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Sample records for 1h-1h cosy nmr

  1. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids. PMID:26203019

  2. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  3. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  4. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  5. Determination of relative orientation between (1)H CSA tensors from a 3D solid-state NMR experiment mediated through (1)H/(1)H RFDR mixing under ultrafast MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    To obtain piercing insights into inter and intramolecular H-bonding, and π-electron interactions measurement of (1)H chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors is gradually becoming an obvious choice. While the magnitude of CSA tensors provides unique information about the local electronic environment surrounding the nucleus, the relative orientation between these tensors can offer further insights into the spatial arrangement of interacting nuclei in their respective three-dimensional (3D) space. In this regard, we present a 3D anisotropic/anisotropic/isotropic proton chemical shift (CSA/CSA/CS) correlation experiment mediated through (1)H/(1)H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) which enhances spin diffusion through recoupled (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequency (70kHz). Relative orientation between two interacting 1H CSA tensors is obtained by fitting two-interacting (1)H CSA tensors by fitting two-dimensional (2D) (1)H/(1)H CSA/CSA spectral slices through extensive numerical simulations. To recouple (1)H CSAs in the indirect frequency dimensions of a 3D experiment we have employed γ-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence based on R-symmetry (R188(7)) with a series of phase-alternated 2700(°)-90180(°) composite-180° pulses on citric acid sample. Due to robustness of applied (1)H CSA recoupling sequence towards the presence of RF field inhomogeneity, we have successfully achieved an excellent (1)H/(1)H CSA/CSA cross-correlation efficiency between H-bonded sites of citric acid. PMID:26065628

  6. 2D-Cosy NMR Spectroscopy as a Quantitative Tool in Biological Matrix: Application to Cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Gilles; Evrard, Brigitte; de Tullio, Pascal

    2015-11-01

    Classical analytical quantifications in biological matrices require time-consuming sample pre-treatments and extractions. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis does not require heavy sample treatments or extractions which therefore increases its accuracy in quantification. In this study, even if quantitative (q)NMR could not be applied to 2D spectra, we demonstrated that cross-correlations and diagonal peak intensities have a linear relationship with the analyzed pharmaceutical compound concentration. This work presents the validation process of a 2D-correlation spectroscopy (COSY) NMR quantification of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in plasma. Specificity, linearity, precision (repeatability and intermediate precision), trueness, limits of quantification (LOQs), and accuracy were used as validation criteria. 2D-NMR could therefore be used as a valuable and accurate analytical technique for the quantification of pharmaceutical compounds, including hardly detectable compounds such as cyclodextrins or poloxamers, in complex biological matrices based on a calibration curve approach.

  7. Complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for ten phenylpiperazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhihui; Yuan, Mu; Zhang, Si; Wu, Jun; Qi, Shuhua; Li, Qingxin

    2005-10-01

    Ten phenylpiperazine derivatives were designed and synthesized. The first complete assignments of (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts for these phenylpiperazine derivatives were achieved by means of 1D and 2D NMR techniques, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra.

  8. Complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for 10 phenylethanoid glycosides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Huang, Jianshe; Xiao, Qiang; Zhang, Si; Xiao, Zhihui; Li, Qingxin; Long, Lijuan; Huang, Liangmin

    2004-07-01

    Ten phenylethanoid glycosides, including two new ones, isolated from the aerial parts of the mangrove plant Acanthus ilicifolius were identified. The first complete assignments of the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts for these glycosides were achieved by means of 2D NMR techniques, including 1H-1H COSY, TOCSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra.

  9. Dynamics-based selective 2D 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectroscopy under ultrafast MAS conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics plays important roles in determining the physical, chemical, and functional properties of a variety of chemical and biological materials. However, a material (such as a polymer) generally has mobile and rigid regions in order to have high strength and toughness at the same time. Therefore, it is difficult to measure the role of mobile phase without being affected by the rigid components. Herein, we propose a highly sensitive solid-state NMR approach that utilizes a dipolar-coupling based filter (composed of 12 equally spaced 90° RF pulses) to selectively measure the correlation of 1H chemical shifts from the mobile regions of a material. It is interesting to find that the rotor-synchronized dipolar filter strength decreases with increasing inter-pulse delay between the 90° pulses, whereas the dipolar filter strength increases with increasing inter-pulse delay under static conditions. In this study, we also demonstrate the unique advantages of proton-detection under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning conditions to enhance the spectral resolution and sensitivity for studies on small molecules as well as multi-phase polymers. Our results further demonstrate the use of finite-pulse radio-frequency driven recoupling pulse sequence to efficiently recouple weak proton-proton dipolar couplings in the dynamic regions of a molecule and to facilitate the fast acquisition of 1H/1H correlation spectrum compared to the traditional 2D NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) experiment. We believe that the proposed approach is beneficial to study mobile components in multi-phase systems, such as block copolymers, polymer blends, nanocomposites, heterogeneous amyloid mixture of oligomers and fibers, and other materials. PMID:26026440

  10. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of four new steroidal glycosides from a gorgonian coral Junceella juncea.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shuhua; Zhang, Si; Huang, Jianshe; Xiao, Zhihui; Wu, Jun; Li, Qingxin

    2005-03-01

    Four new cholest-type steroidal glycosides, junceellosides A-D, isolated from the EtOH/CH(2)Cl(2) extracts of the South China Sea gorgonian coral Junceella juncea, were identified. Complete assignments of the (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts for these compounds were achieved by means of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY spectra.

  11. Crystal structure of 1H,1'H-[2,2'-biimid-azol]-3-ium hydrogen tartrate hemi-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Li; Bian, Li-Fang; Guo, Shao-Wei

    2014-11-01

    In the crystal of the title hydrated salt, C6H7N4 (+)·C4H5O6 (-)·0.5H2O, the bi-imidazole monocation, 1H,1'H-[2,2'-biimidazol]-3-ium, is hydrogen bonded, via N-H⋯O, O-H⋯O and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, to the hydrogen tartrate anion and the water mol-ecule, which is located on a twofold rotation axis, forming sheets parallel to (001). The sheets are linked via C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional structure. There are also C=O⋯π inter-actions present [O⋯π distances are 3.00 (9) and 3.21 (7) Å], involving the carbonyl O atoms and the imidazolium ring, which may help to consolidate the structure. In the cation, the dihedral angle between the rings is 11.6 (2)°.

  12. Complete assignments of (1)H and (13)C NMR data for two 3beta,8beta-epoxymexicanolides from the fruit of a Chinese mangrove Xylocarpus granatum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Xiao, Zhihui; Song, Yang; Zhang, Si; Xiao, Qiang; Ma, Cha; Ding, Haixin; Li, Qingxin

    2006-01-01

    Three 3beta,8beta-epoxymexicanolides, including xyloccensin K, 6-acetoxycedrodorin and a new one named xyloccensin W, were isolated from the fruit of a Chinese mangrove Xylocarpus granatum. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analyses. The first complete assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR data for xyloccensin W was achieved by means of 2D NMR techniques, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY spectra. In addition, the confusion of (1)H and (13)C NMR data previously reported for xyloccensin K was clarified.

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of the 1-substituted 3,3-diphenyl-4-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)azetidin-2-ones: Application of 13C NMR, 1H- 13C COSY NMR and mass spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Girija S.; Pheko, Tshepo

    2008-08-01

    The article deals with spectroscopic characterization of azetidin-2-ones. The presence of substituents like hydroxyl, fluoro, methoxy and benzhydryl, etc., on the azetidin-2-one ring significantly affects the IR absorption and 13C NMR frequencies of the carbonyl group present in these compounds. The presence of an ester carbonyl group or too many methine protons in the molecule has been observed to limit the scope of IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy in unambiguous assignment of the structure. The application of 13C NMR, 2D NMR ( 1H- 13C COSY) and mass spectroscopy in characterization of complex azetidin-2-ones is discussed. An application of the latter two techniques is described in deciding unequivocally between an azetidin-2-one ring and chroman-2-one ring structure for the product obtained by treatment of the 1-substituted 3,3-diphenyl-4-[2'-( O-diphenylacyl)hydroxyphenyl]-2-azetidinones with ethanolic sodium hydroxide at room temperature.

  14. Simple Approaches for Estimating Vicinal 1H- 1H Coupling-Constants and for Obtaining Stereospecific Resonance Assignments in Leucine Side Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantine, K. L.; Friedrichs, M. S.; Mueller, L.

    An approach for deriving stereospecific δ-methyl assignments and χ 2 dihedral angle constraints for leucine residues, based on easily recognized patterns of 1H- 1H spin-spin coupling constants and intraresidue nuclear-Overhauser-effect spectroscopy (NOESY) cross-peak intensities, is described. The approach depends on resolved H γ and/or δ-methyl resonances and on initially obtaining stereospecific assignments for H β2 and H β3. As part of the overall strategy, a method is presented for obtaining qualitative or, in favorable cases, semiquantitative estimates of vicinal 1H- 1H coupling constants from peak intensities measured in a short-mixing-time 1H- 1H total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY) experiment. This method of estimating 1H- 1H spin-spin coupling constants is generally applicable to all side-chain types. The approach is illustrated for several leucine residues within uniformly 15N-labeled and 15N/ 13C-double-labeled isolated light-chain variable domain of the anti-digoxin antibody 26-10. Estimates of 3Jαβ and 3Jβγ coupling constants are derived from a three-dimensional (3D) 13C-edited TOCSY-heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) spectrum. These data are combined with information from 3D 15N-edited NOESY and 3D 13C-edited NOESY spectra to yield stereospecific H β2, H β3, and δ-methyl assignments, as well as constraints on χ (1) and χ 2 dihedral angles. Although the overall approach is illustrated using 3D 15N-edited and 13C-edited data, it is equally applicable to analysis of two-dimensional 1H- 1H NOESY and TOCSY spectra.

  15. Monoterpene Unknowns Identified Using IR, [to the first power]H-NMR, [to the thirteenth power]C-NMR, DEPT, COSY, and HETCOR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alty, Lisa T.

    2005-01-01

    A study identifies a compound from a set of monoterpenes using infrared (IR) and one-dimensional (1D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. After identifying the unknown, each carbon and proton signal can be interpreted and assigned to the structure using the information in the two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra, correlation spectroscopy…

  16. Finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling with phase cycling for 2D 1H/1H correlation at ultrafast MAS frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Yusuke; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-06-01

    The first-order recoupling sequence radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) is commonly used in single-quantum/single-quantum homonuclear correlation 2D experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS) to determine homonuclear proximities. From previously reported analysis of the use of XY-based super-cycling schemes to enhance the efficiency of the finite-pulse-RFDR (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence, XY814 phase cycling was found to provide the optimum performance for 2D correlation experiments on low-γ nuclei. In this study, we analyze the efficiency of different phase cycling schemes for proton-based fp-RFDR experiments. We demonstrate the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle XY414 that only recouples the zero-quantum homonuclear dipolar coupling, for the fp-RFDR sequence in 2D 1H/1H correlation experiments at ultrafast MAS frequencies. The dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY414 and XY814 phase cycling schemes are compared based on results obtained from 2D 1H/1H correlation experiments, utilizing the fp-RFDR pulse sequence, on powder samples of U-13C,15N-L-alanine, N-acetyl-15N-L-valyl-15N-L-leucine, and glycine. Experimental results and spin dynamics simulations show that XY414 performs the best when a high RF power is used for the 180° pulse, whereas XY4 renders the best performance when a low RF power is used. The effects of RF field inhomogeneity and chemical shift offsets are also examined. Overall, our results suggest that a combination of fp-RFDR-XY414 employed in the recycle delay with a large RF-field to decrease the recycle delay, and fp-RFDR-XY4 in the mixing period with a moderate RF-field, is a robust and efficient method for 2D single-quantum/single-quantum 1H/1H correlation experiments at ultrafast MAS frequencies.

  17. Bioinspired, cysteamine-catalyzed co-silicification of (1H, 1H, 2H, 2HPerfluorooctyl) triethoxysilane and tetraethyl orthosilicate: formation of superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Hun; Kim, Ji Yup; Cho, Woo Kyung; Choi, Insung S

    2014-03-01

    Bioinspired silicification attracts a great deal of interest because of its physiologically relevant, mild conditions for hydrolysis and condensation of silica precursors, which makes the bioinspired approach superior to the conventional sol–gel process, particularly when dealing with biological entities. However, the morphological control of silica structures with incorporation of functional groups in the bioinspired silicilication has been unexplored. In this work, we co-silicificated (1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorooctyl)triethoxysilane and tetraethyl orthosilicate to investigate the morphological evolution of fluorinated silica structures in the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-mediated, cysteamine-catalyzed silicification. The generated micrometer-long wormlike and spherical silica structures display superhydrophobicity after film formation. Interestingly, the measurement of dynamic water contact angles shows that the morphological difference leads to a different wetting state, either the self-cleaning or the pinning state of the superhydrophobic surface.

  18. Complex mixture analysis of organic compounds in green coffee bean extract by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Furihata, Kazuo; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2010-11-01

    A complex mixture analysis by one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was carried out for the first time for the identification and quantification of organic compounds in green coffee bean extract (GCBE). A combination of (1)H-(1)H DQF-COSY, (1)H-(13)C HSQC, and (1)H-(13)C CT-HMBC two-dimensional sequences was used, and 16 compounds were identified. In particular, three isomers of caffeoylquinic acid were identified in the complex mixture without any separation. In addition, GCBE components were quantified by the integration of carbon signals by use of a relaxation reagent and an inverse-gated decoupling method without a nuclear Overhauser effect. This NMR methodology provides detailed information about the kinds and amounts of GCBE components, and in our study, the chemical makeup of GCBE was clarified by the NMR results.

  19. Developing SABRE as an analytical tool in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Lyrelle Stacey

    Work presented in this thesis centres around the application of the new hyperpolarisation technique, SABRE, within nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, focusing on optimisation of the technique to characterise small organic molecules. While pyridine was employed as a model substrate, studies on a range of molecules are investigated including substituted pyridines, quinolines, thiazoles and indoles are detailed. Initial investigations explored how the properties of the SABRE catalyst effect the extent of polarisation transfer exhibited. The most important of these properties proved to be the rate constants for loss of pyridine and hydrides as these define the contact time of pyridine with the parahydrogen derived hydride ligands in the metal template. The effect of changing the temperature, solvent or concentration of substrate or catalyst are rationalised. For instance, the catalyst ICy(a) exhibits relatively slow ligand exchange rates and increasing the temperature during hyperpolarisation increases the observed signal enhancements. These studies have revealed a second polarisation transfer template can be used with SABRE in which two substrate molecules are bound. This allows the possibility of investigation of larger substrates which might otherwise be too sterically encumbered to bind. Another significant advance relates to the first demonstration that SABRE can be used in conjunction with an automated system designed with Bruker allowing the acquisition of scan averaged, phase cycled and traditional 2D spectra. The system also allowed investigations into the effect of the polarisation transfer field and application of that knowledge to collect single-scan 13C data for characterisation. The successful acquisition of 1H NOESY, 1H-1H COSY, 1H-13C 2D and ultrafast 1H-1H COSY NMR sequences is detailed for a 10 mM concentration sample, with 1H data collected for a 1 mM sample. A range of studies which aim to demonstrate the applicability of SABRE to the

  20. COSY INFINITY reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Berz, M.

    1990-07-01

    This is a reference manual for the arbitrary order particle optics and beam dynamics code COSY INFINITY. It is current as of June 28, 1990. COSY INFINITY is a code to study and design particle optical systems, including beamlines, spectrometers, and particle accelerators. At its core it is using differential algebraic (DA) methods, which allow a very systematic and simple calculation of high order effects. At the same time, it allows the computation of dependences on system parameters, which is often interesting in its own right and can also be used for fitting. COSY INFINITY has a full structured object oriented language environment. This provides a simple interface for the casual user. At the same time, it offers the demanding user a very flexible and powerful tool for the study and design of systems, and more generally, the utilization of DA methods. The power and generality of the environment is perhaps best demonstrated by the fact that the physics routines of COSY INFINITY are written in its own input language and are very compact. The approach also considerably facilitates the implementation of new features because they are incorporated with the same commands that are used for design and study. 26 refs.

  1. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of three new polyhydroxylated sterols from the South China Sea gorgonian Subergorgia suberosa.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shu-Hua; Zhang, Si; Wang, Yi-Fei; Li, Ming-Yi

    2007-12-01

    Three new polyhydroxylated sterols, 3beta,6alpha,11,20beta,24-pentahydroxy- 9,11-seco-5alpha-24-ethylcholest-7,28-diene-9-one (1), 3-(1',2'-ethandiol)-24- methylcholest-8(9),22E-diene-3beta,5alpha,6alpha,7alpha,11alpha-pentaol (2), 24-methylcholest-7,22 E-diene-3beta,5alpha,6beta,25-tetraol (3) together with five known sterols, were isolated from the EtOH/CH2Cl2 extract of the South China Sea gorgonian Subergorgia suberosa. The complete assignments of the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts for these new compounds were achieved by means of 1D and 2D NMR techniques, including HSQC, HMBC, 1H--1H COSY, and NOESY spectra.

  2. Structure elucidation of organic compounds from natural sources using 1D and 2D NMR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, Gulacti; Ulubelen, Ayhan

    2007-05-01

    In our continuing studies on Lamiaceae family plants including Salvia, Teucrium, Ajuga, Sideritis, Nepeta and Lavandula growing in Anatolia, many terpenoids, consisting of over 50 distinct triterpenoids and steroids, and over 200 diterpenoids, several sesterterpenoids and sesquiterpenoids along with many flavonoids and other phenolic compounds have been isolated. For Salvia species abietanes, for Teucrium and Ajuga species neo-clerodanes for Sideritis species ent-kaurane diterpenes are characteristic while nepetalactones are specific for Nepeta species. In this review article, only some interesting and different type of skeleton having constituents, namely rearranged, nor- or rare diterpenes, isolated from these species will be presented. For structure elucidation of these natural diterpenoids intensive one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques ( 1H, 13C, APT, DEPT, NOE/NOESY, 1H- 1H COSY, HETCOR, COLOC, HMQC/HSQC, HMBC, SINEPT) were used besides mass and some other spectroscopic methods.

  3. Complete 1H NMR spectral analysis of ten chemical markers of Ginkgo biloba

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, José G.; Lankin, David C.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2013-01-01

    The complete and unambiguous 1H NMR assignments of ten marker constituents of Ginkgo biloba are described. The comprehensive 1H NMR profiles (fingerprints) of ginkgolide A, ginkgolide B, ginkgolide C, ginkgolide J, bilobalide, quercetin, kaempferol, isorhamnetin, isoquercetin, and rutin in DMSO-d6 were obtained through the examination of 1D 1H NMR and 2D 1H,1H-COSY data, in combination with 1H iterative Full Spin Analysis (HiFSA). The computational analysis of discrete spin systems allowed a detailed characterization of all the 1H NMR signals in terms of chemical shifts (δH) and spin-spin coupling constants (JHH), regardless of signal overlap and higher order coupling effects. The capability of the HiFSA-generated 1H fingerprints to reproduce experimental 1H NMR spectra at different field strengths was also evaluated. As a result of this analysis, a revised set of 1H NMR parameters for all ten phytoconstituents was assembled. Furthermore, precise 1H NMR assignments of the sugar moieties of isoquercetin and rutin are reported for the first time. PMID:22730238

  4. X-ray structure, NMR and stability-in-solution study of 6-(furfurylamino)-9-(tetrahydropyran-2-yl)purine - A new active compound for cosmetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walla, Jan; Szüčová, Lucie; Císařová, Ivana; Gucký, Tomáš; Zatloukal, Marek; Doležal, Karel; Greplová, Jarmila; Massino, Frank J.; Strnad, Miroslav

    2010-06-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of 6-(furfurylamino)-9-(tetrahydropyran-2-yl)purine ( 1) was determined at 150(2) K. The compound crystallizes in monoclinic P2 1/ c space group with a = 10.5642(2), b = 13.6174(3), c = 10.3742(2) Å, V = 1460.78(5) Å 3, Z = 4, R( F) = for 3344 unique reflections. The purine moiety and furfuryl ring are planar and the tetrahydropyran-2-yl is disordered in the ratio 1:3, probably due to the chiral carbon atom C(17). The individual 1H and 13C NMR signals were assigned by 2D correlation experiments such as 1H- 1H COSY and ge-2D HSQC. Stability-in-solution was determined in methanol/water in acidic pH (3-7).

  5. Xylocarpins A and B, two new mexicanolides from the seeds of a Chinese mangrove Xylocarpus granatum: NMR investigation in mixture.

    PubMed

    Li, Minyi; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Si; Xiao, Qiang; Li, Qingxin

    2007-08-01

    Xylocarpins A and B, two new mexicanolides with a tiglate group at C-3, have been identified in the mixture using NMR spectroscopy. Both compounds were isolated in the mixture from the seeds of a Chinese mangrove Xylocarpus granatum. The first complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for these mexicanolides were achieved by means of 2D NMR techniques, including 1H-1H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY spectra. In order to separate xylocarpins A (1) and B (2) by chemical method, the mixture of two compounds was reduced with sodium borohydride in anhydrous methanol. However, the reduction led to the opening of the delta-lactone ring in xylocarpin B and afforded compound 3 as the main product. The complete NMR assignments of compound 3 were also achieved by means of the above 2D NMR techniques. Moreover, xylocarpin A was easily transformed into xylocarpin B during our normal liquid column chromatography. From this point of view, xylocarpin A was deemed to be the genuine natural product and xylocarpin B might be an artifact.

  6. Preparation and dielectric properties of core-shell structural composites of poly(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl methacrylate)@BaTiO3 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianhong; Chen, Haochuan; Ma, Yuhong; Zhao, Changwen; Yang, Wantai

    2013-07-01

    Polymer nanocomposite films, poly(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl methacrylate)@BaTiO3 (PPFOMA@BaTiO3), with enhanced dielectric permittivity was fabricated via a two-step processes, consisting of BaTiO3 nanoparticle surface modification and surface initiated atom transfer radical grafting polymerization (SI-ATRP). At first, BaTiO3 nanoparticles were treated by hydroxylation, silylation and amidation to offer their SI-ATRP capability. Then PPFOMA chains were grafted from the modified BaTiO3 nanoparticles by SI-ATRP at 70 °C to form core-shell composites. The effects of polymer structure and polymer/BaTiO3 ratios on dielectric properties were measured over a broad frequency from 40 Hz to 30 MHz at room temperature. The results showed that the dielectric constant (k) increased and dielectric loss reduced significantly with the addition of BaTiO3. The k of the composite was up to 7.4 at 100 kHz at room temperature when the BaTiO3 loading was up to 70.70 wt% which is almost three time of pure PPFOMA (k = 2.6). While the dielectric loss (tan δ) of PPFOMA@BaTiO3 composite was about 0.01, which was much lower than that of the pure PPFOMA (tan δ = 0.04).

  7. Responsive Copolymer Brushes of Poly[(2-(Methacryloyloxy)Ethyl) Trimethylammonium Chloride] (PMETAC) and Poly((1)H,(1)H,(2)H,(2)H-Perfluorodecyl acrylate) (PPFDA) to Modulate Surface Wetting Properties.

    PubMed

    Politakos, Nikolaos; Azinas, Stavros; Moya, Sergio Enrique

    2016-04-01

    Polymer brushes have a large potential for controlling properties such as surface lubrication or wetting through facile functionalization. Polymer chemistry, chain density, and length impact on the wetting properties of brushes. This study explores the use of diblock copolymer brushes with different block length and spatial arrangement of the blocks to tune surface wettability. Block copolymer brushes of the polyelectrolyte [2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride (PMETAC) with a contact angle of 17° and a hydrophobic block of (1)H, (1)H, (2)H, (2)H-perfluorodecyl Acrylate (PPFDA) with a contact angle of 130° are synthesized by RAFT polymerization. By changing the sequence of polymerization either block is synthesized as top or bottom block. By varying the concentration of initiator the length of the blocks is varied. Contact angle values with intermediate values between 17° and 130° are measured. In addition, by changing solvent pH and in presence of a different salt the contact angle of the copolymer brushes can be fine tuned. Brushes are characterized by atomic force microscopy, Raman confocal microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  8. Unraveling the active hypoglycemic agent trigonelline in Balanites aegyptiaca date fruit using metabolite fingerprinting by NMR.

    PubMed

    Farag, Mohamed A; Porzel, Andrea; Wessjohann, Ludger A

    2015-11-10

    Trigonelline (3-carboxy-1-methyl pyridinium) was identified as a relevant bioactivity and taste imparting component in Balanites aegyptiaca fruit, using (1)H NMR of crude extracts without any fractionation or isolation step. The structural integrity of trigonelline was established within the extract matrix via(1)H NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HMQC and HMBC and by comparison with authentic standard. A quantitative (1)H NMR method (qHNMR) was used to determine trigonelline concentrations in the peel and pulp of B. aegyptiaca fruit of 8 and 13mgg(-1), respectively. Trigonelline so far has not been reported from B. aegyptiaca or its genus as it easily escapes LC-MS based detection. Its discovery provides novel insight into the balanite fruits antidiabetic properties as the compound is known for a pronounced hypoglycemic effect. In addition, it is likely to impart the perceptible bitter taste portion to balanites sweet bitter taste. UPLC-MS of the crude extract additionally revealed the fruit flavonoid pattern showing quercetin/isorhamnetin flavonol conjugates in addition to epicatechin, the latter being present at much lower levels. PMID:26275727

  9. Constant-time 2D and 3D through-bond correlation NMR spectroscopy of solids under 60 kHz MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-01-01

    Establishing connectivity and proximity of nuclei is an important step in elucidating the structure and dynamics of molecules in solids using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Although recent studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of proton-detected multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments under ultrafast-MAS frequencies and obtaining high-resolution spectral lines of protons, assignment of proton resonances is a major challenge. In this study, we first re-visit and demonstrate the feasibility of 2D constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak correlation (CTUC-COSY) NMR experiment on rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS conditions, where the sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by the reduced spin-spin relaxation rate and the use of low radio-frequency power for heteronuclear decoupling during the evolution intervals of the pulse sequence. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the performance of a proton-detected pulse sequence to obtain a 3D 1H/13C/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum by incorporating an additional cross-polarization period in the CTUC-COSY pulse sequence to enable proton chemical shift evolution and proton detection in the incrementable t1 and t3 periods, respectively. In addition to through-space and through-bond 13C/1H and 13C/13C chemical shift correlations, the 3D 1H/13C/1H experiment also provides a COSY-type 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum, where only the chemical shifts of those protons, which are bonded to two neighboring carbons, are correlated. By extracting 2D F1/F3 slices (1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum) at different 13C chemical shift frequencies from the 3D 1H/13C/1H spectrum, resonances of proton atoms located close to a specific carbon atom can be identified. Overall, the through-bond and through-space homonuclear/heteronuclear proximities determined from the 3D 1H/13C/1H experiment would be useful to study the structure and dynamics of a variety of chemical and biological

  10. Constant-time 2D and 3D through-bond correlation NMR spectroscopy of solids under 60 kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-01-21

    Establishing connectivity and proximity of nuclei is an important step in elucidating the structure and dynamics of molecules in solids using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Although recent studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of proton-detected multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments under ultrafast-MAS frequencies and obtaining high-resolution spectral lines of protons, assignment of proton resonances is a major challenge. In this study, we first re-visit and demonstrate the feasibility of 2D constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak correlation (CTUC-COSY) NMR experiment on rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS conditions, where the sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by the reduced spin-spin relaxation rate and the use of low radio-frequency power for heteronuclear decoupling during the evolution intervals of the pulse sequence. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the performance of a proton-detected pulse sequence to obtain a 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum by incorporating an additional cross-polarization period in the CTUC-COSY pulse sequence to enable proton chemical shift evolution and proton detection in the incrementable t1 and t3 periods, respectively. In addition to through-space and through-bond (13)C/(1)H and (13)C/(13)C chemical shift correlations, the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H experiment also provides a COSY-type (1)H/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum, where only the chemical shifts of those protons, which are bonded to two neighboring carbons, are correlated. By extracting 2D F1/F3 slices ((1)H/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum) at different (13)C chemical shift frequencies from the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H spectrum, resonances of proton atoms located close to a specific carbon atom can be identified. Overall, the through-bond and through-space homonuclear/heteronuclear proximities determined from the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H experiment would be useful to study the structure and dynamics of

  11. Structural analysis of sulfated fucans by high-field NMR.

    PubMed

    Mulloy, B; Ribeiro, A C; Vieira, R P; Mourão, P A

    1994-02-01

    The structures of several sulfated polysaccharides isolated from marine organisms have been determined by a combination of degradative and spectroscopic techniques. For two sulphated fucans, one isolated from the sea cucumber L. grisea, and one from the sea urchin L. variegatus, a novel type of polysaccharide structure is proposed based on the analysis of one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. Both polysaccharides are linear, 1-->3 linked alpha-L-fucans in which a four-residue repeating unit is defined by specific patterns of sulfation at the 2- and 4-positions. The four residues give rise to spin systems which may be identified by 2-dimensional 1H-1H correlated spectroscopy (COSY), and the sequence of the residues is deduced from inter-residue nuclear Overhauser enhancements which produce cross-peaks in the NOESY spectrum. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first polysaccharides for which a regular repeating unit is defined by the pattern of sulfate substitution alone.

  12. Liquid- and solid-state high-resolution NMR methods for the investigation of aging processes of silicone breast implants.

    PubMed

    Birkefeld, Anja Britta; Bertermann, Rüdiger; Eckert, Hellmut; Pfleiderer, Bettina

    2003-01-01

    To investigate aging processes of silicone gel breast implants, which may include migration of free unreacted material from the gel and rubber to local (e.g. connective tissue capsule) or distant sites in the body, chemical alteration of the polymer and infiltration of body compounds, various approaches of multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments (29Si, 13C, 1H) were evaluated. While 29Si, 13C, and 1H solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR techniques performed on virgin and explanted envelopes of silicone prostheses provided only limited information, high-resolution liquid-state NMR techniques of CDCl(3) extracts were highly sensitive analytical tools for the detection of aging related changes in the materials. Using 2D 1H, 1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and 29Si, 1H heteronuclear multiple bond coherence (HMBC) experiments with gradient selection, it was possible to detect lipids (mainly phospholipids) as well as silicone oligomer species in explanted envelopes and gels. Silicone oligomers were also found in connective tissue capsules, indicating that cyclic polysiloxanes can migrate from intact implants to adjacent and distant sites. Furthermore, lipids can permeate the implant and modify its chemical composition.

  13. Chemistry and structure of a host-guest relationship: the power of NMR and X-ray diffraction in tandem.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi-Qiang; Day, Victor W; Bowman-James, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    An amine/amide mixed covalent organic tetrahedral cage 1 (H(12)) was synthesized and characterized. The H(12) cage contains 12 amide NH groups plus four tertiary amine N groups, the latter of which are positioned in a pseudo-tetrahedral array. Crystallographic findings indicate that the tetrahedral host can adopt either a pseudo-C(3) symmetric "compressed tetrahedron" structure, or one in which there are two sets of three stacked pyridine units related by a pseudo-S(4) axis. The latter conformation is ideal for encapsulating small pentameric clusters, either a water molecule or a fluoride ion surrounded by a tetrahedral array of water molecules, i.e., H(2)O·4H(2)O or F(-)·4H(2)O, as observed crystallographically. In solution, however, (19)F NMR spectroscopy indicates that H(12) encapsulates fluoride ion through direct amide hydrogen bonding. By collectively combining one-dimensional (1)H, (13)C, and (19)F with two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H COSY, (1)H-(13)C HSQC, and (1)H-(19)F HETCOR NMR techniques, the solution binding mode of fluoride can be ascertained as consisting of four sets of independent structural subunits with C(3) symmetry. A complex deuterium exchange process for the fluoride complex can also be unraveled by multiple NMR techniques.

  14. Physics at COSY-Juelich

    SciTech Connect

    Stroeher, Hans

    2011-10-21

    COSY, a storage and cooler synchrotron, which is fed by an injector cyclotron, is operated at Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). It provides phase space cooled polarized or unpolarized beams of protons and deuterons with momenta between 0.3 and 3.7 GeV/c for internal experiments and to external target stations. The major experimental facilities, used for the ongoing physics program, are ANKE and WASA (internal) and TOF (external). A new internal target station to investigate polarization build-up by spin-filtering (PAX) has recently been commissioned. COSY is the machine for hadron spin physics on a world-wide scale, which is also used for tests in conjunction with plans to build a dedicated storage ring for electric dipole moment (EDM) measurements of proton, deuteron and {sup 3}He. In this contribution recent results as well as future plans are summarized.

  15. Spin-filtering at COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidemann, Christian; PAX Collaboration

    2011-05-01

    The Spin Filtering experiments at COSY and AD at CERN within the framework of the Polarized Antiproton EXperiments (PAX) are proposed to determine the spin-dependent cross sections in bar pp scattering by observation of the buildup of polarization of an initially unpolarized stored antiproton beam after multiple passage through an internal polarized gas target. In order to commission the experimental setup for the AD and to understand the relevant machine parameters spin-filtering will first be done with protons at COSY. A first major step toward this goal has been achieved with the installation of the required mini-β section in summer 2009 and it's commissioning in January 2010. The target chamber together with the atomic beam source and the so-called Breit-Rabi polarimeter have been installed and commissioned in summer 2010. In addition an openable storage cell has been used. It provides a target thickness of 5·1013 atoms/cm2. We report on the status of spin-filtering experiments at COSY and the outcome of a recent beam time including studies on beam lifetime limitations like intra-beam scattering and the electron-cooling performance as well as machine acceptance studies.

  16. The NMR studies on two new furostanol saponins from Agave sisalana leaves.

    PubMed

    Zou, Peng; Fu, Jing; Yu, He-shui; Zhang, Jie; Kang, Li-ping; Ma, Bai-ping; Yan, Xian-zhong

    2006-12-01

    The detailed NMR studies and full assignments of the 1H and 13C spectral data for two new furostanol saponins isolated from Agave sisalana leaves are described. Their structures were established using a combination of 1D and 2D NMR techniques including 1H, 13C, 1H-1H COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, HMBC and HSQC-TOCSY, and also FAB-MS spectrometry and chemical methods. The structures were established as (25S)-26-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-22 xi-hydroxyfurost-12-one-3beta-yl-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-O-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-galacto- pyranoside (1) and (25S)-26-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-22xi-hydroxyfurost-5-en-12-one-3beta-yl-O-alpha-L-rhamno- pyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-O-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl- (1-->4)-beta-D-galactopyranoside (2).

  17. Identification of endogenous metabolites in human sperm cells using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Amaral, A; Rodriguez, M; Canyellas, N; Correig, X; Ballescà, J L; Ramalho-Santos, J; Oliva, R

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to contribute to the first comprehensive metabolomic characterization of the human sperm cell through the application of two untargeted platforms based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using these two complementary strategies, we were able to identify a total of 69 metabolites, of which 42 were identified using NMR, 27 using GC-MS and 4 by both techniques. The identity of some of these metabolites was further confirmed by two-dimensional (1) H-(1) H homonuclear correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and (1) H-(13) C heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectroscopy. Most of the metabolites identified are reported here for the first time in mature human spermatozoa. The relationship between the metabolites identified and the previously reported sperm proteome was also explored. Interestingly, overrepresented pathways included not only the metabolism of carbohydrates, but also of lipids and lipoproteins. Of note, a large number of the metabolites identified belonged to the amino acids, peptides and analogues super class. The identification of this initial set of metabolites represents an important first step to further study their function in male gamete physiology and to explore potential reasons for dysfunction in future studies. We also demonstrate that the application of NMR and MS provides complementary results, thus constituting a promising strategy towards the completion of the human sperm cell metabolome.

  18. Structural studies of an arabinan from the stems of Ephedra sinica by methylation analysis and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong-Gang; Liang, Jun; Yang, Bing-You; Wang, Qiu-Hong; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2015-05-01

    Plant arabinan has important biological activity. In this study, a water-soluble arabinan (Mw∼6.15kDa) isolated from the stems of Ephedra sinica was found to consist of (1→5)-Araƒ, (1→3,5)-Araƒ, T-Araƒ, (1→3)-Araƒ and (1→2,5)-Araƒ residues at proportions of 10:2:3:2:1. A tentative structure was proposed by methylation analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT-135, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and ROESY) and literature. The structure proposed includes a branched (1→5)-α-Araf backbone where branching occurs at the O-2 and O-3 positions of the residues with 7.7% and 15.4% of the 1,5-linked α-Araf substituted at the O-2 and O-3 positions. The presence of a branched structure was further observed by atomic force microscopy. This polymer was characterized as having a much longer linear (1→5)-α-Araf backbone as a repeating unit. In particular, the presence of α-Araf→3)-α-Araf-(1→3)-α-Araf-(1→ attached at the O-2 is a new finding. This study may facilitate a deeper understanding of structure-activity relationships of biological polysaccharides from the stems of E. sinica.

  19. Fischer indolisation of N-(α-ketoacyl)anthranilic acids into 2-(indol-2-carboxamido)benzoic acids and 2-indolyl-3,1-benzoxazin-4-ones and their NMR study.

    PubMed

    Proisl, Karel; Kafka, Stanislav; Urankar, Damijana; Gazvoda, Martin; Kimmel, Roman; Košmrlj, Janez

    2014-12-21

    N-(α-ketoacyl)anthranilic acids reacted with phenylhydrazinium chloride in boiling acetic acid to afford 2-(indol-2-carboxamido)benzoic acids in good to excellent yields and 2-indolyl-3,1-benzoxazin-4-ones as by-products. The formation of the latter products could easily be suppressed by a hydrolytic workup. Alternatively, by increasing the reaction temperature and/or time, 2-indolyl-3,1-benzoxazin-4-ones can be obtained exclusively. Optimisations of the reaction conditions as well as the scope and the course of the transformations were investigated. The products were characterized by (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR spectroscopy. The corresponding resonances were assigned on the basis of the standard 1D and gradient selected 2D NMR experiments ((1)H-(1)H gs-COSY, (1)H-(13)C gs-HSQC, (1)H-(13)C gs-HMBC) with (1)H-(15)N gs-HMBC as a practical tool to determine (15)N NMR chemical shifts at the natural abundance level of (15)N isotope.

  20. (1)H NMR: A Novel Approach To Determining the Thermodynamic Properties of Acetaldehyde Condensation Reactions with Glycerol, (+)-Catechin, and Glutathione in Model Wine.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Ana L; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2016-09-14

    As wine oxidizes, ethanol is converted to acetaldehyde, but its accumulation is not predictable, due to poorly characterized reactions with alcohols, SO2, thiols, flavanols, and others. Measurement of these components has been thwarted by equilibria into the other forms during sample preparation. NMR spectra can be taken on intact samples and is thus ideal for this situation. Equilibria of acetaldehyde with glycerol, (+)-catechin, and glutathione were studied separately in model wine solutions at pH 3-4 by (1)H NMR and 2D ((1)H-(1)H) COSY spectra. Glycerol acetals had equilibrium constants between 1.14 ± 0.056 and 2.53 ± 0.043 M(-1), whereas ethylidene-bridged (+)-catechin dimers and glutathione thiohemiacetals had more favorable equilibria: from (3.92 ± 0.13) × 10(3) to (6.13 ± 0.32) × 10(3) M(-2) and from 10.18 ± 0.22 to 11.17 ± 0.47 M(-1), respectively. These data can be used to create accurate measures of acetaldehyde in its various forms and, consequently, offer insight into wine oxidation. PMID:27580067

  1. Revised NMR data for incartine: an alkaloid from Galanthus elwesii.

    PubMed

    Berkov, Strahil; Reyes-Chilpa, Ricardo; Codina, Carles; Viladomat, Francesc; Bastida, Jaume

    2007-07-12

    Phytochemical studies on Galanthus elwesii resulted in the isolation of five alkaloids: incartine, hordenine, hippeastrine, 8-O-demethylhomolycorine and lycorine. The NMR data given previously for incartine were revised and completed by two-dimensional 1H-1H and 1H-13C chemical shift correlation experiments. In vitro studies on the bioactivity of incartine were carried out.

  2. Making Submicron CoSi2 Structures On Silicon Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieh, Simon K. W.; Lin, True-Lon; Fathauer, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    Experimetnal fabrication process makes submicron-sized structures of single-crystal metallic CoSi2 on silicon substrates. Amorphous Co:Si(1:2) crystallized by electron beam becoming single-crystal CoSi2. Remaining amorphous Co:Si then preferentially etched away. When fully developed, process used to make fine wires or dots exhibiting quantum confinement of charge carriers.

  3. Resveratrol tetramer of hopeaphenol isolated from Shorea johorensis (Dipterocarpaceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisha, Farra; Din, Laily B.; Yaacob, W. A.

    2014-09-01

    Hopeaphenol (1) as a resveratrol tetramer was isolated from the bark of Shorea johorensis collected from Imbak Canyon, Sabah, Malaysia. The structure of this compound was determined by the spectroscopic evidences using 1H- and 13C-NMR assigned with HSQC, HMBC, 1H-1H COSY and 1H-1H NOESY spectra, mass spectrum, and by comparison with reported data.

  4. COSY - a cooler synchrotron and storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.A.; Berg, G.P.A.; Hacker, U.; Hardt, A.; Kohler, M.; Osterfeld, F.; Prasuhn, D.; Riepe, G.; Rogge, M.; Schult, O.W.B.

    1985-10-01

    The storage ring COSY with phase space cooling and RF acceleration is designed to accept protons and light ions injected from the existing cyclotron JULIC or protons from the LINAC of the proposed neutron spallation source (SNQ). The lay-out of COSY was developed in cooperation with the Universities in Nordrhein-Westfalen and meets the experimental requirements of variable and high quality beams which are necessary for future nuclear research under discussion. The three essential properties of the storage ring will be: high luminosities and very efficient use of the beam in the storage ring by thin internal targets; energy variability in the range of 20 MeV to 1.5 GeV by RF acceleration; and very high beam quality through phase space cooling.

  5. Electrostatic potential map modelling with COSY Infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, J. A.; Baartman, R.; Planche, T.; Saminathan, S.

    2016-06-01

    COSY Infinity (Makino and Berz, 2005) is a differential-algebra based simulation code which allows accurate calculation of transfer maps to arbitrary order. COSY's existing internal procedures were modified to allow electrostatic elements to be specified using an array of field potential data from the midplane. Additionally, a new procedure was created allowing electrostatic elements and their fringe fields to be specified by an analytic function. This allows greater flexibility in accurately modelling electrostatic elements and their fringe fields. Applied examples of these new procedures are presented including the modelling of a shunted electrostatic multipole designed with OPERA, a spherical electrostatic bender, and the effects of different shaped apertures in an electrostatic beam line.

  6. Heavy Meson Production at COSY - 11

    SciTech Connect

    Moskal, P.; Adam, H.H.; Balewski, J.T.; Budzanowski, A.; Goodman, C.; Grzonka, D.; Jarczyk, L.; Jochmann, M.; Khoukaz, A.; Kilian, K.; Kowina, P.; Koehler, M.; Lister, T.; Oelert, W.; Quentmeier, C.; Santo, R.; Schepers, G.; Seddik, U.; Sefzick, T.; Sewerin, S.; Smyrski, J.; Strzalkowski, A.; Wolke, M.; Wuestner, P.

    2000-12-31

    The COSY-11 collaboration has measured the total cross section for the pp {yields} pp{eta}{prime} and pp {yields} pp{eta} reactions in the excess energy range from Q = 1.5 MeV to Q = 23.6 MeV and from Q = 0.5 MeV to Q= 5.4 MeV, respectively. Measurements have been performed with the total luminosity of 73 nb{sup {minus}1} for the pp {yields} pp{eta} reaction and 1360 nb{sup {minus}1} for the pp {yields} pp{eta}{prime} one. Recent results are presented and discussed.

  7. Meson-production experiments at COSY-Jülich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büscher, M.

    2010-09-01

    Selected results from experiments at COSY-Jülich are presented: an attempt to measure the mass of the η meson with high precision (ANKE facility), first steps towards the detection of rare η decays (WASA), and several measurements of Kbar K-pair production (ANKE, COSY-11, MOMO).

  8. Associated Strangeness Production at COSY-TOF

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, S.; COSY-TOF Collaboration

    2000-12-31

    The associated strangeness production in elementary reactions like pp {yields} KYN close to reaction thresholds is one of the main topics to be investigated at the Time-of-Flight spectrometer TOF located at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY (FZ Juelich). The concept of the event reconstruction is based on the identification of the delayed hyperon and kaon decay ({Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup {minus}}, {Sigma}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup 0}, n{pi}{sup +}, and K{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}). Since the highly granulated detector covers almost the full phase space, all differential distributions as well as total cross sections and the hyperon polarization can be extracted from the data.

  9. Spin Filtering Studies at COSY and AD

    SciTech Connect

    Nass, Alexander

    2009-08-04

    The high physics potential of experiments with stored high-energy polarized antiprotons led to the proposal of PAX (Polarized Antiproton eXperiment) for the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) of the FAIR at GSI (Darmstadt/Germany). It is proposed to polarize a stored antiproton beam by means of spin filtering with a polarized H (D) gas target. The feasibility of spin filtering has been demonstrated in the FILTEX experiment. The current interpretation foresees a self-cancellation of the electron contribution to the filtering process and only the hadronic contribution is effective. Several experimental studies with protons (at COSY/Juelich) as well as antiprotons (at AD/CERN) will be carried out to test the principle and measure p-barp-vector and p-bard-vector cross sections. A polarized internal gas target (PIT) with surrounding Silicon detectors immersed into a low-beta section has to be set up.

  10. Deposition Of Pinhole-Free CoSi2 Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon; Fathauer, Robert N.; Grunthaner, Paula J.

    1989-01-01

    New fabrication method produces pinhole-free film of cobalt silicide on silicon substrate. In new method, cobalt and silicon evaporated from electron-beam sources onto substrate of silicon having <111> crystal orientation. Materials deposited in stoichiometric ratio of two silicon atoms to one of cobalt, yielding single-crystal CoSi2 film 5 to 10 nm thick. Layer of amorphous silicon 1 to 2 nm thick deposited on CoSi2. Specimen then annealed at 550 degree C for 10 min. Absence of pinholes critical to operation of multilayer devices employing CoSi2 layers, such as metal base transistor.

  11. Triterpenoid saponins from Argania spinosa.

    PubMed

    Charrouf, Z; Wieruszeski, J M; Fkih-Tetouani, S; Leroy, Y; Charrouf, M; Fournet, B

    1992-06-01

    Five new oleanane saponins named arganine A, B, D, E and F and two known saponins: arganine C and mi-saponin A were isolated from the kernel of Argania spinosa. The structures of these saponins were elucidated by using 1H NMR, 1H-1H COSY NMR, 13C NMR, FAB mass spectrometry and chemical evidence. PMID:1368219

  12. Stereoselective synthesis, spectral and antimicrobial studies of some cyanoacetyl hydrazones of 3-alkyl-2,6-diarylpiperidin-4-ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velayutham Pillai, M.; Rajeswari, K.; Vidhyasagar, T.

    2014-11-01

    A series of novel cyanoacetyl hydrazones of 3-alkyl-2,6-diarylpiperidin-4-ones were synthesized stereoselectively and characterized by IR, Mass, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY and 1H-13C COSY spectra. The stereochemistry of the synthesized compounds was established using NMR spectra. Antimicrobial screening of the synthesized compounds revealed their antibacterial and antifungal potencies. Growth inhibition of Enterobacter Aerogenes by compound 15 was found to be superior to the standard drug.

  13. High-resolution NMR characterization of low abundance oligomers of amyloid-β without purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Samuel A.; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Monette, Martine; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Walsh, Patrick; Cauble, Meagan; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Marsh, E. Neil. G.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the misfolding and self-assembly of the amyloidogenic protein amyloid-β (Aβ). The aggregation of Aβ leads to diverse oligomeric states, each of which may be potential targets for intervention. Obtaining insight into Aβ oligomers at the atomic level has been a major challenge to most techniques. Here, we use magic angle spinning recoupling 1H-1H NMR experiments to overcome many of these limitations. Using 1H-1H dipolar couplings as a NMR spectral filter to remove both high and low molecular weight species, we provide atomic-level characterization of a non-fibrillar aggregation product of the Aβ1-40 peptide using non-frozen samples without isotopic labeling. Importantly, this spectral filter allows the detection of the specific oligomer signal without a separate purification procedure. In comparison to other solid-state NMR techniques, the experiment is extraordinarily selective and sensitive. A resolved 2D spectra could be acquired of a small population of oligomers (6 micrograms, 7% of the total) amongst a much larger population of monomers and fibers (93% of the total). By coupling real-time 1H-1H NMR experiments with other biophysical measurements, we show that a stable, primarily disordered Aβ1-40 oligomer 5-15 nm in diameter can form and coexist in parallel with the well-known cross-β-sheet fibrils.

  14. High-resolution NMR characterization of low abundance oligomers of amyloid-β without purification

    PubMed Central

    Kotler, Samuel A.; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Monette, Martine; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Walsh, Patrick; Cauble, Meagan; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Marsh, E. Neil. G.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the misfolding and self-assembly of the amyloidogenic protein amyloid-β (Aβ). The aggregation of Aβ leads to diverse oligomeric states, each of which may be potential targets for intervention. Obtaining insight into Aβ oligomers at the atomic level has been a major challenge to most techniques. Here, we use magic angle spinning recoupling 1H-1H NMR experiments to overcome many of these limitations. Using 1H-1H dipolar couplings as a NMR spectral filter to remove both high and low molecular weight species, we provide atomic-level characterization of a non-fibrillar aggregation product of the Aβ1-40 peptide using non-frozen samples without isotopic labeling. Importantly, this spectral filter allows the detection of the specific oligomer signal without a separate purification procedure. In comparison to other solid-state NMR techniques, the experiment is extraordinarily selective and sensitive. A resolved 2D spectra could be acquired of a small population of oligomers (6 micrograms, 7% of the total) amongst a much larger population of monomers and fibers (93% of the total). By coupling real-time 1H-1H NMR experiments with other biophysical measurements, we show that a stable, primarily disordered Aβ1-40 oligomer 5–15 nm in diameter can form and coexist in parallel with the well-known cross-β-sheet fibrils. PMID:26138908

  15. High-resolution NMR characterization of low abundance oligomers of amyloid-β without purification.

    PubMed

    Kotler, Samuel A; Brender, Jeffrey R; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Monette, Martine; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Walsh, Patrick; Cauble, Meagan; Holl, Mark M Banaszak; Marsh, E Neil G; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-03

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the misfolding and self-assembly of the amyloidogenic protein amyloid-β (Aβ). The aggregation of Aβ leads to diverse oligomeric states, each of which may be potential targets for intervention. Obtaining insight into Aβ oligomers at the atomic level has been a major challenge to most techniques. Here, we use magic angle spinning recoupling (1)H-(1)H NMR experiments to overcome many of these limitations. Using (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings as a NMR spectral filter to remove both high and low molecular weight species, we provide atomic-level characterization of a non-fibrillar aggregation product of the Aβ1-40 peptide using non-frozen samples without isotopic labeling. Importantly, this spectral filter allows the detection of the specific oligomer signal without a separate purification procedure. In comparison to other solid-state NMR techniques, the experiment is extraordinarily selective and sensitive. A resolved 2D spectra could be acquired of a small population of oligomers (6 micrograms, 7% of the total) amongst a much larger population of monomers and fibers (93% of the total). By coupling real-time (1)H-(1)H NMR experiments with other biophysical measurements, we show that a stable, primarily disordered Aβ1-40 oligomer 5-15 nm in diameter can form and coexist in parallel with the well-known cross-β-sheet fibrils.

  16. EPIC Muon Cooling Simulations using COSY INFINITY

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Maloney, B. Erdelyi, A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

    2011-03-01

    Next gen­er­a­tion mag­net sys­tems need­ed for cool­ing chan­nels in both neu­tri­no fac­to­ries and muon col­lid­ers will be in­no­va­tive and com­pli­cat­ed. De­sign­ing, sim­u­lat­ing and op­ti­miz­ing these sys­tems is a chal­lenge. Using COSY IN­FIN­I­TY, a dif­fer­en­tial al­ge­bra-based code, to sim­u­late com­pli­cat­ed el­e­ments can allow the com­pu­ta­tion and cor­rec­tion of a va­ri­ety of high­er order ef­fects, such as spher­i­cal and chro­mat­ic aber­ra­tions, that are dif­fi­cult to ad­dress with other sim­u­la­tion tools. As an ex­am­ple, a he­li­cal dipole mag­net has been im­ple­ment­ed and sim­u­lat­ed, and the per­for­mance of an epicyclic para­met­ric ion­iza­tion cool­ing sys­tem for muons is stud­ied and com­pared to sim­u­la­tions made using G4Beam­line, a GEAN­T4 toolk­it.

  17. Proton-detected 2D radio frequency driven recoupling solid-state NMR studies on micelle-associated cytochrome-b5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Im, Sangchoul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-05-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is increasingly used in the high-resolution structural studies of membrane-associated proteins and peptides. Most such studies necessitate isotopically labeled (13C, 15N and 2H) proteins/peptides, which is a limiting factor for some of the exciting membrane-bound proteins and aggregating peptides. In this study, we report the use of a proton-based slow magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiment that exploits the unaveraged 1H-1H dipolar couplings from a membrane-bound protein. We have shown that the difference in the buildup rates of cross-peak intensities against the mixing time - obtained from 2D 1H-1H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments on a 16.7-kDa micelle-associated full-length rabbit cytochrome-b5 (cytb5) - can provide insights into protein dynamics and could be useful to measure 1H-1H dipolar couplings. The experimental buildup curves compare well with theoretical simulations and are used to extract relaxation parameters. Our results show that due to fast exchange of amide protons with water in the soluble heme-containing domain of cyb5, coherent 1H-1H dipolar interactions are averaged out for these protons while alpha and side chain protons show residual dipolar couplings that can be obtained from 1H-1H RFDR experiments. The appearance of resonances with distinct chemical shift values in 1H-1H RFDR spectra enabled the identification of residues (mostly from the transmembrane region) of cytb5 that interact with micelles.

  18. Micromelosides A-D, four new coumarins from the stem bark of Micromelum falcatum.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiongming; Qi, Shuhua; Yin, Hao; Xiao, Zhihui; Zhang, Si

    2009-12-01

    Four new coumarins, micromelosides A-D, together with four known coumarins were isolated from the stem bark of Micromelum falcatum. The complete assignments of the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts for these new compounds were achieved by means of 1D and 2D NMR techniques, including 1H-1H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOE difference.

  19. Rapid measurement of multidimensional 1H solid-state NMR spectra at ultra-fast MAS frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yue Qi; Malon, Michal; Martineau, Charlotte; Taulelle, Francis; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2014-02-01

    A novel method to realize rapid repetition of 1H NMR experiments at ultra-fast MAS frequencies is demonstrated. The ultra-fast MAS at 110 kHz slows the 1H-1H spin diffusion, leading to variations of 1H T1 relaxation times from atom to atom within a molecule. The different relaxation behavior is averaged by applying 1H-1H recoupling during relaxation delay even at ultra-fast MAS, reducing the optimal relaxation delay to maximize the signal to noise ratio. The way to determine optimal relaxation delay for arbitrary relaxation curve is shown. The reduction of optimal relaxation delay by radio-frequency driven recoupling (RFDR) was demonstrated on powder samples of glycine and ethenzamide with one and multi-dimensional NMR measurements.

  20. RUBIDIUM, a program for computer-aided assignment of two-dimensional NMR spectra of polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Yu, C; Hwang, J F; Chen, T B; Soo, V W

    1992-01-01

    Taking advantage of the rule-based expert system technology, a program named RUBIDIUM (Rule-Based Identification In 2D NMR Spectrum) was developed to accomplish the automatic 1H NMR resonance assignments of polypeptides. Besides noise elimination and peak selection capabilities, RUBIDIUM detects the cross-peak patterns of amino acid residues in the COSY spectrum, assigning these patterns to amino acid types, performing sequential assignments using combined COSY/NOESY spectra, and finally, achieving the total assignment of the 1H NMR spectrum.

  1. Heteronuclear relayed E.COSY revisited: determination of 3J(H(alpha),C(gamma)) couplings in Asx and aromatic residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Löhr, F; Pérez, C; Köhler, R; Rüterjans, H; Schmidt, J M

    2000-09-01

    Constant-time 3D heteronuclear relayed E.COSY [Schmidt et al. (1996) J. Biomol. NMR, 7, 142-152], as based on generic 2D small-flip-angle HMQC-COSY [Schmidt et al. (1995) J. Biomol. NMR, 6, 95-105], has been modified to allow for quantitative determination of heteronuclear three-bond 3J(H(alpha),C(gamma)) couplings. The method is applicable to amino acid spin topologies with carbons in the gamma position which lack attached protons, i.e. to asparagine, aspartate, and aromatic residues in uniformly 13C-enriched proteins. The pulse sequence critically exploits heteronuclear triple-quantum coherence (HTQC) of CH2 moieties involving geminal H(beta) proton pairs, taking advantage of improved multiple-quantum relaxation properties, at the same time avoiding scalar couplings between those spins involved in multiple-quantum coherence, thus yielding E.COSY-type multiplets with a splitting structure that is simpler than with the original scheme. Numerical least-squares 2D line-shape simulation is used to extract 3J(H(alpha),C(gamma)) coupling constants which are of relevance to side-chain chi1 dihedral-angle conformations in polypeptides. Methods are demonstrated with recombinant 15N,13C-enriched ribonuclease T1 and Desulfovibrio vulgaris flavodoxin with bound oxidized FMN.

  2. Complete Assignment of (1)H-NMR Resonances of the King Cobra Neurotoxin CM-11.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu-Xi; Liu, Wei-Dong; Liu, Ai-Zhuo; Pei, Feng-Kui

    1997-01-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus Hannah) neurotoxin CM-Il is long-chain peptide with 72 amino acid residues. Its complete assignment of (1)H-NMR resonances was obtained using various 2D-NMR technologies, including DQF-COSY, clean-TOCSY and NOESY.

  3. beta-Ureidopropionase deficiency: a novel inborn error of metabolism discovered using NMR spectroscopy on urine.

    PubMed

    Moolenaar, S H; Göhlich-Ratmann, G; Engelke, U F; Spraul, M; Humpfer, E; Dvortsak, P; Voit, T; Hoffmann, G F; Bräutigam, C; van Kuilenburg, A B; van Gennip, A; Vreken, P; Wevers, R A

    2001-11-01

    In this work, NMR investigations that led to the discovery of a new inborn error of metabolism, beta-ureidopropionase (UP) deficiency, are reported. 1D (1)H-NMR experiments were performed using a patient's urine. 3-Ureidopropionic acid was observed in elevated concentrations in the urine spectrum. A 1D (1)H-(1)H total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY) and two heteronuclear 2D NMR techniques (heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) and heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC)) were used to identify the molecular structure of the compound that caused an unknown doublet resonance at 1.13 ppm. Combining the information from the various NMR spectra, this resonance could be assigned to 3-ureidoisobutyric acid. These observations suggested a deficiency of UP. With 1D (1)H-NMR spectroscopy, UP deficiency can be easily diagnosed. The (1)H-NMR spectrum can also be used to diagnose patients suffering from other inborn errors of metabolism in the pyrimidine degradation pathway.

  4. Characterization of a cinnamoyl derivative from broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) florets.

    PubMed

    Survay, Nazneen Shaik; Kumar, Brajesh; Upadhyaya, Chandrama Prakash; Ko, Eunyoung; Lee, Choonghwan; Choi, Jung Nam; Yoon, Do-Young; Jung, Yi-Sook; Park, Se Won

    2010-12-01

    A new intact glucosinolate Cinnamoyl derivative [6'-O-trans-(4″- hydroxy cinnamoyl)-4-(methylsulphinyl) butyl glucosinolate] (A) has been isolated from Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) florets. The compound was isolated and characterized by LC, MS-ESI, FTIR, (1)H and (13)C NMR as well as (1)H-(1)H COSY, DEPT 135° spectrometric experiments.

  5. Highly oxygenated monoterpenes from Chenopodium ambrosioides.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A A

    2000-07-01

    Three new monoterpenes (3-5) were isolated from an organic extract of the aerial parts of Chenopodium ambrosioides. Structures were established on the basis of MS and NMR spectroscopic ((1)H, (13)C, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HMQC and HMBC) data.

  6. Structural investigation of a polysaccharide (DMB) purified from Dioscorea nipponica Makino.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dianhui

    2014-03-15

    A water-soluble polysaccharide was isolated from the aqueous extract of Dioscored nipponica Makino. Compositional analysis, IR analysis, methylation analysis, and NMR studies ((1)H, (13)C, (1)H(1)H COSY, HSQC, and HMBC) revealed the presence of the following repeating unit in the polysaccharide:

  7. Investigating albendazole desmotropes by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chattah, Ana K; Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Pfund, Laura Y; Longhi, Marcela R; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Garnero, Claudia

    2015-03-01

    Characterization of the molecular structure and physicochemical solid-state properties of the solid forms of pharmaceutical compounds is a key requirement for successful commercialization as potential active ingredients in drug products. These properties can ultimately have a critical effect on the solubility and bioavailability of the final drug product. Here, the desmotropy of Albendazole forms I and II was investigated at the atomic level. Ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, together with powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, were performed on polycrystalline samples of the two solids in order to fully characterize and distinguish the two forms. High-resolution one-dimensional (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N together with two-dimensional (1)H/(1)H single quantum-single quantum, (1)H/(1)H single quantum-double quantum, and (1)H/(13)C chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR experiments under MAS conditions were extensively used to decipher the intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions present in both solid forms. These experiments enabled the unequivocal identification of the tautomers of each desmotrope. Our results also revealed that both solid forms may be described as dimeric structures, with different intermolecular hydrogen bonds connecting the tautomers in each dimer. PMID:25584993

  8. pp Elastic Scattering: New Results from EDDA (COSY)

    SciTech Connect

    Scobel, W.; EDDA Collaboration

    2000-12-31

    In the EDDA experiment excitation functions of proton{endash}proton elastic scattering are studied with narrow steps in the projectile momentum range from 0.8 to 3.4 GeV/c and angular range 35{degree} {le} {Theta}{sub cm} {le} 90 {degree} with a detector providing {Delta}{Theta}{sub cm} {approx} 1.4{degree} resolution and 85% solid angle coverage. Measurements are performed continuously during projectile acceleration on the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. In phase 1 of the experiment spin-averaged differential cross sections d{sigma}/d{Omega} have been measured with an internal CH{sub 2} fiber target; background corrections were derived from measurements with a carbon fiber target and from Monte Carlo simulations of inelastic pp contributions. The results provide excitation functions and angular distributions of high precision and internal consistency. In phase 2 of the experiment excitation functions of the analyzing power A{sub N} have been measured using a polarized (P{ge}75%) atomic beam target, and those of the polarization correlation parameters A{sub NN}, A{sub SS} and A{sub SL} will be measured later on with the polarized COSY beam. The measured excitation functions are compared to recent phase shift analyses, and their impact on them is discussed. So far evidence for narrow structures was neither found in the spin-averaged cross sections nor in the analyzing powers.

  9. Diffusion of Si in thin CoSi2 layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schowengerdt, F. D.; Lin, T. L.; Fathauer, R. W.; Grunthaner, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    Evidence of silicon diffusion in 100-A CoSi2 layers grown by room-temperature codeposition and annealing on Si(111) substrates was from Auger peak height ratios, which were interpreted in terms of a Si overlayer. It was found that this layer could be removed by chemical etching and reformed by subsequent annealing. By measuring the intensity of the plasmon energy loss peak associated with the CoL23 VV Auger peak, the effective thickness of the Si overlayer was measured as a function of annealing temperature, by calibrating the plasmon loss data against known overlayer thicknesses on unannealed samples. Similar results were found for samples grown both with and without the addition of a 10-A Si cap to prevent pinhole formation in the CoSi2; moreover, Si diffusion was also observed at temperatures well below the point where pinhole formation is first found, suggesting that Si diffusion does not depend on the presence of observable pinholes.

  10. Proton zero-quantum 2D NMR of 2-propenenitrile aligned by an electric field. Determination of the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruessink, B. H.; De Kanter, F. J. J.; MaClean, C.

    Zero-quantum NMR, selectively detected by 2D NMR, is applied to observe small 1H- 1H dipolar couplings in a polar liquid partially oriented by a strong electric field. The normal (single-quantum) 1H spectrum is severely broadened, which prevents the observation of small couplings. The results from the zero-quantum proton spectrum are used to calculate the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants of 2-deutero-2-propenenitrile from the 2H and 14N NMR spectra.

  11. Drug solubilization mechanism of α-glucosyl stevia by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junying; Higashi, Kenjirou; Ueda, Keisuke; Kadota, Kazunori; Tozuka, Yuichi; Limwikrant, Waree; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2014-04-25

    We investigated the drug solubilization mechanism of α-glucosyl stevia (Stevia-G) which was synthesized from stevia (rebaudioside-A) by transglycosylation. (1)H and (13)C NMR peaks of Stevia-G in water were assigned by two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiments including (1)H-(1)H correlation, (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear multiple bond correlation, and (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence spectroscopies. The (1)H and (13)C peaks clearly showed the incorporation of two glucose units into rebaudioside-A to produce Stevia-G, supported by steviol glycoside and glucosyl residue assays. The concentration-dependent chemical shifts of Stevia-G protons correlated well with a mass-action law model, indicating the self-association of Stevia-G molecules in water. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) was 12.0 mg/mL at 37°C. The aggregation number was 2 below the CMC and 12 above the CMC. Dynamic light scattering and 2D (1)H-(1)H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) NMR experiments demonstrated that Stevia-G self-associated into micelles of a few nanometers in size with a core-shell structure, containing a kaurane diterpenoid-based hydrophobic core and a glucose-based shell. 2D (1)H-(1)H NOESY NMR measurements also revealed that a poorly water-soluble drug, naringenin, was incorporated into the hydrophobic core of the Stevia-G micelle. The Stevia-G self-assembly behavior and micellar drug inclusion capacity can achieve significant enhancement in drug solubility. PMID:24508331

  12. Fabrication of nanometer single crystal metallic CoSi2 structures on Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieh, Kai-Wei (Inventor); Lin, True-Lon (Inventor); Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous Co:Si (1:2 ratio) films are electron gun-evaporated on clean Si(111), such as in a molecular beam epitaxy system. These layers are then crystallized selectively with a focused electron beam to form very small crystalline Co/Si2 regions in an amorphous matrix. Finally, the amorphous regions are etched away selectively using plasma or chemical techniques.

  13. Three new iridoids from the roots of Valeriana jatamansi.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Guo, Yuanqiang; Jin, Da-qing; Zhao, Peng; Guo, Ping; Yamakuni, Tohru; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2012-10-01

    Three new iridoids, valeriandoids D-F (1-3), have been isolated from the roots of Valeriana jatamansi. Structure elucidation, especially the positions of the acyloxy groups, and complete (1)H- and (13)C-NMR assignments of these new compounds were carried out using one- and two-dimensional NMR measurements, including (1)H- and (13)C-NMR, DEPT-135, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HMQC, HMBC, and HR-ESI-MS experiments.

  14. DFT molecular modeling and NMR conformational analysis of a new longipinenetriolone diester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M.; Guerra-Ramírez, Diana; Román-Marín, Luisa U.; Hernández-Hernández, Juan D.; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2006-05-01

    The structure and conformational behavior of the new natural compound (4 R,5 S,7 S,8 R,9 S,10 R,11 R)-longipin-2-en-7,8,9-triol-1-one 7-angelate-9-isovalerate (1) isolated from Stevia eupatoria, were studied by molecular modeling and NMR spectroscopy. A Monte Carlo search followed by DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G* level provided the theoretical conformations of the sesquiterpene framework, which were in full agreement with results derived from the 1H- 1H coupling constant analysis.

  15. Subsurface Growth of CoSi2 by Deposition of Co on Si-Capped CoSi2 Seed Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; George, T.; Pike, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    At a growth temperature of 800 C, Co deposited on Si(111) diffuses through a Si cap and exhibits oriented growth on buried CoSi2 grains, a process referred to as endotaxy. This occurs preferentially to surface nucleation of CoSi2 provided the thickness of the Si cap is less than a critical value between 100 and 200 nm for a deposition rate of 0.01 nm/s. Steady-state endotaxy is modeled under the assumption that the process is controlled by Co diffusion.

  16. (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments for two new steroids from the coral Chromonephthea sp.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hua-Wei; Liao, Xiao-Jian; Xu, Shi-Hai

    2009-04-01

    Two new steroids isolated from EtOH extracts of the South China Sea soft coral Chromonephthea sp. were identified. One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiments including COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY were used for the determination of their structure.

  17. Interfacial stability of CoSi2/Si structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T.; Fathauer, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    The stability of CoSi2/Si interfaces was examined in this study using columnar silicide structures grown on (111) Si substrates. In the first set of experiments, Co and Si were codeposited using MBE at 800 C and the resulting columnar silicide layer was capped by epitaxial Si. Deposition of Co on the surface of the Si capping layer at 800 C results in the growth of the buried silicide columns. The buried columns grow by subsurface diffusion of the deposited Co, suppressing the formation of surface islands of CoSi2. The column sidewalls appear to be less stable than the top and bottom interfaces, resulting in preferential lateral growth and ultimately in the coalescence of the columns to form a continuous buried CoSi2 layer. In the second set of experiments, annealing of a 250 nm-thick buried columnar layer at 1000 C under a 100 nm-thick Si capping layer results in the formation of a surface layer of CoSi2 with a reduction in the sizes of the CoSi2 columns. For a sample having a thicker Si capping layer the annealing leads to Ostwald ripening producing buried equiaxed columns. The high CoSi2/Si interfacial strain could provide the driving force for the observed behavior of the buried columns under high-temperature annealing.

  18. A bidesmosidic triterpene glycoside from the roots of Symphytum officinale.

    PubMed

    Noorwala, M; Mohammad, F V; Ahmad, V U; Sener, B

    1994-05-01

    A new bidesmosidic triterpenoidal saponin of hederagenin was isolated from the ethanolic extract of the roots of Symphytum officinale L. Its structure was elucidated by using 1H NMR, 1H-1H COSY NMR, heteronuclear 1H-13C correlated spectroscopy (heteroCOSY), 13C NMR, DEPT, FAB mass spectrometry and chemical evidence as 3-O-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl]-hederagenin-28-O-[beta-D-gluco pyranosyl- (-->4)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl]ester. PMID:7764880

  19. Computer aided evaluation of two-dimensional NMR spectra of proteins.

    PubMed

    Neidig, K P; Bodenmueller, H; Kalbitzer, H R

    1984-12-28

    A computer program for the automatic evaluation of two-dimensional NMR spectra of peptides and proteins has been developed. The used strategy is described, the advantages and limits of this approach are discussed. The program was successfully tested on a COSY-spectrum of the neuropeptide Glp-Pro-Pro-Gly-Gly-Ser-Lys-Val-Ile-Leu-Phe from hydra, resulting in a drastic reduction of the time needed for the evaluation of two-dimensional NMR data.

  20. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  1. Two novel iridoids from Morinda longifolia.

    PubMed

    Ban, Ninh Khac; Giang, Vu Huong; Linh, Tran My; Lien, Le Quynh; Ngoc, Ninh Thi; Dat, Le Duc; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Van Pham, Cuong; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Regalado, Jacinto; Van Keo, Huynh; Van Kiem, Phan; Van Minh, Chau

    2014-07-01

    Six secondary metabolites, including two novel iridoids, longifolides A (1) and B (2), were isolated by various chromatographic methods from a methanol extract of branches and leaves of Morinda longifolia Craib. The structures of the compounds were determined on the basis of NMR spectroscopic (1H and 13C NMR, HSQC, HMBC, 1H-1H COSY, NOESY) and FTICR-MS data, as well as by comparison of them with literature values.

  2. The absolute stereochemistry of protoxylogranatin A - a new protolimonoid from the seeds of Chinese mangrove Xylocarpus granatum.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-Yi; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Si; Xiao, Qiang; Li, Qing-Xin

    2008-01-01

    A new protolimonoid, named protoxylogranatin A, has been isolated from the seeds of a Chinese mangrove Xylocarpus granatum. Its structure was elucidated on the basis of modern spectroscopic data. The absolute configuration was determined by the application of the modified Mosher MTPA ester method. The first complete assignments of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectral data for this protolimonoid were achieved by means of 2D NMR techniques, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY spectra.

  3. NMR and molecular mechanics study of pyrethrins I and II.

    PubMed

    Rugutt, J K; Henry, C W; Franzblau, S G; Warner, I M

    1999-08-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of the organic extract of the Kenyan pyrethrum flowers (Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium Vissiani) resulted in the isolation of two natural pyrethrin esters, pyrethrin I (PI) and pyrethrin II (PII) as the major constituents. These esters elicited inhibition of the multiple drug resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The high-field (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of PI and PII were unequivocally assigned using modern two-dimensional (2D) proton-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) and heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) experiments. The conformations of both esters were deduced from (1)H-(1)H vicinal coupling constants and confirmed by 2D nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY). Computer molecular modeling (MM) studies revealed that PI and PII molecules adopt a "love-seat" conformation in chloroform (CDCl(3)) solution.

  4. Variable angle spinning (VAS) NMR study of solvent effects in liquid crystalline solutions of 13C-iodomethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gregory H. J.; Martin, Rachel W.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Pines, Alexander; Shahkhatuni, Aleksan G.; Shahkhatuni, Astghik A.; Panosyan, Henry A.

    2004-11-01

    NMR spectra of 13C-iodomethane oriented in three different liquid crystalline solvents have been collected and analyzed under spinning at various angles with respect to the static magnetic field. For each sample the ratio of homonuclear ( 1H- 1H) to heteronuclear ( 13C- 1H) dipolar couplings, which is a function of the geometry of the solute molecule, does not change significantly with the scaling of the dipolar couplings due to spinning at different angles. This result implies that the 'apparent bond angle deviations' (Δ θa), previously calculated from thermotropic liquid crystals, arise from a solvent effect and are not an artifact from scaling the anisotropic interactions.

  5. Disorder dependent half-metallicity in Mn{sub 2}CoSi inverse Heusler alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Mukhtiyar; Saini, Hardev S.; Thakur, Jyoti; Reshak, Ali H.; Kashyap, Manish K.

    2013-12-15

    Heusler alloys based thin-films often exhibit a degree of atomic disorder which leads to the lowering of spin polarization in spintronic devices. We present ab-initio calculations of atomic disorder effects on spin polarization and half-metallicity of Mn{sub 2}CoSi inverse Heusler alloy. The five types of disorder in Mn{sub 2}CoSi have been proposed and investigated in detail. The A2{sub a}-type and B2-type disorders destroy the half-metallicity whereas it sustains for all disorders concentrations in DO{sub 3a}- and A2{sub b}-type disorder and for smallest disorder concentration studied in DO{sub 3b}-type disorder. Lower formation energy/atom for A2{sub b}-type disorder than other four disorders in Mn{sub 2}CoSi advocates the stability of this disorder. The total magnetic moment shows a strong dependence on the disorder and the change in chemical environment. The 100% spin polarization even in the presence of disorders explicitly supports that these disorders shall not hinder the use of Mn{sub 2}CoSi inverse Heusler alloy in device applications. - Graphical abstract: Minority-spin gap (E{sub g↓}) and HM gap (E{sub sf}) as a function of concentrations of various possible disorder in Mn{sub 2}CoSi inverse Heusler alloy. The squares with solid line (black color)/dotted line (blue color)/dashed line (red color) reperesents E{sub g↓} for DO{sub 3a}-/DO{sub 3b}-/A2{sub b}-type disorder in Mn{sub 2}CoSi and the spheres with solid line (black color)/dottedline (blue color)/dashed line (red color) represents E{sub sf} for DO{sub 3a}-/DO{sub 3b}-/A2{sub b}-type disorder in Mn{sub 2}CoSi. - Highlights: • The DO{sub 3}- and A2-type disorders do not affect the half-metallicity in Mn{sub 2}CoSi. • The B2-type disorder solely destroys half-metallicity in Mn{sub 2}CoSi. • The A2-type disorder most probable to occur out of all three types. • The total spin magnetic moment strongly depends on the disorder concentrations.

  6. Preparation and electrochemical properties of Co-Si 3N 4 nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, S. M.; Xi, K.; Li, G. R.; Gao, X. P.

    Cobalt nanoparticles on an amorphous Si 3N 4 matrix were synthesized by direct ball-milling of Co and Si 3N 4 powders for an improvement of their electrochemical performance. The microstructure, morphology and chemical state of the ball-milled Co-Si 3N 4 composites are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical performance of Co-Si 3N 4 composites was investigated by galvanostatic charge-discharge process and cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique. It is found that metallic Co nanoparticles of 10-20 nm in size are highly dispersed on the amorphous inactive Si 3N 4 matrix after the ball-milling. The composite with a Co/Si molar ratio of 2/1 shows the optimized electrochemical performance, including discharge capacity and cycle stability. The formation of Co nanoparticles with a good reaction activity is responsible for the discharge capacity of the composites. The reversible faradic reaction between Co and β-Co(OH) 2 is dominant for ball-milled Co-Si 3N 4 composite. The surface modification of the hydrogen storage PrMg 12-Ni composites using Co-Si 3N 4 composites can enhance the initial discharge capacity based on the hydrogen electrochemical oxidation and Co redox reaction.

  7. Structural and spectroscopic investigation on a new potentially bioactive di-hydrazone containing thiophene heterocyclic rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Vanessa de S.; Ramalho Freitas, Maria Clara; Cruz, Wellington S.; Ribeiro, Tatiana S.; Resende, Jackson A. L. C.; Rey, Nicolás A.

    2016-02-01

    Hydrazones and several substituted hydrazones are associated with a broad spectrum of biological activities, as well as compounds containing the thiophene ring. In this context, a novel di-hydrazone derived from 2-thiophenecarboxylic acid hydrazide was synthesized and completely characterized by elemental analysis, XRD, FT-IR, Raman and UV-Vis spectroscopies, thermogravimetry, 1H NMR, 1H-1H COSY and 1H-1H ROESY. A preliminary in silico pharmacological evaluation was also performed in order to assess the performance of the new compound regarding some molecular properties relevant for a drug's pharmacokinetics in the human body.

  8. Composite-180° pulse-based symmetry sequences to recouple proton chemical shift anisotropy tensors under ultrafast MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Malon, Michal; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the measurement of proton ((1)H) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors to obtain deeper insights into H-bonding interactions which find numerous applications in chemical and biological systems. However, the presence of strong (1)H/(1)H dipolar interaction makes it difficult to determine small size (1)H CSAs from the homogeneously broadened NMR spectra. Previously reported pulse sequences for (1)H CSA recoupling are prone to the effects of radio frequency field (B1) inhomogeneity. In the present work we have carried out a systematic study using both numerical and experimental approaches to evaluate γ-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequences based on R-symmetries that recouple (1)H CSA in the indirect dimension of a 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation experiment under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. The spectral resolution and sensitivity can be significantly improved in both frequency dimensions of the 2D (1)H/(1)H correlation spectrum without decoupling (1)H/(1)H dipolar couplings but by using ultrafast MAS rates up to 70 kHz. We successfully demonstrate that with a reasonable RF field requirement (<200 kHz) a set of symmetry-based recoupling sequences, with a series of phase-alternating 270°0-90°180 composite-180° pulses, are more robust in combating B1 inhomogeneity effects. In addition, our results show that the new pulse sequences render remarkable (1)H CSA recoupling efficiency and undistorted CSA lineshapes. Experimental results on citric acid and malonic acid comparing the efficiencies of these newly developed pulse sequences with that of previously reported CSA recoupling pulse sequences are also reported under ultrafast MAS conditions. PMID:25497846

  9. New developments and prospects on COSI, the simulation software for fuel cycle analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Eschbach, R.; Meyer, M.; Coquelet-Pascal, C.; Tiphine, M.; Krivtchik, G.; Cany, C.

    2013-07-01

    COSI, software developed by the Nuclear Energy Direction of the CEA, is a code simulating a pool of nuclear power plants with its associated fuel cycle facilities. This code has been designed to study various short, medium and long term options for the introduction of various types of nuclear reactors and for the use of associated nuclear materials. In the frame of the French Act for waste management, scenario studies are carried out with COSI, to compare different options of evolution of the French reactor fleet and options of partitioning and transmutation of plutonium and minor actinides. Those studies aim in particular at evaluating the sustainability of Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) deployment and the possibility to transmute minor actinides. The COSI6 version is a completely renewed software released in 2006. COSI6 is now coupled with the last version of CESAR (CESAR5.3 based on JEFF3.1.1 nuclear data) allowing the calculations on irradiated fuel with 200 fission products and 100 heavy nuclides. A new release is planned in 2013, including in particular the coupling with a recommended database of reactors. An exercise of validation of COSI6, carried out on the French PWR historic nuclear fleet, has been performed. During this exercise quantities like cumulative natural uranium consumption, or cumulative depleted uranium, or UOX/MOX spent fuel storage, or stocks of reprocessed uranium, or plutonium content in fresh MOX fuel, or the annual production of high level waste, have been computed by COSI6 and compared to industrial data. The results have allowed us to validate the essential phases of the fuel cycle computation, and reinforces the credibility of the results provided by the code.

  10. Spin Resonances for Stored Deuteron Beams in COSY. Vector Polarization. Tracking with Spink

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio,A.; Lehrach, A.

    2008-04-01

    Results of measurements of vector and tensor polarization of a deuteron beam in the storage ring COSY have been published by the SPIN{at}COSY collaboration. In this experiment a RF Dipole was used that produced spin flip. The strength of the RFD-induced depolarizing resonance was calculated from the amount of spin flipping and the results shown in the figures of the cited paper. In this note we present the simulation of the experimental data (vector polarization) with the spin tracking code Spink.

  11. Ballistic-carrier spectroscopy of the CoSi2/Si interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, W. J.; Hecht, M. H.; Fathauer, R. W.; Bell, L. D.; Lee, E. Y.; Davis, L. C.

    1991-01-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscopy and related ballistic-hole and carrier-scattering spectroscopies were used to investigate carrier transport in the epitaxial CoSi2/Si system. An unexpected degree of variation in interface transmission was observed despite the high crystal quality of the epitaxial silicide layer. Furthermore, clear evidence of the CoSi2 band structure was observed, which has a dramatic effect on interface transport. The major effect of the silicide band structure is to increase the interfacial barrier to electron transmission to a value in excess of the Schottky barrier height.

  12. Improving the resolution in proton-detected through-space heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ming; Trébosc, J.; Lafon, O.; Pourpoint, F.; Hu, Bingwen; Chen, Qun; Amoureux, J.-P.

    2014-08-01

    Connectivities and proximities between protons and low-gamma nuclei can be probed in solid-state NMR spectroscopy using two-dimensional (2D) proton-detected heteronuclear correlation, through Heteronuclear Multiple Quantum Correlation (HMQC) pulse sequence. The indirect detection via protons dramatically enhances the sensitivity. However, the spectra are often broadened along the indirect F1 dimension by the decay of heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherences under the strong 1H-1H dipolar couplings. This work presents a systematic comparison of the performances of various decoupling schemes during the indirect t1 evolution period of dipolar-mediated HMQC (D-HMQC) experiment. We demonstrate that 1H-1H dipolar decoupling sequences during t1, such as symmetry-based schemes, phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) and Decoupling Using Mind-Boggling Optimization (DUMBO), provide better resolution than continuous wave 1H irradiation. We also report that high resolution requires the preservation of 1H isotropic chemical shifts during the decoupling sequences. When observing indirectly broad spectra presenting numerous spinning sidebands, the D-HMQC sequence must be fully rotor-synchronized owing to the rotor-synchronized indirect sampling and dipolar recoupling sequence employed. In this case, we propose a solution to reduce artefact sidebands caused by the modulation of window delays before and after the decoupling application during the t1 period. Moreover, we show that 1H-1H dipolar decoupling sequence using Smooth Amplitude Modulation (SAM) minimizes the t1-noise. The performances of the various decoupling schemes are assessed via numerical simulations and compared to 2D 1H-{13C} D-HMQC experiments on [U-13C]-L-histidineṡHClṡH2O at various magnetic fields and Magic Angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. Great resolution and sensitivity enhancements resulting from decoupling during t1 period enable the detection of heteronuclear correlation between aliphatic protons and

  13. A spectral correlation function for efficient sequential NMR assignments of uniformly (15)N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Bartels, C; Wüthrich, K

    1994-11-01

    A new computer-based approach is described for efficient sequence-specific assignment of uniformly (15)N-labeled proteins. For this purpose three-dimensional (15)N-correlated [(1)H, (1)H]-NOESY spectra are divided up into two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H strips which extend over the entire spectral width along one dimension and have a width of ca. 100 Hz, centered about the amide proton chemical shifts along the other dimension. A spectral correlation function enables sorting of these strips according to proximity of the corresponding residues in the amino acid sequence. Thereby, starting from a given strip in the spectrum, the probability of its corresponding to the C-terminal neighboring residue is calculated for all other strips from the similarity of their peak patterns with a pattern predicted for the sequentially adjoining residue, as manifested in the scalar product of the vectors representing the predicted and measured peak patterns. Tests with five different proteins containing both α-helices and β-sheets, and ranging in size from 58 to 165 amino acid residues show that the discrimination achieved between the sequentially neighboring residue and all other residues compares well with that obtained with an unguided interactive search of pairs of sequentially neighboring strips, with important savings in the time needed for complete analysis of 3D (15)N-correlated [(1)H, (1)H]-NOESY spectra. The integration of this routine into the program package XEASY ensures that remaining ambiguities can be resolved by visual inspection of the strips, combined with reference to the amino acid sequence and information on spin-system types obtained from additional NMR spectra.

  14. SENSASS NMR: New NMR techniques for enhancing the sensitivity and the spectral resolution of polymer supported chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosa, Nicolò; Scherrmann, Marie-Christine; Merlet, Denis; Farjon, Jonathan

    2013-12-01

    The use of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) as organic polymer soluble supports for synthesis has been receiving growing interest. The main advantages of using PEGs as support are related to their non-toxicity, their commercial availability and their solubility properties allowing easy recovery and analysis of compounds linked to the polymer. The NMR characterization of PEG-branched products could however be difficult due to the presence of huge signals of the polymeric support. In order to overcome this problem, we developed new NMR experiments named SENSitivity increAsed and resolution enhanced by Signal Suppression or SENSASS NMR. These experiments implement either semi-selective pulses or Water Gate sequences for reducing signals of the polymer as well as fast pulsing techniques optimizing the recycling delay for enhancing the sensitivity of signals. They have been successfully implemented in classical NMR characterization experiments namely, COSY, HSQC and HMBC experiments.

  15. Ballistic-Charge-Carrier Spectroscopy Of CoSi(2)/Si Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Michael H.; Kaiser, William J.; Fathauer, Robert W.; Bell, Lloyd D.; Lee, Edwin Y.

    1993-01-01

    Report discusses experiments in which ballistic-electron-emission microscopy (BEEM) and related ballistic-hole and charge-carrier-scattering spectroscopies used to investigate transport of electric-charge carriers (electrons and holes) in epitaxial CoSi2/Si system.

  16. Exclusive near threshold two-pion production with the MOMO experiment at COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavink, S.; Bellemann, F.; Berg, A.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bohlscheid, G.; Ernst, J.; Henrich, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Ibald, R.; Jahn, R.; Jarczyk, L.; Joosten, R.; Kozela, A.; Machner, H.; Magiera, A.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mertler, G.; Munkel, J.; Neumann-Cosel, P. v.; Rosendaal, D.; Rossen, P. v.; Schnitker, H.; Scho, K.; Smyrski, J.; Strzalkowski, A.; Tölle, R.; Wurzinger, R.

    1997-05-01

    Near threshold two pion production via the reaction pd→3Heπ+π- was measured kinematically complete with the MOMO experiment at COSY. A remarkable deviation of the obtained two pion invariant mass spectra from phase space as well as a predominant sidewise and back to back emission of the two mesons was observed.

  17. Exclusive near threshold two-pion production with the MOMO experiment at COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavink, S.; Bellemann, F.; Berg, A.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bohlscheid, G.; Ernst, J.; Henrich, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Ibald, R.; Jahn, R.; Jarczyk, L.; Joosten, R.; Kozela, A.; Machner, H.; Magiera, A.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mertler, G.; Munkel, J.; Neumann-Cosel, P. v.; Rosendaal, D.; Rossen, P. v.; Schnitker, H.; Scho, K.; Smyrski, J.; Strzalkowski, A.; Tölle, R.; Wurzinger, R.

    1998-03-01

    Near threshold two pion production via the reaction pd → 3Heπ +π - was measured kinematically complete with the MOMO experiment at COSY. A remarkable deviation of the obtained two pion invariant mass spectra from phase space as well as a predominant back to back and sidewise emission of the two pions was observed.

  18. Access to experimentally infeasible spectra by pure-shift NMR covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredi, André; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Parella, Teodor

    2016-09-01

    Covariance processing is a versatile processing tool to generate synthetic NMR spectral representations without the need to acquire time-consuming experimental datasets. Here we show that even experimentally prohibited NMR spectra can be reconstructed by introducing key features of a reference 1D CHn-edited spectrum into standard 2D spectra. This general procedure is illustrated with the calculation of experimentally infeasible multiplicity-edited pure-shift NMR spectra of some very popular homonuclear (ME-psCOSY and ME-psTOCSY) and heteronuclear (ME-psHSQC-TOCSY and ME-psHMBC) experiments.

  19. Access to experimentally infeasible spectra by pure-shift NMR covariance.

    PubMed

    Fredi, André; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Parella, Teodor

    2016-09-01

    Covariance processing is a versatile processing tool to generate synthetic NMR spectral representations without the need to acquire time-consuming experimental datasets. Here we show that even experimentally prohibited NMR spectra can be reconstructed by introducing key features of a reference 1D CHn-edited spectrum into standard 2D spectra. This general procedure is illustrated with the calculation of experimentally infeasible multiplicity-edited pure-shift NMR spectra of some very popular homonuclear (ME-psCOSY and ME-psTOCSY) and heteronuclear (ME-psHSQC-TOCSY and ME-psHMBC) experiments.

  20. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for the cyanine dyes SYBR Safe and thiazole orange.

    PubMed

    Evenson, William E; Boden, Lauren M; Muzikar, Katy A; O'Leary, Daniel J

    2012-12-01

    Analysis of (1)H and (13)C NMR and mass spectral data for the fluorescent nucleic acid stain SYBR Safe indicates that it contains a cyanine-based cationic core structure identical to thiazole orange. The difference between these two compounds is the type of N-substitution on the quinolinium ring system (SYBR Safe, n-Pr; thiazole orange, Me). The (1)H and (13)C NMR resonances for both compounds were assigned on the basis of one- and two-dimensional (COSY, ROESY, HSQC, and HMBC) experiments. The preferred conformation of these compounds was computed by ab initio methods and found to be consistent with the NMR data.

  1. Validation of the controlled ovarian stimulation impact measure (COSI): assessing the patient perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) is the first step for in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment, a treatment often described and experienced as stressful to patients and their partners. COS also requires concerted efforts by the patients in administering medication and general compliance to treatment protocols. Little is known about the impacts on patients that may be specific to this important first step in treatment. The absence of a conceptually sound and well-validated measure assessing patient experience and functioning during ovarian stimulation has been an obstacle to understanding the impacts of ovarian stimulation on women pursuing IVF. To address this gap, the Controlled Ovarian Stimulation Impact Measure (COSI) was developed based upon accepted methods for designing patient reported outcome (PRO) measures. The purpose of this study was to psychometrically validate the COSI. Methods 267 patients from three countries (Ireland, United Kingdom, United States) were administered the COSI. Psychometric validation was conducted according to an a priori statistical analysis plan. Results The final 28-item COSI was found to have robust scale structure with four domains: Interference in Daily Life (Work and Home), Injection Burden, Psychological Health and Compliance Worry. Internal consistency of all domains was adequate (between 0.80 to 0.87) as was test-retest reliability (between 0.72-0.87). All a-priori hypotheses for convergent and known-groups validity tests were met. Conclusions There is a measurable impact of COS on patient functioning and well-being. The COSI is a well-developed and validated PRO measure of this impact. Future work should include examination of responsiveness and confirmation of concepts in non-western countries. PMID:23902854

  2. 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shift Assignments and Conformational Analysis for the Two Diastereomers of the Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase Inhibitor Brodifacoum

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, John R.; Cho, Herman M.

    2009-10-01

    Proton and 13C NMR chemical shift assignments and 1H-1H scalar couplings for the two diastereomers of the vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) inhibitor brodifacoum have been determined from acetone solutions containing both diastereomers. Data were obtained from homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra acquired at 1H frequencies of 750 and 900 MHz over a 268-303 K temperature range. Conformations inferred from scalar coupling and 1-D NOE measurements exhibit large differences between the diastereomers. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  3. (17)O NMR Investigation of Water Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Eric G; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-18

    The structure and dynamics of the bound water in barium chlorate monohydrate were studied with (17)O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in samples that are stationary and spinning at the magic-angle in magnetic fields ranging from 14.1 to 21.1 T. (17)O NMR parameters of the water were determined, and the effects of torsional oscillations of the water molecule on the (17)O quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) were delineated with variable temperature MAS NMR. With decreasing temperature and reduction of the librational motion, we observe an increase in the experimentally measured CQ explaining the discrepancy between experiments and predictions from density functional theory. In addition, at low temperatures and in the absence of (1)H decoupling, we observe a well-resolved (1)H-(17)O dipole splitting in the spectra, which provides information on the structure of the H2O molecule. The splitting arises because of the homogeneous nature of the coupling between the two (1)H-(17)O dipoles and the (1)H-(1)H dipole. PMID:27454747

  4. (17)O NMR Investigation of Water Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Eric G; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-18

    The structure and dynamics of the bound water in barium chlorate monohydrate were studied with (17)O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in samples that are stationary and spinning at the magic-angle in magnetic fields ranging from 14.1 to 21.1 T. (17)O NMR parameters of the water were determined, and the effects of torsional oscillations of the water molecule on the (17)O quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) were delineated with variable temperature MAS NMR. With decreasing temperature and reduction of the librational motion, we observe an increase in the experimentally measured CQ explaining the discrepancy between experiments and predictions from density functional theory. In addition, at low temperatures and in the absence of (1)H decoupling, we observe a well-resolved (1)H-(17)O dipole splitting in the spectra, which provides information on the structure of the H2O molecule. The splitting arises because of the homogeneous nature of the coupling between the two (1)H-(17)O dipoles and the (1)H-(1)H dipole.

  5. Lipid-ethanol interaction studied by NMR on bicelles.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Bernd W; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2005-04-21

    The interaction of ethanol with phospholipids was studied in bicelles at a physiologically relevant ethanol concentration of 20 mM and a lipid content of 14 wt % by high-resolution NMR. Transient association of ethanol with magnetically aligned bicelles imparts a small degree of anisotropy to the solute. This anisotropy allows detection of residual (1)H-(1)H and (1)H-(13)C dipolar couplings, which are superimposed on scalar couplings. Residual (2)H NMR quadrupole splittings of isotope-labeled ethanol were measured as well. The analysis of residual tensorial interactions yielded information on the orientation and motions of ethanol in the membrane-bound state. The fraction of phosphatidylcholine-bound ethanol was determined independently by gas chromatography and NMR. About 4% of ethanol is bound to phosphatidylcholine at a bicelle concentration of 14 wt % at 40 degrees C. Free and bound ethanol are in rapid exchange. The lifetime of ethanol association with phosphatidylcholine membranes is of the order of a few nanoseconds.

  6. A benzoquinone and flavonoids from Cyperus alopecuroides.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Mahmoud I; Abdel-Razik, Ayman F; El-Khrisy, Ezz El-Din A M; Dawidar, Abdel-Aziz M; Bystrom, Amy; Mabry, Tom J

    2002-06-01

    A benzoquinone, named alopecuquinone, was isolated from the ethanol extract of the inflorescences of Cyperus alopecuroides. Its structure was primarily elucidated by spectroscopic analysis including 1H, 13C NMR, APT, HMQC, 1H-1H COSY and CIMS. The known flavonoids, vicenin 2, orientin, diosmetin, quercetin 3,3'-dimethyl ether and its 3,4'-dimethyl ether, were also isolated and characterized. The ethanol extract of the plant material showed moderate estrogenic activity using a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  7. Jaspiferin G, a new isomalabaricane-type triterpenoid from the sponge Jaspis stellifera.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Guo; Wang, Jia; Xing, Guo-Sheng; Xu, Jiao-Jiao; Qiao, Wei; Zhao, Chuan; Tang, Sheng-An

    2016-01-01

    A new isomalabaricane-type triterpenoid, jaspiferin G (1), together with four known isomalabaricane-type triterpenoids, isogeoditin A (2), 13-(E)-isogeoditin A (3), jaspolide E (4), and 22,23-dihydrostellettin D (5), was isolated from the marine sponge Jaspis stellifera. The structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data ((1)H and (13)C NMR, (1)H(-1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and ROESY) and mass spectrometry. PMID:27101546

  8. Bis-spirolabdane-type diterpenoids from Leonurus sibiricus.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyun Teak; Jin, Qinglong; Shin, Ji Eun; Choi, Eun Jin; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Kim, Yeong Shik; Woo, Eun-Rhan

    2010-02-26

    Six new bis-spirolabdane-type diterpenoids, leosibirinone A (1), 3alpha-acetoxyleoheteronone C (2), leosibirinone B (3), 3alpha-hydroxyleoheteronone A (4), 3alpha-acetoxyleoheteronone E (5), and 3alpha-acetoxy-15-epileoheteronone E (6), were isolated from the aerial parts of Leonurus sibiricus. Their structures were identified on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY spectroscopic analyses.

  9. Chemical constituents of the soft coral Sarcophyton infundibuliforme from the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue-Ping; Wang, Chang-Yun; Shao, Chang-Lun; Li, Liang; Li, Xiu-Bao; Chen, Min; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2010-08-01

    One new cembrane diterpenoid, named sarcolactone A (1), along with five known compounds (2-6) were isolated from the soft coral Sarcophyton infundibuliforme collected from the South China Sea. The structure of sarcolactone A (1) was elucidated by comprehensive analysis of spectral data, especially 2D-NMR spectra (1H-1H COSY, HMBC and NOESY). All the compounds were evaluated for their brine shrimp lethality and antifouling activities.

  10. Endotaxial growth of CoSi2 within (111) oriented Si in a molecular beam epitaxy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T.; Fathauer, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    A new mode of growth is reported in which buried metallic layers can be fabricated within a single-crystal semiconductor through preferential subsurface growth on previously-grown 'seed' regions. The deposition of Co at 800 C at a rate of 0.01 nm/s on (111) Si substrates containing buried CoSi2 columns 40-100 nm below the Si surface results in the growth and coalescence of these subsurface columns. The formation of a CoSi2 layer on the Si surface is suppressed by this growth mode. It is proposed that the high diffusion rate of Co at 800 C, coupled with the high growth rate of CoSi2 at the subsurface columns, is responsible for this preferred 'endotaxial' growth mode. This growth technique was used to produce a continuous buried single-crystal layer of CoSi2 under a single-crystal Si capping layer.

  11. Preparing the COSY-Ring for a Test of Time-Reversal-Invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Eversheim, P.D.; TRI Collaboration

    2000-12-31

    At the cooler synchrotron COSY at Juelich a novel (P-even, T-odd) true null test of time-reversal invariance (TRI) was proposed and accepted, that is supposed to measure TRI to an accuracy of 10{sup {minus}4} (Phase 1) or 10{sup {minus}6} (Phase 2). The parity conserving time-reversal violating observable is the total cross-section asymmetry A{sub y,XZ}. The measurement is planned as an internal target transmission experiment at the cooler synchrotron COSY. A{sub y,XZ} is measured using a polarized beam with an energy of about 1 GeV and a tensor polarized deuteron atomic-beam target.

  12. Growth dynamics of low-dimensional CoSi2 nanostructures revisited: Influence of interface structure and growth temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Bin Leong; Ong, Weijie; Foo, Yong Lim; Pan, Jisheng; Tok, Eng Soon

    2012-11-01

    The growth of cobalt silicide nanostructures on clean Si(001) was studied using scanning tunnelling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Two types of CoSi2 nanostructures, flat and ridge-type islands, were formed when 0.1 ML Co was deposited onto clean Si(001) between 500 °C and 800 °C. These islands form elongated islands along [110] directions and grow into the Si-substrate within the temperature range. The formation of the two types of islands arises primarily due to the type of CoSi2{111}-Si{111} interface formed between the island and the substrate. Flat islands are bound by CoSi2{111}-Si{111} Type-A interfaces such that CoSi2(001)//Si(001) and CoSi2[001]//Si[001]. Ridge islands, on the other hand, are bound by a "twinned" CoSi2{111}-Si{111} Type-B interface such that CoSi2(221)//Si(001) and CoSi2[11¯0] //Si[11¯0]. This leads to the formation of three less energetically-favourable interfaces: CoSi2(1¯1¯1¯)-Si(115¯), CoSi2(1¯1¯2¯)-Si(112¯), and CoSi2(1¯1¯5¯)-Si(111¯). Analysis of the interfacial energies through dangling bond counting per interfacial area for each interface shows that the formation of the Type-B interface is energetically more favourable compared to the rest of the interfaces. As a result, the island elongates preferentially along the Type B interface leading to the formation of long nanowires with large length-width aspect ratio of 20:1. However, this formation is only achieved at high growth temperatures due to the presence of corner-barriers constraining the growth at low temperatures. Conversely, flat islands are slightly elongated at low growth temperatures with aspect ratio reaching 7:1 at 650 °C. As temperature increases towards 760 °C, they are brought closer to equilibrium and hence become less elongated with aspect ratio reduced to 1.6:1.

  13. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of two phytosterols from roots of Piper nigrum.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kun; Li, Wei; Koike, Kazuo; Pei, Yuping; Chen, Yingjie; Nikaido, Tamotsu

    2004-03-01

    Using modern NMR techniques, including DQF-COSY, NOESY, HETCOR and HMBC, the full assignments of all 1H and 13C chemical shifts were made for stigmastane-3,6-dione and stigmast-4-ene-3,6-dione, isolated from the roots of Piper nigrum (Piperaceae). Their stereochemistry was resolved by a combination of 2D NOESY data and analysis of coupling constants. The two compounds were isolated from the genus Piper for the first time.

  14. Ultrafast double-quantum NMR spectroscopy with optimized sensitivity for the analysis of mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rouger, Laetitia; Gouilleux, Boris; Pourchet-Gellez, Mariane; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast (UF) 2D NMR enables the acquisition of 2D spectra within a single-scan. This methodology has become a powerful analytical tool, used in a large array of applications. However, UF NMR spectroscopy still suffers from the need to compromise between sensitivity, spectral width and resolution. With the commonly used UF-COSY pulse sequence, resolution issues are compounded by the presence of strong auto-correlation signals, particularly in the case of samples with high dynamic ranges. The recently proposed concept of UF Double Quantum Spectroscopy (DQS) allows a better peak separation as it provides a lower spectral peak density. This paper presents the detailed investigation of this new NMR tool in an analytical chemistry context. Theoretical calculations and numerical simulations are used to characterize the modulation of peak intensities as a function of pulse-sequence parameters, and thus enable a significant enhancement of the sensitivity. The analytical comparison of UF-COSY and UF-DQS shows similar performances, however the ultrafast implementation of the DQS approach is found to have some sensitivity advantages over its conventional counterpart. The analytical performance of the pulse sequence is illustrated by the quantification of taurine in complex mixtures (homemade and commercial energy drinks). The results demonstrate the high potential of this experiment, which forms a valuable alternative to UF-COSY spectra when the latter are characterized by strong overlaps and high dynamic ranges. PMID:26865359

  15. A bidesmosidic hederagenin hexasaccharide from the roots of Symphytum officinale.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, F V; Noorwala, M; Ahmad, V U; Sener, B

    1995-09-01

    A new bidesmosidic triterpenoidal saponin 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-alpha-L - arabinopyranosyl]-hederagenin-28-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl- (1-->4)-beta-D- glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] ester, was isolated from the roots of Symphytum officinale. The structure was assigned by chemical methods and spectral analysis (1H, 13C, DEPT, NMR, EI-MS and FAB-MS) including 1H-1H COSY, 1H-13C COSY and HOHAHA. The prosapogenin of this saponin is also a new compound. PMID:7546550

  16. A new COmpact hyperSpectral Imaging system (COSI) for UAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sima, Aleksandra; Baeck, Pieter-Jan; Delalieux, Stephanie; Livens, Stefan; Blommaert, Joris; Delauré, Bavo; Boonen, Miet

    2016-04-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the new COmpact hyperSpectral Imaging (COSI) system recently developed at the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO, Belgium) and suitable for multirotor Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) platforms. The camera is compact and lightweight, with a total mass of less than 500g including: an embedded computer, storage and power distribution unit. Such device miniaturization was possible thanks to the application of linear variable filters technology, in which image lines in the across flight direction correspond to different spectral bands as well as a different location on the ground (frame camera). The scanning motion is required to retrieve the complete spectrum for every point on the ground. The COSI camera captures data in 72 narrow (FWHM: 5nm to 10 nm) bands in the spectral range of 600-900 nm. Such spectral information is highly favourable for vegetation studies, since the main chlorophyll absorption feature centred around 680 nm is measured, as well as, the red-edge region (680 nm to 730 nm) which is often linked to plant stress. The NIR region furthermore reflects the internal plant structure, and is often linked to leaf area index and plant biomass. Next to the high spectral resolution, the COSI imager also provides a very high spatial data resolution i.e. images captured with a 9mm lens at 40m altitude cover a swath of ~40m with a ~2cm ground sampling distance. A dedicated data processing chain transforms the raw images into various information and action maps representing the status of the vegetation health and thus allowing for optimization of the management decisions within agricultural fields. In a number of test flights, hyperspectral COSI imager data were acquired covering diverse environments, e.g.: strawberry fields, natural grassland or pear orchards. Next to the COSI system overview, examples of collected data will be presented together with the results of the spectral data analysis. Lessons

  17. 31P NMR conformational studies of non-palindromic DNA duplexes related to HIV-1 enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisne, C.; Simenel, C.; Hantz, E.; Delepierre, M.

    1998-02-01

    Assignment of all 31P resonances of 16 base-pair DNA duplexes, 5' d(CTGGGGACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTCCCCAG)3', related to the DNA kappaB site of the HIV-1 LTR together with a mutated sequence 5' d(CTGCTCACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTGAGCAG)3' was determined by 2D heteronuclear inverse NMR spectroscopy (HSQC-TOCSY and heteronuclear COSY). ^3JH{3'}-P coupling constants for most of the phosphates of the mutated oligomer were obtained using heteronuclear selective COSY. L'attribution des résonances 31P du fragment d'ADN de seize paires de base 5' d(CTGGGGACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTCCCCAG)3' (16N) correspondant au site kappaB du LTR du HIV-1 et de la séquence mutée 5' d(CTGCTCACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTGAGCAG)3' (16M) a été déterminée à l'aide de méthodes 2D hétéronucléaires à détection indirecte (HSQC-TOCSY et COSY hétéronucléaires). Les constantes de couplage ^3JH{3'}-P ont été mesurées pour la plupart des phosphates de 16 M à l'aide d'expérience COSY hétéronucléaires sélectives.

  18. Contiguously substituted cyclooctane polyols. configurational assignments via (1)H NMR correlations and symmetry considerations.

    PubMed

    Moura-Letts, Gustavo; Paquette, Leo A

    2008-10-01

    More advanced oxidation of the cyclooctadienol shown, readily available in enantiomerically pure form from D-glucose, has given rise to a series of intermediates whose relative (and ultimately absolute) configuration was assigned on the basis of (1)H/(1)H coupling constant analysis. The selectivities that were deduced in this manner were drawn from the sequential application of CrO3 oxidation in tandem with Luche reduction, two-step NMO-promoted osmylations bracketed by acetonide formation, and wholesale deprotection. The stereoselectivities of these reactions were traced by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and the stereochemical assignments were confirmed by the presence or absence of symmetry in the final cyclooctane polyols (four shown) generated in this investigation.

  19. Transmission electron microscopy study of the formation of epitaxial CoSi2/Si (111) by a room-temperature codeposition technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Anterroches, Cecile; Yakupoglu, H. Nejat; Lin, T. L.; Fathauer, R. W.; Grunthaner, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    Co and Si have been codeposited on Si (111) substrates near room temperature in a stoichiometric 1:2 ratio in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Annealing of these deposits yields high-quality single-crystal CoSi2 layers. Transmission electron microscopy has been used to examine as-deposited layers and layers annealed at 300, 500, and 600 C. Single-crystal epitaxial grains of CoSi2 embedded in a matrix of amorphous Co/Si are observed in as-deposited samples, while the layer is predominantly single-crystal, inhomogeneously strained CoSi2 at 300 C. At 600 C, a homogeneously strained single-crystal layer with a high density of pinholes is observed. In contrast to other solid phase epitaxy techniques used to grow CoSi2 on Si (111), no intermediate silicide phases are observed prior to the formation of CoSi2.

  20. Intermolecular Interactions between Eosin Y and Caffeine Using 1H-NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Okuom, Macduff O.; Wilson, Mark V.; Jackson, Abby; Holmes, Andrea E.

    2014-01-01

    DETECHIP has been used in testing analytes including caffeine, cocaine, and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) from marijuana, as well as date rape and club drugs such as flunitrazepam, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), and methamphetamine. This study investigates the intermolecular interaction between DETECHIP sensor eosin Y (DC1) and the analyte (caffeine) that is responsible for the fluorescence and color changes observed in the actual array. Using 1H-NMR, 1H-COSY, and 1H-DOSY NMR methods, a proton exchange from C-8 of caffeine to eosin Y is proposed. PMID:25018772

  1. Complete (1)H and (13)C signal assignment of prenol-10 with 3D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Misiak, Maria; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Kwasiborska, Maria; Wójcik, Jacek; Ciepichal, Ewa; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2009-10-01

    The complete assignment of (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts of natural abundance prenol-10 is reported for the first time. It was achieved using 3D NMR experiments, which were based on random sampling of the evolution time space followed by multidimensional Fourier transform. This approach makes it possible to acquire 3D NMR spectra in a reasonable time and preserves high resolution in indirectly detected dimensions. It is shown that the interpretation of 3D COSY-HMBC and 3D TOCSY-HSQC spectra is crucial in the structural analysis of prenol-10.

  2. Intermolecular Interactions between Eosin Y and Caffeine Using (1)H-NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Okuom, Macduff O; Wilson, Mark V; Jackson, Abby; Holmes, Andrea E

    2013-12-31

    DETECHIP has been used in testing analytes including caffeine, cocaine, and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) from marijuana, as well as date rape and club drugs such as flunitrazepam, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), and methamphetamine. This study investigates the intermolecular interaction between DETECHIP sensor eosin Y (DC1) and the analyte (caffeine) that is responsible for the fluorescence and color changes observed in the actual array. Using (1)H-NMR, (1)H-COSY, and (1)H-DOSY NMR methods, a proton exchange from C-8 of caffeine to eosin Y is proposed. PMID:25018772

  3. Synthesis, characterization and dynamic NMR studies of a novel chalcone based N-substituted morpholine derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskar, R.; Baby, C.; Moni, M. S.; Subramanian, K.

    2013-05-01

    The synthesis of a novel chalcone based N-substituted morpholine derivative namely, (E)-1-(biphenyl-4-yl)-3-(4-(5-morpholinopentyloxy) phenyl) prop-2-en-1-one (BMPP), using a two step protocol is reported. The compound is characterized by FTIR, GC-MS and FTNMR spectroscopy techniques. Advanced 2D NMR techniques such as gradient enhanced COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY were employed to establish through-bond and through-space correlations. Dynamic NMR measurements were carried out to obtain the energy barrier to ring inversion of the morpholine moiety.

  4. Protein-ice interaction of an antifreeze protein observed with solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Siemer, Ansgar B; Huang, Kuo-Ying; McDermott, Ann E

    2010-10-12

    NMR on frozen solutions is an ideal method to study fundamental questions of macromolecular hydration, because the hydration shell of many biomolecules does not freeze together with bulk solvent. In the present study, we present previously undescribed NMR methods to study the interactions of proteins with their hydration shell and the ice lattice in frozen solution. We applied these methods to compare solvent interaction of an ice-binding type III antifreeze protein (AFP III) and ubiquitin a non-ice-binding protein in frozen solution. We measured (1)H-(1)H cross-saturation and cross-relaxation to provide evidence for a molecular contact surface between ice and AFP III at moderate freezing temperatures of -35 °C. This phenomenon is potentially unique for AFPs because ubiquitin shows no such cross relaxation or cross saturation with ice. On the other hand, we detected liquid hydration water and strong water-AFP III and water-ubiquitin cross peaks in frozen solution using relaxation filtered (2)H and HETCOR spectra with additional (1)H-(1)H mixing. These results are consistent with the idea that ubiquitin is surrounded by a hydration shell, which separates it from the bulk ice. For AFP III, the water cross peaks indicate that only a portion of its hydration shell (i.e., at the ice-binding surface) is in contact with the ice lattice. The rest of AFP III's hydration shell behaves similarly to the hydration shell of non-ice-interacting proteins such as ubiquitin and does not freeze together with the bulk water.

  5. Echo Planar Correlated Spectroscopic Imaging (EP-COSI): Implementation and Pilot Evaluation in Human Calf in Vivo#

    PubMed Central

    Lipnick, Scott; Verma, Gaurav; Ramadan, Saadallah; Furuyama, Jon; Thomas, M. Albert

    2010-01-01

    Exploiting the speed benefits of echo-planar imaging (EPI), the echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) sequence facilitates recording of one spectral and two to three spatial dimensions faster than the conventional MR Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI). A novel four dimensional (4D) echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging (EP-COSI) was implemented on a whole body 3T MRI scanner combining two spectral with two spatial encodings. Similar to EPSI, the EP-COSI sequence used a bipolar spatial read-out train facilitating simultaneous spatial and spectral encoding, and the conventional phase and spectral encodings for the other spatial and indirect spectral dimensions, respectively. Multiple 2D correlated spectroscopy (COSY) spectra were recorded over the spatially resolved volume of interest (VOI) localized by a train of three slice-selective radio-frequency (RF) pulses (90°-180°-90°). After the initial optimization using phantom solutions, the EP-COSI data were recorded in the lower leg of eight healthy volunteers including one endurance trained volunteer. Pilot results showed acceptable spatial and spectral quality achievable using the EP-COSI sequence. There was a detectable separation of cross peaks arising from the skeletal muscle intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) and extramyocellular lipids (EMCL) saturated and unsaturated pools. Residual dipolar interaction between the N-methylene and N-methyl protons of creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr/PCr) was also observed in the tibialis anterior region. PMID:20574964

  6. Cryogenic Topics Associated with the Superconducting Linac Proposed for the Cosy-Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Eichhorn, R.; Esser, F.; Laatsch, B.; Lennartz, M.; Schug, G.; Stassen, R.

    2004-06-23

    An upgrade of the existing proton and deuteron accelerator facility COSY at the Forschungszentrum Juelich, based on a superconducting linac is under investigation. This paper will report on the cryogenic aspects of the project: The cryomodule layout will be shown and special emphasis will put on the short cold-warm transition, the heat transfer of which was calculated using finite element simulation techniques. The cavity tuner, based on fast piezo-electric actuators to adjust the resonators' frequency, will be shown as well as the adjustable power coupler that uses a cold siphon-shaped window to prevent surface contamination of the cavity during assembly and operation.

  7. Choosing the best pulse sequences, acquisition parameters, postacquisition processing strategies, and probes for natural product structure elucidation by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, William F; Enríquez, Raúl G

    2002-02-01

    The relative merits of different pairs of two-dimensional NMR pulse sequences (COSY-90 vs COSY-45, NOESY vs T-ROESY, HSQC vs HMQC, HMBC vs CIGAR, etc.) are compared and recommendations are made for the preferred choice of sequences for natural product structure elucidation. Similar comparisons are made between different selective 1D sequences and the corresponding 2D sequences. Many users of 2D NMR use longer than necessary relaxation delays and neglect to use forward linear prediction processing. It is shown that using shorter relaxation delays in combination with forward linear prediction allows one to get better resolved spectra in less time. The relative merits of different probes and likely future probe developments are also discussed.

  8. Microbial transformation of Isopimpinellin by Glomerella cingulata.

    PubMed

    Marumoto, Shinsuke; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    Microbial transformation studies conducted on isopimpinellin (1) by the fungus Glomerella cingulata have revealed that 1 was metabolized to give the corresponding reduced acid, 5,8-dimethoxy-6,7-furano-hydrocoumaric acid (2). The structure of metabolite 2 was elucidated by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS), extensive NMR techniques, including (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H correlation spectroscopy (COSY), heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) and heteonuclear multiple bond coherence (HMBC). The biotransformed product 2 showed weak a in vitro β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitory effect. PMID:22027023

  9. Flavanones from Miconia prasina

    PubMed Central

    Tarawneh, Amer H.; León, Francisco; Ibrahim, Mohammed A.; Pettaway, Sara; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Cutler, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    A glycosidic flavanone miconioside C (1) has been isolated from the methanolic extract of the stems of Miconia prasina, together with 7-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranosylmatteucinol (2), miconioside B (3), matteucinol (4), farrerol (5) and desmethoxymatteucinol (6). Their structures were mainly established by extensive NMR studies (1H NMR, 13C NMR, DEPT, 1H-1H COSY, HSQC, HMBC) and mass spectrometry. The compounds 1- 3 were evaluated for in vitro binding assays using cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2). PMID:24976876

  10. Brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons and sterols from the sponge Xestospongia testudinaria with their bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuefeng; Lu, Yanan; Lin, Xiuping; Yang, Bin; Yang, Xianwen; Liu, Yonghong

    2011-10-01

    Four brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons (1-4), including a novel brominated ene-tetrahydrofuran named as mutafuran H (1), and five sterols (5-9) were isolated from the South China Sea sponge Xestospongia testudinaria. The structure of 1 was determined on the basis of NMR ((1)H, (13)C NMR, HSQC, HMBC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, and NOESY), MS, and optical rotation analysis. Known compounds were identified by comparison of their NMR data with those reported in the literature. Compounds 1-4, and 6-9 were evaluated for their toxicity against Artemia salina larvae, and anti-acetylcholinesterase activity.

  11. Complete (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift assignments of mono-, di-, and trisaccharides as basis for NMR chemical shift predictions of polysaccharides using the computer program casper.

    PubMed

    Roslund, Mattias U; Säwén, Elin; Landström, Jens; Rönnols, Jerk; Jonsson, K Hanna M; Lundborg, Magnus; Svensson, Mona V; Widmalm, Göran

    2011-08-16

    The computer program casper uses (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift data of mono- to trisaccharides for the prediction of chemical shifts of oligo- and polysaccharides. In order to improve the quality of these predictions the (1)H and (13)C, as well as (31)P when applicable, NMR chemical shifts of 30 mono-, di-, and trisaccharides were assigned. The reducing sugars gave two distinct sets of NMR resonances due to the α- and β-anomeric forms. In total 35 (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift data sets were obtained from the oligosaccharides. One- and two-dimensional NMR experiments were used for the chemical shift assignments and special techniques were employed in some cases such as 2D (1)H,(13)C-HSQC Hadamard Transform methodology which was acquired approximately 45 times faster than a regular t(1) incremented (1)H,(13)C-HSQC experiment and a 1D (1)H,(1)H-CSSF-TOCSY experiment which was able to distinguish spin-systems in which the target protons were only 3.3Hz apart. The (1)H NMR chemical shifts were subsequently refined using total line-shape analysis with the PERCH NMR software. The acquired NMR data were then utilized in the casper program (http://www.casper.organ.su.se/casper/) for NMR chemical shift predictions of the O-antigen polysaccharides from Klebsiella O5, Shigella flexneri serotype X, and Salmonella arizonae O62. The data were compared to experimental data of the polysaccharides from the two former strains and the lipopolysaccharide of the latter strain showing excellent agreement between predicted and experimental (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

  12. Magnetic ordering in Sc2CoSi2-type R2FeSi2 (R=Gd, Tb) and R2CoSi2 (R=Y, Gd-Er) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozkin, A. V.; Knotko, A. V.; Yapaskurt, V. O.; Pani, M.; Nirmala, R.; Quezado, S.; Malik, S. K.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of Sc2CoSi2-type R2TSi2 (R=Gd-Er, T=Fe, Co) compounds have been studied using magnetization data. These indicate the presence of mixed ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions in these compounds. One observes a ferromagnetic transition followed by an antiferromagnetic order and a further possible spin-reorientation transition at low temperatures. Compared to Gd2{Fe, Co}Si2, the Tb2FeSi2 and {Tb-Er}2CoSi2 compounds exhibit remarkable hysteresis (for e.g. Tb2FeSi2 shows residual magnetization Mres/Tb=2.45 μB, coercive field Hcoer=14.9 kOe, and critical field Hcrit 5 kOe at 5 K) possibly due to the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the rare earth. The R2{Fe, Co}Si2 show relatively small magnetocaloric effect (i.e. isothermal magnetic entropy change, ΔSm) around the magnetic transition temperature: the maximal value of MCE is demonstrated by Ho2CoSi2 (ΔSm=-8.1 J/kg K at 72 K and ΔSm=-9.4 J/kg K at 23 K in field change of 50 kOe) and Er2CoSi2 (ΔSm=-13.6 J/kg K at 32 K and ΔSm=-8.4 J/kg K at 12 K in field change of 50 kOe).

  13. The Kagomé topology of the gallium and indium metal-organic framework types with a MIL-68 structure: synthesis, XRD, solid-state NMR characterizations, and hydrogen adsorption.

    PubMed

    Volkringer, Christophe; Meddouri, Mohamed; Loiseau, Thierry; Guillou, Nathalie; Marrot, Jérôme; Férey, Gérard; Haouas, Mohamed; Taulelle, Francis; Audebrand, Nathalie; Latroche, Michel

    2008-12-15

    The vanadium-based terephthalate analogs of MIL-68 have been obtained with gallium and indium (network composition: M(OH)(O(2)C-C(6)H(4)-CO(2)), M = Ga or In) by using a solvothermal synthesis technique using N,N-dimethylformamide as a solvent (10 and 48 h, for Ga and In, respectively, at 100 degrees C). They have been characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis; vibrational spectroscopy; and solid-state (1)H and (1)H-(1)H radio-frequency-driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR), (1)H-(1)H double quantum correlation (DQ), and (13)C{(1)H} cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy. The three-dimensional network with a Kagomé-like lattice is built up from the connection of infinite trans-connected chains of octahedral units MO(4)(OH)(2) (M = Ga or In), linked to each other through the terephthalate ligands in order to generate triangular and hexagonal one-dimensional channels. The presence of DMF molecules with strong interactions within the channels as well as their departure upon calcination (150 degrees C under a primary vacuum) of the materials has been confirmed by subjecting MIL-68 (Ga) to solid-state (1)H MAS NMR. The (1)H-(1)H RFDR and (1)H-(1)H DQ spectra revealed important information on the spatial arrangement of the guest species with respect to the hybrid organic-inorganic network. (13)C{(1)H} CPMAS NMR of activated samples provided crystallographically independent sites in agreement with X-ray diffraction structure determination. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas are 1117(24) and 746(31) m(2) g(-1) for MIL-98 (Ga) and MIL-68 (In), respectively. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms have been measured at 77 K, and the storage capacities are found to be 2.46 and 1.98 wt % under a saturated pressure of 4 MPa for MIL-68 (Ga) and MIL-68 (In), respectively. For comparison, the hydrogen uptake for the aluminum trimesate MIL-110, which has an open framework with 16 A channels, is 3 wt % under 4 MPa.

  14. Determination of the Lifetime of Heavy {Lambda}-Hypernuclei at COSY Juelich

    SciTech Connect

    Ohm, H.; Borgs, W.; Cassing, W.; Hartmann, M.; Jarczyk, L.; Kamys, B.; Koch, H.R.; Kulessa, P.; Maier, H.J.; Maier, R.; Matoba, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Pysz, K.; Rudy, Z.; Schult, O.; Stroeher, H.; Strzalkowski, A.; Uozumi, Y.; Zychor, I.

    2000-12-31

    The lifetime of heavy hypernuclei has been determined at COSY Juelich, making use of the (p,K) reaction and the recoil-shadow technique based on the detection of fragments from the {Lambda}-decay induced fission. Hypernuclei were produced by bombarding extremely thin U and Bi targets with protons of 1.5 GeV and 1.9 GeV kinetic energy. High luminosity was achieved due to the multipass technique with the target being exposed to the internal beam of COSY. Position-sensitive low-pressure MWPCs permitted clear identification of fission fragments based on energy loss and TOF information. The lifetime of hypernuclei was deduced from the position distributions of fission events in the shadow region and from the recoil momentum calculated within the BUU model. Values of 240{+-}60 ps and 161{+-}14(syst.) ps were found with U and Bi targets, respectively. The deduced production cross sections for hot hypernuclei prior to the evaporation process of {sigma}=150{sub {minus}80}{sup +150} {mu}b for U and 350{+-}140 {mu}b for Bi are in agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  15. Development of a Compact Photon Detector for Anke at Cosy JÜLICH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büscher, M.; Hejny, V.; Koch, H. R.; Machner, H.; Seyfarth, H.; Ströher, H.; Hoek, M.; Novotny, R.; Römer, K.; Bacelar, J.; Löhner, H.; Magiera, A.; Wrońska, A.; Chernychov, V.

    2002-06-01

    COSY Jülich is a race-track shaped synchrotron which accelerates and cools beams of protons (both polarized and unpolarized) and deuterons with momenta up to 3.6 GeV/c. Those beams are delivered to internal and external target positions for hadron physics experiments. Since magnetic and time-of-flight detectors based on organic scintillators are used in the experimental setups, all measurements are essentially "photon blind". Recent improvements in the performance of high-density inorganic scintillators offer the possibility to design very compact large-acceptance electromagnetic calorimeters with excellent timing and good energy resolution, applicable also for photon energies below 1 GeV. Such a detection system, based on PbWO4, is planned to be built for the internal magnetic spectrometer ANKE at COSY Jülich. The limited space and stray magnetic fields of ANKE place severe boundary conditions, which have to be taken into account for detector layout and the choice of photo sensors.

  16. Natural-abundance 15N NMR studies of Turkey ovomucoid third domain. Assignment of peptide 15N resonances to the residues at the reactive site region via proton-detected multiple-quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Polo, Gilberto; Krishnamoorthi, R.; Markley, John L.; Live, David H.; Davis, Donald G.; Cowburn, David

    Heteronuclear two-dimensional 1H{ 15N} multiple-quantum (MQ) spectroscopy has been applied to a protein sample at natural abundance: ovomucoid third domain from turkey ( Meleagris gallopavo), a serine proteinase inhibitor of 56 amino acid residues. Peptide amide 1H NMR assignments obtained by two-dimensional 1H{ 1H} NMR methods (R. Krishnamoorthi and J. L. Markley, unpublished data) led to identification of the corresponding 1H{ 15N} MQ coherence cross peaks. From these, 15N NMR chemical shifts were determined for several specific backbone amide groups of amino acid residues located around the reactive site region of the inhibitor. The results suggest that amide 15N chemical shifts, which are readily obtained in this way, may serve as sensitive probes for conformational studies of proteins.

  17. NMR and mass spectrometric characterization of vinblastine, vincristine and some new related impurities - part I.

    PubMed

    Dubrovay, Zsófia; Háda, Viktor; Béni, Zoltán; Szántay, Csaba

    2013-10-01

    In the course of exploring the possibilities of developing a new, improved process at Gedeon Richter for the production of the "bisindole" alkaloids vinblastine (VLB) and vincristine (VCR), some novel VLB/VCR-related trace impurities were detected by analytical HPLC. Following isolation by preparative HPLC, a combination of 1D and 2D ultra high-field NMR and high-resolution (HR) (LC-)MS/MS studies allowed the structural identification and complete spectral characterization of several hitherto unpublished VLB/VCR-analogue impurities. Since the impurities could not be isolated in entirely pure forms and were available only in minute, mass-limited quantities, accessing the spectral information needed for their ab initio structure determination was met with various practical difficulties. Successful structure determination therefore relied heavily on the availability and use of detailed and definitive spectral data for both VLB and VCR. In particular, the utilization of detailed (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N NMR assignments as well as (1)H-(1)H, (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N spin-spin connectivities pertaining to different solvents for VLB/VCR base and sulphate salt was required. Although NMR studies on VLB base and other bisindoles were reported earlier in the literature, an NMR characterization of VLB and VCR under the above-mentioned circumstances and using ultra-high field instrumentation is either scarcely available or entirely lacking, therefore the necessary data had to be obtained in-house. Likewise, a modern tandem HR-ESI-MS/MS(n) fragmentation study of VLB and VCR has not been published yet. In the present paper we therefore give a thorough NMR and MS characterization of VLB and VCR specifically with a view to filling this void and to provide sufficiently extensive and solid reference data for the structural investigation of the aforementioned VLB/VCR impurities. Besides being scientifically relevant in its own right, the disclosed data should be useful for anyone

  18. Proton NMR assignments and regular backbone structure of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.D. ); Purisima, E.O. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY ); Eastman, M.A.; Scheraga, H.A. )

    1989-07-11

    Proton NMR assignments have been made for 121 of the 124 residues of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A). During the first stage of assignment, COSY and relayed COSY data were used to identify 40 amino acid spin systems belonging to alanine, valine, threonine, isoleucine, and serine residues. Approximately 60 other NH-{alpha}CH-{beta}CH systems were also identified but not assigned to specific amino acid type. NOESY data then were used to connect sequentially neighboring spin systems; approximately 475 of the possible 700 resonances in RNase A were assigned in this way. The authors' assignments agree with those for 20 residues assigned previously. NOESY correlations were used to identify regular backbone structure elements in RNase A, which are very similar to those observed in X-ray crystallographic studies.

  19. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for two oxaphenalenones bacillosporin C and D from the mangrove endophytic fungus SBE-14.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiyong; Shao, Changlun; She, Zhigang; Cai, Xiaoling; Liu, Fan; Vrijimoed, L L P; Lin, Yongcheng

    2007-05-01

    The complete (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments are reported for the novel natural product Bacillosporin D together with the known compound Bacillosporin C. These compounds containing seven rings were isolated from the mangrove endophytic fungus SBE-14 from the South China Sea. 1D and 2D NMR experiments, including COSY, HMQC and HMBC were used to the determination of the structures and NMR assignments. It is proposed that 1 was biogenetically produced by transforming 2. Transforming a lactone to an anhydride is unusual in nature.

  20. NMR analysis of a stress response metabolic signaling network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Halouska, Steven; Schiaffo, Charles E; Sadykov, Marat R; Somerville, Greg A; Powers, Robert

    2011-08-01

    We previously hypothesized that Staphylococcus epidermidis senses a diverse set of environmental and nutritional factors associated with biofilm formation through a modulation in the activity of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Herein, we report our further investigation of the impact of additional environmental stress factors on TCA cycle activity and provide a detailed description of our NMR methodology. S. epidermidis wild-type strain 1457 was treated with stressors that are associated with biofilm formation, a sublethal dose of tetracycline, 5% NaCl, 2% glucose, and autoinducer-2 (AI-2). As controls and to integrate our current data with our previous study, 4% ethanol stress and iron-limitation were also used. Consistent with our prior observations, the effect of many environmental stress factors on the S. epidermidis metabolome was essentially identical to the effect of TCA cycle inactivation in the aconitase mutant strain 1457-acnA::tetM. A detailed quantitative analysis of metabolite concentration changes using 2D (1)H-(13)C HSQC and (1)H-(1)H TOCSY spectra identified a network of 37 metabolites uniformly affected by the stressors and TCA cycle inactivation. We postulate that the TCA cycle acts as the central pathway in a metabolic signaling network.

  1. NMR analysis of a stress response metabolic signaling network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Halouska, Steven; Schiaffo, Charles E; Sadykov, Marat R; Somerville, Greg A; Powers, Robert

    2011-08-01

    We previously hypothesized that Staphylococcus epidermidis senses a diverse set of environmental and nutritional factors associated with biofilm formation through a modulation in the activity of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Herein, we report our further investigation of the impact of additional environmental stress factors on TCA cycle activity and provide a detailed description of our NMR methodology. S. epidermidis wild-type strain 1457 was treated with stressors that are associated with biofilm formation, a sublethal dose of tetracycline, 5% NaCl, 2% glucose, and autoinducer-2 (AI-2). As controls and to integrate our current data with our previous study, 4% ethanol stress and iron-limitation were also used. Consistent with our prior observations, the effect of many environmental stress factors on the S. epidermidis metabolome was essentially identical to the effect of TCA cycle inactivation in the aconitase mutant strain 1457-acnA::tetM. A detailed quantitative analysis of metabolite concentration changes using 2D (1)H-(13)C HSQC and (1)H-(1)H TOCSY spectra identified a network of 37 metabolites uniformly affected by the stressors and TCA cycle inactivation. We postulate that the TCA cycle acts as the central pathway in a metabolic signaling network. PMID:21692534

  2. Advanced Structural Determination of Diterpene Esters Using Molecular Modeling and NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nothias-Scaglia, Louis-Félix; Gallard, Jean-François; Dumontet, Vincent; Roussi, Fanny; Costa, Jean; Iorga, Bogdan I; Paolini, Julien; Litaudon, Marc

    2015-10-23

    Three new jatrophane esters (1-3) were isolated from Euphorbia amygdaloides ssp. semiperfoliata, including an unprecedented macrocyclic jatrophane ester bearing a hemiketal substructure, named jatrohemiketal (3). The chemical structures of compounds 1-3 and their relative configurations were determined by spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of compound 3 was determined unambiguously through an original strategy combining NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Conformational search calculations were performed for the four possible diastereomers 3a-3d differing in their C-6 and C-9 stereocenters, and the lowest energy conformer was used as input structure for geometry optimization. The prediction of NMR parameters ((1)H and (13)C chemical shifts and (1)H-(1)H coupling constants) by density functional theory (DFT) calculations allowed identifying the most plausible diastereomer. Finally, the stereostructure of 3 was solved by comparison of the structural features obtained by molecular modeling for 3a-3d with NMR-derived data (the values of dihedral angles deduced from the vicinal proton-proton coupling constants ((3)JHH) and interproton distances determined by ROESY). The methodology described herein provides an efficient way to solve or confirm structural elucidation of new macrocyclic diterpene esters, in particular when no crystal structure is available.

  3. Estimation of Systematic Errors for Deuteron Electric Dipole Moment Search at COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekmenev, Stanislav

    2016-02-01

    An experimental method which is aimed to find a permanent EDM of a charged particle was proposed by the JEDI (Jülich Electric Dipole moment Investigations) collaboration. EDMs can be observed by their influence on spin motion. The only possible way to perform a direct measurement is to use a storage ring. For this purpose, it was decided to carry out the first precursor experiment at the Cooler Synchrotron (COSY). Since the EDM of a particle violates CP invariance it is expected to be tiny, treatment of all various sources of systematic errors should be done with a great level of precision. One should clearly understand how misalignments of the magnets affects the beam and the spin motion. It is planned to use a RF Wien filter for the precusor experiment. In this paper the simulations of the systematic effects for the RF Wien filter device method will be discussed.

  4. COSY Simulations to Guide Commissioning of the St. George Recoil Mass Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Jaclyn; Moran, Michael; Seymour, Christopher; Gilardy, Gwenaelle; Meisel, Zach; Couder, Manoel

    2015-10-01

    The goal of St. George (STrong Gradient Electromagnetic Online Recoil separator for capture Gamma ray Experiments) is to measure (α, γ) cross sections relevant to stellar helium burning. Recoil separators such as St. George are able to more closely approach the low astrophysical energies of interest because they collect reaction recoils rather than γ-rays, and thus are not limited by room background. In order to obtain an accurate cross section measurement, a recoil separator must be able to collect all recoils over their full range of expected energy and angular spread. The energy acceptance of St. George is currently being measured, and the angular acceptance will be measured soon. Here we present the results of COSY ion optics simulations and magnetic field analyses which were performed to help guide the commissioning measurements and diagnostic upgrades required to complete those measurements. National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program.

  5. Experimental Test of Momentum Cooling Model Predictions at COSY and Conclusions for WASA and HESR

    SciTech Connect

    Stockhorst, H.; Stassen, R.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Katayama, T.; Thorndahl, L

    2007-11-07

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) of the future International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt is planned as an anti-proton cooler ring in the momentum range from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c. An important and challenging feature of the new facility is the combination of highly dense phase space cooled beams with internal targets. A detailed numerical and analytical approach to the Fokker-Planck equation for longitudinal filter cooling including the beam-target interaction has been carried out to demonstrate the stochastic cooling capability. To gain confidence in the model predictions a series of experimental stochastic cooling studies with the internal target ANKE at COSY have been carried out. A remarkable agreement between model and experiment was achieved. On this basis longitudinal stochastic cooling simulations were performed to predict the possibilities and limits of cooling when the newly installed WASA Pellet-target is operated.

  6. 1H and 13C resonance designation of antimycin A1 by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.; Adams, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    Complete 1H and 13C resonance assignments of antimycin A1 were accomplished by two-dimensional NMR techniques, viz. 1H homonuclear COSY correlation, heteronuclear 13C-1H chemical shift correlation and long-range heteronuclear 13C-1H COLOC correlation. Antimycin A1 was found to consist of two isomeric components in a 2:1 ratio based on NMR spectroscopic evidence. The structure of the major component was newly assigned as the 8-isopentanoic acid ester. The spectra of the minor component were consistent with the known structure of antimycin A1.

  7. Solid-State NMR Characterization of Mixed Phosphonic Acid Ligand Binding and Organization on Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Davidowski, Stephen K; Holland, Gregory P

    2016-04-01

    As ligand functionalization of nanomaterials becomes more complex, methods to characterize the organization of multiple ligands on surfaces is required. In an effort to further the understanding of ligand-surface interactions, a combination of multinuclear ((1)H, (29)Si, (31)P) and multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques was utilized to characterize the phosphonic acid functionalization of fumed silica nanoparticles using methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). (1)H → (29)Si cross-polarization (CP)-magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR was used to selectively detect silicon atoms near hydrogen atoms (primarily surface species); these results indicate that geminal silanols are preferentially depleted during the functionalization with phosphonic acids. (1)H → (31)P CP-MAS solid-state NMR measurements on the functionalized silica nanoparticles show three distinct resonances shifted upfield (lower ppm) and broadened compared to the resonances of the crystalline ligands. Quantitative (31)P MAS solid-state NMR measurements indicate that ligands favor a monodentate binding mode. When fumed silica nanoparticles were functionalized with an equal molar ratio of MPA and PPA, the MPA bound the nanoparticle surface preferentially. Cross-peaks apparent in the 2D (1)H exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) NMR measurements of the multiligand sample at short mixing times indicate that the MPA and PPA are spatially close (≤5 Å) on the surface of the nanostructure. Furthermore, (1)H-(1)H double quantum-single quantum (DQ-SQ) back-to-back (BABA) 2D NMR spectra further confirmed that MPA and PPA are strongly dipolar coupled with observation of DQ intermolecular contacts between the ligands. DQ experimental buildup curves and simulations indicate that the average distance between MPA and PPA is no further than 4.2 ± 0.2 Å. PMID:26914738

  8. New Prenylxanthones from the Deep-Sea Derived Fungus Emericella sp. SCSIO 05240

    PubMed Central

    Fredimoses, Mangaladoss; Zhou, Xuefeng; Lin, Xiuping; Tian, Xinpeng; Ai, Wen; Wang, Junfeng; Liao, Shengrong; Liu, Juan; Yang, Bin; Yang, Xianwen; Liu, Yonghong

    2014-01-01

    Four new prenylxanthones, emerixanthones A–D (1–4), together with six known analogues (5–10), were isolated from the culture of the deep-sea sediment derived fungus Emericella sp. SCSIO 05240, which was identified on the basis of morphology and ITS sequence analysis. The newstructures were determined by NMR (1H, 13C NMR, HSQC, HMBC, and 1H-1H COSY), MS, CD, and optical rotation analysis. The absolute configuration of prenylxanthone skeleton was also confirmed by the X-ray crystallographic analysis. Compounds 1 and 3 showed weak antibacterial activities, and 4 displayed mild antifungal activities against agricultural pathogens. PMID:24879543

  9. Inhibitors of platelet lipoxygenase from Ponkan fruit.

    PubMed

    Nogata, Y; Sekiya, K; Ohta, H; Kusumoto, K; Ishizu, T

    2001-04-01

    An activity-guided separation for inhibitors of rat platelet 12-lipoxygenase led to the isolation of two compounds, 4-O-feruloyl-5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (IC50; 5.5 microM) and methyl 4-O-feruloyl-5-O-caffeoylquinate (IC50; 1.9 microM) from the peel of Ponkan fruit (Citrus reticulata). The complete structure of each phenolic ester was determined by NMR spectroscopy [1H and 13C NMR spectra, 1H-1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY), 1H-detected heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC), and heteronuclear multiple bond connectivity (HMBC) spectroscopies] and other spectral methods. PMID:11314960

  10. New clerodane diterpenoids from Croton crassifolius.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Maosong; Cao, Di; Gao, Youheng; Li, Shuhua; Zhu, Jinping; Yang, Bao; Zhou, Lian; Zhou, Yuan; Jin, Jing; Zhao, Zhongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Two new clerodane diterpenoids (1-2), one new clerodane diterpenoid alkaloid (3), as well as thirteen known compounds were isolated from Croton crassifolius. The structures of new compounds were established by a combination of spectroscopic methods, including HRMS, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, (1)H (1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, NOESY and X-ray crystallographic analysis. Compound 3 is firstly reported as the clerodane-type diterpenoid alkaloid in natural products. All of the compounds were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxic activities against CT26.WT cell using the MTT method.

  11. The conformation and CETP inhibitory activity of [10]-dehydrogingerdione isolated from Zingiber officinale.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soon-Yong; Park, Gil-Soon; Lee, Sung Yoon; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Young Kook

    2011-05-01

    In the course of searching for cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors from natural sources, a new type of CETP inhibitor, [10]-dehydrogingerdione (1), was isolated from the extract of rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe. By NMR spectroscopic analysis of its (1)HNMR, (13)C-NMR, and (1)H-(1)H COSY, HMBC, HMQC and NOESY, more precise structure, compared with its originally proposed structures, of [10]-dehydrogingerdione has been elucidated. This active compound inhibited human plasma CETP with IC(50) values of 35 μM.

  12. Sinugyrosanolide A, an unprecedented C-4 norcembranoid, from the Formosan soft coral Sinularia gyrosa.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi-Yie; Shih, Neng-Lang; Chuang, Cheng-Ta; Chiou, Shu-Fen; Yang, Chia-Ning; Wang, Shang-Kwei; Duh, Chang-Yih

    2014-03-15

    Chemical investigations on the acetone extract of the Formosan soft coral Sinularia gyrosa have obtained a novel C-4 norcembranoid possessing an unprecedented tricyclo[9.3.0.0(3,8)]tetradecane skeleton, namely sinugyrosanolide A. The NMR spectroscopic data of the novel norcembranoid were completely assigned by using a combination of 2D NMR experiments including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY. The cytotoxicities, anti-HCMV (human cytomegalovirus) endonuclease activities and antibacterial activities were evaluated in vitro. It showed moderate cytotoxicity against P-388 (mouse lymphocytic leukemia) cancer cell line with an EC50 of 11.8μM. PMID:24529868

  13. New prenylxanthones from the deep-sea derived fungus Emericella sp. SCSIO 05240.

    PubMed

    Fredimoses, Mangaladoss; Zhou, Xuefeng; Lin, Xiuping; Tian, Xinpeng; Ai, Wen; Wang, Junfeng; Liao, Shengrong; Liu, Juan; Yang, Bin; Yang, Xianwen; Liu, Yonghong

    2014-06-01

    Four new prenylxanthones, emerixanthones A-D (1-4), together with six known analogues (5-10), were isolated from the culture of the deep-sea sediment derived fungus Emericella sp. SCSIO 05240, which was identified on the basis of morphology and ITS sequence analysis. The newstructures were determined by NMR (1H, 13C NMR, HSQC, HMBC, and 1H-1H COSY), MS, CD, and optical rotation analysis. The absolute configuration of prenylxanthone skeleton was also confirmed by the X-ray crystallographic analysis. Compounds 1and 3 showed weak antibacterial activities, and 4 displayed mild antifungal activities against agricultural pathogens. PMID:24879543

  14. The conformation and CETP inhibitory activity of [10]-dehydrogingerdione isolated from Zingiber officinale.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soon-Yong; Park, Gil-Soon; Lee, Sung Yoon; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Young Kook

    2011-05-01

    In the course of searching for cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors from natural sources, a new type of CETP inhibitor, [10]-dehydrogingerdione (1), was isolated from the extract of rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe. By NMR spectroscopic analysis of its (1)HNMR, (13)C-NMR, and (1)H-(1)H COSY, HMBC, HMQC and NOESY, more precise structure, compared with its originally proposed structures, of [10]-dehydrogingerdione has been elucidated. This active compound inhibited human plasma CETP with IC(50) values of 35 μM. PMID:21656357

  15. Anti-inflammatory dimeric furanocoumarins from the roots of Angelica dahurica.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan-Qing; Song, Yue-Lin; Zhu, Zhi-Xiang; Su, Cong; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Juan; Shi, She-Po; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2015-09-01

    Seven new dimeric furanocoumarins, dahuribiethrins A-G (1-7), were isolated from the roots of Angelica dahurica. Their structures were determined by chemical derivatization and extensive spectroscopic techniques, including (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, HSQC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HMBC, and NOESY experiments. Compounds 2, 3, 4, and 5 exhibited significant inhibition of nitric oxide production in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells with IC50 values in the range of 8.8-9.8 μM.

  16. New prenylxanthones from the deep-sea derived fungus Emericella sp. SCSIO 05240.

    PubMed

    Fredimoses, Mangaladoss; Zhou, Xuefeng; Lin, Xiuping; Tian, Xinpeng; Ai, Wen; Wang, Junfeng; Liao, Shengrong; Liu, Juan; Yang, Bin; Yang, Xianwen; Liu, Yonghong

    2014-06-01

    Four new prenylxanthones, emerixanthones A-D (1-4), together with six known analogues (5-10), were isolated from the culture of the deep-sea sediment derived fungus Emericella sp. SCSIO 05240, which was identified on the basis of morphology and ITS sequence analysis. The newstructures were determined by NMR (1H, 13C NMR, HSQC, HMBC, and 1H-1H COSY), MS, CD, and optical rotation analysis. The absolute configuration of prenylxanthone skeleton was also confirmed by the X-ray crystallographic analysis. Compounds 1and 3 showed weak antibacterial activities, and 4 displayed mild antifungal activities against agricultural pathogens.

  17. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for 6-demethylvermistatin and two penicillide derivatives from the mangrove fungus Guignardia sp. (No. 4382) from the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xue-Kui; Liu, Fan; She, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Li-Guo; Li, Meng-Feng; Vrijmoed, L L P; Lin, Yong-Cheng

    2008-07-01

    One new compound 6-demethylvermistatin (1), together with two known compounds, the penicillide derivatives (2) and (3) were isolated from the mangrove fungus Guignardia sp. No. 4382 obtained from the South China Sea. Their structures were assigned using high-resolution electron ionization mass spectrometry(HREIMS), (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra, DEPT, and by 2D COSY, HMQC, and HMBC experiments. The absolute configuration of 1 was established by comparison of its CD with that of vermistatin.

  18. Sensitivity of CoSi2 precipitation in silicon to extra-low dopant concentrations. II. First-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, V. A.; Ganchenkova, M. G.; Ruault, M.-O.; Fortuna, F.

    2015-01-01

    The paper is the second part of the study on the influence of very low dopant content in silicon on CoSi2 precipitation during high-temperature cobalt ion implantation into transmission electron microscope samples. It deals with the computational justification of various assumptions used in Paper I when rationalizing the kinetics of cobalt clustering in ion-implanted intrinsic silicon (both undoped and containing low concentrations of phosphorus atoms). In particular, it is proven that divacancies are efficient nucleation centers for the new Co-Si phase. It is shown that the capture of vacancies and divacancies on phosphorus atoms increases their lifetime in silicon matrix, but practically does not affect the mechanism of their interaction with interstitial cobalt atoms. Finally, it is demonstrated that the mobility of phosphorus interstitials at temperatures of our experiment is orders of magnitude higher than might be expected from the published literature data.

  19. Room-temperature codeposition growth technique for pinhole reduction in epitaxial CoSi2 on Si (111)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; Fathauer, R. W.; Grunthaner, P. J.; D'Anterroches, C.

    1988-01-01

    A solid-phase epitaxy has been developed for the growth of CoSi2 films on Si (111) with no observable pinholes (1000/sq cm detection limit). The technique utilizes room-temperature codeposition of Co and Si in stoichiometric ratio, followed by the deposition of an amorphous Si capping layer and subsequent in situ annealing at 550-600 C. CoSi2 films grown without the Si cap are found to have pinhole densities of (1-10) x 10 to the 7th/sq cm when annealed at similar temperatures. A CF4 plasma-etching technique was used to increase the visibility of the pinholes in the silicide layer.

  20. Spectral assignments and structural studies of a warfarin derivative stereoselectively formed by tandem cyclization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velayutham Pillai, M.; Rajeswari, K.; Vidhyasagar, T.

    2015-11-01

    The structural elucidation of a Mannich condensation product of rac-Warfarin with benzaldehyde and methyl amine was carried out using IR, Mass, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, 1H-13C COSY, DEPT-135, HMBC, NOESY spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Formation of a new pyran ring via a tandem cyclization in the presence of methyl amine was observed. The optimized geometry and HOMO-LUMO energy gap along with other important physical parameters were found by Gaussian 09 program using HF 6-31G (d, p) and B3YLP/DFT 6-31G (d, p) level of theory. The preferred conformation of the piperidine ring in solution state was found to be chair from the NMR spectra. Single crystal X-ray diffraction and optimized geometry (by theoretical study) also confirms the chair conformation in the solid state.

  1. Columnar growth of CoSi2 on Si(111), Si(100) and Si(110) by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; Nieh, C. W.; Xiao, Q. F.; Hashimoto, Shin

    1990-01-01

    Codeposition of silicon and cobalt on heated silicon substrates in ratios several times the silicide stoichiometry is found to result in epitaxial columns of CoSi2 surrounded by a matrix of epitaxial silicon. For (111)-oriented wafers, nearly cylindrical columns are formed, where both columns and surrounding silicon are defect free, as deduced from transmission electron microscopy. Independent control of the column diameter and separation is possible, and diameters of 27-135 nm have been demonstrated.

  2. Compact Hyperspectral Imaging System (cosi) for Small Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (rpas) - System Overview and First Performance Evaluation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sima, A. A.; Baeck, P.; Nuyts, D.; Delalieux, S.; Livens, S.; Blommaert, J.; Delauré, B.; Boonen, M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper gives an overview of the new COmpact hyperSpectral Imaging (COSI) system recently developed at the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO, Belgium) and suitable for remotely piloted aircraft systems. A hyperspectral dataset captured from a multirotor platform over a strawberry field is presented and explored in order to assess spectral bands co-registration quality. Thanks to application of line based interference filters deposited directly on the detector wafer the COSI camera is compact and lightweight (total mass of 500g), and captures 72 narrow (FWHM: 5nm to 10 nm) bands in the spectral range of 600-900 nm. Covering the region of red edge (680 nm to 730 nm) allows for deriving plant chlorophyll content, biomass and hydric status indicators, making the camera suitable for agriculture purposes. Additionally to the orthorectified hypercube digital terrain model can be derived enabling various analyses requiring object height, e.g. plant height in vegetation growth monitoring. Geometric data quality assessment proves that the COSI camera and the dedicated data processing chain are capable to deliver very high resolution data (centimetre level) where spectral information can be correctly derived. Obtained results are comparable or better than results reported in similar studies for an alternative system based on the Fabry-Pérot interferometer.

  3. The low-temperature crystal structure of the multiferroic melilite Ca2CoSi2O7.

    PubMed

    Sazonov, Andrew; Hutanu, Vladimir; Meven, Martin; Roth, Georg; Kézsmárki, István; Murakawa, Hiroshi; Tokura, Yoshinori; Náfrádi, Bálint

    2016-02-01

    In the antiferromagnetic ground state, below TN ≃ 5.7 K, Ca2CoSi2O7 exhibits strong magnetoelectric coupling. For a symmetry-consistent theoretical description of this multiferroic phase, precise knowledge of its crystal structure is a prerequisite. Here we report the results of single-crystal neutron diffraction on Ca2CoSi2O7 at temperatures between 10 and 250 K. The low-temperature structure at 10 K was refined assuming twinning in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2 with a 3 × 3 × 1 supercell [a = 23.52 (1), b = 23.52 (1), c = 5.030 (3) Å] compared with the high-temperature normal state [tetragonal space group P42(1)m, a = b ≃ 7.86, c ≃ 5.03 Å]. The precise structural parameters of Ca2CoSi2O7 at 10 K are presented and compared with the literature X-ray diffraction results at 130 and 170 K (low-temperature commensurate phase), as well as at ∼ 500 K (high-temperature normal phase). PMID:26830804

  4. Spin coherence time studies of a horizontally polarized deuteron beam at COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G Guidoboni JEDI Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The measurement of a non-zero electric dipole moment (EDM) aligned along the spin of sub-atomic particles would probe new physics beyond the standard model. It has been proposed to search for the EDM of charged particles using a storage ring and a longitudinally polarized beam. The EDM signal would be a rotation of the polarization from the horizontal plane toward the vertical direction as a consequence of the radial electric field always present in the particle frame. This experiment requires ring conditions that can ensure a lifetime of the in-plane polarization (spin coherence time, SCT) up to 1000 s. A study has begun at the COoler SYnchrotron (COSY) located at the Forschungszentrum Jülich to examine the effects of emittance and momentum spread on the SCT of a polarized deuteron beam at 0.97 GeV c-1. A special Data AcQuisition has been developed in order to provide a direct measurement of a rapidly rotating horizontal polarization as a function of time. The set of data presented here shows how second-order effects from emittance and momentum spread of the beam affect the lifetime of the horizontal polarization of a bunched beam. It has been demonstrated that sextupole fields can be used to correct for these depolarizing sources and increase the SCT up to hundreds of seconds.

  5. Studies of the Twin Helix Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling Channel with COSY INFINITY

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Maloney, K.B. Beard, R.P. Johnson, A. Afanasev, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov, B. Erdelyi

    2012-07-01

    A primary technical challenge to the design of a high luminosity muon collider is an effective beam cooling system. An epicyclic twin-helix channel utilizing parametric-resonance ionization cooling has been proposed for the final 6D cooling stage. A proposed design of this twin-helix channel is presented that utilizes correlated optics between the horizontal and vertical betatron periods to simultaneously focus transverse motion of the beam in both planes. Parametric resonance is induced in both planes via a system of helical quadrupole harmonics. Ionization cooling is achieved via periodically placed wedges of absorbing material, with intermittent rf cavities restoring longitudinal momentum necessary to maintain stable orbit of the beam. COSY INFINITY is utilized to simulate the theory at first order. The motion of particles around a hyperbolic fixed point is tracked. Comparison is made between the EPIC cooling channel and standard ionization cooling effects. Cooling effects are measured, after including stochastic effects, for both a single particle and a distribution of particles.

  6. A very light and thin liquid hydrogen/deuterium heat pipe target for COSY experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Bary, M.; Abdel-Samad, S.; Kilian, K.

    2005-07-01

    A liquid hydrogen/deuterium heat pipe (HP) target is used at the COSY external experiments TOF, GEM and MOMO. The target liquid is produced at a cooled condenser and guided through a central tube assisted by gravitation into the target cell. An aluminum condenser is used instead of copper, which requires less material, improves conductivities and provides shorter cooling down time. Residual condenser temperature fluctuations in the order of ≈0.4 K are reduced by using thermal resistances between the cooling machine and the condenser of the heat pipe combined with a controlled heating power. A new design with only a 7-mm-diameter HP has been developed. The diameter of the condenser part remains at 16 mm to provide enough condensation area. The small amount of material ensures short cooling down times. A cold gas deuterium HP target has been designed and developed which allows protons with energy ⩽1 MeV to be measured. A 7-mm-diameter HP is used to fill a cooling jacket around the D 2 gas cell with LH 2. The D 2 gas is stabilized at 200 mbar to allow for thin windows. Its density is increased by factor 15 compared to room temperature.

  7. The control system of the polarized internal target of ANKE at COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleines, H.; Sarkadi, J.; Zwoll, K.; Engels, R.; Grigoryev, K.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Nekipelov, M.; Rathmann, F.; Seyfarth, H.; Kravtsov, P.; Vasilyev, A.

    2006-05-01

    The polarized internal target for the ANKE experiment at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY of the Forschungszentrum Jülich utilizes a polarized atomic beam source to feed a storage cell with polarized hydrogen or deuterium atoms. The nuclear polarization is measured with a Lamb-shift polarimeter. For common control of the two systems, industrial equipment was selected providing reliable, long-term support and remote control of the target as well as measurement and optimization of its operating parameters. The interlock system has been implemented on the basis of SIEMENS SIMATIC S7-300 family of programmable logic controllers. In order to unify the interfacing to the control computer, all front-end equipment is connected via the PROFIBUS DP fieldbus. The process control software was implemented using the Windows-based WinCC toolkit from SIEMENS. The variety of components, to be controlled, and the logical structure of the control and interlock system are described. Finally, a number of applications derived from the present development to other, new installations are briefly mentioned.

  8. Solid-state NMR characterization of tri-ethyleneglycol grafted polyisocyanopeptides.

    PubMed

    Zinkevich, T; Venderbosch, B; Jaspers, M; Kouwer, P H J; Rowan, A E; van Eck, E R H; Kentgens, A P M

    2016-04-01

    In aqueous media, ethylene glycol substituted polyisocyanopeptides (PICPs) change their state (undergo a sol-to-gel transition) as a response to temperature. This makes them promising materials for various biomedical applications, for instance, for controlled drug release and non-damaging wound dressing. To utilize PICP in biomedical applications, understanding of the origin of the gelation process is needed, but this is experimentally difficult because of the notoriously low gelator concentration in combination with the slow polymer dynamics in the sample. This paper describes a detailed characterization of the dried state of PICPs by solid-state NMR measurements. Both the (13) C and the (1) H NMR resonances were assigned using a combination of 1D cross-polarization magic angle spinning, 2D (13) C-(1) H heteronuclear correlation spectra and (1) H-(1) H single quantum-double quantum experiments. In addition, the chemical groups involved in dipolar interaction with each other were used to discuss the dynamics and spatial conformation of the polymer. In contrast to other PICP polymers, two resonances for the backbone carbon are observed, which are present in equal amounts. The possible origin of these resonances is discussed in the last section of this work. The data obtained during the current studies will be further used in elucidating mechanisms of the bundling and gelation. A comprehensive picture will make it possible to tailor polymer properties to meet specific needs in different applications. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Interactions of Polyvinylpyrrolidone with Chlorin e6-Based Photosensitizers Studied by NMR and Electronic Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hädener, Marianne; Gjuroski, Ilche; Furrer, Julien; Vermathen, Martina

    2015-09-10

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) can act as potential drug delivery vehicle for porphyrin-based photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy (PDT) to enhance their stability and prevent porphyrin self-association. In the present study the interactions of PVP (MW 10 kDa) were probed with five different derivatives of chlorin e6 (CE6) bearing either one of the amino acids serine, lysine, tyrosine or arginine, or monoamino-hexanoic acid as substituent. All derivatives of CE6 (xCE) formed aggregates of a similar structure in aqueous buffer in the millimolar range. In the presence of PVP monomerization of all xCE aggregates could be proved by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. xCE-PVP complex formation was confirmed by (1)H NMR T2 relaxation and diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY). (1)H(1)H-NOESY data suggested that the xCE uptake into the PVP polymer matrix is governed by hydrophobic interactions. UV-vis absorption and fluorescence emission bands of xCE in the micromolar range revealed characteristic PVP-induced bathochromic shifts. The presented data point out the potential of PVP as carrier system for amphiphilic derivatives of chlorin e6. The capacity of PVP to monomerize xCE aggregates may enhance their efficiency as possible photosensitizers in PDT.

  10. Real-time separation of natural products by ultrafast 2D NMR coupled to on-line HPLC.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Luiz H K; Queiroz, Darlene P K; Dhooghe, Liene; Ferreira, Antonio G; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2012-05-21

    Hyphenated HPLC-NMR is an extremely efficient analytical tool, which makes it possible to perform on-flow experiments where 1D NMR spectra are obtained in real time as the analytes are separated and eluted from the chromatographic column. However, it is incompatible with multidimensional NMR methods that form an indispensible tool for the study of complex mixtures. Recently, Frydman and co-workers have proposed an ultrafast 2D NMR approach, where a complete 2D NMR correlation can be recorded in a single scan, thus providing a solution to the irreversibility of hyphenated techniques. This paper presents the first implementation of on-line ultrafast HPLC-NMR. Ultrafast COSY spectra are acquired every 12 s in the course of a chromatographic run performed on a mixture of natural aromatic compounds. The results, obtained on a commercial HPLC-NMR setup, highlight the generality of the ultrafast HPLC-NMR methodology, thus opening the way to a number of applications in the numerous fields in which HPLC-NMR forms a routine analytical tool.

  11. SpinCouple: Development of a Web Tool for Analyzing Metabolite Mixtures via Two-Dimensional J-Resolved NMR Database.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Jun; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Komatsu, Keiko; Gomi, Masahiro; Chikayama, Eisuke; Date, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A new Web-based tool, SpinCouple, which is based on the accumulation of a two-dimensional (2D) (1)H-(1)H J-resolved NMR database from 598 metabolite standards, has been developed. The spectra include both J-coupling and (1)H chemical shift information; those are applicable to a wide array of spectral annotation, especially for metabolic mixture samples that are difficult to label through the attachment of (13)C isotopes. In addition, the user-friendly application includes an absolute-quantitative analysis tool. Good agreement was obtained between known concentrations of 20-metabolite mixtures versus the calibration curve-based quantification results obtained from 2D-Jres spectra. We have examined the web tool availability using nine series of biological extracts, obtained from animal gut and waste treatment microbiota, fish, and plant tissues. This web-based tool is publicly available via http://emar.riken.jp/spincpl.

  12. SpinCouple: Development of a Web Tool for Analyzing Metabolite Mixtures via Two-Dimensional J-Resolved NMR Database.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Jun; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Komatsu, Keiko; Gomi, Masahiro; Chikayama, Eisuke; Date, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A new Web-based tool, SpinCouple, which is based on the accumulation of a two-dimensional (2D) (1)H-(1)H J-resolved NMR database from 598 metabolite standards, has been developed. The spectra include both J-coupling and (1)H chemical shift information; those are applicable to a wide array of spectral annotation, especially for metabolic mixture samples that are difficult to label through the attachment of (13)C isotopes. In addition, the user-friendly application includes an absolute-quantitative analysis tool. Good agreement was obtained between known concentrations of 20-metabolite mixtures versus the calibration curve-based quantification results obtained from 2D-Jres spectra. We have examined the web tool availability using nine series of biological extracts, obtained from animal gut and waste treatment microbiota, fish, and plant tissues. This web-based tool is publicly available via http://emar.riken.jp/spincpl. PMID:26624790

  13. NMR investigation of the interaction of the inhibitor protein Im9 with its partner DNase.

    PubMed Central

    Boetzel, R.; Czisch, M.; Kaptein, R.; Hemmings, A. M.; James, R.; Kleanthous, C.; Moore, G. R.

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial toxin colicin E9 is secreted by producing Escherichia coli cells with its 9.5 kDa inhibitor protein Im9 bound tightly to its 14.5 kDa C-terminal DNase domain. Double- and triple-resonance NMR spectra of the 24 kDa complex of uniformly 13C and 15N labeled Im9 bound to the unlabeled DNase domain have provided sufficient constraints for the solution structure of the bound Im9 to be determined. For the final ensemble of 20 structures, pairwise RMSDs for residues 3-84 were 0.76 +/- 0.14 A for the backbone atoms and 1.36 +/- 0.15 A for the heavy atoms. Representative solution structures of the free and bound Im9 are highly similar, with backbone and heavy atom RMSDs of 1.63 and 2.44 A, respectively, for residues 4-83, suggesting that binding does not cause a major conformational change in Im9. The NMR studies have also allowed the DNase contact surface on Im9 to be investigated through changes in backbone chemical shifts and NOEs between the two proteins determined from comparisons of 1H-1H-13C NOESY-HSQC spectra with and without 13C decoupling. The NMR-defined interface agrees well with that determined in a recent X-ray structure analysis with the major difference being that a surface loop of Im9, which is at the interface, has a different conformation in the solution and crystal structures. Tyr54, a key residue on the interface, is shown to exhibit NMR characteristics indicative of slow rotational flipping. A mechanistic description of the influence binding of Im9 has on the dynamic behavior of E9 DNase, which is known to exist in two slowly interchanging conformers in solution, is proposed. PMID:11045617

  14. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110-120 kHz), (1)H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong (1)H-(1)H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow (1)H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) (1)H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about (1)H-(1)H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical

  15. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  16. Structure determination and analysis of helix parameters in the DNA decamer d(CATGGCCATG)2 comparison of results from NMR and crystallography.

    PubMed

    Dornberger, U; Flemming, J; Fritzsche, H

    1998-12-18

    The solution structure of the DNA decamer (CATGGCCATG)2 has been determined by NMR spectroscopy and restrained molecular dynamic and distance geometry calculations. The restrainted data set includes interproton distances and torsion angles for the deoxyribose sugar ring which were obtained by nuclear Overhauser enhancement intensities and quantitative simulation of cross-peaks from double quantum filtered correlation spectroscopy. The backbone torsion angles were constrained using experimental data from NOE cross-peaks, 1H-1H and 1H-31P-coupling constants. The NMR structure and the crystal structure of the DNA decamer deviates from the structure of the canonical form of B-DNA in a number of observable characteristics. Particularly, both structures display a specific pattern of stacking interaction in the central GGC base triplet. Furthermore, a specific local conformation of the TG/CA base-pair step is present in NMR and crystal structure, highlighting the unusually high flexibility of this DNA duplex part. The solution structure of the TG/CA base-pair step obtained by our high resolution NMR study is characterized by a positive roll angle, whereas in crystal this base-pair step tends to adopt remarkably high twist angles.

  17. Use of LC-MS/TOF, LC-MS(n), NMR and LC-NMR in characterization of stress degradation products: Application to cilazapril.

    PubMed

    Narayanam, Mallikarjun; Sahu, Archana; Singh, Saranjit

    2015-01-01

    Forced degradation studies on cilazapril were carried out according to ICH and WHO guidelines. Significant degradation of the drug was observed in acid and base conditions, resulting primarily in cilazaprilat. In neutral condition, five degradation products were formed, while under oxidative condition, two degradation products were generated. In total, seven degradation products were formed, which were separated on an Inertsil C-18 column using a stability-indicating HPLC method. Structure elucidation of the degradation products was done by using sophisticated and hyphenated tools like, LC-MS/TOF, LC-MS(n), on-line H/D exchange, LC-NMR and NMR. Initially, comprehensive mass fragmentation pathway of the drug was laid down. Critical comparison of mass fragmentation pathways of the drug and its hydrolytic degradation products allowed structure characterization of the latter. 1D and 2D proton LC-NMR studies further confirmed the proposed structures of hydrolytic degradation products. The oxidative degradation products could not be characterized using LC-MS and LC-NMR tools. Hence, these degradation products were isolated using preparative HPLC and extensive 1D ((1)H, (13)C, DEPT) and 2D (COSY, TOCSY, HETCOR and HMBC) NMR studies were performed to ascertain their structures. Finally, degradation pathways and mechanisms of degradation of the drug were outlined. PMID:25890215

  18. Recent results from the NN-interaction studies with polarized beams and targets at ANKE-COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymov, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    Adding to the nucleon-nucleon scattering database is one of the major priorities of the ANKE collaboration. Such data are necessary ingredients, not only for the understanding of nuclear forces, but also for the description of meson production and other nuclear reactions at intermediate energies. By measuring the cross section, deuteron analysing powers, and spin-correlation parameters in the dp → {pp}sn reaction, where {pp}s represents the 1S0 state, information has been obtained on small-angle neutron-proton spin-flip charge-exchange amplitudes. The measurements of pp elastic scattering by the COSY-EDDA have had a major impact on the partial wave analysis of this reaction above 1 GeV. However, these experiments only extended over the central region of c.m. angles, 300 < θcm < 1500, that has left major ambiguities in the phase shift analysis by the SAID group. In contrast, the small angle region is accessible at ANKE-COSY, that allowed measurement of the differential cross section and the analysing power at 50 < θcm < 300 in the 0.8 — 2.8 GeV energy range. The data on the pn elastic scattering are much more scarce than those of pp, especially in the region above 1.15 GeV. The study of the dp → {pp}s n reaction provides the information about the pn elastic scattering at large angles. The small angle scattering was studied with the polarized proton COSY beam and an unpolarised deuterium gas target. The detection the spectator proton in the ANKE vertex silicon detector allowed to use the deuterium target as an effective neutron one. The analysing powers of the process were obtained at six beam energies from 0.8 to 2.4 GeV.

  19. 1H and 13C NMR assignments of three nitrogen containing compounds from the mangrove endophytic fungus (ZZF08).

    PubMed

    Tao, Yiwen; Zeng, Xianjian; Mou, Chengbo; Li, Jun; Cai, Xiaoling; She, Zhigang; Zhou, Shining; Lin, Yongcheng

    2008-05-01

    A new natural product, named phomopsin A, 1-(meta-hydroxyphenyl)-4-hydroxy-3-isoquinolone (1), together with two known compounds cytochalasin H (2) and glucosylceramide (3), was isolated from the mangrove endophytic fungus Phomopsis sp. (ZZF08) obtained from the South China Sea coast. The structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR experiments including COSY, HMQC, and HMBC. According to NMR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, it was found that some assignments about (1)H and (13)C NMR data for cytochalasin H (2) were probably uncorrected in the previous reports. In our cytotoxicity assays, compound 1 showed moderate cytotoxicity toward KB cells with IC(50) at 28.0 microg ml(-1) and KBv200 cells with IC(50) at 16.8 microg ml(-1), and compound 2 exhibited strong cytotoxicity toward KB cells and KBv200 cells with IC(50) less than 1.25 microg ml(-1).

  20. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for two anthraquinones and two xanthones from the mangrove fungus (ZSUH-36).

    PubMed

    Shao, Changlun; She, Zhigang; Guo, Zhiyong; Peng, Hong; Cai, Xiaoling; Zhou, Shining; Gu, Yucheng; Lin, Yongcheng

    2007-05-01

    We report the unambiguous assignments of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of one new natural product, namely, 6,8-di-O-methyl versiconol (1) together with one known anthraquinone aversin (2) and two xanthones 5-methoxysterigmatocystin (3) and sterigmatocystin (4). These compounds were all isolated from the mangrove endophytic fungus ZSUH-36 from the South China Sea. 1D and 2D NMR experiments including COSY, HMQC and HMBC were used to elucidate the structures. Variations in the (1)H NMR spectrum of 6,8-di-O-methyl versiconol (1) were also observed in the temperature range 25-75 degrees C. In addition, the plausible biogenetic path from 1 to 2 is discussed.

  1. Ion-beam mixed ultra-thin cobalt suicide (CoSi2) films by cobalt sputtering and rapid thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kal, S.; Kasko, I.; Ryssel, H.

    1995-10-01

    The influence of ion-beam mixing on ultra-thin cobalt silicide (CoSi2) formation was investigated by characterizing the ion-beam mixed and unmixed CoSi2 films. A Ge+ ion-implantation through the Co film prior to silicidation causes an interface mixing of the cobalt film with the silicon substrate and results in improved silicide-to-silicon interface roughness. Rapid thermal annealing was used to form Ge+ ion mixed and unmixed thin CoSi2 layer from 10 nm sputter deposited Co film. The silicide films were characterized by secondary neutral mass spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, tunneling electron microscopy (TEM), Rutherford backscattering, and sheet resistance measurements. The experi-mental results indicate that the final rapid thermal annealing temperature should not exceed 800°C for thin (<50 nm) CoSi2 preparation. A comparison of the plan-view and cross-section TEM micrographs of the ion-beam mixed and unmixed CoSi2 films reveals that Ge+ ion mixing (45 keV, 1 × 1015 cm-2) produces homogeneous silicide with smooth silicide-to-silicon interface.

  2. The structural identification of a methyl analog of methaqualone via 2-dimensional NMR techniques.

    PubMed

    Angelos, S A; Lankin, D C; Meyers, J A; Raney, J K

    1993-03-01

    A submission to the Drug Enforcement Administration North Central Laboratory of a substance believed to be a structural analog of methaqualone hydrochloride precipitated an interest in being able to obtain a rapid and positive identification of such compounds. Both mass spectrometry and proton NMR spectroscopy (1-dimensional) provided evidence to suggest that the structural analog possessed a second methyl group in the molecule, relative to methaqualone, and that the methyl group was attached to the existing methyl-substituted phenyl ring. By application of proton 2-dimensional (2-D) NMR techniques, specifically the homonuclear shift correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and 2-D NOE (NOESY), the precise location of the methyl group in this unknown methaqualone analog was established and shown to have the structure 2.

  3. Total assignment of 1H and 13C NMR data for the sesquiterpene lactone 15-deoxygoyazensolide.

    PubMed

    Heleno, Vladimir Constantino Gomes; Crotti, Antônio Eduardo Miller; Constantino, Mauricio Gomes; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Lopes, João Luis Callegari

    2004-03-01

    We describe a complete analysis of the 1H and 13C spectra of the anti-inflamatory, schistossomicidal and trypanosomicidal sesquiterpene lactone 15-deoxygoyazensolide. This lactone, with a structure similar to other important ones, was studied by NMR techniques such as COSY, HMQC, HMBC, Jres and NOE experiments. The comparison of the data with some computational results led to an unequivocal assignment of all hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts, even eliminating some previous ambiguities. We were able to determine all hydrogen coupling constants (J) and signal multiplicities and to confirm the stereochemistry. A new method for the determination of the relative position of the lactonization and the position of the ester group on a medium-sized ring by NMR was developed.

  4. Identification of two novel Prodelphinidin A-type dimers from roasted hazelnut skins ( Corylus avellana L.).

    PubMed

    Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Wray, Victor; Winterhalter, Peter

    2013-12-26

    Two new A-type dimeric prodelphinidins, EGC-(2β→O7, 4β→8)-C and EGC-(2β→O5, 4β→6)-C, were isolated from the skins of roasted hazelnut ( Corylus avellana L.) by low-speed rotary countercurrent chromatography (LSRCCC) and final purification by preparative HPLC. Their structures were determined by a combination of mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS(n) and HR-ESI-MS) and NMR spectroscopy that included the application of 2D methods ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY). Furthermore, circular dichroism (CD) and acid-catalyzed degradation (phloroglucinolysis) confirmed the proposed structures.

  5. Anti-inflammatory ligustilides from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Lu, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Cui; Lu, Jin; Li, Guo-Yu; Lin, Rui-Chao; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2013-12-01

    Four new ligustilides chuanxiongnolide R1 (1), chuanxiongnolide R2 (2), chuanxiongdiolide R1 (3) and chuanxiongdiolide R2 (4) together with eight known derivatives (5-12) were isolated from the root of Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. Their structures were elucidated by HR-ESI-MS, UV, IR, 1D and 2D NMR (HSQC, HMBC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, NOESY) methods. The absolute configurations were confirmed via the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum. The anti-inflammatory assay in LPS-triggered RAW 264.7 macrophages was carried out on the twelve compounds. 1, 3, 5 and 6 showed significant inhibitory effects against LPS-induced NO production. PMID:23973655

  6. Sannastatin, a novel toxic macrolactam polyketide glycoside produced by actinomycete Streptomyces sannanensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Xiang; Gao, Jin-Ming; Zhang, An-Ling; Laatsch, Hartmut

    2011-07-01

    A new rare 20-membered macrocyclic lactam incorporating a diene conjugated olefin, designated sannastatin (1), together with the known structurally related vicenistatin (2), has been isolated from the cultures of Streptomyces sannanensis, a bacteria found in the feces of Ailuropoda melanoleuca. The structure of the new compound was established on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses including 1D- and 2D-NMR ((1)H-(1)H COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY) experiments. Compounds 1 and 2 displayed significant growth inhibitory activity against the brine shrimp (Artemia salina) larvae. PMID:21640585

  7. Two new simple iridoids from the ant-plant Myrmecodia tuberosa and their antimicrobial effects.

    PubMed

    Hanh, Nguyen Phuong; Phan, Nguyen Huu Toan; Thuan, Nguyen Thi Dieu; Hanh, Tran Thi Hong; Vien, Le Thi; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Thanh, Nguyen Van; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Binh, Nguyen Quoc; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Kiem, Phan Van; Kim, Young Ho; Minh, Chau Van

    2016-09-01

    Six iridoid derivatives (1-6), including two new compounds myrmecodoides A and B (1 and 2), were isolated from the ant-plant Myrmecodia tuberosa. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data ((1)H and (13)C NMR, HSQC, HMBC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, NOESY and HR-ESI-MS) and by comparison with the literature values. Among isolates, 3 and 4 exhibit weak antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus with MIC value of 100.0 μg/mL.

  8. Terpenoids from Euphorbia pekinensis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fu-Hu; Li, Wen-Hai; Han, Zheng-Zhi; Huang, Wen-Jun; Li, Dong-Xu; Zhao, Sha; Tang, Min-Hao; Yuan, Cheng-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Euphorpekone A (1) and euphorpekone B (2), two new diterpenoids, 3β-hydroxy-25-methyloxylanosta-8,23-diene, a new triterpenoid (3), together with a known triterpenoid, 3β,25-dihydroxylanosta-8,23-diene (4), were isolated from Euphorbia pekinensis Rupr. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of UV, IR, 1D ((1)H, (13)C, NOE) and 2D ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC) NMR, HR-ESI-MS, X-ray diffraction analysis, and CD method. PMID:26654567

  9. A new sesquiterpenoid quinone with cytotoxicity from Abelmoschus sagittifolius.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Po; Ma, Guo-Xu; Wu, Hai-Feng; Yang, Jun-Shan; Xu, Xu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    A new sesquiterpenoid quinone, Acyl hibiscone B (1), together with five known compounds, (R)-lasiodiplodin (2), (R)-de-O-methyllasiodiplodin, (3) dibutyl phthalate (4), (R)-9-phenylnonan-2-ol (5) and hibiscone B (6), was obtained from the stem tuber of Abelmoschus sagittifolius. The structure of compound 1 was elucidated by analysing its (1)H and (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, NOESY and HR-ESI-MS values. Compound 1 showed significant cytotoxicity against Hela and HepG-2 human cancer cell lines.

  10. Two new diarylheptanoids isolated from the roots of Juglans mandshurica.

    PubMed

    Jin, Mei; Diao, Shengbao; Zhang, Changhao; Cao, Shuo; Sun, Jinfeng; Li, Ren; Jiang, Zhe; Zheng, Mingshan; Son, Jong Keun; Li, Gao

    2015-01-01

    Two new diarylheptanoids, ( - )-threo-3',4″-epoxy-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-7-(3-methoxyphenyl)heptan-2,3-diol (1) and (1α,3β,5α,6α)-1,5-epoxy-3,6-dihydroxy-1,7-bis(3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenyl)-heptane (2), along with one known diarylheptanoid, rhoiptelol B (3), were isolated from the roots of Juglans mandshurica. The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were identified based on HR-ESI-MS, 1D and 2D NMR including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HMQC, HMBC and NOESY spectroscopic methods.

  11. A new sesquiterpenoid quinone with cytotoxicity from Abelmoschus sagittifolius.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Po; Ma, Guo-Xu; Wu, Hai-Feng; Yang, Jun-Shan; Xu, Xu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    A new sesquiterpenoid quinone, Acyl hibiscone B (1), together with five known compounds, (R)-lasiodiplodin (2), (R)-de-O-methyllasiodiplodin, (3) dibutyl phthalate (4), (R)-9-phenylnonan-2-ol (5) and hibiscone B (6), was obtained from the stem tuber of Abelmoschus sagittifolius. The structure of compound 1 was elucidated by analysing its (1)H and (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, NOESY and HR-ESI-MS values. Compound 1 showed significant cytotoxicity against Hela and HepG-2 human cancer cell lines. PMID:26230217

  12. Triterpenoid saponins from the shells of Argania spinosa seeds.

    PubMed

    Alaoui, Asma; Charrouf, Zoubida; Soufiaoui, Mohamed; Carbone, Virginia; Malorni, Antonio; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2002-07-31

    Two new oleanene saponins were isolated from the MeOH extract of the shell of Argania spinosa. They possess protobassic acid and 16alpha-protobassic acid as aglycons. The disaccharide moiety linked to C-3 of the aglycon is made up of two glucose units; the pentasaccharide moiety linked to C-28 is made up of arabinose, xylose, and three rhamnose units. Their structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR experiments including (1)H-(1)H (DQF-COSY, 1D TOCSY, and 2D HOHAHA) and (1)H-(13)C (HSQC and HMBC) spectroscopy along with mass spectrometry. PMID:12137482

  13. New labdane diterpenes from Leonurus cardiaca.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Vijai K; Elsohly, Hala N; Smillie, Troy J; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A

    2008-08-01

    Leonurus cardiaca L. has been used in oriental medicine against several types of disorders. The ethanolic extract of leaves of Leonurus cardiaca yielded three new labdane-type diterpenes: 15- O-ethylleopersin C (1), 15- O-methylleopersin C (2), and 15- EPI- O-methylleopersin C (3). Their structures were determined using 1 D and 2 D NMR including 1H-1H COSY, HMQC, HMBC, and ROESY spectroscopic techniques. Compounds (1 - 3) were evaluated for in vitro antiplasmodial activity (D6 and W2 clones) and cytotoxicity (Vero cells).

  14. Labdane diterpenes of Leonurus sibiricus.

    PubMed

    Boalino, Dionne M; McLean, Stewart; Reynolds, William F; Tinto, Winston F

    2004-04-01

    Seven new labdane diterpenes, sibiricinones A-E (1-4, 6) and 15-epi-sibiricinones D and E (5 and 7), and the flavone genkwanin were isolated from the aerial parts of Leonurus sibiricus. Sibiricinone D (4) and 15-epi-sibiricinone D (5), and sibiricinone E (6) and 15-epi-sibiricinone E (7), respectively, were isolated as C-15 epimeric pairs. These secondary metabolites were identified on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, and HMBC spectroscopic techniques. The stereochemical configurations of compounds 4-7 were assigned through 2D T-ROESY and selective NOE experiments.

  15. Bioactive constituents from the marine crinoid Himerometra magnipinna.

    PubMed

    Shao, Nan; Yao, Guangmin; Chang, Leng Chee

    2007-05-01

    A new tetrabromospirocyclohexadienylisoxazole, (+)-12-hydroxyhomoaerothionin (1), together with the known compounds (+)-aerothionin (2) and crinemodin-rhodoptilometrin bianthrone (3), were isolated from the marine crinoid Himerometra magnipinna, which had been collected in the South China Sea, Malaysia. The structure of 1 was elucidated by interpretation of 1D 1H and 13C NMR spectra and 2D 1H-1H COSY, HMQC, and HMBC spectra. This is the first report of tetrabromospirocyclohexadienylisoxazole compounds from a crinoid of Himerometra. Compounds 1-3 were evaluated for their inhibitory activity with the hyphae formation inhibition assay in Streptomyces 85E.

  16. A new minor diketopiperazine from the sponge-derived fungus Simplicillium sp. YZ-11.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing-Fei; Fang, Sheng-Tao; Li, Wen-Zuo; Liu, Su-Jing; Wang, Jian-Hua; Xia, Chuan-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Chemical investigation of the cultures of a sponge-derived fungus Simplicillium sp. YZ-11 led to the isolation of a new minor diketopiperazine alkaloid cyclo-(2-hydroxy-Pro-Gly) (1) and a natural lactone (S)-dihydro-5-[(S)- hydroxyphenylmethyl]-2(3H)-furanone (2), together with five known ergostane-type sterols (3-7). Their structures were established based on extensive spectroscopic methods ((1)H and (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC and HMBC) and optical rotation analysis.

  17. Electrochemical oxidation of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (6:2 FTS) on DSA electrode: operating parameters and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Qiongfang; Li, Xiang; Yan, Feng; Yang, Bo; Deng, Shubo; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2014-08-01

    The 6:2 FTS was the substitute for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in the chrome plating industry in Japan. Electrochemical oxidation of 6:2 FTS was investigated in this study. The degradabilities of PFOS and 6:2 FTS were tested on the Ti/SnO₂-Sb₂O₅-Bi₂O₃ anode. The effects of current density, potential, and supporting electrolyte on the degradation of 6:2 FTS were evaluated. Experimental results showed that 6:2 FTS was more easily degraded than PFOS on the Ti/SnO₂-Sb₂O₅-Bi₂O₃ anode. At a low current density of 1.42 mA/cm², 6:2 FTS was not degraded on Ti/SnO₂-Sb₂O₅-Bi₂O₃, while the degradation ratio increased when the current density ranged from 4.25 to 6.80 mA/cm². The degradation of 6:2 FTS at current density of 6.80 mA/cm² followed pseudo first-order kinetics with the rate constant of 0.074 hr⁻¹. The anodic potential played an important role in the degradation of 6:2 FTS, and the pseudo first-order rate constants increased with the potential. The surface of Ti/SnO₂-Sb₂O₅-Bi₂O₃ was contaminated after electrolysis at constant potential of 3V, while the fouling phenomenon was not observed at 5V. The fouled anode could be regenerated by incinerating at 600°C. The intermediates detected by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a triple-stage quadrupole mass spectrometer (UPLC-MS/MS) were shorter chain perfluorocarboxylic acids. The 6:2 FTS was first attacked by hydroxyl radical, and then formed perfluorinated carboxylates, which decarboxylated and removed CF2 units to yield shorter-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids.

  18. Integrated standardization concept for Angelica botanicals using quantitative NMR

    PubMed Central

    Gödecke, Tanja; Yao, Ping; Napolitano, José G.; Nikolić, Dejan; Dietz, Birgit M.; Bolton, Judy L.; van Breemen, Richard B.; Farnsworth, Norman R.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Lankin, David C.; Pauli, Guido F.

    2011-01-01

    Despite numerous in vitro/vivo and phytochemical studies, the active constituents of Angelica sinensis (AS) have not been conclusively identified for the standardization to bioactive markers. Phytochemical analyses of AS extracts and fractions that demonstrate activity in a panel of in vitro bioassays, have repeatedly pointed to ligustilide as being (associated with) the active principle(s). Due to the chemical instability of ligustilide and related issues in GC/LC analyses, new methods capable of quantifying ligustilide in mixtures that do not rely on an identical reference standard are in high demand. This study demonstrates how NMR can satisfy the requirement for simultaneous, multi-target quantification and qualitative identification. First, the AS activity was concentrated into a single fraction by RP-solid-phase extraction, as confirmed by an (anti-)estrogenicity and cytotoxicity assay. Next, a quantitative 1H NMR (qHNMR) method was established and validated using standard compounds and comparing processing methods. Subsequent 1D/2D NMR and qHNMR analysis led to the identification and quantification of ligustilide and other minor components in the active fraction, and to the development of quality criteria for authentic AS preparations. The absolute and relative quantities of ligustilide, six minor alkyl phthalides, and groups of phenylpropanoids, polyynes, and poly-unsaturated fatty acids were measured by a combination of qHNMR and 2D COSY. The qNMR approach enables multi-target quality control of the bioactive fraction, and enables the integrated biological and chemical standardization of AS botanicals. This methodology can potentially be transferred to other botanicals with active principles that act synergistically, or that contain closely related and/or constituents, which have not been conclusively identified as the active principles. PMID:21907766

  19. Structure and backbone dynamics of a microcrystalline metalloprotein by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Knight, Michael J; Pell, Andrew J; Bertini, Ivano; Felli, Isabella C; Gonnelli, Leonardo; Pierattelli, Roberta; Herrmann, Torsten; Emsley, Lyndon; Pintacuda, Guido

    2012-07-10

    We introduce a new approach to improve structural and dynamical determination of large metalloproteins using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with (1)H detection under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS). The approach is based on the rapid and sensitive acquisition of an extensive set of (15)N and (13)C nuclear relaxation rates. The system on which we demonstrate these methods is the enzyme Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), which coordinates a Cu ion available either in Cu(+) (diamagnetic) or Cu(2+) (paramagnetic) form. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements are obtained from the difference in rates measured in the two forms and are employed as structural constraints for the determination of the protein structure. When added to (1)H-(1)H distance restraints, they are shown to yield a twofold improvement of the precision of the structure. Site-specific order parameters and timescales of motion are obtained by a gaussian axial fluctuation (GAF) analysis of the relaxation rates of the diamagnetic molecule, and interpreted in relation to backbone structure and metal binding. Timescales for motion are found to be in the range of the overall correlation time in solution, where internal motions characterized here would not be observable.

  20. NMR investigation of the complexation and chiral discrimination of pyrazole sulfonamide derivatives with cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Rogez-Florent, Tiphaine; Azaroual, Nathalie; Goossens, Laurence; Goossens, Jean-François; Danel, Cécile

    2015-01-22

    The complexes formed between six original chiral diaryl-pyrazole sulfonamide derivatives, displaying poor solubility, and various CDs (native α-, β- and γ-CDs, hydroxypropylated HP-β-CD, methylated Me-β-CD or amino NH2-β-CD) were studied by 1D and 2D (1)H NMR at physiological pH in order to determine their apparent binding constant, stoichiometry and structure of the supramolecular assembly. For some complexes, the spectra obtained for free racemic compound and for racemic compound in presence of CD indicate a splitting of signal(s). Additional experiments with pure enantiomer and enriched enantiomer allow us to attribute this behavior to chiral discrimination. The complexing ability of the native β-CD towards our compounds appears the most promising since binding values around 7×10(2)M(-1) are obtained. The two-dimensional ROESY ((1)H-(1)H) experiments prove the inclusion of the aliphatic part of the compound in the CD cavity. It is noteworthy that this inclusion occurs via the smaller opening of the cavity.

  1. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-08-16

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of (1)H-(1)H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins. PMID:27489348

  2. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-08-16

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of (1)H-(1)H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins.

  3. Aromatic ring-flipping in supercooled water: implications for NMR-based structural biology of proteins.

    PubMed

    Skalicky, J J; Mills, J L; Sharma, S; Szyperski, T

    2001-01-24

    We have characterized, for the first time, motional modes of a protein dissolved in supercooled water: the flipping kinetics of phenylalanyl and tyrosinyl rings of the 6 kDa protein BPTI have been investigated by NMR at temperatures between -3 and -16.5 degrees C. At T = -15 degrees C, the ring-flipping rate constants of Tyr 23, Tyr 35, and Phe 45 are smaller than 2 s(-1), i.e., flip-broadening of aromatic NMR lines is reduced beyond detection and averaging of NOEs through ring-flipping is abolished. This allows neat detection of distinct NOE sets for the individual aromatic (1)H spins. In contrast, the rings of Phe 4, Tyr 10, Tyr 21, Phe 22, and Phe 33 are flipping rapidly on the chemical shift time scale with rate constants being in the range from approximately 10(2) to 10(5) s(-1) even at T = -15 degrees C. Line width measurements in 2D [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY showed that flipping of the Phe 4 and Phe 33 rings is, however, slowed to an extent that the onset of associated line broadening in the fast exchange limit is registered. The reduced ring-flipping rate constant of Phe 45 in supercooled water allowed very precise determination of Eyring activation enthalpy and entropy from cross relaxation suppressed 2D [(1)H,(1)H]-exchange spectroscopy. This yielded DeltaH = 14 +/- 0.5 kcal.mol(-1) and DeltaS = -4 +/- 1 cal.mol(-1).K(-1), i.e., values close to those previously derived by Wagner and Wüthrich for the temperature range from 4 to 72 degrees C (DeltaH = 16 +/- 1 kcal.mol(-1) and DeltaS = 6 +/- 2 cal.mol(-1).K(-1)). The preservation of the so far uniquely low value for DeltaS indicates that the distribution of internal motional modes associated with the ring flip of Phe 45 is hardly affected by lowering T well below 0 degrees C. Hence, if a globular protein does not cold denature, aromatic flipping rates, and thus likely also the rates of other conformational and/or chemical exchange processes occurring in supercooled water, can be expected to be well estimated from

  4. NMR detection of slow conformational dynamics in an endonuclease toxin.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, S B; Boetzel, R; MacDonald, C; Lian, L Y; Pommer, A J; Reilly, A; James, R; Kleanthous, C; Moore, G R

    1998-07-01

    The cytotoxic activity of the secreted bacterial toxin colicin E9 is due to a non-specific DNase housed in the C-terminus of the protein. Double-resonance and triple-resonance NMR studies of the 134-amino acid 15N- and 13C/15N-labelled DNase domain are presented. Extensive conformational heterogeneity was evident from the presence of far more resonances than expected based on the amino acid sequence of the DNase, and from the appearance of chemical exchange cross-peaks in TOCSY and NOESY spectra. EXSY spectra were recorded to confirm that slow chemical exchange was occurring. Unambiguous sequence-specific resonance assignments are presented for one region of the protein, Pro65-Asn72, which exists in two slowly exchanging conformers based on the identification of chemical exchange cross-peaks in 3D 1H-1H-15N EXSY-HSQC, NOESY-HSQC and TOCSY-HSQC spectra, together with C alpha and C beta chemical shifts measured in triple-resonance spectra and sequential NH NOEs. The rates of conformational exchange for backbone amide resonances in this stretch of amino acids, and for the indole NH of either Trp22 or Trp58, were determined from the intensity variation of the appropriate diagonal and chemical exchange cross-peaks recorded in 3D 1H-1H-15N NOESY-HSQC spectra. The data fitted a model in which this region of the DNase has two conformers, NA and NB, which interchange at 15 degrees C with a forward rate constant of 1.61 +/- 0.5 s-1 and a backward rate constant of 1.05 +/- 0.5 s-1. Demonstration of this conformational equilibrium has led to a reappraisal of a previously proposed kinetic scheme describing the interaction of E9 DNase with immunity proteins [Wallis et al. (1995) Biochemistry, 34, 13743-13750 and 13751-13759]. The revised scheme is consistent with the specific inhibitor protein for the E9 DNase, Im9, associating with both the NA and NB conformers of the DNase and with binding only to the NB conformer detected because the rate of dissociation of the complex of Im9

  5. Databases of Conformations and NMR Structures of Glycan Determinants.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anita; Drouillard, Sophie; Rivet, Alain; Perez, Serge

    2015-12-01

    The present study reports a comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) characterization and a systematic conformational sampling of the conformational preferences of 170 glycan moieties of glycosphingolipids as produced in large-scale quantities by bacterial fermentation. These glycans span across a variety of families including the blood group antigens (A, B and O), core structures (Types 1, 2 and 4), fucosylated oligosaccharides (core and lacto-series), sialylated oligosaccharides (Types 1 and 2), Lewis antigens, GPI-anchors and globosides. A complementary set of about 100 glycan determinants occurring in glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans has also been structurally characterized using molecular mechanics-based computation. The experimental and computational data generated are organized in two relational databases that can be queried by the user through a user-friendly search engine. The NMR ((1)H and (13)C, COSY, TOCSY, HMQC, HMBC correlation) spectra and 3D structures are available for visualization and download in commonly used structure formats. Emphasis has been given to the use of a common nomenclature for the structural encoding of the carbohydrates and each glycan molecule is described by four different types of representations in order to cope with the different usages in chemistry and biology. These web-based databases were developed with non-proprietary software and are open access for the scientific community available at http://glyco3d.cermav.cnrs.fr.

  6. 1H and 13C NMR studies of glycine in anisotropic media: Double-quantum transitions and the effects of chiral interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, Christoph; Kuchel, Philip W.

    2011-07-01

    The 1H NMR spectrum of glycine in stretched gelatin gel and in cromolyn liquid crystal displays a well-resolved doublet due to 1H- 1H dipolar interaction. Multiple spectra were obtained within a wide range of offset frequencies of partially saturating radio-frequency (RF) radiation to generate steady-state irradiation envelopes or z-spectra of glycine. Maximal suppression of the doublet occurred when the irradiation was applied exactly at the centre frequency, between the two glycine peaks. This phenomenon is due to double-quantum transitions and is similar to our previous work on quadrupolar nuclei 2H (HDO) and 23Na +. When the 13C isotopomer glycine-2- 13C was used, the same effect was found in twice, split by 1JCH + 2 DCH. Additional signals in 1H and 13C NMR due to prochiral-chiral interactions were found when glycine-2- 13C was dissolved in chiral anisotropic gelatin and κ-carrageenan gels. The NMR spectra were successfully simulated assuming a 2JHH coupling constant of -16.5 Hz and two distinct dipolar coupling constants for the - 13CH 2- group ( DC,HA, and DC,HB).

  7. Hydrogen-bonding and the dissolution mechanism of uracil in an acetate ionic liquid: new insights from NMR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Araújo, João M M; Pereiro, Ana B; Canongia Lopes, José N; Rebelo, Luís P N; Marrucho, Isabel M

    2013-04-18

    The dissolution of uracil-a pyrimidine nucleic acid base-in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][CH3COO]) has been investigated by methods of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, (1)H-(1)H NOESY NMR spectroscopy, and quantum chemical calculations. The uracil-[C2mim][CH3COO] interactions that define the dissolution mechanism comprise the hydrogen bonds between the oxygen atoms of the acetate anion and the hydrogen atoms of the N1-H and N3-H groups of uracil and also the hydrogen bonds between the most acidic aromatic hydrogen atom (H2) of the imidazolium cation and the oxygen atoms of the carbonyl groups of uracil. The bifunctional solvation nature of the ionic liquid can be inferred from the presence of interactions between both ions of the ionic liquid and the uracil molecule. The location of such interaction sites was revealed using NMR data ((1)H and (13)C chemical shifts both in the IL and in the uracil molecule), complemented by DFT calculations. NOESY experiments provided additional evidence concerning the cation-uracil interactions.

  8. 2D 1H and 3D 1H-15N NMR of zinc-rubredoxins: contributions of the beta-sheet to thermostability.

    PubMed Central

    Richie, K. A.; Teng, Q.; Elkin, C. J.; Kurtz, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    Based on 2D 1H-1H and 2D and 3D 1H-15N NMR spectroscopies, complete 1H NMR assignments are reported for zinc-containing Clostridium pasteurianum rubredoxin (Cp ZnRd). Complete 1H NMR assignments are also reported for a mutated Cp ZnRd, in which residues near the N-terminus, namely, Met 1, Lys 2, and Pro 15, have been changed to their counterparts, (-), Ala and Glu, respectively, in rubredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf Rd). The secondary structure of both wild-type and mutated Cp ZnRds, as determined by NMR methods, is essentially the same. However, the NMR data indicate an extension of the three-stranded beta-sheet in the mutated Cp ZnRd to include the N-terminal Ala residue and Glu 15, as occurs in Pf Rd. The mutated Cp Rd also shows more intense NOE cross peaks, indicating stronger interactions between the strands of the beta-sheet and, in fact, throughout the mutated Rd. However, these stronger interactions do not lead to any significant increase in thermostability, and both the mutated and wild-type Cp Rds are much less thermostable than Pf Rd. These correlations strongly suggest that, contrary to a previous proposal [Blake PR et al., 1992, Protein Sci 1:1508-1521], the thermostabilization mechanism of Pf Rd is not dominated by a unique set of hydrogen bonds or electrostatic interactions involving the N-terminal strand of the beta-sheet. The NMR results also suggest that an overall tighter protein structure does not necessarily lead to increased thermostability. PMID:8732760

  9. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  10. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  11. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  12. NMR studies of metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Sun, Hongzhe

    2012-01-01

    Metalloproteins represent a large share of the proteomes, with the intrinsic metal ions providing catalytic, regulatory, and structural roles critical to protein functions. Structural characterization of metalloproteins and identification of metal coordination features including numbers and types of ligands and metal-ligand geometry, and mapping the structural and dynamic changes upon metal binding are significant for understanding biological functions of metalloproteins. NMR spectroscopy has long been used as an invaluable tool for structure and dynamic studies of macromolecules. Here we focus on the application of NMR spectroscopy in characterization of metalloproteins, including structural studies and identification of metal coordination spheres by hetero-/homo-nuclear metal NMR spectroscopy. Paramagnetic NMR as well as (13)C directly detected protonless NMR spectroscopy will also be addressed for application to paramagnetic metalloproteins. Moreover, these techniques offer great potential for studies of other non-metal binding macromolecules.

  13. NMR methods in combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, M J; Wareing, J R

    1998-06-01

    The use of NMR spectroscopy in combinatorial chemistry has provided a versatile tool for monitoring combinatorial chemistry reactions and for assessing ligand-receptor interactions. The application of magic angle spinning NMR is widespread and has allowed structure determination to be performed on compounds attached to solid supports. A variety of two-dimensional NMR techniques have been applied to enhance the usability of the magic angle spinning NMR data. New developments for solution NMR analysis include high performance liquid chromatography, NMR, mass spectroscopy and flow NMR. NMR based methods currently being investigated may prove valuable as compound screening tools.

  14. Sensitivity of CoSi2 precipitation in silicon to extra-low dopant concentrations. I. Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, F.; Ruault, M.-O.; Borodin, V. A.; Ganchenkova, M. G.; Kaïtasov, O.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the precipitation of cobalt disilicide phase in silicon during high-temperature (500 °C and 650 °C) implantation is noticeably affected by impurities of phosphorus and boron. Measurements of B-type CoSi2 cluster sizes and number densities as a function of implantation dose indicate that the number density of clusters progressively increases as the phosphorus concentration increases from 7 × 1011 to 8 × 1013 cm-3. A tentative explanation of these observations is proposed based on the previously suggested mechanism of precipitate nucleation, and on the results of first principles calculations summarized in Paper II, published as a follow-up paper. The results imply that utmost care is to be taken when dealing with transition metal precipitation during ion implantation into silicon because variations in the dopant content can affect the reproducibility of results even at extremely low dopant concentrations.

  15. Fabrication and electrical transport properties of binary Co-Si nanostructures prepared by focused electron beam-induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Porrati, F.; Huth, M.; Kaempken, B.; Terfort, A.

    2013-02-07

    CoSi-C binary alloys have been fabricated by focused electron beam-induced deposition by the simultaneous use of dicobaltoctacarbonyl, Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8}, and neopentasilane, Si{sub 5}H{sub 12}, as precursor gases. By varying the relative flux of the precursors, alloys with variable chemical composition are obtained, as shown by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Room temperature electrical resistivity measurements strongly indicate the formation of cobalt silicide and cobalt disilicide nanoclusters embedded in a carbonaceous matrix. Temperature-dependent electrical conductivity measurements show that the transport properties are governed by electron tunneling between neighboring CoSi or CoSi{sub 2} nanoclusters. In particular, by varying the metal content of the alloy, the electrical conductivity can be finely tuned from the insulating regime into the quasi-metallic tunneling coupling regime.

  16. Major Groove Width Variations in RNA Structures Determined by NMR and Impact of 13C residual chemical shift anisotropy and 1H-13C residual dipolar coupling on refinement

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, Blanton S; Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Barton, Shawn; Kinde, Benyam; Starck, Patrice; Singh, Rashmi; Bax, Ad

    2010-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid structure determination by NMR spectroscopy relies primarily on local structural restraints provided by 1H-1H NOEs and J-couplings. When employed loosely, these restraints are broadly compatible with A- and B-like helical geometries and give rise to calculated structures that are highly sensitive to the force fields employed during refinement. A survey of recently reported NMR structures reveals significant variations in helical parameters, particularly the major groove width. Although helical parameters observed in high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of isolated A-form RNA helices are sensitive to crystal packing effects, variations among the published X-ray structures are significantly smaller than those observed in NMR structures. Here we show that restraints derived from aromatic 1H-13C residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and residual chemical shift anisotropies (RCSAs) can overcome NMR restraint and force field deficiencies and afford structures with helical properties similar to those observed in high-resolution X-ray structures. PMID:20549304

  17. Complete structure of the cell surface polysaccharide of Streptococcus oralis C104: A 600-MHz NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Abeygunawardana, C.; Bush, C.A. ); Cisar, J.O. )

    1991-09-03

    Specific lectin-carbohydrate interactions between certain oral streptococci and actinomyces contribute to the microbial colonization of teeth. The receptor molecules of Streptococcus oralis, 34, ATCC 10557, and Streptococcus mitis J22 for the galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine reactive fimbrial lectins of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii are antigenically distinct polysaccharides, each formed by a different phosphodiester-linked oligosaccharide repeating unit. Receptor polysaccharide was isolated form S. oralis C104 cells and was shown to contain galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, ribitol, and phosphate with molar ratios of 4:1:1:1. The {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the polysaccharide shows that it contains a repeating structure. The individual sugars in the repeating unit were identified by {sup 1}H coupling constants observed in E-COSY and DQF-COSY spectra. NMR methods included complete resonance assignments ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) by various homonuclear and heteronuclear correlation experiments that utilize scalar couplings. Sequence and linkage assignments were obtained from the heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) spectrum. This analysis shows that the receptor polysaccharide of S. oralis C104 is a ribitol teichoic acid polymer composed of a linear hexasaccharide repeating unit containing two residues each of galactopyranose and galactofuranose and a residue each of GalNAc and ribitol joined end to end by phosphodiester linkages.

  18. Examination of the structures of several glycerolipids from marine macroalgae by NMR and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Logvinov, Stepan; Gerasimenko, Natalia; Esipov, Andrey; Denisenko, Vladimir A

    2015-12-01

    Several classes of glycerolipids were isolated from the total lipids of the algae Saccharina cichorioides, Eualaria fistulosa, Fucus evanescens, Sargassum pallidum, Silvetia babingtonii (Ochrophyta, Phaeophyceae), Tichocarpus crinitus, and Neorhodomela larix (Rhodophyta, Florideophyceae). The structures of these lipids were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, including 1D ((1) H and (13) C) and 2D (COSY, HSQC and HMBC) experiments. All of the investigated algae included common galactolipids and sulfonoglycolipids as the major glycolipids. Minor glycolipids isolated from S. cichorioides, T. crinitus, and N. laris were identified as lyso-galactolipids with a polar group consisted of the galactose. Comparison of the (1) H NMR data of minor nonpolar lipids isolated from the extracts of the brown algae S. pallidum and F. evanescens with the (1) H NMR data of other lipids allowed them to be identified as diacylglycerols. The structures of betaine lipids isolated from brown algae were confirmed by NMR for the first time. The fatty acid compositions of the isolated lipids were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. PMID:26987002

  19. Structural diversity of solid dispersions of acetylsalicylic acid as seen by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Policianova, Olivia; Brus, Jiri; Hruby, Martin; Urbanova, Martina; Zhigunov, Alexander; Kredatusova, Jana; Kobera, Libor

    2014-02-01

    Solid dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients are of increasing interest due to their versatile use. In the present study polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)-metacrylamide] (pHPMA), poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOx), and polyethylene glycol (PEG), each in three Mw, were used to demonstrate structural diversity of solid dispersions. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) was used as a model drug. Four distinct types of the solid dispersions of ASA were created using a freeze-drying method: (i) crystalline solid dispersions containing nanocrystalline ASA in a crystalline PEG matrix; (ii) amorphous glass suspensions with large ASA crystallites embedded in amorphous pHPMA; (iii) solid solutions with molecularly dispersed ASA in rigid amorphous PVP; and (iv) nanoheterogeneous solid solutions/suspensions containing nanosized ASA clusters dispersed in a semiflexible matrix of PEOx. The obtained structural data confirmed that the type of solid dispersion can be primarily controlled by the chemical constitutions of the applied polymers, while the molecular weight of the polymers had no detectable impact. The molecular structure of the prepared dispersions was characterized using solid-state NMR, wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). By applying various (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(1)H correlation experiments combined with T1((1)H) and T1ρ((1)H) relaxation data, the extent of the molecular mixing was determined over a wide range of distances, from intimate intermolecular contacts (0.1-0.5 nm) up to the phase-separated nanodomains reaching ca. 500 nm. Hydrogen-bond interactions between ASA and polymers were probed by the analysis of (13)C and (15)N CP/MAS NMR spectra combined with the measurements of (1)H-(15)N dipolar profiles. Overall potentialities and limitations of individual experimental techniques were thoroughly evaluated.

  20. Selective detection and complete identification of triglycerides in cortical bone by high-resolution (1)H MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mroue, Kamal H; Xu, Jiadi; Zhu, Peizhi; Morris, Michael D; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-07-28

    Using (1)H-based magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we report an atomistic-level characterization of triglycerides in compact cortical bone. By suppressing contributions from immobile molecules present in bone, we show that a (1)H-based constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak (CTUC) two-dimensional COSY-type experiment that correlates the chemical shifts of protons can selectively detect a mobile triglyceride layer as the main component of small lipid droplets embedded on the surface of collagen fibrils. High sensitivity and resolution afforded by this NMR approach could be potentially utilized to investigate the origin of triglycerides and their pathological roles associated with bone fractures, diseases, and aging. PMID:27374353

  1. Pure shift NMR.

    PubMed

    Zangger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Although scalar-coupling provides important structural information, the resulting signal splittings significantly reduce the resolution of NMR spectra. Limited resolution is a particular problem in proton NMR experiments, resulting in part from the limited proton chemical shift range (∼10 ppm) but even more from the splittings due to scalar coupling to nearby protons. "Pure shift" NMR spectroscopy (also known as broadband homonuclear decoupling) has been developed for disentangling overlapped proton NMR spectra. The resulting spectra are considerably simplified as they consist of single lines, reminiscent of proton-decoupled C-13 spectra at natural abundance, with no multiplet structure. The different approaches to obtaining pure shift spectra are reviewed here and several applications presented. Pure shift spectra are especially useful for highly overlapped proton spectra, as found for example in reaction mixtures, natural products and biomacromolecules.

  2. A New Sucrase Enzyme Inhibitor from Azadirachta indica

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhady, Mohamed I. S.; Shaheen, Usama; Bader, Ammar; Youns, Mahmoud A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sucrase enzyme inhibitor considered as an oral anti-diabetic therapy that delays the absorption of eaten carbohydrates, reducing the postprandial glucose and insulin peaks to reach normoglycemia. Materials and Methods: Chromatographic fractionation of the hydroalcoholic extract of leaves of Azadirachta indica growing in KSA, followed by in-vitro assay of sucrase enzyme inhibition activity. Results: This investigation led to the isolation of a new remarkable sucrase enzyme inhibitor; 4’-methyl Quercetin-7-O-β-D-glucuronopyranoside (1) alongside with four known compounds; 2,3-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-(α/β)-D-4C1-glucopyranose (2), Avicularin (3), Castalagin (4) and Quercetin-3-O-glucoside (5). The structure of the new compound (1) was elucidated on the basis of its spectral data, including ESI-MS, UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, HSQC, NOESY and HMBC. Conclusion: Under the assay conditions, hydroalcoholic extract of A. indica and compounds 1-5 exhibited significant sucrase enzyme inhibitory activity. SUMMARY Chromatographic fractionation of the hydroalcoholic extract of leaves of Azadirachta indica, led to the Isolation of a new flavonoid glycoside named 4’-methyl Quercetin-7-O-β-D-glucuronopyranoside, alongside to other 4 known polyphenols. The hydroalcoholic extract as well as the isolated compounds exhibited significant sucrase enzyme inhibitory activity. Abbreviations used: ESI-MS; electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, UV; ultraviolet, NMR; nuclear magnetic resonance, 1H-1H COSY; 1H-1H correlation spectroscopy, NOESY; nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy, and HSQC; heteronuclear multiple bond correlation. A. indica; Azadirachta indica. PMID:27563214

  3. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of fully protonated proteins at slow to moderate magic-angle spinning frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, Kaustubh R.; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K.

    2015-12-01

    1H -detection offers a substitute to the sensitivity-starved experiments often used to characterize biomolecular samples using magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (MAS-ssNMR). To mitigate the effects of the strong 1H -1H dipolar coupled network that would otherwise severely broaden resonances, high MAS frequencies (>40 kHz) are often employed. Here, we have explored the alternative of stroboscopic 1H -detection at moderate MAS frequencies of 5-30 kHz using windowed version of supercycled-phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg homonuclear decoupling. We show that improved resolution in the 1H dimension, comparable to that obtainable at high spinning frequencies of 40-60 kHz without homonuclear decoupling, can be obtained in these experiments for fully protonated proteins. Along with detailed analysis of the performance of the method on the standard tri-peptide f-MLF, experiments on micro-crystalline GB1 and amyloid- β aggregates are used to demonstrate the applicability of these pulse-sequences to challenging biomolecular systems. With only two parameters to optimize, broadbanded performance of the homonuclear decoupling sequence, linear dependence of the chemical-shift scaling factor on resonance offset and a straightforward implementation under experimental conditions currently used for many biomolecular studies (viz. spinning frequencies and radio-frequency amplitudes), we expect these experiments to complement the current 13C -detection based methods in assignments and characterization through chemical-shift mapping.

  4. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of fully protonated proteins at slow to moderate magic-angle spinning frequencies.

    PubMed

    Mote, Kaustubh R; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K

    2015-12-01

    (1)H-detection offers a substitute to the sensitivity-starved experiments often used to characterize biomolecular samples using magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (MAS-ssNMR). To mitigate the effects of the strong (1)H-(1)H dipolar coupled network that would otherwise severely broaden resonances, high MAS frequencies (>40kHz) are often employed. Here, we have explored the alternative of stroboscopic (1)H-detection at moderate MAS frequencies of 5-30kHz using windowed version of supercycled-phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg homonuclear decoupling. We show that improved resolution in the (1)H dimension, comparable to that obtainable at high spinning frequencies of 40-60kHz without homonuclear decoupling, can be obtained in these experiments for fully protonated proteins. Along with detailed analysis of the performance of the method on the standard tri-peptide f-MLF, experiments on micro-crystalline GB1 and amyloid-β aggregates are used to demonstrate the applicability of these pulse-sequences to challenging biomolecular systems. With only two parameters to optimize, broadbanded performance of the homonuclear decoupling sequence, linear dependence of the chemical-shift scaling factor on resonance offset and a straightforward implementation under experimental conditions currently used for many biomolecular studies (viz. spinning frequencies and radio-frequency amplitudes), we expect these experiments to complement the current (13)C-detection based methods in assignments and characterization through chemical-shift mapping.

  5. The use of a selective saturation pulse to suppress t1 noise in two-dimensional (1)H fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Aiden J; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Marsh, Andrew; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Brown, Steven P

    2015-11-01

    A selective saturation pulse at fast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies (60+kHz) suppresses t1 noise in the indirect dimension of two-dimensional (1)H MAS NMR spectra. The method is applied to a synthetic nucleoside with an intense methyl (1)H signal due to triisopropylsilyl (TIPS) protecting groups. Enhanced performance in terms of suppressing the methyl signal while minimising the loss of signal intensity of nearby resonances of interest relies on reducing spin diffusion--this is quantified by comparing two-dimensional (1)H NOESY-like spin diffusion spectra recorded at 30-70 kHz MAS. For a saturation pulse centred at the methyl resonance, the effect of changing the nutation frequency at different MAS frequencies as well as the effect of changing the pulse duration is investigated. By applying a pulse of duration 30 ms and nutation frequency 725 Hz at 70 kHz MAS, a good compromise of significant suppression of the methyl resonance combined with the signal intensity of resonances greater than 5 ppm away from the methyl resonance being largely unaffected is achieved. The effectiveness of using a selective saturation pulse is demonstrated for both homonuclear (1)H-(1)H double quantum (DQ)/single quantum (SQ) MAS and (14)N-(1)H heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) two-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments.

  6. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  7. NMR spectra and potentiometry studies of aluminum(III) binding with coenzyme NAD+ in acidic aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Bi, Shuping; Yang, Xiaoliang; Yang, Li; Hu, Jun; Liu, Jian; Yang, Zhengbiao

    2003-06-01

    Complexation and conformational studies of coenzyme NAD+ with aluminum were conducted in acidic aqueous solutions (pH 2-5) by means of potentiometry as well as multinuclear (1H, 13C, 31P, 27Al) and two-dimensional (1H, 1H-NOESY) NMR spectroscopy. These led to the following results: (1) Al could coordinate with NAD+ through the following binding sites: N7' of adenine and pyrophosphate free oxygen (O(A)1, O(N)1,O(A)2) to form various mononuclear 1:1 (AlLH23+, AlLH2+) and 2:1 (AlL2-) species, and dinuclear 2:2 (Al2L22+) species. (2) The conformations of NAD+ and Al-NAD+ depended on the solvents and different species in the complexes. The results suggest the occurrence of an Al-linked complexation, which causes structural changes at the primary recognition sites and secondary conformational alterations for coenzymes. This finding will help us to understand role of Al in biological enzyme reaction systems.

  8. 3D NMR spectroscopy for resonance assignment and structure elucidation of proteins under MAS: novel pulse schemes and sensitivity considerations.

    PubMed

    Heise, Henrike; Seidel, Karsten; Etzkorn, Manuel; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2005-03-01

    Two types of 3D MAS NMR experiments are introduced, which combine standard (NC,CC) transfer schemes with (1H,1H) mixing to simultaneously detect connectivities and structural constraints of uniformly 15N,13C-labeled proteins with high spectral resolution. The homonuclear CCHHC and CCC experiments are recorded with one double-quantum evolution dimension in order to avoid a cubic diagonal in the spectrum. Depending on the second transfer step, spin systems or proton-proton contacts can be determined with reduced spectral overlap. The heteronuclear NHHCC experiment encodes NH-HC proton-proton interactions, which are indicative for the backbone conformation of the protein. The third dimension facilitates the identification of the amino acid spin system. Experimental results on U-[15N,13C]valine and U-[15N,13C]ubiquitin demonstrate their usefulness for resonance assignments and for the determination of structural constraints. Furthermore, we give a detailed analysis of alternative multidimensional sampling schemes and their effect on sensitivity and resolution. PMID:15705514

  9. Increased effective barrier heights in Schottky diodes by molecular-beam epitaxy of CoSi2 and Ga-doped Si on Si(111)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; Lin, T. L.; Grunthaner, P. J.; Andersson, P. O.; Iannelli, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Increasing the effective Schottky-barrier height of epitaxial CoSi2/Si(111) diodes by the use of thin, highly doped Si layers in close proximity to the metal-semiconductor interface has been studied. Intrinsic Si, Si doped by coevaporation of Ga, and epitaxial CoSi2 layers have all been grown in the same molecular-beam epitaxy system. Current-voltage and photoresponse characterization yield barrier heights ranging from 0.61 eV for a sample with no p(+) layer to 0.89 eV for a sample with a 20-nm-thick p(+) layer. These results are compared to theoretical values based on a one-dimensional solution of Poisson's equation under the depletion approximation.

  10. Sensitivity-Enhanced MQ-HCN-CCH-TOCSY and MQ-HCN-CCH-COSY Pulse Schemes for 13C/ 15N Labeled RNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weidong; Jiang, Licong; Gosser, Yuying Q.

    2000-07-01

    Sensitivity enhanced multiple-quantum 3D HCN-CCH-TOCSY and HCN-CCH-COSY experiments are presented for the ribose resonance assignment of 13C/15N-labeled RNA sample. The experiments make use of the chemical shift dispersion of N1/N9 of pyrimidine/purine to distinguish the ribose spin systems. They provide a complementary approach for the assignment of ribose resonance to the currently used HCCH-COSY and HCCH-TOCSY type experiments in which either 13C or 1H is utilized to separate the different ribose spin systems. The pulse schemes have been demonstrated on a 23-mer 13C/15N-labeled RNA aptamer complexed with neomycin and tested on a 32-mer RNA complexed with a 23-residue peptide.

  11. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  12. Isovalent substitutes play in different ways: Effects of isovalent substitution on the thermoelectric properties of CoSi0.98B0.02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Lu, Xu; Morelli, Donald T.

    2016-07-01

    Boron-added CoSi, CoSi0.98B0.02, possesses a very high thermoelectric power factor of 60 μW cm-1 K-2 at room temperature, which is among the highest power factors that have ever been reported for near-room-temperature thermoelectric applications. Since the electrical properties of this material have been tuned properly, isovalent substitution for its host atoms is intentionally employed to reduce the lattice thermal conductivity while maintaining the electronic properties unchanged. In our previous work, the effect of Rh substitution for Co atoms on the thermoelectric properties of CoSi0.98B0.02 has been studied. Here, we present a study of the substitution of Ge for Si atoms in this compound. Even though Ge and Rh are isovalent with their corresponding host atoms, they play different roles in determining the electrical and thermal transport properties. Through the evaluation of the lattice thermal conductivity by the Debye approximation and the comparison between the high-temperature Seebeck coefficients, we propose that Rh substitution leads to a further overlapping of the conduction and the valence bands, while Ge substitution only shifts the Fermi level upward into the conduction band. Our results show that the influence of isovalent substitution on the electronic structure cannot be ignored when the alloying method is used to improve thermoelectric properties.

  13. Isovalent substitutes play in different ways: Effects of isovalent substitution on the thermoelectric properties of CoSi0.98B0.02

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Hui; Lu, Xu; Morelli, Donald T.

    2016-07-21

    Boron-added CoSi, CoSi0.98B0.02, possesses a very high thermoelectric power factor of 60 μW cm-1 K-2 at room temperature, which is among the highest power factors that have ever been reported for near-room-temperature thermoelectric applications. Since the electrical properties of this material have been tuned properly, isovalent substitution for its host atoms are intentionally employed to reduce the lattice thermal conductivity while maintaining the electronic properties unchanged. In our previous work, the effect of Rh substitution for Co atoms on the thermoelectric properties of CoSi0.98B0.02 has been studied. Here we present a study of the substitution of Ge for Si atomsmore » in this compound. Even though Ge and Rh are isovalent with their corresponding host atoms, they play different roles in determining the electrical and thermal transport properties. Through the evaluation of the lattice thermal conductivity by the Debye approximation and the comparison between the high-temperature Seebeck coefficients, we propose that Rh substitution leads to a further overlapping of the conduction and the valence bands while Ge substitution only shifts the Fermi level upward into the conduction band. Lastly, our results show that the influence of isovalent substitution on the electronic structure cannot be ignored when the alloying method is used to improve thermoelectric properties.« less

  14. Analysis of human muscle extracts by proton NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasubramanian, P.N.; Barany, M.; Arus, C.

    1986-03-01

    Perchloric acid extracts were prepared from pooled human muscle biopsies from patients diagnosed with scoliosis (SCOL) and cerebral palsy (CP). After neutralization with KOH and removal of perchlorate, the extracts were concentrated by freeze drying and dissolved in /sup 2/H/sub 2/O to contain 120 O.D. units at 280 nm per 0.5 ml. /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy was performed with the 5 mm probe of a Varian XL300 instrument. Creatine, lactate, carnosine, and choline were the major resonances in the one-dimensional spectra of both extracts. With creatine as reference, 2.5-fold more lactate was found in SCOL than in CP, and a much smaller difference was also found in their carnosine content. Two-dimensional COSY comparison revealed several differences between the two extracts. Taurine, N-acetyl glutamate, glycerophosphoryl choline (or phosphoryl choline) and an unidentified spot were present only in the extract from SCOL but not in that from CP. On the other hand, aspartate, hydroxy-proline, carnitine and glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine were only present in CP but absent in SCOL. Alanine, cysteine, lysine and arginine appeared in both extracts without an apparent intensity difference.

  15. BIG KARL and COSY: Examples for high performance magnet design taught by {open_quotes}Papa Klaus{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtstedt, U.; Hacker, U.; Maier, R.; Martin, S.; Berg, G.P.A.; Hardt, A.; Huerlimann, W.; Meissburger, J.; Roemer, J.G.M.

    1995-02-01

    The past decades have seen a tremendous development in nuclear, middle, and high energy physics. This advance was in a great part promoted by the availability of newer and more powerful instruments. Over time, these instruments grew in size as well as in sophistication and precision. Nearly all these devices had one fundamental thing in common - magnetic fields produced with currents and iron. The precision demanded by the new experiments and machines did bring the magnet technology to new frontiers requiring the utmost in the accuracy of magnetic fields. The complex properties of the iron challenged innumerable physicists in the attempt to force the magnetic fields into the desired shape. Experience and analytical insight were the pillars for coping with those problems and only few mastered the skills and were in addition able to communicate their intricate knowledge. It was a fortuitous situation that the authors got to know Klaus Halbach who belonged to those few and who shared his knowledge contributing thus largely to the successful completion of two large instruments that were built at the Forschungszentrum Juelich, KFA, for nuclear and middle energy physics. In one case the efforts went to the large spectrometer named BIG KARL whose design phase started in the early 70`s. In the second case the work started in the early 80`s with the task to build a high precision 2.5 GeV proton accelerator for cooled stored and extracted beams known as COSY-Juelich.

  16. Characterization of the fraction components using 1D TOCSY and 1D ROESY experiments. Four new spirostane saponins from Agave brittoniana Trel. spp. Brachypus.

    PubMed

    Macías, Francisco A; Guerra, José O; Simonet, Ana M; Nogueiras, Clara M

    2007-07-01

    A careful NMR analysis, especially 1D TOCSY and 1D ROESY, of two refined saponin fractions allowed us to determine the structures of four new saponins from a polar extract of the Agave brittoniana Trel. spp. Brachypus leaves. A full assignment of the 1H and 13C spectral data for these new saponins, agabrittonosides A-D (1-4), and one previously known saponin, karatavioside A (5) is reported. Their structures were established using a combination of 1D and 2D (1H, 1H-COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, g-HSQC, g-HMBC and g-HSQC-TOCSY) NMR techniques and ESI-MS. Moreover, the work represents a new approach to structural elucidation of saponins in refined fractions by NMR investigations.

  17. Dimeric guaianolides from Artemisia absinthium.

    PubMed

    Turak, Ablajan; Shi, She-Po; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2014-09-01

    Five dimeric guaianolides, absinthins A-E, and seven known dimeric guaianolides were isolated from Artemisia absinthium. Their structures were elucidated based on 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments, including (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY, and through HRESIMS data analysis. The absolute configuration of the known compound, anabsinthin, was determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The isolated compounds were tested to assess their inhibitory activities on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in BV-2 cells; absinthin C and isoanabsinthin exhibited significant inhibitory effects with IC50 values of 1.52 and 1.98μM, respectively.

  18. Study on Dendrobium officinale O-acetyl-glucomannan (Dendronan®): part II. Fine structures of O-acetylated residues.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiaohui; Cui, Steve W; Nie, Shaoping; Phillips, Glyn O; Goff, H Douglas; Wang, Qi

    2015-03-01

    Main objective of this study was to investigate the detailed structural information about O-acetylated sugar residues in Dendronan(®). A water solution (2%, w/w) of Dendronan(®) was treated with endo-β-mannanase to produce oligosaccharides rich in O-acetylated sugar residues. The oligosaccharides were partly recovered by ethanol precipitation (70%, w/w). The recovered sample (designated Hydrolyzed Dendrobium officinale Polysaccharide, HDOP) had a yield of 24.7% based on the dry weight of Dendronan(®) and was highly O-acetylated. A D2O solution of HDOP (6%, w/w) generated strong signals in (1)H, (13)C, 2D (1)H-(1)H COSY, 2D (1)H-(1)H TOCSY, 2D (1)H-(1)H NOESY, 2D (1)H-(13)C HMQC, and 2D (1)H-(13)C HMBC NMR spectra. Results of NMR analyses showed that the majority of O-acetylated mannoses were mono-substituted with acetyl groups at O-2 or O-3 position. There were small amounts of mannose residues with di-O-acetyl substitution at both O-2 and O-3 positions. Minor levels of mannoses with 6-O-acetyl, 2,6-di-O-acetyl, and 3,6-di-O-acetyl substitutions were also identified. Much information about sugar residue sequence was extracted from 2D (1)H-(13)C HMBC and 2D (1)H-(1)H NOESY spectra. (1)J(C-H) coupling constants of major sugar residues were obtained. Evidences for the existence of branches or O-acetylated glucoses in HDOP were not found. The major structure of Dendronan(®) is shown as follows: [Formula: see text] M: β-D-mannopyranose; G: β-D-glucopyranose; a: O-acetyl group.

  19. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  20. Fluorine detected 2D NMR experiments for the practical determination of size and sign of homonuclear F-F and heteronuclear C-F multiple bond J-coupling constants in multiple fluorinated compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspers, Ruud L. E. G.; Ampt, Kirsten A. M.; Dvortsak, Peter; Jaeger, Martin; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2013-06-01

    The use of fluorine in molecules obtained from chemical synthesis has become increasingly important within the pharmaceutical and agricultural industry. NMR characterization of these compounds is of great value with respect to their structure elucidation, their screening in metabolomics investigations and binding studies. The favorable NMR properties of the fluorine nucleus make NMR with fluorine detection of great value in this respect. A suite of NMR 2D F-F- and F-C-correlation experiments with fluorine detection was applied to the assignment of resonances, nJCF- and nJFF-couplings as well as the determination of their size and sign. The utilization of this experiment suite was exemplarily demonstrated for a highly fluorinated vinyl alkyl ether. Especially F-C HSQC and J-scaled F-C HMBC experiments allowed determining the size of the J-couplings of this compound. The relative sign of its homo- and heteronuclear couplings was achieved by different combinations of 2D NMR experiments, including non-selective and F2-selective F-C XLOC, F2-selective F-C HMQC, and F-F COSY. The F2-one/two-site selective F-C XLOC versions were found highly useful, as they led to simplifications of the common E.COSY patterns and resulted in a higher confidence level of the assignment by using selective excitation. The combination of F2-one/two-site selective F-C XLOC experiments with a F2-one-site selective F-C HMQC experiment provided the signs of all nJCF- and nJFF-couplings in the vinyl moiety of the test compound. Other combinations of experiments were found useful as well for special purposes when focusing for example on homonuclear couplings a combination of F-F COSY-10 with a F2-one-site selective F-C HMQC could be used. The E.COSY patterns in the spectra demonstrated were analyzed by use of the spin-selective displacement vectors, and in case of the XLOC also by use of the DQ- and ZQ-displacement vectors. The variety of experiments presented shall contribute to facilitate the

  1. Direct ¹³C-detected NMR experiments for mapping and characterization of hydrogen bonds in RNA.

    PubMed

    Fürtig, Boris; Schnieders, Robbin; Richter, Christian; Zetzsche, Heidi; Keyhani, Sara; Helmling, Christina; Kovacs, Helena; Schwalbe, Harald

    2016-03-01

    In RNA secondary structure determination, it is essential to determine whether a nucleotide is base-paired and not. Base-pairing of nucleotides is mediated by hydrogen bonds. The NMR characterization of hydrogen bonds relies on experiments correlating the NMR resonances of exchangeable protons and can be best performed for structured parts of the RNA, where labile hydrogen atoms are protected from solvent exchange. Functionally important regions in RNA, however, frequently reveal increased dynamic disorder which often leads to NMR signals of exchangeable protons that are broadened beyond (1)H detection. Here, we develop (13)C direct detected experiments to observe all nucleotides in RNA irrespective of whether they are involved in hydrogen bonds or not. Exploiting the self-decoupling of scalar couplings due to the exchange process, the hydrogen bonding behavior of the hydrogen bond donor of each individual nucleotide can be determined. Furthermore, the adaption of HNN-COSY experiments for (13)C direct detection allows correlations of donor-acceptor pairs and the localization of hydrogen-bond acceptor nucleotides. The proposed (13)C direct detected experiments therefore provide information about molecular sites not amenable by conventional proton-detected methods. Such information makes the RNA secondary structure determination by NMR more accurate and helps to validate secondary structure predictions based on bioinformatics.

  2. "Pulse pair technique in high resolution NMR" a reprint of the historical 1971 lecture notes on two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jeener, Jean; Alewaeters, Gerrit

    2016-05-01

    The review articles published in "Progress in NMR Spectroscopy" are usually invited treatments of topics of current interest, but occasionally the Editorial Board may take an initiative to publish important historical material that is not widely available. The present article represents just such a case. Jean Jeener gave a lecture in 1971 at a summer school in Basko Polje, in what was then called Yugoslavia. As is now widely known, Jean Jeener laid down the foundations in that lecture of two - and higher - dimensional NMR spectroscopy by proposing the homonuclear COSY experiment. Jeener realized that the new proposal would open the door towards protein NMR and molecular structure determinations, but he felt that useful versions of such experiments could not be achieved with the NMR, computer and electronics technology available at that time, so that copies of the lecture notes were circulated (the Basko Polje lecture notes by J. Jeener and G. Alewaeters), but no formal publication followed. Fortunately, Ernst, Freeman, Griffin, and many others were more far-sighted and optimistic. An early useful extension was Ernst's proposal to replace the original projection/reconstruction technique of MRI by the widely adopted Fourier transform method inspired by the Basko Polje lecture. Later, the pulse method spread over many fields of spectroscopy as soon as the required technology became available. Jean Jeener, Emeritus professor, Université Libre de Bruxelles. Geoffrey Bodenhausen, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris.

  3. Separation and complete analyses of the overlapped and unresolved 1H NMR spectra of enantiomers by spin selected correlation experiments.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Uday Ramesh; Baishya, Bikash; Suryaprakash, N

    2008-06-26

    NMR spectroscopic discrimination of optical enantiomers is most often carried out using (2)H and (13)C spectra of chiral molecules aligned in a chiral liquid crystalline solvent. The use of proton NMR for such a purpose is severely hindered due to the spectral complexity and the significant loss of resolution arising from numerous short- and long-distance couplings and the indistinguishable overlap of spectra from both R and S enantiomers. The determination of all the spectral parameters by the analyses of such intricate NMR spectra poses challenges, such as, unraveling of the resonances for each enantiomer, spectral resolution, and simplification of the multiplet pattern. The present study exploits the spin state selection achieved by the two-dimensional (1)H NMR correlation of selectively excited isolated coupled spins (Soft-COSY) of the molecules to overcome these problems. The experiment provides the relative signs and magnitudes of all of the proton-proton couplings, which are otherwise not possible to determine from the broad and featureless one-dimensional (1)H spectra. The utilization of the method for quantification of enantiomeric excess has been demonstrated. The studies on different chiral molecules, each having a chiral center, whose spectral complexity increases with the increasing number of interacting spins, and the advantages and limitations of the method over SERF and DQ-SERF experiments have been reported in this work.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Rebaudioside M Isomer from a Bioconversion Reaction of Rebaudioside A and NMR Comparison Studies of Rebaudioside M Isolated from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni and Stevia rebaudiana Morita

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Indra; Bunders, Cynthia; Devkota, Krishna P.; Charan, Romila D.; Ramirez, Catherine; Priedemann, Christopher; Markosyan, Avetik

    2014-01-01

    A minor product, rebaudioside M2 (2), from the bioconversion reaction of rebaudioside A (4) to rebaudioside D (3), was isolated and the complete structure of the novel steviol glycoside was determined. Rebaudioside M2 (2) is considered an isomer of rebaudioside M (1) and contains a relatively rare 1→6 sugar linkage. It was isolated and characterized with NMR (1H, 13C, COSY, HSQC-DEPT, HMBC, 1D-TOCSY, and NOESY) and mass spectral data. Additionally, we emphasize the importance of 1D and 2D NMR techniques when identifying complex steviol glycosides. Numerous NMR spectroscopy studies of rebaudioside M (1), rebaudioside D (3), and mixture of 1 and 3 led to the discovery that SG17 which was previously reported in literature, is a mixture of rebaudioside D (3), rebaudioside M (1), and possibly other related steviol glycosides. PMID:24970220

  5. Isolation and characterization of a novel rebaudioside M isomer from a bioconversion reaction of rebaudioside A and NMR comparison studies of rebaudioside M isolated from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni and Stevia rebaudiana Morita.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Indra; Bunders, Cynthia; Devkota, Krishna P; Charan, Romila D; Ramirez, Catherine; Priedemann, Christopher; Markosyan, Avetik

    2014-01-01

    A minor product, rebaudioside M2 (2), from the bioconversion reaction of rebaudioside A (4) to rebaudioside D (3), was isolated and the complete structure of the novel steviol glycoside was determined. Rebaudioside M2 (2) is considered an isomer of rebaudioside M (1) and contains a relatively rare 1→6 sugar linkage. It was isolated and characterized with NMR (1H, 13C, COSY, HSQC-DEPT, HMBC, 1D-TOCSY, and NOESY) and mass spectral data. Additionally, we emphasize the importance of 1D and 2D NMR techniques when identifying complex steviol glycosides. Numerous NMR spectroscopy studies of rebaudioside M (1), rebaudioside D (3), and mixture of 1 and 3 led to the discovery that SG17 which was previously reported in literature, is a mixture of rebaudioside D (3), rebaudioside M (1), and possibly other related steviol glycosides.

  6. Live cell NMR.

    PubMed

    Freedberg, Darón I; Selenko, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Ever since scientists realized that cells are the basic building blocks of all life, they have been developing tools to look inside them to reveal the architectures and mechanisms that define their biological functions. Whereas "looking into cells" is typically said in reference to optical microscopy, high-resolution in-cell and on-cell nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful method that offers exciting new possibilities for structural and functional studies in and on live cells. In contrast to conventional imaging techniques, in- and on-cell NMR methods do not provide spatial information on cellular biomolecules. Instead, they enable atomic-resolution insights into the native cell states of proteins, nucleic acids, glycans, and lipids. Here we review recent advances and developments in both fields and discuss emerging concepts that have been delineated with these methods.

  7. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  8. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  9. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  10. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  11. Resolving the structure of ligands bound to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by high-resolution magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Polito, Laura; Colombo, Miriam; Monti, Diego; Melato, Sergio; Caneva, Enrico; Prosperi, Davide

    2008-09-24

    A major challenge in magnetic nanoparticle synthesis and (bio)functionalization concerns the precise characterization of the nanoparticle surface ligands. We report the first analytical NMR investigation of organic ligands stably anchored on the surface of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) through the development of a new experimental application of high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS). The conceptual advance here is that the HRMAS technique, already being used for MAS NMR analysis of gels and semisolid matrixes, enables the fine-structure-resolved characterization of even complex organic molecules bound to paramagnetic nanocrystals, such as nanosized iron oxides, by strongly decreasing the effects of paramagnetic disturbances. This method led to detail-rich, well-resolved (1)H NMR spectra, often with highly structured first-order couplings, essential in the interpretation of the data. This HRMAS application was first evaluated and optimized using simple ligands widely used as surfactants in MNP synthesis and conjugation. Next, the methodology was assessed through the structure determination of complex molecular architectures, such as those involved in MNP3 and MNP4. The comparison with conventional probes evidences that HRMAS makes it possible to work with considerably higher concentrations, thus avoiding the loss of structural information. Consistent 2D homonuclear (1)H- (1)H and (1)H- (13)C heteronuclear single-quantum coherence correlation spectra were also obtained, providing reliable elements on proton signal assignments and carbon characterization and opening the way to (13)C NMR determination. Notably, combining the experimental evidence from HRMAS (1)H NMR and diffusion-ordered spectroscopy performed on the hybrid nanoparticle dispersion confirmed that the ligands were tightly bound to the particle surface when they were dispersed in a ligand-free solvent, while they rapidly exchanged when an excess of free ligand was present in solution. In

  12. Bayesian reconstruction of projection reconstruction NMR (PR-NMR).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Won

    2014-11-01

    Projection reconstruction nuclear magnetic resonance (PR-NMR) is a technique for generating multidimensional NMR spectra. A small number of projections from lower-dimensional NMR spectra are used to reconstruct the multidimensional NMR spectra. In our previous work, it was shown that multidimensional NMR spectra are efficiently reconstructed using peak-by-peak based reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm. We propose an extended and generalized RJMCMC algorithm replacing a simple linear model with a linear mixed model to reconstruct close NMR spectra into true spectra. This statistical method generates samples in a Bayesian scheme. Our proposed algorithm is tested on a set of six projections derived from the three-dimensional 700 MHz HNCO spectrum of a protein HasA. PMID:25218584

  13. Growth of single-crystal columns of CoSi2 embedded in epitaxial Si on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; Nieh, C. W.; Xiao, Q. F.; Hashimoto, Shin

    1989-01-01

    The codeposition of Si and Co on a heated Si(111) substrate is found to result in epitaxial columns of CoSi2 if the Si:Co ratio is greater than approximately 3:1. These columns are surrounded by an Si matrix which shows bulk-like crystalline quality based on transmission electron microscopy and ion channeling. This phenomenon has been studied as functions of substrate temperature and Si:Co ratio. Samples with columns ranging in average diameter from approximately 25 to 130 nm have been produced.

  14. 13C and 1H chemical shift assignments and conformation confirmation of trimedlure-Y via 2-D NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warthen, J. D.; Waters, R. M.; McGovern, T. P.

    The conformation of 1,1-dimethylethyl 5-chloro- cis-2-methylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate (trimedlure-Y) was confirmed as 1,2,5 equatorial, axial, equatorial via 13C, 1H, APT, CSCM and COSY NMR analyses. The carbon and proton nuclei in trimedlure-Y and the previously unassigned eight cyclohexyl protons (1.50-2.60 ppm) in 1,1-dimethylethyl 5-chloro- trans-2-methylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate (trimedlure-B 1; 1,2,5 equatorial, equatorial, equatorial) were also characterized by these methods. The effects of the 2-CH 3 in the axial or equatorial conformation upon the chemical shifts of the other nuclei in the molecule are discussed.

  15. Isolation, NMR Spectral Analysis and Hydrolysis Studies of a Hepta Pyranosyl Diterpene Glycoside from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedula, Venkata Sai Prakash; Chen, Steven; Yu, Oliver; Mao, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    From the commercial extract of the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, a minor steviol glycoside, 13-[(2-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-β-d-glucopyranosyl)oxy] ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid-[(2-O-(3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-β-d-glucopyranosyl) ester] (1); also known as rebaudioside O having seven sugar units has been isolated. Its structural characterization has been achieved by the extensive 1D (1H and 13C), and 2D NMR (COSY, HMQC, HMBC) as well as mass spectral data. Further, hydrolysis studies were performed on rebaudioside O using acid and enzymatic methods to identify aglycone and sugar residues in its structure as well as their configurations. PMID:24970189

  16. Structure and antibacterial property of a new diterpenoid from Euphorbia helioscopia.

    PubMed

    Geng, Di; Yi, Li-Tao; Shi, Yao; Min, Zhi-Da

    2015-09-01

    The present study was designed to isolate and evaluate the antibacterial activity of the compounds from the whole plant of Euphorbia helioscopia L.. Various chromatographic techniques were used to isolate and purify the compound. The structure of the compound was elucidated on basis of spectral data ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, NOESY, IR, and HR-ESI-MS). A new jatrophone-type diterpenoid (14α,15β-diacetoxy-3β-benzoyloxy-7β-nicotinoyloxy-9-oxo-jatropha-5E,11E-diene), named euphoheliosnoid E (1), was isolated from the whole plant of E. helioscopia L. Compound 1 showed significant anti-microbial activity against oral pathogens. PMID:26412431

  17. Triterpenoid saponins from Fagonia indica.

    PubMed

    Shaker, K H; Bernhardt, M; Elgamal, M H; Seifert, K

    1999-08-01

    Two new triterpenoid saponins, 3-O-{[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-[alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1- ->3)]- alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl}-ursolic acid-28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl] ester (indicasaponin A), 3-O-{[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-[alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1- ->3)]- alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl}-oleanolic acid-28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl] ester (indicasaponin B) and two known triterpenoid saponins, 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl]-ur solic acid-28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl] ester, 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl]-olean olic acid-28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl] ester have been isolated from Fagonia indica. The structures were determined primarily by NMR spectroscopy. The assignment of NMR signals was performed by means of 1H-1H COSY, NOESY, ROESY, TOCSY, HMQC and HMBC experiments. PMID:10444859

  18. Characterization of three saponins from a fraction using 1D DOSY as a solvent signal suppression tool. Agabrittonosides E-F. Furostane saponins from Agave brittoniana Trel. spp. Brachypus.

    PubMed

    Macías, Francisco A; Guerra, José O; Simonet, Ana M; Pérez, Andy J; Nogueiras, Clara

    2010-05-01

    A careful NMR analysis, especially by 1D TOCSY and 1D ROESY, of a refined saponin fraction allowed us to determine the structure of three saponins from a polar extract of Agave brittoniana Trel. spp. Brachypus leaves. The use of 1D DOSY for the suppression of the solvent signal was useful to obtain the chemical shifts of anomeric signals. A full assignment of the (1)H and (13)C spectral data for the new saponins, agabrittonosides E-F (1-2) and the well-known Karatavioside C (3) and their methoxyl derivatives, is reported. The structures were established using a combination of 1D and 2D ((1)H, (1)H-COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, g-HSQC, g-HMBC and g-HSQC-TOCSY) NMR techniques and ESI-MS. In addition, the methoxylation of these furostane saponins in the presence of MeOH was studied.

  19. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) by withanolides isolated from Physalis angulata L. var. villosa Bonati (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Hu, Zhijuan; Yu, Liyan; Ma, Zhongjun; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Dan; Zhao, Xiaofeng

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, the EtOAc extract of the persistent calyx of Physalis angulata L. var. villosa Bonati (PA) was tested for its potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity with glutathione (GSH) as the substrate using an UPLC-ESI-MS method. The result revealed that the PA had electrophiles that could induce quinone reductase (QR) activity, which might be attributed to the modification of the highly reactive cysteine residues in Keap1. Herein, three new withanolides, compounds 3, 6 and 7, together with four known withanolides, compounds 1, 2, 4 and 5 were isolated from PA extract. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic techniques, including (1)H-, (13)C NMR (DEPT), and 2D-NMR (HMBC, HMQC, (1)H, (1)H-COSY, NOESY) experiments, as well as by HR-MS. All the seven compounds were tested for their QR induction activities towards mouse hepa 1c1c7 cells.

  20. Zebiriosides A-L, oleanane saponins from the roots of Dendrobangia boliviana.

    PubMed

    Zebiri, Ilhem; Haddad, Mohamed; Duca, Laurent; Harakat, Dominique; Cabanillas, Billy; Paloque, Lucie; Scandolera, Amandine; Sauvain, Michel; Rengifo, Elsa; Voutquenne-Nazabadioko, Laurence

    2016-10-01

    Twelve oleanane saponins, zebiriosides A-L, were isolated from the roots of Dendrobangia boliviana Rusby, together with two known saponins, talunùmoside I and 3-O-β-d-glucuronopyranosyl serjanic acid. These saponins are glycosides of serjanic or phytolaccinic acid. Their structures were established on two basis: first, their spectral data, mainly HR-TOFESIMS, 1D-NMR ((1)H, (13)C, DEPT) and 2D-NMR ((1)H(1)H COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, HMBC, and ROESY), and second by comparison with literature data. These compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic, antileishmanial and hemolytic activities. No antileishmanial or hemolytic activities were revealed, however zebirioside C and zebirioside I showed cytotoxicity against fibroblasts with IC50 of 6.4 and 5.6 μM, respectively. PMID:27358036

  1. Phenolic Glycosides from the Twigs of Salix glandulosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung Sub; Kwon, Oh Wook; Kim, Sun Yeou; Choi, Sang Un; Kim, Jae Yoon; Han, Ji Young; Choi, Soo Im; Choi, Jong Gil; Kim, Ki Hyun; Lee, Kang Ro

    2014-08-22

    As a part of an ongoing search for bioactive constituents from Korean medicinal plants, the phytochemical investigations of the twigs of Salix glandulosa afforded 12 new phenolic glycosides (1-12) and a known analogue (13). The structures of 1-13 were characterized by a combination of NMR methods ((1)H and (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HMQC, and HMBC), chemical hydrolysis, and GC/MS. The absolute configuration of 13 [(1R,2S)-2-hydroxycyclohexyl-2'-O-trans-p-coumaroyl-β-d-glucopyranoside] was determined for the first time. Compounds 1-3, 6, and 7 exhibited inhibitory effects on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-activated murine microglial cells (IC50 values in the range 6.6-20.5 μM).

  2. New steroidal saponins from Agave lophantha Schiede and their pharmacological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Khalik, S M; Miyase, T; Melek, F R; el-Shabraway, O A; Mahmoud, I I; Mina, S A

    2002-08-01

    The structures of one new monodesmosidic spirostanoside and one new bisdesmosidic furanostanol glycoside isolated from leaves of Agave lophantha Schiede have been determined by means of spectroscopic and chemical methods as (25R)-5 beta-spirostan-3 beta-ol-3-O-(beta-D-apiofuranosyl(1-->4)beta-D -glucopyranosyl(1-->3)[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->2)]beta-D -galactopyranoside) and 26-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(25R)-5 beta-furost-20(22)-ene-3 beta, 26-diol-3-O-(beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->3)-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1--2)] beta-D-galactopyranoside), respectively. The 1H and 13C NMR resonances of the two compounds were assigned by NMR (1H, 13C, HOHAHA, 1H-1H COSY, HMQC, HMBC, NOE difference) studies. The pharmacological activities of the saponin containing fraction are discussed.

  3. Trifasciatosides A-J, Steroidal Saponins from Sansevieria trifasciata.

    PubMed

    Teponno, Rémy Bertrand; Tanaka, Chiaki; Jie, Bai; Tapondjou, Léon Azefack; Miyamoto, Tomofumi

    2016-01-01

    Four previously unreported steroidal saponins, trifasciatosides A-D (1-4), three pairs of previously undescribed steroidal saponins, trifasciatosides E-J (5a, b-7a, b) including acetylated ones, together with twelve known compounds were isolated from the n-butanol soluble fraction of the methanol extract of Sansevieria trifasciata. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analysis, including (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, (1)H-(1)H correlated spectroscopy (COSY), heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC), heteronuclear multiple bond connectivity (HMBC), total correlated spectroscopy (TOCSY), nuclear Overhauser enhancement and exchange spectroscopy (NOESY), electrospray ionization-time of flight (ESI-TOF)-MS and chemical methods. Compounds 2, 4, and 7a, b exhibited moderate antiproliferative activity against HeLa cells. PMID:27581639

  4. Tungsten(VI) Carbyne/Bis(carbene) Tautomerization Enabled by N-Donor SBA15 Surface Ligands: A Solid-State NMR and DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, Anissa; Sofack-Kreutzer, Julien; Minenkov, Yury; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Hamzaoui, Bilel; Werghi, Baraa; Anjum, Dalaver H; Cavallo, Luigi; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-09-01

    Designing supported well-defined bis(carbene) complexes remains a key challenge in heterogeneous catalysis. The reaction of W(≡CtBu)(CH2 tBu)3 with amine-modified mesoporous SBA15 silica, which has vicinal silanol/silylamine pairs [(≡SiOH)(≡SiNH2 )], leads to [(≡SiNH2 -)(≡SiO-)W(≡CHtBu)(CH2 tBu)2 ] and [(≡SiNH2 -)(≡SiO-)W(=CHtBu)2 (CH2 tBu). Variable temperature, (1) H-(1) H 2D double-quantum, (1) H-(13) C HETCOR, and HETCOR with spin diffusion solid-state NMR spectroscopy demonstrate tautomerization between the alkyl alkylidyne and the bis(alkylidene) on the SBA15 surface. Such equilibrium is possible through the coordination of W to the surface [(≡Si-OH)(≡Si-NH2 )] groups, which act as a [N,O] pincer ligand. DFT calculations provide a rationalization for the surface-complex tautomerization and support the experimental results. This direct observation of such a process shows the strong similarity between molecular mechanisms in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. In propane metathesis (at 150 °C), the tungsten bis(carbene) tautomer is favorable, with a turnover number (TON) of 262. It is the highest TON among all the tungsten alkyl-supported catalysts.

  5. Tungsten(VI) Carbyne/Bis(carbene) Tautomerization Enabled by N-Donor SBA15 Surface Ligands: A Solid-State NMR and DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, Anissa; Sofack-Kreutzer, Julien; Minenkov, Yury; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Hamzaoui, Bilel; Werghi, Baraa; Anjum, Dalaver H; Cavallo, Luigi; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-09-01

    Designing supported well-defined bis(carbene) complexes remains a key challenge in heterogeneous catalysis. The reaction of W(≡CtBu)(CH2 tBu)3 with amine-modified mesoporous SBA15 silica, which has vicinal silanol/silylamine pairs [(≡SiOH)(≡SiNH2 )], leads to [(≡SiNH2 -)(≡SiO-)W(≡CHtBu)(CH2 tBu)2 ] and [(≡SiNH2 -)(≡SiO-)W(=CHtBu)2 (CH2 tBu). Variable temperature, (1) H-(1) H 2D double-quantum, (1) H-(13) C HETCOR, and HETCOR with spin diffusion solid-state NMR spectroscopy demonstrate tautomerization between the alkyl alkylidyne and the bis(alkylidene) on the SBA15 surface. Such equilibrium is possible through the coordination of W to the surface [(≡Si-OH)(≡Si-NH2 )] groups, which act as a [N,O] pincer ligand. DFT calculations provide a rationalization for the surface-complex tautomerization and support the experimental results. This direct observation of such a process shows the strong similarity between molecular mechanisms in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. In propane metathesis (at 150 °C), the tungsten bis(carbene) tautomer is favorable, with a turnover number (TON) of 262. It is the highest TON among all the tungsten alkyl-supported catalysts. PMID:27514022

  6. Flavodoxin from Anabaena 7120: uniform N-15 enrichment and one- and two-dimensional NMR investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.; Westler, W.M.; Mooberry, E.S.; Markley, J.L.

    1987-05-01

    The flavodoxin isolated from Anabaena 7120 grown under iron-limiting conditions has been studied in its oxidized form. Flavodoxin 95%+ enriched in VN was obtained by growing the cyanobacterium with 98% VN nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. A one-dimensional H NMR (500 MHz) spectrum has been collected, as well as a double-quantum-filtered COSY spectrum in D2O. One-dimensional VN NMR (50.68 MHz) spectra have been obtained by observing nitrogen directly and by using the INEPT pulse sequence. Results of a two-dimensional H-detected VN experiment allowed the correlation of VN and H resonances of VN-/sup I/H groups. The four nitrogen resonance of the FMN cofactor have been assigned: N(1), 188.0 ppm; N(3), 162.5 ppm; N(5) 335.0 ppm; and N(10), 163.5 ppm. The resonance assigned to N(3) is coupled to a proton at 10.9 ppm. Shifts in the positions of these VN resonances, compared to corresponding ones in free FMN, suggest that these positions are strongly hydrogen-bonded in the oxidized state as has been observed with lower molecular weight flavodoxins.

  7. Secondary structure determination of human. beta. -endorphin by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtarge, O.; Jardetzky, O.; Li, C.H.

    1987-09-08

    The /sup 1/H NMR spectra of human ..beta..-endorphin indicate that the peptide exists in random-coil form in aqueous solution but becomes helical in mixed solvent. Thermal denaturation NMR experiments show that in water there is no transition between 24 and 75/sup 0/C, while a slow noncooperative thermal unfolding is observed in a 60% methanol-40% water mixed solvent in the same temperature range. These findings are consistent with circular dichroism studies by other workers concluding that ..beta..-endorphin is a random coil in water but that it forms 50% ..cap alpha..-helix or more in mixed solvents. The peptide in the mixed water-methanol solvent was further studied by correlated spectroscopy (COSY) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. These allow a complete set of assignments to be made and establish two distinct stretches over which the solvent induces formation of ..cap alpha..-helices: the first occurs between Tyr-1 and Thr-12 and the second between Leu-14 and extending to Lys-28. There is evidence that the latter is capped by a turn occurring between Lys-28 and Glu-31. These helices form at the enkephalin receptor binding site, which is at the amino terminus, and at the morphine receptor binding site, located at the carboxyl terminus. The findings suggest that these two receptors may specifically recognize ..cap alpha..-helices.

  8. Achievement of 1020MHz NMR.

    PubMed

    Hashi, Kenjiro; Ohki, Shinobu; Matsumoto, Shinji; Nishijima, Gen; Goto, Atsushi; Deguchi, Kenzo; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Noguchi, Takashi; Sakai, Shuji; Takahashi, Masato; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Iguchi, Seiya; Yamazaki, Toshio; Maeda, Hideaki; Tanaka, Ryoji; Nemoto, Takahiro; Suematsu, Hiroto; Miki, Takashi; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2015-07-01

    We have successfully developed a 1020MHz (24.0T) NMR magnet, establishing the world's highest magnetic field in high resolution NMR superconducting magnets. The magnet is a series connection of LTS (low-Tc superconductors NbTi and Nb3Sn) outer coils and an HTS (high-Tc superconductor, Bi-2223) innermost coil, being operated at superfluid liquid helium temperature such as around 1.8K and in a driven-mode by an external DC power supply. The drift of the magnetic field was initially ±0.8ppm/10h without the (2)H lock operation; it was then stabilized to be less than 1ppb/10h by using an NMR internal lock operation. The full-width at half maximum of a (1)H spectrum taken for 1% CHCl3 in acetone-d6 was as low as 0.7Hz (0.7ppb), which was sufficient for solution NMR. On the contrary, the temporal field stability under the external lock operation for solid-state NMR was 170ppb/10h, sufficient for NMR measurements for quadrupolar nuclei such as (17)O; a (17)O NMR measurement for labeled tri-peptide clearly demonstrated the effect of high magnetic field on solid-state NMR spectra. PMID:25978708

  9. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  10. A new chiral N,N',O-donor heteroscorpionate ligand. Structures of Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ complexes and study of solution equilibria by means of 1H NMR/UV-vis titrations and EXSY NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gennari, Marcello; Tegoni, Matteo; Lanfranchi, Maurizio; Pellinghelli, Maria Angela; Marchio, Luciano

    2007-04-16

    The N,N',O-heteroscorpionate ligand 1-(4-methoxy-3,5-dimethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-2-methyl-1-pyrazol-1-yl-propan-2-ol (LOH) was prepared in two high-yield steps. Complexes [M(LOH)2][MCl4] (M2+ = Cu2+ and Zn2+) and [M(LOH)2]Cl2 (M2+ = Ni2+ and Cu2+) were prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The speciation in solution (methanol:water 95:5) of the M2+/LOH systems was investigated by means of spectrophotometric (Ni2+ and Cu2+) and 1H NMR (Zn2+) titrations. The beta1 and beta2 global formation constants for the [M(LOH)]2+ and [M(LOH)2]2+ species were obtained and are in agreement with the Irving-Williams series: Ni2+< Cu2+> Zn2+. The Zn2+/LOH system was studied by means of quantitative 1H-1H EXSY spectroscopy (300 K, mixing time = 0.2-0.8 s), which allows the description of the equilibria occurring between five octahedral [Zn(LOH)2]2+ structural isomers and tetrahedral [Zn(LOH)Cl]Cl species. Exchange constants kijex and associated rate constants kij suggest that two types of interconversion occur: octahedral-octahedral (faster) and octahedral-tetrahedral (slower). DFT calculations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d)) were employed to evaluate the relative stability of the [Zn(LOH)2]2+ isomers, which are comparable for the five complexes with a maximum energy difference of 6.3 kJ/mol.

  11. Optimum levels of exchangeable protons in perdeuterated proteins for proton detection in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Umit; Lange, Sascha; Trent Franks, W; Linser, Rasmus; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Reif, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the level of exchangeable protons on the observed amide proton linewidth obtained in perdeuterated proteins. Decreasing the amount of D(2)O employed in the crystallization buffer from 90 to 0%, we observe a fourfold increase in linewidth for both (1)H and (15)N resonances. At the same time, we find a gradual increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for (1)H-(15)N correlations in dipolar coupling based experiments for H(2)O concentrations of up to 40%. Beyond 40%, a significant reduction in SNR is observed. Scalar-coupling based (1)H-(15)N correlation experiments yield a nearly constant SNR for samples prepared with < or =30% H(2)O. Samples in which more H(2)O is employed for crystallization show a significantly reduced NMR intensity. Calculation of the SNR by taking into account the reduction in (1)H T (1) in samples containing more protons (SNR per unit time), yields a maximum SNR for samples crystallized using 30 and 40% H(2)O for scalar and dipolar coupling based experiments, respectively. A sensitivity gain of 3.8 is obtained by increasing the H(2)O concentration from 10 to 40% in the CP based experiment, whereas the linewidth only becomes 1.5 times broader. In general, we find that CP is more favorable compared to INEPT based transfer when the number of possible (1)H,(1)H interactions increases. At low levels of deuteration (> or =60% H(2)O in the crystallization buffer), resonances from rigid residues are broadened beyond detection. All experiments are carried out at MAS frequency of 24 kHz employing perdeuterated samples of the chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain.

  12. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  13. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  14. Image cross-correlation using COSI-Corr: A versatile technique to monitor and quantity surface deformation in space and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leprince, S.; Ayoub, F.; Avouac, J.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a suite of algorithms for precise Co-registration of Optically Sensed Images and Correlation (COSI-Corr) which were implemented in a software package first released to the academic community in 2007. Its capability for accurate surface deformation measurement has proved useful for a wide variety of applications. We present the fundamental principles of COSI-Corr, which are the key ingredients to achieve sub-pixel registration and sub-pixel measurement accuracy, and we show how they can be applied to various types of images to extract 2D, 3D, or even 4D deformation fields of a given surface. Examples are drawn from recent collaborative studies and include: (1) The study of the Icelandic Krafla rifting crisis that occurred from 1975 to 1984 where we used a combination of archived airborne photographs, declassified spy satellite imagery, and modern satellite acquisitions to propose a detailed 2D displacement field of the ground; (2) The estimation of glacial velocities from fast New Zealand glaciers using successive ASTER acquisitions; (3) The derivation of sand dunes migration rates; (4) The estimation of ocean swell velocity taking advantage of the short time delay between the acquisition of different spectral bands on the SPOT 5 satellite; (5) The derivation of the full 3D ground displacement field induced by the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake, as recorded from pre- and post-event lidar acquisitions; (6) And, the estimation of 2D in plane deformation of mechanical samples under stress in the lab. Finally, we conclude by highlighting the potential future and implication of applying such correlation techniques on a large scale to provide global monitoring of our environment.

  15. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  16. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  17. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  18. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  19. Antiinflammatory and Antioxidant Flavonoids and Phenols from Cardiospermum halicacabum (倒地鈴 Dào Dì Líng)

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hui-Ling; Zhang, Li-Jie; Liang, Yu-Han; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Lee, I-Jung; Liaw, Chia-Ching; Hwang, Syh-Yuan; Kuo, Yao-Haur

    2013-01-01

    Seventeen compounds, quercetin-3-O-α-l-rhamnoside (1), kaempferol-3-O-α-L-rhamnoside (2), apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucuronide (3), apigenin 7-O-β-D-glucuronide methyl ester (4), apigenin 7-O-β-D-glucuronide ethyl ester (5), chrysoeriol (6), apigenin (7), kaempferol (8), luteolin (9), quercetin (10), methyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (11), p-coumaric acid (12), 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (13), hydroquinone (14), protocathehuic acid (15), gallic acid (16), and indole-3-carboxylic acid (17), were isolated from the ethanol extract of Taiwanese Cardiospermum halicabum. All chemical structures were determined by physical and extensive spectroscopic analyses such as 1 H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), 13C NMR, 1H-1H Correlation spectroscopy (1H-1H COSY), Heteronuclear Multiple Quantum Coherence spectroscopy (HMQC), Heteronuclear Multiple-bond Correlation spectroscopy (HMBC), and Nuclear Overhauser Effect spectroscopy (NOESY), as well as comparison with literature values. Furthermore, the High-Performance Liquid Chromatography- Photodiode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD) fingerprint profile was established for the determination of major constituents in the EtOAc extract and retention times of the isolated compounds. All isolated compounds were also evaluated for antiinflammatory and antioxidant activities. PMID:24716153

  20. Antimalarial (+)-trans-hexahydrodibenzopyran derivatives from Machaerium multiflorum.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, I; Li, X C; Dunbar, D C; ElSohly, M A; Khan, I A

    2001-10-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of Machaerium multiflorum yielded the hitherto unreported (+)-trans-hexahydrodibenzopyrans machaeriol A (1) and machaeriol B (2), as well as the known guaiane sesquiterpene (-)-kessane. Structure elucidation was based on (1)H and (13)C NMR data, mainly 2D NMR (1)H-(1)H COSY, (1)H-(13)C HMQC, (1)H-(13)C HMBC, and (1)H-(1)H NOESY experiments. This is the first report of the hexahydrodibenzopyrans from a higher plant other than the genus Cannabis. The cannabimimetic activity was thus evaluated by radioligand binding assay for cannabinoid receptor CB1, which indicated, notably, that both 1 and 2 were inactive. In addition, the cross reactivity of 1 and 2 toward antibodies designed for urinary metabolites of cannabinoids was evaluated with the EMIT and On Line cannabinoids assays. Both compounds showed no response at 100 000 ng/mL in both assays. Machaeriol B (2) demonstrated in vitro antimalarial activity (IC(50) = 120 ng/mL) against Plasmodium falciparum W-2 clone.

  1. Further Study on Chemical Constituents of Parnassia wightiana Wall: Four New Dihydro-β-agarofuran Sesquiterpene Polyesters

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhao-Feng; Zhou, Bo-Hang; Zhao, Jie-Yu; Cao, Fang-Jun; Zhou, Le; Geng, Hui-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Four new (1–4), along with six known (5–10) dihydro-β-agarofuran sesquiterpene polyesters were isolated from the whole plants of Parnassia wightiana. The new compounds were structurally elucidated through spectroscopic analysis including UV (Ultraviolet Spectrum), IR (Infrared Spectrum), 1H-NMR (1Hydrogen-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance), 13C-NMR (13Carbon-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance), DEPT (Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer), 1H-1H COSY (1H-1H Correlation Spectroscopy), HSQC (Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence), HMBC (Heteronuclear Multiple Bond Correlation), NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement Spectroscopy) and HR-MS (High Resolution Mass Specttrum) and their absolute configurations were proposed by comparison of NOESY spectra and specific optical rotations with those of known compounds and biosynthesis grounds. Compound 2 is the first sesquiterpene alkaloid isolated from this plant. New compounds 1–4 exhibited some cytotoxic activities against NB4, MKN-45 and MCF-7 cells at 20 μM and of which 4 showed the highest activity against NB4 and MKN-45 cells with inhibition rates of 85.6% and 30.5%, respectively. PMID:25915027

  2. High field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter from the South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertkorn, N.; Harir, M.; Koch, B. P.; Michalke, B.; Grill, P.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2012-01-01

    resonance envelopes typical of an intricate mixture of natural organic matter with noticeable peaks of anomerics and C-aromatics carbon whereas oxygenated aromatics and ketones were of too low abundance to result in noticeable humps at the S/N ratio provided. Integration according to major substructure regimes revealed continual increase of carboxylic acids and ketones from surface to deep marine DOM, reflecting a progressive oxygenation of marine DOM, with concomitant decline of carbohydrate-related substructures. Isolation of marine DOM by means of SPE likely discriminated against carbohydrates but produced materials with beneficial NMR relaxation properties: a substantial fraction of dissolved organic molecules present allowed the acquisition of two-dimensional NMR spectra with exceptional resolution. JRES, COSY and HMBC NMR spectra were capable to depict resolved molecular signatures of compounds exceeding a certain minimum abundance. Here, JRES spectra suffered from limited resolution whereas HMBC spectra were constrained because of limited S/N ratio. Hence, COSY NMR spectra appeared best suited to depict organic complexity in marine DOM. The intensity and number of COSY cross peaks was found maximal for sample FMAX and conformed to about 1500 molecules recognizable in variable abundance. Surface DOM (FISH) produced a slightly (~25%) lesser number of cross peaks with remarkable positional accordance to FMAX (~80% conforming COSY cross peaks were found in FISH and FMAX). With increasing water depth, progressive attenuation of COSY cross peaks was caused by fast transverse NMR relaxation of yet unknown origin. However, most of the faint COSY cross peak positions of deep water DOM conformed to those observed in the surface DOM, suggesting the presence of a numerous set of identical molecules throughout the entire ocean column even if the investigated water masses belonged to different oceanic regimes and currents. Aliphatic chemical environments of methylene (CH2) and

  3. Automated protein NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Dong; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Lin, Guohui

    2003-01-01

    NMR resonance peak assignment is one of the key steps in solving an NMR protein structure. The assignment process links resonance peaks to individual residues of the target protein sequence, providing the prerequisite for establishing intra- and inter-residue spatial relationships between atoms. The assignment process is tedious and time-consuming, which could take many weeks. Though there exist a number of computer programs to assist the assignment process, many NMR labs are still doing the assignments manually to ensure quality. This paper presents (1) a new scoring system for mapping spin systems to residues, (2) an automated adjacency information extraction procedure from NMR spectra, and (3) a very fast assignment algorithm based on our previous proposed greedy filtering method and a maximum matching algorithm to automate the assignment process. The computational tests on 70 instances of (pseudo) experimental NMR data of 14 proteins demonstrate that the new score scheme has much better discerning power with the aid of adjacency information between spin systems simulated across various NMR spectra. Typically, with automated extraction of adjacency information, our method achieves nearly complete assignments for most of the proteins. The experiment shows very promising perspective that the fast automated assignment algorithm together with the new score scheme and automated adjacency extraction may be ready for practical use. PMID:16452794

  4. NMR spectroscopic properties (1H at 500 MHz) of deuterated* ribonucleotide-dimers ApU*, GpC*, partially deuterated 2'-deoxyribonucleotide-dimers d(TpA*), d(ApT*), d(GpC*) and their comparison with natural counterparts (1H-NMR window).

    PubMed

    Földesi, A; Nilson, F P; Glemarec, C; Gioeli, C; Chattopadhyaya, J

    1993-02-01

    Pure 1'#,2',3',4'#,5',5''-2H6-ribonucleoside derivatives 10-14, 1'#,2',2'',3',4'#,5',5''-2H7-2'-deoxynucleoside blocks 15-18 and their natural-abundance counterparts were used to assemble partially deuterated ribonucleotide-dimers (* indicates deuteration at 1'#,2',3',4'#,5',5''(2H6)): ApU* 21, GpC* 22 and partially deuterated 2'-deoxyribonucleotide-dimers d(TpA*) 23, d(ApT*) 25, d(GpC*) 26 (* indicates deuteration at 1'#,2',2'',3',4'#,5',5''(2H7)) according to the procedure described by Földesi et al. (Tetrahedron, in press). These five partially deuterated oligonucleotides were subsequently compared with their corresponding natural-abundance counterparts by 500 MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy to evaluate the actual NMR simplifications achieved in the non-deuterated part (1H-NMR window) as a result of specific deuterium incorporation. Detailed one-dimensional 1H-NMR (500 MHz), two-dimensional correlation spectra (DQF-COSY and TOCSY) and deuterium isotope effect on the chemical shifts of oligonucleotides have been presented.

  5. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  6. jsNMR: an embedded platform-independent NMR spectrum viewer.

    PubMed

    Vosegaard, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    jsNMR is a lightweight NMR spectrum viewer written in JavaScript/HyperText Markup Language (HTML), which provides a cross-platform spectrum visualizer that runs on all computer architectures including mobile devices. Experimental (and simulated) datasets are easily opened in jsNMR by (i) drag and drop on a jsNMR browser window, (ii) by preparing a jsNMR file from the jsNMR web site, or (iii) by mailing the raw data to the jsNMR web portal. jsNMR embeds the original data in the HTML file, so a jsNMR file is a self-transforming dataset that may be exported to various formats, e.g. comma-separated values. The main applications of jsNMR are to provide easy access to NMR data without the need for dedicated software installed and to provide the possibility to visualize NMR spectra on web sites.

  7. (1)H and (13)C NMR signal assignments of paecilin A and B, two new chromone derivatives from mangrove endophytic fungus Paecilomyces sp. (tree 1-7).

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiyong; She, Zhigang; Shao, Changlun; Wen, Lu; Liu, Fan; Zheng, Zhonghui; Lin, Yongcheng

    2007-09-01

    Two new natural products, named paecilin A (1) and B (2), together with two known compounds secalonic acid D (3) and (11)-cytochalasa-6(12),13-diene-1,21-dione-16,18-dimethyl-7-hydroxy-10-phenyl-(7S*,13E,16S*,18S*) (4), were isolated from the mangrove endophytic fungus, Paecilomyces sp. (tree 1-7) from the South China Sea. 1D and 2D NMR experiments including COSY, HMQC, and HMBC were used for the determination of their structures. In our cytotoxicity assays, secalonic D (3) showed cytotoxicity toward KB cells with IC(50) < 1 microg ml(-1) and inhibiting human topoisomerase I with IC(50) at 0.16 micromol ml(-1). 1, 2, and 4 showed no activity to KB cells.

  8. NMR planar microcoil for microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorli, B.; Chateaux, J. F.; Quiquerez, L.; Bouchet-Fakri, L.; Briguet, A.; Morin, P.

    2006-11-01

    This article deals with the analysis of small sample volume by using a planar microcoil and a micromachined cavity. This microcoil is used as a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency detection coil in order to perform in vitro NMR analysis of the sample introduced into the microcavity. It is a real challenging task to develop microsystem for NMR spectrum extraction for smaller and smaller sample volume. Moreover, it is advantageous that these microsystems could be integrated in a Micro Total Analysing System (μ -TAS) as an analysing tool. In this paper, NMR theory, description, fabrication process and electrical characterization of planar microcoils receiver are described. Results obtained on NMR microspectroscopy experiments have been performed on water and ethanol, using a 1 mm diameter planar coil. This microcoil is tuned and matched at 85.13 MHz which is the Larmor frequency of proton in a 2 T magnetic field. This paper has been presented at “3e colloque interdisciplinaire en instrumentation (C2I 2004)”, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 29 30 janvier 2004.

  9. NMR characterization of shocked quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, M.B.; Cygan, R.T.; Assink, R.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    We have characterized experimentally and naturally-shocked quartz (both synthetic and natural samples) by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Relaxation analysis of experimentally-shocked samples provides a means for quantitative characterization of the amorphous/disordered silica component NMR spectra demonstrate that magnetization in both the amorphous and crystalline components follows power-law behavior as a function of recycle time. This observation is consistent with the relaxation of nuclear spins by paramagnetic impurities. A fractal dimension can be extracted from the power-law exponent associated with each phase, and relative abundances can be extracted from integrated intensities of deconvolved peaks. NMR spectroscopy of naturally-shocked sandstone from Meteor Crater, Arizona (USA) led to the discovery of a new amorphous hydroxylated silica phase. Solid state NMR spectra of both experimentally and naturally shocked quartz were unexpectedly rich in microstructural information, especially when combined with relaxation analysis and cross-polarization studies. We suggest solid state NMR as a potentially useful tool for examining shock-induced microstructural changes in other inorganic compounds, with possible implications for shock processing of structural ceramics.

  10. Structural characterization and DPPH· radical scavenging activity of a polysaccharide from Guara fruits.

    PubMed

    Hua, Dehong; Zhang, Dezhi; Huang, Bing; Yi, Pan; Yan, Chunyan

    2014-03-15

    The crude polysaccharides were extracted from fruits of Psidium guajava Linn. by hot water. After removal of proteins, isolation and purification by DEAE-52 Cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-75 gel filtration, a polysaccharide (GP70-2) was obtained and structurally characterized. GP70-2 has a relative molecular weight of 74 kDa and was composed of D-galactose and L-arabinose in the ratio of 1:1, with a specific optical rotation of [a]D(25) = +101°. Structural characterization of this novel polysaccharide was carried out using infrared spectroscopy, methylation analyses, and NMR studies ((1)H, (13)C, (1)H-(1)H-COSY, HMQC, and HMBC). Based on the above data, the following structure was assigned to the repeated core unit of GP70-2: [Formula: see text]. This polysaccharide showed a concentration dependent DPPH· radical scavenging activity.

  11. Steroidal Saponins from the Rhizomes of Aspidistra typica

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Zhang, Jie; Pang, Xu; Yu, He-Shui; Jia, De-Xian; Liu, Chao; Yu, Li-Yan; Ma, Bai-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Eleven new furostanol saponins, typaspidosides B-L (1–11), one new spirostanol saponin, typaspidoside M (12), and five known spirostanol saponins, 25S-atropuroside (13), neoaspidistrin (14), (25S)-pratioside D1 (15), 25S-aspidistrin (16) and 25S-neosibiricoside (17) were isolated from the rhizomes of Aspidistra typica Baill. The structures of the new compounds were established using 1D and 2D NMR (1H-1H COSY, HMQC, HMBC and ROESY) spectroscopy, high resolution mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. The aglycones of 1–3 (unusual furostanol saponins with opened E ring type), 9 and 10 (the methoxyl substituent at C-23 position) were found, identified from natural products for the first time. Moreover, the anti-HIV activities of the isolated steroidal glycosides were assessed, and compounds 13, 14, 16 and 17 exhibited high active against HIV-1. PMID:26937954

  12. Further saponins from Fagonia cretica.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Khalik, S M; Miyase, T; Melek, F R; el-Ashaal, H A

    2001-03-01

    Three triterpenoid saponins including two new ones were isolated and identified from the aerial parts of Fagonia cretica. The new saponins were characterized as 3-O-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->2)alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl]27-hydroxyoleanolic acid 28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->6)beta-D-glucopyranosyl]ester and 3 beta-O-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl(1-->2)alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl] olean-12-en-27-al-28-oic acid 28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->6)beta-D-glycopyranosyl] ester. The structures were determined by spectral analyses. The NMR assignments were made by means of HOHAHA, 1H-1H COSY, HMQC, HMBC spectra and NOE studies. PMID:11265595

  13. Antioxidant and cytotoxic flavonols from Calotropis procera.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mona A; Hamed, Manal M; Ahmed, Wafaa S; Abdou, Allia M

    2011-01-01

    Phytochemical investigations of Calotropis procera leaves have led to the isolation of two new compounds: quercetagetin-6-methyl ether 3-O-beta-D-4C1-galacturonopyranoside (3) and (E)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl-2-O-beta-D-4C1 -glucopyranoside)-methyl propenoate (4), along with eleven known metabolites: nine flavonol and two cinnamic acid derivatives. All metabolites were isolated for the first time from the genus Calotropis, except for 1 isolated previously from Calotropis gigantea. The structures were determined by spectroscopic methods (UV, ESI-MS, 1H, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, HSQC, and HMBC). The radical scavenging activity of the aqueous methanol extract and compounds 8-13 was measured by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. Cytotoxic screening of the same compounds was carried out on brine shrimps as well.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and fluorescence studies of novel bi-phenyl based acrylate and methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskar, R.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-09-01

    4-[(1 E)-3-(biphenyl-4-yl)buta-1,3-dien-1-yl]phenyl prop-2-enoate ( ACH) and 4-[(1 E)-3-(biphenyl-4-yl)buta-1,3-dien-1-yl]phenyl 2-methylprop-2-enoate ( MCH) was synthesized from biphenyl in three steps and their structures were confirmed by elemental analysis, IR, NMR ( 1H, 13C, DEPT135, 1H- 1H COSY, 1H- 13C HSQC and 1H- 13C HMBC) spectroscopic techniques. In this present study, various physicochemical characteristics we demonstrate solubility, color, absorbance and fluorescence property of novel biphenyl based acrylate and methacrylate measured in different solvents like benzene, dichloromethane, tetrahydrofuran, acetonitrile, dimethylsulfoxide and ethanol.

  15. Novel synthesis, structural analysis, photophysical properties and theoretical study of 2,4,5-tris(2-pyridyl)imidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Báez-Castro, Alberto; Baldenebro-López, Jesús; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel; Höpfl, Herbert; Cruz-Enríquez, Adriana; Miranda-Soto, Valentín; Parra-Hake, Miguel; Campos-Gaxiola, José J.

    2015-11-01

    2,4,5-Tris(2-pyridyl)imidazole has been successfully synthetized by a novel synthetic route and fully characterized by FT-IR,UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy (1H, 13C{1H} ATP, 1H-1H COSY, NOESY 1H-13C HSQC and HMBC) high-resolution, mass spectrometry (HR-FAB+), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Additionally, the molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities were calculated by density functional theory using the M06/6-31G(d) level of theory, showing good agreement with the experimental results. The title compound showed interesting photophysical properties, which were studied experimentally in solution and in the solid state by UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, and theoretically using TD-DFT calculations. Natural and Mulliken atomic charges and the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) have been mapped.

  16. Salvianolic acid Y: a new protector of PC12 cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced injury from Salvia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jun; Ju, Aichun; Zhou, Dazheng; Li, Dekun; Zhou, Wei; Geng, Wanli; Li, Bing; Li, Li; Liu, Yanjie; He, Ying; Song, Meizhen; Wang, Yunhua; Ye, Zhengliang; Lin, Ruichao

    2015-01-06

    Salvianolic acid Y (TSL 1), a new phenolic acid with the same planar structure as salvianolic acid B, was isolated from Salvia officinalis. The structural elucidation and stereochemistry determination were achieved by spectroscopic and chemical methods, including 1D, 2D-NMR (1H-1H COSY, HMQC and HMBC) and circular dichroism (CD) experiments. The biosynthesis pathway of salvianolic acid B and salvianolic acid Y (TSL 1) was proposed based on structural analysis. The protection of PC12 cells from injury induced by H2O2 was assessed in vitro using a cell viability assay. Salvianolic acid Y (TSL 1) protected cells from injury by 54.2%, which was significantly higher than salvianolic acid B (35.2%).

  17. Neuroprotective and antioxidant lanostanoid triterpenes from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma atrum.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Junming; Wang, Xiang; Song, Chengguang

    2016-03-01

    Five new lanostanoid triterpenes were isolated from the ethanol extract of the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma atrum. The structures of the isolated compounds were established based on 1D and 2D ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HMQC, and HMBC) NMR spectroscopy, in addition to high resolution mass spectrometry. The isolated compounds were tested in vitro for neuroprotective activities against 6-OHDA-induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells and radical scavenging activities. As a result, compounds 2 and 5 exhibited potent neuroprotective activity against 6-OHDA-induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells with the lowest IC50 value (0.5 μM) while compounds 1, 3 and 4 possessed significant neuroprotective activity with IC50 value less than 10 μM. Additionally, all tested compounds 1-6 showed the comparable free radical scavenging activities with the standard drug trolox in both ABTS (+) and DPPH experiment. PMID:26709153

  18. Asterosaponins and glycosylated polyhydroxysteroids from the starfish Culcita novaeguineae and their cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Ngoan, Bui Thi; Hanh, Tran Thi Hong; Vien, Le Thi; Diep, Chau Ngoc; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Thao, Do Thi; Thanh, Nguyen Van; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Thung, Do Cong; Kiem, Phan Van; Kim, Young Ho; Minh, Chau Van

    2015-01-01

    Using combined chromatographic methods, two asterosaponins (compounds 1 and 2), including a new compound novaeguinoside E (compound 1), and six glycosylated polyhydroxysteroids (compounds 3-8) were isolated from a methanol extract of the starfish Culcita novaeguineae. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data ((1)H and (13)C NMR, HSQC, HMBC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, ROESY, and HRESI-MS) and by comparison with the literature values. The new compound 1 represents the third example of asterosaponins containing the 5α-cholesta-9(1l)-en-3β,6α,20,22-tetraol aglycone. Among isolated compounds, 4-7 exhibited moderate to weak cytotoxic activities against five human cancer cell lines such as Hep-G2 (hepatoma), KB (epidermoid carcinoma), LNCaP (prostate cancer), MCF7 (breast cancer), and SK-Mel2 (melanoma). PMID:26001122

  19. Identification of an isomer impurity in piperaquine drug substance.

    PubMed

    Lindegårdh, N; Giorgi, F; Galletti, B; Di Mattia, M; Quaglia, M; Carnevale, D; White, N J; Mazzanti, A; Day, N P J

    2006-12-01

    A significant contaminant of the antimalarial drug piperaquine (1,3-bis-[4-(7-chloroquinolyl-4)-piperazinyl-1]propane) has been identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and 2D NMR spectroscopy (1H-1H COSY, 1H-13C HSQC, 1H-13C HMBC). The impurity was identified as the positional isomer 1-[(5-chloroquinolin-4)-piperazinyl]-3-[(7-chloroquinolin-4)-piperazinyl]propane. The impurity is formed because of contamination of batches of 4,7-dichloroquinoline (a precursor in the synthesis of piperaquine) with 4,5-dichloroquinoline. The amount of impurity (peak area impurity/peak area piperaquine using LC-UV at 347 nm) in old batches of piperaquine and in Artekin (the combination of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine) ranged from 1.5 to 5%. PMID:17046006

  20. Croton ruizianus: platelet proaggregating activity of two new pregnane glycosides.

    PubMed

    Piacente, S; Belisario, M A; Del Castillo, H; Pizza, C; De Feo, V

    1998-03-01

    The MeOH extract of the aerial parts of Croton ruizianus afforded two new pregnane glycosides 1 and 2, together with the morphinandienone alkaloids flavinantine (3) and O-methylflavinantine (4). Their structures were elucidated by NMR experiments including 1H-1H (1D TOCSY and 2D DQF-COSY) and 1H-13C (HSQC, HMBC) spectroscopy. The proaggregating activity of the MeOH extract and the isolates were evaluated. Although the MeOH extract and pregnane glycosides (at different doses) were found to promote platelet aggregation, flavinantine (3) and O-methylflavinantine (4) showed only slight activity. The ability of the MeOH extract and the four compounds to act synergistically with thrombin was also evaluated. All the tested compounds were successful in augmenting the aggregating effect of thrombin, although to different degrees.

  1. Phenolic compounds with IL-6 inhibitory activity from Aster yomena.

    PubMed

    Kim, A Ryun; Jin, Qinglong; Jin, Hong-Guang; Ko, Hae Ju; Woo, Eun-Rhan

    2014-07-01

    A new biflavonoid, named asteryomenin (1), as well as six known phenolic compounds, esculetin (2), 4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside-3-hydroxy methyl benzoate (3), caffeic acid (4), isoquercitrin (5), isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside (6), and apigenin (7) were isolated from the aerial parts of Aster yomena. The structures of compounds (1-7) were identified based on 1D and 2D NMR, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY spectroscopic analyses. Compounds 2-7 were isolated from this plant for the first time. For these isolates, the inhibitory activity of IL-6 production in the TNF-α stimulated MG-63 cell was examined. Among these isolates, compounds 4 and 7 appeared to have potent inhibitory activity of IL-6 production in the TNF-α stimulated MG-63 cell, while compounds 1-3 and 5-6 showed moderate activity.

  2. Anti-Mycobacterial Nucleoside Antibiotics from a Marine-Derived Streptomyces sp. TPU1236A

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Ying-Yue; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Five new nucleoside antibiotics, named streptcytosines A–E (1–5), and six known compounds, de-amosaminyl-cytosamine (6), plicacetin (7), bamicetin (8), amicetin (9), collismycin B (10), and SF2738 C (11), were isolated from a culture broth of Streptomyces sp. TPU1236A collected in Okinawa, Japan. The structures of new compounds were elucidated on the basis of their spectroscopic data (HRFABMS, IR, UV, and 2D NMR experiments including 1H-1H COSY, HMQC, HMBC, and NOESY spectra). Streptcytosine A (1) belonged to the amicetin group antibiotics, and streptcytosines B–E (2–5) were derivatives of de-amosaminyl-cytosamine (6), 2,3,6-trideoxyglucopyranosyl cytosine. Compound 1 inhibited the growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis (MIC = 32 µg/mL), while compounds 2–5 were not active at 50 µg/disc. Bamicetin (8) and amicetin (9) showed the MICs of 16 and 8 µg/mL, respectively. PMID:25522318

  3. Neuroprotective and antioxidant lanostanoid triterpenes from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma atrum.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Junming; Wang, Xiang; Song, Chengguang

    2016-03-01

    Five new lanostanoid triterpenes were isolated from the ethanol extract of the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma atrum. The structures of the isolated compounds were established based on 1D and 2D ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HMQC, and HMBC) NMR spectroscopy, in addition to high resolution mass spectrometry. The isolated compounds were tested in vitro for neuroprotective activities against 6-OHDA-induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells and radical scavenging activities. As a result, compounds 2 and 5 exhibited potent neuroprotective activity against 6-OHDA-induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells with the lowest IC50 value (0.5 μM) while compounds 1, 3 and 4 possessed significant neuroprotective activity with IC50 value less than 10 μM. Additionally, all tested compounds 1-6 showed the comparable free radical scavenging activities with the standard drug trolox in both ABTS (+) and DPPH experiment.

  4. 7-Desmethyl-microcystin-RR, a hepatotoxin from a waterbloom of Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Weckesser, J; Ino, T; König, W A; Skulberg, O M

    1992-01-01

    A peptide toxin was isolated from a waterbloom of Microcystis aeruginosa from Lake Frøylandsvatn in Norway. The isolation procedure included liquid and solid phase extraction and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis yielded D-glutamic acid, D-erythro-beta-methylaspartic acid and D-alanine in equimolar and L-arginine in twofold molar ratios. The presence of dehydroalanine was confirmed by hydrogenation and subsequent amino acid analysis with combined gas liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Investigation of the toxin with fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry showed a nominal relative molecular mass of 1023. 3-Amino-9-methoxy-2,6,8-trimethyl-10-phenyl- 4,6-decadienoic acid (Adda) was identified by 1H NMR and 1H, 1H COSY spectroscopy. The structure of the toxin was elucidated as 7-desmethyl-microcystin-RR.

  5. Spectroscopic, crystal structural and electrochemical studies of zinc(II)-Schiff base complex obtained from 2,3-diaminobenzene and 2-hydroxy naphthaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ouari, Kamel; Bendia, Sabrina; Weiss, Jean; Bailly, Corinne

    2015-01-25

    Mononuclear zinc(II) complex, [Zn(II)L], where L is a dianionic ligand, has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electronic, IR and NMR [(1)H, (13)C, DEPT, (1)H-(1)H COSY, ROESY, HSQC and HMBC] spectroscopic techniques. Structural analysis of the complex by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows the presence of a distorted square planar coordination geometry (NNOO) of the metal center. The crystal of the title complex C28H18N2O2Zn belongs to the orthorhombic system with space group Pmn21. Electrochemical behavior of the Zn(II)L complex has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry on glassy carbon and platinum electrodes in DMF at 100 mV/s scan rate.

  6. Sequential sup 1 H NMR assignments and secondary structure of an IgG-binding domain from protein G

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, L.Y.; Yang, J.C.; Derrick, J.P.; Sutcliffe, M.J.; Roberts, G.C.K. ); Murphy, J.P.; Goward, C.R.; Atkinson, T. )

    1991-06-04

    Protein G is a member of a class of cell surface bacterial proteins from Streptococcus that bind IgG with high affinity. A fragment of molecular mass 6,988, which retains IgG-binding activity, has been generated by proteolytic digestion and analyzed by {sup 1}H NMR. Two-dimenstional DQF-COSY, TOCSY, and NOESY spectra have been employed to assign the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the peptide. Elements of regular secondary structure have been identified by using nuclear Overhauser enhancement, coupling constant, and amide proton exchange data. The secondary structure consists of a central {alpha}-helix (Ala28-Val44), flanked by two portions of {beta}-sheet (Val5-Val26 and Asp45-Lys62). This is a fundamentally different arrangement of secondary structure from that of protein A, which is made up of three consecutive {alpha}-helics in free solution. The authors conclude that the molecular mechanisms underlying the association of protein A and protein G with IgG are different.

  7. (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments for five anthraquinones from the mangrove endophytic fungus Halorosellinia sp. (No. 1403).

    PubMed

    Xia, Xue-Kui; Huang, Hua-Rong; She, Zhi-Gang; Shao, Chang-Lun; Liu, Fan; Cai, Xiao-Ling; Vrijmoed, L L P; Lin, Yong-Cheng

    2007-11-01

    We report the unambiguous assignments of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of two new natural products, namely, 1,4,5,6,7,9-hexahydroxy-2-methoxy-7-methyl-5beta,9beta,8abeta, 6alpha,10aalpha-hexahydroanthracen-10 (10aH)-one (1) and 1,4,6-trihydroxy-2-methoxy-7-methylanthracene-9, 10-dione (2), together with three known anthraquinones. These compounds were all isolated from the marine endophytic fungus No. 1403 collected from the South China Sea. Compounds 3 and 4 were isolated from the marine fungus for the first time. The structures were elucidated by the spectroscopic methods 1D and 2D NMR including COSY, HMQC, HMBC and NOE, and HREIMS. In our cytotoxicity assays, compound 5 showed cytotoxicity toward KB and KBv-200 cells with IC(50) of 1.40 and 2.58 microg/ml, respectively. In addition, the plausible biogenic relationship of compounds 1, 2, 3 and 4 is discussed.

  8. Solution NMR conformation of glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been giving a pivotal contribution to the progress of glycomics, mostly by elucidating the structural, dynamical, conformational and intermolecular binding aspects of carbohydrates. Particularly in the field of conformation, NOE resonances, scalar couplings, residual dipolar couplings, and chemical shift anisotropy offsets have been the principal NMR parameters utilized. Molecular dynamics calculations restrained by NMR-data input are usually employed in conjunction to generate glycosidic bond dihedral angles. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are a special class of sulfated polysaccharides extensively studied worldwide. Besides regulating innumerous physiological processes, these glycans are also widely explored in the global market as either clinical or nutraceutical agents. The conformational aspects of GAGs are key regulators to the quality of interactions with the functional proteins involved in biological events. This report discusses the solution conformation of each GAG type analyzed by one or more of the above-mentioned methods.

  9. 1H and 13C NMR assignments of new methoxylated furanoflavonoids from Lonchocarpus araripensis.

    PubMed

    Lima, Almi F; Mileo, Paulo Graziane M; Andrade-Neto, Manoel; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Silveira, Edilberto R; Pessoa, Otília Deusdênia L

    2009-02-01

    Two new polymethoxylated flavonoids, 2',5',6'-trimethoxy-[2'',3'' : 3',4']furano dihydrochalcone and 2,4',4,5-tetramethoxy-[2'',3'' : 6,7]-furanodihydroaurone, were isolated from the root barks of Lonchocarpus araripensis, along with the known compounds 3,4,5,6-tetramethoxy-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-furanoflavan, 3,6-dimethoxy-1'',1''-dimethylcromene-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-flavone, 3',4'-methylenodioxy-5,6-dimethoxy-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-furanoflavone, 3,5,6-trimethoxy-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-furanoflavanone, 3,5,6-trimethoxy-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-furanoflavone, and 6alpha-hydroxy-medicarpin. The complete (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments of the new furan flavonoids were performed using 1D and 2D pulse sequences, including COSY, HSQC, and HMBC experiments, and comparison with spectral data for analog compounds from the literature, particularly for the new furanodihydroaurone because of several inconsistencies on the carbonyl chemical shifts from the literature. PMID:18932264

  10. Advanced NMR characterization of zeolite catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, L. B.

    1985-04-01

    The program discussed in this report is a two-year two-phase joint UOP-University of Illinois study of the application of improved high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to the characterization of zeolite catalysts. During the first phase of this program very pure, and in some cases isotopically enriched faujasites will be prepared and studied by magic angle sample spinning NMR (MASS NMR) and variable engine sample spinning NMR (VASS NMR) on 500 and 360 MHz (proton frequency) NMR spectrometers. The NMR techniques that will be emphasized are the measurement and analysis of the (17)O NMR properties, (27)Al NMR intensity quantitation, and (27)Al and (29)Si NMR relaxation rates. During the second phase of this program these NMR techniques will be used to study the effects of impurity concentration, dealumination treatments and cation exchange on the NMR properties of faujasites. The initial emphasis of this program during Phase I is on the preparation and measurement of the NMR properties of (17)O enriched Na-Y faujasties.

  11. Overcoming the overlap problem in the assignment of 1H NMR spectra of larger proteins by use of three-dimensional heteronuclear 1H-15N Hartmann-Hahn-multiple quantum coherence and nuclear Overhauser-multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy: application to interleukin 1 beta.

    PubMed

    Marion, D; Driscoll, P C; Kay, L E; Wingfield, P T; Bax, A; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1989-07-25

    The application of three-dimensional (3D) heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy to the sequential assignment of the 1H NMR spectra of larger proteins is presented, using uniformly labeled (approximately 95%) [15N]interleukin 1 beta, a protein of 153 residues and molecular mass of 17.4 kDa, as an example. The two-dimensional (2D) 600-MHz spectra of interleukin 1 beta are too complex for complete analysis, owing to extensive cross-peak overlap and chemical shift degeneracy. We show that the combined use of 3D 1H-15N Hartmann-Hahn-multiple quantum coherence (HOHAHA-HMQC) and nuclear Overhauser-multiple quantum coherence (NOESY-HMQC) spectroscopy, designed to provide the necessary through-bond and through-space correlations for sequential assignment, provides a practical general-purpose method for resolving ambiguities which severely limit the analysis of conventional 2D NMR spectra. The absence of overlapping cross-peaks in these 3D spectra allows the unambiguous identification of C alpha H(i)-NH(i+1) and NH(i)-NH(i+1) through-space nuclear Overhauser connectivities necessary for connecting a particular C alpha H(i)-NH(i) through-bond correlation with its associated through-space sequential cross-peak The problem of amide NH chemical shift degeneracy in the 1H NMR spectrum is therefore effectively removed, and the assignment procedure simply involves inspecting a series of 2D 1H-1H slices edited by the chemical shift of the directly bonded 15N atom. Connections between residues can be identified almost without any knowledge of the spin system types involved, though this type of information is clearly required for the eventual placement of the connected residues within the primary sequence.

  12. A chelate-stabilized ruthenium(sigma-pyrrolato) complex: resolving ambiguities in nuclearity and coordination geometry through 1H PGSE and 31P solid-state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Heather M; Bryce, David L; Fogg, Deryn E

    2006-12-11

    Reaction of RuCl2(PPh3)3 with LiNN' (NN' = 2-[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]pyrrolide) affords a single product, with the empirical formula RuCl[(2,6-iPr2C6H3)N=CHC4H3N](PPh3)2. We identify this species as a sigma-pyrrolato complex, [Ru(NN')(PPh3)2]2(mu-Cl)2 (3b), rather than mononuclear RuCl(NN')(PPh3)2 (3a), on the basis of detailed 1D and 2D NMR characterization in solution and in the solid state. Retention of the chelating, sigma-bound iminopyrrolato unit within 3b, despite the presence of labile (dative) chloride and PPh3 donors, indicates that the chelate effect is sufficient to inhibit sigma --> pi isomerization of 3b to a piano-stool, pi-pyrrolato structure. 2D COSY, SECSY, and J-resolved solid-state 31P NMR experiments confirm that the PPh3 ligands on each metal center are magnetically and crystallographically inequivalent, and 31P CP/MAS NMR experiments reveal the largest 99Ru-31P spin-spin coupling constant (1J(99Ru,31P) = 244 +/- 20 Hz) yet measured. Finally, 31P dipolar-chemical shift spectroscopy is applied to determine benchmark phosphorus chemical shift tensors for phosphine ligands in hexacoordinate ruthenium complexes.

  13. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  14. Push-through Direction Injectin NMR Automation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two major spectroscopic techniques successfully used in metabolomics studies. The non-invasive, quantitative and reproducible characteristics make NMR spectroscopy an excellent technique for detection of endogeno...

  15. NMR investigations of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for characterizing protein conformational dynamics on multiple time scales. The insights obtained from NMR studies are complemented and by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide full atomistic details of protein dynamics. Homologous mesophilic (E. coli) and thermophilic (T. thermophilus) ribonuclease H (RNase H) enzymes serve to illustrate how changes in protein sequence and structure that affect conformational dynamic processes can be monitored and characterized by joint analysis of NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations. A Gly residue inserted within a putative hinge between helices B and C is conserved among thermophilic RNases H, but absent in mesophilic RNases H. Experimental spin relaxation measurements show that the dynamic properties of T. thermophilus RNase H are recapitulated in E. coli RNase H by insertion of a Gly residue between helices B and C. Additional specific intramolecular interactions that modulate backbone and sidechain dynamical properties of the Gly-rich loop and of the conserved Trp residue flanking the Gly insertion site have been identified using MD simulations and subsequently confirmed by NMR spin relaxation measurements. These results emphasize the importance of hydrogen bonds and local steric interactions in restricting conformational fluctuations, and the absence of such interactions in allowing conformational adaptation to substrate binding.

  16. Deuterium Exchange Kinetics by NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment which allows such concepts as kinetics, catalysis, isotope shifts, coupling constants, and the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for quantitative work to be covered in the same exercise. Background information, experimental procedures used, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  17. Petrophysical applications of NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, W.P.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    A system for obtaining high-resolution NMR images of oil field cores is described. Separate proton density and T/sub 2/ relaxation images are obtained to distinguish spatial variations of fluid-filled porosity and the physical nature of the pores. Results are presented for typical sandstones.

  18. Direct detection of N-H[...]O=C hydrogen bonds in biomolecules by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Florence; Nisius, Lydia; Dingley, Andrew J; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment is described for the direct detection of N-H[...]O=C hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in 15N and 13C isotope-labeled biomolecules. This quantitative 'long-range' HNCO-COSY (correlation spectroscopy) experiment detects and quantifies electron-mediated scalar couplings across the H-bond (H-bond scalar couplings), which connect the magnetically active (15)N and (13)C nuclei on both sides of the H-bond. Detectable H-bonds comprise the canonical backbone H-bonds in proteins as well as other H-bonds in proteins and nucleic acids with N-H donors and O=C (carbonylic or carboxylic) acceptors. Unlike other NMR observables, which provide only indirect evidence of the presence of H-bonds, the H-bond scalar couplings identify all partners of the H-bond, the donor, the donor proton and the acceptor, in a single experiment. The size of the scalar couplings can be related to H-bond geometries. The time required to detect the N-H[...]O=C H-bonds in small proteins (< or = approximately 10 kDa) is typically on the order of 1 d at millimolar concentrations, whereas H-bond detection for larger proteins (< or = approximately 30 kDa) may be possible within several days depending on concentration, isotope composition, magnetic field strength and molecular weight. The proteins ubiquitin (8.6 kDa), dimeric RANTES (2 x 8.5 kDa) and MAP30 (30 kDa) are used as examples to illustrate this procedure. PMID:18274525

  19. Photochemical route to actinide-transition metal bonds: synthesis, characterization and reactivity of a series of thorium and uranium heterobimetallic complexes.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ashleigh L; Lukens, Wayne W; Lu, Connie C; Arnold, John

    2014-03-01

    A series of actinide-transition metal heterobimetallics has been prepared, featuring thorium, uranium, and cobalt. Complexes incorporating the binucleating ligand N[ο-(NHCH2P(i)Pr2)C6H4]3 with either Th(IV) (4) or U(IV) (5) and a carbonyl bridged [Co(CO)4](-) unit were synthesized from the corresponding actinide chlorides (Th: 2; U: 3) and Na[Co(CO)4]. Irradiation of the resulting isocarbonyls with ultraviolet light resulted in the formation of new species containing actinide-metal bonds in good yields (Th: 6; U: 7); this photolysis method provides a new approach to a relatively unusual class of complexes. Characterization by single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that elimination of the bridging carbonyl and formation of the metal-metal bond is accompanied by coordination of a phosphine arm from the N4P3 ligand to the cobalt center. Additionally, actinide-cobalt bonds of 3.0771(5) Å and 3.0319(7) Å for the thorium and uranium complexes, respectively, were observed. The solution-state behavior of the thorium complexes was evaluated using (1)H, (1)H-(1)H COSY, (31)P, and variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy. IR, UV-vis/NIR, and variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported.

  20. Photochemical route to actinide-transition metal bonds: synthesis, characterization and reactivity of a series of thorium and uranium heterobimetallic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Ashleigh; Lukens, Wayne; Lu, Connie; Arnold, John

    2014-04-01

    A series of actinide-transition metal heterobimetallics has been prepared, featuring thorium, uranium and cobalt. Complexes incorporating the binucleating ligand N[-(NHCH2PiPr2)C6H4]3 and Th(IV) (4) or U(IV) (5) with a carbonyl bridged [Co(CO)4]- unit were synthesized from the corresponding actinide chlorides (Th: 2; U: 3) and Na[Co(CO)4]. Irradiation of the isocarbonyls with ultraviolet light resulted in the formation of new species containing actinide-metal bonds in good yields (Th: 6; U: 7); this photolysis method provides a new approach to a relatively rare class of complexes. Characterization by single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that elimination of the bridging carbonyl is accompanied by coordination of a phosphine arm from the N4P3 ligand to the cobalt center. Additionally, actinide-cobalt bonds of 3.0771(5) and 3.0319(7) for the thorium and uranium complexes, respectively, were observed. The solution state behavior of the thorium complexes was evaluated using 1H, 1H-1H COSY, 31P and variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy. IR, UV-Vis/NIR, and variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported.

  1. Quantum-chemical simulation of 1H NMR spectra. 2. Comparison of DFT-based procedures for computing proton-proton coupling constants in organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Bally, Thomas; Rablen, Paul R

    2011-06-17

    The performance of 250 different computational protocols (combinations of density functionals, basis sets and methods) was assessed on a set of 165 well-established experimental (1)H-(1)H nuclear coupling constants (J(H-H)) from 65 molecules spanning a wide range of "chemical space". Thereby we found that, if one uses core-augmented basis sets and allows for linear scaling of the raw results, calculations of only the Fermi contact term yield more accurate predictions than calculations where all four terms that contribute to J(H-H) are evaluated. It turns out that B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)u+1s is the best (and, in addition, one of the most economical) of all tested methods, yielding predictions of J(H-H) with a root-mean-square deviation from experiment of less than 0.5 Hz for our test set. Another method that does similarly well, without the need for additional 1s basis functions, is B3LYP/cc-pVTZ, which is, however, ca. 8 times more "expensive" in terms of CPU time. A selection of the better methods was tested on a probe set comprising 61 J(H-H) values from 37 molecules. In this set we also included five molecules where conformational averaging is required. The rms deviations were better than or equal to those with the training set, which indicates that the method we recommend is generally applicable for organic molecules. We give instructions on how to carry out calculations of (1)H chemical shifts and J(H-H) most economically and provide scripts to extract the relevant information from the outputs of calculations with the Gaussian program in clearly arranged form, e.g., to feed them into programs for simulating entire (1)H NMR spectra.

  2. SEnD NMR: Sensitivity Enhanced n-Dimensional NMR

    PubMed Central

    Gledhill, John M.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Sparse sampling offers tremendous potential for overcoming the time limitations imposed by traditional Cartesian sampling of indirectly detected dimensions of multidimensional NMR data. However, in many instances sensitivity rather than time remains of foremost importance when collecting data on protein samples. Here we explore how to optimize the collection of radial sampled multidimensional NMR data to achieve maximal signal-to-noise. A method is presented that exploits a rigorous definition of the minimal set of radial sampling angles required to resolve all peaks of interest in combination with a fundamental statistical property of radial sampled data. The approach appears general and can achieve a substantial sensitivity advantage over Cartesian sampling for the same total data acquisition time. Termed Sensitivity Enhanced n-Dimensional or SEnD NMR, the method involves three basic steps. First, data collection is optimized using routines to determine a minimal set of radial sampling angles required to resolve frequencies in the radially sampled chemical shift evolution dimensions. Second, appropriate combinations of experimental parameters (transients and increments) are defined by simple statistical considerations in order to optimize signal-to-noise in single angle frequency domain spectra. Finally, the data is processed with a direct multidimensional Fourier transform and a statistical artifact and noise removal step is employed. PMID:20004602

  3. Enzymatic 13C Labeling and Multidimensional NMR Analysis of Miltiradiene Synthesized by Bifunctional Diterpene Cyclase in Selaginella moellendorffii*

    PubMed Central

    Sugai, Yoshinori; Ueno, Yohei; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Oogami, Shingo; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Natsume, Masahiro; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Diterpenes show diverse chemical structures and various physiological roles. The diversity of diterpene is primarily established by diterpene cyclases that catalyze a cyclization reaction to form the carbon skeleton of cyclic diterpene. Diterpene cyclases are divided into two types, monofunctional and bifunctional cyclases. Bifunctional diterpene cyclases (BDTCs) are involved in hormone and defense compound biosyntheses in bryophytes and gymnosperms, respectively. The BDTCs catalyze the successive two-step type-B (protonation-initiated cyclization) and type-A (ionization-initiated cyclization) reactions of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP). We found that the genome of a lycophyte, Selaginella moellendorffii, contains six BDTC genes with the majority being uncharacterized. The cDNA from S. moellendorffii encoding a BDTC-like enzyme, miltiradiene synthase (SmMDS), was cloned. The recombinant SmMDS converted GGDP to a diterpene hydrocarbon product with a molecular mass of 272 Da. Mutation in the type-B active motif of SmMDS abolished the cyclase activity, whereas (+)-copalyl diphosphate, the reaction intermediate from the conversion of GGDP to the hydrocarbon product, rescued the cyclase activity of the mutant to form a diterpene hydrocarbon. Another mutant lacking type-A activity accumulated copalyl diphosphate as the reaction intermediate. When the diterpene hydrocarbon was enzymatically synthesized from [U-13C6]mevalonate, all carbons were labeled with 13C stable isotope (>99%). The fully 13C-labeled product was subjected to 13C-13C COSY NMR spectroscopic analyses. The direct carbon-carbon connectivities observed in the multidimensional NMR spectra demonstrated that the hydrocarbon product by SmMDS is miltiradiene, a putative biosynthetic precursor of tanshinone identified from the Chinese medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza. Hence, SmMDS functions as a bifunctional miltiradiene synthase in S. moellendorffii. In this study, we demonstrate that one-dimensional and

  4. REDOR NMR for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo DOuble-Resonance (REDOR) NMR is a powerful and versatile solid-state NMR measurement that has been recruited to elucidate drug modes of action and to drive the design of new therapeutics. REDOR has been implemented to examine composition, structure, and dynamics in diverse macromolecular and whole-cell systems, including taxol-bound microtubules, enzyme-cofactor-inhibitor ternary complexes, and antibiotic-whole-cell complexes. The REDOR approach involves the integrated design of specific isotopic labeling strategies and the selection of appropriate REDOR experiments. By way of example, this digest illustrates the versatility of the REDOR approach, with an emphasis on the practical considerations of experimental design and data interpretation. PMID:24035486

  5. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques for Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in NMR hyperpolarization have enabled a wide array of new in vivo molecular imaging modalities—ranging from functional imaging of the lungs to metabolic imaging of cancer. This Concept article explores selected advances in methods for the preparation and use of hyperpolarized contrast agents, many of which are already at or near the phase of their clinical validation in patients. PMID:25470566

  6. NMR Measures of Heterogeneity Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, Hans W.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced solid state NMR spectroscopy provides a wealth of information about structure and dynamics of complex systems. On a local scale, multidimensional solid state NMR has elucidated the geometry and the time scale of segmental motions at the glass transition. The higher order correlation functions which are provided by this technique led to the notion of dynamic heterogeneities, which have been characterized in detail with respect to their rate memory and length scale. In polymeric and low molar mass glass formers of different fragility, length scales in the range 2 to 4 nm are observed. In polymeric systems, incompatibility of backbone and side groups as in polyalkylmethacrylates leads to heteogeneities on the nm scale, which manifest themselves in unusual chain dynamics at the glass transition involving extended chain conformations. References: K. Schmidt-Rohr and H.W. Spiess, Multidimensional Solid-State NMR and Polymers,Academic Press, London (1994). U. Tracht, M. Wilhelm, A. Heuer, H. Feng, K. Schmidt-Rohr, H.W. Spiess, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2727 (1998). S.A. Reinsberg, X.H. Qiu, M. Wilhelm, M.D. Ediger, H.W. Spiess, J.Chem.Phys. 114, 7299 (2001). S.A. Reinsberg, A. Heuer, B. Doliwa, H. Zimmermann, H.W. Spiess, J. Non-Crystal. Solids, in press (2002)

  7. NMR of fd coat protein.

    PubMed

    Cross, T A; Opella, S J

    1979-01-01

    The conformations of the major coat protein of a filamentous bacteriophage can be described by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the protein and the virus. The NMR experiments involve detection of the 13C and 1H nuclei of the coat protein. Both the 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra show that regions of the polypeptide chain have substantially more motion than a typical globular protein. The fd coat protein was purified by gel chromatography of the SDA solubilized virus. Natural abundance 13C NMR spectra at 38 MHz resolve all of the nonprotonated aromatic carbons from the three phenylalanines, two tyrosines, and one tryptophan of the coat protein. The alpha carbons of the coat protein show at least two different classes of relaxation behavior, indicative of substantial variation in the motion of the backbone carbons in contrast to the rigidity of the alpha carbons of globular proteins. The 1H spectrum at 360 MHz shows all of the aromatic carbons and many of the amide protons. Titration of a 1H spectra gives the pKas for the tyrosines.

  8. NMR-Based Milk Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Sundekilde, Ulrik K.; Larsen, Lotte B.; Bertram, Hanne C.

    2013-01-01

    Milk is a key component in infant nutrition worldwide and, in the Western parts of the world, also in adult nutrition. Milk of bovine origin is both consumed fresh and processed into a variety of dairy products including cheese, fermented milk products, and infant formula. The nutritional quality and processing capabilities of bovine milk is closely associated to milk composition. Metabolomics is ideal in the study of the low-molecular-weight compounds in milk, and this review focuses on the recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics trends in milk research, including applications linking the milk metabolite profiling with nutritional aspects, and applications which aim to link the milk metabolite profile to various technological qualities of milk. The metabolite profiling studies encompass the identification of novel metabolites, which potentially can be used as biomarkers or as bioactive compounds. Furthermore, metabolomics applications elucidating how the differential regulated genes affects milk composition are also reported. This review will highlight the recent advances in NMR-based metabolomics on milk, as well as give a brief summary of when NMR spectroscopy can be useful for gaining a better understanding of how milk composition is linked to nutritional or quality traits. PMID:24957988

  9. In-cell NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Serber, Zach; Corsini, Lorenzo; Durst, Florian; Dötsch, Volker

    2005-01-01

    The role of a protein inside a cell is determined by both its location and its conformational state. Although fluorescence techniques are widely used to determine the cellular localization of proteins in vivo, these approaches cannot provide detailed information about a protein's three-dimensional state. This gap, however, can be filled by NMR spectroscopy, which can be used to investigate both the conformation as well as the dynamics of proteins inside living cells. In this chapter we describe technical aspects of these "in-cell NMR" experiments. In particular, we show that in the case of (15)N-labeling schemes the background caused by labeling all cellular components is negligible, while (13)C-based experiments suffer from high background levels and require selective labeling schemes. A correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio of in-cell NMR experiments with the overexpression level of the protein shows that the current detection limit is 150-200 muM (intracellular concentration). We also discuss experiments that demonstrate that the intracellular viscosity is not a limiting factor since the intracellular rotational correlation time is only approximately two times longer than the correlation time in water. Furthermore, we describe applications of the technique and discuss its limitations. PMID:15808216

  10. A General Method for Extracting Individual Coupling Constants from Crowded (1)H NMR Spectra.

    PubMed

    Sinnaeve, Davy; Foroozandeh, Mohammadali; Nilsson, Mathias; Morris, Gareth A

    2016-01-18

    Couplings between protons, whether scalar or dipolar, provide a wealth of structural information. Unfortunately, the high number of (1)H-(1)H couplings gives rise to complex multiplets and severe overlap in crowded spectra, greatly complicating their measurement. Many different methods exist for disentangling couplings, but none approaches optimum resolution. Here, we present a general new 2D J-resolved method, PSYCHEDELIC, in which all homonuclear couplings are suppressed in F2, and only the couplings to chosen spins appear, as simple doublets, in F1. This approaches the theoretical limit for resolving (1)H-(1)H couplings, with close to natural linewidths and with only chemical shifts in F2. With the same high sensitivity and spectral purity as the parent PSYCHE pure shift experiment, PSYCHEDELIC offers a robust method for chemists seeking to exploit couplings for structural, conformational, or stereochemical analyses.

  11. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-08-19

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm(2) silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  12. Advanced NMR technology for bioscience and biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Hernandez, G.; Trewhella, J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Boumenthal, D.K.; Kennedy, M.A.; Moore, G.J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NMR plays critical roles in bioscience and biotechnology in both imaging and structure determination. NMR is limited, however, by the inherent low sensitivity of the NMR experiment and the demands for spectral resolution required to study biomolecules. The authors addressed both of these issues by working on the development of NMR force microscopy for molecular imaging, and high field NMR with isotope labeling to overcome limitations in the size of biomolecules that can be studied using NMR. A novel rf coil design for NMR force microscopy was developed that increases the limits of sensitivity in magnetic resonance detection for imaging, and the authors demonstrated sub-surface spatial imaging capabilities. The authors also made advances in the miniaturization of two critical NMR force microscope components. They completed high field NMR and isotope labeling studies of a muscle protein complex which is responsible for regulating muscle contraction and is too large for study using conventional NMR approaches.

  13. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination. Part II: Pulse NMR and NMR Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Uses simple pulse NMR experiments to discuss Fourier transforms. Studies the generation of spin echoes used in the imaging procedure. Shows that pulse NMR experiments give signals that are additions of sinusoids of differing amplitudes, frequencies, and phases. (MVL)

  14. Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: combining NMR with NIR, GPC/SEC and rheometry.

    PubMed

    Räntzsch, Volker; Wilhelm, Manfred; Guthausen, Gisela

    2016-06-01

    Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques are promising characterization methods for online process analytics and comprehensive offline studies of soft materials. By combining different analytical methods with low-field NMR, information on chemical and physical properties can be correlated with molecular dynamics and complementary chemical information. In this review, we present three hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: a combination of near-infrared spectroscopy and time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) relaxometry, online (1) H-NMR spectroscopy measured directly after size exclusion chromatographic (SEC, also known as GPC) separation and a combination of rheometry and TD-NMR relaxometry for highly viscous materials. Case studies are reviewed that underline the possibilities and challenges of the different hyphenated low-field NMR methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  16. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  17. Solution structure of an analogue of vasoactive intestinal peptide as determined by two-dimensional NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopies and constrained molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.C.; Madison, V.S.; Bolin, D.R.; Greeley, D.N.; Toome, V.; Wegrzynski, B.B. )

    1989-03-21

    Structures have been determined for a potent analogue (VIP') of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in methanol/water solutions. In CD studies, both VIP and VIP' were helical in methanol/water, with the percentage of {alpha}-helix increasing with percentage methanol. The pH had little effect on the structure. Complete {sup 1}H NMR assignments were made for VIP' in 25% methanol at pH 4 and 6 and in 50% methanol at pH 6, using two-dimensional COSY, NOESY, and relay-COSY experiments. There were no widespread changes in chemical shifts between the samples at pH 4 and 6; however, widespread changes were observed between the samples in 25% and 50% methanol. Complete sets of NOEs were obtained for VIP' in 25% methanol, pH 4, and in 50% methanol, pH 6. These NOEs were converted into distance constraints and applied in molecular dynamics and energy minimization calculations using the program CHARMM. A set of low-energy structures was obtained for VIP' in each solvent system. In 25% methanol, VIP' has two helical segments at residues 9-17 and 23-28. The remainder of the structure is not well determined. In 50% methanol, residues 8-26 form a regular, well-defined {alpha}-helix and residues 5-8 form a type III {beta}-turn. The remaining residues are not ordered. These structural assessments agree with the CD data. In the lowest energy structure in 50% methanol, the side chains of Asp{sup 3}, Phe{sup 6}, Thr{sup 7}, and Tyr{sup 10} are clustered together--these residues are conserved throughout the family of peptide hormones homologous to VIP.

  18. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R. ); Wind, Robert A. )

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  19. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  20. Picoliter 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minard, Kevin R.; Wind, Robert A.

    2002-02-01

    In this study, a 267-μm-diameter solenoid transceiver is used to acquire localized 1H NMR spectra and the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at 500 MHz is shown to be within 20-30% of theoretical limits formulated by considering only its resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-μm-diameter globule of triacylglycerols (∼900 mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus laevis frogs and a water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live mammalian cells (∼33 mM). In chemical shift imaging (CSI) experiments performed using a few thousand total scans, the choline methyl line is shown to have an acceptable SNR in resolved volume elements containing only 50 pL of sample, and localized spectra are resolved from just 5 pL in the Xenopus globule. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of performing 1H NMR on picoliter-scale sample volumes in biological cells and tissues and illustrate how the achieved SNR in spectroscopic images can be predicted with reasonable accuracy at microscopic spatial resolutions.

  1. Analytical Applications of NMR: Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1982-01-01

    Highlights a symposium on analytical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), discussing pulse Fourier transformation technique, two-dimensional NMR, solid state NMR, and multinuclear NMR. Includes description of ORACLE, an NMR data processing system at Syracuse University using real-time color graphics, and algorithms for…

  2. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which spectral…

  3. Determination and identification of estrogenic compounds generated with biosynthetic enzymes using hyphenated screening assays, high resolution mass spectrometry and off-line NMR.

    PubMed

    de Vlieger, Jon S B; Kolkman, Ard J; Ampt, Kirsten A M; Commandeur, Jan N M; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Kool, Jeroen; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Niessen, Wilfried M A; Irth, Hubertus; Honing, Maarten

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes the determination and identification of active and inactive estrogenic compounds produced by biosynthetic methods. A hyphenated screening assay towards the human estrogen receptor ligand binding domain (hER)alpha and hERbeta integrating target-ligand interactions and liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry was used. With this approach, information on both biologic activity and structure identity of compounds produced by bacterial mutants of cytochrome P450s was obtained in parallel. Initial structure identification was achieved by high resolution MS/MS, while for full structure determination, P450 incubations were scaled up and the produced entities were purified using preparative liquid chromatography with automated fraction collection. NMR spectroscopy was performed on all fractions for 3D structure analysis; this included 1D-(1)H, 2D-COSY, 2D-NOESY, and (1)H-(13)C-HSQC experiments. This multidimensional screening approach enabled the detection of low abundant biotransformation products which were not suitable for detection in either one of its single components. In total, the analytical scale biosynthesis produced over 85 compounds from 6 different starting templates. Inter- and intra-day variation of the biochemical signals in the dual receptor affinity detection system was less than 5%. The multi-target screening approach combined with full structure characterization based on high resolution MS(/MS) and NMR spectroscopy demonstrated in this paper can generally be applied to e.g. metabolism studies and compound-library screening.

  4. Enzyme dynamics from NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Arthur G

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Biological activities of enzymes, including regulation or coordination of mechanistic stages preceding or following the chemical step, may depend upon kinetic or equilibrium changes in protein conformations. Exchange of more open or flexible conformational states with more closed or constrained states can influence inhibition, allosteric regulation, substrate recognition, formation of the Michaelis complex, side reactions, and product release. NMR spectroscopy has long been applied to the study of conformational dynamic processes in enzymes because these phenomena can be characterized over multiple time scales with atomic site resolution. Laboratory-frame spin-relaxation measurements, sensitive to reorientational motions on picosecond-nanosecond time scales, and rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion measurements, sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond-millisecond time scales, provide information on both conformational distributions and kinetics. This Account reviews NMR spin relaxation studies of the enzymes ribonuclease HI from mesophilic (Escherichia coli) and thermophilic (Thermus thermophilus) bacteria, E. coli AlkB, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae triosephosphate isomerase to illustrate the contributions of conformational flexibility and dynamics to diverse steps in enzyme mechanism. Spin relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the bacterial ribonuclease H enzymes show that the handle region, one of three loop regions that interact with substrates, interconverts between two conformations. Comparison of these conformations with the structure of the complex between Homo sapiens ribonuclease H and a DNA:RNA substrate suggests that the more closed state is inhibitory to binding. The large population of the closed conformation in T. thermophilus ribonuclease H contributes to the increased Michaelis constant compared with the E. coli enzyme. NMR spin relaxation and fluorescence spectroscopy have characterized a

  5. Enzyme Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Biological activities of enzymes, including regulation or coordination of mechanistic stages preceding or following the chemical step, may depend upon kinetic or equilibrium changes in protein conformations. Exchange of more open or flexible conformational states with more closed or constrained states can influence inhibition, allosteric regulation, substrate recognition, formation of the Michaelis complex, side reactions, and product release. NMR spectroscopy has long been applied to the study of conformational dynamic processes in enzymes because these phenomena can be characterized over multiple time scales with atomic site resolution. Laboratory-frame spin-relaxation measurements, sensitive to reorientational motions on picosecond–nanosecond time scales, and rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion measurements, sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond–millisecond time scales, provide information on both conformational distributions and kinetics. This Account reviews NMR spin relaxation studies of the enzymes ribonuclease HI from mesophilic (Escherichia coli) and thermophilic (Thermus thermophilus) bacteria, E. coli AlkB, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae triosephosphate isomerase to illustrate the contributions of conformational flexibility and dynamics to diverse steps in enzyme mechanism. Spin relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the bacterial ribonuclease H enzymes show that the handle region, one of three loop regions that interact with substrates, interconverts between two conformations. Comparison of these conformations with the structure of the complex between Homo sapiens ribonuclease H and a DNA:RNA substrate suggests that the more closed state is inhibitory to binding. The large population of the closed conformation in T. thermophilus ribonuclease H contributes to the increased Michaelis constant compared with the E. coli enzyme. NMR spin relaxation and fluorescence spectroscopy have characterized a

  6. Dihydrofolate reductase: Sequential resonance assignments using 2D and 3D NMR and secondary structure determination in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, M.D.; Birdsall, B.; Jimenez-Barbero, J.; Polshakov, V.I.; McCormick, J.E.; Feeney, J.; Frenkiel, T.A.; Bauer, C.J. ); Roberts, G.C.K. )

    1991-06-25

    Three-dimensional (3D) heteronuclear NMR techniques have been used to make sequential {sup 1}H and {sup 15}H resonance assignments for most of the residues of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a monomeric protein of molecular mass 18,300 Da. A uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled sample of the protein was prepared and its complex with methotrexate (MTX) studied by 3D {sup 15}N/{sup 1}H nuclear Overhauserheteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (NOESY-HMQC), Harmann-Hahn-heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HOHAHA-HMQC), and HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiments. These experiments overcame most of the spectral overlap problems caused by chemical shift degeneracies in 2D spectra and allowed the {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H through-space and through-bond connectivities to be identified unambiguously, leading to the resonance assignments. The novel HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiment allows NOE cross peaks to be detected between NH protons even when their {sup 1}H chemical shifts are degenerate as long as the amide {sup 15}N chemical shifts are nondegenerate. The 3D experiments, in combination with conventional 2D NOESY, COSY, and HOHAHA experiments on unlabelled and selectively deuterated DHFR, provide backbone assignments for 146 of the 162 residues and side-chain assignments for 104 residues of the protein. Data from the NOE-based experiments and identification of the slowly exchanging amide protons provide detailed information about the secondary structure of the binary complex of the protein with methotrexate.

  7. Spatially Localized, One- and Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy and in VivoApplication to Human Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris

    1996-11-01

    The localized1H MR spectrum of human muscle has recently been reported to feature unassigned, orientation-dependent resonance lines. For their characterizationin vivo,various NMR techniques were combined with 3D spatial localization: 2D-J spectroscopy, zero-quantum- and Zeeman-order-filtering, double-quantum-filtering, 2D-constant-time COSY, dipolar-order filtering, and 2D-longitudinal-order separated spectroscopy. The successful implementation of these methods on a whole-body MR system and their application to study human subjects is described.1H MR spectra of human muscle were found to feature residual dipolar couplings and anisotropic susceptibilities which render resonance frequencies, phases, and-with some sequences-signal intensities orientation dependent. Two of the unidentified resonances unequivocally form a dipolar doublet of two equivalent protons, centered at 3.93 ppm. All unknown as well as previously assigned peaks in the range between 2.7 and 3.6 ppm are either subject to dipolar coupling themselves or overlap with spectral contributions of metabolites involved in dipolar coupling. The methyl protons of creatine are likely to be subject to residual dipolar coupling and do therefore form a dipolar triplet and not a singlet as previously assumed. Finally, X3, a further unidentified peak at 3.5 ppm, appears to be part of a multiplet with its center at 3.3 ppm and overlapping the trimethylammonium resonance.

  8. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  9. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  10. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  11. Using Cloud Storage for NMR Data Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soulsby, David

    2012-01-01

    An approach using Google Groups as method for distributing student-acquired NMR data has been implemented. We describe how to configure NMR spectrometer software so that data is uploaded to a laboratory section specific Google Group, thereby removing bottlenecks associated with printing and processing at the spectrometer workstation. Outside of…

  12. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  13. Structure, chemical bonding, and 45Sc solid state NMR of Sc 2RuSi 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmening, Thomas; Al Alam, Adel; Matar, Samir F.; Eckert, Hellmut; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2009-07-01

    The silicide Sc 2RuSi 2 was synthesized from the elements by arc-melting. The structure was refined on the basis of single crystal X-ray diffractometer data: Zr 2CoSi 2 type, C2/ m, a = 1004.7 (2), b = 406.8 (1), c = 946.6 (2) pm, β = 117.95 (2), w R2 = 0.0230, 743 F2 values, and 32 variables. The structure consists of a rigid three-dimensional [RuSi 2] network in which the two crystallographically independent scandium atoms fill larger cages of coordination numbers 16 and 15, respectively. The [RuSi 2] network shows short Ru-Si distances (234-247 pm) and two different Si 2 pairs: Si1-Si1 at 247 and Si2-Si2 at 243 pm. Each silicon atom has trigonal prismatic Sc 6 (for Si2) or Sc 4Ru 2 (for Si1) coordination. These building units are condensed via common edges and faces. The various Sc-Sc distances between the prisms range from 327 to 361 pm. From electronic structure investigation within DFT, chemical bonding shows a major role of Ru-Si bonding and the presence of strong electron localization around Si-Si pairs pointing to a polyanionic silicide network [RuSi 2] δ-. The 45Sc MAS-NMR spectra recorded at 11.7 and 9.4 T clearly resolve the two distinct scandium sites. The large electric field gradients present at both scandium sites result in typical line shapes arising from second-order quadrupole perturbation effects.

  14. NMR and MRI apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Myers, Whittier; McDermott, Robert; ten Haken, Bernard; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas

    2007-03-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. Additional signal to noise benefits are obtained by use of a low noise polarization coil, comprising litz wire or superconducting materials. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  15. Preprocessing of NMR metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Euceda, Leslie R; Giskeødegård, Guro F; Bathen, Tone F

    2015-05-01

    Metabolomics involves the large scale analysis of metabolites and thus, provides information regarding cellular processes in a biological sample. Independently of the analytical technique used, a vast amount of data is always acquired when carrying out metabolomics studies; this results in complex datasets with large amounts of variables. This type of data requires multivariate statistical analysis for its proper biological interpretation. Prior to multivariate analysis, preprocessing of the data must be carried out to remove unwanted variation such as instrumental or experimental artifacts. This review aims to outline the steps in the preprocessing of NMR metabolomics data and describe some of the methods to perform these. Since using different preprocessing methods may produce different results, it is important that an appropriate pipeline exists for the selection of the optimal combination of methods in the preprocessing workflow.

  16. Isolation and characterization of degradation products of moxidectin using LC, LTQ FT-MS, H/D exchange and NMR.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Atul; Razzak, Majid; Al-Kassas, Raida; Greenwood, David R; Harvey, Joanne; Garg, Sanjay

    2012-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the degradation profile and pathways, and identify unknown impurities of moxidectin under stress conditions. During the experiments, moxidectin samples were stressed using acid, alkali, heat and oxidation, and chromatographic profiles were compared with known impurities given in European Pharmacopeia (EP) monograph. Moxidectin has shown good stability under heat, while reaction with alkali produced 2-epi and ∆2,3 isomers (impurities D and E in EP) by characteristic reactions of the oxahydrindene (hexahydrobenzofuran) portion of the macrocyclic lactone. Two new, previously unreported, unknown degradation products, i.e. impurity 1 and impurity 2, detected after acid hydrolysis of moxidectin (impurity 2 was also observed to a lesser extent after oxidation), were isolated from sample matrices and identified using liquid chromatography, NMR, high-resolution FT-ICR MS, and hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies. FTMS analysis showed accurate mass of molecular ion peaks for moxidectin at m/z 640.38412, impurity 1 at m/z 656.37952 and impurity 2 at m/z 611.35684, giving rise to daughter ions traceable up to the seventh levels of MS(n) experiments and supporting the proposed structures. Both unknown impurities along with moxidectin were fully characterized by (1)H, (13)C, 1D HMBC and 2D (NOESY, COSY and HSQC) NMR experiments. The interpretation of experimental data positively identified impurity 1 as 3,4-epoxy-moxidectin and impurity 2 as 23-keto-nemadectin. The identification of new impurities and correlation of their chromatographic profiles with the EP method is very useful to establish the stability profile of moxidectin and its preparations, as well as add value to the forthcoming moxidectin finished product European Pharmacopeia monographs. PMID:22986987

  17. A new anthraquinone and eight constituents from Hedyotis caudatifolia Merr. et Metcalf: isolation, purification and structural identification.

    PubMed

    Luo, Peng; Su, Jiale; Zhu, Yilin; Wei, Jianhua; Wei, Wanxing; Pan, Weigao

    2016-10-01

    Hedyotis caudatifolia Merr. et Metcalf. (HC), a folk medicine in Yao nationalities areas in China, was used to investigate the chemical constituents. Through silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, nine compounds were isolated and purified. By physical and chemical properties, IR, MS (EI-MS, high resolution EI-MS), 1D NMR ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR) and 2D NMR (HSQC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HMBC), their structures were identified as β-sitosterol (1), stigmasterol (2), scopolin (3), 2-hydroxy-1,7,8-trimethoxyanthracene-9,10-dione (4), oleanolic acid (5), ursolic acid (6), methyl barbinervate (7), β-daucosterol (8) and p-Hydroxybenzoic acid (9). These compounds were isolated from HC for the first time, and 4 a new anthraquinone whose biological activities are worth to be investigated in future. These compounds may contribute to the HC's pharmacological effects on treating diseases, and may be used as candidates for control index in establishing the quality control standard of HC.

  18. A new anthraquinone and eight constituents from Hedyotis caudatifolia Merr. et Metcalf: isolation, purification and structural identification.

    PubMed

    Luo, Peng; Su, Jiale; Zhu, Yilin; Wei, Jianhua; Wei, Wanxing; Pan, Weigao

    2016-10-01

    Hedyotis caudatifolia Merr. et Metcalf. (HC), a folk medicine in Yao nationalities areas in China, was used to investigate the chemical constituents. Through silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, nine compounds were isolated and purified. By physical and chemical properties, IR, MS (EI-MS, high resolution EI-MS), 1D NMR ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR) and 2D NMR (HSQC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HMBC), their structures were identified as β-sitosterol (1), stigmasterol (2), scopolin (3), 2-hydroxy-1,7,8-trimethoxyanthracene-9,10-dione (4), oleanolic acid (5), ursolic acid (6), methyl barbinervate (7), β-daucosterol (8) and p-Hydroxybenzoic acid (9). These compounds were isolated from HC for the first time, and 4 a new anthraquinone whose biological activities are worth to be investigated in future. These compounds may contribute to the HC's pharmacological effects on treating diseases, and may be used as candidates for control index in establishing the quality control standard of HC. PMID:27027701

  19. Molecular dynamics and information on possible sites of interaction of intramyocellular metabolites in vivo from resolved dipolar couplings in localized 1H NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Leif; Schmitz, Christian; Bachert, Peter

    2004-12-01

    Proton NMR resonances of the endogenous metabolites creatine and phosphocreatine ((P)Cr), taurine (Tau), and carnosine (Cs, β-alanyl- L-histidine) were studied with regard to residual dipolar couplings and molecular mobility. We present an analysis of the direct 1H- 1H interaction that provides information on motional reorientation of subgroups in these molecules in vivo. For this purpose, localized 1H NMR experiments were performed on m. gastrocnemius of healthy volunteers using a 1.5-T clinical whole-body MR scanner. We evaluated the observable dipolar coupling strength SD0 ( S = order parameter) of the (P)Cr-methyl triplet and the Tau-methylene doublet by means of the apparent line splitting. These were compared to the dipolar coupling strength of the (P)Cr-methylene doublet. In contrast to the aliphatic protons of (P)Cr and Tau, the aromatic H2 ( δ = 8 ppm) and H4 ( δ = 7 ppm) protons of the imidazole ring of Cs exhibit second-order spectra at 1.5 T. This effect is the consequence of incomplete transition from Zeeman to Paschen-Back regime and allows a determination of SD0 from H2 and H4 of Cs as an alternative to evaluating the multiplet splitting which can be measured directly in high-resolution 1H NMR spectra. Experimental data showed striking differences in the mobility of the metabolites when the dipolar coupling constant D0 (calculated with the internuclear distance known from molecular geometry in the case of complete absence of molecular dynamics and motion) is used for comparison. The aliphatic signals involve very small order parameters S ≈ (1.4 - 3) × 10 -4 indicating rapid reorientation of the corresponding subgroups in these metabolites. In contrast, analysis of the Cs resonances yielded S ≈ (113 - 137) × 10 -4. Thus, the immobilization of the Cs imidazole ring owing to an anisotropic cellular substructure in human m. gastrocnemius is much more effective than for (P)Cr and Tau subgroups. Furthermore, 1H NMR experiments on aqueous model

  20. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP).

  1. An Introduction to Biological NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  2. Saturation transfer difference NMR for fragment screening.

    PubMed

    Begley, Darren W; Moen, Spencer O; Pierce, Phillip G; Zartler, Edward R

    2013-01-01

    Fragment screening by saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) is a robust method for identifying small molecule binders and is well suited to a broad set of biological targets. STD-NMR is exquisitely sensitive for detecting weakly binding compounds (a common characteristic of fragments), which is a crucial step in finding promising compounds for a fragment-based drug discovery campaign. This protocol describes the development of a library suitable for STD-NMR fragment screening, as well as preparation of protein samples, optimization of experimental conditions, and procedures for data collection and analysis. PMID:24391096

  3. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  4. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Wong, G P; Hoffmann, D; Hurlimann, M D; Patz, S; Schwartz, L M; Walsworth, R L

    1999-10-18

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks. PMID:11543587

  5. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  6. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Wong, G. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Patz, S.; Schwartz, L. M.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks.

  7. NMR mechanisms in gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, L. J.

    2009-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance was critical to the development of gel dosimetry, as it established the potential for three dimensional dosimetry with chemical dosimeter systems through magnetic resonance imaging [1]. In the last two decades MRI has served as the gold standard for imaging, while NMR relaxometry has played an important role in the development and understanding of the behaviour of new gel dosimetry systems. Therefore, an appreciation of the relaxation mechanisms determining the NMR behaviour of irradiated gel dosimeters is important for a full comprehension of a considerable component of the literature on gel dosimetry. A number of excellent papers have presented this important theory, this brief review will highlight some of the salient points made previously [1-5]. The spin relaxation of gel dosimeters (which determines the dose dependence in most conventional MR imaging) is determined principally by the protons on water molecules in the system. These water protons exist in different environments, or groups (see Figure 1): on bulk water, on water hydrating the chemical species that are being modified under irradiation, and on water hydrating the gel matrix used to spatially stabilize the dosimeter (e.g., gelatin, agarose, etc). The spin relaxation depends on the inherent relaxation rate of each spin group, that is, on the relaxation rate which would be observed for the specific group if it were isolated. Also, the different water environments are not isolated from each other, and the observed relaxation rate also depends on the rate of exchange of magnetization between the groups, and on the fraction of protons in each group. In fact, the water exchanges quickly between the environments, so that relaxation is in what is usually termed the fast exchange regime. In the limit of fast exchange, the relaxation of the water protons is well characterized by a single exponential and hence by a single apparent relaxation rate. In irradiated gel dosimeters this

  8. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of super-stable rhenium(V)porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichan, N. G.; Tyulyaeva, E. Yu.; Khodov, I. A.; Lomova, T. N.

    2014-03-01

    The preparation of rhenium(V) porphyrin complexes {μ-oxo-bis[(oxo)(5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphinato)rhenium(V)] [OReTPP]2O (1), (oxo)(phenoxo)(2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethyl-5-monophenyl-21H,23H-porphinato)rhenium(V) ORe(PhO)MPOEP (2), (cloro)(oxo)(2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethyl-5,15-diphenyl-21H,23H-porphinato)rhenium(V) ORe(Cl)5,15DPOEP (4), and (oxo)(phenoxo)(2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethyl-21H,23H-porphinato)rhenium(V) ORe(PhO)OEP (5)} by the interaction of H2ReCl6 with corresponding porphyrin in boiling phenol is described. (Cloro)(oxo)(2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethyl-5-monophenyl-21H,23H-porphinato)rhenium(V) ORe(Cl)MPOEP (3) and (oxo)(chloro)(2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethyl-21H,23H-porphinato)rhenium(V) ORe(Cl)OEP (6) have been prepared by the reaction of axial-ligand substitution from (2) and (5), respectively. Compounds (2-4) were newly synthesized. Characterization of the compounds (1-6) reported herein was made mainly by UV-Visible, IR, 1Н NMR, 1H1H 2D COSY, 1H1H 2D DOSY, 1H1H 2D ROESY, 1H1H 2D TOCSY spectroscopic techniques and elemental analysis. The stability of the complexes in solutions when exposed to strong acids at the presence of atmospheric oxygen has been estimated. Compounds (2-4) and (6) show them super-stable since they do not undergo dissociation along MN bonds in concentrated H2SO4 under heating up to 363 K. Compounds (3) and (4) undergo one-electron oxidation to form stable π-cation radicals ORe(HSO)P under these conditions. The products of the reaction between all studied porphyrins and concentrated H2SO4 were isolated in CHCl3 by reprecipitation onto ice and proved to be rhenium(V) complexes ORe(HSO4)P.

  9. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment.

    PubMed

    Jang, Richard; Wang, Yan; Xue, Zhidong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates allows NMR-I-TASSER to sample different topologies while convergence to a single structure is not required. Retroactive and blind tests of the CASD-NMR targets from Rounds 1 and 2 demonstrate that even without using NOE peak lists I-TASSER can generate correct structure topology with 15 of 20 targets having a TM-score above 0.5. With the addition of NOE-based distance restraints, NMR-I-TASSER significantly improved the I-TASSER models with all models having the TM-score above 0.5. The average RMSD was reduced from 5.29 to 2.14 Å in Round 1 and 3.18 to 1.71 Å in Round 2. There is no obvious difference in the modeling results with using raw and refined peak lists, indicating robustness of the pipeline to the NOE assignment errors. Overall, despite the low-resolution modeling the current NMR-I-TASSER pipeline provides a coarse-grained structure folding approach complementary to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, which can produce fast near-native frameworks for atomic-level structural refinement.

  10. Secondary structure and side-chain sup 1 H and sup 13 C resonance assignments of calmodulin in solution by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Spera, S.; Barbato, G.; Kay, L.E.; Bax, A. ); Krinks, M. )

    1991-09-24

    Heteronuclear 2D and 3D NMR experiments were carried out on recombinant Drosophila calmodulin (CaM), a protein of 148 residues and with molecular mass of 16.7 kDa, that is uniformly labeled with {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C to a level of > 95%. Nearly complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C side-chain assignments for all amino acid residues are obtained by using the 3D HCCH-COSY and HCCH-TOCSY experiments that rely on large heteronuclear one-bond scalar couplings to transfer magnetization and establish through-bond connectivities. The secondary structure of this protein in solution has been elucidated by a qualitative interpretation of nuclear Overhauser effects, hydrogen exchange data, and {sup 3}J{sub HNH{alpha}} coupling constants. A clear correlation between the {sup 13}C{alpha} chemical shift and secondary structure is found. The secondary structure in the two globular domains of Drosophila CaM in solution is essentially identical with that of the X-ray crystal structure of mammalian CaM which consists of two pairs of a helix-loop-helix motif in each globular domain. The existence of a short antiparallel {beta}-sheet between the two loops in each domain has been confirmed. The eight {alpha}-helix segments identified from the NMR data are located at Glu-6 to Phe-19, thr-29 to Ser-38, Glu-45 to Glu-54, Phe-65 to Lys-77, Glu-82 to Asp-93, Ala-102 to Asn-111, Asp-118 to Glu-127, and Tyr-138 to Thr-146. Although the crystal structure has a long central helix from Phe-65 to Phe-92 that connects the two globular domains, NMR data indicate that residues Asp-78 to Ser-81 of this central helix adopt a nonhelical conformation with considerable flexibility.

  11. Imaging of complex NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Harrison, C G; Adams, D F; Kramer, P B

    1985-01-01

    The Point Spread Function (PSF) in NMR imaging is the result of both the line broadening due to magnet field inhomogeneity and the intrinsic spectrum of the nucleus at resonance. In the case of proton imaging, the line broadening dominates the small chemical shifts and the spectral lines are not resolved. This is not generally the case with other nuclei having strong chemical shifts and the PSF then has a complex structure. During imaging, the complex PSF is convolved with the spatial distribution of the nucleus at resonance and this leads to halo artifacts which are dependent on the imaging technique employed. The images due to the ensemble of spectral lines can be separated in principle by deconvolution of the data with the PSF before reconstruction. In the special case where the complex PSF is spatially independent, it can be obtained from the Free Induction Decay (FID) data produced in the absence of a spatially encoding gradient field. This technique has been successfully applied to in-vivo imaging of exogenous perfluorocarbon material. PMID:3988470

  12. NMR-Assisted Molecular Docking Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Sturlese, Mattia; Bellanda, Massimo; Moro, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular docking are regularly being employed as helpful tools of drug discovery research. Molecular docking is an extremely rapid method to evaluate possible binders from a large chemical library in a fast and cheap manner. NMR techniques can directly detect a protein-ligand interaction, can determine the corresponding association constant, and can consistently identify the ligand binding cavity. Consequently, molecular docking and NMR techniques are naturally complementary techniques where the combination of the two has the potential to improve the overall efficiency of drug discovery process. In this review, we would like to summarize the state of the art of docking methods which have been recently bridged to NMR experiments to identify novel and effective therapeutic drug candidates.

  13. A New Microcell Technique for NMR Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Sophia J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a new laboratory technique for working with small samples of compounds used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Demonstrates how microcells can be constructed for each experiment and samples can be recycled. (TW)

  14. NMR-Assisted Molecular Docking Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Sturlese, Mattia; Bellanda, Massimo; Moro, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular docking are regularly being employed as helpful tools of drug discovery research. Molecular docking is an extremely rapid method to evaluate possible binders from a large chemical library in a fast and cheap manner. NMR techniques can directly detect a protein-ligand interaction, can determine the corresponding association constant, and can consistently identify the ligand binding cavity. Consequently, molecular docking and NMR techniques are naturally complementary techniques where the combination of the two has the potential to improve the overall efficiency of drug discovery process. In this review, we would like to summarize the state of the art of docking methods which have been recently bridged to NMR experiments to identify novel and effective therapeutic drug candidates. PMID:27490497

  15. NMR studies of borates and borides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, P. J.

    1986-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been employed for some 25 years to study the structure of boron-containing compounds.1-3 The earliest works employed the 11B nuclear isotope in a study of glasses containing boron oxide. Many additional NMR studies3-10 of boron-containing glasses have utilized both the 11B and 10B isotopes. Crystalline materials were also studied2,3 at an early date, with particular attention given to borides and boron carbide. After a discussion of the features of NMR spectroscopy particularly pertinent for the study of boron-containing compounds, highlights of the early work and more recent studies will be summarized to indicate the usefulness of 10B and 11B NMR for structural studies.

  16. Solvent signal as an NMR concentration reference.

    PubMed

    Mo, Huaping; Raftery, Daniel

    2008-12-15

    We propose that the NMR solvent signal be utilized as a universal concentration reference because most solvents can be observed by NMR and solvent concentrations can be readily calculated or determined independently. In particular, a highly protonated solvent such as water can serve as a primary concentration standard for its stability, availability, and ease of observation. The potential problems of radiation damping associated with a strong NMR signal can be alleviated by small pulse angle excitation. The solvent signal then can be detected by the NMR receiver with the same efficiency as a dilute analyte. We demonstrated that the analyte's proton concentration can be accurately determined from 4 microM to more than 100 M, referenced by solvent (water) protons of concentrations more than 10 M. The proposed method is robust and indifferent to probe tuning and does not require any additional concentration standard.

  17. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  18. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  19. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  20. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  1. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy in a single scan.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-11-01

    Multidimensional NMR has become one of the most widespread spectroscopic tools available to study diverse structural and functional aspects of organic and biomolecules. A main feature of multidimensional NMR is the relatively long acquisition times that these experiments demand. For decades, scientists have been working on a variety of alternatives that would enable NMR to overcome this limitation, and deliver its data in shorter acquisition times. Counting among these methodologies is the so-called ultrafast (UF) NMR approach, which in principle allows one to collect arbitrary multidimensional correlations in a single sub-second transient. By contrast to conventional acquisitions, a main feature of UF NMR is a spatiotemporal manipulation of the spins that imprints the chemical shift and/or J-coupling evolutions being sought, into a spatial pattern. Subsequent gradient-based manipulations enable the reading out of this information and its multidimensional correlation into patterns that are identical to those afforded by conventional techniques. The current review focuses on the fundamental principles of this spatiotemporal UF NMR manipulation, and on a few of the methodological extensions that this form of spectroscopy has undergone during the years. PMID:26249041

  2. 33S NMR cryogenic probe for taurine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    With the goal of a S33 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe applicable to in vivo NMR on taurine-biological samples, we have developed the S33 NMR cryogenic probe, which is applicable to taurine solutions. The NMR sensitivity gain relative to a conventional broadband probe is as large as 3.5. This work suggests that improvements in the preamplifier could allow NMR measurements on 100 μM taurine solutions, which is the level of sensitivity necessary for biological samples.

  3. Achievement of a 920-MHz High Resolution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashi, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Tadashi; Goto, Atsushi; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Shinji; Wada, Hitoshi; Fujito, Teruaki; Hasegawa, Ken-ichi; Yoshikawa, Masatoshi; Miki, Takashi; Ito, Satoshi; Hamada, Mamoru; Hayashi, Seiji

    2002-06-01

    We have developed a 920-MHz NMR system and performed the proton NMR measurement of H 2O and ethylbenzene using the superconducting magnet operating at 21.6 T (920 MHz for proton), which is the highest field produced by a superconducting NMR magnet in the persistent mode. From the NMR measurements, it is verified that both homogeneity and stability of the magnet have a specification sufficient for a high resolution NMR.

  4. Use of NMR and NMR Prediction Software to Identify Components in Red Bull Energy Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre J.; Shirzadi, Azadeh; Burrow, Timothy E.; Dicks, Andrew P.; Lefebvre, Brent; Corrin, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as part of an upper-level undergraduate analytical chemistry course is described. Students investigate two popular soft drinks (Red Bull Energy Drink and sugar-free Red Bull Energy Drink) by NMR spectroscopy. With assistance of modern NMR prediction software they identify and quantify major components in each…

  5. Performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR.

    PubMed

    van der Schot, Gijs; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-08-01

    We present here the performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR, the critical assessment of automated structure determination by NMR. The CS-Rosetta server uses only chemical shifts for structure prediction, in combination, when available, with a post-scoring procedure based on unassigned NOE lists (Huang et al. in J Am Chem Soc 127:1665-1674, 2005b, doi: 10.1021/ja047109h). We compare the original submissions using a previous version of the server based on Rosetta version 2.6 with recalculated targets using the new R3FP fragment picker for fragment selection and implementing a new annotation of prediction reliability (van der Schot et al. in J Biomol NMR 57:27-35, 2013, doi: 10.1007/s10858-013-9762-6), both implemented in the CS-Rosetta3 WeNMR server. In this second round of CASD-NMR, the WeNMR CS-Rosetta server has demonstrated a much better performance than in the first round since only converged targets were submitted. Further, recalculation of all CASD-NMR targets using the new version of the server demonstrates that our new annotation of prediction quality is giving reliable results. Predictions annotated as weak are often found to provide useful models, but only for a fraction of the sequence, and should therefore only be used with caution. PMID:25982706

  6. High-field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertkorn, N.; Harir, M.; Koch, B. P.; Michalke, B.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2013-03-01

    resolution and depicted resolved molecular signatures in excess of a certain minimum abundance. Classical methyl groups terminating aliphatic chains represented ~15% of total methyl in all samples investigated. A noticeable fraction of methyl (~2%) was bound to olefinic carbon. Methyl ethers were abundant in surface marine SPE-DOM, and the chemical diversity of carbohydrates was larger than that of freshwater and soil DOM. In all samples, we identified sp2-hybridized carbon chemical environments with discrimination of isolated and conjugated olefins and α,β-unsaturated double bonds. Olefinic proton and carbon atoms were more abundant than aromatic ones; olefinic unsaturation in marine SPE-DOM will be more directly traceable to ultimate biogenic precursors than aromatic unsaturation. The abundance of furan, pyrrol and thiophene derivatives was marginal, whereas benzene derivatives, phenols and six-membered nitrogen heterocycles were prominent; a yet unassigned set of six-membered N-heterocycles with likely more than one single nitrogen occurred in all samples. Various key polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon substructures suggested the presence of thermogenic organic matter at all water depths. Progressive NMR cross-peak attenuation from surface to deep marine SPE-DOM was particularly strong in COSY NMR spectra and indicated a continual disappearance of biosignatures as well as entropy gain from an ever increased molecular diversity. Nevertheless, a specific near-seafloor SPE-DOM signature of unsaturated molecules recognized in both NMR and Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FTICR/MS) possibly originated from sediment leaching. The conformity of key NMR and FTICR/MS signatures suggested the presence of a large set of identical molecules throughout the entire ocean column even though the investigated water masses belonged to different oceanic regimes and currents. FTICR/MS showed abundant CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS molecular series with slightly increasing numbers

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Roeder, Stephen B. W.; Assink, Roger A.; Gibson, Atholl A. V.

    1986-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  8. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectly predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.

  9. Biotransformation of the antiviral drugs acyclovir and penciclovir in activated sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Prasse, Carsten; Wagner, Manfred; Schulz, Ralf; Ternes, Thomas A

    2011-04-01

    The biotransformation of the two antiviral drugs, acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV), was investigated in contact with activated sludge. Biodegradation kinetics were determined, and transformation products (TPs) were identified using Hybrid Linear Ion Trap- FT Mass Spectrometry (LTQ Orbitrap Velos) and 1D (1H NMR, 13C NMR) and 2D (1H,1H-COSY, 1H-(13)C-HSQC) NMR Spectroscopy. ACV and PCV rapidly dissipated in the activated sludge batch systems with half-lives of 5.3 and 3.4 h and first-order rate constants in relation to the amount of suspended solids (SS) of 4.9±0.1 L gss(-1) d(-1) and 7.6±0.3 L gss(-1) d(-1), respectively. For ACV only a single TP was found, whereas eight TPs were identified for PCV. Structural elucidation of TPs exhibited that transformation only took place at the side chain leaving the guanine moiety unaltered. The oxidation of the primary hydroxyl group in ACV resulted in the formation of carboxy-acyclovir (Carboxy-ACV). For PCV, transformation was more diverse with several enzymatic reactions taking place such as the oxidation of terminal hydroxyl groups and β-oxidation followed by acetate cleavage. Analysis of different environmental samples revealed the presence of Carboxy-ACV in surface and drinking water with concentrations up to 3200 ng L(-1) and 40 ng L(-1), respectively.

  10. Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid mediated anti-oomycete activity of the endophytic Alcaligenes sp. EIL-2 against Phytophthora meadii.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Amith; Philip, Shaji; Jacob, Manoj Kurian; Narayanan, Sunilkumar Puthenpurackel; Jacob, C Kuruvilla; Kochupurackal, Jayachandran

    2015-01-01

    The oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora meadii, causes various diseases in Hevea brasiliensis at different stages of its life cycle. The study reports the structural characterization of the active principle from the culture filtrate of Alcaligenes sp. EIL-2 (GenBank ID: HQ641257) offering antagonistic activity against P. meadii. Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis showed the similarity of the compound with phenazine derivatives. The specific representations of FT-IR spectrum such as 3200 cm(-1) (OH stretching, NH stretching and presence of aromatic ring), 1737 cm(-1) (carboxylic acid), 2200-2400 cm(-1) (conjugated dienes) and 1467 cm(-1), and 1422 cm(-1) (CN bonds) were an indicative of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). The structure of the compound was further confirmed by (1)H NMR/(13)C NMR spectroscopy, DEPT experiments, and two-dimensional NMR spectral studies, including (1)H-(1)H COSY and (1)H-(13)C HSQC as PCA with the molecular formula of C₁₃H₈N₂O₂. P. meadii was sensitive to purified PCA extract from the endophyte and a concentration of 5 μg/ml completely inhibited the mycelia growth. PCA also showed zoosporicidal activity against P. meadii zoospores. This is the first study of this kind where PCA from an endophyte of H. brasiliensis is being confirmed to carry antagonistic activity against P. meadii.

  11. X-ray and DFT Study of Glaucocalyxin A Compound with Cytotoxic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu-dong; Wang, Tao; Wu, An-an; Ding, Lan; Wang, Han-qing

    2009-06-01

    The title compound glaucocalyxin A (1) (7α, 14β-dihydroxy-ent-kaur-16-en-3,15-dione) isolated from the leaves of isodon excisoides was characterized by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, HMQC, HMBC, and EIMS, and its crystal structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The X-ray crystal structure revealed that the molecular backbone of the chosen crystal is a tetracyclic system, including three six-membered rings and a five-membered ring, and the three six-membered rings are in a chair-like conformation. The five-membered ring adopts a twisted envelope-like conformation, and its geometrical parameters were compared with theoretical calculations at the B3LYP and HF level of theory. The molecules form extensive networks through the intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The experimental NMR data were interpreted with the aid of magnetic shielding constant calculations, by means of the GIAO (gauge-lncluding atomic orbitals) method. Calculated and experimental results were compared with a satisfactory level of agreement. Molecular electrostatic potential map was used in an attempt to identify key features of the diterpenoid glaucocalyxin A that is necessary for its activity. Calculations of molecular electrostatic potential and stabilization energies suggest that the protonation of glaucocalyxin A will be able to occur on carbonyl oxygen atoms.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of chitosan alkyl urea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Jiang, Ji-Zhou; Chen, Wei; Bai, Zheng-Wu

    2016-07-10

    Chitosan is a versatile material employed for various purposes in many fields including the development of chiral stationary phases for enantioseparation. Chitosan alkyl urea is a kind of intermediate used to prepare enantioseparation materials. In order to synthesize the intermediates, in the present work, a new way to prepare chitosan alkyl urea has been established: chitosan was first reacted with methyl chloroformate yielding N-methoxyformylated chitosan, which was then converted to chitosan alkyl urea through amine-ester exchange reaction. With a large excess of methyl chloroformate and primary amine of low stereohindrance, the amino group in chitosan could be almost completely converted to ureido group. The as-prepared chitosan alkyl urea derivatives were characterized by IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR,(1)H-(1)H COSY and (1)H-(13)C HSQC NMR spectra. The chemical shifts of hydrogen and carbon atoms of glucose unit were assigned. It was found that the degree of substitution was obviously lower if cyclopropyl amine, aniline, tert-butyl amine and diethyl amine were used as reactants for the amine-ester exchange reaction. The reason was explained with the aid of theoretical calculations.

  13. Synthesis and properties of nonlinear optical chromophore containing alkoxy-substituted phenylene as conjugation bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Yoon, Sung Cheol; Lim, Jong-Sun; Lee, Changjin

    2007-07-01

    We designed and synthesized a push-pull type chromophore (St-TCF) containing phenylene ring as a conjugation bridge. Bulky alkyl chain was substituted into the phenylene bridge to minimize intermolecular interaction of the neighbor molecules and to enhance solubility of the chromophore in solvents and polymer host. The chemical structure and purity were verified by 1H NMR, 1H-1H COSY, 13C NMR, DEPT and Mass spectroscopy. The NMR spectra showed that we obtained the chromophore in a trans conformation. In spite of the bulky alkyl chains, St-TCF exhibited fairly high melting point of 167 °C. The chromophore was thermally stable up to 200 °C in the nitrogen atmosphere. The relatively high melting point and decomposition on-set may be attributable to the rigid phenylene ring. The chromophore was blended with an optically transparent polymer host and then the macroscopic electro-optic activity was evaluated. In a preliminary result, the polymer films containing St-TCF as a concentration of 50 wt% exhibited as large as 20-24 pm/V electro-optic coefficient at 1.55 μ.

  14. New imidazolidineiminothione derivatives: Synthesis, spectral characterization and evaluation of antitumor, antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Ziad; El-Sharief, Marwa A M Sh; Abbas, Samir Y

    2016-10-21

    A series of new imidazolidineiminothione derivatives with various halogenated and alkylated aromatic substituents at N-(1) and at N-(3) was synthesized through the reaction of N-arylcyanothioformamides with arylisocyanate derivatives. Structure of imidazolidineiminothione derivatives were established based on spectroscopic IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, (1)H,(1)H-COSY, HSQC, (19)F NMR, MS and elemental analyses data. Evaluation of antitumor, antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal activities for the synthesized compounds were carried out to probe their activities. Most of the synthesized compounds displayed antitumor activity. The presence of 3,5-dichlorophenyl moiety at N-(1) and trichlorophenyl moiety on N-(3) (2f) resulted the highest cytotoxic activity. The presence of 9H-fluorenyl moiety on N-(3) resulted in the lowest cytotoxic activity. The antiviral screening displayed that 2d and 2f were markedly active against one or two viral strains. Compound 2d (3,5-dichlorophenyl moiety at N-(1) and 4-chlorophenyl moiety on N-(3)) showed 100% antiviral effect toward HAV. Compound 2f showed 96.7% antiviral effect toward HSV1 and 80.3% antiviral effect toward HAV. The antimicrobial activity suggested that all of the imidazolidineiminothione derivatives possess significant antimicrobial activity against most of the test organisms. Some imidazolidineiminothione derivatives showed MIC values of antibacterial and antifungal activities ranged from 0.78 to 6.25 μg/ml.

  15. Salicin derivatives from Salix glandulosa and their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung Sub; Subedi, Lalita; Park, Kyoung Jin; Kim, Sun Yeou; Choi, Sang Un; Kim, Ki Hyun; Lee, Kang Ro

    2015-10-01

    Two new salicin derivatives, saliglandin (1) and 6'-O-(Z)-p-coumaroylsalicin (2), along with fourteen known analogues (3-16) were isolated from the twigs of Salix glandulosa Seemen. The structures of 1-16 were characterized by the use of NMR methods ((1)H and (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC and HMBC), chemical hydrolysis, and GC/MS. The full NMR data assignment of the known compounds 6, 13, and 14 are reported for the first time. Isolated compounds were evaluated for their nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory efficacy in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglial cell (BV-2). Compounds 2, 5, 8-16 significantly inhibited NO production, compound 11 being the most efficacious (IC50 13.57 μM) respectively. Moreover, compound 16 dramatically increased the nerve growth factor (NGF) production (165.24 ± 11.1%) in C6 glioma cells. Taken together, these results revealed that salicin derivatives from Salix glandulosa might have potent effect as anti-neuroinflammatory agents.

  16. BOOK REVIEW: NMR Imaging of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of materials is a field of increasing importance. Applications extend from fundamental science like the characterization of fluid transport in porous rock, catalyst pellets and hemodialysers into various fields of engineering for process optimization and product quality control. While the results of MRI imaging are being appreciated by a growing community, the methods of imaging are far more diverse for materials applications than for medical imaging of human beings. Blümich has delivered the first book in this field. It was published in hardback three years ago and is now offered as a paperback for nearly half the price. The text provides an introduction to MRI imaging of materials covering solid-state NMR spectroscopy, imaging methods for liquid and solid samples, and unusual MRI in terms of specialized approaches to spatial resolution such as an MRI surface scanner. The book represents an excellent and thorough treatment which will help to grow research in materials MRI. Blümich developed the treatise over many years for his research students, graduates in chemistry, physics and engineering. But it may also be useful for medical students looking for a less formal discussion of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The structure of this book is easy to perceive. The first three chapters cover an introduction, the fundamentals and methods of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The book starts at the ground level where no previous knowledge about NMR is assumed. Chapter 4 discusses a wide variety of transformations beyond the Fourier transformation. In particular, the Hadamard transformation and the 'wavelet' transformation are missing from most related books. This chapter also includes a description of noise-correlation spectroscopy, which promises the imaging of large objects without the need for extremely powerful radio-frequency transmitters. Chapters 5 and 6 cover basic imaging methods. The following chapter about the use of relaxation and

  17. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  18. NMR methodologies in the analysis of blueberries.

    PubMed

    Capitani, Donatella; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Delfini, Maurizio; Vista, Silvia; Antiochia, Riccarda; Proietti, Noemi; Bubici, Salvatore; Ferrante, Gianni; Carradori, Simone; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Mannina, Luisa

    2014-06-01

    An NMR analytical protocol based on complementary high and low field measurements is proposed for blueberry characterization. Untargeted NMR metabolite profiling of blueberries aqueous and organic extracts as well as targeted NMR analysis focused on anthocyanins and other phenols are reported. Bligh-Dyer and microwave-assisted extractions were carried out and compared showing a better recovery of lipidic fraction in the case of microwave procedure. Water-soluble metabolites belonging to different classes such as sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and phenolic compounds, as well as metabolites soluble in organic solvent such as triglycerides, sterols, and fatty acids, were identified. Five anthocyanins (malvidin-3-glucoside, malvidin-3-galactoside, delphinidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-galactoside, and petunidin-3-glucoside) and 3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl quercetin were identified in solid phase extract. The water status of fresh and withered blueberries was monitored by portable NMR and fast-field cycling NMR. (1) H depth profiles, T2 transverse relaxation times and dispersion profiles were found to be sensitive to the withering.

  19. Review of advances in coupling electrochemistry and liquid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Ugo; Boujtita, Mohammed

    2015-05-01

    The coupling of electrochemistry and NMR spectroscopy (EC-NMR) may present an interesting approach in the environmental oxidative degradation or metabolism studies. This review presents experimental advances in the field of EC-NMR and highlights the main advantages and drawbacks of in situ and on line of NMR spectroelectrochemistry. The analysis of NMR spectra recorded in situ or on line EC-NMR permits to elucidate the reaction pathway of the electrochemical oxidation reactions and could constitute a fast way for monitoring unstable species as for instance quinone and quinone imine structures without using any coupling agents. The use of 1D and 2D NMR coupled with electrochemistry may leads to the elucidation of the major species produced from the electrochemical oxidation process. The present review gives an overview about the development of the electrochemical cells which can operate on line or in situ with NMR measurements. Future developments and potential applications of EC-NMR are also discussed.

  20. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  1. Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes of two new hexadentate Schiff base ligands derived from different aldehydes and ethanol amine; X-ray crystal structure, IR and NMR spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golbedaghi, Reza; Rezaeivala, Majid; Albeheshti, Leila

    2014-11-01

    Four new [Cd(H2L1)(NO3)]ClO4 (1), [Zn(H2L1)](ClO4)2 (2), [Cd(H2L2)(NO3)]ClO4 (3), and [Zn(H2L2)](ClO4)2 (4), complexes were prepared by the reaction of two new Schiff base ligands and Cd(II) and Zn(II) metal ions in equimolar ratios. The ligands H2L1 and H2L2 were synthesized by reaction of 2-[2-(2-formyl phenoxy)ethoxy]benzaldehyde and/or 2-[2-(3-formyl phenoxy)propoxy]benzaldehyde and ethanol amine and characterized by IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. All complexes were characterized by IR, 1H and 13C NMR, COSY, and elemental analysis. Also, the complex 1 was characterized by X-ray in addition to the above methods. The X-ray crystal structure of compound 1 showed that all nitrogen and oxygen atoms of ligand (N2O4) and a molecule of nitrate with two donor oxygen atom have been coordinated to the metal ion and the Cd(II) ion is in an eight-coordinate environment that is best described as a distorted dodecahedron geometry.

  2. 1H NMR chemical shift studies of pregn-5-ene-3β,20( R)-diol and pregn-5-ene-3β-ol,20-one D-glucopyranoside derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warthen, J. D.; Waters, R. M.; Oliver, J. E.

    The 1H NMR chemical shift and J value data of a series of pregn-5-ene-3β,20( R)-diol/pregn-5-ene-3β-ol, 20-one D-glucopyranosides and D-glucopyranoside derivatives are reported because of their relevance to the structure determination of pregnenediol tri- and diglucosides on tobacco hornworm eggs. Effects of various substituents at the 3β- and 20( R)-positions of the pregn-5-ene nucleus upon chemical shifts of selected protons on the pregn-5-ene nucleus are discussed. Chemical shifts of selected protons on the D-glucopyranoside nucleus/nuclei are also discussed. Differentiation between the pregn-5-ene substitution points, between anomeric glucose configurations and between anomeric protons on β- D-glucosides at 3β and 20( R) is demonstrated. A COSY NMR analysis of the Manduca peracetylated triglucoside is utilized to show the interaction of the three anomeric β- D-glucoside protons and to distinguish the dissimilar one.

  3. Conformational NMR Study of Bistriazolyl Anion Receptors.

    PubMed

    Makuc, Damjan; Merckx, Tamara; Dehaen, Wim; Plavec, Janez

    2016-01-01

    Conformational features of pyridine- and pyrimidine-based bistriazolyl anion receptors dissolved in acetonitrile-d3 were assessed by multidimensional, heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. NOESY correlation signals suggested preorganization of both host molecules in solution in the absence of anions. In addition, only a single set of signals was observed in the 1H NMR spectra, which suggested a symmetrical conformation of anion receptors or their conformational exchange that is fast on the NMR time-scale. Furthermore, the predominant conformations of the pyridine- and pyrimidine-based anion receptors are preserved upon addition of chloride, bromide, and acetate anions. Chemical shift changes observed upon addition of anions showed that the NH (thio)urea and triazole protons are involved in anion-receptor interactions through hydrogen bonding. PMID:27640375

  4. Review of NMR characterization of pyrolysis oils

    DOE PAGES

    Hao, Naijia; Ben, Haoxi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Adhikari, Sushil; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-08-24

    Here, pyrolysis of renewable biomass has been developed as a method to produce green fuels and chemicals in response to energy security concerns as well as to alleviate environmental issues incurred with fossil fuel usage. However, pyrolysis oils still have limited commercial application, mainly because unprocessed oils cannot be readily blended with current petroleum-based transportation fuels. To better understand these challenges, researchers have applied diverse characterization techniques in the development of bio-oil studies. In particular, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a key spectroscopic characterization method through analysis of bio-oil components. This review highlights the NMR strategies for pyrolysis oil characterizationmore » and critically discusses the applications of 1H, 13C, 31P, 19F, and two-dimensional (2-D NMR) analyses such as heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) in representative pyrolysis oil studies.« less

  5. NMR Spectroscopy: Processing Strategies (by Peter Bigler)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Nancy S.

    1998-06-01

    Peter Bigler. VCH: New York, 1997. 249 pp. ISBN 3-527-28812-0. $99.00. This book, part of a four-volume series planned to deal with all aspects of a standard NMR experiment, is almost the exact book I have been hoping to find. My department has acquired, as have hundreds of other undergraduate institutions, high-field NMR instrumentation and the capability of doing extremely sophisticated experiments. However, the training is often a one- or two-day experience in which the material retained by the faculty trained is garbled and filled with holes, not unlike the information our students seem to retain. This text, and the accompanying exercises based on data contained on a CD-ROM, goes a long way to fill in the gaps and clarify misunderstandings about NMR processing.

  6. NMR phase noise in bitter magnets.

    PubMed

    Sigmund, E E; Calder, E S; Thomas, G W; Mitrović, V F; Bachman, H N; Halperin, W P; Kuhns, P L; Reyes, A P

    2001-02-01

    We have studied the temporal instability of a high field resistive Bitter magnet through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This instability leads to transverse spin decoherence in repeated and accumulated NMR experiments as is normally performed during signal averaging. We demonstrate this effect via Hahn echo and Carr--Purcell--Meiboom--Gill (CPMG) transverse relaxation experiments in a 23-T resistive magnet. Quantitative analysis was found to be consistent with separate measurements of the magnetic field frequency fluctuation spectrum, as well as with independent NMR experiments performed in a magnetic field with a controlled instability. Finally, the CPMG sequence with short pulse delays is shown to be successful in recovering the intrinsic spin--spin relaxation even in the presence of magnetic field temporal instability.

  7. A modularized pulse programmer for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenping; Bao, Qingjia; Yang, Liang; Chen, Yiqun; Liu, Chaoyang; Qiu, Jianqing; Ye, Chaohui

    2011-02-01

    A modularized pulse programmer for a NMR spectrometer is described. It consists of a networked PCI-104 single-board computer and a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The PCI-104 is dedicated to translate the pulse sequence elements from the host computer into 48-bit binary words and download these words to the FPGA, while the FPGA functions as a sequencer to execute these binary words. High-resolution NMR spectra obtained on a home-built spectrometer with four pulse programmers working concurrently demonstrate the effectiveness of the pulse programmer. Advantages of the module include (1) once designed it can be duplicated and used to construct a scalable NMR/MRI system with multiple transmitter and receiver channels, (2) it is a totally programmable system in which all specific applications are determined by software, and (3) it provides enough reserve for possible new pulse sequences.

  8. An NMR Study of Microvoids in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattrix, Larry

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is most crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally not be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active Xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb and Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe-129-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts in Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of Xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A series of spectra were obtained interspersed with applications of vacuum and heating to drive out the adsorbed Xe and determine the role of Xe-Xe interactions in the observed chemical shift.

  9. The Quiet Renaissance of Protein NMR

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Paul J.; Chen, Jiang; Cho, Min-Kyu; Kim, Ji-Hun; Lu, Zhenwei; Mathew, Sijo; Peng, Dungeng; Song, Yuanli; Van Horn, Wade D.; Zhuang, Tiandi; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    From roughly 1985 through the start of the new millennium, the cutting edge of solution protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was to a significant extent driven by the aspiration to determine structures. Here we survey recent advances in protein NMR that herald a renaissance in which a number of its most important applications reflect the broad problem-solving capability displayed by this method during its classical era during the 1970s and early 80s. “Without receivers fitted and kept in order, the air may tingle and thrill with the message, but it will not reach my spirit and consciousness.” Mary Slessor, Calabar, circa 1910 PMID:23368985

  10. Tritiation methods and tritium NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, D.K.; Morimoto, H.; Salijoughian, M.; Williams, P.G.

    1991-09-01

    We have used a simple process for the production of highly tritiated water and characterized the product species by {sup 1}H and {sup 3}H NMR spectroscopy. The water is readily manipulated and used in subsequent reactions either as T{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}COOT or CF{sub 3}COOT. Development of tritiated diimide has progressed to the point where cis-hydrogenated products at 1-20 Ci/mmole S.A. are possible. Tri-n-butyl tin tritide has been produced at >95% tritium content and well characterized by multinuclear NMR techniques. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  11. NMR investigation of the quantum pigeonhole effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V. S., Anjusha; Hegde, Swathi S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    NMR quantum simulators have been used for studying various quantum phenomena. Here, using a four-qubit NMR quantum simulator, we investigate the recently postulated quantum pigeonhole effect. In this phenomenon, a set of three particles in a two-path interferometer often appears to be in such a superposition that no two particles can be assigned a single path, thus exhibiting the nonclassical behavior. In our experiments, quantum pigeons are emulated by three nuclear qubits whose states are probed jointly and noninvasively by an ancillary spin. The experimental results are in good agreement with quantum theoretical predictions.

  12. Magic angle spinning NMR of viruses.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Caitlin M; Lu, Manman; Suiter, Christopher L; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    Viruses, relatively simple pathogens, are able to replicate in many living organisms and to adapt to various environments. Conventional atomic-resolution structural biology techniques, X-ray crystallography and solution NMR spectroscopy provided abundant information on the structures of individual proteins and nucleic acids comprising viruses; however, viral assemblies are not amenable to analysis by these techniques because of their large size, insolubility, and inherent lack of long-range order. In this article, we review the recent advances in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy that enabled atomic-resolution analysis of structure and dynamics of large viral systems and give examples of several exciting case studies. PMID:25919197

  13. Magic Angle Spinning NMR of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Caitlin; Lu, Manman; Suiter, Christopher L.; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Viruses, relatively simple pathogens, are able to replicate in many living organisms and to adapt to various environments. Conventional atomic-resolution structural biology techniques, X-ray crystallography and solution NMR spectroscopy provided abundant information on the structures of individual proteins and nucleic acids comprising viruses; however, viral assemblies are not amenable to analysis by these techniques because of their large size, insolubility, and inherent lack of long-range order. In this article, we review the recent advances in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy that enabled atomic-resolution analysis of structure and dynamics of large viral systems and give examples of several exciting case studies. PMID:25919197

  14. NMR spectra of androstane analogs of brassinosteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranovskii, A. V.; Litvinovskaya, R. P.; Aver'kova, M. A.; Khripach, N. B.; Khripach, V. A.

    2007-09-01

    We have used two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy to make a complete assignment of signals from the nuclei of hydrogen and carbon atoms in the spectra of brassinosteroids in the androstane series. We have confirmed the stereochemistry of the chiral centers and the structure of the molecules. We have studied the effect of the configuration of the 2,3-diol groups in the A ring of the steroids on the chemical shift of adjacent atoms in the 13C and 1H NMR spectra.

  15. NMR Microscopy - Micron-Level Resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Wing-Chi Edmund

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been developed into a powerful and widely used diagnostic tool since the invention of techniques using linear magnetic field gradients in 1973. The variety of imaging contrasts obtainable in MRI, such as spin density, relaxation times and flow rate, gives MRI a significant advantage over other imaging techniques. For common diagnostic applications, image resolutions have been in the order of millimeters with slice thicknesses in centimeters. For many research applications, however, resolutions in the order of tens of microns or smaller are needed. NMR Imaging in these high resolution disciplines is known as NMR microscopy. Compared with conventional microscopy, NMR microscopy has the advantage of being non-invasive and non-destructive. The major obstacles of NMR microscopy are low signal-to-noise ratio and effects due to spin diffusion. To overcome these difficulties, more sensitive RF probes and very high magnetic field gradients have to be used. The most effective way to increase sensitivity is to build smaller probes. Microscope probes of different designs have been built and evaluated. Magnetic field gradient coils that can produce linear field gradients up to 450 Gauss/cm were also assembled. In addition, since microscope probes often employ remote capacitors for RF tuning, the associated signal loss in the transmission line was studied. Imaging experiments have been carried out in a 2.1 Tesla small bore superconducting magnet using the typical two-dimensional spin warp imaging technique. Images have been acquired for both biological and non-biological samples. The highest resolution was obtained in an image of a nerve bundle from the spinal cord of a racoon and has an in-plane resolution of 4 microns. These experiments have demonstrated the potential application of NMR microscopy to pathological research, nervous system study and non -destructive testings of materials. One way to further improve NMR microscopy is

  16. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2ω 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2ω0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2ω0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  17. NMR blood vessel imaging method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Riederer, S.J.

    1988-04-26

    A high speed method of forming computed images of blood vessels based on measurements of characteristics of a body is described comprising the steps of: subjecting a predetermined body area containing blood vessels of interest to, successively, applications of a short repetition time (TR) NMR pulse sequence during the period of high blood velocity and then to corresponding applications during the period of low blood velocity for successive heart beat cycles; weighting the collected imaging data from each application of the NMR pulse sequence according to whether the data was acquired during the period of high blood velocity or a period of low blood velocity of the corresponding heart beat cycle; accumulating weighted imaging data from a plurality of NMR pulse sequences corresponding to high blood velocity periods and from a plurality of NMR pulse sequences corresponding to low blood velocity periods; subtracting the weighted imaging data corresponding to each specific phase encoding acquired during the high blood velocity periods from the weighted imaging data for the same phase encoding corresponding to low blood velocity periods in order to compute blood vessel imaging data; and forming an image of the blood vessels of interest from the blood vessel imaging data.

  18. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    An accessory for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  19. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  20. Advanced Laboratory NMR Spectrometer with Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biscegli, Clovis; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of an inexpensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for use in advanced laboratory courses. Applications to the nondestructive analysis of the oil content in corn seeds and in monitoring the crystallization of polymers are presented. (SK)

  1. NMR in a Diamond Anvil Pressure Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Matthew; Dioguardi, Adam; Weir, Samuel; Bush, Blaine; Dunuwille, Mihindra; Deemyad, Shanti; Curro, Nichlas

    We present recent advances in the use of diamond anvil pressure cells in nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. This technique allows access to new regions of the phase diagrams of iron pnictide and heavy fermion materials, and promises to allow NMR experiments under pressures not previously accessible.

  2. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra. PMID:26789115

  3. A Primer of Fourier Transform NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macomber, Roger S.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a new spectroscopic technique that is often omitted from undergraduate curricula because of lack of instructional materials. Therefore, information is provided to introduce students to the technique of data collection and transformation into the frequency domain. (JN)

  4. NMR characterization of polymers: Review and update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NMR spectroscopy is a major technique for the characterization and analysis of polymers. A large number of methodologies have been developed in both the liquid and the solid state, and the literature has grown considerably (1-5). The field now covers a broad spectrum of activities, including polym...

  5. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments. PMID:24441771

  6. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra.

  7. Hyperpolarized NMR probes for biological assays.

    PubMed

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H

    2014-01-16

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments.

  8. NMR analysis of a fluorocarbon copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-10-01

    Vinylidene fluoride (VF/sub 2/) can be copolymerized with chlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE) in an aqueous emulsion using a peroxide chain initiator. The physical properties of the resulting fluorocarbon polymer depend on the ratio of VF/sub 2/ to CTFE and the randomness of the copolymerization. When CTFE and VF are polymerized in an approximately 3:1 mole ratio, the resulting polymer is soluble in acetone (and other solvents) at room temperature. Using proton and fluorine-19 NMR, the mole ratio of CTFE to VF/sub 2/, the emulsifier (perfluorodecanoate) concentration, and the randomness of copolymerization can be determined. A trifluorotoluene internal standard is added to a d/sub 6/-acetone solution of the fluoropolymer. Proton NMR is used to determine the amount of VF/sub 2/. Fluorine-19 NMR is used to measure the amount of emulsifier and the randomness of copolymerization. Each analysis requires about 5 minutes, and is quite precise, with relative standard deviations from 3 to 10% (10 replicates analyzed). In addition, the results from NMR analyses agree well with wet chemical analyses. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. RNA Secondary Structure Determination by NMR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan L; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Turner, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic programming methods for predicting RNA secondary structure often use thermodynamics and experimental restraints and/or constraints to limit folding space. Chemical mapping results typically restrain certain nucleotides not to be in AU or GC pairs. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra can reveal the order of AU, GC, and GU pairs in double helixes. This chapter describes a program, NMR-assisted prediction of secondary structure and chemical shifts (NAPSS-CS), that constrains possible secondary structures on the basis of the NMR determined order and 5'-3' direction of AU, GC, and GU pairs in helixes. NAPSS-CS minimally requires input of the order of base pairs as determined from nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) of imino protons. The program deduces the 5'-3' direction of the base pairs if certain chemical shifts are also input. Secondary structures predicted by the program provide assignments of input chemical shifts to particular nucleotides in the sequence, thus facilitating an important step for determination of the three dimensional structure by NMR. The method is particularly useful for revealing pseudoknots and an example is provided. The method may also allow determination of secondary structures when a sequence folds into two structures that exchange slowly. PMID:27665599

  10. Carbon-fluorine bond cleavage in the preparation of Osmium(III) and Osmium(IV) fluorothiolate complexes. Fluorine by fluorine NMR-assignment and fluxional processes.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Maribel; Bernès, Sylvain; Cerón, Margarita; Cortina, Verónica; Mendoza, Consuelo; Torrens, Hugo

    2007-06-11

    Reactions of OsO4 with HSR (R=C6F5, C6F4H-4,) in refluxing ethanol afford [Os(SC6F5)3(SC6F4(SC6F5)-2)] (1) and [Os(SC6F4H-4)3(SC6F3H-4-(SC6F4H-4)-2)] (2), which involve the rupture of C-F bonds. At room temperature, the compound [Os(SC6F5)3(PMe2Ph)2] or [Os(SC6F5)4(PMe2Ph)] reacts with KOH(aq) in acetone, giving rise to [ Os(SC6F5)(SC6F4(SC6F4O-2)-2)(PMe2Ph)2] (3), through a process involving the rupture of two C-F bonds, while the compound [Os(SC6F4H)4(PPh3)] reacts with KOH(aq) in acetone to afford [Os(SC6F4H-4)2(SC6F3H-4-O-2)(PPh3)] (4), which also implies a C-F bond cleavage. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies of 1, 2, and 4 indicate that these compounds include five-coordinated metal ions in essentially trigonal-bipyramidal geometries, whereas these studies on the paramagnetic compound 3 show a six-coordinated osmium center in a distorted octahedral geometry. 19F, 1H, 31P{1H}, and COSY 19F-19F NMR studies for the diamagnetic 1, 2, and 4 compounds, including variable-temperature 19F NMR experiments, showed that these molecules are fluxional. Some of the activation parameters for these dynamic processes have been determined.

  11. Separation and identification of degradation products in eprinomectin formulation using LC, LTQ FT-MS, H/D exchange, and NMR.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Atul; Razzak, Majid; Al-Kassas, Raida; Greenwood, David R; Harvey, Joanne; Garg, Sanjay

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of the compendial active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) method for the analysis of finished products and characterization of degradation products in eprinomectin (EPM) samples. Heat stressed sample tests revealed a limitation of the API method in distinguishing an impurity merging with the principal analyte peak. A new selective, specific and sensitive method was therefore developed for the determination of EPM in formulations that separates its degradation products currently undetectable with the official method. The determination was carried out by reversed-phase HPLC using an isocratic solvent elution. The method was validated and found to be precise, accurate and specific; the detector response was linear over 50-150 μg/ml (EPM) and 0.1-3 μg/ml (degradation product) range of concentrations. Two major degradation products detected with the new method were isolated from sample matrices and characterized using LC-PDA, high resolution FT-ICR MS, NMR and hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HX-MS) studies. FTMS analysis showed accurate mass of molecular ion peaks for EPM and its two degradation products at m/z 914.52505 (mass error ≤ 1 ppm) with almost identical fragmentation patterns. Given the isomeric nature of the compounds, all three were further evaluated by ¹H, ¹³C, 1D NOESY and 2D (COSY) NMR experiments. The interpretation of experimental data positively identified Unknown 1 as the 2-epimer of EPM and Unknown 2 as the structural isomer Δ2,3-EPM containing a conjugated enoate. The new HPLC method and identification exercise is useful for analysis of EPM and its degradation products. PMID:22341479

  12. An NMR study of microvoids in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattix, Larry

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb the Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe(129)-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts line Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A single Xe-129 line at 83.003498 Mhz (with protons at 300 Mhz) was observed for the gas. With the xenon charged PMR-15 samples, a second broader line is observed 190 ppm downfield from the gas line (also observed). The width of the NMR line from the Xe-129 absorbed in the polymer is at least partially due to the distribution of microvoid sizes. From the chemical shift (relative to the gas line) and the line width, we estimate the average void sizes to be 2.74 +/- 0.20 angstroms. Since Xe-129 has such a large chemical shift range (approximately 5000 ppm), we expect the chemical shift anisotropy to contribute to the

  13. Dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Aaron J; Zagdoun, Alexandre; Lelli, Moreno; Lesage, Anne; Copéret, Christophe; Emsley, Lyndon

    2013-09-17

    Many of the functions and applications of advanced materials result from their interfacial structures and properties. However, the difficulty in characterizing the surface structure of these materials at an atomic level can often slow their further development. Solid-state NMR can probe surface structure and complement established surface science techniques, but its low sensitivity often limits its application. Many materials have low surface areas and/or low concentrations of active/surface sites. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is one intriguing method to enhance the sensitivity of solid-state NMR experiments by several orders of magnitude. In a DNP experiment, the large polarization of unpaired electrons is transferred to surrounding nuclei, which provides a maximum theoretical DNP enhancement of ∼658 for (1)H NMR. In this Account, we discuss the application of DNP to enhance surface NMR signals, an approach known as DNP surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy (DNP SENS). Enabling DNP for these systems requires bringing an exogeneous radical solution into contact with surfaces without diluting the sample. We proposed the incipient wetness impregnation technique (IWI), a well-known method in materials science, to impregnate porous and particulate materials with just enough radical containing solution to fill the porous volume. IWI offers several advantages: it is extremely simple, provides a uniform wetting of the surface, and does not increase the sample volume or substantially reduce the concentration of the sample. This Account describes the basic principles behind DNP SENS through results obtained for mesoporous and nanoparticulate samples impregnated with radical solutions. We also discuss the quantification of the overall sensitivity enhancements obtained with DNP SENS and compare that with ordinary room temperature NMR spectroscopy. We then review the development of radicals and solvents that give the best possible enhancements today. With the best

  14. A mobile one-sided NMR sensor with a homogeneous magnetic field: the NMR-MOLE.

    PubMed

    Manz, B; Coy, A; Dykstra, R; Eccles, C D; Hunter, M W; Parkinson, B J; Callaghan, P T

    2006-11-01

    A new portable NMR sensor with a novel one-sided access magnet design, termed NMR-MOLE (MObile Lateral Explorer), has been characterised in terms of sensitivity and depth penetration. The magnet has been designed to be portable and create a volume with a relatively homogeneous magnetic field, 15,000 ppm over a region from 4 to 16 mm away from the probe, with maximum sensitivity at a depth of 10 mm. The proton NMR frequency is 3.3 MHz. We have demonstrated that with this approach a highly sensitive, portable, unilateral NMR sensor can be built. Such a design is especially suited for the characterisation of liquids in situations where unilateral or portable access is required.

  15. Using NMR to study full intact wine bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekley, A. J.; Bruins, P.; Sisto, M.; Augustine, M. P.

    2003-03-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe and spectrometer capable of investigating full intact wine bottles is described and used to study a series of Cabernet Sauvignons with high resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy. Selected examples of full bottle 13C NMR spectra are also provided. The application of this full bottle NMR method to the measurement of acetic acid content, the detection of complex sugars, phenols, and trace elements in wine is discussed.

  16. Solid-State NMR Imaging by Tetrahedral-Magic-Echo Time-Suspension Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, S.; Uraoka, A.; Inouye, T.

    A new approach to solid-state imaging using tetrahedral magic echoes (TME) is proposed and compared with the previously reported modified-magic-echo (MME) approaches. The comparison has shown that for common organic solids, where the homonuclear 1H- 1H dipolar interaction is dominant, the degree of TME line narrowing is nearly the same as that of time-suspended MME line narrowing; however, the TME narrowing is substantially superior to the MME narrowing for solids where the heteronuclear dipolar interaction between 1H and a second spin species is comparable in magnitude to the homonuclear 1H- 1H dipolar interaction. This superiority stems from the fact that the homonuclear and hereronuclear interactions do not commute with each other. The TME approach further possesses certain practical advantages over the MME approaches. For example, the optional application of gradient pulses during the RF irradiation periods in the TME sequences increases the scaling factor of the gradient amplitude from {1}/{4} to {1}/{2}, making the gradient switching easier. No apparent deterioration of the TME line-narrowing by the optional gradient application was noted.

  17. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered. PMID:26974032

  18. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered.

  19. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  20. Strategy for the study of paramagnetic proteins with slow electronic relaxation rates by nmr spectroscopy: application to oxidized human [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Machonkin, Timothy E; Westler, William M; Markley, John L

    2004-05-01

    NMR studies of paramagnetic proteins are hampered by the rapid relaxation of nuclei near the paramagnetic center, which prevents the application of conventional methods to investigations of the most interesting regions of such molecules. This problem is particularly acute in systems with slow electronic relaxation rates. We present a strategy that can be used with a protein with slow electronic relaxation to identify and assign resonances from nuclei near the paramagnetic center. Oxidized human [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin (adrenodoxin) was used to test the approach. The strategy involves six steps: (1) NMR signals from (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei unaffected or minimally affected by paramagnetic effects are assigned by standard multinuclear two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) spectroscopic methods with protein samples labeled uniformly with (13)C and (15)N. (2) The very broad, hyperfine-shifted signals from carbons in the residues that ligate the metal center are classified by amino acid and atom type by selective (13)C labeling and one-dimensional (1D) (13)C NMR spectroscopy. (3) Spin systems involving carbons near the paramagnetic center that are broadened but not hyperfine-shifted are elucidated by (13)C[(13)C] constant time correlation spectroscopy (CT-COSY). (4) Signals from amide nitrogens affected by the paramagnetic center are assigned to amino acid type by selective (15)N labeling and 1D (15)N NMR spectroscopy. (5) Sequence-specific assignments of these carbon and nitrogen signals are determined by 1D (13)C[(15)N] difference decoupling experiments. (6) Signals from (1)H nuclei in these spin systems are assigned by paramagnetic-optimized 2D and 3D (1)H[(13)C] experiments. For oxidized human ferredoxin, this strategy led to assignments (to amino acid and atom type) for 88% of the carbons in the [2Fe-2S] cluster-binding loops (residues 43-58 and 89-94). These included complete carbon spin-system assignments for eight of the 22 residues and partial assignments for

  1. NMR Constraints Analyser: a web-server for the graphical analysis of NMR experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Heller, Davide Martin; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with X-ray crystallography, are the main techniques used for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of biological molecules. The output of an NMR experiment includes a set of lower and upper limits for the distances (constraints) between pairs of atoms. If the number of constraints is high enough, there will be a finite number of possible conformations (models) of the macromolecule satisfying the data. Thus, the more constraints are measured, the better defined these structures will be. The availability of a user-friendly tool able to help in the analysis and interpretation of the number of experimental constraints per residue, is thus of valuable importance when assessing the levels of structure definition of NMR solved biological macromolecules, in particular, when high-quality structures are needed in techniques such as, computational biology approaches, site-directed mutagenesis experiments and/or drug design. Here, we present a free publicly available web-server, i.e. NMR Constraints Analyser, which is aimed at providing an automatic graphical analysis of the NMR experimental constraints atom by atom. The NMR Constraints Analyser server is available from the web-page http://molsim.sci.univr.it/constraint.

  2. Structural investigations on betacyanin pigments by LC NMR and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stintzing, Florian C; Conrad, Jürgen; Klaiber, Iris; Beifuss, Uwe; Carle, Reinhold

    2004-02-01

    Four betacyanin pigments were analysed by LC NMR and subjected to extensive NMR characterisation after isolation. Previously, low pH values were applied for NMR investigations of betalains resulting in rapid degradation of the purified substances thus preventing extensive NMR studies. Consequently, up to now only one single (13)C NMR spectrum of a betalain pigment, namely that of neobetanin (=14,15-dehydrobetanin), was available. Because of its sufficient stability under highly acidic conditions otherwise detrimental for betacyanins, this pigment remained an exemption. Since betalains are most stable in the pH range of 5-7, a new solvent system has been developed allowing improved data acquisition through improved pigment stability at near neutral pH. Thus, not only (1)H, but for the first time also partial (13)C data of betanin, isobetanin, phyllocactin and hylocerenin isolated from red-purple pitaya [Hylocereus polyrhizus (Weber) Britton & Rose, Cactaceae] could be indirectly obtained by gHSQC- and gHMQC-NMR experiments.

  3. OPENCORE NMR: Open-source core modules for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    A tool kit for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer [K. Takeda, A highly integrated FPGA-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 033103], referred to as the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer, is open to public. The system is composed of an FPGA chip and several peripheral boards for USB communication, direct-digital synthesis (DDS), RF transmission, signal acquisition, etc. Inside the FPGA chip have been implemented a number of digital modules including three pulse programmers, the digital part of DDS, a digital quadrature demodulator, dual digital low-pass filters, and a PC interface. These FPGA core modules are written in VHDL, and their source codes are available on our website. This work aims at providing sufficient information with which one can, given some facility in circuit board manufacturing, reproduce the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer presented here. Also, the users are encouraged to modify the design of spectrometer according to their own specific needs. A home-built NMR spectrometer can serve complementary roles to a sophisticated commercial spectrometer, should one comes across such new ideas that require heavy modification to hardware inside the spectrometer. This work can lower the barrier of building a handmade NMR spectrometer in the laboratory, and promote novel and exciting NMR experiments.

  4. Cell adhesion promoting peptide GVKGDKGNPGWPGAP from the collagen type IV triple helix: Cis/trans proline-induced multiple sup 1 H NMR conformations and evidence for a KG/PG multiple turn repeat motif in the all-trans proline state

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, K.H.; Parra-Diaz, D. ); McCarthy, J.B.; Chelberg, M. )

    1991-08-20

    Peptide GVKGDKGNPGWPGAPY (called peptide IV-H1), derived from the protein sequence of human collagen type IV, triple-helix domain residues 1263-1277, represents an RGD-independent, cell-specific, adhesion, spreading, and motility promoting domain in type IV collagen. In this study, peptide IV-H1 has been investigated by {sup 1}H NMR (500 MHz) spectroscopy. Cis-trans proline isomerization at each of the three proline residues gives rise to a number of slowly exchanging (500-MHz NMR time scale) conformation states. The presence of more than two sets of resonances for residues sequentially proximal to a proline, e.g., A14-cis-P15 K3, indicates long range conformation interactions and the presence of preferred structure in this short linear peptide. Many resonances belonging to these multiple species have been assigned by using mono-proline-substituted analogues. Conformational (isomer) state-specific 2D {sup 1}H NMR assignments for the combination of cis and trans proline states have been made via analysis of COSY-type, HOHAHA, and NOESY spectra. The NMR data indicate significant {beta}-turn populations centered at K3-G4, K5-G6, P9-G10, and P12-G13, and a C-terminal {gamma}-turn within the A14-P15-Y16 sequence. These NMR data are supported by circular dichroic studies which indicate the presence of 52% {beta}-turn, 10% helix, and 38% random coil structural populations. Since equally spaced KG and PG residues are found on both sides of peptide IV-H1 in the native collagen type IV sequence, this multiple turn repeat motif may continue through a longer segment of the protein.

  5. Surface rupture and slip variation induced by the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, Baja California, quantified using COSI-Corr analysis on pre- and post-earthquake LiDAR acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leprince, S.; Hudnut, K. W.; Akciz, S. O.; Hinojosa-Corona, A.; Fletcher, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    One-hundred and three years after the publication of the Lawson report on the Great 1906 earthquake, accurate documentation of surface deformation along the entire length of an earthquake is still challenging. Analysis of pre- and post-earthquake topographic data provides an opportunity to deliver the full 3D displacement field of the ground's surface. However, direct differencing of a pre- and post-earthquake digital topography model (DEM) generally leads to biased estimation of the vertical component of the deformation. Indeed, if the earthquake also produced significant horizontal motion, or if the pre- and post-earthquake DEM acquisitions exhibit non-negligible horizontal mis-registration, then the vertical offset measured by direct differencing will be biased by the local topography gradient. To overcome this limitation, we use the COSI-Corr sub-pixel correlation algorithm to estimate the relative horizontal offset between the pre- and post- 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah earthquake high resolution LiDAR acquisitions. Compensating for the horizontal offset between the two LiDAR acquisitions allows us to estimate unbiased measurements of the vertical component of the surface fault rupture induced by the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. We will also show the limitations of the available data set, such as aircraft jitter artifacts, which impaired accurate measurements of the horizontal component of the surface deformation. This analysis shows an unprecedented view of the complete vertical slip component of the rupture induced by the Mw 7.2 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, sampled at every 5 m, over a length of about 100 km, and with a vertical accuracy of a few centimeters. Using sampling bins as narrow as 150 m and 1.5 km long, variations in the vertical component of an oblique slip earthquake are presented, with breaks along multiple fault-strands showing opposite dip directions and diffuse boundaries. With the availability of high precision pre- and post-earthquake data

  6. NMR CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    C.T. Philip Chang; Changho Choi; Jeromy T. Hollenshead; Rudi Michalak; Jack Phan; Ramon Saavedra; John C. Slattery; Jinsoo Uh; Randi Valestrand; A. Ted Watson; Song Xue

    2005-01-01

    A critical and long-standing need within the petroleum industry is the specification of suitable petrophysical properties for mathematical simulation of fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs (i.e., reservoir characterization). The development of accurate reservoir characterizations is extremely challenging. Property variations may be described on many scales, and the information available from measurements reflect different scales. In fact, experiments on laboratory core samples, well-log data, well-test data, and reservoir-production data all represent information potentially valuable to reservoir characterization, yet they all reflect information about spatial variations of properties at different scales. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) provide enormous potential for developing new descriptions and understandings of heterogeneous media. NMR has the rare capability to probe permeable media non-invasively, with spatial resolution, and it provides unique information about molecular motions and interactions that are sensitive to morphology. NMR well-logging provides the best opportunity ever to resolve permeability distributions within petroleum reservoirs. We develop MRI methods to determine, for the first time, spatially resolved distributions of porosity and permeability within permeable media samples that approach the intrinsic scale: the finest resolution of these macroscopic properties possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the permeability is actually resolved at a scale smaller than the sample. In order to do this, we have developed a robust method to determine of relaxation distributions from NMR experiments and a novel implementation and analysis of MRI experiments to determine the amount of fluid corresponding to imaging regions, which are in turn used to determine porosity and saturation distributions. We have developed a novel MRI experiment to determine velocity distributions within flowing experiments, and

  7. Multinuclear NMR studies of relaxor ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Donghua

    Multinuclear NMR of 93Nb, 45Sc, and 207Pb has been carried out to study the structure, disorder, and dynamics of a series of important solid solutions: perovskite relaxor ferroelectric materials (1-x) Pb(Mg1/3Nb 2/3)O3-x Pb(Sc1/2Nb1/2)O 3 (PMN-PSN). 93Nb NMR investigations of the local structure and cation order/disorder are presented as a function of PSN concentration, x. The superb fidelity and accuracy of 3QMAS allows us to make clear and consistent assignments of spectral intensities to the 28 possible nearest B-site neighbor (nBn) configurations, (NMg, NSc, NNb), where each number ranges from 0 to 6 and their sum is 6. For most of the 28 possible nBn configurations, isotropic chemical shifts and quadrupole product constants have been extracted from the data. The seven configurations with only larger cations, Mg 2+ and Sc3+ (and no Nb5+) are assigned to the seven observed narrow peaks, whose deconvoluted intensities facilitate quantitative evaluation of, and differentiation between, different models of B-site (chemical) disorder. The "completely random" model is ruled out and the "random site" model is shown to be in qualitative agreement with the NMR experiments. To obtain quantitative agreement with observed NMR intensities, the random site model is slightly modified by including unlike-pair interaction energies. To date, 45Sc studies have not been as fruitful as 93Nb NMR because the resolution is lower in the 45Sc spectra. The lower resolution of 45Sc spectra is due to a smaller span of isotropic chemical shift (40 ppm for 45Sc vs. 82 ppm for 93Nb) and to the lack of a fortuitous mechanism that simplifies the 93Nb spectra; for 93Nb the overlap of the isotropic chemical shifts of 6-Sc and 6-Nb configurations results in the alignment of all the 28 configurations along only seven quadrupole distribution axes. Finally we present variable temperature 207Pb static, MAS, and 2D-PASS NMR studies. Strong linear correlations between isotropic and anisotropic chemical

  8. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to β-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil → helix-like → β-sheet-like → β-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of β-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  9. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  10. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  11. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  12. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander; McDermott, Robert F.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  13. Disentangling scalar coupling patterns by real-time SERF NMR.

    PubMed

    Gubensäk, Nina; Fabian, Walter M F; Zangger, Klaus

    2014-10-21

    Scalar coupling constants and signal splitting patterns in NMR spectra contain a wealth of short-range structural information. The extraction of these parameters from (1)H NMR spectra is often prohibited by simultaneous scalar coupling interactions with several other protons. Here we present a high-resolution NMR experiment where scalar coupling to only one selected signal is visible. All other couplings are removed from the spectrum. This real-time selectively refocused NMR experiment is achieved by spatially selective homonuclear broadband decoupling combined with selective refocusing during acquisition. It allows the unperturbed extraction of scalar coupling constants from the highly resolved acquisition dimension of NMR spectra.

  14. Systematic NMR Analysis of Stable Isotope Labeled Metabolite Mixtures in Plant and Animal Systems: Coarse Grained Views of Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Suto, Michitaka; Nishihara, Takashi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Hirayama, Takashi; Kikuchi, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Background Metabolic phenotyping has become an important ‘bird's-eye-view’ technology which can be applied to higher organisms, such as model plant and animal systems in the post-genomics and proteomics era. Although genotyping technology has expanded greatly over the past decade, metabolic phenotyping has languished due to the difficulty of ‘top-down’ chemical analyses. Here, we describe a systematic NMR methodology for stable isotope-labeling and analysis of metabolite mixtures in plant and animal systems. Methodology/Principal Findings The analysis method includes a stable isotope labeling technique for use in living organisms; a systematic method for simultaneously identifying a large number of metabolites by using a newly developed HSQC-based metabolite chemical shift database combined with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy; Principal Components Analysis; and a visualization method using a coarse-grained overview of the metabolic system. The database contains more than 1000 1H and 13C chemical shifts corresponding to 142 metabolites measured under identical physicochemical conditions. Using the stable isotope labeling technique in Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells and Bombyx mori, we systematically detected >450 HSQC peaks in each 13C-HSQC spectrum derived from model plant, Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells and the invertebrate animal model Bombyx mori. Furthermore, for the first time, efficient 13C labeling has allowed reliable signal assignment using analytical separation techniques such as 3D HCCH-COSY spectra in higher organism extracts. Conclusions/Significance Overall physiological changes could be detected and categorized in relation to a critical developmental phase change in B. mori by coarse-grained representations in which the organization of metabolic pathways related to a specific developmental phase was visualized on the basis of constituent changes of 56 identified metabolites. Based on the observed intensities of 13C atoms of

  15. NMR shielding calculations across the periodic table: diamagnetic uranium compounds. 2. Ligand and metal NMR.

    PubMed

    Schreckenbach, Georg

    2002-12-16

    In this and a previous article (J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 8244), the range of application for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is extended to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shieldings and chemical shifts in diamagnetic actinide compounds. Two relativistic DFT methods are used, ZORA ("zeroth-order regular approximation") and the quasirelativistic (QR) method. In the given second paper, NMR shieldings and chemical shifts are calculated and discussed for a wide range of compounds. The molecules studied comprise uranyl complexes, [UO(2)L(n)](+/-)(q); UF(6); inorganic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)Cl(n), n = 0-6; and organometallic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n), n = 0-5. Uranyl complexes include [UO(2)F(4)](2-), [UO(2)Cl(4)](2-), [UO(2)(OH)(4)](2-), [UO(2)(CO(3))(3)](4-), and [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2+). For the ligand NMR, moderate (e.g., (19)F NMR chemical shifts in UF(6-n)Cl(n)) to excellent agreement [e.g., (19)F chemical shift tensor in UF(6) or (1)H NMR in UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n)] has been found between theory and experiment. The methods have been used to calculate the experimentally unknown (235)U NMR chemical shifts. A large chemical shift range of at least 21,000 ppm has been predicted for the (235)U nucleus. ZORA spin-orbit appears to be the most accurate method for predicting actinide metal chemical shifts. Trends in the (235)U NMR chemical shifts of UF(6-n)L(n) molecules are analyzed and explained in terms of the calculated electronic structure. It is argued that the energy separation and interaction between occupied and virtual orbitals with f-character are the determining factors.

  16. New sesquiterpene coumarin from the roots of Ferula latisecta

    PubMed Central

    Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Amanolahi, Farjad; Schneider, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The genus of Ferula belongs to the tribe Peucedaneae, subfamily of Apioideae and family of Umbelliferae with 133 species distributed throughout the Mediterranean area and central Asia, especially in the former USSR and neighboring countries such as Iran. The popular Persian name of the most of these species is “Koma”. In this research we tried to isolate and elucidate the structure of new sesquiterpene in the root of Ferula latisecta (F. latisecta). Materials and Methods: Dried and powdered roots of F. latisecta were extracted with CH2Cl2 using a Soxhlet apparatus. The extract was concentrated in vacuo to give a red extract. The extract was subjected to column chromatography on silica gel. 1H NMR, 13C NMR, DEPT, 1H-1H COSY, HMBC, HSQC, and NOESY spectra were the methods we used to elucidate the structure of new sesquiterpene in this plant. Results: One new sesquieterpene coumarin, namely Latisectin and IUPAC name [1-(2-Hydroxy-4-methoxy-phenyl)-3,4,8,12-tetramethyl-trideca-4,7,11-trien-1-one ] , together with one known compound , Kopetdaghin C, were isolated from the root of F. latisecta. Conclusion: In this research the structure of one new and one known sesquiterpene in the root of F. latisecta was elucidated. PMID:25050242

  17. Guest encapsulation and coronene-C60 exchange in supramolecular zinc porphyrin tweezers, grids and prisms.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Soumen K; Schmittel, Michael

    2013-05-21

    Using a variant of the HETPHEN concept, heteroleptic 2D and 3D metallosupramolecular structures, such as tweezer T, grid G and tetragonal prism P, were fabricated quantitatively and characterised by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, DOSY as well as ESI-MS. All structures encapsulate C60, with P showing the highest binding affinity (Kassoc = 3.3 × 10(6) M(-1)). The association constant increases along the series T < G < P, most likely due to the enhanced structural rigidity and better coplanarity of the two zinc porphyrin units. In contrast to T and G, the tetragonal prism P shows notable encapsulation of coronene (Kassoc = 1.1 × 10(4) M(-1)). In T and G, on the other hand, complexation of coronene is kinetically inhibited by the bulky mesityl rings at the porphyrin periphery. As illustrated in the facile displacement of coronene by C60 in coronene@P to furnish C60@P, P behaves as a flexible and guest-adaptive host.

  18. Synthesis of 21,23-selenium- and tellurium-substituted 5-porphomethenes, 5,10-porphodimethenes, 5,15-porphodimethenes, and porphotrimethenes and their interactions with mercury.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sohail; Yadav, Kumar Karitkey; Bhattacharya, Soumee; Chauhan, Prashant; Chauhan, S M S

    2015-04-17

    The 3+1 condensation of symmetrical 16-Selena/telluratripyrranes with symmetrical selenophene-2,5-diols/tellurophene-2,5-diols in the presence of BF3-etheratre or BF3-methanol followed by oxidation with DDQ gave 5,10-porphodimethenes, whereas the process with unsymmetrical selenophene-2,5-diols/tellurophene-2,5-diols gave 5-porphomethenes. In addition, the reaction of unsymmetrical 16-Selena/telluratripyrranes with symmetrical selenophene-2,5-diols/tellurophene-2,5-diols gave the corresponding porphotrimethenes, whereas the process with unsymmetrical selenophene-2,5-diols/tellurophene-2,5-diols gave the 5,15-porphodimethenes. The structures of different products were characterized by IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, CHN analysis, and mass spectrometry. The binding of mercury with the calix[4]phyrins mentioned above had been observed in the decreasing order of porphodimethenes > porphomethenes > porphotrimethenes by UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

  19. Two novel bioactive glucosinolates from Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) florets.

    PubMed

    Survay, Nazneen Shaik; Kumar, Brajesh; Jang, Mi; Yoon, Do-Young; Jung, Yi-Sook; Yang, Deok-Chun; Park, Se Won

    2012-09-01

    Two novel glucosinolates along with one known glucosinolate were isolated from Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) florets. Their structures were established mainly by 1D ((1)H and (13)C NMR), 2D NMR ((1)H-(1)H COSY, DEPT 135°, HSQC and HMBC), and Tandem MS-MS spectrometric data as 2-mercaptomethyl sulfinyl glucosinolate [(Z)-4-(methylsulfinyl)-N-(sulfooxy)-2-((2'S,3'R,4'S,5'S,6'R)-3',4',5'-trihydroxy-6'(hydroxylmethyl)-2'-mercapto tetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-yl) butane amide] 1, (Z)-1-((2S,5S)-5-hydroxytetra-hydro-2H-pyran-2-ylthio)-2-(1H-indol-3-yl) ethylidene amino sulfate 2 and a known cinnamoyl [6'-O-trans-(4″-hydroxy cinnamoyl)4-(methylsulphinyl)butyl glucosinolate] 3. Compound 1 exhibited scavenging activity against DPPH with an inhibitory concentration IC(50) of 20 mM, whereas compound 3 was a weak antioxidant when compared to the standard quercetin (5 mM) as a positive control. Both the compounds showed a significant and similar antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus with an IC(50) of <625 μg/mL when compared to antibiotic duricef. Against Salmonella typhimurium the IC(50) of 1 and 3 was determined as <625 μg/mL and <1250 μg/mL, respectively, when compared to ampicillin (IC(50) ≤ 39 μg/mL) as a positive control.

  20. Isolation of brassicasterol, its synthetic prodrug-crystal structure, stereochemistry and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Arun; Prakash, Rohit; Srivastava, Sangeeta; Amandeep; Bishnoi, Abha; Singh, Ranvijay Pratap

    2014-07-01

    In the present study brassicasterol (1), was isolated from the chloroform extract of the flowers of Allamanda violacea and identified with the help of different spectroscopic techniques like 1H, 13C, 2D NMR (1H-1H COSY), IR, UV and mass spectrometry. A novel prodrug was synthesized by carrying out esterification of brassicasterol (1) with the well known drug naproxen using Steglich esterification to give 3β-(2-(6-methoxynaphthalene-2yl) propionoxy) 24 methyl cholest-5, 22-dien (2). Compounds 2 was subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction technique and crystallized out in monoclinic form having P21 space group and stabilized by CH-π interactions. Structure and stereochemistry of compound 2 was established with the help of modern spectroscopic techniques like 1H NMR, IR, UV, mass spectrometry as well as with single crystal X-ray diffraction. Molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of compounds 1 and 2 were calculated by density functional method (DFT/B3LYP) using 6-31G (d, p) basis set, bond parameters and IR frequencies were correlated with the experimental data. 1H and 13C chemical shifts of compound 1 and 1H chemical shifts of compound 2 were calculated with GIAO method and correlated with experimental data. Hyperconjugative interactions were studied with the help of natural bond order analysis (NBO). Electronic properties of both the compounds such as HOMO-LUMO energies were measured with the help of time dependent DFT method.

  1. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Luong, Michel

    2015-09-07

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a “bump” or as a “dip” superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  2. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner. PMID:24149218

  3. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  4. High Resolution non-Markovianity in NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Nadja K.; Peterson, John P. S.; Sarthour, Roberto S.; Souza, Alexandre M.; Monken, C. H.; Roditi, Itzhak; Oliveira, Ivan S.; Santos, Marcelo F.

    2016-01-01

    Memoryless time evolutions are ubiquitous in nature but often correspond to a resolution-induced approximation, i.e. there are correlations in time whose effects are undetectable. Recent advances in the dynamical control of small quantum systems provide the ideal scenario to probe some of these effects. Here we experimentally demonstrate the precise induction of memory effects on the evolution of a quantum coin (qubit) by correlations engineered in its environment. In particular, we design a collisional model in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and precisely control the strength of the effects by changing the degree of correlation in the environment and its time of interaction with the qubit. We also show how these effects can be hidden by the limited resolution of the measurements performed on the qubit. The experiment reinforces NMR as a test bed for the study of open quantum systems and the simulation of their classical counterparts. PMID:27669652

  5. NMR spectral analysis using prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Kigawa, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    Signal assignment is a fundamental step for analyses of protein structure and dynamics with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Main-chain signal assignment is achieved with a sequential assignment method and/or an amino-acid selective stable isotope labeling (AASIL) method. Combinatorial selective labeling (CSL) methods, as well as our labeling strategy, stable isotope encoding (SiCode), were developed to reduce the required number of labeled samples, since one of the drawbacks of AASIL is that many samples are needed. Signal overlapping in NMR spectra interferes with amino-acid determination by CSL and SiCode. Since spectral deconvolution by peak fitting with a gradient method cannot resolve closely overlapped signals, we developed a new method to perform both peak fitting and amino acid determination simultaneously, with a replica exchange Monte Carlo method, incorporating prior knowledge of stable-isotope labeling ratios and the amino-acid sequence of the protein.

  6. NMR-based diffusion lattice imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laun, Frederik Bernd; Müller, Lars; Kuder, Tristan Anselm

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion experiments are widely employed as they yield information about structures hindering the diffusion process, e.g., about cell membranes. While it has been shown in recent articles that these experiments can be used to determine the shape of closed pores averaged over a volume of interest, it is still an open question how much information can be gained in open well-connected systems. In this theoretical work, it is shown that the full structure information of connected periodic systems is accessible. To this end, the so-called "SEquential Rephasing by Pulsed field-gradient Encoding N Time intervals" (SERPENT) sequence is used, which employs several diffusion encoding gradient pulses with different amplitudes. Two two-dimensional solid matrices that are surrounded by an NMR-visible medium are considered: a hexagonal lattice of cylinders and a rectangular lattice of isosceles triangles.

  7. Quantitative calibration of radiofrequency NMR Stark effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.; Kempf, James G.

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) Stark responses can occur in quadrupolar nuclei for an electric field oscillating at twice the usual NMR frequency (2ω0). Calibration of responses to an applied E field is needed to establish nuclear spins as probes of native E fields within material and molecular systems. We present an improved approach and apparatus for accurate measurement of quadrupolar Stark effects. Updated values of C14 (the response parameter in cubic crystals) were obtained for both 69Ga and 75As in GaAs. Keys to improvement include a modified implementation of voltage dividers to assess the 2ω0 amplitude, |E|, and the stabilization of divider response by reduction of stray couplings in 2ω0 circuitry. Finally, accuracy was enhanced by filtering sets of |E| through a linear response function that we established for the radiofrequency amplifier. Our approach is verified by two types of spectral results. Steady-state 2ω0 excitation to presaturate NMR spectra yielded C14 = (2.59 ± 0.06) × 1012 m-1 for 69Ga at room-temperature and 14.1 T. For 75As, we obtained (3.1 ± 0.1) × 1012 m-1. Both values reconcile with earlier results from 77 K and below 1 T, whereas current experiments are at room temperature and 14.1 T. Finally, we present results where few-microsecond pulses of the 2ω0 field induced small (tens of Hz) changes in high-resolution NMR line shapes. There too, spectra collected vs |E| agree with the model for response, further establishing the validity of our protocols to specify |E|.

  8. Water absorption in mortar determined by NMR.

    PubMed

    Pel, L; Hazrati, K; Kopinga, K; Marchand, J

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) offers the possibility to determine moisture profiles in porous building materials. Moreover, the relaxation of the nuclear magnetic resonance signal can provide additional information on the water distribution in the microstructure. For mortar, it is shown that the transverse relaxation yields information on the distribution of water in the gel pores and capillary pores. Moisture profiles and relaxation were measured during water absorption. The effect of the drying treatment on the microstructure and the water absorption was investigated.

  9. Protein NMR structures refined without NOE data.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyojung; Kim, Tae-Rae; Ahn, SeonJoo; Ji, Sunyoung; Lee, Jinhyuk

    2014-01-01

    The refinement of low-quality structures is an important challenge in protein structure prediction. Many studies have been conducted on protein structure refinement; the refinement of structures derived from NMR spectroscopy has been especially intensively studied. In this study, we generated flat-bottom distance potential instead of NOE data because NOE data have ambiguity and uncertainty. The potential was derived from distance information from given structures and prevented structural dislocation during the refinement process. A simulated annealing protocol was used to minimize the potential energy of the structure. The protocol was tested on 134 NMR structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) that also have X-ray structures. Among them, 50 structures were used as a training set to find the optimal "width" parameter in the flat-bottom distance potential functions. In the validation set (the other 84 structures), most of the 12 quality assessment scores of the refined structures were significantly improved (total score increased from 1.215 to 2.044). Moreover, the secondary structure similarity of the refined structure was improved over that of the original structure. Finally, we demonstrate that the combination of two energy potentials, statistical torsion angle potential (STAP) and the flat-bottom distance potential, can drive the refinement of NMR structures.

  10. NMR Studies of Cartilage Dynamics, Diffusion, Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huster, Daniel; Schiller, Jurgen; Naji, Lama; Kaufmann Jorn; Arnold, Klaus

    An increasing number of people is suffering from rheumatic diseases, and, therefore, methods of early diagnosis of joint degeneration are urgently required. For their establishment, however, an improved knowledge about the molecular organisation of cartilage would be helpful. Cartilage consists of three main components: Water, collagen and chondroitin sulfate (CS) that is (together with further polysaccharides and proteins) a major constituent of the proteoglycans of cartilage. 1H and 13C MAS (magic-angle spinning) NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) opened new perspectives for the study of the macromolecular components in cartilage. We have primarily studied the mobilities of CS and collagen in bovine nasal and pig articular cartilage (that differ significantly in their collagen/polysaccharide content) by measuring 13C NMR relaxation times as well as the corresponding 13C CP (cross polarisation) MAS NMR spectra. These data clearly indicate that the mobility of cartilage macromolecules is broadly distributed from almost completely rigid (collagen) to highly mobile (polysaccharides), which lends cartilage its mechanical strength and shock-absorbing properties.

  11. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  12. Discrete analysis of stochastic NMR.II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. T. S.; Rods, M. S.; Newmark, R. D.; Budinger, T. F.

    Stochastic NMR is an efficient technique for high-field in vivo imaging and spectroscopic studies where the peak RF power required may be prohibitively high for conventional pulsed NMR techniques. A stochastic NMR experiment excites the spin system with a sequence of RF pulses where the flip angles or the phases of the pulses are samples of a discrete stochastic process. In a previous paper the stochastic experiment was analyzed and analytic expressions for the input-output cross-correlations, average signal power, and signal spectral density were obtained for a general stochastic RF excitation. In this paper specific cases of excitation with random phase, fixed flip angle, and excitation with two random components in quadrature are analyzed. The input-output cross-correlation for these two types of excitations is shown to be Lorentzian. Line broadening is the only spectral distortion as the RF excitation power is increased. The systematic noise power is inversely proportional to the number of data points N used in the spectral reconstruction. The use of a complete maximum length sequence (MLS) may improve the signal-to-systematic-noise ratio by 20 dB relative to random binary excitation, but peculiar features in the higher-order autocorrelations of MLS cause noise-like distortion in the reconstructed spectra when the excitation power is high. The amount of noise-like distortion depends on the choice of the MLS generator.

  13. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    DOE PAGES

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectlymore » predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.« less

  14. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2015-08-01

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD-NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases (15)N-(1)H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD-NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include (1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the discriminating power score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and (2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta. PMID:26081575

  15. NMR spectroscopy of experimentally shocked single crystal quartz: A reexamination of the NMR shock barometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiske, P. S.; Gratz, A. J.; Nellis, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Cygan and others report a broadening of the Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) peak for synthetic quartz powders with increasing shock pressure which they propose as a shock wave barometer for natural systems. These results are expanded by studying single crystal quartz shocked to 12 and 33 GPa using the 6.5 m two-stage light-gas gun at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Our NMR results differ substantially from those of Cygan and others and suggest that the proposed shock wave barometer may require refinement. The difference in results between this study and that of Cygan and others is most likely caused by different starting materials (single crystal vs. powder) and different shock loading histories. NMR results from single crystal studies may be more applicable to natural systems.

  16. Protein Structure Determination Using Protein Threading and Sparse NMR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, O.H.; Einstein, J.R.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-11-14

    It is well known that the NMR method for protein structure determination applies to small proteins and that its effectiveness decreases very rapidly as the molecular weight increases beyond about 30 kD. We have recently developed a method for protein structure determination that can fully utilize partial NMR data as calculation constraints. The core of the method is a threading algorithm that guarantees to find a globally optimal alignment between a query sequence and a template structure, under distance constraints specified by NMR/NOE data. Our preliminary tests have demonstrated that a small number of NMR/NOE distance restraints can significantly improve threading performance in both fold recognition and threading-alignment accuracy, and can possibly extend threading's scope of applicability from structural homologs to structural analogs. An accurate backbone structure generated by NMR-constrained threading can then provide a significant amount of structural information, equivalent to that provided by the NMR method with many NMR/NOE restraints; and hence can greatly reduce the amount of NMR data typically required for accurate structure determination. Our preliminary study suggests that a small number of NMR/NOE restraints may suffice to determine adequately the all-atom structure when those restraints are incorporated in a procedure combining threading, modeling of loops and sidechains, and molecular dynamics simulation. Potentially, this new technique can expand NMR's capability to larger proteins.

  17. NMR and EPR Studies of Chloroiron(III) Tetraphenylchlorin and Its Complexes with Imidazoles and Pyridines of Widely Differing Basicities

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Sheng; Shokhireva, Tatjana Kh.; Lichtenberger, Dennis L.; Walker, F. Ann

    2008-01-01

    The NMR and EPR spectra of two bis-imidazole and three bis-pyridine complexes of tetraphenylchlorinatoiron(III), [(TPC)Fe(L)2]+ (L = Im-d4, 2-MeHIm, 4-Me2NPy, Py and 4-CNPy) have been investigated. The full resonance assignments of the [(TPC)Fe(L)2]+ complexes of this study have been made from COSY and NOESY experiments and ADF calculations. Unlike the [(OEC)Fe(L)2]+ complexes reported previously (Cai, S.; Lichtenberger, D. L.; Walker, F. A. Inorg. Chem. 2005, 44, 1890-1903), the NMR data for the [(TPC)Fe(L)2]+ complexes of this study indicate that the ground state is S = ½ for each bis-ligand complex, whereas a higher spin state was present at NMR temperatures for the Py and 4-CNPy complexes of (OEC)Fe(III). The pyrrole-8,17 and pyrroline-H of all [TPCFe(L)2]+ show large magnitude chemical shifts (hence indicating large spin density on the adjacent carbons that are part of the π system), while pyrrole-12,13-CH2 and -7,18-CH2 protons show much smaller chemical shifts, as predicted by the spin densities obtained from ADF calculations. The magnitude of the chemical shifts decreases with decreasing donor ability of the substituted pyridine ligands, with the non-hindered imidazole ligand having slightly larger magnitude chemical shifts than the most basic pyridine, even though its basicity is significantly lower (4-Me2NPyH+ pKa = 9.7, H2Im+ pKa = 6.65 (adjusted for the statistical factor of 2 protons)). The temperature dependence of the chemical shifts of all but the 4-Me2NPy bis-ligand complexes studied over the temperature range of the NMR investigations shows that most of them have mixed (dxy)2(dxz,dyz)3/(dxzdyz)4(dxy)1 electron configurations that cannot be resolved by temperature-dependent fitting of the proton chemical shifts, with a S = 3/2 excited state in each case that in most cases lies at more than kT at room temperature above the ground state. The observed pattern of chemical shifts of the 4-CNPy complex and analysis of the temperature dependence

  18. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use. PMID:24091140

  19. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  20. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  1. Direct Comparison of (19)F qNMR and (1)H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin; He, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR ((1)H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR ((19)F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both (19)F and (1)H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that (19)F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to (1)H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from (19)F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. (19)F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  2. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  3. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes.

  4. NMR study of magnetism and superparamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shaojie

    The research described in this dissertation is concerned with two different types of magnetic materials. Both types of systems involve competing interactions between transition metal ions. New approaches involving magnetic resonance in the large hyperfine fields at nuclear sites have been developed. The interactions responsible for the properties that have been investigated in the materials studied are geometric frustration in an insulator and ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions in a metal alloy. Further details are given below. The extended kagome frustrated system YBaCo4O7 has 2D kagome and triangular lattices of Co ions stacked along the c-axis. Antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering accompanied by a structural transition has been reported in the literature. From a zero field (ZF) NMR single crystal rotation experiment, we have obtained the Co spin configurations for both the kagome and triangular layers. A 'spin-flop' configuration between the spins on the kagome layer and the spins on the triangular layer is indicated by our results. Our NMR findings are compared with neutron scattering results for this intriguing frustrated AF spin system. The non-stoichiometric oxygenated sister compound YBaCo4O7.1 has application potential for oxygen storage. While, its' magnetic properties are quite different from those of the stoichiometric compound, in spite of their similar structures of alternating kagome and triangular Co layers. Various techniques, including ZF NMR have been used to investigate the spin dynamics and spin configuration in a single crystal of YBaCo4O7.1. A magnetic transition at 80 K is observed, which is interpreted as the freezing out of spins in the triangular layers. At low temperatures (below 50 K), the spin dynamics persists and a fraction of spins in the kagome layers form a viscous spin liquid. Below 10 K, a glass-like spin structure forms and a large distribution of spin correlation times are suggested by nuclear spin lattice relaxation

  5. Lithium Polymer Electrolytes and Solid State NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkeley, Emily R.

    2004-01-01

    Research is being done at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) developing new kinds of batteries that do not depend on a solution. Currently, batteries use liquid electrolytes containing lithium. Problems with the liquid electrolyte are (1) solvents used can leak out of the battery, so larger, more restrictive, packages have to be made, inhibiting the diversity of application and decreasing the power density; (2) the liquid is incompatible with the lithium metal anode, so alternative, less efficient, anodes are required. The Materials Department at GRC has been working to synthesize polymer electrolytes that can replace the liquid electrolytes. The advantages are that polymer electrolytes do not have the potential to leak so they can be used for a variety of tasks, small or large, including in the space rover or in space suits. The polymers generated by Dr. Mary Ann Meador's group are in the form of rod -coil structures. The rod aspect gives the polymer structural integrity, while the coil makes it flexible. Lithium ions are used in these polymers because of their high mobility. The coils have repeating units of oxygen which stabilize the positive lithium by donating electron density. This aids in the movement of the lithium within the polymer, which contributes to higher conductivity. In addition to conductivity testing, these polymers are characterized using DSC, TGA, FTIR, and solid state NMR. Solid state NMR is used in classifying materials that are not soluble in solvents, such as polymers. The NMR spins the sample at a magic angle (54.7') allowing the significant peaks to emerge. Although solid state NMR is a helpful technique in determining bonding, the process of preparing the sample and tuning it properly are intricate jobs that require patience; especially since each run takes about six hours. The NMR allows for the advancement of polymer synthesis by showing if the expected results were achieved. Using the NMR, in addition to looking at polymers, allows for

  6. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  7. Measurement of vorticity diffusion by NMR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer R; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-05-01

    In a Newtonian fluid, vorticity diffuses at a rate determined by the kinematic viscosity. Here we use rapid NMR velocimetry, based on a RARE sequence, to image the time-dependent velocity field on startup of a fluid-filled cylinder and therefore measure the diffusion of vorticity. The results are consistent with the solution to the vorticity diffusion equation where the angular velocity on the outside surface of the fluid, at the cylinder's rotating wall, is fixed. This method is a means of measuring kinematic viscosity for low viscosity fluids without the need to measure stress. PMID:20189854

  8. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils. PMID:26453215

  9. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils.

  10. MULTIPLE-QUANTUM NMR IN SOLIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Y-S.

    1982-11-01

    Time domain multiple-quantum (MQ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for spectral simplification and for providing new information on molecular dynamics. In this thesis, applications of MQ NMR are presented and show distinctly the advantages of this method over the conventional single-quantum NMR. Chapter 1 introduces the spin Hamiltonians, the density matrix formalism and some basic concepts of MQ NMR spectroscopy. In chapter 2, {sup 14}N double-quantum coherence is observed with high sensitivity in isotropic solution, using only the magnetization of bound protons. Spin echoes are used to obtain the homogeneous double-quantum spectrum and to suppress a large H{sub 2}O solvent signal. Chapter 3 resolves the main difficulty in observing high MQ transitions in solids. Due to the profusion of spin transitions in a solid, individual lines are unresolved. Excitation and detection of high quantum transitions by normal schemes are thus difficult. To ensure that overlapping lines add constructively and thereby to enhance sensitivity, time-reversal pulse sequences are used to generate all lines in phase. Up to 22-quantum {sup 1}H absorption in solid adamantane is observed. A time dependence study shows an increase in spin correlations as the excitation time increased. In chapter 4, a statistical theory of MQ second moments is developed for coupled spins of spin I = 1/2. The model reveals that the ratio of the average dipolar coupling to the rms value largely determines the dependence of second moments on the number of quanta. The results of this model are checked against computer-calculated and experimental second moments, and show good agreement. A simple scheme is proposed in chapter 5 for sensitivity improvement in a MQ experiment. The scheme involves acquiring all of the signal energy available in the detection period by applying pulsed spinlocking and sampling between pulses. Using this technique on polycrystalline adamantane, a large

  11. NMR measurements of intracellular ions in hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veniero, Joseph C.; Gupta, R. K.

    1993-08-01

    The NMR methods for the measurement of intracellular free Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and H+ are introduced. The recent literature is then presented showing applications of these methods to cells and tissues from hypertensive animal model systems, and humans with essential hypertension. The results support the hypothesis of consistent derangement of the intracellular ionic environment in hypertension. The theory that this derangement may be a common link in the disease states of high blood pressure and abnormal insulin and glucose metabolism, which are often associated clinically, is discussed.

  12. A NMR characterisation of a banded sandstone.

    PubMed

    Bolam, A C; Packer, K J

    1998-01-01

    1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have been carried out on a banded sandstone to investigate the effects of structural inhomogeneities on the fluid dynamics of the sample as a whole. The results obtained from average propagator measurements (the probability of a displacement z in a time delta or P delta (z)) using pulsed-field-gradient techniques have been compared to those obtained from a study of a homogeneous sandstone. Relaxation has been used to derive the pore sizes for the differing bands and have been found to correlate with flow velocities within the bands.

  13. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  14. On the sensitivity of running-fluid NMR magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, V. V.; Dudkin, V. I.; Petrov, A. A.; Myazin, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    A new procedure for determining the sensitivity of running-fluid NMR magnetometers is considered. The procedure is based on mathematical processing of experimental data that are related to measuring the gradient of a nutation-line slope at the point at which an inverted NMR signal crosses zero. The procedure allows one to determine the sensitivity of running-fluid NMR magnetometers for resonance frequencies of magnetic-field measurements within a range of 0.5 Hz to 840 MHz.

  15. Touch NMR: An NMR Data Processing Application for the iPad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Qiyue; Chen, Zhiwei; Yan, Zhiping; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful technologies to aid research in numerous scientific disciplines. With the development of consumer electronics, mobile devices have played increasingly important roles in our daily life. However, there is currently no application available for mobile devices able to…

  16. NMR-based dynamics of free glycosaminoglycans in solution.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2014-08-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) comprise a special class of complex carbohydrates endowed with numerous biological functions. Most of these functions are regulated by conformational arrangements or dynamical properties of GAGs in solution. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful technique used for dynamic analyses. Spin relaxation, scalar couplings, chemical shifts and nuclear Overhauser effect resonances are the commonest NMR parameters utilized in such analyses. Computational molecular dynamics are also very often employed in conjunction with, or restrained by, the NMR dataset. This report aims at describing the major NMR-based information available so far concerning the dynamical properties of free GAGs in solution.

  17. Rotational Doppler Effect and Barnett Field in Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudo, Hiroyuki; Harii, Kazuya; Matsuo, Mamoru; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Ono, Masao; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-04-01

    We report the observation of the rotational Doppler effect using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We have developed a coil-spinning technique that enables measurements by rotating a detector and fixing a sample. We found that the rotational Doppler effect gives rise to NMR frequency shifts equal to the rotation frequency. We formulate the rotational Doppler effect and the Barnett field using a vector model for the nuclear magnetic moment. This formulation reveals that, with just the sample rotating, both effects cancel each other, thereby explaining the absence of an NMR frequency shift in conventional sample-spinning NMR measurements.

  18. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  19. NMR measurements in solutions of dialkylimidazolium haloaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Saboungi, M.L.; Klingler, R.J.; Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

    1992-06-01

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 35}Cl NMR spectra of AlCl{sub 3}-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) melts were measured for initial compositions ranging from 50 to 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} at various temperatures. It was shown by changing the preaquisition delay time (DE value) that the dominant aluminum species are AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in the melt formed by mixing 50 mol % with EMIC and Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 7}{sup {minus}} in the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} melt. In the equimolar mixture, the chemical shift of {sup 27}Al NMR spectrum is 103.28 ppm and the line width is 22.83Hz. In the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixture, the chemical shift is 103.41 ppm and the line width is 2624Hz. A third species observed at 97 ppm in the {sup 27}Al spectra for the 55 and 60 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixtures is identified to be a product of the reaction with residual water. The relaxation rates for each species in the melts were determined.

  20. NMR investigation of iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    We report NMR investigation of the electronic properties of iron-based superconductors with primary focus on the 11 (FeSe) and 122 (Co-doped BaFe2As2) systems. From the ^77Se and ^75As NMR Knight shift K measurements, we will deduce the intrinsic temperature and concentration dependences of the uniform spin susceptibility, χspin, in these systems. We will also demonstrate the evolution of antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations (AFSF) as a function of pressure (in FeSe) or the doping level (in Ba[Fe1-xCox]2As2). Our results show that the optimal superconducting phase exists in close proximity with SDW order; superconductivity sets in only after AFSF grow toward Tc. This work was carried out in collaboration with F.L. Ning and K. Ahilan (McMaster), T. McQueen and R.J. Cava (Princeton), A.S. Sefat, M.A. McGuire, B. C. Sales, and D. Mandrus (Oak Ridge), P. Cheng, B. Shen, and H.-H Wen (Chinese Academy of Sciences). The work at McMaster was supported by NSERC, CIFAR, and CFI.