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Sample records for 1h-15n hsqc spectra

  1. Screening enoxaparin tetrasaccharide SEC fractions for 3-O-sulfo-N-sulfoglucosamine residues using [(1)H,(15)N] HSQC NMR.

    PubMed

    Beecher, Consuelo N; Manighalam, Matthew S; Nwachuku, Adanma F; Larive, Cynthia K

    2016-02-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate (HS) are important in mediating a variety of biological processes through binding to myriad different proteins. Specific structural elements along the polysaccharide chains are essential for high affinity protein binding, such as the 3-O-sulfated N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS3S) residue, a relatively rare modification essential for heparin's anticoagulant activity. The isolation of 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides from complex mixtures is challenging because of their low abundance. Although methods such as affinity chromatography are useful in isolating oligosaccharides that bind specific proteins with high affinity, other important 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides may easily be overlooked. Screening preparative-scale size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) fractions of heparin or HS digests using [(1)H,(15)N] HSQC NMR allows the identification of fractions containing 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides through the unique (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts of the GlcNS3S residue. Those SEC fractions containing 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides can then be isolated using strong anion-exchange (SAX)-HPLC. Compared with the results obtained by pooling the fractions comprising a given SEC peak, SAX-HPLC analysis of individual SEC fractions produces a less complicated chromatogram in which the 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides are enriched relative to more abundant components. The utility of this approach is demonstrated for tetrasaccharide SEC fractions of the low molecular weight heparin drug enoxaparin facilitating the isolation and characterization of an unsaturated 3-O-sulfated tetrasaccharide containing a portion of the antithrombin-III binding sequence.

  2. MUSIC in triple-resonance experiments: amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations

    PubMed

    Schubert; Smalla; Schmieder; Oschkinat

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH(2) or XH(3) (X can be (15)N or (13)C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. MUSIC in Triple-Resonance Experiments: Amino Acid Type-Selective 1H- 15N Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Mario; Smalla, Maika; Schmieder, Peter; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective 1H-15N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH2 or XH3 (X can be 15N or 13C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains.

  4. A closer look at the nitrogen next door: 1H-15N NMR methods for glycosaminoglycan structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeslay, Derek J.; Beni, Szabolcs; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, experimental conditions were presented for the detection of the N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS) NHSO3- or sulfamate 1H and 15N NMR resonances of the pharmaceutically and biologically important glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparin in aqueous solution. In the present work, we explore further the applicability of nitrogen-bound proton detection to provide structural information for GAGs. Compared to the detection of 15N chemical shifts of aminosugars through long-range couplings using the IMPACT-HNMBC pulse sequence, the more sensitive two-dimensional 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiments provided additional structural data. The IMPACT-HNMBC experiment remains a powerful tool as demonstrated by the spectrum measured for the unsubstituted amine of 3-O-sulfoglucosamine (GlcN(3S)), which cannot be observed with the 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiment due to the fast exchange of the amino group protons with solvent. The 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY NMR spectrum reported for the mixture of model compounds GlcNS and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) demonstrate the broad utility of this approach. Measurements for the synthetic pentasaccharide drug Arixtra® (Fondaparinux sodium) in aqueous solution illustrate the power of this NMR pulse sequence for structural characterization of highly similar N-sulfoglucosamine residues in GAG-derived oligosaccharides.

  5. UV-visible and (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopic studies of colorimetric thiosemicarbazide anion sensors.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kristina N; Makuc, Damjan; Podborska, Agnieszka; Szaciłowski, Konrad; Plavec, Janez; Magri, David C

    2015-02-14

    Four model thiosemicarbazide anion chemosensors containing three N-H bonds, substituted with phenyl and/or 4-nitrophenyl units, were synthesised and studied for their anion binding abilities with hydroxide, fluoride, acetate, dihydrogen phosphate and chloride. The anion binding properties were studied in DMSO and 9 : 1 DMSO-H2O by UV-visible absorption and (1)H/(13)C/(15)N NMR spectroscopic techniques and corroborated with DFT studies. Significant changes were observed in the UV-visible absorption spectra with all anions, except for chloride, accompanied by dramatic colour changes visible to the naked eye. These changes were determined to be due to the deprotonation of the central N-H proton and not due to hydrogen bonding based on (1)H/(15)N NMR titration studies with acetate in DMSO-d6-0.5% water. Direct evidence for deprotonation was confirmed by the disappearance of the central thiourea proton and the formation of acetic acid. DFT and charge distribution calculations suggest that for all four compounds the central N-H proton is the most acidic. Hence, the anion chemosensors operate by a deprotonation mechanism of the central N-H proton rather than by hydrogen bonding as is often reported.

  6. ARTSY-J: Convenient and precise measurement of 3JHNHα couplings in medium-size proteins from TROSY-HSQC spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Julien; Ying, Jinfa; Shen, Yang; Torchia, Dennis A.; Bax, Ad

    2016-07-01

    A new and convenient method, named ARTSY-J, is introduced that permits extraction of the 3JHNHα couplings in proteins from the relative intensities in a pair of 15N-1H TROSY-HSQC spectra. The pulse scheme includes 3JHNHα dephasing of the narrower TROSY 1HN-{15N} doublet component during a delay, integrated into the regular two-dimensional TROSY-HSQC pulse scheme, and compares the obtained intensity with a reference spectrum where 3JHNHα dephasing is suppressed. The effect of passive 1Hα spin flips downscales the apparent 3JHNHα coupling by a uniform factor that depends approximately linearly on both the duration of the 3JHNHα dephasing delay and the 1H-1H cross relaxation rate. Using such a correction factor, which accounts for the effects of both inhomogeneity of the radiofrequency field and 1Hα spin flips, agreement between prior and newly measured values for the small model protein GB3 is better than 0.3 Hz. Measurement for the HIV-1 protease homodimer (22 kDa) yields 3JHNHα values that agree to better than 0.7 Hz with predictions made on the basis of a previously parameterized Karplus equation. Although for Gly residues the two individual 3JHNHα couplings cannot be extracted from a single set of ARTSY-J spectra, the measurement provides valuable ϕ angle information.

  7. ARTSY-J: Convenient and precise measurement of (3)JHNHα couplings in medium-size proteins from TROSY-HSQC spectra.

    PubMed

    Roche, Julien; Ying, Jinfa; Shen, Yang; Torchia, Dennis A; Bax, Ad

    2016-07-01

    A new and convenient method, named ARTSY-J, is introduced that permits extraction of the (3)JHNHα couplings in proteins from the relative intensities in a pair of (15)N-(1)H TROSY-HSQC spectra. The pulse scheme includes (3)JHNHα dephasing of the narrower TROSY (1)H(N)-{(15)N} doublet component during a delay, integrated into the regular two-dimensional TROSY-HSQC pulse scheme, and compares the obtained intensity with a reference spectrum where (3)JHNHα dephasing is suppressed. The effect of passive (1)H(α) spin flips downscales the apparent (3)JHNHα coupling by a uniform factor that depends approximately linearly on both the duration of the (3)JHNHα dephasing delay and the (1)H-(1)H cross relaxation rate. Using such a correction factor, which accounts for the effects of both inhomogeneity of the radiofrequency field and (1)H(α) spin flips, agreement between prior and newly measured values for the small model protein GB3 is better than 0.3Hz. Measurement for the HIV-1 protease homodimer (22kDa) yields (3)JHNHα values that agree to better than 0.7Hz with predictions made on the basis of a previously parameterized Karplus equation. Although for Gly residues the two individual (3)JHNHα couplings cannot be extracted from a single set of ARTSY-J spectra, the measurement provides valuable ϕ angle information.

  8. Identification of allosteric PIF-pocket ligands for PDK1 using NMR-based fragment screening and 1H-15N TROSY experiments.

    PubMed

    Stockman, Brian J; Kothe, Michael; Kohls, Darcy; Weibley, Laura; Connolly, Brendan J; Sheils, Alissa L; Cao, Qing; Cheng, Alan C; Yang, Lily; Kamath, Ajith V; Ding, Yuan-Hua; Charlton, Maura E

    2009-02-01

    Aberrant activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway because of genetic mutations of essential signalling proteins has been associated with human diseases including cancer and diabetes. The pivotal role of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 in the PI3K signalling cascade has made it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. The N-terminal lobe of the 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 catalytic domain contains a docking site which recognizes the non-catalytic C-terminal hydrophobic motifs of certain substrate kinases. The binding of substrate in this so-called PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket allows interaction with 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 and enhanced phosphorylation of downstream kinases. NMR spectroscopy was used to a screen 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 domain construct against a library of chemically diverse fragments in order to identify small, ligand-efficient fragments that might interact at either the ATP site or the allosteric PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket. While majority of the fragment hits were determined to be ATP-site binders, several fragments appeared to interact with the PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket. Ligand-induced changes in 1H-15N TROSY spectra acquired using uniformly 15N-enriched PDK1 provided evidence to distinguish ATP-site from PDK1 Interacting Fragment-site binding. Caliper assay data and 19F NMR assay data on the PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket fragments and structurally related compounds identified them as potential allosteric activators of PDK1 function.

  9. 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of light organ-associated fatty acid-binding protein of Taiwanese fireflies.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kai-Li; Lee, Yi-Zong; Chen, Yun-Ru; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2016-04-01

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are a family of proteins that modulate the transfer of various fatty acids in the cytosol and constitute a significant portion in many energy-consuming cells. The ligand binding properties and specific functions of a particular type of FABP seem to be diverse and depend on the respective binding cavity as well as the cell type from which this protein is derived. Previously, a novel FABP (lcFABP; lc: Luciola cerata) was identified in the light organ of Taiwanese fireflies. The lcFABP was proved to possess fatty acids binding capabilities, especially for fatty acids of length C14-C18. However, the structural details are unknown, and the structure-function relationship has remained to be further investigated. In this study, we finished the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of (15)N/(13)C-enriched lcFABP by solution NMR spectroscopy. In addition, the secondary structure distribution was revealed based on the backbone N, H, Cα, Hα, C and side chain Cβ assignments. These results can provide the basis for further structural exploration of lcFABP.

  10. (1)H, (15)N, (13)C backbone resonance assignments of human soluble catechol O-methyltransferase in complex with S-adenosyl-L-methionine and 3,5-dinitrocatechol.

    PubMed

    Czarnota, Sylwia; Baxter, Nicola J; Cliff, Matthew J; Waltho, Jonathan P; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2017-04-01

    Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an enzyme that plays a major role in catechol neurotransmitter deactivation. Inhibition of COMT can increase neurotransmitter levels, which provides a means of treatment for Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and depression. COMT exists as two isozymes: a soluble cytoplasmic form (S-COMT), expressed in the liver and kidneys and a membrane-bound form (MB-COMT), found mostly in the brain. Here we report the backbone (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of S-COMT in complex with S-adenosyl-L-methionine, 3,5-dinitrocatechol and Mg(2+). Assignments were obtained by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. In total, 97 % of all backbone resonances were assigned in the complex, with 205 out of a possible 215 residues assigned in the (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectrum. Prediction of solution secondary structure from a chemical shift analysis using the TALOS+ webserver is in good agreement with published X-ray crystal structures.

  11. Simultaneous quantification and identification of individual chemicals in metabolite mixtures by two-dimensional extrapolated time-zero (1)H-(13)C HSQC (HSQC(0)).

    PubMed

    Hu, Kaifeng; Westler, William M; Markley, John L

    2011-02-16

    Quantitative one-dimensional (1D) (1)H NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for determining metabolite concentrations because of the direct proportionality of signal intensity to the quantity of analyte. However, severe signal overlap in 1D (1)H NMR spectra of complex metabolite mixtures hinders accurate quantification. Extension of 1D (1)H to 2D (1)H-(13)C HSQC leads to the dispersion of peaks along the (13)C dimension and greatly alleviates peak overlapping. Although peaks are better resolved in 2D (1)H-(13)C HSQC than in 1D (1)H NMR spectra, the simple proportionality of cross peaks to the quantity of individual metabolites is lost by resonance-specific signal attenuation during the coherence transfer periods. As a result, peaks for individual metabolites usually are quantified by reference to calibration data collected from samples of known concentration. We show here that data from a series of HSQC spectra acquired with incremented repetition times (the time between the end of the first (1)H excitation pulse to the beginning of data acquisition) can be extrapolated back to zero time to yield a time-zero 2D (1)H-(13)C HSQC spectrum (HSQC(0)) in which signal intensities are proportional to concentrations of individual metabolites. Relative concentrations determined from cross peak intensities can be converted to absolute concentrations by reference to an internal standard of known concentration. Clustering of the HSQC(0) cross peaks by their normalized intensities identifies those corresponding to metabolites present at a given concentration, and this information can assist in assigning these peaks to specific compounds. The concentration measurement for an individual metabolite can be improved by averaging the intensities of multiple, nonoverlapping cross peaks assigned to that metabolite.

  12. MetaboQuant: a tool combining individual peak calibration and outlier detection for accurate metabolite quantification in 1D (1)H and (1)H-(13)C HSQC NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Klein, Matthias S; Oefner, Peter J; Gronwald, Wolfram

    2013-05-01

    Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used to analyze complex mixtures of organic compounds such as biological fluids and tissue extracts. Targeted profiling approaches with reliable compound quantitifcation are hampered, however, by signal overlap and other interferences. Here, we present a tool named MetaboQuant for automated compound quantification from pre-processed 1D and 2D heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) NMR spectral data and concomitant validation of results. Performance of MetaboQuant was tested on a urinary spike-in data set and compared with other quantification strategies. The use of individual calibration factors in combination with the validation algorithms of MetaboQuant raises the reliability of the quantification results. MetaboQuant can be downloaded at http://genomics.uni-regensburg.de/site/institute/software/metaboquant/ as stand-alone software for Windows or run on other operating systems from within Matlab. Separate software for peak fitting and integration is necessary in order to use MetaboQuant.

  13. 13C-NOESY-HSQC with Split Carbon Evolution for Increased Resolution with Uniformly Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, Matthias; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst

    1998-06-01

    Two new pulse sequences are presented for the recording of 2D13C-HSQC and 3D13C-NOESY-HSQC experiments, containing two consecutive carbon evolution periods. The two periods are separated by az-filter which creates a clean CxHz-quantum state for evolution in the second period. Each period is incremented (in anon-constant-time fashion) only to the extent that the defocusing of carbon inphase magnetization throughJ-coupling with neighboring carbons remains insignificant. Therefore,13C homonuclearJ-couplings are rendered ineffective, reducing the loss of signal and peak splitting commonly associated with long13C evolution times. The two periods are incremented according to a special acquisition protocol employing a13C-13C gradient echo to yield a data set analogous to one obtained by evolution over the added duration of both periods. The spectra recorded with the new technique on uniformly13C-labeled proteins at twice the evolution time of the standard13C-HSQC experiment display a nearly twofold enhancement of resolution in the carbon domain, while maintaining a good sensitivity even in the case of large proteins. Applied to the IIAManprotein ofE. coli(31 kDa), the13C-HSQC experiment recorded with a carbon evolution time of 2 × 8 ms showed a 36% decrease in linewidths compared to the standard13C-HSQC experiment, and theS/Nratio of representative cross-peaks was reduced to 40%. This reduction reflects mostly the typical loss of intensity observed when recording with an increased resolution. The13C-NOESY-HSQC experiment derived from the13C-HSQC experiment yielded additional NOE restraints between resonances which previously had been unresolved.

  14. Suppression of phase and amplitude J(HH) modulations in HSQC experiments.

    PubMed

    Castañar, Laura; Sistaré, Eduard; Virgili, Albert; Williamson, R Thomas; Parella, Teodor

    2015-02-01

    The amplitude and the phase of cross peaks in conventional 2D HSQC experiments are modulated by both proton-proton, J(HH), and proton-carbon, (1)J(CH), coupling constants. It is shown by spectral simulation and experimentally that J(HH) interferences are suppressed in a novel perfect-HSQC pulse scheme that incorporates perfect-echo INEPT periods. The improved 2D spectra afford pure in-phase cross peaks with respect to (1)J(CH) and J(HH), irrespective of the experiment delay optimization. In addition, peak volumes are not attenuated by the influence of J(HH), rendering practical issues such as phase correction, multiplet analysis, and signal integration more appropriate.

  15. CLIP-ASAP-HSQC for fast and accurate extraction of one-bond couplings from isotropic and partially aligned molecules.

    PubMed

    Becker, Johanna; Luy, Burkhard

    2015-11-01

    Fast measurement of heteronuclear one-bond couplings, a class of NMR parameters valuable for structure elucidation, is highly desirable, especially if samples undergo chemical reactions or dynamic processes are observed. Methods presented so far face severe limitations in terms of resolution, accessible bandwidth, and sensitivity. We present the CLean InPhase-Acceleration by Sharing Adjacent Polarization-HSQC (CLIP-ASAP-HSQC) pulse sequence that allows fast acquisition of spectra with clean inphase multiplets in about 25 s. The performance in terms of accurate extraction of one-bond couplings is demonstrated on three test samples including partially aligned molecules.

  16. 13C and 15N CP/MAS, 1H-15N SCT CP/MAS and FTIR spectroscopy as tools for qualitative detection of the presence of zwitterionic and non-ionic forms of ansa-macrolide 3-formylrifamycin SV and its derivatives in solid state.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Piotr; Pyta, Krystian; Klich, Katarzyna; Schilf, Wojciech; Kamieński, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    (13)C, (15)N CP/MAS, including (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N short contact time CP/MAS experiments, and FTIR methods were applied for detailed structural characterization of ansa-macrolides as 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its derivatives (2-6) in crystal and in powder forms. Although HPLC chromatograms for 2/CH3 OH and 2/CH3 CCl3 were the same for rifampicin crystals dissolved in respective solvents, the UV-vis data recorded for them were different in 300-375 nm region. Detailed solid state (13)C and (15)N CP/MAS NMR and FTIR studies revealed that rifampicin (2), in contrast to 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its amino derivatives (3-6), can occur in pure non-ionic or zwitterionic forms in crystal and in pure these forms or a mixture of them in a powder. Multinuclear CP/MAS and FTIR studies demonstrated also that 3-6 derivatives were present exclusively in pure zwitterionic forms, both in powder and in crystal. On the basis of the solid state NMR and FTIR studies, two conformers of 3-formylrifamycin SV were detected in powder form due to the different orientations of carbonyl group of amide moiety. The PM6 molecular modeling at the semi-empirical level of theory, allowed visualization the most energetically favorable non-ionic and zwitterionic forms of 1-6 antibiotics, strongly stabilized via intramolecular H-bonds. FTIR studies indicated that the originally adopted forms of these type antibiotics in crystal or in powder are stable in standard laboratory conditions in time. The results presented point to the fact that because of a possible presence of two forms of rifampicin (compound 2), quantification of the content of this antibiotic in relevant pharmaceuticals needs caution.

  17. Estimation of procyanidin/prodelphinidin and cis/trans flavanol ratios of condensed tannin fractions by 1H-13C HSQC NMR spectroscopy: Correlation with thiolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integration of cross-peak contours of H/C-2’,6’ signals from prodelphinidin (PD) and of H/C-6’ signals from procyanidin (PC) units in 1H-13C HSQC nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of condensed tannins yielded nuclei-adjusted PC/PD estimates that were highly correlated with PC/PD ratios obtain...

  18. The Heteronuclear Single-Quantum Correlation (HSQC) Experiment: Vectors versus Product Operators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Vega-Herna´ndez, Karen; Antuch, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A vectorial representation of the full sequence of events occurring during the 2D-NMR heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) experiment is presented. The proposed vectorial representation conveys an understanding of the magnetization evolution during the HSQC pulse sequence for those who have little or no quantum mechanical background.…

  19. Measurement of absolute concentrations of individual compounds in metabolite mixtures by gradient-selective time-zero 1H-13C HSQC with two concentration references and fast maximum likelihood reconstruction analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kaifeng; Ellinger, James J; Chylla, Roger A; Markley, John L

    2011-12-15

    Time-zero 2D (13)C HSQC (HSQC(0)) spectroscopy offers advantages over traditional 2D NMR for quantitative analysis of solutions containing a mixture of compounds because the signal intensities are directly proportional to the concentrations of the constituents. The HSQC(0) spectrum is derived from a series of spectra collected with increasing repetition times within the basic HSQC block by extrapolating the repetition time to zero. Here we present an alternative approach to data collection, gradient-selective time-zero (1)H-(13)C HSQC(0) in combination with fast maximum likelihood reconstruction (FMLR) data analysis and the use of two concentration references for absolute concentration determination. Gradient-selective data acquisition results in cleaner spectra, and NMR data can be acquired in both constant-time and non-constant-time mode. Semiautomatic data analysis is supported by the FMLR approach, which is used to deconvolute the spectra and extract peak volumes. The peak volumes obtained from this analysis are converted to absolute concentrations by reference to the peak volumes of two internal reference compounds of known concentration: DSS (4,4-dimethyl-4-silapentane-1-sulfonic acid) at the low concentration limit (which also serves as chemical shift reference) and MES (2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) at the high concentration limit. The linear relationship between peak volumes and concentration is better defined with two references than with one, and the measured absolute concentrations of individual compounds in the mixture are more accurate. We compare results from semiautomated gsHSQC(0) with those obtained by the original manual phase-cycled HSQC(0) approach. The new approach is suitable for automatic metabolite profiling by simultaneous quantification of multiple metabolites in a complex mixture.

  20. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Cox, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS 15N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by 15N NMR. Liquid state 15N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (1H-15N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  1. Detailed Chemical Composition of Condensed Tannins via Quantitative (31)P NMR and HSQC Analyses: Acacia catechu, Schinopsis balansae, and Acacia mearnsii.

    PubMed

    Crestini, Claudia; Lange, Heiko; Bianchetti, Giulia

    2016-09-23

    The chemical composition of Acacia catechu, Schinopsis balansae, and Acacia mearnsii proanthocyanidins has been determined using a novel analytical approach that rests on the concerted use of quantitative (31)P NMR and two-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. This approach has offered significant detailed information regarding the structure and purity of these complex and often elusive proanthocyanidins. More specifically, rings A, B, and C of their flavan-3-ol units show well-defined and resolved absorbance regions in both the quantitative (31)P NMR and HSQC spectra. By integrating each of these regions in the (31)P NMR spectra, it is possible to identify the oxygenation patterns of the flavan-3-ol units. At the same time it is possible to acquire a fingerprint of the proanthocyanidin sample and evaluate its purity via the HSQC information. This analytical approach is suitable for both the purified natural product proanthocyanidins and their commercial analogues. Overall, this effort demonstrates the power of the concerted use of these two NMR techniques for the structural elucidation of natural products containing labile hydroxy protons and a carbon framework that can be traced out via HSQC.

  2. A fast approach to 3D HSQC-based spectroscopy based on a Fourier phase encoding of pre-targeted resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yulan; Smith, Pieter E. S.; Zhang, Zhiyong; Frydman, Lucio

    2017-01-01

    Multidimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) provides a unique window into structure and dynamics at an atomic level. Traditionally, given the scan-by-scan time modulation involved in these experiments, the duration of nD NMR increases exponentially with spectral dimensionality. In addition, acquisition times increase as the number of spectral elements being sought in each indirect domain - given by the ratio between the spectral bandwidth being targeted and the resolution desired. These long sampling times can be substantially reduced by exploiting information that is often available from lower-dimensionality acquisitions. This work presents a novel approach that exploits previous 2D information to speed up the acquisition of 3D spectra, based on what we denote as a Time-Optimized FouriEr Encoding (TOFEE) of pre-targeted peaks. Such 3D TOFEE experiments, which present points in common with Hadamard-encoded 3D acquisitions, do not necessarily require more scans than their 2D counterparts. This is here demonstrated based on extensions of 2D Heteronuclear Single-quantum Coherence (HSQC) experiments, to 3D HSQC-TOCSY or 3D HSQC-NOESY acquisitions. The theoretical basis of this new approach is given, and experimental demonstrations are presented on small molecule and protein-based model systems.

  3. Perfect 1JCH-resolved HSQC: Efficient measurement of one-bond proton-carbon coupling constants along the indirect dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcó, N.; Souza, A. A.; Nolis, P.; Gil, R. R.; Parella, T.

    2017-03-01

    A versatile 1JCH-resolved HSQC pulse scheme for the speedy, accurate and automated determination of one-bond proton-carbon coupling constants is reported. The implementation of a perfectBIRD element allows a straightforward measurement from the clean doublets obtained along the highly resolved F1 dimension, even for each individual 1JCHa and 1JCHb in diastereotopic HaCHb methylene groups. Real-time homodecoupling during acquisition and other alternatives to minimize accidental signal overlapping in overcrowded spectra are also discussed.

  4. Quantitative 2D HSQC NMR determination of polymer structures by selecting suitable internal standard references.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liming; Gellerstedt, Göran

    2007-01-01

    A new analytical method based on the 2D HSQC NMR sequence is presented, which can be applied for quantitative structural determination of complicated polymers. The influence of T1 and T2 relaxations, off-resonance effects, coupling constants and homonuclear couplings are discussed. It was found that the T2 values measured on polymeric samples with the conventional HSQC-CPMG sequence could not be used to correct the errors caused by T2 relaxations during the polarization transfer delay. A unique way of selecting the proper internal standard reference signal(s) is therefore proposed to eliminate the major errors caused by T2 relaxations, resonance offsets, coupling constant deviations and homonuclear couplings. Two polymer samples, a cellulose triacetate and an acetylated lignin, have been used to illustrate the principles. The methodology developed in this work is robust to instrument miss-setting and it can find wide-spread applications in areas where a quantitative analysis of structurally complicated polymers is necessary.

  5. Quantitative two-dimensional HSQC experiment for high magnetic field NMR spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskela, Harri; Heikkilä, Outi; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Heikkinen, Sami

    2010-01-01

    The finite RF power available on carbon channel in proton-carbon correlation experiments leads to non-uniform cross peak intensity response across carbon chemical shift range. Several classes of broadband pulses are available that alleviate this problem. Adiabatic pulses provide an excellent magnetization inversion over a large bandwidth, and very recently, novel phase-modulated pulses have been proposed that perform 90° and 180° magnetization rotations with good offset tolerance. Here, we present a study how these broadband pulses (adiabatic and phase-modulated) can improve quantitative application of the heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) experiment on high magnetic field strength NMR spectrometers. Theoretical and experimental examinations of the quantitative, offset-compensated, CPMG-adjusted HSQC (Q-OCCAHSQC) experiment are presented. The proposed experiment offers a formidable improvement to the offset performance; 13C offset-dependent standard deviation of the peak intensity was below 6% in range of ±20 kHz. This covers the carbon chemical shift range of 150 ppm, which contains the protonated carbons excluding the aldehydes, for 22.3 T NMR magnets. A demonstration of the quantitative analysis of a fasting blood plasma sample obtained from a healthy volunteer is given.

  6. Qualification of HSQC methods for quantitative composition of heparin and low molecular weight heparins.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Lucio; Boccardi, Giovanni; Torri, Giangiacomo; Karfunkle, Michael; Macchi, Eleonora; Muzi, Laura; Keire, David; Guerrini, Marco

    2017-03-20

    An NMR HSQC method has recently been proposed for the quantitative determination of the mono- and disaccharide subunits of heparin and low molecular weight heparins (LMWH). The focus of the current study was the validation of this procedure to make the 2D-NMR method suitable for pharmaceutical quality control applications. Pre-validation work investigated the effects of several experimental parameters to assess robustness and to optimize critical factors. Important experimental parameters were pulse sequence selection, equilibration interval between pulse trains and temperature. These observations were needed so that the NMR method was sufficiently understood to enable continuous improvement. A standard validation study on heparin then examined linearity, repeatability, intermediate precision and limits of detection and quantitation; selected validation parameters were also determined for LMWH.

  7. Exploring the use of Generalized Indirect Covariance to reconstruct pure shift NMR spectra: Current Pros and Cons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredi, André; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Martin, Gary E.; Parella, Teodor

    2016-05-01

    The current Pros and Cons of a processing protocol to generate pure chemical shift NMR spectra using Generalized Indirect Covariance are presented and discussed. The transformation of any standard 2D homonuclear and heteronuclear spectrum to its pure shift counterpart by using a reference DIAG spectrum is described. Reconstructed pure shift NMR spectra of NOESY, HSQC, HSQC-TOCSY and HSQMBC experiments are reported for the target molecule strychnine.

  8. Exploring the use of Generalized Indirect Covariance to reconstruct pure shift NMR spectra: Current Pros and Cons.

    PubMed

    Fredi, André; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Martin, Gary E; Parella, Teodor

    2016-05-01

    The current Pros and Cons of a processing protocol to generate pure chemical shift NMR spectra using Generalized Indirect Covariance are presented and discussed. The transformation of any standard 2D homonuclear and heteronuclear spectrum to its pure shift counterpart by using a reference DIAG spectrum is described. Reconstructed pure shift NMR spectra of NOESY, HSQC, HSQC-TOCSY and HSQMBC experiments are reported for the target molecule strychnine.

  9. 1H, 15N and 13C backbone resonance assignments of the archetypal serpin α1-antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Nyon, Mun Peak; Kirkpatrick, John; Cabrita, Lisa D; Christodoulou, John; Gooptu, Bibek

    2012-10-01

    Alpha(1)-antitrypsin is a 45-kDa (394-residue) serine protease inhibitor synthesized by hepatocytes, which is released into the circulatory system and protects the lung from the actions of neutrophil elastase via a conformational transition within a dynamic inhibitory mechanism. Relatively common point mutations subvert this transition, causing polymerisation of α(1)-antitrypsin and deficiency of the circulating protein, predisposing carriers to severe lung and liver disease. We have assigned the backbone resonances of α(1)-antitrypsin using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. These assignments provide the starting point for a detailed solution state characterization of the structural properties of this highly dynamic protein via NMR methods.

  10. 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of an intramolecular Lmo2-LIM2/Ldb1-LID complex.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson-White, Lorna E; Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Kwan, Ann H; Ryan, Daniel P; Mackay, Joel P; Matthews, Jacqueline M

    2010-10-01

    Lmo2 is a LIM-only protein involved in hematopoiesis and the development of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Here we report backbone and side chain NMR assignments for an engineered intramolecular complex of the C-terminal LIM domain from Lmo2 tethered to the LIM interaction domain (LID) from LIM domain binding protein 1 (Ldb1).

  11. 1H-13C HSQC NMR spectroscopy for estimating procyanidin/prodelphinidin and cis/trans flavan-3-ol ratios of condensed tannin samples: correlation with thiolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies with a diverse array of 22 condensed tannin (CT) fractions from 9 plant species demonstrated that procyanidin/prodelphinidin (PC/PD) and cis/trans flavan-3-ol ratios can be appraised by 1H-13C HSQC NMR. The method was developed from fractions containing 44 to ~100% CT, PC/PD ratios ranging f...

  12. EPIC- and CHANCE-HSQC: Two 15N Photo-CIDNP-Enhanced Pulse Sequences for the Sensitive Detection of Solvent-Exposed Tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Sekhar, Ashok; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) of nuclei other than 1H offers a tremendous potential for sensitivity enhancement in liquid state NMR under mild, physiologically relevant conditions. Photo-CIDNP enhancements of 15N magnetization are much larger than those typically observed for 1H. However, the low gyromagnetic ratio of 15N prevents a full fruition of the potential signal-to-noise gains attainable via 15N photo-CIDNP. Here, we propose two novel pulse sequences, EPIC- and CHANCE-HSQC, tailored to overcome the above limitation. EPIC-HSQC exploits the strong 1H polarization and its subsequent transfer to non-equilibrium Nz magnetization prior to 15N photo-CIDNP laser irradiation. CHANCE-HSQC synergistically combines 1H and 15N photo-CIDNP. The above pulse sequences, tested on tryptophan (Trp) and the Trp-containing protein apoHmpH, were found to display up to two-fold higher sensitivity than the reference NPE-SE-HSQC pulse train (based on simple 15N photo-CIDNP followed by N-H polarization transfer), and up to a ca. 3-fold increase in sensitivity over the corresponding dark pulse schemes (lacking laser irradiation). The observed effects are consistent with the predictions from a theoretical model of photo-CIDNP and prove the potential of 15N and 1H photo-CIDNP in liquid state heteronuclear correlation NMR. PMID:19643649

  13. 1H and 15N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton

    PubMed Central

    Pomin, Vitor H.

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially 1H-15N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the 1H-15N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate 15N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS 15N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via 1H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D 1H and 2D 1H-15N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  14. Sequential assignment of 1H, 15N, 13C resonances and secondary structure of human calmodulin-like protein determined by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, H.; Rogers, M. S.; Schleucher, J.; Edlund, U.; Strehler, E. E.; Sethson, I.

    1998-01-01

    Human calmodulin-like protein (CLP) is closely related to vertebrate calmodulin, yet its unique cell specific expression pattern, overlapping but divergent biochemical properties, and specific target proteins suggest that it is not an isoform of calmodulin. To gain insight into the structural differences that may underlie the difference target specificities and biochemical properties of CLP when compared to calmodulin, we determined the sequential backbone assignment and associated secondary structure of 144 out of the 148 residues of Ca2+-CLP by using multinuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Despite a very high overall degree of structural similarity between CLP and calmodulin, a number of significant differences were found mainly in the length of alpha-helices and in the central nonhelical flexible region. Interestingly, the regions of greatest primary sequence divergence between CLP and calmodulin in helices III and VIII displayed only minor secondary structure differences. The data suggest that the distinct differences in target specificity and biochemical properties of CLP and calmodulin result from the sum of several minor structural and side-chain changes spread over multiple domains in these proteins. PMID:9828009

  15. 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of domain 5 of Dictyostelium discoideum gelation factor (ABP-120) in its native and 8M urea-denatured states.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Cabrita, Lisa D; Christodoulou, John; Dobson, Christopher M

    2009-06-01

    The gelation factor from Dictyostelium discoideum (ABP-120) is an actin binding protein consisting of six immunoglobulin (Ig) domains in the C-terminal rod domain. We have recently used the pair of domains 5 and 6 of ABP-120 as a model system for studying multi-domain nascent chain folding on the ribosome. Here we present the NMR assignments of domain 5 in its native and 8M urea-denatured states.

  16. 1H, 15N, 13C resonance assignment of 9.7 M urea-denatured state of the GTPase effector domain (GED) of dynamin.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Jeetender; Sharma, Shilpy; Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2009-06-01

    The GTPase effector domain (GED) of dynamin, a multi-domain protein involved in endocytosis, forms a megadalton-sized self-assembly (even at micromolar concentrations) in native conditions in vitro. While such large assemblies have remained inaccessible to detailed NMR structural characterization, till date, a significant recent achievement has been the elucidation of the GED association pathway starting from a Gdn-HCl denatured monomer. Since, the nature of the denaturant has a strong influence on the conformational preferences in the denatured states, and hence on the association pathways, or even on the final assembly, we report here the NMR resonance assignment of 9.7 M urea-denatured GED from Homo sapiens. This will form the basis for the characterization of the association pathways and the final assembly driven by urea dilution.

  17. 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shift assignments of cyanobacteriochrome NpR6012g4 in the red-absorbing dark state.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qinhong; Lim, Sunghyuk; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Clark Lagarias, J; Ames, James B

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteriochrome (CBCR) photosensory proteins are phytochrome homologs using bilin chromophores for light sensing across the visible spectrum. NpR6012g4 is a CBCR from Nostoc punctiforme that serves as a model for a widespread CBCR subfamily with red/green photocycles. We report NMR chemical shift assignments for both the protein backbone and side-chain resonances of the red-absorbing dark state of NpR6012g4 (BMRB no. 26582).

  18. Sequence-specific 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of Art v 1: a proline-rich allergen of Artemisia vulgaris pollen.

    PubMed

    Razzera, Guilherme; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Almeida, Marcius S; Ferreira, Fatima; Almeida, Fabio C L; Valente, Ana Paula

    2009-06-01

    Art v 1 is the major allergen of Artemisia vulgaris. The IgE raised against Art v 1 not only can cross-react with other proteins from the Asteraceae family members but also with components of various forms of food. Art v 1 is an important target for immunotherapy strategies, including vaccination with hypoallergenic derivatives or chimeras. We report the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of the recombinant Art v 1 and identification of secondary structures based on (13)C chemical shifts.

  19. Access to experimentally infeasible spectra by pure-shift NMR covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredi, André; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Parella, Teodor

    2016-09-01

    Covariance processing is a versatile processing tool to generate synthetic NMR spectral representations without the need to acquire time-consuming experimental datasets. Here we show that even experimentally prohibited NMR spectra can be reconstructed by introducing key features of a reference 1D CHn-edited spectrum into standard 2D spectra. This general procedure is illustrated with the calculation of experimentally infeasible multiplicity-edited pure-shift NMR spectra of some very popular homonuclear (ME-psCOSY and ME-psTOCSY) and heteronuclear (ME-psHSQC-TOCSY and ME-psHMBC) experiments.

  20. A Solution NMR Investigation into the Murine Amelogenin Splice-Variant LRAP (Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein).

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Roberts, Jacky; Snead, Malcolm L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2010-09-01

    Amelogenins are the dominant proteins present in ameloblasts during the early stages of enamel biomineralization, making up >90% of the matrix protein. Along with the full-length protein there are several splice-variant isoforms of amelogenin present including LRAP (Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein), a protein that consists of the first 33 and the last 26 residues of full-length amelogenin. Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy we have assigned the 1H-15N HSQC spectrum of murine LRAP (rp(H)LRAP) in 2% acetic acid at pH 3.0 by making extensive use of previous chemical shift assignments for full-length murine amelogenin (rp(H)M180). This correlation was possible because LRAP, like the full-length protein, is intrinsically disordered under these solution conditions. The major difference between the 1H-15N HSQC spectra of rp(H)M180 and rp(H)LRAP was an additional set of amide resonances for each of the seven non-proline residues between S12* and Y12 at the N-terminus of rp(H)LRAP indicating that the N-terminal region of LRAP exists in two different conformations. Analysis of the proline carbon chemical shifts suggest that the molecular basis for the two states is not a cis-trans isomerization of one or more of the proline residues in the N-terminal region and is likely due to a slow exchange process. As observed with rp(H)M180, residue specific changes in molecular dynamics, manifested by the reduction in intensity and disappearance of 1H-15N HSQC cross peaks, were observed with the addition of NaCl to rp(H)LRAP. These perturbations may signal early events governing supramolecular self-assembly of rp(H)LRAP into nanospheres. However, the different pattern of 1H-15N HSQC cross peak perturbation between rp(H)LRAP and rp(H)M180 in high salt suggest that the termini may behave differently in their respective nanospheres, and perhaps, these differences account for the cell signaling properties attributable to LRAP but not the full-length protein.

  1. A solution NMR investigation into the murine amelogenin splice-variant LRAP (Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein).

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Tarasevich, Barbara J; Roberts, Jacky; Snead, Malcolm L; Shaw, Wendy J

    2010-09-01

    Amelogenins are the dominant proteins present in ameloblasts during the early stages of enamel biomineralization, making up >90% of the matrix protein. Along with the full-length protein there are several splice-variant isoforms of amelogenin present including LRAP (Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein), a protein that consists of the first 33 and the last 26 residues of full-length amelogenin. Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy we have assigned the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum of murine LRAP (rp(H)LRAP) in 2% acetic acid at pH 3.0 by making extensive use of previous chemical shift assignments for full-length murine amelogenin (rp(H)M180). This correlation was possible because LRAP, like the full-length protein, is intrinsically disordered under these solution conditions. The major difference between the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of rp(H)M180 and rp(H)LRAP was an additional set of amide resonances for each of the seven non-proline residues between S12 and Y12 near the N-terminus of rp(H)LRAP indicating that the N-terminal region of LRAP exists in two different conformations. Analysis of the proline carbon chemical shifts suggests that the molecular basis for the two states is not a cis-trans isomerization of one or more of the proline residues in the N-terminal region. Starting from 2% acetic acid, where rp(H)LRAP was monomeric in solution, NaCl addition effected residue specific changes in molecular dynamics manifested by the reduction in intensity and disappearance of (1)H-(15)N HSQC cross peaks. As observed for the full-length protein, these perturbations may signal early events governing supramolecular self-assembly of rp(H)LRAP into nanospheres. However, the different patterns of (1)H-(15)N HSQC cross peak perturbation between rp(H)LRAP and rp(H)M180 in high salt suggest that the termini may behave differently in their respective nanospheres, and perhaps, these differences contribute to the cell signaling properties attributable to LRAP but not to the full

  2. A solution NMR investigation into the murine amelogenin splice-variant LRAP (Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein)

    PubMed Central

    Buchko, Garry W.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Roberts, Jacky; Snead, Malcolm L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2010-01-01

    Amelogenins are the dominant proteins present in ameloblasts during the early stages of enamel biomineralization, making up >90% of the matrix protein. Along with the full-length protein there are several splice-variant isoforms of amelogenin present including LRAP (Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein), a protein that consists of the first 33 and the last 26 residues of full-length amelogenin. Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy we have assigned the 1H-15N HSQC spectrum of murine LRAP (rp(H)LRAP) in 2% acetic acid at pH 3.0 by making extensive use of previous chemical shift assignments for full-length murine amelogenin (rp(H)M180). This correlation was possible because LRAP, like the full-length protein, is intrinsically disordered under these solution conditions. The major difference between the 1H-15N HSQC spectra of rp(H)M180 and rp(H)LRAP was an additional set of amide resonances for each of the seven non-proline residues between S12* and Y12 at the N-terminus of rp(H)LRAP indicating that the N-terminal region of LRAP exists in two different conformations. Analysis of the proline carbon chemical shifts suggest that the molecular basis for the two states is not a cis-trans isomerization of one or more of the proline residues in the N-terminal region. Starting from 2% acetic acid, where rp(H)LRAP was monomeric in solution, NaCl addition effected residue specific changes in molecular dynamics manifested by the reduction in intensity and disappearance of 1H-15N HSQC cross peaks. As observed for the full length protein, these perturbations may signal early events governing supramolecular self-assembly of rp(H)LRAP into nanospheres. However, the different pattern of 1H-15N HSQC cross peak perturbation between rp(H)LRAP and rp(H)M180 in high salt suggest that the termini may behave differently in their respective nanospheres, and perhaps, these differences contribute to the cell signaling properties attributable to LRAP but not the full-length protein. PMID:20304108

  3. StAR-related lipid transfer domain protein 5 binds primary bile acids[S

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Lorin, Aurélien; Lefebvre, Andrée; Frappier, Vincent; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael; Lavigne, Pierre; LeHoux, Jean-Guy

    2012-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid transfer (START) domain proteins are involved in the nonvesicular intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The STARD1 (STARD1 and STARD3) and STARD4 subfamilies (STARD4–6) have an internal cavity large enough to accommodate sterols. To provide a deeper understanding on the structural biology of this domain, the binding of sterols to STARD5, a member of the STARD4 subfamily, was monitored. The SAR by NMR [1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC)] approach, complemented by circular dichroism (CD) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), was used. Titration of STARD5 with cholic (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), leads to drastic perturbation of the 1H-15N HSQC spectra and the identification of the residues in contact with those ligands. The most perturbed residues in presence of ligands are lining the internal cavity of the protein. Ka values of 1.8·10−4 M−1 and 6.3·104 M−1 were measured for CA and CDCA, respectively. This is the first report of a START domain protein in complex with a sterol ligand. Our original findings indicate that STARD5 may be involved in the transport of bile acids rather than cholesterol. PMID:23018617

  4. Inequality spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-03-01

    Inequality indices are widely applied in economics and in the social sciences as quantitative measures of the socioeconomic inequality of human societies. The application of inequality indices extends to size-distributions at large, where these indices can be used as general gauges of statistical heterogeneity. Moreover, as inequality indices are plentiful, arrays of such indices facilitate high-detail quantification of statistical heterogeneity. In this paper we elevate from arrays of inequality indices to inequality spectra: continuums of inequality indices that are parameterized by a single control parameter. We present a general methodology of constructing Lorenz-based inequality spectra, apply the general methodology to establish four sets of inequality spectra, investigate the properties of these sets, and show how these sets generalize known inequality gauges such as: the Gini index, the extended Gini index, the Rényi index, and hill curves.

  5. Storm Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    portion is defined by the day/night boundary (known as the terminator).

    These two images illustrate only a small fraction of the information contained in a single LEISA scan, highlighting just one aspect of the power of infrared spectra for atmospheric studies.

  6. Chemical synthesis of glycoproteins with the specific installation of gradient enriched 15N-labeled amino acids for getting insight into glycoprotein behavior.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Yasuhiro; Nguyen, Minh Hien; Izumi, Masayuki; Sato, Hajime; Okamoto, Ryo

    2017-03-09

    We propose a novel partially 15N-labelling method for the amide backbone of a synthetic glycoprotein. By use of a chemical approach utilizing SPPS and NCL, we inserted thirteen 15N-labeled amino acids at specific positions of the protein backbone, while intentionally varying the enrichment of 15N atoms. This idea enables us to discriminate even the same type of amino acid based on the intensities of 1H-15N HSQC signals, thus allowing us to understand the dynamics of the local conformation of a synthetic homogeneous glycoprotein. Results suggested that the attachment of an oligosaccharide of either a bi-antennary complex-type or a high-mannose-type did not disturb protein conformation. However, T1 values suggested that the oligosaccharide influenced dynamics at the local conformation. Temperature-varied CD spectra and T1 values clearly indicated that oligosaccharides appeared to inhibit protein fluctuation or, in other words, stabilize protein structure.

  7. Synthesis and complete assignment of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 6-substituted and 2,6-disubstituted pyridazin-3(2H)-ones.

    PubMed

    Besada, Pedro; Costas, Tamara; Vila, Noemi; Chessa, Carla; Terán, Carmen

    2011-07-01

    Several pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives were synthesized starting from alkyl furans using oxidation with singlet oxygen to give 4-methoxy or 4-hydroxybutenolides, key intermediates of the synthetic strategy followed. For all pyridazinones reported, a complete assignment of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra using one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic methods, which included NOE, DEPT, COSY, HSQC and HMBC experiments, was accomplished. Correlations between the chemical shifts of the heterocyclic ring atoms and substituents at N-2 and C-6 were analyzed.

  8. Exploiting the phase of NMR signals to carry useful information. Application to the measurement of chemical shifts in aliased 2D spectra.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Gualito, Karla; Jeannerat, Damien

    2015-11-01

    Taking advantage of the phase of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals to encode NMR information is not easy because of their low precision and their sensitivity to nearby signals. We nevertheless demonstrated that the phase in indirect dimension of (1) H-(13) C heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) signals could provide carbon chemical shifts at low, but sufficient precision to resolve the ambiguities of the chemical shifts in aliased spectra. This approach, we called phase-encoding of the aliasing order Na (PHANA), only requires inserting a constant delay during the t1 evolution time to obtain spectra where signals with mixed phases can be decoded at the processing to reconstruct full spectra with a 15-fold increase in resolution.

  9. A solution NMR investigation into the early events of amelogenin nanosphere self-assembly initiated with sodium chloride or calcium chloride.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Tarasevich, Barbara J; Bekhazi, Jacky; Snead, Malcolm L; Shaw, Wendy J

    2008-12-16

    Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy, new insights into the early events governing amelogenin supramolecular self-assembly have been identified using sodium chloride and calcium chloride to trigger the association. Two-dimensional 1H-15N HSQC spectra were recorded for 15N- and 13C-labeled murine amelogenin as a function of increasing NaCl and CaCl2 concentration beginning with solution conditions of 2% acetic acid at pH 3.0, where amelogenin was monomeric. Residue specific changes in molecular dynamics, manifested by the reduction in intensity and disappearance of 1H-15N HSQC cross-peaks, were observed with the addition of either salt to the protein. With increasing NaCl concentrations, residues between T21 and R31 near the N-terminus were affected first, suggesting that these residues may initiate amelogenin dimerization, the first step in nanosphere assembly. At higher NaCl concentrations, more residues near the N-terminus (Y12-I51) were affected, and with further additions of NaCl, residues near the C-terminus (L141-T171) began to show a similar change in molecular dynamics. With increasing CaCl2 concentrations, a similar stepwise change in molecular dynamics involving essentially the same set of amelogenin residues was observed. As the concentration of either salt was increased, a concomitant increase in the estimated overall rotational correlation time (tau(c)) was observed, consistent with assembly. Self-assembly into a dimer or trimer was established with dynamic light scattering studies under similar conditions that showed an increase in diameter of the smallest species from 4.1 nm in the absence of salt to 10 nm in the presence of salt. These results suggest a possible stepwise interaction mechanism, starting with the N-terminus and followed by the C-terminus, leading to amelogenin nanosphere assembly.

  10. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna C.; Vogel, Petr

    2016-10-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these spectra and their associated uncertainties is crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to date have been determined either by converting measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that make up the spectra, using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to β-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  11. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  12. Photographic spectra of fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two methods of spectroscopy of meteors using image intensified video cameras and classical photographic film cameras are compared. Video cameras provide large number of low resolution spectra of meteors of normal brightness, which can be used for statistical studies. Large format film cameras have been used through the history and provide high resolution spectra, which can be used to derive temperature, density and absolute abundances of various elements in the radiating plasma. The sensitivity of films is, however, low and only spectra of bright meteors (fireballs) can be studied. Examples of photographic fireball spectra are provided.

  13. Z-matrix formalism for quantitative noise assessment of covariance nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.

    PubMed

    Snyder, David A; Ghosh, Arindam; Zhang, Fengli; Szyperski, Thomas; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2008-09-14

    Due to the limited sensitivity of many nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications, careful consideration must be given to the effect of NMR data processing on spectral noise. This work presents analytical relationships as well as simulated and experimental results characterizing the propagation of noise by unsymmetric covariance NMR processing, which concatenates two NMR spectra along a common dimension, resulting in a new spectrum showing spin correlations as cross peaks that are not directly measured in either of the two input spectra. It is shown how the unsymmetric covariance spectrum possesses an inhomogeneous noise distribution across the spectrum with the least amount of noise in regions whose rows and columns do not contain any cross or diagonal peaks and with the largest amount of noise on top of signal peaks. Therefore, methods of noise estimation commonly used in Fourier transform spectroscopy underestimate the amount of uncertainty in unsymmetric covariance spectra. Different data processing procedures, including the Z-matrix formalism, thresholding, and maxima ratio scaling, are described to assess noise contributions and to reduce noise inhomogeneity. In particular, determination of a Z score, which measures the difference in standard deviations of a statistic from its mean, for each spectral point yields a Z matrix, which indicates whether a given peak intensity above a threshold arises from the covariance of signals in the input spectra or whether it is likely to be caused by noise. Application to an unsymmetric covariance spectrum, obtained by concatenating two 2D (13)C-(1)H heteronuclear, single quantum coherence (HSQC) and (13)C-(1)H heteronuclear, multiple bond correlation (HMBC) spectra of a metabolite mixture along their common proton dimension, reveals that for sufficiently sensitive input spectra the reduction in sensitivity due to covariance processing is modest.

  14. Backbone assignments and secondary structure of the Escherichia coli enzyme-II mannitol A domain determined by heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Kroon, G. J.; Grötzinger, J.; Dijkstra, K.; Scheek, R. M.; Robillard, G. T.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the backbone assignments and the secondary structure determination of the A domain of the Escherichia coli mannitol transport protein, enzyme-IImtl. The backbone resonances were partially assigned using three-dimensional heteronuclear 1H NOE 1H-15N single-quantum coherence (15N NOESY-HSQC) spectroscopy and three-dimensional heteronuclear 1H total correlation 1H-15N single-quantum coherence (15N TOCSY-HSQC) spectroscopy on uniformly 15N enriched protein. Triple-resonance experiments on uniformly 15N/13C enriched protein were necessary to complete the backbone assignments, due to overlapping 1H and 15N frequencies. Data obtained from three-dimensional 1H-15N-13C alpha correlation experiments (HNCA and HN(CO)CA), a three-dimensional 1H-15N-13CO correlation experiment (HNCO), and a three-dimensional 1H alpha-13C alpha-13CO correlation experiment (COCAH) were combined using SNARF software, and yielded the assignments of virtually all observed backbone resonances. Determination of the secondary structure of IIAmtl is based upon NOE information from the 15N NOESY-HSQC and the 1H alpha and 13C alpha secondary chemical shifts. The resulting secondary structure is considerably different from that reported for IIAglc of E. coli and Bacillus subtilis determined by NMR and X-ray. PMID:8401218

  15. Enzyme IIBcellobiose of the phosphoenol-pyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli: backbone assignment and secondary structure determined by three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ab, E.; Schuurman-Wolters, G. K.; Saier, M. H.; Reizer, J.; Jacuinod, M.; Roepstorff, P.; Dijkstra, K.; Scheek, R. M.; Robillard, G. T.

    1994-01-01

    The assignment of backbone resonances and the secondary structure determination of the Cys 10 Ser mutant of enzyme IIBcellobiose of the Escherichia coli cellobiose-specific phosphoenol-pyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system are presented. The backbone resonances were assigned using 4 triple resonance experiments, the HNCA and HN(CO)CA experiments, correlating backbone 1H, 15N, and 13C alpha resonances, and the HN(CA)CO and HNCO experiments, correlating backbone 1H,15N and 13CO resonances. Heteronuclear 1H-NOE 1H-15N single quantum coherence (15N-NOESY-HSQC) spectroscopy and heteronuclear 1H total correlation 1H-15N single quantum coherence (15N-TOCSY-HSQC) spectroscopy were used to resolve ambiguities arising from overlapping 13C alpha and 13CO frequencies and to check the assignments from the triple resonance experiments. This procedure, together with a 3-dimensional 1H alpha-13C alpha-13CO experiment (COCAH), yielded the assignment for all observed backbone resonances. The secondary structure was determined using information both from the deviation of observed 1H alpha and 13C alpha chemical shifts from their random coil values and 1H-NOE information from the 15N-NOESY-HSQC. These data show that enzyme IIBcellobiose consists of a 4-stranded parallel beta-sheet and 5 alpha-helices. In the wild-type enzyme IIBcellobiose, the catalytic residue appears to be located at the end of a beta-strand. PMID:8003964

  16. Lily Pad Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the 'Lily Pad' bounce-mark area at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was acquired on the 3rd sol, or martian day, of Opportunity's mission (Jan.26, 2004). The upper left image is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera, showing regions from which spectra were extracted from the 'Lily Pad' area. As noted by the line graph on the right, the green spectra is from the undisturbed surface and the red spectra is from the airbag bounce mark.

  17. Entire-Dataset Analysis of NMR Fast-Exchange Titration Spectra: A Mg(2+) Titration Analysis for HIV-1 Ribonuclease H Domain.

    PubMed

    Karki, Ichhuk; Christen, Martin T; Spiriti, Justin; Slack, Ryan L; Oda, Masayuki; Kanaori, Kenji; Zuckerman, Daniel M; Ishima, Rieko

    2016-12-15

    This article communicates our study to elucidate the molecular determinants of weak Mg(2+) interaction with the ribonuclease H (RNH) domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in solution. As the interaction is weak (a ligand-dissociation constant >1 mM), nonspecific Mg(2+) interaction with the protein or interaction of the protein with other solutes that are present in the buffer solution can confound the observed Mg(2+)-titration data. To investigate these indirect effects, we monitored changes in the chemical shifts of backbone amides of RNH by recording NMR (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence spectra upon titration of Mg(2+) into an RNH solution. We performed the titration under three different conditions: (1) in the absence of NaCl, (2) in the presence of 50 mM NaCl, and (3) at a constant 160 mM Cl(-) concentration. Careful analysis of these three sets of titration data, along with molecular dynamics simulation data of RNH with Na(+) and Cl(-) ions, demonstrates two characteristic phenomena distinct from the specific Mg(2+) interaction with the active site: (1) weak interaction of Mg(2+), as a salt, with the substrate-handle region of the protein and (2) overall apparent lower Mg(2+) affinity in the absence of NaCl compared to that in the presence of 50 mM NaCl. A possible explanation may be that the titrated MgCl2 is consumed as a salt and interacts with RNH in the absence of NaCl. In addition, our data suggest that Na(+) increases the kinetic rate of the specific Mg(2+) interaction at the active site of RNH. Taken together, our study provides biophysical insight into the mechanism of weak metal interaction on a protein.

  18. Spectra of Surface Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-22

    with a wave follower during Marsen. J. Gophysical Res. 88, 9844-9849. 11. Hughes, B.A., 1978. The effects on internal waves on surface waves : 2...Spectra of Surface Waves K. Watson March 1989 JSR-88-130 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. DTIC SELECTE JUN0 11989 0 JASONE The...Arlington, VA 22209 8503Z 11. TITLE (hlde Secvfty Cof.kaftn) SPECTRA OF SURFACE WAVES (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOfRS) K. Watson 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME

  19. Quantum spectra and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Julio Cesar

    This work focuses on time-dependent quantum theory and methods for the study of the spectra and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. Specifically, we have addressed the following two problems: (1) Development of a time-dependent spectral method for the construction of spectra of simple quantum systems. This includes the calculation of eigenenergies, the construction of bound and continuum eigenfunctions, and the calculation of photo cross-sections. Computational applications include the quadrupole photoabsorption spectra and dissociation cross-sections of molecular hydrogen from various vibrational states in its ground electronic potential-energy curve. This method is seen to provide an advantageous alternative, both from the computational and conceptual point of view, to existing standard methods. (2) Explicit time-dependent formulation of photoabsorption processes -- Analytical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation are constructed and employed for the calculation of probability densities, momentum distributions, fluxes, transition rates, expectation values and correlation functions. These quantities are seen to establish the link between the dynamics and the calculated, or measured, spectra and cross-sections, and to clarify the dynamical nature of the excitation, transition and ejection processes. Numerical calculations on atomic and molecular hydrogen corroborate and complement the previous results, allowing the identification of different regimes during the photoabsorption process.

  20. Quantum Spectra and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Julio Cesar

    1992-01-01

    This work focuses on time-dependent quantum theory and methods for the study of the spectra and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. Specifically, we have addressed the following two problems: (i) Development of a time-dependent spectral method for the construction of spectra of simple quantum systems--This includes the calculation of eigenenergies, the construction of bound and continuum eigenfunctions, and the calculation of photo cross-sections. Computational applications include the quadrupole photoabsorption spectra and dissociation cross-sections of molecular hydrogen from various vibrational states in its ground electronic potential -energy curve. This method is seen to provide an advantageous alternative, both from the computational and conceptual point of view, to existing standard methods. (ii) Explicit time-dependent formulation of photoabsorption processes --Analytical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation are constructed and employed for the calculation of probability densities, momentum distributions, fluxes, transition rates, expectation values and correlation functions. These quantities are seen to establish the link between the dynamics and the calculated, or measured, spectra and cross-sections, and to clarify the dynamical nature of the excitation, transition and ejection processes. Numerical calculations on atomic and molecular hydrogen corroborate and complement the previous results, allowing the identification of different regimes during the photoabsorption process.

  1. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  2. Rock Outcrop Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left shows a rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, looking north, and was acquired on the 4th sol, or martian day, of the rover's mission (Jan. 27, 2004). The yellow box outlines an area detailed in the top left image, which is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera. The top image uses solid colors to show several regions on or near the rock outcrop from which spectra were extracted: the dark soil above the outcrop (yellow), the distant horizon surface (aqua), a bright rock in the outcrop (green), a darker rock in the outcrop (red), and a small dark cobblestone (blue). Spectra from these regions are shown in the plot to the right.

  3. Barnacle Bill Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These IMP spectra show the characteristics of the rock surface measured by the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (blue), the soil trapped in pits on the rock surface (red), and the deposit of bright drift on the top of the rock. The area measured by the APXS has the properties expected for nearly unweathered igneous rock, and the soil trapped in the pits is intermediate to the unweathered rock and the highly weathered drift material.

  4. SPECTRA. September 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Transportation Services program with the Dragon capsule. (Credit: SpaceX /Chris Thompson) S p a c e c r a f t e n g in e e r in g spectra NRL...secondary payloads on board a Space Exploration Technologies ( SpaceX ), Inc., Falcon 9 launch vehicle. NRL’s nanosatellites are part of the CubeSat...Maryland. The primary payload launched aboard the SpaceX Falcon 9 was the Dragon capsule. Developed by SpaceX and sponsored by NASA’s Commercial Orbital

  5. Determinations of Photon Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    COVERED O14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 115. PAGE COUNT THESIS/ftFROW*W FROM TO 1989 1 54 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION A ?RQVk;U kOR 3UB LIC RELEASE...IAW AFR 190- 1 ERNEST A. HAYGOOD, 1st Lt, USAF Executive Officer, Civilian Institution ProQrams 17. COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on...spectra from measurements obtained with a sodium iodide counting system. A response matrix is computed by combining photon cross sections with

  6. Control spectra for Quito

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Roberto; Rivas-Medina, Alicia; Caiza, Pablo; Quizanga, Diego

    2017-03-01

    The Metropolitan District of Quito is located on or very close to segments of reverse blind faults, Puengasí, Ilumbisí-La Bota, Carcelen-El Inca, Bellavista-Catequilla and Tangahuilla, making it one of the most seismically dangerous cities in the world. The city is divided into five areas: south, south-central, central, north-central and north. For each of the urban areas, elastic response spectra are presented in this paper, which are determined by utilizing some of the new models of the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) NGA-West2 program. These spectra are calculated considering the maximum magnitude that could be generated by the rupture of each fault segment, and taking into account the soil type that exists at different points of the city according to the Norma Ecuatoriana de la Construcción (2015). Subsequently, the recurrence period of earthquakes of high magnitude in each fault segment is determined from the physical parameters of the fault segments (size of the fault plane and slip rate) and the pattern of recurrence of type Gutenberg-Richter earthquakes with double truncation magnitude (Mmin and Mmax) is used.

  7. Theoretical Studies of Molecular Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher (Technical Monitor); Freedman, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    This summary describes the research activities of the principal investigator during the reporting period. The research includes spectroscopy, management of molecular databases, and generation of spectral line profiles and opacity data. The spectroscopy research includes oxygen broadening of nitric oxide (NO), analysis of CO2 spectra, analysis of HNO3 spectra, and analysis of CO spectra.

  8. Automated NMR structure determination of stereo-array isotope labeled ubiquitin from minimal sets of spectra using the SAIL-FLYA system.

    PubMed

    Ikeya, Teppei; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Jee, Jun-Goo; Kainosho, Masatsune; Güntert, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) has been combined with the fully automated NMR structure determination algorithm FLYA to determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein ubiquitin from different sets of input NMR spectra. SAIL provides a complete stereo- and regio-specific pattern of stable isotopes that results in sharper resonance lines and reduced signal overlap, without information loss. Here we show that as a result of the superior quality of the SAIL NMR spectra, reliable, fully automated analyses of the NMR spectra and structure calculations are possible using fewer input spectra than with conventional uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. FLYA calculations with SAIL ubiquitin, using a single three-dimensional "through-bond" spectrum (and 2D HSQC spectra) in addition to the 13C-edited and 15N-edited NOESY spectra for conformational restraints, yielded structures with an accuracy of 0.83-1.15 A for the backbone RMSD to the conventionally determined solution structure of SAIL ubiquitin. NMR structures can thus be determined almost exclusively from the NOESY spectra that yield the conformational restraints, without the need to record many spectra only for determining intermediate, auxiliary data of the chemical shift assignments. The FLYA calculations for this report resulted in 252 ubiquitin structure bundles, obtained with different input data but identical structure calculation and refinement methods. These structures cover the entire range from highly accurate structures to seriously, but not trivially, wrong structures, and thus constitute a valuable database for the substantiation of structure validation methods.

  9. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  10. Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin in phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Akiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi; Okuda, Haruhiro; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-01

    Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin (OXT) in phosphate buffer was elucidated by one-dimensional (1D)- and two-dimensional (2D)-NMR techniques, which involve the assignment of peptide amide NH protons and carbamoyl NH(2) protons. The (1)H-(15)N correlation of seven amide NH protons and three carbamoyl NH(2) protons were also shown by HSQC NMR of OXT without (15)N enrichment.

  11. Sequencing BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  12. Sequencing BPS spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  13. Sequencing BPS spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; ...

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explainmore » from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.« less

  14. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  15. Homonuclear BIRD-decoupled spectra for measuring one-bond couplings with highest resolution: CLIP/CLAP-RESET and constant-time-CLIP/CLAP-RESET.

    PubMed

    Reinsperger, Tony; Luy, Burkhard

    2014-02-01

    Heteronuclear one-bond couplings are of interest for various aspects of structural analysis of small organic molecules, including for example the distinction of axial and equatorial protons or the use of RDCs as angular constraints. Such couplings are most easily measured from pure doublets in HSQC-type spectra. Recently, the fully decoupled RESET HSQC experiment was reported and several other so-called pure-shift methods followed that allow for the removal of splittings due to homonuclear scalar interactions in one and two-dimensional NMR. In this work we present broadband homonuclear decoupled CLIP/CLAP-RESET experiments based on an isotope-selective BIRD filter element using a recently reported improved version of Zangger-Sterk data chunking. The concatenated FIDs result in multiplets in which most homonuclear splittings are removed while the heteronuclear one-bond couplings are retained. Couplings can be extracted in an IPAP fashion without scaling of subspectra by the use of optimized coherence transfer elements like the COB-INEPT. The method leads to complete homonuclear decoupling for CH groups and CH3 groups in isotropic samples, but leaves residual splittings with antiphase contributions for e.g. CH2 groups due to (2)JHH coupling evolution that is not affected by the BIRD element. For this case we present a constant-time version of the proposed BIRD decoupling scheme with full homonuclear decoupling. In addition, the effects of strong coupling are discussed. Strong coupling artifacts cannot be circumvented, but the proposed experiments allow their distinct recognition.

  16. Laboratory simulation of dust spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory studies of the IR spectra of interstellar dust are reviewed. Studies of the absorption spectra of dense molecular clouds are discussed, including methods to produce interstellar ice analogues, simulations of astronomical spectra, and IR absorption features caused by ices. Comparisons are made between observational and experimental results of interstellar dust studies. Also, the interstellar emission features associated with dusty regions exposed to UV radiation are examined, including bands related to PAHs and PAH-related materials. It is shown that interstellar spectra are more consistant with emission from free PAHs than with emission from particles.

  17. Chemical shift prediction for denatured proteins.

    PubMed

    Prestegard, James H; Sahu, Sarata C; Nkari, Wendy K; Morris, Laura C; Live, David; Gruta, Christian

    2013-02-01

    While chemical shift prediction has played an important role in aspects of protein NMR that include identification of secondary structure, generation of torsion angle constraints for structure determination, and assignment of resonances in spectra of intrinsically disordered proteins, interest has arisen more recently in using it in alternate assignment strategies for crosspeaks in (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of sparsely labeled proteins. One such approach involves correlation of crosspeaks in the spectrum of the native protein with those observed in the spectrum of the denatured protein, followed by assignment of the peaks in the latter spectrum. As in the case of disordered proteins, predicted chemical shifts can aid in these assignments. Some previously developed empirical formulas for chemical shift prediction have depended on basis data sets of 20 pentapeptides. In each case the central residue was varied among the 20 amino common acids, with the flanking residues held constant throughout the given series. However, previous choices of solvent conditions and flanking residues make the parameters in these formulas less than ideal for general application to denatured proteins. Here, we report (1)H and (15)N shifts for a set of alanine based pentapeptides under the low pH urea denaturing conditions that are more appropriate for sparse label assignments. New parameters have been derived and a Perl script was created to facilitate comparison with other parameter sets. A small, but significant, improvement in shift predictions for denatured ubiquitin is demonstrated.

  18. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  19. Projecting Spectra for Classroom Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive spectrum projector that makes high-dispersion, high-efficiency diffraction gratings using a holographic process. Discusses classroom applications such as transmission spectra, absorption spectra, reflection characteristics of materials, color mixing, florescence and phosphorescence, and break up spectral colors. (MDH)

  20. Slow conformational dynamics of an endonuclease persist in its complex with its natural protein inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, S B; Czisch, M; Wechselberger, R; Kaptein, R; Hemmings, A M; James, R; Kleanthous, C; Moore, G R

    2000-04-01

    The bacterial toxin colicin E9 is secreted by producing Escherichia coli cells with its 9.5 kDa inhibitor protein Im9 bound tightly to its 14.5 kDa C-terminal DNase domain. Double- and triple-resonance NMR spectra of the isolated DNase domain uniformly labeled with 13C/15N bound to unlabeled Im9 contain more signals than expected for a single DNase conformer, consistent with the bound DNase being present in more than one form. The presence of chemical exchange cross peaks in 750 MHz 15N-1H-15N HSQC-NOESY-HSQC spectra for backbone NH groups of Asp20, Lys21, Trp22, Leu23, Lys69, and Asn70 showed that the bound DNase was in dynamic exchange. The rate of exchange from the major to the minor form was determined to be 1.1 +/- 0.2 s(-1) at 298 K. Previous NMR studies have shown that the free DNase interchanges between two conformers with a forward rate constant of 1.61 +/- 0.11 s(-1) at 288 K, and that the bound Im9 is fixed in one conformation. The NMR studies of the bound DNase show that Im9 binds similarly to both conformers of the DNase and that the buried Trp22 is involved in the dynamic process. For the free DNase, all NH groups within a 9 A radius of any point of the Trp22 ring exhibit heterogeneity suggesting that a rearrangement of the position of this side chain is connected with the conformational interchange. The possible functional significance of this feature of the DNase is discussed.

  1. Phonon spectra of alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeković, S.; Vukajlović, F.; Veljković, V.

    1982-10-01

    In this work we used a simple local model pseudopotential which includes screening for the phonon spectra calculations of alkali metals. The results obtained are in very good agreement with experimental data. In some branches of phonon spectra the differences between theoretical and experimental results are within 1-2%, while the maximum error is about 6%. The suggested form of the pseudopotential allows us to describe the phonon spectra of Na, K and Rb with only one, and, at the same time, a unique, parameter. In this case, the maximum disagreements from experiment are 9% for Na, 8% for K and 7% for Rb.

  2. Spectra ID of recent SN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, Peter

    2013-12-01

    P. Challis, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), on behalf of the CfA Supernova Group, report spectra (range 320-860 nm) of various SN obtained during Dec. 24-27 UT by P. Challis, S. Gottilla (MMTO.org), and E. Marin (MMTO.org) with the MMT 6.5-m telescope (+ Blue Channel). Cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  3. Determination of size and sign of hetero-nuclear coupling constants from 2D 19F-13C correlation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampt, Kirsten A. M.; Aspers, Ruud L. E. G.; Dvortsak, Peter; van der Werf, Ramon M.; Wijmenga, Sybren S.; Jaeger, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Fluorinated organic compounds have become increasingly important within the polymer and the pharmaceutical industry as well as for clinical applications. For the structural elucidation of such compounds, NMR experiments with fluorine detection are of great value due to the favorable NMR properties of the fluorine nucleus. For the investigation of three fluorinated compounds, triple resonance 2D HSQC and HMBC experiments were adopted to fluorine detection with carbon and/or proton decoupling to yield F-C, F-C{H}, F-C{Cacq} and F-C{H,Cacq} variants. Analysis of E.COSY type cross-peak patterns in the F-C correlation spectra led, apart from the chemical shift assignments, to determination of size and signs of the JCH, JCF, and JHF coupling constants. In addition, the fully coupled F-C HMQC spectrum of steroid 1 was interpreted in terms of E.COSY type patterns. This example shows how coupling constants due to different nuclei can be determined together with their relative signs from a single spectrum. The analysis of cross-peak patterns, as presented here, not only provides relatively straightforward routes to the determination of size and sign of hetero-nuclear J-couplings in fluorinated compounds, it also provides new and easy ways for the determination of residual dipolar couplings and thus for structure elucidation. The examples and results presented in this study may contribute to a better interpretation and understanding of various F-C correlation experiments and thereby stimulate their utilization.

  4. Residue-specific NH exchange rates studied by NMR diffusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Torsten; Cabrita, Eurico J.; Morris, Gareth A.; Günther, Robert; Hofmann, Hans-Jörg; Berger, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    We present a novel approach to the investigation of rapid (>2 s -1) NH exchange rates in proteins, based on residue-specific diffusion measurements. 1H, 15N-DOSY-HSQC spectra are recorded in order to observe resolved amide proton signals for most residues of the protein. Human ubiquitin was used to demonstrate the proposed method. Exchange rates are derived directly from the decay data of the diffusion experiment by applying a model deduced from the assumption of a two-site exchange with water and the "pure" diffusion coefficients of water and protein. The "pure" diffusion coefficient of the protein is determined in an experiment with selective excitation of the amide protons in order to suppress the influence of magnetization transfer from water to amide protons on the decay data. For rapidly exchanging residues a comparison of our results with the exchange rates obtained in a MEXICO experiment showed good agreement. Molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum mechanical calculations were performed to find molecular parameters correlating with the exchangeability of the NH protons. The RMS fluctuations of the amide protons, obtained from the MD simulations, together with the NH coupling constants provide a bilinear model which shows a good correlation with the experimental NH exchange rates.

  5. Amino acid-selective isotope labeling of proteins for nuclear magnetic resonance study: proteins secreted by Brevibacillus choshinensis.

    PubMed

    Tanio, Michikazu; Tanaka, Rikou; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2009-03-15

    Here we report the first application of amino acid-type selective (AATS) isotope labeling of a recombinant protein secreted by Brevibacillus choshinensis for a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study. To prepare the 15N-AATS-labeled protein, the transformed B. choshinensis was cultured in 15N-labeled amino acid-containing C.H.L. medium, which is commonly used in the Escherichia coli expression system. The analyses of the 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra of the secreted proteins with a 15N-labeled amino acid demonstrated that alanine, arginine, asparagine, cysteine, glutamine, histidine, lysine, methionine, and valine are suitable for selective labeling, although acidic and aromatic amino acids are not suitable. The 15N labeling for glycine, isoleucine, leucine, serine, and threonine resulted in scrambling to specific amino acids. These results indicate that the B. choshinensis expression system is an alternative tool for AATS labeling of recombinant proteins, especially secretory proteins, for NMR analyses.

  6. Evidence for interaction between the triheme cytochrome PpcA from Geobacter sulfurreducens and anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate, an analog of the redox active components of humic substances.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Joana M; Morgado, Leonor; Catarino, Teresa; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Pokkuluri, P Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2014-06-01

    The bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens displays an extraordinary respiratory versatility underpinning the diversity of electron donors and acceptors that can be used to sustain anaerobic growth. Remarkably, G. sulfurreducens can also use as electron donors the reduced forms of some acceptors, such as the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), a feature that confers environmentally competitive advantages to the organism. Using UV-visible and stopped-flow kinetic measurements we demonstrate that there is electron exchange between the triheme cytochrome PpcA from Gs and AQDS. 2D-(1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR spectra were recorded for (15)N-enriched PpcA samples, in the absence and presence of AQDS. Chemical shift perturbation measurements, at increasing concentration of AQDS, were used to probe the interaction region and to measure the binding affinity of the PpcA-AQDS complex. The perturbations on the NMR signals corresponding to the PpcA backbone NH and heme substituents showed that the region around heme IV interacts with AQDS through the formation of a complex with a definite life time in the NMR time scale. The comparison of the NMR data obtained for PpcA in the presence and absence of AQDS showed that the interaction is reversible. Overall, this study provides for the first time a clear illustration of the formation of an electron transfer complex between AQDS and a G. sulfurreducens triheme cytochrome, shedding light on the electron transfer pathways underlying the microbial oxidation of humics.

  7. Protein NMR Studies of substrate binding to human blood group A and B glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Peters, Thomas; Grimm, Lena Lisbeth; Weissbach, Sophie; Flügge, Friedemann; Begemann, Nora; Palcic, Monica

    2017-03-03

    Donor and acceptor substrate binding to human blood group A and B glycosyltransferases (GTA, GTB) has been studied by a variety of protein NMR experiments. Prior crystallographic studies have shown these enzymes to adopt an open conformation in the absence of substrates. Binding of either the donor substrate UDP-Gal, or of UDP induces a semi-closed conformation. In the presence of both, donor- and acceptor substrates, the enzymes shift towards a closed conformation with ordering of an internal loop and the C-terminal residues, which then completely cover the donor-binding pocket. Chemical shift titrations of uniformly 2H,15N labeled GTA or GTB with UDP affected about 20% of all cross peaks in 1H,15N-TROSY-HSQC spectra reflecting substantial plasticity of the enzymes. On the other hand, it is this conformational flexibility that impedes NH backbone assignments. Chemical shift perturbation experiments using 1-13C-methyl Ile labeled samples revealed two Ile residues, Ile123 at the bottom of the UDP binding pocket, and Ile192 as part of the internal loop that were significantly disturbed upon stepwise addition of UDP and H-disaccharide, also revealing long-range perturbations. Finally, methyl TROSY based relaxation dispersion experiments do not reveal s to ms time scale motions. Although this study reveals substantial conformational plasticity of GTA and GTB it remains enigmatic how binding of substrates shifts the enzymes into catalytically competent states.

  8. Using HMBC and ADEQUATE NMR data to define and differentiate long-range coupling pathways: is the Crews rule obsolete?

    PubMed

    Senior, Mary M; Williamson, R Thomas; Martin, Gary E

    2013-11-22

    It is well known that as molecules become progressively more proton-deficient, structure elucidation becomes correspondingly more challenging. When the ratio of (1)H to (13)C and the sum of other heavy atoms falls below 2, an axiom that has been dubbed the "Crews rule" comes into play. The general premise of the Crews rule is that highly proton-deficient molecules may have structures that are difficult, and in some cases impossible, to elucidate using conventional suites of NMR experiments that include proton and carbon reference spectra, COSY, multiplicity-edited HSQC, and HMBC (both (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N). However, with access to modern cryogenic probes and microcyroprobes, experiments that have been less commonly utilized in the past and new experiments such as inverted (1)J(CC) 1,n-ADEQUATE are feasible with modest sized samples. In this light, it may well be time to consider revising the Crews rule. The complex, highly proton-deficient alkaloid staurosporine (1) is used as a model proton-deficient compound for this investigation to highlight the combination of inverted (1)J(CC) 1,n-ADEQUATE with 1.7 mm cryoprobe technology.

  9. Vibrational Spectra of Selected Monohalogenated Monocarboxylic Acids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS, INFRARED SPECTRA), (*CARBOXYLIC ACIDS, *INFRARED SPECTRA), IODINE COMPOUNDS, CHLORINE COMPOUNDS, BROMINE COMPOUNDS, ACETIC ACID , ACETATES, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, MOLECULAR ASSOCIATION

  10. Photon spectra from WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Lineros, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into standard model particles, it must contribute to the fluxes of cosmic rays that are detected on the Earth and, in particular, to the observed gamma-ray fluxes. The magnitude of such a contribution depends on the particular dark matter candidate, but certain features of the produced photon spectra may be analyzed in a rather model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the complete photon spectra coming from WIMP annihilation into standard model particle-antiparticle pairs obtained by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We present results for each individual annihilation channel and provide analytical fitting formulas for the different spectra for a wide range of WIMP masses.

  11. QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Cid Fernandes, R. E-mail: abml@iac.es E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx

    2012-09-10

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

  12. The structure of BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Pietro

    In this thesis we develop and apply novel techniques for analyzing BPS spectra of supersymmetric quantum field theories of class S. By a combination of wall-crossing, spectral networks and quiver methods we explore the BPS spectra of higher rank four-dimensional N = 2 super Yang-Mills, uncovering surprising new phenomena. Focusing on the SU(3) case, we prove the existence of wild BPS spectra in field theory, featuring BPS states of higher spin whose degeneracies grow exponentially with the energy. The occurrence of wild BPS states is surprising because it appears to be in tension with physical expectations on the behavior of the entropy as a function of the energy scale. The solution to this puzzle comes from realizing that the size of wild BPS states grows rapidly with their mass, and carefully analyzing the volume-dependence of the entropy of BPS states. We also find some interesting structures underlying wild BPS spectra, such as a Regge-like relation between the maximal spin of a BPS multiplet and the square of its mass, and the existence of a universal asymptotic distribution of spin-j irreps within a multiplet of given charge. We also extend the spectral networks construction by introducing a refinement in the topological classification of 2d-4d BPS states, and identifying their spin with a topological invariant known as the "writhe of soliton paths". A careful analysis of the 2d-4d wall-crossing behavior of this refined data reveals that it is described by motivic Kontsevich-Soibelman transformations, controlled by the Protected Spin Character, a protected deformation of the BPS index encoding the spin of BPS states. Our construction opens the way for the systematic study of refined BPS spectra in class S theories. We apply it to several examples, including ones featuring wild BPS spectra, where we find an interesting relation between spectral networks and certain functional equations. For class S theories of A 1 type, we derive an alternative technique for

  13. Computer Simulation of NMR Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a PASCAL computer program which provides interactive analysis and display of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra from spin one-half nuclei using a hard-copy or monitor. Includes general and theoretical program descriptions, program capability, and examples of its use. (Source for program/documentation is included.)…

  14. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  15. Discrimination of petroleum fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Stelmaszewski, Adam

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents studies of the total spectra (fluorescence-excitation matrix) of petroleum with regard to the utilization of fluorescence for determining petroleum pollutants. Thorough testing of one group, comprising almost forty lubricating oils in the form of their hexane solutions, points out their discrimination.

  16. Shape effects on asteroid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davalos, J.; Carvano, J.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this work is to probe how the shape of a body like an asteroid could be modifying its observed spectra and the derived mineralogical interfaces based on spectral modeling. To model this effect, we construct an oblate ellipsoid with triangular facets, where each facet contributes to the overall reflectance. The synthetic spectra is generated by the isotropic multiple-scattering approximation (IMSA) reflectance model of Hapke (1993). First, we obtained optical constants by inverting the spectra of meteorites, obtained from the RELAB spectral database. These optical constants were found inverting the reflectance bidirectional equation of Hapke; this is made in two steps: (i) The first inversion is to find the single-scattering albedo π (ii) in the model of Hapke, this albedo is found under the regime of the geometric optics, where the particle size is much larger than the wavelength of the incident radiation. Here we assumed a constant value for the real part of the optical constant n=1.5. With these optical constants, we can construct synthetic spectra for any particle size. The phase function used is the double Henyey-Greenstein phase function and an accurate expression for the H-functions. We started with the ellipsoidal shape a=1.0, b=c=0.5 for two particle size 50 and 250 μ m, in this part, we found good differences in the BAR parameter between the two geometric models, this was done for 100 Eucrite meteorites spectra. In this first study, we found that the BAR parameter between the two models is bigger when the particle size increases. In the second part, we started with different ellipsoidal shapes and produced synthetic spectra for material with eucrite and diogenite composition with a phase angle of 20 degrees, incidence and emission angles of 10 degrees, and particle size at 250 μ m. All spectra was generated for four parameters of phase angle b=[0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8] taking the empirical relation between the phase constants of Hapke (2012

  17. Phobos surface spectra mineralogical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.; Pendleton, Y.; Bertini, I.; Magrin, S.; Carli, C.; La Forgia, F.; Barbieri, C.

    2014-04-01

    A mineralogical model composed of a mixture of Tagish Lake meteorite (TL) and Pyroxene Glass (PM80) was presented in [1] to explain the surface reflectance of Phobos from 0.25 to 4.0 μm. The positive results we obtained, when comparing the OSIRIS data [2] extended in wavelength to include the [3,4] spectra, forced us to perform a wider comparison between our TL-PM80 model and the CRISM and OMEGA Phobos spectra presented in [5]. Such spectra cover three different regions of interest (ROIs) situated in the Phobos sub-Mars hemisphere: the interior of the Stickney crater, its eastern rim, and its proximity terrain southeast of the Reldresal crater. We decided to vary the percentage mixture of the components of our model (80% TL, 20% PM80), between pure TL and pure PM80, by means of the radiative transfer code based on the [6] formulation of the slab approximation. Once this spectral range was derived, see Fig. 1, we attempted to compare it with the [5] spectra between 0.4 and 2.6 μm, i.e. below the thermal emitted radiation, to see if any spectral match was possible. We observed that CRISM scaled spectra above 1.10 μm fall within pure Tagish Lake composition and the [1] model. The CRISM data below 1.10 μm present more discrepancies with our models, in particular for the Stickney's rim spectrum. Nevertheless the TL and PM80 components seem to be good mineralogical candidates on Phobos. We performed the same analysis with the OMEGA data and, again, we found out that the Stickney's rim spectrum lies out of our model range, while the two remaining spectra still lie between pure TL and 80% TL - 20% PM80, but indicating that a different, more complicated mixture is expected in order to explain properly both the spectral trend and the possible absorption bands located above 2.0 μm. Within this analysis, we point out that a big fraction of TL material (modeled pure or present with a minimum percentage of 80% mixed together with 20% PM80) seems to explain Phobos spectral

  18. Interaction between two discontiguous chain segments from the beta-sheet of Escherichia coli thioredoxin suggests an initiation site for folding.

    PubMed

    Tasayco, M L; Fuchs, J; Yang, X M; Dyalram, D; Georgescu, R E

    2000-09-05

    The approach of comparing folding and folding/binding processes is exquisitely poised to narrow down the regions of the sequence that drive protein folding. We have dissected the small single alpha/beta domain of oxidized Escherichia coli thioredoxin (Trx) into three complementary fragments (N, residues 1-37; M, residues 38-73; and C, residues 74-108) to study them in isolation and upon recombination by far-UV CD and NMR spectroscopy. The isolated fragments show a minimum of ellipticity of ca. 197 nm in their far-UV CD spectra without concentration dependence, chemical shifts of H(alpha) that are close to the random coil values, and no medium- and long-range NOE connectivities in their three-dimensional NMR spectra. These fragments behave as disordered monomers. Only the far-UV CD spectra of binary or ternary mixtures that contain N- and C-fragments are different from the sum of their individual spectra, which is indicative of folding and/or binding of these fragments. Indeed, the cross-peaks corresponding to the rather hydrophobic beta(2) and beta(4) regions of the beta-sheet of Trx disappear from the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of isolated labeled N- and C-fragments, respectively, upon addition of the unlabeled complementary fragments. The disappearing cross-peaks indicate interactions between the beta(2) and beta(4) regions, and their reappearance at lower temperatures indicates unfolding and/or dissociation of heteromers that are predominantly held by hydrophobic forces. Our results argue that the folding of Trx begins by zippering two discontiguous and rather hydrophobic chain segments (beta(2) and beta(4)) corresponding to neighboring strands of the native beta-sheet.

  19. Hierarchical analysis of molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A novel representation of molecular spectra in terms of hierarchical trees has proven to be an important aid for the study of many significant problems in gas-phase chemical dynamics. Trees are generated from molecular spectra by monitoring the changes that occur in a spectrum as resolution is changed in a continuous manner. A tree defines a genealogy among all lines of a spectrum. This allows for a detailed understanding of the assignment of features of a spectrum that may be difficult to obtain any other way as well as an understanding of intramolecular energy transfer time scales, mechanisms, and pathways. The methodology has been applied to several problems: transition state spectroscopy, intramolecular energy transfer in highly excited molecules, high-resolution overtone spectroscopy, and the nature of the classical-quantum correspondence when there is classical chaos (``quantum chaos``).

  20. Eigenvectors of optimal color spectra.

    PubMed

    Flinkman, Mika; Laamanen, Hannu; Tuomela, Jukka; Vahimaa, Pasi; Hauta-Kasari, Markku

    2013-09-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) and weighted PCA were applied to spectra of optimal colors belonging to the outer surface of the object-color solid or to so-called MacAdam limits. The correlation matrix formed from this data is a circulant matrix whose biggest eigenvalue is simple and the corresponding eigenvector is constant. All other eigenvalues are double, and the eigenvectors can be expressed with trigonometric functions. Found trigonometric functions can be used as a general basis to reconstruct all possible smooth reflectance spectra. When the spectral data are weighted with an appropriate weight function, the essential part of the color information is compressed to the first three components and the shapes of the first three eigenvectors correspond to one achromatic response function and to two chromatic response functions, the latter corresponding approximately to Munsell opponent-hue directions 9YR-9B and 2BG-2R.

  1. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15-30 labels simultaneously.

  2. Optical Spectra of Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, the first optical spectra of triggered lightning flashes were acquired. Data from two triggered lightning flashes were obtained at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in north-central Florida. The spectrometer that was used has an average dispersion of 260 Å/mm resulting in an average resolution of 5 Å when mated to a Photron (SA1.1) high-speed camera. The spectra captured with this system had a free spectral range of 3800-8000 Å. The spectra were captured at 300,000 frames per second. The spectrometer's vertical field of view was 3 m at an altitude 50 m above the launch tower, intended to view the middle of the triggering wire. Preliminary results show that the copper spectrum dominated the earliest part of the flash and copper lines persisted during the total lifetime of the detectable spectrum. Animations over the lifetime of the stroke from the initial wire illumination to multiple return strokes show the evolution of the spectrum. In addition, coordinated high speed channel base current, electric field and imagery measurements of the exploding wire, downward leaders, and return strokes were recorded. Quantitative analysis of the spectral evolution will be discussed in the context of the overall flash development.

  3. Ultraviolet Spectra of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, Ted

    1996-07-01

    The ultraviolet reflectance spectra of the icy satellites ofUranus are largely unknown. We propose to use the HubbleSpace Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph in order to obtainthe first high S/N UV spectra of Ariel, Titania, and Oberon.Because of our innovative targeting approach, we have alsobeen able to include Umbriel in our observational plans.These satellites sample almost the full range of UV albedosand UV/VIS colors exhibited by the large Uranian satellites.The spectral resolution and range will overlap with earth-based telescopic and spacecraft observations of these objectsallowing for comparisons of the UV data with existing visualand near-infrared spectra of these objects. These comparisonswill ultimately provide greater constraints on the relativelylow albedo spectrally neutral non-ice component on the Uraniansatellites. The existance of UV spectral features due tospecies such as O_3, H_2O_2 or carbon-rich macromolecules(e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) can provide evidencefor modification of the surfaces via plasma or meteoriticbombardment, alteration by high-energy ultraviolet radiation,or accretion of particles from nearby sources such asplanetary rings or dust bands.

  4. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2009-02-28

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS ¹⁵N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by ¹⁵N NMR. Liquid state ¹⁵N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (¹H–¹⁵N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  5. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  6. Two slow meteors with spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubs, Martin; Sposetti, Stefano; Spinner, Roger; Booz, Beat

    2017-01-01

    On January 2, 2017 two peculiar meteors (M20170102_001216 and M20170102_015202) were observed by several stations in Switzerland. Both had a long duration, slow velocity, similar brightness and a very similar radiant. As they appeared in a time interval of 100 minutes, a satellite was suspected as a possible origin of these two observations. A closer inspection however showed that this interpretation was incorrect. The two objects were slow meteors. Spectra were taken from both objects, which were nearly identical. Together this points to a common origin of the two meteors.

  7. The Optical Spectra of Aerosols.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    espressione dell’ampiezza di diffusione in * avanti vengono fattorizzati. In questo modo la somma delle am- piezze di diftusione di "cluster" con...F1D-Ali35 687 THE OPTICAL SPECTRA OF REROSOLSOU) MESSINA UNIV (ITALY) i/i 1ST DI STRIJTTURA DELLA IIATERIA F BORIIHESE OCT 83 UNCLASSIFIED DRR78--85F...ELEMENT PROJECT, TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS * Istituto di Struttura della Materia 61102A-1T161102-BH57-01 Un iversita di Messina V~nina. Ttalv St

  8. Method of processing positron lifetime spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Valuev, N.P.; Klimov, A.B.; Zhikharev, A.N.

    1985-05-01

    This paper describes a method for the processing of spectra of positron annihilation which permits a much more relaible determination of the lifetime during numerical processing of spectra by computer.

  9. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2000-01-01

    We have computed the synthetic infrared spectra of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing up to 54 carbon atoms. The species studied include ovalene, circumcoronene, dicoronylene, and hexabenzocoronene. We report spectra for anions, neutrals, cations, and multiply charged cations.

  10. Backbone (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N NMR resonance assignments of the Krüppel-like factor 4 activation domain.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Brigid S; Weiss, Emma R; Smith, Steven P; Langelaan, David N

    2017-04-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a transcription factor involved in diverse biological processes, including development, cellular differentiation and proliferation, and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. KLF4 has also been associated with disease states, such as cardiovascular disease and several cancers. KLF4 contains an activation domain, repression domain, and a structurally characterized C-terminal zinc finger domain that mediates its binding to DNA. The structurally uncharacterized KLF4 activation domain is critical for transactivation by KLF4 and mediates its binding to the transcriptional coactivator CBP/p300. Here, we report the (1)H, (15)N, (13)CO, (13)Cα and (13)Cβ NMR chemical shift assignments of KLF41-130, which contains the KLF4 activation domain. Narrow chemical shift dispersion in the (1)H dimension of the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum suggests that the KLF41-130 fragment is intrinsically disordered.

  11. Visible Spectra of Titanium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V.; Nagarajan, R.; Maier, J. P.; Zhuang, X.; Le, A.; Steimle, T. C.

    2011-05-01

    Titanium oxide (TiO) has been extensively studied spectroscopically due to its astrophysical relevance. TiO is the main opacity source in the atmospheres of cool M-type stars in the visible and near infrared. In view of the high cosmic abundance of Ti and O, titanium dioxide (TiO2) is believed to play an important role in dust formation processes from the gas-phase in circumstellar shells of oxygen-rich stars. The electronic spectra of a cold molecular beam of TiO2 have been investigated using mass-resolved resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. TiO2 was produced by laser ablation of a pure titanium rod in the presence of a supersonic expanding mixture of approximately 5% O2 in either helium or argon. The spectra were recorded in the region 17500 cm-1 to 22500 cm-1 and the bands assigned to the A1B2 ← X1A1 transition. The origin and harmonic vibrational constants for the A1B2 state were determined to be: T000 = 17593(5) cm-1, ω1 = 876(3) cm-1, ω2 = 184(1) cm-1, and ω3 = 316(2) cm-1. Further, the dispersed fluorescence of a few bands were recorded to obtain vibrational parameters for the X1A1 state.

  12. Human- and computer-accessible 2D correlation data for a more reliable structure determination of organic compounds. Future roles of researchers, software developers, spectrometer managers, journal editors, reviewers, publisher and database managers toward artificial-intelligence analysis of NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Jeannerat, Damien

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of a universal data format to report the correlation data of 2D NMR spectra such as COSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra will have a large impact on the reliability of structure determination of small organic molecules. These lists of assigned cross peaks will bridge signals found in NMR 1D and 2D spectra and the assigned chemical structure. The record could be very compact, human and computer readable so that it can be included in the supplementary material of publications and easily transferred into databases of scientific literature and chemical compounds. The records will allow authors, reviewers and future users to test the consistency and, in favorable situations, the uniqueness of the assignment of the correlation data to the associated chemical structures. Ideally, the data format of the correlation data should include direct links to the NMR spectra to make it possible to validate their reliability and allow direct comparison of spectra. In order to take the full benefits of their potential, the correlation data and the NMR spectra should therefore follow any manuscript in the review process and be stored in open-access database after publication. Keeping all NMR spectra, correlation data and assigned structures together at all time will allow the future development of validation tools increasing the reliability of past and future NMR data. This will facilitate the development of artificial intelligence analysis of NMR spectra by providing a source of data than can be used efficiently because they have been validated or can be validated by future users. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Neutron and photon spectra in LINACs.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Martínez-Ovalle, S A; Lallena, A M; Mercado, G A; Benites-Rengifo, J L

    2012-12-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation, using the MCNPX code, was carried out in order to estimate the photon and neutron spectra in two locations of two linacs operating at 15 and 18 MV. Detailed models of both linac heads were used in the calculations. Spectra were estimated below the flattening filter and at the isocenter. Neutron spectra show two components due to evaporation and knock-on neutrons. Lethargy spectra under the filter were compared to the spectra calculated from the function quoted by Tosi et al. that describes reasonably well neutron spectra beyond 1 MeV, though tends to underestimate the energy region between 10(-6) and 1 MeV. Neutron and the Bremsstrahlung spectra show the same features regardless of the linac voltage.

  14. Spectra from pair-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model of relativistic nonmagnetized plasma with uniform temperature and electron density distributions is considered, and spectra from plasma in pair equilibrium are studied. A range of dimensionless temperature (T) greater than about 0.2 is considered. The spectra from low pair density plasmas in pair equilibrium vary from un-Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra at Thomson cross section tau(N) much less than one to Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra with tau(N) over one. For high pair density plasmas the spectra are flat for T greater than about one, and have broad intensity peaks at energy roughly equal to 3T for T less than one. In the latter region the total luminosity is approximately twice the annihilation luminosity. All spectra are flat in the X-ray region, in contradiction to observed AGN spectra. For dimensionless luminosity greater than about 100, the cooling time becomes shorter than the Thomson time.

  15. [Vibrational spectra of Corallium elatius].

    PubMed

    Fan, Lu-wei; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yang

    2013-09-01

    Corallium elatius, which has unique color distribution characteristic, is the most important species of Taiwan precious corals. EPMA, XRD, FTIR and Laser Raman detective methods were used to study the chemical, mineral composition and spectra characteristics of Corallium elatius. The result of EPMA, XRD and FTIR shows the high-Mg calcite mineral componentand the stable minor chemical constituents of the samples. Meanwhile, the cell parameter indicates the lattice distortion and the preferred orientation of calcite grain caused by organic matter. The red part of the samples shows a different Raman spectrum from that of the white part, located at 1517/1128 cm(-1) and 1296/1016 cm(-1). Raman scattering measurement reveals the relationship between the organic matter and color.

  16. Power spectra of solar convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, D.-Y.; Labonte, B. J.; Braun, D. C.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of convective motions on the sun are studied using Kitt Peak Doppler images and power spectra of convection. The power peaks at a scale of about 29,000 km and drops off smoothly with wavenumber. There is no evidence of apparent energy excess at the scale of the mesogranulation proposed by other authors. The vertical and horizontal power for each wavenumber are obtained and used to calculate the vertical and horizontal velocities of the supergranulation. The amplitude of vertical and horizontal velocities of the supergranulation are 0.034 (+ or - 0.002) km/s and 0.38 (+ or - 0.01) km/s, respectively. The corresponding rms values are 0.024 (+ or - 0.002) km/s and 0.27 (+ or - 0.01) km/s.

  17. Reflectance spectra of primitive chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Moyano-Cambero, C. E.; Llorca, J.

    2013-05-01

    We are studying a wide sample of pristine carbonaceous chondrites from the NASA Antarctic collection in order to get clues on the physico-chemical processes occurred in the parent bodies of these meteorites. We are obtaining laboratory reflectance spectra of different groups of carbonaceous chondrites, but here we focus in CM and CI chondrites. We discuss the main spectral features that can be used to identify primitive carbonaceous asteroids by remote sensing techniques. Two different spectrometers were used covering the entire 0.3 to 30 μm electromagnetic window. Only a handful of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) exhibit bands or features clearly associated with aqueous alteration. Among them are the target asteroids of Osiris Rex and Marco Polo-R missions.

  18. Pressure spectra and cross spectra at an area contraction in a ducted combustion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Raftopoulos, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure spectra and cross-spectra at an area contraction in a liquid fuel, ducted, combustion noise test facility are analyzed. Measurements made over a range of air and fuel flows are discussed. Measured spectra are compared with spectra calculated using a simple analytical model.

  19. Line Coupling in Atmospheric Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical modeling of atmospheric spectra is important for a number of different applications: for instance, in the determination of minor atmospheric constituents such as ozone, carbon dioxide, CFC's etc.; in monitoring the temperature profile for climate studies; and in measuring the incoming and outgoing radiation to input into global climate models. In order to accomplish the above mentioned goal, one needs to know the spectral parameters characterizing the individual spectral lines (frequency, width, strength, and shape) as well as the physical parameters of the atmosphere (temperature, abundances, and pressure). When all these parameters are known, it is usually assumed that the resultant spectra and concomitant absorption coefficient can then be calculated by a superposition of individual profiles of appropriate frequency, strength and shape. However, this is not true if the lines are 'coupled'. Line coupling is a subtle effect that takes place when lines of a particular molecule overlap in frequency. In this case when the initial states and the final states of two transitions are connected by collisions, there is a quantum interference resulting in perturbed shapes. In general, this results in the narrowing of Q-branches (those in which the rotational quantum number does not change), and vibration-rotational R- and P branches (those in which the rotational quantum number changes by +/- 1), and in the spectral region beyond band heads (regions where the spectral lines pile up due to centrifugal distortion). Because these features and spectral regions are often those of interest in the determination of the abundances and pressure-temperature profiles, one must take this effect into account in atmospheric models.

  20. Heteronuclear NMR assignments and secondary structure of the coiled coil trimerization domain from cartilage matrix protein in oxidized and reduced forms.

    PubMed Central

    Wiltscheck, R.; Kammerer, R. A.; Dames, S. A.; Schulthess, T.; Blommers, M. J.; Engel, J.; Alexandrescu, A. T.

    1997-01-01

    The C-terminal oligomerization domain of chicken cartilage matrix protein is a trimeric coiled coil comprised of three identical 43-residue chains. NMR spectra of the protein show equivalent magnetic environments for each monomer, indicating a parallel coiled coil structure with complete threefold symmetry. Sequence-specific assignments for 1H-, 15N-, and 13C-NMR resonances have been obtained from 2D 1H NOESY and TOCSY spectra, and from 3D HNCA, 15N NOESY-HSQC, and HCCH-TOCSY spectra. A stretch of alpha-helix encompassing five heptad repeats (35 residues) has been identified from intra-chain HN-HN and HN-H alpha NOE connectivities. 3JHNH alpha coupling constants, and chemical shift indices. The alpha-helix begins immediately downstream of inter-chain disulfide bonds between residues Cys 5 and Cys 7, and extends to near the C-terminus of the molecule. The threefold symmetry of the molecule is maintained when the inter-chain disulfide bonds that flank the N-terminus of the coiled coil are reduced. Residues Ile 21 through Glu 36 show conserved chemical shifts and NOE connectivities, as well as strong protection from solvent exchange in the oxidized and reduced forms of the protein. By contrast, residues Ile 10 through Val 17 show pronounced chemical shift differences between the oxidized and reduced protein. Strong chemical exchange NOEs between HN resonances and water indicate solvent exchange on time scales faster than 10 s, and suggests a dynamic fraying of the N-terminus of the coiled coil upon reduction of the disulfide bonds. Possible roles for the disulfide crosslinks of the oligomerization domain in the function of cartilage matrix protein are proposed. PMID:9260286

  1. OVI absorbers in SDSS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stephan

    We conducted a systematic search for signatures of the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) in Quasar spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 3 (DR3), focusing on finding intervening absorbers via detection of their O VI doublet. We present a search algorithm, and criteria for distinguishing candidates from spurious Lyman a forest lines. In addition, we compare our findings with simulations of the Lyman a forest in order to estimate the detectability of O VI doublets over various redshift intervals. We obtain a sample of 1866 O VI doublet candidates with rest-frame equivalent width >= 0.05 λ in 855 AGN spectra (out of 3702 objects with redshifts in the range accessible for O VI detection). This sample is subdivided into 3 groups according to the likelihood of being real and the potential for follow-up observation of the candidate. The group with the cleanest and most secure candidates is comprised of 145 candidates. 69 of these reside at a velocity separation >= 5000 km/s from the QSO, and can therefore be classified tentatively as intervening absorbers. Most of these absorbers have not been picked up by earlier, automated QSO absorption line detection algorithms. This sample increases the number of known O VI absorbers at redshifts beyond z abs >= 2.7 substantially. We propose to obtain observations of some of the candidates with the best signatures for O VI doublets with high signal-to-noise and high resolution in order to better constrain the physical state of the absorbers. We then focused on a subsample of 387 AGN sightlines with an average S/N >= 5: 0, allowing for the detection of absorbers above a rest-frame equivalent width limit of W r >= 0:19 ? A for the O VI 1032 λ component. Accounting for random interlopers mimicking an O VI doublet, we derive for the first time a secure lower limit for the redshift number density DN/Dz for redshifts z abs >= 2:8. With extensive Monte Carlo simulations we quantify the losses of absorbers due to blending

  2. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo P.; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of atomic, ionic and molecular species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic both in measuring the spectra and in their interpretation, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, and for this reason, it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS in spectroscopy (Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013

  3. Interpretation of Nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran Vibrational Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, L. L.; Khamchukov, Yu. D.; Lyubimov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    The structures of four possible stereoisomers of the closed form of photochromic nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran (NISTP) {1',3'-dihydro-1',3',3'-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro[2H-1-benzothiopyran-2,2'-(2H)-indoline]} were determined by the DFT method. The geometry of the most stable isomer was defined. Nitro-substitution changes mainly the lengths of bonds formed by S and N with spiro-atom Cs. According to the calculations, the CsS bond changes most and lengthens by 0.019 Å. It is shown that the S atom has large displacement amplitudes in normal modes assigned to Raman lines at 230, 285, 360, and 575 cm-1 and weak IR bands at 467 and 577 cm-1. Oscillations involving the nitro group are very active in Raman and IR spectra. Their frequencies are slightly lower than similar frequencies of nitrobenzene and nitroindolinospirobenzopyran, indicating a higher degree of vibrational coupling of the NO2 group with the NISTP molecular skeleton.

  4. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petzold, Donald E.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the midlatitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 microns, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future.

  5. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  6. A Bayesian method for analysing relaxation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocci Brazzano, L.; Pellizza, L. J.; Matteo, C. L.; Sorichetti, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of electrical and mechanical properties of material, relies on a precise analysis of the relaxation spectra. We explore the ability of a Bayesian method to achieve an accurate estimation of spectral parameters. We implemented a parallel-tempering Markov-chain Monte Carlo algorithm and used it to fit simulated and measured spectra. An exhaustive testing of the code shows that it presents an extremely good performance, accurately fitting complex spectra under strong noise and overlapping components. We conclude that this technique is quite suitable for relaxation spectra analysis, complementing classical methods.

  7. ALIEN: A nebular spectra analysis software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, R.; Vazquez, R.

    2000-11-01

    A new C-coded software, designed to analyze nebular spectra, is presented. T his software is able to read the fluxes of the most important ions directly from IRAF's output file (splot.log). Spectra can be dereddened using the Balmer lines ratio and the Seaton's extinction law. Electron temperature and density, as well as ionic abundances by number are estimated by means of numeric calculations based on the five-level atom model. The dereddened spectra and the table containing the ionic abundances can be saved in a LaTex formatted file. This software has been initially designed to work with a low dispersion spectra.

  8. Near-Infrared Spectra of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, C. C.; Lynch, D. K.; Rudy, R. J.; Mazuk, S.; Puetter, R. C.

    2001-05-01

    We present 0.8 to 2.5 micron spectra taken on June 21 & 22, 1998 UT of the Uranian satellites Miranda, Titania, Ariel, Oberon, and Umbriel. The spectra were taken using The Aerospace Corporation's Near-Infrared Imaging Spectragraph (NIRIS) on the University of California's Lick Observatory 3 meter Shane telescope. These spectra will be compared with previous work including Brown, R.H. and Cruikshank, D.P. (1983) as well as more recent spectra and analysis by Grundy, W. et al. (1999). Support for this research was provided by The Aerospace Corporation's Independent Research and Development Program.

  9. [Describing language of spectra and rough set].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bo; Hu, Zhan-yi; Zhao, Yong-heng

    2002-06-01

    It is the traditional way to analyze spectra by experiences in astronomical field. And until now there has never been a suitable theoretical frame to describe spectra, which is may be owing to small spectra datasets that astronomers can get by low-level instruments. With the high-speed development of telescopes, especially on behalf of LAMOST, a large telescope which can collect more than 20,000 spectra in an observing night, spectra datasets are becoming larger and larger very fast. Facing these voluminous datasets, the traditional spectra-processing way simply depending on experiences becomes unfit. In this paper, we develop a brand-new language--describing language of spectra (DLS) to describe spectra of celestial bodies by defining BE (Basic element). And based on DLS, we introduce the method of RSDA (Rough set and data analysis), which is a technique of data mining. By RSDA we extract some rules of stellar spectra, and this experiment can be regarded as an application of DLS.

  10. Resolution enhancement in second-derivative spectra.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, Mirosław A

    2015-01-01

    Derivative spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the resolution enhancement in infrared, near-infrared, Raman, ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Despite its great significance in analytical chemistry, not all aspects of the applications of this method have been explored as yet. This is the first systematic study of the parameters that influence the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra. The derivative spectra were calculated with the Savitzky-Golay method with different window size (5, 15, 25) and polynomial order (2, 4). The results obtained in this work show that the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra strongly depends on the data spacing in the original spectra, window size, polynomial order, and peak profile. As shown, the resolution enhancement is related to variations in the width of the peaks upon the differentiation. The present study reveals that in order to maximize the separation of the peaks in the second derivative spectra, the original spectra should be recorded at high resolution and differentiated using a small window size and high polynomial order. However, working with the real spectra one has to compromise between the noise reduction and optimization of the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra.

  11. Spectra of the Jovian ring and Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Becklin, E. E.; Jewitt, D. C.; Danielson, G. E.; Terrile, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements made between 0.887 and 2.4 microns demonstrate that the Jovian ring and Amalthea have similar reflection spectra. The spectra, in particular the ratio of the 0.9- to 2.2-micron reflectivities, are inconsistent with those expected from water, ammonia, or methane frosts, but are consistent with reflection from large rock bodies.

  12. The acyl nitroso Diels-Alder (ANDA) reaction of sorbate derivatives: an X-ray and 15N NMR study with an application to amino-acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bollans, Lee; Bacsa, John; Iggo, Jonathan A; Morris, Gareth A; Stachulski, Andrew V

    2009-11-07

    We present a study of the acyl nitroso Diels-Alder (ANDA) reaction of sorbate esters and sorbic alcohol derivatives, using alkoxycarbonyl nitroso dienophiles. An optimisation of the reaction conditions for ethyl sorbate is first presented, and the product is used in an efficient synthesis of 5-methylornithine. Structure-reactivity trends in sorbic alcohol (E,E-2,4-hexadien-1-ol) and its acylated analogues are then discussed. We present single-crystal X-ray structural proof for key adducts in both series and present in detail a novel HMBC/HSQC ((1)H-(15)N) criterion for ready distinction of regioisomers arising from such ANDA reactions.

  13. Two-face, two-turn α-helix mimetics based on a cross-acridine scaffold: analogues of the Bim BH3 domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangqian; Wang, Ziqian; Feng, Yingang; Song, Ting; Su, Pengchen; Chen, Chengbin; Chai, Gaobo; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Zhichao

    2014-06-16

    The design of a cross-acridine scaffold mimicking the i, i+3, i+5, and i+7 residues distributed over a two-face, two-turn α-helix is described. Docking studies and 2D (1)H, (15)N HSQC NMR spectroscopy provide compelling evidence that compound 3 d accurately reproduces the arrangement of four hotspots in the Bim BH3 peptide to permit binding to the Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 proteins (Ki 0.079 and 0.056 μM, respectively). Furthermore, the hotspot mutation could also be mimicked by individual or multiple deletions of side chains on the scaffold.

  14. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo; Damiano, Mario; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of chemical species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a powerful blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, thence it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/WFC3, Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS and Hubble/WFC3 in spectroscopy (Damiano, Morello et al., in prep., Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013) with excellent

  15. Mid-Infrared Spectra of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, B.; Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.; Morgan, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    Mid-infrared (8-13 microns) spectra of radiation emitted from the surface of solar system objects can be interpreted in terms of surface composition. However, the spectral features are weak, and require exceptionally high signal-to-noise ratio spectra to detect them. Ground-based observations of spectra in this region are plagued by strong atmospheric absorptions from water and ozone. High-altitude balloon measurements that avoid atmospheric absorptions can be affected by contamination of the optics by dust. We have developed a technique to obtain mid-infrared spectra of Mercury that minimizes these problems. The resulting spectra show evidence of transparency features that can be used to qualitatively characterize the surface composition. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Isotope shifts in spectra of molecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskaya, E. V.; Kolomiitsova, T. D.; Shurukhina, A. V.; Shchepkin, D. N.

    2016-02-01

    In the IR absorption spectra of low-temperature molecular liquids, we have observed anomalously large isotope shifts of frequencies of vibrational bands that are strong in the dipole absorption. The same effect has also been observed in their Raman spectra. At the same time, in the spectra of cryosolutions, the isotope shifts of the same bands coincide with a high accuracy (±(0.1-0.5) cm-1) with the shifts that are observed in the spectra of the gas phase. The difference between the spectra of examined low-temperature systems is caused by the occurrence of resonant dipole-dipole interactions between spectrally active identical molecules. The calculation of the band contour in the spectrum of liquid freon that we have performed in this work taking into account the resonant interaction between states of simultaneous transitions in isotopically substituted molecules can explain this effect.

  17. PCA: Principal Component Analysis for spectra modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Peter D.; Oliver, Seb; Farrah, Duncan; Wang, Lingyu; Efstathiou, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    The mid-infrared spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) contain a variety of spectral features that can be used as diagnostics to characterize the spectra. However, such diagnostics are biased by our prior prejudices on the origin of the features. Moreover, by using only part of the spectrum they do not utilize the full information content of the spectra. Blind statistical techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) consider the whole spectrum, find correlated features and separate them out into distinct components. This code, written in IDL, classifies principal components of IRS spectra to define a new classification scheme using 5D Gaussian mixtures modelling. The five PCs and average spectra for the four classifications to classify objects are made available with the code.

  18. Handbook of Monochromatic XPS Spectra, Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crist, B. Vincent

    2000-10-01

    This handbook is one of three containing an invaluable collection of research grade XPS Spectra. Each handbook concentrates on a specific family of materials (the elements and their native oxides, semiconductors and polymers) and is entirely self-contained. The introductory section to each handbook includes comprehensive information about the XPS instrument used, the materials and the advanced methods used to collect the spectra. Energy resolution settings, instrument characteristics, energy referencing methods, traceability, energy scale calibration details and transmission function are all reported. Among the many valuable features included in each of these handbooks are: ? All spectra were measured by using AlK monochromatic X-rays ? All spectra were collected in a self-consistent manner to maximise data reliability and quality ? All peaks in the wide spectra are fully annotated and accompanied by detailed atom % tables that report BEs for each of the labelled peaks ? Each high-energy resolution spectrum is peak-fitted and accompanied by detailed tables containing binding energies, FWHMs and relative percentages. In this volume 'Semiconductors' are contained XPS Spectra from a wide range of semiconductive materials and related materials, a rare tool for scientists and analysts in this area. Exclusive features of this volume include: ? Binding energies are accurate to +/- 0.08eV ? Charge compensation was done with a flood-gun mesh-screen system ? Valence band spectra document the occupied density of states (DOS) and the fundamental electronic nature of the semi-conductive materials analysed ? Analyses were done: "as received", "freshly fractured in air", "ion etched" and "chemically treated" ? Alphabetically organised by chemical abbreviations for ease of locating each material This handbook is an invaluable reference for materials scientists and electrical engineers in industry, academia and government laboratories interested in the analysis of semiconductors

  19. Computer processing of tunable diode laser spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.

    1989-01-01

    A computer-controlled tunable diode laser spectrometer and spectral analysis software are described. The three-channel system records simultaneously the transmission of a subject gas, a temperature-stabilized etalon, and a calibration gas. The software routines are applied to diode laser spectra of HNO3 and NO2 to illustrate the procedures adopted for conversion of raw spectral data to useful transmission and harmonic spectra. Extraction of line positions, absorption intensities, collisional broadening coefficients, and gas concentrations from recorded spectra is also described.

  20. Analysis of atmospheric spectra for trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Seals, Robert K., Jr.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Goldman, Aaron; Murcray, David G.; Murcray, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is the comprehensive analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra recorded in the middle-infrared region to obtain simultaneous measurements of coupled parameters (gas concentrations of key trace constituents, total column amounts, pressure, and temperature) in the stratosphere and upper troposphere. Solar absorption spectra recorded at 0.002 and 0.02 cm exp -1 resolutions with the University of Denver group's balloon-borne, aircraft borne, and ground-based interferometers and 0.005 to 0.01 cm exp -1 resolution solar spectra from Kitt Peak are used in the analyses.

  1. Vibrational spectra and structure of isopropylbenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, A. I.; Noskov, A. I.; Remizov, A. B.; Chachkov, D. V.

    2008-12-01

    Infrared spectra (4000-400 cm -1) and Raman spectra (1700-40 cm -1) of the liquid and two crystalline solids of isopropylbenzene (cumene) and isopropylbenzene-d 12 have been recorded. The spectra indicate that in the liquid and crystalline solids isopropylbenzene exists in planar conformation only (C sbnd H bond is in the plane of the benzene ring). An assignment of the observed band wave numbers both isopropylbenzene and isopropylbenzene-d 12 is discussed by comparison with normal mode wave numbers and IR intensities calculated from ab initio 6-31G (d) force fields.

  2. Investigation of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changjun; Tong, Na; Song, Lixin; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The morphology structures were observed under different conditions using Atomic Force Microscope. The results show that the spectral intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is higher than that untreated between 200-1750 cm-1, while the intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is lower than that untreated beyond 1750 cm-1 and the fluorescence background of Raman spectra is decreased. The spectral intensity of PET treated with sulfuric acid is remarkably reduced than that untreated, and the intensity of PET treated with copper sulphate is much higher than that untreated.

  3. Spectra: Time series power spectrum calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, Tabaré

    2017-01-01

    Spectra calculates the power spectrum of a time series equally spaced or not based on the Spectral Correlation Coefficient (Ferraz-Mello 1981, Astron. Journal 86 (4), 619). It is very efficient for detection of low frequencies.

  4. Spatial evolution of ocean wave spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The spatially evolving deep water synthetic aperture radar (SAR) directional spectra of a mixed ocean wave system are compared with a comprehensive set of surface and aircraft measurements. The evolution of the SAR spectra, at least for ocean wavelengths greater than 80 m, is seen as generally consistent with the auxiliary data set in both time and space. From the spatial evolution of the angular component of the spectra, it is possible to project back to an apparent remote storm source that is also consistent with the storm location via GOES satellite imagery. The data provide compelling evidence that the spatial evolution of SAR ocean wave spectra can be a useful tool in global ocean wave monitoring and forecasting.

  5. Synthesis and Spectra of Vanadium Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.; Stupgia, Sean

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates simple synthetic techniques, redox principles in synthesis reactions, interpretation of visible spectra using Orgel diagrams, and the spectrochemical series. The experiment is suitable for the advanced undergraduate inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  6. An analysis of middle ultraviolet dayglow spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walden, Billie S.

    1991-12-01

    Middle ultraviolet spectra from 1800 to 3400A are analyzed. These spectra were obtained from the March 1990 rocket flight of the NPS MUSTANG instrument over the altitudes 105km to 315km. The data were compared with computer generated synthetic spectra. A least squares fitting procedure was developed for this purpose. Each data point was weighted using the standard deviation of the means. Synthetic spectra were generated for the following emissions: N2 Vegard-Kaphan; N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield; NO gamma, delta, and epsilon; OI 2972A, OII 2470A; and NII 2143A. Altitude profiles for the emissions were obtained. Tentative identification was made of the OIII 2853A emission. A comparison of VK and LBH profiles demonstrates the process of N2 A-state quenching by atomic oxygen.

  7. [Spectra of dark green jade from Myanmar].

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chai, Lin-Tao; Guo, Shou-Guo; Fan, Jian-Liang; Bao, Feng

    2013-05-01

    Chemical compositions and spectral characteristics of one type of dark green jades assumed from omphacite jadeite from Myanmar jadeite mining area were studied by X-ray powder diffraction(XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectra(XRF), Raman spectra(RM) and UV-Vis Spectroscopy, etc. Based on testing by XRD and XRF, it was shown that it belongs to iron-enriched plagioclase, including albite and anorthite. The compositions range is between Ab0.731 An0.264 Or0.004 and Ab0.693 An0.303 Or0.004. Raman spectra of samples, albite jade and anorthite were collected and analyzed. Additionally, the distributions of Si, Al in the crystal structure were also discussed. UV-Vis spectra showed that dark green hue of this mineral is associated with d--d electronic transition of Fe3+ and Cr3+.

  8. Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

  9. Frequency Spectra of Magnetoacoustic Emission in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanchenko, S. V.; Grokhovsky, V. I.; Kolchanov, N. N.

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the magnetoacoustic emission spectra of iron meteorites and their industrial analogs. The revealed differences in signal amplitude, position and width of the peaks are associated with the features of structure and the magnetic texture.

  10. Contribution to the study of turbulence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, R.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus suitable for turbulence measurement between ranges of 1 to 5000 cps and from 6 to 16,000 cps was developed and is described. Turbulence spectra downstream of the grills were examined with reference to their general characteristics, their LF qualities, and the effects of periodic turbulence. Medium and HF are discussed. Turbulence spectra in the boundary layers are similarly examined, with reference to their fluctuations at right angles to the wall, and to lateral fluctuations. Turbulence spectra in a boundary layer with suction to the wall is discussed. Induced turbulence, and turbulence spectra at high Reynolds numbers. Calculations are presented relating to the effect of filtering on the value of the correlations in time and space.

  11. Comparing Ultraviolet Spectra Against Calculations: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.

    2003-01-01

    The five-year goal of this effort is to calculate high fidelity mid-UV spectra for individual stars and stellar systems for a wide range of ages, abundances, and abundance ratios. In this first year, the emphasis was placed on revising the list of atomic line parameters used to calculate mid-UV spectra. First, new identifications of atomic lines and measurements of their transition probabilities were obtained for lines of the first and second ionization stages of iron-peak elements. Second, observed mid-UV and optical spectra for standard stars were re-analyzed and compared to new calculations, to refine the determination of transition probabilities and to estimate the identity of lines still missing from the laboratory lists. As evidenced by the figures, a dramatic improvement has resulted in the reproduction of the spectra of standard stars by the calculations.

  12. POLLUX: a database of synthetic stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, A.; Gebran, M.; Josselin, E.; Martins, F.; Plez, B.; Belmas, M.; Lèbre, A.

    2010-06-01

    Aims: Synthetic spectra are needed to determine fundamental stellar and wind parameters of all types of stars. They are also used for the construction of theoretical spectral libraries helpful for stellar population synthesis. Therefore, a database of theoretical spectra is required to allow rapid and quantitative comparisons to spectroscopic data. We provide such a database offering an unprecedented coverage of the entire Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Methods: We present the POLLUX database of synthetic stellar spectra. For objects with Teff ≤ 6000 K, MARCS atmosphere models are computed and the program TURBOSPECTRUM provides the synthetic spectra. ATLAS12 models are computed for stars with 7000 K ≤ Teff ≤ 15 000 K. SYNSPEC gives the corresponding spectra. Finally, the code CMFGEN provides atmosphere models for the hottest stars (Teff > 25 000 K). Their spectra are computed with CMF_FLUX. Both high resolution (R > 150 000) optical spectra in the range 3000 to 12 000 Å and spectral energy distributions extending from the UV to near-IR ranges are presented. These spectra cover the HR diagram at solar metallicity. Results: We propose a wide variety of synthetic spectra for various types of stars in a format that is compliant with the Virtual Observatory standards. A user-friendly web interface allows an easy selection of spectra and data retrieval. Upcoming developments will include an extension to a large range of metallicities and to the near-IR high resolution spectra, as well as a better coverage of the HR diagram, with the inclusion of models for Wolf-Rayet stars and large datasets for cool stars. The POLLUX database is accessible at http://pollux.graal.univ-montp2.fr/ and through the Virtual Observatory. Copy of database is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb

  13. Diffuse emission and pathological Seyfert spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    In this annual ROSAT status report, the diffuse emission and spectra from Seyfert galaxies are examined. Three papers are presented and their contents include the soft x-ray properties and spectra of a binary millisecond pulsar, the PSPC and HRI observations of a Starburst/Seyfert 2 Galaxy, and an analysis of the possibility of x-ray luminous starbursts in the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey.

  14. On the Photoelectron Spectra of Li4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The most stable structure for Li4(-) is found to be the rhombus. Electron detachment from this structure does not seem able to fully explain the photoelectron spectra. The computed results are consistent with those Rao, Jena, and Ray who have proposed that the experimental spectra consists of a superposition of detachment from the Li4(-) rhombus and tetrahedron, forming the singlet and triplet states of Li4, respectively.

  15. New atlas of IR solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Murcray, F. H.; Vanallen, J. W.; Bradford, C. M.; Cook, G. R.; Murcray, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Over 4500 absorption lines have been marked on the spectra and the corresponding line positions tabulated. The associated absorbing telluric or solar species for more than 90% of these lines have been identified and only a fraction of the unidentified lines have peak absorptions greater than a few percent. The high resolution and the low Sun spectra greatly enhance the sensitivity limits for identification of trace constituents.

  16. Trigonometric Polynomials For Estimation Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Orthogonal sets of trigonometric polynomials used as suboptimal substitutes for discrete prolate-spheroidal "windows" of Thomson method of estimation of spectra. As used here, "windows" denotes weighting functions used in sampling time series to obtain their power spectra within specified frequency bands. Simplified windows designed to require less computation than do discrete prolate-spheroidal windows, albeit at price of some loss of accuracy.

  17. Analytical calculation of two-dimensional spectra.

    PubMed

    Bell, Joshua D; Conrad, Rebecca; Siemens, Mark E

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate an analytical calculation of two-dimensional (2D) coherent spectra of electronic or vibrational resonances. Starting with the solution to the optical Bloch equations for a two-level system in the 2D time domain, we show that a fully analytical 2D Fourier transform can be performed if the projection-slice and Fourier-shift theorems of Fourier transforms are applied. Results can be fit to experimental 2D coherent spectra of resonances with arbitrary inhomogeneity.

  18. THE SPITZER ATLAS OF STELLAR SPECTRA (SASS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ardila, David R.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Makowiecki, Wojciech; Stauffer, John; Rho, Jeonghee; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Song, Inseok

    2010-12-15

    We present the Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra, which includes 159 stellar spectra (5-32 {mu}m; R {approx} 100) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This Atlas gathers representative spectra of a broad section of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, intended to serve as a general stellar spectral reference in the mid-infrared. It includes stars from all luminosity classes, as well as Wolf-Rayet (WR) objects. Furthermore, it includes some objects of intrinsic interest, such as blue stragglers and certain pulsating variables. All of the spectra have been uniformly reduced, and all are available online. For dwarfs and giants, the spectra of early-type objects are relatively featureless, characterized by the presence of hydrogen lines in A spectral types. Besides these, the most noticeable photospheric features correspond to water vapor and silicon monoxide in late-type objects and methane and ammonia features at the latest spectral types. Most supergiant spectra in the Atlas present evidence of circumstellar gas and/or dust. The sample includes five M supergiant spectra, which show strong dust excesses and in some cases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. Sequences of WR stars present the well-known pattern of lines of He I and He II, as well as forbidden lines of ionized metals. The characteristic flat-top shape of the [Ne III] line is evident even at these low spectral resolutions. Several Luminous Blue Variables and other transition stars are present in the Atlas and show very diverse spectra, dominated by circumstellar gas and dust features. We show that the [8]-[24] Spitzer colors (IRAC and MIPS) are poor predictors of spectral type for most luminosity classes.

  19. On optimization of absorption-dispersion spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawranek, J. P.; Grabska, J.; Beć, K. B.

    2016-12-01

    A modified approach to the analysis of spectra of the complex electric permittivity of liquids in the Infrared region is presented. These spectra are derived from experimental spectra of the complex refractive index. Subsequently they are used to determine important secondary quantities, e.g. spectra of complex molecular polarizabilities and an integral property - the molar vibrational polarization. The accuracy of these quantities depends essentially on the accuracy of both components of the complex electric permittivity spectrum. In the proposed procedure, the spectra of the complex electric permittivity are approximated using the Classical Damped Harmonic Oscillator (CDHO) model for the description of individual bandshapes. The CDHO model defines both the real and imaginary part of the complex permittivity. The fitting procedure includes a simultaneous optimization of both the real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity spectrum. A comparison of absorption-only curve fitting and the novel absorption-dispersion double curve fitting is presented; advantages of the new approach in accuracy, reliability and convergence time are pointed out. Due to the complexity of the problem, the choice was restricted to non-gradient methods of optimization. The performance of several gradientless algorithms was tested. Among numerous procedures the Powell General Least Squares Method Without Derivatives was found to be the most efficient. The reliability of obtained results of the band separatiovn process was tested on several simulated spectra of increasing complexity. The applicability of the developed approach to the analysis of exemplary experimental data was evaluated and discussed.

  20. Parameterizing Stellar Spectra Using Deep Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang-Ru; Pan, Ru-Yang; Duan, Fu-Qing

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale sky surveys are observing massive amounts of stellar spectra. The large number of stellar spectra makes it necessary to automatically parameterize spectral data, which in turn helps in statistically exploring properties related to the atmospheric parameters. This work focuses on designing an automatic scheme to estimate effective temperature ({T}{eff}), surface gravity ({log}g) and metallicity [Fe/H] from stellar spectra. A scheme based on three deep neural networks (DNNs) is proposed. This scheme consists of the following three procedures: first, the configuration of a DNN is initialized using a series of autoencoder neural networks; second, the DNN is fine-tuned using a gradient descent scheme; third, three atmospheric parameters {T}{eff}, {log}g and [Fe/H] are estimated using the computed DNNs. The constructed DNN is a neural network with six layers (one input layer, one output layer and four hidden layers), for which the number of nodes in the six layers are 3821, 1000, 500, 100, 30 and 1, respectively. This proposed scheme was tested on both real spectra and theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models. Test errors are measured with mean absolute errors (MAEs). The errors on real spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are 0.1477, 0.0048 and 0.1129 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (64.85 K for {T}{eff}), respectively. Regarding theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models, the MAE of the test errors are 0.0182, 0.0011 and 0.0112 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (14.90 K for {T}{eff}), respectively.

  1. Disk-Averaged Synthetic Spectra of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong ,William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  2. H. N. Russell and Atomic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devorkin, David

    2001-04-01

    “I would rather analyze spectra than do cross-word puzzles or do almost anything else” Henry Norris Russell wrote to William F. Meggers in 1927. Meggers, chief of the spectroscopy division at the NBS, had been surprised that an astrophysicist could be so keen about the analysis of complex spectra. But Russell was a new type of astrophysicist, one who made physics the core of his research. Spectra, for Russell, held the "master key" to knowledge about the universe, and of the atom. He was first attracted by the challenge of detecting and explaining anomalies, which he hoped would lead to new knowledge about the structure of matter. Then, influenced by physicists such as Meggers, he devoted himself to filling in the picture of the structure of atoms from their characteristic spectra as completely as possible. In this talk I will review how Russell worked with Meggers and became the nucleus of an ever-widening circle of spectroscopists devoted to the analysis of complex spectra.

  3. Improving Algorithm for Automatic Spectra Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rackovic, K.; Nikolic, S.; Kotrc, P.

    2009-09-01

    Testing and improving of the computer program for automatic processing (flat-fielding) of a great number of solar spectra obtained with the horizontal heliospectrograph HSFA2 has been done. This program was developed in the Astronomical Institute of Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic in Ondřejov. An irregularity in its work has been discovered, i.e. the program didn't work for some of the spectra. To discover a cause of this error an algorithm has been developed, and a program for examination of the parallelism of reference hairs crossing the spectral slit on records of solar spectra has been made. The standard methods for data processing have been applied-calculating and analyzing higher-order moments of distribution of radiation intensity. The spectra with the disturbed parallelism of the reference hairs have been eliminated from further processing. In order to improve this algorithm of smoothing of spectra, isolation and removal of the harmonic made by a sunspot with multiple elementary transformations of ordinates (Labrouste's transformations) are planned. This project was accomplished at the first summer astronomy practice of students of the Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade, Serbia in 2007 in Ondřejov.

  4. Cloud supersaturations from CCN spectra Hoppel minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, James G.; Noble, Stephen; Tabor, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectral measurements in two aircraft field projects, Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T), often showed bimodality that had previously been observed in submicrometer aerosol size distributions obtained by differential mobility analyzers. However, a great deal of spectral shape variability from very bimodal to very monomodal was observed in close proximity. Cloud supersaturation (S) estimates based on critical S, Sc, at minimal CCN concentrations between two modes (Hoppel minima) were ascertained for 63% of 325 measured spectra. These cloud S were lower than effective S (Seff) determined by comparing ambient CCN spectra with nearby cloud droplet concentrations (Nc). Averages for the polluted MASE stratus were 0.15 and 0.23% and for the cumulus clouds of ICE-T 0.44 and 1.03%. This cloud S disagreement between the two methods might in part be due to the fact that Hoppel minima include the effects of cloud processing, which push CCN spectra toward lower S. Furthermore, there is less cloud processing by the smaller cloud droplets, which might be related to smaller droplets evaporating more readily. Significantly lower concentrations within the more bimodal spectra compared with the monomodal spectra indicated active physical processes: Brownian capture of interstitial CCN and droplet coalescence. Chemical cloud processing also contributed to bimodality, especially in MASE.

  5. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-01-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  6. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  7. EXPLORING THE MORPHOLOGY OF RAVE STELLAR SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Matijevic, G.; Zwitter, T.; Bienayme, O.; Siebert, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M.; Watson, F. G.; and others

    2012-06-01

    The RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is a medium-resolution (R {approx} 7500) spectroscopic survey of the Milky Way that has already obtained over half a million stellar spectra. They present a randomly selected magnitude-limited sample, so it is important to use a reliable and automated classification scheme that identifies normal single stars and discovers different types of peculiar stars. To this end, we present a morphological classification of {approx}350, 000 RAVE survey stellar spectra using locally linear embedding, a dimensionality reduction method that enables representing the complex spectral morphology in a low-dimensional projected space while still preserving the properties of the local neighborhoods of spectra. We find that the majority of all spectra in the database ({approx} 90%-95%) belong to normal single stars, but there is also a significant population of several types of peculiars. Among them, the most populated groups are those of various types of spectroscopic binary and chromospherically active stars. Both of them include several thousands of spectra. Particularly the latter group offers significant further investigation opportunities since activity of stars is a known proxy of stellar ages. Applying the same classification procedure to the sample of normal single stars alone shows that the shape of the projected manifold in two-dimensional space correlates with stellar temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity.

  8. Cleaning HI Spectra Contaminated by GPS RFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, Kamin; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NUDET systems aboard GPS satellites utilize radio waves to communicate information regarding surface nuclear events. The system tests appear in spectra as RFI (radio frequency interference) at 1381MHz, which contaminates observations of extragalactic HI (atomic hydrogen) signals at 50-150 Mpc. Test durations last roughly 20-120 seconds and can occur upwards of 30 times during a single night of observing. The disruption essentially renders the corresponding HI spectra useless.We present a method that automatically removes RFI in HI spectra caused by these tests. By capitalizing on the GPS system's short test durations and predictable frequency appearance we are able to devise a method of identifying times containing compromised data records. By reevaluating the remaining data, we are able to recover clean spectra while sacrificing little in terms of sensitivity to extragalactic signals. This method has been tested on 500+ spectra taken by the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT), in which it successfully identified and removed all sources of GPS RFI. It will also be used to eliminate RFI in the upcoming Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS).This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  9. Background noise spectra of global seismic stations

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.M.; Claassen, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    Over an extended period of time station noise spectra were collected from various sources for use in estimating the detection and location performance of global networks of seismic stations. As the database of noise spectra enlarged and duplicate entries became available, an effort was mounted to more carefully select station noise spectra while discarding others. This report discusses the methodology and criteria by which the noise spectra were selected. It also identifies and illustrates the station noise spectra which survived the selection process and which currently contribute to the modeling efforts. The resulting catalog of noise statistics not only benefits those who model network performance but also those who wish to select stations on the basis of their noise level as may occur in designing networks or in selecting seismological data for analysis on the basis of station noise level. In view of the various ways by which station noise were estimated by the different contributors, it is advisable that future efforts which predict network performance have available station noise data and spectral estimation methods which are compatible with the statistics underlying seismic noise. This appropriately requires (1) averaging noise over seasonal and/or diurnal cycles, (2) averaging noise over time intervals comparable to those employed by actual detectors, and (3) using logarithmic measures of the noise.

  10. Structural and Functional Basis of CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha) Binding to Heparin

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy,J.; Cho, Y.; Sachpatzidis, A.; Fan, C.; Hodsdon, M.; Lolis, E.

    2007-01-01

    CXCL12 (SDF-1a) and CXCR4 are critical for embryonic development and cellular migration in adults. These proteins are involved in HIV-1 infection, cancer metastasis, and WHIM disease. Sequestration and presentation of CXCL12 to CXCR4 by glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is proposed to be important for receptor activation. Mutagenesis has identified CXCL12 residues that bind to heparin. However, the molecular details of this interaction have not yet been determined. Here we demonstrate that soluble heparin and heparan sulfate negatively affect CXCL12-mediated in vitro chemotaxis. We also show that a cluster of basic residues in the dimer interface is required for chemotaxis and is a target for inhibition by heparin. We present structural evidence for binding of an unsaturated heparin disaccharide to CXCL12 attained through solution NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography. Increasing concentrations of the disaccharide altered the two-dimensional 1H-15N-HSQC spectra of CXCL12, which identified two clusters of residues. One cluster corresponds to {beta}-strands in the dimer interface. The second includes the amino-terminal loop and the a-helix. In the x-ray structure two unsaturated disaccharides are present. One is in the dimer interface with direct contacts between residues His25, Lys27, and Arg41 of CXCL12 and the heparin disaccharide. The second disaccharide contacts Ala20, Arg21, Asn30, and Lys64. This is the first x-ray structure of a CXC class chemokine in complex with glycosaminoglycans. Based on the observation of two heparin binding sites, we propose a mechanism in which GAGs bind around CXCL12 dimers as they sequester and present CXCL12 to CXCR4.

  11. Probing the Catalytic Potential of the Hamster Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase 2 Catalytic Triad by Site-directed Mutagenesis of the Proximal Conserved Residue, Tyrosine 190

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Naixia; Liu, Li; Walters, Kylie J.; Hanna, Patrick E.; Wagner, Carston R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) play an important role in both detoxification of arylamine and hydrazine drugs and activation of arylamine carcinogens. Since the catalytic triad, Cys-His-Asp, of mammalian NATs has been shown to be essential for maintaining protein stability, rendering it impossible to assess alterations of the triad on catalysis, we explored the impact of the highly conserved proximal residue, Tyr-190, which forms a direct hydrogen bond interaction with one of the triad residues, Asp-122, as well as a potential pi-pi stacking interaction with the active site His-107. Replacement of Hamster NAT2 Tyr-190 by either phenylalanine, isoleucine, or alanine was well tolerated and did not result in significant alterations in the overall fold of the protein. Nevertheless, stopped-flow and steady-state kinetic analysis revealed that Tyr-190 was critical for maximizing the acetylation rate of NAT2 and the transacetylation rate of p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) when compared to wild type. Tyr-190 was also shown to play an important role in determining the pKa of the active site cysteine during acetylation, as well as the pH versus rate profile for transacetylation. We hypothesized that the pH-dependence was associated with global changes in the active site structure, which was revealed by the superposition of [1H, 15N] HSQC spectra for wild type and Y190A. These results suggest that NAT2 catalytic efficiency is partially governed by the ability of Tyr-190 to mediate the collective impact of multiple side chains on the electrostatic potential and local conformation of active site. PMID:19860825

  12. Characterization of the sensor domain of QseE histidine kinase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Kwon Joo; Park, Jin-Wan; Kim, Eun-Hee; Jeon, Young Ho; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Cheong, Hae-Kap

    2016-10-01

    In enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), the QseEF two-component system causes attaching and effacing (AE) lesion on epithelial cells. QseE histidine kinase senses the host hormone epinephrine, sulfate, and phosphate; it also regulates QseF response regulator, which activates LEE gene that encodes AE lesion. In order to understand the recognition of ligand molecules and signal transfer mechanism in pathogenic bacteria, structural studies of the sensor domain of QseE of Escherichia coli should be conducted. In this study, we describe the overexpression, purification, and structural and biophysical properties of the sensor domain of QseE. The fusion protein had a 6×His tag at its N-terminus; this protein was overexpressed as inclusion bodies in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The protein was denatured in 7M guanidine hydrochloride and refolded by dialysis. The purification of the refolded protein was carried out using Ni-NTA affinity column and size-exclusion chromatography. Thereafter, the characteristics of the refolded protein were determined from NMR, CD, and MALS spectroscopies. In a pH range of 7.4-5.0, the folded protein existed in a monomeric form with a predominantly helical structure. (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR spectra shows that approximately 93% backbone amide peaks are detected at pH 5.0, suggesting that the number of backbone signals is sufficient for NMR studies. These data might provide an opportunity for structural and functional studies of the sensor domain of QseE.

  13. Purification and biochemical characterization of a monomeric form of papaya mosaic potexvirus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Lecours, Katia; Tremblay, Marie-Hélène; Gagné, Marie-Eve Laliberté; Gagné, Stéphane M; Leclerc, Denis

    2006-05-01

    Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) is a flexuous rod shape virus made of 1400 subunits that assemble around a plus sense genomic RNA. The structure determination of PapMV and of flexuous viruses in general is a major challenge for both NMR and X-ray crystallography. In this report, we present the characterization of a truncated version of the PapMV coat protein (CP) that is suitable for NMR study. The deletion of the N-terminal 26 amino acids of the PapMV CP (CP27-215) generates a monomer that can be expressed to high level and easily purified for production of an adequate NMR sample. The RNA gel shift assay showed that CP27-215 lost its ability to bind RNA in vitro, suggesting that the multimerization of the subunit is important for this function. The fusion of a 6x His tag at the C-terminus improved the solubility of the monomer and allowed its concentration to 0.2 mM. The CD spectra of the truncated and the wild-type proteins were similar, suggesting that both proteins are well ordered and have a similar secondary structure. CP27-215 was 15N labeled for NMR studies and a 2D 1H-15N-HSQC spectrum confirmed the presence of a well-ordered structure and the monomeric form of the protein. These results show that CP27-215 is amenable to a complete and exhaustive NMR study that should lead to the first three-dimensional structure determination of a flexuous rod shape virus.

  14. Structural characterization of the DC-SIGN-Lewis(X) complex.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Kari; Mitchell, Daniel A; Prestegard, James H

    2014-09-09

    Dendritic cell-specific intracellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) is a C-type lectin highly expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting dendritic cells. DC-SIGN mediates interactions among dendritic cells, pathogens, and a variety of epithelia, myeloid cells, and endothelia by binding to high mannose residues on pathogenic invaders or fucosylated residues on the membranes of other immune cells. Although these interactions are normally beneficial, they can also contribute to disease. The structural characterization of binding geometries is therefore of interest as a basis for the construction of mimetics that can mediate the effects of abnormal immune response. Here, we report the structural characteristics of the interaction of the DC-SIGN carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) with a common fucosylated entity, the Lewis(X) trisaccharide (Le(X)), using NMR methods. Titration of the monomeric DC-SIGN CRD with Le(X) monitored by 2D NMR revealed significant perturbations of DC-SIGN cross-peak positions in (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra and identified residues near the binding site. Additionally, saturation transfer difference (STD) and transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (trNOE) NMR experiments, using a tetrameric form of DC-SIGN, identified binding epitopes and bound conformations of the Le(X) ligand. The restraints derived from these multiple experiments were used to generate models for the binding of Le(X) to the DC-SIGN CRD. Ranking of the models based on the fit of model-based simulations of the trNOE data and STD buildup curves suggested conformations distinct from those seen in previous crystal structures. The new conformations offer insight into how differences between binding of Lewis(X) and mannose-terminated saccharides may be propagated.

  15. A Novel Method of Production and Biophysical Characterization of the Catalytic Domain of Yeast Oligosaccharyl Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chengdong; Mohanty, Smita; Banerjee, Monimoy

    2010-01-01

    Oligosaccharyl transferase (OT) is a multi-subunit enzyme that catalyzes N-linked glycosylation of nascent polypeptides in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. In the case of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, OT is composed of nine integral membrane protein subunits. Defects in N-linked glycosylation cause a series of disorders known as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). The C-terminal domain of Stt3p subunit has been reported to contain the acceptor protein recognition site and/or catalytic site. We report here the subcloning, overexpression, a robust but novel method of production of pure C-terminal domain of Stt3p at 60∼70 mg/L in E. coli. CD spectra indicate that the C-terminal Stt3p is highly helical and has a stable tertiary structure in SDS micelles. The well dispersed 2D {1H-15N}-HSQC spectrum in SDS micelles indicates that it is feasible to determine the atomic structure by NMR. The effect of the conserved D518E mutation on the conformation of the C-terminal Stt3p is particularly interesting. The comparative analysis of the fluorescence and NMR data of the mutant and the wild-type C-terminal domain of Stt3p revealed that the replacement of the key residue Asp518, which is located within the WWDYG signature motif (residues 516-520), led to a distinct tertiary structure, even though both proteins have similar overall secondary structures. This observation strongly suggests that Asp518, which was previously proposed to primarily function as a catalytic residue, also plays a critical structural role. Moreover, the activity of the protein was confirmed by Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) and NMR titration studies. PMID:20047336

  16. Interactions between the toxin Kid of the bacterial parD system and the antitoxins Kis and MazE.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Monique B; Monti, Maria Chiara; van den Heuvel, Robert H H; Santos-Sierra, Sandra; Folkers, Gert E; Lemonnier, Marc; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón; Heck, Albert J R; Boelens, Rolf

    2007-04-01

    The proteins Kid and Kis are the toxin and antitoxin, respectively, encoded by the parD operon of Escherichia coli plasmid R1. Kis prevents the inhibition of E. coli cell growth caused by the RNA cleavage activity of Kid. Overproduction of MazE, the chromosome-encoded homologue of Kis, has been demonstrated to neutralize Kid toxicity to a certain extent in the absence of native Kis. Here, we show that a high structural similarity exists between these antitoxins, using NMR spectroscopy. We report about the interactions between Kid and Kis that are responsible for neutralization of Kid toxicity and enhance autoregulation of parD transcription. Native macromolecular mass spectrometry data demonstrate that Kid and Kis form multiple complexes. At Kis:Kid ratios equal to or exceeding 1:1, as found in vivo in a plasmid-containing cell, various complexes are present, ranging from Kid(2)-Kis(2) tetramer up to Kis(2)-Kid(2)-Kis(2)-Kid(2)-Kis(2) decamer. When Kid is in excess of Kis, corresponding to an in vivo situation immediately after loss of the plasmid, the Kid(2)-Kis(2)-Kid(2) heterohexamer is the most abundant species. NMR chemical shift and intensity perturbations in the (1)H (15)N HSQC spectra of Kid and Kis, observed when titrating the partner protein, show that the interaction sites of Kid and Kis resemble those within the previously reported MazF(2)-MazE(2)-MazF(2) complex. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Kid(2)-MazE(2) tetramers can be formed via weak interactions involving a limited part of the Kis-binding residues of Kid. The functional roles of the identified Kid-Kis and Kid-MazE interaction sites and complexes in toxin neutralization and repression of transcription are discussed.

  17. Red spectra from white and blue noise

    PubMed Central

    Balmforth, N. J.; Provenzale, A.; Spiegel, E. A.; Martens, M.; Tresser, C.; Wu, C. W.

    1999-01-01

    The value of maps of the interval in modelling population dynamics has recently been called into question because temporal variations from such maps have blue or white power spectra, whereas many observations of real populations show time-series with red spectra. One way to deal with this discrepancy is to introduce chaotic or stochastic fluctuations in the parameters of the map. This leads to on–off intermittency and can markedly redden the spectrum produced by a model that does not by itself have a red spectrum. The parameter fluctuations need not themselves have a red spectrum in order to achieve this effect. Because the power spectrum is not invariant under a change of variable, another way to redden the spectrum is by a suitable transformation of the variables used. The question this poses is whether spectra are the best means of characterizing a fluctuating variable.

  18. Crystal field spectra of lunar pyroxenes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.; Abu-Eid, R. M.; Huggins, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    Absorption spectra in the visible and near infrared regions have been obtained for pyroxene single crystals in rocks from the Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 missions. The polarized spectra are compared with those obtained from terrestrial calcic clinopyroxenes, subcalcic augites, pigeonites, and orthopyroxenes. The lunar pyroxenes contain several broad, intense absorption bands in the near infrared, the positions of which are related to bulk composition, Fe(2+) site occupancy and structure type of the pyroxene. The visible spectra contain several sharp, weak peaks mainly due to spin-forbidden transitions in Fe(2+). Additional weak bands in this region in Apollo 11 pyroxenes are attributed to Ti(3+) ions. Spectral features from Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Cr(3+), and Cr(2+) were not observed.

  19. Vibrational spectra of molecular fluids in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakcheev, V. G.; Morozov, V. B.

    2012-12-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is applied for quantitative analysis of carbon dioxide phase composition in pores of nanoporous glass samples at nearcritical temperatures. Measurements of the 1388 1/cm Q-branch were made in a wide pressure range corresponding to coexistence of gas (gas-like), adsorbed and condensed phases within pores. At temperatures several degrees below the critical value, CARS spectra behavior is easy to interpret in terms of thermodynamic model of surface adsorption and capillary condensation. It allows estimating mass fractions of different phase components. Moreover, spectra measured at near critical temperatures 30.5 and 33°C have pronounced inhomogeneous shapes and indicate the presence of condensed phase in the volume of pores. The effect obviously reflects the fluid behaviour near the critical point in nanopores. Pores with smaller radii are filled with condensed phase at lower pressures. The analysis of the CARS spectra is informative for quantitative evaluation of phase composition in nanopores.

  20. Janus Spectra in Two-Dimensional Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory T.; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-09-01

    In large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows, and other two-dimensional flows, the exponent of the turbulent energy spectra, α , may theoretically take either of two distinct values, 3 or 5 /3 , but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed α =3 . Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which α transitions from 3 to 5 /3 for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to 3 for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows.

  1. FAST INVERSION OF SOLAR Ca II SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, C.; Choudhary, D. P.; Rezaei, R.; Louis, R. E.

    2015-01-10

    We present a fast (<<1 s per profile) inversion code for solar Ca II lines. The code uses an archive of spectra that are synthesized prior to the inversion under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We show that it can be successfully applied to spectrograph data or more sparsely sampled spectra from two-dimensional spectrometers. From a comparison to a non-LTE inversion of the same set of spectra, we derive a first-order non-LTE correction to the temperature stratifications derived in the LTE approach. The correction factor is close to unity up to log τ ∼ –3 and increases to values of 2.5 and 4 at log τ = –6 in the quiet Sun and the umbra, respectively.

  2. Molecular dynamics and spectra. II. Diatomic Raman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berens, Peter H.; White, Steven R.; Wilson, Kent R.

    1981-07-01

    This paper and paper I in this series [P.H. Berens and K.R. Wilison, J. Chem. Phys. 74, 4872 (1981)] indicate that infrared and Raman rotational and fundamental vibrational-rotational spectra of dense systems (high pressure gases, liquids, and solids) are essentially classical, in that they can be computed and understood from a basically classical mechanical viewpoint, with some caveats for features in which anharmonicity is important, such as the detailed shape of Q branches. It is demonstrated here, using the diatomic case as an example, that ordinary, i.e., nonresonant, Raman band contours can be computed from classical mechanics plus simple quantum corrections. Classical versions of molecular dynamics, linear response theory, and ensemble averaging, followed by straightforward quantum corrections, are used to compute the pure rotational and fundamental vibration-rotational Raman band contours of N2 for the gas phase and for solutions of N2 in different densities of gas phase Ar and in liquid Ar. The evolution is seen from multiple peaked line shapes characteristic of free rotation in the gas phase to single peaks characteristic of hindered rotation in the liquid phase. Comparison is made with quantum and correspondence principle classical gas phase spectral calculations and with experimental measurements for pure N2 and N2 in liquid Ar. Three advantages are pointed out for a classical approach to infrared and Raman spectra. First, a classical approach can be used to compute the spectra of complex molecular systems, e.g., of large molecules, clusters, liquids, solutions, and solids. Second, this classical approach can be extended to compute the spectra of nonequilibrium and time-dependent systems, e.g., infrared and Raman spectra during the course of chemical reactions. Third, a classical viewpoint allows experimental infrared and Raman spectra to be understood and interpreted in terms of atomic motions with the considerable aid of classical models and of our

  3. Infrared spectra of cesium chloride aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Jean-Joseph; Chapados, Camille

    2000-10-01

    The aqueous solutions of CsCl were studied at room temperature by infrared (IR) spectroscopy in the entire solubility range, 0-1200 g/L, using attenuated total reflection (ATR) sampling. The influence of anomalous dispersion on the IR-ATR spectra was evaluated by calculating the imaginary refractive index, k(ν), of each sample. Factor analysis (FA) was used to determine the number and abundance of species in the solutions. FA applied to both k(ν) spectra and IR-ATR spectra produced two principal spectra with a similar abundance of species. This result indicates that, even at high salt concentration, the optical effects do not influence the chemical analysis of IR-ATR spectra. The spectral modifications related to the salt concentrations are mainly first order. Second order effects were observed, but being weak, were not investigated. The two principal spectra are related to the two species present in the solution: pure water and CsCl-solvated water. From the latter, 2.8±0.4 water molecules were calculated to be associated with each close-bound Cs+/Cl- ion pair. In the case of KCl and NaCl aqueous solutions, both of which showed the same number of species, the number of water molecules associated to an ion pair was 5.0±0.4. That the latter number is different from that of CsCl indicates that the interaction between water molecules and ion pairs is different when cation Na or K in the chloride salt is replaced by Cs.

  4. Observed and theoretical spectra in the 10-100 A interval. [of solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E.; Acton, L. W.

    1988-01-01

    The soft X-ray spectra recorded in two sounding-rocket flights in 1982 and 1985 are compared with predicted spectra. The processed densitometer trace of the full spectrum is presented, together with the new spectrum from the 1985 experiment. The intensities of the lines are then compared with predictions.

  5. Experimental Constraints on Neutrino Spectra Following Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, Jim; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We discuss new initiatives to constrain predictions of fission neutrino spectra from nuclear reactors. These predictions are germane to the understanding of reactor flux anomalies; are needed to reduce systematic uncertainty in neutrino oscillation spectra; and inform searches for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. The initiatives include a search for very high- Q beta decay components to the neutrino spectrum from the Daya Bay power plant; plans for a measurement of the β- spectrum from 252Cf fission products; and precision measurements of the 235U fission neutrino spectrum from PROSPECT and other very short baseline reactor experiments.

  6. A data base of geologic field spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Goetz, A. F. H.; Paley, H. N.; Alley, R. E.; Abbott, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that field samples measured in the laboratory do not always present an accurate picture of the ground surface sensed by airborne or spaceborne instruments because of the heterogeneous nature of most surfaces and because samples are disturbed and surface characteristics changed by collection and handling. The development of new remote sensing instruments relies on the analysis of surface materials in their natural state. The existence of thousands of Portable Field Reflectance Spectrometer (PFRS) spectra has necessitated a single, all-inclusive data base that permits greatly simplified searching and sorting procedures and facilitates further statistical analyses. The data base developed at JPL for cataloging geologic field spectra is discussed.

  7. Separating Peaks in X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David; Taylor, Clayborne; Wade, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Deconvolution algorithm assists in analysis of x-ray spectra from scanning electron microscopes, electron microprobe analyzers, x-ray fluorescence spectrometers, and like. New algorithm automatically deconvolves x-ray spectrum, identifies locations of spectral peaks, and selects chemical elements most likely producing peaks. Technique based on similarities between zero- and second-order terms of Taylor-series expansions of Gaussian distribution and of damped sinusoid. Principal advantage of algorithm: no requirement to adjust weighting factors or other parameters when analyzing general x-ray spectra.

  8. Vibrational spectra study on quinolones antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Yu, Ke; Wang, Sihuan

    2006-09-01

    In order to be able to fully understand and easily identify the quilonoles, we collected IR and Raman spectra of six quinolones, and attempted to assign the attribution of the observed frequencies and their association with specific modes of vibration. According to the structure, the compounds were divided into the groups, and the similarities and differences were further studied by comparing. The result of the study shows that the frequency and intensity are comparable to the corresponding structure. The spectra not only have the commonness but also the individualities.

  9. Hadron rapidity spectra within a hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostukhin, A. S.; Toneev, V. D.

    2017-01-01

    A 2-stage hybrid model is proposed that joins the fast initial state of interaction, described by the hadron string dynamics (HSD) model, to subsequent evolution of the expanding system at the second stage, treated within ideal hydrodynamics. The developed hybrid model is assigned to describe heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the NICA collider under construction in Dubna. Generally, the model is in reasonable agreement with the available data on proton rapidity spectra. However, reproducing proton rapidity spectra, our hybrid model cannot describe the rapidity distributions of pions. The model should be improved by taking into consideration viscosity effects at the hydrodynamical stage of system evolution.

  10. Four years of meteor spectra patrol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of the NASA-Langley Research Center meteor spectra patrol is described in general terms. The recording of very faint meteors was made possible by three great strides in optical and photographic technology in the 1960's: (1) the availability of optical-grade fused silica at modest cost, (2) the development of large transmission gratings with high blaze efficiency, and (3) the development of a method for avoiding plate fogging due to background skylight, which consisted of using a photoelectric meteor detector which actuates the spectrograph shutter when a meteor occurs in the field. The classification scheme for meteor spectra developed by Peter M. Millman is described.

  11. Micro-Raman spectra of ugrandite garnet.

    PubMed

    Moroz, T; Ragozin, A; Salikhov, D; Belikova, G; Puchkov, V; Kagi, H

    2009-08-01

    The natural garnets from chromite ores associated with pegmatoid pyroxenites of Sangalyk area (Uchaly ore district, southern Urals, Russia) were studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The compositions of these garnets were close to ugrandite, an isomorphous intermediate group of uvarovite-grossularite-andradite, X(3)Y(2)(SiO(4))(3), X = Ca(2+), Y = Al(3+), Fe(3+), Cr(3+), according to Raman spectra and X-ray microprobe analyses. An assignment of most of the observed bands in visible and near infrared Raman spectra is reported.

  12. Micro-Raman spectra of ugrandite garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, T.; Ragozin, A.; Salikhov, D.; Belikova, G.; Puchkov, V.; Kagi, H.

    2009-08-01

    The natural garnets from chromite ores associated with pegmatoid pyroxenites of Sangalyk area (Uchaly ore district, southern Urals, Russia) were studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The compositions of these garnets were close to ugrandite, an isomorphous intermediate group of uvarovite-grossularite-andradite, X 3Y 2(SiO 4) 3, X = Ca 2+, Y = Al 3+, Fe 3+, Cr 3+, according to Raman spectra and X-ray microprobe analyses. An assignment of most of the observed bands in visible and near infrared Raman spectra is reported.

  13. Gravitational effects on planetary neutron flux spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Drake, D. M.; O'dell, R. D.; Brinkley, F. W.; Anderson, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the planetary neutron flux spectra for planet Mars, and the lifetime of the neutron, were investigated using a modified one-dimensional diffusion accelerated neutral-particle transport code, coupled with a multigroup cross-section library tailored specifically for Mars. The results showed the presence of a qualitatively new feature in planetary neutron leakage spectra in the form of a component of returning neutrons with kinetic energies less than the gravitational binding energy (0.132 eV for Mars). The net effect is an enhancement in flux at the lowest energies that is largest at and above the outermost layer of planetary matter.

  14. Algorithms for classification of astronomical object spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiewicz, P.; Szuppe, J.; Hryniewicz, K.

    2015-09-01

    Obtaining interesting celestial objects from tens of thousands or even millions of recorded optical-ultraviolet spectra depends not only on the data quality but also on the accuracy of spectra decomposition. Additionally rapidly growing data volumes demands higher computing power and/or more efficient algorithms implementations. In this paper we speed up the process of substracting iron transitions and fitting Gaussian functions to emission peaks utilising C++ and OpenCL methods together with the NOSQL database. In this paper we implemented typical astronomical methods of detecting peaks in comparison to our previous hybrid methods implemented with CUDA.

  15. Parallel Genetic Algorithm for Alpha Spectra Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Orellana, Carlos J.; Rubio-Montero, Pilar; González-Velasco, Horacio

    2005-01-01

    We present a performance study of alpha-particle spectra fitting using parallel Genetic Algorithm (GA). The method uses a two-step approach. In the first step we run parallel GA to find an initial solution for the second step, in which we use Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method for a precise final fit. GA is a high resources-demanding method, so we use a Beowulf cluster for parallel simulation. The relationship between simulation time (and parallel efficiency) and processors number is studied using several alpha spectra, with the aim of obtaining a method to estimate the optimal processors number that must be used in a simulation.

  16. Thermal Emission and Reflected Light Spectra of Super Earths with Flat Transmission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin; Line, Michael; Kempton, Eliza; Lewis, Nikole; Cahoy, Kerri

    2015-12-01

    Planets larger than Earth and smaller than Neptune are some of the most numerous in the galaxy, but observational efforts to understand this population have proved challenging because optically thick clouds or hazes at high altitudes obscure molecular features. We present models of super Earths that include thick clouds and hazes and predict their transmission, thermal emission, and reflected light spectra. Very thick, lofted clouds of salts or sulfides in high metallicity (1000× solar) atmospheres create featureless transmission spectra in the near-infrared. Photochemical hazes with a range of particle sizes also create featureless transmission spectra at lower metallicities. Cloudy thermal emission spectra have muted features more like blackbodies, and hazy thermal emission spectra have emission features caused by an inversion layer at altitudes where the haze forms. Close analysis of reflected light from warm (˜400-800 K) planets can distinguish cloudy spectra, which have moderate albedos (0.05-0.20), from hazy models, which are very dark (0.0-0.03). Reflected light spectra of cold planets (˜200 K) accessible to a space-based visible light coronagraph will have high albedos and large molecular features that will allow them to be more easily characterized than the warmer transiting planets. We suggest a number of complementary observations to characterize this population of planets, including transmission spectra of hot (≳ 1000 K) targets, thermal emission spectra of warm targets using the James Webb Space Telescope, high spectral resolution (R ˜ 105) observations of cloudy targets, and reflected light spectral observations of directly imaged cold targets. Despite the dearth of features observed in super Earth transmission spectra to date, different observations will provide rich diagnostics of their atmospheres.

  17. Fourier smoothing of digital photographic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupama, G. C.

    1990-03-01

    Fourier methods of smoothing one-dimensional data are discussed with particular reference to digital photographic spectra. Data smoothed using lowpass filters with different cut-off frequencies are intercompared. A method to scale densities in order to remove the dependence of grain noise on density is described. Optimal filtering technique which models signal and noise in Fourier domain is also explained.

  18. Rotational and Vibrational Spectra of Molecular Clusters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-30

    3 I D ’- 2095 205 209 2105 i k (c),,.-..0 WavenumbersHCN/Av ixture .Pekarlbld asM -mnmr dmr 6 9014 CARS spectra ofthe v, region of HCN in...shown above, the bond stretching constants below the structure. Values shown in parentheses were held fixed. %% -.. .4 .. 0 Table 8 Sumawy of norma

  19. Laboratory millimeter and submillimeter spectra of CO/+/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, K. V. L. N.; Helminger, P.; Herbst, E.; De Lucia, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    The strong electric dipole-allowed transitions of the molecular ion CO(+) in the region 235-470 GHz have been measured in the laboratory. The laboratory spectra at 235 GHz appear to confirm the claim by Erickson et al. (1981) to have observed CO(+) in OMC-1.

  20. Principal component analysis of phenolic acid spectra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic acids are common plant metabolites that exhibit bioactive properties and have applications in functional food and animal feed formulations. The ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectra of four closely related phenolic acid structures were evaluated by principal component analysis (PCA) to...

  1. Variations on supersymmetry breaking and neutrino spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Borzumati, F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Nomura, Y.; Yanagida, T.

    2000-12-11

    The problem of generating light neutrinos within supersymmetric models is discussed. It is shown that the hierarchy of scales induced by supersymmetry breaking can give rise to suppression factors of the correct order of magnitude to produce experimentally allowed neutrino spectra.

  2. Chaotic spectra: How to extract dynamic information

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, H.S.; Gomez Llorente, J.M.; Zakrzewski, J.; Kulander, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    Nonlinear dynamics is applied to chaotic unassignable atomic and molecular spectra with the aim of extracting detailed information about regular dynamic motions that exist over short intervals of time. It is shown how this motion can be extracted from high resolution spectra by doing low resolution studies or by Fourier transforming limited regions of the spectrum. These motions mimic those of periodic orbits (PO) and are inserts into the dominant chaotic motion. Considering these inserts and the PO as a dynamically decoupled region of space, resonant scattering theory and stabilization methods enable us to compute ladders of resonant states which interact with the chaotic quasi-continuum computed in principle from basis sets placed off the PO. The interaction of the resonances with the quasicontinuum explains the low resolution spectra seen in such experiments. It also allows one to associate low resolution features with a particular PO. The motion on the PO thereby supplies the molecular movements whose quantization causes the low resolution spectra. Characteristic properties of the periodic orbit based resonances are discussed. The method is illustrated on the photoabsorption spectrum of the hydrogen atom in a strong magnetic field and on the photodissociation spectrum of H/sub 3//sup +/. Other molecular systems which are currently under investigation using this formalism are also mentioned. 53 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Correlation Functions Aid Analyses Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Norton, Robert H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    New uses found for correlation functions in analyses of spectra. In approach combining elements of both pattern-recognition and traditional spectral-analysis techniques, spectral lines identified in data appear useless at first glance because they are dominated by noise. New approach particularly useful in measurement of concentrations of rare species of molecules in atmosphere.

  4. EEG Power Spectra of Adolescent Poor Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Peggy T.; McPherson, W. Brian; Oglesby, D. Michael; Dykman, Roscoe A.

    1998-01-01

    Electroencephalographic power spectra were studied in two poor-reading adolescent groups (n=38), dysphonetic and phonetic. Significant Group x Hemisphere effects were found in the alpha and beta bands, with the phonetic group showing right greater than left asymmetry. Results suggest more circumscribed and mature processing in the phonetically…

  5. Discriminating Dysarthria Type from Envelope Modulation Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the…

  6. Prompt fission neutron spectra of actinides

    DOE PAGES

    Capote, R.; Chen, Y. -J.; Hambsch, F. -J.; ...

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  7. Spectra of Angrites and Possible Parent Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; McCoy, T. J.; Binzel, R. P.

    2001-01-01

    One meteorite class where very little progress has been made in identifying possible parent bodies is the angrites. We have obtained spectra of two new angrites (D'Orbigny and Sahara 99555). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Calculated late time spectra of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, T.S.

    1987-10-30

    We consider here the nebular phase spectra of supernovae whose late time luminosity is provided by the radioactive decay of /sup 56/Ni and /sup 56/Co synthesized in the explosion. A broad variety of supernovae are known or suspected to fall in this category. This includes all SNIa and SNIb, and at least some SNII, in particular SN1987a. At sufficiently late times the expanding supernova becomes basically nebular in character due to its decreasing optical depth. The spectra produced during this stage contain information on the density and abundance structure of the entire supernova, as opposed to spectra near maximum light which are affected only by the outermost layers. A numerical model for nebular spectrum formation is therefore potentially very valuable for answering currently outstanding questions about the post-explosion supernova structure. As an example, we can hope to determine the degree of mixing which occurs between the layers of the ''onion-skin'' abundance structure predicted by current one dimensional explosion calculations. In the sections which follow, such a numerical model is briefly described and then applied to SN1972e, a typical SNIa, SN1985f, an SNIb, and finally to SN1987a. In the case of SN1987a predicted spectra are presented for the wavelength range from 1 to 100 microns at a time 300 days after explosion. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Astronomy Spectra Experiment for Nonscience Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental technique to develop inferential thinking in less scientifically-oriented community college students is described. Students activate unlabeled gas discharge tubes and identify the gases by comparing color photographs with spectrometer observations. Includes methods for taking color photographs of spectra. (SK)

  10. Students' Mental Models of Atomic Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Körhasan, Nilüfer Didis; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Mental modeling, which is a theory about knowledge organization, has been recently studied by science educators to examine students' understanding of scientific concepts. This qualitative study investigates undergraduate students' mental models of atomic spectra. Nine second-year physics students, who have already taken the basic chemistry and…

  11. Automatic Spike Removal Algorithm for Raman Spectra.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yao; Burch, Kenneth S

    2016-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique, widely used in both academia and industry. In part, the technique's extensive use stems from its ability to uniquely identify and image various material parameters: composition, strain, temperature, lattice/excitation symmetry, and magnetism in bulk, nano, solid, and organic materials. However, in nanomaterials and samples with low thermal conductivity, these measurements require long acquisition times. On the other hand, charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors used in Raman microscopes are vulnerable to cosmic rays. As a result, many spurious spikes occur in the measured spectra, which can distort the result or require the spectra to be ignored. In this paper, we outline a new method that significantly improves upon existing algorithms for removing these spikes. Specifically, we employ wavelet transform and data clustering in a new spike-removal algorithm. This algorithm results in spike-free spectra with negligible spectral distortion. The reduced dependence on the selection of wavelets and intuitive wavelet coefficient adjustment strategy enables non-experts to employ these powerful spectra-filtering techniques.

  12. Temporal Evolution of Solar Energetic Particle Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Donald J.; Dalla, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    During solar flares and coronal mass ejections, Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) may be released into the interplanetary medium and near-Earth locations. The energy spectra of SEP events at 1 AU are typically averaged over the entire event or studied in a few snapshots. In this article we analyze the time evolution of the energy spectra of four large selected SEP events using a large number of snapshots. We use a multi-spacecraft and multi-instrument approach for the observations, obtained over a wide SEP energy range. We find large differences in the spectra at the beginning of the events as measured by different instruments. We show that over time, a wave-like structure is observed traveling through the spectra from the highest energies to the lowest energies, creating an "arch" shape that then straightens into a power law later in the event, after times on the order of 10 hours. We discuss the processes that determine SEP intensities and their role in shaping the spectral time evolution.

  13. Solar Energetic Particle Spectra Measured with PAMELA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, James; Bruno, Alessandro; Boezio, Mirko; Bravar, Ulisse; Christian, Eric; Georgia, De Nolfo; Martucci, Matteo; Merge, Matteo; Munini, Riccardo; Sparvoli, Roberta; Stochaj, Steven; Pamela Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We have measured the event integrated spectra from several SEP events from 2006 to 2014 in the energy range starting at 80 MeV and extending well above the neutron monitor threshold. The PAMELA instrument is in a high inclination, low Earth orbit and has access to SEPs when at high geographic latitudes. This means that the spectra have been assembled from regularly spaced measurements with gaps during the course of the event. Furthermore, the field of view of PAMELA is small and during the high latitude passes it scans a wide range of asymptotic directions as the spacecraft moves. Correcting for data gaps and solid angle effects, we have compiled event-integrated intensity spectra that typically exhibit power law shapes in energy with an exponential roll over. The events analyzed include two, maybe three, GLEs. In those cases the roll over energy lies above the neutron monitor threshold (1 GV) while the others are lower. We see no qualitative difference between the spectra of GLE vs. non-GLE events. National Science Foundation, NASA, Italian Space Agency, Russian Space Agency.

  14. Mid-infrared spectra of comet nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael S. P.; Woodward, Charles E.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Reach, William T.; Harker, David E.

    2017-03-01

    Comet nuclei and D-type asteroids have several similarities at optical and near-IR wavelengths, including near-featureless red reflectance spectra, and low albedos. Mineral identifications based on these characteristics are fraught with degeneracies, although some general trends can be identified. In contrast, spectral emissivity features in the mid-infrared provide important compositional information that might not otherwise be achievable. Jovian Trojan D-type asteroids have emissivity features strikingly similar to comet comae, suggesting that they have the same compositions and that the surfaces of the Trojans are highly porous. However, a direct comparison between a comet and asteroid surface has not been possible due to the paucity of spectra of comet nuclei at mid-infrared wavelengths. We present 5-35 μm thermal emission spectra of comets 10P/Tempel 2, and 49P/Arend-Rigaux observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our analysis reveals no evidence for a coma or tail at the time of observation, suggesting the spectra are dominated by the comet nucleus. We fit each spectrum with the near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) and find sizes in agreement with previous values. However, the NEATM beaming parameters of the nuclei, 0.74-0.83, are systematically lower than the Jupiter-family comet population mean of 1.03 ± 0.11, derived from 16- and 22-μm photometry. We suggest this may be either an artifact of the spectral reduction, or the consequence of an emissivity low near 16 μm. When the spectra are normalized by the NEATM model, a weak 10-μm silicate plateau is evident, with a shape similar to those seen in mid-infrared spectra of D-type asteroids. A silicate plateau is also evident in previously published Spitzer spectra of the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1. We compare, in detail, these comet nucleus emission features to those seen in spectra of the Jovian Trojan D-types (624) Hektor, (911) Agamemnon, and (1172) Aneas, as well

  15. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz F. C.

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle ( Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a ν1 band at ca. 1520 cm -1, in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carboncarbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a ν1 band at 1537 cm -1 which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carboncarbon double bonds. A correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm -1) of the ν1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit ν1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm -1, respectively. On the basis of the correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm -1 and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm -1, which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form.

  16. An Interactive Gallery of Planetary Nebula Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwitter, K. B.; Henry, R. B. C.

    2002-12-01

    We have created a website containing high-quality moderate-resolution spectra of 88 planetary nebulae (PNe) from 3600 to 9600 Å, obtained at KPNO and CTIO. Spectra are displayed in a zoomable window, and there are templates available that show wavelength and ion identifications. In addition to the spectra themselves, the website also contains a brief discussion of PNe as astronomical objects and as contributors to our understanding of stellar evolution, and a table with atlas information for each object along with a link to an image. This table can be re-ordered by object name, galactic or equatorial coordinates, distance from the sun, the galactic center, or the galactic plane. We envision that this website, which concentrates a large amount of data in one place, will be of interest to a variety of users. PN researchers might need to check the spectrum of a particular object of interest; the non-specialist astronomer might simply be interested in perusing such a collection of spectra; and finally, teachers of introductory astronomy can use this database to illustrate basic principles of atomic physics and radiation. To encourage such use, we have written two simple exercises at a basic level to introduce beginning astronomy students to the wealth of information that PN spectra contain. We are grateful to Adam Wang of the Williams College OIT and to his summer student teams who worked on various apects of the implementation of this website. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-9819123 and by Williams College and the University of Oklahoma.

  17. Backbone chemical shift assignments for Xanthomonas campestris peroxiredoxin Q in the reduced and oxidized states: a dramatic change in backbone dynamics.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Perkins, Arden; Parsonage, Derek; Poole, Leslie B; Karplus, P Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are ubiquitous enzymes that reduce peroxides as part of antioxidant defenses and redox signaling. While Prx catalytic activity and sensitivity to hyperoxidative inactivation depend on their dynamic properties, there are few examples where their dynamics has been characterized by NMR spectroscopy. Here, we provide a foundation for studies of the solution properties of peroxiredoxin Q from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (XcPrxQ) by assigning the observable (1)H(N), (15)N, (13)C(α), (13)C(β), and (13)C' chemical shifts for both the reduced (dithiol) and oxidized (disulfide) states. In the reduced state, most of the backbone amide resonances (149/152, 98 %) can be assigned in the XcPrxQ (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum. In contrast, a remarkable 51 % (77) of these amide resonances are not visible in the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum of the disulfide state of the enzyme, indicating a substantial change in backbone dynamics associated with the formation of an intramolecular C48-C84 disulfide bond.

  18. EMPCA and Cluster Analysis of Quasar Spectra: Construction and Application to Simulated Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrs, Adam; Leighly, Karen; Wagner, Cassidy; Macinnis, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Quasars have complex spectra with emission lines influenced by many factors. Therefore, to fully describe the spectrum requires specification of a large number of parameters, such as line equivalent width, blueshift, and ratios. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) aims to construct eigenvectors-or principal components-from the data with the goal of finding a few key parameters that can be used to predict the rest of the spectrum fairly well. Analysis of simulated quasar spectra was used to verify and justify our modified application of PCA.We used a variant of PCA called Weighted Expectation Maximization PCA (EMPCA; Bailey 2012) along with k-means cluster analysis to analyze simulated quasar spectra. Our approach combines both analytical methods to address two known problems with classical PCA. EMPCA uses weights to account for uncertainty and missing points in the spectra. K-means groups similar spectra together to address the nonlinearity of quasar spectra, specifically variance in blueshifts and widths of the emission lines.In producing and analyzing simulations, we first tested the effects of varying equivalent widths and blueshifts on the derived principal components, and explored the differences between standard PCA and EMPCA. We also tested the effects of varying signal-to-noise ratio. Next we used the results of fits to composite quasar spectra (see accompanying poster by Wagner et al.) to construct a set of realistic simulated spectra, and subjected those spectra to the EMPCA /k-means analysis. We concluded that our approach was validated when we found that the mean spectra from our k-means clusters derived from PCA projection coefficients reproduced the trends observed in the composite spectra.Furthermore, our method needed only two eigenvectors to identify both sets of correlations used to construct the simulations, as well as indicating the linear and nonlinear segments. Comparing this to regular PCA, which can require a dozen or more components, or to

  19. Ab initio infrared and Raman spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredkin, D. R.; White, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.; Komornicki, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that with increased computer power and improved computational techniques, such as the gradients developed in recent years, it is becoming practical to compute spectra ab initio, from the fundamental constants of nature, for systems of increasing complexity. The present investigation has the objective to explore several possible ab initio approaches to spectra, giving particular attention to infrared and nonresonance Raman. Two approaches are discussed. The sequential approach, in which first the electronic part and then later the nuclear part of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is solved, is appropriate for small systems. The simultaneous approach, in which the electronic and nuclear parts are solved at the same time, is more appropriate for many-atom systems. A review of the newer quantum gradient techniques is provided, and the infrared and Raman spectral band contours for the water molecule are computed.

  20. Automated analysis of slitless spectra - Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchemin, M.; Borra, E. F.; Levesque, S.

    1991-09-01

    The stellar spectral classification that can be achieved with very low-dispersion spectroscopy is examined. Several methods are applied to slitless spectra taken from the automated grens plates analysis project undertaken at Laval University. It is suggested that an accuracy in B - V of about 0.1 mag at B approximating 19 for stars bluer than B - V below 0.8 mag or better for redder stars can be obtained by probing the continuum. Results from DDO-like photometry show that grens data behave similarly to the Gunn and Stryker library of standard stars for many indices. Results of multivariate analysis are coherent with the stellar spectral classification and provide a powerful and objective means of cataloging spectra of the same spectral shape.

  1. High resolution derivative spectra in remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demetriades-Shah, Tanvir H.; Steven, Michael D.; Clark, Jeremy A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of derivative spectra is an established technique in analytical chemistry for the elimination of background signals and for resolving overlapping spectral features. Application of this technique for tackling analogous problems such as interference from soil background reflectance in the remote sensing of vegetation or for resolving complex spectra of several target species within individual pixels in remote sensing is proposed. Methods for generating derivatives of high spectral resolution data are reviewed. Results of experiments to test the use of derivatives for monitoring chlorosis in vegetation show that derivative spectral indices are superior to conventional broad-band spectral indices such as the near-infrared/red reflectance ratio. Conventional broad-band indices are sensitive to both leaf cover as well as leaf color. New derivative spectral indices which were able to monitor chlorosis unambiguously were identified. Potential areas for the application of this technique in remote sensing are considered.

  2. Vibrational Spectra of Hydrolysed Triethoxysilane on Germania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabtawi, Sami; Mallik, Robert

    1996-04-01

    Hydrolysed triethoxysilane (TES) monolayers are introduced onto ultra-thin (of order 1.5 nm) and relatively hydrogern-free sputtered germania films. Two methods are used to dope the germania surface: (i) from TES vapor under a water vapor/nitrogen atmosphere, and (ii) from aqueous acidic hydrolysed TES solution. Vibrational Spectra obtained using these two methods are similar; in both cases Si-H stretching and bending modes are present at approximately 2000 - 2200, and 900 wavenumbers respectively, together with broad Si-O-Si symmetric and asymmetric stretching peaks centered at 700 and 1100 wavenumbers respectively. Only very weak features due to residual CH species are present indicating a large degree of hydrolysis in both cases. All spectra obtained closely resemble those of hydrogenated amorphous silicon monoxide films, confirming that a polysiloxane matrix is present.

  3. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studied. The results reveal that the 3.2-eV peak comes from the structural defect at the interface between the GaN nanorod and Si substrate. The surface state emission of the single GaN nanorod is stronger as the diameter of the GaN nanorod becomes smaller due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio. PMID:22168896

  4. Energy spectra in elasto-inertial turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, P. C.; da Silva, C. B.; Pinho, F. T.

    2016-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations of statistically steady homogeneous isotropic turbulence in viscoelastic fluids described by the FENE-P model are presented. Emphasis is given to large polymer relaxation times compared to the eddy turnover time, which is a regime recently termed elasto-inertial turbulence. In this regime the polymers are ineffective in dissipating kinetic energy but they play a lead role in transferring kinetic energy to the small solvent scales which turns out to be concomitant with the depletion of the usual non-linear energy cascade. However, we show that the non-linear interactions are still highly active, but they lead to no net downscale energy transfer because the forward and reversed energy cascades are nearly balanced. Finally, we show that the tendency for a steeper elasto-inertial power-law spectra is reversed for large polymer relaxation times and the spectra tend towards the usual k-5/3 functional form.

  5. Terahertz-sideband spectra involving Kapteyn series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, Ian; Tautz, Robert C.; Citrin, D. S.

    2009-09-01

    Kapteyn series of the second kind appear in models of even- and odd-order sideband spectra in the optical regime of a quantum system modulated by a high-frequency (e.g., terahertz) electromagnetic field (Citrin D S 1999 Phys. Rev. B 60 5659) and in certain time-periodic transport problems in superlattices (Ignatov A A and Romanov Y A 1976 Phys. Status Solidi b 73 327; Feise M W and Citrin D S 1999 Appl. Phys. Lett. 75 3536). This paper shows that both the even- and the odd-order Kapteyn series that appear can be summed in closed form, thereby allowing more transparent insight into the structural dependence of the sideband spectra and also providing an analytic control for the accuracy of numerical procedures designed to evaluate the series. The general method of analysis may also be of interest for other Kapteyn series.

  6. Analysis of spectra using correlation functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Norton, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    A novel method is presented for the quantitative analysis of spectra based on the properties of the cross correlation between a real spectrum and either a numerical synthesis or laboratory simulation. A new goodness-of-fit criterion called the heteromorphic coefficient H is proposed that has the property of being zero when a fit is achieved and varying smoothly through zero as the iteration proceeds, providing a powerful tool for automatic or near-automatic analysis. It is also shown that H can be rendered substantially noise-immune, permitting the analysis of very weak spectra well below the apparent noise level and, as a byproduct, providing Doppler shift and radial velocity information with excellent precision. The technique is in regular use in the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) project and operates in an interactive, realtime computing environment with turn-around times of a few seconds or less.

  7. RADLite: Raytracer for infrared line spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus; Dullemond, Kees

    2013-08-01

    RADLite is a raytracer that is optimized for producing infrared line spectra and images from axisymmetric density structures, originally developed to function on top of the dust radiative transfer code RADMC. RADLite can consistently deal with a wide range of velocity gradients, such as those typical for the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. The code is intended as a back-end for chemical and excitation codes, and can rapidly produce spectra of thousands of lines for grids of models for comparison with observations. It includes functionality for simulating telescopic images for optical/IR/midIR/farIR telescopes. It takes advantage of multi-threaded CPUs and includes an escape-probability non-LTE module.

  8. Bone densitometry using x-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Krmar, M; Shukla, S; Ganezer, K

    2010-10-21

    In contrast to the two distinct energy regions that are involved in dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry for bone densitometry, the complete spectrum of a beam transmitted through two layers of different materials is utilized in this study to calculate the areal density of each material. Test objects constructed from aluminum and Plexiglas were used to simulate cortical bone and soft tissue, respectively. Solid-state HPGe (high-purity germanium) detectors provided high-resolution x-ray spectra over an energy range of approximately 20-80 keV. Areal densities were obtained from spectra using two methods: a system of equations for two spectral regions and a nonlinear fit of the entire spectrum. Good agreement with the known areal densities of aluminum was obtained over a wide range of PMMA thicknesses. The spectral method presented here can be used to decrease beam hardening at a small number of bodily points selected for examination.

  9. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  10. Specific heat of multifractal energy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, L. R.; Vallejos, R. O.; Tsallis, C.; Mendes, R. S.; Roux, S.

    2001-07-01

    Motivated by the self-similar character of energy spectra demonstrated for quasicrystals, we investigate the case of multifractal energy spectra, and compute the specific heat associated with simple archetypal forms of multifractal sets as generated by iterated maps. We considered the logistic map and the circle map at their threshold to chaos. Both examples show nontrivial structures associated with the scaling properties of their respective chaotic attractors. The specific heat displays generically log-periodic oscillations around a value that characterizes a single exponent, the ``fractal dimension,'' of the distribution of energy levels close to the minimum value set to 0. It is shown that when the fractal dimension and the frequency of log oscillations of the density of states are large, the amplitude of the resulting log oscillation in the specific heat becomes much smaller than the log-periodic oscillation measured on the density of states.

  11. Specific heat spectra for quasiperiodic ladder sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, D. A.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Bezerra, C. G.

    2006-12-01

    We performed a theoretical study of the specific heat C(T) as a function of the temperature for double-strand quasiperiodic sequences. To mimic DNA molecules, the sequences are made up from the nucleotides guanine G, adenine A, cytosine C and thymine T, arranged according to the Fibonacci and Rudin-Shapiro quasiperiodic sequences. The energy spectra are calculated using the two-dimensional Schrödinger equation, in a tight-binding approximation, with the on-site energy exhibiting long-range disorder and non-random hopping amplitudes. We compare the specific heat features of these quasiperiodic artificial sequences to the spectra considering a segment of the first sequenced human chromosome 22 (Ch22), a real genomic DNA sequence.

  12. Neutron Spectra in a 15 MV LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Chu, Wei-Han; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Lan, Jen-Hong

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra were calculated inside the treatment hall of a 15 MV LINAC, calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. With a Bonner sphere spectrometer with pairs of thermoluminiscent dosimeters the neutron spectrum at 100 cm from the isocenter was measured and compared with the calculated spectrum. All the spectra in the treatment hall show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons; also the room-return due to the hall features is shown. In the maze the large contribution are due to epithermal and thermal neutrons. A good agreement between the calculated and measured spectrum at 100 cm was noticed, from this comparison the differences are attributed to the water content in the concrete of the hall.

  13. Measurement and interpretation of plutonium spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise, J.; Fred, M.S.; Carnall, W.T.; Crosswhite, H.M.; Crosswhite, H.

    1982-01-01

    The atomic spectroscopic data available for plutonium are among the rickest of any in the periodic system. They include high-resolution grating and Fourier-transform spectra as well as extensive Zeeman and isotope-shift studies. We summarize the present status of the term analysis and cite the configurations that have been identified. A least-squares adjustment of a parametric Hamiltonian for configurations of both Pu I and Pu II has shown that almost all of the expected low levels are now known. The use of a model Hamiltonian applicable to both lanthanide and actinide atomic species has been applied to the low configurations of Pu I and Pu II making use of trends predicted by ab initio calculations. This same model has been used to describe the energy levels of Pu/sup 3 +/ in LaCl/sub 3/, and an extension has permitted preliminary calculations of the spectra of other valence states.

  14. Model atmospheres, predicted spectra, and colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical models of stellar atmospheres and the process of forming a spectrum are reviewed with particular reference to the spectra of B stars. In the case of classical models the stellar atmosphere is though to consist of plane parallel layers of gas in which radiative and hydrostatic equilibrium exists. No radiative energy is lost or gained in the model atmosphere, but the detailed shape of the spectrum is changed as a result of the interactions with the ionized gas. Predicted line spectra using statistical equilibrium local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), and non-LTE physics are compared and the determination of abundances is discussed. The limitations of classical modeling are examined. Models developed to demonstrate what motions in the upper atmosphere will do to the spectrum and to explore the effects of using geometries different from plane parallel layer are reviewed. In particular the problem of radiative transfer is addressed.

  15. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Chang; Li, Guan-Hua; Lin, Yuan-Ting; Chang, Ching-Wen; Wadekar, Paritosh; Chen, Quark Yung-Sung; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Tchernycheva, Maria; Julien, François Henri; Tu, Li-Wei

    2011-12-14

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studied. The results reveal that the 3.2-eV peak comes from the structural defect at the interface between the GaN nanorod and Si substrate. The surface state emission of the single GaN nanorod is stronger as the diameter of the GaN nanorod becomes smaller due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio.

  16. Characteristics of magnetospheric radio noise spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Magnetospheric radio noise spectra (30 kHz to 10 MHz) taken by IMP-6 and RAE-2 exhibit time-varying characteristics which are related to spacecraft position and magnetospheric processes. In the mid-frequency range (100-1,000 kHz) intense noise peaks rise by a factor of 100 or more above background; 80% of the peak frequencies are within the band 125 kHz to 600 kHz, and the peak occurs most often (18% of the time) at 280 kHz. This intense mid-frequency noise has been detected at radial distances from 1.3 Re to 60 Re on all sides of the Earth during magnetically quiet as well as disturbed periods. Maximum occurrence of the mid-frequency noise is in the evening to midnight hours where splash-type energetic particle precipitation takes place. ""Magnetospheric lightning'' can be invoked to explain the spectral shape of the observed spectra.

  17. Knowledge Discovery in Mega-Spectra Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škoda, P.; Bromová, P.; Lopatovsk'y, L.; Palička, A.; Vávzný, J.

    2015-09-01

    The recent progress of astronomical instrumentation resulted in the construction of multi-object spectrographs with hundreds to thousands of micro-slits or optical fibres allowing the acquisition of tens of thousands of spectra of celestial objects per observing night. Currently there are two spectroscopic surveys containing millions of spectra. These surveys are being processed by automatic pipelines, spectrum by spectrum, in order to estimate physical parameters of individual objects resulting in extensive catalogues, used typically to construct the better models of space-kinematic structure and evolution of the Universe or its subsystems. Such surveys are, however, very good source of homogenised, pre-processed data for application of machine learning techniques common in Astroinformatics. We present challenges of knowledge discovery in such surveys as well as practical examples of machine learning based on specific shapes of spectral features used in searching for new candidates of interesting astronomical objects, namely Be and B[e] stars and quasars.

  18. Reanalysis of Tyrannosaurus rex Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Bern, Marshall; Phinney, Brett S; Goldberg, David

    2009-09-01

    Asara et al. reported the detection of collagen peptides in a 68-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex bone by shotgun proteomics. This finding has been called into question as a possible statistical artifact. We reanalyze Asara et al.'s tandem mass spectra using a different search engine and different statistical tools. Our reanalysis shows a sample containing common laboratory contaminants, soil bacteria, and bird-like hemoglobin and collagen.

  19. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  20. Ir spectra of preparations of ozonized pyrocatechin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khovratovich, N. N.; Novikova, T. M.; Khmel'Nitskii, A. I.; Cherenkevich, S. N.; Loban, V. A.

    1998-03-01

    We investigate IR spectra of the solid phase of products obtained at different stages in the process of ozonizing aqueous solutions of pyrocatechin. We found that melanin structures are formed in the process of pyrocatechin ozonization. The existence of intra- and intermolecular interactions in the melanin preparations formed, leading to the formation of molecular associates, is shown. Thorough treatment of preparations with ozone leads to destruction of polymer systems and formation of water-soluble products of acid type.

  1. Understanding the baryon and meson spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2013-10-01

    A brief overview is given of what we know of the baryon and meson spectra, with a focus on what are the key internal degrees of freedom and how these relate to strong coupling QCD. The challenges, experimental, theoretical and phenomenological, for the future are outlined, with particular reference to a program at Jefferson Lab to extract hadronic states in which glue unambiguously contributes to their quantum numbers.

  2. Nebular spectra of pair-instability supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerkstrand, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Heger, A.

    2016-01-01

    If very massive stars (M ≳ 100 M⊙) can form and avoid too strong mass-loss during their evolution, they are predicted to explode as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). One critical test for candidate events is whether their nucleosynthesis yields and internal ejecta structure, being revealed through nebular-phase spectra at t ≳ 1 yr, match those of model predictions. Here, we compute theoretical spectra based on model PISN ejecta at 1-3 yr post-explosion to allow quantitative comparison with observations. The high column densities of PISNe lead to complete gamma-ray trapping for t ≳ 2 yr which, combined with fulfilled conditions of steady state, leads to bolometric supernova luminosities matching the 56Co decay. Most of the gamma-rays are absorbed by the deep-lying iron and silicon/sulphur layers. The ionization balance shows a predominantly neutral gas state, which leads to emission lines of Fe I, Si I, and S I. For low-mass PISNe, the metal core expands slowly enough to produce a forest of distinct lines, whereas high-mass PISNe expand faster and produce more featureless spectra. Line blocking is complete below ˜5000 Å for several years, and the model spectra are red. The strongest line is typically [Ca II] λλ7291, 7323, one of few lines from ionized species. We compare our models with proposed PISN candidates SN 2007bi and PTF12dam, finding discrepancies for several key observables and thus no support for a PISN interpretation. We discuss distinct spectral features predicted by the models, and the possibility of detecting pair-instability explosions among non-superluminous supernovae.

  3. Analysis of the IRAS Low Resolution Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    which were previously not known. 1. RESEARCH The Infrared Astronomical Satellite , IRAS, surveyed the sky in four wavelength bands centered on 12, 25, 60...agree at 12 Am unless a linear baseline is subtracted from the usable portion of the spectrum. The IRAS science team characterized the LRS spectra...that have silicate dust grain emission features extending from about 8 -14 Am with a maximum around 10 Am are characterized as 2n where n= I to 9

  4. CUBISM: CUbe Builder for IRS Spectra Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sings Irs Team; Smith, J. D.; Armus, Lee; Bot, Caroline; Buckalew, Brent; Dale, Danny; Helou, George; Jarrett, Tom; Roussel, Helene; Sheth, Kartik

    2011-11-01

    CUBISM, written in IDL, constructs spectral cubes, maps, and arbitrary aperture 1D spectral extractions from sets of mapping mode spectra taken with Spitzer's IRS spectrograph. CUBISM is optimized for non-sparse maps of extended objects, e.g. the nearby galaxy sample of SINGS, but can be used with data from any spectral mapping AOR (primarily validated for maps which are designed as suggested by the mapping HOWTO).

  5. Wavevector-Frequency Spectra of Nonhomogeneous Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-22

    TITLE (Indud* Security Qasafication) WAVEVECTOR-FREQUENCY SPECTRA OF NONHOMOGENEOUS FIELDS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Dr . Wayne A. Strawderman...SAME AS RPT. D DTIC USERS 22a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE INDIVIDUAL Dr . Wayne A. Strawderman 21. ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION UNCLASSIFIED 22b.T...Program Element 62314N. The NUSC Project No. is B60010. Principal Investigator Dr . H. P. Bakewell, Jr., Code 2141. The Sponsoring Activity was the Office

  6. Simultaneous Confidence Bands for Autoregressive Spectra.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    CONFIDENCE BANDS FOR AUTOREGRESSIVE SPECTRA H. Joseph Newton Marcello Pagano Institute of Statistics Department of Biostatistics Texas A&M University...AUTHOR(4) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMIUER(a) H. Joseph Newton and Marcello Pagano ONR N00014-82-MP-2001 ARU DAAG 29-80-C-0070 0. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME...Parzen (1974), Uirych and Bishop (1975), and Beamish and Priestley (1981), for example) despite 1) a continuing discussion of the problems of order

  7. Meteor spectra in the EDMOND database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukal, J.; Gorková, S.; Srba, J.; Ferus, M.; Civiš, S.; di Pietro, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a selection of five interesting meteor spectra obtained in the years 2014 and 2015 via CCTV video systems with a holographic grating, working in CEMENT and BRAMON meteor observation networks. Based on the EDMOND multi stations video meteor trajectory data an orbital classification of these meteors was performed. Selected meteors are members of the LYR, SPE, DSA and LVI meteor streams, one meteor is classified as sporadic background (SPO). In calibrated spectra the main chemical components were identified. Meteors are chemically classified based on relative intensities of the main spectral lines (or multiplets): Mg I (2), Na I (1), and Fe I (15). Bolide EN091214 is linked with the 23rd meteorite with known orbit (informally known as "Žďár"), two fragments of the parent body were found in the Czech Republic so far (August, 2015). For this particular event a time resolved spectral observation and comparison with laboratory spectra of LL3.2 chondritic meteorite are presented.

  8. Infrared spectra of substituted polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W. Jr; Hudgins, D. M.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    Calculations are carried out using density functional theory (DFT) to determine the harmonic frequencies and intensities of 1-methylanthracene, 9-methylanthracene, 9-cyanoanthracene, 2-aminoanthracene, acridine, and their positive ions. The theoretical data are compared with matrix-isolation spectra for these species also reported in this work. The theoretical and experimental frequencies and relative intensities for the neutral species are in generally good agreement, whereas the positive ion spectra are only in qualitative agreement. Relative to anthracene, we find that substitution of a methyl or CN for a hydrogen does not significantly affect the spectrum other than to add the characteristic methyl C-H and C triple bond N stretches near 2900 and 2200 cm-1, respectively. However, addition of NH2 dramatically affects the spectrum of the neutral. Not only are the NH2 modes themselves strong, but this electron-withdrawing group induces sufficient partial charge on the ring to give the neutral molecule spectra characteristics of the anthracene cation. The sum of the absolute intensities is about four times larger for 2-aminoanthracene than those for 9-cyanoanthracene. Substituting nitrogen in the ring at the nine position (acridine) does not greatly alter the spectrum compared with anthracene.

  9. Analysis of positron lifetime spectra in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1988-01-01

    A new procedure for analyzing multicomponent positron lifetime spectra in polymers was developed. It requires initial estimates of the lifetimes and the intensities of various components, which are readily obtainable by a standard spectrum stripping process. These initial estimates, after convolution with the timing system resolution function, are then used as the inputs for a nonlinear least squares analysis to compute the estimates that conform to a global error minimization criterion. The convolution integral uses the full experimental resolution function, in contrast to the previous studies where analytical approximations of it were utilized. These concepts were incorporated into a generalized Computer Program for Analyzing Positron Lifetime Spectra (PAPLS) in polymers. Its validity was tested using several artificially generated data sets. These data sets were also analyzed using the widely used POSITRONFIT program. In almost all cases, the PAPLS program gives closer fit to the input values. The new procedure was applied to the analysis of several lifetime spectra measured in metal ion containing Epon-828 samples. The results are described.

  10. Janus spectra: cascades without local isotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional turbulent flows host two disparate cascades: of enstrophy and of energy. The phenomenological theory of turbulence, which provides the theoretical underpinning of these cascades, assumes local isotropy. This assumption has been amply verified via computational, experimental and field data amassed to date. Local isotropy mandates that the streamwise (u) and transverse (v) velocity fluctuations partake in the same cascade; consequently, the attendant spectral exponents (αu and αv) of the turbulent energy spectra are the same, αu =αv . Here we report experiments in soap-film flows where αu corresponds to the energy cascade, but concurrently αv corresponds to the enstrophy cascade, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Remarkably, the tools of phenomenological theory can be invoked to elucidate this manifestly anisotropic flow. Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology.

  11. IRAS Low Resolution Spectra of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Walker, Russell G.

    2002-01-01

    Optical/near-infrared studies of asteroids are based on reflected sunlight and surface albedo variations create broad spectral features, suggestive of families of materials. There is a significant literature on these features, but there is very little work in the thermal infrared that directly probes the materials emitting on the surfaces of asteroids. We have searched for and extracted 534 thermal spectra of 245 asteroids from the original Dutch (Groningen) archive of spectra observed by the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). We find that, in general, the observed shapes of the spectral continua are inconsistent with that predicted by the standard thermal model used by IRAS. Thermal models such as proposed by Harris (1998) and Harris et al.(1998) for the near-earth asteroids with the "beaming parameter" in the range of 1.0 to 1.2 best represent the observed spectral shapes. This implies that the IRAS Minor Planet Survey (IMPS, Tedesco, 1992) and the Supplementary IMPS (SIMPS, Tedesco, et al., 2002) derived asteroid diameters are systematically underestimated, and the albedos are overestimated. We have tentatively identified several spectral features that appear to be diagnostic of at least families of materials. The variation of spectral features with taxonomic class hints that thermal infrared spectra can be a valuable tool for taxonomic classification of asteroids.

  12. Optical spectra analysis for breast cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkov, S. A.; Kochemasov, G. G.; Lyubynskaya, T. E.; Maslov, N. V.; Nuzhny, A. S.; da Silva, L. B.; Rubenchik, A.

    2011-11-01

    Minimally invasive probe and optical biopsy system based on optical spectra recording and analysis seem to be a promising tool for early diagnostics of breast cancer. Light scattering and absorption spectra are generated continuously as far as the needle-like probe with one emitting and several collecting optical fibers penetrates through the tissues toward to the suspicious area. That allows analyzing not only the state of local site, but also the structure of tissues along the needle trace. The suggested method has the advantages of automated on-line diagnosing and minimal tissue destruction and in parallel with the conventional diagnostic procedures provides the ground for decision-making. 165 medical trials were completed in Nizhny Novgorod Regional Oncology Centre, Russia. Independent diagnoses were the results of fine biopsy and histology. Application of wavelet expansion and clasterization techniques for spectra analysis revealed several main spectral types for malignant and benign tumors. Automatic classification algorithm demonstrated specificity ˜90% and sensitivity ˜91%. Large amount of information, fuzziness in criteria and data noisiness make neural networks to be an attractive analytic tool. The model based on three-layer perceptron was tested over the sample of 29 `cancer' and 29 `non-cancer' cases and demonstrated total separation.

  13. VARIABILITY IN OPTICAL SPECTRA OF {epsilon} ORIONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Gregory B.; Morrison, Nancy D. E-mail: nmorris@utnet.utoledo.edu

    2013-04-15

    We present the results of a time series analysis of 130 echelle spectra of {epsilon} Ori (B0 Ia), acquired over seven observing seasons between 1998 and 2006 at Ritter Observatory. The equivalent widths of H{alpha} (net) and He I {lambda}5876 were measured and radial velocities were obtained from the central absorption of He I {lambda}5876. Temporal variance spectra (TVS) revealed significant wind variability in both H{alpha} and He I {lambda}5876. The He I TVS have a double-peaked profile consistent with radial velocity oscillations. A periodicity search was carried out on the equivalent width and radial velocity data, as well as on wavelength-binned spectra. This analysis has revealed several periods in the variability with timescales of two to seven days. Many of these periods exhibit sinusoidal modulation in the associated phase diagrams. Several of these periods were present in both H{alpha} and He I, indicating a possible connection between the wind and the photosphere. Due to the harmonic nature of these periods, stellar pulsations may be the origin of some of the observed variability. Periods on the order of the rotational period were also detected in the He I line in the 1998-1999 season and in both lines during the 2004-2005 season. These periods may indicate rotational modulation due to structure in the wind.

  14. Near-infrared spectra of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    Near infrared spectra of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus were measured at resolutions higher than previously available in the range from 6,000 to 10,750/cm. The resolution was 0.5/cm for Jupiter and Saturn, and 32/cm for Uranus. The spectra are presented both individually and as ratio spectra, in which the planetary spectra are divided by the solar spectrum. The Uranus spectrum is shown with Saturn, Jupiter, and Sun spectra reduced to the same resolution so that Uranus can be compared with the other outer planets. The high resolution Saturn, Jupiter, and Sun spectra are presented in parallel plots to simplify comparisons between them.

  15. EMPCA and Cluster Analysis of Quasar Spectra: Application to SDSS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighly, Karen; Marrs, Adam; Wagner, Cassidy; Macinnis, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the quasar continuum is necessary to measure and analyze absorption lines. But quasar continua, in particular the emission lines, vary from object to object. Patterns in the variations allow a spectral principal component analysis (SPCA) approach using large samples of quasar spectra, e.g., from the SDSS. Then, a small number of the derived principal component spectra can be used to reconstruct an arbitrary quasar's continuum.A problem with this approach is that the number of principal components required to model an arbitrary quasar, usually 8 to 20 in the literature, is large. One reason why so many components are required is that SPCA implicitly assumes that spectra bins are independent. Quasar emission lines are spread over a range of spectral bins, and more importantly, can sometimes be blueshifted. So while the intrinsic variability may only be a function of a few physical parameters, the nonlinearity inherent in the variations from object to object requires a large number of prinicipal components to accurately model a quasar continuum.We present a modified approach. We perform a SPCA analysis, using an expectation-maximization algorithm by Bailey et al. 2012, which takes into account uncertainties and missing data. We project the sample spectra on the resulting eignevectors to obtain the projection coefficients. Reasoning that intriniscally similar spectra will have similar projection coefficients, we perform a cluster analysis on the projection coefficients. The results are used to divide the sample into groups of similar spectra. A second PCA analysis is then performed on each group. We find that many fewer eigenspectra are required to accurately model the spectra in each group. We apply this approach to several samples of quasars from the SDSS.

  16. Intrinsic Wavelength Shifts in Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, D.; Lindegren, L.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Madsen, S.

    2004-12-01

    Wavelengths of stellar spectral lines do not have the precise values `naively' expected from laboratory wavelengths merely Doppler-shifted by stellar radial motion. Slight displacements may originate as convective shifts (correlated velocity and brightness patterns in the photosphere), as gravitational redshifts, or perhaps be induced by wave motions. Intrinsic lineshifts thus reveal stellar surface structure, while possible periodic changes (during a stellar activity cycle, say) need to be segregated from variability induced by orbiting exoplanets. Absolute lineshifts can now be studied also in some stars other than the Sun, thanks to astrometric determinations of stellar radial motion. Comparisons between spectroscopic apparent radial velocities and astrometrically determined radial motions reveal greater spectral blueshifts in F-type stars than in the Sun (as theoretically expected from their more vigorous convection), further increasing in A-type stars (possibly due to atmospheric shockwaves). Solar spectral atlases, and high-resolution spectra (from UVES on ESO VLT) of a dozen solar-type stars are being surveyed for `unblended' photospheric lines of most atomic species with accurate laboratory wavelengths available. One aim is to understand the ultimate information content of stellar spectra, and in what detail it will be feasible to verify models of stellar atmospheric hydrodynamics. These may predict line asymmetries (bisectors) and shifts for widely different classes of lines, but there will not result any comparison with observations if such lines do not exist in real spectra. An expected near-future development in stellar physics is spatially resolved spectroscopy across stellar disks, enabled by optical interferometry and adaptive optics on very large telescopes. Stellar surface structure manifests itself in the center-to-limb wavelength changes along a stellar diameter, and their spatially resolved time variability, diagnostics which already now can be

  17. Effect of Temperature on Jet Velocity Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Statistical jet noise prediction codes that accurately predict spectral directivity for both cold and hot jets are highly sought both in industry and academia. Their formulation, whether based upon manipulations of the Navier-Stokes equations or upon heuristic arguments, require substantial experimental observation of jet turbulence statistics. Unfortunately, the statistics of most interest involve the space-time correlation of flow quantities, especially velocity. Until the last 10 years, all turbulence statistics were made with single-point probes, such as hotwires or laser Doppler anemometry. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) brought many new insights with its ability to measure velocity fields over large regions of jets simultaneously; however, it could not measure velocity at rates higher than a few fields per second, making it unsuitable for obtaining temporal spectra and correlations. The development of time-resolved PIV, herein called TR-PIV, has removed this limitation, enabling measurement of velocity fields at high resolution in both space and time. In this paper, ground-breaking results from the application of TR-PIV to single-flow hot jets are used to explore the impact of heat on turbulent statistics of interest to jet noise models. First, a brief summary of validation studies is reported, undertaken to show that the new technique produces the same trusted results as hotwire at cold, low-speed jets. Second, velocity spectra from cold and hot jets are compared to see the effect of heat on the spectra. It is seen that heated jets possess 10 percent more turbulence intensity compared to the unheated jets with the same velocity. The spectral shapes, when normalized using Strouhal scaling, are insensitive to temperature if the stream-wise location is normalized relative to the potential core length. Similarly, second order velocity correlations, of interest in modeling of jet noise sources, are also insensitive to temperature as well.

  18. High precision radial velocities with GIANO spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Sanna, N.; Gratton, R.; Benatti, S.; Bonavita, M.; Oliva, E.; Origlia, L.; Desidera, S.; Claudi, R.; Sissa, E.

    2016-06-01

    Radial velocities (RV) measured from near-infrared (NIR) spectra are a potentially excellent tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool or active stars. High resolution infrared (IR) spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. GIANO is an infrared echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and it is a powerful tool to provide high resolution spectra for accurate RV measurements of exoplanets and for chemical and dynamical studies of stellar or extragalactic objects. No other high spectral resolution IR instrument has GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range (0.95-2.45 μm) in a single exposure. In this paper we describe the ensemble of procedures that we have developed to measure high precision RVs on GIANO spectra acquired during the Science Verification (SV) run, using the telluric lines as wavelength reference. We used the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) method to determine the velocity for both the star and the telluric lines. For this purpose, we constructed two suitable digital masks that include about 2000 stellar lines, and a similar number of telluric lines. The method is applied to various targets with different spectral type, from K2V to M8 stars. We reached different precisions mainly depending on the H-magnitudes: for H ˜ 5 we obtain an rms scatter of ˜ 10 m s-1, while for H ˜ 9 the standard deviation increases to ˜ 50 ÷ 80 m s-1. The corresponding theoretical error expectations are ˜ 4 m s-1 and 30 m s-1, respectively. Finally we provide the RVs measured with our procedure for the targets observed during GIANO Science Verification.

  19. Evolution of Fourier spectra through interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitna, Alexander; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Nemec, Frantisek; Goncharov, Oleksandr

    2014-05-01

    Well established nearly isothermic solar wind expansion requires an additional heating. A dissipation of large scale variations of the solar wind kinetic energy into the thermal energy via turbulence cascades is thought to be an important source of this heating, although the exact mechanism is yet to be found. For this reason, the turbulence in the solar wind is a subject of extensive theoretical and experimental studies on different time scales ranging from years to minutes. The frequency spectrum of magnetic field fluctuations can be divided into several domains differing by spectral indices - the lowest frequencies are controlled by the solar activity, MHD activity shapes the spectrum at higher (up to 0.1 Hz) frequencies, whereas the ion and electron kinetic effects dominate at the high frequency end of the spectra. Interplanetary shocks of various origins are a part of solar wind turbulence naturally occurring in the solar wind and the BMSW instrument onboard the Spektr-R spacecraft has detected tens of them in course of the 2011-2013 years. Based on its high-time resolution of the ion flux, density and velocity measurements reaching 31 ms, we study an evolution of the frequency spectra on MHD and kinetic scales across fast forward low Mach number shocks. We have found that the power of downstream fluctuations rises by an order of magnitude in a broad range of frequencies independently of its upstream value but the slope of the spectrum on the kinetic scale (≡3-8 Hz) has been found to be statistically steeper downstream than upstream of the shock. The time needed to a full relaxation to the pre-shock spectral shape is as long as several hours. A combination of the ion flux power spectra obtained by BMSW with fast magnetic field observations of other spacecraft enhances our understanding of dissipation mechanisms.

  20. Synthesized Spectra of Optically Thin Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olluri, K.; Gudiksen, B. V.; Hansteen, V. H.; De Pontieu, B.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years realistic 3D numerical models of the solar atmosphere have become available. The models attempt to recreate the solar atmosphere and mimic observations in the best way, in order to make it possible to couple complicated observations with physical properties such as the temperatures, densities, velocities, and magnetic fields. We here present a study of synthetic spectra created using the Bifrost code in order to assess how well they fit with previously taken solar data. A study of the synthetic intensity, nonthermal line widths, Doppler shifts, and correlations between any two of these three components of the spectra first assuming statistical equilibrium is made, followed by a report on some of the effects nonequilibrium ionization will have on the synthesized spectra. We find that the synthetic intensities compare well with the observations. The synthetic observations depend on the assumed resolution and point-spread function (PSF) of the instrument, and we find a large effect on the results, especially for intensity and nonthermal line width. The Doppler shifts produce the reported persistent redshifts for the transition region (TR) lines and blueshifts for the upper TR and corona lines. The nonthermal line widths reproduce the well-known turnoff point around (2-3) × 105 K, but with much lower values than those observed. The nonthermal line widths tend to increase with decreasing assumed instrumental resolution, also when nonequilibrium ionization is included. Correlations between the nonthermal line width of any two TR line studies as reported by Chae et al. are reproduced, while the correlations of intensity to line width are reproduced only after applying a PSF to the data. Doppler shift correlations reported by Doschek for the TR lines and correlations of Doppler shift to nonthermal line width of the Fe xii 19.5 line reported by Doschek et al. are reproduced.

  1. Ultraviolet Spectra of Normal Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Anne

    1997-01-01

    The data related to this grant on the Ultraviolet Spectra of Normal Spiral Galaxies have been entirely reduced and analyzed. It is incorporated into templates of Spiral galaxies used in the calculation of K corrections towards the understanding of high redshift galaxies. The main paper was published in the Astrophysical Journal, August 1996, Volume 467, page 38. The data was also used in another publication, The Spectral Energy Distribution of Normal Starburst and Active Galaxies, June 1997, preprint series No. 1158. Copies of both have been attached.

  2. SIMULATION OF PARTICLE SPECTRA AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    KAHANA,D.E.; KAHANA,S.H.

    2001-09-04

    A purely hadronic simulation is performed of the recently reported data from PHOBOS at energies of {radical}s = 56, 130 GeV using the relativistic heavy ion cascade LUCIFER which had previously given a good description of the NA49 inclusive spectra at {radical}s = 17.2 GeV/A. The results compare well with these early measurements at RHIC and indeed successfully predict the increase in multiplicity now seen by PHOBOS and the other RHIC detectors at the nominal maximum energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV/A, suggesting that evidence for quark-gluon matter remains elusive.

  3. Electronic absorption spectra from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Anirban

    Methods for simulating electronic absorption spectra of molecules from first principles (i.e., without any experimental input, using quantum mechanics) are developed and compared. The electronic excitation and photoelectron spectra of ethylene are simulated, using the EOM-CCSD method for the electronic structure calculations. The different approaches for simulating spectra are broadly of two types---Frank-Condon (FC) approaches and vibronic coupling approaches. For treating the vibrational motion, the former use the Born-Oppenheimer or single surface approximation while the latter do not. Moreover, in our FC approaches the vibrational Hamiltonian is additively separable along normal mode coordinates, while in vibronic approaches a model Hamiltonian (obtained from ab initio electronic structure theory) provides an intricate coupling between both normal modes and electronic states. A method called vertical FC is proposed, where in accord with the short-time picture of molecular spectroscopy, the approximate excited-state potential energy surface that is used to calculate the electronic spectrum is taken to reproduce the ab initio potential at the ground-state equilibrium geometry. The potential energy surface along normal modes may be treated either in the harmonic approximation or using the full one-dimensional potential. Systems with highly anharmonic potential surfaces can be treated and expensive geometry optimizations are not required, unlike the traditional FC approach. The ultraviolet spectrum of ethylene between 6.2 and 8.7 eV is simulated using vertical FC. While FC approaches for simulation are computationally very efficient, they are not accurate when the underlying approximations are unreasonable. Then, vibronic coupling model Hamiltonians are necessary. Since these Hamiltonians have an analytic form, they are used to map the potential energy surfaces and understand their topology. Spectra are obtained by numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonians. The

  4. Multifractal spectra in homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deane, A. E.; Keefe, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    Employing numerical simulations of 3-D homogeneous shear flow, the associated multifractal spectra of the energy dissipation, scalar dissipation and vorticity fields were calculated. The results for (128) cubed simulations of this flow, and those obtained in recent experiments that analyzed 1- and 2-D intersections of atmospheric and laboratory flows, are in some agreement. A two-scale Cantor set model of the energy cascade process which describes the experimental results from 1-D intersections quite well, describes the 3-D results only marginally.

  5. Applying Zeeman Doppler imaging to solar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, G. A. J.; Saar, S. H.; Collier Cameron, A.

    2004-03-01

    A new generation of spectro-polarimeters with high throughput (e.g. CFHT/ESPADONS and LBT/PEPSI) is becoming available. This opportunity can be exploited using Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI), a technique that inverts time-series of Stokes V spectra to map stellar surface magnetic fields (Semel 1989). ZDI is assisted by ``Least squares deconvolution'' (LSD), which sums up the signal from 1000's of photospheric lines to produce a mean deconvolved profile with higher S:N (Donati & Collier Cameron 1997).

  6. Transmission spectra of sausage-like microresonators.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ming-Yong; Shen, Mei-Xia; Lin, Xiu-Min

    2015-10-05

    We experimentally develop a sausage-like microresonator (SLM) by making two microtapers on a single-mode fiber, and study whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) in SLMs with different lengths. The transmission spectra from 1530 nm to 1550 nm of several SLMs are presented and SLMs with different lengths are shown to have different transmission features. The maximal Q factor observed in the SLMs is 3.8 * 10(7). For comparison, the transmission spectrum of a fiber cylinder microresonator is given and the maximal Q factor achieved in the fiber microcylinder resonator is 1.7 * 10(7). The strain tuning of the SLM is also demonstrated.

  7. Far-infrared spectra of acetanilide revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spire, A.; Barthes, M.; Kellouai, H.; De Nunzio, G.

    2000-03-01

    A new investigation of the temperature dependence of the far-infrared spectra of acetanilide and some isotopomers is presented. Four absorption bands are considered at 31, 42, 64, and 80 cm-1, and no significant change of their integrated intensity is observed when reducing the temperature. The temperature induced frequency shift values and other properties of these bands are consistent with an assignment as anharmonic lattice phonons. These results rule out the assignment of the 64, 80, and 106 cm-1 bands as normal modes of the polaronic excitation, as previously suggested.

  8. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. ); Kozanecki, W. )

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  9. Solar Doppler shifts - Sources of continuous spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Oscillation observations can be used to study nonoscillatory solar phenomena that exhibit Doppler shifts. The paper discusses several effects of these phenomena and their associated temporal and spatial power spectra: (1) they limit the signal-to-noise ratio and sometimes detectability of oscillation modes; (2) there is the potential for better understanding and/or detection of solar phenomena; (3) large-scale convection may spatially modulate oscillation modes, leading to a continuous background spectrum; and (4) in regions of the spectrum where the resolution to separate modes is lacking one can determine upper limits for the integrated effects of modes.

  10. Methane and the Spectra of T Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeier, Derek; Hauschildt, Peter H.; Allard, France

    2003-06-01

    We have updated our PHOENIX model atmospheres and theoretical spectra for ultracool dwarfs with new opacity data for methane based on line strength predictions with the STDS software. By extending the line list to rotational levels of J = 40 we can significantly improve the shape of the near-IR absorption features of CH_4, and in addition find an enhanced blanketing effect, resulting in up to 50% more flux emerging in the J band than seen in previous models, which may thus contribute to the brightening in J and blue IR colors observed in T dwarfs.

  11. Covariance Analysis of Gamma Ray Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-01

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  12. Covariance analysis of gamma ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-15

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  13. GENERAL RELATIVISTIC EFFECTS ON NONLINEAR POWER SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Donghui; Gong, Jinn-Ouk; Noh, Hyerim; Hwang, Jai-chan E-mail: jgong@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: jchan@knu.ac.kr

    2011-01-20

    The nonlinear nature of Einstein's equation introduces genuine relativistic higher order corrections to the usual Newtonian fluid equations describing the evolution of cosmological perturbations. We study the effect of such novel nonlinearities on the next-to-leading order matter and velocity power spectra for the case of a pressureless, irrotational fluid in a flat Friedmann background. We find that pure general relativistic corrections are negligibly small over all scales. Our result guarantees that, in the current paradigm of standard cosmology, one can safely use Newtonian cosmology even in nonlinear regimes.

  14. Complete assignment of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of cis and trans isonucleoside derivatives of purine with a tetrahydropyran ring.

    PubMed

    Besada, Pedro; Costas, Tamara; Terán, Carmen

    2010-06-01

    (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of cis and trans isonucleoside analogues of purine in which the furanose moiety is substituted by a tetrahydropyran ring were completely assigned using one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments that include NOE, DEPT, COSY and HSQC. The significant (1)H and (13)C NMR signals differentiating between the cis and trans stereoisomers were compared.

  15. Classification of specialty seed meals from NIR reflectance spectra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy was used to identify alternative seed meals proposed for food and feed formulations. Spectra were collected from cold pressed Camelina (Camelina sativa), Coriander (Coriandrum sativum), and Pennycress (Thlaspi arvense) meals. Additional spectra were collected ...

  16. Velocity, scalar and transfer spectra in numerical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Robert M.

    1990-02-01

    Velocity and passive-scalar spectra for turbulent fields generated by a forced three-dimensional simulation with 128-cubed grid points and Taylor-microscale Reynolds numbers up to 83 are shown to have convective and diffusive spectral regimes. One- and three-dimensional spectra are compared with experiment and theory. If normalized by the Kolmogorov dissipation scales and scalar dissipation, velocity spectra and scalar spectra for given Prandtl numbers collapse to single curves in the dissipation regime with exponentail tails. If multiplied by k exp 5/3, the velocity spectra show an anomalously high Kolmogorov constant that is consistent with low Reynolds number experiments. When normalized by the Batchelor scales, the scalar spectra show a universal dissipation regime that is independent of Prandtl numbers from 0.1 to 1.0. The time development of velocity spectra is illustrated by energy-transfer spectra in which distinct pulses propagate to high wavenumbers.

  17. Study on Mössbauer spectra of hemoglobin in thalassemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuanhui, Guo; Nanming, Zhao; Xiufang, Zhang; Naifei, Gao; Youwen, Huang; Rongxin, Wang

    1988-02-01

    The57Fe Mössbauer spectra of erythrocytes in normal subjects and nine patients of different thalassemias were studied. Together with clinical analysis, the correlation between the components in the spectra and different types of anemias was discussed.

  18. Quantum synchrotron spectra from semirelativistic electrons in teragauss magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron spectra are calculated from quantum electrodynamic transition rates for thermal and power-law electron distributions. It is shown that quantum effects appear in thermal spectra when the photon energy is greater than the electron temperature, and in power-law spectra when the electron energy in units of the electron rest mass times the magnetic field strength in units of the critical field strength is of order unity. These spectra are compared with spectra calculated from the ultrarelativistic approximation for synchrotron emission. It is found that the approximation for the power-law spectra is good, and the approximation for thermal spectra produces the shape of the spectrum accurately but fails to give the correct normalization. Single photon pair creation masks the quantum effects for power-law distributions, so only modifications to thermal spectra are important for gamma-ray bursts.

  19. REPS: REscaled Power Spectra for initial conditions with massive neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zennaro, Matteo; Bel, Julien; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Carbone, Carmelita; Sefusatti, Emiliano; Guzzo, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    REPS (REscaled Power Spectra) provides accurate, one-percent level, numerical simulations of the initial conditions for massive neutrino cosmologies, rescaling the late-time linear power spectra to the simulation initial redshift.

  20. Identifying Minerals from Their Infra-red Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, W. G.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a British secondary school's use of a spectrometer to identify minerals. Discusses the origins of mineral spectra, the preparation of the specimen, the actual spectroscopic scanning, and the interpretation of the spectra. (TW)

  1. Retrieving sea-wave spectra using satellite-imagery spectra in a wide range of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondur, V. G.; Dulov, V. A.; Murynin, A. B.; Ignatiev, V. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    A method to register sea-wave spectra using optical aerospace imagery has been developed. The method is based on the use of retrieval operators both in areas of high and low spatial frequencies, including the areas of spectral maximum. The approach to adjust and validate the method developed using sea truth data obtained by string wave recorders has been suggested. This paper presents the results of using the suggested method to study sea-wave spectra using high-resolution satellite imagery for various water areas under different conditions of wave generation.

  2. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yuji; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61).

  3. Infrared Spectra of Substituted Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Hudgins, Douglas M.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Calculations are carried out using density functional theory (DFT) to determine the harmonic frequencies and intensities of 1-methylanthracene, 9-methylanthracene, 9-cyanoanthracene, 2-aminoanthracene, acridine, and their positive ions. The theoretical data are compared with matrix-isolation spectra for these species also reported in this work. The theoretical and experimental frequencies and relative intensities for the neutral species are in generally good agreement, whereas the positive ion spectra are only in qualitative agreement. Relative to anthracene, we find that substitution of amethyl or CN for a hydrogen does not significantly affect the spectrum other than to add the characteristic methyl C-H stretch and C-N stretch (near 2200/cm), respectively. However, addition of NH2 dramatically affects the spectrum of the neutral. Not only are the NH2 modes themselves strong, but this electron withdrawing group induces sufficient partial charge on the ring to give the neutral molecule characteristics of the anthracene cation spectrum. The sum of the absolute intensities is about four times larger for 2-aminoanthracene than for 9-cyanoanthracene. Substituting nitrogen in the ring at the nine position (acridine) does not greatly alter the spectrum compared with anthracene.

  4. An atlas of selected calibrated stellar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Russell G.; Cohen, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Five hundred and fifty six stars in the IRAS PSC-2 that are suitable for stellar radiometric standards and are brighter than 1 Jy at 25 microns were identified. In addition, 123 stars that meet all of our criteria for calibration standards, but which lack a luminosity class were identified. An approach to absolute stellar calibration of broadband infrared filters based upon new models of Vega and Sirius due to Kurucz (1992) is presented. A general technique used to assemble continuous wide-band calibrated infrared spectra is described and an absolutely calibrated 1-35 micron spectrum of alpha(Tau) is constructed and the method using new and carefully designed observations is independently validated. The absolute calibration of the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS) database is investigated by comparing the observed spectrum of alpha(Tau) with that assumed in the original LRS calibration scheme. Neglect of the SiO fundamental band in alpha(Tau) has led to the presence of a specious 'emission' feature in all LRS spectra near 8.5 microns, and to an incorrect spectral slope between 8 and 12 microns. Finally, some of the properties of asteroids that effect their utility as calibration objects for the middle and far infrared region are examined. A technique to determine, from IRAS multiwaveband observations, the basic physical parameters needed by various asteroid thermal models that minimize the number of assumptions required is developed.

  5. Reflectance Spectra of Space Debris in GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, T.; Vannanti, A.; Krag, H.; Erd, C.

    The space debris environment in the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) region is mostly investigated by means of optical surveys. Such surveys revealed a considerable amount of debris in the size range of 10 centimeter to one meter. Some of these debris exhibit particularly high area-to-mass ratios as derived from the evolution of their orbits. In order to understand the nature and eventually the origin of these objects, observations allowing to derive physical characteristics like size, shape and material are required. Information on the shape and the attitude motion of a debris piece may be obtained by photometric light curves. The most promising technique to investigate the surface material properties is reflectance spectroscopy. This paper discusses preliminary results obtained from spectrometric observations of space debris in GEO. The observations were acquired at the 1-meter ESA Space Debris Telescope (ESASDT) on Tenerife with a low-resolution spectrograph in the wavelength range of 450-960 nm. The target objects were space debris of different types with brightness as small as magnitude 15. Some simple-shaped, intact "calibration objects" with known surface materials like the MSG-2 satellites were also observed. The spectra show shape variations expected to be caused by the different physical properties of the objects. The determination of the possible materials is still in a preliminary phase. Limitations of the acquisition process of the spectra and the subsequent analysis are discussed. Future steps planned for a better characterization of the debris from the observed data are briefly outlined.

  6. Spectra of {gamma} rays feeding superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding {gamma}rays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by {approximately}30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the {gamma} cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed.

  7. Wave spectra from sun glint patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Borrego, Josue

    1992-12-01

    The problem of retrieving spatial information of the sea surface heights from aerial images is considered. We proceed, for simplicity, by considering a one-dimensional model of the problem. With some simplifying assumptions, we derive some analytical and numerical results that relate the autocorrelation of the surface heights and those of the sunglint patterns. We assume that the surfaces are such that they constitute approximations to Gaussian random processes. We also assume that the surfaces are illuminated by a source (the sun) of a fixed angular extent and imaged through a lens that subtends a very small solid angle. With these assumptions, we calculate their images, as they would be formed by a signal clipping detector. In order to do this, we define a `glitter function,' which operates on the slope of the surfaces. To test our predictions we have conducted a Monte Carlo type simulation. Random surfaces with two different power spectra have been generated in a computer. We find that under favorable conditions, it is possible to invert the relation numerically and estimate the surface height autocorrelation from the sunglint data. We obtain the wave spectra from the surface height autocorrelation via a Fourier transform.

  8. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61). PMID:27326765

  9. Equilibria and absorption spectra of tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Metzler, C M; Viswanath, R; Metzler, D E

    1991-05-25

    Tryptophanase (tryptophan: indole-lyase) from Escherichia coli has been isolated in the holoenzyme form and its absorption spectra and acid-base chemistry have been reevaluated. Apoenzyme has been prepared by dialysis against sodium phosphate and L-alanine and molar absorptivities of the coenzyme bands have been estimated by readdition of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The spectrophotometric titration curve, whose midpoint is at pH 7.6 in 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffers, indicates some degree of cooperativity in dissociation of a pair of protons. Resolution of the computed spectra of individual ionic forms of the enzyme with lognormal distribution curves shows that band shapes are similar to those of model Schiff bases and of aspartate aminotransferase. Using molar areas from the latter we estimated amounts of individual tautomeric species. In addition to ketoenamine and enolimine or covalent adduct the high pH form also appears to contain approximately 18% of a species with a dipolar ionic ring (protonated on the ring nitrogen and with phenolate -O-). We suggest that this may be the catalytically active form of the coenzyme in tryptophanase. The equilibrium between tryptophanase and L-alanine has also been reevaluated.

  10. Millimeter wave absorption spectra of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, O.P.; Hagmann, M.J.; Hill, D.W.; Partlow, L.M.; Bush, L.

    1980-01-01

    A solid-state computer-controlled system has been used to make swept-frequency measurements of absorption of biological specimens from 26.5 to 90.0 GHz. A wide range of samples was used, including solutions of DNA and RNA, and suspensions of BHK-21/C13 cells, Candida albicans, C krusei, and Escherichia coli. Sharp spectra reported by other workers were not observed. The strong absorbance of water (10--30 dB/mm) caused the absorbance of all aqueous preparations that we examined to have a water-like dependence on frequency. Reduction of incident power (to below 1.0 microW), elimination of modulation, and control of temperature to assure cell viability were not found to significantly alter the water-dominated absorbance. Frozen samples of BHK-21/C13 cells tested at dry ice and liquid nitrogen temperatures were found to have average insertion loss reduced to 0.2 dB/cm but still showed no reproducible peaks that could be attributed to absorption spectra. It is concluded that the special resonances reported by others are likely to be in error.

  11. Rotary spectra analysis applied to static stabilometry.

    PubMed

    Chiaramello, E; Knaflitz, M; Agostini, V

    2011-01-01

    Static stabilometry is a technique aimed at quantifying postural sway during quiet standing in the upright position. Many different models and many different techniques to analyze the trajectories of the Centre of Pressure (CoP) have been proposed. Most of the parameters calculated according to these different approaches are affected by a relevant intra- and inter-subject variability or do not have a clear physiological interpretation. In this study we hypothesize that CoP trajectories have rotational characteristics, therefore we decompose them in clockwise and counter-clockwise components, using the rotary spectra analysis. Rotary spectra obtained studying a population of healthy subjects are described through the group average of spectral parameters, i.e., 95% spectral bandwidth, mean frequency, median frequency, and skewness. Results are reported for the clockwise and the counter-clockwise components and refer to the upright position maintained with eyes open or closed. This study demonstrates that the approach is feasible and that some of the spectral parameters are statistically different between the open and closed eyes conditions. More research is needed to demonstrate the clinical applicability of this approach, but results so far obtained are promising.

  12. Nuclear size effects in vibrational spectra.

    PubMed

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Shee, Avijit; Saue, Trond

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical study of nuclear volume in the rovibrational spectra of diatomic molecules which is an extension of a previous study restricted to rotational spectra [Chem. Phys., 2012, 401, 103]. We provide a new derivation for the electron-nucleus electrostatic interaction energy which is basically independent of the choice of model for the nuclear charge distribution. Starting from this expression we derive expressions for the electronic, rotational and vibrational field shift parameters in terms of effective electron density and its first and second derivatives with respect to internuclear distance. The effective density is often approximated by the contact density, but we demonstrate that this leads to errors on the order of 10% and is furthermore not necessary since the contact and effective densities can be obtained at the same computational cost. We calculate the field shift parameters at the 4-component relativistic coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles level and find that our results confirm the experimental findings of Tiemann and co-workers [Chem. Phys., 1982, 68(21), 1982, Ber. Bunsenges. Phys. Chem., 1982, 86, 821], whereas we find no theoretical justification for a scaling factor introduced in later work [Chem. Phys., 1985, 93, 349]. For lead sulfide we study the effective density as a function of internuclear distance and find a minimum some 0.2 Å inside the equilibrium bond distance. We also discuss Bigeleisen-Goeppert-Mayer theory of isotope fractionation in light of our results.

  13. Serial FBG sensor network allowing overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbenseth, S.; Lochmann, S.; Ahrens, A.; Rehm, B.

    2016-05-01

    For structure or material monitoring low impact serial fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks have attracted increasing research interest. Common sensor networks using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) for FBG interrogation are limited in their efficiency by the spectral width of their light source, the FBG tuning range and the spectral guard bands. Overlapping spectra are strictly forbidden in this case. Applying time division multiplexing (TDM) or active resonator schemes may overcome these restrictions. However, they introduce other substantial disadvantages like signal roundtrip dependency or sophisticated control of active resonating structures. Code division multiplexing (CDM) as a means of FBG interrogation by simple autocorrelation of appropriate codes has been shown to be superior in this respect. However, it came at the cost of a second spectrometer introducing additional equalization efforts. We demonstrate a new serial FBG sensor network utilizing CDM signal processing for efficient sensor interrogation without the need of a second spectrometer and additional state of polarization (SOP) controlling components. It allows overlapping spectra even when all sensing FBGs are positioned at the same centre wavelength and it shows a high degree of insensitivity to SOP. Sequence inversed keyed (SIK) serial signal processing utilizing quasi-orthogonal balanced codes ensures simple and quick sensor interrogation with high signal-to-interference/noise ratio.

  14. Spectra and statistics in compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianchun; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Spectra and one-point statistics of velocity and thermodynamic variables in isotropic turbulence of compressible fluid are examined by using numerical simulations with solenoidal forcing at the turbulent Mach number Mt from 0.05 to 1.0 and at the Taylor Reynolds number Reλ from 40 to 350. The velocity field is decomposed into a solenoidal component and a compressible component in terms of the Helmholtz decomposition, and the compressible velocity component is further decomposed into a pseudosound component, namely, the hydrodynamic component associated with the incompressible field and an acoustic component associated with sound waves. It is found that the acoustic mode dominates over the pseudosound mode at turbulent Mach numbers Mt≥0.4 in our numerical simulations. At turbulent Mach numbers Mt≤0.4 , there exists a critical wave number kc beyond which the pseudosound mode dominates while the acoustic mode dominates at small wave numbers k spectra of pressure, density, and temperature exhibit a k-7 /3 scaling for Mt≤0.3 and a k-5 /3 scaling for Mt≥0.5 .

  15. High Resolution Infrared Spectra of Triacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doney, Kirstin D.; Zhao, Dongfeng; Linnartz, Harold

    2015-06-01

    Triacetylene, HC6H, is the longest poly-acetylene chain found in space, and is believed to be involved in the formation of longer chain molecules and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, abundances are expected to be low, and observational confirmation requires knowledge of the gas-phase spectra, which up to now has been incomplete with only the weak, low lying bending modes being known. We present new infrared (IR) spectra in the C-H stretch region obtained using ultra-sensitive and highly precise IR continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS), combined with supersonic plasma expansions The talk reviews the accurate determination of the rotational constants of the asymmetric fundamental mode, νb{5}, including discussion on the perturber state, and associated hot bands. The determined molecular parameters are accurate enough to aid astronomical searches with such facilities as ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) or the upcoming JWST (James Webb Space Telecscope), which can now probe even trace molecules (abundances of ˜ 10-6 - 10-10 with respect to H2). D. Zhao, J. Guss, A. Walsh, H. Linnartz, Chem. Phys. Lett., 565, 132 (2013) K.D. Doney, D. Zhao, H. Linnartz, in preparation

  16. Discriminating Dysarthria Type From Envelope Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the rhythmicity of speech within specified frequency bands. Method EMS was conducted on sentences produced by 43 speakers with 1 of 4 types of dysarthria and healthy controls. The EMS consisted of the spectra of the slow-rate (up to 10 Hz) amplitude modulations of the full signal and 7 octave bands ranging in center frequency from 125 to 8000 Hz. Six variables were calculated for each band relating to peak frequency and amplitude and relative energy above, below, and in the region of 4 Hz. Discriminant function analyses (DFA) determined which sets of predictor variables best discriminated between and among groups. Results Each of 6 DFAs identified 2–6 of the 48 predictor variables. These variables achieved 84%–100% classification accuracy for group membership. Conclusions Dysarthrias can be characterized by quantifiable temporal patterns in acoustic output. Because EMS analysis is automated and requires no editing or linguistic assumptions, it shows promise as a clinical and research tool. PMID:20643800

  17. Microwave Spectra of 9-FLUORENONE and Benzophenone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Channing; Sedo, Galen; van Wijngaarden, Jennifer

    2015-06-01

    The pure rotational spectra of 9-fluorenone (C13H8O) and benzophenone (C13H10O) were observed using chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (cp-FTMW). The 9-fluorenone spectrum was collected between 8 and 13 GHz, which allowed for the assignment of 124 rotational transitions. A separate spectrum spanning from 8 to 14 GHz was collected for benzophenone, allowing for the assignment of 133 rotational transitions. Both aromatic ketones exhibited strong b-type spectra with little to no centrifugal distortion, indicating highly rigid molecular structures. A comparison of the experimentally determined spectral constants of 9-fluorenone to those calculated using both ab initio and density functional theory strongly suggest the molecule conforms to a planar C2v symmetric geometry as expected for its polycyclic structure. Whereas, a comparison of the experimental benzophenone constants to those predicted by theory suggests a molecule with non-planar C2 symmetry, where the two phenyl groups are rotated approximately 32° out-of-plane to form a paddlewheel like geometry.

  18. Stellar parametrization from Gaia RVS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Allende Prieto, C.; Fustes, D.; Manteiga, M.; Arcay, B.; Bijaoui, A.; Dafonte, C.; Ordenovic, C.; Ordoñez Blanco, D.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Among the myriad of data collected by the ESA Gaia satellite, about 150 million spectra will be delivered by the Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS) for stars as faint as GRVS~ 16. A specific stellar parametrization will be performed on most of these RVS spectra, i.e. those with enough high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), which should correspond to single stars that have a magnitude in the RVS band brighter than ~14.5. Some individual chemical abundances will also be estimated for the brightest targets. Aims: We describe the different parametrization codes that have been specifically developed or adapted for RVS spectra within the GSP-Spec working group of the analysis consortium. The tested codes are based on optimisation (FERRE and GAUGUIN), projection (MATISSE), or pattern-recognition methods (Artificial Neural Networks). We present and discuss each of their expected performances in the recovered stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity) for B- to K-type stars. The performances for determining of [α/Fe] ratios are also presented for cool stars. Methods: Each code has been homogeneously tested with a large grid of RVS simulated synthetic spectra of BAFGK-spectral types (dwarfs and giants), with metallicities varying from 10-2.5 to 10+ 0.5 the solar metallicity, and taking variations of ±0.4 dex in the composition of the α-elements into consideration. The tests were performed for S/N ranging from ten to 350. Results: For all the stellar types we considered, stars brighter than GRVS~ 12.5 are very efficiently parametrized by the GSP-Spec pipeline, including reliable estimations of [α/Fe]. Typical internal errors for FGK metal-rich and metal-intermediate stars are around 40 K in Teff, 0.10 dex in log(g), 0.04 dex in [M/H], and 0.03 dex in [α/Fe] at GRVS = 10.3. They degrade to 155 K in Teff, 0.15 dex in log(g), 0.10 dex in [M/H], and 0.1 dex in [α/Fe] at GRVS~ 12. Similar accuracies in Teff and [M/H] are

  19. Spatially Resolved Mid-IR Spectra from Meteorites; Linking Composition, Crystallographic Orientation and Spectra on the Micro-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, N. R.

    2016-08-01

    IR spectroscopy is used to infer composition of extraterrestrial bodies, comparing bulk spectra to databases of separate mineral phases. We extract spatially resolved meteorite-specific spectra from achondrites with respect to zonation and orientation.

  20. Mineral Spectra from Nili Fossae, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Spectra collected by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) indicate the presence of three distinct minerals. The graphed information comes from an observation of terrain in the Nili Fossae area of northern Mars. CRISM is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

    Iron-magnesium smectite clay is formed through alteration of rocks by liquid water and is characterized by distinctive absorptions at 1.4, 1.9, and 2.3 micrometers due to water (H2O) and OH in the atomic structure of the mineral. Olivine is an iron magnesium silicate and primary igneous mineral, and water is not in its structure. Its spectrum is characterized by a strong and broad absorption at 1.0 micrometer due to ferrous iron (Fe2+). Carbonate is an alteration mineral identified by the distinctive paired absorptions at 2.3 and 2.5 micrometers. The precise band positions at 2.31 and 2.51 micrometers identify the carbonate at this location as magnesium carbonate. The broad 1.0 micrometer band indicates some small amount of ferrous iron is also present and the feature at 1.9 micrometers indicates the presence of water. CRISM researchers believe the magnesium carbonate found in the Nili Fossae region formed from alteration of olivine by water.

    The data come from a CRISM image catalogued as FRT00003E12. The spectra shown here are five-pixel-by-five-pixel averages of CRISM L-detector spectra taken from three different areas within the image that have then been ratioed to a five-pixel-by-five-pixel common denominator spectrum taken from a spectrally unremarkable area with no distinctive mineralogic signatures. This technique highlights the spectral contrasts between regions due to their unique mineralogy. The spectral wavelengths near 2.0 micrometers are affected by atmospheric absorptions and have been removed for clarity.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars

  1. IR SPECTRA BY DFT FOR GLUCOSE AND ITS EPIMERS: A COMPARISON BETWEEN VACUUM AND SOLVATED SPECTRA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared spectra were calculated for the low energy geometry optimized structures of glucose and all of its epimers, at B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. Calculations were performed both in vacuo and using the COSMO solvation method. Frequencies, zero point energies, enthalpies, entropies, and rel...

  2. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Nitrogen Substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The B3LYP/4-31G approach is used to compute the harmonic frequencies of substituted naphthalene, anthracene, and their cations. The substitutions include cyano (CN), aminio (NH2), imino (NH), and replacement of a CH group by a nitrogen atom. All unique sites are considered, namely 1 and 2 for naphthalene and 1, 2, and 9 for an'tracene, except for the imino, where only 2-iminonaphthalene is studied. The IR spectra of these substituted species are compared with those of the unsubstituted molecules. The addition of a CN group does not significantly affect the spectra except to add the CN stretching frequency. Replacing a CH group by N has only a small effect on the IR spectra. The addition of the NH2 group dramatically affects the neutral spectra, giving it much of the character of the cation spectra. However, the neutral 2-irrinonaphthalene spectra looks more like that of naphthalene than like the 2-aminonaphthalene spectra.

  3. New LRS spectra for 356 bright IRAS sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Kevin; Cohen, Martin

    1989-01-01

    The low-resolution spectra of all IRAS point sources with F(nu) (12 microns) greater than 40 Jy that were not included in the Atlas of Low-Resolution Spectra are presented. These have been classified into eight groups based upon the spectral morphology. Silicate emission spectra and red-continuum spectra associated with H II region sources form about 60 percent of this sample. All types of spectra in the LRS Atlas are represented in the sample except for emission-line sources. The sample is used to test a recent classification scheme for IRAS sources based on broadband colors. The spectra is used to test a recent classification scheme for IRAS sources based on broadband colors. The spectra are consistent with the classifications from the colors in most cases.

  4. Phonon spectra of plutonium at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorado, Boris; Bottin, François; Bouchet, Johann

    2017-03-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations are used to investigate the vibrational properties of the high-temperature δ and ɛ phases of plutonium. We combine the local-density approximation (LDA)+U for strong electron correlations and the temperature-dependent effective potential method in order to calculate the phonon spectra of the two phases, as well as their dependence on temperature. Our results show that the ɛ phase can only be stabilized when temperature and correlations are simultaneously accounted for. We are also able to quantify the degree of anharmonicity of the two phases. While the δ phase is fairly harmonic up to 1000 K, we find that the ɛ phase is strongly anharmonic, which explains why this structure dominates the phase diagram at high temperature.

  5. Electron spectra from decay of fission products

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, J K

    1982-09-01

    Electron spectra following decay of individual fission products (72 less than or equal to A less than or equal to 162) are obtained from the nuclear data given in the compilation using a listed and documented computer subroutine. Data are given for more than 500 radionuclides created during or after fission. The data include transition energies, absolute intensities, and shape parameters when known. An average beta-ray energy is given for fission products lacking experimental information on transition energies and intensities. For fission products having partial or incomplete decay information, the available data are utilized to provide best estimates of otherwise unknown decay schemes. This compilation is completely referenced and includes data available in the reviewed literature up to January 1982.

  6. Multiconfigurational Effects in Theoretical Resonance Raman Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingjin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We analyze resonance Raman spectra of the nucleobase uracil in the short‐time approximation calculated with multiconfigurational methods. We discuss the importance of static electron correlation by means of density‐matrix renormalization group self‐consistent field (DMRG‐SCF) calculations. Our DMRG‐SCF results reveal that a minimal active orbital space that leads to a qualitatively correct description of the resonance Raman spectrum of uracil should encompass parts of the σ/σ* bonding/anti‐bonding orbitals of the pyrimidine ring. We trace these findings back to the considerable entanglement between the σ/σ* bonding/anti‐bonding as well as valence π/π* orbitals in the excited‐state electronic structure of uracil, which indicates non‐negligible non‐dynamical correlation effects that are less pronounced in the electronic ground state. PMID:27933695

  7. Chemical and isotopic determination from complex spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Zardecki, A.; Strittmatter, R.B.

    1995-07-01

    Challenges for proliferation detection include remote, high- sensitivity detection of chemical effluents from suspect facilities and enhanced detection sensitivity for nuclear material. Both the identification of chemical effluents with lidar and enhanced nuclear material detection from radiation sensors involve determining constituents from complex spectra. In this paper, we extend techniques used to analyze time series to the analysis of spectral data. Pattern identification methods are applied to spectral data for domains where standard matrix inversion may not be suitable because of detection statistics. We use a feed-forward, back-propagation neural network in which the nodes of the input layer are fed with the observed spectral data. The nodes of the output layer contain the identification and concentration of the isotope or chemical effluent the sensor is to identify. We will discuss the neural network architecture, together with preliminary results obtained from the training process.

  8. Terahertz absorption spectra of highly energetic chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slingerland, E. J.; Vallon, M. K.; Jahngen, E. G. E.; Giles, R. H.; Goyette, T. M.

    2010-04-01

    Research into absorption spectra is useful for detecting chemicals in the field. Each molecule absorbs a set of specific frequencies, which are dependent on the molecule's structure. While theoretical models are available for predicting the absorption frequencies of a particular molecule, experimental measurements are a more reliable method of determining a molecule's actual absorption behavior. The goal of this research is to explore chemical markers (absorption frequencies) that can be used to identify highly energetic molecules of interest to the remote sensing community. Particular attention was paid to the frequency ranges located within the terahertz transmission windows of the atmosphere. In addition, theoretical derivations, with the purpose of calculating the detection limits of such chemicals, will also be presented.

  9. Radioactive sample effects on EDXRF spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Christopher G

    2008-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a rapid, straightforward method to determine sample elemental composition. A spectrum can be collected in a few minutes or less, and elemental content can be determined easily if there is adequate energy resolution. Radioactive alpha emitters, however, emit X-rays during the alpha decay process that complicate spectral interpretation. This is particularly noticeable when using a portable instrument where the detector is located in close proximity to the instrument analysis window held against the sample. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from specimens containing plutonium-239 (a moderate alpha emitter) and americium-241 (a heavy alpha emitter). These specimens were then analyzed with a wavelength dispersive XRF (WDXRF) instrument to demonstrate the differences to which sample radiation-induced X-ray emission affects the detectors on these two types of XRF instruments.

  10. Evolution and infrared spectra of brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.; Hubbard, William B.; Marley, Mark S.

    1986-01-01

    Self-consistent models are constructed for the structure, evolution, and observable properties of degenerately cooling objects, or 'brown dwarfs'. Model atmospheres composed of a range of likely gaseous and particulate opacity sources are calculated in order to provide a boundary condition for interior temperature-pressure profiles and to determine the emergent spectra for such objects. The radius derived from the interior models is combined with the emergent fluxes calculated from the atmosphere model to fit the data of McCarthy, Probst, and Low (1985) and to derive the luminosity and mass of VB 8B. The latter is found to be most probably an 0.05 solar mass object with effective temperature in the 1200-1500 K range and an atmosphere which very likely contains particulate absorbers. Key changes in chemical oxidation state and condensation of major constituents during the evolution of brown dwarfs are presented.

  11. Neural Network Solutions to Optical Absorption Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbrock, Conrad

    2012-10-01

    Artificial neural networks have been effective in reducing computation time while achieving remarkable accuracy for a variety of difficult physics problems. Neural networks are trained iteratively by adjusting the size and shape of sums of non-linear functions by varying the function parameters to fit results for complex non-linear systems. For smaller structures, ab initio simulation methods can be used to determine absorption spectra under field perturbations. However, these methods are impractical for larger structures. Designing and training an artificial neural network with simulated data from time-dependent density functional theory may allow time-dependent perturbation effects to be calculated more efficiently. I investigate the design considerations and results of neural network implementations for calculating perturbation-coupled electron oscillations in small molecules.

  12. First dynamic spectra of stellar microwave flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Bookbinder, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The VLA has been used in the spectral-line mode at 1.4 GHz to obtain the first dynamic spectra of stellar sources other than the sun. Two very intense, highly circularly polarized, microwave outbursts were observed on the dMe flare star UV Cet, in addition to a slowly varying, unpolarized component. One outburst was purely left circularly polarized and showed no variations as a function of frequency across the 41 MHz band, whereas the other was as much as 70 percent right-circularly polarized and showed distinct variations with frequency. Although the slowly varying emission is probably due to incoherent gyrosynchrotron emission, the two flaring events are the result of coherent mechanisms. The coherent emission is interpreted in terms of plasma radiation and the cyclotron maser instability.

  13. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  14. Galactic cosmic ray composition and energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Galactic cosmic ray nuclei represent a significant risk to long-duration spaceflight outside the magnetosphere. We review briefly existing measurements of the composition and energy spectra of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, pointing out which species and energy ranges are most critical to assessing cosmic ray risks for spaceflight. Key data sets are identified and a table of cosmic ray abundances is presented for elements from H to Ni (Z = 1 to 28). Because of the 22-year nature of the solar modulation cycle, data from the approaching 1998 solar minimum is especially important to reducing uncertainties in the cosmic ray radiation hazard. It is recommended that efforts to model this hazard take advantage of approaches that have been developed to model the astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays.

  15. 3- to 13-micron spectra of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Keith S.; Hammel, H. B.; Young, Leslie; Joiner, Joanna; Hackwell, J.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R.

    1993-01-01

    The Broadband Array Spectrograph System with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility was used to obtain 3- to 13-micron spectra of Io on June 14-16, 1991. The extinction correction and its error for each standard star (Alpha Boo, Alpha Lyr, and Mu UMa) were found individually by performing an unweighted linear fit of instrumental magnitude as a function of airmass. The model results indicate two significant trends: (1) modest differences between the two hemispheres at lower background temperatures and (2) a tendency to higher temperatures, smaller areas, and less power from the warm component at higher background temperatures with an increased contrast between the two hemispheres. The increased flux from 8 to 13 microns is due primarily to a greater area on the Loki (trailing) hemisphere for the warm component, although temperature also plays a role.

  16. UV Spectra, Bombs, and the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Philip G.

    2015-08-01

    A recent analysis of UV data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reports plasma “bombs” with temperatures near 8 × 104 K within the solar photosphere. This is a curious result, first because most bomb plasma pressures p (the largest reported case exceeds 103 dyn cm-2) fall well below photospheric pressures (\\gt 7× {10}3), and second, UV radiation cannot easily escape from the photosphere. In the present paper the IRIS data is independently analyzed. I find that the bombs arise from plasma originally at pressures between ≤ 80 and 800 dyne cm-2 before explosion, i.e., between ≥ 850 and 550 km above {τ }500=1. This places the phenomenon’s origin in the low-mid chromosphere or above. I suggest that bomb spectra are more compatible with Alfvénic turbulence than with bi-directional reconnection jets.

  17. On Magnetic Spectra of Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, C. V.; Sabaka, T. J.; Purucker, M.

    2002-01-01

    The spectral method for distinguishing crustal from core-source magnetic fields is reexamined, modified, and applied to both a comprehensive geomagnetic field model and an altitude normalized magnetic map of Mars. The observational spectra are fairly fitted by theoretical forms expected from certain elementary classes of magnetic sources. For Earth we find fields from a core of radius 3512 +/- 64 km, in accord with the seismologic core radius of 3480 km, and a crust represented by a shell of random dipolar sources at radius 6367 +/- 14 km, near the planetary mean radius of 6371.2 km. For Mars we find no sign of a core-source field, only a field from a crust represented in same way, but at radius 3344 +/- 10 km, about 46 km below the planetary mean radius of 3389.5 km, and with sources about 9.6 +/- 3.2 times stronger.

  18. Spectra as windows into exoplanet atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Adam S

    2014-09-02

    Understanding a planet's atmosphere is a necessary condition for understanding not only the planet itself, but also its formation, structure, evolution, and habitability. This requirement puts a premium on obtaining spectra and developing credible interpretative tools with which to retrieve vital planetary information. However, for exoplanets, these twin goals are far from being realized. In this paper, I provide a personal perspective on exoplanet theory and remote sensing via photometry and low-resolution spectroscopy. Although not a review in any sense, this paper highlights the limitations in our knowledge of compositions, thermal profiles, and the effects of stellar irradiation, focusing on, but not restricted to, transiting giant planets. I suggest that the true function of the recent past of exoplanet atmospheric research has been not to constrain planet properties for all time, but to train a new generation of scientists who, by rapid trial and error, are fast establishing a solid future foundation for a robust science of exoplanets.

  19. Towards simulation of high temperature methane spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysov, A.; Champion, J. P.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Wenger, C.

    Methane plays a central role in gas layers of temperatures up to around 3000K in a number of astrophysical objects ranging from giant planets to brown dwarfs, over proto-solar nebulae, to several classes of cool stars. In order to model and analyse these objects correctly, an accurate and complete list of spectral lines at high temperature is demanded. Predicting high temperature spectra implies, however, predicting hot bands and thus modelling highly excited vibrational states. This is a real challenge in the case of methane. We report the preliminary results of a theoretical study combining the global effective Hamiltonian approach and its computational implementation (STDS package: http://www.u-bourgogne.fr/LPUB/ shTDS.html) with semi-quantitative statistical considerations.

  20. Satellite spectra for helium-like titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Bely-Dubac, F.; Faucher, P.; Steeman-Clark, L.; Dubau, J.; Cammy-Val, C.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; von Goeler, S.

    1982-06-01

    Wavelengths and atomic parameters for both dielectronic and inner-shell satellite lines of the type ls/sup 2/ nl - 1s2l' nl, with n = 2, 3, and 4, have been calculated for Ti XX. The atomic data were calculated in a multiconfiguration intermediate coupling scheme and are compared with previous results for n = 2. The intensities of the higher n satellites are derived from these data, and thus an estimate of the contribution of the unresolved dielectronic satellites to the resonance line is obtained. Direct excitation rates are also given for the resonance, intercombination and forbidden lines for He-like titanium. Cascades and the effect of resonances for these lines are not considered in this paper. These results are used to fit an experimental soft x-ray spectrum from the PDX (Poloidal Divertor Experiment) tokamak discharge. Good agreement is obtained between computed and observed spectra.

  1. Workshop to establish databases of carbohydrate spectra

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The workshop was organized to formulate guidelines for establishing spectral databases of complex carbohydrates. The databases will enable the scientific community to avoid the great waste of research effort and funds that frequently occurs when carbohydrate chemists are forced to duplicate the structural characterization of previously characterized complex carbohydrates. Chemists waste their effort on repetitive characterizations because in the absence of spectral databases they are unaware they are analyzing a known molecule until they have completely determined its structure. Chemists will be able to avoid much of this wasted effort when the collections of mass and of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra initiated at the workshop are subsequently developed into searchable databases. Then scientists only need query the databases with the spectrum or with information defining the spectrum of an unidentified carbohydrate to find out if it has been previously characterized.

  2. Optical absorption spectra of dications of carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Jeevarajan, J.A.; Wei, C.C.; Jeevarajan, A.S.; Kispert, L.D.

    1996-04-04

    Quantitative optical absorption spectra of the cation radicals and the dications of canthaxanthin (I), {beta}carotene (II), 7`-cyano-7`-ethoxycarbonyl-7`-apo-{beta}-carotene (III), and 7`,7`-dimethyl-7`-apo-{beta}-carotene (IV) in dichloromethane solution are reported. Exclusive formation of dications occurs when the carotenoids are oxidized with ferric chloride. Addition of neutral carotenoid to the dications results in equilibrium formation of cation radicals. Oxidation with iodine in dichloromethane affords only cation radicals; electrochemical oxidation under suitable conditions yields both dications and cation radicals. Values of the optical parameters depend on the nature of the oxidative medium. The oscillator strengths calculated for gas phase cation radicals and dications of I-IV using the INDO/S method show the same trend as the experimental values. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. X ray spectra of cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Halpern, Jules

    1990-01-01

    X ray spectral parameters of cataclysmic variables observed with the 'Einstein' imaging proportional counter were determined by fitting an optically thin, thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum to the raw data. Most of the sources show temperatures of order a few keV, while a few sources exhibit harder spectra with temperatures in excess of 10 keV. Estimated 0.1 to 3.5 keV luminosities are generally in the range from 10(exp 30) to 10(exp 32) erg/sec. The results are consistent with the x rays originating in a disk/white dwarf boundary layer of non-magnetic systems, or in a hot, post-shock region in the accretion column of DQ Her stars, with a negligible contribution from the corona of the companion. In a few objects column densities were found that are unusually high for interstellar material. It was suggested that the absorption occurs in the system itself.

  4. HF Accelerated Electron Fluxes, Spectra, and Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert C.; Jensen, Joseph B.

    2015-10-01

    Wave particle interactions, an essential aspect of laboratory, terrestrial, and astrophysical plasmas, have been studied for decades by transmitting high power HF radio waves into Earth's weakly ionized space plasma, to use it as a laboratory without walls. Application to HF electron acceleration remains an active area of research (Gurevich in Usp Fizicheskikh Nauk 177(11):1145-1177, 2007) today. HF electron acceleration studies began when plasma line observations proved (Carlson et al. in J Atmos Terr Phys 44:1089-1100, 1982) that high power HF radio wave-excited processes accelerated electrons not to ~eV, but instead to -100 times thermal energy (10 s of eV), as a consequence of inelastic collision effects on electron transport. Gurevich et al (J Atmos Terr Phys 47:1057-1070, 1985) quantified the theory of this transport effect. Merging experiment with theory in plasma physics and aeronomy, enabled prediction (Carlson in Adv Space Res 13:1015-1024, 1993) of creating artificial ionospheres once ~GW HF effective radiated power could be achieved. Eventual confirmation of this prediction (Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 36:L18107, 2009; Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 37:L02106, 2010; Blagoveshchenskaya et al. in Ann Geophys 27:131-145, 2009) sparked renewed interest in optical inversion to estimate electron spectra in terrestrial (Hysell et al. in J Geophys Res Space Phys 119:2038-2045, 2014) and planetary (Simon et al. in Ann Geophys 29:187-195, 2011) atmospheres. Here we present our unpublished optical data, which combined with our modeling, lead to conclusions that should meaningfully improve future estimates of the spectrum of HF accelerated electron fluxes. Photometric imaging data can significantly improve detection of emissions near ionization threshold, and confirm depth of penetration of accelerated electrons many km below the excitation altitude. Comparing observed to modeled emission altitude shows future experiments need electron density profiles

  5. Universality of vibrational spectra of globular proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyuntae; Song, Guang; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    It is shown that the density of modes of the vibrational spectrum of globular proteins is universal, i.e. regardless of the protein in question, it closely follows one universal curve. The present study, including 135 proteins analyzed with a full atomic empirical potential (CHARMM22) and using the full complement of all atoms Cartesian degrees of freedom, goes far beyond previous claims of universality, confirming that universality holds even in the frequency range that is well above 100 cm-1 (300-4000 cm-1), where peaks and turns in the density of states are faithfully reproduced from one protein to the next. We also characterize fluctuations of the spectral density from the average, paving the way to a meaningful discussion of rare, unusual spectra and the structural reasons for the deviations in such ‘outlier’ proteins. Since the method used for the derivation of the vibrational modes (potential energy formulation, set of degrees of freedom employed, etc) has a dramatic effect on the spectral density, another significant implication of our findings is that the universality can provide an exquisite tool for assessing and improving the quality of potential functions and the quality of various models used for NMA computations. Finally, we show that the input configuration also affects the density of modes, thus emphasizing the importance of simplified potential energy formulations that are minimized at the outset. In summary, our findings call for a serious two-way dialogue between theory and experiment: experimental spectra of proteins could now guide the fine tuning of theoretical empirical potentials, and the various features and peaks observed in theoretical studies—being universal, and hence now rising in importance—would hopefully spur experimental confirmation.

  6. Spectra of small Koronis family members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Rivkin, A.; Trilling, D.; Moskovitz, N.

    2014-07-01

    The space-weathering process and its implications for the relationships between S- and Q-type asteroids and ordinary chondrite meteorites are long-standing problems in asteroid science. Although the visible and near-infrared spectra of S- and Q-type objects qualitatively show the same absorption features and quantitatively show evidence of the same minerals, the S types display increased spectral slopes and muted absorption features compared to the Q types. This spectral mismatch is consistent with the effects of the space weathering process. Binzel et al. provided the missing link between Q- and S-type bodies in near-Earth space by showing a reddening of spectral slope in objects from 0.1 to 5 km that corresponded to the transition from Q- to S-type spectra. This result implied that size, and therefore age, is related to the relationship between Q- and S-type. The existence of Q-type objects in the main belt was not confirmed until Mothe-Diniz and Nesvorny (2008) found them in young S-type clusters. To investigate the trend from Q to S in the main belt, we examined space weathering within the old main-belt Koronis family using a spectrophotometric survey (Rivkin et al. 2011, Thomas et al. 2011). Rivkin et al. (2011) identified several potential Q-type objects within the Koronis family. Our Q-type candidates were identified using broad-band spectrophotometry and could not be taxonomically classified on that basis alone. We obtained follow-up visible and near-infrared spectral observations of our potential Q-type objects, (26970) Elias, (45610) 2000 DJ_{48}, and (37411) 2001 XF_{152}, using Gemini and Magellan. We will present the results of these spectral follow-up observations. Observations of (26970) Elias demonstrate that the object is more consistent with the average Q-type spectrum than the average S-type spectrum.

  7. Polarization effects in cutaneous autofluorescent spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Angelova, L.; Jeliazkova, Al.; Genova, Ts.; Pavlova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2014-05-01

    Used polarized light for fluorescence excitation one could obtain response related to the anisotropy features of extracellular matrix. The fluorophore anisotropy is attenuated during lesions' growth and level of such decrease could be correlated with the stage of tumor development. Our preliminary investigations are based on in vivo point-by-point measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) from healthy volunteers skin on different ages and from different anatomical places using linear polarizer and analyzer for excitation and emission light detected. Measurements were made using spectrofluorimeter FluoroLog 3 (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) with fiber-optic probe in steady-state regime using excitation in the region of 280-440 nm. Three different situations were evaluated and corresponding excitation-emission matrices were developed - with parallel and perpendicular positions for linear polarizer and analyzer, and without polarization of excitation and fluorescence light detected from a forearm skin surface. The fluorescence spectra obtained reveal differences in spectral intensity, related to general attenuation, due to filtering effects of used polarizer/analyzer couple. Significant spectral shape changes were observed for the complex autofluorescence signal detected, which correlated with collagen and protein cross-links fluorescence, that could be addressed to the tissue extracellular matrix and general condition of the skin investigated, due to morphological destruction during lesions' growth. A correlation between volunteers' age and the fluorescence spectra detected was observed during our measurements. Our next step is to increase developed initial database and to evaluate all sources of intrinsic fluorescent polarization effects and found if they are significantly altered from normal skin to cancerous state of the tissue, this way to develop a non-invasive diagnostic tool for dermatological practice.

  8. Curved Radio Spectra of Weak Cluster Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2015-08-01

    In order to understand certain observed features of arc-like giant radio relics such as the rareness, uniform surface brightness, and curved integrated spectra, we explore a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model for radio relics in which a spherical shock impinges on a magnetized cloud containing fossil relativistic electrons. Toward this end, we perform DSA simulations of spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, and calculate the ensuing radio synchrotron emission from re-accelerated electrons. Three types of fossil electron populations are considered: a delta-function like population with the shock injection momentum, a power-law distribution, and a power law with an exponential cutoff. The surface brightness profile of the radio-emitting postshock region and the volume-integrated radio spectrum are calculated and compared with observations. We find that the observed width of the Sausage relic can be explained reasonably well by shocks with speed {u}{{s}}˜ 3× {10}3 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and sonic Mach number {M}{{s}}˜ 3. These shocks produce curved radio spectra that steepen gradually over (0.1-10){ν }{br} with a break frequency {ν }{br}˜ 1 GHz if the duration of electron acceleration is ˜60-80 Myr. However, the abrupt increase in the spectral index above ˜1.5 GHz observed in the Sausage relic seems to indicate that additional physical processes, other than radiative losses, operate for electrons with {γ }{{e}}≳ {10}4.

  9. High Pressure Oxygen A-Band Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Brian; Sung, Keeyoon; Yu, Shanshan; Lunny, Elizabeth M.; Bui, Thinh Quoc; Okumura, Mitchio; Rupasinghe, Priyanka; Bray, Caitlin; Long, David A.; Hodges, Joseph; Robichaud, David; Benner, D. Chris; Devi, V. Malathy; Hoo, Jiajun

    2015-06-01

    Composition measurements from remote sensing platforms require knowledge of air mass to better than the desired precision of the composition. Oxygen spectra allow determination of air mass since the mixing ratio of oxygen is fixed. The OCO-2 mission is currently retrieving carbon dioxide concentration using the oxygen A-band for air mass normalization. The 0.25% accuracy desired for the carbon dioxide concentration has pushed the state-of-the-art for oxygen spectroscopy. To produce atmospheric pressure A-band cross-sections with this accuracy requires a sophisticated line-shape model (Galatry or Speed-Dependent) with line mixing (LM) and collision induced absorption (CIA). Models of each of these phenomena exist, but an integrated self-consistent model must be developed to ensure accuracy. This presentation will describe the ongoing effort to parameterize these phenomena on a representative data set created from complementary experimental techniques. The techniques include Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS), photo-acoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). CRDS data allow long-pathlength measurements with absolute intensities, providing lineshape information as well as LM and CIA, however the subtleties of the lineshape are diminished in the saturated line-centers. Conversely, the short paths and large dynamic range of the PAS data allow the full lineshape to be discerned, but with an arbitrary intensity axis. Finally, the FTS data provides intermediate paths and consistency across a broad pressure range. These spectra are all modeled with the Labfit software using first the spectral line database HITRAN, and then model values are adjusted and fitted for better agreement with the data.

  10. [Raman spectra of monkey cerebral cortex tissue].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ji-chun; Guo, Jian-yu; Cai, Wei-ying; Wang, Zu-geng; Sun, Zhen-rong

    2010-01-01

    Monkey cerebral cortex, an important part in the brain to control action and thought activities, is mainly composed of grey matter and nerve cell. In the present paper, the in situ Raman spectra of the cerebral cortex of the birth, teenage and aged monkeys were achieved for the first time. The results show that the Raman spectra for the different age monkey cerebral cortex exhibit most obvious changes in the regions of 1000-1400 and 2800-3000 cm(-1). With monkey growing up, the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1313 and 2885 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH2 chain vibrational mode of lipid become stronger and stronger whereas the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1338 and 2932 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH3 chain vibrational mode of protein become weaker and weaker. In addition, the two new Raman bands at 1296 and 2850 cm(-1) are only observed in the aged monkey cerebral cortex, therefore, the two bands can be considered as a character or "marker" to differentiate the caducity degree with monkey growth In order to further explore the changes, the relative intensity ratios of the Raman band at 1313 cm(-1) to that at 1338 cm(-1) and the Raman band at 2885 cm(-1) to that at 2 932 cm(-1), I1313/I1338 and I2885/I2932, which are the lipid-to-protein ratios, are introduced to denote the degree of the lipid content. The results show that the relative intensity ratios increase significantly with monkey growth, namely, the lipid content in the cerebral cortex increases greatly with monkey growth. So, the authors can deduce that the overmuch lipid is an important cause to induce the caducity. Therefore, the results will be a powerful assistance and valuable parameter to study the order of life growth and diagnose diseases.

  11. THEORETICAL SPECTRA OF TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANET SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Renyu; Seager, Sara; Ehlmann, Bethany L.

    2012-06-10

    We investigate spectra of airless rocky exoplanets with a theoretical framework that self-consistently treats reflection and thermal emission. We find that a silicate surface on an exoplanet is spectroscopically detectable via prominent Si-O features in the thermal emission bands of 7-13 {mu}m and 15-25 {mu}m. The variation of brightness temperature due to the silicate features can be up to 20 K for an airless Earth analog, and the silicate features are wide enough to be distinguished from atmospheric features with relatively high resolution spectra. The surface characterization thus provides a method to unambiguously identify a rocky exoplanet. Furthermore, identification of specific rocky surface types is possible with the planet's reflectance spectrum in near-infrared broad bands. A key parameter to observe is the difference between K-band and J-band geometric albedos (A{sub g}(K) - A{sub g}(J)): A{sub g}(K) - A{sub g}(J) > 0.2 indicates that more than half of the planet's surface has abundant mafic minerals, such as olivine and pyroxene, in other words primary crust from a magma ocean or high-temperature lavas; A{sub g}(K) - A{sub g}(J) < -0.09 indicates that more than half of the planet's surface is covered or partially covered by water ice or hydrated silicates, implying extant or past water on its surface. Also, surface water ice can be specifically distinguished by an H-band geometric albedo lower than the J-band geometric albedo. The surface features can be distinguished from possible atmospheric features with molecule identification of atmospheric species by transmission spectroscopy. We therefore propose that mid-infrared spectroscopy of exoplanets may detect rocky surfaces, and near-infrared spectrophotometry may identify ultramafic surfaces, hydrated surfaces, and water ice.

  12. Prediction of electroencephalographic spectra from neurophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Rennie, C. J.; Wright, J. J.; Bahramali, H.; Gordon, E.; Rowe, D. L.

    2001-02-01

    A recent neurophysical model of propagation of electrical waves in the cortex is extended to include a physiologically motivated subcortical feedback loop via the thalamus. The electroencephalographic spectrum when the system is driven by white noise is then calculated analytically in terms of physiological parameters, including the effects of filtering of signals by the cerebrospinal fluid, skull, and scalp. The spectral power at low frequencies is found to vary as f-1 when awake and f-3 when asleep, with a breakpoint to a steeper power-law tail at frequencies above about 20 Hz in both cases; the f-1 range concurs with recent magnetoencephalographic observations of such a regime. Parameter sensitivities are explored, enabling a model with fewer free parameters to be proposed, and showing that spectra predicted for physiologically reasonable parameter values strongly resemble those observed in the laboratory. Alpha and beta peaks seen near 10 Hz and twice that frequency, respectively, in the relaxed wakeful state are generated via subcortical feedback in this model, thereby leading to predictions of their frequencies in terms of physiological parameters, and of correlations in their occurrence. Subcortical feedback is also predicted to be responsible for production of anticorrelated peaks in deep sleep states that correspond to the occurrence of theta rhythm at around half the alpha frequency and sleep spindles at 3/2 times the alpha frequency. An additional positively correlated waking peak near three times the alpha frequency is also predicted and tentatively observed, as are two new types of sleep spindle near 5/2 and 7/2 times the alpha frequency, and anticorrelated with alpha. These results provide a theoretical basis for the conventional division of EEG spectra into frequency bands, but imply that the exact bounds of these bands depend on the individual. Three types of potential instability are found: one at zero frequency, another in the theta band at around

  13. CO2 profile retrievals from TCCON spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohe, Susanne; Hase, Frank; Sepúlveda, Eliezer; García, Omaira; Wunch, Debra; Wennberg, Paul; Gómez-Peláez, Angel; Abshire, James B.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Schneider, Matthias; Blumenstock, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) is a global network of ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometers recording direct solar spectra in the near-infrared spectral region. With stringent requirements on the instrumentation, data processing and calibration, accurate and precise column-averaged abundances of CO2, CH4, N2O, HF, CO, H2O, and HDO are retrieved being an essential contribution for the validation of satellite data (e.g. GOSAT, OCO-2) and carbon cycle research (Olsen and Randerson, 2004). However, the determined column-averaged dry air mole fraction (DMF) contains no information about the vertical CO2 profile, due to the use of a simple scaling retrieval within the common TCCON analysis, where the fitting algorithm GFIT (e.g. Yang et al., 2005) is used. In this presentation we will apply a different procedure for calculating trace gas abundances from the measured spectra, the fitting algorithm PROFFIT (Hase et. al., 2004) which has been shown to be in very good accordance with GFIT. PROFFIT additionally offers the ability to perform profile retrievals in which the pressure broadening effect of absorption lines is used to retrieve vertical gas profiles, being of great interest especially for the CO2 modelling community. A new analyzing procedure will be shown and retrieved vertical CO2 profiles of the TCCON sites Izaña (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain) and Lamont (Oklahoma, USA) will be presented and compared with simultaneously performed surface in-situ measurements and CO2 profiles from different aircraft campaigns. References: - Hase, F. et al., J.Q.S.R.T. 87, 25-52, 2004. - Olsen, S.C. and Randerson, J.T., J.G.Res., 109, D023012, 2004. - Yang, Z. et al., J.Q.S.R.T., 90, 309-321, 2005.

  14. Spectra of volcanic rocks glasses as analogues of Mercury surface spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, C.; Capaccioni, F.; de Sanctis, M.; Filacchione, G.; Sgavetti, M.; di Genova, D.; Vona, A.; Visonà, D.; Ammannito, E.

    2010-12-01

    Remote-sensing studies have revealed that most of the inner planets surfaces are composed by magmatic effusive rocks as lava flows or pyroclastic deposits, that are the natural products of magma-rock dynamic systems controlled by T, P, oxygen fugacity and time. These materials generally contain a fair amount of volcanic glass, due to the magma rapid cooling once effused on the surface. The VNIR reflectance spectroscopy is one of the most relevant tools for remote-sensing studies and in the last decades gave important results identifying the presence of different Fe-Mg silicates, such as olivine and pyroxenes, on the planets surfaces. However, the mineralogical interpretation of the observed spectral features of several volcanic areas on the inner Solar System bodies is still matter of debate. In particular the presence of dark volcanic glass, which can dominate or not the rock texture, influences the spectra signatures. In fact samples with a glass-bearing groundmass have lower albedo and reduced band intensity of the spectra of samples with comparable mineral composition and intergranular texture. As a consequence, an important goal for studying the planetary crusts is to understand the spectral behavior of volcanic material, where chemical or physical parameters are different depending on geologic context and effusive processes. We present here preliminary laboratory activity to investigate VNIR reflectance spectra of several volcanic glasses. Reflectance spectra, in the wavelength range between 0.35- 2.50 μm, are measured on powders of magmatic rocks, having different composition and textures, at fine (<60 μm in diameter) and very fine (<10 μm) grain sizes. For each rock sample a corresponding “thermal shocked-sample” is produced by heating at 1300°C and P=1 atm and a glass-sample was produced by melting at 1500°C and P=1 atm, than quenching it in air. Reflectance spectra of powders of shocked and glass-samples were acquired at the same grain size, and

  15. Browsing a wealth of millimeter-wavelength doppler spectra data

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson,K.; Luke,E.; Kollias, P.; Remillard, J.; Widener, K.; Jensen, M.

    2010-03-15

    The ARM Climate Research Facility has collected an extensive archive of vertically pointing millimeter wavelength Doppler radar spectra at both 35 and 95 GHz. These data are a rich potential source of detailed microphysical and dynamical cloud and precipitation information. The recording of spectra, which is ongoing, began at the Southern Great Plains site in September of 2003, at the North Slope of Alaska site in April 2004, and at Tropical Western Pacific sites in 2006. Spectra are also being collected during ARM Mobile Facility deployments. The data’s temporal resolution is as high as two seconds, at height intervals of 45 to 90 m. However, the sheer volume of available data can be somewhat daunting to access and search for specific features of interest. Here we present a user interface for spectra browsing, which allows the user to view time-height images of radar moments, select a time or height of interest, and then “drill down” through images of spectrograms to individual Doppler spectra or time- and height-sequences of spectra. Also available are images summarizing spectral characteristics, such as number of spectral peaks, spectral shape information (skewness and kurtosis), moment uncertainty estimates, and hydrometeor vs. clutter identification as produced by the ARM MicroARSCL (Microphysical Active Remote Sensing of Clouds) value-added product. In addition to the access and visualization tools, we are developing a Doppler spectra simulator capable of generating Doppler spectra from liquid, mixed-phase, and solid cloud constituents and precipitation. The Doppler spectra simulator can be used as an interface between explicit microphysics models and Doppler spectra observations from the ARM radars. The plan is to ultimately make the spectra simulator available from within the spectra browser, allowing a user to associate observed spectra with the microphysical conditions capable of producing them.

  16. Conformal symmetry and light flavor baryon spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchbach, M.; Compean, C. B.

    2010-08-01

    The degeneracy among parity pairs systematically observed in the N and Δ spectra is interpreted to hint on a possible conformal symmetry realization in the light flavor baryon sector in line with AdS5/CFT4. The case is made by showing that all the observed N and Δ resonances with masses below 2500 MeV distribute fairly well each over the first levels of a unitary representation of the conformal group, a representation that covers the spectrum of a quark-diquark system, placed directly on a conformally compactified Minkowski spacetime, R1⊗S3, as approached from the AdS5 cone. The free geodesic motion on the S3 manifold is described by means of the scalar conformal equation there, which is of the Klein-Gordon-type. The equation is then gauged by the curved Coulomb potential that has the form of a cotangent function. Conformal symmetry is not exact, this because the gauge potential slightly modifies the conformal centrifugal barrier of the free geodesic motion. Thanks to this, the degeneracy between P11-S11 pairs from same level is relaxed, while the remaining states belonging to same level remain practically degenerate. The model describes the correct mass ordering in the P11-S11 pairs through the spectra as a combined effect of the above conformal symmetry breaking, on the one side, and a parity change of the diquark from a scalar at low masses, to a pseudoscalar at higher masses, on the other. The quality of the wave functions is illustrated by calculations of realistic mean square charge radii and electric charge form factors on the examples of the proton, and the protonic P11(1440), and S11(1535) resonances. The scheme also allows for a prediction of the dressing function of an effective instantaneous gluon propagator from the Fourier transform of the gauge potential. We find a dressing function that is finite in the infrared and tends to zero at infinity.

  17. Ab initio infrared and Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredkin, Donald R.; Komornicki, Andrew; White, Steven R.; Wilson, Kent R.

    1983-06-01

    We discuss several ways in which molecular absorption and scattering spectra can be computed ab initio, from the fundamental constants of nature. These methods can be divided into two general categories. In the first, or sequential, type of approach, one first solves the electronic part of the Schrödinger equation in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, mapping out the potential energy, dipole moment vector (for infrared absorption) and polarizability tensor (for Raman scattering) as functions of nuclear coordinates. Having completed the electronic part of the calculation, one then solves the nuclear part of the problem either classically or quantum mechanically. As an example of the sequential ab initio approach, the infrared and Raman rotational and vibrational-rotational spectral band contours for the water molecule are computed in the simplest rigid rotor, normal mode approximation. Quantum techniques are used to calculate the necessary potential energy, dipole moment, and polarizability information at the equilibrium geometry. A new quick, accurate, and easy to program classical technique involving no reference to Euler angles or special functions is developed to compute the infrared and Raman band contours for any rigid rotor, including asymmetric tops. A second, or simultaneous, type of ab initio approach is suggested for large systems, particularly those for which normal mode analysis is inappropriate, such as liquids, clusters, or floppy molecules. Then the curse of dimensionality prevents mapping out in advance the complete potential, dipole moment, and polarizability functions over the whole space of nuclear positions of all atoms, and a solution in which the electronic and nuclear parts of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation are simultaneously solved is needed. A quantum force classical trajectory (QFCT) molecular dynamic method, based on linear response theory, is described, in which the forces, dipole moment, and polarizability are computed quantum

  18. [Raman spectra of fossil dinosaurs from different regions].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qun; Wang, Yi-lin

    2007-12-01

    Raman microscopic spectra in the higher wave number region were obtained from 7 fossil dinosaurs specimens from different regions. The specimens of fossil dinosaurs are different parts of bone. The Raman spectra of fossil dinosaurs indicate the high similarity among peak positions of different fossil dinosaurs; but important differences exist in the spectral peak figures. In the wave number region of 1000-1800 cm(-1) the Raman spectra of the same bone part fossils from different regions are very similar, example similarities between spectra of Lufeing backbone head and Yua nmou backbone head; Lufeng limb bone and Wuding limb bone. There are relations between the same bone part spectra of different fossil dinosaurs. The characteristic does not relate to regions. Raman spectra of fossil dinosaurs cannot be used to distinguish fossil source, although the part of bone can be used as an indicator to narrow the range of possible geographical origins.

  19. Radial Distribution of Electron Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The average track model describes the response of physical and biological systems using radial dose distribution as the key physical descriptor. We report on an extension of this model to describe the average distribution of electron spectra as a function of radial distance from an ion. We present calculations of these spectra for ions of identical linear energy transfer (LET), but dissimilar charge and velocity to evaluate the differences in electron spectra from these ions. To illustrate the usefulness of the radial electron spectra for describing effects that are not described by electron dose, we consider the evaluation of the indirect events in microdosimetric distributions for ions. We show that folding our average electron spectra model with experimentally determined frequency distributions for photons or electrons provides a good representation of radial event spectra from high-energy ions in 0.5-2 micrometer sites.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of Auger-electron spectra.

    PubMed

    Grau Carles, A; Kossert, K

    2009-01-01

    A procedure to calculate the complex spectra of electron-capture nuclides which simultaneously eject several electrons and X-rays with different energies is presented. The model is applied to compute spectra of the radionuclides (125)I, (123)I and (111)In. The spectra are then compared with experimental spectra obtained by means of liquid scintillation counting. To this end, the computed spectra were transformed to allow for the nonlinear response function for a liquid scintillator, chemical quenching, as well as the Wallac-type amplifier used for the measurements. The calculated spectra are important for applications of free parameter models in liquid scintillation counting and also for studying the impact of electron-capture nuclides on DNA.

  1. Camera artifacts in IUE low-dispersion spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, D. Michael; Norman, Dara J.; Bruegman, Otto W.

    1990-01-01

    Sky-background images obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) were analyzed to study artificial spectral features (camera artifacts) in low-dispersion spectra. The artifacts mimic emission features and have been present in long-exposure spectra since the launch of the IUE satellite. The camera artifacts are strong in spectra characterized by long exposure times because they scale in time-integrated flux with the background level, which increases during the exposure due to camera phosphorescence. The artifacts cannot be detected in spectra obtained from short, direct exposures of flat-field lamps or standard stars. Plots of average sky-background spectra for the three operational IUE cameras (SWP, LWP, and LWR) are given to aid scientists in the identification of artifacts in their spectra.

  2. Simulation of dielectric spectra of erythrocytes with various shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Koji

    2009-07-01

    Dielectric spectra of erythrocyte suspensions were numerically simulated over a frequency range from 1 kHz to 100 MHz to study the effects of erythrocyte shape on the dielectric spectra. First, a biconcave-discoid model for normal erythrocytes or discocytes was compared with an equivalent oblate spheroid model. The two models showed similar dielectric spectra to each other, suggesting that the oblate spheroid model can be approximately used for discocytes. Second, dielectric spectra were simulated for discocytes deformed by osmotic cell swelling. The deformation resulted in the increase in relaxation intensity and the sharpening of spectrum shape. Finally, dielectric spectra were simulated for echinocytes, stomatocytes and sickle cells that are induced by chemical agents and diseases. The dielectric spectra of echinocytes and stomatocytes were similar to each other, being distinguishable from that of discocytes and quite different from that of sickle cells.

  3. Principal spectra describing magnetooptic permittivity tensor in cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamrlová, Jana; Legut, Dominik; Veis, Martin; Pištora, Jaromír; Hamrle, Jaroslav

    2016-12-01

    We provide unified phenomenological description of magnetooptic effects being linear and quadratic in magnetization. The description is based on few principal spectra, describing elements of permittivity tensor up to the second order in magnetization. Each permittivity tensor element for any magnetization direction and any sample surface orientation is simply determined by weighted summation of the principal spectra, where weights are given by crystallographic and magnetization orientations. The number of principal spectra depends on the symmetry of the crystal. In cubic crystals owning point symmetry we need only four principal spectra. Here, the principal spectra are expressed by ab initio calculations for bcc Fe, fcc Co and fcc Ni in optical range as well as in hard and soft x-ray energy range, i.e. at the 2p- and 3p-edges. We also express principal spectra analytically using modified Kubo formula.

  4. A novel computational method for comparing vibrational circular dichroism spectra.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jian; Zhu, Chengyue; Reiling, Stephan; Vaz, Roy

    2010-08-01

    A novel method, SimIR/VCD, for comparing experimental and calculated VCD (vibrational circular dichroism) spectra is developed, based on newly defined spectra similarities. With computationally optimized frequency scaling and shifting, a calculated spectrum can be easily identified to match an observed spectrum, which leads to an unbiased molecular chirality assignment. The time-consuming manual band-fitting work is greatly reduced. With (1S)-(-)-alpha-pinene as an example, it demonstrates that the calculated VCD similarity is correlated with VCD spectra matching quality and has enough sensitivity to identify variations in the spectra. The study also compares spectra calculated using different DFT methods and basis sets. Using this method should facilitate the spectra matching, reduce human error and provide a confidence measure in the chiral assignment using VCD spectroscopy.

  5. AIS spectra of desert shrub canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, R.; Isaacson, D. L.; Schrumpf, B. J.; Ripple, W. J.; Lewis, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data were collected 30 August 1985 from a desert shrub community in central Oregon. Spectra from artificial targets placed on the test site and from bare soil, big sagebrush (Artemesia tridentata wyomingensis), silver sagebrush (Artemesia cana bolander), and exposed volcanic rocks were studied. Spectral data from grating position 3 (tree mode) were selected from 25 ground positions for analysis by Principal Factor Analysis (PFA). In this grating position, as many as six factors were identified as significant in contributing to spectral structure. Channels 74 through 84 (tree mode) best characterized between-class differences. Other channels were identified as nondiscriminating and as associated with such errors as excessive atmospheric absorption and grating positin changes. The test site was relatively simple with the two species (A. tridentata and A. cana) representing nearly 95% of biomass and with only two mineral backgrounds, a montmorillonitic soil and volcanic rocks. If, as in this study, six factors of spectral structure can be extracted from a single grating position from data acquired over a simple vegetation community, then AIS data must be considered rich in information-gathering potential.

  6. Derivation of Piezoelectric Losses from Admittance Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Yuan; Ural, Seyit O.; Rajapurkar, Aditya; Tuncdemir, Safakcan; Amin, Ahmed; Uchino, Kenji

    2009-04-01

    High power density piezoelectrics are required to miniaturize devices such as ultrasonic motors, transformers, and sound projectors. The power density is limited by the heat generation in piezoelectrics, therefore, clarification of the loss mechanisms is necessary. This paper provides a methodology to determine the electromechanical losses, i.e., dielectric, elastic and piezoelectric loss factors in piezoelectrics by means of a detailed analysis of the admittance/impedance spectra. This method was applied to determine the piezoelectric losses for lead zirconate titanate ceramics and lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate single crystals. The analytical solution provides a new method for obtaining the piezoelectric loss factor, which is usually neglected in practice by transducer designers. Finite element simulation demonstrated the importance of piezoelectric losses to yield a more accurate fitting to the experimental data. A phenomenological model based on two phase-shifts and the Devonshire theory of a polarizable-deformable insulator is developed to interpret the experimentally observed magnitudes of the mechanical quality factor at resonance and anti-resonance.

  7. Spectra as windows into exoplanet atmospheres

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding a planet’s atmosphere is a necessary condition for understanding not only the planet itself, but also its formation, structure, evolution, and habitability. This requirement puts a premium on obtaining spectra and developing credible interpretative tools with which to retrieve vital planetary information. However, for exoplanets, these twin goals are far from being realized. In this paper, I provide a personal perspective on exoplanet theory and remote sensing via photometry and low-resolution spectroscopy. Although not a review in any sense, this paper highlights the limitations in our knowledge of compositions, thermal profiles, and the effects of stellar irradiation, focusing on, but not restricted to, transiting giant planets. I suggest that the true function of the recent past of exoplanet atmospheric research has been not to constrain planet properties for all time, but to train a new generation of scientists who, by rapid trial and error, are fast establishing a solid future foundation for a robust science of exoplanets. PMID:24613929

  8. Shape of the A=14 {beta} spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.; Brown, B.A.

    1995-10-01

    The shape of allowed {Beta} spectra have a small contribution from the interference of the vector, weak-magnetism and axial GT matrix elements. According to CVC plus charge-symmetry of nuclear interactions, in a 0{sup +}{r_arrow} 1{sup +} transition like the {Beta} and {gamma} decays of the A=14 system, the weak-magnetism and electro-magnetic-Ml matrix elements should be equal. A measurement of the shape of the {sup 14}O spectrum, however, disagrees, by a factor of two with naive calculation described above. It has been speculated that because of the high supression of GT matrix element in the A=14 system, one could understand this discrepancy based on small charge-symmetry-effects. We have used shell-model wave functions adjusted to fit {sup 14}N(e,e{sup {prime}}) inelastic scattering, the width of the M1-{gamma} transition, and the {Beta} log f t`s, and show that reasonable assumptions lead to estimates that are very close to the naive CVC estimation. We propose that the {sup 14}O discrepancy is important and that new experiments should be done to measure the shape of the spectrum.

  9. Characteristics of magnetospheric radio noise spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Magnetospheric radio noise spectra (30 kHz to 10 MHz) taken by IMP-6 and RAE-2 exhibit time varying characteristics which are related to spacecraft position and magnetospheric processes. In the midfrequency range (100-1000 kHz) intense noise peaks rise a factor of 100 or more above background; 80% of the peak frequencies are within the band 125 kHz to 600 kHz, and the peak occurs most often (18% of the time) at 280 kHz. Bandwidths of the peaks range from about 100 kHz to more than 500 kHz; most often the lower cutoff is at about 100 kHz and the upper at 380 kHz for a total bandwidth of 280 kHz. This intense mid-frequency noise was detected at radial distances from 1.3 Re to 60 Re on all sides of the earth (i.e., all local times) during magnetically quiet as well as disturbed periods. Maximum occurrence of the mid-frequency noise is in the evening to midnight hours where splash-type energetic particle precipitation takes place.

  10. AB initio infrared and Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredkin, D. R.; Komornicki, A.; White, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.

    1982-08-01

    We discuss several ways in which molecular absorption and scattering spectra can be computed ab initio, from the fundamental constants of nature. These methods can be divided into two general categories. In the first, or sequential, type of approach, one first solves the electronic part of the Schroedinger equation in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, mapping out the potential energy, dipole moment vector (for infrared absorption) and polarizability tensor (for Raman scattering) as functions of nuclear coordinates. Having completed the electronic part of the calculation, one then solves the nuclear part of the problem either classically or quantum mechanically. As an example of the sequential ab initio approach, the infrared and Raman rotational and vibrational-rotational spectral band contours for the water molecule are computed in the simplest rigid rotor, normal mode approximation. Quantum techniques, are used to calculate the necessary potential energy, dipole moment, and polarizability information at the equilibrium geometry. A new quick, accurate, and easy to program classical technique involving no reference to Euler angles or special functions is developed to compute the infrared and Raman angles or special functions is developed to compute the infrared and Raman band contours for any rigid rotor, including asymmetric tops. A second, or simultaneous, type of ab initio approach is suggested for large systems, particularly those for which normal mode analysis is inappropriate, such as liquids, clusters, or floppy molecules.

  11. Xgremlin: Interferograms and spectra from Fourier transform spectrometers analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, G.; Griesmann, U.; Brault, J. W.; Abrams, M. C.

    2015-11-01

    Xgremlin is a hardware and operating system independent version of the data analysis program Gremlin used for Fourier transform spectrometry. Xgremlin runs on PCs and workstations that use the X11 window system, including cygwin in Windows. It is used to Fourier transform interferograms, plot spectra, perform phase corrections, perform intensity and wavenumber calibration, and find and fit spectral lines. It can also be used to construct synthetic spectra, subtract continua, compare several different spectra, and eliminate ringing around lines.

  12. Enhancement of energy spectra through constant fraction timing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermis, Elif Ebru; Celiktas, Cuneyt

    2017-02-01

    The energy spectra of 137Cs, 60Co and 14C were achieved by using the spectrometers composed of different types of detectors. In this work, constant fraction timing method was used to enhance their energy spectra. Energy resolution values of 137Cs and 60Co gamma energy spectra were improved through this timing method. In addition, electronic noise appeared in the energy spectrum of 14C was discriminated through the timing method, leading to clear beta energy spectrum.

  13. Double-Resonance Facilitated Decomposion of Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ryota; Ishikawa, Haruki

    2016-06-01

    Emission spectra provide us with rich information about the excited-state processes such as proton-transfer, charge-transfer and so on. In the cases that more than one excited states are involved, emission spectra from different excited states sometimes overlap and a decomposition of the overlapped spectra is desired. One of the methods to perform a decomposition is a time-resolved fluorescence technique. It uses a difference in time evolutions of components involved. However, in the gas-phase, a concentration of the sample is frequently too small to carry out this method. On the other hand, double-resonance technique is a very powerful tool to discriminate or identify a common species in the spectra in the gas-phase. Thus, in the present study, we applied the double-resonance technique to resolve the overlapped emission spectra. When transient IR absorption spectra of the excited state are available, we can label the population of the certain species by the IR excitation with a proper selection of the IR wavenumbers. Thus, we can obtain the emission spectra of labeled species by subtracting the emission spectra with IR labeling from that without IR. In the present study, we chose the charge-transfer emission spectra of cyanophenyldisilane (CPDS) as a test system. One of us reported that two charge-transfer (CT) states are involved in the intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) process of CPDS-water cluster and recorded the transient IR spectra. As expected, we have succeeded in resolving the CT emission spectra of CPDS-water cluster by the double resonance facilitated decomposion technique. In the present paper, we will report the details of the experimental scheme and the results of the decomposition of the emission spectra. H. Ishikawa, et al., Chem. Phys. Phys. Chem., 9, 117 (2007).

  14. Asymmetric protonation of EmrE

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Emma A.; Robinson, Anne E.; Liu, Yongjia

    2015-01-01

    The small multidrug resistance transporter EmrE is a homodimer that uses energy provided by the proton motive force to drive the efflux of drug substrates. The pKa values of its “active-site” residues—glutamate 14 (Glu14) from each subunit—must be poised around physiological pH values to efficiently couple proton import to drug export in vivo. To assess the protonation of EmrE, pH titrations were conducted with 1H-15N TROSY-HSQC nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. Analysis of these spectra indicates that the Glu14 residues have asymmetric pKa values of 7.0 ± 0.1 and 8.2 ± 0.3 at 45°C and 6.8 ± 0.1 and 8.5 ± 0.2 at 25°C. These pKa values are substantially increased compared with typical pKa values for solvent-exposed glutamates but are within the range of published Glu14 pKa values inferred from the pH dependence of substrate binding and transport assays. The active-site mutant, E14D-EmrE, has pKa values below the physiological pH range, consistent with its impaired transport activity. The NMR spectra demonstrate that the protonation states of the active-site Glu14 residues determine both the global structure and the rate of conformational exchange between inward- and outward-facing EmrE. Thus, the pKa values of the asymmetric active-site Glu14 residues are key for proper coupling of proton import to multidrug efflux. However, the results raise new questions regarding the coupling mechanism because they show that EmrE exists in a mixture of protonation states near neutral pH and can interconvert between inward- and outward-facing forms in multiple different protonation states. PMID:26573622

  15. Correspondence of electron spectra from photoionization and nuclear internal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Wark, D.L.; Bartlett, R.; Bowles, T.J.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Sivia, D.S.; Trela, W.; Wilkerson, J.F. ); Brown, G.S. ); Crasemann, B.; Sorensen, S.L.; Schaphorst, S.J. ); Knapp, D.A.; Henderson, J. ); Tulkki, J.; Aberg, T. )

    1991-10-21

    Electron energy spectra have been measured that result from {ital K}-shell ionization of Kr by two different mechanisms: (1) photoionization and (2) internal conversion in the decay of the isomeric state of {sup 83}Kr. It is demonstrated experimentally that these spectra, including satellites on the low-energy side of the primary 1{ital s}-electron peak, are identical. A theoretical interpretation of the identity of the spectra is given. The spectra agree well with a relativistic many-electron calculation in which the satellites are attributed to excitation and ionization of {ital M} and {ital N} electrons during the {ital K}-ionization process.

  16. Infrared spectra of lunar soil analogs. [spectral reflectance of minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronson, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The infrared spectra of analogs of lunar soils were investigated to further the development of methodology for interpretation of remotely measured infrared spectra of the lunar surface. The optical constants of dunite, bytownite, augite, ilmenite, and a mare glass analog were obtained. The infrared emittance spectra of powdered minerals were measured and compared with spectra calculated by the reflectance theory using a catalog of optical constants. The results indicate that the predictions of the theory closely simulate the experimental measurements if the optical constants are properly derived.

  17. Energy Spectra of Very Large Gradual Solar Particle Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    Bastille Day event, the Fe spectrum here does not harden with increasing energy. Instead, it falls much Fig. 2. Sample heavy-ion spectra from the 1998 April... Bastille Day) event from two intervals covering 6–14 and 22–26 hours after the flare (Tylka et al. 2001). The spectra clearly evolve, with e-folding...flare component much larger than 5% is excluded by <QFe> 10 from SEPICA in the Bastille Day event. To model the Fe spectra, we first fit the spectra

  18. [Near infrared Raman spectra analysis of rhizoma dioscoreae].

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Shuo; Chen, Rong; Li, Yong-Zeng; Feng, Shang-Yuan; Huang, Zu-Fang; Xie, Bing-Xian

    2008-05-01

    A novel and compact near-infrared (NIR) Raman system was developed using 785 nm diode laser, volume-phase technology holographic system, and NIR intensified charge-coupled device (CCD). The Raman spectra and first derivative spectra of rhizoma dioscoreae were obtained. The Raman spectra of rhizoma dioscoreae showed three strong characteristic peaks at 477, 863 and 936 cm(-1), respectively. The major ingredients are protein, amino acid, starch, polysaccharides and so on, matching the known basic biochemical composition of rhizoma dioscoreae. In the first derivative spectra of rhizoma dioscoreae, the distinguishing characteristic peaks appeared at 467, 484, 870 and 943 cm(-1). Contrasted with rhizoma dioscoreae Raman spectra in the ranges of 600 to 800 cm(-1) and 1 000 to 1 400 cm(-1), the changes in rhizoma dioscoreae Raman first derivative spectra are represented more clearly than the rhizoma dioscoreae Raman spectra. So the rhizoma dioscoreae Raman first derivative spectra can be an accurate supplementary analysis method to the rhizoma dioscoreae Raman spectra.

  19. Vibrational Spectra and Structures of Silicon - Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presilla-Marquez, Jose-Domingo

    1992-01-01

    Fourier transform studies of silicon-carbon clusters produced by vaporizing mixtures of silicon and carbon-12 or carbon-13 and quenching the products in argon, have enabled the identification of new vibrational spectra and structures. The far infrared nu_3(b_2) fundamental has been found at 160.4 cm ^{-1} for SiC_2 . Its structure is now described as T-shaped with ionic bonding. In the case of Si_2C, a previously observed vibration at 1188.4 cm^ {-1} has been confirmed as the nu_3(b_2), antisymmetric Si -C stretching mode, and a new vibration at 839.5 cm ^{-1} has been identified as the nu_1(a_1), symmetric Si-Si stretching fundamental. The nu_2(a _1) bending mode has not been observed; however, the nu_2(a_1) + nu_3(b_2) combination band has been identified at 1354.8 cm^{-1} . The results of force constant adjustment calculations confirm the ground state geometry of Si_2 C as a floppy, bent symmetrical structure. Five out of six fundamental modes have been identified for the Si_3C cluster which is observed here for the first time: the symmetric breathing vibration, nu_1(a_1) = 658.2 cm ^{-1}; the Si_ beta-Si_alpha -Si_beta symmetric deformation vibration, nu_2(a_1) = 511.8 cm^{-1}; the Si beta-C-Si_{beta } symmetric deformation vibration, nu_3(a_1) = 309.5 cm ^{-1}; the Si_beta -C antisymmetric stretching vibration, nu_5(b_2) = 1101.4 cm ^{-1}; and the Si_ alpha-Si_beta antisymmetric stretching vibration, nu_6(b _2) = 357.6 cm^{-1} . The fundamental frequencies, relative intensities, and isotopic shifts are in excellent agreement with the results of ab initio calculations predicting a rhomboidal structure of C_{2v} symmetry for Si_3C, with carbon-silicon transannular bonding between the two equivalent Si atoms. Another new silicon-carbon cluster, rhombic Si _2C_2, has been identified and the nu_3(b_ {rm 1u}) = 982.9 and nu _4(b_{rm 2u}) = 382.2 cm^{-1} fundamentals have been assigned. These results are in excellent agreement with ab initio calculations. The first

  20. Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R; Chen, Y J; Hambsch, F J; Kornilov, N V; Lestone, J P; Litaize, O; Morillon, B; Neudecker, D; Oberstedt, S; Ohsawa, T; Smith, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    The energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) “Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides”was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei. The following technical areas were addressed: (i) experiments and uncertainty quantification (UQ): New data for neutron-induced fission of 233U, 235U, 238U, and 239Pu have been measured, and older data have been compiled and reassessed. There is evidence from the experimental work of this CRP that a very small percentage of neutrons emitted in fission are actually scission neutrons; (ii) modeling: The Los Alamos model (LAM) continues to be the workhorse for PFNS evaluations. Monte Carlo models have been developed that describe the fission phenomena microscopically, but further development is needed to produce PFNS evaluations meeting the uncertainty targets; (iii) evaluation methodologies: PFNS evaluations rely on the use of the least-squares techniques for merging experimental and model data. Considerable insight was achieved on how to deal with the problem of too small uncertainties in PFNS evaluations. The importance of considering that all experimental PFNS data are “shape” data was stressed; (iv) PFNS evaluations: New evaluations, including covariance data, were generated for major actinides including 1) non-model GMA evaluations of the 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f), and 233U(nth,f) PFNS based exclusively on experimental data (0.02 ≤ E ≤ 10 MeV), which resulted in PFNS average energies E of 2.00±0.01, 2.073±0.010, and 2.030±0.013 MeV, respectively; 2) LAM evaluations of neutron-induced fission spectra on uranium and plutonium targets with improved UQ for incident energies from thermal up to 30 MeV; and 3) Point-by-Point calculations for 232Th, 234U and 237Np targets; and (v) data

  1. Quantum confinement in metal nanofilms: Optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir I.

    2016-05-01

    We report optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra of Au, Fe, Co and Ni polycrystalline nanofilms in the UV-vis-NIR range, featuring discrete bands resulting from transverse quantum confinement. The film thickness ranged from 1.1 to 15.6 nm, depending on the material. The films were deposited on fused silica substrates by sputtering/thermo-evaporation, with Fe, Co and Ni protected by a SiO2 film deposited on top. The results are interpreted within the particle-in-a-box model, with the box width equal to the mass thickness of the nanofilm. The transverse-quantized energy levels and transition energies scale as the inverse square of the film thickness. The calculated values of the effective electron mass are 0.93 (Au), 0.027 (Fe), 0.21 (Co) and 0.16 (Ni), in units of mo - the mass of the free electron, being independent on the film thickness. The uncertainties in the effective mass values are ca. 2.5%, determined by the film thickness calibration. The second calculated model parameter, the quantum number n of the HOMO, was thickness-independent in Au (5.00) and Fe (6.00), and increased with the film thickness in Co (from 7 to 9) and Ni (from 7 to 11). The transitions observed in the absorbance all start at the level n and correspond to Δn=+1, +2, +3, etc. The photoluminescence bands exhibit large Stokes shifts, shifting to higher energies with the increased excitation energy. The photoluminescence quantum yields grow linearly with the excitation energy, showing evidence of multiple exciton generation. A prototype Fe-SnO2 nanofilm photovoltaic cell demonstrated at least 90% quantum yield of photoelectrons at 77 K.

  2. AGNs with composite spectra. II. Additional data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, A. C.; Véron-Cetty, M.-P.; Véron, P.

    1999-03-01

    In a previous paper \\cite[(Véron et al. 1997)]{ver97} we presented medium resolution (3.4 Angstroms FWHM) spectroscopic observations of 15 ``transition objects'', selected for having an ambiguous location in the \\cite[Veilleux & Osterbrock (1987)]{vei87} diagnostic diagrams, and showed that most of them were in fact ``composite'', this being due to the simultaneous presence on the slit of both a Seyfert or Liner nucleus and a H Ii region. Here, we report new spectroscopic observations of 53 emission-line galaxies with a ``transition'' spectrum, bringing up to 61 the total number of observed objects in an unbiased sample of 88 ``transition objects''. Almost all of the observed galaxies have a ``composite" nature, confirming the finding that true ``transition'' spectra may not exist at all. By eliminating ``composite objects'' from the diagnostic diagrams, a clear separation between the different classes of nuclear emission-line regions (Seyfert 2s, Liners and H Ii regions) becomes apparent; by restricting the volume occupied by the different line-emitting regions in the 3-dimensional diagnostic diagrams, we are also restricting the range of possible physical parameters in these regions. There seems to be no continuity between Seyfert 2s and Liners, the two classes occupying distinct volumes in the 3-dimensional space defined by lambda 6300/Hα ii, lambda 6583/Hα , and lambda 6300/Hα . Based on observations collected at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data obtained from the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF) archive. Tables 5 and 6 are also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  3. Mutation spectra of complex environmental mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    DeMarini, D.M.

    1997-10-01

    Bioassay-directed chemical analysis of complex environmental mixtures has indicated that much of the genotoxic activity of mixtures is due to the presence of one or a few classes or chemicals within the mixture. We have extended this observation to the molecular level by using colony probe hybridization and PCR/DNA sequence analysis to determine the mutation spectra of {approximately}8,000 revertants induced by a variety of complex mixtures and their chemical fractions in TA100 and TA98 of Salmonella. For urban air, >80% of mutagenic activity was due to a base/neutral fraction that contained primarily PAHs. The mutation spectrum induced by unfractionated urban air was not significantly different from that produced by a model PAH, B(a)P. The mutation spectrum induced by organic extracts of chlorinated drinking water were similar to those produced by the chlorinated furanone MX, which accounted for {approximately}20% of the mutagenic activity of the samples. The base/neutral fraction of municipal waste incinerator emissions accounted for the primary class of mutations induced by the emissions, and a polar neutral fraction accounted for the secondary class of mutations induced by the emissions. The primary class of mutations induced by cigarette smoke condensate in TA100 (GC {yields} TA) is also the primary class of mutations in the p53 gene of lung tumors of cigarette smokers. These results confirm at the molecular level that the mutations induced by a complex mixture reflect the dominance of one or a few classes of chemicals within the mixture.

  4. FULL POLARIZATION SPECTRA OF 3C 279

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, D. C.; Lister, M. L.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Wardle, J. F. C. E-mail: mlister@physics.purdue.edu E-mail: mfa@umich.edu

    2009-05-01

    We report the results of parsec-scale, multifrequency Very Long Baseline Array observations of the core region of 3C 279 in Stokes I, linear polarization, and circular polarization. These full polarization spectra are modeled by radiative transfer simulations to constrain the magnetic field and particle properties of the parsec-scale jet in 3C 279. We find that the polarization properties of the core region, including the amount of linear polarization, the amount and sign of Faraday rotation, and the amount and sign of circular polarization can be explained by a consistent physical picture. The base of the jet, component D, is modeled as an inhomogeneous Blandford-Koenigl style conical jet dominated by a vector-ordered poloidal magnetic field along the jet axis, and we estimate its net magnetic flux. This poloidal field is responsible for the linear and circular polarization from this inhomogeneous component. Farther down the jet, the magnetic field in two homogeneous features is dominated by local shocks and a smaller fraction of vector-ordered poloidal field remains along the jet axis. This remaining poloidal field provides internal Faraday rotation which drives Faraday conversion of linear polarization into circular polarization from these components. In this picture, we find the jet to be kinetically dominated by protons with the radiating particles being dominated by electrons at an approximate fraction of {approx}>75%, still allowing the potential for a significant admixture of positrons. Based on the amounts of Faraday conversion deduced for the homogeneous components, we find a plausible range for the lower cutoff in the relativistic particle energy spectrum to be 5 {approx}< {gamma} {sub l} {approx}< 35. The physical picture described here is not unique if the observed Faraday rotation and depolarization occur in screens external to the jet; however, we find the joint explanation of linear and circular polarization observations from a single set of

  5. First Infrared Spectra of Nitrous Oxide Pentamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, M.; Oliaee, J. Norooz; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; McKellar, A. R. W.

    2012-06-01

    High resolution spectra have previously been studied for N_2O dimers (two isomers), trimers (one isomer), and tetramers (two isomers). Here, we assign two new bands to the N_2O pentamer. The bands are observed in the region of the N_2O νb{1} fundamental using a tunable laser to probe a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion. They are centered at 2233.9 and 2236.4 wn for 14N_2O, and at 2164.4 and 2166.8 wn for 15N_2O. Attribution to the pentamer is based on comparison of the observed rotational constants with theoretical ones from calculated cluster structures based on two rather different N_2O pair potentials. The first potential function is from a recent high level ab initio study. The second potential is a relatively simple empirical one, based partly on fitting to bulk properties. The likely pentamer structure is a completely unsymmetric one. It can be visualized starting with a highly symmetric oblate tetramer which is attacked by a fifth monomer, locating itself at a favorable distance and breaking the symmetry. Interestingly, analysis of the two bands yields very similar but not quite identical ground state parameters. We believe that they are due to distinct isomers having this same basic structure but differing in the orientation direction of one N_2O monomer. [1] R. Dawes, X.-G. Wang, A.W. Jasper, and T. Carrington, Jr., {J. Chem. Phys.} {133}, 134304 (2010). [2] B. Kutcha, R.D. Etters, and R. LeSar, {J. Chem. Phys.} {97}, 5662 (1992). [3] J.N. Oliaee, M. Dehghany, N. Moazzen-Ahmadi, and A.R.W. McKellar, {J. Chem. Phys.} {134}, 074310 (2011).

  6. Hardness ratios of different neutron spectra.

    PubMed

    Tommasino, L; Tripathy, S P

    2004-01-01

    Extensive data have been gathered in the past on the response of different detectors, based on the registration of neutron-induced fissions in bismuth, gold, tantalum and thorium by the spark-replica counter and the thin film breakdown counter. These detectors make it possible to exploit the excellent characteristics of the fission reactions for the measurements of high-energy neutrons. Most of the investigations have been carried out at the quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam facility at The Svedberg Laboratory-TSL of the Uppsala University in cooperation with the Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI). The responses of different fission detectors in the neutron energy range 35-180 MeV have been evaluated: a region where the predictive power of available nuclear reaction models and codes is not reliable yet. For neutron energy >200 MeV, the fission-detector responses have been derived from the data of the proton fission cross sections. By using the ratio of the responses of these detectors, a simple and accurate way to evaluate the spectrum hardness can be obtained, thus providing a tool to obtain spectral information needed for neutron dosimetry without the need to know the entire spectrum. Extensive data have been already obtained for the high-energy neutron spectrum from the CERN concrete facility. In the present paper, the measured values of the response ratios for different fissile detectors exposed at the CERN facility are compared with those calculated for the spectra from the same facility and from different altitudes in the atmosphere, respectively.

  7. Turbulence Spectra and Eddy Diffusivity over Forests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Xuhui

    1996-08-01

    The main objectives of this observational study are to examine the stability dependence of velocity and air temperature spectra and to employ the spectral quantities to establish relations for eddy diffusivity over forests. The datasets chosen for the analysis were collected above the Browns River forest and the Camp Borden forest over a wide range of stability conditions.Under neutral and unstable conditions the nondimensional dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) over the forests is lower than that from its Monin-Obukhov similarity (MOS) function for the smooth-wall surface layer. The agreement is somewhat better under stable conditions but a large scatter is evident. When the frequency is made nondimensional by the height of the stand (h) and the longitudinal velocity at this height (uh, the Kaimal spectral model for neutral air describes the observations very well. The eddy diffusivity formulation K = c 4w/ provides a promising alternative to the MOS approach, where w is the standard deviation of the vertical velocity and TKE dissipation rate. Current datasets yield a constant of 0.43 for c for sensible heat in neutral and stable air, a value very close to that for the smooth-wall surface layer. It is postulated that c is a conservative parameter for sensible heat in the unstable air, its value probably falling between 0.41 and 0.54. In the absence of data, it is possible to estimate K from measurements of the local mean wind u and air stability. As a special case, it is shown that K = 0.27(uh/uh)w under neutral stability. This relation is then used to establish a profile model for wind speed and scalar concentration in the roughness sublayer. The analysis points out that uh and h are important scaling parameters in attempts to formulate quantitative relations for turbulence over tall vegetation.

  8. Database-Driven Analyses of Astronomical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cami, Jan

    2012-03-01

    species to the fullerene species C60 and C70 [4]. Given the large number and variety of molecules detected in space, molecular infrared spectroscopy can be used to study pretty much any astrophysical environment that is not too energetic to dissociate the molecules. At the lowest energies, it is interesting to note that molecules such as CN have been used to measure the temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background (see e.g., Ref. 15). The great diagnostic potential of infrared molecular spectroscopy comes at a price though. Extracting the physical parameters from the observations requires expertise in knowing how various physical processes and instrumental characteristics play together in producing the observed spectra. In addition to the astronomical aspects, this often includes interpreting and understanding the limitations of laboratory data and quantum-chemical calculations; the study of the interaction of matter with radiation at microscopic scales (called radiative transfer, akin to ray tracing) and the effects of observing (e.g., smoothing and resampling) on the resulting spectra and possible instrumental effects (e.g., fringes). All this is not trivial. To make matters worse, observational spectra often contain many components, and might include spectral contributions stemming from very different physical conditions. Fully analyzing such observations is thus a time-consuming task that requires mastery of several techniques. And with ever-increasing rates of observational data acquisition, it seems clear that in the near future, some form of automation is required to handle the data stream. It is thus appealing to consider what part of such analyses could be done without too much human intervention. Two different aspects can be separated: the first step involves simply identifying the molecular species present in the observations. Once the molecular inventory is known, we can try to extract the physical parameters from the observed spectral properties. For both

  9. Impedance spectra of hot, dry silicate minerals and rocks: qualitative interpretation of spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huebner, J.S.; Dillenburg, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    Impedance spectroscopy helps distinguish the contributions that grain interiors and grain boundaries make to electrical resistance of silicate minerals and rocks. Olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxenes, and both natural and synthetic clinopyroxenite were measured. A network of electrical elements is presented for use in interpreting impedance spectra and conductive paths in hot or cold, wet or dry, minerals and rocks at any pressure. In dry rocks, a series network path predominates; in wet rocks, aqueous pore fluid and crystals both conduct. Finite resistance across the sample-electrode interface is evidence that electronic charge carriers are present at the surface, and presumably within, the silicate minerals and rocks measured. -from Authors

  10. [Raman spectra of YBCO superconductor with hot ultrapressing treatment].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-feng; Wei, Le-han; Cao, Xiao-wei

    2002-02-01

    Laser Raman spectra of YBCO oxide superconductor with hot ultrapressing and annealing treatment are reported. In addition to improving physical properties, the spectra data show that the processing can also perfect orthorhombie phase and enhance lattice on orientation trend as well as is good for formation of two dimension CuO2 net. The relation between structure and the superconductivity has been discussed.

  11. Representation of Complex Dynamic Spectra in Auditory Cortex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    broadband acoustic spectra, or spectral profile, the most important physical correlate of timbre (Plomp 1976). To determine how AI units represent...98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Natural spectra such as speech, music , and various natural sounds are composed of both downward and upward moving

  12. An investigation of a mathematical model for atmospheric absorption spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niple, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program that calculates absorption spectra for slant paths through the atmosphere is described. The program uses an efficient convolution technique (Romberg integration) to simulate instrument resolution effects. A brief information analysis is performed on a set of calculated spectra to illustrate how such techniques may be used to explore the quality of the information in a spectrum.

  13. Deconvolution of CPM absorption spectra: A new technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Pablo

    1990-12-01

    We have found a new technique for deconvoluting absorption spectra obtained with the constant photocurrent method on hydrogenated amorphous silicon samples. We have shown that our method is simpler and more accurate than those used until now. Finally, examples of spectra deconvolution for one sample after various thermal treatments are provided.

  14. A database of synthetic molecular spectra for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cami, J.; Markwick-Kemper, A. J.

    We present an online database of molecular template spectra for astrophysical purposes. The initial database contains over 100,000 individual template spectra for 42 molecules totalling 97 isotopomers, and we provide an interface to the calculation of more spectra tailored to users' individual needs. Normalized absorption spectra are calculated in the LTE limit and presented for a wide range of astrophysically relevant temperature and column density regimes. For the same parameters, pure emission spectra are also calculated. The template spectra can be retrieved at different instrumental resolving powers, and can be combined together with different abundances interactively. Users can request additional spectra to be calculated for other parameters, the results of which become part of the database. These template spectra will be useful for identification of molecular absorption and emission bands over a wide range of spectroscopic observations, and allow a first estimate of temperatures and column densities in the regions where the molecular bands are formed. We highlight the different applications for which we believe this database and service to be useful, and offer some examples of how the templates can be used in various astrophysical contexts, and in particular for the analyis of observations with ISO and Spitzer.

  15. ARES I-X USS Fracture Analysis Loads Spectra Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Curtis; Mackey, Alden

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the development of a set of bounding load spectra for the ARES I-X launch vehicle. These load spectra are used in the determination of the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) of the welds in the ARES I-X upper stage simulator (USS).

  16. The width of gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Magnus; Borgonovo, Luis

    2015-03-01

    The emission processes active in the highly relativistic jets of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain unknown. In this paper, we propose a new measure to describe spectra: the width of the EFE spectrum, a quantity dependent only on finding a good fit to the data. We apply this to the full sample of GRBs observed by Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Compton Gamma-ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The results from the two instruments are fully consistent. We find that the median widths of spectra from long and short GRBs are significantly different (chance probability <10-6). The width does not correlate with either duration or hardness, and this is thus a new, independent distinction between the two classes. Comparing the measured spectra with widths of spectra from fundamental emission processes - synchrotron and blackbody radiation - the results indicate that a large fraction of GRB spectra are too narrow to be explained by synchrotron radiation from a distribution of electron energies: for example, 78 per cent of long GRBs and 85 per cent of short GRBs are incompatible with the minimum width of standard slow cooling synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian distribution of electrons, with fast cooling spectra predicting even wider spectra. Photospheric emission can explain the spectra if mechanisms are invoked to give a spectrum much broader than a blackbody.

  17. Reddy Main Belt Asteroid Spectra V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, V.; Sanchez, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    This data set contains low-resolution (R 150) near-infrared (0.7-2.5 microns) spectra of 90 main belt asteroids observed with the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i. This data set archives reduced, calibrated spectra of targets of opportunity observed from 2001 to 2012.

  18. Infrared spectra of interstellar deuteronated PAHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buragohain, Mridusmita; Pathak, Amit; Sarre, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have emerged as a potential constituent of the ISM that emit strong features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.2 and 12.7 μm with weaker and blended features in the 3-20μm region. These features are proposed to arise from the vibrational relaxation of PAH molecules on absorption of background UV photons (Tielens 2008). These IR features have been observed towards almost all types of astronomical objects; say H II regions, photodissociation regions, reflection nebulae, planetary nebulae, young star forming regions, external galaxies, etc. A recent observation has proposed that interstellar PAHs are major reservoir for interstellar deuterium (D) (Peeters et al. 2004). According to the `deuterium depletion model' as suggested by Draine (2006), some of the Ds formed in the big bang are depleted in PAHs, which can account for the present value of D/H in the ISM. Hence, study of deuterated PAHs (PADs) is essential in order to measure D/H in the ISM.In this work, we consider another probable category of the large PAH family, i.e. Deuteronated PAHs (DPAH+). Onaka et al. have proposed a D/H ratio which is an order of magnitude smaller than the proposed value of D/H by Draine suggesting that if Ds are depleted in PAHs, they might be accommodated in large PAHs (Onaka et al. 2014). This work reports a `Density Functional Theory' calculation of large deuteronated PAHs (coronene, ovalene, circumcoronene and circumcircumcoronene) to determine the expected region of emission features and to find a D/H ratio that is comparable to the observational results. We present a detailed analysis of the IR spectra of these molecules and discuss the possible astrophysical implications.ReferencesDraine B. T. 2006, in ASP Conf. Ser. 348, Proc. Astrophysics in the Far Ultraviolet: Five Years of Discovery with FUSE, ed. G. Sonneborn, H. Moos, B-G Andersson (San Francisco, CA:ASP) 58Onaka T., Mori T. I., Sakon I., Ohsawa R., Kaneda H., Okada Y., Tanaka M

  19. Experimental Investigation on Terahertz Spectra of Amphetamine Type Stimulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jin-Hai; Shen, Jing-Ling; Liang, Lai-Shun; Xu, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Cun-Lin

    2005-12-01

    The spectral absorption features of three amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) belonging to illicit drugs have been studied with terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and the characteristic absorption spectra (fingerprint spectra) are obtained in the range from 0.2 to 2.5 THz. Fingerprint spectra of illicit drugs in terahertz band are bases to detect and to inspect nondestructively illicit drugs with terahertz technique. With fingerprint spectra of illicit drugs and strong penetrability for cloths, paper bags and leathered or plastic luggage terahertz technique would be better than other techniques in illicit drugs detection and inspection. Thus, this work would contribute to the building of corresponding fingerprint spectra database of illicit drugs and provide experimental bases for using of terahertz detection apparatus in drugs nondestructive detection and inspection in the future.

  20. Statistical Methods for Characterizing Variability in Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisewski, Jessi; Yale Astrostatistics

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have seen a proliferation in the number of exoplanets discovered. One technique for uncovering exoplanets relies on the detection of subtle shifts in the stellar spectra due to the Doppler effect caused by an orbiting object. However, stellar activity can cause distortions in the spectra that mimic the imprint of an orbiting exoplanet. The collection of stellar spectra potentially contains more information than is traditionally used for estimating its radial velocity curve. I will discuss some statistical methods that can be used for characterizing the sources of variability in the spectra. Statistical assessment of stellar spectra is a focus of the Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute (SAMSI)'s yearlong program on Statistical, Mathematical and Computational Methods for Astronomy's Working Group IV (Astrophysical Populations).

  1. Constraining Galaxy Evolution Using Observed UV-Optical Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally

    2007-01-01

    Our understanding of galaxy evolution depends on model spectra of stellar populations, and the models are only as good as the observed spectra and stellar parameters that go into them. We are therefore evaluating modem UV-optical model spectra using Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) as the reference standard. The NGSL comprises intermediate-resolution (R is approximately 1000) STIS spectra of 378 stars having a wide range in metallicity and age. Unique features of the NGSL include its broad wavelength coverage (1,800-10,100 A) and high-S/N, absolute spectrophotometry. We will report on a systematic comparison of model and observed UV-blue spectra, describe where on the HR diagram significant differences occur, and comment on current approaches to correct the models for these differences.

  2. Vibrational spectra, tautomerism and thermodynamics of anticarcinogenic drug: 5-Fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, V. K.; Palafox, M. Alcolea

    2011-09-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 5-Fluorouracil were recorded in the solid phase in the regions 400-4000 cm -1 and 50-4000 cm -1, respectively. The vibrational spectra were analysed and the observed fundamentals were assigned to different normal modes of vibration. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the scaled vibrational values using DFT methods: the Ar matrix data were related to gas phase calculations, while the values of the solid state spectra were compared to those with dimer simulations. The study indicates that some features that are characteristic of vibrational spectra of uracil and its derivatives are retained in the spectrum of 5-fluorouracil and it exists in ketonic form in the solid phase. The tautomerism was also studied and the spectra of the two most stable forms were simulated. The calculated wavenumbers have been employed to yield thermodynamic properties.

  3. Fundamental spectra of optical functions of ferroelectric sodium nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, V. V. Kalugin, A. I.; Sobolev, V. Val.; Iskhakova, S. G.

    2008-07-15

    Spectra of optical fundamental functions of ferroelectric sodium nitrite were determined in the range 4-24 eV at 77 K for the three polarizations: E -parallel a, E -parallel b, and E -parallel c. The calculations were based on the experimental R(E) reflection spectra and integral Kramers-Kronig relations. Using the method of Argand diagrams, the permittivity and bulk characteristic electron loss spectra were decomposed into the elementary transverse and longitudinal components. Their main parameters were determined. The obtained data were compared with the theoretical calculations of the permittivity spectra performed using the FPLAPW method. The main features of the permittivity spectra, the parameters of the transitions, and their theoretical nature were established.

  4. Recovery of fluctuation spectrum evolution from tomographic shear spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Bonometto, Silvio A.; Mezzetti, Marino E-mail: mezzetti@oats.inaf.it

    2013-05-01

    Forthcoming large angle surveys are planned to obtain high precision tomographic shear data. In principle, they will allow us to recover the spectra of matter density fluctuation, at various redshift, through the inversion of the expressions yielding shear spectra from fluctuation spectra. This was discussed in previous work, where SVD techniques for matrix inversion were also shown to be the optimal tool to this aim. Here we show the significant improvements obtainable by using a 7 bin tomography, as allowed by future Euclid data, and discuss error propagation from shear to fluctuation spectra. We find that the technique is a promising tool, namely for the analysis of baryon physics through high–l shear spectra and to test the consistency between expansion rate and fluctuation growth.

  5. New low-resolution spectrometer spectra for IRAS sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Kevin; Kwok, Sun; Stencel, R. E.; Brugel, E.

    1991-01-01

    Low-resolution spectra of 486 IRAS point sources with F sub nu(12 microns) in the range 20-40 Jy are presented. This is part of an effort to extract and classify spectra that were not included in the Atlas of Low-Resolution Spectra and represents an extension of the earlier work by Volk and Cohen which covers sources with F sub nu(12 microns) greater than 40 Jy. The spectra have been examined by eye and classified into nine groups based on the spectral morphology. This new classification scheme is compared with the mechanical classification of the Atlas, and the differences are noted. Oxygen-rich stars of the asymptotic giant branch make up 33 percent of the sample. Solid state features dominate the spectra of most sources. It is found that the nature of the sources as implied by the present spectral classification is consistent with the classifications based on broad-band colors of the sources.

  6. EFFECTS OF FORSTERITE GRAIN SHAPE ON INFRARED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, C.; Imai, Y.; Chihara, H.; Murata, K.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Suto, H.; Tachibana, S.; Ohara, S.

    2010-02-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) detected several sharp infrared features around young stars, comets, and evolved stars. These sharp features were identified as Mg-rich crystalline silicates of forsterite and enstatite by comparison with spectra from laboratory data. However, certain infrared emission bands in the observed spectra cannot be identified because they appear at slightly shorter wavelengths than the peaks in forsterite laboratory spectra, where the shapes of forsterite particles are irregular. To solve this problem, we measured infrared spectra of forsterite grains of various shapes (irregular, plate-like with no sharp edges, elliptical, cauliflower, and spherical) in the infrared spectral region between 5 and 100 mum. The spectra depend on particle shape. The spectra of the 11, 19, 23, and 33 mum bands, in particular, are extremely sensitive to particle shape, whereas some peaks such as the 11.9, 49, and 69 mum bands remained almost unchanged despite different particle shapes. This becomes most evident from the spectra of near-spherical particles produced by annealing an originally amorphous silicate sample at temperature from 600 to 1150 deg. C. The spectra of these samples differ strongly from those of other ones, showing peaks at much shorter wavelengths. At a higher annealing temperature of 1200 deg. C, the particle shapes changed drastically from spherical to irregular and the spectra became similar to those of forsterite particles with irregular shapes. Based on ISO data and other observational data, the spectra of outflow sources and disk sources may correspond to differences in forsterite shape, and further some unidentified peaks, such as those at 32.8 or 32.5 mum, may be due to spherical or spherical-like forsterite.

  7. Quadrupolar Echo Spectra of the Tunneling CD 3Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejniczak, Z.; Detken, A.; Manz, B.; Haeberlen, U.

    Deuteron NMR spectra of both single crystal and powder samples of acetylsalicylic acid-CD 3were measured using the quadrupolar-echo technique. The experiments were done in the temperature range 17-100 K, with a special emphasis on the range 20- 30 K, in which the observable tunneling frequency decreases rapidly from its low-temperature value of 2.7 down to 1.2 MHz. In the tunneling regime, modulations of the line intensities and phases as a function of the echo time τ are observed in the single-crystal spectra. The modulation frequency is equal to the orientation-dependent displacement of the inner satellite pairs (α lines) from the Larmor frequency. These effects were confirmed in numerical simulations and fully explain the phase-modulation effects observed previously in quadrupolar-echo spectra of methyl-deuterated methanol and para-xylene guest molecules in some inclusion compounds. By measuring the temperature and orientation dependence of the quadrupolar lineshapes, it was found that the echo spectra are more sensitive to the value of the tunneling frequency than the spectra obtained from the free induction decay. It is pointed out that, because of the modulation effects, special care must be taken when structural parameters are to be extracted from quadrupolar-echo spectra, in particular from spectra of powder samples.

  8. THE Be STAR SPECTRA (BeSS) DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Neiner, C.; De Batz, B.; Cochard, F.; Floquet, M.; Mekkas, A.; Desnoux, V.

    2011-11-15

    Be stars vary on many timescales, from hours to decades. A long time base of observations to analyze certain phenomena in these stars is therefore necessary. Collecting all existing and future Be star spectra into one database has thus emerged as an important tool for the Be star community. Moreover, for statistical studies, it is useful to have centralized information on all known Be stars via an up-to-date catalog. These two goals are what the Be Star Spectra (BeSS, http://basebe.obspm.fr) database proposes to achieve. The database contains an as-complete-as-possible catalog of known Be stars with stellar parameters, as well as spectra of Be stars from all origins (any wavelength, any epoch, any resolution, etc.). It currently contains over 54,000 spectra of more than 600 different Be stars among the {approx}2000 Be stars in the catalog. A user can access and query this database to retrieve information on Be stars or spectra. Registered members can also upload spectra to enrich the database. Spectra obtained by professional as well as amateur astronomers are individually validated in terms of format and science before being included in BeSS. In this paper, we present the database itself as well as examples of the use of BeSS data in terms of statistics and the study of individual stars.

  9. NIR Spectra of Type Ia Supernovae: High-Cadence Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, Howie H.; Hsiao, E.; Vinko, J.; Parrent, J. T.; Silverman, J. M.; Kirshner, R. P.; Phillips, M.; Wheeler, J. C.; Burns, C. R.; Morrell, N.; Contreras, C.; Challis, P.; Supernova Project, Carnegie, II; CfA Supernova Group

    2014-01-01

    New observing resources and coordinated scheduling make it possible to obtain sequences of NIR spectra from individual supernovae on a regular basis. In the past three years the Carnegie Supernova Project II and the CfA Supernova Group have obtained 350 NIR spectra of 78 supernovae. Here we describe eight series of NIR spectra from Type Ia supernovae for which there are ten or more observations with 4 or more of the spectra obtained before Mg II becomes undetectable at about six days post-maximum. NIR spectra are particularly useful for tracing the burning history of the outer layers in SN Ia and the presence of Mg II defines the limit of the carbon burning region. Recent analysis suggests that all significant absorption features in spectra of SN Ia are blends of two or more lines. Data sets with higher spectral cadence are more successful at breaking line-identification degeneracies and consequently provide more accurate information about line profiles and velocity measurements. Three of the eight spectral series in this sample include more than 20 observations and in two cases, there are 12 spectra between -12d and +6d with respect to B-max. The eight SN Ia vary from -18.0 to -19.5 in absolute magnitude and we explore the differences between the supernovae in the timing and strength of spectral features. We make qualitative comparisons of these results to theoretical models for the chemical distribution of materials in SN Ia.

  10. LET spectra measurements from the STS-35 CPDs

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    Linear energy transfer (LET) spectra derived form automated track analysis system (ATAS) track parameter measurements for crew passive dosimeters (CPD`s) flown with the astronauts on STS-35 are plotted. The spread between the seven individual spectra is typical of past manual measurements of sets of CPD`s. This difference is probably due to the cumulative net shielding variations experienced by the CPD`s as the astronauts carrying them went about their activities on the Space Shuttle. The STS-35 mission was launched on Dec. 2, 1990, at 28.5 degrees inclination and 352-km altitude. This is somewhat higher than the nominal 300-km flights and the orbit intersects more of the high intensity trapped proton region in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). However, in comparison with APD spectra measured on earlier lower altitude missions (STS-26, -29, -30, -32), the flux spectra are all roughly comparable. This may be due to the fact that the STS-35 mission took place close to solar maximum (Feb. 1990), or perhaps to shielding differences. The corresponding dose and dose equivalent spectra for this mission are shown. The effect of statistical fluctuations at the higher LET values, where track densities are small, is very noticeable. This results in an increased spread within the dose rate and dose equivalent rate spectra, as compared to the flux spectra. The contribution to dose and dose equivalent per measured track is much greater in the high LET region and the differences, though numerically small, are heavily weighted in the integral spectra. The optimum measurement and characterization of the high LET tails of the spectra represent an important part of the research into plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) response. The integral flux, dose rate, dose equivalent rate and mission dose equivalent for the seven astronauts are also given.

  11. Atomistic modeling of IR action spectra under circularly polarized electromagnetic fields: toward action VCD spectra.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Florent

    2015-03-01

    The nonlinear response and dissociation propensity of an isolated chiral molecule, camphor, to a circularly polarized infrared laser pulse was simulated by molecular dynamics as a function of the excitation wavelength. The results indicate similarities with linear absorption spectra, but also differences that are ascribable to dynamical anharmonic effects. Comparing the responses between left- and right-circularly polarized pulses in terms of dissociation probabilities, or equivalently between R- and S-camphor to a similarly polarized pulse, we find significant differences for the fingerprint C = O amide mode, with a sensitivity that could be sufficient to possibly enable vibrational circular dichroism as an action technique for probing molecular chirality and absolute conformations in the gas phase.

  12. Pulsar gamma-rays: Spectra luminosities and efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The general characteristics of pulsar gamma ray spectra are presented for a model where the gamma rays are produced by curvature radiation from energetic particles above the polar cap and attenuated by pair production. The shape of the spectrum is found to depend on pulsar period, magnetic field strength, and primary particle energy. By a comparison of numerically calculated spectra with the observed spectra of the Crab and Vela pulsars, it is determined that primary particles must be accelerated to energies of about 3 x 10 to the 7th power mc sq. A genaral formula for pulsar gamma ray luminosity is determined and is found to depend on period and field strength.

  13. Spectra of Husimi cacti: exact results and applications.

    PubMed

    Galiceanu, Mircea; Blumen, Alexander

    2007-10-07

    Starting from exact relations for finite Husimi cacti we determine their complete spectra to very high accuracy. The Husimi cacti are dual structures to the dendrimers but, distinct from these, contain loops. Our solution makes use of a judicious analysis of the normal modes. Although close to those of dendrimers, the spectra of Husimi cacti differ. From the wealth of applications for measurable quantities which depend only on the spectra, we display for Husimi cacti the behavior of the fluorescence depolarization under quasiresonant Forster energy transfer.

  14. Spectra of Husimi cacti: Exact results and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiceanu, Mircea; Blumen, Alexander

    2007-10-01

    Starting from exact relations for finite Husimi cacti we determine their complete spectra to very high accuracy. The Husimi cacti are dual structures to the dendrimers but, distinct from these, contain loops. Our solution makes use of a judicious analysis of the normal modes. Although close to those of dendrimers, the spectra of Husimi cacti differ. From the wealth of applications for measurable quantities which depend only on the spectra, we display for Husimi cacti the behavior of the fluorescence depolarization under quasiresonant Förster energy transfer.

  15. The analysis of spectra of novae taken near maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stryker, L. L.; Hestand, J.; Starrfield, S.; Wehrse, R.; Hauschildt, P.; Spies, W.; Baschek, B.; Shaviv, G.

    1988-01-01

    A project to analyze ultraviolet spectra of novae obtained at or near maximum optical light is presented. These spectra are characterized by a relatively cool continuum with superimposed permitted emission lines from ions such as Fe II, Mg II, and Si II. Spectra obtained late in the outburst show only emission lines from highly ionized species and in many cases these are forbidden lines. The ultraviolet data will be used with calculations of spherical, expanding, stellar atmospheres for novae to determine elemental abundances by spectral line synthesis. This method is extremely sensitive to the abundances and completely independent of the nebular analyses usually used to obtain novae abundances.

  16. Vibronic analysis of NLO spectra of PDA crystals and films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Debasis; Soos, Zoltan G.

    1995-09-01

    A joint analysis of recent NLO spectra of polydiacetylene films and crystals is presented, using vibronic contributions in the Condon approximation and (pi) -electronic states from Pariser-Parr-Pople theory. Raman resonances are shown to be corrections to average excitations. An even-parity state above the photoconduction edge is found in two-photon absorption of PDA-PTS crystals and nondegenerate four-wave-mixing spectra of PDA- 4BCMU films. We incorporate linear and resonance Raman spectra in the joint NLO analysis and emphasize the different roles of electronic and vibrational contributions.

  17. Computer Processing Of Tunable-Diode-Laser Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.

    1991-01-01

    Tunable-diode-laser spectrometer measuring transmission spectrum of gas operates under control of computer, which also processes measurement data. Measurements in three channels processed into spectra. Computer controls current supplied to tunable diode laser, stepping it through small increments of wavelength while processing spectral measurements at each step. Program includes library of routines for general manipulation and plotting of spectra, least-squares fitting of direct-transmission and harmonic-absorption spectra, and deconvolution for determination of laser linewidth and for removal of instrumental broadening of spectral lines.

  18. Primary Cosmic-Ray Spectra in the Knee Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter-Antonyan, Samvel V.; Biermann, P. L.

    2003-07-01

    Using EAS inverse approach and KASCADE EAS data the primary energy spectra for different primary nuclei at energies 1015 - 1017 eV are obtained in the framework of multi-comp onent model of primary cosmic ray origin and QGSJET and SIBYLL interaction models. The rigidity-dep endent behavior of spectra is the same for two interaction models. The extrap olation of the obtained primary spectra in a 1017 - 1018 eV energy range displays a presence of the extragalactic component of primary cosmic rays.

  19. Study on Properties of Energy Spectra of the Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    The energy-spectra of nonlinear vibration of molecular crystals such as acetanilide have been calculated by using discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation appropriate to the systems, containing various interactions. The energy levels including higher excited states are basically consistent with experimental values obtained by infrared absorption and Raman scattering in acetanilide. We further give the features of distribution of the energy-spectra for the acetanilide. Using the energy spectra we also explained well experimental results obtained by Careri et al..

  20. Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, H.; Cartwright, D. C.; Trajmar, S.

    1979-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine, for energy losses from 0 to 17.0 eV, have been taken at incident electron energies of 30, 50, and 90 eV and scattering angles from 5 to 140 deg. Features in the spectra above 11.5 eV energy loss agree well with the assignments recently made from optical spectroscopy. Excitations of many of the eleven repulsive valence excited electronic states are observed and their location correlates reasonably well with recent theoretical results. Several of these excitations have been observed for the first time and four features, for which there are no identifications, appear in the spectra.

  1. X-ray spectra from three cosmic sources.

    PubMed

    Grader, R J; Hill, R W; Seward, F D; Toor, A

    1966-06-10

    Three cosmic x-ray sources have been observed from a water-launched rocket carrying two x-ray detectors to an altitude of 200 kilometers. The x-ray spectra, measured in the photon energy range between I and 40 kiloelectron volts, are all different. The sources in order of hardness of spectra are Cyg XR-1, Tau XR-1, and Sco XR-1. The intensity of Sco XR-J decreased at low photon energies. The differences in spectra might source mechanisms.

  2. Small-world network spectra in mean-field theory.

    PubMed

    Grabow, Carsten; Grosskinsky, Stefan; Timme, Marc

    2012-05-25

    Collective dynamics on small-world networks emerge in a broad range of systems with their spectra characterizing fundamental asymptotic features. Here we derive analytic mean-field predictions for the spectra of small-world models that systematically interpolate between regular and random topologies by varying their randomness. These theoretical predictions agree well with the actual spectra (obtained by numerical diagonalization) for undirected and directed networks and from fully regular to strongly random topologies. These results may provide analytical insights to empirically found features of dynamics on small-world networks from various research fields, including biology, physics, engineering, and social science.

  3. Anomalous Raman spectra from La2CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Gerald; Dacol, F. H.

    1990-03-01

    We show that some published Raman spectra from the superconductors (La2-xSrx)CuO4 and La2NiO4 are incorrect. We believe that these spectra were obtained when the samples were ``burnt'' by the focused laser beam and were actually due to La2O3. Similar anomalous results can be obtained when starting with Nd2CuO4 where the spectra come from Nd2O3. A spectrum distinctly different from those of La2O3 or Nd2O3 is obtained from Y2O3.

  4. Stretched-exponential Doppler spectra in underwater acoustic communication channels.

    PubMed

    van Walree, P A; Jenserud, T; Otnes, R

    2010-11-01

    The theory of underwater sound interacting with the sea surface predicts a Gaussian-spread frequency spectrum in the case of a large Rayleigh parameter. However, recent channel soundings reveal more sharply peaked spectra with heavier tails. The measured Doppler spread increases with the frequency and differs between multipath arrivals. The overall Doppler spectrum of a broadband waveform is the sum of the spectra of all constituent paths and frequencies, and is phenomenologically described by a stretched or compressed exponential. The stretched exponential also fits well to the broadband spectrum of a single propagation path, and narrowband spectra summed over all paths.

  5. Communication: Nonadditive dielectric susceptibility spectra of associating liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierwirth, S. P.; Münzner, P.; Knapp, T. A.; Gainaru, C.; Böhmer, R.

    2017-03-01

    Highly unusual linear-response spectra involving contributions from hydrogen-bonded supramolecular processes and from structural relaxations are found in 4-methyl-3-heptanol mixed with 2-ethyl-1-hexylbromide. Although the mean time scales of the underlying relaxations are separated by more than 3 decades, the overall spectra cannot be decomposed into a sum of these processes. This finding challenges the ubiquitous practice of disentangling susceptibility spectra of Debye liquids by adding suitable subspectra. The spectral shape of the studied viscous mixtures is excellently described using the Williams ansatz, here a necessary approach and not as previously considered merely an alternative to additive analyses.

  6. SANS spectra of the fractal supernucleosomal chromatin structure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilatovskiy, Andrey V.; Lebedev, Dmitry V.; Filatov, Michael V.; Petukhov, Michael G.; Isaev-Ivanov, Vladimir V.

    2012-03-01

    The eukaryotic genome consists of chromatin—a nucleoprotein complex with hierarchical architecture based on nucleosomes, the organization of higher-order chromatin structures still remains unknown. Available experimental data, including SANS spectra we had obtained for whole nuclei, suggested fractal nature of chromatin. Previously we had built random-walk supernucleosomal models (up to 106 nucleosomes) to interpret our SANS spectra. Here we report a new method to build fractal supernucleosomal structure of a given fractal dimension or two different dimensions. Agreement between calculated and experimental SANS spectra was significantly improved, especially for model with two fractal dimensions—3 and 2.

  7. NMR Structural Studies of Antimicrobial Peptides: LPcin Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji-Ho; Kim, Ji-Sun; Choi, Sung-Sub; Kim, Yongae

    2016-01-01

    Lactophoricin (LPcin), a component of proteose peptone (113–135) isolated from bovine milk, is a cationic amphipathic antimicrobial peptide consisting of 23 amino acids. We designed a series of N- or C-terminal truncated variants, mutated analogs, and truncated mutated analogs using peptide-engineering techniques. Then, we selected three LPcin analogs of LPcin-C8 (LPcin-YK1), LPcin-T2WT6W (LPcin-YK2), and LPcin-T2WT6W-C8 (LPcin-YK3), which may have better antimicrobial activities than LPcin, and successfully expressed them in E. coli with high yield. We elucidated the 3D structures and topologies of the three LPcin analogs in membrane environments by conducting NMR structural studies. We investigated the purity of the LPcin analogs and the α-helical secondary structures by performing 1H-15N 2D HSQC and HMQC-NOESY liquid-state NMR spectroscopy using protein-containing micelle samples. We measured the 3D structures and tilt angles in membranes by conducting 15N 1D and 2D 1H-15N SAMMY type solid-state NMR spectroscopy with an 800 MHz in-house-built 1H-15N double-resonance solid-state NMR probe with a strip-shield coil, using protein-containing large bicelle samples aligned and confirmed by molecular-dynamics simulations. The three LPcin analogs were found to be curved α-helical structures, with tilt angles of 55–75° for normal membrane bilayers, and their enhanced activities may be correlated with these topologies. PMID:26789765

  8. Competitive formation of DNA linkage isomers by a trinuclear platinum complex and the influence of pre-association.

    PubMed

    Moniodis, Joseph J; Thomas, Donald S; Davies, Murray S; Berners-Price, Susan J; Farrell, Nicholas P

    2015-02-28

    2D [(1)H, (15)N] HSQC NMR spectroscopy has been used to monitor the reaction of fully (15)N-labelled [{trans-PtCl(NH3)2}2(μ-trans-Pt(NH3)2{NH2(CH2)6NH2}2)](4+) (BBR3464 ((15)N-1)) with the 14-mer duplex (5'-{d(ATACATG(7)G(8)TACATA)}-3'·5'-{d(TATG(18)TACCATG(25)TAT)}-3' or I) at pH 5.4 and 298 K, to examine the possible formation of 1,4 and 1,5-GG adducts in both 5'-5' and 3'-3' directions. In a previous study, the binding of the dinuclear 1,1/t,t to I showed specific formation of the 5'-5' 1,4 G(8)G(18) cross-link, whereas in this case a mixture of adducts were formed. Initial (1)H NMR spectra suggested the presence of two pre-associated states aligned in both directions along the DNA. The pre-association was studied in the absence of covalent binding, by use of the "non-covalent" analog [{trans-Pt(NH3)3}2(μ-trans-Pt(NH3)2{NH2(CH2)6NH2}2)](6+) (AH44, 0). Chemical shift changes of DNA protons combined with NOE connectivities between CH2 and NH3 protons of 0 and the adenine H2 protons on I show that two different molecules of 0 are bound in the minor groove. Molecular dynamic simulations were performed to study the interaction of 0 at the two pre-association sites using charges derived from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Structures where the central platinum is located in the minor groove and the aliphatic linkers extend into the major groove, in opposite directions, often represent the lowest energy structures of the snapshots selected. In the reaction of (15)N-1 and I, following the pre-association step, aquation occurs to give the mono aqua monochloro species 2, with a rate constant of 3.43 ± 0.03 × 10(-5) s(-1). There was evidence for two monofunctional adducts (3, 4) bound to the 3' (G8) and 5' (G7) residues and the asymmetry of the (1)H,(15)N peak for 3 suggested two conformers of the 3' adduct, aligned in different directions along the DNA. The rate constant for combined monofunctional adduct formation (0.6 ± 0.1 M(-1)) is ca. 2-fold lower

  9. Structural Analysis of Dusty Plasma Formations Based on Spatial Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Khakhaev, A. D.; Luizova, L. A.; Piskunov, A. A.; Podryadchikov, S. F.; Soloviev, A. V.

    2008-09-07

    Some advantages of studying the structure of dusty plasma formations using spatial spectra are illustrated by simulated experiments and by processing actual images of dusty structures in dc glow discharge in inert and molecular gases.

  10. Microwave spectra of some chlorine and fluorine compounds. [spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequencies, peak absorption intensities, and integrated intensities are shown for 21 organic compounds which contain chlorine, fluorine, or both.

  11. Wind-induced vibrations of structures using design spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Vazquez, P.

    2016-12-01

    This paper discusses the estimation of wind dynamic response of two types of structures by following classical and novel approaches. A new method for structural analysis based on wind design spectra is introduced and tested against simulated and experimental data. Design spectra are derived from the dynamic response of a group of oscillators subject to wind, using similar techniques than those used to derive design spectra for seismic engineering applications. The method is used on three chimneys of different height as well as on a regular building which has been experimentally tested in the past. The chimneys and building are also submitted to simulated wind fields to provide additional sets of results. It is observed that the spectral approach is consistent with experimental and simulated results and therefore is concluded that design spectra can cover broad range of practical applications.

  12. Exploiting Low-Dimensional Structure in Astronomical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Joseph W.; Freeman, Peter E.; Lee, Ann B.; Schafer, Chad M.

    2009-01-01

    Dimension-reduction techniques can greatly improve statistical inference in astronomy. A standard approach is to use Principal Components Analysis (PCA). In this work, we apply a recently developed technique, diffusion maps, to astronomical spectra for data parameterization and dimensionality reduction, and develop a robust, eigenmode-based framework for regression. We show how our framework provides a computationally efficient means by which to predict redshifts of galaxies, and thus could inform more expensive redshift estimators such as template cross-correlation. It also provides a natural means by which to identify outliers (e.g., misclassified spectra, spectra with anomalous features). We analyze 3835 Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra and show how our framework yields a more than 95% reduction in dimensionality. Finally, we show that the prediction error of the diffusion-map-based regression approach is markedly smaller than that of a similar approach based on PCA, clearly demonstrating the superiority of diffusion maps over PCA for this regression task.

  13. CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR SPECTRA WITH LOCAL LINEAR EMBEDDING

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Scott F.; Connolly, Andrew; Vanderplas, Jake; Schneider, Jeff; Xiong Liang

    2011-12-15

    We investigate the use of dimensionality reduction techniques for the classification of stellar spectra selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using local linear embedding (LLE), a technique that preserves the local (and possibly nonlinear) structure within high-dimensional data sets, we show that the majority of stellar spectra can be represented as a one-dimensional sequence within a three-dimensional space. The position along this sequence is highly correlated with spectral temperature. Deviations from this 'stellar locus' are indicative of spectra with strong emission lines (including misclassified galaxies) or broad absorption lines (e.g., carbon stars). Based on this analysis, we propose a hierarchical classification scheme using LLE that progressively identifies and classifies stellar spectra in a manner that requires no feature extraction and that can reproduce the classic MK classifications to an accuracy of one type.

  14. Detection of Ordered and Chaotic Motion using the Dynamical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voglis, N.; Contopoulos, G.; Efthymiopoulos, C.

    The dynamical spectra of stretching numbers, helicity, twist, and rotation angles can be used in developing efficient methods for distinguishing between ordered and chaotic motion in dynamical systems. A fast and detailed investigation of phase-space in 2 or 3 degrees of freedom can be obtained by the above methods. In 2 degrees of freedom a combined use of moments of angular dynamical spectra (of the twist and the rotation angles) can determine the main frequencies of an orbit, and detect rotational tori, thin chaotic layers, islands and cantori. In 3 degrees of freedom dynamical spectra can detect chaotic orbits with even extremely small Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers (e.g. 10^(-7)). The method is based on the fact that the dynamical spectra are invariant with respect to the initial orientation of the deviation vector for chaotic orbits, while they are not invariant for ordered orbits.

  15. Sparticle spectra from Large-Volume String Compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Joseph P.

    2007-11-20

    Large-volume models are a promising approach to stabilising moduli and generating the weak hierarchy through TeV-supersymmetry. I describe the pattern of sparticle mass spectra that arises in these models.

  16. Computed survey spectra of 2-5 micron atmospheric absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, D. H.; Lebow, P. S.

    1983-08-01

    Computed high resolution survey spectra of atmospheric absorption coefficient vs wavenumber are presented covering the wavelength region 2-5 micrometers. The 1980 AFGL atmospheric absorption parameter compilation was employed with a mid-latitude, sea-level atmospheric model.

  17. Infrared spectra of jennite and tobermorite from first-principles

    SciTech Connect

    Vidmer, Alexandre Sclauzero, Gabriele; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2014-06-01

    The infrared absorption spectra of jennite, tobermorite 14 Å, anomalous tobermorite 11 Å, and normal tobermorite 11 Å are simulated within a density-functional-theory scheme. The atomic coordinates and the cell parameters are optimized resulting in structures which agree with previous studies. The vibrational frequencies and modes are obtained for each mineral. The vibrational density of states is analyzed through extensive projections on silicon tetrahedra, oxygen atoms, OH groups, and water molecules. The coupling with the electric field is achieved through the use of density functional perturbation theory, which yields Born effective charges and dielectric constants. The simulated absorption spectra reproduce well the experimental spectra, thereby allowing for a detailed interpretation of the spectral features in terms of the underlying vibrational modes. In the far-infrared part of the absorption spectra, the interplay between Ca and Si related vibrations leads to differences which are sensitive to the calcium/silicon ratio of the mineral.

  18. Frequency spectra of short-period variations of cosmic ray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonova, V. P.; Zusmanovich, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    Frequency spectra for different periods of solar activity were calculated by 5-minutes data of a neutron super-monitor, (altitude 3340 m, cutoff rigidity is 6, 7 GV, counting rate is about 4.5.10 per hour). It was shown that shifting of the spectrum power from low-frequency range to high-frequency range takes place from minimum to maximum of the solar activity. It was reliably distinguished the peak with 160-minutes period coincided with the period of the Sun's atmosphere oscillation and some types of geomagnetic pulsation by the method of accumulation of the frequency spectra. It was conducted the comparison of cosmic ray spectra with spectra of geomagnetic field for the same point of the registration and at the same period.

  19. Online Spectral Fit Tool for Analyzing Reflectance Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, A.; Kohout, T.

    2015-11-01

    The Online Spectral Fit Tool is developed for analyzing Vis-NIR spectral behavior of asteroids and meteorites. Implementation is done using JavaScript/HTML. Fitted spectra consist of spline continuum and gamma distributions for absorption bands.

  20. Infrared transmission spectra of Sea of Fertility regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akhmanova, M. V.; Karyakin, A. V.; Tartasov, L. S.

    1974-01-01

    Transmission spectra in the 2-25 micrometer region were obtained for samples of lunar regolith returned by the Luna 16 automatic station. A comparison of the Luna 16, Apollo 11, and Apollo 12 samples showed that the infrared transmission spectra of regolith samples from the mare regions are similar and characteristic of basic basaltic rocks. The absorption bands show up in the vibration region of the SiO4 groups. No water and OH groups were found in the samples based on the spectrum. Spectra of regolith samples calcined at 1000C showed changes that can be interpreted as changes in the spectra of irradiated crystals (especially distinctly for the Luna 16 samples).

  1. Isosbestics in Infrared Aerosol Spectra: Proposed Applications for Remote Sensing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    droplet solutions and chemical reactions if the complex indices of refraction are known. The technique seems most applicable in the Rayleigh regime. Remote ... sensing , Isosbestics, Infrared, Infrared spectra, Atmosphere, Water, Aerosols, Rayleigh regime.

  2. Solvent effect on the vibrational spectra of Carvedilol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Pataki, Hajnalka; Unsalan, Ozan; Mikosch, Hans; Vajna, Balázs; Marosi, György

    2012-09-01

    Carvedilol (CRV) is an important medicament for heart arrhythmia. The aim of this work was the interpretation of its vibrational spectra with consideration on the solvent effect. Infrared and Raman spectra were recorded in solid state as well in solution. The experimental spectra were evaluated using DFT quantum chemical calculations computing the optimized structure, atomic net charges, vibrational frequencies and force constants. The same calculations were done for the molecule in DMSO and aqueous solutions applying the PCM method. The calculated force constants were scaled to the experimentally observed solid state frequencies. The characters of the vibrational modes were determined by their potential energy distributions. Solvent effects on the molecular properties were interpreted. Based on these results vibrational spectra were simulated.

  3. Solvent effect on the vibrational spectra of Carvedilol.

    PubMed

    Billes, Ferenc; Pataki, Hajnalka; Unsalan, Ozan; Mikosch, Hans; Vajna, Balázs; Marosi, György

    2012-09-01

    Carvedilol (CRV) is an important medicament for heart arrhythmia. The aim of this work was the interpretation of its vibrational spectra with consideration on the solvent effect. Infrared and Raman spectra were recorded in solid state as well in solution. The experimental spectra were evaluated using DFT quantum chemical calculations computing the optimized structure, atomic net charges, vibrational frequencies and force constants. The same calculations were done for the molecule in DMSO and aqueous solutions applying the PCM method. The calculated force constants were scaled to the experimentally observed solid state frequencies. The characters of the vibrational modes were determined by their potential energy distributions. Solvent effects on the molecular properties were interpreted. Based on these results vibrational spectra were simulated.

  4. Computer-assisted infrared spectra interpretation for amorphous silicon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavak, Hamide; Esen, Ramazan

    2005-12-01

    A computer program for the structural interpretation of the infrared (IR) spectra is developed and tested. The interpretation of the IR spectra is made by using an hybrid system which includes library search and rule-based interpretation methods together. The computer programs were written in Pascal Codes. The prototype IR library of silicon alloys includes amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiOx), amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si3N4) and amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) references. The known spectra of these compounds were fed into the system as an unknown samples. The performance of the developed program was evaluated on a test set of 157 spectra and the percentages of successful identification ranged between 78% and 99% for different alloys.

  5. Predicting Infrared Spectra of Nerve Agents Using Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.-P.; Wang, H.-T.; Zheng, W.-P.; Sun, C.; Bai, Y.; Guo, X.-D.; Sun, H.

    2016-09-01

    Vibration frequencies of four nerve agents and two simulators are calculated using B3LYP coupled with ten basis sets. To evaluate the accuracy of calculated spectra, root mean square error (RMSE) and weighted cross-correlation average (WCCA) are considered. The evaluation shows that B3LYP/6-311+g(d,p) performs best in predicting infrared spectra, and polarization functions are found to be more important than diffusion functions in spectra simulation. Moreover, B3LYP calculation underestimates frequencies related to the P atom. The WCCA metric derives 1.008 as a unique scaling factor for calculated frequencies. The results indicate that the WCCA metric can identify six agents based on calculated spectra.

  6. Power spectra at radio frequency of lightning return stroke waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Thomson, D. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Rinnert, K.; Krider, E. P.

    1989-01-01

    The power spectra of the wideband (10 Hz to 100 kHz) magnetic field signals in a number of lightning return strokes (primarily first return strokes) measured during a lightning storm which occurred in Lindau, West Germany in August, 1984 have been calculated. The RF magnetic field data were obtained with the engineering unit of the Galileo Jupiter Probe lightning experiment. The spectra of the magnetic field data definitely show fine structure, with two or three distinct peaks appearing in the spectra of many of the waveforms. An enhancement of power at frequencies of about 60-70 kHz is often seen in the spectra of the waveform time segments preceding and following the rise-to-peak amplitude of the return stroke.

  7. Mammography X-Ray Spectra Simulated with Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Gonzalez, J. Ramirez; Manzanares-Acuna, E.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Villasana, R. Hernandez; Mercado, G. A.

    2008-08-11

    Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out to obtain the x-ray spectra of various target-filter combinations for a mammography unit. Mammography is widely used to diagnose breast cancer. Further to Mo target with Mo filter combination, Rh/Rh, Mo/Rh, Mo/Al, Rh/Al, and W/Rh are also utilized. In this work Monte Carlo calculations, using MCNP 4C code, were carried out to estimate the x-ray spectra produced when a beam of 28 keV electrons did collide with Mo, Rh and W targets. Resulting x-ray spectra show characteristic x-rays and continuous bremsstrahlung. Spectra were also calculated including filters.

  8. Distances in spaces of physical models: partition functions versus spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, Gunther; Kontogeorgis, Aristides

    2017-01-01

    We study the relation between convergence of partition functions (seen as general Dirichlet series) and convergence of spectra and their multiplicities. We describe applications to convergence in physical models, e.g., related to topology change and averaging in cosmology.

  9. Thermo-Reflectance Spectra of Eros: Unambiguous Detection of Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucey, P. G.; Hinrichs, J. L.; Urquhart-Kelly, M.; Wellnitz, D.; Bell, J. F., III; Clark, B. E.

    2001-01-01

    Olivine is readily detected on 433 Eros using the new thermo-reflectance spectral technique applied to near-IR spectra obtained at Eros by the NEAR spacecraft. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Plasmon-polariton fractal spectra in quasiperiodic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcelos, M. S.; Albuquerque, E. L.

    1998-02-01

    We carry out a theoretical analysis for the spectra of plasmon polaritons in multiple semiconductor layers arranged in a quasiperiodical fashion. This quasiperiodicity can be of the type of so-called substitutional sequences. They are characterized by the nature of their Fourier spectrum, which can be dense pure point (Fibonacci sequences) or singular continuous (Thue-Morse and double-period sequences). These substitutional sequences are described in terms of a series of generations that obey peculiar recursion relations. In order to study the plasmon-polariton spectra, we use a convenient theoretical model based on a transfer-matrix treatment, with the layers characterized by a frequency-dependent dielectric function, including the effect of retardation. We present numerical results to discuss the fractal aspect of the spectra, and compare it with the nonfractal spectra presented in the periodic case.

  11. [Study on THz spectra of nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotine].

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; Huang, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-yan; Zhao, Guo-zhong

    2009-09-01

    The terahertz (THz) spectra of nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotine were studied at room temperature. The time-domain THz spectra were measured. The frequency-domain spectra were obtained by fast Fourier transform (FFT). The spectral response and the dispersive relationship of refractive index in THz spectral range were obtained. The results show that the samples have obvious spectral response in THz spectral range except nicotine. The corresponding stimulated spectra were given by using density functional theory (DFT) method for both nicotinamide and nicotinic acid. The origin of the absorption peaks of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide was explored. It is thought that the absorption peak of nicotinic acid is caused by the torsion and wagging of the molecule, but the absorption peaks of nicotinamide (except 1.93 THz) are caused by intermolecular or phonon mode. It was shown that the molecule structure and vibrational modes of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide can be analyzed by the combination of simulation and experimental results.

  12. On the calibration of the IRAS low-resolution spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Kevin; Cohen, Martin

    1989-01-01

    The need for corrections to the LRS spectra based on a study of a number of normal stars observed by IRAS is discussed. The spectra of bright stars, such as alpha CMa, were found to be inconsistent with blackbody sources, this effect being generally observed in sources earlier than about K3. An attempt is made to correct the LRS spectra by changing the blackbody calibration temperature for Alpha Tau, assumed to be a 10,000-K blackbody source for the original LRS flux calibration. It is found that an anomalously low color temperature must be assumed for alpha Tau to produce reasonable results for earlier-type stars. Corrections based on a set of stars with well-determined effective temperatures are examined, as are the resulting color temperatures for 72 stars with Atlas spectra.

  13. Infrared spectra of olivine polymorphs - Alpha, beta phase and spinel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, R.

    1980-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectra of several olivines (alpha phase) and their corresponding beta phase (modified spinel) and spinel (gamma) high-pressure polymorphs are determined. Spectra were measured for ground and pressed samples of alpha and gamma A2SiO4, where A = Fe, Ni, Co; alpha and gamma Mg2GeO4; alpha Mg2SiO4; and beta Co2SiO4. The spectra are interpreted in terms of internal, tetrahedral and octagonal, and lattice vibration modes, and the spinel results are used to predict the spectrum of gamma Mg2SiO4. Analysis of spectra obtained from samples of gamma Mg2GeO4 heated to 730 and 1000 C provides evidence that partial inversion could occur in silicate spinels at elevated temperatures and pressures.

  14. The absorption spectra of carbonates and their precursors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, C.; Chihara, H.; Suto, H.

    The carbonates calcite and dolomite have been discovered in the dust shells of evolved stars (Kemper et al. 2002) and young proto stars (Ceccarelli et al. 2002). The mechanism for carbonate formation with a aqueous or non-aqueous process were discussed in their papers. These processes have not yet been reproduced in a laboratory experiment. First of all, we measured the mass absorption spectra of varous carbonates were measured in the mid- and far-infrared region. These spectra show very strong and broad peaks in the far-infrared region. The calcite and dolomite have peaks at about 92 microns and 63 microns, respectively. The alternative process of carbonates has not yet been clear. We investigate the alternative process measuring the spectra of the precursors of carbonates. We will report the preliminary results and discuss about the alternative process comparing the measured spectra of the precursors with the observation.

  15. [Vibrational assignment analysis of Raman spectra of fatty alcohols].

    PubMed

    Zou, Qiao; Du, Xian-Yuan; Zhang, Chen; Li, Xing-Chun; Li, Yu

    2013-01-01

    In the present research, Raman spectra of 31 fatty alcohols were calculated by B3LYP/6-31G (d) and verified by taking methanol for example. The study results indicate that B3LYP/6-31G (d) is an effective approach for the fatty alcohols Raman spectra calculated. The vibrational assignment and Raman spectra features of 6 unbranched alcohols were discussed and the vibrating peaks derived from stretching vibration by C-O were chosen as the research target selection, and the multiple principal component regression models were established and validated with the parameters including polarizability, thermodynamic and energy parameters of the above unbranched alcohols. There exists significant correlation between the vibrating peaks derived from stretching vibration by C-O of fatty alcohols and the parameters (sig. = 0.015). This study will benefit the Raman spectra research of homologs.

  16. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of bisphthalocyaninatolanthanide (III). Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsui, M.; Kasuga, K.

    1980-06-01

    The NMR spectra of bisphthalocyaninatolanthanide (III) complexes (La, Nd, Sm, and Eu) have been examined. An effect of a macrocyclic-ring current and induced shift caused by lanthanide (III) ions were discussed.

  17. Measuring Complex Sum Frequency Spectra with a Nonlinear Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Bisson, Patrick J; Marmolejos, Joam M; Shultz, Mary Jane

    2016-06-02

    Currently, the only techniques capable of delivering molecular-level data on buried or soft interfaces are the nonlinear spectroscopic methods: sum frequency generation (SFG) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Deducing molecular information from spectra requires measuring the complex components-the amplitude and the phase-of the surface response. A new interferometer has been developed to determine these components with orders-of-magnitude improvement in uncertainty compared with current methods. Both the sample and reference spectra are generated within the interferometer, hence the label nonlinear interferometer. The interferometer configuration provides experimenters with wide latitude for both the sample enclosure and reference material choice and is thus widely applicable. The instrument is described and applied to the well-studied octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) film. The OTS spectra support the interpretation that variation in fabrication solvent water content and substrate preparation account for differences in OTS spectra reported in the literature.

  18. LET spectra measurements on LDEF: variations with shielding and location.

    PubMed

    Benton, E V; Frank, A L; Csige, I; Frigo, L A; Benton, E R

    1996-11-01

    LET spectra measurements made with passive plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) were found to depend on detector orientation, shielding and experiment location. LET spectra were measured at several locations on LDEF as part of the P0006 LETSME experiment (Benton and Parnell, 1984), the P0004 Seeds in Space experiment (Parks and Alston, 1984), the A00l5 Free Flyer Biostacks and the M0004 Fiber Optics Data Link experiment (Taylor, 1984). Locations included the east, west and Earth sides of the LDEF satellite. The LET spectra measured with PNTDs deviated significantly from calculations, especially for high LET particles (LET infinity H2O > or = 100 keV/micrometer). At high LETs, short-range inelastic secondary particles produced by trapped proton interactions with the nuclei of the detector were found to be the principal contributor to LET spectra. At lower LETs, the spectra appeared to be due to short-range, inelastic and stopping primary protons, with primary GCR particles making a smaller contribution. The dependence of LET spectra on detector orientation and shielding was studied using the four orthogonal stacks in the P0006 experiment. Both measurements of total track density and LET spectra showed a greater number of particles arriving from the direction of space than from Earth. Measurements of LET spectra in CR-39 PNTD on the east (leading) and west (trailing) sides of LDEF showed a higher rate of production at the west side. This was caused by a larger flux of trapped protons on the west side as predicted by the east/west trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Track density measured in CR-39 PNTDs increased as a function of shielding depth in the detector stack. A similar measurement made in a thick stack of CR-39 interspersed with layers of Al and exposed to 154 MeV protons at a ground-based accelerator showed a similar result, indicating that a significant fraction of the particle events counted were from secondaries and that the

  19. LET spectra measurements on LDEF: variations with shielding and location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Csige, I.; Frigo, L. A.; Benton, E. R.

    1996-01-01

    LET spectra measurements made with passive plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) were found to depend on detector orientation, shielding and experiment location. LET spectra were measured at several locations on LDEF as part of the P0006 LETSME experiment (Benton and Parnell, 1984), the P0004 Seeds in Space experiment (Parks and Alston, 1984), the A00l5 Free Flyer Biostacks and the M0004 Fiber Optics Data Link experiment (Taylor, 1984). Locations included the east, west and Earth sides of the LDEF satellite. The LET spectra measured with PNTDs deviated significantly from calculations, especially for high LET particles (LET infinity H2O > or = 100 keV/micrometer). At high LETs, short-range inelastic secondary particles produced by trapped proton interactions with the nuclei of the detector were found to be the principal contributor to LET spectra. At lower LETs, the spectra appeared to be due to short-range, inelastic and stopping primary protons, with primary GCR particles making a smaller contribution. The dependence of LET spectra on detector orientation and shielding was studied using the four orthogonal stacks in the P0006 experiment. Both measurements of total track density and LET spectra showed a greater number of particles arriving from the direction of space than from Earth. Measurements of LET spectra in CR-39 PNTD on the east (leading) and west (trailing) sides of LDEF showed a higher rate of production at the west side. This was caused by a larger flux of trapped protons on the west side as predicted by the east/west trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Track density measured in CR-39 PNTDs increased as a function of shielding depth in the detector stack. A similar measurement made in a thick stack of CR-39 interspersed with layers of Al and exposed to 154 MeV protons at a ground-based accelerator showed a similar result, indicating that a significant fraction of the particle events counted were from secondaries and that the

  20. Seasonal Variations of Stratospheric Age Spectra in GEOSCCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Feng; Waugh, Darryn; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.; Pawson, Steven; Stolarski, Richard S.; Strahan, Susan E.; Nielsen, J. Eric

    2011-01-01

    There are many pathways for an air parcel to travel from the troposphere to the stratosphere, each of which takes different time. The distribution of all the possible transient times, i.e. the stratospheric age spectrum, contains important information on transport characteristics. However, it is computationally very expensive to compute seasonally varying age spectra, and previous studies have focused mainly on the annual mean properties of the age spectra. To date our knowledge of the seasonality of the stratospheric age spectra is very limited. In this study we investigate the seasonal variations of the stratospheric age spectra in the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM). We introduce a method to significantly reduce the computational cost for calculating seasonally dependent age spectra. Our simulations show that stratospheric age spectra in GEOSCCM have strong seasonal cycles and the seasonal cycles change with latitude and height. In the lower stratosphere extratropics, the average transit times and the most probable transit times in the winter/early spring spectra are more than twice as old as those in the summer/early fall spectra. But the seasonal cycle in the subtropical lower stratosphere is nearly out of phase with that in the extratropics. In the middle and upper stratosphere, significant seasonal variations occur in the sUbtropics. The spectral shapes also show dramatic seasonal change, especially at high latitudes. These seasonal variations reflect the seasonal evolution of the slow Brewer-Dobson circulation (with timescale of years) and the fast isentropic mixing (with timescale of days to months).

  1. Laboratory spectra of C60 and related molecular structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janca, J.; Solc, M.; Vetesnik, M.

    1994-01-01

    The electronic spectra of fullerene structures in high frequency discharge are studied in the plasma chemistry laboratory of the Faculty of Science of Masaryk University in Brno. The ultraviolet and visual spectra are investigated in order to be compared with the diffuse interstellar bands and interpreted within the theory of quantum mechanics. The preliminary results of the study are presented here in the form of a poster.

  2. Data Analysis for Rotationally Resolved Spectra: A Simulated Annealing Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-29

    Table V. Expe rimental Data PSA was used to analyze high resolution infrared spectra of 2- fluoroethanol (2FE) and difluoroethane (DFE). Although the...does not inhere in the model used to calculate spectra, so the match to the experimental spectrum is not ideal. 8. PSA optimization of Difluoroethane ...A) The experimental spectrum of Difluoroethane . B) The spectrum generated from the starting state given to PSA. C) The spectrum generated from the

  3. Space Shuttle fatigue loads spectra for prelaunch and liftoff loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldish, Judith; Ortasse, Raphael

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue loads spectra for the prelaunch and liftoff flight segments of the Space Shuttle were developed. A variety o methods were used to determine the distributions of several important parameters, such as time of exposure on the launch, pad, month of launch, and wind speed. Also, some lessons learned that would be applicable to development of fatigue loads spectra for other reusable space vehicles are presented.

  4. Mössbauer Spectra of Clays and Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F. E.; Wagner, U.

    2004-06-01

    The physical, chemical and mineralogical aspects of the use of Mössbauer spectroscopy in studies of clay-based ceramics are described. Mössbauer spectra of pottery clays fired under oxidising, reducing and changing conditions are explained, and the possibilities of using Mössbauer spectra to derive information on the firing temperatures and the kiln atmosphere during firing in antiquity are discussed and illustrated by examples.

  5. Anomalous atmospheric absorption spectra due to water dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Peipei; Zhang, Hansheng; Shen, Shanxiong; Cheng, I.-Shan

    1986-11-01

    The anomalous atmospheric absorption spectra in the window wavelength region of 8-14 microns have been suggested due to the water dimer. Based on laboratory measurements, water continuum CO2 laser absorption spectra and a resonance absorption line due to the weak local wave vapor pure rotational transition have been reported. The equilibrium concentration of water dimers in the atmosphere, the electronic binding energy and the theoretical calculations for absorption attenuation have been obtained in agreement with published data.

  6. Infrared reflectance spectra of Hyperion, Titania, and Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Lebofsky, M. J.; Rieke, G. H.

    1981-01-01

    Medium-resolution infrared (1-2.5 microns; Delta-lambda/lambda = 0.05) photometry of Triton, Titania, and Hyperion and medium-resolution (1.5-2.4 microns; Delta-lambda/lambda not greater than 0.01) spectroscopy of Triton are presented. Hyperion and Titania have spectra roughly similar to the laboratory spectrum of water frost, while the spectrum of Triton is inconsistent with the spectra of frosts likely to be major surface constituents.

  7. Retrieval of constituent mixing ratios from limb thermal emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, William A.; Kunde, Virgil G.; Conrath, Barney J.

    1988-01-01

    An onion-peeling iterative, least-squares relaxation method to retrieve mixing ratio profiles from limb thermal emission spectra is presented. The method has been tested on synthetic data, containing various amounts of added random noise for O3, HNO3, and N2O. The retrieval method is used to obtain O3 and HNO3 mixing ratio profiles from high-resolution thermal emission spectra. Results of the retrievals compare favorably with those obtained previously.

  8. Fluorescence Spectra Of Corneal Tissue Under Excimer Laser Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loree, Thomas R.; Johnson, Tamara M.; Birmingham, Brian S.; McCord, Roy C.

    1988-06-01

    The corneas of pigs' eyes were irradiated with ablative levels of 193, 248, and 308 nm and the spectra of the produced light recorded. In all cases there was an appreciable amount of uv light produced in the 300-400 nm band. The 193 nm irradiation exhibited a threshold at 0.5 J/cm2; markedly different spectra were produced below and above that threshold.

  9. Estimation of Sea Surface Wave Spectra Using Acoustic Tomography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    develops a new technique for estimating quasi- homogeneous and quasi-stationary sea surface wave frequency-direction spectra using acoustic tomog...problems for the homogeneous and quasi- homogeneous frequency-direction spectrum are introduced. The theory is ap- plied tosynthetic data which simulate...thesis introduces a technique that estimates the quasi-stationary and quasi- homogeneous sea surface wave frequency-direction spectrum from the spectra of

  10. Electronic and vibrational circular dichroism spectra of (R)-(-)-apomorphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbate, Sergio; Longhi, Giovanna; Lebon, France; Tommasini, Matteo

    2012-09-01

    Apomorphine is a chiral drug molecule; notwithstanding its extraordinary importance, little attention has been paid to the characterization of its chiroptical properties. Here we report on its electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra, recorded in methanol and water, and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) in methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solutions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have allowed us to interpret the spectra and to evaluate the role of possible conformations, charge-states and interactions with counter ions.

  11. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Duisterwinkel, H. A.; Abbema, J. K. van; Kawachimaru, R.; Paganini, L.; Graaf, E. R. van der; Brandenburg, S.; Goethem, M. J. van

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. Methods: In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. Results: The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. Conclusions: A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  12. Infrared spectra of lunar soils. [using a Michelson interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronson, J. R.; Emslie, A. G.; Smith, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    Measured data obtained by Michelson interferometer spectrometer were stored in a computer file and smoothed by being passed forward and backward through a digital four-pole low pass filter. Infrared spectra of the 10 lunar samples are presented in the format of brightness temperature versus frequency. The mol % of feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, ilmenite and ferromagnetic silicate in each sample is presented in tables. The reflectance spectra of ilmenite and enstatite are shown in graphs.

  13. Afterpulse time spectra of high-speed photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress of understanding of the afterpulse time spectra of high-speed photon detectors using photoemission and secondary emission processes is reviewed and summarized. Furthermore, the afterpulse time spectra of high-gain conventionally designed and microchannel plate photon detectors was investigated. Specifically, the devices studied included RCA 8850, RCA 8854 and ITT F 4129g photomultipliers. Descriptions are given of the measuring techniques.

  14. Resonant Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectra: Theory and Simulations.

    PubMed

    Rao, B Jayachander; Gelin, Maxim F; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2016-05-19

    We present a description of resonant femtosecond stimulated Raman spectra, which is based on the solution of the nonperturbative equation of motion of the chromophore in the laser fields. The theory is applicable for arbitrary shapes and durations of the Raman pulses, accounts for excited-state absorption, and describes nonstationary preparation of the system by an actinic pulse. The method is illustrated by the calculation of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectra of a model system with a conical intersection.

  15. Electronic Spectra from Molecular Dynamics: A Simple Approach.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    to the measured contours. This method and others such as the methods of Lax, Lee, Tellinghuisen and Moeller and the Landau - Zener - Stuckleberg...dynamic binning spectra, and his semi- classical Franck-Condon spectra are approximated by our harmonic quantum correction. The Landau - Zener ...depends on our assumption of two degrees of freedom, and Eq. (3.6) is gen- eral. B. Equivalence with Landau - Zener - Stuckelberg, Tully - Preston (LZSTP

  16. Absorption-Edge-Modulated Transmission Spectra for Water Contaminant Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-31

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6390--16-9675 Absorption-Edge-Modulated Transmission Spectra for Water Contaminant...ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Absorption-Edge-Modulated Transmission Spectra for Water Contaminant Monitoring...Unlimited Unclassified Unlimited 35 Samuel G. Lambrakos (202) 767-2601 Monitoring of contaminants associated with specific water resources using

  17. Formation of cyclotron lines in gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, S. G.; Meszaros, P.

    1989-01-01

    A transmission model of gamma-ray burst sources is studied using the relativistic QED magnetic-resonant opacities including multiple photon scattering, incorporated into a discrete-ordinate radiative-transport scheme. The physics of the cyclotron line-producing region is discussed in general, and the expected line profiles, relative harmonic strengths, and polarizations are indicated under various conditions. The calculated spectra for these models show good agreement with the spectra reported from Ginga for GB 880205 and GB 870303.

  18. A COMPARISON OF GADRAS SIMULATED AND MEASURED GAMMA RAY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffcoat, R.; Salaymeh, S.

    2010-06-28

    Gamma-ray radiation detection systems are continuously being developed and improved for detecting the presence of radioactive material and for identifying isotopes present. Gamma-ray spectra, from many different isotopes and in different types and thicknesses of attenuation material and matrixes, are needed to evaluate the performance of these devices. Recently, a test and evaluation exercise was performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory that required a large number of gamma-ray spectra. Simulated spectra were used for a major portion of the testing in order to provide a pool of data large enough for the results to be statistically significant. The test data set was comprised of two types of data, measured and simulated. The measured data were acquired with a hand-held Radioisotope Identification Device (RIID) and simulated spectra were created using Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS, Mitchell and Mattingly, Sandia National Laboratory). GADRAS uses a one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculation to simulate gamma-ray spectra. The measured and simulated spectra have been analyzed and compared. This paper will discuss the results of the comparison and offer explanations for spectral differences.

  19. Identification of THz absorption spectra of chemicals using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jingling; Jia, Yan; Liang, Meiyan; Chen, Sijia

    2007-09-01

    Absorption spectra in the range from 0.2 to 2.6 THz of chemicals such as illicit drugs and antibiotics obtaining from Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy technique were identified successfully by artificial neural networks. Back Propagation (BP) and Self-Organizing Feature Map (SOM) were investigated to do the identification or classification, respectively. Three-layer BP neural networks were employed to identify absorption spectra of nine illicit drugs and six antibiotics. The spectra of the chemicals were used to train a BP neural network and then the absorption spectra measured in different times were identified by the trained BP neural network. The average identification rate of 76% was achieved. SOM neural networks, another important neural network which sorts input vectors by their similarity, was used to sort 60 absorption spectra from 6 illicit drugs. The whole network was trained by setting a 20×20 and a 16×16 grid, and both of them had given satisfied clustering results. These results indicate that it is feasible to apply BP and SOM neural networks model in the field of THz spectra identification.

  20. LSD-based analysis of high-resolution stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsymbal, V.; Tkachenko, A.; Van, Reeth T.

    2014-11-01

    We present a generalization of the method of least-squares deconvolution (LSD), a powerful tool for extracting high S/N average line profiles from stellar spectra. The generalization of the method is effected by extending it towards the multiprofile LSD and by introducing the possibility to correct the line strengths from the initial mask. We illustrate the new approach by two examples: (a) the detection of astroseismic signatures from low S/N spectra of single stars, and (b) disentangling spectra of multiple stellar objects. The analysis is applied to spectra obtained with 2-m class telescopes in the course of spectroscopic ground-based support for space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler. Usually, rather high S/N is required, so smaller telescopes can only compete successfully with more advanced ones when one can apply a technique that enables a remarkable increase in the S/N of the spectra which they observe. Since the LSD profiles have a potential for reconstruction what is common in all the spectral profiles, it should have a particular practical application to faint stars observed with 2-m class telescopes and whose spectra show remarkable LPVs.

  1. Cancer detection based on Raman spectra super-paramagnetic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Solís, José Luis; Guizar-Ruiz, Juan Ignacio; Martínez-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Zerega, Brenda Esmeralda; Juárez-López, Héctor Alfonso; Vargas-Rodríguez, Héctor; Gallegos-Infante, Luis Armando; González-Silva, Ricardo Armando; Espinoza-Padilla, Pedro Basilio; Palomares-Anda, Pascual

    2016-08-01

    The clustering of Raman spectra of serum sample is analyzed using the super-paramagnetic clustering technique based in the Potts spin model. We investigated the clustering of biochemical networks by using Raman data that define edge lengths in the network, and where the interactions are functions of the Raman spectra's individual band intensities. For this study, we used two groups of 58 and 102 control Raman spectra and the intensities of 160, 150 and 42 Raman spectra of serum samples from breast and cervical cancer and leukemia patients, respectively. The spectra were collected from patients from different hospitals from Mexico. By using super-paramagnetic clustering technique, we identified the most natural and compact clusters allowing us to discriminate the control and cancer patients. A special interest was the leukemia case where its nearly hierarchical observed structure allowed the identification of the patients's leukemia type. The goal of this study is to apply a model of statistical physics, as the super-paramagnetic, to find these natural clusters that allow us to design a cancer detection method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of preliminary results evaluating the usefulness of super-paramagnetic clustering in the discipline of spectroscopy where it is used for classification of spectra.

  2. Correlations between heterocycle ring size and x-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doomes, E. E.; McCarley, R. L.; Poliakoff, E. D.

    2003-08-01

    X-ray absorption spectra are reported for two classes of ring systems, cyclic polymethylene sulfides and organochromium ring compounds with phosphorus-complexing bidentate ligands. For the cyclic polymethylene sulfides, spectra were acquired in the region of the sulfur K-edge. For the organochromium complexes, spectra were acquired at both the chromium K-edge and at the phosphorus K-edge. These systems allow one to interrogate how the spectra evolve as the bond angle about the absorbing atom is varied. Systematic trends are observed as a function of ring size/bond angle. For the cyclic sulfides, the peaks in the continuum above the sulfur K-edge shift to higher energy and broaden with increasing ring size. These continuum features are assigned to shape resonances. In the chromium K-edge measurements, changes in the P-Cr-C bond angle do not influence the spectra appreciably, indicating that the four carbonyl groups dominate the photoelectron scattering processes. However, the phosphorus K-edge spectra are sensitive to changes in the endocyclic Cr-P-C bond angle. The trends observed in the phosphorus K-edge region for the organometallic continuum features are consistent with those observed for the cyclic polymethylene sulfides.

  3. Rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation.

    PubMed

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyze the rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). We compare our findings with their nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) analogs and show that the spectra of the individual rogue waves significantly differ from their NLSE analogs. A remarkable difference is the one-sided development of the triangular spectrum before the rogue wave becomes evident in time. Also we show that increasing the skewness of the rogue wave results in increased asymmetry in the triangular Fourier spectra. Additionally, the triangular spectra of the rogue waves of the KEE begin to develop at earlier stages of their development compared to their NLSE analogs, especially for larger skew angles. This feature may be used to enhance the early warning times of the rogue waves. However, we show that in a chaotic wave field with many spectral components the triangular spectra remain as the main attribute as a universal feature of the typical wave fields produced through modulation instability and characteristic features of the KEE's analytical rogue wave spectra may be suppressed in a realistic chaotic wave field.

  4. Rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyze the rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). We compare our findings with their nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) analogs and show that the spectra of the individual rogue waves significantly differ from their NLSE analogs. A remarkable difference is the one-sided development of the triangular spectrum before the rogue wave becomes evident in time. Also we show that increasing the skewness of the rogue wave results in increased asymmetry in the triangular Fourier spectra. Additionally, the triangular spectra of the rogue waves of the KEE begin to develop at earlier stages of their development compared to their NLSE analogs, especially for larger skew angles. This feature may be used to enhance the early warning times of the rogue waves. However, we show that in a chaotic wave field with many spectral components the triangular spectra remain as the main attribute as a universal feature of the typical wave fields produced through modulation instability and characteristic features of the KEE's analytical rogue wave spectra may be suppressed in a realistic chaotic wave field.

  5. Turbulence spectra of the FIRE stratocumulus-topped boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, G. S.; Nucciarone, J. J.; Albrecht, Bruce A.

    1990-01-01

    There are at least four physical phenomena which contribute to the FIRE boundary layer turbulence spectra: boundary layer spanning eddies resulting from buoyant and mechanical production of turbulent kinetic energy (the microscale subrange); inertial subrange turbulence which cascades this energy to smaller scales; quasi-two dimensional mesoscale variations; and gravity waves. The relative contributions of these four phenomena to the spectra depend on the altitude of observation and variable involved (vertical velocity, temperature and moisture spectra are discussed). The physical origins of these variations in relative contribution are discussed. As expected from the theory (Kaimal et al., 1976), mixed layer scaling of the spectra (i.e., nondimensionalizing wavelength by Z(sub i) and spectral density by Z(sub i) and the dissipation rates) is successful for the microscale subrange and inertial subrange but not for the mesoscale subrange. The most striking feature of the normalized vertical velocity spectra is the lack of any significant mesoscale contribution. The spectral peak results from buoyant and mechanical production on scales similar to the boundary layer depth. The decrease in spectral density at larger scales results from the suppression of vertical velocity perturbations with large horizontal scales by the shallowness of the atmosphere. The spectral density also decreases towards smaller scales following the well known inertial subrange slope. There is a significant variation in the shape of the normalized spectra with height.

  6. [Study on Raman Spectra of Some Clinical Medicine].

    PubMed

    Dong, He; Liu, Chuan; Dai, Chang-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at the shortage of the Raman spectra of drugs and the current situation of drug testing, we have applied Raman spectroscopic technique to several kinds of medicine, such as antibiotics, antihistamine, hemocoagulase and antiemetics. The spectral properties for the samples with high Raman activity are investigated by observing their Raman spectra to yield the shift, intensity, and line width of the Raman peaks, as well as the line shape of Raman envelope. For those samples with weak Raman activity or complex structures that are hard to be identified, we have also made some tentative measurements or raise some suggestions for future measurement. Comparing the similarities or differences among many Raman spectra of drugs, it is evident that drugs with small molecule have apparent spectral characteristics, by which to recognize them is very feasible, while those with large molecule usually have weak peaks or complex envelope in their spectra, leading to a difficult recognition and uncertain peak positions. This work not only proposes to identify chemical ingredients of drugs by observing and analyzing their Raman spectra, but also provides experimental evidences for medical workers doing so. The present results lay the foundation for establish the database of Raman spectra for drugs, and point out the prospect for rapid identification and detection of drugs, promoting the application of Raman spectroscopy technology on drug detection to a certain extent.

  7. APPLICATION OF INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY TO THE ANALYSIS OF INORGANIC NITRATES. PHASE 1. SPECTRA OF INORGANIC NITRATES IN ACETONE AND THE USE OF SUCH SPECTRA IN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A study was made of the spectra of soluble inorganic nitrates in acetone solution and the use of such spectra in analytical chemistry . The spectra of...solubilities of anhydrous inorganic nitrates in acetone. The applications of the spectra of inorganic nitrates in acetone to analytical chemistry is

  8. Chemical shift assignments of the connexin37 carboxyl terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanjun; Spagnol, Gaelle; Pontifex, Tasha K; Burt, Janis M; Sorgen, Paul L

    2017-03-01

    Connexin37 (Cx37) is a gap junction protein involved in cell-to-cell communication in the vasculature and other tissues. Cx37 suppresses proliferation of vascular cells involved in tissue development and repair in vivo, as well as tumor cells. Global deletion of Cx37 in mice leads to enhanced vasculogenesis in development, as well as collateralgenesis and angiogenesis in response to injury, which together support improved tissue remodeling and recovery following ischemic injury. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C resonance assignments for an important regulatory domain of Cx37, the carboxyl terminus (CT; C233-V333). The predicted secondary structure of the Cx37CT domain based on the chemical shifts is that of an intrinsically disordered protein. In the (1)H-(15)N HSQC, N-terminal residues S254-Y259 displayed a second weaker peak and residues E261-Y266 had significant line broadening. These residues are flanked by prolines (P250, P258, P260, and P268), suggesting proline cis-trans isomerization. Overall, these assignments will be useful for identifying the binding sites for intra- and inter-molecular interactions that affect Cx37 channel activity.

  9. Comparison of remotely sensed continental-shelf wave spectra with spectra computed by using a wave refraction computer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    An initial attempt was made to verify the Langley Research Center and Virginia Institute of Marine Science mid-Atlantic continental-shelf wave refraction model. The model was used to simulate refraction occurring during a continental-shelf remote sensing experiment conducted on August 17, 1973. Simulated wave spectra compared favorably, in a qualitative sense, with the experimental spectra. However, it was observed that most of the wave energy resided at frequencies higher than those for which refraction and shoaling effects were predicted, In addition, variations among the experimental spectra were so small that they were not considered statistically significant. In order to verify the refraction model, simulation must be performed in conjunction with a set of significantly varying spectra in which a considerable portion of the total energy resides at frequencies for which refraction and shoaling effects are likely.

  10. Vibrational spectra, normal coordinate treatment and simulation of the vibrational spectra of piperazine glyoxime and its Co(III) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özpozan, T.; Küçükusta, D.; Büyükmumcu, Z.

    2003-12-01

    Newly synthesized Co(III) complexes of piperazine glyoxime (PGO) are examined from the vibrational spectroscopy point of view. A complete interpretation of the vibrational spectra of both the ligand and the complex has been carried out on the basis of normal coordinate analysis. A valence force field has been developed for both of the compounds. The vibrational spectra of the compounds are simulated by a visual basic program prepared to run on an MS Excel data sheet.

  11. Estimation of damped oscillation associated spectra from ultrafast transient absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Jumper, Chanelle C; Snellenburg, Joris J; Scholes, Gregory D; van Grondelle, Rienk; Malý, Pavel

    2016-11-07

    When exciting a complex molecular system with a short optical pulse, all chromophores present in the system can be excited. The resulting superposition of electronically and vibrationally excited states evolves in time, which is monitored with transient absorption spectroscopy. We present a methodology to resolve simultaneously the contributions of the different electronically and vibrationally excited states from the complete data. The evolution of the excited states is described with a superposition of damped oscillations. The amplitude of a damped oscillation cos(ωnt)exp(-γnt) as a function of the detection wavelength constitutes a damped oscillation associated spectrum DOASn(λ) with an accompanying phase characteristic φn(λ). In a case study, the cryptophyte photosynthetic antenna complex PC612 which contains eight bilin chromophores was excited by a broadband optical pulse. Difference absorption spectra from 525 to 715 nm were measured until 1 ns. The population dynamics is described by four lifetimes, with interchromophore equilibration in 0.8 and 7.5 ps. We have resolved 24 DOAS with frequencies between 130 and 1649 cm(-1) and with damping rates between 0.9 and 12 ps(-1). In addition, 11 more DOAS with faster damping rates were necessary to describe the "coherent artefact." The DOAS contains both ground and excited state features. Their interpretation is aided by DOAS analysis of simulated transient absorption signals resulting from stimulated emission and ground state bleach.

  12. Estimation of damped oscillation associated spectra from ultrafast transient absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Stokkum, Ivo H. M.; Jumper, Chanelle C.; Snellenburg, Joris J.; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Malý, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    When exciting a complex molecular system with a short optical pulse, all chromophores present in the system can be excited. The resulting superposition of electronically and vibrationally excited states evolves in time, which is monitored with transient absorption spectroscopy. We present a methodology to resolve simultaneously the contributions of the different electronically and vibrationally excited states from the complete data. The evolution of the excited states is described with a superposition of damped oscillations. The amplitude of a damped oscillation cos(ωnt)exp(-γnt) as a function of the detection wavelength constitutes a damped oscillation associated spectrum DOASn(λ) with an accompanying phase characteristic φn(λ). In a case study, the cryptophyte photosynthetic antenna complex PC612 which contains eight bilin chromophores was excited by a broadband optical pulse. Difference absorption spectra from 525 to 715 nm were measured until 1 ns. The population dynamics is described by four lifetimes, with interchromophore equilibration in 0.8 and 7.5 ps. We have resolved 24 DOAS with frequencies between 130 and 1649 cm-1 and with damping rates between 0.9 and 12 ps-1. In addition, 11 more DOAS with faster damping rates were necessary to describe the "coherent artefact." The DOAS contains both ground and excited state features. Their interpretation is aided by DOAS analysis of simulated transient absorption signals resulting from stimulated emission and ground state bleach.

  13. Extracting Infrared Spectra of Protein Secondary Structures Using a Library of Protein Spectra and the Ramachandran Plot.

    PubMed

    Coe, James V; Nystrom, Steven V; Chen, Zhaomin; Li, Ran; Verreault, Dominique; Hitchcock, Charles L; Martin, Edward W; Allen, Heather C

    2015-10-15

    Infrared (IR) spectra from 1200 to 1800 cm(-1) of the pure α-helix and β-sheet secondary structures have been extracted using a covariant least-squares procedure which relates a library of 40 infrared (IR) solution protein spectra from the work of Dong, Carpenter, and Caughey and amino acid fractions of the proteins based on assignments by STRIDE (secondary structure identification) of Eisenhaber and Argos. The excitonic splitting of the β-sheet structures is determined for this library of solution proteins. The method is extended to find a set of spectral basis functions that analyze IR spectra of protein samples for α-helix and β-sheet content. A rigorous error analysis including covariance, the correlations between the input library spectra, was used to justify the results and avoid less meaningful results. The utility of the results on α-helix and β-sheet regions is demonstrated by detecting protein changes due to cancer in imaging Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectra of liver tissue slices. This work ends with a method to extract IR spectra of less prominent torsional angle distributions.

  14. Biochemical investigations of the mechanism of action of small molecules ZL006 and IC87201 as potential inhibitors of the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Anders; Pedersen, Søren W.; Dorr, Liam A.; Vallon, Gary; Ripoche, Isabelle; Ducki, Sylvie; Lian, Lu-Yun

    2015-01-01

    ZL006 and IC87201 have been presented as efficient inhibitors of the nNOS/PSD-95 protein-protein interaction and shown great promise in cellular experiments and animal models of ischemic stroke and pain. Here, we investigate the proposed mechanism of action of ZL006 and IC87201 using biochemical and biophysical methods, such as fluorescence polarization (FP), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and 1H-15N HSQC NMR. Our data show that under the applied in vitro conditions, ZL006 and IC87201 do not interact with the PDZ domains of nNOS or PSD-95, nor inhibit the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interface by interacting with the β-finger of nNOS-PDZ. Our findings have implications for further medicinal chemistry efforts of ZL006, IC87201 and analogues, and challenge the general and widespread view on their mechanism of action. PMID:26177569

  15. 3D NMR Experiments for Measuring 15N Relaxation Data of Large Proteins: Application to the 44 kDa Ectodomain of SIV gp41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffrey, Michael; Kaufman, Joshua; Stahl, Stephen J.; Wingfield, Paul T.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Clore, G. Marius

    1998-12-01

    A suite of 3D NMR experiments for measuring15N-{1H} NOE,15NT1, and15NT1ρvalues in large proteins, uniformly labeled with15N and13C, is presented. These experiments are designed for proteins that exhibit extensive spectral overlap in the 2D1H-15N HSQC spectrum. The pulse sequences are readily applicable to perdeuterated samples, which increases the spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, thereby permitting the characterization of protein dynamics to be extended to larger protein systems. Application of the pulse sequences is demonstrated on a perdeuterated13C/15N-labeled sample of the 44 kDa ectodomain of SIV gp41.

  16. Alpha particle spectra and microdosimetry of radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Caswell, R.S.; Coyne, J.J.

    1992-12-31

    We are interested in understanding the physics of the process by which radon-daughter alpha particles irradiate cells, leading to the induction of cancer. We are focusing initially on two aspects: the alpha spectra incident upon cells, which are needed for input to biophysical models of cancer induction; and microdosimetric spectra and parameters which give information on radiation quality. Adapting an analytical method previously developed for neutron radiation, we have calculated the alpha-particle slowing-down spectra (the spectra incident upon cells) and, subsequently, the microdosimetric spectra and parameters for various cell nuclei or site diameters. Results will be presented from three modes of program operation. MODE 1 is for the thin, plane source of radon-daughter activity adjacent to the epithelium. MODE 2 is for the thick source layer (the mucous-serous layer) adjacent to the epithelium. MODE4 is for cylindrical airways of various radii, lined by the mucous-serous layer. MODE 1 is most useful for understanding the problem; MODE 4 is most anatomically relevant. MODE 3 is not discussed in this paper. Alpha-particle spectra and microdosimetric spectra and parameters are studied as a function of cell depth, {sup 218}Po/{sup 214}Po ratio, airway radius, and cell nucleus or the site size. Also available from the calculation is mean dose as a function of depth below the airway surface. The results described here are available on personal computer diskettes. We are beginning to compare our studies with the calculations of other workers and plan to extend the calculations to the nanometer target level.

  17. Spectra Handling from AIRS and IRIS for Climate Change Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Lau, M.; Aumann, H. H.; Yung, Y. L.

    2010-12-01

    Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) measurements over a long period from satellites provide valuable information for the climate change research. Due to the different coverage, spectral resolution and instrument sensitivities, the data comparisons between different satellites could be problematic and possible artifacts could be easily introduced. In this paper, we have analyzed the data taken by IRIS in 1970 and by AIRS from 2002 to 2010. IRIS (Prabhakara, 1988) was a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) and it flew on the NASA Nimbus 4 satellite which was launched in April 1970 into an 1100km altitude sun-synchronous polar orbit. It collected data from the nadir track between 400cm-1 and 1600 cm-1 from April 1970 until January 1971. AIRS (Aumann, 2003) is a grating spectrometer launched on the EOS-Aqua satellite in May 2002 and it measures spectra from 650cm-1 to 2700cm-1. AIRS scans to ±49.5o cross track as the satellite moves forwards taking 90 spectra each with an instantaneous field of view of 1.1o in a row perpendicular to the direction of motion of the satellite. This results in a ground footprint of 13km diameter at nadir. In this paper, we analyzed the spectra between 650 cm-1 and 1350 cm-1 for nadir view footprints in order to match the IRIS’s measurements. Most of the possible sources of error or biases have been carefully handled, these include the errors from the data editing, spatial coverage, missing data (spatial gap), and spectral resolution, spectra frequency shift due to the fields of view, sea surface temperature fluctuations, clear sky determination, and spectra response function symmetry. It is extremely important when comparing spectra in the high slope spectra regions where possible large artifacts could be introduced. We have used a radiative model to simulate the spectra as observed in both IRIS and AIRS by using US Standard Atmospheric Profiles. The tropospheric warming and stratospheric warming are introduced in the model as well. The

  18. Secondary particle contribution to LET spectra on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Frigo, L. A.; Csige, I.

    1996-01-01

    Four experiments utilizing passive detectors (P0006, P0004, A0015, M0004) were flown on LDEF to study the radiation environment. These experiments have been summarized in a companion paper (Benton et al., 1996). One of the experimental goals was to measure LET spectra at different locations and shielding depths with plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD). It was found that the LET spectra extended well above the LET cutoff imposed by the geomagnetic field on GCR particle penetration into LEO. The high LET particles detected were mostly short-range (range < 2000 m), indicating that they were secondaries produced locally within the PNTD. The presence of these high LET particle fluences is important for the determination of dose equivalent because of the high Quality Factors (Q) involved. A relatively small fraction of particle fluence can contribute a large fraction of dose equivalent. Short-range, inelastic secondary particles produced by trapped protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) were found to be a major contributor to the LET spectra above 100 keV/micrometer. The LET spectra were found to extend beyond the approximately 137 keV/micrometer relativistic GCR Fe peak to over 1000 keV/micrometer. The high LET tail of the LET spectra was measured in CR-39 and polycarbonate PNTDs using different techniques. GCR made a relatively modest contribution to the LET spectra as compared to the contributions from short-range secondary particles and stopping protons. LET spectra intercomparisons were made between LDEF measurements and exposures to 154 MeV accelerated proton beams. The similarities support the role of nuclear interactions by trapped protons as the major source of secondary particles in the PNTDs. Also techniques were employed to reduce the range cutoff for detection of the short-range secondaries to approximately 1 micrometer, so that essentially all secondary particles were included in the LET spectra. This has allowed a more realistic assessment of

  19. First light with Trident: multi-platform synthetic quasar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvia, Devin W.; Hummels, Cameron B.; Smith, Britton

    2017-01-01

    Observational efforts to better understand the nature of the intergalactic and circumgalactic media have relied heavily on the information encoded in the absorption line systems of quasar spectra. Numerical simulations of large-scale structure and galaxy evolution are well-suited to explore the properties of those same media owing to the relative ease with which one can access physical quantities from complex, three-dimensional data. However, a difficulty arises when one tries to make direct “apple-to-apples” comparisons between observed spectra and simulated data. In an effort to provide a common language capable of linking theory and observation, we announce the release of Trident. Trident is a publicly available software tool that enables the creation of realistic synthetic absorption spectra from virtually all widely-used hydrodynamics simulation codes. Through user-controlled levels of spectral realism, direct comparisons between simulated and observed data become not only possible, but greatly simplified. We present the methods for extracting artificial quasar sightlines and generating spectra as well as early-stage applications of those spectra to intergalactic and circumgalactic absorption line studies.

  20. Similarity spectra analysis of high-performance jet aircraft noise.

    PubMed

    Neilsen, Tracianne B; Gee, Kent L; Wall, Alan T; James, Michael M

    2013-04-01

    Noise measured in the vicinity of an F-22A Raptor has been compared to similarity spectra found previously to represent mixing noise from large-scale and fine-scale turbulent structures in laboratory-scale jet plumes. Comparisons have been made for three engine conditions using ground-based sideline microphones, which covered a large angular aperture. Even though the nozzle geometry is complex and the jet is nonideally expanded, the similarity spectra do agree with large portions of the measured spectra. Toward the sideline, the fine-scale similarity spectrum is used, while the large-scale similarity spectrum provides a good fit to the area of maximum radiation. Combinations of the two similarity spectra are shown to match the data in between those regions. Surprisingly, a combination of the two is also shown to match the data at the farthest aft angle. However, at high frequencies the degree of congruity between the similarity and the measured spectra changes with engine condition and angle. At the higher engine conditions, there is a systematically shallower measured high-frequency slope, with the largest discrepancy occurring in the regions of maximum radiation.

  1. [An automated measurement of the galaxies spectra of LAMOST].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guang-hua; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-heng

    2005-06-01

    To measure redshifts of the marge amount of galaxies' spectra automatically is the main goal of the data processing for the LAMOST project (Large Sky Area Multi-Object Optical Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope). A method called PCAZ can be applied to measure the very small redshifts (generally z < 0.2) due to the restriction of the wavelength range of the templates that are composed to make orthogonal templates. In the present article, the authors break the restriction by improving PCAZ method according to the characteristic of LAMOST spectra. Applying this new method to the SDSS data, more than 90% of the results are correct. The maximum limitation for redshift measurement of this new method depends on the wavelength range of the templates and the S/N of the blue parts of the spectra. According to the spectral feature of LAMOST, the authors can measure the galaxies with z < 0.8 correctly. From the experiment the authors concluded: first, this method can be used to measure the redshift of LAMOST spectra; second, the authors need to compose self-contained templates of various galaxies (UV-IR) to measure the survey redshift; finally, the S/N of the blue end of the spectra influences the measurement of the large redshift.

  2. Guide to solar reference spectra and irradiance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    The international standard for determining solar irradiances was published by the International Standards Organization (ISO) in May 2007. The document, ISO 21348 Space Environment (natural and artificial) - Process for determining solar irradiances, describes the process for representing solar irradiances. We report on the next progression of standards work, i.e., the development of a guide that identifies solar reference spectra and irradiance models for use in engineering design or scientific research. This document will be produced as an AIAA Guideline and ISO Technical Report. It will describe the content of the reference spectra and models, uncertainties and limitations, technical basis, data bases from which the reference spectra and models are formed, publication references, and sources of computer code for reference spectra and solar irradiance models, including those which provide spectrally-resolved lines as well as solar indices and proxies and which are generally recognized in the solar sciences. The document is intended to assist aircraft and space vehicle designers and developers, heliophysicists, geophysicists, aeronomers, meteorologists, and climatologists in understanding available models, comparing sources of data, and interpreting engineering and scientific results based on different solar reference spectra and irradiance models.

  3. Energetic solar electron spectra and gamma-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dröge, Wolfgang

    1996-06-01

    We analyze solar energetic electron events measured with particle detectors on board of the ISEE-3 (ICE) and Helios 1 and 2 spacecraft. Energy spectra in the range 0.1 to tens of MeV are generated applying the results of a careful re-examination of the electron response function of the instruments. The spectral shapes of events observed simultaneously, among them five on all three s/c, are in very good agreement inspite of the sometimes considerable difference in azimuthal and radial distances of the s/c with respect to the flare. These findings suggest that transport processes at the Sun and in the interplanetary medium depend only weakly on the electron energy and that the observed spectra are representative of the accelerated electron spectra at the Sun. A comparison of the electron spectra with SMM gamma-ray spectra gives evidence for the existence of different acceleration and emission mechanism in flares with long (LDEs) and short duration (SDEs) soft X-ray emission.

  4. ON THE INTERPRETATION OF SUPERNOVA LIGHT ECHO PROFILES AND SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, A.; Narayan, G.; Sinnott, B.; Welch, D. L.; R. J. Foley; Mandel, K.; Huber, M. E.; Blondin, S.

    2011-05-01

    The light echo (LE) systems of historical supernovae in the Milky Way and local group galaxies provide an unprecedented opportunity to reveal the effects of asymmetry on observables, particularly optical spectra. Scattering dust at different locations on the LE ellipsoid witnesses the supernova from different perspectives, and the light consequently scattered toward Earth preserves the shape of line profile variations introduced by asymmetries in the supernova photosphere. However, the interpretation of supernova LE spectra to date has not involved a detailed consideration of the effects of outburst duration and geometrical scattering modifications due to finite scattering dust filament dimension, inclination, and image point-spread function and spectrograph slit width. In this paper, we explore the implications of these factors and present a framework for future-resolved supernova LE spectra interpretation, and test it against Cas A and SN 1987A LE spectra. We conclude that the full modeling of the dimensions and orientation of the scattering dust using the observed LEs at two or more epochs is critical for the correct interpretation of LE spectra. Indeed, without doing so one might falsely conclude that differences exist when none are actually present.

  5. The mid-infrared transmission spectra of Antarctic ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The mid-IR (4000-450/cm; 2.5-22.2 microns) transmission spectra of seven Antarctic ureilites and 10 Antarctic H-5 ordinary chondrites are presented. The ureilite spectra show a number of absorption bands, the strongest of which is a wide, complex feature centered near 1000/cm (10 microns) due to Si-O stretching vibrations in silicates. The profiles and positions of the substructure in this feature indicate that Mg-rich olivines and pyroxenes are the main silicates responsible. The relative abundances of these two minerals, as inferred from the spectra, show substantial variation from meteorite to meteorite, but generally indicate olivine is the most abundant (olivine:pyroxene = 60:40 to 95:5). Both the predominance of olivine and the variable olivine-to-pyroxene ratio are consistent with the known composition and heterogeneity of ureilites. The H-5 ordinary chondrites spanned a range of weathering classes and were used to provide a means of addressing the extent to which the ureilite spectra may have been altered by weathering processes. It was found that, while weathering of these meteorites produces some weak bands due to the formation of small amounts of carbonates and hydrates, the profile of the main silicate feature has been little affected by Antarctic exposure in the meteorites studied here. The mid-IR ureilite spectra provide an additional means of testing potential asteroidal parent bodies for the ureilites.

  6. Analytic calculations of anharmonic infrared and Raman vibrational spectra.

    PubMed

    Cornaton, Yann; Ringholm, Magnus; Louant, Orian; Ruud, Kenneth

    2016-02-07

    Using a recently developed recursive scheme for the calculation of high-order geometric derivatives of frequency-dependent molecular properties [Ringholm et al., J. Comp. Chem., 2014, 35, 622], we present the first analytic calculations of anharmonic infrared (IR) and Raman spectra including anharmonicity both in the vibrational frequencies and in the IR and Raman intensities. In the case of anharmonic corrections to the Raman intensities, this involves the calculation of fifth-order energy derivatives-that is, the third-order geometric derivatives of the frequency-dependent polarizability. The approach is applicable to both Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham density functional theory. Using generalized vibrational perturbation theory to second order, we have calculated the anharmonic infrared and Raman spectra of the non- and partially deuterated isotopomers of nitromethane, where the inclusion of anharmonic effects introduces combination and overtone bands that are observed in the experimental spectra. For the major features of the spectra, the inclusion of anharmonicities in the calculation of the vibrational frequencies is more important than anharmonic effects in the calculated infrared and Raman intensities. Using methanimine as a trial system, we demonstrate that the analytic approach avoids errors in the calculated spectra that may arise if numerical differentiation schemes are used.

  7. Comparative Modelling of the Spectra of Cool Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebzelter, T.; Heiter, U.; Abia, C.; Eriksson, K.; Ireland, M.; Neilson, H.; Nowotny, W; Maldonado, J; Merle, T.; Peterson, R.; Plez, B.; Short, C. I.; Wahlgren, G. M.; Worley, C.; Aringer, B.; Bladh, S.; de Laverny, P.; Goswami, A.; Mora, A.; Norris, R. P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Scholz, M.; Thevenin, F.; Tsuji, T.; Kordopatis, G.

    2012-01-01

    Our ability to extract information from the spectra of stars depends on reliable models of stellar atmospheres and appropriate techniques for spectral synthesis. Various model codes and strategies for the analysis of stellar spectra are available today. Aims. We aim to compare the results of deriving stellar parameters using different atmosphere models and different analysis strategies. The focus is set on high-resolution spectroscopy of cool giant stars. Methods. Spectra representing four cool giant stars were made available to various groups and individuals working in the area of spectral synthesis, asking them to derive stellar parameters from the data provided. The results were discussed at a workshop in Vienna in 2010. Most of the major codes currently used in the astronomical community for analyses of stellar spectra were included in this experiment. Results. We present the results from the different groups, as well as an additional experiment comparing the synthetic spectra produced by various codes for a given set of stellar parameters. Similarities and differences of the results are discussed. Conclusions. Several valid approaches to analyze a given spectrum of a star result in quite a wide range of solutions. The main causes for the differences in parameters derived by different groups seem to lie in the physical input data and in the details of the analysis method. This clearly shows how far from a definitive abundance analysis we still are.

  8. Iron Mining Eta Carinae's Archived Spectra and Benchmarking Atomic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urech, Alexander; Bautista, M.; Gull, T. R.; Hartman, H.; Fivet, V.

    2013-01-01

    Fe II has proven to be one of the most conspicuous species in UV, visible, and IR spectra. The complexity of this atomic system still challenges current theoretical methods. Comparisons of available atomic data with different astronomical spectra is the focus of the current research. Spectra from the Orion and the Eta Carinae nebulae are being used in these studies. Orions spectrum contains over 70 emission line for [Fe II] which have been used in the systematical benchmarking of Einstein transition probabilities (A-values) for forbidden transitions of the interest species against calculations from literature and our own. The spectra from many other sources must be compared to end with accurate data, which is why examination of Eta Carinae is also taking place. The Weigelt blobs are close in ejectas thought to originate from the central star of Eta Carinae and are of particular interest in this study. IDL software is being used for measuring the forbidden [Fe II] transitions from these spectra collected with the Hubble Space Telescope/ Space Telescope Image Spectrograph.

  9. Analytic calculations of anharmonic infrared and Raman vibrational spectra

    PubMed Central

    Louant, Orian; Ruud, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Using a recently developed recursive scheme for the calculation of high-order geometric derivatives of frequency-dependent molecular properties [Ringholm et al., J. Comp. Chem., 2014, 35, 622], we present the first analytic calculations of anharmonic infrared (IR) and Raman spectra including anharmonicity both in the vibrational frequencies and in the IR and Raman intensities. In the case of anharmonic corrections to the Raman intensities, this involves the calculation of fifth-order energy derivatives—that is, the third-order geometric derivatives of the frequency-dependent polarizability. The approach is applicable to both Hartree–Fock and Kohn–Sham density functional theory. Using generalized vibrational perturbation theory to second order, we have calculated the anharmonic infrared and Raman spectra of the non- and partially deuterated isotopomers of nitromethane, where the inclusion of anharmonic effects introduces combination and overtone bands that are observed in the experimental spectra. For the major features of the spectra, the inclusion of anharmonicities in the calculation of the vibrational frequencies is more important than anharmonic effects in the calculated infrared and Raman intensities. Using methanimine as a trial system, we demonstrate that the analytic approach avoids errors in the calculated spectra that may arise if numerical differentiation schemes are used. PMID:26784673

  10. Characterization of radiation belt electron energy spectra from CRRES observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, W. R.; Lindstrom, C. D.; Ginet, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    Energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt and the slot region exhibit a wide variety of energy spectral forms, more so than radiation belt protons. We characterize the spatial and temporal dependence of these forms using observations from the CRRES satellite Medium Electron Sensor A (MEA) and High-Energy Electron Fluxmeter (HEEF) instruments, together covering an energy range 0.15-8 MeV. Spectra were classified with two independent methods, data clustering and curve-fitting analyses, in each case defining categories represented by power law, exponential, and bump-on-tail (BOT) or other complex shapes. Both methods yielded similar results, with BOT, exponential, and power law spectra respectively dominating in the slot region, outer belt, and regions just beyond the outer belt. The transition from exponential to power law spectra occurs at higher L for lower magnetic latitude. The location of the transition from exponential to BOT spectra is highly correlated with the location of the plasmapause. In the slot region during the days following storm events, electron spectra were observed to evolve from exponential to BOT yielding differential flux minima at 350-650 keV and maxima at 1.5-2 MeV; such evolution has been attributed to energy-dependent losses from scattering by whistler hiss.

  11. Local Mode Analysis: Decoding IR Spectra by Visualizing Molecular Details.

    PubMed

    Massarczyk, M; Rudack, T; Schlitter, J; Kuhne, J; Kötting, C; Gerwert, K

    2017-02-08

    Integration of experimental and computational approaches to investigate chemical reactions in proteins has proven to be very successful. Experimentally, time-resolved FTIR difference-spectroscopy monitors chemical reactions at atomic detail. To decode detailed structural information encoded in IR spectra, QM/MM calculations are performed. Here, we present a novel method which we call local mode analysis (LMA) for calculating IR spectra and assigning spectral IR-bands on the basis of movements of nuclei and partial charges from just a single QM/MM trajectory. Through LMA the decoding of IR spectra no longer requires several simulations or optimizations. The novel approach correlates the motions of atoms of a single simulation with the corresponding IR bands and provides direct access to the structural information encoded in IR spectra. Either the contributions of a particular atom or atom group to the complete IR spectrum of the molecule are visualized, or an IR-band is selected to visualize the corresponding structural motions. Thus, LMA decodes the detailed information contained in IR spectra and provides an intuitive approach for structural biologists and biochemists. The unique feature of LMA is the bidirectional analysis connecting structural details to spectral features and vice versa spectral features to molecular motions.

  12. Update from the Analysis of High Resolution Propane Spectra and the Interpretation of Titan's Infrared Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavans, V.; Nixon, C.; Hewagama, T.; Jennings, D. E.

    2012-04-01

    Titan has an extremely thick atmosphere dominated by nitrogen, but includes a range of trace species such as hydrocarbons and nitriles. One such hydrocarbon is propane (C3H8). Propane has 21 active IR bands covering broad regions of the mid-infrared. Therefore, its ubiquitous signature may potentially mask weaker signatures of other undetected species with important roles in Titan's chemistry. Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) observations of Titan's atmosphere hint at the presence of such molecules. Unfortunately, C3H8 line atlases for the vibration bands ν8, ν21, ν20, and ν7 (869, 922, 1054, and 1157 cm-1, respectively) are not currently available for subtracting the C3H8 signal to reveal, or constrain, the signature of underlying chemical species. Using spectra previously obtained by Jennings, D. E., et al. at the McMath-Pierce FTIR at Kitt Peak, AZ, as the source and automated analysis utilities developed for this application, we are compiling an atlas of spectroscopic parameters for propane that characterize the ro-vibrational transitions in the above bands. In this paper, we will discuss our efforts for inspecting and fitting the aforementioned bands, present updated results for spectroscopic parameters including absolute line intensities and transition frequencies in HITRAN and GEISA formats, and show how these optical constants will be used in searching for other trace chemical species in Titan's atmosphere. Our line atlas for the ν21 band contains a total number of 2971 lines. The band integrated strength calculated for the ν21 band is 1.003 cm-1/(cm-atm). Fig. 1: Demonstration of Gaussian fit for sample spectral region 927.25 to 927.50 cm-1 (ν21). References: Jennings, D. E., et al.: "Foreign-gas pressure broadening parameters of propane near 748 cm-1". JQSRT, Vol. 42, pp. 399-403, 1989.

  13. Expression, purification, and characterization of coiled coil and leucine zipper domains of C-terminal myosin binding subunit of myosin phosphatase for solution NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok K; Sawhney, Paramvir; Memisoglu, Gonen; Rigby, Alan C

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions between MBS and PKG are mediated by the involvement of C-terminal domain of MBS, MBS(CT180) and N-terminal coiled coil (CC) leucine zipper (LZ) domain of PKG-Iα, PKG-Iα1(-59). MBS(CT180) is comprised of three structurally variant domains of non-CC, CC, and LZ nature. Paucity of three-dimensional structural information of these MBS domains precludes atomic level understanding of MBS-PKG contractile complex structure. Here we present data on cloning, expression, and purification of CC, LZ, and CCLZ domains of MBS(CT180) and their biophysical characterization using size exclusion chromatography (SEC), circular dichroism (CD), and two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR. The methods as detailed resulted in high level protein expression and high milligram quantities of purified isotopically ((15)N and (13)C) enriched polypeptides. SEC, CD, and (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR experiments demonstrated that recombinantly expressed MBS CC domain is well folded and exists as a dimer within physiologic pH range, which is supported by our previous findings. The dimerization of CC MBS is likely mediated through formation of coiled coil conformation. In contrast, MBS LZ domain was almost unfolded that exists as non-stable low structured monomer within physiologic pH range. Protein folding and stability of MBS LZ was improved as a function of decrease in pH that adopts a folded, stable, and structured conformation at acidified pH 4.5. SEC and NMR analyses of LZ vs. CCLZ MBS domains indicated that inclusion of CC domain partially improves protein folding of LZ domain.

  14. Expression, purification and reconstitution of the C-terminal transmembrane domain of scavenger receptor BI into detergent micelles for NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Jensen, Davin R; Peterson, Francis C; Volkman, Brian F; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-03-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), the high density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor, is important for the delivery of HDL-cholesteryl esters to the liver for excretion via bile formation. The focus on therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing cholesterol levels highlights the critical need to understand the structural features of SR-BI that drive cholesterol removal. Yet, in the absence of a high-resolution structure of SR-BI, our understanding of how SR-BI interacts with HDL is limited. In this study, we have optimized the NMR solution conditions for the structural analysis of the C-terminal transmembrane domain of SR-BI that harbors putative domains required for receptor oligomerization. An isotopically-labeled SR-BI peptide encompassing residues 405-475 was bacterially-expressed and purified. [U-(15)N]-SR-BI(405-475) was incorporated into different detergent micelles and assessed by (1)H-(15)N-HSQC in order to determine which detergent micelle best maintained SR-BI(405-475) in a folded, native conformation for subsequent NMR analyses. We also determined the optimal detergent concentration used in micelles, as well as temperature, solution buffer and pH conditions. Based on (1)H-(15)N-HSQC peak dispersion, intensity, and uniformity, we determined that [U-(15)N]-SR-BI(405-475) should be incorporated into 5% detergent micelles consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phospho-[1'-rac-glycerol] (LPPG) and data collected at 40°C in a non-buffered solution at pH 6.8. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of SR-BI(405-475) to form dimers upon chemical crosslinking. These studies represent the first steps in obtaining high-resolution structural information by NMR for the HDL receptor that plays a critical role in regulating whole body cholesterol removal.

  15. Interpretation of Anomalous Ultraviolet Transitions of Fe II Observed in Laboratory Fourier Transform Spectra and Stellar HST and IUE Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sveneric; Brage, Tomas; Leckrone, David S.; Nave, Gillian; Wahlgren, Glenn M.

    1995-06-01

    We discuss LS-forbidden ΔS = 2 transitions of Fe II that appear as strong lines in ultraviolet stellar and laboratory spectra. The lines occur because of indirect level mixing-two close energy levels, W2P3/2 and x6P3/2, are mixed through a third level acting as a catalyst. In transition multiplets, that involve either the w2P3/2 or the x6P3/2 level, the normal component is accompanied by a close, parasite component. These components are well resolved in laboratory Fourier transform spectra, from which accurate intensity ratios can be measured. Spectra of the HgMn star χ Lupi recorded with the Hubble Space Telescope, show the normal and the parasite components resolved for the first time in stellar spectra. These have been used together with laboratory spectra to derive oscillator strengths for four multiplets and the mixing coefficients for the two interacting energy levels. We also provide improved spectroscopic data for all Fe ii multiplets that include the w2P3/2 and x6P3/2 levels. The level mixing involves the UV 191 multiplet of Fe II around 1780 Å, which is shown to have one parasite component. This multiplet is known to be a prominent emission feature in spectra of various objects, e.g., cool star chromospheres and symbiotic stars. As an example, we show IUE spectra of the eclipsing binary 32 Cyg, which provides perfect conditions for fluorescence experiments, and discuss possible excitation mechanisms of UV 191. Based on second-order perturbation theory and multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations, an atomic three-level model is constructed. This model explains the contradiction found when applying first-order perturbation theory, viz., two close energy levels perturbing each other without causing a repulsion.

  16. NMR Studies of Ligand Binding to P450eryF Provides Insight into the Mechanism of Cooperativity

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Arthur G.; Diaz, Maria D.; Lampe, Jed N.; Shireman, Laura; Grinstead, Jeffrey S.; Dabrowski, Michael J.; Pearson, Josh T.; Bowman, Michael K.; Atkins, William M.; Campbell, Ann P.

    2006-02-14

    Cytochrome P450’s (P450’s) catalyze the oxidative metabolism of most drugs and toxins. Although extensive studies have proven that some P450’s demonstrate both homotropic and heterotropic cooperativity toward a number of substrates, the mechanistic and molecular details of P450 allostery are still not well-established. Here, we use UV/vis and heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques to study the mechanism and thermodynamics of the binding of two 9-aminophenanthrene (9-AP) and testosterone (TST) molecules to the erythromycin-metabolizing bacterial P450eryF. UV/vis absorbance spectra of P450eryF demonstrated that binding occurs with apparent negative homotropic cooperativity for TST and positive homotropic cooperativity for 9-AP with Hill-equation-derived dissociation constants of KS ) 4 and 200 íM, respectively. The broadening and shifting observed in the 2D-{1H,15N}-HSQC-monitored titrations of 15N-Phe-labeled P450eryF with 9-AP and TST indicated binding on intermediate and fast chemical exhange time scales, respectively, which was consistent with the Hillequation- derived KS values for these two ligands. Regardless of the type of spectral perturbation observed (broadening for 9-AP and shifting for TST), the 15N-Phe NMR resonances most affected were the same in each titration, suggesting that the two ligands “contact” the same phenylalanines within the active site of P450eryF. This finding is in agreement with X-ray crystal structures of bound P450eryF showing different ligands occupying similar active-site niches. Complex spectral behavior was additionally observed for a small collection of resonances in the TST titration, interpreted as multiple binding modes for the lowaffinity TST molecule or multiple TST-bound P450eryF conformational substates. A structural and energetic model is presented that combines the energetics and structural aspects of 9-AP and TST binding derived from these observations.

  17. Structural and biochemical analysis of the Hordeum vulgare L. HvGR-RBP1 protein, a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein involved in the regulation of barley plant development and stress response.

    PubMed

    Tripet, Brian P; Mason, Katelyn E; Eilers, Brian J; Burns, Jennifer; Powell, Paul; Fischer, Andreas M; Copié, Valérie

    2014-12-23

    The timing of whole-plant senescence influences important agricultural traits such as yield and grain protein content. Post-transcriptional regulation by plant RNA-binding proteins is essential for proper control of gene expression, development, and stress responses. Here, we report the three-dimensional solution NMR structure and nucleic acid-binding properties of the barley glycine-rich RNA-binding protein HvGR-RBP1, whose transcript has been identified as being >45-fold up-regulated in early-as compared to late-senescing near-isogenic barley germplasm. NMR analysis reveals that HvGR-RBP1 is a multidomain protein comprising a well-folded N-terminal RNA Recognition Motif (RRM) and a structurally disordered C-terminal glycine-rich domain. Chemical shift differences observed in 2D (1)H-(15)N correlation (HSQC) NMR spectra of full-length HvGR-RBP1 and N-HvGR-RBP1 (RRM domain only) suggest that the two domains can interact both in-trans and intramolecularly, similar to what is observed in the tobacco NtGR-RBP1 protein. Further, we show that the RRM domain of HvGR-RBP1 binds single-stranded DNA nucleotide fragments containing the consensus nucleotide sequence 5'-TTCTGX-3' with low micromolar affinity in vitro. We also demonstrate that the C-terminal glycine-rich (HvGR) domain of Hv-GR-RBP1 can interact nonspecifically with ssRNA in vitro. Structural similarities with other plant glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins suggest that HvGR-RBP1 may be multifunctional. Based on gene expression analysis following cold stress in barley and E. coli growth studies following cold shock treatment, we conclude that HvGR-RBP1 functions in a manner similar to cold-shock proteins and harbors RNA chaperone activity. HvGR-RBP1 is therefore not only involved in the regulation of barley development including senescence, but also functions in plant responses to environmental stress.

  18. Structural characterization of the protein cce_0567 from Cyanothece 51142, a metalloprotein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2009-03-11

    The genome of many cyanobacacteria contain the sequence for a small protein (<100 amino acids) with a commom "domain of unknown function" grouped into the DUF683 protein family. While the biological function of DUF683 is still not known, their genomic location within nitrogen fixation clusters suggests that DUF683 proteins may play a role in the process. The diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 contains a gene for a protein that fall into the DUF683 family, cce_0567 (78 aa, 9.0 kDa). In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 proteins may play in nitrogen fixation, we have determined the first crystal structure for a protein in this family, cce_0567, to 1.84 Å resolution. Cce_0567 crystallized in space group P21 with two protein molecules and one Ni2+ cation per asymmetric unit. The protein is composed of two α-helices from residues P11 to G41 (α1) and L49-E74 (α2) with the second α-helix containing a short 310-helix (Y46 - N48). A four-residue linker (L42 - D45) between the helices allows them to form an anti-parallel bundle that cross over each other towards their termini. In solution it is likely that two molecules of cce_0567 form a rod-like dimer by the stacking interactions of ~1/2 of the protein. Histidine-36 is highly conserved in all known DUF683 proteins and the N2 nitrogen of the H36 side chain of each molecule in the dimer coordinate with Ni2+ in the crystal structure. The divalent cation Ni2+ was titrated into 15N-labelled cce_0567 and chemical shift perturbations were observed only in the 1H-15N HSQC spectra for residues at, or near, the site of Ni2+ binding observed in the crystal structure. There was no evidence for an increase in the size of cce_0567 upon binding Ni2+, even in large molar excess of Ni2+, indicating that a metal was not required for dimer formation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that cce_0567 was extremely robust, with a melting temperature of ~62ºC that was reversible.

  19. Fitting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Optical Spectra

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a comprehensive methodology for the fitting of single-walled carbon nanotube absorption spectra is presented. Different approaches to background subtraction, choice of line profile, and calculation of full width at half-maximum are discussed both in the context of previous literature and the contemporary understanding of carbon nanotube photophysics. The fitting is improved by the inclusion of exciton–phonon sidebands, and new techniques to improve the individualization of overlapped nanotube spectra by exploiting correlations between the first- and second-order optical transitions and the exciton–phonon sidebands are presented. Consideration of metallic nanotubes allows an analysis of the metallic/semiconducting content, and a process of constraining the fit of highly congested spectra of carbon nanotube solid films according to the spectral weights of each (n, m) species in solution is also presented, allowing for more reliable resolution of overlapping peaks into single (n, m) species contributions. PMID:28393134

  20. HITRAN spectroscopy evaluation using solar occultation FTIR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, Geoffrey C.; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Sung, Keeyoon; Rothman, Laurence S.; E. Gordon, Iouli

    2016-10-01

    High resolution FTIR solar occultation spectra, acquired by the JPL MkIV Fourier transform spectrometer from balloon, covering 650-5650 cm-1 at 0.01 cm-1 resolution, are systematically analyzed using the last four versions of the HITRAN linelist (2000, 2004, 2008, 2012). The rms spectral fitting residuals are used to assess the quality and adequacy of the linelists as a function of wavenumber and altitude. Although there have been substantial overall improvements with each successive version of HITRAN, there are nevertheless a few spectral regions where the latest HITRAN version (2012) has regressed, or produces residuals that far exceed the noise level. A few of these instances are investigated further and their causes identified. We emphasize that fitting atmospheric spectra, in addition to laboratory spectra, should be part of the quality assurance for any new linelist before public release.