7. Regional T1 relaxation time constants in Ex vivo human brain: Longitudinal effects of formalin exposure

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Mekala R.; Shu, Yunhong; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Relaxation time constants are useful as markers of tissue properties. Imaging ex vivo tissue is done for research purposes; however, T1 relaxation time constants are altered by tissue fixation in a time‐dependent manner. This study investigates regional changes in T1 relaxation time constants in ex vivo brain tissue over 6 months of fixation. Methods Five ex vivo human brain hemispheres in 10% formalin were scanned over 6 months. Mean T1 relaxation time constants were measured in regions of interest (ROIs) representing gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) regions and analyzed as a function of fixation time. Results Cortical GM ROIs had longer T1 relaxation time constants than WM ROIs; the thalamus had T1 relaxation time constants similar to those of WM ROIs. T1 relaxation time constants showed rapid shortening within the first 6 weeks after fixation followed by a slower rate of decline. Conclusion Both GM and WM T1 relaxation time constants of fixed brain tissue show rapid decline within the first 6 weeks after autopsy and slow by 6 months. This information is useful for optimizing MR imaging acquisition parameters according to fixation time for ex vivo brain imaging studies. Magn Reson Med 77:774–778, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:26888162

  8. Effects of pulmonary inhalation on hyperpolarized krypton-83 magnetic resonance T1 relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupic, K. F.; Elkins, N. D.; Pavlovskaya, G. E.; Repine, J. E.; Meersmann, T.

    2011-07-01

    The 83Kr magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation time T1 of krypton gas in contact with model surfaces was previously found to be highly sensitive to surface composition, surface-to-volume ratio, and surface temperature. The work presented here explored aspects of pulmonary 83Kr T1 relaxation measurements in excised lungs from healthy rats using hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr with approximately 4.4% spin polarization. MR spectroscopy without spatial resolution was applied to the ex vivo lungs that actively inhale hp 83Kr through a custom designed ventilation system. Various inhalation schemes were devised to study the influence of anatomical dead space upon the measured 83Kr T1 relaxation times. The longitudinal 83Kr relaxation times in the distal airways and the respiratory zones were independent of the lung inhalation volume, with T1 = 1.3 s and T1 = 1.0 s, depending only on the applied inhalation scheme. The obtained data were highly reproducible between different specimens. Further, the 83Kr T1 relaxation times in excised lungs were unaffected by the presence of up to 40% oxygen in the hp gas mixture. The results support the possible importance of 83Kr as a biomarker for evaluating lung function.

  9. Effects of pulmonary inhalation on hyperpolarized krypton-83 magnetic resonance T1 relaxation.

    PubMed

    Stupic, K F; Elkins, N D; Pavlovskaya, G E; Repine, J E; Meersmann, T

    2011-07-07

    The (83)Kr magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation time T(1) of krypton gas in contact with model surfaces was previously found to be highly sensitive to surface composition, surface-to-volume ratio, and surface temperature. The work presented here explored aspects of pulmonary (83)Kr T(1) relaxation measurements in excised lungs from healthy rats using hyperpolarized (hp) (83)Kr with approximately 4.4% spin polarization. MR spectroscopy without spatial resolution was applied to the ex vivo lungs that actively inhale hp (83)Kr through a custom designed ventilation system. Various inhalation schemes were devised to study the influence of anatomical dead space upon the measured (83)Kr T(1) relaxation times. The longitudinal (83)Kr relaxation times in the distal airways and the respiratory zones were independent of the lung inhalation volume, with T(1) = 1.3 s and T(1) = 1.0 s, depending only on the applied inhalation scheme. The obtained data were highly reproducible between different specimens. Further, the (83)Kr T(1) relaxation times in excised lungs were unaffected by the presence of up to 40% oxygen in the hp gas mixture. The results support the possible importance of (83)Kr as a biomarker for evaluating lung function.

  10. Capturing fast relaxing spins with SWIFT adiabatic rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation (T1ρ) mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Nissi, M J; Idiyatullin, D; Michaeli, S; Garwood, M; Ellermann, J

    2016-04-01

    Rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation, with the characteristic time constant T1ρ, provides a means to access motion-restricted (slow) spin dynamics in MRI. As a result of their restricted motion, these spins are sometimes characterized by a short transverse relaxation time constant T2 and thus can be difficult to detect directly with conventional image acquisition techniques. Here, we introduce an approach for three-dimensional adiabatic T1ρ mapping based on a magnetization-prepared sweep imaging with Fourier transformation (MP-SWIFT) sequence, which captures signal from almost all water spin populations, including the extremely fast relaxing pool. A semi-analytical procedure for T1ρ mapping is described. Experiments on phantoms and musculoskeletal tissue specimens (tendon, articular and epiphyseal cartilages) were performed at 9.4 T for both the MP-SWIFT and fast spin echo (FSE) read outs. In the phantom with liquids having fast molecular tumbling and a single-valued T1ρ time constant, the measured T1ρ values obtained with MP-SWIFT and FSE were similar. Conversely, in normal musculoskeletal tissues, T1ρ values measured with MP-SWIFT were much shorter than the values obtained with FSE. Studies of biological tissue specimens demonstrated that T1ρ-weighted SWIFT provides higher contrast between normal and diseased tissues relative to conventional acquisitions. Adiabatic T1ρ mapping with SWIFT readout captures contributions from the otherwise undetected fast relaxing spins, allowing more informative T1ρ measurements of normal and diseased states.

  11. T 1 Relaxation Measurement of Ex-Vivo Breast Cancer Tissues at Ultralow Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Hwang, Seong-min; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Lim, Sanghyun; Han, Jae Ho; Yim, Hyunee; Kim, Jang-Hee; Jung, Yong Sik; Kim, Ku Sang

    2015-01-01

    We investigated T1 relaxations of ex-vivo cancer tissues at low magnetic fields in order to check the possibility of achieving a T1 contrast higher than those obtained at high fields. The T1 relaxations of fifteen pairs (normal and cancerous) of breast tissue samples were measured at three magnetic fields, 37, 62, and 122 μT, using our superconducting quantum interference device-based ultralow field nuclear magnetic resonance setup, optimally developed for ex-vivo tissue studies. A signal reconstruction based on Bayesian statistics for noise reduction was exploited to overcome the low signal-to-noise ratio. The ductal and lobular-type tissues did not exhibit meaningful T1 contrast values between normal and cancerous tissues at the three different fields. On the other hand, an enhanced T1 contrast was obtained for the mucinous cancer tissue. PMID:25705658

  12. Miscibility of nifedipine and hydrophilic polymers as measured by (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation.

    PubMed

    Aso, Yukio; Yoshioka, Sumie; Miyazaki, Tamaki; Kawanishi, Tohru; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Satoshi; Takakura, Asako; Hayashi, Takashi; Muranushi, Noriyuki

    2007-08-01

    The miscibility of a drug with excipients in solid dispersions is considered to be one of the most important factors for preparation of stable amorphous solid dispersions. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the feasibility of (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements to assess the miscibility of a drug with excipients. Solid dispersions of nifedipine with the hydrophilic polymers poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and alpha,beta-poly(N-5-hydroxypentyl)-L-aspartamide (PHPA) with various weight ratios were prepared by spray drying, and the spin-lattice relaxation decay of the solid dispersions in a laboratory frame (T(1) decay) and in a rotating frame (T(1rho) decay) were measured. T(1rho) decay of nifedipine-PVP solid dispersions (3 : 7, 5 : 5 and 7 : 3) was describable with a mono-exponential equation, whereas T(1rho) decay of nifedipine-PHPA solid dispersions (3 : 7, 4 : 6 and 5 : 5) was describable with a bi-exponential equation. Because a mono-exponential T(1rho) decay indicates that the domain sizes of nifedipine and polymer in solid dispersion are less than several nm, it is speculated that nifedipine is miscible with PVP but not miscible with PHPA. All the nifedipine-PVP solid dispersions studied showed a single glass transition temperature (T(g)), whereas two glass transitions were observed for the nifedipine-PHPA solid dispersion (3 : 7), thus supporting the above speculation. For nifedipine-HPMC solid dispersions (3 : 7 and 5 : 5), the miscibility of nifedipine and HPMC could not be determined by DSC measurements due to the lack of obviously evident T(g). In contrast, (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements showed that nifedipine and HPMC are miscible, since T(1rho) decay of the solid dispersions (3 : 7, 5 : 5 and 7 : 3) was describable with a mono-exponential equation. These results indicate that (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements are useful for assessing the miscibility of a drug and an

  13. 1H and 2H NMR spin-lattice relaxation probing water: PEG molecular dynamics in solution.

    PubMed

    Clop, Eduardo M; Perillo, María A; Chattah, Ana K

    2012-10-04

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) measurements were performed in aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) of 6000 Da molecular mass to study the dynamical relation between PEG and water molecules at different solute concentrations. (1)H-T(1) experiments were carried on at a low magnetic field in the time domain (20 MHz) and at a high field (400 MHz) to obtain spectral resolution. Two contributing components were identified in each proton system, PEG and water, presenting values of T(1) with very different orders of magnitude. The approximate matching between the shorter (1)H-T(1) values associated with water and PEG has lead us to conclude that there exists a network of interactions (hydrogen bonds) between the solute and the solvent, which results in the presence of an ordered and dehydrated structure of PEG folded or self-assembled in equilibrium with a more flexible monomer structure. Dynamic light scattering results were consistent with the formation of PEG aggregates, showing a mean size between 40 and 100 nm.

  14. The interplay of T1- and T2-relaxation on T1-weighted MRI of hMSCs induced by Gd-DOTA-peptides.

    PubMed

    Cao, Limin; Li, Binbin; Yi, Peiwei; Zhang, Hailu; Dai, Jianwu; Tan, Bo; Deng, Zongwu

    2014-04-01

    Three Gd-DOTA-peptide complexes with different peptide sequence are synthesized and used as T1 contrast agent to label human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for magnetic resonance imaging study. The peptides include a universal cell penetrating peptide TAT, a linear MSC-specific peptide EM7, and a cyclic MSC-specific peptide CC9. A significant difference in labeling efficacy is observed between the Gd-DOTA-peptides as well as a control Dotarem. All Gd-DOTA-peptides as well as Dotarem induce significant increase in T1 relaxation rate which is in favor of T1-weighted MR imaging. Gd-DOTA-CC9 yields the maximum labeling efficacy but poor T1 contrast enhancement. Gd-DOTA-EM7 yields the minimum labeling efficacy but better T1 contrast enhancement. Gd-DOTA-TAT yields a similar labeling efficacy as Gd-DOTA-CC9 and similar T1 contrast enhancement as Gd-DOTA-EM7. The underlying mechanism that governs T1 contrast enhancement effect is discussed. Our results suggest that T1 contrast enhancement induced by Gd-DOTA-peptides depends not only on the introduced cellular Gd content, but more importantly on the effect that Gd-DOTA-peptides exert on the T1-relaxation and T2-relaxation processes/rates. Both T1 and particularly T2 relaxation rate have to be taken into account to interpret T1 contrast enhancement. In addition, the interpretation has to be based on cellular instead of aqueous longitudinal and transverse relaxivities of Gd-DOTA-peptides.

  15. Effect of Lanthanide Ions on Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhancement and Liquid State T1 Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jeremy; Fain, Sean B.; Rowland, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    In the dynamic nuclear polarization process, microwave irradiation facilitates exchange of polarization from a radical’s unpaired electron to nuclear spins at cryogenic temperatures, increasing polarization by >10000. Doping samples with Gd3+ ions further increases the achievable solid-state polarization. However, upon dissolution, paramagnetic lanthanide metals can be potent relaxation agents, decreasing liquid-state polarization. Here, the effects of lanthanide metals on the solid and liquid-state magnetic properties of [1-13C]pyruvate are studied. The results show that in addition to gadolinium, holmium not only increases the achievable polarization but also the rate of polarization. Liquid-state relaxation studies found that unlike gadolinium, holmium minimally affects T1. Additionally, results reveal that linear contrast agents dissociate in pyruvic acid, greatly reducing liquid-state T1. While macrocyclic agents do not readily dissociate, they yield lower solid-state polarization. Results indicate that polarization with free lanthanides and subsequent chelation during dissolution produces the highest polarization enhancement while minimizing liquid-state relaxation. PMID:22367680

  16. A classical description of relaxation of interacting pairs of unlike spins: Extension to T1 ϱ, T2, and T1 ϱoff, including contact interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konig, Seymour H.

    A novel derivation of the equations that describe the spin-lattice magnetic relaxation of nuclear spin moments, in liquids, resulting from magnetic dipolar interactions with neighboring paramagnetic ions, the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan equations was previously presented (S. H. Koenig, J. Magn. Reson.31, 1 (1978)). The derivation involves a computation of the dissipative energy flow from the nuclear spins to the lattice rather than a computation of the lattice-produced fluctuations of the local field at the nuclear spins. Two advantages accrue: (1) the spectral densities that enter into the relaxation expressions can be directly related to well-defined absorption transitions and relaxation processes of the paramagnetic ions, clarifying the physical processes that produce relaxation, and (2) the derivation can be readily generalized to paramagnetic ions with arbitrary spin Hamiltonian, and to deviations of their susceptibility from Curie law behavior. The derivation is extended to include relaxation in liquids in the rotating frame: the on resonance T1 ϱ which reduces to T2 for small amplitude radiofrequency fields; and the off resonance T1 ϱoff, which reduces to T1. The results, which are given for contact as well as dipolar interactions, also describe relaxation of 13C and 15N nuclei by protons under conditions of proton-decoupling, a situation becoming increasingly important in the study of biological macromolecules by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy.

  17. Modeling T1 and T2 relaxation in bovine white matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barta, R.; Kalantari, S.; Laule, C.; Vavasour, I. M.; MacKay, A. L.; Michal, C. A.

    2015-10-01

    The fundamental basis of T1 and T2 contrast in brain MRI is not well understood; recent literature contains conflicting views on the nature of relaxation in white matter (WM). We investigated the effects of inversion pulse bandwidth on measurements of T1 and T2 in WM. Hybrid inversion-recovery/Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill experiments with broad or narrow bandwidth inversion pulses were applied to bovine WM in vitro. Data were analysed with the commonly used 1D-non-negative least squares (NNLS) algorithm, a 2D-NNLS algorithm, and a four-pool model which was based upon microscopically distinguishable WM compartments (myelin non-aqueous protons, myelin water, non-myelin non-aqueous protons and intra/extracellular water) and incorporated magnetization exchange between adjacent compartments. 1D-NNLS showed that different T2 components had different T1 behaviours and yielded dissimilar results for the two inversion conditions. 2D-NNLS revealed significantly more complicated T1/T2 distributions for narrow bandwidth than for broad bandwidth inversion pulses. The four-pool model fits allow physical interpretation of the parameters, fit better than the NNLS techniques, and fits results from both inversion conditions using the same parameters. The results demonstrate that exchange cannot be neglected when analysing experimental inversion recovery data from WM, in part because it can introduce exponential components having negative amplitude coefficients that cannot be correctly modeled with nonnegative fitting techniques. While assignment of an individual T1 to one particular pool is not possible, the results suggest that under carefully controlled experimental conditions the amplitude of an apparent short T1 component might be used to quantify myelin water.

  18. Measurement of Ligand–Target Residence Times by 1H Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A ligand-observed 1H NMR relaxation experiment is introduced for measuring the binding kinetics of low-molecular-weight compounds to their biomolecular targets. We show that this approach, which does not require any isotope labeling, is applicable to ligand–target systems involving proteins and nucleic acids of variable molecular size. The experiment is particularly useful for the systematic investigation of low affinity molecules with residence times in the micro- to millisecond time regime. PMID:27933946

  19. Molecular mobility of lyophilized poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and methylcellulose as determined by the laboratory and rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation times of 1H and 13C.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Sumie; Aso, Yukio; Kojima, Shigeo

    2003-11-01

    Laboratory- and rotating- frame spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1) and T(1rho)) of (1)H and (13)C in lyophilized poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and methylcellulose (MC) are determined to examine feasibility of using T(1) and T(1rho) as a measure of molecular motions on large time scales related to the storage stability of lyophilized formulations. The T(1rho) of proton and carbon was found to reflect the mobility of PVP and MC backbones, indicating that it is useful as a measure of large-time-scale molecular motions. In contrast to the T(1rho), the T(1) of proton measured in the same temperature range reflected the mobility of PVP and MC side chains. The T(1) of proton may be useful as a measure of local molecular motions on a smaller-time-scale, although the measurement is interfered by moisture under some conditions. The temperature dependence of T(1) and T(1rho) indicated that methylene in the MC molecule had much higher mobility than that in the dextran molecule, also indicated that methylene in the PVP side chain had a higher mobility than that in the MC side chain.

  20. Estimation of free copper ion concentrations in blood serum using T1 relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blicharska, Barbara; Witek, Magdalena; Fornal, Maria; MacKay, Alex L.

    2008-09-01

    The water proton relaxation rate constant R1 = 1/ T1 (at 60 MHz) of blood serum is substantially increased by the presence of free Cu 2+ ions at concentrations above normal physiological levels. Addition of chelating agents to serum containing paramagnetic Cu 2+ nulls this effect. This was demonstrated by looking at the effect of adding a chelating agent—D-penicillamine (D-PEN) to CuSO 4 and CuCl 2 aqueous solutions as well as to rabbit blood serum. We propose that the measurement of water proton spin-lattice relaxation rate constants before and after chelation may be used as an alternative approach for monitoring the presence of free copper ions in blood serum. This method may be used in the diagnosis of some diseases (leukaemia, liver diseases and particularly Wilson's disease) because, in contrast to conventional methods like spectrophotometry which records the total number of both bound and free ions, the proton relaxation technique is sensitive solely to free paramagnetic ions dissolved in blood serum. The change in R1 upon chelation was found to be less than 0.06 s -1 for serum from healthy subjects but greater than 0.06 s -1 for serum from untreated Wilson's patients.

  1. 1H NMR relaxation of water: a probe for surfactant adsorption on kaolin.

    PubMed

    Totland, Christian; Lewis, Rhiannon T; Nerdal, Willy

    2011-11-01

    In this study, (1)H NMR is used to investigate properties of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (TTAB), and dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) adsorbed on kaolin by NMR T(1) and T(2) measurements of the water proton resonance. The results show that adsorbed surfactants form a barrier between sample water and the paramagnetic species present on the clay surface, thus significantly increasing the proton T(1) values of water. This effect is attributed to the amount of adsorbed surfactants and the arrangement of the surfactant aggregates. The total surface area covered by the cationic (DTAB and TTAB) and anionic (SDS) surfactants could be estimated from the water T(1) data and found to correspond to the fractions of negatively and positively charged surface area, respectively. For selected samples, the amount of paramagnetic species on the clay surface was reduced by treatment with hydrofluoric (HF) acid. For these samples, T(1) and T(2) measurements were taken in the temperature range 278-338 K, revealing detailed information on molecular mobility and nuclear exchange for the sample water that is related to surfactant behavior both on the surface and in the aqueous phase.

  2. Solution dynamics of the trp repressor: a study of amide proton exchange by T1 relaxation.

    PubMed

    Gryk, M R; Finucane, M D; Zheng, Z; Jardetzky, O

    1995-03-10

    The amide proton exchange rates of Escherichia coli trp repressor have been measured through their effects on the longitudinal relaxation rates of the amide protons. Three types of exchange regimes have been observed: (1) slow exchange (on a minute/hour time-scale), measurable by isotope exchange, but not by relaxation techniques in the core of the molecule; (2) relatively rapid exchange, with the rates on a T1 relaxation time-scale (seconds) in the DNA-binding region and (3) very fast exchange at the N and C termini. The results have been analyzed in terms of the two-site exchange model originally proposed by Linderstrøm-Lang, and of a three-site extension of the model. The values of the intrinsic exchange rates calculated using the two-state model agree with the values expected from the studies of Englander and co-workers for the very fast case of the chain terminals, but disagree with the literature values by two orders of magnitude in the intermediate case found in the DNA-binding region. The implication of these findings is that the "open" state of the two-state model in the DNA-binding region is not completely open and has an intrinsic exchange rate different from that of a random coil peptide. Alternatively, if the literature values of the intrinsic exchange rates are assumed to apply to the open states in all parts of the repressor molecule, two "closed" helical states have to be postulated, in slow exchange with each other, with only one of them in rapid exchange with the open state and hence with the solvent. Kinetically, the two models are indistinguishable.

  3. (1)H-(14)N cross-relaxation spectrum analysis in sildenafil and sildenafil citrate.

    PubMed

    Gregorovič, Alan; Apih, Tomaž; Seliger, Janez

    2016-09-01

    Here we describe a method for the extraction of (14)N quadrupole parameters from a (1)H-(14)N cross-relaxation spectrum by fitting the lineshapes of the (14)N quadrupole transitions. The procedures used typically to fit quadrupole lineshapes are not directly applicable to fit the (1)H-(14)N cross-relaxation spectrum, because the presence of proton homonuclear dipolar interaction broadens the lineshapes considerably and prevents a reliable determination of Cq and η from a single lineshape. Instead, one must fit two or even three lineshapes originating from the same nitrogen site simultaneously. The problem is to identify which lineshapes belong together when many are observed due to the existence of several nitrogen sites. We solve this problem by fitting the spectrum for all possible combinations and find the best-fitting one. This combination then most likely correctly identifies lineshapes belonging to the same nitrogen site. There are two main advantages of our method compared to the typically used method, which relies only on lineshape singularities: (i) the method is "automatic" and does not require knowledge of nitrogen quadrupole parameters in similar environments to aid dip pairing and (ii) the accuracy of quadrupole parameters is better, as proton linewidth is included in the fits. We use sildenafil and sildenafil citrate as model compounds, each with six non-equivalent nitrogen sites.

  4. Rapid and simple determination of T1 relaxation times in time-domain NMR by Continuous Wave Free Precession sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Monaretto, Tatiana; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times have been widely used in time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) to determine several physicochemical properties of petroleum, polymers, and food products. The measurement of T2 through the CPMG pulse sequence has been used in most of these applications because it denotes a rapid, robust method. On the other hand, T1 has been occasionally used in TD-NMR due to the long measurement time required to collect multiple points along the T1 relaxation curve. Recently, several rapid methods to measure T1 have been proposed. Those methods based upon single shot, known as Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) pulse sequences, have been employed in the simultaneous measurement of T1 and T2 in a rapid fashion. However, these sequences can be used exclusively in instrument featuring short dead time because the magnitude of the signal at thermal equilibrium is required. In this paper, we demonstrate that a special CWFP sequence with a low flip angle can be a simple and rapid method to measure T1 regardless of instruments dead time. Experimental results confirmed that the method called CWFP-T1 may be used to measure both single T1 value and T1 distribution in heterogeneous samples. Therefore, CWFP-T1 sequence can be a feasible alternative to CPMG in the determination of physicochemical properties, particularly in processes where fast protocols are requested such as industrial applications.

  5. /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation in gaseous benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Folkendt, M.M.; Weiss-Lopez, B.E.; True, N.S.

    1988-08-25

    The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time, T/sub 1/, measured for benzene protons at densities between 0.81 and 54.4 mol/m/sup 3/ (15 and 980 Torr) at 381 K exhibits a characteristic nonlinear density dependence. Analysis of the density-dependent T/sub 1/ data yields a spin-rotation coupling constant, C/sub eff/, of /vert bar/182.6 (0.4)/vert bar/ Hz and an angular momentum reorientation cross section, sigma, of 131 (1) /Angstrom//sup 2/. The /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation time of singly labeled /sup 13/C benzene is a linear function of density over the density range 1.07-75.12 mol/m/sup 3/ (20-1330 Torr). /sup 13/C T/sub 1/ values are shorter than /sup 1/H T/sub 1/ values by a factor of ca. 100 at comparable densities. The nuclear Overhauser enhancement factor, /eta/, is 0.0 /plus minus/ 0.02 at densities between 11 and 85.3 mol/m/sup 3/ (200 and 1500 Torr), demonstrating that dipole-dipole relaxation is relatively inefficient in this region. The spin-rotation coupling constant, C/sub eff/, for /sup 13/C nuclei in benzene is estimated to be /vert bar/1602 (68)/vert bar/ Hz.

  6. Knee Cartilage Thickness, T1ρ and T2 Relaxation Time Are Related to Articular Cartilage Loading in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Van Rossom, Sam; Smith, Colin Robert; Zevenbergen, Lianne; Thelen, Darryl Gerard; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Van Assche, Dieter; Jonkers, Ilse

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage is responsive to the loading imposed during cyclic routine activities. However, the local relation between cartilage in terms of thickness distribution and biochemical composition and the local contact pressure during walking has not been established. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relation between cartilage thickness, proteoglycan and collagen concentration in the knee joint and knee loading in terms of contact forces and pressure during walking. 3D gait analysis and MRI (3D-FSE, T1ρ relaxation time and T2 relaxation time sequence) of fifteen healthy subjects were acquired. Experimental gait data was processed using musculoskeletal modeling to calculate the contact forces, impulses and pressure distribution in the tibiofemoral joint. Correlates to local cartilage thickness and mean T1ρ and T2 relaxation times of the weight-bearing area of the femoral condyles were examined. Local thickness was significantly correlated with local pressure: medial thickness was correlated with medial condyle contact pressure and contact force, and lateral condyle thickness was correlated with lateral condyle contact pressure and contact force during stance. Furthermore, average T1ρ and T2 relaxation time correlated significantly with the peak contact forces and impulses. Increased T1ρ relaxation time correlated with increased shear loading, decreased T1ρ and T2 relaxation time correlated with increased compressive forces and pressures. Thicker cartilage was correlated with higher condylar loading during walking, suggesting that cartilage thickness is increased in those areas experiencing higher loading during a cyclic activity such as gait. Furthermore, the proteoglycan and collagen concentration and orientation derived from T1ρ and T2 relaxation measures were related to loading. PMID:28076431

  7. Spatial Distribution and Relationship of T1ρ and T2 Relaxation Times in Knee Cartilage With Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojuan; Pai, Alex; Blumenkrantz, Gabrielle; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Link, Thomas; Ma, Benjamin; Ries, Michael; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2009-01-01

    T1ρ and T2 relaxation time constants have been proposed to probe biochemical changes in osteoarthritic cartilage. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial correlation and distribution of T1ρ and T2 values in osteoarthritic cartilage. Ten patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and 10 controls were studied at 3T. The spatial correlation of T1ρ and T2 values was investigated using Z-scores. The spatial variation of T1ρ and T2 values in patellar cartilage was studied in different cartilage layers. The distribution of these relaxation time constants was measured using texture analysis parameters based on gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM). The mean Z-scores for T1ρ and T2 values were significantly higher in OA patients vs. controls (P < 0.05). Regional correlation coefficients of T1ρ and T2 Z-scores showed a large range in both controls and OA patients (0.2– 0.7). OA patients had significantly greater GLCM contrast and entropy of T1ρ values than controls (P < 0.05). In summary, T1ρ and T2 values are not only increased but are also more heterogeneous in osteoarthritic cartilage. T1ρ and T2 values show different spatial distributions and may provide complementary information regarding cartilage degeneration in OA. PMID:19319904

  8. Prefrontal NAA and Glx Levels in Different Stages of Psychotic Disorders: a 3T 1H-MRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Liemburg, Edith; Sibeijn-Kuiper, Anita; Bais, Leonie; Pijnenborg, Gerdina; Knegtering, Henderikus; van der Velde, Jorien; Opmeer, Esther; de Vos, Annerieke; Dlabac-De Lange, Jozarni; Wunderink, Lex; Aleman, André

    2016-01-01

    H-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H-MRS) can offer insights in various neuropathologies by measuring metabolite levels in the brain. In the current study we investigated the levels of glutamate + glutamine (Glx, neurotransmitter and precursor) and N-Acetyl Aspartate + glutamic acid (NAA + NAAG; neuronal viability) in the prefrontal cortex of patients with a psychotic disorder and people at Ultra High Risk (UHR) for psychosis. A 1H-MRS spectrum was acquired in 31 patients with a recent onset psychotic disorder and 60 with a chronic state, 16 UHR patients and 36 healthy controls. Absolute metabolite levels were calculated using LCModel with a reference water peak. Groups were compared while taking into account age and partial volume effects. Moreover, we investigated associations with positive and negative symptoms, duration of illness, and antipsychotic treatment in patients. The most notable finding is that chronicity of schizophrenia was related to decreased levels of Glx and NAA. On the other hand, although on an exploratory note, UHR showed increased levels of prefrontal Glx and NAA levels with increasing age. Our results may indicate an initial Glx and NAA increase and subsequent decrease during illness progression that may be related to the neurotoxic effects of glutamate. PMID:26903078

  9. Prefrontal NAA and Glx Levels in Different Stages of Psychotic Disorders: a 3T 1H-MRS Study.

    PubMed

    Liemburg, Edith; Sibeijn-Kuiper, Anita; Bais, Leonie; Pijnenborg, Gerdina; Knegtering, Henderikus; van der Velde, Jorien; Opmeer, Esther; de Vos, Annerieke; Dlabac-De Lange, Jozarni; Wunderink, Lex; Aleman, André

    2016-02-23

    H-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) can offer insights in various neuropathologies by measuring metabolite levels in the brain. In the current study we investigated the levels of glutamate + glutamine (Glx, neurotransmitter and precursor) and N-Acetyl Aspartate + glutamic acid (NAA + NAAG; neuronal viability) in the prefrontal cortex of patients with a psychotic disorder and people at Ultra High Risk (UHR) for psychosis. A (1)H-MRS spectrum was acquired in 31 patients with a recent onset psychotic disorder and 60 with a chronic state, 16 UHR patients and 36 healthy controls. Absolute metabolite levels were calculated using LCModel with a reference water peak. Groups were compared while taking into account age and partial volume effects. Moreover, we investigated associations with positive and negative symptoms, duration of illness, and antipsychotic treatment in patients. The most notable finding is that chronicity of schizophrenia was related to decreased levels of Glx and NAA. On the other hand, although on an exploratory note, UHR showed increased levels of prefrontal Glx and NAA levels with increasing age. Our results may indicate an initial Glx and NAA increase and subsequent decrease during illness progression that may be related to the neurotoxic effects of glutamate.

  10. Separation of Anisotropy and Exchange Broadening Using 15N CSA- 15N- 1H Dipole-Dipole Relaxation Cross-Correlation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Christian; Holak, Tad A.

    2000-08-01

    Based on the measurement of cross-correlation rates between 15N CSA and 15N-1H dipole-dipole relaxation we propose a procedure for separating exchange contributions to transverse relaxation rates (R2 = 1/T2) from effects caused by anisotropic rotational diffusion of the protein molecule. This approach determines the influence of anisotropy and chemical exchange processes independently and therefore circumvents difficulties associated with the currently standard use of T1/T2 ratios to determine the rotational diffusion tensor. We find from computer simulations that, in the presence of even small amounts of internal flexibility, fitting T1/T2 ratios tends to underestimate the anisotropy of overall tumbling. An additional problem exists when the N-H bond vector directions are not distributed homogeneously over the surface of a unit sphere, such as in helix bundles or β-sheets. Such a case was found in segment 4 of the gelation factor (ABP 120), an F-actin cross-linking protein, in which the diffusion tensor cannot be calculated from T1/T2 ratios. The 15N CSA tensor of the residues for this β-sheet protein was found to vary even within secondary structure elements. The use of a common value for the whole protein molecule therefore might be an oversimplification. Using our approach it is immediately apparent that no exchange broadening exists for segment 4 although strongly reduced T2 relaxation times for several residues could be mistaken as indications for exchange processes.

  11. White matter and lesion T1 relaxation times increase in parallel and correlate with disability in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Parry, A; Clare, S; Jenkinson, M; Smith, S; Palace, J; Matthews, P M

    2002-09-01

    Previous studies have established the clinical relevance of hypointense lesions ("black holes") on T1-weighted MRI as a surrogate marker for pathological change [36]. In contrast to measuring the volume of "black holes", the direct measurement of T1 values allows an objective assessment of the changes contributing to hypointensity both in the focal lesions and in the normal appearing white matter (NAWM). The aims of this study were first, to determine the relationship between T1 values in the NAWM and in discrete lesions, second, to test the relationship between white matter T1 changes and measures of disability and third, to determine whether pathology leading to T1 change occurred in thalamic grey matter of patients with multiple sclerosis. 24 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (13 with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 11 with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis) and 11 controls participated. White matter T1 histograms and mean T1 values for the thalamus were generated from whole brain T1 relaxation time maps measured using a novel echo-planar imaging based MRI sequence at 3Tesla. Tissue segmentation based on T2- and T1-weighted images allowed independent study of changes in lesions and NAWM. White matter T1 histograms from the patient group showed a reduced peak height and a shift towards higher T1 values (p = 0.028) relative to controls. The mean thalamic T1 was greater for secondary progressive patients than for healthy controls (p = 0.03). Mean white matter T1 values correlated significantly with disability (r = 0.48, p = 0.02). The mean T1 value in the T1-hypointense lesions correlated strongly with the mean T1 value in the NAWM (r = 0.80, p < 0.001). No significant relationship was found between mean white matter T1 value and cerebral volume (r = -0.23, p = 0.31). The T1 measurements extend previous observations suggesting that changes in the NAWM occur in parallel with pathology in lesions of MS. T1 measurements of either

  12. TU-EF-BRA-02: Longitudinal Proton Spin Relaxation and T1-Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lemen, L.

    2015-06-15

    NMR, and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient - Anthony Wolbarst Net Voxel Magnetization, m(x,t). T1-MRI; The MRI Device - Lisa Lemen ‘Classical’ NMR; FID Imaging in 1D via k-Space - Nathan Yanasak Spin-Echo; S-E/Spin Warp in a 2D Slice - Ronald Price Magnetic resonance imaging not only reveals the structural, anatomic details of the body, as does CT, but also it can provide information on the physiological status and pathologies of its tissues, like nuclear medicine. It can display high-quality slice and 3D images of organs and vessels viewed from any perspective, with resolution better than 1 mm. MRI is perhaps most extraordinary and notable for the plethora of ways in which it can create unique forms of image contrast, reflective of fundamentally different biophysical phenomena. As with ultrasound, there is no risk from ionizing radiation to the patient or staff, since no X-rays or radioactive nuclei are involved. Instead, MRI harnesses magnetic fields and radio waves to probe the stable nuclei of the ordinary hydrogen atoms (isolated protons) occurring in water and lipid molecules within and around cells. MRI consists, in essence, of creating spatial maps of the electromagnetic environments around these hydrogen nuclei. Spatial variations in the proton milieus can be related to clinical differences in the biochemical and physiological properties and conditions of the associated tissues. Imaging of proton density (PD), and of the tissue proton spin relaxation times known as T1 and T2, all can reveal important clinical information, but they do so with approaches so dissimilar from one another that each is chosen for only certain clinical situations. T1 and T2 in a voxel are determined by different aspects of the rotations and other motions of the water and lipid molecules involved, as constrained by the local biophysical surroundings within and between its cells – and they, in turn, depend on the type of tissue and its state of health. Three other common

  13. Measurements of T1 and T2 relaxation times of colon cancer metastases in rat liver at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Gambarota, G; Veltien, A; van Laarhoven, H; Philippens, M; Jonker, A; Mook, O R; Frederiks, W M; Heerschap, A

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of colon cancer metastases in rat liver at 7 T. A dedicated RF microstrip coil of novel design was built in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and, in combination with respiratory triggering, to minimize motion artifacts. T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging was performed to follow tumor growth. T1-weighted images provided a good anatomical delineation of the liver structure, while the best contrast between metastases and normal liver tissue was achieved with T2-weighted images. Measurements of T1 and T2 relaxation times were performed with inversion recovery FLASH and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill and inversion recovery FLASH imaging sequences, respectively, for quantitative MR characterization of metastases. Both the T1 and T2 of the metastases were significantly higher than those of normal liver tissue. Further, an increase in the T1 relaxation time of the metastases was observed with tumor growth. These findings suggest that quantitative in vivo MR characterization provides information on tumor development and possibly response to therapy, though additional studies are needed to elucidate the correlation between the changes in relaxation times and tumor microenvironment.

  14. The use of a selective saturation pulse to suppress t1 noise in two-dimensional 1H fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Aiden J.; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Marsh, Andrew; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Brown, Steven P.

    2015-11-01

    A selective saturation pulse at fast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies (60+ kHz) suppresses t1 noise in the indirect dimension of two-dimensional 1H MAS NMR spectra. The method is applied to a synthetic nucleoside with an intense methyl 1H signal due to triisopropylsilyl (TIPS) protecting groups. Enhanced performance in terms of suppressing the methyl signal while minimising the loss of signal intensity of nearby resonances of interest relies on reducing spin diffusion - this is quantified by comparing two-dimensional 1H NOESY-like spin diffusion spectra recorded at 30-70 kHz MAS. For a saturation pulse centred at the methyl resonance, the effect of changing the nutation frequency at different MAS frequencies as well as the effect of changing the pulse duration is investigated. By applying a pulse of duration 30 ms and nutation frequency 725 Hz at 70 kHz MAS, a good compromise of significant suppression of the methyl resonance combined with the signal intensity of resonances greater than 5 ppm away from the methyl resonance being largely unaffected is achieved. The effectiveness of using a selective saturation pulse is demonstrated for both homonuclear 1H-1H double quantum (DQ)/single quantum (SQ) MAS and 14N-1H heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) two-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments.

  15. The use of a selective saturation pulse to suppress t1 noise in two-dimensional (1)H fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Aiden J; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Marsh, Andrew; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Brown, Steven P

    2015-11-01

    A selective saturation pulse at fast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies (60+kHz) suppresses t1 noise in the indirect dimension of two-dimensional (1)H MAS NMR spectra. The method is applied to a synthetic nucleoside with an intense methyl (1)H signal due to triisopropylsilyl (TIPS) protecting groups. Enhanced performance in terms of suppressing the methyl signal while minimising the loss of signal intensity of nearby resonances of interest relies on reducing spin diffusion--this is quantified by comparing two-dimensional (1)H NOESY-like spin diffusion spectra recorded at 30-70 kHz MAS. For a saturation pulse centred at the methyl resonance, the effect of changing the nutation frequency at different MAS frequencies as well as the effect of changing the pulse duration is investigated. By applying a pulse of duration 30 ms and nutation frequency 725 Hz at 70 kHz MAS, a good compromise of significant suppression of the methyl resonance combined with the signal intensity of resonances greater than 5 ppm away from the methyl resonance being largely unaffected is achieved. The effectiveness of using a selective saturation pulse is demonstrated for both homonuclear (1)H-(1)H double quantum (DQ)/single quantum (SQ) MAS and (14)N-(1)H heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) two-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments.

  16. Surface-NMR measurements of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 in a homogeneous sandy aquifer in Skive, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walbrecker, J.; Behroozmand, A.

    2011-12-01

    Efficient groundwater management requires reliable means of characterizing shallow groundwater aquifers. One key parameter in this respect is hydraulic conductivity. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a geophysical exploration technique that can potentially provide this type of information in a noninvasive, cost-effective way. The technique is based on measuring the precession of nuclear spins of protons in groundwater molecules. It involves large loop antennas deployed on Earth's surface to generate electromagnetic pulses tuned to specifically excite and detect groundwater proton spins. Naturally, the excited state of spins is transitory - once excited, spins relax back to their equilibrium state. This relaxation process is strongly influenced by the spin environment, which, in the case of groundwater, is defined by the aquifer. By employing empirical relations, changes in relaxation behavior can be used to identify changes in aquifer hydraulic conductivity, making the NMR relaxation signal a very important piece of information. Particularly, efforts are made to record the longitudinal relaxation parameter T1, because it is known from laboratory studies that it often reliably correlates with hydraulic conductivity, even in the presence of magnetic species. In surface NMR, T1 data are collected by recording the NMR signal amplitude following two sequential excitation pulses as a function of the delay time τ between the two pulses. In conventional acquisition, the two pulses have a mutual phase shift of π. Based on theoretical arguments it was recently shown that T1 times acquired according to this conventional surface-NMR scheme are systematically biased. It was proposed that the bias can be minimized by cycling the phase of the two pulses between π and zero in subsequent double-pulse experiments, and subtracting the resulting signal amplitudes (phase-cycled pseudosaturation recovery scheme, pcPSR). We present the first surface-NMR T1 data set recorded

  17. ESR lineshape and 1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion in propylene glycol solutions of nitroxide radicals - Joint analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Hoffmann, S. K.; Goslar, J.; Lijewski, S.; Kubica-Misztal, A.; Korpała, A.; Oglodek, I.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-12-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) experiments are reported for propylene glycol solutions of the nitroxide radical: 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16 containing 15N and 14N isotopes. The NMRD experiments refer to 1H spin-lattice relaxation measurements in a broad frequency range (10 kHz-20 MHz). A joint analysis of the ESR and NMRD data is performed. The ESR lineshapes give access to the nitrogen hyperfine tensor components and the rotational correlation time of the paramagnetic molecule. The NMRD data are interpreted in terms of the theory of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in solutions of nitroxide radicals, recently presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124506 (2013)]. The theory includes the effect of the electron spin relaxation on the 1H relaxation of the solvent. The 1H relaxation is caused by dipole-dipole interactions between the electron spin of the radical and the proton spins of the solvent molecules. These interactions are modulated by three dynamic processes: relative translational dynamics of the involved molecules, molecular rotation, and electron spin relaxation. The sensitivity to rotation originates from the non-central positions of the interacting spin in the molecules. The electronic relaxation is assumed to stem from the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine coupling, modulated by rotation of the radical molecule. For the interpretation of the NMRD data, we use the nitrogen hyperfine coupling tensor obtained from ESR and fit the other relevant parameters. The consistency of the unified analysis of ESR and NMRD, evaluated by the agreement between the rotational correlation times obtained from ESR and NMRD, respectively, and the agreement of the translation diffusion coefficients with literature values obtained for pure propylene glycol, is demonstrated to be satisfactory.

  18. In vivo relaxation time measurements on a murine tumor model--prolongation of T1 after photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y H; Hawk, R M; Ramaprasad, S

    1995-01-01

    RIF tumors implanted on mice feet were investigated for changes in relaxation times (T1 and T2) after photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photodynamic therapy was performed using Photofrin II as the photosensitizer and laser light at 630 nm. A home-built proton solenoid coil in the balanced configuration was used to accommodate the tumors, and the relaxation times were measured before, immediately after, and up to several hours after therapy. Several control experiments were performed untreated tumors, tumors treated with Photofrin II alone, or tumors treated with laser light alone. Significant increases in T1s of water protons were observed after PDT treatment. In all experiments, 31P spectra were recorded before and after the therapy to study the tumor status and to confirm the onset of PDT. These studies show significant prolongation of T1s after the PDT treatment. The spin-spin relaxation measurements, on the other hand, did not show such prolongation in T2 values after PDT treatment.

  19. T1 Relaxation Rate (R1) Indicates Nonlinear Mn Accumulation in Brain Tissue of Welders With Low-Level Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Young; Flynn, Michael R.; Du, Guangwei; Lewis, Mechelle M.; Fry, Rebecca; Herring, Amy H.; Van Buren, Eric; Van Buren, Scott; Smeester, Lisa; Kong, Lan; Yang, Qing; Mailman, Richard B.; Huang, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    Although the essential element manganese (Mn) is neurotoxic at high doses, the effects of lower exposure are unclear. MRI T1-weighted (TIW) imaging has been used to estimate brain Mn exposure via the pallidal index (PI), defined as the T1W intensity ratio in the globus pallidus (GP) versus frontal white matter (FWM). PI may not, however, be sensitive to Mn in GP because Mn also may accumulate in FWM. This study explored: (1) whether T1 relaxation rate (R1) could quantify brain Mn accumulation more sensitively; and (2) the dose-response relationship between estimated Mn exposure and T1 relaxation rate (R1). Thirty-five active welders and 30 controls were studied. Occupational questionnaires were used to estimate hours welding in the past 90 days (HrsW) and lifetime measures of Mn exposure. T1W imaging and T1-measurement were utilized to generate PI and R1 values in brain regions of interest (ROIs). PI did not show a significant association with any measure of Mn and/or welding-related exposure. Conversely, in several ROIs, R1 showed a nonlinear relationship to HrsW, with R1 signal increasing only after a critical exposure was reached. The GP had the greatest rate of Mn accumulation. Welders with higher exposure showed significantly higher R1 compared either with controls or with welders with lower exposure. Our data are additional evidence that Mn accumulation can be assessed more sensitively by R1 than by PI. Moreover, the nonlinear relationship between welding exposure and Mn brain accumulation should be considered in future studies and policies. PMID:25953701

  20. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  1. Ventricular cerebrospinal fluid lactate is increased in chronic fatigue syndrome compared with generalized anxiety disorder: an in vivo 3.0 T (1)H MRS imaging study.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Sanjay J; Mao, Xiangling; Keegan, Kathryn A; Levine, Susan M; Smith, Eric L P; Heier, Linda A; Otcheretko, Viktor; Coplan, Jeremy D; Shungu, Dikoma C

    2009-04-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a controversial diagnosis because of the lack of biomarkers for the illness and its symptom overlap with neuropsychiatric, infectious, and rheumatological disorders. We compared lateral ventricular volumes derived from tissue-segmented T(1)-weighted volumetric MRI data and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate concentrations measured by proton MRS imaging ((1)H MRSI) in 16 subjects with CFS (modified US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria) with those in 14 patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and in 15 healthy volunteers, matched group-wise for age, sex, body mass index, handedness, and IQ. Mean lateral ventricular lactate concentrations measured by (1)H MRSI in CFS were increased by 297% compared with those in GAD (P < 0.001) and by 348% compared with those in healthy volunteers (P < 0.001), even after controlling for ventricular volume, which did not differ significantly between the groups. Regression analysis revealed that diagnosis accounted for 43% of the variance in ventricular lactate. CFS is associated with significantly raised concentrations of ventricular lactate, potentially consistent with recent evidence of decreased cortical blood flow, secondary mitochondrial dysfunction, and/or oxidative stress abnormalities in the disorder.

  2. Dipolar cross-relaxation modulates signal amplitudes in the 1H NMR spectrum of hyperpolarized [ 13C]formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Matthew E.; Harrison, Crystal; Mander, William; Malloy, Craig R.; Dean Sherry, A.

    2007-12-01

    The asymmetry in the doublet of a spin coupled to hyperpolarized 13C has been used previously to measure the initial polarization of 13C. We tested the hypothesis that a single observation of the 1H NMR spectrum of hyperpolarized 13C formate monitors 13C polarization. Depending on the microwave frequency during the polarization process, in-phase or out-of-phase doublets were observed in the 1H NMR spectrum. Even in this simple two-spin system, 13C polarization was not reflected in the relative area of the JCH doublet components due to strong heteronuclear cross-relaxation. The Solomon equations were used to model the proton signal as a function of time after polarization and to estimate 13C polarization from the 1H NMR spectra.

  3. Enhancement of T1 and T2 relaxation by paramagnetic silica-coated nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gerion, D; Herberg, J; Gjersing, E; Ramon, E; Maxwell, R; Gray, J W; Budinger, T F; Chen, F F

    2006-08-28

    We present the first comprehensive investigation on water-soluble nanoparticles embedded into a paramagnetic shell and their properties as an MRI contrast agent. The nanoprobes are constructed with an inorganic core embedded into an ultra-thin silica shell covalently linked to chelated Gd{sup 3+} paramagnetic ions that act as an MRI contrast agent. The chelator contains the molecule DOTA and the inorganic core contains a fluorescent CdSe/ZnS qdots in Au nanoparticles. Optical properties of the cores (fluorescence emission or plasmon position) are not affected by the neither the silica shell nor the presence of the chelated paramagnetic ions. The resulting complex is a MRI/fluorescence probe with a diameter of 8 to 15 nm. This probe is highly soluble in high ionic strength buffers at pH ranging from {approx}4 to 11. In MRI experiments at clinical field strengths of 60 MHz, the QDs probes posses spin-lattice (T{sub 1}) and a spin-spin (T{sub 2}) relaxivities of 1018.6 +/- 19.4 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} and 2438.1 +/- 46.3 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} respectively for probes having {approx}8 nm. This increase in relaxivity has been correlated to the number of paramagnetic ions covalently linked to the silica shell, ranging from approximately 45 to over 320. We found that each bound chelated paramagnetic species contributes by over 23 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} to the total T{sub 1} and by over 54 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} to the total T{sub 2} relaxivity respectively. The contrast power is modulated by the number of paramagnetic moieties linked to the silica shell and is only limited by the number of chelated paramagnetic species that can be packed on the surface. So far, the sensitivity of our probes is in the 100 nM range for 8-10 nm particles and reaches 10 nM for particles with approximately 15-18 nm in diameter. The sensitivities values in solutions are equivalent of those obtained with small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of 7 nm diameter clustered into a 100 nm polymeric

  4. Superparamagnetic behaviour and T 1, T 2 relaxivity of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjura Hoque, S.; Srivastava, C.; Venkatesha, N.; Kumar, P. S. Anil; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2013-05-01

    In the present study, ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation followed by calcinations at 473 and 673 K for 4 h. Particle sizes obtained were 4 and 6 nm for the calcination temperatures of 473 and 673 K, respectively. To study the origin of system's low temperature spin dynamic behaviour, temperature dependence of susceptibility ? was investigated as a function of particle size and frequency. Slight increase in the grain size from 4 nm at 473 K to 6 nm at 673 K has led to a peak shift of temperature dependence of susceptibility measured at a constant frequency of 400 Hz. Temperature dependence of ? at different frequencies also resulted in peak shift. Relaxation time dependence of peak temperature obeys a power law, which provides the fitting parameters within the range of superparamagnetic nature of the particles. Further, dependence of relaxation time and peak temperature obeys Vogel-Fulcher law rather than Néel-Brown equation demonstrating that the particles follow the behaviour of superparamagnetism of slightly interacting system. Spin-lattice, T 1 and spin-spin, T 2 relaxivity of proton of the water molecule in the presence of chitosan-coated superparamagnetic ZnFe2O4 nanoparticle yields the values of 0.002 and 0.360 s-1 per ppm.

  5. 7Li relaxation time measurements at very low magnetic field by 1H dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeghib, Nadir; Grucker, Daniel

    2001-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of water protons was used to measure the relaxation time of lithium at very low magnetic field as a demonstration of the use of DNP for nuclei less abundant than water protons. Lithium (Li+) was chosen because it is an efficient treatment for manic-depressive illness, with an unknown action mechanism. After having recalled the theoretical basis of a three-spin system comprising two nuclei - the water proton of the solvent, the dissolved Li+ ion and the free electron of a free radical - we have developed a transient solution in order to optimize potential biological applications of Li DNP. The three-spin model has allowed computation of all the parameters of the system - the longitudinal relaxation rate per unit of free radical concentration, the dipolar and scalar part of the coupling between the nuclei and the electron, and the maximum signal enhancement achievable for both proton and lithium spins. All these measurements have been obtained solely through the detection of the proton resonance.

  6. (31)P-MRS of healthy human brain: ATP synthesis, metabolite concentrations, pH, and T1 relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jimin; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2015-11-01

    The conventional method for measuring brain ATP synthesis is (31)P saturation transfer (ST), a technique typically dependent on prolonged pre-saturation with γ-ATP. In this study, ATP synthesis rate in resting human brain is evaluated using EBIT (exchange kinetics by band inversion transfer), a technique based on slow recovery of γ-ATP magnetization in the absence of B1 field following co-inversion of PCr and ATP resonances with a short adiabatic pulse. The unidirectional rate constant for the Pi → γ-ATP reaction is 0.21 ± 0.04 s(-1) and the ATP synthesis rate is 9.9 ± 2.1 mmol min(-1)  kg(-1) in human brain (n = 12 subjects), consistent with the results by ST. Therefore, EBIT could be a useful alternative to ST in studying brain energy metabolism in normal physiology and under pathological conditions. In addition to ATP synthesis, all detectable (31)P signals are analyzed to determine the brain concentration of phosphorus metabolites, including UDPG at around 10 ppm, a previously reported resonance in liver tissues and now confirmed in human brain. Inversion recovery measurements indicate that UDPG, like its diphosphate analogue NAD, has apparent T1 shorter than that of monophosphates (Pi, PMEs, and PDEs) but longer than that of triphosphate ATP, highlighting the significance of the (31)P-(31)P dipolar mechanism in T1 relaxation of polyphosphates. Another interesting finding is the observation of approximately 40% shorter T1 for intracellular Pi relative to extracellular Pi, attributed to the modulation by the intracellular phosphoryl exchange reaction Pi ↔ γ-ATP. The sufficiently separated intra- and extracellular Pi signals also permit the distinction of pH between intra- and extracellular environments (pH 7.0 versus pH 7.4). In summary, quantitative (31)P MRS in combination with ATP synthesis, pH, and T1 relaxation measurements may offer a promising tool to detect biochemical alterations at early stages of brain dysfunctions and diseases.

  7. T1-relaxation of 129Xe on metal single crystal surfaces—multilayer experiments on iridium and monolayer considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Dirk; Mannstadt, Wolfgang; Gerhard, Peter; Koch, Matthias; Jänsch, Heinz J.

    2002-11-01

    The surface of a typical laboratory single crystal has about 10 15 surface atoms or adsorption sites, respectively, and is thus far out of reach for conventional NMR experiments using thermal polarization. It should however be in reach for NMR of adsorbed laser polarized (hyperpolarized) 129Xe, which is produced by spin transfer from optically pumped rubidium. With multilayer experiments of xenon adsorbed on an iridium surface we do not only demonstrate that monolayer sensitivity has been obtained, we also show that such surface experiments can be performed under ultra high vacuum conditions with the crystal being mounted in a typical surface analysis chamber on a manipulator with far-reaching sample heating and cooling abilities. With only four spectra summed up we present an NMR signal from at most 4×10 14 atoms of 129Xe, four layers of naturally abundant xenon, respectively. The fact that no monolayer signal has been measured so far is explained by a fast Korringa relaxation due to the Fermi contact interaction of the 129Xe nuclei with the electrons of the metal substrate. T1-relaxation times in the order of several ms have been calculated using all electron density functional theory for several metal substrates.

  8. Collisional cross-section of water molecules in vapour studied by means of 1H relaxation in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammoli, Daniele; Canet, Estel; Buratto, Roberto; Miéville, Pascal; Helm, Lothar; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-12-01

    In gas phase, collisions that affect the rotational angular momentum lead to the return of the magnetization to its equilibrium (relaxation) in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). To the best of our knowledge, the longitudinal relaxation rates R1 = 1/T1 of protons in H2O and HDO have never been measured in gas phase. We report R1 in gas phase in a field of 18.8 T, i.e., at a proton Larmor frequency ν0 = 800 MHz, at temperatures between 353 and 373 K and pressures between 9 and 101 kPa. By assuming that spin rotation is the dominant relaxation mechanism, we estimated the effective cross-section σJ for the transfer of angular momentum due to H2O-H2O and HDO-D2O collisions. Our results allow one to test theoretical predictions of the intermolecular potential of water in gas phase.

  9. Collisional cross-section of water molecules in vapour studied by means of 1H relaxation in NMR

    PubMed Central

    Mammoli, Daniele; Canet, Estel; Buratto, Roberto; Miéville, Pascal; Helm, Lothar; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    In gas phase, collisions that affect the rotational angular momentum lead to the return of the magnetization to its equilibrium (relaxation) in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). To the best of our knowledge, the longitudinal relaxation rates R1 = 1/T1 of protons in H2O and HDO have never been measured in gas phase. We report R1 in gas phase in a field of 18.8 T, i.e., at a proton Larmor frequency ν0 = 800 MHz, at temperatures between 353 and 373 K and pressures between 9 and 101 kPa. By assuming that spin rotation is the dominant relaxation mechanism, we estimated the effective cross-section σJ for the transfer of angular momentum due to H2O-H2O and HDO-D2O collisions. Our results allow one to test theoretical predictions of the intermolecular potential of water in gas phase. PMID:28008913

  10. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and 1H-NMR relaxation properties of iron oxide/paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Maria R.; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Sieni, Elisabetta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Forzan, Michele; Cavallari, Eleonora; Stefania, Rachele; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) can be exploited in biomedicine as agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatments and as contrast enhancers in magnetic resonance imaging. New, oleate-covered, iron oxide particles have been prepared either by co-precipitation or thermal decomposition methods and incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-Fe-NPs) to improve their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Moreover, the PLGA-Fe-NPs have been loaded with paclitaxel to pursue an MFH-triggered drug release. Remarkably, it has been found that the nanoparticle formulations are characterized by peculiar 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles that directly correlate with their heating potential when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. By prolonging the magnetic field exposure to 30 min, a significant drug release was observed for PLGA-Fe-NPs in the case of the larger-sized magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the immobilization of lipophilic Fe-NPs in PLGA-NPs also made it possible to maintain Néel relaxation as the dominant relaxation contribution in the presence of large iron oxide cores (diameters of 15-20 nm), with the advantage of preserving their efficiency when they are entrapped in the intracellular environment. The results reported herein show that NMRD profiles are a useful tool for anticipating the heating capabilities of Fe-NPs designed for MFH applications.

  11. A general model to calculate the spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time of blood, accounting for haematocrit, oxygen saturation and magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Hales, Patrick W; Kirkham, Fenella J; Clark, Christopher A

    2016-02-01

    Many MRI techniques require prior knowledge of the T1-relaxation time of blood (T1bl). An assumed/fixed value is often used; however, T1bl is sensitive to magnetic field (B0), haematocrit (Hct), and oxygen saturation (Y). We aimed to combine data from previous in vitro measurements into a mathematical model, to estimate T1bl as a function of B0, Hct, and Y. The model was shown to predict T1bl from in vivo studies with a good accuracy (± 87 ms). This model allows for improved estimation of T1bl between 1.5-7.0 T while accounting for variations in Hct and Y, leading to improved accuracy of MRI-derived perfusion measurements.

  12. Facile Preparation of a New Gadofullerene-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent with High 1H Relaxivity

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chunying; Corwin, Frank D.; Zhang, Jianfei; Chen, Zhijian; Reid, Jonathan E.; Sun, Minghao; Xu, Wei; Sim, Jae Hyun; Wang, Chunru; Fatouros, Panos P.; Esker, Alan R.; Gibson, Harry W.; Dorn, Harry C.

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on the trimetallic nitride templated (TNT) metallofullerene, Gd3N@C80, was synthesized by a facile method in high yield. The observed longitudinal and transverse relaxivities, r1 and r2, for water hydrogens in the presence of the water-soluble gadofullerene 2, Gd3N@C80(OH)~26(CH2CH2COOM)~16 (M = Na or H), are 207 and 282 mM-1s-1 (per C80 cage) at 2.4 T, respectively; these values are 50 times larger than those of Gd3+ poly(aminocarboxylate) complexes, such as commercial Omniscan® and Magnevist®. This high 1H relaxivity for this new hydroxylated and carboxylated gadofullerene derivative provides high signal enhancement at significantly lower Gd concentration as demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo MRI studies. Dynamic light scattering data reveal a unimodal size distribution with an average hydrodynamic radius of ca. 78 nm in pure water (pH = 7), which is significantly different from other hydroxylated or carboxylated fullerene and metallofullerene derivatives reported to date. Agarose gel infusion results indicate that the gadofullerene 2 displayed diffusion properties different from that of commercial Omniscan® and those of PEG5000 modified Gd3N@C80. The reactive carboxyl functionality present on this highly efficient contrast agent may also serve as a precursor for biomarker tissue-targeting purposes. PMID:19445504

  13. A triarylmethyl spin label for long-range distance measurement at physiological temperatures using T1 relaxation enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongyu; Bridges, Michael D.; López, Carlos J.; Rogozhnikova, Olga Yu.; Trukhin, Dmitry V.; Brooks, Evan K.; Tormyshev, Victor; Halpern, Howard J.; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2016-08-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has become an important tool for measuring distances in proteins on the order of a few nm. For this purpose pairs of spin labels, most commonly nitroxides, are site-selectively introduced into the protein. Recent efforts to develop new spin labels are focused on tailoring the intrinsic properties of the label to either extend the upper limit of measurable distances at physiological temperature, or to provide a unique spectral lineshape so that selective pairwise distances can be measured in a protein or complex containing multiple spin label species. Triarylmethyl (TAM) radicals are the foundation for a new class of spin labels that promise to provide both capabilities. Here we report a new methanethiosulfonate derivative of a TAM radical that reacts rapidly and selectively with an engineered cysteine residue to generate a TAM containing side chain (TAM1) in high yield. With a TAM1 residue and Cu2+ bound to an engineered Cu2+ binding site, enhanced T1 relaxation of TAM should enable measurement of interspin distances up to 50 Å at physiological temperature. To achieve favorable TAM1-labeled protein concentrations without aggregation, proteins are tethered to a solid support either site-selectively using an unnatural amino acid or via native lysine residues. The methodology is general and readily extendable to complex systems, including membrane proteins.

  14. Development of PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles as a T1-weighted contrast agent: chemical synthesis, in vivo brain MR imaging, and accounting for high relaxivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-Jun; Song, Xiao-Xia; Tang, Qun

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles consisting of manganese-based T1-weighted contrast agents have rapidly achieved clinical application, however low proton relaxivity impedes further development. In this report, by analyzing nanoparticles' surface oxidation states we propose the possible reason for the low r1 relaxivity of common MnO nanoparticles and develop PEGylated fluoroperovskite KMnF3 nanoparticles as new T1-weighted contrast agents, which exhibit the highest longitudinal relaxivity (r1 = 23.15 mM-1 s-1) among all the reported manganese-based T1-weighted contrast agents. We, for the first time, illustrate a typical example showing that the surface oxidation states of metal ions exposed on the nanoparticles' surfaces are able to influence not only the optical, magnetic, electronic or catalytic properties but also water proton longitudinal relaxivity when applied as an MRI contrast agent. Cytotoxicity tests demonstrate that the PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles are free from toxicity. Further in vivo MRI experiments distinctively depict fine anatomical features in brain imaging at a low dose of 5 mg of Mn per kg and possible removal from the kidneys due to their small size and biocompatibility.Magnetic nanoparticles consisting of manganese-based T1-weighted contrast agents have rapidly achieved clinical application, however low proton relaxivity impedes further development. In this report, by analyzing nanoparticles' surface oxidation states we propose the possible reason for the low r1 relaxivity of common MnO nanoparticles and develop PEGylated fluoroperovskite KMnF3 nanoparticles as new T1-weighted contrast agents, which exhibit the highest longitudinal relaxivity (r1 = 23.15 mM-1 s-1) among all the reported manganese-based T1-weighted contrast agents. We, for the first time, illustrate a typical example showing that the surface oxidation states of metal ions exposed on the nanoparticles' surfaces are able to influence not only the optical, magnetic, electronic or

  15. Initial evaluation of hepatic T1 relaxation time as an imaging marker of liver disease associated with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD).

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Erokwu, Bernadette O; DeSantis, David A; Croniger, Colleen M; Schur, Rebecca M; Lu, Lan; Mariappuram, Jose; Dell, Katherine M; Flask, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a potentially lethal multi-organ disease affecting both the kidneys and the liver. Unfortunately, there are currently no non-invasive methods to monitor liver disease progression in ARPKD patients, limiting the study of potential therapeutic interventions. Herein, we perform an initial investigation of T1 relaxation time as a potential imaging biomarker to quantitatively assess the two primary pathologic hallmarks of ARPKD liver disease: biliary dilatation and periportal fibrosis in the PCK rat model of ARPKD. T1 relaxation time results were obtained for five PCK rats at 3 months of age using a Look-Locker acquisition on a Bruker BioSpec 7.0 T MRI scanner. Six three-month-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were also scanned as controls. All animals were euthanized after the three-month scans for histological and biochemical assessments of bile duct dilatation and hepatic fibrosis for comparison. PCK rats exhibited significantly increased liver T1 values (mean ± standard deviation = 935 ± 39 ms) compared with age-matched SD control rats (847 ± 26 ms, p = 0.01). One PCK rat exhibited severe cholangitis (mean T1  = 1413 ms), which occurs periodically in ARPKD patients. The observed increase in the in vivo liver T1 relaxation time correlated significantly with three histological and biochemical indicators of biliary dilatation and fibrosis: bile duct area percent (R = 0.85, p = 0.002), periportal fibrosis area percent (R = 0.82, p = 0.004), and hydroxyproline content (R = 0.76, p = 0.01). These results suggest that hepatic T1 relaxation time may provide a sensitive and non-invasive imaging biomarker to monitor ARPKD liver disease.

  16. Effect of manganese on human placental spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Angtuaco, T.L.; Mattison, D.R.; Thomford, P.J.; Jordan, J.

    1986-01-01

    Human placentas were obtained immediately following delivery and incubated with manganese chloride (MnCl/sub 2/) in concentrations ranging from 0.002 to 2.0 mM. Proton density, T1 and T2 were measured at times ranging from 5-200 minutes. There was rapid uptake of manganese by the placenta producing a dose-dependent decrease in placental T1 and T2. The major effect of manganese uptake was shortening of T1 suggesting that the contrast between placenta and myometrium will be enhanced predominantly for T1-dependent imaging pulse sequences.

  17. Comparison of T1 relaxation times in adipose tissue of severely obese patients and healthy lean subjects measured by 1.5 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Garnov, Nikita; Linder, Nicolas; Schaudinn, Alexander; Blüher, Matthias; Karlas, Thomas; Schütz, Tatjana; Dietrich, Arne; Kahn, Thomas; Busse, Harald

    2014-09-01

    Subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) differ in composition, endocrine function and localization in the body. VAT is considered to play a role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease, and other obesity-related disorders. It has been shown that the amount, distribution, and (cellular) composition of adipose tissue (AT) correlate well with metabolic conditions. In this study, T1 relaxation times of AT were measured in severely obese subjects and compared with those of healthy lean controls. Here, we tested the hypothesis that T1 relaxation times of AT differ between lean and obese individuals, but also between VAT and SAT as well as superficial (sSAT) and deep SAT (dSAT) in the same individual. Twenty severely obese subjects (BMI 41.4 ± 4.8 kg/m(2) ) and ten healthy lean controls matched for age (BMI 21.5 ± 1.9 kg/m(2) ) underwent MRI at 1.5 T using a single-shot fast spin-echo sequence (short-tau inversion recovery) at six different inversion times (TI range 100-1000 ms). T1 relaxation times were computed for all subjects by fitting the TI -dependent MR signal intensities of user-defined regions of interest in both SAT and VAT to a model function. T1 times in sSAT and dSAT were only measured in obese patients. For both obese patients and controls, the T1 times of SAT (275 ± 14 and 301 ± 12 ms) were significantly (p < 0.01) shorter than the respective values in VAT (294 ± 20 and 360 ± 35 ms). Obese subjects also showed significant (p < 0.01) T1 differences between sSAT (268 ± 11 ms) and dSAT (281 ± 19 ms). More important, T1 differences in both SAT and VAT were highly significant (p < 0.001) between obese patients and healthy subjects. The results of our pilot study suggest that T1 relaxation times differ between severely obese patients and lean controls, and may potentially provide an additional means for the non-invasive assessment of AT

  18. ESR lineshape and {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion in propylene glycol solutions of nitroxide radicals – Joint analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kruk, D.; Hoffmann, S. K.; Goslar, J.; Lijewski, S.; Kubica-Misztal, A.; Korpała, A.; Oglodek, I.; Moscicki, J.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.

    2013-12-28

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) experiments are reported for propylene glycol solutions of the nitroxide radical: 4-oxo-TEMPO-d{sub 16} containing {sup 15}N and {sup 14}N isotopes. The NMRD experiments refer to {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation measurements in a broad frequency range (10 kHz–20 MHz). A joint analysis of the ESR and NMRD data is performed. The ESR lineshapes give access to the nitrogen hyperfine tensor components and the rotational correlation time of the paramagnetic molecule. The NMRD data are interpreted in terms of the theory of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in solutions of nitroxide radicals, recently presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124506 (2013)]. The theory includes the effect of the electron spin relaxation on the {sup 1}H relaxation of the solvent. The {sup 1}H relaxation is caused by dipole-dipole interactions between the electron spin of the radical and the proton spins of the solvent molecules. These interactions are modulated by three dynamic processes: relative translational dynamics of the involved molecules, molecular rotation, and electron spin relaxation. The sensitivity to rotation originates from the non-central positions of the interacting spin in the molecules. The electronic relaxation is assumed to stem from the electron spin–nitrogen spin hyperfine coupling, modulated by rotation of the radical molecule. For the interpretation of the NMRD data, we use the nitrogen hyperfine coupling tensor obtained from ESR and fit the other relevant parameters. The consistency of the unified analysis of ESR and NMRD, evaluated by the agreement between the rotational correlation times obtained from ESR and NMRD, respectively, and the agreement of the translation diffusion coefficients with literature values obtained for pure propylene glycol, is demonstrated to be satisfactory.

  19. 1H-19F spin-lattice relaxation spectroscopy: proton tunnelling in the hydrogen bond studied by field-cycling NMR.

    PubMed

    Noble, D L; Aibout, A; Horsewill, A J

    2009-12-01

    Proton tunnelling in the hydrogen bonds of two fluorine substituted benzoic acid dimers has been investigated using field-cycling NMR relaxometry. The close proximity of the (19)F nuclei to the hydrogen bond protons introduces heteronuclear (19)F-(1)H dipolar interactions into the spin-lattice relaxation processes. This renders the (1)H magnetisation-recovery biexponential and introduces multiple spectral density components into the relaxation matrix characterised by frequencies that are sums and differences of the (19)F and (1)H Larmor frequencies. Using field-cycling NMR pulse sequences that measure the spin-lattice relaxation and cross-relaxation rates we demonstrate how some of these multiple spectral density components can be separately resolved. This leads to an accurate determination of the correlation times that characterise the proton tunnelling motion. A broad spectrum of relaxation behaviour is illustrated and explored in the chosen samples and the investigation is used to explore the theory and practise of field-cycling NMR relaxometry in cases where heteronuclear interactions are significant.

  20. Ligand protons in a frozen solution of copper histidine relax via a T1e-driven three-spin mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, S.; Epel, B.; Vega, S.; Goldfarb, D.

    2007-10-01

    Davies electron-nuclear double resonance spectra can exhibit strong asymmetries for long mixing times, short repetition times, and large thermal polarizations. These asymmetries can be used to determine nuclear relaxation rates in paramagnetic systems. Measurements of frozen solutions of copper(L-histidine)2 reveal a strong field dependence of the relaxation rates of the protons in the histidine ligand, increasing from low (g‖) to high (g⊥) field. It is shown that this can be attributed to a concentration-dependent T1e-driven relaxation process involving strongly mixed states of three spins: the histidine proton, the Cu(II) electron spin of the same complex, and another distant electron spin with a resonance frequency differing from the spectrometer frequency approximately by the proton Larmor frequency. The protons relax more efficiently in the g⊥ region, since the number of distant electrons able to participate in this relaxation mechanism is higher than in the g‖ region. Analytical expressions for the associated nuclear polarization decay rate Teen-1 are developed and Monte Carlo simulations are carried out, reproducing both the field and the concentration dependences of the nuclear relaxation.

  1. Characterization of t1 relaxation and blood-myocardial contrast enhancement of NC100150 injection in cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Wagenseil, J E; Johansson, L O; Lorenz, C H

    1999-11-01

    A new ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (Clariscan; NC100150 Injection) was studied in domestic farm pigs. The T1 effects were characterized for blood and myocardium and the blood-myocardial contrast was measured in T1-weighted cine images. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured at baseline and contrast doses of 1 and 5 mg Fe/kg body weight (bw) at end diastole and late systole. The T1 values for blood and myocardium were reduced by 97 and 43%, respectively, from baseline to 5 mg Fe/kg bw. The CNR was significantly improved with contrast at end diastole and late systole. The maximum improvement shown was 202% at 5 mg Fe/kg bw in late systole. The percent SNR enhancement was significantly higher in blood than myocardium at late systole. NC100150 Injection is an effective T1 shortening agent and can be used to improve blood-myocardial contrast in cine images of the heart. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:784-789.

  2. 1H NMR z-spectra of acetate methyl in stretched hydrogels: Quantum-mechanical description and Markov chain Monte Carlo relaxation-parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishmarev, Dmitry; Chapman, Bogdan E.; Naumann, Christoph; Mamone, Salvatore; Kuchel, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    The 1H NMR signal of the methyl group of sodium acetate is shown to be a triplet in the anisotropic environment of stretched gelatin gel. The multiplet structure of the signal is due to the intra-methyl residual dipolar couplings. The relaxation properties of the spin system were probed by recording steady-state irradiation envelopes ('z-spectra'). A quantum-mechanical model based on irreducible spherical tensors formed by the three magnetically equivalent spins of the methyl group was used to simulate and fit experimental z-spectra. The multiple parameter values of the relaxation model were estimated by using a Bayesian-based Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm.

  3. Systematic T1 improvement for hyperpolarized 129xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, Maricel; Babcock, Earl; Blümler, Peter; Heil, Werner; Karpuk, Sergei; Tullney, Kathlynne

    2015-03-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of hyperpolarized (HP)-129Xe was improved at typical storage conditions (i.e. low and homogeneous magnetic fields). Very long wall relaxation times T1wall of about 18 h were observed in uncoated, spherical GE180 glass cells of ∅ = 10 cm which were free of rubidium and not permanently sealed but attached to a standard glass stopcock. An "aging" process of the wall relaxation was identified by repeating measurements on the same cell. This effect could be easily removed by repeating the initial cleaning procedure. In this way, a constant wall relaxation was ensured. The Xe nuclear spin-relaxation rate 1 /T1Xel -Xe due to van der Waals molecules was investigated too, by admixing three different buffer gases (N2, SF6 and CO2). Especially CO2 exhibited an unexpected high efficiency (r) in shortening the lifetime of the Xe-Xe dimers and hence prolonging the total T1 relaxation even further. These measurements also yielded an improved accuracy for the van der Waals relaxation for pure Xe (with 85% 129Xe) of T1Xe -Xe = (4.6 ± 0.1)h . Repeating the measurements with HP 129Xe in natural abundance in mixtures with SF6, a strong dependence of T1Xe -Xe and r on the isotopic enrichment was observed, uncovering a shorter T1Xe -Xe relaxation for the 129Xe in natural composition as compared to the 85% isotopically enriched gas.

  4. Silica-F127 nanohybrid-encapsulated manganese oxide nanoparticles for optimized T1 magnetic resonance relaxivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei Hsu, Benedict You; Wang, Miao; Zhang, Yu; Vijayaragavan, Vimalan; Wong, Siew Yee; Yuang-Chi Chang, Alex; Bhakoo, Kishore Kumar; Li, Xu; Wang, John

    2013-12-01

    To properly engineer MnO nanoparticles (MONPs) of high r1 relaxivity, a nanohybrid coating consisting of silica and F127 (PEO106PPO70PEO106) is designed to encapsulate MONPs. Achieved by an interfacial templating scheme, the nanohybrid encapsulating layer is highly permeable and hydrophilic to allow for an optimal access of water molecules to the encapsulated manganese oxide core. Hence, the efficacy of MONPs as MRI contrast agents is significantly improved, as demonstrated by an enhancement of the MR signal measured with a pre-clinical 7.0 T MRI scanner. The nanohybrid encapsulation strategy also confers high colloidal stability to the hydrophobic MONPs by the surface decoration of PEO chains and a small overall diameter (<100 nm) of the PEO-SiO2 nanohybrid-encapsulated MONPs (PEOMSNs). The PEOMSNs are not susceptible to Mn-ion leaching, and their biocompatibility is affirmed by a low toxicity profile. Moreover, these hybrid nanocapsules exhibit a nano-rattle structure, which would favor the facile loading of various therapeutic reagents for theranostic applications.To properly engineer MnO nanoparticles (MONPs) of high r1 relaxivity, a nanohybrid coating consisting of silica and F127 (PEO106PPO70PEO106) is designed to encapsulate MONPs. Achieved by an interfacial templating scheme, the nanohybrid encapsulating layer is highly permeable and hydrophilic to allow for an optimal access of water molecules to the encapsulated manganese oxide core. Hence, the efficacy of MONPs as MRI contrast agents is significantly improved, as demonstrated by an enhancement of the MR signal measured with a pre-clinical 7.0 T MRI scanner. The nanohybrid encapsulation strategy also confers high colloidal stability to the hydrophobic MONPs by the surface decoration of PEO chains and a small overall diameter (<100 nm) of the PEO-SiO2 nanohybrid-encapsulated MONPs (PEOMSNs). The PEOMSNs are not susceptible to Mn-ion leaching, and their biocompatibility is affirmed by a low toxicity profile

  5. TROMBONE: T1-Relaxation-Oblivious Mapping of Transmit Radio-Frequency Field (B1) for MRI at High Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Fleysher, Roman; Fleysher, Lazar; Inglese, Matilde; Sodickson, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Fast, 3D radio-frequency transmit field (B1) mapping is important for parallel transmission, spatially-selective pulse design and quantitative MRI applications. It has been shown that AFI — two interleaved spoiled gradient recalled echo (SPGR) images acquired in steady state with two very short time delays (T R1, T R2) — is an attractive method of B1 mapping. Herein, we describe the TROMBONE method which efficiently integrates AFI with EPI imaging, alleviates very short T R requirement of AFI and through their synergy yields up to 16 times higher precision in B1 estimation in the same experimental time. High precision of TROMBONE can be traded for faster scans. The map of B1 reconstructed from the ratio of intensities of two images is insensitive to longitudinal relaxation time (T1) in the physiologically relevant range. A table of the optimal acquisition protocol parameters for various target experimental conditions is provided. PMID:21394765

  6. Self-Assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles Designed as Imaging Probes for 19F and Relaxation-Enhanced 1H imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preslar, Adam Truett

    This work incorporates whole-body imaging functionality into peptide amphiphile (PA) nanostructures used for regenerative medicine to facilitate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two strategies were employed: 1. Conjugation of gadolinium chelates to peptide nanostructures to monitor biomaterial degradation in vivo with MRI and inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) 2. Synthesis of perfluorinated moiety-bearing peptide amphiphiles for 19F-MRI. The Gd(III) chelate gadoteridol was conjugated by copper-catalyzed "click" chemistry to a series of PAs known to form cylindrical nanostructures. By fitting nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion (NMRD) profiles to the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) equations, it was observed that the water exchange parameter (tauM) depended on thermal annealing or calcium ion cross-linking. The sequence C16V 3A3E3G(Gd) exhibited an acceleration of nearly 100 ns after thermal annealing and calcium addition. These gadolinium-labeled PAs were used to track in vivo degradation of gels within the tibialis anterior muscle in a murine model. The half-life of biomaterial degradation was determined to be 13.5 days by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) of Gd(III). Gel implants could be monitored by MRI for eight days before the signal dispersed due to implant degradation and dilution. Additionally, nanostructures incorporating highly fluorinated domains were investigated for use as MRI contrast agents. Short, perfluoroalkyane tails of seven or eight carbon atoms in length were grafted to PA sequences containing a V2A2 beta-sheet forming sequence. The V2A2 sequence is known to drive 1D nanostructure assembly. It was found that the sequences C7F13V2A 2E2 and C7F13V2A 2K3 formed 1D assemblies in water which transition from ribbon-like to cylindrical shape as pH increases from 4.5 to 8.0. Ribbon-like nanostructures had reduced magnetic resonance signal by T 2 relaxation quenching, whereas their cylindrical counterparts

  7. Systematic T1 improvement for hyperpolarized 129xenon.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Maricel; Babcock, Earl; Blümler, Peter; Heil, Werner; Karpuk, Sergei; Tullney, Kathlynne

    2015-03-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of hyperpolarized (HP)-(129)Xe was improved at typical storage conditions (i.e. low and homogeneous magnetic fields). Very long wall relaxation times T(1)(wall) of about 18 h were observed in uncoated, spherical GE180 glass cells of ∅=10 cm which were free of rubidium and not permanently sealed but attached to a standard glass stopcock. An "aging" process of the wall relaxation was identified by repeating measurements on the same cell. This effect could be easily removed by repeating the initial cleaning procedure. In this way, a constant wall relaxation was ensured. The Xe nuclear spin-relaxation rate 1/T1(Xe-Xe) due to van der Waals molecules was investigated too, by admixing three different buffer gases (N(2), SF(6) and CO(2)). Especially CO(2) exhibited an unexpected high efficiency (r) in shortening the lifetime of the Xe-Xe dimers and hence prolonging the total T1 relaxation even further. These measurements also yielded an improved accuracy for the van der Waals relaxation for pure Xe (with 85% (129)Xe) of T(1)(Xe-Xe)=(4.6±0.1)h. Repeating the measurements with HP (129)Xe in natural abundance in mixtures with SF6, a strong dependence of T(1)(Xe-Xe) and r on the isotopic enrichment was observed, uncovering a shorter T(1)(Xe-Xe) relaxation for the (129)Xe in natural composition as compared to the 85% isotopically enriched gas.

  8. Inhomogeneous 1H NMR spin-lattice relaxation in the organic superconductor kappa-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu[N(CN)2]Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezo, Joseph Christopher

    The two-dimensional superconductors based on the organic molecule "ET" have been an active area of research since their discovery over two decades ago. The member of this family with the highest critical temperature, kappa-(ET)2Cu[N(CN)2]Br ( Tc=11.7 K), has seen renewed interest since the observation of an anomalous Nernst signal by Nam et al in 2007 [51]. A similar effect was seen earlier by Ong's group in some of the high-temperature cuprate superconductors by [78,84]. This is interpreted to be evidence of a picture of superconductivity in which the resistive transition is driven by thermal fluctuations in the phase of the superconducting order parameter. Below Tc, these fluctuations take the form of bound vortex-antivortex pairs that have no long-range effect on the phase. At Tc, they undergo a Kosterlitz-Thouless unbinding transition; the unbound vortices destroy long-range phase coherence. Previously reported proton NMR measurements on this material have shown a high sensitivity to vortex motion, but reported no interesting behavior above the phase transition [15,25,42]. In this thesis, we revisit the 1H NMR properties of kappa-(ET)2Cu[N(CN)2]Br, paying specific attention to the spin-lattice relaxation, to look for some fingerprint of the phenomenon observed by Nam et al.

  9. Pressure and temperature effects on 2H spin-lattice relaxation times and 1H chemical shifts in tert-butyl alcohol- and urea-D2O solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Koji; Ibuki, Kazuyasu; Ueno, Masakatsu

    1998-01-01

    The pressure and temperature effects of hydrophobic hydration were studied by NMR spectroscopy. The 1H chemical shifts (δ) were measured at 7.7, 29.9, and 48.4 °C under high pressure up to 294 MPa for HDO contained as impurity in neat D2O, 1 mol kg-1 tert-butyl alcohol (TBA)-D2O, and 1 mol kg-1 urea-D2O solutions, for the methyl group of TBA in the TBA-D2O solution, and for the amino group of urea in the urea-D2O solution. The 2H spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) were measured under the same conditions as the chemical shift measurements for D2O in neat D2O, TBA-D2O and urea-D2O solutions with organic contents up to 8 mol%. The following features are observed for the pressure effect on δ (HDO) and 2H-T1 in TBA-D2O solutions: (1) The δ (HDO) exhibits a downfield shift relative to that in neat D2O, and the difference of δ (HDO) between TBA solution and neat D2O becomes larger with increasing pressure at lower temperature. (2) The decrement of the rotational correlation time of water in the hydration shell of TBA (τcs) relative to the value at atmospheric pressure is smaller than that in the bulk (τc0). (3) The pressure coefficients of T1 are positive in dilute solutions but are negative in more than 4 to 5 mol% solutions. These results suggest that the hydrophobic hydration shell of TBA is different than the open structure of water present in bulk, and resists pressure more strongly than the open structure of water in the bulk. In solutions of 4 to 5 mol%, the hydration shell collapses. On the other hand, the τcs in the hydration shell of urea is slightly larger than that in bulk water at lower pressure, but is obviously larger at higher pressure. In view of the rotational motion of water molecules, urea seems to strengthen the water structure slightly rather than weaken it, although δ (HDO) approaches that in the bulk with pressure. It is difficult to classify urea into a structure maker or a breaker.

  10. Dynamics of [C{sub 3}H{sub 5}N{sub 2}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] by means of {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry and quadrupole relaxation enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Masierak, W.; Florek-Wojciechowska, M.; Oglodek, I.; Jakubas, R.; Privalov, A. F.; Kresse, B.; Fujara, F.; Kruk, D.

    2015-05-28

    {sup 1}H spin-lattice field cycling relaxation dispersion experiments in the intermediate phase II of the solid [C{sub 3}H{sub 5}N{sub 2}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] are presented. Two motional processes have been identified from the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion profiles and quantitatively described. It has been concluded that these processes are associated with anisotropic reorientations of the imidazolium ring, characterized by correlation times of the order of 10{sup −8} s-10{sup −9} s and of about 10{sup −5} s. Moreover, quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) effects originating from slowly fluctuating {sup 1}H-{sup 14}N dipolar interactions have been observed. From the positions of the relaxation maxima, the quadrupole coupling parameters for the {sup 14}N nuclei in [C{sub 3}H{sub 5}N{sub 2}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] have been determined. The {sup 1}H-{sup 14}N relaxation contribution associated with the slow dynamics has been described in terms of a theory of QRE [Kruk et al., Solid State Nucl. Magn. Reson. 40, 114 (2011)] based on the stochastic Liouville equation. The shape of the QRE maxima (often referred to as “quadrupole peaks”) has been consistently reproduced for the correlation time describing the slow dynamics and the determined quadrupole coupling parameters.

  11. Mn2+ complexes with 12-membered pyridine based macrocycles bearing carboxylate or phosphonate pendant arm: crystallographic, thermodynamic, kinetic, redox, and 1H/17O relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Drahoš, Bohuslav; Kotek, Jan; Císařová, Ivana; Hermann, Petr; Helm, Lothar; Lukeš, Ivan; Tóth, Éva

    2011-12-19

    potentials (E(ox) = 0.73 V for MnL(1) and E(ox) = 0.68 V for MnL(2)), in accordance with air-oxidation. The parameters governing the relaxivity of the Mn(2+) complexes were determined from variable-temperature (17)O NMR and (1)H NMRD data. The water exchange is extremely fast, k(ex) = 3.03 and 1.77 × 10(9) s(-1) for MnL(1) and MnL(2), respectively. Variable-pressure (17)O NMR measurements have been performed to assess the water exchange mechanism on MnL(1) and MnL(2) as well as on other Mn(2+) complexes. The negative activation volumes for both MnL(1) and MnL(2) complexes confirmed an associative mechanism of the water exchange as expected for a hexacoordinated Mn(2+) ion. The hydration number of q = 1 was confirmed for both complexes by (17)O chemical shifts. A relaxometric titration with phosphate, carbonate or citrate excluded the replacement of the coordinated water molecule by these small endogenous anions.

  12. Rapid Parametric Mapping of the Longitudinal Relaxation Time T1 Using Two-Dimensional Variable Flip Angle Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Dieringer, Matthias A.; Deimling, Michael; Santoro, Davide; Wuerfel, Jens; Madai, Vince I.; Sobesky, Jan; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Visual but subjective reading of longitudinal relaxation time (T1) weighted magnetic resonance images is commonly used for the detection of brain pathologies. For this non-quantitative measure, diagnostic quality depends on hardware configuration, imaging parameters, radio frequency transmission field (B1+) uniformity, as well as observer experience. Parametric quantification of the tissue T1 relaxation parameter offsets the propensity for these effects, but is typically time consuming. For this reason, this study examines the feasibility of rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angles (VFA) approach at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla. These efforts include validation in phantom experiments and application for brain T1 mapping. Methods T1 quantification included simulations of the Bloch equations to correct for slice profile imperfections, and a correction for B1+. Fast gradient echo acquisitions were conducted using three adjusted flip angles for the proposed T1 quantification approach that was benchmarked against slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and an inversion-recovery spin-echo based reference method. Brain T1 mapping was performed in six healthy subjects, one multiple sclerosis patient, and one stroke patient. Results Phantom experiments showed a mean T1 estimation error of (-63±1.5)% for slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and (0.2±1.4)% for the proposed approach compared to the reference method. Scan time for single slice T1 mapping including B1+ mapping could be reduced to 5 seconds using an in-plane resolution of (2×2) mm2, which equals a scan time reduction of more than 99% compared to the reference method. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angle approach is feasible at 1.5T/3T/7T. It represents a valuable alternative for rapid T1 mapping due to the gain in speed versus conventional approaches. This progress may serve to enhance the capabilities of

  13. Ultrashort TE (UTE) MR imaging of bovine cortical bone: the effect of water loss on the T1 and T2* relaxation times

    PubMed Central

    Kokabi, Nima; Bae, Won; Diaz, Eric; Chung, Christine B; Bydder, Graeme M; Du, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    The effects of water loss on the T1 and T2* of bovine cortical bone were investigated using ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences with signals excited either by a short hard pulse or by two longer half pulses. Nine bovine femur samples were prepared and sequentially air and oven dried. On average 3.42% of bone by weight was lost after air-drying for three days, with another 5.98% of bone weight loss after oven-drying at 100 °C for 24 hours. T1 and T2* were measured after every 1% decrease in weight, with 9–10% bone weight loss at the termination of the drying process. After both forms of drying the overall T1 decreased 33% from 153±18 ms to 102±17 ms when measured using the hard pulse and from 186±25 ms to 122±23 ms when using the half pulses. T2* decreased by 45–50% from 368±29 μs to 201±19 μs using the hard pulse and from 379±35 μs to 191±17 μs using the half pulses. A steady decrease of 26–31% was observed in both T1 and T2* with the first 3–4% bone water loss after air-drying. Oven-drying at 100 °C for 24 hours resulted on an additional 4% T1 reduction but 25% T2* reduction. PMID:21360749

  14. sup 31 P and sup 1 H NMR studies of the structure of enzyme-bound substrate complexes of lobster muscle arginine kinase: Relaxation measurements with Mn(II) and Co(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Jarori, G.K.; Ray, B.D.; Rao, B.D.N. )

    1989-11-28

    The paramagnetic effects of Mn(II) and Co(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rates of {sup 31}P nuclei of ATP and ADP and of Mn(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine bound to arginine kinase from lobster tail muscle have been measured. Temperature variation of {sup 31}P relaxation rates in E-MnADP and E-MnATP yields activation energies ({Delta}E) in the range 6-10 kcal/mol. Thus, the {sup 31}P relaxation rates in these complexes are exchange limited and cannot provide structural information. However, the relaxation rates in E-CoADP and E-CoATP exhibit frequency dependence and {Delta}E values in the range 1-2 kcal/mol; i.e., these rates depend upon {sup 31}P-Co(II) distances. These distances were calculated to be in the range 3.2-4.5 {angstrom}, appropriate for direct coordination between Co(II) and the phosphoryl groups. The paramagnetic effect of Mn(II) on the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine in the E-MnADP-Arg complex was also measured at three frequencies. From the frequency dependence of the relaxation rate an effective {tau}{sub C} of 0.6 ns has also been calculated, which is most likely to be the electron spin relaxation rate ({tau}{sub S1}) for Mn(II) in this complex. The distance estimated on the basis of the reciprocal sixth root of the average relaxation rate of the {delta} protons was 10.9 {plus minus} 0.3 {angstrom}.

  15. Renal T(*)(2) perfusion using an iron oxide nanoparticle contrast agent--influence of T(1) relaxation on the first-pass response.

    PubMed

    Bjørnerud, Atle; Johansson, Lars O; Ahlström, Håkan K

    2002-02-01

    Quantitative perfusion measurements require accurate knowledge of the correlation between first-pass signal changes and the corresponding tracer concentration in tissue. In the present study, a detailed analysis of first-pass renal cortical changes in T(1) and T(*)(2) following bolus injection of the iron oxide nanoparticle NC100150 Injection was investigated in a pig model using a double-echo gradient-echo sequence. The estimated change in 1/T(*)(2) during first pass calculated from single-echo sequences was compared to the true double-echo-derived 1/T(*)(2) curves. Using a single-echo (TE = 6 ms) spoiled gradient-echo sequence, the first-pass 1/T(*)(2) response following a bolus injection of 1 mg Fe/kg of NC100150 Injection was significantly underestimated due to counteracting T(1) effects. Signal response simulations showed that the relative error in the first-pass response decreased with increasing TE and contrast agent dose. However, both the maximum TE and the maximum dose are limited by excessive cortical signal loss, and the maximum TE is further limited by high temporal resolution requirements. The problem of T(1) contamination can effectively be overcome by using a double-echo gradient-echo sequence. This yields a first-pass response that truly reflects the tissue tracer concentration, which is a critical requirement for quantitative renal perfusion assessment.

  16. {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry and quadrupole relaxation enhancement as a sensitive probe of dynamical properties of solids—[C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sub 3}Bi{sub 2}I{sub 9} as an example

    SciTech Connect

    Florek-Wojciechowska, M.; Wojciechowski, M.; Brym, Sz.; Kruk, D.; Jakubas, R.

    2016-02-07

    {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry has been applied to reveal information on dynamics and structure of Gu{sub 3}Bi{sub 2}I{sub 9} ([Gu = C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}] denotes guanidinium cation). The data have been analyzed in terms of a theory of quadrupole relaxation enhancement, which has been extended here by including effects associated with quadrupole ({sup 14}N) spin relaxation caused by a fast fluctuating component of the electric field gradient tensor. Two motional processes have been identified: a slow one occurring on a timescale of about 8 × 10{sup −6} s which has turned out to be (almost) temperature independent, and a fast process in the range of 10{sup −9} s. From the {sup 1}H-{sup 14}N relaxation contribution (that shows “quadrupole peaks”) the quadrupole parameters, which are a fingerprint of the arrangement of the anionic network, have been determined. It has been demonstrated that the magnitude of the quadrupole coupling considerably changes with temperature and the changes are not caused by phase transitions. At the same time, it has been shown that there is no evidence of abrupt changes in the cationic dynamics and the anionic substructure upon the phase transitions.

  17. Interaction between reduced glutathione and PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers in aqueous solutions: studied by 1H NMR and spin-lattice relaxation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lianwei; Guo, Chen; Yang, Liangrong; Xiang, Junfeng; Tang, Yalin; Liu, Huizhou

    2011-03-17

    In order to investigate the effect of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers on the glutathione (GSH)/glutathione-S-transferase (GST) detoxification system, interaction between the copolymers and GSH is studied by NMR measurements. Selective rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect (ROE) experiment confirms that glutamyl (Glu) α-H of GSH has spatial contact with EO methylene protons. Spin-lattice relaxation times of GSH Glu α-H show a decrease when PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers are added, and the decrease is greater with copolymers possessing more EO units. Other protons of GSH show little change in the presence of the copolymers. The addition of GSH promotes the dehydration of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers. This results from the breaking of hydrogen bonds between water and the polymers and the forming of hydrogen bonds between Glu α-carboxylate protons and oxygen atoms of EO units. The dissociation constant between GSH and P85 copolymer is determined by spin-lattice relaxation measurements, which shows the binding is of low affinity and the two molecules are in fast dissociation kinetics. This study suggests that GSH transporting or utilizing systems may be affected by treatment of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers.

  18. Different structure of the complexes of two cytochrome P-450 isozymes with acetanilide by 1H-NMR relaxation and spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Woldman YaYu; Weiner, L M; Lyakhovich, V V

    1993-05-28

    The functional and spectral characteristics of the interaction of acetanilide with phenobarbital- and methylcholanthrene- induced rat liver microsomes, as well as with corresponding major isozymes (cytochromes P-450b and P-450c) have been compared. The magnitude of the reverse 1st type binding spectra proved to be negatively correlated with the acetanilide oxidation on isozymes under study. The data on paramagnetic relaxation of acetanilide protons in the presence of P-450 have shown the structure of the enzyme-substrate complex to be different for two isozymes, acetanilide molecule being closer to Fe ion in the active site in the case of P-450c, which is active towards acetanilide oxidation. For the P-450c-acetanilide complex the group oxidized (phenyl) is the closest to Fe ion.

  19. Solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation and isolated-molecule and cluster electronic structure calculations in organic molecular solids: The relationship between structure and methyl group and t-butyl group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianlong E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu; Mallory, Frank B.; Mallory, Clelia W.; Odhner, Hosanna R.; Beckmann, Peter A. E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu

    2014-05-21

    We report ab initio density functional theory electronic structure calculations of rotational barriers for t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups both in the isolated molecules and in central molecules in clusters built from the X-ray structure in four t-butyl aromatic compounds. The X-ray structures have been reported previously. We also report and interpret the temperature dependence of the solid state {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz in one of the four compounds. Such experiments for the other three have been reported previously. We compare the computed barriers for methyl group and t-butyl group rotation in a central target molecule in the cluster with the activation energies determined from fitting the {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation data. We formulate a dynamical model for the superposition of t-butyl group rotation and the rotation of the t-butyl group's constituent methyl groups. The four compounds are 2,7-di-t-butylpyrene, 1,4-di-t-butylbenzene, 2,6-di-t-butylnaphthalene, and 3-t-butylchrysene. We comment on the unusual ground state orientation of the t-butyl groups in the crystal of the pyrene and we comment on the unusually high rotational barrier of these t-butyl groups.

  20. (1)H relaxivity of water in aqueous suspensions of Gd(3+)-loaded NaY nanozeolites and AlTUD-1 mesoporous material: the influence of Si/Al ratio and pore size.

    PubMed

    Norek, Małgorzata; Neves, Isabel C; Peters, Joop A

    2007-07-23

    The results of a (1)H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) and EPR study on aqueous suspensions of Gd(3+)-loaded NaY nanozeolites and AlTUD-1 mesoporous material are described. Upon increase of the Si/Al ratio from 1.7 to 4.0 in the Gd(3+)-loaded zeolites, the relaxation rate per mM Gd(3+) (r1) at 40 MHz and 25 degrees C increases from 14 to 27 s(-)1 mM(-1). The NMRD and EPR data were fitted with a previously developed two-step model that considers the system as a concentrated aqueous solution of Gd(3+) in the interior of the zeolite that is in exchange with the bulk water outside the zeolite. The results show that the observed increase in relaxivity can mainly be attributed to the residence lifetime of the water protons in the interior of the material, which decreased from 0.3 to 0.2 micros, upon the increase of the Si/Al ratio. This can be explained by the decreased interaction of water with the zeolite walls as a result of the increased hydrophobicity. The importance of the exchange rate of water between the inside and the outside of the material was further demonstrated by the relatively high relaxivity (33 s(-1) mM(-1) at 40 MHz, 25 degrees C) observed for a suspension of the Gd(3+)-loaded mesoporous material AlTUD-1. Unfortunately, Gd(3+) leaches rather easily from that material, but not from the Gd(3+)-loaded NaY zeolites, which may have potential as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  1. Polyion complex micelle MRI contrast agents from poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lysine) block copolymers having Gd-DOTA; preparations and their control of T(1)-relaxivities and blood circulation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Kouichi; Kawano, Kumi; Maitani, Yoshie; Yokoyama, Masayuki

    2010-12-01

    The current study synthesized macromolecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents constituted of the poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-lysine) block copolymer (PEG-P(Lys)). A chelate group, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), was attached to the primary amino group of the block copolymer in desired contents. Gd-DOTA-based macromolecular contrast agents were prepared from PEG-P(Lys) having DOTA (PEG-P(Lys-DOTA) and Gd(III) ions. All of the PEG-P(Lys) block copolymers having gadolinium ions (PEG-P(Lys-DOTA-Gd)) showed higher T(1) relaxivity (per gadolinium), r(1)=5.6-7.3mM(-1)s(-1), than that of a low-molecular-weight gadolinium-chelate, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-gadolinium(III) (Gd-DTPA) at 9.4T. The study prepared the polyion complex (PIC) micelles from the amino groups of the lysine units and an oppositely charged polyanion, poly(methacrylic acid) or dextran sulfate, in an aqueous medium. In contrast, the fully DOTA-attached PEG-P(Lys-DOTA-Gd) formed a PIC with a polycation. Compared with partially DOTA-attached cationic PEG-P(Lys-DOTA-Gd), this PIC micelle yielded a forty percent decrease of r(1). This r(1) decrease was considered to result from a change in the accessibility of water molecules to gadolinium ions in the micelles' inner core. The r(1) was decreased upon formation of the PIC micelle, and this change proved that our concept worked in vitro. Blood-circulation characteristics of PIC micelles were controlled by means of changing the molecular weight of the counter anion. The PIC micelles accumulated in tumor tissues, and MRI study showed T1W image of axial slice of tumor area was significantly enhanced at 24h after the injection.

  2. 1H NMR study of the phase transitions of trissarcosine calcium chloride single crystals at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyuhong; Lee, Moohee; Lee, Kwang Sei; Lim, Ae Ran

    2005-10-01

    The 1H NMR line-width and spin lattice relaxation time T1 of TSCC single crystals were studied. Variations in the temperature dependence of the spin lattice relaxation time were observed near 65 and 130 K, indicating drastic alterations of the spin dynamics at the phase transition temperatures. The changes in the temperature dependence of T1 near 65 and 130 K correspond to phase transitions of the crystal. The anomalous decrease in T1 around 130 K is due to the critical slowing down of the soft mode. The abrupt change in relaxation time at 65 K is associated with a structural phase transition. The proton spin lattice relaxation time of this crystal also has a minimum value in the vicinity of 185 K, which is governed by the reorientation of the CH3 groups of the sarcosine molecules. From this result, we conclude that the two phase transitions at 65 and 130 K can be discerned from abrupt variations in the 1H NMR relaxation behavior, and that 1H nuclei play important roles in the phase transitions of the TSCC single crystal.

  3. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  4. The in vivo relaxivity of MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuter, Borys

    1999-11-01

    Post-contrast clinical 1H Magnetic Resonance Images have to date been interpreted with little regard for possible variations in the in-vivo properties of injected magnetic pharmaceuticals (contrast agents), particularly in their relaxivity or ability to alter tissue relaxation rates, T2-1 and T 2-1, per unit concentration. The relaxivities of contrast agents have only rarely been measured in-vivo, measurements usually being performed on excised tissues and at magnetic field strengths lower than used in clinical practice. Some researchers have simply assumed that relaxivities determined in homogeneous tissue phantoms were applicable in-vivo. In this thesis, the relaxivities of two contrast agents, Gd-DTPA and Gd-EOB-DTPA, were measured in simple tissue phantoms and in the kidney and liver of intact, but sacrificed, Wistar rats using a clinical MR scanner with a magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. T1 and T2 were determined from sets of images acquired using a standard clinical spin-echo pulse sequence. The contrast agent concentration in tissue was assessed by radioassay of 153Gd-DTPA or 153Gd-EOB-DTPA, mixed with the normal compound prior to injection. Relaxivity was taken as the slope of a linear regression fit of relaxation rate against Gd concentration. The relaxivities of Gd-EOB-DTPA were similarly determined in normal and biliary- obstructed guinea pigs. Relaxivities in tissue differed significantly from values obtained in simple phantoms. Kidney T1 relaxivity was reduced for both compounds in normal animals. Three days or more of biliary obstruction produced further reductions in kidney T1 relaxivity of Gd-EOB-DTPA, providing strong evidence that disease affects contrast agent relaxivity. Kidney T2 relaxivity was much greater than T1 relaxivity and was also depressed by biliary obstruction. Liver T1 and T 2 relaxivites were increased above phantom values, but were not affected by the biliary obstruction. Water compartmentalisation, macromolecular binding, proton

  5. Saturation-inversion-recovery: A method for T1 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Zhao, Ming; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Song, Yiqiao

    2017-01-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation (T1) has always been measured by inversion-recovery (IR), saturation-recovery (SR), or related methods. These existing methods share a common behavior in that the function describing T1 sensitivity is the exponential, e.g., exp(- τ /T1), where τ is the recovery time. In this paper, we describe a saturation-inversion-recovery (SIR) sequence for T1 measurement with considerably sharper T1-dependence than those of the IR and SR sequences, and demonstrate it experimentally. The SIR method could be useful in improving the contrast between regions of differing T1 in T1-weighted MRI.

  6. H-1 Relaxation Times of Metabolites in Biological Samples Obtained with Nondestructive Ex-vivo Slow-MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Wind, Robert A.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-03-01

    Methods suitable for measuring 1H relaxation times such as T1, T2 and T1p, in small sized biological objects including live cells, excised organs and tissues, oil seeds etc., were developed in this work. This was achieved by combining inversion-recovery, spin-echo, or spin lock segment with the phase-adjusted spinning sideband (PASS) technique that was applied at slow sample spinning rate. Here, 2D-PASS was used to produce a high-resolution 1H spectrum free from the magnetic susceptibility broadening so that the relaxation parameters of individual metabolite can be determined. Because of the slow spinning employed, tissue and cell damage due to sample spinning is minimized. The methodologies were demonstrated by measuring 1H T1, T2 and T1p of metabolites in excised rat livers and sesame seeds at spinning rates of as low as 40 Hz.

  7. Effects of spin-lock field direction on the quantitative measurement of spin-lattice relaxation time constant in the rotating frame (T1ρ) in a clinical MRI system

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Seonghwan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether the direction of spin-lock field, either parallel or antiparallel to the rotating magnetization, has any effect on the spin-lock MRI signal and further on the quantitative measurement of T1ρ, in a clinical 3 T MRI system. Methods: The effects of inverted spin-lock field direction were investigated by acquiring a series of spin-lock MRI signals for an American College of Radiology MRI phantom, while the spin-lock field direction was switched between the parallel and antiparallel directions. The acquisition was performed for different spin-locking methods (i.e., for the single- and dual-field spin-locking methods) and for different levels of clinically feasible spin-lock field strength, ranging from 100 to 500 Hz, while the spin-lock duration was varied in the range from 0 to 100 ms. Results: When the spin-lock field was inverted into the antiparallel direction, the rate of MRI signal decay was altered and the T1ρ value, when compared to the value for the parallel field, was clearly different. Different degrees of such direction-dependency were observed for different spin-lock field strengths. In addition, the dependency was much smaller when the parallel and the antiparallel fields are mixed together in the dual-field method. Conclusions: The spin-lock field direction could impact the MRI signal and further the T1ρ measurement in a clinical MRI system.

  8. Cardiac T1 Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2014-01-01

    T1 mapping of the heart has evolved into a valuable tool to evaluate myocardial tissue properties, with or without contrast injection, including assessment of myocardial edema and free water content, extra-cellular volume (expansion), and most recently cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The MRI pulse sequence techniques developed for these applications have had to address at least two important considerations for cardiac applications: measure magnetization inversion recoveries during cardiac motion with sufficient temporal resolution for the shortest expected T1 values, and, secondly, obtain these measurements within a time during which a patient can comfortably suspend breathing. So-called Look-Locker techniques, and variants thereof, which all sample multiple points of a magnetization recovery after each magnetization preparation have therefore become a mainstay in this field. The rapid pace of advances and new findings based on cardiac T1 mapping for assessment of diffuse fibrosis, or myocardial edema show that these techniques enrich the capabilities of MRI for myocardial tissue profiling, which is arguably unmatched by other cardiac imaging modalities. PMID:24509619

  9. 1H NMR spin-spin relaxation and imaging in porous systems: an application to the morphological study of white portland cement during hydration in the presence of organics.

    PubMed

    Gussoni, M; Greco, F; Bonazzi, F; Vezzoli, A; Botta, D; Dotelli, G; Natali Sora, I; Pelosato, R; Zetta, L

    2004-07-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin relaxation and imaging have been applied to investigate white Portland cement pastes during hydration in the absence and in the presence of organic solvents. The main organic solvent investigated was methanol, alone or together with the organic waste 2-chloroaniline (2-CA), an aromatic amine representative of an important class of highly toxic compounds. For all the analysed samples, prepared with a solvent-to-cement ratio of 0.4, the decay of the echo magnetization has been fitted by adopting a model that combines an exponential component with a gaussian one. The calculated independent relaxation parameters have been discussed in terms of morphological and dynamical changes that occur during the cement hardening process and pore formation. Three kinds of water molecules: "solid-like" (chemically and physically bound), "liquid-like" (porous trapped) and "free" water, endowed with anisotropic, near isotropic and isotropic motion, respectively, were identified. Spin-echo images collected on the same samples during the hydration kinetics, allowed the changes of water and solvents spatial distribution in the porous network to be monitored, showing percolation phenomena and confirming the multimodal open channels structure of the hardened cement system. Both T(2) relaxation and imaging data indicated that a pronounced delay occurs in the cement hardening when organics are present.

  10. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  11. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-07

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  12. Brain Metabolites B1–Corrected Proton T1 Mapping in the Rhesus Macaque at 3 T

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Songtao; Fleysher, Roman; Fleysher, Lazar; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Ratai, Eva-Maria; González, R. Gilberto; Gonen, Oded

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of metabolic quantification in MR spectroscopy (MRS) is limited by the unknown radio-frequency field (B1) and longitudinal relaxation time (T1). To address both issues in proton (1H) MRS we obtained B1-corrected T1 maps of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho) and creatine (Cr) in five healthy rhesus macaques at 3 T. For efficient use of the 4 hour experiment, we used a new three-point protocol that optimizes the precision of T1 in 3D 1H-MRS localization for extensive, ~30%, brain coverage at (0.6×0.6×0.5 cm)3=180 μL spatial resolution. The resulting mean±standard error (SEM) T1s in 700 voxels were: NAA=1232±44, Cr=1238±23 and Cho=1107±56 ms. Their histograms from all 140 voxels in each animal were similar in position and shape - characterized by SEMs of the full width at half maximum divided by their means, of better than 8%. Regional gray matter NAA, Cho and Cr T1s: 1333±43, 1265±52 and 1131±28 ms were 5–10% longer than white matter: 1188±34, 1201±24 and 1082±50 ms (statistically significant for the NAA only), all within 10% of the corresponding published values in the human brain. PMID:20373387

  13. Different molecular motions in lyophilized protein formulations as determined by laboratory and rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Sumie; Aso, Yukio; Kojima, Shigeo

    2002-10-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory and rotating frame (T(1) and T(1rho)) of protons and carbons in lyophilized bovine serum gamma-globulin formulation containing dextran were determined by (1)H solid-state pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and high-resolution (13)C solid-state NMR. The temperature dependence of T(1) and T(1rho) of dextran protons in the lyophilized formulation suggests that the correlation time, tau(c), of the methylene protons in dextran is approximately 10(-6) s at -100 degrees C and 60% relative humidity, and decreases to 10(-7) s at 0 degrees C. When temperature is increased from 0 degrees C, the increased motion of the methylene groups is reflected in T(1), but is too fast to be observed by changes in T(1rho). Thus, the motion of the methine groups rather than the methylene groups begins to be reflected in T(1rho). The correlation time of the methine protons as determined by T(1rho) was of the same order as that of the methine carbons as determined by T(1rho). As the temperature is increased past the glass/rubber transition temperature, both the methylene and methine motions are greatly enhanced, resulting in much shorter T(1) and T(1rho) relaxation times.

  14. Imazalil-cyclomaltoheptaose (beta-cyclodextrin) inclusion complex: preparation by supercritical carbon dioxide and 13C CPMAS and 1H NMR characterization.

    PubMed

    Lai, Simona; Locci, Emanuela; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia; Lai, Adolfo; Marongiu, Bruno

    2003-10-10

    An inclusion complex between imazalil (IMZ), a selected fungicide, and cyclomaltoheptaose (beta-cyclodextrin, betaCD) was obtained using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide. The best preparation conditions were determined, and the inclusion complex was investigated by means of 1H NMR spectroscopy in aqueous solution and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy in the solid state. Information on the geometry of the betaCD/IMZ complex was obtained from ROESY spectroscopy, while the dynamics of the inclusion complex in the kilohertz range was obtained from the proton spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame, T(1rho) (1H).

  15. A Unified Maximum Likelihood Framework for Simultaneous Motion and $T_{1}$ Estimation in Quantitative MR $T_{1}$ Mapping.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Llorden, Gabriel; den Dekker, Arnold J; Van Steenkiste, Gwendolyn; Jeurissen, Ben; Vanhevel, Floris; Van Audekerke, Johan; Verhoye, Marleen; Sijbers, Jan

    2017-02-01

    In quantitative MR T1 mapping, the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of tissues is estimated from a series of T1 -weighted images. As the T1 estimation is a voxel-wise estimation procedure, correct spatial alignment of the T1 -weighted images is crucial. Conventionally, the T1 -weighted images are first registered based on a general-purpose registration metric, after which the T1 map is estimated. However, as demonstrated in this paper, such a two-step approach leads to a bias in the final T1 map. In our work, instead of considering motion correction as a preprocessing step, we recover the motion-free T1 map using a unified estimation approach. In particular, we propose a unified framework where the motion parameters and the T1 map are simultaneously estimated with a Maximum Likelihood (ML) estimator. With our framework, the relaxation model, the motion model as well as the data statistics are jointly incorporated to provide substantially more accurate motion and T1 parameter estimates. Experiments with realistic Monte Carlo simulations show that the proposed unified ML framework outperforms the conventional two-step approach as well as state-of-the-art model-based approaches, in terms of both motion and T1 map accuracy and mean-square error. Furthermore, the proposed method was additionally validated in a controlled experiment with real T1 -weighted data and with two in vivo human brain T1 -weighted data sets, showing its applicability in real-life scenarios.

  16. Transfer of hyperpolarization from long T 1 storage nuclei to short T 1 neighbors using FLOPSY-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Karlos X.; Harrison, Crystal; Dean Sherry, A.; Malloy, Craig R.; Merritt, Matthew E.

    2011-12-01

    Nuclei with long T 1s are optimal targets for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Therefore, most of the agents used in metabolic imaging and spectroscopy studies are based on carboxylic acid moieties that lack protons, a strong source of dipolar relaxation. Metabolic flux information encoded into spectra of small molecule metabolites in the form of the 13C isotopomer data cannot be accessed using standard 13C hyperpolarization methods because protonated carbons relax too quickly through T 1 dipolar relaxation. It is shown here that the longitudinal mixing sequence FLOPSY-8 can be used to transfer polarization from a long T 1 storage nucleus to adjacent protonated carbons so that they may be detected with high sensitivity. We demonstrate that FLOPSY-8 allows a direct readout of isotopomer populations in butyrate and glutamate in vitro.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of NMR relaxation and diffusion of bulk hydrocarbons and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Philip M.; Asthagiri, Dilip; Chapman, Walter G.; Hirasaki, George J.

    2017-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and diffusion of bulk n-C5H12 to n-C17H36 hydrocarbons and bulk water. The MD simulations of the 1H NMR relaxation times T1,2 in the fast motion regime where T1 =T2 agree with measured (de-oxygenated) T2 data at ambient conditions, without any adjustable parameters in the interpretation of the simulation data. Likewise, the translational diffusion DT coefficients calculated using simulation configurations agree with measured diffusion data at ambient conditions. The agreement between the predicted and experimentally measured NMR relaxation times and diffusion coefficient also validate the forcefields used in the simulation. The molecular simulations naturally separate intramolecular from intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions helping bring new insight into the two NMR relaxation mechanisms as a function of molecular chain-length (i.e. carbon number). Comparison of the MD simulation results of the two relaxation mechanisms with traditional hard-sphere models used in interpreting NMR data reveals important limitations in the latter. With increasing chain length, there is substantial deviation in the molecular size inferred on the basis of the radius of gyration from simulation and the fitted hard-sphere radii required to rationalize the relaxation times. This deviation is characteristic of the local nature of the NMR measurement, one that is well-captured by molecular simulations.

  18. U1h Superstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Glen Sykes

    2000-11-01

    The U1H Shaft Project is a design build subcontract to supply the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) a 1,045 ft. deep, 20 ft. diameter, concrete lined shaft for unspecified purposes. The subcontract awarded to Atkinson Construction by Bechtel Nevada to design and construct the shaft for the DOE has been split into phases with portions of the work being released as dictated by available funding. The first portion released included the design for the shaft, permanent hoist, headframe, and collar arrangement. The second release consisted of constructing the shaft collar to a depth of 110 ft., the service entry, utility trenches, and installation of the temporary sinking plant. The temporary sinking plant included the installation of the sinking headframe, the sinking hoist, two deck winches, the shaft form, the sinking work deck, and temporary utilities required to sink the shaft. Both the design and collar construction were completed on schedule. The third release consisted of excavating and lining the shaft to the station depth of approximately 950 feet. Work is currently proceeding on this production sinking phase. At a depth of approximately 600 feet, Atkinson has surpassed production expectation and is more than 3 months ahead of schedule. Atkinson has employed the use of a Bobcat 331 excavator as the primary means of excavation. the shaft is being excavated entirely in an alluvial deposit with varying degrees of calcium carbonate cementation. Several more work packages are expected to be released in the near future. The remaining work packages include, construction of the shaft station a depth of 975 ft. and construction of the shaft sump to a depth of 1,045 ft., installation of the loading pocket and station steel and equipment, installation of the shaft steel and guides, installation of the shaft utilities, and installation of the permanent headframe, hoist, collar utilities, and facilities.

  19. Differential protonation and dynamic structure of doxylamine succinate in solution using 1H and 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Somashekar, B S; Nagana Gowda, G A; Ramesha, A R; Khetrapal, C L

    2004-07-01

    A protonation and dynamic structural study of doxylamine succinate, a 1:1 salt of succinic acid with dimethyl-[2-(1-phenyl-1-pyridin-2-yl-ethoxy)ethyl]amine, in solution using one- and two-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR experiments at variable temperature and concentration is presented. The two acidic protons of the salt doxylamine succinate are in 'intermediate' exchange at room temperature, as evidenced by the appearance of a broad signal. This signal evolves into two distinct signals below about -30 degrees C. A two-dimensional 1H-1H double quantum filtered correlation experiment carried out at -55 degrees C shows protonation of one of the acidic protons to the dimethylamine nitrogen. A two-dimensional rotating frame 1H-1H NOE experiment at the same temperature reveals that the other proton remains with the succinate moiety. Comparison of the 1H and 13C chemical shifts and the 13C T1 relaxation times of the salt with those of the free base further substantiate the findings.

  20. Investigation of local symmetry in LiH3(SeO3)2 single crystals by 1H and 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2013-10-01

    The local environments of 1H and 7Li nuclei in LiH3(SeO3)2 crystals were investigated using FT NMR. The 7Li spectrum does changes from three resonance lines to one resonance line near Tm (=383 K). The variation in the splitting of the 7Li resonance lines with temperature indicates that the EFG at the Li sites produced by the (SeO3)2- groups varies with temperature. The changes in the temperature dependence of the intensity, line width, and spin-lattice relaxation time T1 near Tm for the 1H and 7Li nuclei coincide with the distortion of the structural framework surrounding each 1H and 7Li ion. Finally, the NMR results obtained here are compared to MH3(SeO3)2 (M = Na, K, and Cs) crystals previously reported.

  1. Irreversible change in the T1 temperature dependence with thermal dose using the proton resonance frequency-T1 technique.

    PubMed

    Diakite, Mahamadou; Payne, Allison; Todd, Nick; Parker, Dennis L

    2013-04-01

    Denaturation of macromolecules within the tissues is believed to be the major factor contributing to the damage of tissues upon hyperthermia. As a result, the value of the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of the tissue water, which is related to the translational and rotational rates of water, represents an intrinsic probe for investigating structural changes in tissues at high temperature. Therefore, the goal of this work is to investigate whether the simultaneous measurement of temperature and T1 using a hybrid proton resonance frequency (PRF)-T1 measurement technique can be used to detect irreversible changes in T1 that might be indicative of tissue damage. A new hybrid PRF-T1 sequence was implemented based on the variable flip angle driven-equilibrium single-pulse observation (DESPOT)1 method from a standard three dimensional segmented echo-planar imaging sequence by alternating two flip angles from measurement to measurement. The structural changes of the heated tissue volumes were analyzed based on the derived T1 values and the corresponding PRF temperatures. Using the hybrid PRF-T1 technique, we demonstrate that the change of spin lattice relaxation time T1 is reversible with temperature for low thermal dose (thermal dose ≤ 240 cumulative equivalent minutes [CEM] 43°C) and irreversible with temperature after significant accumulation of thermal dose in ex vivo chicken breast tissue. These results suggest that the hybrid PRF-T1 method may be a potentially powerful tool to investigate the extent and mechanism of heat damage of biological tissues.

  2. Probing water environment of Trp59 in ribonuclease T1: insight of the structure-water network relationship.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wei-Chih; Shen, Jiun-Yi; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Wee, Kevin; Lin, Li-Ju; Kuo, Yi-Ching; Yang, Cheng-Han; Weng, Shih-Hui; Huang, Huai-Ching; Chen, You-Hua; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2015-02-12

    In this study, we used the tryptophan analogue, (2,7-aza)Trp, which exhibits water catalyzed proton transfer isomerization among N(1)-H, N(7)-H, and N(2)-H isomers, to probe the water environment of tryptophan-59 (Trp59) near the connecting loop region of ribonuclease Tl (RNase T1) by replacing the tryptophan with (2,7-aza)Trp. The resulting (2,7-aza)Trp59 triple emission bands and their associated relaxation dynamics, together with relevant data of 7-azatryptophan and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, lead us to propose two Trp59 containing conformers in RNase T1, namely, the loop-close and loop-open forms. Water is rich in the loop-open form around the proximity of (2,7-aza)Trp59, which catalyzes (2,7-aza)Trp59 proton transfer in the excited state, giving both N(1)-H and N(7)-H isomer emissions. The existence of N(2)-H isomer in the loop-open form, supported by the MD simulation, is mainly due to the specific hydrogen bonding between N(2)-H proton and water molecule that bridges N(2)-H and the amide oxygen of Pro60, forming a strong network. The loop-close form is relatively tight in space, which squeezes water molecules out of the interface of α-helix and β2 strand, joined by the connecting loop region; accordingly, the water-scant environment leads to the sole existence of the N(1)-H isomer emission. MD simulation also points out that the Trp-water pairs appear to preferentially participate in a hydrogen bond network incorporating polar amino acid moieties on the protein surface and bulk waters, providing the structural dynamic features of the connecting loop region in RNase T1.

  3. Change of translational-rotational coupling in liquids revealed by field-cycling 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R.; Schneider, E.; Rössler, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Applying the field-cycling nuclear magnetic resonance technique, the frequency dependence of the 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate, R 1 ω = T1 - 1 ω , is measured for propylene glycol (PG) which is increasingly diluted with deuterated chloroform. A frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz and a broad temperature interval from 220 to about 100 K are covered. The results are compared to those of experiments, where glycerol and o-terphenyl are diluted with their deuterated counter-part. Reflecting intra- as well as intermolecular relaxation, the dispersion curves R 1 ω , x (x denotes mole fraction PG) allow to extract the rotational time constant τrot(T, x) and the self-diffusion coefficient D(T, x) in a single experiment. The Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relation is tested in terms of the quantity D(T, x) τrot(T, x) which provides a measure of an effective hydrodynamic radius or equivalently of the spectral separation of the translational and the rotational relaxation contribution. In contrast to o-terphenyl, glycerol and PG show a spectral separation much larger than suggested by the SED relation. In the case of PG/chloroform mixtures, not only an acceleration of the PG dynamics is observed with increasing dilution but also the spectral separation of rotational and translational relaxation contributions continuously decreases. Finally, following a behavior similar to that of o-terphenyl already at about x = 0.6; i.e., while D(T, x) τrot(T, x) in the mixture is essentially temperature independent, it strongly increases with x signaling thus a change of translational-rotational coupling. This directly reflects the dissolution of the hydrogen-bond network and thus a change of solution structure.

  4. Structure vs. composition: A solid-state 1H and 29Si NMR study of quenched glasses along the Na 2O-SiO 2-H 2O join

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, George D.; Mysen, Bjorn O.; Lee, Sung Keun

    2005-05-01

    A suite of six hydrous (7 wt.% H 2O) sodium silicate glasses spanning sodium octasilicate to sodium disilicate in composition were analyzed using 29Si single pulse (SP) magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, 1H- 29Si cross polarization (CP) MAS NMR, and fast MAS 1H-NMR. From the 29Si SPMAS data it is observed that at low sodium compositions dissolved water significantly depolymerizes the silicate network. At higher sodium contents, however, dissolved H 2O does not affect a significant increase in depolymerization over that predicted based on the Na/Si ratio alone. The fast MAS 1H-NMR data reveal considerable complexity in proton environments in each of the glasses studied. The fast MAS 1H-NMR spectra of the highest sodium concentration glasses do not exhibit evidence of signficantly greater fractions of dissolved water as molecular H 2O than the lower sodium concentration glasses requiring that the decrease in polymerization at high sodium contents involves a change in sodium solution mechanism. Variable contact time 1H- 29Si cross polarization (CP) MAS NMR data reveal an increase in the rotating frame spin lattice relaxation rate constant ( T1ρ*) for various Q n species with increasing sodium content that correlates with a reduction in the average 1H- 29Si coupling strength. At the highest sodium concentration, however, T1ρ* drops significantly, consistent with a change in the Na 2O solution mechanism.

  5. Sodium and T1ρ MRI for molecular and diagnostic imaging of articular cartilage†

    PubMed Central

    Borthakur, Arijitt; Mellon, Eric; Niyogi, Sampreet; Witschey, Walter; Kneeland, J. Bruce; Reddy, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    In this article, both sodium magnetic resonance (MR) and T1ρ relaxation mapping aimed at measuring molecular changes in cartilage for the diagnostic imaging of osteoarthritis are reviewed. First, an introduction to structure of cartilage, its degeneration in osteoarthritis (OA) and an outline of diagnostic imaging methods in quantifying molecular changes and early diagnostic aspects of cartilage degeneration are described. The sodium MRI section begins with a brief overview of the theory of sodium NMR of biological tissues and is followed by a section on multiple quantum filters that can be used to quantify both bi-exponential relaxation and residual quadrupolar interaction. Specifically, (i) the rationale behind the use of sodium MRI in quantifying proteoglycan (PG) changes, (ii) validation studies using biochemical assays, (iii) studies on human OA specimens, (iv) results on animal models and (v) clinical imaging protocols are reviewed. Results demonstrating the feasibility of quantifying PG in OA patients and comparison with that in healthy subjects are also presented. The section concludes with the discussion of advantages and potential issues with sodium MRI and the impact of new technological advancements (e.g. ultra-high field scanners and parallel imaging methods). In the theory section on T1ρ, a brief description of (i) principles of measuring T1ρ relaxation, (ii) pulse sequences for computing T1ρ relaxation maps, (iii) issues regarding radio frequency power deposition, (iv) mechanisms that contribute to T1ρ in biological tissues and (v) effects of exchange and dipolar interaction on T1ρ dispersion are discussed. Correlation of T1ρ relaxation rate with macromolecular content and biomechanical properties in cartilage specimens subjected to trypsin and cytokine-induced glycosaminoglycan depletion and validation against biochemical assay and histopathology are presented. Experimental T1ρ data from osteoarthritic specimens, animal models, healthy human

  6. Low resolution 1H NMR assignment of proton populations in pound cake and its polymeric ingredients.

    PubMed

    Luyts, A; Wilderjans, E; Waterschoot, J; Van Haesendonck, I; Brijs, K; Courtin, C M; Hills, B; Delcour, J A

    2013-08-15

    Based on a model system approach, five different proton populations were distinguished in pound cake crumb using one dimensional low resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In free induction decay (FID) measurements, proton populations were assigned to (i) non-exchanging CH protons of crystalline starch, proteins and crystalline fat and (ii) non-exchanging CH protons of amorphous starch and gluten, which are in little contact with water. In Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) measurements, three proton populations were distinguished. The CPMG population with the lowest mobility and the FID population with the highest mobility represent the same proton population. The two CPMG proton populations with the highest mobility were assigned to exchanging protons (i.e., protons of water, starch, gluten, egg proteins and sugar) and protons of lipids (i.e., protons of egg yolk lipids and amorphous lipid fraction of margarine) respectively. Based on their spin-lattice relaxation times (T1), two dimensional (1)H NMR spectroscopy further resolved the two proton populations with the highest mobility into three and two proton populations, respectively.

  7. Proton-detected 3D 14N/14N/1H isotropic shift correlation experiment mediated through 1H-1H RFDR mixing on a natural abundant sample under ultrafast MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    In this contribution, we have demonstrated a proton detection-based approach on a natural abundant powdered L-Histidine HCl-H2O sample at ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) to accomplish 14N/14N correlation from a 3D 14N/14N/1H isotropic shift correlation experiment mediated through 1H finite-pulse radio frequency-driven recoupling (fp-RFDR). Herein the heteronuclear magnetization transfer between 14N and 1H has been achieved by HMQC experiment, whereas 14N/14N correlation is attained through enhanced 1H-1H spin diffusion process due to 1H-1H dipolar recoupling during the RFDR mixing. While the use of ultrafast MAS (90 kHz) provides sensitivity enhancement through increased 1H transverse relaxation time (T2), the use of micro-coil probe which can withstand strong 14N radio frequency (RF) fields further improves the sensitivity per unit sample volume.

  8. T1ρ magnetic resonance: basic physics principles and applications in knee and intervertebral disc imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Chen, Weitian; Ahuja, Anil; Yuan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    T1ρ relaxation time provides a new contrast mechanism that differs from T1- and T2-weighted contrast, and is useful to study low-frequency motional processes and chemical exchange in biological tissues. T1ρ imaging can be performed in the forms of T1ρ-weighted image, T1ρ mapping and T1ρ dispersion. T1ρ imaging, particularly at low spin-lock frequency, is sensitive to B0 and B1 inhomogeneity. Various composite spin-lock pulses have been proposed to alleviate the influence of field inhomogeneity so as to reduce the banding-like spin-lock artifacts. T1ρ imaging could be specific absorption rate (SAR) intensive and time consuming. Efforts to address these issues and speed-up data acquisition are being explored to facilitate wider clinical applications. This paper reviews the T1ρ imaging’s basic physic principles, as well as its application for cartilage imaging and intervertebral disc imaging. Compared to more established T2 relaxation time, it has been shown that T1ρ provides more sensitive detection of proteoglycan (PG) loss at early stages of cartilage degeneration. T1ρ has also been shown to provide more sensitive evaluation of annulus fibrosis (AF) degeneration of the discs. PMID:26807369

  9. T1ρ magnetic resonance: basic physics principles and applications in knee and intervertebral disc imaging.

    PubMed

    Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; Zhang, Qinwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Chen, Weitian; Ahuja, Anil; Yuan, Jing

    2015-12-01

    T1ρ relaxation time provides a new contrast mechanism that differs from T1- and T2-weighted contrast, and is useful to study low-frequency motional processes and chemical exchange in biological tissues. T1ρ imaging can be performed in the forms of T1ρ-weighted image, T1ρ mapping and T1ρ dispersion. T1ρ imaging, particularly at low spin-lock frequency, is sensitive to B0 and B1 inhomogeneity. Various composite spin-lock pulses have been proposed to alleviate the influence of field inhomogeneity so as to reduce the banding-like spin-lock artifacts. T1ρ imaging could be specific absorption rate (SAR) intensive and time consuming. Efforts to address these issues and speed-up data acquisition are being explored to facilitate wider clinical applications. This paper reviews the T1ρ imaging's basic physic principles, as well as its application for cartilage imaging and intervertebral disc imaging. Compared to more established T2 relaxation time, it has been shown that T1ρ provides more sensitive detection of proteoglycan (PG) loss at early stages of cartilage degeneration. T1ρ has also been shown to provide more sensitive evaluation of annulus fibrosis (AF) degeneration of the discs.

  10. Advanced new relaxation filter-selective signal excitation methods for (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Asada, Mamiko; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2014-10-21

    We have developed new relaxation filter-selective signal excitation (RFS) methods for (13)C solid-state NMR, which enable extraction of the spectrum of a target component from a mixture of several components. These methods are based on the equalization of proton relaxation time in a single domain via rapid intraproton spin diffusion and the difference in proton relaxation time of individual components in the mixture. We recently reported two types of RFS methods using proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame ((1)H T1rho) in (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, to increase the availability of RFS methods, we focus on proton spin-lattice relaxation time ((1)H T1). Introduction of simple pulse sequences to one-dimensional experiments reduced data acquisition time and increased flexibility, and led to the development of two new types of RFS methods using (1)H T1. We then demonstrated these methods by selectively exciting the (13)C signals of target components in a commercially available drug and a number of physical mixtures, and we showed them to be applicable to the quantitative analysis of individual components in these solid mixtures with an experimental duration of 1.5 to about 10 h. The practicality and versatility of these four RFS methods were increased by combining two or more of them, or by using a flip-back pulse, which is an effective means of shortening experimental duration. These RFS methods are suitable for use in a broad range of fields.

  11. In vivo1H NMR spectroscopy of the human brain at 9.4 T: Initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deelchand, Dinesh Kumar; Moortele, Pierre-François Van de; Adriany, Gregor; Iltis, Isabelle; Andersen, Peter; Strupp, John P.; Thomas Vaughan, J.; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2010-09-01

    In vivo proton NMR spectroscopy allows non-invasive detection and quantification of a wide range of biochemical compounds in the brain. Higher field strength is generally considered advantageous for spectroscopy due to increased signal-to-noise and increased spectral dispersion. So far 1H NMR spectra have been reported in the human brain up to 7 T. In this study we show that excellent quality short echo time STEAM and LASER 1H NMR spectra can be measured in the human brain at 9.4 T. The information content of the human brain spectra appears very similar to that measured in the past decade in rodent brains at the same field strength, in spite of broader linewidth in human brain. Compared to lower fields, the T1 relaxation times of metabolites were slightly longer while T2 relaxation values of metabolites were shorter (<100 ms) at 9.4 T. The linewidth of the total creatine (tCr) resonance at 3.03 ppm increased linearly with magnetic field (1.35 Hz/T from 1.5 T to 9.4 T), with a minimum achievable tCr linewidth of around 12.5 Hz at 9.4 T. At very high field, B0 microsusceptibility effects are the main contributor to the minimum achievable linewidth.

  12. Dynamic structures of intact chicken erythrocyte chromatins as studied by 1H-31P cross-polarization NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Akutsu, H; Nishimoto, S; Kyogoku, Y

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic properties of DNA in intact chicken erythrocyte cells, nuclei, nondigested chromatins, digested soluble chromatins, H1, H5-depleted soluble chromatins and nucleosome cores were investigated by means of single-pulse and 1H-31P cross-polarization NMR. The temperature dependence of the phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy was identical for the former three in the presence of 3 mM MgCl2, suggesting that the local higher order structure is identical for these chromatins. The intrinsic phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy of the nucleosome cores was -159 ppm. The chemical shift anisotropy of DNA in the chromatins can be further averaged by the motion of the linker DNA. The spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame of the proton spins (T1p) of the nondigested chromatins was measured at various locking fields. The result was analyzed on the assumption of the isotropic motion to get a rough value of the correlation time of the motion efficient for the relaxation, which was eventually ascribed to the segmental motion of the linker DNA with restricted amplitude. The 30 nm filament structure induced by NaCl was shown to be dynamically different from that induced by MgCl2. Side-by-side compaction of 30-nm filaments was suggested to be induced in the MgCl2 concentration range higher than 0.3 mM. Biological significance of the dynamic structure was discussed in connection with the results obtained. PMID:7948693

  13. Detection of cerebral NAD(+) by in vivo (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Robin A; Behar, Kevin L

    2014-07-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) plays a central role in cellular metabolism both as a coenzyme for electron-transfer enzymes as well as a substrate for a wide range of metabolic pathways. In the current study NAD(+) was detected on rat brain in vivo at 11.7T by 3D localized (1)H MRS of the NAD(+) nicotinamide protons in the 8.7-9.5 ppm spectral region. Avoiding water perturbation was critical to the detection of NAD(+) as strong, possibly indirect cross-relaxation between NAD(+) and water would lead to a several-fold reduction of the NAD(+) intensity in the presence of water suppression. Water perturbation was minimized through the use of localization by adiabatic spin-echo refocusing (LASER) in combination with frequency-selective excitation. The NAD(+) concentration in the rat cerebral cortex was determined at 296 ± 28 μm, which is in good agreement with recently published (31) P NMR-based results as well as results from brain extracts in vitro (355 ± 34 μm). The T1 relaxation time constants of the NAD(+) nicotinamide protons as measured by inversion recovery were 280 ± 65 and 1136 ± 122 ms in the absence and presence of water inversion, respectively. This confirms the strong interaction between NAD(+) nicotinamide and water protons as observed during water suppression. The T2 relaxation time constants of the NAD(+) nicotinamide protons were determined at 60 ± 13 ms after confounding effects of scalar coupling evolution were taken into account. The simplicity of the MR sequence together with the robustness of NAD(+) signal detection and quantification makes the presented method a convenient choice for studies on NAD(+) metabolism and function. As the method does not critically rely on magnetic field homogeneity and spectral resolution it should find immediate applications in rodents and humans even at lower magnetic fields.

  14. Hyperpolarized (129)Xe T (1) in oxygenated and deoxygenated blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.; Kacher, D. F.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Jolesz, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    The viability of the new technique of hyperpolarized (129)Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) for imaging organs other than the lungs depends on whether the spin-lattice relaxation time, T(1), of (129)Xe is sufficiently long in the blood. In previous experiments by the authors, the T(1) was found to be strongly dependent upon the oxygenation of the blood, with T(1) increasing from about 3 s in deoxygenated samples to about 10 s in oxygenated samples. Contrarily, Tseng et al. (J. Magn. Reson. 1997; 126: 79-86) reported extremely long T(1) values deduced from an indirect experiment in which hyperpolarized (129)Xe was used to create a 'blood-foam'. They found that oxygenation decreased T(1). Pivotal to their experiment is the continual and rapid exchange of hyperpolarized (129)Xe between the gas phase (within blood-foam bubbles) and the dissolved phase (in the skin of the bubbles); this necessitated a complicated analysis to extract the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood. In the present study, the experimental design minimizes gas exchange after the initial bolus of hyperpolarized (129)Xe has been bubbled through the sample. This study confirms that oxygenation increases the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood, from about 4 s in freshly drawn venous blood, to about 13 s in blood oxygenated to arterial levels, and also shifts the red blood cell resonance to higher frequency. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Abbreviations used BOLD blood oxygen level dependent NOE nuclear overhouses effect PO(2) oxygen partial pressure RBC red blood cells RF radio frequency SNR signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. Relaxed heaps

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, J.R. ); Gabow, H.N.; Shrairman, R. ); Tarjan, R.E. )

    1988-11-01

    The relaxed heap is a priority queue data structure that achieves the same amortized time bounds as the Fibonacci heap - a sequence of m decrease key and n delete min operations takes time O(m + n log n). A variant of relaxed heaps achieves similar bounds in the worst case - O(1) time for decrease key and O(log n) for delete min. Relaxed heaps give a processor-efficient parallel implementation of Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, and hence other algorithms in network optimization. A relaxed heap is a type of binomial queue that allows heap order to be violated.

  16. Activation of the umami taste receptor (T1R1/T1R3) initiates the peristaltic reflex and pellet propulsion in the distal colon.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Derek M; Hurst, Norman R; Bradley, Zachary L; Mahavadi, Sunila; Kuemmerle, John F; Lyall, Vijay; DeSimone, John; Murthy, Karnam S; Grider, John R

    2014-12-01

    Intraluminal nutrients in the gut affect the peristaltic reflex, although the mechanism is not well defined. Recent evidence supports the presence of taste receptors and their signaling components in enteroendocrine cells, although their function is unclear. This study aimed to determine if nutrients modify colonic motility through activation of taste receptors. Colonic sections were immunostained for the umami taste receptor T1R1/T1R3, which mediates the response to umami ligands, such as monosodium glutamate (MSG), in taste cells. Ascending contraction, descending relaxation, and calcitonin gene-related peptide release were measured in three-chamber flat-sheet preparations of rat colon in response to MSG alone or with inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP). Velocity of artificial fecal pellet propulsion was measured by video recording in guinea pig distal colon. T1R1/T1R3 receptors were present in enteroendocrine cells of colonic sections from human, rat, mouse, and guinea pig. MSG initiated ascending contraction and descending relaxation components of the peristaltic reflex and calcitonin gene-related peptide release in flat-sheet preparations. IMP augmented the MSG-induced effects, suggesting activation of T1R1/T1R3 receptors. In T1R1(-/-) mice, mucosal stroking, but not MSG, elicited a peristaltic reflex. Intraluminal perfusion of MSG enhanced the velocity of artificial fecal pellet propulsion, which was also augmented by IMP. Propulsion was also increased by l-cysteine, but not l-tryptophan, supporting a role of T1R1/T1R3 receptors. We conclude that T1R1/T1R3 activation by luminal MSG or l-cysteine elicits a peristaltic reflex and CGRP release and increases the velocity of pellet propulsion in distal colon. This mechanism may explain how nutrients regulate colonic propulsion.

  17. Quantitative T1 mapping under precisely controlled graded hyperoxia at 7T.

    PubMed

    Bhogal, Alex A; Siero, Jeroen Cw; Zwanenburg, Jaco; Luijten, Peter R; Philippens, Marielle Ep; Hoogduin, Hans

    2017-04-01

    Increasing the concentration of oxygen dissolved in water is known to increase the recovery rate (R1 = 1/T1) of longitudinal magnetization (T1 relaxation). Direct T1 changes in response to precise hyperoxic gas challenges have not yet been quantified and the actual effect of increasing arterial oxygen concentration on the T1 of brain parenchyma remains unclear. The aim of this work was to use quantitative T1 mapping to measure tissue T1 changes in response to precisely targeted hyperoxic respiratory challenges ranging from baseline end-tidal oxygen (PetO2) to approximately 500 mmHg. We did not observe measureable T1 changes in either gray matter or white matter parenchymal tissue. The T1 of peripheral cerebrospinal fluid located within the sulci, however, was reduced as a function of PetO2. No significant T1 changes were observed in the ventricular cerebrospinal fluid under hyperoxia. Our results indicate that care should be taken to distinguish actual T1 changes from those which may be related to partial volume effects with cerebrospinal fluid, or regions with increased fluid content such as edema when examining hyperoxia-induced changes in T1 using methods based on T1-weighted imaging.

  18. T2 can be greater than 2T1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevian, H. M.; Skinner, J. L.

    1989-08-01

    We consider a quantum-mechanical two-level system under the influence of both diagonal and off-diagonal stochastic perturbations, and focus on the decay times T1 and T2, which refer to the relaxation to equilibrium of the populations and relative phase of the two levels, respectively. From both theoretical and experimental viewpoints one traditionally expects that T2≤2T1. On the other hand, from a fourth-order cumulant expansion calculation of the asymptotic time dependence of the density matrix elements, Budimir and Skinner [J. Stat. Phys. 49, 1029 (1987)] showed that, in fact, in some instances T2>2T1. In this paper we solve the stochastic model numerically, which leads to the exact time dependence of the density matrix at all times. We find that the analytic prediction that T2>2T1 is not only correct, but also meaningful, in the sense that the density matrix elements decay exponentially after only a short transient time.

  19. 31P NMR Relaxation of Cortical Bone Mineral at Multiple Magnetic Field Strengths and Levels of Demineralization

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Alan C.; Wright, Alexander C.; Wehrli, Suzanne L.; Ong, Henry H.; Li, Cheng; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Recent work has shown that solid-state 1H and 31P MRI can provide detailed insight into bone matrix and mineral properties, thereby potentially enabling differentiation of osteoporosis from osteomalacia. However, 31P MRI of bone mineral is hampered by unfavorable relaxation properties. Hence, accurate knowledge of these properties is critical to optimizing MRI of bone phosphorus. Methods In this work, 31P MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was predicted on the basis of T1 and T2* (effective transverse relaxation time) measured in lamb bone at six field strengths (1.5 – 11.7 T) and subsequently verified by 3-D ultra-short echo-time and zero echo-time imaging. Further, T1 was measured in deuterium-exchanged bone and partially demineralized bone. Results 31P T2* was found to decrease from 220.3 ± 4.3 μs to 98.0 ± 1.4 μs from 1.5 to 11.7 T, and T1 to increase from 12.8 ± 0.5 s to 97.3 ± 6.4 s. Deuteron substitution of exchangeable water showed that 76% of the 31P longitudinal relaxation rate is due to 1H-31P dipolar interactions. Lastly, hypomineralization was found to decrease T1, which may have implications for 31P MRI based mineralization density quantification. Conclusion Despite the steep decrease in the T2*/T1 ratio, SNR should increase with field strength as Bo0.4 for sample-dominated noise and as Bo1.1 for coil-dominated noise. This was confirmed by imaging experiments. PMID:23505120

  20. Correlation of lactate and pH in human skeletal muscle after exercise by 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Pan, J W; Hamm, J R; Hetherington, H P; Rothman, D L; Shulman, R G

    1991-07-01

    We have made in vivo 1H NMR measurements of the time course of pH and lactate in human skeletal muscle after exercise. Spectra were obtained in a 4.7-T 30-cm bore Bruker Biospec spectrometer with a 2.5-cm diameter single surface coil. pH was determined from the shift of the endogenous carnosine H-C2 peak while lactate concentrations were determined by comparison with endogenous total creatine, taken to be 28.5 mM/kg wet wt. Fitting the data shows that the exponential decay of lactate (-0.094 +/- 0.014 min-1. t1/2 = 10.6 min) is slower than that of pH (-0.147 +/- 0.015 min-1, t1/2 = 4.7 min), n = 7 with two different volunteers. These values are significantly different with P less than 0.0005. Relaxation times of lactate and creatine were also measured for lactate quantitation; creatine T1, 1.23 +/- 12 s, T2, 136.2 +/- 26.4 ms (both in resting human muscle); lactate T1 (in postmortem rabbit muscle), 1.0 +/- 11 s and T2, 80 ms (in postexercise human muscle). At the end of intense exercise, the lactate level reached was 25.3 +/- 4.0 mM and the average pH drop was 1.0 pH unit. We discuss the implications of these measurements in conjunction with existing data on other sources of H+ flux, phosphocreatine resynthesis, H+ transport, and contribution of inorganic phosphate to buffering.

  1. T1ρ Imaging in Premanifest Huntington Disease Reveals Changes Associated with Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, Shafik N.; Wemmie, John; Johnson, Casey P.; Johnson, Hans; Paulsen, Jane S.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Magnotta, Vincent A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Imaging biomarkers sensitive to Huntington’s disease (HD) during the premanifest phase preceding motor diagnosis may accelerate identification and evaluation of potential therapies. For this purpose, quantitative MRI sensitive to tissue microstructure and metabolism may hold great potential. We investigated the potential value of T1ρ relaxation to detect pathological changes in premanifest HD (preHD) relative to other quantitative relaxation parameters. Methods Quantitative MR parametric mapping was used to assess differences between 50 preHD subjects and 26 age- and sex-matched controls. Subjects with preHD were classified into two progression groups based on their CAG-age product (CAP) score; a high and a low/moderate CAP group. Voxel-wise and region-of-interest analyses were used to assess changes in the quantitative relaxation times. Results T1ρ showed a significant increase in the relaxation times in the high-CAP group, as compared to controls, largely in the striatum. The T1ρ changes in the preHD subjects showed a significant relationship with CAP score. No significant changes in T2 or T2* relaxation times were found in the striatum. T2* relaxation changes were found in the globus pallidus, but no significant changes with disease progression were found. Conclusion These data suggest that quantitative T1ρ mapping may provide a useful marker for assessing disease progression in HD. The absence of T2 changes suggests that the T1ρ abnormalities are unlikely owing to altered water content or tissue structure. The established sensitivity of T1ρ to pH and glucose suggests that these factors are altered in HD perhaps owing to abnormal mitochondrial function. PMID:25820773

  2. Arrangement and mobility of water in vermiculite hydrates followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sanz, J; Herrero, C P; Serratosa, J M

    2006-04-20

    The arrangement of water molecules in one- and two-layer hydrates of high-charged vermiculites, saturated with alkaline (Li(+), Na(+)) and alkali-earth (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+)) cations, has been analyzed with (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Two different orientations for water molecules have been found, depending on the hydration state and the sites occupied by interlayer cations. As the amount of water increases, hydrogen bond interactions between water molecules increase at expenses of water-silicate interactions. This interaction favors water mobility in vermiculites. A comparison of the temperature dependence of relaxation times T(1) and T(2) for one and two-layer hydrates of Na-vermiculite shows that the rotations of water molecules around C(2)-axes and that of cation hydration shells around the c-axis is favored in the two-layer hydrate. In both hydrates, the anisotropic diffusion of water takes place at room temperature, preserving the orientation of water molecules relative to the silicate layers. Information obtained by NMR spectroscopy is compatible with that deduced by infrared spectroscopy and with structural studies carried out with X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques on single-crystals of vermiculite.

  3. Molecular motions in glassy crystal cyanoadamantane : a proton spin-lattice relaxation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoureux, J. P.; Decressain, R.; Sahour, M.; Cochon, E.

    1992-02-01

    Cyanoadamantane C{10}H{15}CN exhibits four different solid phases : two cubic plastic (I and I'), one cubic glassy (Ig) and one monoclinic ordered (II). In cubic plastic phases (I, I') three types of motion coexist : a uniaxial rotation of the molecule around its C—CequivN axis, a tumbling reorientation of this dipolar axis between the <~ngle 001rangle directions and a vacancy self-diffusion. In the cubic glassy state (Ig) the tumbling motion is frozen and therefore only the uniaxial rotation survives. In the ordered phase (II), the molecules only perform a 3-fold uniaxial rotation among identical positions. These different molecular motions in the four solid phases have been studied by the analysis of the T_{1 z} and T_{1 ρ} spin-lattice relaxation times in ^1H-NMR. The derived residence time are compared, when possible, to values previously deduced from quasi-elastic neutron scattering, dielectric relaxation and second moment of the ^1H-NMR lineshape. Le cyanoadamantane C{10}H{15}CN possède quatre phases solides différentes : deux plastiques cubiques (I et I'), une vitreuse cubique (Ig) et une ordonnée monoclinique (II). Dans les phases plastiques cubiques (I, I') trois types de mouvements coexistent : une rotation uniaxiale de la molécule autour de son axe C—CequivN, un basculement de cet axe dipolaire entre les directions <~ngle 001rangle et une diffusion moléculaire. Dans l'état vitreux cubique (Ig), le mouvement de basculement est gelé et seule la rotation uniaxiale subsiste. Enfin dans la phase ordonnée (II), les molécules effectuent une rotation uniaxiale d'ordre 3 entre positions indiscernables. Ces différents mouvements dans les quatre phases solides ont été évalués par l'analyse des temps de relaxation spin-réseau T_{1 z} et T_{1 ρ} en ^1H-RMN. Les temps de résidence qui en sont déduits sont comparés (lorsque cela est possible) aux valeurs correspondantes déduites précédemment par diffusion quasi-élastique des neutrons, par

  4. The Effect of Three Times a Week Glatiramer Acetate on Cerebral T1 Hypointense Lesions in Relapsing‐Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Michael G.; Ramasamy, Deepa P.; Davis, Mat D.; Steinerman, Joshua R.; Khan, Omar

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Two definitions of T1 hypointense (T1H) lesions can be derived from pre‐contrast images: those that may or may not have a corresponding gadolinium‐enhancing correlate on post‐contrast images (T1H total), and those that are simultaneously non‐gadolinium‐enhancing on post‐contrast scans (T1H non‐enhancing). To determine the differences in lesion evolution between these two T1H definitions, we examined the effect of glatiramer acetate 40 mg/mL three times weekly subcutaneous injection (GA40) on the number of new or enlarging T1H total and T1H non‐enhancing lesions in patients with relapsing‐remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). METHODS The Phase III GALA study randomized 1404 RRMS subjects 2:1 to receive GA40 or placebo for 12 months. MRI scans were obtained at baseline and at months 6 and 12. Cumulative numbers of T1H total and of T1H non‐enhancing lesions were analyzed using an adjusted negative binomial regression model. A total of 1,357 patients had MRI data collected at either the month 6 or month 12 visit. RESULTS Among the 1,357 patients with MRI scans performed at either the month 6 or month 12 visit, 883 treated with GA40 developed an adjusted cumulative mean of 1.72 T1H total lesions versus 2.62 in 440 placebo controls (risk ratio, .66; 95% CI, .54‐.80; P < .0001). On T1H non‐enhanced scans, GA40‐treated patients developed an adjusted cumulative mean of 1.35 T1H non‐enhancing lesions versus 1.91 in placebo controls (risk ratio, .71; CI, .58‐.87; P = .0009). CONCLUSIONS GA40 significantly reduced the number of new or enlarging T1H total lesions and T1H non‐enhancing lesions compared with placebo. Although the treatment effect magnitude was comparable with both definitions, the use of T1H non‐enhancing lesions may be more relevant for more uniform standardization in future clinical trials. PMID:26394270

  5. Relaxation magnétique nucléaire du carbone-13 et dynamique des molécules de chlorpromazine associées en solution aqueuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, S.; Thévand, A.

    1998-02-01

    13C relaxation times and heteronuclear NOE enhancements have been measured for chlorpromazine hydrochloride salt in chloroform and water. The dipolar contribution to 13C ^1H spin systems relaxation rates were extracted and allowed us to characterize the molecular reorientation in the two solvents. The correlation times are on either side of “T1 minimum". The values agree with the size of the molecule and show an association by stacking of 11 monomeric entities. Les temps de relaxation des 13C et les accroissements par effet Overhauser 1Hto13C ont été mesurés parallèlement sur la molécule de chlorhydrate de chlorpromazine non associée dans le chloroforme et auto-associée dans l'eau. L'extraction de la contribution dipolaire aux constantes de vitesse de relaxation des systèmes 13C 1H de la molécule a permis de caractériser la réorientation de la molécule dans les deux cas. Les temps de corrélation obtenus qui se situent de part et d'autre du “T1 minimum" sont en accord avec la taille de la molécule isolée et montrent que l'agrégat est formé par empilement de 11 molécules.

  6. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  7. 1H and 13C MAS NMR analysis for the role of chemically inequivalent a-N(CH3)4 and b-N(CH3)4 ions in [N(CH3)4]2CuCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory frame, T1, and in the rotating frame, T1ρ, for 1H and 13C in [N(CH3)4]2CuCl4 were measured by static NMR and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR as functions of temperature. The intensities of the 1H and 13C signals changed near phase transition temperatures TC1 and TC3, which indicated that N(CH3)4 plays an important role in these phase transitions. It was thus apparent that the T1 and T1ρ for 1H are governed by the same molecular motions. Two inequivalent ions, a-N(CH3)4 and b-N(CH3)4, were identified by 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR. From these results, the behaviors of these two chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 groups in the paraelastic and ferroelastic phases are discussed.

  8. Study of cross - relaxation and molecular dynamics in the solid 3-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid by solid state NMR off - resonance.

    PubMed

    Woźniak-Braszak, Aneta

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics of the solid 3-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid containing proton (1)H and fluorine (19)F nuclei was explored by the solid-state NMR off - resonance technique. Contrary to the previous experiments the proton nuclei system I relaxed in the off - resonance effective field B→e while fluorine nuclei system S was saturated for short time in comparison to the relaxation time T1I. New cross - relaxation solid - state NMR off - resonance experiments were conducted on a homebuilt pulse spectrometer operating at the on-resonance frequency of 30.2MHz, at the off - resonance frequency varied between 30.2 and 30.6MHz for protons and at the frequency of 28.411MHz for fluorines, respectively. Based on the experimental data the dispersions of the proton off - resonance spin - lattice relaxation rate ρρ(I), the fluorine off - resonance spin - lattice relaxation rate ρρ(S) and the cross - relaxation rate σρ in the rotating frame were determined.

  9. Bisphosphonate-Anchored PEGylation and Radiolabeling of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide: Long-Circulating Nanoparticles for in Vivo Multimodal (T1 MRI-SPECT) Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The efficient delivery of nanomaterials to specific targets for in vivo biomedical imaging is hindered by rapid sequestration by the reticuloendothelial system (RES) and consequent short circulation times. To overcome these two problems, we have prepared a new stealth PEG polymer conjugate containing a terminal 1,1-bisphosphonate (BP) group for strong and stable binding to the surface of ultrasmall-superparamagnetic oxide nanomaterials (USPIOs). This polymer, PEG(5)-BP, can be used to exchange the hydrophobic surfactants commonly used in the synthesis of USPIOs very efficiently and at room temperature using a simple method in 1 h. The resulting nanoparticles, PEG(5)-BP-USPIOs are stable in water or saline for at least 7 months and display a near-zero ζ-potential at neutral pH. The longitudinal (r1) and transverse (r2) relaxivities were measured at a clinically relevant magnetic field (3 T), revealing a high r1 of 9.5 mM–1 s–1 and low r2/r1 ratio of 2.97, making these USPIOs attractive as T1-weighted MRI contrast agents at high magnetic fields. The strong T1-effect was demonstrated in vivo, revealing that PEG(5)-BP-USPIOs remain in the bloodstream and enhance its signal 6-fold, allowing the visualization of blood vessels and vascular organs with high spatial definition. Furthermore, the optimal relaxivity properties allow us to inject a dose 4 times lower than with other USPIOs. PEG(5)-BP-USPIOs can also be labeled using a radiolabeled-BP for visualization with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and thus affording dual-modality contrast. The SPECT studies confirmed low RES uptake and long blood circulation times (t1/2 = 2.97 h). These results demonstrate the potential of PEG(5)-BP-USPIOs for the development of targeted multimodal imaging agents for molecular imaging. PMID:23194247

  10. Cerebral abnormalities: use of calculated T1 and T2 magnetic resonance images for diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, C.M.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1984-01-01

    The potential clinical importance of T1 and T2 relaxation times in distinguishing normal and pathologic tissue with magnetic resonance (MR) is discussed and clinical examples of cerebral abnormalities are given. Five patients with cerebral infarction, 15 with multiple sclerosis, two with Wilson disease, and four with tumors were imaged. Hemorrhagic and ischemic cerebrovascular accidents were distinguished using the spin echo technique. In the patients with multiple sclerosis, lesions had prolonged T1 and T2 times, but the definition of plaque was limited by spatial resolution. No abnormalities in signal intensity were seen in the patient with Wilson disease who was no longer severly disabled; abnormal increased signal intensity in the basal ganglia was found in the second patient with Wilson disease. Four tumors produced abnormal T1 and T2 relaxation times but these values alone were not sufficient for tumor characterization.

  11. T1- and T2-weighted imaging at 8 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Kangarlu, A; Abduljalil, A M; Robitaille, P M

    1999-01-01

    In this work, both T1- and T2-weighted fast imaging methods at 8 T are presented. These include the modified driven equilibrium Fourier transform (MDEFT) and rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) methods, respectively. Axial MDEFT images were acquired with large nutation angles, both partially suppressing gray and white matter and permitting the visualization of vascular structures rich in unsaturated spins. Sagittal RARE images, acquired from the same volunteer, were highly T2-weighted, thus highlighting the CSF. At the same time, they provided good visualization of the corpus callosum, cerebellum, and gray and white matter structures. Importantly, both MDEFT and RARE images could be acquired without violating specific absorption rate guidelines.

  12. Elucidating connectivity and metal-binding structures of unlabeled paramagnetic complexes by 13C and 1H solid-state NMR under fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Nalinda P; Shaibat, Medhat A; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2007-08-23

    Characterizing paramagnetic complexes in solids is an essential step toward understanding their molecular functions. However, methodologies to characterize chemical and electronic structures of paramagnetic systems at the molecular level have been notably limited, particularly for noncrystalline solids. We present an approach to obtain connectivities of chemical groups and metal-binding structures for unlabeled paramagnetic complexes by 13C and 1H high-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) using very fast magic angle spinning (VFMAS, spinning speed >or=20 kHz). It is experimentally shown for unlabeled Cu(II)(Ala-Thr) that 2D 13C/1H correlation SSNMR under VFMAS provides the connectivity of chemical groups and assignments for the characterization of unlabeled paramagnetic systems in solids. We demonstrate that on the basis of the assignments provided by the VFMAS approach multiple 13C-metal distances can be simultaneously elucidated by a combination of measurements of 13C anisotropic hyperfine shifts and 13C T1 relaxation due to hyperfine interactions for this peptide-Cu(II) complex. It is also shown that an analysis of 1H anisotropic hyperfine shifts allows for the determination of electron-spin states in Fe(III)-chloroprotoporphyin-IX in solid states.

  13. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  14. Reduced Right Ventricular Native Myocardial T1 in Anderson-Fabry Disease: Comparison to Pulmonary Hypertension and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Joseph J.; Chow, Kelvin; Khan, Aneal; Michelakis, Evangelos; Paterson, Ian; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Thompson, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is characterized by progressive multiorgan accumulation of intracellular sphingolipids due to α-galactosidase A enzyme deficiency, resulting in progressive ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, arrhythmias, and death. Decreased native (non-contrast) left ventricular (LV) T1 (longitudinal relaxation time) with MRI discriminates AFD from healthy controls or other presentations of concentric hypertrophy, but the right ventricle (RV) has not been studied. The aims of the current study were to evaluate native RV T1 values in AFD, with a goal of better understanding the pathophysiology of RV involvement. Methods and Results Native T1 values were measured in the inferior RV wall (RVI), interventricular septum (IVS), and inferior LV (LVI) in patients with AFD, patients with pulmonary hypertension, who provided an alternative RV pathological process for comparison, and healthy controls. A minimum wall thickness of 4 mm was selected to minimize partial volume errors in tissue T1 analysis. T1 analysis was performed in 6 subjects with AFD, 6 subjects with PH, and 21 controls. Native T1 values were shorter (adjusted p<0.05 for all comparisons), independent of location, in subjects with AFD (RVI-T1 = 1096±49 ms, IVS-T1 = 1053±41 ms, LVI-T1 = 1072±44 ms) compared to both PH (RVI-T1 = 1239±41 ms, IVS-T1 = 1280±123 ms, LVI-T1 = 1274±57 ms) and HC (IVS-T1 = 1180±60 ms, LVI-T1 = 1183±45 ms). RVI measurements were not possible in controls due to insufficient wall thickness. Conclusion Native T1 values appear similarly reduced in the left and right ventricles of individuals with AFD and RV wall thickening, suggesting a common pathology. In contrast, individuals with PH and thickened RVs showed increased native T1 values in both ventricles, suggestive of fibrosis. PMID:27305064

  15. Measurement of solute proton spin-lattice relaxation times in water using the 1,3,3,1 sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Sankar, S.S.; Mole, P.A.; Coulson, R.L.

    1986-12-01

    /sup 1/H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the N-CH3 proton resonances of phosphocreatine (PCr) and creatine (Cr) in water solutions were obtained using the 1,3,3,1 pulse sequence. These T1 values were equivalent to those obtained in D/sub 2/O and water using either the conventional inversion-recovery experiment or the 1,3,3,1 pulse sequence. Thus, the 1,3,3,1 sequence of proton NMR can provide an independent means along with phosphorous NMR for assess PCr and for the study of the creatine kinase reaction (PCr + ADP in equilibrium ATP + Cr) in aqueous solutions and perhaps in biological preparations.

  16. T1 and susceptibility contrast at high fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelavalli, Jaladhar

    Clinical imaging at high magnetic field strengths (≥ 3Tesla) is sought after primarily due to the increased signal strength available at these fields. This increased SNR can be used to perform: (a) high resolution imaging in the same time as at lower field strengths; (b) the same resolution imaging with much faster acquisition; and (c) functional MR imaging (fMRI), dynamic perfusion and diffusion imaging with increased sensitivity. However they are also associated with increased power deposition (SAR) due to increase in imaging frequency and longer T1 relaxation times. Longer T1s mean longer imaging times for generating good T1 contrast images. On the other hand for faster imaging, at high fields fast spin echo or magnetization prepared sequences are conventionally proposed which are, however, associated with high SAR values. Imaging with low SAR is more and more important as we move towards high fields and particularly for patients with metallic implants like pacemakers or deep brain stimulator. The SAR limit acceptable for these patients is much less than the limit acceptable for normal subjects. A new method is proposed for imaging at high fields with good contrast with simultaneous reduction in power deposition. Further, T1 based contrast optimization problem in FLASH imaging is considered for tissues with different T1s but same spin densities. The solution providing optimal imaging parameters is simplified for quick and easy computation in a clinical setting. The efficacy of the simplification is evaluated and practical limits under which the simplification can be applied are worked out. The phase difference due to variation in magnetic susceptibility property among biological tissues is another unique source of contrast which is different from the conventional T1, T2 and T2* contrast. This susceptibility based phase contrast has become more and more important at high fields, partly due to contrast generation issues due to longer T 1s and shorter T2s and

  17. Brain abnormalities in bipolar disorder detected by quantitative T1ρ mapping.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C P; Follmer, R L; Oguz, I; Warren, L A; Christensen, G E; Fiedorowicz, J G; Magnotta, V A; Wemmie, J A

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal metabolism has been reported in bipolar disorder, however, these studies have been limited to specific regions of the brain. To investigate whole-brain changes potentially associated with these processes, we applied a magnetic resonance imaging technique novel to psychiatric research, quantitative mapping of T1 relaxation in the rotating frame (T1ρ). This method is sensitive to proton chemical exchange, which is affected by pH, metabolite concentrations and cellular density with high spatial resolution relative to alternative techniques such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography. Study participants included 15 patients with bipolar I disorder in the euthymic state and 25 normal controls balanced for age and gender. T1ρ maps were generated and compared between the bipolar and control groups using voxel-wise and regional analyses. T1ρ values were found to be elevated in the cerebral white matter and cerebellum in the bipolar group. However, volumes of these areas were normal as measured by high-resolution T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Interestingly, the cerebellar T1ρ abnormalities were normalized in participants receiving lithium treatment. These findings are consistent with metabolic or microstructural abnormalities in bipolar disorder and draw attention to roles of the cerebral white matter and cerebellum. This study highlights the potential utility of high-resolution T1ρ mapping in psychiatric research.

  18. Hydrogels incorporating GdDOTA: towards highly efficient dual T1/T2 MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Courant, Thomas; Roullin, Valérie Gaëlle; Cadiou, Cyril; Callewaert, Maïté; Andry, Marie Christine; Portefaix, Christophe; Hoeffel, Christine; de Goltstein, Marie Christine; Port, Marc; Laurent, Sophie; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert; Molinari, Michaël; Chuburu, Françoise

    2012-09-03

    Do not tumble dry: Gadolinium-DOTA encapsulated into polysaccharide nanoparticles (GdDOTA NPs) exhibited high relaxivity (r(1) =101.7 s(-1) mM(-1) per Gd(3+) ion at 37 °C and 20 MHz). This high relaxation rate is due to efficient Gd loading, reduced tumbling of the Gd complex, and the hydrogel nature of the nanoparticles. The efficacy of the nanoparticles as a T(1)/T(2) dual-mode contrast agent was studied in C6 cells.

  19. Natural relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by natural inflation, we propose a relaxation mechanism consistent with inflationary cosmology that explains the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and Planck scale. This scenario is based on a selection mechanism that identifies the low-scale dynamics as the one that is screened from UV physics. The scenario also predicts the near-criticality and metastability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum state, explaining the Higgs boson mass observed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Once Majorana right-handed neutrinos are introduced to provide a viable reheating channel, our framework yields a corresponding mass scale that allows for the seesaw mechanism as well as for standard thermal leptogenesis. We argue that considering singlet scalar dark matter extensions of the proposed scenario could solve the vacuum stability problem and discuss how the cosmological constant problem is possibly addressed.

  20. Translational diffusion in paramagnetic liquids by 1H NMR relaxometry: nitroxide radicals in solution.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Korpała, A; Kubica, A; Meier, R; Rössler, E A; Moscicki, J

    2013-01-14

    For nitroxide radicals in solution one can identify three frequency regimes in which (1)H spin-lattice relaxation rate of solvent molecules depend linearly on square root of the (1)H resonance frequency. Combining a recently developed theory of nuclear (proton) spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of nitroxide radicals [D. Kruk et al., J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)] with properties of the spectral density function associated with translational dynamics, relationships between the corresponding linear changes of the relaxation rate (for (14)N spin probes) and relative translational diffusion coefficient of the solvent and solute molecules have been derived (in analogy to (15)N spin probes [E. Belorizky et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 3674 (1998)]). This method allows a simple and straightforward determination of diffusion coefficients in spin-labeled systems, by means of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The approach has thoroughly been tested by applying to a large set of experimental data-(1)H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion results for solutions of different viscosity (decalin, glycerol, propylene glycol) of (14)N and (15)N spin probes. The experiments have been performed versus temperature (to cover a broad range of translational diffusion coefficients) using field cycling spectrometer which covers three decades in (1)H resonance frequency, 10 kHz-20 MHz. The limitations of NMR relaxometry caused by the time scale of the translational dynamics as well as electron spin relaxation have been discussed. It has been shown that for spin-labeled systems NMR relaxometry gives access to considerably faster diffusion processes than for diamagnetic systems.

  1. Translational diffusion in paramagnetic liquids by 1H NMR relaxometry: Nitroxide radicals in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-01-01

    For nitroxide radicals in solution one can identify three frequency regimes in which 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate of solvent molecules depend linearly on square root of the 1H resonance frequency. Combining a recently developed theory of nuclear (proton) spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of nitroxide radicals [D. Kruk et al., J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854 with properties of the spectral density function associated with translational dynamics, relationships between the corresponding linear changes of the relaxation rate (for 14N spin probes) and relative translational diffusion coefficient of the solvent and solute molecules have been derived (in analogy to 15N spin probes [E. Belorizky et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 3674 (1998)], 10.1021/jp980397h). This method allows a simple and straightforward determination of diffusion coefficients in spin-labeled systems, by means of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The approach has thoroughly been tested by applying to a large set of experimental data—1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion results for solutions of different viscosity (decalin, glycerol, propylene glycol) of 14N and 15N spin probes. The experiments have been performed versus temperature (to cover a broad range of translational diffusion coefficients) using field cycling spectrometer which covers three decades in 1H resonance frequency, 10 kHz-20 MHz. The limitations of NMR relaxometry caused by the time scale of the translational dynamics as well as electron spin relaxation have been discussed. It has been shown that for spin-labeled systems NMR relaxometry gives access to considerably faster diffusion processes than for diamagnetic systems.

  2. Distinct human and mouse membrane trafficking systems for sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Madoka; Goto, Masao; Kawai, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsuko; Kusakabe, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3 are included in the T1r taste receptor family that belongs to class C of the G protein-coupled receptors. Heterodimerization of T1r2 and T1r3 is required for the perception of sweet substances, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heterodimerization, including membrane trafficking. We developed tagged mouse T1r2 and T1r3, and human T1R2 and T1R3 and evaluated membrane trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We found that human T1R3 surface expression was only observed when human T1R3 was coexpressed with human T1R2, whereas mouse T1r3 was expressed without mouse T1r2 expression. A domain-swapped chimera and truncated human T1R3 mutant showed that the Venus flytrap module and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 contain a region related to the inhibition of human T1R3 membrane trafficking and coordinated regulation of human T1R3 membrane trafficking. We also found that the Venus flytrap module of both human T1R2 and T1R3 are needed for membrane trafficking, suggesting that the coexpression of human T1R2 and T1R3 is required for this event. These results suggest that the Venus flytrap module and CRD receive taste substances and play roles in membrane trafficking of human T1R2 and T1R3. These features are different from those of mouse receptors, indicating that human T1R2 and T1R3 are likely to have a novel membrane trafficking system.

  3. Distinct Human and Mouse Membrane Trafficking Systems for Sweet Taste Receptors T1r2 and T1r3

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Madoka; Goto, Masao; Kawai, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsuko; Kusakabe, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3 are included in the T1r taste receptor family that belongs to class C of the G protein-coupled receptors. Heterodimerization of T1r2 and T1r3 is required for the perception of sweet substances, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heterodimerization, including membrane trafficking. We developed tagged mouse T1r2 and T1r3, and human T1R2 and T1R3 and evaluated membrane trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We found that human T1R3 surface expression was only observed when human T1R3 was coexpressed with human T1R2, whereas mouse T1r3 was expressed without mouse T1r2 expression. A domain-swapped chimera and truncated human T1R3 mutant showed that the Venus flytrap module and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 contain a region related to the inhibition of human T1R3 membrane trafficking and coordinated regulation of human T1R3 membrane trafficking. We also found that the Venus flytrap module of both human T1R2 and T1R3 are needed for membrane trafficking, suggesting that the coexpression of human T1R2 and T1R3 is required for this event. These results suggest that the Venus flytrap module and CRD receive taste substances and play roles in membrane trafficking of human T1R2 and T1R3. These features are different from those of mouse receptors, indicating that human T1R2 and T1R3 are likely to have a novel membrane trafficking system. PMID:25029362

  4. 1H-detected 1H- 1H correlation spectroscopy of a stereo-array isotope labeled amino acid under fast magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Kainosho, Masatsune; Akutsu, Hideo; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2010-04-01

    The combined use of selective deuteration, stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL), and fast magic-angle spinning effectively suppresses the 1H-1H dipolar couplings in organic solids. This method provided the high-field 1H NMR linewidths comparable to those achieved by combined rotation and multiple-pulse spectroscopy. This technique was applied to two-dimensional 1H-detected 1H-1H polarization transfer CHH experiments of valine. The signal sensitivity for the 1H-detected CHH experiments was greater than that for the 13C-detected 1H-1H polarization transfer experiments by a factor of 2-4. We obtained the 1H-1H distances in SAIL valine by CHH experiments with an accuracy of about 0.2 Å by using a theory developed for 1H-1H polarization transfer in 13C-labeled organic compounds.

  5. Eccentricity mapping of the human visual cortex to evaluate temporal dynamics of functional T1ρ mapping

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Hye-Young; Wemmie, John A; Johnson, Casey P; Thedens, Daniel R; Magnotta, Vincent A

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments suggest that T1 relaxation in the rotating frame (T1ρ) is sensitive to metabolism and can detect localized activity-dependent changes in the human visual cortex. Current functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods have poor temporal resolution due to delays in the hemodynamic response resulting from neurovascular coupling. Because T1ρ is sensitive to factors that can be derived from tissue metabolism, such as pH and glucose concentration via proton exchange, we hypothesized that activity-evoked T1ρ changes in visual cortex may occur before the hemodynamic response measured by blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) contrast. To test this hypothesis, functional imaging was performed using T1ρ, BOLD, and ASL in human participants viewing an expanding ring stimulus. We calculated eccentricity phase maps across the occipital cortex for each functional signal and compared the temporal dynamics of T1ρ versus BOLD and ASL. The results suggest that T1ρ changes precede changes in the two blood flow-dependent measures. These observations indicate that T1ρ detects a signal distinct from traditional fMRI contrast methods. In addition, these findings support previous evidence that T1ρ is sensitive to factors other than blood flow, volume, or oxygenation. Furthermore, they suggest that tissue metabolism may be driving activity-evoked T1ρ changes. PMID:25966957

  6. 23Na and 1H NMR Microimaging of Intact Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olt, Silvia; Krötz, Eva; Komor, Ewald; Rokitta, Markus; Haase, Axel

    2000-06-01

    23Na NMR microimaging is described to map, for the first time, the sodium distribution in living plants. As an example, the response of 6-day-old seedlings of Ricinus communis to exposure to sodium chloride concentrations from 5 to 300 mM was observed in vivo using 23Na as well as 1H NMR microimaging. Experiments were performed at 11.75 T with a double resonant 23Na-1H probehead. The probehead was homebuilt and equipped with a climate chamber. T1 and T2 of 23Na were measured in the cross section of the hypocotyl. Within 85 min 23Na images with an in-plane resolution of 156 × 156 μm were acquired. With this spatial information, the different types of tissue in the hypocotyl can be discerned. The measurement time appears to be short compared to the time scale of sodium uptake and accumulation in the plant so that the kinetics of salt stress can be followed. In conclusion, 23Na NMR microimaging promises great potential for physiological studies of the consequences of salt stress on the macroscopic level and thus may become a unique tool for characterizing plants with respect to salt tolerance and salt sensitivity.

  7. 23Na and (1)H NMR microimaging of intact plants.

    PubMed

    Olt, S; Krötz, E; Komor, E; Rokitta, M; Haase, A

    2000-06-01

    (23)Na NMR microimaging is described to map, for the first time, the sodium distribution in living plants. As an example, the response of 6-day-old seedlings of Ricinus communis to exposure to sodium chloride concentrations from 5 to 300 mM was observed in vivo using (23)Na as well as (1)H NMR microimaging. Experiments were performed at 11.75 T with a double resonant (23)Na-(1)H probehead. The probehead was homebuilt and equipped with a climate chamber. T(1) and T(2) of (23)Na were measured in the cross section of the hypocotyl. Within 85 min (23)Na images with an in-plane resolution of 156 x 156 micrometer were acquired. With this spatial information, the different types of tissue in the hypocotyl can be discerned. The measurement time appears to be short compared to the time scale of sodium uptake and accumulation in the plant so that the kinetics of salt stress can be followed. In conclusion, (23)Na NMR microimaging promises great potential for physiological studies of the consequences of salt stress on the macroscopic level and thus may become a unique tool for characterizing plants with respect to salt tolerance and salt sensitivity.

  8. Characterization of heroin samples by 1H NMR and 2D DOSY 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Balayssac, Stéphane; Retailleau, Emmanuel; Bertrand, Geneviève; Escot, Marie-Pierre; Martino, Robert; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Gilard, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-four samples of heroin from different illicit drug seizures were analyzed using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H NMR) and two-dimensional diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (2D DOSY) (1)H NMR. A careful assignment and quantification of (1)H signals enabled a comprehensive characterization of the substances present in the samples investigated: heroin, its main related impurities (6-acetylmorphine, acetylcodeine, morphine, noscapine and papaverine) and cutting agents (caffeine and acetaminophen in nearly all samples as well as lactose, lidocaine, mannitol, piracetam in one sample only), and hence to establish their spectral signatures. The good agreement between the amounts of heroin, noscapine, caffeine and acetaminophen determined by (1)H NMR and gas chromatography, the reference method in forensic laboratories, demonstrates the validity of the (1)H NMR technique. In this paper, 2D DOSY (1)H NMR offers a new approach for a whole characterization of the various components of these complex mixtures.

  9. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... level is often dependent on his or her breathing pattern. Therefore, people with chronic lung conditions may ...

  10. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  11. Enhanced Y1H Assays for Arabidopis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcription regulation plays a key role in development and response to environment. To understand this mechanism, we need to know which transcription factor (TFs) would bind to which promoter, thus regulate their target gene expression. Yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) technique can be used to map this kind...

  12. Hybrid Nanotrimers for Dual T1 and T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Development of multifunctional nanoparticle-based probes for dual T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could allow us to image and diagnose the tumors or other abnormalities in an exceptionally accurate and reliable manner. In this study, by fusing distinct nanocrystals via solid-state interfaces, we built hybrid heteronanostructures to combine both T1 and T2- weighted contrast agents together for MRI with high accuracy and reliability. The resultant hybrid heterotrimers showed high stability in physiological conditions and could induce both simultaneous positive and negative contrast enhancements in MR images. Small animal positron emission tomography imaging study revealed that the hybrid heterostructures displayed favorable biodistribution and were suitable for in vivo imaging. Their potential as dual contrast agents for T1 and T2-weighted MRI was further demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo imaging and relaxivity measurements. PMID:25283972

  13. Probing molecular dynamics in chromatographic systems using high-resolution 1H magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy: interaction between p-Xylene and C18-bonded silica.

    PubMed

    Coen, Muireann; Wilson, Ian D; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Tang, Huiru; Lindon, John C

    2004-06-01

    The exact nature of the interaction between small molecules and chromatographic solid phases has been the subject of much research, but detailed understanding of the molecular dynamics in such systems remains elusive. High-resolution (1)H magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been applied to the investigation of C18-bonded silica material as used in chromatographic separation techniques together with an adsorbed model analyte, p-xylene. Two distinct p-xylene and water environments were identified within the C18-bonded silica through the measurement of (1)H NMR chemical shifts, T(1) and T(2) relaxation times and diffusion coefficients, including their temperature dependence. The results have been analyzed in terms of two environments, p-xylene within the C18 chains, in slow exchange on the NMR time scale with p-xylene in a more mobile state adsorbed as a layer in close proximity to the C18 particles, but which is distinct from free liquid p-xylene. The techniques used here could have more general applications, including the study of drug molecules bound into phospholipid membranes in micelles or vesicles.

  14. Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

  15. (1)H-NMR and charge transport in metallic polypyrrole at ultra-low temperatures and high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Jugeshwar Singh, K; Clark, W G; Ramesh, K P; Menon, Reghu

    2008-11-19

    The temperature dependence of conductivity, proton spin relaxation time (T(1)) and magnetoconductance (MC) in metallic polypyrrole (PPy) doped with PF(6)(-) have been carried out at mK temperatures and high magnetic fields. At T<1 K both electron-electron interaction (EEI) and hopping contributes to conductivity. The temperature dependence of a proton T(1) is classified in three regimes: (a) for T<6 K-relaxation mechanism follows a modified Korringa relation due to EEI and disorder, (b) for 6 Krelaxation mechanism is via spin diffusion to the paramagnetic centers and (c) for T>50 K-relaxation is due to the dipolar interaction modulated by the reorientation of the symmetric PF(6) groups following the Bloembergen, Purcell and Pound (BPP) model. The data analysis shows that the Korringa ratio is enhanced by an order of magnitude. The positive and negative MC at T<250 mK is due to the contributions from weak localization and Coulomb-correlated hopping transport, respectively. The role of EEI is observed to be consistent in conductivity, T(1) and MC data, especially at T<1 K.

  16. Errors in quantitative T1rho imaging and the correction methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time constant in rotating frame (T1rho) is useful for assessment of the properties of macromolecular environment inside tissue. Quantification of T1rho is found promising in various clinical applications. However, T1rho imaging is prone to image artifacts and quantification errors, which remains one of the greatest challenges to adopt this technique in routine clinical practice. The conventional continuous wave spin-lock is susceptible to B1 radiofrequency (RF) and B0 field inhomogeneity, which appears as banding artifacts in acquired images. A number of methods have been reported to modify T1rho prep RF pulse cluster to mitigate this effect. Adiabatic RF pulse can also be used for spin-lock with insensitivity to both B1 RF and B0 field inhomogeneity. Another source of quantification error in T1rho imaging is signal evolution during imaging data acquisition. Care is needed to affirm such error does not take place when specific pulse sequence is used for imaging data acquisition. Another source of T1rho quantification error is insufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which is common among various quantitative imaging approaches. Measurement of T1rho within an ROI can mitigate this issue, but at the cost of reduced resolution. Noise-corrected methods are reported to address this issue in pixel-wise quantification. For certain tissue type, T1rho quantification can be confounded by magic angle effect and the presence of multiple tissue components. Review of these confounding factors from inherent tissue properties is not included in this article. PMID:26435922

  17. T1rho Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3T Detects Knee Cartilage Changes After Viscosupplementation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Roshan P; Stambough, Jeffrey B; Fenty, Matthew; Mauck, Robert L; Kelly, John D; Reddy, Ravinder; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P

    2015-07-01

    Viscosupplementation may affect cartilage. Changes in T1rho magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) relaxation times correlate with proteoglycan changes in cartilage. The authors hypothesized that T1rho MRI will show an improvement in proteoglycan content at 6 weeks and 3 months after viscosupplementation and that this improvement will correlate with functional outcome scores. Ten patients (mean age, 56 years; Kellgren-Lawrence grade 1 or 2) underwent T1rho MRI at baseline, 6 weeks, and 3 months after viscosupplementation. Volumetric T1rho means were calculated by depth and region. Visual analog scale (VAS), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were obtained. Mean T1rho values decreased in the superficial patella at 6 weeks (10.3%, P=.002) and 3 months (7.9%, P=.018) and in the middle patella at 6 weeks (7.0%, P=.014) compared with baseline values. Deep patella T1rho values increased at 3 months compared with 6 weeks (9.9%, P=.033), returning to values similar to baseline. Mean T1rho values increased in the deep tibia at 6 weeks (4.7%, P=.048) and in the middle tibia (5.2%, P=.004) and deep tibia (11.2%, P=.002) at 3 months compared with baseline. At 6 weeks, improvement was seen in VAS (5.9 to 3.9, P<.01), IKDC-9 (55.3 to 63.7, P=.03), and WOMAC (43.9 to 32.8, P=.03) scores. Functional VAS (4.0, P=.02), IKDC-9 (67.8, P=.04), and WOMAC (30.0, P=.04) scores remained better at 3 months. T1rho MRI is a feasible noninvasive method of studying molecular changes in cartilage. Some segments improved after viscosupplementation, and others worsened, possibly reflecting natural history or symptom relief and subsequent increase in activity-related wear.

  18. Slow magnetic relaxations in a ladder-type Dy(iii) complex and its dinuclear analogue.

    PubMed

    Boča, R; Stolárová, M; Falvello, L R; Tomás, M; Titiš, J; Černák, J

    2017-04-06

    The complex {[Dy2(PDOA)3(H2O)6]·2H2O}n (1) (H2PDOA = 1,2-phenylenedioxydiacetic acid) was prepared from aqueous solution. Its crystal structure, built up of {-Dy-O-C-O-}n chains interlinked by PDOA ligands yielding a ladder-like arrangement, was determined at 173 K. 1 exhibits slow magnetic relaxation under a small magnetic field BDC = 0.2 T with two (LF and HF) relaxation channels. The LF relaxation time at BDC = 0.2 T and T = 1.85 K is as slow as τ(LF) = 46 ms whereas the HF channel is τ(HF) = 1.4 ms. The mole fraction of the LF species is xLF = 0.76 at 1.85 K and it escapes progressively on heating. In the dinuclear analogue [Dy2(PDOA)3(H2O)6]·3.5H2O (2) one PDOA ligand forms a bis(chelate) bridge between the two Dy(iii) atoms yielding a local structure analogous to that in 1; however its AC susceptibility data show slightly different quantitative characteristics of the single-molecule magnetic behaviour.

  19. Increasing 14N NQR signal by 1H-14N level crossing with small magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Sauer, Karen L; Buess, Michael L; Klug, Christopher A; Miller, Joel B

    2005-11-01

    NQR detection of materials, such as TNT, is hindered by the low signal-to-noise ratio at low NQR frequencies. Sweeping small (0-26 mT) magnetic fields to shift the (1)H NMR frequency relative to the (14)N NQR frequencies can provide a significant increase of the (14)N NQR signal-to-noise ratio. Three effects of (1)H-(14)N level crossing are demonstrated in diglycine hydrochloride and TNT. These effects are (1) transferring (1)H polarization to one or more of the (14)N transitions, including the use of an adiabatic flip of the (1)H polarization during the field sweep, (2) shortening the effective (14)N T(1) by the interaction of (1)H with the (14)N transitions, (3) "level transfer" effect where the third (14)N (spin 1) energy level or other (14)N sites with different NQR frequency are used as a reservoir of polarization which is transferred to the measured (14)N transition by the (1)H. The (14)N NQR signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by a factor of 2.5 for one (14)N site in diglycine hydrochloride (and 2.2 in TNT), even though the maximum (1)H frequency used in this work, 111 6 kHz, is only 30% larger than the measured (14)N frequencies (834 kHz for diglycine hydrochloride and 843 kHz for TNT).

  20. Complete (1) H NMR assignment of cedranolides.

    PubMed

    Perez-Hernandez, Nury; Gordillo-Roman, Barbara; Arrieta-Baez, Daniel; Cerda-Garcia-Rojas, Carlos M; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2017-03-01

    Complete and unambiguous (1) H NMR chemical shift assignment of α-cedrene (2) and cedrol (9), as well as for α-pipitzol (1), isocedrol (10), and the six related compounds 3-8 has been established by iterative full spin analysis using the PERCH NMR software (PERCH Solutions Ltd., Kuopio, Finland). The total sets of coupling constants are described and correlated with the conformational equilibria of the five-membered ring of 1-10, which were calculated using the complete basis set method. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Analysis of the Precision of Variable Flip Angle T1 Mapping with Emphasis on the Noise Propagated from RF Transmit Field Maps

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoojin; Callaghan, Martina F.; Nagy, Zoltan

    2017-01-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging, precise measurements of longitudinal relaxation time (T1) is crucial to acquire useful information that is applicable to numerous clinical and neuroscience applications. In this work, we investigated the precision of T1 relaxation time as measured using the variable flip angle method with emphasis on the noise propagated from radiofrequency transmit field (B1+) measurements. The analytical solution for T1 precision was derived by standard error propagation methods incorporating the noise from the three input sources: two spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) images and a B1+ map. Repeated in vivo experiments were performed to estimate the total variance in T1 maps and we compared these experimentally obtained values with the theoretical predictions to validate the established theoretical framework. Both the analytical and experimental results showed that variance in the B1+ map propagated comparable noise levels into the T1 maps as either of the two SPGR images. Improving precision of the B1+ measurements significantly reduced the variance in the estimated T1 map. The variance estimated from the repeatedly measured in vivo T1 maps agreed well with the theoretically-calculated variance in T1 estimates, thus validating the analytical framework for realistic in vivo experiments. We concluded that for T1 mapping experiments, the error propagated from the B1+ map must be considered. Optimizing the SPGR signals while neglecting to improve the precision of the B1+ map may result in grossly overestimating the precision of the estimated T1 values. PMID:28337119

  2. Solid state and solution properties of lanthanide(III) complexes of a tetraiminodiphenolate macrocyclic ligand. X-ray structure, 1H NMR and luminescence spectral studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Pradip; Dutta, Supriya; Flörke, Ulrich; Nag, Kamalaksha

    2008-11-01

    The lanthanide(III) complexes of composition [Ln(LH 2)(H 2O) 3Cl]Cl 2 (Ln = La-Lu and Y, 1- 15) derived from the tetraiminodiphenolate macrocyclic ligand L 2- have been prepared and characterized. In these compounds, the two uncoordinated imine nitrogens of the macrocycle are protonated and hydrogen-bonded with the metal-bound phenolate oxygens and thereby provide a zwitterionic structure to the ligand. The X-ray crystal structure of the compounds of La and Nd have been determined and they are found to be isostructural. The coordination polyhedra for the eight-coordinated metal centre in the complex cation [Ln(N 2O 2)(O 3Cl)] 2+ can be described as distorted square antiprism. Intermolecular hydrogen-bondings involving the three coordinated water molecules and the two uncoordinated chloride ions give rise to the 2-D network in which the chlorides are triply hydrogen-bridged and the water molecules are doubly hydrogen-bridged. Moreover, the aromatic rings in this network are involved in π-π interaction in two different ways. 1H NMR spectra of the complexes in (CD 3) 2SO have been studied. The spectral assignments for the paramagnetic complexes of Ce-Eu have been made from { 1H- 1H} COSY spectra and longitudinal relaxation time ( T1) measurements. It is inferred that the complex species [Ln(LH 2){(CD 3) 2SO} 4] 3+ that exist in solution are isostructural for the compounds of La-Eu. The contact and pseudo-contact contribution to the isotropic paramagnetic shifts in the complexes of Ce-Eu have been estimated. The luminescence spectra of the complexes of La, Sm, Eu and Tb have been studied in methanol-ethanol (1:4) glassy matrix and in the solid state at 77 K, and the quantum yields have been estimated.

  3. Difference between Extra- and Intracellular T1 Values of Carboxylic Acids Affects the Quantitative Analysis of Cellular Kinetics by Hyperpolarized NMR.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Magnus; Jensen, Pernille Rose; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Lerche, Mathilde H

    2016-10-17

    Incomplete knowledge of the longitudinal relaxation time constant (T1 ) leads to incorrect assumptions in quantitative kinetic models of cellular systems, studied by hyperpolarized real-time NMR. Using an assay that measures the intracellular signal of small carboxylic acids in living cells, the intracellular T1 of the carboxylic acid moiety of acetate, keto-isocaproate, pyruvate, and butyrate was determined. The intracellular T1 is shown to be up to four-fold shorter than the extracellular T1 . Such a large difference in T1 values between the inside and the outside of the cell has significant influence on the quantification of intracellular metabolic activity. It is expected that the significantly shorter T1 value of the carboxylic moieties inside cells is a result of macromolecular crowding. An artificial cytosol has been prepared and applied to predict the T1 of other carboxylic acids. We demonstrate the value of this prediction tool.

  4. EXponentially Converging Eradication Pulse Train (EXCEPT) for solvent-signal suppression in investigations with variable T1 times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satterfield, Emmalou T.; Pfaff, Annalise R.; Zhang, Wenjia; Chi, Lingyu; Gerald, Rex E.; Woelk, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Selective presaturation is a common technique for suppressing excessive solvent signals during proton NMR analysis of dilute samples in protic solvents. When the solvent T1 relaxation time constant varies within a series of samples, parameters for the presaturation sequence must often be re-adjusted for each sample. The EXCEPT (EXponentially Converging Eradication Pulse Train) presaturation pulse sequence was developed to eliminate time consuming pulse-parameter re-optimization as long as the variation in the solvent's T1 remains within an order of magnitude. EXCEPT consists of frequency-selective inversion pulses with progressively decreasing interpulse delays. The interpulse delays were optimized to encompass T1 relaxation times ranging from 1 to 10 s, but they can be easily adjusted by a single factor for other ranges that fall within an order of magnitude with respect to T1. Sequences with different numbers of inversion pulses were tested to maximize suppression while minimizing the number of pulses and thus the total time needed for suppression. The EXCEPT-16 experiment, where 16 denotes the number of inversion pulses, was found satisfactory for many standard applications. Experimental results demonstrate that EXCEPT provides effective T1-insensitive solvent suppression as predicted by the theory. The robustness of EXCEPT with respect to changes in solvent T1 allows NMR investigations to be carried out for a series of samples without the need for pulse-parameter re-optimization for each sample.

  5. Artifacts correction for T1rho imaging with constant amplitude spin-lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weitian

    2017-01-01

    T1rho imaging with constant amplitude spin-lock is prone to artifacts in the presence of B1 RF and B0 field inhomogeneity. Despite significant technological progress, improvements on the robustness of constant amplitude spin-lock are necessary in order to use it for routine clinical practice. This work proposes methods to simultaneously correct for B1 RF and B0 field inhomogeneity in constant amplitude spin-lock. By setting the maximum B1 amplitude of the excitation adiabatic pulses equal to the expected constant amplitude spin-lock frequency, the spins become aligned along the effective field throughout the spin-lock process. This results in T1rho-weighted images free of artifacts, despite the spatial variation of the effective field caused by B1 RF and B0 field inhomogeneity. When the pulse is long, the relaxation effect during the adiabatic half passage may result in a non-negligible error in the mono-exponential relaxation model. A two-acquisition approach is presented to solve this issue. Simulation, phantom, and in-vivo scans demonstrate the proposed methods achieve superior image quality compared to existing methods, and that the two-acquisition method is effective in resolving the relaxation effect during the adiabatic half passage.

  6. Proton spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms and the metal-insulator transition in cerium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamir, D.; Barnes, R. G.; Salibi, N.; Cotts, R. M.; Phua, T.-T.; Torgeson, D. R.; Peterson, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) experiments have been done on cerium hydride (CeHx) samples to search for correlations between NMR properties and known electrical conductivity changes as a function of hydrogen concentration and temperature. Data are presented for the 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate R1 (=1T1) and some line shapes for 2.10<=x<=2.92 for temperatures from about 100 to 375 K. Although two 1H resonances are observed at some temperatures, proton spin-lattice relaxation is characterized by a single relaxation time at each x and T. To a good approximation R1=AT+R, where AT is attributed to direct dipolar coupling between protons and the electronic magnetic dipole moment of Ce3+, and R is an essentially temperature-independent term attributed to indirect [Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY)] coupling to the Ce3+ moment. The AT term is so large that for most experiments the proton-proton dipolar and proton-conduction-electron couplings are negligible. The x dependence of the constant A is consistent with the dipolar coupling. The constant R decreases in a steep manner as x is increased above x~2.65 just below the regime 2.75

  7. Measurement of Myocardial T1ρ with a Motion Corrected, Parametric Mapping Sequence in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Mohammed; Han, Yuchi; Witschey, Walter R. T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a robust T1ρ magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence for assessment of myocardial disease in humans. Materials and Methods We developed a breath-held T1ρ mapping method using a single-shot, T1ρ-prepared balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) sequence. The magnetization trajectory was simulated to identify sources of T1ρ error. To limit motion artifacts, an optical flow-based image registration method was used to align T1ρ images. The reproducibility and accuracy of these methods was assessed in phantoms and 10 healthy subjects. Results are shown in 1 patient with pre-ventricular contractions (PVCs), 1 patient with chronic myocardial infarction (MI) and 2 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Results In phantoms, the mean bias was 1.0 ± 2.7 msec (100 msec phantom) and 0.9 ± 0.9 msec (60 msec phantom) at 60 bpm and 2.2 ± 3.2 msec (100 msec) and 1.4 ± 0.9 msec (60 msec) at 80 bpm. The coefficient of variation (COV) was 2.2 (100 msec) and 1.3 (60 msec) at 60 bpm and 2.6 (100 msec) and 1.4 (60 msec) at 80 bpm. Motion correction improved the alignment of T1ρ images in subjects, as determined by the increase in Dice Score Coefficient (DSC) from 0.76 to 0.88. T1ρ reproducibility was high (COV < 0.05, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.85–0.97). Mean myocardial T1ρ value in healthy subjects was 63.5 ± 4.6 msec. There was good correspondence between late-gadolinium enhanced (LGE) MRI and increased T1ρ relaxation times in patients. Conclusion Single-shot, motion corrected, spin echo, spin lock MRI permits 2D T1ρ mapping in a breath-hold with good accuracy and precision. PMID:27003184

  8. Improved spectral resolution and high reliability of in vivo (1) H MRS at 7 T allow the characterization of the effect of acute exercise on carnosine in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Just Kukurová, Ivica; Valkovič, Ladislav; Ukropec, Jozef; de Courten, Barbora; Chmelík, Marek; Ukropcová, Barbara; Trattnig, Siegfried; Krššák, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to observe the behavior of carnosine peaks in human soleus (SOL) and gastrocnemius (GM) muscles following acute exercise, to determine the relaxation times and to assess the repeatability of carnosine quantification by (1) H MRS at 7 T. Relaxation constants in GM and SOL were measured by a stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) localization sequence. For T1 measurement, an inversion recovery sequence was used. The repeatability of the measurement and the absolute quantification of carnosine were determined in both muscles in five healthy volunteers. For absolute quantification, an internal water reference signal was used. The effect of acute exercise on carnosine levels and resonance lines was tested in eight recreational runners/cyclists. The defined carnosine measurement protocol was applied three times - before and twice after (approximately 20 and 40 min) a 1-h submaximal street run and additional toe-hopping. The measured T1 relaxation times for the C2-H carnosine peak at 7 T were 2002 ± 94 and 1997 ± 259 ms for GM and SOL, respectively, and the T2 times were 95.8 ± 9.4 and 81.0 ± 21.8 ms for GM and SOL, respectively. The coefficient of variation of the carnosine quantification measurement was 9.1% for GM and 6.3% for SOL, showing high repeatability, and the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of 0.93 for GM and 0.98 for SOL indicate the high reliability of the measurement. Acute exercise did not change the concentration of carnosine in the muscle, but affected the shape of the resonance lines, in terms of the shifting and splitting into doublets. Carnosine measurement by (1) H MRS at 7 T in skeletal muscle exhibits high repeatability and reliability. The observed effects of acute exercise were more prominent in GM, probably as a result of the larger portion of glycolytic fibers in this muscle and the more pronounced exercise-induced change in pH. Our results support the application of the MRS-based assessment of

  9. The Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Hyperpolarized 89Y Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Ashish; Lumata, Lloyd; Xing, Yixun; Merritt, Matthew; Zhao, Piyu; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, Dean; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2011-03-01

    The low sensitivity of NMR can be overcome by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). However, a limitation to the use of hyperpolarized materials is the signal decay due to T1 relaxation. Among NMR-active nuclei, 89 Y is potentially valuable in medical imaging because in chelated form, pH-sensitive agents can be developed. 89 Y also offers many attractive features -- 100 % abundance, a 1/2 spin, and a long T1 , up to 10 min. Yet, developing new 89 Y complexes with even longer T1 values is desirable. Designing such complexes relies upon understanding the mechanism(s) responsible for T1 relaxation. We report an approach to hyperpolarized T1 measurements that enabled an analysis of relaxation mechanisms by selective deuteration of the ligand backbone, the solvent or both. Hyperpolarized 89 Y -- DTPA, DOTA, EDTA, and deuterated EDTA complexes were studied. Results suggest that substitution of low-gamma nuclei on the ligand backbone as opposed to that of the solvent most effectively increase the 89 Y T1 . These results are encouraging for in vivo applications as the presence of bound water may not dramatically affect the T1 .

  10. Preliminary 1H NMR study on archaeological waterlogged wood.

    PubMed

    Maccotta, Antonella; Fantazzini, Paola; Garavaglia, Carla; Donato, Ines D; Perzia, Patrizia; Brai, Maria; Morreale, Filippa

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Relaxation (MRR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are powerful tools to obtain detailed information on the pore space structure that one is unlikely to obtain in other ways. These techniques are particularly suitable for Cultural Heritage materials, because they use water 1H nuclei as a probe. Interaction with water is one of the main causes of deterioration of materials. Porous structure in wood, for example, favours the penetration of water, which can carry polluting substances and promote mould growth. A particular case is waterlogged wood from underwater discoveries and moist sites; in fact, these finds are very fragile because of chemical, physical and biological decay from the long contact with the water. When wood artefacts are brought to the surface and directly dried in air, there is the collapse of the cellular structures, and wood loses its original form and dimensions and cannot be used for study and museum exhibits. In this work we have undertaken the study of some wood finds coming from Ercolano's harbour by MRR and MRI under different conditions, and we have obtained a characterization of pore space in wood and images of the spatial distribution of the confined water in the wood.

  11. Nuclear Moment Alignment, Relaxation and Detection Mechanisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    404720 GUDANc a CONTROL SYSTEM FscM u81 sM CAnoa AVenu. Woodland Nilo. Callal 8SM5 temperature dependence such at T1 .7 5 (typical of relaxation due to...an expression for the additional field due to rubidium polarization as 3-14 404720 QUIDANCI & CONTROL SYSThMS FSCM O6481 SO Canoa Av@nu. W dlnd Wl

  12. A simple method for NMR t1 noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Huaping; Harwood, John S.; Yang, Danzhou; Post, Carol Beth

    2017-03-01

    t1 noise appears as random or semi-random spurious streaks along the indirect t1 (F1) dimension of a 2D or nD NMR spectrum. It can significantly downgrade spectral quality, especially for spectra with strong diagonal signals such as NOESY, because useful and weak cross-peaks can be easily buried under t1 noise. One of the significant contributing factors to t1 noise is unwanted and semi-random F2 signal modulation during t1 acquisition. As such, t1 noise from different acquisitions is unlikely to correlate with each other strongly. In the case of NOESY, co-addition of multiple spectra significantly reduces t1 noise compared with conventional acquisition with the same amount of total acquisition time and resolution.

  13. Multislice 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging: assessment of epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Michael W.; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Schuff, Norbert; Soher, Brian J.; Vermathen, Peter P.; Fein, George; Laxer, Kenneth D.

    1998-07-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H MRSI) with volume pre-selection (i.e. by PRESS) or multislice 1H MRSI was used to investigate changes in brain metabolites in Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Examples of results from several ongoing clinical studies are provided. Multislice 1H MRSI of the human brain, without volume pre-selection offers considerable advantages over previously available techniques. Furthermore, MRI tissue segmentation and completely automated spectra curve fitting greatly facilitate quantitative data analysis. Future efforts will be devoted to obtaining full brain coverage and data acquisition at short spin echo times (TE less than 30 ms) for the detection of metabolites with short T2 relaxation times.

  14. Latent Period of Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Irisawa, H

    1961-10-27

    The latent period of relaxation of molluscan myocardium due to anodal current is much longer than that of contraction. Although the rate and the grade of relaxation are intimately related to both the stimulus condition and the muscle tension, the latent period of relaxation remains constant, except when the temperature of the bathing fluid is changed.

  15. Graphene oxide based theranostic platform for T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengxin; Cao, Yuhua; Chong, Yu; Ma, Yufei; Zhang, Hailu; Deng, Zongwu; Hu, Chunhong; Zhang, Zhijun

    2013-12-26

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful and widely used clinical technique in cancer diagnosis. MRI contrast agents (CAs) are often used to improve the quality of MRI-based diagnosis. In this work, we developed a positive T1 MRI CA based on graphene oxide (GO)-gadolinium (Gd) complexes. In our strategy, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is chemically conjugated to GO, followed by Gd(III) complexation, to form a T1 MRI CA (GO-DTPA-Gd). We have demonstrated that the GO-DTPA-Gd system significantly improves MRI T1 relaxivity and leads to a better cellular MRI contrast effect than Magnevist, a commercially used CA. Next, an anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), was loaded on the surface of GO sheets via physisorption. Thus-prepared GO-DTPA-Gd/DOX shows significant cytotoxicity to the cancer cells (HepG2). This work provides a novel strategy to build a GO-based theranostic nanoplatform with T1-weighted MRI, fluorescence imaging, and drug delivery functionalities.

  16. A new linear least squares method for T1 estimation from SPGR signals with multiple TRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lin-Ching; Koay, Cheng Guan; Basser, Peter J.; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2009-02-01

    The longitudinal relaxation time, T1, can be estimated from two or more spoiled gradient recalled echo x (SPGR) images with two or more flip angles and one or more repetition times (TRs). The function relating signal intensity and the parameters are nonlinear; T1 maps can be computed from SPGR signals using nonlinear least squares regression. A widely-used linear method transforms the nonlinear model by assuming a fixed TR in SPGR images. This constraint is not desirable since multiple TRs are a clinically practical way to reduce the total acquisition time, to satisfy the required resolution, and/or to combine SPGR data acquired at different times. A new linear least squares method is proposed using the first order Taylor expansion. Monte Carlo simulations of SPGR experiments are used to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the estimated T1 from the proposed linear and the nonlinear methods. We show that the new linear least squares method provides T1 estimates comparable in both precision and accuracy to those from the nonlinear method, allowing multiple TRs and reducing computation time significantly.

  17. Motion Correction for Myocardial T1 Mapping using Image Registration with Synthetic Image Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hui; Shah, Saurabh; Greiser, Andreas; Guetter, Christoph; Littmann, Arne; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Arai, Andrew E; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Guehring, Jens; Kellman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of myocardial T1 relaxation has potential value in the diagnosis of both ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. Image acquisition using the Modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery technique is clinically feasible for T1 mapping. However, respiratory motion limits its applicability and degrades the accuracy of T1 estimation. The robust registration of acquired inversion recovery images is particularly challenging due to the large changes in image contrast, especially for those images acquired near the signal null point of the inversion recovery and other inversion times for which there is little tissue contrast. In this paper, we propose a novel motion correction algorithm. This approach is based on estimating synthetic images presenting contrast changes similar to the acquired images. The estimation of synthetic images is formulated as a variational energy minimization problem. Validation on a consecutive patient data cohort shows that this strategy can perform robust non-rigid registration to align inversion recovery images experiencing significant motion and lead to suppression of motion induced artifacts in the T1 map. PMID:22135227

  18. An improved 3-D Look--Locker imaging method for T(1) parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Nkongchu, Ken; Santyr, Giles

    2005-09-01

    The 3-D Look-Locker (LL) imaging method has been shown to be a highly efficient and accurate method for the volumetric mapping of the spin lattice relaxation time T(1). However, conventional 3-D LL imaging schemes are typically limited to small tip angle RF pulses (T(1) estimation. In this work, a more generalized form of the 3-D LL imaging method that incorporates an additional and variable delay time between recovery samples is described, which permits the use of larger tip angles (>5 degrees ), thereby improving the SNR and the accuracy of the method. In phantom studies, a mean T(1) measurement accuracy of less than 2% (0.2-3.1%) using a tip angle of 10 degrees was obtained for a range of T(1) from approximately 300 to 1,700 ms with a measurement time increase of only 15%. This accuracy compares favorably with the conventional 3-D LL method that provided an accuracy between 2.2% and 7.3% using a 5 degrees flip angle.

  19. Synthesis of Long-T1 Silicon Nanoparticles for Hyperpolarized 29Si Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Tonya M.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Lee, Menyoung; Ganguly, Shreyashi; Marcus, Charles M.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the synthesis, materials characterization and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of amorphous and crystalline silicon nanoparticles for use as hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents. The particles were synthesized by means of a metathesis reaction between sodium silicide (Na4Si4) and silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) and were surface functionalized with a variety of passivating ligands. The synthesis scheme results in particles of diameter ~10 nm with long size-adjusted 29Si spin lattice relaxation (T1) times (> 600 s), which are retained after hyperpolarization by low temperature DNP. PMID:23350651

  20. Proton relaxation times in cancer diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Santhana Mariappan, S.V.; Subramanian, S.; Chandrakumar, N.; Rajalakshmi, K.R.; Sukumaran, S.S.

    1988-10-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation parameters (T1, T2) were measured for over 100 malignant and normal tissue samples of various organs of the human body. The purpose of this study was to estimate the reliability of the NMR technique in discriminating normal from malignant tissues. Breast and cervix samples were analyzed by using the malignancy index concept and we were able to distinguish malignant and normal tissue in 17 out of 18 breast samples and 5 out of 7 cervix samples. Since the relaxation data of a normal control population of the other organs were not available, the data for these are reported without any further analysis. The distinction between carcinomas and sarcomas was also made by using the estimated relaxation parameters. Malignancy indices of breast tissue samples for linear least-squares and nonlinear two-parameter and three-parameter least-squares procedures were calculated and used to evaluate the relative efficiencies in discriminating malignant from normal tissues.

  1. L-Theanine elicits umami taste via the T1R1 + T1R3 umami taste receptor.

    PubMed

    Narukawa, Masataka; Toda, Yasuka; Nakagita, Tomoya; Hayashi, Yukako; Misaka, Takumi

    2014-06-01

    L-Theanine is a unique amino acid present in green tea. It elicits umami taste and has a considerable effect on tea taste and quality. We investigated L-theanine activity on the T1R1 + T1R3 umami taste receptor. L-Theanine activated T1R1 + T1R3-expressing cells and showed a synergistic response with inosine 5'-monophosphate. The site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that L-theanine binds to L-amino acid binding site in the Venus flytrap domain of T1R1. This study shows that L-theanine elicits an umami taste via T1R1 + T1R3.

  2. 1H-NMR, dielectric and calorimetric studies of molecular motions in m-nitroaniline crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak, M. Magdalena; Wójcik, Grażyna; Gallier, Jean; Bertault, Marcel; Freundlich, Piotr; Kołodziej, Hubert A.

    1998-04-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation time, T1, spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame, T1 ρ, and the second moment of the resonance line measurements at 80 MHz and over the 190-380 K temperature range are reported for protons in the optically nonlinear material m-nitroaniline ( m-NA). T1 has also been measured for samples irradiated by low energy and low intensity radiation. The real and imaginary parts of electric permittivity as well as tan  δ have been recorded in the 80-380 K temperature range at frequencies ranging from 100 Hz to 1.0 MHz. DSC measurements have been performed in the 110-387 K temperature range. Two phase transitions have been found: A glassy to rotative transition at 160 K and a plastic to plastic transformation at 365 K. The main feature of the m-NA crystal is that its plasticity continues to grow as the temperature increases. The reorientations of phenyl rings, the -NH 2 group proton 180° jumps, the lattice distortions caused by anisotropic thermal expansion and the cooperative reorientations of big molecular aggregates are thought to be the reasons for phase transitions and for the subsequent intermolecular charge transfer. The results are discussed with respect to optical second harmonic generation and near-IR photochemical reaction found in the m-NA crystal.

  3. Geometrically confined ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles boost the T1 contrast ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Kaiyuan; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Zhang, Zongjun; Zhou, Zijian; Yang, Li; Wang, Lirong; Ai, Hua; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-01

    High-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents and novel contrast enhancement strategies are urgently needed for sensitive and accurate diagnosis. Here we report a strategy to construct a new T1 contrast agent based on the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) theory. We loaded the ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles into worm-like interior channels of mesoporous silica nanospheres (Gd2O3@MSN nanocomposites). This unique structure endows the nanocomposites with geometrical confinement, high molecular tumbling time, and a large coordinated number of water molecules, which results in a significant enhancement of the T1 contrast with longitudinal proton relaxivity (r1) as high as 45.08 mM-1 s-1. Such a high r1 value of Gd2O3@MSN, compared to those of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles and gadolinium-based clinical contrast agents, is mainly attributed to the strong geometrical confinement effect. This strategy provides new guidance for developing various high-performance T1 contrast agents for sensitive imaging and disease diagnosis.High-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents and novel contrast enhancement strategies are urgently needed for sensitive and accurate diagnosis. Here we report a strategy to construct a new T1 contrast agent based on the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) theory. We loaded the ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles into worm-like interior channels of mesoporous silica nanospheres (Gd2O3@MSN nanocomposites). This unique structure endows the nanocomposites with geometrical confinement, high molecular tumbling time, and a large coordinated number of water molecules, which results in a significant enhancement of the T1 contrast with longitudinal proton relaxivity (r1) as high as 45.08 mM-1 s-1. Such a high r1 value of Gd2O3@MSN, compared to those of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles and gadolinium-based clinical contrast agents, is mainly attributed to the strong geometrical confinement effect. This strategy

  4. Comparative clinicopathological characteristics of colon and rectal T1 carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ichimasa, Katsuro; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Miyachi, Hideyuki; Kouyama, Yuta; Hayashi, Takemasa; Wakamura, Kunihiko; Hisayuki, Tomokazu; Kudo, Toyoki; Misawa, Masashi; Mori, Yuichi; Matsudaira, Shingo; Hidaka, Eiji; Hamatani, Shigeharu; Ishida, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node metastasis significantly influences the management of patients with colorectal carcinoma. It has been observed that the biology of colorectal carcinoma differs by location. The aim of the current study was to retrospectively compare the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with colon and rectal T1 carcinomas, particularly their rates of lymph node metastasis. Of the 19,864 patients who underwent endoscopic or surgical resection of colorectal neoplasms at Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, 557 had T1 surgically resected carcinomas, including 457 patients with colon T1 carcinomas and 100 patients with rectal T1 carcinomas. Analysed clinicopathological features included patient age, gender, tumor size, morphology, tumor budding, invasion depth, vascular invasion, histological grade, lymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis. Rectal T1 carcinomas were significantly larger than colon T1 carcinomas (mean ± standard deviation: 23.7±13.1 mm vs. 19.9±11.0 mm, P<0.01) and were accompanied by significantly higher rates of vascular invasion (48.0% vs. 30.2%, P<0.01). Significant differences were not observed among any other clinicopathological factors. In conclusion, tumor location itself was not a risk factor for lymph node metastasis in colorectal T1 carcinomas, even though on average, rectal T1 carcinomas were larger and accompanied by a significantly higher rate of vascular invasion than colon T1 carcinomas. PMID:28356962

  5. Kinetics of the in vivo31P 1H nuclear overhauser effect of the human-calf-muscle phosphocreatine resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachert, Peter; Bellemann, Matthias E.

    In 31P 1H double-resonance experiments in a 1.5 T whole-body MR system, we observed in vivo the truncated driven, transient, and steady-state 31P- 1H nuclear Overhauser effect of the phosphocreatine resonance in 31P MR spectra of human gastrocnemius muscle. Maximum signal enhancements of 0.52 ± 0.01, 0.20 ± 0.01, and 0.79 ± 0.02 were measured, respectively. Fitting the data with theoretical functions which solve the multispin Solomon equations for N protons (S spins) dipolar coupled to a 31P nucleus (I spin) yields cross-relaxation times {2}/{[Σ i=1-N σIS(i) ] } in the order of 20 s. In vivo experiments are feasible for studying relaxation mechanisms in coupled 31P 1H spin systems in intact tissue.

  6. Relaxation of hyperpolarized 129 Xe in a deflating polymer bag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Harald E.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2011-09-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging with hyperpolarized (HP) noble gases, data is often acquired during prolonged gas delivery from a storage reservoir. However, little is known about the extent to which relaxation within the reservoir will limit the useful acquisition time. For quantitative characterization, 129Xe relaxation was studied in a bag made of polyvinyl fluoride (Tedlar). Particular emphasis was on wall relaxation, as this mechanism is expected to dominate. The HP 129Xe magnetization dynamics in the deflating bag were accurately described by a model assuming dissolution of Xe in the polymer matrix and dipolar relaxation with neighboring nuclear spins. In particular, the wall relaxation rate changed linearly with the surface-to-volume ratio and exhibited a relaxivity of κ = 0.392 ± 0.008 cm/h, which is in reasonable agreement with κ = 0.331 ± 0.051 cm/h measured in a static Tedlar bag. Estimates for the bulk gas-phase 129Xe relaxation yielded T1bulk=2.55±0.22 h, which is dominated by intrinsic Xe-Xe relaxation, with small additional contributions from magnetic field inhomogeneities and oxygen-induced relaxation. Calculations based on these findings indicate that relaxation may limit HP 129Xe experiments when slow gas delivery rates are employed as, for example, in mouse imaging or vascular infusion experiments.

  7. Time-Dependent Changes in T1 during Fracture Healing in Juvenile Rats: A Quantitative MR Approach

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Katharina; Neumayer, Bernhard; Amerstorfer, Eva; Scheurer, Eva; Diwoky, Clemens; Stollberger, Rudolf; Sprenger, Hanna; Weinberg, Annelie M.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) offers several advantages in imaging and determination of soft tissue alterations when compared to qualitative imaging techniques. Although applications in brain and muscle tissues are well studied, its suitability to quantify relaxation times of intact and injured bone tissue, especially in children, is widely unknown. The objective observation of a fracture including its age determination can become of legal interest in cases of child abuse or maltreatment. Therefore, the aim of this study is the determination of time dependent changes in intact and corresponding injured bones in immature rats via qMRI, to provide the basis for an objective and radiation-free approach for fracture dating. Thirty-five MR scans of 7 Sprague-Dawley rats (male, 4 weeks old, 100 ± 5 g) were acquired on a 3T MRI scanner (TimTrio, Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany) after the surgical infliction of an epiphyseal fracture in the tibia. The images were taken at days 1, 3, 7, 14, 28, 42 and 82 post-surgery. A proton density-weighted and a T1-weighted 3D FLASH sequence were acquired to calculate the longitudinal relaxation time T1 of the fractured region and the surrounding tissues. The calculation of T1 in intact and injured bone resulted in a quantitative observation of bone development in intact juvenile tibiae as well as the bone healing process in the injured tibiae. In both areas, T1 decreased over time. To evaluate the differences in T1 behaviour between the intact and injured bone, the relative T1 values (bone-fracture) were calculated, showing clear detectable alterations of T1 after fracture occurrence. These results indicate that qMRI has a high potential not only for clinically relevant applications to detect growth defects or developmental alterations in juvenile bones, but also for forensically relevant applications such as the dating of fractures in cases of child abuse or maltreatment. PMID:27832068

  8. Crystalline 1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-ylidenes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, Guy; Gulsado-Barrios, Gregorio; Bouffard, Jean; Donnadieu, Bruno

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides novel and stable crystalline 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes. The present invention also provides methods of making 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes. The present invention also provides methods of using 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes in catalytic reactions.

  9. Spatially localized sup 1 H NMR spectra of metabolites in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hanstock, C.C. ); Rothman, D.L.; Jue, T.; Shulman, R.G. ); Prichard, J.W. )

    1988-03-01

    Using a surface coil, the authors have obtained {sup 1}H NMR spectra from metabolites in the human brain. Localization was achieved by combining depth pulses with image-selected in vivo spectroscopy magnetic field gradient methods. {sup 1}H spectra in which total creatine (3.03 ppm) has a signal/noise ratio of 95:1 were obtained in 4 min from 14 ml of brain. A resonance at 2.02 ppm consisting predominantly of N-acetylaspartate was measured relative to the creatine peak in gray and white matter, and the ratio was lower in the white matter. The spin-spin relaxation times of N-acetylaspartate and creatine were measured in white and gray matter and while creatine relaxation times were the same in both, the N-acetylaspartate relaxation time was longer in white matter. Lactate was detected in the normoxic brain and the average of three measurements was {approx}0.5 mM from comparison with the creatine plus phosphocreatine peak, which was assumed to be 10.5 mM.

  10. Quantitative T1, T2, and T2* Mapping and Semi-Quantitative Neuromelanin-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human Midbrain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neuromelanin is a dark pigment granule present within certain catecholamine neurons of the human brain. Here, we aimed to clarify the relationship between contrast of neuromelanin-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR relaxation times using T1, T2, and T2* mapping of the lower midbrain. Methods The subjects were 14 healthy volunteers (11 men and 3 women, mean age 29.9 ± 6.9 years). Neuromelanin-sensitive MRI was acquired using an optimized T1-weighted two-dimensional (2D)-turbo spin-echo sequence. To quantitatively evaluate the relaxation time, 2D-image data for the T1, T2, and T2* maps were also acquired. The regions of interest (substantia nigra pars compacta [SNc], superior cerebellar peduncles [SCP], cerebral peduncles [CP], and midbrain tegmentum [MT]) were manually drawn on neuromelanin-sensitive MRI to measure the contrast ratio (CR) and on relaxation maps to measure the relaxation times. Results The CR in the SNc was significantly higher than the CRs in the SCP and CP. Compared to the SCP and CP, the SNc had significantly higher T1 relaxation times. Moreover, the SNc had significantly lower T2 and T2* relaxation times than the other three regions (SCP, CP, and MT). Correlation analyses showed no significant correlations between the CRs in the SNc, SCP, and CP and each relaxation time. Conclusions We demonstrated the relationship between the CR of neuromelanin-sensitive MRI and the relaxation times of quantitative maps of the human midbrain. PMID:27768782

  11. Rotational dynamics of benzene and water in an ionic liquid explored via molecular dynamics simulations and NMR T1 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasaka, Yoshiro; Klein, Michael L.; Nakahara, Masaru; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2012-02-01

    The rotational dynamics of benzene and water in the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and NMR T1 measurements. MD trajectories based on an effective potential are used to calculate the 2H NMR relaxation time, T1 via Fourier transform of the relevant rotational time correlation function, C2R(t). To compensate for the lack of polarization in the standard fixed-charge modeling of the IL, an effective ionic charge, which is smaller than the elementary charge is employed. The simulation results are in closest agreement with NMR experiments with respect to the temperature and Larmor frequency dependencies of T1 when an effective charge of ±0.5e is used for the anion and the cation, respectively. The computed C2R(t) of both solutes shows a bi-modal nature, comprised of an initial non-diffusive ps relaxation plus a long-time ns tail extending to the diffusive regime. Due to the latter component, the solute dynamics is not under the motional narrowing condition with respect to the prevalent Larmor frequency. It is shown that the diffusive tail of the C2R(t) is most important to understand frequency and temperature dependencies of T1 in ILs. On the other hand, the effect of the initial ps relaxation is an increase of T1 by a constant factor. This is equivalent to an "effective" reduction of the quadrupolar coupling constant (QCC). Thus, in the NMR T1 analysis, the rotational time correlation function can be modeled analytically in the form of aexp (-t/τ) (Lipari-Szabo model), where the constant a, the Lipari-Szabo factor, contains the integrated contribution of the short-time relaxation and τ represents the relaxation time of the exponential (diffusive) tail. The Debye model is a special case of the Lipari-Szabo model with a = 1, and turns out to be inappropriate to represent benzene and water dynamics in ILs since a is as small as 0.1. The use of the Debye model would result in an underestimation

  12. Electron spin relaxation in x-lithium phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hideo; Dalton, Lauraine A; Ha, Duc; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2007-07-19

    Continuous-wave linewidths and spin susceptibilities, spin-spin relaxation rates (1/T2), and spin-lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) for two sources of x-LiPc were measured at 9.5 GHz between 15 and 298 K. Relaxation rates at 34 GHz were measured between 80 and 298 K. Room-temperature relaxation rates also were measured at 250 MHz, 1.9 GHz, and 2.76 GHz. The temperature dependences of linewidths and spin susceptibilities are characteristic of 1-D organic conductors. The ratio of populations of localized and delocalized electrons varies with sample preparation. For a single needle between 15 and about 200 K, 1/T2 is higher for the parallel orientation, but 1/T1 is higher for the perpendicular orientation, consistent with predictions based on dipolar interactions. Between about 60 and 150 K, which is the temperature regime in which spin susceptibility is changing rapidly with temperature, 1/T1 exhibits a non-monotonic dependence on temperature and is lower at 34 GHz than at 9.5 GHz. In other organic conductors, this dependence has been attributed to a bottleneck mechanism of relaxation. At higher temperatures, 1/T1 becomes less orientation-dependent. At room temperature, T1 increases rapidly between 250 MHz (3.0 micros) and 2.76 GHz (6.3 micros) and then shows less frequency dependence up to 34 GHz (9.8 micros). The relaxation rate near room temperature might have a substantial contribution from spin hopping perpendicular to the stacking axis of the molecules.

  13. Calculation of the optical spectra of the copper(I) complex with triphenylphosphine, iodine, and 3-pyridine-2-yl-5-phenyl-1 H-1,2,4-triazole by the DFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaeva, V. A.; Minaev, B. F.; Baryshnikov, G. V.

    2017-02-01

    The IR and UV spectra of the [CuIL(PPh3)] complex (PPh3 = triphenylphosphine, L = 3-pyridine- 2-yl-5-phenyl-1 H-1,2,4-triazole) have been analyzed in detail within the density functional theory (DFT) and its time-dependent version TD DFT. The standard functional B3LYP and sets of basis orbitals 6-311G(d,p) and Lanl2DZ are used for the atoms of the elements of periods I and II and for the iodine atom, respectively. The calculated IR spectra of the complex and free ligands coincide with the observed IR bands, due to which one can completely interpret all normal modes and confirm X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. Particular attention is paid to the structure of excited triplet ( T 1) state in order to explain the role of copper and iodine ions in the formation of photo- and electroluminescence spectra. It is shown that the equilibrium T 1 state undergoes structural relaxation after the vertical excitation and significantly changes its electronic nature and the charge transfer structure.

  14. Ethanol-induced fatty liver in the rat examined by in vivo 1H chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging and localized spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Ling, M; Brauer, M

    1992-01-01

    In vivo 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), chemical shift selective imaging (CSI), and localized (VOSY) 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) were used to study fatty infiltration in the livers of rats chronically fed an ethanol-containing all-liquid DeCarli-Lieber diet. Conventional total proton MRI showed a somewhat hyperintense liver for ethanol-fed rats, compared with pair-fed controls. CSI showed a dramatic increase in the fat signal intensity for ethanol-treated rats that was fairly homogeneous throughout the liver. However, CSI also showed a substantial decrease in the water signal intensity for the ethanol-treated rats compared to pair-fed control rats. 1H VOSY MR spectra also showed a 5.5-fold increase in the methylene resonance (1.3 ppm) of fat and a 50-70% decrease in the water resonance (4.8 ppm). Relative in vivo proton T1 and T2 relaxation times for the water resonance separate from the fat resonance, determined from modified VOSY experiments, were found to tend to increase and decrease, respectively, for ethanol-treated rat livers compared with controls. The decrease in hepatic water signal intensity could be accounted for by the decrease in T2 and decrease in water density due to the presence of accumulated hepatic fat (approximately 25 mg/g wet weight of liver). When ethanol was withdrawn from the chronically treated rats, fatty infiltration was observed by both CSI and VOSY spectra to revert toward control values with a half-life of 2-4 days. By day 16, however, the signal intensity for hepatic fat was still significantly higher than control levels. In vitro 1H MRS studies of chloroform-methanol extracts confirmed the 5.5-fold increase in total hepatic fat induced by the chronic ethanol treatment, and showed further that triacylglycerols were increased 7.7-fold, cholesterol was increased fourfold, and phospholipids were increased 3.3-fold, compared with liver extracts from pair-fed control rats.

  15. Proton Dynamics in the Anti-ferroelectric CsH3(SeO3)2 by using 1H NMR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moohee; Ndiaye, B.; Kang, K.; Kim, H.; Sim, J.; Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-03-01

    1H NMR techniques have been employed on the anti-ferroelectric CsH3(SeO3)2 to measure spectrum, shift, T1 and T2 from 300 K down to 80 K at 4.85 T. The 1H NMR spectrum at 300 K shows a composite structure; one dominant broad peak and two small narrow peaks. From the temperature dependences of both intensity and T1 for each peak, we identify that the narrow peaks come from rapidly moving protons whereas the broad peaks originate from rigid protons. The spectra below 200 K show several peaks associated with six nonequivalent proton sites and also the T1 decays show a non-exponential curve coming from many proton sites. T1 is very long even at 300 K and becomes even longer at low temperature. By analyzing T1 decays with T1S and T1L, we confirm that 1/T1(T) show an activated behavior; the short component originates from proton dynamics with activation energy of ~ 140 K and the long component is associated with that of ~ 100 K. Further analysis suggests that some protons show an abrupt change in both shift and T1L across Tc and may be responsible for the phase transition.

  16. PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION IN CRYSTALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTALS, PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE, RELAXATION TIME , CRYSTAL DEFECTS, QUARTZ, GLASS, STRAIN(MECHANICS), TEMPERATURE, NUCLEAR SPINS, HYDROGEN, CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, FLUORIDES, COLOR CENTERS, PHONONS, OXYGEN.

  17. Voltage-dependent gating rearrangements in the intracellular T1-T1 interface of a K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2006-04-01

    The intracellular tetramerization domain (T1) of most eukaryotic voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv channels) exists as a "hanging gondola" below the transmembrane regions that directly control activation gating via the electromechanical coupling between the S4 voltage sensor and the main S6 gate. However, much less is known about the putative contribution of the T1 domain to Kv channel gating. This possibility is mechanistically intriguing because the T1-S1 linker connects the T1 domain to the voltage-sensing domain. Previously, we demonstrated that thiol-specific reagents inhibit Kv4.1 channels by reacting in a state-dependent manner with native Zn(2+) site thiolate groups in the T1-T1 interface; therefore, we concluded that the T1-T1 interface is functionally active and not protected by Zn(2+) (Wang, G., M. Shahidullah, C.A. Rocha, C. Strang, P.J. Pfaffinger, and M. Covarrubias. 2005. J. Gen. Physiol. 126:55-69). Here, we co-expressed Kv4.1 channels and auxiliary subunits (KChIP-1 and DPPX-S) to investigate the state and voltage dependence of the accessibility of MTSET to the three interfacial cysteines in the T1 domain. The results showed that the average MTSET modification rate constant (k(MTSET)) is dramatically enhanced in the activated state relative to the resting and inactivated states (approximately 260- and approximately 47-fold, respectively). Crucially, under three separate conditions that produce distinct activation profiles, k(MTSET) is steeply voltage dependent in a manner that is precisely correlated with the peak conductance-voltage relations. These observations strongly suggest that Kv4 channel gating is tightly coupled to voltage-dependent accessibility changes of native T1 cysteines in the intersubunit Zn(2+) site. Furthermore, cross-linking of cysteine pairs across the T1-T1 interface induced substantial inhibition of the channel, which supports the functionally dynamic role of T1 in channel gating. Therefore, we conclude that the complex

  18. Proton-nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times in brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Kamman, R.L.; Go, K.G.; Berendsen, H.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Proton relaxation times of protein solutions, bovine brain, and edematous feline brain tissue were studied as a function of water concentration, protein concentration, and temperature. In accordance with the fast proton exchange model for relaxation, a linear relation could be established between R1 and the inverse of the weight fraction of tissue water. This relation also applied to R2 of gray matter and of protein solutions. No straightforward relation with water content was found for R2 of white matter. Temperature-dependent studies indicated that in this case, the slow exchange model for relaxation had to be applied. The effect of macromolecules in physiological relevant concentrations on the total relaxation behavior of edematous tissue was weak. Total water content changes predominantly affected the relaxation rates. The linear relation may have high clinical potential for assessment of the status of cerebral edema on the basis of T1 and T2 readings from MR images.

  19. Three-dimensional ultrashort echo time cones T1ρ (3D UTE-cones-T1ρ ) imaging.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ya-Jun; Carl, Michael; Shao, Hongda; Tadros, Anthony S; Chang, Eric Y; Du, Jiang

    2017-03-20

    We report a novel three-dimensional (3D) ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence employing Cones trajectory and T1ρ preparation (UTE-Cones-T1ρ ) for quantitative T1ρ assessment of short T2 tissues in the musculoskeletal system. A basic 3D UTE-Cones sequence was combined with a spin-locking preparation pulse for T1ρ contrast. A relatively short TR was used to decrease the scan time, which required T1 measurement and compensation using 3D UTE-Cones data acquisitions with variable TRs. Another strategy to reduce the total scan time was to acquire multiple Cones spokes (Nsp ) after each T1ρ preparation and fat saturation. Four spin-locking times (TSL = 0-20 ms) were acquired over 12 min, plus another 7 min for T1 measurement. The 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence was compared with a two-dimensional (2D) spiral-T1ρ sequence for the imaging of a spherical CuSO4 phantom and ex vivo meniscus and tendon specimens, as well as the knee and ankle joints of healthy volunteers, using a clinical 3-T scanner. The CuSO4 phantom showed a T1ρ value of 76.5 ± 1.6 ms with the 2D spiral-T1ρ sequence, as well as 85.7 ± 3.6 and 89.2 ± 1.4 ms for the 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequences with Nsp of 1 and 5, respectively. The 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence provided shorter T1ρ values for the bovine meniscus sample relative to the 2D spiral-T1ρ sequence (10-12 ms versus 16 ms, respectively). The cadaveric human Achilles tendon sample could only be imaged with the 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence (T1ρ  = 4.0 ± 0.9 ms), with the 2D spiral-T1ρ sequence demonstrating near-zero signal intensity. Human studies yielded T1ρ values of 36.1 ± 2.9, 18.3 ± 3.9 and 3.1 ± 0.4 ms for articular cartilage, meniscus and the Achilles tendon, respectively. The 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence allows volumetric T1ρ measurement of short T2 tissues in vivo.

  20. Gas-phase spin relaxation of Xe129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anger, B. C.; Schrank, G.; Schoeck, A.; Butler, K. A.; Solum, M. S.; Pugmire, R. J.; Saam, B.

    2008-10-01

    We have completed an extensive study of Xe129 longitudinal spin relaxation in the gas phase, involving both intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. The dominant intrinsic relaxation is mediated by the formation of persistent Xe2 van der Waals dimers. The dependence of this relaxation on applied magnetic field yields the relative contributions of the spin-rotation and chemical-shift-anisotropy interactions; the former dominates at magnetic fields below a few tesla. This relaxation also shows an inverse quadratic dependence on temperature T ; the maximum low-field intrinsic relaxation for pure xenon at room temperature (measured here to be 4.6h , in agreement with previous work) increases by ≈60% for T=100°C . The dominant extrinsic relaxation is mediated by collisions with the walls of the glass container. Wall relaxation was studied in silicone-coated alkali-metal-free cells, which showed long (many hours or more) and robust relaxation times, even at the low magnetic fields typical for spin-exchange optical pumping (≈3mT) . The further suppression of wall relaxation for magnetic fields above a few tesla is consistent with the interaction of Xe129 with paramagnetic spins on or inside the surface coating. At 14.1T and sufficiently low xenon density, we measured a relaxation time T1=99h , with an inferred wall-relaxation time of 174h . A prototype large storage cell ( 12cm diameter) was constructed to take advantage of the apparent increase in wall-relaxation time for cells with a smaller surface-to-volume ratio. The measured relaxation time in this cell at 3mT and 100°C was 5.75h . Such a cell (or one even larger) could be used to store many liters of hyperpolarized Xe129 produced by a flow-through polarizer and accumulator for up to three times longer than currently implemented schemes involving freezing xenon in liquid nitrogen.

  1. Three-dimensional T(1), T(2) and proton density mapping with inversion recovery balanced SSFP.

    PubMed

    Newbould, Rexford D; Skare, Stefan T; Alley, Marcus T; Gold, Garry E; Bammer, Roland

    2010-11-01

    By combining a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) readout with an initial inversion pulse, all three contrast parameters, T(1), T(2) and proton density (M(0)), may be rapidly calculated from the signal progression in time. However, here it is shown that this technique is quite sensitive to variation in the applied transmit RF (B(1)) field, leading to pronounced errors in calculated values. Two-dimensional (2D) acquisitions are taxed to accurately quantify the relaxation, as the short RF pulses required by SSFP's rapid TR contain a broad spectrum of excitation angles. A 3D excitation using a large diameter excitation coil was able to correctly quantify the parameters. While the extreme B(1) sensitivity was previously problematic and has precluded use of IR-bSSFP for relaxometry, in this work these obstacles were significantly reduced, allowing the rapid quantification of T(1), T(2) and M(0). The results may further be used to simulate image contrast from common sequences, such as a T(1)-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) examination.

  2. Geometrically confined ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles boost the T(1) contrast ability.

    PubMed

    Ni, Kaiyuan; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Zhang, Zongjun; Zhou, Zijian; Yang, Li; Wang, Lirong; Ai, Hua; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-14

    High-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents and novel contrast enhancement strategies are urgently needed for sensitive and accurate diagnosis. Here we report a strategy to construct a new T1 contrast agent based on the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) theory. We loaded the ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles into worm-like interior channels of mesoporous silica nanospheres (Gd2O3@MSN nanocomposites). This unique structure endows the nanocomposites with geometrical confinement, high molecular tumbling time, and a large coordinated number of water molecules, which results in a significant enhancement of the T1 contrast with longitudinal proton relaxivity (r1) as high as 45.08 mM(-1) s(-1). Such a high r1 value of Gd2O3@MSN, compared to those of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles and gadolinium-based clinical contrast agents, is mainly attributed to the strong geometrical confinement effect. This strategy provides new guidance for developing various high-performance T1 contrast agents for sensitive imaging and disease diagnosis.

  3. Three Dimensional T1, T2, and Proton Density Mapping with Inversion Recovery Balanced SSFP

    PubMed Central

    Newbould, Rexford D.; Skare, Stefan T.; Alley, Marcus T.; Gold, Garry E.; Bammer, Roland

    2010-01-01

    By combining a bSSFP readout with an initial inversion pulse, all three contrast parameters, T1, T2, and proton density (M0), may be rapidly calculated from the signal progression in time. However, here it is shown that this technique is quite sensitive to variation in the applied transmit RF (B1) field, leading to pronounced errors in calculated values. 2D acquisitions are taxed to accurately quantify the relaxation, as the short RF pulses required by SSFP's rapid TR contain a broad spectrum of excitation angles. A 3D excitation using a large diameter excitation coil was able to correctly quantify the parameters. While the extreme B1 sensitivity was previously problematic, and has precluded use of IR-bSSFP for relaxometry, in this work these obstacles were significantly reduced, allowing the rapid quantification of T1, T2, and M0. The results may further be used to simulate image contrast from common sequences, such as a T1-weighted or FLAIR examination. PMID:20692784

  4. Rotating Frame Spin Lattice Relaxation in a Swine Model of Chronic, Left Ventricular Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Witschey, Walter RT; Pilla, James J; Ferrari, Giovanni; Koomalsingh, Kevin; Haris, Mohammed; Hinmon, Robin; Zsido, Gerald; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Reddy, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    T1ρ relaxation times were quantified in a swine model of chronic, left ventricular myocardial infarction. It was found that there were low frequency relaxation mechanisms that suppress endogenous contrast at low spin lock amplitudes and in T2-weighted images. A moderate amplitude spin locking pulse could overcome these relaxation mechanisms. Relaxation dispersion data was measured over a range of RF field amplitudes and a model was formulated to include dipole-dipole relaxation modulated by molecular rotation and an apparent exchange mechanism. These techniques may find some use in the clinic for the observation of chronic, left ventricular cardiac remodeling. PMID:20677236

  5. Unexpected proton spin-lattice relaxation in the solutions of polyolefin and tetrachloroethane.

    PubMed

    He, Yiyong; Qiu, Xiaohua; Zhou, Zhe

    2010-07-01

    'Unexpected' proton spin-lattice relaxation (T(1)) times are reported for the solutions of poly(ethylene-co-1-octene) and tetrachloroethane-d(2). For the residual protons of the deuterated solvent and the methyl and vinyl protons at the polymer chain ends, their T(1) relaxation times vary significantly with both the polymer concentration and molecular weight over a wide range. The T(1)s also decrease with increasing temperature at relative high temperatures. Such behaviors are in contrast to most reported polymer solutions in which the T(1) has nearly no concentration or molecular weight dependence in the dilute and semi-dilute regime, and normal dependence on temperature. Further investigation revealed that the paramagnetic oxygen effect did shorten the measured proton T(1)s, but cannot account for the unexpected T(1) dependences. Spin rotation is proposed to provide a reasonable explanation.

  6. TEACHING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NORRIS, JEANNE E.; STEINHAUS, ARTHUR H.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO FIND OUT WHETHER (1) THE METHODS FOR ATTAINING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION THAT HAVE PROVED FRUITFUL IN THE ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLINIC CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ADAPTED TO THE TEACHER-CLASS RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLASSROOM AND GYMNASIUM, AND (2) NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION CAN BE TAUGHT SUCCESSFULLY BY AN APPROPRIATELY TRAINED…

  7. Relaxation of magnetotail plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.

    1987-01-01

    A quasi-thermodynamic model is presented for the relaxation of magnetotail plasmas during substorms, followed by quiet times. It is proposed that the plasma relaxes to a state of low-potential energy subject to a small number of global constraints. The constraints are exactly preserved by all ideal motions and, approximately, by a wide class of motions of the plasma undergoing magnetic reconnection. A variational principle which minimizes the free energy predicts the relaxed state. Exact, two-dimensional solutions of the relaxed state are obtained. A universal feature of the exact solutions is a chain of magnetic islands along the tail axis. Sufficient conditions for the stability of relaxed states are obtained from the second variation of the free-energy functional.

  8. Defining myocardial tissue abnormalities in end-stage renal failure with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using native T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Elaine; Talle, Mohammed A; Mangion, Kenneth; Bell, Elizabeth; Rauhalammi, Samuli M; Roditi, Giles; McComb, Christie; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Welsh, Paul; Woodward, Rosemary; Struthers, Allan D; Jardine, Alan G; Patel, Rajan K; Berry, Colin; Mark, Patrick B

    2016-10-01

    Noninvasive quantification of myocardial fibrosis in end-stage renal disease is challenging. Gadolinium contrast agents previously used for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are contraindicated because of an association with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. In other populations, increased myocardial native T1 times on cardiac MRI have been shown to be a surrogate marker of myocardial fibrosis. We applied this method to 33 incident hemodialysis patients and 28 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers who underwent MRI at 3.0T. Native T1 relaxation times and feature tracking-derived global longitudinal strain as potential markers of fibrosis were compared and associated with cardiac biomarkers. Left ventricular mass indices were higher in the hemodialysis than the control group. Global, Septal and midseptal T1 times were all significantly higher in the hemodialysis group (global T1 hemodialysis 1171 ± 27 ms vs. 1154 ± 32 ms; septal T1 hemodialysis 1184 ± 29 ms vs. 1163 ± 30 ms; and midseptal T1 hemodialysis 1184 ± 34 ms vs. 1161 ± 29 ms). In the hemodialysis group, T1 times correlated with left ventricular mass indices. Septal T1 times correlated with troponin and electrocardiogram-corrected QT interval. The peak global longitudinal strain was significantly reduced in the hemodialysis group (hemodialysis -17.7±5.3% vs. -21.8±6.2%). For hemodialysis patients, the peak global longitudinal strain significantly correlated with left ventricular mass indices (R = 0.426), and a trend was seen for correlation with galectin-3, a biomarker of cardiac fibrosis. Thus, cardiac tissue properties of hemodialysis patients consistent with myocardial fibrosis can be determined noninvasively and associated with multiple structural and functional abnormalities.

  9. SU-D-303-03: Impact of Uncertainty in T1 Measurements On Quantification of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Aryal, M; Cao, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI requires native longitudinal relaxation time (T1) measurement. This study aimed to assess uncertainty in T1 measurements using two different methods. Methods and Materials: Brain MRI scans were performed on a 3T scanner in 9 patients who had low grade/benign tumors and partial brain radiotherapy without chemotherapy at pre-RT, week-3 during RT (wk-3), end-RT, and 1, 6 and 18 months after RT. T1-weighted images were acquired using gradient echo sequences with 1) 2 different flip angles (50 and 150), and 2) 5 variable TRs (100–2000ms). After creating quantitative T1 maps, average T1 was calculated in regions of interest (ROI), which were distant from tumors and received a total of accumulated radiation doses < 5 Gy at wk-3. ROIs included left and right normal Putamen and Thalamus (gray matter: GM), and frontal and parietal white matter (WM). Since there were no significant or even a trend of T1 changes from pre-RT to wk-3 in these ROIs, a relative repeatability coefficient (RC) of T1 as a measure of uncertainty was estimated in each ROI using the data pre-RT and at wk-3. The individual T1 changes at later time points were evaluated compared to the estimated RCs. Results: The 2-flip angle method produced small RCs in GM (9.7–11.7%) but large RCs in WM (12.2–13.6%) compared to the saturation-recovery (SR) method (11.0–17.7% for GM and 7.5–11.2% for WM). More than 81% of individual T1 changes were within T1 uncertainty ranges defined by RCs. Conclusion: Our study suggests that the impact of T1 uncertainty on physiological parameters derived from DCE MRI is not negligible. A short scan with 2 flip angles is able to achieve repeatability of T1 estimates similar to a long scan with 5 different TRs, and is desirable to be integrated in the DCE protocol. Present study was supported by National Institute of Health (NIH) under grant numbers; UO1 CA183848 and RO1 NS064973.

  10. Pharmacological characterisation of the GlyT-1 glycine transporter using two novel radioligands.

    PubMed

    Herdon, Hugh J; Roberts, Jennifer C; Coulton, Steve; Porter, Rod A

    2010-11-01

    Inhibitors of the glycine transporter GlyT-1 are being developed as potential treatments for schizophrenia. Here we report on the use of two novel radioligands, [(3)H]-SB-733993 and [(3)H]-GSK931145, for the characterisation of GlyT-1 in both cells and native tissue. Binding was evaluated in membranes either from HEK293 cells expressing recombinant human GlyT-1 (hGlyT-1) or from rat cerebral cortex. Specific binding of both [(3)H]-SB-733993 and [(3)H]-GSK931145 to hGlyT-1 HEK293 cell membranes and rat cerebral cortex membranes was saturable and comprised >90% of total binding. K(d) and B(max) values for the two radioligands were fairly similar, with K(d) values of 1-2 nM and B(max) values of around 7000 fmol/mg protein in hGlyT-1 membranes and 3000 fmol/mg protein in rat cortex membranes. Association of [(3)H]-SB-733993 was faster, with binding reaching equilibrium within 30 min compared with 90 min for [(3)H]-GSK931145. Dissociation was also much slower for [(3)H]-GSK931145 than for [(3)H]-SB-733993, with 50% of specific binding being dissociated by approximately 40 min and 5 min, respectively. Autoradiography studies with [(3)H]-GSK931145 showed widespread distribution of binding in rat brain, with generally higher binding in caudal compared with rostral areas. Initial studies in human frontal cortex membranes showed clear specific binding of [(3)H]-GSK931145, though with much lower density (B(max) 570 fmol/mg protein) and slightly lower affinity (K(d) 4.5 nM) compared with rat cortex. A human brain autoradiography study showed higher specific binding in cerebellum compared with frontal cortex. All GlyT-1 inhibitors tested, as well as glycine itself, competed fully for the binding of both [(3)H]-SB-733993 and [(3)H]-GSK931145 in both hGlyT-1 and rat cortex membranes. Studies on the effect of varying NaCl concentration showed that [(3)H]-SB-733993 binding was reduced by >90% in the absence of added Na(+) ions, whilst [(3)H]-GSK931145 binding was unaffected

  11. Design of self-refocused pulses under short relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Issa, Bashar

    2009-06-01

    The effect of using self-refocused RF pulses of comparable duration to relaxation times is studied in detail using numerical simulation. Transverse magnetization decay caused by short T2 and longitudinal component distortion due to short T1 are consistent with other studies. In order to design new pulses to combat short T1 and T2 the relaxation terms are directly inserted into the Bloch equations. These equations are inverted by searching the RF solution space using simulated annealing global optimization technique. A new T2-decay efficient excitation pulse is created (SDETR: single delayed excursion T2 resistive) which is also energy efficient. Inversion pulses which improve the inverted magnetization profile and achieve better suppression of the remaining transverse magnetization are also created even when both T1 and T2 are short. This is achieved, however, on the expense of a more complex B1 shape of larger energy content.

  12. Analysis of the Precision of Variable Flip Angle T1 Mapping with Emphasis on the Noise Propagated from RF Transmit Field Maps.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoojin; Callaghan, Martina F; Nagy, Zoltan

    2017-01-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging, precise measurements of longitudinal relaxation time (T1) is crucial to acquire useful information that is applicable to numerous clinical and neuroscience applications. In this work, we investigated the precision of T1 relaxation time as measured using the variable flip angle method with emphasis on the noise propagated from radiofrequency transmit field ([Formula: see text]) measurements. The analytical solution for T1 precision was derived by standard error propagation methods incorporating the noise from the three input sources: two spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) images and a [Formula: see text] map. Repeated in vivo experiments were performed to estimate the total variance in T1 maps and we compared these experimentally obtained values with the theoretical predictions to validate the established theoretical framework. Both the analytical and experimental results showed that variance in the [Formula: see text] map propagated comparable noise levels into the T1 maps as either of the two SPGR images. Improving precision of the [Formula: see text] measurements significantly reduced the variance in the estimated T1 map. The variance estimated from the repeatedly measured in vivoT1 maps agreed well with the theoretically-calculated variance in T1 estimates, thus validating the analytical framework for realistic in vivo experiments. We concluded that for T1 mapping experiments, the error propagated from the [Formula: see text] map must be considered. Optimizing the SPGR signals while neglecting to improve the precision of the [Formula: see text] map may result in grossly overestimating the precision of the estimated T1 values.

  13. Cardiac MOLLI T1 mapping at 3.0 T: comparison of patient-adaptive dual-source RF and conventional RF transmission.

    PubMed

    Rasper, Michael; Nadjiri, Jonathan; Sträter, Alexandra S; Settles, Marcus; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Rummeny, Ernst J; Huber, Armin M

    2017-01-30

    To prospectively compare image quality and myocardial T1 relaxation times of modified Look-Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) imaging at 3.0 T (T) acquired with patient-adaptive dual-source (DS) and conventional single-source (SS) radiofrequency (RF) transmission. Pre- and post-contrast MOLLI T1 mapping using SS and DS was acquired in 27 patients. Patient wise and segment wise analysis of T1 times was performed. The correlation of DS MOLLI measurements with a reference spin echo sequence was analysed in phantom experiments. DS MOLLI imaging reduced T1 standard deviation in 14 out of 16 myocardial segments (87.5%). Significant reduction of T1 variance could be obtained in 7 segments (43.8%). DS significantly reduced myocardial T1 variance in 16 out of 25 patients (64.0%). With conventional RF transmission, dielectric shading artefacts occurred in six patients causing diagnostic uncertainty. No according artefacts were found on DS images. DS image findings were in accordance with conventional T1 mapping and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging. Phantom experiments demonstrated good correlation of myocardial T1 time between DS MOLLI and spin echo imaging. Dual-source RF transmission enhances myocardial T1 homogeneity in MOLLI imaging at 3.0 T. The reduction of signal inhomogeneities and artefacts due to dielectric shading is likely to enhance diagnostic confidence.

  14. Assessment of the evaluation of liver T1 mapping imaging applying virtual ECG gating on a modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) pulse sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Seung-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Suk-Jun; Choe, Bo-Young

    2014-10-01

    A T1 mapping calculation error may occur in a physicochemical environment with large relaxivity. We evaluated through a simulated electrocardiogram (ECG) the administration of a contrast with high relaxivity and its effect on the heart rate by using a modified Look-Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) pulse sequence. The agarose 2% phantom of high relaxivity environment was developed by diluting gadoxetic acid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T1 contrast media. The gold standard T1 determination was based on coronal single section imaging with a 2D inversion-recovery turbo spin echo sequence (2D-IRTSE) in a 3T MR unit. Using the identical 3T MR scanner, we acquired T1 mapping for the MOLLI pulse sequence with various virtual heart rates. T1 mapping data of the two different pulse sequences ( i.e., 2D-IRTSE and MOLLI) were measured to investigate the accuracy and the specificity. An in vivo study was conducted in the same manner as the phantom experiments for liver T1 mapping imaging in three healthy volunteers. The MOLLI pulse sequence showed an error rate of less than 10% at a contrast agent concentration of 0.4 mmol/L, and significant error, compared with the reference value, was observed at 0.6 mmol/L or higher. The percentage error of the T1 value did not correlated with the RR ( i.e., the time between heart beats) change that was observed (P =.270). Based on the in-vivo liver test, T1 mapping imaging of an abdominal organ as the liver can be successfully achieved using the applied virtual ECG gating on the MOLLI sequence.

  15. The Effects of Dissolved Oxygen upon Amide Proton Relaxation and Chemical Shift in a Perdeuterated Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Tobias S.; Campbell, Iain D.; Boyd, Jonathan

    2002-08-01

    The effects of dissolved molecular oxygen upon amide proton ( 1H N) longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and chemical shifts were studied for a small protein domain, the second type 2 module of fibronectin ( 2F2)—isotopically enriched to 99% 2H, 98% 15N. Longitudinal relaxation rate enhancements, R O 2( 1H N), of individual backbone 1H N nuclei varied up to 14 fold between a degassed and oxygenated (1 bar) solution, indicating that the oxygen distribution within the protein is inhomogeneous. On average, smaller relaxation rate enhancements were observed for 1H N nuclei associated with the core of the protein compared to 1H N nuclei closer to the surface, suggesting restricted oxygen accessibility to some regions. In agreement with an O 2- 1H N hyperfine interaction in the extreme narrowing limit, the 1H N transverse relaxation rates showed no significant change, up to an oxygen pressure of 9.5 bar (the maximum pressure used in this study). For most 1H N resonances, small Δδ O 2( 1H N) hyperfine chemical shifts could be detected between oxygen pressures of 1 bar and 9.5 bar.

  16. T1 mapping of the myocardium: intra-individual assessment of post-contrast T1 time evolution and extracellular volume fraction at 3T for Gd-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Myocardial T1 relaxation time (T1 time) and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) are altered in patients with diffuse myocardial fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to perform an intra-individual assessment of normal T1 time and ECV for two different contrast agents. Methods A modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery (MOLLI) sequence was acquired at 3 T in 24 healthy subjects (8 men; 28 ± 6 years) at mid-ventricular short axis pre-contrast and every 5 min between 5-45 min after injection of a bolus of 0.15 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA; Magnevist®) (exam 1) and 0.1 mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA; Multihance®) (exam 2) during two separate scanning sessions. T1 times were measured in myocardium and blood on generated T1 maps. ECVs were calculated as ΔR1myocardium/ΔR1blood*1−hematocrit. Results Mean pre-contrast T1 relaxation times for myocardium and blood were similar for both the first and second CMR exam (p > 0.5). Overall mean post-contrast myocardial T1 time was 15 ± 2 ms (2.5 ± 0.7%) shorter for Gd-DTPA at 0.15 mmol/kg compared to Gd-BOPTA at 0.1 mmol/kg (p < 0.01) while there was no significant difference for T1 time of blood pool (p > 0.05). Between 5 and 45 minutes after contrast injection, mean ECV values increased linearly with time for both contrast agents from 0.27 ± 0.03 to 0.30 ± 0.03 (p < 0.0001). Mean ECV values were slightly higher (by 0.01, p < 0.05) for Gd-DTPA compared to Gd-BOPTA. Inter-individual variation of ECV was higher (CV 8.7% [exam 1, Gd-DTPA] and 9.4% [exam 2, Gd-BOPTA], respectively) compared to variation of pre-contrast myocardial T1 relaxation time (CV 4.5% [exam 1] and 3.0% [exam 2], respectively). ECV with Gd-DTPA was highly correlated to ECV by Gd-BOPTA (r = 0.803; p < 0.0001). Conclusion In comparison to pre-contrast myocardial T1 relaxation time, variation in ECV values of normal subjects is larger. However, absolute differences in ECV

  17. Water and salt distribution in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) studied by low-field 1H NMR, 1H and 23Na MRI and light microscopy: effects of raw material quality and brine salting.

    PubMed

    Aursand, Ida G; Veliyulin, Emil; Böcker, Ulrike; Ofstad, Ragni; Rustad, Turid; Erikson, Ulf

    2009-01-14

    The effect of different Atlantic salmon raw materials (prerigor, postrigor and frozen/thawed) on water mobility and salt uptake after brine salting was investigated by using LF 1H NMR T2 relaxation,1H and 23Na MRI and light microscopy. Distributed exponential analysis of the T2 relaxation data revealed two main water pools in all raw materials, T21 and T22, with relaxation times in the range of 20-100 ms and 100-300 ms, respectively. Raw material differences were reflected in the T2 relaxation data. Light microscopy demonstrated structural differences between unsalted and salted raw materials. For prerigor fillets, salting induced a decrease in T21 population coupled with a more open microstructure compared to unsalted fillets, whereas for frozen/thawed fillets, an increase in T21 population coupled with salt-induced swelling of myofibers was observed. The result implies that the T21 population was directly affected by the density of the muscle myofiber lattice. MR imaging revealed significant differences in salt uptake between raw materials, prerigor salted fillets gained least salt (1.3-1.6% NaCl), whereas the frozen/thawed fillets gained most salt (2.7-2.9% NaCl), and obtained the most even salt distribution due to the more open microstructure. This study demonstrates the advantage of LF NMR T2 relaxation and 1H and 23Na MRI as effective tools for understanding of the relationship between the microstructure of fish muscle, its water mobility and its salt uptake.

  18. Electronic states and molecular dynamics of single-component molecular conductors [M (tmdt) 2] (M =Ni , Pt) studied by 13C and 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Rina; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Yoshimura, Masahide; Gangi, Hiro; Kanoda, Kazushi; Zhou, Biao; Idobata, Yuki; Kobayashi, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The molecular conductors [M(tmdt) 2] (M =Ni , Pt) consisting of single molecular species are investigated with 13C NMR and 1H NMR. The temperature dependences of the 13C NMR shift and relaxation rate provide microscopic evidence for the metallic nature with appreciable electron correlations. Both compounds exhibit an anomalous frequency-dependent enhancement in the 1H nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate in a wide temperature range. These observations signify the presence of extraordinary molecular motions with low energy excitations.

  19. Relaxation techniques for stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems such as high blood pressure, stomachaches, headaches, anxiety, and depression. Using relaxation techniques can help you feel calm. These exercises can also help you manage stress and ease ...

  20. Assessment of T1 and T2* effects in vivo and ex vivo using iron oxide nanoparticles in steady state--dependence on blood volume and water exchange.

    PubMed

    Bjørnerud, Atle; Johansson, Lars O; Briley-Saebø, Karen; Ahlström, Håkan K

    2002-03-01

    Accurate knowledge of the relationship between contrast agent concentration and tissue relaxation is a critical requirement for quantitative assessment of tissue perfusion using contrast-enhanced MRI. In the present study, using a pig model, the relationship between steady-state blood concentration levels of an iron oxide nanoparticle with a hydrated diameter of 12 nm (NC100150 Injection) and changes in the transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates (1/T2* and 1/T1, respectively) in blood, muscle, and renal cortex was investigated at 1.5 T. Ex vivo measurements of 1/T2* and 1/T1 were additionally performed in whole pig blood spiked with different concentrations of the iron oxide nanoparticle. In renal cortex and muscle, 1/T2* increased linearly with contrast agent concentration with slopes of 101 +/-22 s(-1)mM(-1) and 6.5 +/-0.9 s(-1)mM(-1) (mean +/- SD), respectively. In blood, 1/T2* increased as a quadratic function of contrast agent concentration, with different quadratic terms in the ex vivo vs. the in vivo experiments. In vivo, 1/T1 in blood increased linearly with contrast agent concentration, with a slope (T1-relaxivity) of 13.9 +/- 0.9 s(-1)mM(-1). The achievable increase in 1/T1 in renal cortex and muscle was limited by the rate of water exchange between the intra- and extravascular compartments and the 1/T1-curves were well described by a two-compartment water exchange limited relaxation model.

  1. Calibration of myocardial T2 and T1 against iron concentration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The assessment of myocardial iron using T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been validated and calibrated, and is in clinical use. However, there is very limited data assessing the relaxation parameters T1 and T2 for measurement of human myocardial iron. Methods Twelve hearts were examined from transfusion-dependent patients: 11 with end-stage heart failure, either following death (n = 7) or cardiac transplantation (n = 4), and 1 heart from a patient who died from a stroke with no cardiac iron loading. Ex-vivo R1 and R2 measurements (R1 = 1/T1 and R2 = 1/T2) at 1.5 Tesla were compared with myocardial iron concentration measured using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Results From a single myocardial slice in formalin which was repeatedly examined, a modest decrease in T2 was observed with time, from mean (±SD) 23.7 ± 0.93 ms at baseline (13 days after death and formalin fixation) to 18.5 ± 1.41 ms at day 566 (p < 0.001). Raw T2 values were therefore adjusted to correct for this fall over time. Myocardial R2 was correlated with iron concentration [Fe] (R2 0.566, p < 0.001), but the correlation was stronger between LnR2 and Ln[Fe] (R2 0.790, p < 0.001). The relation was [Fe] = 5081•(T2)-2.22 between T2 (ms) and myocardial iron (mg/g dry weight). Analysis of T1 proved challenging with a dichotomous distribution of T1, with very short T1 (mean 72.3 ± 25.8 ms) that was independent of iron concentration in all hearts stored in formalin for greater than 12 months. In the remaining hearts stored for <10 weeks prior to scanning, LnR1 and iron concentration were correlated but with marked scatter (R2 0.517, p < 0.001). A linear relationship was present between T1 and T2 in the hearts stored for a short period (R2 0.657, p < 0.001). Conclusion Myocardial T2 correlates well with myocardial iron concentration, which raises the possibility that T2 may provide additive

  2. Lumbar intervertebral discs T2 relaxometry and T1ρ relaxometry correlation with age in asymptomatic young adults

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Carlos E. Garrido; Bonugli, Gustavo P.; Mazoroski, Debora; Tamashiro, Mauricio H.; Savarese, Leonor G.; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the detection of intervertebral disc (IVD) composition aging-related changes using T2 and T1ρ relaxometry in vivo in asymptomatic young adults. Methods We recruited ninety asymptomatic and young adults (42 men and 48 women) between 20 and 40 years old. T2 and T1ρ lumbar spine mappings were acquired using 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Two independent observers manually segmented 450 lumbar discs in all slices. They also performed sub region segmentation of annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) at the central MRI sagittal slices. Results There was no difference between men and women for T2 (P=0.37) or T1ρ relaxometry (P=0.97). There was a negative correlation between age (20–40 years) and IVD T2 relaxation time of the whole disc (r=−0.30, P<0.0001), NP (r=−0.20 to −0.51, P<0.05) and posterior AF (r=−0.21 to −0.31, P<0.05) at all lumbar disc levels. There was no statistical correlation between aging and IVD T1ρ relaxation both for NP and AF. Conclusions T2 relaxometry detected gradual IVD dehydration in the first two decades of adulthood. We observed no significant variation of T1ρ or volumetry with aging in our study group. Our results suggest that T2 mapping may be more appropriate to detect early IVD aging changes. PMID:27709076

  3. Relaxivity of Gd-based contrast agents on X nuclei with long intrinsic relaxation times in aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    van Heeswijk, Ruud B.; Laus, Sabrina; Morgenthaler, Florence D.; Gruetter, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    The relaxivity of commercially available gadolinium-based contrast agents was studied for X-nuclei resonances with long intrinsic relaxation times ranging between 6 and several hundred seconds. Omniscan in pure 13C formic acid had a relaxivity of 2.9 mM-1 s-1, whereas its relaxivity on glutamate C1 and C5 in aqueous solution was ∼0.5 mM-1 s-1. Both relaxivities allow the preparation of solutions with a predetermined short T1 suggest that in vitro substantial sensitivity gains in their measurement can be achieved. 6Li has a long intrinsic relaxation time, on the order of several minutes, which was strongly affected by the contrast agents. Relaxivity ranged from ∼0.1 mM-1 s-1 for Omniscan to 0.3 for Magnevist, whereas the relaxivity of Gd-DOTP was at 11 mM-1 s-1 two orders of magnitude higher. Overall these experiments suggest that the presence of 0.1-10 μM contrast agents should be detectable, provided sufficient sensitivity is available, such as that afforded by hyperpolarization, recently introduced to in vivo imaging. PMID:17448617

  4. Europium-engineered iron oxide nanocubes with high T1 and T2 contrast abilities for MRI in living subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lijiao; Zhou, Zijian; Liu, Hanyu; Wu, Changqiang; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Guoming; Ai, Hua; Gao, Jinhao

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents with both positive (T1) and negative (T2) contrast abilities are needed in clinical diagnosis for fault-free accurate detection of lesions. We report a facile synthesis of europium-engineered iron oxide (EuIO) nanocubes as T1 and T2 contrast agents for MRI in living subjects. The Eu(iii) oxide-embedded iron oxide nanoparticles significantly increase the T1 relaxivity with an enhanced positive contrast effect. EuIO nanocubes with 14 nm in diameter showed a high r1 value of 36.8 mM-1 s-1 with respect to total metal ions (Fe + Eu), which is about 3 times higher than that of Fe3O4 nanoparticles with similar size. Moreover, both r1 and r2 values of EuIO nanocubes can be tuned by varying their sizes and Eu doping ratios. After citrate coating, EuIO nanocubes can provide enhanced T1 and T2 contrast effects in small animals, particularly in the cardiac and liver regions. This work may provide an insightful strategy to design MRI contrast agents with both positive and negative contrast abilities for biomedical applications.Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents with both positive (T1) and negative (T2) contrast abilities are needed in clinical diagnosis for fault-free accurate detection of lesions. We report a facile synthesis of europium-engineered iron oxide (EuIO) nanocubes as T1 and T2 contrast agents for MRI in living subjects. The Eu(iii) oxide-embedded iron oxide nanoparticles significantly increase the T1 relaxivity with an enhanced positive contrast effect. EuIO nanocubes with 14 nm in diameter showed a high r1 value of 36.8 mM-1 s-1 with respect to total metal ions (Fe + Eu), which is about 3 times higher than that of Fe3O4 nanoparticles with similar size. Moreover, both r1 and r2 values of EuIO nanocubes can be tuned by varying their sizes and Eu doping ratios. After citrate coating, EuIO nanocubes can provide enhanced T1 and T2 contrast effects in small animals, particularly in the cardiac and liver

  5. NMR relaxation dispersion of vulcanized natural rubber.

    PubMed

    Kariyo, Sobiroh; Stapf, Siegfried

    2004-01-01

    The dependence of the 1H spin-lattice relaxation time on the magnetic field strength has been determined for linear and cross-linked polyisoprene for Larmor frequencies between 5 kHz and 20 MHz. Universal power-law relations are found for all temperatures and cross-link densities under investigation and are compared to published results of rotating-frame experiments on similar natural rubber samples. The shape of the individual dispersion functions can be superposed into a master curve using appropriate shift factors. While addition of filler particles even at large weight fractions has only a minor effect on the relaxation times, uniaxial deformation and swelling are demonstrated to alter the molecular dynamics significantly.

  6. Estimating T1 from Multichannel Variable Flip Angle SPGR Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Trzasko, Joshua D.; Mostardi, Petrice M.; Riederer, Stephen J.; Manduca, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative estimation of T1 is a challenging but important task inherent to many clinical applications. The most commonly used paradigm for estimating T1 in vivo involves performing a sequence of spoiled gradient-recalled echo acquisitions at different flip angles, followed by fitting of an exponential model to the data. Although there has been substantial work comparing different fitting methods, there has been little discussion on how these methods should be applied for data acquired using multichannel receivers. In this note, we demonstrate that the manner in which multichannel data is handled can have a substantial impact on T1 estimation performance and should be considered equally as important as choice of flip angles or fitting strategy. PMID:22807160

  7. Myocardial T1 mapping: modalities and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Jellis, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis appears to be linked to myocardial dysfunction in a multitude of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. Accurate non-invasive quantitation of this extra-cellular matrix has the potential for widespread clinical benefit in both diagnosis and guiding therapeutic intervention. T1 mapping is a cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging technique, which shows early clinical promise particularly in the setting of diffuse fibrosis. This review will outline the evolution of T1 mapping and the various techniques available with their inherent advantages and limitations. Histological validation of this technique remains somewhat limited, however clinical application in a range of pathologies suggests strong potential for future development. PMID:24834410

  8. A comparison study between the saturation-recovery-T1 and CASL MRI methods for quantitative CBF imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yi; Divani, Afshin A; Murphy, Amanda J; Chen, Wei

    2017-04-01

    The saturation-recovery (SR)-T1 MRI method for quantitatively imaging cerebral blood flow (CBF) change (ΔCBF) concurrently with the blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD) alteration has been recently developed and validated by simultaneous measurement of relative CBF change using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) in rats at 9.4T. In this study, ΔCBF induced by mildly transient hypercapnia and measured by the SR-T1 MRI method was rigorously compared with an established perfusion MRI method-continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) approach in normal and preclinical middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) rat models. The results show an excellent agreement between ΔCBF values measured with these two imaging methods. Moreover, the intrinsic longitudinal relaxation rate (R1(int)) was experimentally determined in vivo in normal rat brains at 9.4T by comparing two independent measures of the apparent longitudinal relaxation rate (R1(app)) and CBF measured by the CSAL approach across a wide range of perfusion. In turn, the R1(int) constant can be employed to calculate the CBF value based on the R1(app) measurement in healthy brain. This comparison study validates the fundamental relationship for linking brain tissue water R1(app) and cerebral perfusion, demonstrates the feasibility of imaging and quantifying both CBF and its change using the SR-T1 MRI method in vivo.

  9. Muon spin relaxation studies of interstitial and molecular motion.

    PubMed

    Cox, S F

    1998-03-01

    The unusual methods of preparation and analysis of spin polarization in muSR spectroscopy, which exploit the unique properties of the positive muon, are introduced in this article. Following a summary overview of applications, particular attention is paid to the problem of spin-lattice relaxation for a muon experiencing a hyperfine interaction with a single unpaired electron. The specific cases considered are the interstitial diffusion of muonium--the 1-electron atom which may be considered as a light isotope of hydrogen-and the molecular dynamics of organic radicals labelled by muonium. Rate equations for the evolution of population in the hyperfine-coupled spin states are solved numerically for various relaxation mechanisms. The formalism is equally valid for conventional ESR studies of paramagnetic states but is pursued specifically to simulate T1-relaxation in muSR. The simulations are compared with literature data. Also treated is the case of intermittent hyperfine coupling, appropriate to electron capture and loss in semiconductors or soliton motion in polymers; for this, a Monte Carlo approach is used to simulate the muon response. (For low-dimensional motion, the relaxation function is not exponential, so that a unique value of T1 cannot be defined.) Finally, a proposal is made to implement muon-T1 measurements in the rotating frame; this is designed for the selective study of electronically diamagnetic muonium states (i.e., those without hyperfine coupling) in the presence of a paramagnetic muonium or radical fraction.

  10. The relationship between reorientational molecular motions and phase transitions in [Mg(H2O)6](BF4)2, studied with the use of 1H and 19F NMR and FT-MIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuli, Edward; Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Grad, Bartłomiej; Kozak, Asja; Wasicki, Jan W.; Bilski, Paweł; Hołderna-Natkaniec, Krystyna; Medycki, Wojciech

    2015-02-01

    A 1H and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance study of [Mg(H2O)6](BF4)2 has confirmed the existence of two phase transitions at Tc1 ≈ 257 K and Tc2 ≈ 142 K, detected earlier by the DSC method. These transitions were reflected by changes in the temperature dependences of both proton and fluorine of second moments M2H and M2F and of spin-lattice relaxation times T1H and T1F. The study revealed anisotropic reorientations of whole [Mg(H2O)6]2+ cations, reorientations by 180° jumps of H2O ligands, and aniso- and isotropic reorientations of BF4- anions. The activation parameters for these motions were obtained. It was found that the phase transition at Tc1 is associated with the reorientation of the cation as a whole unit around the C3 axis and that at Tc2 with isotropic reorientation of the BF4- anions. The temperature dependence of the full width at half maximum value of the infrared band of ρt(H2O) mode (at ˜596 cm-1) indicated that in phases I and II, all H2O ligands in [Mg(H2O)6]2+ perform fast reorientational motions (180° jumps) with a mean value of activation energy equal to ca 10 kJ mole-1, what is fully consistent with NMR results. The phase transition at Tc1 is associated with a sudden change of speed of fast (τR ≈ 10-12 s) reorientational motions of H2O ligands. Below Tc2 (in phase III), the reorientations of certain part of the H2O ligands significantly slow down, while others continue their fast reorientation with an activation energy of ca 2 kJ mole-1. This fast reorientation cannot be evidenced in NMR relaxation experiments. Splitting of certain IR bands connected with H2O ligands at the observed phase transitions suggests a reduction of the symmetry of the octahedral [Mg(H2O)6]2+ complex cation.

  11. A novel enterocin T1 with anti-Pseudomonas activity produced by Enterococcus faecium T1 from Chinese Tibet cheese.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Lanwei; Yi, Huaxi; Han, Xue; Gao, Wei; Chi, Chunliang; Song, Wei; Li, Haiying; Liu, Chunguang

    2016-02-01

    An enterocin-producing Enterococcus faecium T1 was isolated from Chinese Tibet cheese. The enterocin was purified by SP-Sepharose and reversed phase HPLC. It was identified as unique from other reported bacteriocins based on molecular weight (4629 Da) and amino acid compositions; therefore it was subsequently named enterocin T1. Enterocin T1 was stable at 80-100 °C and over a wide pH range, pH 3.0-10.0. Protease sensitivity was observed to trypsin, pepsin, papain, proteinase K, and pronase E. Importantly, enterocin T1 was observed to inhibit the growth of numerous Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria including Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes. Take together, these results suggest that enterocin T1 is a novel bacteriocin with the potential to be used as a bio-preservative to control Pseudomonas spp. in food.

  12. Relaxation rates of low-field gas-phase ^129Xe storage cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limes, Mark; Saam, Brian

    2010-10-01

    A study of longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates T1 of ^129Xe and Xe-N2 mixtures in a magnetic field of 3.8 mT is presented. In this regime, intrinsic spin relaxation is dominated by the intramolecular spin-rotation interaction due to persistent xenon dimers, a mechanism that can be quelled by introducing large amounts of N2 into the storage cell. Extrinsic spin relaxation is dominated by the wall-relaxation rate, which is the primary quantity of interest for the various low-field storage cells and coatings that we have tested. Previous group work has shown that extremely long gas-phase relaxation times T1 can be obtained, but only at large magnetic fields and low xenon densities. The current work is motivated by the practical benefits of retaining hyperpolarized ^129Xe for extended periods of time in a small magnetic field.

  13. (1)H NMR metabonomic analysis in renal cell carcinoma: a possible diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Zira, Athina N; Theocharis, Stamatios E; Mitropoulos, Dionisios; Migdalis, Vasilios; Mikros, Emmanuel

    2010-08-06

    (1)H NMR based metabonomic approach was applied in order to monitor the alterations of plasma metabolic profile in Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) patients and controls. (1)H NMR spectra of plasma samples from 32 RCC patients and 13 controls (patients exhibiting benign urologic disease) were recorded and analyzed using multivariate statistical techniques. Alterations in the levels of LDL/VLDL, NAC, lactate, and choline were observed between RCC patients and controls discriminating these groups in Principal Component Analysis (PCA) plots. Post OSC PLS-DA presented a satisfactory clustering between T1 with T3 RCC patients. Decrease in plasma lipid concentrations in RCC patients was verified using conventional clinical chemistry analysis. The results suggest that combination of (1)H NMR spectroscopy with PCA has potential in cancer diagnosis; however, a limitation of the method to monitor RCC is that major biomarkers revealed (lipoproteins and choline) in this metabolic profile are not unique to RCC but may be the result of the presence of any malignancy.

  14. Fast electronic relaxation in lathanide porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvirko, M. P.; Stelmakh, G. F.; Pyatosin, V. E.; Solovyov, K. N.; Kachura, T. F.; Piskarskas, A. S.; Gadonas, R. A.

    1986-08-01

    The photophysical processes in porphyrin complexes of lanthanides (Ln) and their correlation with Ln 3+ ion characteristics have been studied by picosecond transient spectroscopy and spectrofluorimetry. The lifetimes of the S 2, S 1 and T 1 π-electron states have been determined for the Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu complexes of tetrabenzporphin (TBP). Depending on the nature of the Ln 3+ ion the non-radiative decay rates of the Ln TBP (π, π*) states vary by several orders of magnitude: from 3 × 10 11 to > 2 × 10 13 s -1 for the S 2 decay, from 2 × 10 10 to > 2 × 10 11 s -1 for the S 1 decay and from 6 × 10 2 to 3 × 10 10 s -1 for the T 1 decay. The T 1 deactivation rate constant of paramagnetic complexes decreases exponentially with the energy gap between the T 1 level and the nearest lower-lying accepting 4f-level beginning with Δ E ≈ 4000 cm -1. For Δ E < 4000 cm -1 there is a tendency toward stabilization of the τ -1T values. By example of the Dy, Tb, Ho, Er and Tm complexes it is shown that combination states, in which the Ln 3+_ ion and the macrocyclic ligand are excited simultaneously, participate in the deactivation of the S 2 and S 1 states. The anomalously high rates of deactivation of the S 2, S 1 and T 1 states in the case of Eu, Yb and Sm complexes are due to the charge-transfer states involved in relaxation processes.

  15. Pulsed eldor measurement of nitrogen T1 in spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, James S.; Froncisz, W.; Mottley, C.

    1984-10-01

    A 180° pulse is delivered to one hyperfine line of a nitroxide spin label, and the arrival and disappearance of saturation at another hyperfine line is monitored with a second microwave field. Electron and nitrogen nuclear relaxation times are found to be in poor agreement ,vith the electron-nuclear dipolar (END) mechanism.

  16. Are turns required for the folding of ribonuclease T1?

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, J. B.; Mullins, L. S.; Raushel, F. M.

    1996-01-01

    Ribonuclease T1 (RNase T1) is a small, globular protein of 104 amino acids for which extensive thermodynamic and structural information is known. To assess the specific influence of variations in amino acid sequence on the mechanism for protein folding, circularly permuted variants of RNase T1 were constructed and characterized in terms of catalytic activity and thermodynamic stability. The disulfide bond connecting Cys-2 and Cys-10 was removed by mutation of these residues to alanine (C2, 10A) to avoid potential steric problems imposed by the circular permutations. The original amino-terminus and carboxyl-terminus of the mutant (C2, 10A) were subsequently joined with a tripeptide linker to accommodate a reverse turn and new termini were introduced throughout the primary sequence in regions of solvent-exposed loops at Ser-35 (cp35S1), Asp-49 (cp49D1), Gly-70 (cp70G1), and Ser-96 (cp96S1). These circularly permuted RNase T1 mutants retained 35-100% of the original catalytic activity for the hydrolysis of guanylyl(3'-->5')cytidine, suggesting that the overall tertiary fold of these mutants is very similar to that of wild-type protein. Chemical denaturation curves indicated thermodynamic stabilities at pH 5.0 of 5.7, 2.9, 2.6, and 4.6 kcal/mol for cp35S1, cp49D1, cp70G1, and cp96S1, respectively, compared to a value of 10.1 kcal/mol for wild-type RNase T1 and 6.4 kcal/mol for (C2, 10A) T1. A fifth set of circularly permuted variants was attempted with new termini positioned in a tight beta-turn between Glu-82 and Gln-85. New termini were inserted at Asn-83 (cp83N1), Asn-84 (cp84N1), and Gln-85 (cp85Q1). No detectable amount of protein was ever produced for any of the mutations in this region, suggesting that this turn may be critical for the proper folding and/or thermodynamic stability of RNase T1. PMID:8745397

  17. Metabolomic by 1H NMR spectroscopy differentiates "Fiano di Avellino" white wines obtained with different yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Pierluigi; Spaccini, Riccardo; Francesca, Nicola; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2013-11-13

    We employed (1)H NMR spectroscopy to examine the molecular profile of a white "Fiano di Avellino" wine obtained through fermentation by either a commercial or a selected autochthonous Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast starter. The latter was isolated from the same grape variety used in the wine-making process in order to strengthen the relationship between wine molecular quality and its geographical origin. (1)H NMR spectra, where water and ethanol signals were suppressed by a presaturated T1-edited NMR pulse sequence, allowed for definition of the metabolic content of the two differently treated wines. Elaboration of NMR spectral data by multivariate statistical analyses showed that the two different yeasts led to significant diversity in the wine metabolomes. Our results indicate that metabolomics by (1)H NMR spectroscopy combined with multivariate statistical analysis enables wine differentiation as a function of yeast species and other wine-making factors, thereby contributing to objectively relate wine quality to the terroir.

  18. A study of T₁ relaxation time as a measure of liver fibrosis and the influence of confounding histological factors.

    PubMed

    Hoad, Caroline L; Palaniyappan, Naaventhan; Kaye, Philip; Chernova, Yulia; James, Martin W; Costigan, Carolyn; Austin, Andrew; Marciani, Luca; Gowland, Penny A; Guha, Indra N; Francis, Susan T; Aithal, Guruprasad P

    2015-06-01

    Liver biopsy is the standard test for the assessment of fibrosis in liver tissue of patients with chronic liver disease. Recent studies have used a non-invasive measure of T1 relaxation time to estimate the degree of fibrosis in a single slice of the liver. Here, we extend this work to measure T1 of the whole liver and investigate the effects of additional histological factors such as steatosis, inflammation and iron accumulation on the relationship between liver T1 and fibrosis. We prospectively enrolled patients who had previously undergone liver biopsy to have MR scans. A non-breath-holding, fast scanning protocol was used to acquire MR relaxation time data (T1 and T2*), and blood serum was used to determine the enhanced liver fibrosis (ELF) score. Areas under the receiver operator curves (AUROCs) for T1 to detect advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis were derived in a training cohort and then validated in a second cohort. Combining the cohorts, the influence of various histology factors on liver T1 relaxation time was investigated. The AUROCs (95% confidence interval (CI)) for detecting advanced fibrosis (F ≥ 3) and cirrhosis (F = 4) for the training cohort were 0.81 (0.65-0.96) and 0.92 (0.81-1.0) respectively (p < 0.01). Inflammation and iron accumulation were shown to significantly alter T1 in opposing directions in the absence of advanced fibrosis; inflammation increasing T1 and iron decreasing T1. A decision tree model was developed to allow the assessment of early liver disease based on relaxation times and ELF, and to screen for the need for biopsy. T1 relaxation time increases with advanced fibrosis in liver patients, but is also influenced by iron accumulation and inflammation. Together with ELF, relaxation time measures provide a marker to stratify patients with suspected liver disease for biopsy.

  19. Rapid assessment of quantitative T1, T2 and T2* in lower extremity muscles in response to maximal treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Juliet; Scandling, Debbie; Joshi, Rohit; Aneja, Ashish; Craft, Jason; Raman, Subha V; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Simonetti, Orlando P; Mihai, Georgeta

    2015-08-01

    MRI provides a non-invasive diagnostic platform to quantify the physical and physiological attributes of skeletal muscle at rest and in response to exercise. MR relaxation parameters (T1, T2 and T2*) are characteristic of tissue composition and metabolic properties. With the recent advent of quantitative techniques that allow rapid acquisition of T1, T2 and T2* maps, we posited that an integrated treadmill exercise-quantitative relaxometry paradigm can rapidly characterize exercise-induced changes in skeletal muscle relaxation parameters. Accordingly, we investigated the rest/recovery kinetics of T1, T2 and T2* in response to treadmill exercise in the anterior tibialis, soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of healthy volunteers, and the relationship of these parameters to age and gender. Thirty healthy volunteers (50.3 ± 16.6 years) performed the Bruce treadmill exercise protocol to maximal exhaustion. Relaxometric maps were sequentially acquired at baseline and for approximately 44 minutes post-exercise. Our results show that T1, T2 and T2* are significantly and differentially increased immediately post-exercise among the leg muscle groups, and these values recover to near baseline within 30-44 minutes. Our results demonstrate the potential to characterize the kinetics of relaxation parameters with quantitative mapping and upright exercise, providing normative values and some clarity on the impact of age and gender.

  20. Europium-engineered iron oxide nanocubes with high T1 and T2 contrast abilities for MRI in living subjects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijiao; Zhou, Zijian; Liu, Hanyu; Wu, Changqiang; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Guoming; Ai, Hua; Gao, Jinhao

    2015-04-21

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents with both positive (T1) and negative (T2) contrast abilities are needed in clinical diagnosis for fault-free accurate detection of lesions. We report a facile synthesis of europium-engineered iron oxide (EuIO) nanocubes as T1 and T2 contrast agents for MRI in living subjects. The Eu(iii) oxide-embedded iron oxide nanoparticles significantly increase the T1 relaxivity with an enhanced positive contrast effect. EuIO nanocubes with 14 nm in diameter showed a high r1 value of 36.8 mM(-1) s(-1) with respect to total metal ions (Fe + Eu), which is about 3 times higher than that of Fe3O4 nanoparticles with similar size. Moreover, both r1 and r2 values of EuIO nanocubes can be tuned by varying their sizes and Eu doping ratios. After citrate coating, EuIO nanocubes can provide enhanced T1 and T2 contrast effects in small animals, particularly in the cardiac and liver regions. This work may provide an insightful strategy to design MRI contrast agents with both positive and negative contrast abilities for biomedical applications.

  1. Fast Determination of Flip Angle and T1 in Hyperpolarized Gas MRI During a Single Breath-Hold

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Han, Yeqing; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-01-01

    MRI of hyperpolarized media, such as 129Xe and 3He, shows great potential for clinical applications. The optimal use of the available spin polarization requires accurate flip angle calibrations and T1 measurements. Traditional flip angle calibration methods are time-consuming and suffer from polarization losses during T1 relaxation. In this paper, we propose a method to simultaneously calibrate flip angles and measure T1 in vivo during a breath-hold time of less than 4 seconds. We demonstrate the accuracy, robustness and repeatability of this method and contrast it with traditional methods. By measuring the T1 of hyperpolarized gas, the oxygen pressure in vivo can be calibrated during the same breath hold. The results of the calibration have been applied in variable flip angle (VFA) scheme to obtain a stable steady-state transverse magnetization. Coupled with this method, the ultra-short TE (UTE) and constant VFA (CVFA) schemes are expected to give rise to new applications of hyperpolarized media. PMID:27169670

  2. Teaching 1H NMR Spectrometry Using Computer Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habata, Yoichi; Akabori, Sadatoshi

    2001-01-01

    Molecular modeling by computer is used to display stereochemistry, molecular orbitals, structure of transition states, and progress of reactions. Describes new ideas for teaching 1H NMR spectroscopy using computer modeling. (Contains 12 references.) (ASK)

  3. Functionally active t1-t1 interfaces revealed by the accessibility of intracellular thiolate groups in kv4 channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Rocha, Carmen A; Strang, Candace; Pfaffinger, Paul J; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2005-07-01

    Gating of voltage-dependent K(+) channels involves movements of membrane-spanning regions that control the opening of the pore. Much less is known, however, about the contributions of large intracellular channel domains to the conformational changes that underlie gating. Here, we investigated the functional role of intracellular regions in Kv4 channels by probing relevant cysteines with thiol-specific reagents. We find that reagent application to the intracellular side of inside-out patches results in time-dependent irreversible inhibition of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 currents. In the absence or presence of Kv4-specific auxiliary subunits, mutational and electrophysiological analyses showed that none of the 14 intracellular cysteines is essential for channel gating. C110, C131, and C132 in the intersubunit interface of the tetramerization domain (T1) are targets responsible for the irreversible inhibition by a methanethiosulfonate derivative (MTSET). This result is surprising because structural studies of Kv4-T1 crystals predicted protection of the targeted thiolate groups by constitutive high-affinity Zn(2+) coordination. Also, added Zn(2+) or a potent Zn(2+) chelator (TPEN) does not significantly modulate the accessibility of MTSET to C110, C131, or C132; and furthermore, when the three critical cysteines remained as possible targets, the MTSET modification rate of the activated state is approximately 200-fold faster than that of the resting state. Biochemical experiments confirmed the chemical modification of the intact alpha-subunit and the purified tetrameric T1 domain by MTS reagents. These results conclusively demonstrate that the T1--T1 interface of Kv4 channels is functionally active and dynamic, and that critical reactive thiolate groups in this interface may not be protected by Zn(2+) binding.

  4. Functionally Active T1-T1 Interfaces Revealed by the Accessibility of Intracellular Thiolate Groups in Kv4 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangyu; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Rocha, Carmen A.; Strang, Candace; Pfaffinger, Paul J.; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Gating of voltage-dependent K+ channels involves movements of membrane-spanning regions that control the opening of the pore. Much less is known, however, about the contributions of large intracellular channel domains to the conformational changes that underlie gating. Here, we investigated the functional role of intracellular regions in Kv4 channels by probing relevant cysteines with thiol-specific reagents. We find that reagent application to the intracellular side of inside-out patches results in time-dependent irreversible inhibition of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 currents. In the absence or presence of Kv4-specific auxiliary subunits, mutational and electrophysiological analyses showed that none of the 14 intracellular cysteines is essential for channel gating. C110, C131, and C132 in the intersubunit interface of the tetramerization domain (T1) are targets responsible for the irreversible inhibition by a methanethiosulfonate derivative (MTSET). This result is surprising because structural studies of Kv4-T1 crystals predicted protection of the targeted thiolate groups by constitutive high-affinity Zn2+ coordination. Also, added Zn2+ or a potent Zn2+ chelator (TPEN) does not significantly modulate the accessibility of MTSET to C110, C131, or C132; and furthermore, when the three critical cysteines remained as possible targets, the MTSET modification rate of the activated state is ∼200-fold faster than that of the resting state. Biochemical experiments confirmed the chemical modification of the intact α-subunit and the purified tetrameric T1 domain by MTS reagents. These results conclusively demonstrate that the T1T1 interface of Kv4 channels is functionally active and dynamic, and that critical reactive thiolate groups in this interface may not be protected by Zn2+ binding. PMID:15955876

  5. Probing the influential factors of NMR T1-T2 spectra in the characterization of the kerogen by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xinmin; Fan, Yiren; Chen, Hua; Deng, Shaogui; Cao, Yingchang; Zahid, Muhammad Aleem

    2015-11-01

    The low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been widely used to characterize the longitudinal and transversal relaxation (T1-T2) spectrum of unconventional resources such as shale gas and tight oil containing significant proportions of kerogen and bitumen. However, it requires exquisite design of the acquisition model and the inversion algorithm due to the fast relaxation nature of the kerogen and bitumen. A new direct two dimensional (2D) inversion algorithm combined the iterative truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) and the Akaiake Information Criterion (AIC) is presented to perform the data inversion efficiently. The fluid component decomposition (FCD) is applied to construct the forward T1-T2 model of the kerogen, and numerical simulations are conducted to investigate factors which may influence inversion results including echo spacing, recovery time series, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and the maximal iteration time. Results show that the T2 component is heavily impaired by the echo spacing, whereas the T1 component is influenced by the recovery time series but with limited effects. The inversion precision is greatly affected by the quality of the data. The inversed spectrum deviates from the model seriously when the SNR of the artificial noise is lower than 50, and the T2 component is more sensitive to the noise than the T1 component. What's more, the maximal iteration time can also affect the inversion result, especially when the maximal iteration time is smaller than 500. Proper acquisition and inversion parameters for the characterization of the kerogen are obtained considering the precision and the computational cost.

  6. Probing the influential factors of NMR T1-T2 spectra in the characterization of the kerogen by numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xinmin; Fan, Yiren; Chen, Hua; Deng, Shaogui; Cao, Yingchang; Zahid, Muhammad Aleem

    2015-11-01

    The low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been widely used to characterize the longitudinal and transversal relaxation (T1-T2) spectrum of unconventional resources such as shale gas and tight oil containing significant proportions of kerogen and bitumen. However, it requires exquisite design of the acquisition model and the inversion algorithm due to the fast relaxation nature of the kerogen and bitumen. A new direct two dimensional (2D) inversion algorithm combined the iterative truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) and the Akaiake Information Criterion (AIC) is presented to perform the data inversion efficiently. The fluid component decomposition (FCD) is applied to construct the forward T1-T2 model of the kerogen, and numerical simulations are conducted to investigate factors which may influence inversion results including echo spacing, recovery time series, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and the maximal iteration time. Results show that the T2 component is heavily impaired by the echo spacing, whereas the T1 component is influenced by the recovery time series but with limited effects. The inversion precision is greatly affected by the quality of the data. The inversed spectrum deviates from the model seriously when the SNR of the artificial noise is lower than 50, and the T2 component is more sensitive to the noise than the T1 component. What's more, the maximal iteration time can also affect the inversion result, especially when the maximal iteration time is smaller than 500. Proper acquisition and inversion parameters for the characterization of the kerogen are obtained considering the precision and the computational cost.

  7. Water distribution in brine salted cod (Gadus morhua) and salmon (Salmo salar): a low-field 1H NMR study.

    PubMed

    Aursand, Ida G; Gallart-Jornet, Lorena; Erikson, Ulf; Axelson, David E; Rustad, Turid

    2008-08-13

    Low-field (LF) (1)H NMR T 2 relaxation measurements were used to study changes in water distribution in lean (Atlantic cod) and fatty (Atlantic salmon) fish during salting in 15% NaCl and 25% NaCl brines. The NMR data were treated by PCA, continuous distribution analysis, and biexponential fitting and compared with physicochemical data. Two main water pools were observed in unsalted fish, T 21, with relaxation times in the range 20-100 ms, and T 22, with relaxation times in the range 100-300 ms. Pronounced changes in T 2 relaxation data were observed during salting, revealing changes in the water properties. Salting in 15% brine lead to a shift toward longer relaxation times, reflecting increased water mobility, whereas, salting in saturated brines had the opposite effect. Water mobility changes were observed earlier in the salting process for cod compared to salmon. Good linear correlations ( F

  8. [Management of T1a vocal fold carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Reiter, R; Brosch, S; Smith, E; Pickhard, A

    2013-12-01

    About 2/3 of the larynx carcinomas affect the vocal chords. The main risk factor is smoking. Carcinomas in this localisation often arise from leukoplakias with dysplasia. A typical symptom is dysphonia. Arrest of vibration in microlaryngostroboscopy is a hint that a carcinoma could be present. Transoral laser cordectomy or radiotherapy show equivalent oncological results and results in quality of voice in the treatment of vocal fold carcinoma (T1a). As lymph node and distant metastasis are very rare, follow-up can concentrate on microlaryngoscopy. In case of a suspicious area on the vocal fold, biopsy of the affected tissue is needed to plan correct treatment. The prognosis of the T1 vocal chord carcinoma is quite good with a 5-year survival rate of almost 100%.

  9. Relaxation in quantum glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona Torres, Carlos E.

    The Ising model in transverse field provides the simplest description of a quantum glass. I study two systems that are realizations of the Ising model in transverse field, LiHoxY1-- xF4 and Rb1-- x(NH4)xH2PO 4. In the spin glass LiHoxY1-- xF4, applying a magnetic field Ht transverse to the Ising direction introduces tunneling between the bare Ising eigenstates. In addition, the coupling between the transverse dipolar interaction and the transverse field introduces entanglement or tunable random fields depending on the concentration. By comparing the classical and quantum transitions in LiHo0.198Y0.802F4 and LiHo 0.167Y0.833F4, I characterize the crossover from random field dominated behavior in the 19.8% sample to entanglement dominated behavior in the 16.7% sample. The quantum transition in the 19.8% sample is dominated by the limit on its correlation length caused by the random fields, while the dominant effect in the 16.7% sample is the enhanced tunneling rate introduced by entanglement. The proton glass Rb1--x(NH 4)xH2PO4 relaxes through tunneling of protons in the hydrogen bonds of the crystal, yielding an effective Ising model in transverse field. Since this field cannot be tuned directly, I combine bulk dielectric susceptibility measurements with neutron Compton scattering measurements of the local tunneling potential in two different concentrations, x = 35% and 72%. I find that tunneling drives the fastest relaxation processes at temperatures as high as 20 K and explicitly calculate the tunneling rate from the tunneling potential of the hydrogen bond. Moreover, the structural mechanism for the glassy relaxation allows a real-space picture of the relaxation dynamics to be correlated to the free energy description of aging. I find that the glassy relaxation is driven by the sequential diffusion of defects called Takagi configurations with a classical to quantum crossover in the relaxation at 3 K. I relate the relaxation rate to the quantum action of tunneling

  10. Clinical Outcomes in cT1 Micropapillary Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Willis, DL; Fernandez, MI; Dickstein, RJ; Parikh, S; Shah, JB; Pisters, LL; Guo, CC; Henderson, S; Czerniak, BA; Grossman, HB; Dinney, CP; Kamat, AM

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While many urologists recommend radical cystectomy for patient with micropapillary bladder cancer (MPBC) invading the lamina propria (cT1), contradictory small reports exist regarding the efficacy of conservative management with intravesical BCG for this disease. Herein we report our updated experience with largest series of patients with cT1 MPBC. Materials and Methods An IRB approved review of our cancer database identified 283 patients with MPBC, including 72 staged as cT1N0M0 at diagnosis and initiation of therapy. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier estimator and compared using the log-rank test. Results Within this 72 patient cohort, 40 received primary intravesical BCG and 26 underwent upfront radical cystectomy. Patients receiving BCG experienced high rates of disease recurrence (75%) and progression (45%); 35% developed lymph node metastasis. Patients treated with upfront cystectomy had improved survival compared to patients treated with primary BCG (5 year disease specific survival (DSS) of 100% vs. 60% respectively, p=0.006) or patients undergoing delayed cystectomy after recurrence (5 yr. DSS: 62%, p=0.015). Prognosis was especially poor in patients who waited for progression prior to undergoing radical cystectomy, with an estimated 5-year DSS of only 24% and a median survival of 35 months. In patients treated with upfront cystectomy, pathologic upstaging occurred in 27%, including 20% with lymph node metastasis. Conclusions While certain patients with T1 MPBC may respond to intravesical BCG, improved survival is seen in those patients who undergo early radical cystectomy. Further molecular studies are needed to identify subsets of patients able to spare their bladders safely. PMID:25254936

  11. T1 correlates age: A short-TE MR relaxometry study in vivo on human cortical bone free water at 1.5T.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Atena; Abbasi-Rad, Shahrokh; Rad, Hamidreza Saligheh

    2016-02-01

    Large pores of human cortical bone (>30μm) are filled with fluids, essentially consisting of water, suggesting that cortical bone free water can be considered as a reliable surrogate measure of cortical bone porosity and hence quality. Signal from such pores can be reliably captured using Short Echo Time (STE) pulse sequence with echo-time in the range of 1-1.5msec (which should be judiciously selected correspond to T2(⁎) value of free water molecules). Furthermore, it is well-known that cortical bone T1-relaxivity is a function of its geometry, suggesting that cortical bone free water increases with age. In this work, we quantified cortical bone free water longitudinal relaxation time (T1) by a Dual-TR technique using STE pulse sequence. In the sequel, we investigated relationship between STE-derived cortical bone free water T1-values and age in a group of healthy volunteers (thirty subjects covering the age range of 20-70years) at 1.5T. Preliminary results showed that cortical bone free water T1 highly correlates with age (r(2)=0.73, p<0.0001), representing cortical bone free water T1 as a reliable indicator of cortical bone porosity and age-related deterioration. It can be concluded that STE-MRI can be utilized as proper alternative in quantifying cortical bone porosity parameters in-vivo, with the advantages of widespread clinical availability and being cost-effective.

  12. Monitoring Dendritic Cell Migration using 19F / 1H Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Waiczies, Helmar; Guenther, Martin; Skodowski, Julia; Lepore, Stefano; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf; Waiczies, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Continuous advancements in noninvasive imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have greatly improved our ability to study physiological or pathological processes in living organisms. MRI is also proving to be a valuable tool for capturing transplanted cells in vivo. Initial cell labeling strategies for MRI made use of contrast agents that influence the MR relaxation times (T1, T2, T2*) and lead to an enhancement (T1) or depletion (T2*) of signal where labeled cells are present. T2* enhancement agents such as ultrasmall iron oxide agents (USPIO) have been employed to study cell migration and some have also been approved by the FDA for clinical application. A drawback of T2* agents is the difficulty to distinguish the signal extinction created by the labeled cells from other artifacts such as blood clots, micro bleeds or air bubbles. In this article, we describe an emerging technique for tracking cells in vivo that is based on labeling the cells with fluorine (19F)-rich particles. These particles are prepared by emulsifying perfluorocarbon (PFC) compounds and then used to label cells, which subsequently can be imaged by 19F MRI. Important advantages of PFCs for cell tracking in vivo include (i) the absence of carbon-bound 19F in vivo, which then yields background-free images and complete cell selectivityand(ii) the possibility to quantify the cell signal by 19F MR spectroscopy. PMID:23542739

  13. The structure of polycaprolactone-clay nanocomposites investigated by 1H NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Mariana S S B; Rodrigues, Claudia Lopes; Neto, Roberto P C; Tavares, Maria Inês Bruno

    2012-09-01

    Nanocomposites based on polycaprolactone (PCL), containing concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 wt% of sodium montmorillonite (NT-25) and organo-modified montmorillonite clay, with three different salts (Viscogel B7, Viscogel S4 and Viscogel B8), were prepared employing the solution intercalation method using chloroform. The PCL nanocomposites were characterized by relaxometry, through determination of the hydrogen spin-lattice relaxation times using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Conventional X-ray diffraction (XDR) was also used to measure the basal space of the nanoclay. The proton spin-lattice relaxation parameters showed that hybrid nanocomposites were formed, containing different parts of intercalated and exfoliated organoclay. The proton T1rhoH also indicated changes in the microstructure, organization and the molecular mobility of the hybrid materials. NMR relaxometry is a good way to evaluate nanomaterials because it provides complementary information, since it is measured in a different time scale. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis were also used to investigate the crystallization and thermal behavior of the nanocomposites, respectively. All materials had low crystallization temperature (Tc) and the melting temperature (Tm) were very close to that of the PCL matrix, but the degree of crystallinity of the nanocomposites decreased. TGA analysis demonstrated that montmorillonite accelerates PCL's decomposition while unmodified montmorillonite has the opposite effect.

  14. Syntheses, structures, and 1H, 13C{1H} and 119Sn{1H} NMR chemical shifts of a family of trimethyltin alkoxide, amide, halide and cyclopentadienyl compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Lichtscheidl, Alejandro G.; Janicke, Michael T.; Scott, Brian L.; ...

    2015-08-21

    The synthesis and full characterization, including Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data (1H, 13C{1H} and 119Sn{1H}), for a series of Me3SnX (X = O-2,6-tBu2C6H3 (1), (Me3Sn)N(2,6-iPr2C6H3) (3), NH-2,4,6-tBu3C6H2 (4), N(SiMe3)2 (5), NEt2, C5Me5 (6), Cl, Br, I, and SnMe3) compounds in benzene-d6, toluene-d8, dichloromethane-d2, chloroform-d1, acetonitrile-d3, and tetrahydrofuran-d8 are reported. The X-ray crystal structures of Me3Sn(O-2,6-tBu2C6H3) (1), Me3Sn(O-2,6-iPr2C6H3) (2), and (Me3Sn)(NH-2,4,6-tBu3C6H2) (4) are also presented. As a result, these compiled data complement existing literature data and ease the characterization of these compounds by routine NMR experiments.

  15. Sensitivity of proton NMR relaxation times in a HTPB based polyurethane elastomer to thermo-oxidative aging.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Mowery, Daniel Michael; Celina, Mathias Christopher

    2004-09-01

    Solid-state {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry studies were conducted on a hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) based polyurethane elastomer thermo-oxidatively aged at 80 C. The {sup 1}H T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, and T{sub 1{rho}} relaxation times of samples thermally aged for various periods of time were determined as a function of NMR measurement temperature. The response of each measurement was calculated from a best-fit linear function of the relaxation time vs. aging time. It was found that the T{sub 2,H} and T{sub 1{rho},H} relaxation times exhibited the largest response to thermal degradation, whereas T{sub 1,H} showed minimal change. All of the NMR relaxation measurements on solid samples showed significantly less sensitivity to thermal aging than the T{sub 2,H} relaxation times of solvent-swollen samples.

  16. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation of 205TI in TIMo 6Se 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, H.; Ohtani, T.; Sano, Y.; Nakamura, Y.

    1991-12-01

    Temperature dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate of 205TI has been studied in a superconducting Chevrel compound TIMo 6Se 8. The rate follows the Korringa relation in the normal state with (T 1T) -1=3.4×10 2 (sK) -1. It follows a power law with T 1-1=2.64×10 -3T 6.9 in the superconducting state. An enhancement of the relaxation rate just below T c was not observed. These suggest that TIMo 6Se 8 is a new example of gapless superconductors. The relaxation behaviors in this Chevrel compound, which has low T c but has high H C2 is discussed in comparison with those in high-Tc oxides.

  17. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  18. Zn2+-dependent redox switch in the intracellular T1-T1 interface of a Kv channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Strang, Candace; Pfaffinger, Paul J; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2007-05-04

    The thiol-based redox regulation of proteins plays a central role in cellular signaling. Here, we investigated the redox regulation at the Zn(2+) binding site (HX(5)CX(20)CC) in the intracellular T1-T1 inter-subunit interface of a Kv4 channel. This site undergoes conformational changes coupled to voltage-dependent gating, which may be sensitive to oxidative stress. The main results show that internally applied nitric oxide (NO) inhibits channel activity profoundly. This inhibition is reversed by reduced glutathione and suppressed by intracellular Zn(2+), and at least two Zn(2+) site cysteines are required to observe the NO-induced inhibition (Cys-110 from one subunit and Cys-132 from the neighboring subunit). Biochemical evidence suggests strongly that NO induces a disulfide bridge between Cys-110 and Cys-132 in intact cells. Finally, further mutational studies suggest that intra-subunit Zn(2+) coordination involving His-104, Cys-131, and Cys-132 protects against the formation of the inhibitory disulfide bond. We propose that the interfacial T1 Zn(2+) site of Kv4 channels acts as a Zn(2+)-dependent redox switch that may regulate the activity of neuronal and cardiac A-type K(+) currents under physiological and pathological conditions.

  19. 35Cl NQR and 1H NMR Studies of Molecular Motions in Guanidinium Salt of Chloroacetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdanowska-Fnjczek, Maria; Grottel, Małgorzata; Jakubas, Ryszard

    1998-07-01

    Multinuclear NQR and NMR techniques have been applied in order to study the molecular dynamics in [C(NH2)3](ClH2CCOO). The 35Cl NQR frequency was measured over a wide range of temperature. The experimental results were described by using the theories of Bayer and Brown which take into account the torsional oscillations of the CClH2 -group of the anion. A study of the proton NMR second moment as well as relaxation times T1, and T1p performed in a wide temperature range revealed an onset of the guanidinium cation reorientation around its two-fold symmetry axis. Activation parameters for this motion were determined.

  20. A Comparison of Relaxation Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    Some researchers argue that all relaxation techniques produce a single relaxation response while others support a specific-effects hypothesis which suggests that progressive relaxation affects the musculoskeletal system and that guided imagery affects cognitive changes. Autogenics is considered a technique which is both somatic and cognitive. This…

  1. Relaxation from particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo

    2016-12-01

    We consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a "Relaxion" solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  2. NMR relaxation of protein and water protons in diamagnetic hemoglobin solutions.

    PubMed

    Eisenstadt, M

    1985-07-02

    We have measured T1 and T2 of protein and water protons in hemoglobin solutions using broad-line pulse techniques; selective excitation and detection methods enabled the intrinsic protein and water relaxation rates, as well as the spin-transfer rate between them, to be obtained at 5, 10, and 20 MHz. Water and protein T1 data were also obtained at 100 and 200 MHz for hemoglobin in H2O/D2O mixtures by using commercial Fourier-transform instruments. The T1 data conform to a simple model of two well-mixed spin systems with single intrinsic relaxation times and an average spin-transfer rate, with each phase recovering from a radio-frequency excitation with a biexponential time dependence. At low frequencies, protein T1 and T2 agree reasonably with a model of dipolar relaxation of an array of fixed protons tumbling in solution, explicitly calculating methyl and methylene relaxation and using a continuum approximation for the others. Differing values in H2O and D2O are mainly ascribed to solvent viscosity. For water-proton relaxation, T1, T2, and spin transfer were measured for H2O and HDO, which enabled a separation of inter-and intramolecular contributions to relaxation. Despite such detail, few firm conclusions could be reached about hydration water. But it seems clear that few long-lived hydration sites are needed to explain T1 and T2, and the spin-transfer value mandates fewer than five sites with a lifetime longer than 10(-8) s.

  3. Complex mechanism of relaxation in solid chloroxylenol (antibacterial/antifungal agent) studied by ¹H NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Tomczak, Marzena Agnieszka; Medycki, Wojciech

    2014-03-27

    Molecular relaxation in antibacterial/antifungal agent: chloroxylenol (4-chloro-3,5-dimethylphenol, PCMX) in the solid state was studied by the (1)H NMR and quantum chemistry calculations. The temperature dependencies of the proton spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) in the ranges 15-273 K (at 24.667 MHz), 77-295 K (at 15 MHz), and 112-291 K at 90 MHz and the second moment (M2) of (1)H NMR resonant line in the range 106-380 K were measured. The two minima in the temperature dependence of T1 revealed two activation processes, whereas the M2 dependence in the studied range was quite flat and revealed the only significant reduction at 380 K. The low temperature part of T1(T) dependence indicated the occurrence of two processes characteristic of methyl bearing solids; the quantum mechanics governed incoherent tunneling (responsible for the low temperature flattening of T1) and the classical Arrhenius dependence governed hindered rotation (related to the wide low temperature minimum of 0.066 s at 57 K, 24.667 MHz). The 2D potential energy surface obtained using DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p) calculations revealed the inequivalence of methyl groups and the lack of their interplay/coupling. The activation energies of classical hindered rotation are 3.35 and 2.5 kJ/mol, whereas temperatures at which the proton tunneling T(tun) finally ceases are 52 and 63 K, for inequivalent methyl groups. C(p)(T) required for the estimation of T(tun) was calculated purely theoretically on the basis of the Einstein and Debye models of specific heat and 51 modes of atomic vibrations, 4 internal rotations, and 3 torsions calculated by DFT. The -CH3 motion (tunneling and classical) results in the reduction in the (1)H NMR line second moment from 17.3 G(2) (rigid) to approximately 11.05 G(2). The pointed high temperature minimum T1(T) of 0.109 s at 89 K, 24.667 MHz, which shifts with frequency, was assigned to small-angle libration jumps, by the Θ2 = ±15° between two positions of equilibrium. The

  4. The TOTEM T1 read out card motherboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minutoli, S.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.

    2010-12-01

    This article describes the Read Out Card (ROC) motherboard, which is the main component of the T1 forward telescope front-end electronic system. The ROC main objectives are to acquire tracking data and trigger information from the detector. It performs data conversion from electrical to optical format and transfers the data streams to the next level of the system and it implements Slow Control modules which are able to receive, decode and distribute the LHC machine low jitter clock and fast command. The ROC also provides a spy mezzanine connection based on programmable FPGA and USB2.0 for laboratory and portable DAQ debugging system.

  5. T-1 Test Program Ver. 6.0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Perlinski, Anthony W.

    2004-05-21

    The software allows for easy setup and testing of a variety of RF Electronic Sensor Platforms (ESPs). The software interprets RF messages from the ESP and displays the information in a graphical user interface. This program is used primarily for testing of the T-1 Electronic Sensor Platform. The software imports Electronic Tag Data files which are created from the Electronic Sensor Platform Programmer (ESPP). The software will automatically add sensors to its database when a RF message s received that the program recognizes. Any data that is generated can be stored to a file for later analysis.

  6. RGD-functionalized ultrasmall iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted T1-weighted MR imaging of gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yu; Yang, Jia; Yan, Yu; Li, Jingchao; Shen, Mingwu; Zhang, Guixiang; Mignani, Serge; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-08-01

    We report a convenient approach to prepare ultrasmall Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with an arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) peptide for in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of gliomas. In our work, stable sodium citrate-stabilized Fe3O4 NPs were prepared by a solvothermal route. Then, the carboxylated Fe3O4 NPs stabilized with sodium citrate were conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-linked RGD. The formed ultrasmall RGD-functionalized nanoprobe (Fe3O4-PEG-RGD) was fully characterized using different techniques. We show that these Fe3O4-PEG-RGD particles with a size of 2.7 nm are water-dispersible, stable, cytocompatible and hemocompatible in a given concentration range, and display targeting specificity to glioma cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrin in vitro. With the relatively high r1 relaxivity (r1 = 1.4 mM-1 s-1), the Fe3O4-PEG-RGD particles can be used as an efficient nanoprobe for targeted T1-weighted positive MR imaging of glioma cells in vitro and the xenografted tumor model in vivo via an active RGD-mediated targeting pathway. The developed RGD-functionalized Fe3O4 NPs may hold great promise to be used as a nanoprobe for targeted T1-weighted MR imaging of different αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells or biological systems.We report a convenient approach to prepare ultrasmall Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with an arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) peptide for in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of gliomas. In our work, stable sodium citrate-stabilized Fe3O4 NPs were prepared by a solvothermal route. Then, the carboxylated Fe3O4 NPs stabilized with sodium citrate were conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-linked RGD. The formed ultrasmall RGD-functionalized nanoprobe (Fe3O4-PEG-RGD) was fully characterized using different techniques. We show that these Fe3O4-PEG-RGD particles with a size of 2.7 nm are water-dispersible, stable, cytocompatible and hemocompatible in a given concentration

  7. Study of anisotropy in nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of water protons in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kasturi, S R; Chang, D C; Hazlewood, C F

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropy of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and the spin-spin relaxation times (T2) of water protons in skeletal muscle tissue have been studied by the spin-echo technique. Both T1 and T2 have been measured for the water protons of the tibialis anterior muscle of mature male rats for theta = 0, 55, and 90 degrees, where theta is the orientation of the muscle fiber with respect to the static field. The anisotropy in T1 and T2 has been measured at temperatures of 28, -5 and -10 degrees C. No significant anisotropy was observed in the T1 of the tissue water, while an average anisotropy of approximately 5% was observed in T2 at room temperature. The average anisotropy of T2 at -5 and -10 degrees C was found to be approximately 2 and 1.3%, respectively. PMID:6266530

  8. Vibrational and structural relaxation of hydrated protons in Nafion membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyuan; Lotze, Stephan; Bakker, Huib J.

    2017-02-01

    We study the vibrational dynamics of the bending mode at 1730 cm-1 of proton hydration structures in Nafion membranes with polarization-resolved infrared (IR) pump-probe spectroscopy. The bending mode relaxes to an intermediate state with a time constant T1 of 170 ± 30 fs. Subsequently, the dissipated energy equilibrates with Teq of 1.5 ± 0.2 ps. The transient absorption signals show a long-living anisotropy, which indicates that for part of the excited proton hydration clusters the vibrational energy dissipation results in a local structural change, e.g. the breaking of a local hydrogen bond. This structural relaxation relaxes with a time constant of 38 ± 4 ps.

  9. Proton magnetic relaxation dispersion in aqueous biopolymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, S.

    Investigation of the magnetic field dependence of proton spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of bovine fibrinogen has been performed for Larmor frequencies between 50 Hz and 60 MHz, and complemented with measurements of spin-spin relaxation rates at 2 kHz and 25 MHz. A thorough analysis of experimental data, including the effects of protein concentration, temperature, pH and isotopic dilution, leads to an overall relaxation scheme consistent with T1 and T2 values at both low and high magnetic fields. The scheme involves water molecules slightly anisotropically bound on proteins as well as slow exchanging protein protons magnetically coupled to solute nuclei. A coherent picture, reminiscent of the traditional hydration layer, can be obtained for bound water. A major conclusion is that transfer of single protons may contribute substantially to the chemical exchange between free and bound water.

  10. Distribution of NMR relaxations in a random Heisenberg chain.

    PubMed

    Shiroka, T; Casola, F; Glazkov, V; Zheludev, A; Prša, K; Ott, H-R; Mesot, J

    2011-04-01

    NMR measurements of the (29)Si spin-lattice relaxation time T(1) were used to probe the spin-1/2 random Heisenberg chain compound BaCu(2)(Si(1-x)Ge(x))(2)O(7). Remarkable differences between the pure (x=0) and the fully random (x=0.5) cases are observed, indicating that randomness generates a distribution of local magnetic relaxations. This distribution, which is reflected in a stretched exponential NMR relaxation, exhibits a progressive broadening with decreasing temperature, caused by a growing inequivalence of magnetic sites. Compelling independent evidence for the influence of randomness is also obtained from magnetization data and Monte Carlo calculations. These results suggest the formation of random-singlet states in this class of materials, as previously predicted by theory.

  11. T1 and T2 temperature dependence of female human breast adipose tissue at 1.5 T: groundwork for monitoring thermal therapies in the breast.

    PubMed

    Baron, Paul; Deckers, Roel; Knuttel, Floor M; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2015-11-01

    The T1 and T2 temperature dependence of female breast adipose tissue was investigated at 1.5 T in order to evaluate the applicability of relaxation-based MR thermometry in fat for the monitoring of thermal therapies in the breast. Relaxation times T1 , T2 and T2TSE (the apparent T2 measured using a turbo spin echo readout sequence) were measured in seven fresh adipose breast samples for temperatures from 25 to 65 °C. Spectral water suppression was used to reduce the influence of the residual water signal. The temperature dependence of the relaxation times was characterized. The expected maximum temperature measurement errors based on average calibration lines were calculated. In addition, the heating-cooling reversibility was investigated for two samples. The T1 and T2TSE temperature (T) dependence could be fitted well with an exponential function of 1/T. A linear relationship between T2 and temperature was found. The temperature coefficients (mean ± inter-sample standard deviation) of T1 and T2TSE increased from 25 °C (dT1/dT = 5.35 ± 0.08 ms/°C, dT2TSE/dT = 3.82 ± 0.06 ms/°C) to 65 °C (dT1 /dT = 9.50 ± 0.16 ms/°C, dT2TSE/dT = 7.99 ± 0.38 ms/°C). The temperature coefficient of T2 was 0.90 ± 0.03 ms/°C. The temperature-induced changes in the relaxation times were found to be reversible after heating to 65 °C. Given the small inter-sample variation of the temperature coefficients, relaxation-based MR thermometry appears to be feasible in breast adipose tissue, and may be used as an adjunct to proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) thermometry in aqueous tissue (glandular + tumor).

  12. Connexin 43-targeted T1 contrast agent for MRI diagnosis of glioma.

    PubMed

    Abakumova, Tatiana; Abakumov, Maxim; Shein, Sergey; Chelushkin, Pavel; Bychkov, Dmitry; Mukhin, Vladimir; Yusubalieva, Gaukhar; Grinenko, Nadezhda; Kabanov, Alexander; Nukolova, Natalia; Chekhonin, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive form of brain tumor. Early and accurate diagnosis of glioma and its borders is an important step for its successful treatment. One of the promising targets for selective visualization of glioma and its margins is connexin 43 (Cx43), which is highly expressed in reactive astrocytes and migrating glioma cells. The purpose of this study was to synthesize a Gd-based contrast agent conjugated with specific antibodies to Cx43 for efficient visualization of glioma C6 in vivo. We have prepared stable nontoxic conjugates of monoclonal antibody to Cx43 and polylysine-DTPA ligands complexed with Gd(III), which are characterized by higher T1 relaxivity (6.5 mM(-1) s(-1) at 7 T) than the commercial agent Magnevist® (3.4 mM(-1) s(-1)). Cellular uptake of Cx43-specific T1 contrast agent in glioma C6 cells was more than four times higher than the nonspecific IgG-contrast agent, as detected by flow cytometry and confocal analysis. MRI experiments showed that the obtained agents could markedly enhance visualization of glioma C6 in vivo after their intravenous administration. Significant accumulation of Cx43-targeted contrast agents in glioma and the peritumoral zone led not only to enhanced contrast but also to improved detection of the tumor periphery. Fluorescence imaging confirmed notable accumulation of Cx43-specific conjugates in the peritumoral zone compared with nonspecific IgG conjugates at 24 h after intravenous injection. All these features of Cx43-targeted contrast agents might be useful for more precise diagnosis of glioma and its borders by MRI.

  13. Novel 1H low field nuclear magnetic resonance applications for the field of biodiesel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biodiesel production has increased dramatically over the last decade, raising the need for new rapid and non-destructive analytical tools and technologies. 1H Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) applications, which offer great potential to the field of biodiesel, have been developed by the Phyto Lipid Biotechnology Lab research team in the last few years. Results Supervised and un-supervised chemometric tools are suggested for screening new alternative biodiesel feedstocks according to oil content and viscosity. The tools allowed assignment into viscosity groups of biodiesel-petrodiesel samples whose viscosity is unknown, and uncovered biodiesel samples that have residues of unreacted acylglycerol and/or methanol, and poorly separated and cleaned glycerol and water. In the case of composite materials, relaxation time distribution, and cross-correlation methods were successfully applied to differentiate components. Continuous distributed methods were also applied to calculate the yield of the transesterification reaction, and thus monitor the progress of the common and in-situ transesterification reactions, offering a tool for optimization of reaction parameters. Conclusions Comprehensive applied tools are detailed for the characterization of new alternative biodiesel resources in their whole conformation, monitoring of the biodiesel transesterification reaction, and quality evaluation of the final product, using a non-invasive and non-destructive technology that is new to the biodiesel research area. A new integrated computational-experimental approach for analysis of 1H LF-NMR relaxometry data is also presented, suggesting improved solution stability and peak resolution. PMID:23590829

  14. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in nitroxide spin-label EPR.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear relaxation is a sensitive monitor of rotational dynamics in spin-label EPR. It also contributes competing saturation transfer pathways in T1-exchange spectroscopy, and the determination of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in site-directed spin labelling. A survey shows that the definition of nitrogen nuclear relaxation rate Wn commonly used in the CW-EPR literature for (14)N-nitroxyl spin labels is inconsistent with that currently adopted in time-resolved EPR measurements of saturation recovery. Redefinition of the normalised (14)N spin-lattice relaxation rate, b=Wn/(2We), preserves the expressions used for CW-EPR, whilst rendering them consistent with expressions for saturation recovery rates in pulsed EPR. Furthermore, values routinely quoted for nuclear relaxation times that are deduced from EPR spectral diffusion rates in (14)N-nitroxyl spin labels do not accord with conventional analysis of spin-lattice relaxation in this three-level system. Expressions for CW-saturation EPR with the revised definitions are summarised. Data on nitrogen nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are compiled according to the three-level scheme for (14)N-relaxation: T1n=1/Wn. Results are compared and contrasted with those for the two-level (15)N-nitroxide system.

  15. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in nitroxide spin-label EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear relaxation is a sensitive monitor of rotational dynamics in spin-label EPR. It also contributes competing saturation transfer pathways in T1-exchange spectroscopy, and the determination of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in site-directed spin labelling. A survey shows that the definition of nitrogen nuclear relaxation rate Wn commonly used in the CW-EPR literature for 14N-nitroxyl spin labels is inconsistent with that currently adopted in time-resolved EPR measurements of saturation recovery. Redefinition of the normalised 14N spin-lattice relaxation rate, b = Wn/(2We), preserves the expressions used for CW-EPR, whilst rendering them consistent with expressions for saturation recovery rates in pulsed EPR. Furthermore, values routinely quoted for nuclear relaxation times that are deduced from EPR spectral diffusion rates in 14N-nitroxyl spin labels do not accord with conventional analysis of spin-lattice relaxation in this three-level system. Expressions for CW-saturation EPR with the revised definitions are summarised. Data on nitrogen nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are compiled according to the three-level scheme for 14N-relaxation: T1n = 1/Wn. Results are compared and contrasted with those for the two-level 15N-nitroxide system.

  16. Extended ISIS sequences insensitive to T(1) smearing.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, M; Starck, G; Vikhoff-Baaz, B; Alpsten, M; Ekholm, S; Forssell-Aronsson, E

    2000-10-01

    Image selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) is a volume selection method often used for in vivo (31)P MRS, since it is suitable for measurements of substances with short T(2). However, ISIS can suffer from significant signal contributions caused by T(1) smearing from regions outside the VOI. A computer model was developed to simulate this contamination. The simulation results for the ISIS experiment order implemented in our MR system (ISIS-0) were in agreement with results obtained from phantom measurements. A new extended ISIS experiment order (E-ISIS) was developed, consisting of four "optimal" ISIS experiment orders (ISIS-1 to ISIS-4) performed consecutively with dummy ISIS experiments in between. The simulation results show that contamination due to T(1) smearing is, effectively, eliminated with E-ISIS and is significantly lower than for ISIS-0 and ISIS-1. E-ISIS offers increased accuracy for quantitative and qualitative determination of substances studied using in vivo MRS. Hence, E-ISIS can be valuable for both clinical and research applications.

  17. Applications of 1H-NMR to Biodiesel Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel derived from vegetable oils, animal fats, or used cooking oils. It is produced by reacting these materials with an alcohol in the presence of a catalyst to give the corresponding mono-alkyl esters. 1H-NMR is a routine analytical method that has been used for...

  18. Nuclear receptor NR1H3 in familial multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Sadovnick, A. Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony L.; Ross, Jay P.; Bernales, Cecily Q.; Encarnacion, Mary; Yee, Irene M.; de Lemos, Madonna; Greenwood, Talitha; Lee, Joshua D.; Wright, Galen; Ross, Colin J.; Zhang, Si; Song, Weihong; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease characterized by myelin loss and neuronal dysfunction. Despite the aggregation observed in some families, pathogenic mutations have remained elusive. In this study we describe the identification of NR1H3 p.Arg415Gln in seven MS patients from two multi-incident families presenting severe and progressive disease, with an average age at onset of 34 years. Additionally, association analysis of common variants in NR1H3 identified rs2279238 conferring a 1.35-fold increased risk of developing progressive MS. The p.Arg415Gln position is highly conserved in orthologs and paralogs, and disrupts NR1H3 heterodimerization and transcriptional activation of target genes. Protein expression analysis revealed that mutant NR1H3 (LXRA) alters gene expression profiles, suggesting a disruption in transcriptional regulation as one of the mechanisms underlying MS pathogenesis. Our study indicates that pharmacological activation of LXRA or its targets may lead to effective treatments for the highly debilitating and currently untreatable progressive phase of MS. PMID:27253448

  19. Complete 1H and 13C spectral assignment of floridoside.

    PubMed

    Simon-Colin, Christelle; Kervarec, Nelly; Pichon, Roger; Deslandes, Eric

    2002-02-11

    Floridoside (2-O-alpha-D-galactopyranosylglycerol) was extracted from the red marine alga Rhodymenia palmata, and purified by ion-exchange chromatography: 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy experiments were used to unambiguously assign the complete 1H and 13C spectra.

  20. New T1-based superconductor T1PbSrRCuO without Ca with Tc above 100 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Z. Z.; Xin, Y.; Meason, J. M.

    1991-04-01

    Ca-free T1PbSrRCuO samples (R=rare earths) with Tc up to above 100 K were prepared, and studied by resistance and ac susceptibility measurements and by powder x-ray diffraction analyses. A 1212-type phase (Tl1-xPbx)Sr2(Sr1-yRy)Cu2Oz is responsible for the observed supercondcutivity. A rare-earth is required for the formation of the 1212 phase. Pb-dopping is necessary to increase the Tc of the 1212 phase from 90 K to above 100 K.

  1. Depth and orientational dependencies of MRI T(2) and T(1ρ) sensitivities towards trypsin degradation and Gd-DTPA(2-) presence in articular cartilage at microscopic resolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nian; Xia, Yang

    2012-04-01

    Depth and orientational dependencies of microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T(2) and T(1ρ) sensitivities were studied in native and trypsin-degraded articular cartilage before and after being soaked in 1 mM Gd-DTPA(2-) solution. When the cartilage surface was perpendicular to B(0), a typical laminar appearance was visible in T(2)-weighted images but not in T(1ρ)-weighted images, especially when the spin-lock field was high (2 kHz). At the magic angle (55°) orientation, neither T(2)- nor T(1ρ)-weighted image had a laminar appearance. Trypsin degradation caused a depth- and orientational-dependent T(2) increase (4%-64%) and a more uniform T(1ρ) increase at a sufficiently high spin-lock field (55%-81%). The presence of the Gd ions caused both T(2) and T(1ρ) to decrease significantly in the degraded tissue (6%-38% and 44%-49%, respectively) but less notably in the native tissue (5%-10% and 16%-28%, respectively). A quantity Sensitivity was introduced that combined both the percentage change and the absolute change in the relaxation analysis. An MRI experimental protocol based on two T(1ρ) measurements (without and with the presence of the Gd ions) was proposed to be a new imaging marker for cartilage degradation.

  2. T(1) measurement of (31)P metabolites at rest and during steady-state dynamic exercise using a clinical nuclear magnetic resonance scanner.

    PubMed

    Cettolo, V; Piorico, C; Francescato, M P

    2006-03-01

    This article illustrates some problems and possible solutions to determine the apparent spin-lattice relaxation time (T(1)) of the muscular (31)P metabolites at rest and during dynamic steady-state exercise using a clinical 1.5 T NMR scanner and a surface coil. T(1) was first estimated on a phosphates solution (phantom) using four different acquisition protocols, all based on the multiple-point "progressive saturation" method, and by fitting each data set with two different mathematical models. Subsequently, two of the four protocols and both models were used to estimate T(1) both at rest and during exercise on the calf muscles of 10 healthy volunteers. Experimental results obtained on the phantom showed that T(1) is greatly affected by the longest nominal explored repetition time (P<0.001) and by the mathematical model (P<0.001), ranging from 0.65+/-0.10 to 8.4+/-0.8 s. The two acquisition protocols applied on volunteers yielded significantly different T(1) (P<0.001), which were also rather different from the literature values for the same metabolites. Nevertheless, independently of the acquisition protocol and/or the fitting procedure, T(1) of all muscular phosphagens did not change statistically from rest to steady-state aerobic exercise.

  3. DNA-gadolinium-gold nanoparticles for in vivo T1 MR imaging of transplanted human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Francesca J; Rotz, Matthew W; Ghuman, Harmanvir; MacRenaris, Keith W; Meade, Thomas J; Modo, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The unambiguous imaging of transplanted cells remains a major challenge to understand their biological function and therapeutic efficacy. In vivo imaging of implanted cells is reliant on tagging these to differentiate them from host tissue, such as the brain. We here characterize a gold nanoparticle conjugate that is functionalized with modified deoxythymidine oligonucleotides bearing Gd(III) chelates and a red fluorescent Cy3 moiety to visualize in vivo transplanted human neural stem cells. This DNA-Gd@Au nanoparticle (DNA-Gd@AuNP) exhibits an improved T1 relaxivity and excellent cell uptake. No significant effects of cell uptake have been found on essential cell functions. Although T1 relaxivity is attenuated within cells, it is sufficiently preserved to afford the in vivo detection of transplanted cells using an optimized voxel size. In vivo MR images were corroborated by a post-mortem histological verification of DNA-Gd@AuNPs in transplanted cells. With 70% of cells being correctly identified using the DNA-Gd-AuNPs indicates an overall reliable detection. Less than 1% of cells were false positive for DNA-Gd@AuNPs, but a significant number of 30% false negatives reveals a dramatic underestimation of transplanted cells using this approach. DNA-Gd@AuNPs therefore offer new opportunities to visualize transplanted cells unequivocally using T1 contrast and use cellular MRI as a tool to derive biologically relevant information that allows us to understand how the survival and location of implanted cells determines therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Progressive muscle relaxation, yoga stretching, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Ghoncheh, Shahyad; Smith, Jonathan C

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and yoga stretching (hatha) exercises. Forty participants were randomly divided into two groups and taught PMR or yoga stretching exercises. Both groups practiced once a week for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, practitioners of PMR displayed higher levels of relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement at Week 4 and higher levels of Mental Quiet and Joy as a posttraining aftereffect at Week 5. Contrary to what was hypothesized, groups did not display different levels of R-States Energized or Aware. Results suggest the value of supplementing traditional somatic conceptualizations of relaxation with the psychological approach embodied in ABC relaxation theory. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  5. MAIN-BELT COMET P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Kaluna, Heather M.; Yang Bin; Haghighipour, Nader; Micheli, Marco; Denneau, Larry; Jedicke, Robert; Kleyna, Jan; Veres, Peter; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Ansdell, Megan; Elliott, Garrett T.; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Meech, Karen J.; Riesen, Timm E.; Sonnett, Sarah; Novakovic, Bojan; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Sheppard, Scott S.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We present initial results from observations and numerical analyses aimed at characterizing the main-belt comet P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS). Optical monitoring observations were made between 2012 October and 2013 February using the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope, the Keck I telescope, the Baade and Clay Magellan telescopes, Faulkes Telescope South, the Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory, and the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope. The object's intrinsic brightness approximately doubles from the time of its discovery in early October until mid-November and then decreases by {approx}60% between late December and early February, similar to photometric behavior exhibited by several other main-belt comets and unlike that exhibited by disrupted asteroid (596) Scheila. We also used Keck to conduct spectroscopic searches for CN emission as well as absorption at 0.7 {mu}m that could indicate the presence of hydrated minerals, finding an upper limit CN production rate of Q{sub CN} < 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} mol s{sup -1}, from which we infer a water production rate of Q{sub H{sub 2O}}<5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} mol s{sup -1}, and no evidence of the presence of hydrated minerals. Numerical simulations indicate that P/2012 T1 is largely dynamically stable for >100 Myr and is unlikely to be a recently implanted interloper from the outer solar system, while a search for potential asteroid family associations reveals that it is dynamically linked to the {approx}155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family.

  6. A Large Volume Double Channel 1H-X RF Probe for Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance at 0.0475 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Shchepin, Roman V.; Wilkens, Ken; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we describe a large volume 340 mL 1H-X magnetic resonance (MR) probe for studies of hyperpolarized compounds at 0.0475 T. 1H/13C and 1H/15N probe configurations are demonstrated with the potential for extension to 1H/129Xe. The primary applications of this probe are preparation and quality assurance of 13C and 15N hyperpolarized contrast agents using PASADENA (parahydrogen and synthesis allow dramatically enhanced nuclear alignment) and other parahydrogen-based methods of hyperpolarization. The probe is efficient and permits 62 μs 13C excitation pulses at 5.3 Watts, making it suitable for portable operation. The sensitivity and detection limits of this probe, tuned to 13C, are compared with a commercial radio frequency (RF) coil operating at 4.7 T. We demonstrate that low field MR of hyperpolarized contrast agents could be as sensitive as conventional high field detection and outline potential improvements and optimization of the probe design for preclinical in vivo MRI. PASADENA application of this low-power probe is exemplified with 13C hyperpolarized 2-hydroxyethyl propionate-1-13C,2,3,3-d3. PMID:22706029

  7. Quantification of (1) H-MRS signals based on sparse metabolite profiles in the time-frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Parto Dezfouli, Mohammad Ali; Parto Dezfouli, Mohsen; Ahmadian, Alireza; Frangi, Alejandro F; Esmaeili Rad, Melika; Saligheh Rad, Hamidreza

    2017-02-01

    MRS is an analytical approach used for both quantitative and qualitative analysis of human body metabolites. The accurate and robust quantification capability of proton MRS ((1) H-MRS) enables the accurate estimation of living tissue metabolite concentrations. However, such methods can be efficiently employed for quantification of metabolite concentrations only if the overlapping nature of metabolites, existing static field inhomogeneity and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are taken into consideration. Representation of (1) H-MRS signals in the time-frequency domain enables us to handle the baseline and noise better. This is possible because the MRS signal of each metabolite is sparsely represented, with only a few peaks, in the frequency domain, but still along with specific time-domain features such as distinct decay constant associated with T2 relaxation rate. The baseline, however, has a smooth behavior in the frequency domain. In this study, we proposed a quantification method using continuous wavelet transformation of (1) H-MRS signals in combination with sparse representation of features in the time-frequency domain. Estimation of the sparse representations of MR spectra is performed according to the dictionaries constructed from metabolite profiles. Results on simulated and phantom data show that the proposed method is able to quantify the concentration of metabolites in (1) H-MRS signals with high accuracy and robustness. This is achieved for both low SNR (5 dB) and low signal-to-baseline ratio (-5 dB) regimes.

  8. HIST1H2AA — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    HIST1H2AA, a member of the histone 2A family, is a core component of the nucleosome. The nucleosome is a histone octamer containing two molecules each of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 assembled in one H3-H4 heterotetramer and two H2A-H2B heterodimers. Nucleosomes wrap and compact DNA into chromatin, limiting DNA accessibility to the cellular machineries which require DNA as a template (the octamer wraps approximately 147 bp of DNA). Histones thereby play a central role in transcription regulation, DNA repair, DNA replication and chromosomal stability. DNA accessibility is regulated via a complex set of post-translational modifications of histones, also called histone code, and nucleosome remodeling. The HIST1H2AA gene is intronless and encodes a member of the histone H2A family. Transcripts from this gene contain a palindromic termination element.

  9. Quantitative produced water analysis using mobile 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Lisabeth; Kalli, Chris; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; May, Eric F.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Graham, Brendan F.; Carroll, Matthew R. J.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-10-01

    Measurement of oil contamination of produced water is required in the oil and gas industry to the (ppm) level prior to discharge in order to meet typical environmental legislative requirements. Here we present the use of compact, mobile 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in combination with solid phase extraction (SPE), to meet this metrology need. The NMR hardware employed featured a sufficiently homogeneous magnetic field, such that chemical shift differences could be used to unambiguously differentiate, and hence quantitatively detect, the required oil and solvent NMR signals. A solvent system consisting of 1% v/v chloroform in tetrachloroethylene was deployed, this provided a comparable 1H NMR signal intensity for the oil and the solvent (chloroform) and hence an internal reference 1H signal from the chloroform resulting in the measurement being effectively self-calibrating. The measurement process was applied to water contaminated with hexane or crude oil over the range 1-30 ppm. The results were validated against known solubility limits as well as infrared analysis and gas chromatography.

  10. Ultrasonic degradation of 1-H-benzotriazole in water.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-Benítez, Henry; Soltan, Jafar; Peñuela, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the effect of different parameters of ultrasonic power, pollutant initial concentration, pH and the presence of co-existing chemical species (oxygen, nitrogen, ozone, and radical scavengers) on the ultrasonic degradation of the endocrine disruptor 1-H-benzotriazole. Increasing the 1-H-benzotriazole initial concentration from 41.97 to 167.88 μM increased the pollutant degradation rate by 40%. Likewise, a high applied ultrasonic power enhanced the extent of 1-H-benzotriazole removal and its initial degradation rate, which was accelerated in the presence of ozone and oxygen, but inhibited by nitrogen. The most favorable pH for the ultrasonic degradation was acidic media, reaching ∼90% pollutant removal in 2 h. The hydroxyl free radical concentration in the reaction medium was proportional to the ultrasound power and the irradiation time. Kinetic models based on a Langmuir-type mechanism were used to predict the pollutant sonochemical degradation. It was concluded that degradation takes place at both the bubble-liquid interfacial region and in the bulk solution, and OH radicals were the main species responsible for the reaction. Hydroxyl free radicals were generated by water pyrolysis and then diffused into the interfacial region and the bulk solution where most of the solute molecules were present.

  11. Ultrafast Relaxation in Conjugated Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * EXPERIMENTAL * Samples * Femtosecond experimental apparatus * RESULTS AND DISCUSSION * Poly(phenylacetylenes) * Blue-phase PDA-3BCMU * Red-phase PDA-4BCMU * Blue-phase PDA-DFMP * P3MT * P3DT * PTV * RELAXATION MECHANISMS * Review of the previous works * Symmetry of the lower electronic excited states * Primary relaxation processes * Theoretical studies of nonlinear excitations * Mechanism of relaxation in polymers with a weakly nondegenerate ground state (poly(phenylacetylene)s) * Dual peak component with power-law decay * Single-peak component with an exponential decay * Hot self-trapped exciton * Transition to the electron-hole threshold * Transition to a biexciton state * Mechanism of relaxation in polymers with a strongly or moderately nondegenerate ground state * Classifications of polymers * Femtosecond relaxation * Picosecond relaxation * CONCLUSION * Acknowledgments * REFERENCES

  12. Relaxing music for anxiety control.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Dave; Polman, Remco; McGregor, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the characteristics of relaxing music for anxiety control. Undergraduate students (N=84) were instructed to imagine themselves in an anxiety producing situation while listening to a selection of 30 music compositions. For each composition, level of relaxation, the factors that either enhanced or detracted from its relaxing potential and the emotional labels attached were assessed. Participants were also asked to state which music components (e.g., tempo, melody) were most conducive to relaxation. Additional information was obtained through the use of a focus group of 6 undergraduate music students. This paper presents details on the characteristics of relaxing-music for anxiety control and emotional labels attached to the relaxing compositions. Furthermore, an importance value has been attached to each of the music components under scrutiny, thus providing an indication of which music components should receive greatest attention when selecting music for anxiety control.

  13. ABC relaxation theory and the factor structure of relaxation states, recalled relaxation activities, dispositions, and motivations.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Wedell, A B; Kolotylo, C J; Lewis, J E; Byers, K Y; Segin, C M

    2000-06-01

    ABC Relaxation Theory proposes 15 psychological relaxation-related states (R-States): Sleepiness, Disengagement, Physical Relaxation, Mental Quiet, Rested/Refreshed, At Ease/At Peace, Energized, Aware, Joy, Thankfulness and Love, Prayerfulness, Childlike Innocence, Awe and Wonder, Mystery, and Timeless/Boundless/Infinite. The present study summarizes the results of 13 separate factor analyses of immediate relaxation-related states, states associated with recalled relaxation activities, relaxation dispositions, and relaxation motivations on a combined sample of 1,904 individuals (group average ages ranged from 28-40 yr.). Four exploratory factor analyses of Smith Relaxation Inventories yielded 15 items that most consistently and exclusively load (generally at least .70) on six replicated factors. These items included happy, joyful, energized, rested, at peace, warm, limp, silent, quiet, dozing, drowsy, prayerful, mystery, distant, and indifferent. Subsequent factor analyses restricted to these items and specifying six factors were performed on 13 different data sets. Each yielded the same six-factor solution: Factor 1: Centered Positive Affect, Factor 2: Sleepiness, Factor 3: Disengagement, Factor 4: Physical Relaxation, Factor 5: Mental Quiet, and Factor 6: Spiritual. Implications for ABC Relaxation Theory are discussed.

  14. Spin relaxation measurements using first-harmonic out-of-phase absorption EPR signals.

    PubMed

    Livshits, V A; Páli, T; Marsh, D

    1998-09-01

    The dependence on spin-lattice (T1) relaxation of the first-harmonic absorption EPR signal (V'1) detected in phase quadrature with the Zeeman modulation has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally for nitroxide spin labels. Spectral simulations were performed by iterative solution of the Bloch equations that contained explicitly both the modulation and microwave magnetic fields (T. Páli, V. A. Livshits, and D. Marsh, 1996, J. Magn. Reson. B 113, 151-159). It was found that, of the various non-linear EPR displays, the first-harmonic out-of-phase V'1-signal, recorded under conditions of partial saturation of the microwave absorption, is particularly favorable for determining spin-lattice relaxation enhancements because of its superior signal intensity and relative insensitivity to spin-spin (T2) relaxation. By varying the Zeeman modulation frequency it is also possible to tune the optimum sensitivity of the V'1-signal to different ranges of the T1-relaxation time. A Zeeman modulation frequency of 25 kHz appears to be particularly suited to spin label applications. Calibrations are given for the dependence on T1-relaxation time of both the amplitude and the second integral of the V'1-signal recorded under standard conditions. Experiments on different spin labels in solution and in membranes demonstrate the practical usable sensitivity of the V'1-signal, even at modulation frequencies of 25 kHz, and these are used to investigate the dependence on microwave field intensity, in comparison with theoretical predictions. The practicable sensitivity to spin-lattice relaxation enhancements is demonstrated experimentally for a spin-labeled membrane system in the presence of paramagnetic ions. The first-harmonic out-of-phase V'1-signal appears to be the non-linear CW EPR method of choice for determining T1-relaxation enhancements in spin-labeled systems.

  15. Main-belt Comet P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Kaluna, Heather M.; Novaković, Bojan; Yang, Bin; Haghighipour, Nader; Micheli, Marco; Denneau, Larry; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Jedicke, Robert; Kleyna, Jan; Vereš, Peter; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Ansdell, Megan; Elliott, Garrett T.; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Meech, Karen J.; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Riesen, Timm E.; Sheppard, Scott S.; Sonnett, Sarah; Tholen, David J.; Urban, Laurie; Kaiser, Nick; Chambers, K. C.; Burgett, William S.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Price, Paul A.

    2013-07-01

    We present initial results from observations and numerical analyses aimed at characterizing the main-belt comet P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS). Optical monitoring observations were made between 2012 October and 2013 February using the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope, the Keck I telescope, the Baade and Clay Magellan telescopes, Faulkes Telescope South, the Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory, and the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope. The object's intrinsic brightness approximately doubles from the time of its discovery in early October until mid-November and then decreases by ~60% between late December and early February, similar to photometric behavior exhibited by several other main-belt comets and unlike that exhibited by disrupted asteroid (596) Scheila. We also used Keck to conduct spectroscopic searches for CN emission as well as absorption at 0.7 μm that could indicate the presence of hydrated minerals, finding an upper limit CN production rate of Q CN < 1.5 × 1023 mol s-1, from which we infer a water production rate of Q_H_2O<5\\times 10^{25} mol s-1, and no evidence of the presence of hydrated minerals. Numerical simulations indicate that P/2012 T1 is largely dynamically stable for >100 Myr and is unlikely to be a recently implanted interloper from the outer solar system, while a search for potential asteroid family associations reveals that it is dynamically linked to the ~155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation, the Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inova

  16. Transverse relaxation of scalar-coupled protons.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Takuya F; Baishya, Bikash; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-10-25

    In a preliminary communication (B. Baishya, T. F. Segawa, G. Bodenhausen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 17538-17539), we recently demonstrated that it is possible to obtain clean echo decays of protons in biomolecules despite the presence of homonuclear scalar couplings. These unmodulated decays allow one to determine apparent transverse relaxation rates R(2) (app) of individual protons. Herein, we report the observation of R(2) (app) for three methyl protons, four amide H(N) protons, and all 11 backbone H(α) protons in cyclosporin A. If the proton resonances overlap, their R(2) (app) rates can be measured by transferring their magnetization to neighboring (13)C nuclei, which are less prone to overlap. The R(2) (app) rates of protons attached to (13)C are faster than those attached to (12)C because of (13)C-(1)H dipolar interactions. The differences of these rates allow the determination of local correlation functions. Backbone H(N) and H(α) protons that have fast decay rates R(2) (app) also feature fast longitudinal relaxation rates R(1) and intense NOESY cross peaks that are typical of crowded environments. Variations of R(2) (app) rates of backbone H(α) protons in similar amino acids reflect differences in local environments.

  17. Proton-detected 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H correlation experiment for structural analysis in rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS above 60 kHz.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-28

    A proton-detected 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H chemical shift correlation experiment is proposed for the assignment of chemical shift resonances, identification of (13)C-(1)H connectivities, and proximities of (13)C-(1)H and (1)H-(1)H nuclei under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning (ultrafast-MAS) conditions. Ultrafast-MAS is used to suppress all anisotropic interactions including (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings, while the finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used to recouple dipolar couplings among protons and the insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer technique is used to transfer magnetization between heteronuclear spins. The 3D experiment eliminates signals from non-carbon-bonded protons and non-proton-bonded carbons to enhance spectral resolution. The 2D (F1/F3) (1)H/(1)H and 2D (13)C/(1)H (F2/F3) chemical shift correlation spectra extracted from the 3D spectrum enable the identification of (1)H-(1)H proximity and (13)C-(1)H connectivity. In addition, the 2D (F1/F2) (1)H/(13)C chemical shift correlation spectrum, incorporated with proton magnetization exchange via the fp-RFDR recoupling of (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings, enables the measurement of proximities between (13)C and even the remote non-carbon-bonded protons. The 3D experiment also gives three-spin proximities of (1)H-(1)H-(13)C chains. Experimental results obtained from powder samples of L-alanine and L-histidine ⋅ H2O ⋅ HCl demonstrate the efficiency of the 3D experiment.

  18. Proton-detected 3D 1H/13C/1H correlation experiment for structural analysis in rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS above 60 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-01

    A proton-detected 3D 1H/13C/1H chemical shift correlation experiment is proposed for the assignment of chemical shift resonances, identification of 13C-1H connectivities, and proximities of 13C-1H and 1H-1H nuclei under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning (ultrafast-MAS) conditions. Ultrafast-MAS is used to suppress all anisotropic interactions including 1H-1H dipolar couplings, while the finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used to recouple dipolar couplings among protons and the insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer technique is used to transfer magnetization between heteronuclear spins. The 3D experiment eliminates signals from non-carbon-bonded protons and non-proton-bonded carbons to enhance spectral resolution. The 2D (F1/F3) 1H/1H and 2D 13C/1H (F2/F3) chemical shift correlation spectra extracted from the 3D spectrum enable the identification of 1H-1H proximity and 13C-1H connectivity. In addition, the 2D (F1/F2) 1H/13C chemical shift correlation spectrum, incorporated with proton magnetization exchange via the fp-RFDR recoupling of 1H-1H dipolar couplings, enables the measurement of proximities between 13C and even the remote non-carbon-bonded protons. The 3D experiment also gives three-spin proximities of 1H-1H-13C chains. Experimental results obtained from powder samples of L-alanine and L-histidine ṡ H2O ṡ HCl demonstrate the efficiency of the 3D experiment.

  19. Sodium-23 magnetic resonance imaging during and after transient cerebral ischemia: multinuclear stroke protocols for double-tuned 23Na/1H resonator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Ansar, Saema; Handwerker, Eva

    2012-11-01

    A double-tuned 23Na/1H resonator system was developed to record multinuclear MR image data during and after transient cerebral ischemia. 1H-diffusion-, 1H perfusion, 1H T2-, 1H arterial blood flow- and 23Na spin density-weighted images were then acquired at three time points in a rodent stroke model: (I) during 90 min artery occlusion, (II) directly after arterial reperfusion and (III) one day after arterial reperfusion. Normal 23Na was detected in hypoperfused stroke tissue which exhibited a low 1H apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and no changes in 1H T2 relaxation time during transient ischemia, while 23Na increased and ADC values recovered to normal values directly after arterial reperfusion. For the first time, a similar imaging protocol was set-up on a clinical 3T MRI site in conjunction with a commercial double-tuned 1H/23Na birdcage resonator avoiding a time-consuming exchange of resonators or MRI systems. Multinuclear 23Na/1H MRI data sets were obtained from one stroke patient during both the acute and non-acute stroke phases with an aquisition time of 22 min. The lesion exhibiting low ADC was found to be larger compared to the lesion with high 23Na at 9 h after symptom onset. It is hoped that the presented pilot data demonstrate that fast multinuclear 23Na/1H MRI preclinical and clinical protocols can enable a better understanding of how temporal and regional MRI parameter changes link to pathophysiological variations in ischemic stroke tissue.

  20. Complete assignment of NMR data of 22 phenyl-1H-pyrazoles' derivatives.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Aline Lima; Alves de Oliveira, Carlos Henrique; Mairink, Laura Maia; Pazini, Francine; Menegatti, Ricardo; Lião, Luciano Morais

    2011-08-01

    Complete assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts and J((1)H/(1)H and (1)H/(19)F) coupling constants for 22 1-phenyl-1H-pyrazoles' derivates were performed using the concerted application of (1)H 1D and (1)H, (13)C 2D gs-HSQC and gs-HMBC experiments. All 1-phenyl-1H-pyrazoles' derivatives were synthesized as described by Finar and co-workers. The formylated 1-phenyl-1H-pyrazoles' derivatives were performed under Duff's conditions.

  1. Anomalous hyperfine coupling and nuclear magnetic relaxation in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okvátovity, Zoltán; Simon, Ferenc; Dóra, Balázs

    2016-12-01

    The electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction shows up in a variety of phenomena including, e.g., NMR studies of correlated states and spin decoherence effects in quantum dots. Here we focus on the hyperfine coupling and the NMR spin relaxation time T1 in Weyl semimetals. Since the density of states in Weyl semimetals varies with the square of the energy around the Weyl point, a naive power counting predicts a 1 /T1T ˜E4 scaling, with E the maximum of temperature (T ) and chemical potential. By carefully investigating the hyperfine interaction between nuclear spins and Weyl fermions, we find that while its spin part behaves conventionally, its orbital part diverges unusually, with the inverse of the energy around the Weyl point. Consequently, the nuclear spin relaxation rate scales in a graphenelike manner as 1 /T1T ˜E2ln(E /ω0) , with ω0 the nuclear Larmor frequency. This allows us to identify an effective hyperfine coupling constant, which is tunable by gating or doping. This is relevant for the decoherence effect in spintronics devices and double quantum dots, where hyperfine coupling is the dominant source of spin-blockade lifting.

  2. Hydration water dynamics in biopolymers from NMR relaxation in the rotating frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blicharska, Barbara; Peemoeller, Hartwig; Witek, Magdalena

    2010-12-01

    Assuming dipole-dipole interaction as the dominant relaxation mechanism of protons of water molecules adsorbed onto macromolecule (biopolymer) surfaces we have been able to model the dependences of relaxation rates on temperature and frequency. For adsorbed water molecules the correlation times are of the order of 10 -5 s, for which the dispersion region of spin-lattice relaxation rates in the rotating frame R1ρ = 1/ T1ρ appears over a range of easily accessible B1 values. Measurements of T1ρ at constant temperature and different B1 values then give the "dispersion profiles" for biopolymers. Fitting a theoretical relaxation model to these profiles allows for the estimation of correlation times. This way of obtaining the correlation time is easier and faster than approaches involving measurements of the temperature dependence of R1 = 1/ T1. The T1ρ dispersion approach, as a tool for molecular dynamics study, has been demonstrated for several hydrated biopolymer systems including crystalline cellulose, starch of different origins (potato, corn, oat, wheat), paper (modern, old) and lyophilized proteins (albumin, lysozyme).

  3. Differentiation between cortical atrophy and hydrocephalus using 1H MRS.

    PubMed

    Bluml, S; McComb, J G; Ross, B D

    1997-03-01

    Quantitative 1H MRS to determine cerebral metabolite patterns and MRI to determine CSF flow were applied to 12 patients with ventricular dilation-Group A, cortical atrophy (N = 5); or Group B, hydrocephalus (N = 7)- and in 9 normal controls. While mean brain water (Group A = 80% +/- 6; Group B = 86% +/- 5; normal = 85% +/- 4) did not differ between the two groups of patients and controls, 1H MRS distinguished those patients with cortical atrophy (Group A) (N-acetylaspartate/ creatine (NAA/Cr) = 0.69 +/- 0.17, versus normal = 1.06 +/- 0.16; P < 0.002; [NAA] = 5.9 +/- 1.3 mmoles/kg, versus normal 8.0 +/- 1.4; P < 0.02) from those with hydrocephalus (Group B) (NAA/Cr = 1.16 +/- 0.11; [NAA] = 9.2 +/- 1.2; P > 0.13 and P > 0.07). Lactate levels were elevated in 3/5 patients with cortical atrophy, but in 0/7 of those with hydrocephalus. Mean absolute concentrations (mmoles/kg) of the five major cerebral osmolytes were 41 +/- 4 (Group A), 43 +/- 6 (Group B), and 42 +/- 4 (normal), so that despite massive brain deformation, constant osmolality was maintained. 1H MRS may directly benefit surgical planning in hydrocephalus infants by clearly identifying those with cortical atrophy who do not require CSF diversion. Thinning of the cortical mantle in hydrocephalus may result from osmotically driven reduction in individual cell volumes, (shrinkage), rather than brain-compression.

  4. (1)H NMR at Larmor frequencies down to 3Hz by means of Field-Cycling techniques.

    PubMed

    Kresse, B; Becher, M; Privalov, A F; Hofmann, M; Rössler, E A; Vogel, M; Fujara, F

    2017-04-01

    Field-Cycling (FC) NMR experiments were carried out at (1)H Larmor frequencies down to about 3Hz. This could be achieved by fast switching a high polarizing magnetic field down to a low evolution field which is tilted with respect to the polarization field. Then, the low frequency Larmor precession of the nuclear spin magnetization about this evolution field is registered by means of FIDs in a high detection field. The crucial technical point of the experiment is the stabilization of the evolution field, which is achieved by compensating for temporal magnetic field fluctuations of all three spatial components. The paper reports on some other basic low field experiments such as the simultaneous measurement of the Larmor frequency and the spin-lattice relaxation time in such small fields as well as the irradiation of oscillating transversal magnetic field pulses at very low frequencies as a novel method for field calibration in low field FC NMR. The potential of low field FC is exemplified by the (1)H relaxation dispersion of water at frequencies below about 2kHz stemming from the slow proton exchange process.

  5. Anomalous NMR relaxation in cartilage matrix components and native cartilage: fractional-order models.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L; Li, Weiguo; Pilar Velasco, M; Trujillo, Juan; Reiter, David A; Morgenstern, Ashley; Spencer, Richard G

    2011-06-01

    We present a fractional-order extension of the Bloch equations to describe anomalous NMR relaxation phenomena (T(1) and T(2)). The model has solutions in the form of Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions that generalize conventional exponential relaxation. Such functions have been shown by others to be useful for describing dielectric and viscoelastic relaxation in complex, heterogeneous materials. Here, we apply these fractional-order T(1) and T(2) relaxation models to experiments performed at 9.4 and 11.7 Tesla on type I collagen gels, chondroitin sulfate mixtures, and to bovine nasal cartilage (BNC), a largely isotropic and homogeneous form of cartilage. The results show that the fractional-order analysis captures important features of NMR relaxation that are typically described by multi-exponential decay models. We find that the T(2) relaxation of BNC can be described in a unique way by a single fractional-order parameter (α), in contrast to the lack of uniqueness of multi-exponential fits in the realistic setting of a finite signal-to-noise ratio. No anomalous behavior of T(1) was observed in BNC. In the single-component gels, for T(2) measurements, increasing the concentration of the largest components of cartilage matrix, collagen and chondroitin sulfate, results in a decrease in α, reflecting a more restricted aqueous environment. The quality of the curve fits obtained using Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions are in some cases superior to those obtained using mono- and bi-exponential models. In both gels and BNC, α appears to account for micro-structural complexity in the setting of an altered distribution of relaxation times. This work suggests the utility of fractional-order models to describe T(2) NMR relaxation processes in biological tissues.

  6. Anomalous NMR Relaxation in Cartilage Matrix Components and Native Cartilage: Fractional-Order Models

    PubMed Central

    Magin, Richard L.; Li, Weiguo; Velasco, M. Pilar; Trujillo, Juan; Reiter, David A.; Morgenstern, Ashley; Spencer, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a fractional-order extension of the Bloch equations to describe anomalous NMR relaxation phenomena (T1 and T2). The model has solutions in the form of Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions that generalize conventional exponential relaxation. Such functions have been shown by others to be useful for describing dielectric and viscoelastic relaxation in complex, heterogeneous materials. Here, we apply these fractional-order T1 and T2 relaxation models to experiments performed at 9.4 and 11.7 Tesla on type I collagen gels, chondroitin sulfate mixtures, and to bovine nasal cartilage (BNC), a largely isotropic and homogeneous form of cartilage. The results show that the fractional-order analysis captures important features of NMR relaxation that are typically described by multi-exponential decay models. We find that the T2 relaxation of BNC can be described in a unique way by a single fractional-order parameter (α), in contrast to the lack of uniqueness of multi-exponential fits in the realistic setting of a finite signal-to-noise ratio. No anomalous behavior of T1 was observed in BNC. In the single-component gels, for T2 measurements, increasing the concentration of the largest components of cartilage matrix, collagen and chondroitin sulfate, results in a decrease in α, reflecting a more restricted aqueous environment. The quality of the curve fits obtained using Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions are in some cases superior to those obtained using mono- and bi-exponential models. In both gels and BNC, α appears to account for microstructural complexity in the setting of an altered distribution of relaxation times. This work suggests the utility of fractional-order models to describe T2 NMR relaxation processes in biological tissues. PMID:21498095

  7. Anomalous NMR relaxation in cartilage matrix components and native cartilage: Fractional-order models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Richard L.; Li, Weiguo; Pilar Velasco, M.; Trujillo, Juan; Reiter, David A.; Morgenstern, Ashley; Spencer, Richard G.

    2011-06-01

    We present a fractional-order extension of the Bloch equations to describe anomalous NMR relaxation phenomena ( T1 and T2). The model has solutions in the form of Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions that generalize conventional exponential relaxation. Such functions have been shown by others to be useful for describing dielectric and viscoelastic relaxation in complex, heterogeneous materials. Here, we apply these fractional-order T1 and T2 relaxation models to experiments performed at 9.4 and 11.7 Tesla on type I collagen gels, chondroitin sulfate mixtures, and to bovine nasal cartilage (BNC), a largely isotropic and homogeneous form of cartilage. The results show that the fractional-order analysis captures important features of NMR relaxation that are typically described by multi-exponential decay models. We find that the T2 relaxation of BNC can be described in a unique way by a single fractional-order parameter ( α), in contrast to the lack of uniqueness of multi-exponential fits in the realistic setting of a finite signal-to-noise ratio. No anomalous behavior of T1 was observed in BNC. In the single-component gels, for T2 measurements, increasing the concentration of the largest components of cartilage matrix, collagen and chondroitin sulfate, results in a decrease in α, reflecting a more restricted aqueous environment. The quality of the curve fits obtained using Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions are in some cases superior to those obtained using mono- and bi-exponential models. In both gels and BNC, α appears to account for micro-structural complexity in the setting of an altered distribution of relaxation times. This work suggests the utility of fractional-order models to describe T2 NMR relaxation processes in biological tissues.

  8. Core/shell Fe3O4/Gd2O3 nanocubes as T1-T2 dual modal MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfen; Zhi, Debo; Luo, Yufeng; Zhang, Jiqian; Nan, Xiang; Zhang, Yunjiao; Zhou, Wei; Qiu, Bensheng; Wen, Longping; Liang, Gaolin

    2016-06-01

    T1-T2 dual modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has attracted considerable interest because it offers complementary diagnostic information, leading to more precise diagnosis. To date, a number of nanostructures have been reported as T1-T2 dual modal MR contrast agents (CAs). However, hybrids of nanocubes with both iron and gadolinium (Gd) elements as T1-T2 dual modal CAs have not been reported. Herein, we report the synthesis of novel core/shell Fe3O4/Gd2O3 nanocubes as T1-T2 dual-modal CAs and their application for enhanced T1-T2 MR imaging of rat livers. A relaxivity study at 1.5 T indicated that our Fe3O4/Gd2O3 nanocubes have an r1 value of 45.24 mM-1 s-1 and an r2 value of 186.51 mM-1 s-1, which were about two folds of those of Gd2O3 nanoparticles and Fe3O4 nanocubes, respectively. In vivo MR imaging of rats showed both T1-positive and T2-negative contrast enhancements in the livers. We envision that our Fe3O4/Gd2O3 nanocubes could be applied as T1-T2 dual modal MR CAs for a wide range of theranostic applications in the near future.T1-T2 dual modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has attracted considerable interest because it offers complementary diagnostic information, leading to more precise diagnosis. To date, a number of nanostructures have been reported as T1-T2 dual modal MR contrast agents (CAs). However, hybrids of nanocubes with both iron and gadolinium (Gd) elements as T1-T2 dual modal CAs have not been reported. Herein, we report the synthesis of novel core/shell Fe3O4/Gd2O3 nanocubes as T1-T2 dual-modal CAs and their application for enhanced T1-T2 MR imaging of rat livers. A relaxivity study at 1.5 T indicated that our Fe3O4/Gd2O3 nanocubes have an r1 value of 45.24 mM-1 s-1 and an r2 value of 186.51 mM-1 s-1, which were about two folds of those of Gd2O3 nanoparticles and Fe3O4 nanocubes, respectively. In vivo MR imaging of rats showed both T1-positive and T2-negative contrast enhancements in the livers. We envision that our Fe3O4/Gd2O3 nanocubes

  9. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a tool to measure dehydration in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Matthew; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Colucci, Lina A; Cima, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Dehydration is a prevalent pathology, where loss of bodily water can result in variable symptoms. Symptoms can range from simple thirst to dire scenarios involving loss of consciousness. Clinical methods exist that assess dehydration from qualitative weight changes to more quantitative osmolality measurements. These methods are imprecise, invasive, and/or easily confounded, despite being practiced clinically. We investigate a non-invasive, non-imaging (1)H NMR method of assessing dehydration that attempts to address issues with existing clinical methods. Dehydration was achieved by exposing mice (n = 16) to a thermally elevated environment (37 °C) for up to 7.5 h (0.11-13% weight loss). Whole body NMR measurements were made using a Bruker LF50 BCA-Analyzer before and after dehydration. Physical lean tissue, adipose, and free water compartment approximations had NMR values extracted from relaxation data through a multi-exponential fitting method. Changes in before/after NMR values were compared with clinically practiced metrics of weight loss (percent dehydration) as well as blood and urine osmolality. A linear correlation between tissue relaxometry and both animal percent dehydration and urine osmolality was observed in lean tissue, but not adipose or free fluids. Calculated R(2) values for percent dehydration were 0.8619 (lean, P < 0.0001), 0.5609 (adipose, P = 0.0008), and 0.0644 (free fluids, P = 0.3445). R(2) values for urine osmolality were 0.7760 (lean, P < 0.0001), 0.5005 (adipose, P = 0.0022), and 0.0568 (free fluids, P = 0.3739). These results suggest that non-imaging (1)H NMR methods are capable of non-invasively assessing dehydration in live animals.

  10. Probing Structure Property Relationships in Complex Engineering Silicones by 1H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Gjersing, E L; Maxwell, R S; Eastwood, E; Bowen, D; Stephens, T

    2006-07-14

    It is generally accepted that the properties of polymeric materials are controlled by the network structure and the reactions by which they have been constructed. These properties include the bulk moduli at creation, but also the properties as a function of age during use. In order to interpret mechanical properties and predict the time dependent changes in these properties, detailed knowledge of the effect of structural changes must be obtained. The degree and type of crosslinking, the molecular weight between crosslinks, the number of elastically ineffective chains (loops, dangling chain ends, sol-fraction) must be characterized. A number of theoretical and experimental efforts have been reported in the last few years on model networks prepared by endlinking reactions and the relationships of those structures with the ultimate mechanical properties. A range of experimental methods have been used to investigate structure including rheometric, scattering, infrared, {sup 29}Si MAS and CPMAS, {sup 1}H relaxation measurements, and recently {sup 1}H multiple quantum methods. Characterization of the growth of multiple quantum coherences have recently been shown to provide detailed insight into silicone network structure by the ability to selective probe the individual components of the polymer network, such as the polymer-filler interface or network chains. We have employed recently developed MQ methods to investigate the structure-property relationships in a series of complex, endlinked filled-PDMS blends. Here, a systematic study of the relationship between the molecular formulation, as dictated by the amount and type of crosslinks present and by the remaining network chains, and the segmental dynamics as observed by MQ NMR was performed.

  11. Regional variations in MR relaxation of hip joint cartilage in subjects with and without femoralacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Subburaj, Karupppasamy; Valentinitsch, Alexander; Dillon, Alexander B; Joseph, Gabby B; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M; Vail, Thomas P; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze regional variations of magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation times (T1ρ and T2) in hip joint cartilage of healthy volunteers and subjects with femoral acetabular impingement (FAI). Morphological and quantitative images of the hip joints of 12 healthy volunteers and 9 FAI patients were obtained using a 3T MR scanner. Both femoral and acetabular cartilage layers in each joint were semi-automatically segmented on sagittal 3D high-resolution spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) images. These segmented regions of interest (ROIs) were automatically divided radially into twelve equal sub-regions (30(0) intervals) based on the fitted center of the femur head. The mean value of T1ρ/T2 was calculated in each sub-region after superimposing the divided cartilage contours on the MR relaxation (T1ρ/T2) maps to quantify the relaxation times. T1ρ and T2 relaxation times of the femoral cartilage were significantly higher in FAI subjects compared to healthy controls (39.9±3.3 msec in FAI vs. 35.4±2.3msec in controls for T1ρ (P=0.0020); 33.9±3.1 msec in FAI vs. 31.1±1.7 msec in controls for T2 (P=0.0160)). Sub-regional analysis showed significantly different T1ρ and T2 relaxation times in the anterior-superior region (R9) of the hip joint cartilage between subjects with FAI and healthy subjects, suggesting possible regional differences in cartilage matrix composition between these two groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that sub-regional analysis in femoral cartilage was more sensitive in discriminating FAI joint cartilage from that of healthy joints than global analysis of the whole region (T1ρ: area under the curve (AUC)=0.981, P=0.0001 for R9 sub-region; AUC=0.901, P=0.002 for whole region; T2: AUC=0.976, P=0.0005 for R9 sub-region; AUC=0.808, P=0.0124 for whole region). The results of this study demonstrated regional variations in hip cartilage composition using MR relaxation times (T1ρ and T2) and suggested

  12. Development of relaxation turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. M.

    1976-01-01

    Relaxation turbulence models have been intensively studied. The complete time dependent mass averaged Navier-Stokes equations have been solved for flow into a two dimensional compression corner. A new numerical scheme has been incorporated into the developed computed code with an attendant order of magnitude reduction in computation time. Computed solutions are compared with experimental measurements of Law for supersonic flow. Details of the relaxation process have been studied; several different relaxation models, including different relaxation processes and varying relaxation length, are tested and compared. Then a parametric study has been conducted in which both Reynolds number and wedge angle are varied. To assess effects of Reynolds number and wedge angle, the parametric study includes the comparison of computed separation location and upstream extent of pressure rise; numerical results are also compared with the measurements of surface pressure, skin friction and mean velocity field.

  13. The 1H NMR Profile of Healthy Dog Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Musteata, Mihai; Nicolescu, Alina; Solcan, Gheorghe; Deleanu, Calin

    2013-01-01

    The availability of data for reference values in cerebrospinal fluid for healthy humans is limited due to obvious practical and ethical issues. The variability of reported values for metabolites in human cerebrospinal fluid is quite large. Dogs present great similarities with humans, including in cases of central nervous system pathologies. The paper presents the first study on healthy dog cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile using 1H NMR spectroscopy. A number of 13 metabolites have been identified and quantified from cerebrospinal fluid collected from a group of 10 mix breed healthy dogs. The biological variability as resulting from the relative standard deviation of the physiological concentrations of the identified metabolites had a mean of 18.20% (range between 9.3% and 44.8%). The reported concentrations for metabolites may be used as normal reference values. The homogeneity of the obtained results and the low biologic variability show that the 1H NMR analysis of the dog’s cerebrospinal fluid is reliable in designing and interpreting clinical and therapeutic trials in dogs with central nervous system pathologies. PMID:24376499

  14. Metabolomic insight into soy sauce through (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ko, Bong-Kuk; Ahn, Hyuk-Jin; van den Berg, Frans; Lee, Cherl-Ho; Hong, Young-Shick

    2009-08-12

    Soy sauce, a well-known seasoning in Asia and throughout the world, consists of many metabolites that are produced during fermentation or aging and that have various health benefits. However, their comprehensive assessment has been limited due to targeted or instrumentally specific analysis. This paper presents for the first time a metabolic characterization of soy sauce, especially that aged up to 12 years, to obtain a global understanding of the metabolic variations through (1)H NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate pattern recognition techniques. Elevated amino acids and organic acids and the consumption of carbohydrate were associated with continuous involvement of microflora in aging for 12 years. In particular, continuous increases in the levels of betaine were found during aging for up to 12 years, demonstrating that microbial- or enzyme-related metabolites were also coupled with osmotolerant or halophilic bacteria present during aging. This work provides global insights into soy sauce through a (1)H NMR-based metabolomic approach that enhances the current understanding of the holistic metabolome and allows assessment of soy sauce quality.

  15. Optimization of sparse phase encodings for variable repetition-delay turbo-spin echo (TSE) T1 measurements for preclinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, DongKyu; Han, Sohyun; Cho, HyungJoon

    2017-01-01

    A variable repetition-delay (TR) spin echo sequence with repeated refocusing pulses, i.e., a variable TR turbo-spin echo (TSE), provides an attractive means of acquiring an accurate T1 map information that is free from gradient echo based artifacts such as magnetic field inhomogeneities particularly for ultra-high field (at 7T and above) preclinical applications. However, the applicability of multi-slice TSE sequences is often limited by signal distortion from T2 relaxation due to echo-train acquisitions for short T2 tissues, inter-slice cross talks and magnetization transfer (MT) from repetitive slice-selective 180° pulse, and extended scan times with multiple TR excitations. These TSE shortcomings are difficult to remedy for preclinical applications, where small sizes of target organs usually limit the slice-gap control with restricted parallel imaging capabilities. In this study, compressed-sensing-assisted turbo-spin echo (CS-TSE) acquisitions for variable TR T1 measurements at 7T preclinical scanner were implemented to reduce the echo-trains by sparse phase encodings. Following the sparse signal simulation and sampling scheme optimization, the measured T1 values from CS-TSE and TSE were compared for phantoms, ex vivo, and in vivo subjects. The phantom T1 values from CS-TSE and TSE were identical to those from the inversion recovery spin echo. For both ex vivo and in vivo multi-slice T1 mapping, the shortened echo-trains of CS-TSE relieved the T2 relaxation, reduced the inter-slice interferences of multi-slice acquisition, and made room for additional slice encodings while maintaining a shorter scan time than the conventional TSE at the expense of local image smoothness from CS regularizations.

  16. New approach for understanding experimental NMR relaxivity properties of magnetic nanoparticles: focus on cobalt ferrite.

    PubMed

    Rollet, Anne-Laure; Neveu, Sophie; Porion, Patrice; Dupuis, Vincent; Cherrak, Nadine; Levitz, Pierre

    2016-12-07

    Relaxivities r1 and r2 of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated in the aim of improving the models of NMR relaxation induced by magnetic nanoparticles. On one hand a large set of relaxivity data has been collected for cobalt ferrite MNP dispersions. On the other hand the relaxivity has been calculated for dispersions of cobalt ferrite MNPs with size ranging from 5 to 13 nm, without using any fitting procedure. The model is based on the magnetic dipolar interaction between the magnetic moments of the MNPs and the (1)H nuclei. It takes into account both the longitudinal and transversal contributions of the magnetic moments of MNPs leading to three contributions in the relaxation equations. The comparison of the experimental and theoretical data shows a good agreement of the NMR profiles as well as the temperature dependence.

  17. Exchange-mediated spin-lattice relaxation of Fe3+ ions in borate glasses.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sushil K; Pilbrow, John R

    2007-03-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of two borate glasses doped with different concentrations of Fe2O3 were measured using the Electron Spin-Echo (ESE) technique at X-band (9.630 GHz) in the temperature range 2-6K. In comparison with a previous investigation of Fe3+-doped silicate glasses, the relaxation rates were comparable and differed by no more than a factor of two. The data presented here extend those previously reported for borate glasses in the 10-250K range but measured using the amplitude-modulation technique. The T1 values were found to depend on temperature (T) as T(n) with n approximately 1 for the 1% and 0.1% Fe2O3-doped glass samples. These results are consistent with spin-lattice relaxation as effected by exchange interaction of a Fe3+ spin exchange-coupled to another Fe3+ spin in an amorphous material.

  18. A Static Picture of the Relaxation and Intersystem Crossing Mechanisms of Photoexcited 2-Thiouracil

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accurate excited-state quantum chemical calculations on 2-thiouracil, employing large active spaces and up to quadruple-ζ quality basis sets in multistate complete active space perturbation theory calculations, are reported. The results suggest that the main relaxation path for 2-thiouracil after photoexcitation should be S2 → S1 → T2 → T1, and that this relaxation occurs on a subpicosecond time scale. There are two deactivation pathways from the initially excited bright S2 state to S1, one of which is nearly barrierless and should promote ultrafast internal conversion. After relaxation to the S1 minimum, small singlet–triplet energy gaps and spin–orbit couplings of about 130 cm–1 are expected to facilitate intersystem crossing to T2, from where very fast internal conversion to T1 occurs. An important finding is that 2-thiouracil shows strong pyramidalization at the carbon atom of the thiocarbonyl group in several excited states. PMID:26284285

  19. [Spin-lattice relaxation of water protons in plant and animal cells].

    PubMed

    Samuilov, F D; Nikiforov, E A; Nikiforova, V I

    2012-01-01

    NMR-spin echo method has been used to study spin-lattice relaxation time of protons T1 in plant and animal cells - muscle tissue of fish, the cells of which unlike plant cells have no developed system of vacuoles, plastids and a solid cell wall. According to the values of T1 time a new NMR parameter K, a coefficient of relaxation effectiveness of a cell structure, has been calculated. This parameter can be used for quantitative characterization of the influence of different cell structures, the tissue water interact with, for a time of spin-lattice relaxation of water protons. It has been ascertained that the values of K coefficient in animal tissue and in storing tissues of some plants differ little; it may be stipulated by permanent transmembrane water exchange which occurs at high rate in the living cell. It has been concluded that there exists a certain similarity between water state in protoplast of plant and animal cells.

  20. Zeeman energy and spin relaxation in a one-electron quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Hanson, R; Witkamp, B; Vandersypen, L M K; van Beveren, L H Willems; Elzerman, J M; Kouwenhoven, L P

    2003-11-07

    We have measured the relaxation time, T1, of the spin of a single electron confined in a semiconductor quantum dot (a proposed quantum bit). In a magnetic field, applied parallel to the two-dimensional electron gas in which the quantum dot is defined, Zeeman splitting of the orbital states is directly observed by measurements of electron transport through the dot. By applying short voltage pulses, we can populate the excited spin state with one electron and monitor relaxation of the spin. We find a lower bound on T1 of 50 micros at 7.5 T, only limited by our signal-to-noise ratio. A continuous measurement of the charge on the dot has no observable effect on the spin relaxation.

  1. Investigation of intermolecular double-quantum off-resonance longitudinal relaxation in the tilted rotating frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Honghao; Zheng, Bingwen; Ke, Hanping; Chen, Zhong

    2015-11-01

    A modified correlation spectroscopy revamped by asymmetric z-gradients echo detection (CRAZED) sequence was applied to investigate the behavior of intermolecular double-quantum longitudinal relaxation processes in the tilted rotating frame. Theoretical formalism based on dipolar field theory was presented in detail. Spectroscopic measurements and quantitative analysis demonstrated that the signal intensities and intermolecular double-quantum off-resonance longitudinal relaxation time in the rotating frame (T1ρ, DQC eff) are inversely correlated with the tilt angle (θ), while positively correlated with the effective frequency of spin-locking field (ωe). Magnetic resonance imaging experiments of an agarose phantom also prove the validity of the theoretical analysis and demonstrated the feasibility of imaging based on T1ρ, DQC eff . The rotating-frame double-quantum relaxation measurements are useful for probing slow-motion molecules and this study provides the guidance for optimization of the spin-lock experiments.

  2. Simultaneous Quantitative MRI Mapping of T1, T2* and Magnetic Susceptibility with Multi-Echo MP2RAGE

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Tobias; Möller, Harald E.; Schäfer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of relaxation times is essential for understanding the biophysical mechanisms underlying contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. Quantitative experiments, while offering major advantages in terms of reproducibility, may benefit from simultaneous acquisitions. In this work, we demonstrate the possibility of simultaneously recording relaxation-time and susceptibility maps with a prototype Multi-Echo (ME) Magnetization-Prepared 2 RApid Gradient Echoes (MP2RAGE) sequence. T1 maps can be obtained using the MP2RAGE sequence, which is relatively insensitive to inhomogeneities of the radio-frequency transmit field, B1+. As an extension, multiple gradient echoes can be acquired in each of the MP2RAGE readout blocks, which permits the calculation of T2* and susceptibility maps. We used computer simulations to explore the effects of the parameters on the precision and accuracy of the mapping. In vivo parameter maps up to 0.6 mm nominal resolution were acquired at 7 T in 19 healthy volunteers. Voxel-by-voxel correlations and the test-retest reproducibility were used to assess the reliability of the results. When using optimized paramenters, T1 maps obtained with ME-MP2RAGE and standard MP2RAGE showed excellent agreement for the whole range of values found in brain tissues. Simultaneously obtained T2* and susceptibility maps were of comparable quality as Fast Low-Angle SHot (FLASH) results. The acquisition times were more favorable for the ME-MP2RAGE (≈ 19 min) sequence as opposed to the sum of MP2RAGE (≈ 12 min) and FLASH (≈ 10 min) acquisitions. Without relevant sacrifice in accuracy, precision or flexibility, the multi-echo version may yield advantages in terms of reduced acquisition time and intrinsic co-registration, provided that an appropriate optimization of the acquisition parameters is performed. PMID:28081157

  3. An improved prognostic model for stage T1a and T1b prostate cancer by assessments of cancer extent

    PubMed Central

    Rajab, Ramzi; Fisher, Gabrielle; Kattan, Michael W; Foster, Christopher S; Møller, Henrik; Oliver, Tim; Reuter, Victor; Scardino, Peter T; Cuzick, Jack; Berney, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    Treatment decisions on prostate cancer diagnosed by trans-urethral resection (TURP) of the prostate are difficult. The current TNM staging system for pT1 prostate cancer has not been re-evaluated for 25 years. Our objective was to optimise the predictive power of tumor extent measurements in TURP of the prostate specimens. A total of 914 patients diagnosed by TURP of the prostate between 1990 and 1996, managed conservatively were identified. The clinical end point was death from prostate cancer. Diagnostic serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and contemporary Gleason grading was available. Cancer extent was measured by the percentage of chips infiltrated by cancer. Death rates were compared by univariate and multivariate proportional hazards models, including baseline PSA and Gleason score. The percentage of positive chips was highly predictive of prostate cancer death when assessed as a continuous variable or as a grouped variable on the basis of and including the quintiles, quartiles, tertiles and median groups. In the univariate model, the most informative variable was a four group-split (≤ 10%, >10–25%, > 25–75% and > 75%); (HR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.8–2.4, P < 0.0001). The same was true in a multivariate model (ΔX2 (1 d.f.) = 15.0, P = 0.0001). The current cutoff used by TNM (< = 5%) was sub-optimal (ΔX2 (1 d.f.) = 4.8, P = 0.023). The current TNM staging results in substantial loss of information. Staging by a four-group subdivision would substantially improve prognostication in patients with early stage disease and also may help to refine management decisions in patients who would do well with conservative treatments. PMID:20834240

  4. Quantitative characterization of food products by two-dimensional D-T2 and T1-T2 distribution functions in a static gradient.

    PubMed

    Hürlimann, Martin D; Burcaw, Lauren; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2006-05-01

    We present new NMR techniques to characterize food products that are based on the measurement of two-dimensional diffusion-T2 relaxation and T1-T2 relaxation distribution functions. These measurements can be performed in magnets of modest strength and low homogeneity and do not require pulsed gradients. As an illustration, we present measurements on a range of dairy products that include milks, yogurt, cream, and cheeses. The two-dimensional distribution functions generally exhibit two distinct components that correspond to the aqueous phase and the liquid fat content. The aqueous phase exhibits a relatively sharp peak, characterized by a large T1/T2 ratio of around 4. The diffusion coefficient and relaxation times are reduced from the values for bulk water by an amount that is sample specific. The fat signal has a similar signature in all samples. It is characterized by a wide T2 distribution and a diffusion coefficient of 10(-11) m2/s for a diffusion time of 40 ms, determined by bounded diffusion in the fat globules of 3 microm diameter.

  5. Fluorescence-tagged amphiphilic brush copolymer encapsulated Gd2O3 core-shell nanostructures for enhanced T 1 contrast effect and fluorescent imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fenghe; Peng, Erwin; Liu, Feng; Li, Pingjing; Fong Yau Li, Sam; Xue, Jun Min

    2016-10-01

    To obtain suitable T 1 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) application, aqueous Gd2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) with high longitudinal relativity (r 1) are demanded. High quality Gd2O3 NPs are usually synthesized through a non-hydrolytic route which requires post-synthetic modification to render the NPs water soluble. The current challenge is to obtain aqueous Gd2O3 NPs with high colloidal stability and enhanced r 1 relaxivity. To overcome this challenge, fluorescence-tagged amphiphilic brush copolymer (AFCP) encapsulated Gd2O3 NPs were proposed as suitable T 1 contrast agents. Such a coating layer provided (i) superior aqueous stability, (ii) biocompatibility, as well as (iii) multi-modality (conjugation with fluorescence dye). The polymeric coating layer thickness was simply adjusted by varying the phase-transfer parameters. By reducing the coating thickness, i.e. the distance between the paramagnetic centre and surrounding water protons, the r 1 relaxivity could be enhanced. In contrast, a thicker polymeric layer coating prevents Gd3+ ions leakage, thus improving its biocompatibility. Therefore, it is important to strike a balance between the biocompatibility and the r 1 relaxivity behaviour. Lastly, by conjugating fluorescence moiety, an additional imaging modality was enabled, as demonstrated from the cell-labelling experiment.

  6. Genetic Variation in Myosin 1H Contributes to Mandibular Prognathism

    PubMed Central

    Tassopoulou-Fishell, Maria; Deeley, Kathleen; Harvey, Erika M.; Sciote, James; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several candidate loci have been suggested as influencing mandibular prognathism (1p22.1, 1p22.2, 1p36, 3q26.2, 5p13-p12, 6q25, 11q22.2-q22.3, 12q23, 12q13.13, and 19p13.2). The goal of this study was to replicate these results in a well-characterized homogeneous sample set. Methods Thirty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms spanning all candidate regions were studied in 44 prognathic and 35 Class I subjects from the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine Dental Registry and DNA Repository. The 44 mandibular prognathism subjects had an average age of 18.4 years, 31 were females and 13 males, and 24 were White, 15 African American, two Hispanic, and three Asian. The 35 Class I subjects had an average age of 17.6 years, 27 were females and 9 males, and 27 were White, six African Americans, one Hispanic, and two Asian. Skeletal mandibular prognathism diagnosis included cephalometric values indicative of Class III such as ANB smaller than two degrees, negative Witts appraisal, and positive A–B plane. Additional mandibular prognathism criteria included negative OJ and visually prognathic (concave) profile as determined by the subject's clinical evaluation. Orthognathic subjects without jaw deformations were used as a comparison group. Mandibular prognathism and orthognathic subjects were matched based on race, sex and age. Genetic markers were tested by polymerase chain reaction using TaqMan chemistry. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to determine overrepresentation of marker allele with alpha of 0.05. Results An association was unveiled between a marker in MYO1H (rs10850110) and the mandibular prognathism phenotype (p=0.03). MYO1H is a Class-I myosin that is in a different protein group than the myosin isoforms of muscle sarcomeres, which are the basis of skeletal muscle fiber typing. Class I myosins are necessary for cell motility, phagocytosis and vesicle transport. Conclusions More strict clinical definitions may increase

  7. Curie-type paramagnetic NMR relaxation in the aqueous solution of Ni(II).

    PubMed

    Mareš, Jiří; Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Lounila, Juhani; Vaara, Juha

    2014-04-21

    Ni(2+)(aq) has been used for many decades as a model system for paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) relaxation studies. More recently, its magnetic properties and also nuclear magnetic relaxation rates have been studied computationally. We have calculated electron paramagnetic resonance and NMR parameters using quantum-mechanical (QM) computation of molecular dynamics snapshots, obtained using a polarizable empirical force field. Statistical averages of hyperfine coupling, g- and zero-field splitting tensors, as well as the pNMR shielding terms, are compared to the available experimental and computational data. In accordance with our previous work, the isotropic hyperfine coupling as well as nuclear shielding values agree well with experimental measurements for the (17)O nuclei of water molecules in the first solvation shell of the nickel ion, whereas larger deviations are found for (1)H centers. We report, for the first time, the Curie-type contribution to the pNMR relaxation rate using QM calculations together with Redfield relaxation theory. The Curie relaxation mechanism is analogous to chemical shift anisotropy relaxation, well-known in diamagnetic NMR. Due to the predominance of other types of paramagnetic relaxation mechanisms for this system, it is possible to extract the Curie term only computationally. The Curie mechanism alone would result in around 16 and 20 s(-1) of relaxation rates (R1 and R2 respectively) for the (1)H nuclei of water molecules bonded to the Ni(2+) center, in a magnetic field of 11.7 T. The corresponding (17)O relaxation rates are around 33 and 38 s(-1). We also report the Curie contribution to the relaxation rate for molecules beyond the first solvation shell in a 1 M solution of Ni(2+) in water.

  8. Taste information derived from T1R-expressing taste cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryusuke; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-03-01

    The taste system of animals is used to detect valuable nutrients and harmful compounds in foods. In humans and mice, sweet, bitter, salty, sour and umami tastes are considered the five basic taste qualities. Sweet and umami tastes are mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors, belonging to the T1R (taste receptor type 1) family. This family consists of three members (T1R1, T1R2 and T1R3). They function as sweet or umami taste receptors by forming heterodimeric complexes, T1R1+T1R3 (umami) or T1R2+T1R3 (sweet). Receptors for each of the basic tastes are thought to be expressed exclusively in taste bud cells. Sweet (T1R2+T1R3-expressing) taste cells were thought to be segregated from umami (T1R1+T1R3-expressing) taste cells in taste buds. However, recent studies have revealed that a significant portion of taste cells in mice expressed all T1R subunits and responded to both sweet and umami compounds. This suggests that sweet and umami taste cells may not be segregated. Mice are able to discriminate between sweet and umami tastes, and both tastes contribute to behavioural preferences for sweet or umami compounds. There is growing evidence that T1R3 is also involved in behavioural avoidance of calcium tastes in mice, which implies that there may be a further population of T1R-expressing taste cells that mediate aversion to calcium taste. Therefore the simple view of detection and segregation of sweet and umami tastes by T1R-expressing taste cells, in mice, is now open to re-examination.

  9. The effects of bone on proton NMR relaxation times of surrounding liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. A.; Genant, H. K.; Dunham, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary attempts by our group at UCSF to assess fat content of vertebral marrow in the lumbar spine using relaxation time information demonstrated that the presence of trabecular bone affects relaxation times. The objective of this work was a thorough study of the effects of bone on NMR relaxation characteristics of surrounding liquids. Trabecular bone from autopsy specimens was ground up and sifted into a series of powders with graded densities ranging from 0.3 gm/cc to 0.8 gm/cc. Each powder was placed first in n-saline and then in cottonseed oil. With spectroscopy, spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) and effective spin-spin relaxation times (T2*) were measured for each liquid in each bone powder. As bone density and surface to volume ratio increased, T1 decreased faster for saline than for oil. T2* decreased significantly for both water and oil as the surface to volume ratio increased. It was concluded that effects of water on T1 could be explained by a surface interaction at the bone/liquid interface, which restricted rotational and translational motion of nearby molecules. The T1s of oil were not affected since oil molecules are nonpolar, do not participate in significant intermolecular hydrogen bonding, and therefore would not be expected to interact strongly with the bone surface. Effects on T2* could be explained by local magnetic field inhomogeneities created by discontinuous magnetic susceptibility near the bone surface. These preliminary results suggest that water in contact with trabecular bone in vivo will exhibit shortened relaxation times.

  10. Crystal structure of 1H,1'H-[2,2'-biimid-azol]-3-ium hydrogen tartrate hemi-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Li; Bian, Li-Fang; Guo, Shao-Wei

    2014-11-01

    In the crystal of the title hydrated salt, C6H7N4 (+)·C4H5O6 (-)·0.5H2O, the bi-imidazole monocation, 1H,1'H-[2,2'-biimidazol]-3-ium, is hydrogen bonded, via N-H⋯O, O-H⋯O and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, to the hydrogen tartrate anion and the water mol-ecule, which is located on a twofold rotation axis, forming sheets parallel to (001). The sheets are linked via C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional structure. There are also C=O⋯π inter-actions present [O⋯π distances are 3.00 (9) and 3.21 (7) Å], involving the carbonyl O atoms and the imidazolium ring, which may help to consolidate the structure. In the cation, the dihedral angle between the rings is 11.6 (2)°.

  11. One dimensional 1H, 2H and 3H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, A. J.; Astrakharchik, G. E.; Vranješ Markić, L.; Boronat, J.

    2016-05-01

    The ground-state properties of one-dimensional electron-spin-polarized hydrogen 1H, deuterium 2H, and tritium 3H are obtained by means of quantum Monte Carlo methods. The equations of state of the three isotopes are calculated for a wide range of linear densities. The pair correlation function and the static structure factor are obtained and interpreted within the framework of the Luttinger liquid theory. We report the density dependence of the Luttinger parameter and use it to identify different physical regimes: Bogoliubov Bose gas, super-Tonks-Girardeau gas, and quasi-crystal regimes for bosons; repulsive, attractive Fermi gas, and quasi-crystal regimes for fermions. We find that the tritium isotope is the one with the richest behavior. Our results show unambiguously the relevant role of the isotope mass in the properties of this quantum system.

  12. Progressive muscle relaxation, breathing exercises, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Smith, J C

    2001-12-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) and breathing exercises. Forty-two students were divided randomly into two groups and taught PMR or breathing exercises. Both groups practiced for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, PMR practitioners displayed greater increments in relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement, while breathing practitioners displayed higher levels of R-State Strength and Awareness. Slight differences emerged at Weeks 1 and 2; major differences emerged at Weeks 4 and 5. A delayed and potentially reinforcing aftereffect emerged for PMR only after five weeks of training--increased levels of Mental Quiet and Joy. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  13. Liquid-state paramagnetic relaxation from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantaharju, Jyrki; Vaara, Juha

    2016-10-01

    We simulate nuclear and electron spin relaxation rates in a paramagnetic system from first principles. Sampling a molecular dynamics trajectory with quantum-chemical calculations produces a time series of the instantaneous parameters of the relevant spin Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonians are, in turn, used to numerically solve the Liouville-von Neumann equation for the time evolution of the spin density matrix. We demonstrate the approach by studying the aqueous solution of the Ni2 + ion. Taking advantage of Kubo's theory, the spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation rates are extracted from the simulations of the time dependence of the longitudinal and transverse magnetization, respectively. Good agreement with the available experimental data is obtained by the method.

  14. Stress relaxation in heterogeneous polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, T. A.

    1992-05-01

    When heterogeneous polymers such as diblock copolymers form a microdomain phase, an imposed strain gives rise to stress from two sources, and several mechanisms of stress relaxation. The release of stress by disentanglement is strongly influenced by the effective confinement of the junction points to the domain boundaries and by the stretching of the chains. Using accepted notions of entangled chain kinetics, it is argued that the relaxation time for sliding stress is exponential in the chainlength to the 7/9 power. A method for calculating the frequency-dependent dynamic modulus is sketched. Despite the slow relaxation implied by these mechanisms, it appears possible to create domains of high energy.

  15. Suppression of sodium nuclear magnetic resonance double-quantum coherence by chemical shift and relaxation reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Robert B.; Huntley, James J. A.; Jin, Haoran; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    1992-12-01

    An investigation into the signal suppression behavior of the paramagnetic shift and relaxation reagents, Dy(P3O10)27- and Gd(P3O10)27-, with regard to their use in the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of sodium has been performed. Measurements of T1 and T2 relaxation time constants of sodium in normal saline, Krebs-Henseleit buffer, and human blood serum, as a function of concentration of these reagents showed that, although closely coupled in the saline and K-H buffer environments, in plasma T1 and T2 become decoupled, transverse relaxation dominating in comparison to longitudinal relaxation. Linewidth measurements further suggest that relaxation in the plasma milieu is controlled primarily by inherent T2 relaxation, rather than by field inhomogeneity or diffusion effects. Quantitative single-quantum (1Q) and double-quantum (2Q) intensity measurements, biexponential T2 relaxation measurements, and parametric studies of the preparation time of the 2Q pulse sequence, were obtained in suspensions of bovine serum albumin and human erythrocytes. The observed suppression of sodium 2Q coherence by paramagnetic shift and relaxation reagents was found to exhibit a complex behavior in albumin solutions, involving the biexponential T2 decay to be expected during the preparation time of the 2Q filter pulse sequence, as well as the optimum preparation time for production of the double-quantum coherence itself. The controlling factor for both of these effects is the biexponential amplitude function in the expression for the transverse magnetization observed following application of the 2Q pulse sequence. This in turn is determined entirely by the values for the slow and fast components of biexponential relaxation in sodium, which themselves depend upon the concentration of the macromolecular binding sites for quadrupolar interaction. A similar behavior has been observed in suspensions of human erythrocytes.

  16. Facile preparation of multifunctional uniform magnetic microspheres for T1-T2 dual modal magnetic resonance and optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Shuang; Liu, Ruiqing; Yuan, Tianmeng; Zhang, Shulai; Xu, Zushun; Xu, Haibo

    2016-08-01

    Molecular imaging is of significant importance for early detection and diagnosis of cancer. Herein, a novel core-shell magnetic microsphere for dual modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging was produced by one-pot emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization, which could provide high resolution rate of histologic structure information and realize high sensitive detection at the same time. The synthesized magnetic microspheres composed of cores containing oleic acid (OA) and sodium undecylenate (NaUA) modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles and styrene (St), Glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), and polymerizable lanthanide complexes (Gd(AA)3Phen and Eu(AA)3Phen) polymerized on the surface for outer shells. Fluorescence spectra show characteristic emission peaks from Eu(3+) at 590nm and 615nm and vivid red fluorescence luminescence can be observed by 2-photon confocal scanning laser microscopy (CLSM). In vitro cytotoxicity tests based on the MTT assay demonstrate good cytocompatibility, the composites have longitudinal relaxivity value (r1) of 8.39mM(-1)s(-1) and also have transverse relaxivity value (r2) of 71.18mM(-1)s(-1) at clinical 3.0 T MR scanner. In vitro and in vivo MRI studies exhibit high signal enhancement on both T1- and T2-weighted MR images. These fascinating multifunctional properties suggest that the polymer microspheres have large clinical potential as multi-modal MRI/optical probes.

  17. Transverse relaxation in the rotating frame induced by chemical exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaeli, Shalom; Sorce, Dennis J.; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Ugurbil, Kamil; Garwood, Michael

    2004-08-01

    In the presence of radiofrequency irradiation, relaxation of magnetization aligned with the effective magnetic field is characterized by the time constant T1 ρ. On the other hand, the time constant T2 ρ characterizes the relaxation of magnetization that is perpendicular to the effective field. Here, it is shown that T2 ρ can be measured directly with Carr-Purcell sequences composed of a train of adiabatic full-passage (AFP) pulses. During adiabatic rotation, T2 ρ characterizes the relaxation of the magnetization, which under adiabatic conditions remains approximately perpendicular to the time-dependent effective field. Theory is derived to describe the influence of chemical exchange on T2 ρ relaxation in the fast-exchange regime, with time constant defined as T2 ρ,ex . The derived theory predicts the rate constant R 2ρ, ex (=1/T 2ρ, ex) to be dependent on the choice of amplitude- and frequency-modulation functions used in the AFP pulses. Measurements of R2 ρ,ex of the water/ethanol exchanging system confirm the predicted dependence on modulation functions. The described theoretical framework and adiabatic methods represent new tools to probe exchanging systems.

  18. Isotope Effects in Collisional VT Relaxation of Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieniek, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    A simple exponential-potential model of molecular collisions leads to a two-parameter analytic expression for rates of collisionally induced vibrational-translation (VT) energy exchange that has been shown to be accurate over variations of orders of magnitude as a function of temperature in a variety of systems. This includes excellent agreement with reported experimental and theoretical results for the fundamental self-relaxation rate of molecular hydrogen H2(v = 1) + H2 yields H2(v = 0) + H2. The analytic rate successfully follows the five-orders-of-magnitude change in experimental values for the temperature range 50-2000 K. This approach is now applied to isotope effects in the vibrational relaxation rates of excited HD and D2 in collision with H2: HD(v = 1)+H2 yields HD(v = 0)+H2 and D2(v = 1)+H2 yields D2(v = 0)+H2. The simplicity of the analytic expression for the thermal rate lends itself to convenient application in modeling the evolving vibrational populations of molecular hydrogen in shocked astrophysical environments.

  19. Effective rotational correlation times of proteins from NMR relaxation interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghan; Hilty, Christian; Wider, Gerhard; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the effective rotational correlation times, τc, for the modulation of anisotropic spin-spin interactions in macromolecules subject to Brownian motion in solution is of key interest for the practice of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. The value of τc enables an estimate of the NMR spin relaxation rates, and indicates possible aggregation of the macromolecular species. This paper reports a novel NMR pulse scheme, [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT, which is based on transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy and permits to determine τc for 15N- 1H bonds without interference from dipole-dipole coupling of the amide proton with remote protons. [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT is highly efficient since only a series of one-dimensional NMR spectra need to be recorded. Its use is suggested for a quick estimate of the rotational correlation time, to monitor sample quality and to determine optimal parameters for complex multidimensional NMR experiments. Practical applications are illustrated with the 110 kDa 7,8-dihydroneopterin aldolase from Staphylococcus aureus, the uniformly 15N-labeled Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) in 60 kDa mixed OmpX/DHPC micelles with approximately 90 molecules of unlabeled 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), and the 16 kDa pheromone-binding protein from Bombyx mori, which cover a wide range of correlation times.

  20. 13C-CPMAS and 1H-NMR study of the inclusion complexes of beta-cyclodextrin with carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol prepared in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Locci, Emanuela; Lai, Simona; Piras, Alessandra; Marongiu, Bruno; Lai, Adolfo

    2004-09-01

    Beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) inclusion complexes with carvacrol (1), thymol (2), and eugenol (3) (components of essential oils of vegetable origin) were prepared by the supercritical CO2 technique, and their structural characterization was achieved by means of 1H-NMR in aqueous solution and 13C-CPMAS NMR in the solid state. Evidence of the formation of the inclusion complexes for all the examined systems was obtained by 1H-NMR in solution, while 2D-ROESY-NMR experiments were used to investigate the geometry of inclusion. In addition, the dynamics of these inclusion complexes in the kHz timescale was investigated by analysis of the 1H and 13C spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame.

  1. Change of translational-rotational coupling in liquids revealed by field-cycling {sup 1}H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, R.; Schneider, E.; Rössler, E. A.

    2015-01-21

    Applying the field-cycling nuclear magnetic resonance technique, the frequency dependence of the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate, R{sub 1}(ω)=T{sub 1}{sup −1}(ω), is measured for propylene glycol (PG) which is increasingly diluted with deuterated chloroform. A frequency range of 10 kHz–20 MHz and a broad temperature interval from 220 to about 100 K are covered. The results are compared to those of experiments, where glycerol and o-terphenyl are diluted with their deuterated counter-part. Reflecting intra- as well as intermolecular relaxation, the dispersion curves R{sub 1}(ω,x) (x denotes mole fraction PG) allow to extract the rotational time constant τ{sub rot}(T, x) and the self-diffusion coefficient D(T, x) in a single experiment. The Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relation is tested in terms of the quantity D(T, x) τ{sub rot}(T, x) which provides a measure of an effective hydrodynamic radius or equivalently of the spectral separation of the translational and the rotational relaxation contribution. In contrast to o-terphenyl, glycerol and PG show a spectral separation much larger than suggested by the SED relation. In the case of PG/chloroform mixtures, not only an acceleration of the PG dynamics is observed with increasing dilution but also the spectral separation of rotational and translational relaxation contributions continuously decreases. Finally, following a behavior similar to that of o-terphenyl already at about x = 0.6; i.e., while D(T, x) τ{sub rot}(T, x) in the mixture is essentially temperature independent, it strongly increases with x signaling thus a change of translational-rotational coupling. This directly reflects the dissolution of the hydrogen-bond network and thus a change of solution structure.

  2. Native T1 Mapping Demonstrating Apical Thrombi in Eosinophilic Myocarditis Associated with Churg-Strauss Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Kyongmin Sarah; Jeong, Soh Yong; Lee, Kyo Young; Chang, Kiyuk

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic myocarditis is a disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the myocardium, consisting of acute necrotic stage, thrombotic stage, and fibrotic stage. Although T1 mapping has been increasingly used in various cardiac pathologies, there has been no report of T1 mapping in eosinophilic myocarditis. We report a case of 75-year-old female with eosinophilic myocarditis, whose cardiac magnetic resonance imaging included native T1 mapping, in which apical thrombi were distinctly seen as areas with decreased T1 values, next to areas of inflammation seen as increased T1 value in subendocardium. PMID:27826352

  3. Reproducibility and comparison of oxygen-enhanced T1 quantification in COPD and asthma patients

    PubMed Central

    Jobst, Bertram J.; Anjorin, Angela; Sedlaczek, Oliver; Wolf, Ursula; Terekhov, Maxim; Hoffmann, Christian; Ley, Sebastian; Düber, Christoph; Biederer, Jürgen; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Jakob, Peter M.; Wielpütz, Mark O.

    2017-01-01

    T1 maps have been shown to yield useful diagnostic information on lung function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma, both for native T1 and ΔT1, the relative reduction while breathing pure oxygen. As parameter quantification is particularly interesting for longitudinal studies, the purpose of this work was both to examine the reproducibility of lung T1 mapping and to compare T1 found in COPD and asthma patients using IRSnapShotFLASH embedded in a full MRI protocol. 12 asthma and 12 COPD patients (site 1) and further 15 COPD patients (site 2) were examined on two consecutive days. In each patient, T1 maps were acquired in 8 single breath-hold slices, breathing first room air, then pure oxygen. Maps were partitioned into 12 regions each to calculate average values. In asthma patients, the average T1,RA = 1206ms (room air) was reduced to T1,O2 = 1141ms under oxygen conditions (ΔT1 = 5.3%, p < 5⋅10−4), while in COPD patients both native T1,RA = 1125ms was significantly shorter (p < 10−3) and the relative reduction to T1,O2 = 1081ms on average ΔT1 = 4.2%(p < 10−5). On the second day, with T1,RA = 1186ms in asthma and T1,RA = 1097ms in COPD, observed values were slightly shorter on average in all patient groups. ΔT1 reduction was the least repeatable parameter and varied from day to day by up to 23% in individual asthma and 30% in COPD patients. While for both patient groups T1 was below the values reported for healthy subjects, the T1 and ΔT1 found in asthmatics lies between that of the COPD group and reported values for healthy subjects, suggesting a higher blood volume fraction and better ventilation. However, it could be demonstrated that lung T1 quantification is subject to notable inter-examination variability, which here can be attributed both to remaining contrast agent from the previous day and the increased dependency of lung T1 on perfusion and thus current lung state. PMID:28207845

  4. Stress Relaxation of Interim Restoratives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-18

    unmodified zinc oxide- eugenol cement were more favorable than those of IRM and Cavit. The plastic behavior of gutta-percha temporary stopping precluded assessment of its relaxation at temperatures in excess of 22P C. (Author)

  5. Relaxation labeling using modular operators

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.S.; Frei, W.

    1983-01-01

    Probabilistic relaxation labeling has been shown to be useful in image processing, pattern recognition, and artificial intelligence. The approaches taken to date have been encumbered with computationally extensive summations which generally prevent real-time operation and/or easy hardware implementation. The authors present a new and unique approach to the relaxation labeling problem using modular, VLSI-oriented hierarchical complex operators. One of the fundamental concepts of this work is the representation of the probability distribution of the possible labels for a given object (pixel) as an ellipse, which may be summed with neighboring object's distribution ellipses, resulting in a new, relaxed label space. The mathematical development of the elliptical approach will be presented and compared to more classical approaches, and a hardware block diagram that shows the implementation of the relaxation scheme using vlsi chips will be presented. Finally, results will be shown which illustrate applications of the modular scheme, iteratively, to both edges and lines. 13 references.

  6. Microscale simulations of NMR relaxation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, Oliver; Klitzsch, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    In petrophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the measured relaxation signals originate from the fluid filled pore space. Hence, in rocks or sediments the water content directly corresponds to the initial amplitude of the recorded NMR relaxation signals. The relaxation rate (longitudinal/transversal decay time T1, T2) is sensitive to pore sizes and physiochemical properties of rock-fluid interfaces (surface relaxivity), as well as the concentration of paramagnetic ions in the fluid phases (bulk relaxivity). In the subproject A2 of the TR32 we aim at improving the basic understanding of these processes at the pore scale and thereby advancing the interpretation of NMR data by reducing the application of restrictive approximated interpretation schemes, e.g. for deriving pore size distributions, connectivity or permeability. In this respect we numerically simulate NMR relaxation data at the micro sale to study the impact of physical and hydrological parameters such as internal field gradients or pore connectivities on NMR signals. Joint numerical simulations of the NMR relaxation behavior (Bloch equations) in the presence of internal gradients (Ampere's law) and fluid flow (Navier-Stokes) on a pore scale dimension have been implemented in a finite element (FE) model using Comsol Multiphysics. Processes governing the time and spatial behavior of the nuclear magnetization density in a porous medium are diffusion and surface interactions at the rock-fluid interface. Based on Fick's law of diffusive motion Brownstein and Tarr (1979) introduced differential equations that describe the relaxation behavior of the Spin magnetization in single isolated pores and derived analytical solutions for simple geometries, i.e. spherical, cylindrical and planar. However, by numerically solving these equations in a general way using a FE algorithm this approach can be applied to study and simulate coupled complex pore systems, e.g. derived from computer tomography (CT

  7. Microscale simulations of NMR relaxation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Klitzsch, N.; Clauser, C.

    2009-12-01

    In petrophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the measured relaxation signals originate from the fluid filled pore space. Hence, in rocks or sediments the water content directly corresponds to the initial amplitude of the recorded NMR relaxation signals. The relaxation rate (longitudinal/transversal decay time T1, T2) is sensitive to pore sizes and physiochemical properties of rock-fluid interfaces (surface relaxivity), as well as the concentration of paramagnetic ions in the fluid phases (bulk relaxivity). We aim at improving the basic understanding of these processes at the pore scale and thereby advancing the interpretation of NMR data by reducing the application of restrictive approximated interpretation schemes, e.g. for deriving pore size distributions, connectivity or permeability. In this respect we numerically simulate NMR relaxation data at the micro sale to study the impact of physical and hydrological parameters such as internal field gradients or pore connectivities on NMR signals. Joint numerical simulations of the NMR relaxation behavior (Bloch equations) in the presence of internal gradients (Ampere’s law) and fluid flow (Navier-Stokes) on a pore scale dimension have been implemented in a finite element (FE) model using Comsol Multiphysics. Processes governing the time and spatial behavior of the nuclear magnetization density in a porous medium are diffusion and surface interactions at the rock-fluid interface. Based on Fick's law of diffusive motion Brownstein and Tarr (1979) introduced differential equations that describe the relaxation behavior of the Spin magnetization in single isolated pores and derived analytical solutions for simple geometries, i.e. spherical, cylindrical and planar. However, by numerically solving these equations in a general way using a FE algorithm this approach can be applied to study and simulate coupled complex pore systems, e.g. derived from computer tomography (CT). In this respect substantial

  8. Temperature and concentration-dependent relaxation of ferrofluids characterized with a high-Tc SQUID-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Chang; Liu, Chieh-Wen; Liao, S. H.; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Chen, M. J.; Chen, K. L.; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, S. Y.; Wang, L. M.

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the relaxation of protons in magnetic fluids using a high-Tc SQUID magnetometer. It was found that the longitudinal relaxation rate, 1/T1, is slower than the transverse relaxation rate, 1/T2, for ferrofluids in the same field. This is due to the fact that the 1/T1 process involves returning the magnetization to the z-direction, which automatically involves the loss of magnetization in the x-y plane governed by the 1/T2 process. Additionally, 1/T1 and 1/T2 at high temperatures are slower than the corresponding relaxation rates at low temperatures, which is due to the enhanced Brownian motion of nanoparticles at high temperatures.

  9. Ultra-low field T1 vs. T1rho at 3T and 7T: study of rotationally immobilized protein gels and animal brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Inglis, Ben; Barr, Ian; Clarke, John

    2015-03-01

    Clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines operating in static fields of typically 1.5 T or 3 T can capture information on slow molecular dynamics utilizing the so-called T1rho technique. This technique, in which a radiofrequency (RF) spin-lock field is applied with microtesla amplitude, has been used, for example, to determine the onset time of stroke in studies on rats. The long RF pulse, however, may exceed the specific absorption rate (SAR) limit, putting subjects at risk. Ultra-low-field (ULF) MRI, based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), directly detects proton signals at a static magnetic field of typically 50-250 μT. Using our ULF MRI system with adjustable static field of typically 55 to 240 μT, we systematically measured the T1 and T2 dispersion profiles of rotationally immobilized protein gels (bovine serum albumin), ex vivo pig brains, and ex vivo rat brains with induced stroke. Comparing the ULF results with T1rho dispersion obtained at 3 T and 7 T, we find that the degree of protein immobilization determines the frequency-dependence of both T1 and T1rho. Furthermore, T1rho and ULF T1 show similar results for stroke, suggesting that ULF MRI may be used to image traumatic brain injury with negligible SAR. This research was supported by the Henry H. Wheeler, Jr. Brain Imaging Center and the Donaldson Trust.

  10. Quantifying Temperature-Dependent T1 Changes in Cortical Bone Using Ultrashort Echo-Time MRI

    PubMed Central

    Han, Misung; Rieke, Viola; Scott, Serena J; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Jones, Peter D; Larson, Peder E Z; Diederich, Chris J; Krug, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrashort echo-time (UTE) MRI to quantify T1 changes in cortical bone due to heating. Methods Variable flip-angle T1 mapping combined with 3D UTE imaging was used to measure T1 in cortical bone. A calibration experiment was performed to detect T1 changes with temperature in ex vivo cortical bone samples from a bovine femur. Ultrasound heating experiments were performed using an interstitial applicator in ex vivo bovine femur specimens, and heat-induced T1 changes were quantified. Results The calibration experiment demonstrated that T1 increases with temperature in cortical bone. We observed a linear relationship between temperature and T1 with a linear coefficient of 0.67–0.84 ms/°C over a range of 25–70°C. The ultrasound heating experiments showed increased T1 changes in the heated regions, and the relationship between the temperature changes and T1 changes was similar to that of the calibration. Conclusion We demonstrated a temperature dependence of T1 in ex vivo cortical bone using a variable flip-angle UTE T1 mapping method. PMID:26390357

  11. Conformational behavior and tautomer selective photochemistry in low temperature matrices: the case of 5-(1H-tetrazol-1-yl)-1,2,4-triazole.

    PubMed

    Pagacz-Kostrzewa, M; Reva, I D; Bronisz, R; Giuliano, B M; Fausto, R; Wierzejewska, M

    2011-06-09

    The conformational properties and the photolysis behavior of one of the simplest N-C bonded bicyclic azoles, 5-(1H-tetrazol-1-yl)-1,2,4-triazole (T), were studied in argon and xenon matrices by infrared spectroscopy. Analysis of the experimental results was supported by extensive theoretical calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level of approximation. Out of the eight T minima located on the potential energy surface, the three most stable species were detected in low temperature matrices, namely, 5-(1H-tetrazol-1-yl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole (T1) and two conformers of 5-(1H-tetrazol-1-yl)-2H-1,2,4-triazole (T2a and T2b). With increase of the substrate temperature either during deposition of the matrices or during annealing the T2b → T2a conversion took place, in agreement with the predicted low energy barrier for this transformation (5.38 kJ mol(-1)). Both broad band and narrow band laser UV irradiations of T isolated in Xe and Ar matrices induce unimolecular decomposition involving cleavage of the tetrazole ring of T1 and T2a (T2b) that leads to the production of 1H-1,2,4-triazol-5-yl carbodiimide (P1) and 1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl carbodiimide (P2), respectively. When the laser is used, in addition to the main P1 and P2 photoproducts, several minor products could be successfully identified in the matrices: N-cyanocarbodiimide HNCNCN (detected for the first time) associated with nitrilimine HNNCH and HCN. An interesting phenomenon of tautomer-selective photochemistry was observed for the matrix-isolated compound. It could be explained by the different LUMO-HOMO energy gaps estimated for T1, T2a, and T2b, connected with different threshold energies necessary to start the photolysis of T1 and T2a (T2b).

  12. MRI T1ρ and T2 mapping for the assessment of articular cartilage changes in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis after hemicallotasis osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, E.; Hirose, J.; Okamoto, N.; Yamabe, S.; Mizuta, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to clarify the appearance of the reparative tissue on the articular surface and to analyse the properties of the reparative tissue after hemicallotasis osteotomy (HCO) using MRI T1ρ and T2 mapping. Methods Coronal T1ρ and T2 mapping and three-dimensional gradient-echo images were obtained from 20 subjects with medial knee osteoarthritis. We set the regions of interest (ROIs) on the full-thickness cartilage of the medial femoral condyle (MFC) and medial tibial plateau (MTP) of the knee and measured the cartilage thickness (mm) and T1ρ and T2 relaxation times (ms). Statistical analysis of time-dependent changes in the cartilage thickness and the T1ρ and T2 relaxation times was performed using one-way analysis of variance, and Scheffe’s test was employed for post hoc multiple comparison. Results The cartilage-like repair tissue appeared on the cartilage surface of the medial compartment post-operatively, and the cartilage thickness showed a significant increase between the pre-operative and one-year post-operative time points (MFC; p = 0.003, MTP; p < 0.001). The T1ρ values of the cartilage-like repair tissue showed no difference over time, however, the T2 values showed a significant decrease between the pre-operative and one-year post-operative time points (MFC; p = 0.004, MTP; p = 0.040). Conclusion This study clarified that the fibrocartilage-like repair tissue appeared on the articular surface of the medial compartment after HCO as evidenced by MRI T1ρ and T2 mapping. Cite this article: H. Nishioka, E. Nakamura, J. Hirose, N. Okamoto, S. Yamabe, H. Mizuta. MRI T1ρ and T2 mapping for the assessment of articular cartilage changes in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis after hemicallotasis osteotomy. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:294–300. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.57.BJR-2016-0057.R1. PMID:27421285

  13. Liver Metabolite Concentrations Measured with 1H MR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pettigrew, Roderic I.; Gharib, Ahmed M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of measuring choline and glycogen concentrations in normal human liver in vivo with proton (hydrogen 1 [1H]) magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy. Materials and Methods: Signed consent to participate in an institutional review board–approved and HIPAA-compliant study was obtained from 46 subjects (mean age, 46 years ± 17 [standard deviation]; 24 women) consecutively recruited during 285 days. Navigator-gated MR images were used to select 8-mL volumes for point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) with a 35-msec echo time. Line widths were minimized with fast breath-hold B0 field mapping and further manual shimming. Navigator-gated spectra were recorded with and without water suppression to determine metabolite concentrations with water signals as an internal reference. In three subjects, echo time was varied to determine the glycogen and choline T2. Linear regression analysis was used to examine relations between choline, hepatic lipid content, body mass index, glycogen content, and age. Results: Choline concentrations could be determined in 46 of 48 studies and was found to be 8.6 mmol per kilogram of wet weight ± 3.1 (range, 3.8–17.6; n = 44). Twenty-seven spectra in 25 individuals with narrow line widths and low lipid content were adequate for quantitation of glycogen. The glycogen (glucosyl unit) concentration was 38.1 mmol/kg wet weight ± 14.4. The T2 of combined glycogen peaks in the liver of three subjects was 36 msec ± 8. Choline levels showed a weak but significant correlation with glycogen (r2 = 0.15; P < .05) but not with lipid content. Conclusion: Navigator-gated and gradient-echo shimmed PRESS 1H MR spectroscopy may allow quantification of liver metabolites that are important for understanding and identifying disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism. © RSNA, 2012 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.12112344/-/DC1 PMID:22891360

  14. Hexamethyldisiloxane-based nanoprobes for (1) H MRI oximetry.

    PubMed

    Gulaka, Praveen K; Rastogi, Ujjawal; McKay, Madalyn A; Wang, Xianghui; Mason, Ralph P; Kodibagkar, Vikram D

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative in vivo oximetry has been reported using (19) F MRI in conjunction with reporter molecules, such as perfluorocarbons, for tissue oxygenation (pO(2) ). Recently, hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) has been proposed as a promising alternative reporter molecule for (1) H MRI-based measurement of pO(2) . To aid biocompatibility for potential systemic administration, we prepared various nanoemulsion formulations using a wide range of HMDSO volume fractions and HMDSO to surfactant ratios. Calibration curves (R(1) versus pO(2) ) for all emulsion formulations were found to be linear and similar to neat HMDSO for low surfactant concentrations (<10% v/v). A small temperature dependence in the calibration curves was observed, similar to previous reports on neat HMDSO, and was characterized to be approximately 1 Torr/ °C under hypoxic conditions. To demonstrate application in vivo, 100 µL of this nanoemulsion was administered to healthy rat thigh muscle (Fisher 344, n=6). Dynamic changes in mean thigh tissue pO(2) were measured using the PISTOL (proton imaging of siloxanes to map tissue oxygenation levels) technique in response to oxygen challenge. Changing the inhaled gas to oxygen for 30 min increased the mean pO(2) significantly (p<0.001) from 39 ± 7 to 275 ± 27 Torr. When the breathing gas was switched back to air, the tissue pO(2) decreased to a mean value of 45 ± 6 Torr, not significantly different from baseline (p>0.05), in 25 min. A first-order exponential fit to this part of the pO(2) data (i.e. after oxygen challenge) yielded an oxygen consumption-related kinetic parameter k=0.21 ± 0.04 min(-1) . These results demonstrate the feasibility of using HMDSO nanoemulsions as nanoprobes of pO(2) and their utility to assess oxygen dynamics in vivo, further developing quantitative (1) H MRI oximetry.

  15. Vacancy Relaxation in Cubic Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girifalco, L. A.; Weizer, V. G.

    1960-01-01

    The configuration of the atoms surrounding a vacancy in four face-centered cubic and three body-centered cubic metals has been computed, using a pairwise, central-force model in which the energy of interaction between two atoms was taken to have the form of a Morse function. Only radial relaxations were considered. The first and second nearest-neighbor relaxations for the face-centered systems were found to be: Pb (1.42,-0.43), Ni (2.14,-0.39), Cu(2.24,-0.40) and Ca (2.73,-0.41, expressed in percentages of normal distances. For the body-centered systems the relaxations out to the fourth nearest neighbors to the vacancy were: Fe (6.07,-2.12, -0.25, -), Ba (7.85, -2.70, 0.70, -0.33) and Na (10.80, -3.14, 3.43, -0.20). The positive signs indicate relaxation toward the vacancy and the negative signs indicate relaxation away from the vacancy. The energies of relaxation (eV) are: Pb (0.162), Ni (0.626), Cu (0.560), Ca (0.400), Fe (1.410), Ba (0.950) and Na (0.172).

  16. Improved TROSY-HNCA experiment with suppression of conformational exchange induced relaxation.

    PubMed

    Pervushin, K; Gallius, V; Ritter, C

    2001-10-01

    A general method for improving of the sensitivity of the TROSY-type triple resonance experiments in the presence of conformational exchange-induced (CSX) relaxation is proposed based on the use of CPMG-INEPT (Müller et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1995, 117, 11043-11048) during the N-C polarization transfer periods. Significantly improved sensitivity is demonstrated for the majority of cross-peaks in the new [15N,1H]-TROSY-XY-HNCA experiment, measured with partially folded RNase AS-Protein, with negligible loss of sensitivity for resonances unaffected by CSX relaxation. In addition, a comparison of cross-peak amplitudes in [15N,1N]-TROSY-XY-HNCA and conventional [15N,1H]-TROSY-HNCA spectra provides a quick and sensitive estimation of the CSX relaxation contribution.

  17. Detection of Leptomeningeal Metastasis by Contrast-Enhanced 3D T1-SPACE: Comparison with 2D FLAIR and Contrast-Enhanced 2D T1-Weighted Images

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Bomi; Hwang, Eo-Jin; Lee, Song; Jang, Jinhee; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Kim, Bum-soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced 3D(dimensional) T1-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions (T1-SPACE), 2D fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image in detection of leptomeningeal metastasis except for invasive procedures such as a CSF tapping. Materials and Methods Three groups of patients were included retrospectively for 9 months (from 2013-04-01 to 2013-12-31). Group 1 patients with positive malignant cells in CSF cytology (n = 22); group 2, stroke patients with steno-occlusion in ICA or MCA (n = 16); and group 3, patients with negative results on MRI, whose symptom were dizziness or headache (n = 25). A total of 63 sets of MR images are separately collected and randomly arranged: (1) CE 3D T1-SPACE; (2) 2D FLAIR; and (3) CE T1-GRE using a 3-Tesla MR system. A faculty neuroradiologist with 8-year-experience and another 2nd grade trainee in radiology reviewed each MR image- blinded by the results of CSF cytology and coded their observations as positives or negatives of leptomeningeal metastasis. The CSF cytology result was considered as a gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity of each MR images were calculated. Diagnostic accuracy was compared using a McNemar’s test. A Cohen's kappa analysis was performed to assess inter-observer agreements. Results Diagnostic accuracy was not different between 3D T1-SPACE and CSF cytology by both raters. However, the accuracy test of 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE was inconsistent by the two raters. The Kappa statistic results were 0.657 (3D T1-SPACE), 0.420 (2D FLAIR), and 0.160 (2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE). The 3D T1-SPACE images showed the highest inter-observer agreements between the raters. Conclusions Compared to 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE, contrast-enhanced 3D T1 SPACE showed a better detection rate of

  18. Hyperpolarized nanodiamond with long spin-relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David E. J.; Reilly, David J.

    2015-10-01

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance, such as 13C-labelled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarization technique is the inherently short spin-relaxation times, typically <60 s for 13C liquid-state compounds, which limit the time that the signal remains boosted. Here we demonstrate that 1.1% natural abundance 13C spins in synthetic nanodiamond can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of free radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1 h. Combined with the already established applications of nanodiamonds in the life sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance.

  19. Mapping of prostate cancer by 1H MRSI.

    PubMed

    Kobus, Thiele; Wright, Alan J; Scheenen, Tom W J; Heerschap, Arend

    2014-01-01

    In many studies, it has been demonstrated that (1)H MRSI of the human prostate has great potential to aid prostate cancer management, e.g. in the detection and localisation of cancer foci in the prostate or in the assessment of its aggressiveness. It is particularly powerful in combination with T2 -weighted MRI. Nevertheless, the technique is currently mainly used in a research setting. This review provides an overview of the state-of-the-art of three-dimensional MRSI, including the specific hardware required, dedicated data acquisition sequences and information on the spectral content with background on the MR-visible metabolites. In clinical practice, it is important that relevant MRSI results become available rapidly, reliably and in an easy digestible way. However, this functionality is currently not fully available for prostate MRSI, which is a major obstacle for routine use by inexperienced clinicians. Routine use requires more automation in the processing of raw data than is currently available. Therefore, we pay specific attention in this review on the status and prospects of the automated handling of prostate MRSI data, including quality control. The clinical potential of three-dimensional MRSI of the prostate is illustrated with literature examples on prostate cancer detection, its localisation in the prostate, its role in the assessment of cancer aggressiveness and in the selection and monitoring of therapy.

  20. 3-hydroxy-2(1H)-pyridinone chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, K.N.; Xu, J.

    1997-04-29

    Disclosed is a series of improved metal chelating agents, which are highly effective upon both injection and oral administration; several of the most effective are of low toxicity. These chelating agents incorporate within their structure 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO) and 3-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (3,2-HOPO) moieties with a substituted carbamoyl group ortho to the hydroxy or oxo groups of the hydroxypyridinone ring. The electron-withdrawing carbamoyl group increases the acidity of the hydroxypyridinones. In the metal complexes of the chelating agents, the amide protons form very strong hydrogen bonds with its adjacent HOPO oxygen donor, making these complexes very stable at physiological conditions. The terminal N-substituents provides a certain degree of lipophilicity to the 3,2-HOPO, increasing oral activity. Also disclosed is a method of making the chelating agents and a method of producing a known compound, 3-hydroxy-1-alkyl-2(1H)pyridinone, used as a precursor to the chelating agent, safely and in large quantities. 2 figs.

  1. 3-hydroxy-2(1H)-pyridinone chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Xu, Jide

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed is a series of improved metal chelating agents, which are highly effective upon both injection and oral administration; several of the most effective are of low toxicity. These chelating agents incorporate within their structure 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO) and 3-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (3,2-HOPO) moieties with a substituted carbamoyl group ortho to the hydroxy or oxo groups of the hydroxypyridinone ring. The electron-withdrawing carbamoyl group increases the acidity of the hydroxypyridinones. In the metal complexes of said chelating agents, the amide protons form very strong hydrogen bonds with its adjacent HOPO oxygen donor, making these complexes very stable at physiological conditions. The terminal N-substituents provides a certain degree of lipophilicity to said 3,2-HOPO, increasing oral activity. Also disclosed is a method of making the chelating agents and a method of producing a known compound, 3-hydroxy-1-alkyl-2(1H)pyridinone, used as a precursor to the chelating agent, safely and in large quantities.

  2. 1H NMR Metabolomics Analysis of Glioblastoma Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Ferguson, Dean; Culf, Adrian; Morin, Pier; Touaibia, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of malignant glioma, characterized by unpredictable clinical behaviors that suggest distinct molecular subtypes. With the tumor metabolic phenotype being one of the hallmarks of cancer, we have set upon to investigate whether GBMs show differences in their metabolic profiles. 1H NMR analysis was performed on metabolite extracts from a selection of nine glioblastoma cell lines. Analysis was performed directly on spectral data and on relative concentrations of metabolites obtained from spectra using a multivariate regression method developed in this work. Both qualitative and quantitative sample clustering have shown that cell lines can be divided into four groups for which the most significantly different metabolites have been determined. Analysis shows that some of the major cancer metabolic markers (such as choline, lactate, and glutamine) have significantly dissimilar concentrations in different GBM groups. The obtained lists of metabolic markers for subgroups were correlated with gene expression data for the same cell lines. Metabolic analysis generally agrees with gene expression measurements, and in several cases, we have shown in detail how the metabolic results can be correlated with the analysis of gene expression. Combined gene expression and metabolomics analysis have shown differential expression of transporters of metabolic markers in these cells as well as some of the major metabolic pathways leading to accumulation of metabolites. Obtained lists of marker metabolites can be leveraged for subtype determination in glioblastomas. PMID:22528487

  3. Effects of vorticity and impurity on NMR relaxation rate in chiral p-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kenta K.; Ichioka, Masanori; Onari, Seiichiro

    2016-11-01

    In order to study site-selective NMR in chiral p-wave superconductors, we calculate local nuclear relaxation rate T1-1 in the vortex lattice state by Eilenberger theory with and without non-magnetic impurity scattering in the Born limit and unitary limit. The local T1-1 in the NMR resonance line shape is different between two chiral states p±, depending on whether the chirality is parallel or anti-parallel to the vorticity. In the p--wave, anomalous suppression of local T1-1 occurs around the vortex core due to the negative coherence term coming from odd-frequency s-wave Cooper pair induced around the vortex. We especially examine the site dependence of the anomalous suppression of local T1-1, including the applied magnetic field dependence and the impurity effects.

  4. Nitrergic relaxation of the horse corpus cavernosum. Role of cGMP.

    PubMed

    Recio, P; López, P G; Hernández, M; Prieto, D; Contreras, J; García-Sacristán, A

    1998-06-12

    The involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and the mechanisms mediating neurogenic relaxation were investigated in the horse corpus cavernosum. NADPH-diaphorase activity was expressed in nerve fibres around arteries and muscular bundles in the horse trabecular tissue. Relaxations in response to electrical field stimulation were tetrodotoxin (10(-6) M)-sensitive, indicating their neurogenic origin. The NO synthase inhibitor, L-NO-arginine (L-NO-Arg, 3 x 10(-5) M), abolished the electrically induced relaxations, which were significantly reversed by L-arginine (3 x 10(-3) M). Exogenous NO (10(-6)-10(-3) M) evoked relaxations which were unaffected by L-NO-Arg. 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 5 x 10(-6) M), an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase activation by NO, reduced the relaxations in response to electrical stimulation and exogenous NO. Iberiotoxin (3 x 10(-8) M) or apamin (5 x 10(-7) M), inhibitors of large and small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, respectively, and glibenclamide (3 x 10(-6) M), a blocker of ATP-sensitive K+ channels, failed to modify the relaxations with NO. It is suggested that NO is present in nerve fibres of the horse corpus cavernosum and relaxes smooth muscle through a guanylate cyclase-dependent mechanism. Neither Ca2+-activated nor ATP-sensitive K+ channels seem to be involved in these relaxations.

  5. Distinct Contributions of T1R2 and T1R3 Taste Receptor Subunits to the Detection of Sweet Stimuli

    SciTech Connect

    Nie,Y.; Vigues, S.; Hobbs, J.; Conn, G.; Munger, S.

    2005-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-type chemosensory receptors of animals selectively interact with their cognate ligands remain poorly understood. There is growing evidence that many chemosensory receptors exist in multimeric complexes, though little is known about the relative contributions of individual subunits to receptor functions. This study showed that each of the two subunits in the mammalian heteromeric T1R2:T1R3 sweet taste receptor binds sweet stimuli, though with distinct affinities and conformational changes. Furthermore, ligand affinities for T1R3 are drastically reduced by the introduction of a single amino acid change associated with decreased sweet taste sensitivity in mice. Thus, individual T1R subunits increase the receptive range of the sweet taste receptor, offering a functional mechanism for phenotypic variations in sweet taste.

  6. Fully automatic detection of deep white matter T1 hypointense lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Spies, Lothar; Tewes, Anja; Suppa, Per; Opfer, Roland; Buchert, Ralph; Winkler, Gerhard; Raji, Alaleh

    2013-12-07

    A novel method is presented for fully automatic detection of candidate white matter (WM) T1 hypointense lesions in three-dimensional high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. By definition, T1 hypointense lesions have similar intensity as gray matter (GM) and thus appear darker than surrounding normal WM in T1-weighted images. The novel method uses a standard classification algorithm to partition T1-weighted images into GM, WM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As a consequence, T1 hypointense lesions are assigned an increased GM probability by the standard classification algorithm. The GM component image of a patient is then tested voxel-by-voxel against GM component images of a normative database of healthy individuals. Clusters (≥0.1 ml) of significantly increased GM density within a predefined mask of deep WM are defined as lesions. The performance of the algorithm was assessed on voxel level by a simulation study. A maximum dice similarity coefficient of 60% was found for a typical T1 lesion pattern with contrasts ranging from WM to cortical GM, indicating substantial agreement between ground truth and automatic detection. Retrospective application to 10 patients with multiple sclerosis demonstrated that 93 out of 96 T1 hypointense lesions were detected. On average 3.6 false positive T1 hypointense lesions per patient were found. The novel method is promising to support the detection of hypointense lesions in T1-weighted images which warrants further evaluation in larger patient samples.

  7. Fully automatic detection of deep white matter T1 hypointense lesions in multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spies, Lothar; Tewes, Anja; Suppa, Per; Opfer, Roland; Buchert, Ralph; Winkler, Gerhard; Raji, Alaleh

    2013-12-01

    A novel method is presented for fully automatic detection of candidate white matter (WM) T1 hypointense lesions in three-dimensional high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. By definition, T1 hypointense lesions have similar intensity as gray matter (GM) and thus appear darker than surrounding normal WM in T1-weighted images. The novel method uses a standard classification algorithm to partition T1-weighted images into GM, WM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As a consequence, T1 hypointense lesions are assigned an increased GM probability by the standard classification algorithm. The GM component image of a patient is then tested voxel-by-voxel against GM component images of a normative database of healthy individuals. Clusters (≥0.1 ml) of significantly increased GM density within a predefined mask of deep WM are defined as lesions. The performance of the algorithm was assessed on voxel level by a simulation study. A maximum dice similarity coefficient of 60% was found for a typical T1 lesion pattern with contrasts ranging from WM to cortical GM, indicating substantial agreement between ground truth and automatic detection. Retrospective application to 10 patients with multiple sclerosis demonstrated that 93 out of 96 T1 hypointense lesions were detected. On average 3.6 false positive T1 hypointense lesions per patient were found. The novel method is promising to support the detection of hypointense lesions in T1-weighted images which warrants further evaluation in larger patient samples.

  8. T1/ST2 promotes T helper 2 cell activation and polyfunctionality in bronchopulmonary mycosis.

    PubMed

    Piehler, D; Grahnert, A; Eschke, M; Richter, T; Köhler, G; Stenzel, W; Alber, G

    2013-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 enhances T helper (Th)2 immunity via its receptor T1/ST2. Infection with the yeast-like pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is usually controlled by a Th1-mediated immune response. The mechanisms responsible for nonprotective Th2 immunity leading to allergic inflammation in pulmonary cryptococcosis are still not fully understood. Using a murine pulmonary model of C. neoformans infection, we report that T1/ST2 expression correlates with the intensity of Th2 activation, as demonstrated by the expression of CD25 and CD44 and downregulation of CD62L. Antigen-specific T1/ST2(+) Th cells are the primary source of the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 as compared with wild-type T1/ST2(-) Th cells or Th cells from T1/ST2(-/-) mice. In addition, T1/ST2(+) Th cells almost exclusively contain bi- and trifunctional Th2 cytokine-producing Th cells compared with T1/ST2(-) Th cells or Th cells from T1/ST2(-/-) mice. Finally, T1/ST2-driven Th2 development resulted in defective pulmonary fungal control. These data demonstrate that T1/ST2 directs Th2 cell activation and polyfunctionality in allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis.

  9. Sugar-induced cephalic-phase insulin release is mediated by a T1r2+T1r3-independent taste transduction pathway in mice

    PubMed Central

    Stano, Sarah; Holter, Marlena; Azenkot, Tali; Goldman, Olivia; Margolskee, Robert F.; Vasselli, Joseph R.; Sclafani, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Sensory stimulation from foods elicits cephalic phase responses, which facilitate digestion and nutrient assimilation. One such response, cephalic-phase insulin release (CPIR), enhances glucose tolerance. Little is known about the chemosensory mechanisms that activate CPIR. We studied the contribution of the sweet taste receptor (T1r2+T1r3) to sugar-induced CPIR in C57BL/6 (B6) and T1r3 knockout (KO) mice. First, we measured insulin release and glucose tolerance following oral (i.e., normal ingestion) or intragastric (IG) administration of 2.8 M glucose. Both groups of mice exhibited a CPIR following oral but not IG administration, and this CPIR improved glucose tolerance. Second, we examined the specificity of CPIR. Both mouse groups exhibited a CPIR following oral administration of 1 M glucose and 1 M sucrose but not 1 M fructose or water alone. Third, we studied behavioral attraction to the same three sugar solutions in short-term acceptability tests. B6 mice licked more avidly for the sugar solutions than for water, whereas T1r3 KO mice licked no more for the sugar solutions than for water. Finally, we examined chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses to each of the sugars. Both mouse groups exhibited CT nerve responses to the sugars, although those of B6 mice were stronger. We propose that mice possess two taste transduction pathways for sugars. One mediates behavioral attraction to sugars and requires an intact T1r2+T1r3. The other mediates CPIR but does not require an intact T1r2+T1r3. If the latter taste transduction pathway exists in humans, it should provide opportunities for the development of new treatments for controlling blood sugar. PMID:26157055

  10. Sugar-induced cephalic-phase insulin release is mediated by a T1r2+T1r3-independent taste transduction pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Glendinning, John I; Stano, Sarah; Holter, Marlena; Azenkot, Tali; Goldman, Olivia; Margolskee, Robert F; Vasselli, Joseph R; Sclafani, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Sensory stimulation from foods elicits cephalic phase responses, which facilitate digestion and nutrient assimilation. One such response, cephalic-phase insulin release (CPIR), enhances glucose tolerance. Little is known about the chemosensory mechanisms that activate CPIR. We studied the contribution of the sweet taste receptor (T1r2+T1r3) to sugar-induced CPIR in C57BL/6 (B6) and T1r3 knockout (KO) mice. First, we measured insulin release and glucose tolerance following oral (i.e., normal ingestion) or intragastric (IG) administration of 2.8 M glucose. Both groups of mice exhibited a CPIR following oral but not IG administration, and this CPIR improved glucose tolerance. Second, we examined the specificity of CPIR. Both mouse groups exhibited a CPIR following oral administration of 1 M glucose and 1 M sucrose but not 1 M fructose or water alone. Third, we studied behavioral attraction to the same three sugar solutions in short-term acceptability tests. B6 mice licked more avidly for the sugar solutions than for water, whereas T1r3 KO mice licked no more for the sugar solutions than for water. Finally, we examined chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses to each of the sugars. Both mouse groups exhibited CT nerve responses to the sugars, although those of B6 mice were stronger. We propose that mice possess two taste transduction pathways for sugars. One mediates behavioral attraction to sugars and requires an intact T1r2+T1r3. The other mediates CPIR but does not require an intact T1r2+T1r3. If the latter taste transduction pathway exists in humans, it should provide opportunities for the development of new treatments for controlling blood sugar.

  11. Predictors of associated autoimmune diseases (AAID) in families with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Results from the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC)

    PubMed Central

    Wägner, Ana M; Santana, Ángelo; Hernández, Marta; Wiebe, Julia C; Nóvoa, Javier; Mauricio, Didac

    2011-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a clinically heterogeneous disease. The presence of associated autoimmune diseases (AAID) may represent a distinct form of autoimmune diabetes, with involvement of specific mechanisms. The aim of this study was to find predictors of AAID in the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) data set. Methods 3263 families with at least 2 siblings with T1D were included. Clinical information was obtained using questionnaires, anti-GAD and anti-IA-2 were measured and HLA-genotyping was performed. Siblings with T1D with and without AAID were compared and a multivariate regression analysis was performed to find predictors of AAID. T1D-associated HLA haplotypes were defined as the 4 most susceptible and protective, respectively. Results AAID was present in 14.4% of the T1D affected siblings. Age of diabetes onset, current age and time since diagnosis were higher, and there was a female predominance and more family history of AAID in the group with AAID, as well as more frequent anti-GAD and less frequent anti-IA2 positivity. Risk and protective HLA haplotype distributions were similar, though DRB1*0301-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 was more frequent in the group with AAID. In the multivariate analysis, female gender, age of onset, family history of AAID, time since diagnosis and anti-GAD positivity were significantly associated with AAID. Conclusions In patients with T1D, the presence of AAID is associated with female predominance, more frequent family history of AAID, later onset of T1D and more anti-GAD antibodies, despite longer duration of the disease. The predominance of certain HLA haplotypes suggests that specific mechanisms of disease may be involved. PMID:21744463

  12. Relaxation behavior study of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles at ultralow and ultrahigh magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Dong, Hui; Pacheco, Victor; Willbold, Dieter; Zhang, Yi; Offenhaeusser, Andreas; Hartmann, Rudolf; Weirich, Thomas E; Ma, Peixiang; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Gu, Zhongwei

    2011-12-15

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) have attracted attention because of their current and potential usefulness as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). USPIOs are usually used for their significant capacity to produce predominant proton relaxation effects, which result in signal reduction. However, most previous studies that utilized USPIOs have been focused on the relaxation behavior at commonly used magnetic fields of clinical MRI systems (typically 1-3 T). In this paper, magnetic relaxation processes of protons in water surrounding the USPIOs are studied at ultralow (≤10 mT) and ultrahigh magnetic fields (14.1 T). USPIOs used in our experiments were synthesized with a core size of 6 nm, and transferred from organic to water by ligand exchange. The proton spin-lattice relaxation time (T(1)) and spin-spin relaxation time (T(2)) were investigated at ultralow (212 μT for T(2) and 10 mT for T(1)) and at 14.1 T with different iron concentrations. At all of the fields, there is a linear relationship between the inverse of relaxation times and the iron concentration. The spin-spin relaxivity (r(2)) at 14.1 T is much larger than that value of the ultralow field. At ultralow field, however, the spin-lattice relaxivity (r(1)) is larger than the r(1) at ultrahigh field. The results provide a perspective on potential in vivo and in vitro applications of USPIOs in ultralow and ultrahigh field NMR and MRI.

  13. Relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yimin; Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    Two relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods are presented for elliptic equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The first scheme is a pointwise-preconditioned Richardson relaxation scheme and the second is a line relaxation scheme. The line relaxation scheme provides an efficient and relatively simple approach for solving two-dimensional spectral equations. Numerical examples and comparisons with other methods are given.

  14. Radiosynthesis of (S)-[(18)F]T1: The first PET radioligand for molecular imaging of α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Sarasamkan, Jiradanai; Fischer, Steffen; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Ludwig, Friedrich-Alexander; Scheunemann, Matthias; Arunrungvichian, Kuntarat; Vajragupta, Opa; Brust, Peter

    2017-03-18

    Recent pharmacologic data revealed the implication of α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in nicotine and drug addiction. To image α3β4 nAChRs in vivo, we aimed to establish the synthesis of a [(18)F]-labelled analog of the highly affine and selective α3β4 ligand (S)-3-(4-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)quinuclidine ((S)-T1). (S)-[(18)F]T1 was synthesized from ethynyl-4-[(18)F]fluorobenzene ([(18)F]5) and (S)-azidoquinuclidine by click reaction. After a synthesis time of 130min (S)-[(18)F]T1 was obtained with a radiochemical yield (non-decay corrected) of 4.3±1.3%, a radiochemical purity of >99% and a molar activity of >158 GBq/μmol. The brain uptake and the brain-to-blood ratio of (S)-[(18)F]T1 in mice at 30min post injection were 2.02 (SUV) and 6.1, respectively. According to an ex-vivo analysis, the tracer remained intact (>99%) in brain. Only one major radiometabolite was detected in plasma and urine samples. In-vitro autoradiography on pig brain slices revealed binding of (S)-[(18)F]T1 to brain regions associated with the expression of α3β4 nAChRs, which could be reduced by the α3β4 nAChR selective drug AT-1001. These findings make (S)-[(18)F]T1 a potential tool for the non-invasive imaging of α3β4 nAChRs in the brain by PET.

  15. Nuclear Spin Relaxation and Molecular Interactions of a Novel Triazolium-Based Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Jesse J; Schneider, Yanika; Kail, Brian W; Luebke, David R; Nulwala, Hunaid; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2013-04-11

    Nuclear spin relaxation, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) techniques are used to determine supramolecular arrangement of 3-methyl-1-octyl-4-phenyl-1H-triazol-1,2,3-ium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [OMPhTz][Tf{sub 2}N], an example of a triazolium-based ionic liquid. The results obtained showed first-order thermodynamic dependence for nuclear spin relaxation of the anion. First-order relaxation dependence is interpreted as through-bond dipolar relaxation. Greater than first-order dependence was found in the aliphatic protons, aromatic carbons (including nearest neighbors), and carbons at the end of the aliphatic tail. Greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of spin relaxation rates is interpreted as relaxation resulting from at least one mechanism additional to through-bond dipolar relaxation. In rigid portions of the cation, an additional spin relaxation mechanism is attributed to anisotropic effects, while greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of the octyl side chain’s spin relaxation rates is attributed to cation–cation interactions. Little interaction between the anion and the cation was observed by spin relaxation studies or by ESI-MS. No extended supramolecular structure was observed in this study, which was further supported by MS and SAXS. nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) factors are used in conjunction with spin–lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1}) measurements to calculate rotational correlation times for C–H bonds (the time it takes for the vector represented by the bond between the two atoms to rotate by one radian). The rotational correlation times are used to represent segmental reorientation dynamics of the cation. A combination of techniques is used to determine the segmental interactions and dynamics of this example of a triazolium-based ionic liquid.

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Spin-Noise and Unusual Relaxation of Oxygen-17 in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendet-Taicher, Eli

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have evolved into widely used techniques, providing diagnostic power in medicine and material sciences due to their high precision and non-invasive nature. Due to the small population differences between spin energy states, a significant sensitivity problem for NMR arises. The low sensitivity of NMR is probably its greatest limitation for applications to biological systems. An alternative probe tuning strategy based on the spin-noise response for application in standard one-dimensional and common high-resolution multidimensional standard biomolecular NMR experiments has shown an increase of up to 50% signal-to-noise (SNR) in one-dimensional NMR experiments and an increase of up to 22% in multi-dimensional ones. The method requires the adjustment of the optimal tuning condition, which may be offset by several hundreds kHz from the conventional tuning settings using the noise response of the water protons as an indicator. This work is described in the first part of the thesis (chapters 2--3). The second part (Chapter 4) of the thesis deals with anomalous oxygen-17 NMR relaxation behavior in water. Oxygen-17 (17O), which has spin of 5/2 and a natural abundance of 0.0373% possesses an electric quadrupole moment. Spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation occur by the quadrupole interaction, while the J-coupling to 1H spins and exchange are deciding factors. T1 and T2 of 17O in water have been previously measured over a large range of temperatures. The spin-spin relaxation times of 17O as a function of temperature show an anomalous behaviour, expressed by a local maximum at the temperature of maximum density (TMD) of water. It is shown that the same anomalous behaviour shifts to the respective temperatures of maximum density for H2O/D2O solutions with different compositions and salt concentrations. This phenomenon can be correlated to the pH dependency of T2 of 17O in water, and water proton exchange rates

  17. Increased native T1-values at the interventricular insertion regions in precapillary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Spruijt, Onno A; Vissers, Loek; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; Hofman, Mark B M; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Marcus, J Tim

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of the pressure overloaded right ventricle (RV) of precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH) patients, exhibits late gadolinium enhancement at the interventricular insertion regions, a phenomenon which has been linked to focal fibrosis. Native T1-mapping is an alternative technique to characterize myocardium and has the advantage of not requiring the use of contrast agents. The aim of this study was to characterize the myocardium of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), systemic scleroderma related PH (PAH-Ssc) and chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH) patients using native T1-mapping and to see whether native T1-values were related to disease severity. Furthermore, we compared native T1-values between the different precapillary PH categories. Native T1-mapping was performed in 46 IPAH, 14 PAH-SSc and 10 CTEPH patients and 10 control subjects. Native T1-values were assessed using regions of interest at the RV and LV free wall, interventricular septum and interventricular insertion regions. In PH patients, native T1-values of the interventricular insertion regions were significantly higher than the native T1-values of the RV free wall, LV free wall and interventricular septum. Native T1-values at the insertion regions were significantly related to disease severity. Native T1-values were not different between IPAH, PAH-Ssc and CTEPH patients. Native T1-values of the interventricular insertion regions are significantly increased in precapillary PH and are related to disease severity. Native T1-mapping can be developed as an alternative technique for the characterization of the interventricular insertion regions and has the advantage of not requiring the use of contrast agents.

  18. Effects of Off-Resonance Irradiation, Cross-Relaxation, and Chemical Exchange on Steady-State Magnetization and Effective Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsley, Peter B.; Monahan, W. Gordon

    2000-04-01

    In the presence of an off-resonance radiofrequency field, recovery of longitudinal magnetization to a steady state is not purely monoexponential. Under reasonable conditions with zero initial magnetization, recovery is nearly exponential and an effective relaxation rate constant R1eff = 1/T1eff can be obtained. Exact and approximate formulas for R1eff and steady-state magnetization are derived from the Bloch equations for spins undergoing cross-relaxation and chemical exchange between two sites in the presence of an off-resonance radiofrequency field. The relaxation formulas require that the magnetization of one spin is constant, but not necessarily zero, while the other spin relaxes. Extension to three sites with one radiofrequency field is explained. The special cases of off-resonance effects alone and with cross-relaxation or chemical exchange, cross-relaxation alone, and chemical exchange alone are compared. The inaccuracy in saturation transfer measurements of exchange rate constants by published formulas is discussed for the creatine kinase reaction.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance and proton relaxation times in experimental heterotopic heart transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene, M.; Lechat, P.; Hadjiisky, P.; Teillac, A.; Grosgogeat, Y.; Cabrol, C.

    1986-01-01

    It should be possible to detect heart transplant rejection by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging if it induces myocardial T1 and T2 proton relaxation time alterations or both. We studied 20 Lewis rats after a heterotopic heart transplantation. In vitro measurement of T1 and T2 was performed on a Minispec PC20 (Bruker) 3 to 9 days after transplantation. Histologic analysis allowed the quantification of rejection process based on cellular infiltration and myocardiolysis. Water content, a major determinant of relaxation time, was also studied. T1 and T2 were significantly prolonged in heterotopic vs orthotopic hearts (638 +/- 41 msec vs 606 +/- 22 msec for T1, p less than 0.01 and 58.2 +/- 8.4 msec vs 47.4 +/- 1.9 msec for T2, p less than 0.001). Water content was also increased in heterotopic hearts (76.4 +/- 2.3 vs 73.8 +/- 1.0, p less than 0.01). Most importantly, we found close correlations between T1 and especially T2 vs water content, cellular infiltration, and myocardiolysis. We conclude that rejection reaction should be noninvasively detected by NMR imaging, particularly with pulse sequences emphasizing T2.

  20. Ellipsoidal Relaxation of Deformed Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lira, Rafael B.; Riske, Karin A.; Dimova, Rumiana; Lin, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental quantification on the ellipsoidal relaxation of vesicles are presented. The current work reveals the simplicity and universal aspects of this process. The Helfrich formula is shown to apply to the dynamic relaxation of moderate-to-high tension membranes, and a closed-form solution is derived which predicts the vesicle aspect ratio as a function of time. Scattered data are unified by a time scale, which leads to a similarity behavior, governed by a distinctive solution for each vesicle type. Two separate regimes in the relaxation are identified, namely, the "entropic" and the "constant-tension" regimes. The bending rigidity and the initial membrane tension can be simultaneously extracted from the data analysis, posing the current approach as an effective means for the mechanical analysis of biomembranes.

  1. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented.

  2. Phenoxy herbicides and fibrates potently inhibit the human chemosensory receptor subunit T1R3

    PubMed Central

    Maillet, Emeline L.; Margolskee, Robert F.; Mosinger, Bedrich

    2009-01-01

    We show that phenoxy-auxin herbicides and lipid-lowering fibrates inhibit human but not rodent T1R3. T1R3 as a co-receptor in taste cells responds to sweet compounds and amino-acids; in endocrine cells of gut and pancreas T1R3 contributes to glucose sensing. Thus, certain effects of fibrates in treating hyperlipidemia and type II diabetes may be via actions on T1R3. Likewise, phenoxy-herbicides may have adverse metabolic effects in humans that would have gone undetected in studies on rodents. PMID:19817384

  3. T1rho MRI and CSF biomarkers in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Haris, Mohammad; Yadav, Santosh K; Rizwan, Arshi; Singh, Anup; Cai, Kejia; Kaura, Deepak; Wang, Ena; Davatzikos, Christos; Trojanowski, John Q; Melhem, Elias R; Marincola, Francesco M; Borthakur, Arijitt

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we have evaluated the performance of magnetic resonance (MR) T1rho (T1ρ) imaging and CSF biomarkers (T-tau, P-tau and Aβ-42) in characterization of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and control subjects. With informed consent, AD (n = 27), MCI (n = 17) and control (n = 17) subjects underwent a standardized clinical assessment and brain MRI on a 1.5-T clinical-scanner. T1ρ images were obtained at four different spin-lock pulse duration (10, 20, 30 and 40 ms). T1ρ maps were generated by pixel-wise fitting of signal intensity as a function of the spin-lock pulse duration. T1ρ values from gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) of medial temporal lobe were calculated. The binary logistic regression using T1ρ and CSF biomarkers as variables was performed to classify each group. T1ρ was able to predict 77.3% controls and 40.0% MCI while CSF biomarkers predicted 81.8% controls and 46.7% MCI. T1ρ and CSF biomarkers in combination predicted 86.4% controls and 66.7% MCI. When comparing controls with AD, T1ρ predicted 68.2% controls and 73.9% AD, while CSF biomarkers predicted 77.3% controls and 78.3% for AD. Combination of T1ρ and CSF biomarkers improved the prediction rate to 81.8% for controls and 82.6% for AD. Similarly, on comparing MCI with AD, T1ρ predicted 35.3% MCI and 81.9% AD, whereas CSF biomarkers predicted 53.3% MCI and 83.0% AD. Collectively CSF biomarkers and T1ρ were able to predict 59.3% MCI and 84.6% AD. On receiver operating characteristic analysis T1ρ showed higher sensitivity while CSF biomarkers showed greater specificity in delineating MCI and AD from controls. No significant correlation between T1ρ and CSF biomarkers, between T1ρ and age, and between CSF biomarkers and age was observed. The combined use of T1ρ and CSF biomarkers have promise to improve the early and specific diagnosis of AD. Furthermore, disease progression form MCI to AD might be easily tracked using

  4. Derivatives of pyrazinecarboxylic acid: 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopic investigations.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Wolfgang; Eller, Gernot A; Datterl, Barbara; Habicht, Daniela

    2009-07-01

    NMR spectroscopic studies are undertaken with derivatives of 2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid. Complete and unambiguous assignment of chemical shifts ((1)H, (13)C, (15)N) and coupling constants ((1)H,(1)H; (13)C,(1)H; (15)N,(1)H) is achieved by combined application of various 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques. Unequivocal mapping of (13)C,(1)H spin coupling constants is accomplished by 2D (delta,J) long-range INEPT spectra with selective excitation. Phenomena such as the tautomerism of 3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid are discussed.

  5. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT(2) measurements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  6. Electron spin-lattice relaxation in radicals containing two methyl groups, generated by /γ-irradiation of polycrystalline solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbridge, James R.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2002-12-01

    The effects of methyl rotation on electron spin-lattice relaxation times were examined by pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance for the major radicals in γ-irradiated polycrystalline α-amino isobutyric acid, dimethyl-malonic acid, and L-valine. The dominant radical is the same in irradiated dimethyl-malonic acid and α-amino isobutyric acid. Continuous wave saturation recovery was measured between 10 and 295 K at S-band and X-band. Inversion recovery, echo-detected saturation recovery, and pulsed electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) data were obtained between 77 and 295 K. For the radicals in the three solids, recovery time constants measured by the various techniques were not the same, because spectral diffusion processes contribute differently for each measurement. Hyperfine splitting due to the protons of two methyl groups is resolved in the EPR spectra for each of the samples. Pulsed ELDOR data were obtained to characterize the spectral diffusion processes that transfer magnetization between hyperfine lines. Time constants were obtained for electron spin-lattice relaxation ( T1e), nuclear spin relaxation ( T1n), cross-relaxation ( Tx1), and spin diffusion ( Ts). Between 77 and 295 K rapid cross-relaxation (Δ Ms=±1, Δ MI=∓1) was observed for each sample, which is attributed to methyl rotation at a rate that is approximately equal to the electron Larmor frequency. The large temperature range over which cross-relaxation was observed suggests that methyl groups in the radical and in the lattice, with different activation energies for rotation, contribute to the rapid cross-relaxation. Activation energies for methyl and amino group rotation between 160 and 1900 K (1.3-16 kJ/mol) were obtained by analysis of the temperature dependence of 1/ T1e at S-band and X-band in the temperature intervals where the dynamic process dominates T1e.

  7. Local spin dynamics of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in different solvents with variable size and shape: A 1H NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basini, M.; Orlando, T.; Arosio, P.; Casula, M. F.; Espa, D.; Murgia, S.; Sangregorio, C.; Innocenti, C.; Lascialfari, A.

    2017-01-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) based on a nearly monodisperse iron oxide core and capped by oleic acid have been used as model systems for investigating the superparamagnetic spin dynamics by means of magnetometry measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) relaxometry. The key magnetic properties (saturation magnetization, coercive field, and frequency dependent "blocking" temperature) of MNPs with different core size (3.5 nm, 8.5 nm, and 17.5 nm), shape (spherical and cubic), and dispersant (hexane and water-based formulation) have been determined. 1H NMR dispersion profiles obtained by measuring the r1 (longitudinal) and r2 (transverse) nuclear relaxivities in the frequency range 0.01-60 MHz confirmed that in all samples the physical mechanisms that drive the nuclear relaxation are the Néel reversal at low temperature and the Curie relaxation at high frequency. The magnetization reversal time at room temperature extracted from the fitting of NMR data falls in the typical range of superparamagnetic systems (10-9-10-10 s). Furthermore, from the distance of minimum approach we could conclude that water molecules do not arrive in close vicinity of the magnetic core. Our findings contribute to elucidate the local spin dynamics mechanisms in colloidal superparamagnetic nanoparticles which are useful in biomedical application as, e.g., contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  8. A mixed relaxed clock model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325829

  9. A mixed relaxed clock model.

    PubMed

    Lartillot, Nicolas; Phillips, Matthew J; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-19

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'.

  10. Nuclear magnetic relaxation induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization: Longitudinal relaxation dispersion for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2013-10-01

    In complex biological or colloidal samples, magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) experiments using the field-cycling technique can characterize molecular motions on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds, provided that a rigorous theory of nuclear spin relaxation is available. In gels, cross-linked proteins, and biological tissues, where an immobilized macromolecular component coexists with a mobile solvent phase, nuclear spins residing in solvent (or cosolvent) species relax predominantly via exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of anisotropic nuclear (electric quadrupole or magnetic dipole) couplings. The physical or chemical exchange processes that dominate the MRD typically occur on a time scale of microseconds or longer, where the conventional perturbation theory of spin relaxation breaks down. There is thus a need for a more general relaxation theory. Such a theory, based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) for the EMOR mechanism, is available for a single quadrupolar spin I = 1. Here, we present the corresponding theory for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair. To our knowledge, this is the first treatment of dipolar MRD outside the motional-narrowing regime. Based on an analytical solution of the spatial part of the SLE, we show how the integral longitudinal relaxation rate can be computed efficiently. Both like and unlike spins, with selective or non-selective excitation, are treated. For the experimentally important dilute regime, where only a small fraction of the spin pairs are immobilized, we obtain simple analytical expressions for the auto-relaxation and cross-relaxation rates which generalize the well-known Solomon equations. These generalized results will be useful in biophysical studies, e.g., of intermittent protein dynamics. In addition, they represent a first step towards a rigorous theory of water 1H relaxation in biological tissues, which is a prerequisite for unravelling the molecular basis of soft

  11. Analog circuits for relaxation networks.

    PubMed

    Card, H

    1993-12-01

    Selected examples are presented of recent advances, primarily from the U.S. and Canada, in analog circuits for relaxation networks. Relaxation networks having feedback connections exhibit potentially greater computational power per neuron than feedforward networks. They are also more poorly understood especially with respect to learning algorithms. Examples are described of analog circuits for (i) supervised learning in deterministic Boltzmann machines, (ii) unsupervised competitive learning and feature maps and (iii) networks with resistive grids for vision and audition tasks. We also discuss recent progress on in-circuit learning and synaptic weight storage mechanisms.

  12. Another challenge to paramagnetic relaxation theory: a study of paramagnetic proton NMR relaxation in closely related series of pyridine-derivatised dysprosium complexes.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicola J; Finney, Katie-Louise N A; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Parker, David

    2016-02-14

    Measurements of the relaxation rate behaviour of two series of dysprosium complexes have been performed in solution, over the field range 1.0 to 16.5 Tesla. The field dependence has been modelled using Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory, allowing estimates of the electronic relaxation time, T1e, and the size of the magnetic susceptibility, μeff, to be made. Changes in relaxation rate of the order of 50% at higher fields were measured, following variation of the para-substituent in the single pyridine donor. The magnetic susceptibilities deviated unexpectedly from the free-ion values for certain derivatives in each series examined, in a manner that was independent of the electron-releasing/withdrawing ability of the pyridine substituent, suggesting that the polarisability of just one pyridine donor in octadenate ligands can play a significant role in defining the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy.

  13. Characterization of structural relaxation in inorganic glasses using length dilatometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Erick

    characterization technique is comprised of three main components: experimental measurements, fitting of configurational length change, and description of glass behavior by analysis of fitting parameters. N-BK7 optical glass from Schott was used as the proof of concept glass but the main scientific interest was in three chalcogenide glasses: As40Se 60, As20Se80, and Ge17.9As19.7 Se62.4. The dilatometric experiments were carried out using a thermomechanical analyzer (TMA) on glass sample that were synthesized by the author, in all cases except N-BK7. Isothermal structural relaxation measurements were done on (12 mm tall x 3 mm x 3 mm) beams placed vertically in the TMA. The samples were equilibrated at a starting temperature (T 0) until structural equilibrium was reached then a temperature down step was initiated to the final temperature (T 1) and held isothermally until relaxation concluded. The configurational aspect of length relaxation, and therefore volume relaxation was extracted and fit with a Prony series. The Prony series parameters indicated a number of relaxation events occurring within the glass on timescales typically an order of magnitude apart in time. The data analysis showed as many as 4 discrete relaxation times at lower temperatures. The number of discrete relaxation decreased as the temperature increased until just one single relaxation was left in the temperature range just at or above Tg. In the case of N-BK7 these trends were utilized to construct a simple model that could be applied to glass manufacturing in the areas of annealing or PGM. A future development of a rather simple finite element model (FEM) would easily be able to use this model to predict the exponential-like, temperature and time dependent relaxation behaviors of the glass. The predictive model was not extended to the chalcogenide glass studied here, but could easily be applied to them in the future. The relaxation time trends versus temperature showed a definite region of transition between a

  14. Spin relaxation of electrons in bulk CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprinzl, Daniel; Nahalkova, Petra; Kunc, Jan; Maly, Petr; Horodysky, Petr; Grill, Roman; Belas, Eduard; Franc, Jan; Nemec, Petr

    2007-03-01

    We report on the measurements of the spin relaxation time T1 of photo-excited electrons in bulk CdTe. The carrier dynamics were investigated by transient absorption experiments using 80 fs circularly polarized laser pulses at sample temperatures from 20 to 300 K. We studied both p and n type doped CdTe samples, which were prepared in the form of thin platelets from the crystals grown by the modified Bridgman method. The obtained results are compared with the spin relaxation times reported for other semiconductors with the same crystal structure (e.g., GaAs [1]). Finally, the relative contributions of the D'yakonov-Perel, Elliott-Yafet, Bir-Aronov-Pikus, and other mechanisms to the measured spin relaxation times in CdTe are discussed. This work was supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic (grant 202/03/H003), by the Ministry of Education of the Czech Republic in the framework of the research centre LC510 and the research plan MSM 0021620834. [1] J. M. Kikkawa and D. D. Awschalom, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 4313 (1998).

  15. Reducing Relaxation of Hyperpolarized ^129 Xe during Cryogenic Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Happer, W.

    2004-05-01

    Recent experimental results^1 indicate that the T1 relaxation time of solid ^129Xe is much shorter than previous models had predicted^2 near the xenon melting point of 161 K and at low magnetic fields. This enhanced relaxation is detrimental to commercial xenon polarizers, which cryogenically distill hyperpolarized ^129Xe from a buffer gas mixture. We have measured the fraction of xenon polarization lost during a typical cryogenic collection, using different permanent magnets to vary the holding field from 700 gauss to over a tesla. The results indicate that using a stronger permanent magnet around the cryo-trap is a simple way to increase the final polarization of the pure xenon gas. An additional experiment was conducted in order to determine whether the majority of the xenon relaxation occurs throughout accumulation (possibly as a result of temperature inhomogeneities within the frozen sample) or during the brief thawing time. In pinpointing the polarization loss, this research may suggest new designs for xenon polarizers. 1. Kuzma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 147602 (2002). 2. Fitzgerald et al., Phys. Rev. B 59, 8795 (1999).

  16. NMR spin relaxation rates in the Heisenberg bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Tiago; Curro, Nicholas; Scalettar, Richard; Paiva, Thereza; Dos Santos, Raimundo R.

    One of the striking features of heavy fermions is the fact that in the vicinity of a quantum phase transition these systems exhibit the breakdown of Fermi-liquid behavior and superconductivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) expirements play an important role in the study of these phenomena. Measurements of NMR spin relaxation rates and Knight shift, for instance, can be used to probe the electronic spin susceptibility of these systems. Here we studied the NMR response of the Heisenberg bilayer model. In this model, it is well known that the increase of the interplane coupling between the planes, Jperp, supresses the antiferromagnetic order at a quantum critical point (QCP). We use stochastic series expansion (SSE) and the maximum-entropy analytic continuation method to calculate the NMR spin lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 and the spin echo decay 1 /T2 G as function of Jperp. The spin echo decay, T2 G increases for small Jperp, due to the increase of the order parameter, and then vanishes abruptly in the QCP. The effects of Jperp dilution disorder in the QCP and the relaxation rates are also discussed. This research was supported by the NNSA Grant Number DE-NA 0002908, and Ciência sem fronteiras program/CNPQ.

  17. Investigation of cyano-bridged coordination nanoparticles Gd3+/[Fe(CN)6]3-/d-mannitol as T1-weighted MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, M.; Gallud, A.; Ayadi, A.; Kennouche, S.; Porredon, C.; Gary-Bobo, M.; Larionova, J.; Goze-Bac, Ch.; Zanca, M.; Garcia, M.; Basile, I.; Long, J.; de Lapuente, J.; Borras, M.; Guari, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Cyano-bridged Gd3+/[Fe(CN)6]3- coordination polymer nanoparticles of 3-4 nm stabilized with d-mannitol presenting a high r1 relaxivity value of 11.4 mM-1 s-1 were investigated in vivo as contrast agents (CA) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). They allow an increase of the MR image contrast and can act as an efficient intravascular T1 CA with a relatively long blood-circulation lifetime (60 min) without specific toxicity.Cyano-bridged Gd3+/[Fe(CN)6]3- coordination polymer nanoparticles of 3-4 nm stabilized with d-mannitol presenting a high r1 relaxivity value of 11.4 mM-1 s-1 were investigated in vivo as contrast agents (CA) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). They allow an increase of the MR image contrast and can act as an efficient intravascular T1 CA with a relatively long blood-circulation lifetime (60 min) without specific toxicity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and procedures, toxicological data, physical characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01557j

  18. Synthesis of 1H-indazoles and 1H-pyrazoles via FeBr3/O2 mediated intramolecular C-H amination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianshui; Bao, Weiliang

    2013-02-01

    A new synthesis of substituted 1H-indazoles and 1H-pyrazoles from arylhydrazones via FeBr(3)/O(2) mediated C-H activation/C-N bond formation reactions is reported. The corresponding 1,3-diaryl-substituted indazoles and trisubstituted pyrazoles were obtained in moderate to excellent yields under mild conditions.

  19. Relaxation Times and Line Widths of Isotopically-Substituted Nitroxides in Aqueous Solution at X-band

    PubMed Central

    Biller, Joshua R.; Meyer, Virginia; Elajaili, Hanan; Rosen, Gerald M.; Kao, Joseph P.Y.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eatona, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    Optimization of nitroxides as probes for EPR imaging requires detailed understanding of spectral properties. Spin lattice relaxation times, spin packet line widths, nuclear hyperfine splitting, and overall lineshapes were characterized for six low molecular weight nitroxides in dilute deoxygenated aqueous solution at X-band. The nitroxides included 6-member, unsaturated 5-member, or saturated 5-member rings, most of which were isotopically labeled. The spectra are near the fast tumbling limit with T1 ~ T2 in the range of 0.50 to 1.1 μs at ambient temperature. Both spin-lattice relaxation T1 and spin-spin relaxation T2 are longer for 15N- than for 14N-nitroxides. The dominant contributions to T1 are modulation of nitrogen hyperfine anisotropy and spin rotation. Dependence of T1 on nitrogen nuclear spin state mI was observed for both 14N and 15N. Unresolved hydrogen/deuterium hyperfine couplings dominate overall line widths. Lineshapes were simulated by including all nuclear hyperfine couplings and spin packet line widths that agreed with values obtained by electron spin echo. Line widths and relaxation times are predicted to be about the same at 250 MHz as at X-band. PMID:21843961

  20. "Stressing" Relaxation in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager-Decker, Iris

    A rationale is offered for incorporating relaxation training in elementary school classroom activities. Cited are research studies which focus on the reaction of children to stressful life changes and resulting behavioral and physical disorders. A list is given of significant life events which may be factors in causing diseases or misbehavior in…

  1. Theory of nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, J.

    1983-01-01

    A theory of nuclear magnetic interaction is based on the study of the stochastic rotation operator. The theory is applied explicitly to relaxation by anisotropic chemical shift and to spin-rotational interactions. It is applicable also to dipole-dipole and quadrupole interactions.

  2. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  3. Distributed Relaxation for Conservative Discretizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2001-01-01

    A multigrid method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work that is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in one target-grid residual evaluation. The way to achieve this efficiency is the distributed relaxation approach. TME solvers employing distributed relaxation have already been demonstrated for nonconservative formulations of high-Reynolds-number viscous incompressible and subsonic compressible flow regimes. The purpose of this paper is to provide foundations for applications of distributed relaxation to conservative discretizations. A direct correspondence between the primitive variable interpolations for calculating fluxes in conservative finite-volume discretizations and stencils of the discretized derivatives in the nonconservative formulation has been established. Based on this correspondence, one can arrive at a conservative discretization which is very efficiently solved with a nonconservative relaxation scheme and this is demonstrated for conservative discretization of the quasi one-dimensional Euler equations. Formulations for both staggered and collocated grid arrangements are considered and extensions of the general procedure to multiple dimensions are discussed.

  4. Joint Brain Parametric T1-Map Segmentation and RF Inhomogeneity Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ping-Feng; Steen, R. Grant; Yezzi, Anthony; Krim, Hamid

    2009-01-01

    We propose a constrained version of Mumford and Shah's (1989) segmentation model with an information-theoretic point of view in order to devise a systematic procedure to segment brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data for parametric T1-Map and T1-weighted images, in both 2-D and 3D settings. Incorporation of a tuning weight in particular adds a probabilistic flavor to our segmentation method, and makes the 3-tissue segmentation possible. Moreover, we proposed a novel method to jointly segment the T1-Map and calibrate RF Inhomogeneity (JSRIC). This method assumes the average T1 value of white matter is the same across transverse slices in the central brain region, and JSRIC is able to rectify the flip angles to generate calibrated T1-Maps. In order to generate an accurate T1-Map, the determination of optimal flip-angles and the registration of flip-angle images are examined. Our JSRIC method is validated on two human subjects in the 2D T1-Map modality and our segmentation method is validated by two public databases, BrainWeb and IBSR, of T1-weighted modality in the 3D setting. PMID:19710938

  5. PeaT1-induced systemic acquired resistance in tobacco follows salicylic acid-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yang, Xiufen; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua; Zeng, Hongmei; Mao, Jianjun; Gao, Qiufeng

    2011-04-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible defense mechanism which plays a central role in protecting plants from pathogen attack. A new elicitor, PeaT1 from Alternaria tenuissima, was expressed in Escherichia coil and characterized with systemic acquired resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). PeaT1-treated plants exhibited enhanced systemic resistance with a significant reduction in number and size of TMV lesions on wild tobacco leaves as compared with control. The quantitative analysis of TMV CP gene expression with real-time quantitative PCR showed there was reduction in TMV virus concentration after PeaT1 treatment. Similarly, peroxidase (POD) activity and lignin increased significantly after PeaT1 treatment. The real-time quantitative PCR revealed that PeaT1 also induced the systemic accumulation of pathogenesis-related gene, PR-1a and PR-1b which are the markers of systemic acquired resistance (SAR), NPR1 gene for salicylic acid (SA) signal transduction pathway and PAL gene for SA synthesis. The accumulation of SA and the failure in development of similar level of resistance as in wild type tobacco plants in PeaT1 treated nahG transgenic tobacco plants indicated that PeaT1-induced resistance depended on SA accumulation. The present work suggested that the molecular mechanism of PeaT1 inducing disease resistance in tobacco was likely through the systemic acquired resistance pathway mediated by salicylic acid and the NPR1 gene.

  6. Comparative Relaxant Effects of Ataciguat and Zaprinast on Sheep Sphincter of Oddi

    PubMed Central

    Çakmak, Erol; Yönem, Özlem; Saraç, Bülent; Parlak, Mesut; Çelik, Cumali; Ataseven, Hilmi; Bağcivan, İhsan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Relaxing the sphincter of Oddi (SO) is an important process during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures. This issue suggests that the easier the sphincterotomy and cannulation, the more post-ERCP complications decrease. Aims: To compare the relaxant effects of ataciguat (a novel soluble guanylyl cyclase activator) and zaprinast (an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 5) on sheep SO in vitro, thus testing whether they can be used during ERCP. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Sheep SO rings were placed in tissue baths and their isometric tension to ataciguat and zaprinast were tested. We also tested their isometric tension against ataciguat in the presence of 1H-(1,2,4) oxadiazole (4,3-a) quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) which is a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. Results: Ataciguat and zaprinast both triggered concentration addicted relaxation on sheep SO rings (p=0.0018, p=0.0025 respectively) but the relaxation of the ataciguat was significantly greater than that of zaprinast at all concentrations (p=0.0024). It was observed that decreased relaxation responses were initiated by ataciguat in the presence of ODQ (p=0.0012). Conclusion: Ataciguat and zaprinast both have relaxing effects on sphincter of Oddi, although that of zaprinast is lower. We believe that ataciguat and zaprinast can be used in ERCP procedures in order to relax the sphincter of Oddi and thus can be used locally in order to decrease complications. PMID:27606143

  7. Loss of PiT-1 results in abnormal endocytosis in the yolk sac visceral endoderm.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, Mary C; Giachelli, Cecilia M

    2014-08-01

    PiT-1 protein is a transmembrane sodium-dependent phosphate (Pi) transporter. PiT-1 knock out (KO) embryos die from largely unknown causes by embryonic day (E) 12.5. We tested the hypothesis that PiT-1 is required for endocytosis in the embryonic yolk sac (YS) visceral endoderm (VE). Here we present data supporting that PiT-1 KO results in a YS remodeling defect and decreased endocytosis in the YS VE. The remodeling defect is not due to an upstream cardiomyocyte requirement for PiT-1, as SM22αCre-specific KO of PiT-1 in the developing heart and the YS mesodermal layer (ME) does not recapitulate the PiT-1 global KO phenotype. Furthermore, we find that high levels of PiT-1 protein localize to the YS VE apical membrane. Together these data support that PiT-1 is likely required in YS VE. During normal development maternal immunoglobulin (IgG) is endocytosed into YS VE and accumulates in the apical side of the VE in a specialized lysosome termed the apical vacuole (AV). We have identified a reduction in PiT-1 KO VE cell height and a striking loss of IgG accumulation in the PiT-1 KO VE. The endocytosis genes Tfeb, Lamtor2 and Snx2 are increased at the RNA level. Lysotracker Red staining reveals a loss of distinct AVs, and yolk sacs incubated ex vivo with phRODO Green Dextran for Endocytosis demonstrate a functional loss of endocytosis. As yolk sac endocytosis is controlled in part by microautophagy, but expression of LC3 had not been examined, we investigated LC3 expression during yolk sac development and found stage-specific LC3 RNA expression that is predominantly from the YS VE layer at E9.5. Normalized LC3-II protein levels are decreased in the PiT-1 KO YS, supporting a requirement for PiT-1 in autophagy in the YS. Therefore, we propose the novel idea that PiT-1 is central to the regulation of endocytosis and autophagy in the YS VE.

  8. Relaxation processes in non-Debye dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turik, A. V.; Bogatin, A. S.; Andreev, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    The specific features of the relaxation processes in non-Debye dielectrics have been investigated. The nature of the difference between the relaxation frequencies of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss (conductivity) has been explained. It has been shown that the average relaxation frequency of the conductivity is considerably (in some cases, by several orders of magnitude) higher than the relaxation frequency of the dielectric constant owing to an increase in the conductivity spectra of the statistical weight of the relaxation processes with short relaxation times.

  9. Morphological transformation of C3H/10T1/2 CL8 cells by procarcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Oshiro, Y.; Balwierz, P.S.

    1982-01-01

    In order to increase the sensitivity of the C3H/10T1/2 CL8 (10T1/2) cell transformation system, the chemical exposure period was increased to a total of 6 days (two consecutive 3-day exposures). Using this modified procedure, we transformed 10T1/2 cells with procarcinogens such as aflatoxin B/sub 1/, benz(a)anthracene, and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide which have been negative in the standard 10T1/2 cell transformation assay. However, ..beta..-naphthylamine was inconclusive and 2-acetylaminofluorine was negative in this modified assay system. Results demonstrate that a simple modification of the 10T1/2 cell transformation method can increase the sensitivity to some procarcinogens that require metabolic activation.

  10. SirT1 Regulates Energy Metabolism and Response to Caloric Restriction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boily, Gino; Seifert, Erin L.; Bevilacqua, Lisa; He, Xiao Hong; Sabourin, Guillaume; Estey, Carmen; Moffat, Cynthia; Crawford, Sean; Saliba, Sarah; Jardine, Karen; Xuan, Jian; Evans, Meredith; Harper, Mary-Ellen; McBurney, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    The yeast sir2 gene and its orthologues in Drosophila and C. elegans have well-established roles in lifespan determination and response to caloric restriction. We have studied mice carrying two null alleles for SirT1, the mammalian orthologue of sir2, and found that these animals inefficiently utilize ingested food. These mice are hypermetabolic, contain inefficient liver mitochondria, and have elevated rates of lipid oxidation. When challenged with a 40% reduction in caloric intake, normal mice maintained their metabolic rate and increased their physical activity while the metabolic rate of SirT1-null mice dropped and their activity did not increase. Moreover, CR did not extend lifespan of SirT1-null mice. Thus, SirT1 is an important regulator of energy metabolism and, like its orthologues from simpler eukaryotes, the SirT1 protein appears to be required for a normal response to caloric restriction. PMID:18335035

  11. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used.

  12. Measurement of diffuse ventricular fibrosis with myocardial T1 in patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Jay A.; Abdallah, Wissam; Yoneda, Zachary T.; Brittain, Evan; Aznaurov, Sam G.; Parvez, Babar; Adkins, Keith; Whalen, S. Patrick; Estrada, J.C.; Shen, Sharon; Crossley, George H.; Kanagasundram, Arvindh; Saavedra, Pablo; Ellis, Christopher R.; Lawson, Mark; Darbar, Dawood; Shoemaker, M. Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with cardiac fibrosis, which can now be measured noninvasively using T1-mapping with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). This study aimed to assess the impact of AF on ventricular T1 at the time of CMRI. Methods Subjects with AF scheduled for AF ablation underwent CMRI with standard electrocardiography gating and breath-hold protocols on a 1.5 T scanner with post-contrast ventricular T1 recorded from 6 regions of interest at the mid-ventricle. Baseline demographic, clinical, and imaging characteristics were examined using univariate and multivariable linear regression modeling for an association with myocardial T1. Results One hundred fifty-seven patients were studied (32% women; median age, 61 years [interquartile range {IQR}, 55–67], 50% persistent AF [episodes>7 days or requiring electrical or pharmacologic cardioversion], 30% in AF at the time of the CMRI). The median global T1 was 404 ms (IQR, 381–428). AF at the time of CMRI was associated with a 4.4% shorter T1 (p=0.000) compared to sinus rhythm when adjusted for age, sex, persistent AF, body mass index, congestive heart failure, and renal dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate<60). A post-hoc multivariate model adjusted for heart rate suggested that heart rate elevation (p=0.009) contributes to the reduction in T1 observed in patients with AF at the time of CMRI. No association between ventricular T1 and AF recurrence after ablation was demonstrated. Conclusion AF at the time of CMRI was associated with lower post-contrast ventricular T1 compared with sinus rhythm. This effect was at least partly due to elevated heart rate. T1 was not associated with the recurrence of AF after ablation. PMID:26949431

  13. T1BT* structural study of an anti-plasmodial peptide through NMR and molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background T1BT* is a peptide construct containing the T1 and B epitopes located in the 5’ minor repeat and the 3’ major repeat of the central repeat region of the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP), respectively, and the universal T* epitope located in the C-terminus of the same protein. This peptide construct, with B = (NANP)3, has been found to elicit antisporozoite antibodies and gamma-interferon-screening T-cell responses in inbred strains of mice and in outbred nonhuman primates. On the other hand, NMR and CD spectroscopies have identified the peptide B’ = (NPNA)3 as the structural unit of the major repeat in the CSP, rather than the more commonly quoted NANP. With the goal of assessing the structural impact of the NPNA cadence on a proven anti-plasmodial peptide, the solution structures of T1BT* and T1B’T* were determined in this work. Methods NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics calculations were used to determine the solution structures of T1BT* and T1B’T*. These structures were compared to determine the main differences and similarities between them. Results Both peptides exhibit radically different structures, with the T1B’T* showing strong helical tendencies. NMR and CD data, in conjunction with molecular modelling, provide additional information about the topologies of T1BT* and T1B’T*. Knowing the peptide structures required to elicit the proper immunogenic response can help in the design of more effective, conformationally defined malaria vaccine candidates. If peptides derived from the CSP are required to have helical structures to interact efficiently with their corresponding antibodies, a vaccine based on the T1B’T* construct should show higher efficiency as a pre-erythrocyte vaccine that would prevent infection of hepatocytes by sporozoites. PMID:23506240

  14. Evaluation of the pituitary gland using magnetic resonance imaging: T1-weighted vs. VIBE imaging.

    PubMed

    Davis, M A; Castillo, M

    2013-06-01

    Volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) is used for abdominal imaging as a fast and efficient modality. Evaluation of brain lesions using VIBE is not common and its use for the pituitary gland has not yet been addressed. Our goal was to compare coronal T1-weighted (T1W) and VIBE images in patients undergoing studies of the pituitary gland. We hypothesized that, for this purpose, VIBE is superior to T1W images. T1W and VIBE images of the pituitary gland in 32 patients were evaluated. The two sequences were compared with specific attention to: contrast enhancement (gland and cavernous sinuses) and ability to view the anatomy of the cavernous sinuses. In patients with macroadenomas, visualization of the optic chiasm was also assessed. Images were rated as: VIBE being better, equal, or worse in comparison to T1W images. We also compared VIBE and T1W images specifically looking at micro/macro-adenomas and post-surgical patients. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square statistics. Of the 32 patients, the VIBE sequence showed superior contrast enhancement in 18 patients, six were found as being equal to T1W, and in eight instances VIBE was found to be worse than T1W. These results were statistically significant (p=.02). When looking at micro/macro-adenomas and post-surgical patients specifically, there was a trend to VIBE being superior to T1W but these data were not statistically significant. Visualization of chiasm in macroadenomas was similar for both techniques. VIBE was significantly superior to T1W with respect to pituitary and cavernous sinus contrast enhancement and cavernous sinus anatomy. A trend towards VIBE being superior in the evaluation of adenomas (pre- and post-operative) was seen, but it was not statistically significant. This is likely due to the small population size.

  15. Noninvasive monitoring of moisture uptake in Ca(NO3)2 -polluted calcareous stones by 1H-NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Casieri, Cinzia; Terenzi, Camilla; De Luca, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    NMR transverse relaxation time (T(2)) distribution of (1)H nuclei of water has been used to monitor the moisture condensation kinetics in Ca(NO(3))(2)  · (4)H(2)O-polluted Lecce stone, a calcareous stone with highly regular porous structure often utilized as basic material in Baroque buildings. Polluted samples have been exposed to water vapor adsorption at controlled relative humidity to mimic environmental conditions. In presence of pollutants, the T(2) distributions of water in stone exhibit a range of relaxation time values and amplitudes not observed in the unpolluted case. These characteristics could be exploited for in situ noninvasive detection of salt pollution in Lecce stone or as damage precursors in architectural buildings of cultural heritage interest.

  16. Surface NMR measurement of proton relaxation times in medium to coarse-grained sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Shushakov, O A

    1996-01-01

    A surface NMR investigation of groundwater in the geomagnetic field is under study. To detect the surface NMR a wire loop with a diameter of about 100 m, being an antenna for both an exciting field source and the NMR signal receiver, is laid out on the ground. A sinusoidal current pulse with a rectangular envelope is passed through the loop to excite the NMR signal. The carrier frequency of the oscillating current in this pulse is equal to the Larmor frequency of protons in the Earth's magnetic field. The current amplitude is changed up to 200 amps and the pulse duration is fixed and is equal to 40 ms. The exciting pulse is followed by an induction emf signal caused by the Larmor nuclear precession in geomagnetic field. The relaxation times T1, T2, and T2* were measured by the surface NMR for both groundwater in medium to coarse-grained sand at borehole and for bulk water under the ice surface of frozen lake. To determine T1, a longitudinal interference in experiments with repeated pulses was measured. A sequence with equal period between equal excitation pulses was used. The relaxation times T1, T2, measured for bulk water under the ice of the Ob reservoir were 1.0 s and 0.7 s, respectively. To estimate an influence of dissolved oxygen T1 of the same water at the same temperature was measured by lab NMR with and without pumping of oxygen. The relaxation time T1 measured for water in the medium to coarse-grained sand is 0.65 s. The relaxation time T2 estimated by spin echo sequence is found to be equal to 0.15 s. The relaxation time T2* is found to be about 80 ms. This result contradicts published earlier phenomenological correlation between relaxation time T2* and grain size of water-bearing rock. This could be as a result of unsound approach based on grain size or influence of paramagnetic impurities.

  17. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  18. Enhanced MRI relaxivity of aquated Gd3+ ions by carboxyphenylated water-dispersed graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Gizzatov, Ayrat; Keshishian, Vazrik; Guven, Adem; Dimiev, Ayrat M; Qu, Feifei; Muthupillai, Raja; Decuzzi, Paolo; Bryant, Robert G; Tour, James M; Wilson, Lon J

    2014-03-21

    The present study demonstrates that highly water-dispersed graphene nanoribbons dispersed by carboxyphenylated substituents and conjugated to aquated Gd(3+) ions can serve as a high-performance contrast agent (CA) for applications in T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with relaxivity (r1,2) values outperforming currently-available clinical CAs by up to 16 times for r1 and 21 times for r2.

  19. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization and Relaxation of H and D Atoms in Solid Mixtures of Hydrogen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheludiakov, S.; Ahokas, J.; Järvinen, J.; Vainio, O.; Lehtonen, L.; Vasiliev, S.; Lee, D. M.; Khmelenko, V. V.

    2017-04-01

    We report on a study of dynamic nuclear polarization and electron and nuclear spin relaxation of atomic hydrogen and deuterium in solid molecular matrices of H2, D2, and HD mixtures. The electron and nuclear spin relaxation times (T_{1e} and T_{1N}) were measured within the temperature range 0.15-2.5 K in a magnetic field of 4.6 T, conditions which ensure a high polarization of electron spins. We found that T_{1e} is nearly temperature independent in this temperature range, while T_{1N} decreased by two orders of magnitude upon raising temperature. Such strong temperature dependence is typical for the nuclear Orbach mechanism of relaxation via the electron spins. We found that the nuclear spins of H atoms in solid D2 and D2{:}HD can be efficiently polarized by the Overhauser effect. Pumping the forbidden transitions of H atoms also leads to DNP, with the efficiency strongly dependent on the concentration of D atoms. This behavior indicates the cross effect mechanism of the DNP and nuclear relaxation, which turns out to be well resolved in the conditions of our experiments. Efficient DNP of H atoms was also observed when pumping the middle D line located in the center of the ESR spectrum. This phenomenon can be explained in terms of clusters or pairs of H atoms with a strong exchange interaction. These clusters have partially allowed transitions in the center of the ESR spectrum, and DNP may be created via the resolved cross effect.

  20. Nuclear magnetic relaxation of3He gas. I. Pure3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusher, C. P.; Secca, M. F.; Richards, M. G.

    1988-07-01

    Longitudinal relaxation times T 1 have been measured in3He gas, using pulsed NMR, for number densities between 3 × 1023 and 6 × 1025 spins m-3 and temperatures between 0.6 and 15 K. Relaxation takes place on or near the walls of the Pyrex sample cells and measurements of T 1 give information about the surface phases. A cryogenic wall coating of solid molecular hydrogen was found to delay the formation of a3He monolayer on cooling, and T 1 measurements were consistent with a binding energy of ˜13 K for a3He atom to a hydrogen surface. At temperatures below ˜2 K a completed3He monolayer forms on the H2 coating. No variation of the areal density of monolayer completion with bulk number density at fixed temperature could be observed and the completed3He monolayer is thought to be a dense fluid. Baking the Pyrex sample cells under vacuum and using an rf discharge in3He gas to clean the walls before sealing in the sample gas were found to increase the observed T1's by up to three orders of magnitude. Once a3He monolayer has formed on the H2 surface in these cleaned, sealed cells, the dipolar interaction between adsorbed spins is thought to be the dominant source of longitudinal relaxation. The data are consistent with a dipolar relaxation model with a correlation time of ˜2 × 10-9 sec. This time is long compared to the value of 10-11 or 10-12 sec in the 3D fluid. This suggests that if the surface phase is a 2D fluid and the dipolar mechanism is indeed the dominant one, then the atoms in the 2D fluid are less mobile than in three dimensions. This is consistent with recent susceptibility measurements.

  1. Anomalous dielectric relaxation of water confined in graphite oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ji; Tian, Yuchen; Gu, Min; Tang, Tong B.

    2015-09-28

    Nonmonotonic thermal dependence of dielectric relaxation of water has been observed in hydrated graphite oxide (GO). Graphite oxide prepared via Hummers method then imbued with specific water contents were characterized, with {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ambient- and variable-temperature X-ray diffractometries, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. Pressed pellets provided with either conducting or blocking electrodes yielded dielectric loss, which was shown to originate from dielectric relaxation of the confined water. Three relaxation processes were observed in impedance spectroscopy. Our previous work has identified two different types of water in GO, namely, intercalated water and water in inter-grain voids. P{sub 1} expresses the reorientation of water confined inside inter-grain voids, and P{sub 2}, the rotation of intercalated water molecules confined in interlayers. The present work reveals a new process P{sub 3}, which also relates to intercalated water. It slows down with temperature, and this apparent anomaly is explained by the decrease in water content and consequent narrowing of interlayer spacing in graphite oxide, as confirmed by characterization techniques. The present study should contribute to our understanding of surface water dynamics.

  2. Anomalous dielectric relaxation of water confined in graphite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ji; Tian, Yuchen; Gu, Min; Tang, Tong B.

    2015-09-01

    Nonmonotonic thermal dependence of dielectric relaxation of water has been observed in hydrated graphite oxide (GO). Graphite oxide prepared via Hummers method then imbued with specific water contents were characterized, with 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ambient- and variable-temperature X-ray diffractometries, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. Pressed pellets provided with either conducting or blocking electrodes yielded dielectric loss, which was shown to originate from dielectric relaxation of the confined water. Three relaxation processes were observed in impedance spectroscopy. Our previous work has identified two different types of water in GO, namely, intercalated water and water in inter-grain voids. P1 expresses the reorientation of water confined inside inter-grain voids, and P2, the rotation of intercalated water molecules confined in interlayers. The present work reveals a new process P3, which also relates to intercalated water. It slows down with temperature, and this apparent anomaly is explained by the decrease in water content and consequent narrowing of interlayer spacing in graphite oxide, as confirmed by characterization techniques. The present study should contribute to our understanding of surface water dynamics.

  3. Origin and Spread of Bos taurus: New Clues from Mitochondrial Genomes Belonging to Haplogroup T1

    PubMed Central

    Bonfiglio, Silvia; Ginja, Catarina; De Gaetano, Anna; Achilli, Alessandro; Olivieri, Anna; Colli, Licia; Tesfaye, Kassahun; Agha, Saif Hassan; Gama, Luis T.; Cattonaro, Federica; Penedo, M. Cecilia T; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Torroni, Antonio; Ferretti, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Background Most genetic studies on modern cattle have established a common origin for all taurine breeds in the Near East, during the Neolithic transition about 10 thousand years (ka) ago. Yet, the possibility of independent and/or secondary domestication events is still debated and is fostered by the finding of rare mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups like P, Q and R. Haplogroup T1, because of its geographic distribution, has been the subject of several investigations pointing to a possible independent domestication event in Africa and suggesting a genetic contribution of African cattle to the formation of Iberian and Creole cattle. Whole mitochondrial genome sequence analysis, with its proven effectiveness in improving the resolution of phylogeographic studies, is the most appropriate tool to investigate the origin and structure of haplogroup T1. Methodology A survey of >2200 bovine mtDNA control regions representing 28 breeds (15 European, 10 African, 3 American) identified 281 subjects belonging to haplogroup T1. Fifty-four were selected for whole mtDNA genome sequencing, and combined with ten T1 complete sequences from previous studies into the most detailed T1 phylogenetic tree available to date. Conclusions Phylogenetic analysis of the 64 T1 mitochondrial complete genomes revealed six distinct sub-haplogroups (T1a–T1f). Our data support the overall scenario of a Near Eastern origin of the T1 sub-haplogroups from as much as eight founding T1 haplotypes. However, the possibility that one sub-haplogroup (T1d) arose in North Africa, in domesticated stocks, shortly after their arrival from the Near East, can not be ruled out. Finally, the previously identified “African-derived American" (AA) haplotype turned out to be a sub-clade of T1c (T1c1a1). This haplotype was found here for the first time in Africa (Egypt), indicating that it probably originated in North Africa, reached the Iberian Peninsula and sailed to America, with the first European settlers

  4. Polydopamine-based coordination nanocomplex for T1/T2 dual mode magnetic resonance imaging-guided chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Ai, Kelong; Liu, Jianhua; Ren, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Chunhuan; Lu, Lehui

    2016-01-01

    Despite the progress in the design and synthesis of theranostic agents, limitations on efficiency and safety offer significant room for improvement in these agents. Inspired by the natural binding ability of polydopamine nanospheres (PDAs) with iron ion, a simple and versatile synthesis strategy is developed to prepare biodegradable coordination polymer (CP) encapsulated PDAs nanocomplex (PDAs@CPx, x = 3, 6, 9). We found that the PDAs@CP3 can serve as a T1/T2 dual mode contrast agent (DMCA) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which possesses high longitudinal (r1 = 7.524 mM(-1) s(-1)) and transverse (r2 = 45.92 mM(-1) s(-1)) relaxivities. In this system, benefitting from the high photothermal conversion efficiency derived from PDAs, DOX loaded PDAs@CP3 nanocomplex is able to not only destroy the tumor directly by heat, but also stimulate the chemotherapy by enabling NIR-responsive on demand delivery of DOX. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example exploring the potential of PDAs@CPx nanocomplex for T1/T2 dual mode MRI-guided chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy. This work extends the currently available theranostic agents, and opens up new avenues to rationally design the high-performance T1/T2 DMCA.

  5. Europium-doped gadolinium sulfide nanoparticles as a dual-mode imaging agent for T1-weighted MR and photoluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jongjin; Kim, Mi Ae; Cho, Jee-Hyun; Lee, Seung Jae; Yang, Ilseung; Cho, Janggeun; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Chulhyun; Park, Joung Kyu

    2012-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of europium-doped gadolinium sulfide (GdS:Eu(3+)) opto-magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) via sonochemistry. Their photoluminescence and strong paramagnetic properties enable these NPs to be utilized as an in vitro cell imaging and in vivo T(1)-weighted MR imaging probe. The GdS:Eu(3+) NPs have a prominent longitudinal (r(1)) relaxivity value, which is a critical parameter for T(1)-weighted MR imaging. Here, we showed not only their strong positive contrast effect to blood vessels and organs of mice, but also blood half-life and biodistribution including clearance from organs, in order to assess the GdS:Eu(3+) NPs as a competent nanocrystal-based T(1) contrast agent. We further showed confocal images of breast cancer cells containing GdS:Eu(3+) NPs to evaluate as a photoluminescence probe. Dual-mode imaging capability obtained from the GdS:Eu(3+) NPs will allow target-oriented cellular imaging as well as the resulting disease-specific MR imaging.

  6. 1H and 10B NMR and MRI investigation of boron- and gadolinium-boron compounds in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Bonora, M; Corti, M; Borsa, F; Bortolussi, S; Protti, N; Santoro, D; Stella, S; Altieri, S; Zonta, C; Clerici, A M; Cansolino, L; Ferrari, C; Dionigi, P; Porta, A; Zanoni, G; Vidari, G

    2011-12-01

    (10)B molecular compounds suitable for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) are tagged with a Gd(III) paramagnetic ion. The newly synthesized molecule, Gd-BPA, is investigated as contrast agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with the final aim of mapping the boron distribution in tissues. Preliminary Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements, which include (1)H and (10)B relaxometry in animal tissues, proton relaxivity of the paramagnetic Gd-BPA molecule in water and its absorption in tumoral living cells, are reported.

  7. Conformational distribution of baclofen analogues by 1H and 13C NMR analysis and ab initio HF MO STO-3G or STO-3G* calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccher, Claude; Berthelot, Pascal; Debaert, Michel; Vermeersch, Gaston; Guyon, René; Pirard, Bernard; Vercauteren, Daniel P.; Dory, Magdalena; Evrard, Guy; Durant, François

    1993-12-01

    The conformations of 3-(substituted furan-2-yl) and 3-(substituted thien-2-yl)-γ-aminobutyric acid 1-9 in solution (D 2O) are estimated from high-resolution (300 MHz) 1H NMR coupling data. Conformations and populations of conformers are calculated by means of a modified Karplus-like relationship for the vicinal coupling constants. The results are compared with X-ray crystallographic investigations (torsion angles) and ab initio HF MO ST-3G or STO-3G* calculations. 1H NMR spectral analysis shows how 1-9 in solution retain the preferred g- conformation around the C3C4 bond, as found in the solid state, while a partial rotation is set up around the C2C3 bond: the conformations about C2C3 are all highly populated in solution. The 13C spin-lattice relaxation times are also discussed.

  8. Disappearing "T1 black holes" in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pirko, Istvan; Johnson, Aaron; Gamez, Jeff; Macura, Slobodan I; Rodriguez, Moses

    2004-05-01

    Brain MRI in multiple sclerosis (MS) frequently shows areas of hypointensity in the white matter on T1 weighted sequences ("T1 black holes"). These areas are thought to be consistent with irreversible axonal loss. In this study T1 black holes were characterized in Theiler's Murine Encephalitis Virus infection, an established model of demyelinating diseases in mice. The spectrum of TMEV is broad in different strains. C57BL/6J mice develop a self-limited brain disease, which resolves within 4-6 weeks. We followed six mice with serial MRI and MRS on days 0, 3,7,21 and 45. The studies were performed in a 7 Tesla magnet. Periventricular and parahippocampal T1 black holes seen as early as 3 days, with decreasing NAA/Cre ratio on MRS. The extent of pathology was most severe on days 3 and 7. T1 black holes are thought to be consistent with areas of irreversible axonal loss. This is challenged by our observations of resolution of T1 black holes by day 45. This was concomitant with the normalization of MRS findings in the areas of interest. We conclude that T1 black holes may represent a transient phenomenon in this model of MS. The recovery of these areas studied suggests an active repair mechanism.

  9. Dynamic Quantitative T1 Mapping in Orthotopic Brain Tumor Xenografts1

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Kelsey; Erokwu, Bernadette O.; Johansen, Mette L.; Basilion, James P.; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A.; Flask, Chris A.; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.

    2016-01-01

    Human brain tumors such as glioblastomas are typically detected using conventional, nonquantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI. In this manuscript, we tested whether dynamic quantitative T1 mapping by MRI can localize orthotopic glioma tumors in an objective manner. Quantitative T1 mapping was performed by MRI over multiple time points using the conventional contrast agent Optimark. We compared signal differences to determine the gadolinium concentration in tissues over time. The T1 parametric maps made it easy to identify the regions of contrast enhancement and thus tumor location. Doubling the typical human dose of contrast agent resulted in a clearer demarcation of these tumors. Therefore, T1 mapping of brain tumors is gadolinium dose dependent and improves detection of tumors by MRI. The use of T1 maps provides a quantitative means to evaluate tumor detection by gadolinium-based contrast agents over time. This dynamic quantitative T1 mapping technique will also enable future quantitative evaluation of various targeted MRI contrast agents. PMID:27084431

  10. Phonon induced spin relaxation times of single donors and donor clusters in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsueh, Yuling; Buch, Holger; Hollenberg, Lloyd; Simmons, Michelle; Klimeck, Gerhard; Rahman, Rajib

    2014-03-01

    The phonon induced relaxation times (T1) of electron spins bound to single phosphorous (P) donors and P donor clusters in silicon is computed using the atomistic tight-binding method. The electron-phonon Hamiltonian is directly computed from the strain dependent tight-binding Hamiltonian, and the relaxation time is computed from Fermi's Golden Rule using the donor states and the electron-phonon Hamiltonian. The self-consistent Hartree method is used to compute the multi-electron wavefunctions in donor clusters. The method takes into account the full band structure of silicon including the spin-orbit interaction, and captures both valley repopulation and single valley g-factor shifts in a unified framework. The single donor relaxation rate varies proportionally to B5, and is of the order of seconds at B =2T, both in good agreement with experimental single donor data (A. Morello et. al., Nature 467, 687 (2010)). T1 calculations in donor clusters show variations for different electron numbers and donor numbers and locations. The computed T1 in a 4P:5e donor cluster match well with a scanning tunneling microscope patterned P donor cluster (H. Buch et. al., Nature Communications 4, 2017 (2013)).

  11. MRI and (1)H MRS findings of hepatobilary changes and cholangiocarcinoma development in hamsters infected with Opisthorchis viverrini and treated with N-nitrosodimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Hanpanich, Petcharakorn; Pinlaor, Somchai; Charoensuk, Lakhanawan; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Chamgramol, Yaovalux; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Mairiang, Eimorn

    2015-11-01

    3 T MRI and (1)H MRS were useful for quantitative investigation of the serial development of hepatobiliary changes in Opisthorchis viverrini infection in hamsters, and the differential diagnosis of cholangiocacinoma (CCA) development from bile duct changes and normal condition is unclear. In this study, we investigated the serial development of hepatobiliary changes and CCAgenesis in O. viverrini-infected and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) treated hamsters (ON group) using 3 T MRI and (1)H MRS and the results were compared with those either in the O. viverrini-infected group (OV group) and uninfected normal controls. In the ON group, CCAs were first found at 9 weeks post-infection, with sizes of ~2 mm. The typical MR signal characteristics of CCA were hypo- and occasionally isointensity signal on T1-weighted images, and mild-moderate to hyper-intensity signal on T2-weighted images compared to the liver parenchyma. T2-weighted images with fat suppression revealed dilatation of the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts, and often defined the anatomical level of biliary obstruction, cystic lesions, liver abscesses, and CCA which was starting seen of these noticeable abnormalities at 5 weeks onwards. The results of fibrosis grading using MR images showed a positive correlation (r=0.90, P<0.038 by Spearman's rank correlation test) with those of the histopathological grading. In addition, 3.0 T (1)H MRS showed elevated choline and decreased lipids levels in the liver tissues of the ON group. In conclusion, MRI and (1)H MRS are useful for the quantitative investigation of the serial development of hepatobilary changes and CCA in hamsters, and are potentially useful as early diagnostic tools for CCA.

  12. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, D. K.; Somphonsane, R.; Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  13. Ferromagnetic resonance study of structure and relaxation of magnetization in NiFe/Ru superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alayo, W.; Landi, S., Jr.; Pelegrini, F.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.

    2014-01-01

    The structural properties and relaxation processes of magnetization in [Ni81Fe19(t1)/Ru(t2)]N superlattices (N=number of bilayers) were analyzed by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) with a fixed microwave frequency. One series of samples was deposited with constant NiFe layer thickness (t1) and variable Ru layer thickness (t2); the other series, with constant t2 and variable t1. A single FMR mode was observed for t2<15 Å and t1>75 Å and it has been attributed to the resonance of the exchange-coupled NiFe layers across the Ru interlayers. For the other values of t1 and t2, several FMR modes appeared and they were associated to non-coupled magnetic phases with different effective magnetization formed during the multilayer growth. The FMR linewidths were analyzed as a function of the magnetic layer thickness and a strong dependence on t1-2 was observed. It was attributed to the contribution of the two-magnon scattering mechanism for the linewidth.

  14. Orientational mobility and relaxation spectra of dendrimers: Theory and computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Markelov, Denis A; Lyulin, Sergey V; Gotlib, Yuli Y; Lyulin, Alexey V; Matveev, Vladimir V; Lahderanta, Erkki; Darinskii, Anatolij A

    2009-01-28

    The developed theory of the orientational mobility of individual segments of a perfectly branched dendrimer is used to calculate the relaxation spectrum of a dendrimer. Frequency dependences of NMR relaxation 1/T(1) and of the nuclear Overhauser effect have been theoretically calculated from the Brownian dynamics simulation data. The dendrimer segmental orientational mobility is governed by three main relaxation processes: (i) the rotation of the dendrimer as a whole, (ii) the rotation of the dendrimer's branch originated from a given segment, and (iii) the local reorientation of the segment. The internal orientational mobility of an individual dendrimer segment depends only on the topological distance between this segment and the terminal shell of the dendrimer. Characteristic relaxation times of all processes and their contributions to the segmental mobility have been calculated. The influence of the number of generations and the number of the generation shell on the relaxation times has been studied. The correlation between the characteristic times and the calculated relaxation spectrum of the dendrimer has been established.

  15. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

    PubMed

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  16. Models of violently relaxed galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, David; Tremaine, Scott; Johnstone, Doug

    1989-02-01

    The properties of spherical self-gravitating models derived from two distribution functions that incorporate, in a crude way, the physics of violent relaxation are investigated. The first distribution function is identical to the one discussed by Stiavelli and Bertin (1985) except for a change in the sign of the 'temperature', i.e., e exp(-aE) to e exp(+aE). It is shown that these 'negative temperature' models provide a much better description of the end-state of violent relaxation than 'positive temperature' models. The second distribution function is similar to the first except for a different dependence on angular momentum. Both distribution functions yield single-parameter families of models with surface density profiles very similar to the R exp 1/4 law. Furthermore, the central concentration of models in both families increases monotonically with the velocity anisotropy, as expected in systems that formed through cold collapse.

  17. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  18. Resonant relaxation in electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christopher; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2005-04-01

    We compute the leading, chiral charge-changing relaxation term in the quantum transport equations that govern electroweak baryogenesis using the closed time path formulation of nonequilibrium quantum field theory. We show that the relaxation transport coefficients may be resonantly enhanced under appropriate conditions on electroweak model parameters and that such enhancements can mitigate the impact of similar enhancements in the CP-violating source terms. We also develop a power counting in the time and energy scales entering electroweak baryogenesis and include effects through second order in ratios ɛ of the small and large scales. We illustrate the implications of the resonantly enhanced O(ɛ2) terms using the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, focusing on the interplay between the requirements of baryogenesis and constraints obtained from collider studies, precision electroweak data, and electric dipole moment searches.

  19. Parallel Comparative Studies on Mouse Toxicity of Oxide Nanoparticle- and Gadolinium-Based T1 MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Ling, Daishun; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Shuaifei; Liu, Ying; Bai, Ru; Baik, Seungmin; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2015-12-22

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents with high relaxivity are highly desirable because they can significantly increase the accuracy of diagnosis. However, they can be potentially toxic to the patients. In this study, using a mouse model, we investigate the toxic effects and subsequent tissue damage induced by three T1 MRI contrast agents: gadopentetate dimeglumine injection (GDI), a clinically used gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent (GBCAs), and oxide nanoparticle (NP)-based contrast agents, extremely small-sized iron oxide NPs (ESIONs) and manganese oxide (MnO) NPs. Biodistribution, hematological and histopathological changes, inflammation, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses are evaluated for 24 h after intravenous injection. These thorough assessments of the toxic and stress responses of these agents provide a panoramic description of safety concerns and underlying mechanisms of the toxicity of contrast agents in the body. We demonstrate that ESIONs exhibit fewer adverse effects than the MnO NPs and the clinically used GDI GBCAs, providing useful information on future applications of ESIONs as potentially safe MRI contrast agents.

  20. Error reduction and parameter optimization of the TAPIR method for fast T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, M; Steinhoff, S; Shah, N J

    2003-06-01

    A methodology is presented for the reduction of both systematic and random errors in T(1) determination using TAPIR, a Look-Locker-based fast T(1) mapping technique. The relations between various sequence parameters were carefully investigated in order to develop recipes for choosing optimal sequence parameters. Theoretical predictions for the optimal flip angle were verified experimentally. Inversion pulse imperfections were identified as the main source of systematic errors in T(1) determination with TAPIR. An effective remedy is demonstrated which includes extension of the measurement protocol to include a special sequence for mapping the inversion efficiency itself.

  1. Relaxation: A Fourth "R" for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick, A. B.

    Relaxation training helps the individual handle tension through concentrating upon efficient use of muscles. A program of progressive relaxation can be easily incorporated into elementary and secondary schools. Objectives of such a program include the following: (a) to learn to relax technically for purposes of complete rest (deep muscle…

  2. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  3. A study of dipolar interactions and dynamic processes of water molecules in tendon by 1H and 2H homonuclear and heteronuclear multiple-quantum-filtered NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Eliav, U; Navon, G

    1999-04-01

    The effect of proton exchange on the measurement of 1H-1H, 1H-2H, and 2H-2H residual dipolar interactions in water molecules in bovine Achilles tendons was investigated using double-quantum-filtered (DQF) NMR and new pulse sequences based on heteronuclear and homonuclear multiple-quantum filtering (MQF). Derivation of theoretical expressions for these techniques allowed evaluation of the 1H-1H and 1H-2H residual dipolar interactions and the proton exchange rate at a temperature of 24 degrees C and above, where no dipolar splitting is evident. The values obtained for these parameters at 24 degrees C were 300 and 50 Hz and 3000 s-1, respectively. The results for the residual dipolar interactions were verified by repeating the above measurements at a temperature of 1.5 degrees C, where the spectra of the H2O molecules were well resolved, so that the 1H-1H dipolar interaction could be determined directly from the observed splitting. Analysis of the MQF experiments at 1.5 degrees C, where the proton exchange was in the intermediate regime for the 1H-2H dipolar interaction, confirmed the result obtained at 24 degrees C for this interaction. A strong dependence of the intensities of the MQF signals on the proton exchange rate, in the intermediate and the fast exchange regimes, was observed and theoretically interpreted. This leads to the conclusion that the MQF techniques are mostly useful for tissues where the residual dipolar interaction is not significantly smaller than the proton exchange rate. Dependence of the relaxation times and signal intensities of the MQF experiments on the orientation of the tendon with respect to the magnetic field was observed and analyzed. One of the results of the theoretical analysis is that, in the fast exchange regime, the signal decay rates in the MQF experiments as well as in the spin echo or CPMG pulse sequences (T2) depend on the orientation as the square of the second-rank Legendre polynomial.

  4. Higher triplet state of fullerene C70 revealed by electron spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, Mikhail N.; Behrends, Jan; Kulik, Leonid V.

    2015-12-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation times T1 of photoexcited triplets 3C70 in glassy decalin were obtained from electron spin echo inversion recovery dependences. In the range 30-100 K, the temperature dependence of T1 was fitted by the Arrhenius law with an activation energy of 172 cm-1. This indicates that the dominant relaxation process of 3C70 is described by an Orbach-Aminov mechanism involving the higher triplet state t2 which lies 172 cm-1 above the lowest triplet state t1. Chemical modification of C70 fullerene not only decreases the intrinsic triplet lifetime by about ten times but also increases T1 by several orders of magnitude. The reason for this is the presence of a low-lying excited triplet state in 3C70 and its absence in triplet C70 derivatives. The presence of the higher triplet state in C70 is in good agreement with the previous results from phosphorescence spectroscopy.

  5. 87Rb spin-lattice relaxation times in ferroelectric-paraelectric-incommensurate phases of Rb2CoBr4 using static NMR and MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2017-04-01

    To better elucidate the structural properties of Rb2CoBr4 in paraelectric, incommensurate, and ferroelectric phases, we studied the 87Rb nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation times in laboratory frame T1 and in rotating frame T1ρ. The resonance frequency and the chemical shift do not change abruptly near the phase transition temperature of Ti = 333 K and TC = 192 K, whereas T1 and T1ρ display discontinuous changes near Ti and TC. The abrupt changes in the relaxation times near these temperatures seem to be a result of the structural phase transitions. The results are distinctly different from those reported for Rb2CoCl4.

  6. Ion