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Sample records for 1p 1d 2s

  1. Measurement of Absolute Cross Sections for Excitation of the 2s^2 ^1S - 2s2p ^1P^o Transition in O^4+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Berrington, K. A.

    2005-05-01

    Experimental electron excitation cross sections are reported for the 2s^2 1S - 2s2p^ 1P^o transitions in O^4+ located at 19.689 eV. The JPL electron-cyclotron resonance ion source is utilized [1], along with the electron energy loss method, in a merged electron-ion beams geometry[2]. The center-of-mass interaction energies for the measurements are in the range 18 eV (below threshold) to 30 eV. Data are compared with results of a 26-term R-matrix calculation that includes fine structure explicitly via the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian [3]. There is good agreement with theoretical results and with previous electron energy-loss measurements [3]. Clear resonance enhancement is observed in both experiment and theoretical results near threshold for this ^1S - ^1P^o transition. J. Lozano and N. Djuric acknowledge support through the NASA-NRC program. This work was carried out at JPL/Caltech and was supported by NASA. [1] J. B. Greenwood, S. J. Smith, A.Chutjian, and E. Pollack, Phys. Rev. A 59 1348, (1999). [2] A. Chutjian, Physica Scripta T110, 203 (2004). [3] M. Bannister et al., Int.J. Mass Spectrometry 192, 39 (1999).

  2. Differing susceptibility to autophagic degradation of two LC3-binding proteins: SQSTM1/p62 and TBC1D25/OATL1

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Satoshi; Uemura, Takefumi; Annoh, Hiromichi; Fujita, Naonobu; Waguri, Satoshi; Itoh, Takashi; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MAP1LC3/LC3 (a mammalian ortholog family of yeast Atg8) is a ubiquitin-like protein that is essential for autophagosome formation. LC3 is conjugated to phosphatidylethanolamine on phagophores and ends up distributed both inside and outside the autophagosome membrane. One of the well-known functions of LC3 is as a binding partner for receptor proteins, which target polyubiquitinated organelles and proteins to the phagophore through direct interaction with LC3 in selective autophagy, and their LC3-binding ability is essential for degradation of the polyubiquitinated substances. Although a number of LC3-binding proteins have been identified, it is unknown whether they are substrates of autophagy or how their interaction with LC3 is regulated. We previously showed that one LC3-binding protein, TBC1D25/OATL1, plays an inhibitory role in the maturation step of autophagosomes and that this function depends on its binding to LC3. Interestingly, TBC1D25 seems not to be a substrate of autophagy, despite being present on the phagophore. In this study we investigated the molecular basis for the escape of TBC1D25 from autophagic degradation by performing a chimeric analysis between TBC1D25 and SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1), and the results showed that mutant TBC1D25 with an intact LC3-binding site can become an autophagic substrate when TBC1D25 is forcibly oligomerized. In addition, an ultrastructural analysis showed that TBC1D25 is mainly localized outside autophagosomes, whereas an oligomerized TBC1D25 mutant rather uniformly resides both inside and outside the autophagosomes. Our findings indicate that oligomerization is a key factor in the degradation of LC3-binding proteins and suggest that lack of oligomerization ability of TBC1D25 results in its asymmetric localization at the outer autophagosome membrane. PMID:26902585

  3. Photon transitions in {psi}(2S) decays to {chi}{sub cJ}(1P) and {eta}{sub c}(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Athar, S.B.; Avery, P.; Breva-Newell, L.; Patel, R.; Potlia, V.; Stoeck, H.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Cawlfield, C.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Gollin, G.D.; Karliner, I.; Kim, D.; Lowrey, N.; Naik, P.; Sedlack, C.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Williams, J.; Wiss, J.

    2004-12-01

    We have studied the inclusive photon spectrum in {psi}(2S) decays using the CLEO III detector. We present the most precise measurements of electric dipole (E1) photon transition rates for {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub cJ}(1P) (J=0,1,2). We also confirm the hindered magnetic dipole (M1) transition, {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}(1S). However, the direct M1 transition {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}(2S) observed by the Crystal Ball as a narrow peak at a photon energy of 91 MeV is not found in our data.

  4. Dimensional heterostructures of 1D CdS/2D ZnIn2S4 composited with 2D graphene: designed synthesis and superior photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qingyong; Wu, Wei; Liu, Jun; Wu, Zhaohui; Yao, Weijing; Ding, Jin; Jiang, Changzhong

    2017-02-28

    The development of photocatalysts with superior photoactivity and stability for the degradation of organic dyes is very important for environmental remediation. In this study, we have presented a multidimensional (1D and 2D) structured CdS/ZnIn2S4/RGO photocatalyst with superior photocatalytic performance. The CdS/ZnIn2S4 helical dimensional heterostructures (DHS) were prepared via a facile solvothermal synthesis method to facilitate the epitaxial growth of 2D ZnIn2S4 nanosheets on 1D CdS nanowires. Ultrathin 2D ZnIn2S4 nanosheets have grown uniformly and perpendicular to the surface of 1D CdS nanowires. The as-obtained 1D/2D CdS/ZnIn2S4 helical DHS show good photocatalytic properties for malachite green (MG). Subsequently, 2D reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was introduced into the 1D/2D CdS/ZnIn2S4 helical DHS as a co-catalyst. The photoactivity and stability of the CdS/ZnIn2S4/RGO composites are significantly improved after 6 cycles. The enhanced photoactivity can be attributed to the high surface area of RGO, the improved adsorption of organic dyes and the efficient spatial separation of photo-induced charge carriers. The transfer of photo-generated electrons from the interface of CdS and ZnIn2S4 to RGO also restricted the photocorrosion of metal sulfide, suggesting an improved stability of the reused CdS/ZnIn2S4/RGO composited photocatalyst.

  5. Antisite Defects in Layered Multiferroic CuCr0.9In0.1P2S6

    DOE PAGES

    He, Qian; Belianinov, Alex; Dziaugys, Andrius; ...

    2015-10-06

    The CuCr1-xInxP2S6 system represents a large family of metal chalcogenophosphates that are unique and promising candidates for 2D materials with functionalities such as ferroelectricity. We carried out detailed microstructural and chemical characterization of these compounds using aberration-corrected STEM, in order to understand the origin of these different ordering phenomena. Quantitative STEM-HAADF imaging and analysis identified the stacking order of an 8-layer thin flake, which leads to the identification of anti-site In3+(Cu+) doping. We believe that these findings will pave the way towards understanding the ferroic coupling phenomena in van der Waals lamellar compounds, as well as the potential applications inmore » 2-D electronics.« less

  6. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2) attenuates reactive oxygen species formation and inhibits cell death: implications for otoprotective therapy

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Deron R.; Reolo, Marie J. Y.; Peh, Yee Xin; Wang, Wei; Lee, Chang-Wook; Rivera, Rich; Paterson, Ian C.; Chun, Jerold

    2016-01-01

    Ototoxic drugs, such as platinum-based chemotherapeutics, often lead to permanent hearing loss through apoptosis of neuroepithelial hair cells and afferent neurons of the cochlea. There is no approved therapy for preventing or reversing this process. Our previous studies identified a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), S1P2, as a potential mediator of otoprotection. We therefore sought to identify a pharmacological approach to prevent cochlear degeneration via activation of S1P2. The cochleae of S1pr2−/− knockout mice were evaluated for accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. This showed that loss of S1P2 results in accumulation of ROS that precedes progressive cochlear degeneration as previously reported. These findings were supported by in vitro cell-based assays to evaluate cell viability, induction of apoptosis, and accumulation of ROS following activation of S1P2 in the presence of cisplatin. We show for the first time, that activation of S1P2 with a selective receptor agonist increases cell viability and reduces cisplatin-mediated cell death by reducing ROS. Cumulatively, these results suggest that S1P2 may serve as a therapeutic target for attenuating cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity. PMID:27080739

  7. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2) attenuates reactive oxygen species formation and inhibits cell death: implications for otoprotective therapy.

    PubMed

    Herr, Deron R; Reolo, Marie J Y; Peh, Yee Xin; Wang, Wei; Lee, Chang-Wook; Rivera, Rich; Paterson, Ian C; Chun, Jerold

    2016-04-15

    Ototoxic drugs, such as platinum-based chemotherapeutics, often lead to permanent hearing loss through apoptosis of neuroepithelial hair cells and afferent neurons of the cochlea. There is no approved therapy for preventing or reversing this process. Our previous studies identified a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), S1P2, as a potential mediator of otoprotection. We therefore sought to identify a pharmacological approach to prevent cochlear degeneration via activation of S1P2. The cochleae of S1pr2(-/-) knockout mice were evaluated for accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. This showed that loss of S1P2 results in accumulation of ROS that precedes progressive cochlear degeneration as previously reported. These findings were supported by in vitro cell-based assays to evaluate cell viability, induction of apoptosis, and accumulation of ROS following activation of S1P2 in the presence of cisplatin. We show for the first time, that activation of S1P2 with a selective receptor agonist increases cell viability and reduces cisplatin-mediated cell death by reducing ROS. Cumulatively, these results suggest that S1P2 may serve as a therapeutic target for attenuating cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity.

  8. Co-nucleus 1D/2D Heterostructures with Bi2S3 Nanowire and MoS2 Monolayer: One-Step Growth and Defect-Induced Formation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; Huang, Le; Li, Bo; Wang, Xiaoting; Zhou, Ziqi; Li, Jingbo; Wei, Zhongming

    2016-09-27

    Heterostructures constructed by low-dimensional (such as 0D, 1D, and 2D) materials have opened up opportunities for exploring interesting physical properties and versatile (opto)electronics. Recently, 2D/2D heterostructures, in particular, atomically thin graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenides, including graphene/MoS2, WSe2/MoS2, and WS2/WSe2, were efficiently prepared (by transfer techniques, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth, etc.) and systematically studied. In contrast, investigation of 1D/2D heterostructures was still very challenging and rarely reported, and the understanding of such heterostructures was also not well established. Herein, we demonstrate the one-step growth of a heterostructure on the basis of a 1D-Bi2S3 nanowire and a 2D-MoS2 monolayer through the CVD method. Multimeans were employed, and the results proved the separated growth of a Bi2S3 nanowire and a MoS2 sheet in the heterostructure rather than forming a BixMo1-xSy alloy due to their large lattice mismatch. Defect-induced co-nucleus growth, which was an important growth mode in 1D/2D heterostructures, was also experimentally confirmed and systematically investigated in our research. Such 1D/2D heterostructures were further fabricated and utilized in (opto)electronic devices, such as field-effect transistors and photodetectors, and revealed their potential for multifunctional design in electrical properties. The direct growth of such nanostructures will help us to gain a better comprehension of these specific configurations and allow device functionalities in potential applications.

  9. A new potential energy surface for the H2S system and dynamics study on the S(1D) + H2(X1Σg+) reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jiuchuang; He, Di; Chen, Maodu

    2015-01-01

    We constructed a new global potential energy surface (PES) for the electronic ground state (1A′) of H2S based on 21,300 accurate ab initio energy points over a large configuration space. The ab initio energies are obtained from multireference configuration interaction calculations with a Davidson correction using basis sets of quadruple zeta quality. The neural network method is applied to fit the PES, and the root mean square error of fitting is small (1.68 meV). Time-dependent wave packet studies for the S(1D) + H2(X1Σg+) → H(2S) + SH(X2Π) reaction on the new PES are conducted to study the reaction dynamics. The calculated integral cross sections decrease with increasing collision energy and remain fairly constant within the high collision energy range. Both forward and backward scatterings can be observed as expected for a barrierless reaction with a deep well on the PES. The calculated integral cross sections and differential cross sections are in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:26435516

  10. Merged-beam measurements of absolute cross sections for electron-impact excitation of S{sup 4+} (3s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{yields}3s3p {sup 1}P) and S{sup 5+} (3s {sup 2}S{yields}3p {sup 2}P)

    SciTech Connect

    Wallbank, B.; Bannister, M. E.; Krause, H. F.; Chung, Y.-S.; Smith, A. C. H.; Djuric, N.; Dunn, G. H.

    2007-05-15

    Absolute cross sections for electron-impact excitation of the dipole-allowed transitions S{sup 4+} (3s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{yields}3s3p {sup 1}P) and S{sup 5+} (3s {sup 2}S{yields}3p {sup 2}P) were measured near threshold using the merged electron-ion beams energy-loss technique. Although the magnitudes of the measured cross sections are in reasonable agreement with available theoretical data, the experimental data indicate that the contributions of dielectronic resonances in the near-threshold region are underestimated by these calculations.

  11. Quark-Hadron Duality in Spin Structure Functions $g_1^p$ and $g_1^d$

    SciTech Connect

    P.E. Bosted; K.V. Dharmawardane; G.E. Dodge; T.A. Forest; S.E. Kuhn; Y. Prok

    2006-07-25

    New measurements of the spin structure functions of the proton and deuteron g{sub 1}{sup p}(x, Q{sup 2}) and g{sub 1}{sup d}(x, Q{sup 2}) in the nucleon resonance region are compared with extrapolations of target-mass-corrected next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD fits to higher energy data. Averaged over the entire resonance region (W < 2 GeV), the data and QCD fits are in good agreement in both magnitude and Q{sup 2} dependence for Q{sup 2} > 1.7 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}. This ''global'' duality appears to result from cancellations among the prominent ''local'' resonance regions: in particular strong {sigma}{sub 3/2} contributions in the {Delta}(1232) region appear to be compensated by strong {sigma}{sub 1/2} contributions in the resonance region centered on 1.5 GeV. These results are encouraging for the extension of NLO QCD fits to lower W and Q{sup 2} than have been used previously.

  12. Local duality in spin structure functions g1(p) and g1(d)

    SciTech Connect

    Yelena Prok

    2006-02-01

    Inclusive double spin asymmetries obtained by scattering polarized electrons off polarized protons and deuterons have been analyzed to address the issue of quark hadron duality in the polarized spin structure functions gp 1 and gd 1. A polarized electron beam, solid polarized NH3 and ND3 targets and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) in Hall B were used to collect the data. The resulting gp 1 and gd 1 were averaged over the nucleon resonance energy region (M

  13. Exit Strategies: S1P Signaling and T Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Baeyens, Audrey; Fang, Victoria; Chen, Cynthia; Schwab, Susan R

    2015-12-01

    Whereas the role of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) in T cell egress and the regulation of S1P gradients between lymphoid organs and circulatory fluids in homeostasis are increasingly well understood, much remains to be learned about S1P signaling and distribution during an immune response. Recent data suggest that the role of S1PR1 in directing cells from tissues into circulatory fluids is reprised again and again, particularly in guiding activated T cells from non-lymphoid tissues into lymphatics. Conversely, S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2), which antagonizes migration towards chemokines, confines cells within tissues. Here we review the current understanding of the roles of S1P signaling in activated T cell migration. In this context, we outline open questions, particularly regarding the shape of S1P gradients in different tissues in homeostasis and inflammation, and discuss recent strategies to measure S1P.

  14. Highly selective and potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 (S1P1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Vachal, Petr; Toth, Leslie M; Hale, Jeffrey J; Yan, Lin; Mills, Sander G; Chrebet, Gary L; Koehane, Carol A; Hajdu, Richard; Milligan, James A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Mandala, Suzanne

    2006-07-15

    Novel series of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists were developed through a systematic SAR aimed to achieve high selectivity for a single member of the S1P family of receptors, S1P1. The optimized structure represents a highly S1P1-selective and efficacious agonist: S1P1/S1P2, S1P1/S1P3, S1P1/S1P4>10,000-fold, S1P1/S1P5>600-fold, while EC50 (S1P1) <0.2 nM. In vivo experiments are consistent with S1P1 receptor agonism alone being sufficient for achieving desired lymphocyte-lowering effect.

  15. Dnm1p-dependent peroxisome fission requires Caf4p, Mdv1p and Fis1p.

    PubMed

    Motley, Alison M; Ward, Gemma P; Hettema, Ewald H

    2008-05-15

    Yeast peroxisomes multiply by fission. Fission requires two dynamin-related proteins, Dnm1p and Vps1p. Using an in vivo fission assay, we show that Dnm1p-dependent peroxisome fission requires Fis1p, Caf4p and Mdv1p. Fluorescence microscopy of cells expressing GFP-tagged Caf4p and Mdv1p revealed that their association with peroxisomes relies on Fis1p. Vps1p-dependent peroxisome fission occurs independently of these factors. Vps1p contributes most to fission of peroxisomes when cells are grown on glucose. Overexpression of Dnm1p suppresses the fission defect as long as Fis1p and either Mdv1p or Caf4p are present. Conversely, overexpression of Dnm1p does not restore the vacuolar fusion defect of vps1 cells and Vps1p overexpression does not restore the mitochondrial fission defect of dnm1 cells. These data show that Vps1p and Dnm1p are part of independent fission machineries. Because the contribution of Dnm1p to peroxisome fission appears to be more pronounced in cells that proliferate peroxisomes in response to mitochondrial dysfunction, Dnm1p might be part of the mechanism that coordinates mitochondrial and peroxisomal biogenesis.

  16. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) and S1P Signaling Pathway: Therapeutic Targets in Autoimmunity and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsing-Chuan; Han, May H

    2016-07-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and S1P receptors (S1PR) are ubiquitously expressed. S1P-S1PR signaling has been well characterized in immune trafficking and activation in innate and adaptive immune systems. However, the full extent of its involvement in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is not well understood. FTY720 (fingolimod), a non-selective S1PR modulator, significantly decreased annualized relapse rates in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). FTY720, which primarily targets S1P receptor 1 as a functional antagonist, arrests lymphocyte egress from secondary lymphoid tissues and reduces neuroinflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that FTY720 also decreases astrogliosis and promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation within the CNS and may have therapeutic benefit to prevent brain atrophy. Since S1P signaling is involved in multiple immune functions, therapies targeting S1P axis may be applicable to treat autoimmune diseases other than MS. Currently, over a dozen selective S1PR and S1P pathway modulators with potentially superior therapeutic efficacy and better side-effect profiles are in the pipeline of drug development. Furthermore, newly characterized molecules such as apolipoprotein M (ApoM) (S1P chaperon) and SPNS2 (S1P transporter) are also potential targets for treatment of autoimmune diseases. Finally, the application of therapies targeting S1P and S1P signaling pathways may be expanded to treat several other immune-mediated disorders (such as post-infectious diseases, post-stroke and post-stroke dementia) and inflammatory conditions beyond their application in primary autoimmune diseases.

  17. S1P control of endothelial integrity.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yuquan; Hla, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a lipid mediator produced by sphingolipid metabolism, promotes endothelial cell spreading, vascular maturation/stabilization, and barrier function. S1P is present at high concentrations in the circulatory system, whereas in tissues its levels are low. This so-called vascular S1P gradient is essential for S1P to regulate much physiological and pathophysiological progress such as the modulation of vascular permeability. Cellular sources of S1P in blood has only recently begun to be identified. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of S1P in regulating vascular integrity. In particular, we discuss the recent discovery of the endothelium-protective functions of HDL-bound S1P which is chaperoned by apolipoprotein M.

  18. Platelet and Erythrocyte Sources of S1P Are Redundant for Vascular Development and Homeostasis, but Both Rendered Essential After Plasma S1P Depletion in Anaphylactic Shock.

    PubMed

    Gazit, Salomé L; Mariko, Boubacar; Thérond, Patrice; Decouture, Benoit; Xiong, Yuquan; Couty, Ludovic; Bonnin, Philippe; Baudrie, Véronique; Le Gall, Sylvain M; Dizier, Blandine; Zoghdani, Nesrine; Ransinan, Jessica; Hamilton, Justin R; Gaussem, Pascale; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Chun, Jerold; Coughlin, Shaun R; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla; Hla, Timothy; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoit; Camerer, Eric

    2016-09-30

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling is essential for vascular development and postnatal vascular homeostasis. The relative importance of S1P sources sustaining these processes remains unclear. To address the level of redundancy in bioactive S1P provision to the developing and mature vasculature. S1P production was selectively impaired in mouse platelets, erythrocytes, endothelium, or smooth muscle cells by targeted deletion of genes encoding sphingosine kinases -1 and -2. S1P deficiency impaired aggregation and spreading of washed platelets and profoundly reduced their capacity to promote endothelial barrier function ex vivo. However, and in contrast to recent reports, neither platelets nor any other source of S1P was essential for vascular development, vascular integrity, or hemostasis/thrombosis. Yet rapid and profound depletion of plasma S1P during systemic anaphylaxis rendered both platelet- and erythrocyte-derived S1P essential for survival, with a contribution from blood endothelium observed only in the absence of circulating sources. Recovery was sensitive to aspirin in mice with but not without platelet S1P, suggesting that platelet activation and stimulus-response coupling is needed. S1P deficiency aggravated vasoplegia in this model, arguing a vital role for S1P in maintaining vascular resistance during recovery from circulatory shock. Accordingly, the S1P2 receptor mediated most of the survival benefit of S1P, whereas the endothelial S1P1 receptor was dispensable for survival despite its importance for maintaining vascular integrity. Although source redundancy normally secures essential S1P signaling in developing and mature blood vessels, profound depletion of plasma S1P renders both erythrocyte and platelet S1P pools necessary for recovery and high basal plasma S1P levels protective during anaphylactic shock. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. One-pot carbanionic synthesis of P1,P2-diglycosyl, P1,P1,P2-triglycosyl, and P1,P1,P2,P2-tetraribosyl methylenediphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Grison, Claude; Chibli, Hicham; Barthès, Nicolas; Coutrot, Philippe

    2006-10-13

    Novel lithiated carbanions derived from ethyl glycosyl- and diglycosyl methylphosphonates were used in a direct and convenient synthesis of P1,P2-diglycosyl, P1,P1,P2-triglycosyl, and P1,P1,P2,P2-tetraribosyl methylenediphosphonates involving a one-pot methylidenediphosphonylation of sugars.

  20. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) induces COX-2 expression and PGE2 formation via S1P receptor 2 in renal mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Völzke, Anja; Koch, Alexander; Meyer Zu Heringdorf, Dagmar; Huwiler, Andrea; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)-induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) formation in renal mesangial cells may provide potential therapeutic targets to treat inflammatory glomerular diseases. Thus, we evaluated the S1P-dependent signaling mechanisms which are responsible for enhanced COX-2 expression and PGE2 formation in rat mesangial cells under basal conditions. Furthermore, we investigated whether these mechanisms are operative in the presence of angiotensin II (Ang II) and of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Treatment of rat and human mesangial cells with S1P led to concentration-dependent enhanced expression of COX-2. Pharmacological and molecular biology approaches revealed that the S1P-dependent increase of COX-2 mRNA and protein expression was mediated via activation of S1P receptor 2 (S1P2). Further, inhibition of Gi and p42/p44 MAPK signaling, both downstream of S1P2, abolished the S1P-induced COX-2 expression. In addition, S1P/S1P2-dependent upregulation of COX-2 led to significantly elevated PGE2 levels, which were further potentiated in the presence of Ang II and IL-1β. A functional consequence downstream of S1P/S1P2 signaling is mesangial cell migration that is stimulated by S1P. Interestingly, inhibition of COX-2 by celecoxib and SC-236 completely abolished the migratory response. Overall, our results demonstrate that extracellular S1P induces COX-2 expression via activation of S1P2 and subsequent Gi and p42/p44 MAPK-dependent signaling in renal mesangial cells leading to enhanced PGE2 formation and cell migration that essentially requires COX-2. Thus, targeting S1P/S1P2 signaling pathways might be a novel strategy to treat renal inflammatory diseases.

  1. Carboxyarabinitol-1-P phosphatase of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Kobza, J.; Moore, B.d.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The activity of carboxyarabinitol-1-P (CA1P) phosphatase was detected in clarified stromal extracts by the generation of {sup 14}C-carboxyarabinitol from {sup 14}C-CA1P. Carboxyribitol-1-P dependent activity was 3% of the CA1P dependent activity, indicating the enzyme was specific for CA1P. Inclusion of DTT in the assay was required for maximum velocity, but it appears that the enzyme is not regulated by thioredoxin in vivo. Activity o f the CA1P phosphatase was stimulated by RuBP, NADPH and FBP, though the latter two metabolites were required at nonphysiological concentrations in order to achieve significant stimulation. Contrary to a previous report on purified tobacco enzyme, ATP stimulated the CA1P phosphatase activity. In the presence of 1 mM RuBP or ATP, rates of 2 or 3 {mu}mol mg{sup {minus}1} Chl h{sup {minus}1}, respectively, were observed at 1 mM CA1P. These rates were 3-4 fold higher than the rate observed in the absence of effectors and are 2-4 times the in vivo rate of degradation of CA1P during dark/light transitions. The rates from bean were about 7 fold higher than rates reported for the enzyme from tobacco. Changes in the levels of ATP and RuBP associated with dark/light transitions could modulate the enzyme activity in vivo, but it remains to be established if this is the only mechanism for the required regulation of the enzyme.

  2. 1p36 deletion syndrome: an update

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Valerie K; Zaveri, Hitisha P; Scott, Daryl A

    2015-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are the most common terminal deletions in humans. Medical problems commonly caused by terminal deletions of 1p36 include developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, short stature, distinctive facial features, brain anomalies, orofacial clefting, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. Although 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered clinically recognizable, there is significant phenotypic variation among affected individuals. This variation is due, at least in part, to the genetic heterogeneity seen in 1p36 deletions which include terminal and interstitial deletions of varying lengths located throughout the 30 Mb of DNA that comprise chromosome 1p36. Array-based copy number variant analysis can easily identify genomic regions of 1p36 that are deleted in an affected individual. However, predicting the phenotype of an individual based solely on the location and extent of their 1p36 deletion remains a challenge since most of the genes that contribute to 1p36-related phenotypes have yet to be identified. In addition, haploinsufficiency of more than one gene may contribute to some phenotypes. In this article, we review recent successes in the effort to map and identify the genes and genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36-related phenotypes. In particular, we highlight evidence implicating MMP23B, GABRD, SKI, PRDM16, KCNAB2, RERE, UBE4B, CASZ1, PDPN, SPEN, ECE1, HSPG2, and LUZP1 in various 1p36 deletion phenotypes. PMID:26345236

  3. 1p36 deletion syndrome: an update.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Valerie K; Zaveri, Hitisha P; Scott, Daryl A

    2015-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are the most common terminal deletions in humans. Medical problems commonly caused by terminal deletions of 1p36 include developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, short stature, distinctive facial features, brain anomalies, orofacial clefting, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. Although 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered clinically recognizable, there is significant phenotypic variation among affected individuals. This variation is due, at least in part, to the genetic heterogeneity seen in 1p36 deletions which include terminal and interstitial deletions of varying lengths located throughout the 30 Mb of DNA that comprise chromosome 1p36. Array-based copy number variant analysis can easily identify genomic regions of 1p36 that are deleted in an affected individual. However, predicting the phenotype of an individual based solely on the location and extent of their 1p36 deletion remains a challenge since most of the genes that contribute to 1p36-related phenotypes have yet to be identified. In addition, haploinsufficiency of more than one gene may contribute to some phenotypes. In this article, we review recent successes in the effort to map and identify the genes and genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36-related phenotypes. In particular, we highlight evidence implicating MMP23B, GABRD, SKI, PRDM16, KCNAB2, RERE, UBE4B, CASZ1, PDPN, SPEN, ECE1, HSPG2, and LUZP1 in various 1p36 deletion phenotypes.

  4. Monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gajecka, Marzena; Mackay, Katherine L; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2007-11-15

    Monosomy 1p36 results from a heterozygous deletion of the most distal chromosomal band on the short arm of chromosome 1. Occurring in approximately 1 in 5,000 live births, monosomy 1p36 is the most common terminal deletion observed in humans. Monosomy 1p36 is associated with mental retardation, developmental delay, hearing impairment, seizures, growth impairment, hypotonia, and heart defects. The syndrome is also characterized by several distinct dysmorphic features, including large anterior fontanels, microcephaly, brachycephaly, deep-set eyes, flat nose and nasal bridge, and pointed chin. Several genes have been proposed as causative for individual features of the phenotype. In addition, based upon molecular characterization of subjects with monosomy 1p36, several mechanisms for the generation and stabilization of terminal deletions have been proposed.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in acute lung injury: Role of S1P lyase.

    PubMed

    Ebenezer, David L; Fu, Panfeng; Suryadevara, Vidyani; Zhao, Yutong; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2017-01-01

    Cellular level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), the simplest bioactive sphingolipid, is tightly regulated by its synthesis catalyzed by sphingosine kinases (SphKs) 1 & 2 and degradation mediated by S1P phosphatases, lipid phosphate phosphatases, and S1P lyase. The pleotropic actions of S1P are attributed to its unique inside-out (extracellular) signaling via G-protein-coupled S1P1-5 receptors, and intracellular receptor independent signaling. Additionally, S1P generated in the nucleus by nuclear SphK2 modulates HDAC1/2 activity, regulates histone acetylation, and transcription of pro-inflammatory genes. Here, we present data on the role of S1P lyase mediated S1P signaling in regulating LPS-induced inflammation in lung endothelium. Blocking S1P lyase expression or activity attenuated LPS-induced histone acetylation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Degradation of S1P by S1P lyase generates Δ2-hexadecenal and ethanolamine phosphate and the long-chain fatty aldehyde produced in the cytoplasmic compartment of the endothelial cell seems to modulate histone acetylation pattern, which is different from the nuclear SphK2/S1P signaling and inhibition of HDAC1/2. These in vitro studies suggest that S1P derived long-chain fatty aldehyde may be an epigenetic regulator of pro-inflammatory genes in sepsis-induced lung inflammation. Trapping fatty aldehydes and other short chain aldehydes such as 4-hydroxynonenal derived from S1P degradation and lipid peroxidation, respectively by cell permeable agents such as phloretin or other aldehyde trapping agents may be useful in treating sepsis-induced lung inflammation via modulation of histone acetylation. .

  6. Measurement of absolute cross sections for excitation of the 2s(2) S-1 -> 2s2p P-1 degrees transition in O+4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Djuric, N.; Lozano, J. A.; Berrington, K. A.; Chutjian, A.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental cross sections are reported for the 1s(2)2s(2) S-1 -> 1s(2)2s2p P-1(o) transition in O+4 located at 19.689 eV. Use is made of the electron energy-loss method, using a merged electron-ion beam geometry. The center-of-mass interaction energies for the measurements in the S-1 -> P-1(o) transition are in the range 18 eV ( below the threshold) to 30 eV. Data are compared with other previous electron energy-loss measurements and with results of a 26 term R-matrix calculation that includes fine structure explicitly via the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. Clear resonance enhancement is observed in all experimental and theoretical results near the threshold for this S-1 -> P-1(o) transition.

  7. Nonequivalent Group Equating via 1-P HGLLM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Kwang-lee; Kamata, Akihito

    The quality of nonequivalent group equating by the one-parameter hierarchical generalized linear logistic model (1-P HGLLM) was examined by comparing it with: (1) traditional concurrent equating; (2) Stocking-Lord's method; and (3) multiple-group concurrent equating. Root mean squared errors (RMSEs) for item parameters indicated that there was no…

  8. The T1D Exchange clinic registry.

    PubMed

    Beck, Roy W; Tamborlane, William V; Bergenstal, Richard M; Miller, Kellee M; DuBose, Stephanie N; Hall, Callyn A

    2012-12-01

    The T1D Exchange includes a clinic-based registry, a patient-centric web site called Glu, and a biobank. The aim of the study was to describe the T1D Exchange clinic registry and provide an overview of participant characteristics. Data obtained through participant completion of a questionnaire and chart extraction include diabetes history, management, and monitoring; general health; lifestyle; family history; socioeconomic factors; medications; acute and chronic diabetic complications; other medical conditions; and laboratory results. Data were collected from 67 endocrinology centers throughout the United States. We studied 25,833 adults and children with presumed autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D). Participants ranged in age from less than 1 to 93 yr, 50% were female, 82% were Caucasian, 50% used an insulin pump, 6% used continuous glucose monitoring, and 16% had a first-degree family member with T1D. Glycosylated hemoglobin at enrollment averaged 8.3% and was highest in 13 to 25 yr olds. The prevalence of renal disease was ≤4% until T1D was present for at least 10 yr, and retinopathy treatment was ≤2% until T1D was present for at least 20 yr. A severe hypoglycemic event (seizure or coma) in the prior 12 months was reported by 7% of participants and diabetic ketoacidosis in the prior 12 months by 8%. The T1D Exchange clinic registry provides a database of important information on individuals with T1D in the United States. The rich dataset of the registry provides an opportunity to address numerous issues of relevance to clinicians and patients, including assessments of associations between patient characteristics and diabetes management factors with outcomes.

  9. EMODEL_1D v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, David F.

    2016-07-06

    Program EMODEL_1D is an electromagnetic earth model construction utility designed to generate a three-dimensional (3D) uniformly-gridded representation of one-dimensional (1D) layered earth model. Each layer is characterized by the isotropic EM properties electric permittivity ?, magnetic permeability ?, and current conductivity ?. Moreover, individual layers of the model may possess a linear increase/decrease of any or all of these properties with depth.

  10. Caged ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) analogs: Novel tools for studying C1P biology.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio; Gangoiti, Patricia; Rivera, Io-Guané; Presa, Natalia; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Ordoñez, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite that is produced in cells by the action of ceramide kinase (CerK) acting upon ceramide, and is also found in the circulation. C1P was first demonstrated to be mitogenic and antiapoptotic in different cell types, and was later shown to induce cell migration. Understanding the precise mechanisms by which C1P exerts its biological effects has been possible using specific photosensitive caged C1P analogues synthesized by Robert Bittman's group. These compounds are cell permeable, bypass cell plasma membrane receptors, and can be released into the cytosol upon light irradiation, thereby allowing precise determination of the intracellular mechanisms of actions of C1P. Two derivatives of N-palmitoyl-ceramide 1-phosphate have been used in most studies. In one C1P derivative the cage was 7-(N,N-diethylamino)coumarin (DECM-C1P) while in the other it was a 4-bromo-5-hydroxy-2-nitrobenzhydryl moiety (BHNB-C1P). The uncaging process released C1P in the cytosol, and this was accompanied by stimulation of cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, and production of low levels of reactive oxygen species. However, intracellular accumulation of C1P did not affect chemotaxis. The caged C1P analogues allowed distinction between the extracellular events evoked by C1P, as for example through interaction with a putative cell-surface receptor, from its intracellular effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Shift in ApoM/S1P Between HDL-Particles in Women With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated With Impaired Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the ApoM/S1P Complex.

    PubMed

    Frej, Cecilia; Mendez, Armando J; Ruiz, Mario; Castillo, Melanie; Hughes, Thomas A; Dahlbäck, Björn; Goldberg, Ronald B

    2017-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) patients have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease despite high levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Apolipoprotein M (apoM) and its ligand sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P) exert many of the anti-inflammatory effects of HDL. We investigated whether apoM and S1P are altered in T1D and whether apoM and S1P are important for HDL functionality in T1D. ApoM and S1P were quantified in plasma from 42 healthy controls and 89 T1D patients. HDL was isolated from plasma and separated into dense, medium-dense, and light HDL by ultracentrifugation. Primary human aortic endothelial cells were challenged with tumor necrosis factor-α in the presence or absence of isolated HDL. Proinflammatory adhesion molecules E-selectin and vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 were quantified by flow cytometry. Activation of the S1P1- receptor was evaluated by analyzing downstream signaling targets and receptor internalization. There were no differences in plasma levels of apoM and S1P between controls and T1D patients, but the apoM/S1P complexes were shifted from dense to light HDL particles in T1D. ApoM/S1P in light HDL particles from women were less efficient in inhibiting expression of vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 than apoM/S1P in denser particles. The light HDL particles were unable to activate Akt, whereas all HDL subfractions were equally efficient in activating Erk and receptor internalization. ApoM/S1P in light HDL particles were inefficient in inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-α-induced vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in contrast to apoM/S1P in denser HDL particles. T1D patients have a higher proportion of light particles and hence more dysfunctional HDL, which could contribute to the increased cardiovascular disease risk associated with T1D. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Heat Capacity of 1D Molecular Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatskii, M. I.; Barabashko, M. S.; Sumarokov, V. V.; Jeżowski, A.; Stachowiak, P.

    2017-04-01

    The heat capacity of 1D chains of nitrogen and methane molecules (adsorbed in the outer grooves of bundles of closed-cap single-walled carbon nanotubes) has been studied in the temperature ranges 2-40 and 2-60 K, respectively. The temperature dependence of the heat capacity of 1D chains of nitrogen molecules below 3 K is close to a linear. It was found that the rotational heat capacity of methane molecules is a significant part of the total heat capacity of the chains throughout the whole investigated temperature range, whereas in the case of nitrogen, the librations are significant only above 15 K. The dependence of the heat capacity for methane below 10 K indicates the presence of a Schottky anomaly caused by the tunneling between the lowest energy levels of the CH4 molecule rotational spectra. Characteristic features observed in the temperature dependence of the heat capacity of 1D methane crystals are also discussed.

  13. Upstream Design and 1D-CAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroyuki

    Recently, engineering design environment of Japan is changing variously. Manufacturing companies are being challenged to design and bring out products that meet the diverse demands of customers and are competitive against those produced by rising countries(1). In order to keep and strengthen the competitiveness of Japanese companies, it is necessary to create new added values as well as conventional ones. It is well known that design at the early stages has a great influence on the final design solution. Therefore, design support tools for the upstream design is necessary for creating new added values. We have established a research society for 1D-CAE (1 Dimensional Computer Aided Engineering)(2), which is a general term for idea, methodology and tools applicable for the upstream design support, and discuss the concept and definition of 1D-CAE. This paper reports our discussion about 1D-CAE.

  14. Crystal Structures of Human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 (AS160) RabGTPase-activating Protein (RabGAP) Domains Reveal Critical Elements for GLUT4 Translocation

    SciTech Connect

    S Park; W Jin; S Shoelson

    2011-12-31

    We have solved the x-ray crystal structures of the RabGAP domains of human TBC1D1 and human TBC1D4 (AS160), at 2.2 and 3.5 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Like the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP domain, whose structure was solved previously in complex with mouse Rab33B, the human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 domains both have 16 {alpha}-helices and no {beta}-sheet elements. We expected the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP/mouse Rab33B structure to predict the corresponding interfaces between cognate mammalian RabGAPs and Rabs, but found that residues were poorly conserved. We further tested the relevance of this model by Ala-scanning mutagenesis, but only one of five substitutions within the inferred binding site of the TBC1D1 RabGAP significantly perturbed catalytic efficiency. In addition, substitution of TBC1D1 residues with corresponding residues from Gyp1p did not enhance catalytic efficiency. We hypothesized that biologically relevant RabGAP/Rab partners utilize additional contacts not described in the yeast Gyp1p/mouse Rab33B structure, which we predicted using our two new human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 structures. Ala substitution of TBC1D1 Met{sup 930}, corresponding to a residue outside of the Gyp1p/Rab33B contact, substantially reduced catalytic activity. GLUT4 translocation assays confirmed the biological relevance of our findings. Substitutions with lowest RabGAP activity, including catalytically dead RK and Met{sup 930} and Leu{sup 1019} predicted to perturb Rab binding, confirmed that biological activity requires contacts between cognate RabGAPs and Rabs beyond those in the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP/mouse Rab33B structure.

  15. Helical Floquet Channels in 1D Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budich, Jan Carl; Hu, Ying; Zoller, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We show how dispersionless channels exhibiting perfect spin-momentum locking can arise in a 1D lattice model. While such spectra are forbidden by fermion doubling in static 1D systems, here we demonstrate their appearance in the stroboscopic dynamics of a periodically driven system. Remarkably, this phenomenon does not rely on any adiabatic assumptions, in contrast to the well known Thouless pump and related models of adiabatic spin pumps. The proposed setup is shown to be experimentally feasible with state-of-the-art techniques used to control ultracold alkaline earth atoms in optical lattices.

  16. S1P lyase in skeletal muscle regeneration and satellite cell activation: exposing the hidden lyase.

    PubMed

    Saba, Julie D; de la Garza-Rodea, Anabel S

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid whose actions are essential for many physiological processes including angiogenesis, lymphocyte trafficking and development. In addition, S1P serves as a muscle trophic factor that enables efficient muscle regeneration. This is due in part to S1P's ability to activate quiescent muscle stem cells called satellite cells (SCs) that are needed for muscle repair. However, the molecular mechanism by which S1P activates SCs has not been well understood. Further, strategies for harnessing S1P signaling to recruit SCs for therapeutic benefit have been lacking. S1P is irreversibly catabolized by S1P lyase (SPL), a highly conserved enzyme that catalyzes the cleavage of S1P at carbon bond C(2-3), resulting in formation of hexadecenal and ethanolamine-phosphate. SPL enhances apoptosis through substrate- and product-dependent events, thereby regulating cellular responses to chemotherapy, radiation and ischemia. SPL is undetectable in resting murine skeletal muscle. However, we recently found that SPL is dynamically upregulated in skeletal muscle after injury. SPL upregulation occurred in the context of a tightly orchestrated genetic program that resulted in a transient S1P signal in response to muscle injury. S1P activated quiescent SCs via a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)-dependent pathway, thereby facilitating skeletal muscle regeneration. Mdx mice, which serve as a model for muscular dystrophy (MD), exhibited skeletal muscle SPL upregulation and S1P deficiency. Pharmacological SPL inhibition raised skeletal muscle S1P levels, enhanced SC recruitment and improved mdx skeletal muscle regeneration. These findings reveal how S1P can activate SCs and indicate that SPL suppression may provide a therapeutic strategy for myopathies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Advances in Lysophospholipid Research.

  17. DESIGN PACKAGE 1D SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    L.R. Eisler

    1995-02-02

    The purpose of this analysis is to systematically identify and evaluate hazards related to the Yucca Mountain Project Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package 1D, Surface Facilities, (for a list of design items included in the package 1D system safety analysis see section 3). This process is an integral part of the systems engineering process; whereby safety is considered during planning, design, testing, and construction. A largely qualitative approach was used since a radiological System Safety analysis is not required. The risk assessment in this analysis characterizes the accident scenarios associated with the Design Package 1D structures/systems/components in terms of relative risk and includes recommendations for mitigating all identified risks. The priority for recommending and implementing mitigation control features is: (1) Incorporate measures to reduce risks and hazards into the structure/system/component (S/S/C) design, (2) add safety devices and capabilities to the designs that reduce risk, (3) provide devices that detect and warn personnel of hazardous conditions, and (4) develop procedures and conduct training to increase worker awareness of potential hazards, on methods to reduce exposure to hazards, and on the actions required to avoid accidents or correct hazardous conditions. The scope of this analysis is limited to the Design Package 1D structures/systems/components (S/S/Cs) during normal operations excluding hazards occurring during maintenance and ''off normal'' operations.

  18. Calibration of a 1D/1D urban flood model using 1D/2D model results in the absence of field data.

    PubMed

    Leandro, J; Djordjević, S; Chen, A S; Savić, D A; Stanić, M

    2011-01-01

    Recently increased flood events have been prompting researchers to improve existing coupled flood-models such as one-dimensional (1D)/1D and 1D/two-dimensional (2D) models. While 1D/1D models simulate sewer and surface networks using a one-dimensional approach, 1D/2D models represent the surface network by a two-dimensional surface grid. However their application raises two issues to urban flood modellers: (1) stormwater systems planning/emergency or risk analysis demands for fast models, and the 1D/2D computational time is prohibitive, (2) and the recognized lack of field data (e.g. Hunter et al. (2008)) causes difficulties for the calibration/validation of 1D/1D models. In this paper we propose to overcome these issues by calibrating a 1D/1D model with the results of a 1D/2D model. The flood-inundation results show that: (1) 1D/2D results can be used to calibrate faster 1D/1D models, (2) the 1D/1D model is able to map the 1D/2D flood maximum extent well, and the flooding limits satisfactorily in each time-step, (3) the 1D/1D model major differences are the instantaneous flow propagation and overestimation of the flood-depths within surface-ponds, (4) the agreement in the volume surcharged by both models is a necessary condition for the 1D surface-network validation and (5) the agreement of the manholes discharge shapes measures the fitness of the calibrated 1D surface-network.

  19. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) displays sustained S1P1 receptor agonism and signaling through S1P lyase-dependent receptor recycling.

    PubMed

    Gatfield, John; Monnier, Lucile; Studer, Rolf; Bolli, Martin H; Steiner, Beat; Nayler, Oliver

    2014-07-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) type 1 receptor (S1P1R) is a novel therapeutic target in lymphocyte-mediated autoimmune diseases. S1P1 receptor desensitization caused by synthetic S1P1 receptor agonists prevents T-lymphocyte egress from secondary lymphoid organs into the circulation. The selective S1P1 receptor agonist ponesimod, which is in development for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, efficiently reduces peripheral lymphocyte counts and displays efficacy in animal models of autoimmune disease. Using ponesimod and the natural ligand S1P, we investigated the molecular mechanisms leading to different signaling, desensitization and trafficking behavior of S1P1 receptors. In recombinant S1P1 receptor-expressing cells, ponesimod and S1P triggered Gαi protein-mediated signaling and β-arrestin recruitment with comparable potency and efficiency, but only ponesimod efficiently induced intracellular receptor accumulation. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), ponesimod and S1P triggered translocation of the endogenous S1P1 receptor to the Golgi compartment. However, only ponesimod treatment caused efficient surface receptor depletion, receptor accumulation in the Golgi and degradation. Impedance measurements in HUVEC showed that ponesimod induced only short-lived Gαi protein-mediated signaling followed by resistance to further stimulation, whereas S1P induced sustained Gαi protein-mediated signaling without desensitization. Inhibition of S1P lyase activity in HUVEC rendered S1P an efficient S1P1 receptor internalizing compound and abrogated S1P-mediated sustained signaling. This suggests that S1P lyase - by facilitating S1P1 receptor recycling - is essential for S1P-mediated sustained signaling, and that synthetic agonists are functional antagonists because they are not S1P lyase substrates.

  20. Glass-based 1-D dielectric microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiasera, Alessandro; Scotognella, Francesco; Valligatla, Sreeramulu; Varas, Stefano; Jasieniak, Jacek; Criante, Luigino; Lukowiak, Anna; Ristic, Davor; Gonçalves, Rogeria Rocha; Taccheo, Stefano; Ivanda, Mile; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ramponi, Roberta; Martucci, Alessandro; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a reliable RF sputtering techniques allowing to fabricate glass-based one dimensional microcavities, with high quality factor. This property is strongly related to the modification of the density of states due to the confinement of the gain medium in a photonic band gap structure. In this short review we present some of the more recent results obtained by our team exploiting these 1D microcavities. In particular we present: (1) Er3+ luminescence enhancement of the 4I13/2 → 4I15/2 transition; (2) broad band filters based on disordered 1-D photonic structures; (3) threshold defect-mode lasing action in a hybrid structure.

  1. YORP torques with 1D thermal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, S.; Bartczak, P.; Czekaj, M.

    2010-11-01

    A numerical model of the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect for objects defined in terms of a triangular mesh is described. The algorithm requires that each surface triangle can be handled independently, which implies the use of a 1D thermal model. Insolation of each triangle is determined by an optimized ray-triangle intersection search. Surface temperature is modelled with a spectral approach; imposing a quasi-periodic solution we replace heat conduction equation by the Helmholtz equation. Non-linear boundary conditions are handled by an iterative, fast Fourier transform based solver. The results resolve the question of the YORP effect in rotation rate independence on conductivity within the non-linear 1D thermal model regardless of the accuracy issues and homogeneity assumptions. A seasonal YORP effect in attitude is revealed for objects moving on elliptic orbits when a non-linear thermal model is used.

  2. Measurement of persistence in 1D diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, G. P.; Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.; Cory, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    Using a novel NMR scheme we observed persistence in 1D gas diffusion. Analytical approximations and numerical simulations have indicated that for an initially random array of spins undergoing diffusion, the probability p(t) that the average spin magnetization in a given region has not changed sign (i.e., "persists") up to time t follows a power law t(-straight theta), where straight theta depends on the dimensionality of the system. Using laser-polarized 129Xe gas, we prepared an initial "quasirandom" 1D array of spin magnetization and then monitored the ensemble's evolution due to diffusion using real-time NMR imaging. Our measurements are consistent with analytical and numerical predictions of straight theta approximately 0.12.

  3. Centrosome Positioning in 1D Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlerz, Katrina; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    During cell migration, the positioning of the centrosome and nucleus define a cell's polarity. For a cell migrating on a two-dimensional substrate the centrosome is positioned in front of the nucleus. Under one-dimensional confinement, however, the centrosome is positioned behind the nucleus in 60% of cells. It is known that the centrosome is positioned by CDC42 and dynein for cells moving on a 2D substrate in a wound-healing assay. It is currently unknown, however, if this is also true for cells moving under 1D confinement, where the centrosome position is often reversed. Therefore, centrosome positioning was studied in cells migrating under 1D confinement, which mimics cells migrating through 3D matrices. 3 to 5 μm fibronectin lines were stamped onto a glass substrate and cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei and centrosomes migrated on the lines. Our results show that when a cell changes directions the centrosome position is maintained. That is, when the centrosome is between the nucleus and the cell's trailing edge and the cell changes direction, the centrosome will be translocated across the nucleus to the back of the cell again. A dynein inhibitor did have an influence on centrosome positioning in 1D migration and change of directions.

  4. Cometary gas relations 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, Marcos R.

    Photographic and photoelectric observations of comet 1P/Halley's ionised gas coma from CO+ at 4,250 Å and neutral gas coma from CN at 3,880 Å were part of the Bochum Halley Monitoring Program, conducted at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, from February 17 to April 17, 1986. In this spectral range it is possible to see the continuum formation, motion and expansion of plasma and neutral gas structures. To observe the morphology of these structures, 32 CO+ photos (glass plates) from comet 1P/Halley obtained by means of an interference filter have been analysed. They have a field of view of 28.6 × 28.6 degrees and were obtained from March 29 to April 17, 1986 with exposure times between 20 and 120 minutes. All photos were digitised with a PDS 2020 GM microdensitometer. After digitisation, the data were reduced to relative intensities, and those with proper calibrations were also converted to absolute intensities, expressed in terms of column densities. The CO+ absolute intensity values still contain the continuum intensity. To calculate the CO+ column density it is necessary to subtract this continuum intensity. The relations between CO+ and CN in average column density values (NCO+/NCN) are 11.6 for a circular diaphragm with average diameter (Φ) of 6.1 arcminutes which corresponds to a distance from the nucleus (ρ) equal to 6.3 × 104 km; 20.0 for Φ = 7.1 arcminutes and ρ = 7.3 × 104 km; 8.1 for Φ = 8.5 arcminutes and ρ = 8.7 × 104 km; 35.6 for Φ = 11.9 arcminutes and ρ = 1.2 × 105 km; and 31.3 for Φ = 16.7 arcminutes and ρ = 1.7 × 105 km. These values are in perfect agreement with the data for short distances (ρ from 3.9 × 103 to 1.2 × 104 km) and small slit diameters (Φ from 0.4 to 1.2 arcminutes). With the use of diaphragms with large diameters it is possible to get some information about the outer coma of the comet (in this paper, from 60,000 until 170,000 km away from the nucleus). At these distances, the CO+ column density

  5. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  6. Mapping of the serotonin 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} autoreceptor gene (HTR1D) on chromosome 1 using a silent polymorphism in the coding region

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, N.; Lappalainen, J.; Linnoila, M.

    1995-04-24

    Serotonin (5-HT){sub ID} receptors are 5-HT release-regulating autoreceptors in the human brain. Abnormalities in brain 5-HT function have been hypothesized in the pathophysiology of various psychiatric disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, autism, mood disorders, eating disorders, impulsive violent behavior, and alcoholism. Thus, mutations occurring in 5-HT autoreceptors may cause or increase the vulnerability to any of these conditions. 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} and 5-HT{sub 1D{Beta}} subtypes have been previously localized to chromosomes 1p36.3-p34.3 and 6q13, respectively, using rodent-human hybrids and in situ localization. In this communication, we report the detection of a 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} receptor gene polymorphism by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding sequence. The polymorphism was used for fine scale linkage mapping of 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} on chromosome 1. This polymorphism should also be useful for linkage studies in populations and in families. Our analysis also demonstrates that functionally significant coding sequence variants of the 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} are probably not abundant either among alcoholics or in the general population. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Observation of the h(c)(1P) Using e+ e- collisions above the DD threshold.

    PubMed

    Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Hietala, J; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Xiao, T; Martin, L; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; Ecklund, K M; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Pearson, L J; Thorndike, E H; Ricciardi, S; Thomas, C; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Mountain, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Lincoln, A; Smith, M J; Zhou, P; Zhu, J; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Randrianarivony, K; Tatishvili, G; Briere, R A; Vogel, H; Onyisi, P U E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Das, S; Ehrlich, R; Gibbons, L; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Sun, W M; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Lowrey, N; Mehrabyan, S; Selen, M; Wiss, J; Libby, J; Kornicer, M; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Tarbert, C M; Besson, D

    2011-07-22

    Using 586  pb(-1) of e+ e- collision data at E(c.m.) = 4170  MeV, produced at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring collider and collected with the CLEO-c detector, we observe the process e+ e- → π+ π- h(c)(1P). We measure its cross section to be 15.6±2.3±1.9±3.0  pb, where the third error is due to the external uncertainty on the branching fraction of ψ(2S) → π0 h(c)(1P), which we use for normalization. We also find evidence for e+ e- → ηh(c)(1P) at 4170 MeV at the 3σ level and see hints of a rise in the e+ e- → π+ π- h(c)(1P) cross section at 4260 MeV.

  8. The functional roles of S1P in immunity.

    PubMed

    Hisano, Yu; Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2012-10-01

    The lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is generated within cells from sphingosine by two sphingosine kinases (SPHK1 and SPHK2). Intracellularly synthesized S1P is released into the extracellular fluid by S1P transporters, including SPNS2. Released S1P binds specifically to the G protein-coupled S1P receptors (S1PR1/S1P(1)-S1PR5/S1P(5)), which activate a diverse range of downstream signalling pathways. Recent studies have proposed that one of the central physiological functions of intercellular S1P signalling is in lymphocyte trafficking in vivo because genetic disruption of SPHK1/2, SPNS2 or S1PR1/S1P(1) in mice induces a lymphopenia phenotype. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of intercellular S1P signalling in the context of immunity.

  9. The IPP gene is assigned to human chromosome 1p32-1p22

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Yeh, A.; Huang, R.C.C. ); Jabs, E.W.; Li, Xiang ); Dracopoli, N.C. )

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported the isolation and characterization of a novel mouse gene that is promoted by an intracisternal A-particle (IAP) LTR and is expressed in placental tissue (mouse IAP-promoted placenta gene, Ipp). Based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) studies using inbred strains and recombinant inbred (RI) mice, we have established the linkage between the Ipp gene and several loci on distal mouse chromosome 4. In this publication, we report the partial sequence of a human cDNA clone isolated from a human placental library that has 83% identity to the 3[prime]region of the Ipp cDNA. For human chromosome mapping, two 20-base oligonucleotides within the homologous region were used as primers for polymerase chain reactions (PCR) to chromosome-specific DNAs from two somatic cell hybrid panels and several hybrid cell lines carrying breakpoints on human chromosome 1p. We have assigned this human homolog of the Ipp (IPP) gene to chromosome 1 at 1p32-1p22, based on analysis of PCR products. With this assignment, the homology between mouse chromosome 4 and human chromosome 1 is maintained (5). 7 refs., 1 fig.

  10. 1D-VAR Retrieval Using Superchannels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel; Larar, Allen; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter; Mango, Stephen; SaintGermain, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Since modern ultra-spectral remote sensors have thousands of channels, it is difficult to include all of them in a 1D-var retrieval system. We will describe a physical inversion algorithm, which includes all available channels for the atmospheric temperature, moisture, cloud, and surface parameter retrievals. Both the forward model and the inversion algorithm compress the channel radiances into super channels. These super channels are obtained by projecting the radiance spectra onto a set of pre-calculated eigenvectors. The forward model provides both super channel properties and jacobian in EOF space directly. For ultra-spectral sensors such as Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed Interferometer (NAST), a compression ratio of more than 80 can be achieved, leading to a significant reduction in computations involved in an inversion process. Results will be shown applying the algorithm to real IASI and NAST data.

  11. Electron-impact excitation of the n 1P levels of helium - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, David C.; Csanak, George; Trajmar, Sandor; Register, D. F.

    1992-01-01

    New experimental electron-energy-loss data have been used to extract differential and integral cross sections for excitation of the 2 1P level, and for the overlapping (3 1P, 3 1D, 3 3D) levels of helium, at 30-, 50-, and 100-eV incident electron energies. First-order many-body theory (FOMBT) has been used to calculate the differential and integral cross sections for excitation of the n 1P (n = 2,...,6) levels of helium by electron impact, for incident electron energies from threshold to 500 eV. Detailed comparisons between these two new sets of data are made as well as comparisons with appropriate published experimental and theoretical results. A simple scaling relationship is derived from the FOMBT results for n = 2,...,6 that provides differential and integral cross sections for all symmetry final levels of helium with n = 6 or greater.

  12. Yet1p-Yet3p interacts with Scs2p-Opi1p to regulate ER localization of the Opi1p repressor.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Thompson, Sarah L; Barlowe, Charles

    2011-05-01

    Lipid sensing mechanisms at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) coordinate an array of biosynthetic pathways. A major phospholipid regulatory circuit in yeast is controlled by Scs2p, an ER membrane protein that binds the transcriptional repressor protein Opi1p. Cells grown in the absence of inositol sequester Scs2p-Opi1p at the ER and derepress target genes including INO1. We recently reported that Yet1p and Yet3p, the yeast homologues of BAP29 and BAP31, are required for normal growth in the absence of inositol. Here we show that the Yet1p-Yet3p complex acts in derepression of INO1 through physical association with Scs2p-Opi1p. Yet complex binding to Scs2p-Opi1p was enhanced by inositol starvation, although the interaction between Scs2p and Opi1p was not influenced by YET1 or YET3 deletion. Interestingly, live-cell imaging analysis indicated that Opi1p does not efficiently relocalize to the ER during inositol starvation in yet3Δ cells. Together our data demonstrate that a physical association between the Yet complex and Scs2p-Opi1p is required for proper localization of the Opi1p repressor to ER membranes and subsequent INO1 derepression.

  13. A role of the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-S1P receptor 2 pathway in epithelial defense against cancer (EDAC).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Sayaka; Yako, Yuta; Fujioka, Yoichiro; Kajita, Mihoko; Kameyama, Takeshi; Kon, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Susumu; Ohba, Yusuke; Ohno, Yusuke; Kihara, Akio; Fujita, Yasuyuki

    2016-02-01

    At the initial step of carcinogenesis, transformation occurs in single cells within epithelia, where the newly emerging transformed cells are surrounded by normal epithelial cells. A recent study revealed that normal epithelial cells have an ability to sense and actively eliminate the neighboring transformed cells, a process named epithelial defense against cancer (EDAC). However, the molecular mechanism of this tumor-suppressive activity is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated a role for the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2) pathway in EDAC. First, we show that addition of the S1PR2 inhibitor significantly suppresses apical extrusion of RasV12-transformed cells that are surrounded by normal cells. In addition, knockdown of S1PR2 in normal cells induces the same effect, indicating that S1PR2 in the surrounding normal cells plays a positive role in the apical elimination of the transformed cells. Of importance, not endogenous S1P but exogenous S1P is involved in this process. By using FRET analyses, we demonstrate that S1PR2 mediates Rho activation in normal cells neighboring RasV12-transformed cells, thereby promoting accumulation of filamin, a crucial regulator of EDAC. Collectively these data indicate that S1P is a key extrinsic factor that affects the outcome of cell competition between normal and transformed epithelial cells.

  14. 75 FR 27411 - Airworthiness Directives; Turbomeca Arriel 1B, 1D, 1D1, and 1S1 Turboshaft Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... repetitive relative position checks of the gas generator 2nd stage turbine blades on Turbomeca Arriel 1B... turbines on Arriel 1B, 1D, and 1D1 engines. This AD requires lowering the initial and repetitive thresholds for replacement of 2nd stage turbines on Arriel 1B, 1D, and 1D1 engines. This AD results from reports...

  15. Exogenous S1P Exposure Potentiates Ischemic Stroke Damage That Is Reduced Possibly by Inhibiting S1P Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eunjung; Han, Jeong Eun; Jeon, Sejin; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Choi, Ji Woong; Chun, Jerold

    2015-01-01

    Initial and recurrent stroke produces central nervous system (CNS) damage, involving neuroinflammation. Receptor-mediated S1P signaling can influence neuroinflammation and has been implicated in cerebral ischemia through effects on the immune system. However, S1P-mediated events also occur within the brain itself where its roles during stroke have been less well studied. Here we investigated the involvement of S1P signaling in initial and recurrent stroke by using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (M/R) model combined with analyses of S1P signaling. Gene expression for S1P receptors and involved enzymes was altered during M/R, supporting changes in S1P signaling. Direct S1P microinjection into the normal CNS induced neuroglial activation, implicating S1P-initiated neuroinflammatory responses that resembled CNS changes seen during initial M/R challenge. Moreover, S1P microinjection combined with M/R potentiated brain damage, approximating a model for recurrent stroke dependent on S1P and suggesting that reduction in S1P signaling could ameliorate stroke damage. Delivery of FTY720 that removes S1P signaling with chronic exposure reduced damage in both initial and S1P-potentiated M/R-challenged brain, while reducing stroke markers like TNF-α. These results implicate direct S1P CNS signaling in the etiology of initial and recurrent stroke that can be therapeutically accessed by S1P modulators acting within the brain.

  16. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P{sub 1} receptor by a novel competitive S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of a newly developed S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficacy of S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P{sub 1}) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P{sub 1} and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P{sub 1} antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  17. Chemical and genetic tools to explore S1P biology.

    PubMed

    Cahalan, Stuart M

    2014-01-01

    The zwitterionic lysophospholipid Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) is a pleiotropic mediator of physiology and pathology. The synthesis, transport, and degradation of S1P are tightly regulated to ensure that S1P is present in the proper concentrations in the proper location. The binding of S1P to five G protein-coupled S1P receptors regulates many physiological systems, particularly the immune and vascular systems. Our understanding of the functions of S1P has been aided by the tractability of the system to both chemical and genetic manipulation. Chemical modulators have been generated to affect most of the known components of S1P biology, including agonists of S1P receptors and inhibitors of enzymes regulating S1P production and degradation. Genetic knockouts and manipulations have been similarly engineered to disrupt the functions of individual S1P receptors or enzymes involved in S1P metabolism. This chapter will focus on the development and utilization of these chemical and genetic tools to explore the complex biology surrounding S1P and its receptors, with particular attention paid to the in vivo findings that these tools have allowed for.

  18. Expression of S1P metabolizing enzymes and receptors correlate with survival time and regulate cell migration in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Bien-Möller, Sandra; Lange, Sandra; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Paland, Heiko; Küpper, Johannes; Herzog, Susann; Weitmann, Kerstin; Havemann, Christoph; Vogelgesang, Silke; Marx, Sascha; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Henry W S; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2016-03-15

    A signaling molecule which is involved in proliferation and migration of malignant cells is the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). There are hints for a potential role of S1P signaling in malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) which is characterized by a poor prognosis. Therefore, a comprehensive expression analysis of S1P receptors (S1P1-S1P5) and S1P metabolizing enzymes in human GBM (n = 117) compared to healthy brain (n = 10) was performed to evaluate their role for patient´s survival. Furthermore, influence of S1P receptor inhibition on proliferation and migration were studied in LN18 GBM cells. Compared to control brain, mRNA levels of S1P1, S1P2, S1P3 and S1P generating sphingosine kinase-1 were elevated in GBM. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated an association between S1P1 and S1P2 with patient´s survival times. In vitro, an inhibitory effect of the SphK inhibitor SKI-II on viability of LN18 cells was shown. S1P itself had no effect on viability but stimulated LN18 migration which was blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P2. The participation of S1P1 and S1P2 in LN18 migration was further supported by siRNA-mediated silencing of these receptors. Immunoblots and inhibition experiments suggest an involvement of the PI3-kinase/AKT1 pathway in the chemotactic effect of S1P in LN18 cells.In summary, our data argue for a role of S1P signaling in proliferation and migration of GBM cells. Individual components of the S1P pathway represent prognostic factors for patients with GBM. Perspectively, a selective modulation of S1P receptor subtypes could represent a therapeutic approach for GBM patients and requires further evaluation.

  19. 1D-1D Coulomb drag in a 6 Million Mobility Bi-layer Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilodeau, Simon; Laroche, Dominique; Xia, Jian-Sheng; Lilly, Mike; Reno, John; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Gervais, Guillaume

    We report Coulomb drag measurements in vertically-coupled quantum wires. The wires are fabricated in GaAs/AlGaAs bilayer heterostructures grown from two different MBE chambers: one at Sandia National Laboratories (1.2M mobility), and the other at Princeton University (6M mobility). The previously observed positive and negative drag signals are seen in both types of devices, demonstrating the robustness of the result. However, attempts to determine the temperature dependence of the drag signal in the 1D regime proved challenging in the higher mobility heterostructure (Princeton), in part because of difficulties in aligning the wires within the same transverse subband configuration. Nevertheless, this work, performed at the Microkelvin laboratory of the University of Florida, is an important proof-of-concept for future investigations of the temperature dependence of the 1D-1D drag signal down to a few mK. Such an experiment could confirm the Luttinger charge density wave interlocking predicted to occur in the wires. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  20. Role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Oxidoreductases Bdh1p and Ara1p in the Metabolism of Acetoin and 2,3-Butanediol ▿

    PubMed Central

    González, Eva; Fernández, M. Rosario; Marco, Didac; Calam, Eduard; Sumoy, Lauro; Parés, Xavier; Dequin, Sylvie; Biosca, Josep A.

    2010-01-01

    NAD-dependent butanediol dehydrogenase (Bdh1p) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae reversibly transforms acetoin to 2,3-butanediol in a stereospecific manner. Deletion of BDH1 resulted in an accumulation of acetoin and a diminution of 2,3-butanediol in two S. cerevisiae strains under two different growth conditions. The concentrations of (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol are mostly dependent on Bdh1p activity, while those of (meso)-2,3-butanediol are also influenced by the activity of NADP(H)-dependent oxidoreductases. One of them has been purified and shown to be d-arabinose dehydrogenase (Ara1p), which converts (R/S)-acetoin to meso-2,3-butanediol and (2S,3S)-2,3-butanediol. Deletion of BDH2, a gene adjacent to BDH1, whose encoded protein is 51% identical to Bdh1p, does not significantly alter the levels of acetoin or 2,3-butanediol in comparison to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we have expressed Bdh2p with a histidine tag and have shown it to be inactive toward 2,3-butanediol. A whole-genome expression analysis with microarrays demonstrates that BDH1 and BDH2 are reciprocally regulated. PMID:19966022

  1. The MAPK Hog1p Modulates Fps1p-dependent Arsenite Uptake and Tolerance in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, Michael; Di, Yujun; Tängemo, Carolina; Morillas, Montserrat; Ahmadpour, Doryaneh; Van der Does, Charlotte; Wagner, Annemarie; Johansson, Erik; Boman, Johan; Posas, Francesc; Wysocki, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic is widely distributed in nature and all organisms possess regulatory mechanisms to evade toxicity and acquire tolerance. Yet, little is known about arsenic sensing and signaling mechanisms or about their impact on tolerance and detoxification systems. Here, we describe a novel role of the S. cerevisiae mitogen-activated protein kinase Hog1p in protecting cells during exposure to arsenite and the related metalloid antimonite. Cells impaired in Hog1p function are metalloid hypersensitive, whereas cells with elevated Hog1p activity display improved tolerance. Hog1p is phosphorylated in response to arsenite and this phosphorylation requires Ssk1p and Pbs2p. Arsenite-activated Hog1p remains primarily cytoplasmic and does not mediate a major transcriptional response. Instead, hog1Δ sensitivity is accompanied by elevated cellular arsenic levels and we demonstrate that increased arsenite influx is dependent on the aquaglyceroporin Fps1p. Fps1p is phosphorylated on threonine 231 in vivo and this phosphorylation critically affects Fps1p activity. Moreover, Hog1p is shown to affect Fps1p phosphorylation. Our data are the first to demonstrate Hog1p activation by metalloids and provides a mechanism by which this kinase contributes to tolerance acquisition. Understanding how arsenite/antimonite uptake and toxicity is modulated may prove of value for their use in medical therapy. PMID:16885417

  2. Targeting sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) levels and S1P receptor functions for therapeutic immune interventions.

    PubMed

    Gräler, Markus H

    2010-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an important regulator of many different immune functions including lymphocyte circulation, antigen presentation, and T cell development. It stimulates five G protein-coupled receptors designated S1P(1-5), which are also expressed by immune cells. S1P receptors couple to different heterotrimeric G proteins including G alpha i, q, and 12/13, and elicit cellular signalling events by activating the small GTPases Rac and Rho and protein kinases Akt, ERK, and JNK, and by inducing cellular calcium flux and inhibiting cAMP accumulation, amongst others. S1P is the exit signal for lymphocytes leaving lymphoid organs and present in blood and lymph at high nanomolar concentrations due to the S1P-producing activity of sphingosine kinases (SK). The S1P-degrading enzyme S1P-lyase maintains low amounts of S1P in lymphoid organs. Disrupting this concentration difference by S1P receptor agonists and antagonists like FTY720, SEW2871, and VPC23019, by an anti-S1P antibody, or by inhibiting the S1P-lyase has therapeutic potential for autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and rheumatoid arthritis and for many other disorders like cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. This report aims to provide a brief overview of concepts, approaches, pharmaceutical compounds, and targets that are currently used to modulate S1P-driven immune functions.

  3. Differential requirement of SAGA subunits for Mot1p and Taf1p recruitment in gene activation.

    PubMed

    van Oevelen, Chris J C; van Teeffelen, Hetty A A M; Timmers, H T Marc

    2005-06-01

    Transcription activation in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) involves ordered recruitment of transcription factor complexes, such as TFIID, SAGA, and Mot1p. Previously, we showed that both Mot1p and Taf1p are recruited to the HXT2 and HXT4 genes, which encode hexose transporter proteins. Here, we show that SAGA also binds to the HXT2 and HXT4 promoters and plays a pivotal role in the recruitment of Mot1p and Taf1p. The deletion of either SPT3 or SPT8 reduces Mot1p binding to HXT2 and HXT4. Surprisingly, the deletion of GCN5 reduces Taf1p binding to both promoters. When GCN5 is deleted in spt3Delta or spt8Delta strains, neither Mot1p nor Taf1p binds, and this results in a diminished recruitment of TATA binding protein and polymerase II to the HXT4 but not the HXT2 promoter. This is reflected by the SAGA-dependent expression of HXT4. In contrast, SAGA-independent induction of HXT2 suggests a functional redundancy with other factors. A functional interplay of different SAGA subunits with Mot1p and Taf1p was supported by phenotypic analysis of MOT1 SAGA or TAF1/SAGA double mutant strains, which revealed novel genetic interactions between MOT1 and SPT8 and between TAF1 and GCN5. In conclusion, our data demonstrate functional links between SAGA, Mot1p, and TFIID in HXT gene regulation.

  4. Regulation of S1P receptors and sphingosine kinases expression in acute pulmonary endothelial cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiying; Zhang, Zili; Li, Puyuan; Yuan, Xin; Zheng, Jing; Liu, Jinwen

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a severe clinical syndrome with mortality rate as high as 30–40%. There is no treatment yet to improve pulmonary endothelial barrier function in patients with severe pulmonary edema. Developing therapies to protect endothelial barrier integrity and stabilizing gas exchange is getting more and more attention. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is able to enhance the resistance of endothelial cell barrier. S1P at physiological concentrations plays an important role in maintaining endothelial barrier function. Proliferation, regeneration and anti-inflammatory activity that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibit make it possible to regulate the homeostatic control of S1P. Methods By building a pulmonary endothelial cell model of acute injury, we investigated the regulation of S1P receptors and sphingosine kinases expression by MSCs during the treatment of acute lung injury using RT-PCR, and investigated the HPAECs Micro-electronics impedance using Real Time Cellular Analysis. Results It was found that the down-regulation of TNF-α expression was more significant when MSC was used in combination with S1P. The combination effection mainly worked on S1PR2, S1PR3 and SphK2. The results show that when MSCs were used in combination with S1P, the selectivity of S1P receptors was increased and the homeostatic control of S1P concentration was improved through regulation of expression of S1P metabolic enzymes. Discussions The study found that, as a potential treatment, MSCs could work on multiple S1P related genes simultaneously. When it was used in combination with S1P, the expression regulation result of related genes was not simply the superposition of each other, but more significant outcome was obtained. This study establishes the experimental basis for further exploring the efficacy of improving endothelial barrier function in acute lung injury, using MSCs in combination with S1P and their

  5. Controlling H{sub 2}S emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Nagl, G.J.

    1997-03-01

    With its signature rotten egg smell, hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is not only odorous, but corrosive and toxic, too. It is produced naturally, by the anaerobic decomposition of sulfur-bearing materials, and synthetically, by a host of chemical process operations, including hydrogenation and hydrodesulfurization and coking. Many processes have been developed to convert H{sub 2}S to innocuous forms, such as elemental sulfur and sulfates. Selecting the best one depends on the overall composition and variability of the gas stream, the concentration of H{sub 2}S present, and the absolute quantity of H{sub 2}S to be removed. This article describes the advantages and disadvantages of seven H{sub 2}S removal systems. Described are: the Claus process, chemical oxidants, caustic scrubbers, adsorption, H{sub 2}S scavengers, amine absorption units, and liquid-phase oxidation systems.

  6. Study of di-pion Bottomonium Transitions and Search for the h_b(1P) State

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-12-09

    We study inclusive di-pion decays using a sample of 108 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector. We search for the decay mode {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}h{sub b} (1P) and find no evidence for the bottomonium spin-singlet state h{sub b}(1P) in the invariant mass distribution recoiling against the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} system. Assuming the h{sub b}(1P) mass to be 9.900 GeV/c{sup 2}, we measure the upper limit on the branching fraction {Beta}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}h{sub b}(1P)] < 1.2 x 10{sup -4}, at 90% confidence level. We also investigate the {chi}{sub bJ}(2P) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {chi}{sub bJ}(1P), {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S), and {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S) di-pion transitions and present an improved measurement of the branching fraction of the {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S) decay and of the {Upsilon}(3S) - {Upsilon}(2S) mass difference.

  7. CYP2S1: A short review

    SciTech Connect

    Saarikoski, Sirkku T. . E-mail: sirkku.saarikoski@ktl.fi; Rivera, Steven P.; Hankinson, Oliver; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti

    2005-09-01

    A new member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, CYP2S1, has recently been identified in human and mouse. In this paper, we review the data currently available for CYP2S1. The human CYP2S1 gene is located in chromosome 19q13.2 within a cluster including CYP2 family members CYP2A6, CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1. These genes also show the highest homology to the human CYP2S1. The gene has recently been found to harbor genetic polymorphism. CYP2S1 is inducible by dioxin, the induction being mediated by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) in a manner typical for CYP1 family members. In line with this, CYP2S1 has been shown to be inducible by coal tar, an abundant source of PAHs, and it was recently reported to metabolize naphthalene. This points to the involvement of CYP2S1 in the metabolism of toxic and carcinogenic compounds, similar to other dioxin-inducible CYPs. CYP2S1 is expressed in epithelial cells of a wide variety of extrahepatic tissues. The highest expression levels have been observed in the epithelial tissues frequently exposed to xenobiotics, e.g., the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and urinary tracts, and in the skin. The observed ubiquitous tissue distribution, as well as the expression of CYP2S1 throughout embryogenesis suggest that CYP2S1 is likely to metabolize important endogenous substrates; thus far, retinoic acid has been identified. In conclusion, CYP2S1 exhibits many features of interest for human health and thus warrants further investigation.

  8. Interaction between ORC and Cdt1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Asano, Teita; Makise, Masaki; Takehara, Masaya; Mizushima, Tohru

    2007-12-01

    Origin recognition complex (ORC), a six-protein complex, is the most likely initiator of chromosomal DNA replication in eukaryotes. Throughout the cell cycle, ORC binds to chromatin at origins of DNA replication and functions as a 'landing pad' for the binding of other proteins, including Cdt1p, to form a prereplicative complex. In this study, we used yeast two-hybrid analysis to examine the interaction between Cdt1p and every ORC subunit. We observed potent interaction with Orc6p, and weaker interaction with Orc2p and Orc5p. Coimmunoprecipitation assay confirmed that Cdt1p interacted with Orc6p, as well as with Orc1p and Orc2p. We mapped the C-terminal region, and a middle region of Orc6p (amino acids residues 394-435, and 121-175, respectively), as important for interaction with Cdt1p. Cdt1p was purified to examine its direct interaction with ORC, and its effect on the activity of ORC. Glutathione-S-transferase pull-down analysis revealed that Cdt1p binds directly to ORC. Cdt1p neither bound to origin DNA and ATP nor affected ORC-binding to origin DNA and ATP. These results suggest that interaction of Cdt1p with ORC is involved in the formation of the prereplicative complex, rather than in regulation of the activity of ORC.

  9. S1P and the birth of platelets.

    PubMed

    Hla, Timothy; Galvani, Sylvain; Rafii, Shahin; Nachman, Ralph

    2012-11-19

    Recent work has highlighted the multitude of biological functions of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which include roles in hematopoietic cell trafficking, organization of immune organs, vascular development, and neuroinflammation. Indeed, a functional antagonist of S1P(1) receptor, FTY720/Gilenya, has entered the clinic as a novel therapeutic for multiple sclerosis. In this issue of the JEM, Zhang et al. highlight yet another function of this lipid mediator: thrombopoiesis. The S1P(1) receptor is required for the growth of proplatelet strings in the bloodstream and the shedding of platelets into the circulation. Notably, the sharp gradient of S1P between blood and the interstitial fluids seems to be essential to ensure the production of platelets, and S1P appears to cooperate with the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis. Pharmacologic modulation of the S1P(1) receptor altered circulating platelet numbers acutely, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for controlling thrombocytopenic states. However, the S1P(4) receptor may also regulate thrombopoiesis during stress-induced accelerated platelet production. This work reveals a novel physiological action of the S1P/S1P(1) duet that could potentially be harnessed for clinical translation.

  10. Crystal structure of TBC1D15 GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain and its activity on Rab GTPases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Na; Gu, Xin; Zhou, X Edward; Wang, Weidong; Cheng, Dandan; Ge, Yinghua; Ye, Fei; Xu, H Eric; Lv, Zhengbing

    2017-04-01

    TBC1D15 belongs to the TBC (Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16) domain family and functions as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Rab GTPases. So far, the structure of TBC1D15 or the TBC1D15·Rab complex has not been determined, thus, its catalytic mechanism on Rab GTPases is still unclear. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the Shark and Sus TBC1D15 GAP domains, to 2.8 Å and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. Shark-TBC1D15 and Sus-TBC1D15 belong to the same subfamily of TBC domain-containing proteins, and their GAP-domain structures are highly similar. This demonstrates the evolutionary conservation of the TBC1D15 protein family. Meanwhile, the newly determined crystal structures display new variations compared to the structures of yeast Gyp1p Rab GAP domain and TBC1D1. GAP assays show that Shark and Sus GAPs both have higher catalytic activity on Rab11a·GTP than Rab7a·GTP, which differs from the previous study. We also demonstrated the importance of arginine and glutamine on the catalytic sites of Shark GAP and Sus GAP. When arginine and glutamine are changed to alanine or lysine, the activities of Shark GAP and Sus GAP are lost.

  11. A new H2S-specific near-infrared fluorescence-enhanced probe that can visualize the H2S level in colorectal cancer cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Jie; Xi, Zhen; Li, Lu-Yuan; Gu, Xiangxiang; Zhang, Qiang-Zhe; Yi, Long

    2017-04-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence-based sensors capable of selective detection of H2S in vivo would be useful tools to understand the mechanisms of diseases. A new NIR fluorescence probe 1 was developed for the detection of endogenous H2S in colorectal cancer cells in mice. 1 displayed an 87-fold fluorescence enhancement at 796 nm (with excitation at 730 nm) when reacted with H2S in a buffer (pH 7.4). 1 was water-soluble, cell-membrane-permeable, had low cytotoxicity and high selectivity and sensitivity for H2S. The properties of 1 enable its use in monitoring endogenous H2S in living cells, tissues, and mice. The bioimaging results indicated that (1) d-Cys could induce endogenous H2S production in living cells and stimulate angiogenesis; (2) tail intravenous injection of 1 into mice generated strong fluorescence in the liver while intraperitoneal injection of d-Cys could further enhance fluorescence in the liver in vivo; (3) importantly, endogenous H2S in colorectal cancer cells (HCT116, HT29) in vitro and in murine tumor models could be quickly and selectively detected by intratumoral injection of 1. These results indicated that our new probe could serve as an efficient tool for the detection of cellular H2S in living animals and even for cancer diagnosis.

  12. Functional Characterization of Candida albicans ABC Transporter Cdr1p

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Suneet; Saini, Preeti; Smriti; Jha, Sudhakar; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Prasad, Rajendra

    2003-01-01

    In view of the importance of Candida drug resistance protein (Cdr1p) in azole resistance, we have characterized it by overexpressing it as a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged fusion protein (Cdr1p-GFP). The overexpressed Cdr1p-GFP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is shown to be specifically labeled with the photoaffinity analogs iodoarylazidoprazosin (IAAP) and azidopine, which have been used to characterize the drug-binding sites on mammalian drug-transporting P-glycoproteins. While nystatin could compete for the binding of IAAP, miconazole specifically competed for azidopine binding, suggesting that IAAP and azidopine bind to separate sites on Cdr1p. Cdr1p was subjected to site-directed mutational analysis. Among many mutant variants of Cdr1p, the phenotypes of F774A and ΔF774 were particularly interesting. The analysis of GFP-tagged mutant variants of Cdr1p revealed that a conserved F774, in predicted transmembrane segment 6, when changed to alanine showed increased binding of both photoaffinity analogues, while its deletion (ΔF774), as revealed by confocal microscopic analyses, led to mislocalization of the protein. The mislocalized ΔF774 mutant Cdr1p could be rescued to the plasma membrane as a functional transporter by growth in the presence of a Cdr1p substrate, cycloheximide. Our data for the first time show that the drug substrate-binding sites of Cdr1p exhibit striking similarities with those of mammalian drug-transporting P-glycoproteins and despite differences in topological organization, the transmembrane segment 6 in Cdr1p is also a major contributor to drug substrate-binding site(s). PMID:14665469

  13. Moments of the Spin Structure Functions g1p and g1d for 0.05 < Q2 < 3.0 GeV2

    SciTech Connect

    Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Burkert, Volker; Deur, Alexandre; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dodge, Gail; Griffioen, Keith; Kuhn, Sebastian; Minehart, Ralph; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, G.; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Beard, Kevin; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bonner, Billy; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Fersch, Robert; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Huertas, Marco; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Kim, Kyungmo; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klusman, Mike; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, K.; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O'Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, J.; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seely, Mikell; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, Jeffrey; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Suleiman, Riad; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; V

    2009-02-01

    The spin structure functions $g_1$ for the proton and the deuteron have been measured over a wide kinematic range in $x$ and \\Q2 using 1.6 and 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident upon polarized NH$_3$ and ND$_3$ targets at Jefferson Lab. Scattered electrons were detected in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, for $0.05 < Q^2 < 5 $\\ GeV$^2$ and $W < 3$ GeV. The first moments of $g_1$ for the proton and deuteron are presented -- both have a negative slope at low \\Q2, as predicted by the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule. The first result for the generalized forward spin polarizability of the proton $\\gamma_0^p$ is also reported, and shows evidence of scaling above $Q^2$ = 1.5 GeV$^2$. Although the first moments of $g_1$ are consistent with Chiral Perturbation Theory (\\ChPT) calculations up to approximately $Q^2 = 0.06$ GeV$^2$, a significant discrepancy is observed between the $\\gamma_0^p$ data and \\ChPT\\ for $\\gamma_0^p$,even at the lowest \\Q2.

  14. Differential Requirement of SAGA Subunits for Mot1p and Taf1p Recruitment in Gene Activation†

    PubMed Central

    van Oevelen, Chris J. C.; van Teeffelen, Hetty A. A. M.; Timmers, H. T. Marc

    2005-01-01

    Transcription activation in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) involves ordered recruitment of transcription factor complexes, such as TFIID, SAGA, and Mot1p. Previously, we showed that both Mot1p and Taf1p are recruited to the HXT2 and HXT4 genes, which encode hexose transporter proteins. Here, we show that SAGA also binds to the HXT2 and HXT4 promoters and plays a pivotal role in the recruitment of Mot1p and Taf1p. The deletion of either SPT3 or SPT8 reduces Mot1p binding to HXT2 and HXT4. Surprisingly, the deletion of GCN5 reduces Taf1p binding to both promoters. When GCN5 is deleted in spt3Δ or spt8Δ strains, neither Mot1p nor Taf1p binds, and this results in a diminished recruitment of TATA binding protein and polymerase II to the HXT4 but not the HXT2 promoter. This is reflected by the SAGA-dependent expression of HXT4. In contrast, SAGA-independent induction of HXT2 suggests a functional redundancy with other factors. A functional interplay of different SAGA subunits with Mot1p and Taf1p was supported by phenotypic analysis of MOT1 SAGA or TAF1/SAGA double mutant strains, which revealed novel genetic interactions between MOT1 and SPT8 and between TAF1 and GCN5. In conclusion, our data demonstrate functional links between SAGA, Mot1p, and TFIID in HXT gene regulation. PMID:15923605

  15. The caspase-generated cleavage product of Ets-1 p51 and Ets-1 p27, Cp17, induces apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Choul-Li, Souhaila; Tulasne, David; Aumercier, Marc

    2016-11-04

    The transcription factor Ets-1 is involved in various physiological processes and invasive pathologies. Human Ets-1 exists under three isoforms: p51, the predominant full-length isoform, p42 and p27, shorter alternatively spliced isoforms. We have previously demonstrated that Ets-1 p51, but not the spliced variant Ets-1 p42, is processed by caspases in vitro and during apoptosis. However, the caspase cleavage of the second spliced variant Ets-1 p27 remains to investigate. In the present study, we demonstrate that Ets-1 p27 is a cleavage substrate of caspases. We show that Ets-1 p27 is processed in vitro by caspase-3, resulting in three C-terminal fragments Cp20, Cp17 and Cp14. Similarly, Ets-1 p27 was cleaved during apoptotic cell death induced by anisomycin, producing fragments consistent with those observed in in vitro cleavage assay. These fragments are generated by cleavage at three sites located in the exon VII-encoded region of Ets-1 p27. As a functional consequences, Cp17 fragment, the major cleavage product generated during apoptosis, induced itself apoptosis when transfected into cells. Our results show that Ets-1 p27 is cleaved in the same manner as Ets-1 p51 within the exon VII-encoded region, thus generating a stable C-terminal fragment that induces cell death by initiating apoptosis.

  16. Rat1p maintains RNA polymerase II CTD phosphorylation balance

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Schmid, Manfred; Malagon, Francisco; Haaning, Line Lindegaard; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2014-01-01

    In S. cerevisiae, the 5′-3′ exonuclease Rat1p partakes in transcription termination. Although Rat1p-mediated RNA degradation has been suggested to play a role for this activity, the exact mechanisms by which Rat1p helps release RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) from the DNA template are poorly understood. Here we describe a function of Rat1p in regulating phosphorylation levels of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest RNAPII subunit, Rpb1p, during transcription elongation. The rat1-1 mutant exhibits highly elevated levels of CTD phosphorylation as well as RNAPII distribution and transcription termination defects. These phenotypes are all rescued by overexpression of the CTD phosphatase Fcp1p, suggesting a functional relationship between the absence of Rat1p activity, elevated CTD phosphorylation, and transcription defects. We also demonstrate that rat1-1 cells display increased RNAPII transcription kinetics, a feature that may contribute to the cellular phenotypes of the mutant. Consistently, the rat1-1 allele is synthetic lethal with the rpb1-E1103G mutation, causing increased RNAPII speed, and is suppressed by the rpb2-10 mutation, causing slowed transcription. Thus, Rat1p plays more complex roles in controlling transcription than previously thought. PMID:24501251

  17. Precision measurement of the mass of the hc(1P1) state of charmonium.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Reed, J; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hunt, J M; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Ledoux, J; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P

    2008-10-31

    A precision measurement of the mass of the h_{c}(1P1) state of charmonium has been made using a sample of 24.5x10;{6} psi(2S) events produced in e;{+}e;{-} annihilation at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR). The reaction used was psi(2S)-->pi;{0}h_{c}, pi;{0}-->gammagamma, h_{c}-->gammaeta_{c}, and the reaction products were detected in the CLEO-c detector. Data have been analyzed both for the inclusive reaction and for the exclusive reactions in which eta_{c} decays are reconstructed in 15 hadronic decay channels. Consistent results are obtained in the two analyses. The averaged results of the present measurements are M(h_{c})=3525.28+/-0.19(stat.)+/-0.12(syst.) MeV, and B(psi(2S)-->pi;{0}h_{c})xB(h_{c}-->gammaeta_{c})=(4.19+/-0.32+/-0.45)x10;{-4}. Using the ;{3}P_{J} centroid mass, DeltaM_{hf}(1P) identical withM(chi_{cJ})-M(h_{c})=+0.02+/-0.19+/-0.13 MeV.

  18. Internally consistent database for sulfides and sulfosalts in the system Ag 2S-Cu 2S-ZnS-Sb 2S 3-As 2S 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Richard O.

    2000-11-01

    An updated thermodynamic database for Ag 2S-Cu 2S-ZnS-Sb 2S 3-As 2S 3 sulfides and sulfosalts applicable to temperatures above 119°C is developed to calculate phase relations for polybasite-pearceite- and fahlore-bearing assemblages. It is based on pre-existing and new constraints on activity-composition, Ag-Cu and As-Sb partitioning, and other relations, and on experiments (200-300°C, evacuated silica tubes) conducted to define the stability of the polybasite-pearceite [(Ag 1- x,Cu x) 16(Sb 1- y,As y) 2S 11] + ZnS sphalerite assemblage with respect to assemblages containing (Ag,Cu) 2S sulfides coexisting with (Cu, Ag) 10Zn 2(Sb,As) 4S 13 fahlore sulfosalts. It was found that the thermodynamics of mixing of bcc- and hcp-(Ag,Cu) 2S solutions, which are fast-ion conductors, may be described by using site multiplicities of metals α Ag,Cu > 2 and temperature-dependent regular solution parameters. We obtained estimates for the Gibbs energies of formation for Ag 16Sb 2S 11 and Cu 16Sb 2S 11 polybasite endmembers from the simple sulfides (Ag 2S, Cu 2S, and Sb 2S 3) of -30.79 and -4.07 kJ/gfw at 200°C, and -32.04 and -0.59 kJ/gfw at 400°C, respectively, that are about one half kJ/gfw more positive and about 6 kJ/gfw more negative than those estimated by Harlov and Sack (1995b). The corresponding estimates for formation energies of Ag 10Zn 2Sb 4S 13 and Cu 10Zn 2Sb 4S 13 fahlores (-20.29 and -105.29 kJ/gfw at 200°C and -23.72 and -105.76 kJ/gfw at 400°C) are comparable to, and roughly 110 kJ/gfw more positive than, the corresponding estimates of Ebel and Sack (1994). We also determined that the Gibbs energies of the As-Sb exchange reactions: 1/4Ag 10Zn2Sb4S13+1/2Ag 16As2S11=1/2Ag 16Sb2S11+1/4Ag 10Zn2As4S13Sb-fahlorepearceitepolybasiteAs-fahlore and Ag3SbS3+1/2Ag 16As2S11=1/2Ag 16Sb2S11+Ag3AsS3pyrargyritepearceitepolybasiteproustite are, respectively, 8.75 and 0.40 kJ/gfw in the range 150-350°C, and these predictions are consistent with As-Sb partitioning relations

  19. Yhh1p/Cft1p directly links poly(A) site recognition and RNA polymerase II transcription termination.

    PubMed

    Dichtl, Bernhard; Blank, Diana; Sadowski, Martin; Hübner, Wolfgang; Weiser, Stefan; Keller, Walter

    2002-08-01

    RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcription termination requires co-transcriptional recognition of a functional polyadenylation signal, but the molecular mechanisms that transduce this signal to pol II remain unclear. We show that Yhh1p/Cft1p, the yeast homologue of the mammalian AAUAAA interacting protein CPSF 160, is an RNA-binding protein and provide evidence that it participates in poly(A) site recognition. Interestingly, RNA binding is mediated by a central domain composed of predicted beta-propeller-forming repeats, which occurs in proteins of diverse cellular functions. We also found that Yhh1p/Cft1p bound specifically to the phosphorylated C-terminal domain (CTD) of pol II in vitro and in a two-hybrid test in vivo. Furthermore, transcriptional run-on analysis demonstrated that yhh1 mutants were defective in transcription termination, suggesting that Yhh1p/Cft1p functions in the coupling of transcription and 3'-end formation. We propose that direct interactions of Yhh1p/Cft1p with both the RNA transcript and the CTD are required to communicate poly(A) site recognition to elongating pol II to initiate transcription termination.

  20. Dynamin-related proteins Vps1p and Dnm1p control peroxisome abundance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kuravi, Kasinath; Nagotu, Shirisha; Krikken, Arjen M; Sjollema, Klaas; Deckers, Markus; Erdmann, Ralf; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J

    2006-10-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains three dynamin-related-proteins, Vps1p, Dnm1p and Mgm1p. Previous data from glucose-grown VPS1 and DNM1 null mutants suggested that Vps1p, but not Dnm1p, plays a role in regulating peroxisome abundance. Here we show that deletion of DNM1 also results in reduction of peroxisome numbers. This was not observed in glucose-grown dnm1 cells, but was evident in cells grown in the presence of oleate. Similar observations were made in cells lacking Fis1p, a protein involved in Dnm1p function. Fluorescence microscopy of cells producing Dnm1-GFP or GFP-Fis1p demonstrated that both proteins had a dual localization on mitochondria and peroxisomes. Quantitative analysis revealed a greater reduction in peroxisome number in oleate-induced vps1 cells relative to dnm1 or fis1 cells. A significant fraction of oleate-induced vps1 cells still contained two or more peroxisomes. Conversely, almost all cells of a dnm1 vps1 double-deletion strain contained only one, enlarged peroxisome. This suggests that deletion of DNM1 reinforces the vps1 peroxisome phenotype. Time-lapse imaging indicated that during budding of dnm1 vps1 cells, the single peroxisome present in the mother cell formed long protrusions into the developing bud. This organelle divided at a very late stage of the budding process, possibly during cytokinesis.

  1. A role for Yip1p in COPII vesicle biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Heidtman, Matthew; Chen, Catherine Z.; Collins, Ruth N.; Barlowe, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Yeast Ypt1p-interacting protein (Yip1p) belongs to a conserved family of transmembrane proteins that interact with Rab GTPases. We encountered Yip1p as a constituent of ER-derived transport vesicles, leading us to hypothesize a direct role for this protein in transport through the early secretory pathway. Using a cell-free assay that recapitulates protein transport from the ER to the Golgi complex, we find that affinity-purified antibodies directed against the hydrophilic amino terminus of Yip1p potently inhibit transport. Surprisingly, inhibition is specific to the COPII-dependent budding stage. In support of this in vitro observation, strains bearing the temperature-sensitive yip1-4 allele accumulate ER membranes at a nonpermissive temperature, with no apparent accumulation of vesicle intermediates. Genetic interaction analyses of the yip1-4 mutation corroborate a function in ER budding. Finally, ordering experiments show that preincubation of ER membranes with COPII proteins decreases sensitivity to anti-Yip1p antibodies, indicating an early requirement for Yip1p in vesicle formation. We propose that Yip1p has a previously unappreciated role in COPII vesicle biogenesis. PMID:14557247

  2. A role for Yip1p in COPII vesicle biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heidtman, Matthew; Chen, Catherine Z; Collins, Ruth N; Barlowe, Charles

    2003-10-13

    Yeast Ypt1p-interacting protein (Yip1p) belongs to a conserved family of transmembrane proteins that interact with Rab GTPases. We encountered Yip1p as a constituent of ER-derived transport vesicles, leading us to hypothesize a direct role for this protein in transport through the early secretory pathway. Using a cell-free assay that recapitulates protein transport from the ER to the Golgi complex, we find that affinity-purified antibodies directed against the hydrophilic amino terminus of Yip1p potently inhibit transport. Surprisingly, inhibition is specific to the COPII-dependent budding stage. In support of this in vitro observation, strains bearing the temperature-sensitive yip1-4 allele accumulate ER membranes at a nonpermissive temperature, with no apparent accumulation of vesicle intermediates. Genetic interaction analyses of the yip1-4 mutation corroborate a function in ER budding. Finally, ordering experiments show that preincubation of ER membranes with COPII proteins decreases sensitivity to anti-Yip1p antibodies, indicating an early requirement for Yip1p in vesicle formation. We propose that Yip1p has a previously unappreciated role in COPII vesicle biogenesis.

  3. Structural Characterization of Tip20p and Dsl1p, Subunits of the Dsl1p Vesicle Tethering Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, A.; Ren, Y; Jeffrey, P; Hughson, F

    2009-01-01

    Multisubunit tethering complexes are essential for intracellular trafficking and have been proposed to mediate the initial interaction between vesicles and the membranes with which they fuse. Here we report initial structural characterization of the Dsl1p complex, whose three subunits are essential for trafficking from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Crystal structures reveal that two of the three subunits, Tip20p and Dsl1p, resemble known subunits of the exocyst complex, establishing a structural connection among several multisubunit tethering complexes and implying that many of their subunits are derived from a common progenitor. We show, moreover, that Tip20p and Dsl1p interact directly via N-terminal alpha-helices. Finally, we establish that different Dsl1p complex subunits bind independently to different ER SNARE proteins. Our results map out two alternative protein-interaction networks capable of tethering COPI-coated vesicles, via the Dsl1p complex, to ER membranes.

  4. A simple procedure for protein ubiquitination detection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Gap1p as an example.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yongkun; Zhao, Xinrui; Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2013-07-01

    We established a simple procedure for protein ubiquitination detection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was split into two parts, an N-terminal (GN) and a C-terminal (GC) region. The fusion fragments GN-UBI3 and multi-cloning site (MCS)-GC were inserted into the vector pY26-TEF/GPD, resulting in pUbDetec16. pUbDetec16 was designed for use in detecting protein ubiquitination. Any gene of interest can be inserted into the MCS and the recombinant plasmid can be transferred into a Δura3 auxotrophic S. cerevisiae strain. Protein ubiquitination can then be detected using a fluorescence microscope. The ubiquitination of a protein can be determined based on a fluorescence signal. To validate the reliability of this procedure, Gap1p, a protein known to be ubiquitinated, was used as a positive control. A triple mutant of Gap1p, Gap1p(K9R,K16R,K76R), which did not contain any ubiquitination site, was used as a negative control. pUbDetec16-GAP1 and pUbDetec16-GAP1(K9R,K16R,K76R) were constructed and transferred into the Δura3 auxotrophic S. cerevisiae strain CEN.PK2-1D. Transformants of pUbDetec16-GAP1 emitted fluorescence, while the pUbDetec16-GAP1(K9R,K16R,K76R) transformants did not. The ubiquitination of Gap1p and Gap1p(K9R, K16R, K76R) was further verified using classical SDS-PAGE analysis. This procedure significantly simplifies manipulation involving ubiquitination detection using the BiFC approach, particularly on a large scale. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of Cdh1p in maintaining genomic stability in budding yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Karen E; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2003-01-01

    Cdh1p, a substrate specificity factor for the cell cycle-regulated ubiquitin ligase, the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), promotes exit from mitosis by directing the degradation of a number of proteins, including the mitotic cyclins. Here we present evidence that Cdh1p activity at the M/G(1) transition is important not only for mitotic exit but also for high-fidelity chromosome segregation in the subsequent cell cycle. CDH1 showed genetic interactions with MAD2 and PDS1, genes encoding components of the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint that acts at metaphase to prevent premature chromosome segregation. Unlike cdh1delta and mad2delta single mutants, the mad2delta cdh1delta double mutant grew slowly and exhibited high rates of chromosome and plasmid loss. Simultaneous deletion of PDS1 and CDH1 caused extensive chromosome missegregation and cell death. Our data suggest that at least part of the chromosome loss can be attributed to kinetochore/spindle problems. Our data further suggest that Cdh1p and Sic1p, a Cdc28p/Clb inhibitor, have overlapping as well as nonoverlapping roles in ensuring proper chromosome segregation. The severe growth defects of both mad2delta cdh1delta and pds1delta cdh1dDelta strains were rescued by overexpressing Swe1p, a G(2)/M inhibitor of the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc28p/Clb. We propose that the failure to degrade cyclins at the end of mitosis leaves cdh1delta mutant strains with abnormal Cdc28p/Clb activity that interferes with proper chromosome segregation. PMID:14573464

  6. Lifetime of the 7s6d {sup 1}D{sub 2} atomic state of radium.

    SciTech Connect

    Trimble, W. L.; Sulai, I. A.; Ahmad, I.; Bailey, K.; Graner, B.; Greene, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Korsch, W.; Lu, Z.-T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Physics; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Kentucky

    2009-01-01

    The lifetime of the 7s6d {sup 1}D{sub 2} state of atomic radium is determined to be 385(45) {mu}s using cold {sup 226}Ra atoms prepared in a magneto-optical trap. The {sup 1}D{sub 2} state is populated from the decay of the {sup 1}P{sub 1} state which is excited by a pulse of 483 nm light. The decay of the {sup 1}D{sub 2} state is observed by detecting delayed fluorescence at 714 nm from the last step in the decay sequence {sup 1}P{sub 1}-{sup 1}D{sub 2}-{sup 3}P{sub 1}-{sup 1}S{sub 0}. The measured lifetime is compared to a number of theoretical calculations. An improved value of the 7s7p {sup 1}P{sub 1} level of 20 715.598(6) cm{sup -1} is obtained.

  7. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: 1p36 deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... shaped. People with 1p36 deletion syndrome may have vision or hearing problems. Some have abnormalities ... to affect between 1 in 5,000 and 1 in 10,000 newborns. However, this may be an underestimate because some ...

  9. Growth patterns of patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sangu, Noriko; Shimojima, Keiko; Shimada, Shino; Ando, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-05-01

    1p36 deletion syndrome is one of the most common subtelomeric deletion syndromes. Obesity is frequently observed in patients with this syndrome. Thus, it is important to evaluate the growth status of an individual patient. For this purpose, we accumulated recorded growth data from 44 patients with this syndrome and investigated the growth patterns of patients. Most of the patients showed weight parameters within normal limits, whereas a few of these patients showed intrauterine growth delay and microcephaly. The length of the patients after birth was under the 50th centile in most patients. Many patients showed poor weight gain after birth, and only two female patients were overweight. These findings indicate two different phenotypes of the 1p36 deletion syndrome. The overweight patients with 1p36 deletion started excessive weight gain after two years of life. This characteristic of the patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome is similar to Prader-Willi syndrome.

  10. 1p36 tumor suppression--a matter of dosage?

    PubMed

    Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Schwab, Manfred; Westermann, Frank

    2012-12-01

    A broad range of human malignancies is associated with nonrandom 1p36 deletions, suggesting the existence of tumor suppressors encoded in this region. Evidence for tumor-specific inactivation of 1p36 genes in the classic "two-hit" manner is scarce; however, many tumor suppressors do not require complete inactivation but contribute to tumorigenesis by partial impairment. We discuss recent data derived from both human tumors and functional cancer models indicating that the 1p36 genes CHD5, CAMTA1, KIF1B, CASZ1, and miR-34a contribute to cancer development when reduced in dosage by genomic copy number loss or other mechanisms. We explore potential interactions among these candidates and propose a model where heterozygous 1p36 deletion impairs oncosuppressive pathways via simultaneous downregulation of several dosage-dependent tumor suppressor genes.

  11. Pih1p-Tah1p Puts a Lid on Hexameric AAA+ ATPases Rvb1/2p.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shaoxiong; Yu, Ge; He, Huan; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Peilu; Marshall, Alan G; Demeler, Borries; Stagg, Scott M; Li, Hong

    2017-10-03

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) R2TP complex affords an Hsp90-mediated and nucleotide-driven chaperone activity to proteins of small ribonucleoprotein particles (snoRNPs). The current lack of structural information on the ScR2TP complex, however, prevents a mechanistic understanding of this biological process. We characterized the structure of the ScR2TP complex made up of two AAA+ ATPases, Rvb1/2p, and two Hsp90 binding proteins, Tah1p and Pih1p, and its interaction with the snoRNP protein Nop58p by a combination of analytical ultracentrifugation, isothermal titration calorimetry, chemical crosslinking, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and cryoelectron microscopy methods. We find that Pih1p-Tah1p interacts with Rvb1/2p cooperatively through the nucleotide-sensitive domain of Rvb1/2p. Nop58p further binds Pih1p-Tahp1 on top of the dome-shaped R2TP. Consequently, nucleotide binding releases Pih1p-Tah1p from Rvb1/2p, which offers a mechanism for nucleotide-driven binding and release of snoRNP intermediates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. O/1 D/ production in ozone photolysis near 3100 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.-L.; Demore, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    Relative quantum yields of O(1 D) production in ozone photolysis from 2750 to 3340 A have been determined in the gas phase at -40 C. The O(1 D) was monitored by means of its reaction with isobutane to form isobutyl alcohol. The light source was a high pressure mercury lamp combined with a monochromator, with a bandwidth of 16 A. The results show a constant O(1 D) production below 3000 A, which is taken as unity on the basis of previous work. There is a very sharp fall-off in O(1 D) production which is centered at 3080 A. At 3130 A, O(1 D) production is not greater than 0.1.

  13. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) Lyase Inhibition Causes Increased Cardiac S1P Levels and Bradycardia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Harris, Christopher M; Mittelstadt, Scott; Banfor, Patricia; Bousquet, Peter; Duignan, David B; Gintant, Gary; Hart, Michelle; Kim, Youngjae; Segreti, Jason

    2016-10-01

    Inhibition of the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-catabolizing enzyme S1P lyase (S1PL) elevates the native ligand of S1P receptors and provides an alternative mechanism for immune suppression to synthetic S1P receptor agonists. S1PL inhibition is reported to preferentially elevate S1P in lymphoid organs. Tissue selectivity could potentially differentiate S1PL inhibitors from S1P receptor agonists, the use of which also results in bradycardia, atrioventricular block, and hypertension. But it is unknown if S1PL inhibition would also modulate cardiac S1P levels or cardiovascular function. The S1PL inhibitor 6-[(2R)-4-(4-benzyl-7-chlorophthalazin-1-yl)-2-methylpiperazin-1-yl]pyridine-3-carbonitrile was used to determine the relationship in rats between drug concentration, S1P levels in select tissues, and circulating lymphocytes. Repeated oral doses of the S1PL inhibitor fully depleted circulating lymphocytes after 3 to 4 days of treatment in rats. Full lymphopenia corresponded to increased levels of S1P of 100- to 1000-fold in lymph nodes, 3-fold in blood (but with no change in plasma), and 9-fold in cardiac tissue. Repeated oral dosing of the S1PL inhibitor in telemeterized, conscious rats resulted in significant bradycardia within 48 hours of drug treatment, comparable in magnitude to the bradycardia induced by 3 mg/kg fingolimod. These results suggest that S1PL inhibition modulates cardiac function and does not provide immune suppression with an improved cardiovascular safety profile over fingolimod in rats.

  14. Channel specific rate constants for reactions of O(1D) with HCl and HBr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, P. H.; Wells, J. R.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    The absolute rate coefficients and product yields for reactions of O(1D) with HCl(1) and HBr(2) at 287 K are presently determined by means of the time-resolved resonance fluorescence detection of O(3P) and H(2S) in conjunction with pulsed laser photolysis of O3/HX/He mixtures. Total rate coefficients for O(1D) removal are found to be, in units of 10 to the -10th cu cm/molecule per sec, k(1) = 1.50 + or - 0.18 and k(2) 1.48 + or - 0.16; the absolute accuracy of these rate coefficients is estimated to be + or - 20 percent.

  15. Measurement of CA1P and CA in leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.d.; Kobza, J.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Carboxyarabinitol-1-phosphate (CA1P) and carboxyarabinitol (CA) were assayed in leaves by isotope dilution. {sup 14}C-labeled standards were synthesized from (2-{sup 14}C) CABP using acid (CA1P) or alkaline (CA) phosphatase. Either was added to boiling 80% EtOH along with liquid N{sub 2}-killed leaves. Each was largely purified by anion exchange chromatography. CA1P samples were subjected to 2D-TLE/TLC. The specific activity of the {sup 14}C-containing spot was measured using alkaline phosphatase. CA samples were run on an HPLC and the specific activity was determined using a UV monitor and a flow-through radioisotope detector. In 3 of the tested species, light/dark amount of CA1P (nmol/mg Chl) were kidney bean, 0.7/67; sugar beet, 0.8/33; and Alocasia, 0/3.4. Light/dark CA levels (nmol/mg Chl) in these respective species were 897/653, 3.2/3.5, and 5.7/4.6. These results support the hypothesis that CA is a product of CA1P metabolism in vivo under high light, but also indicate that CA is not the only intermediate involved in CA1P synthesis under low light/dark conditions.

  16. Jen1p: A High Affinity Selenite Transporter in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Joseph R.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2010-01-01

    Selenium is a micronutrient in most eukaryotes, including humans, which is well known for having an extremely thin border between beneficial and toxic concentrations. Soluble tetravalent selenite is the predominant environmental form and also the form that is applied in the treatment of human diseases. To acquire this nutrient from low environmental concentrations as well as to avoid toxicity, a well-controlled transport system is required. Here we report that Jen1p, a proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter in S. cerevisiae, catalyzes high-affinity uptake of selenite. Disruption of JEN1 resulted in selenite resistance, and overexpression resulted in selenite hypersensitivity. Transport assay showed that overexpression of Jen1p enables selenite accumulation in yeast compared with a JEN1 knock out strain, indicating the Jen1p transporter facilitates selenite accumulation inside cells. Selenite uptake by Jen1p had a Km of 0.91 mM, which is comparable to the Km for lactate. Jen1p transported selenite in a proton-dependent manner which resembles the transport mechanism for lactate. In addition, selenite and lactate can inhibit the transport of each other competitively. Therefore, we postulate selenite is a molecular mimic of monocarboxylates which allows selenite to be transported by Jen1p. PMID:20861301

  17. Jen1p: a high affinity selenite transporter in yeast.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Joseph R; Rosen, Barry P; Liu, Zijuan

    2010-11-15

    Selenium is a micronutrient in most eukaryotes, including humans, which is well known for having an extremely thin border between beneficial and toxic concentrations. Soluble tetravalent selenite is the predominant environmental form and also the form that is applied in the treatment of human diseases. To acquire this nutrient from low environmental concentrations as well as to avoid toxicity, a well-controlled transport system is required. Here we report that Jen1p, a proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter in S. cerevisiae, catalyzes high-affinity uptake of selenite. Disruption of JEN1 resulted in selenite resistance, and overexpression resulted in selenite hypersensitivity. Transport assay showed that overexpression of Jen1p enables selenite accumulation in yeast compared with a JEN1 knock out strain, indicating the Jen1p transporter facilitates selenite accumulation inside cells. Selenite uptake by Jen1p had a Km of 0.91 mM, which is comparable to the Km for lactate. Jen1p transported selenite in a proton-dependent manner which resembles the transport mechanism for lactate. In addition, selenite and lactate can inhibit the transport of each other competitively. Therefore, we postulate selenite is a molecular mimic of monocarboxylates which allows selenite to be transported by Jen1p.

  18. Recent Results of Bottomonium Spectroscopy in Radiative ϒ(2 S) Decays at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stottler, Zachary; Belle Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We report on the recent results of a search for ϒ(2 S) ->(b b) γ decays. We characterize the properties of χbJ(1 P) (J = 0 , 1 , 2) mesons, which are reconstructed from 74 hadronic final states containing charged and neutral pions, kaons, protons. In total, we observe 41 modes with a significance at or above 5 σ , many of which are first observations. Our results are based on an integrated luminosity of 24 . 7 fb-1 of e+e- collision data recorded by the Belle detector at the ϒ(2 S) resonance, corresponding to (157 . 8 +/- 3 . 6) ×106 ϒ(2 S) events.

  19. ψ(2S) Production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaojian; Rapp, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the production of ψ(2S) and the pertinent double ratio of its nuclear modi cation factor (R AA) over that of the J/ψ in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC. Based on a transport model with temperature dependent reaction rates, a sequential regeneration pattern emerges: the larger ψ(2S) width, relative to the J/ψ, around and below the critical temperature, implies that most of the ψ(2S) states are regenerated later in the evolution of the reball. This has noticeable consequences for the transverse-momentum (pT ) spectra of the regenerated charmonia. While the total yield of ψ(2S) meson remains smaller than those of J/ψ’s, their harder pT spectra can produce a double ratio above unity for a pT > 3 GeV cut, as applied by the CMS collaboration. A signi cant uncertainty in our calculations is associated with the values of the temperature where most of the ψ(2S) regeneration occurs, i.e., the quantitative temperature dependence of its inelastic width.

  20. Interaction of environmental contaminants with zebrafish organic anion transporting polypeptide, Oatp1d1 (Slco1d1)

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko; Fent, Karl; Smital, Tvrtko

    2014-10-01

    Polyspecific transporters from the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP/Oatp) superfamily mediate the uptake of a wide range of compounds. In zebrafish, Oatp1d1 transports conjugated steroid hormones and cortisol. It is predominantly expressed in the liver, brain and testes. In this study we have characterized the transport of xenobiotics by the zebrafish Oatp1d1 transporter. We developed a novel assay for assessing Oatp1d1 interactors using the fluorescent probe Lucifer yellow and transient transfection in HEK293 cells. Our data showed that numerous environmental contaminants interact with zebrafish Oatp1d1. Oatp1d1 mediated the transport of diclofenac with very high affinity, followed by high affinity towards perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), nonylphenol, gemfibrozil and 17α-ethinylestradiol; moderate affinity towards carbaryl, diazinon and caffeine; and low affinity towards metolachlor. Importantly, many environmental chemicals acted as strong inhibitors of Oatp1d1. A strong inhibition of Oatp1d1 transport activity was found by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), chlorpyrifos-methyl, estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2), followed by moderate to low inhibition by diethyl phthalate, bisphenol A, 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4 tetrahydronapthalene and clofibrate. In this study we identified Oatp1d1 as a first Solute Carrier (SLC) transporter involved in the transport of a wide range of xenobiotics in fish. Considering that Oatps in zebrafish have not been characterized before, our work on zebrafish Oatp1d1 offers important new insights on the understanding of uptake processes of environmental contaminants, and contributes to the better characterization of zebrafish as a model species. - Highlights: • We optimized a novel assay for determination of Oatp1d1 interactors • Oatp1d1 is the first SLC characterized fish xenobiotic transporter • PFOS, nonylphenol, diclofenac, EE2, caffeine are high affinity Oatp1d1substrates • PFOA, chlorpyrifos

  1. AtPng1p. The first plant transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Della Mea, Massimiliano; Caparrós-Ruiz, David; Claparols, Inmaculada; Serafini-Fracassini, Donatella; Rigau, Joan

    2004-08-01

    Studies have revealed in plant chloroplasts, mitochondria, cell walls, and cytoplasm the existence of transglutaminase (TGase) activities, similar to those known in animals and prokaryotes having mainly structural roles, but no protein has been associated to this type of activity in plants. A recent computational analysis has shown in Arabidopsis the presence of a gene, AtPng1p, which encodes a putative N-glycanase. AtPng1p contains the Cys-His-Asp triad present in the TGase catalytic domain. AtPng1p is a single gene expressed ubiquitously in the plant but at low levels in all light-assayed conditions. The recombinant AtPng1p protein could be immuno-detected using animal TGase antibodies. Furthermore, western-blot analysis using antibodies raised against the recombinant AtPng1p protein have lead to its detection in microsomal fraction. The purified protein links polyamines-spermine (Spm) > spermidine (Spd) > putrescine (Put)-and biotin-cadaverine to dimethylcasein in a calcium-dependent manner. Analyses of the gamma-glutamyl-derivatives revealed that the formation of covalent linkages between proteins and polyamines occurs via the transamidation of gamma-glutamyl residues of the substrate, confirming that the AtPng1p gene product acts as a TGase. The Ca(2+)- and GTP-dependent cross-linking activity of the AtPng1p protein can be visualized by the polymerization of bovine serum albumine, obtained, like the commercial TGase, at basic pH and in the presence of dithiotreitol. To our knowledge, this is the first reported plant protein, characterized at molecular level, showing TGase activity, as all its parameters analyzed so far agree with those typically exhibited by the animal TGases.

  2. Capturing 1D Channel Network Topology in NetCDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagers, B.; van Dam, A.; Mooiman, J.

    2016-12-01

    Traditional Climate and Forecasting conventions for NetCDF files provide support for data on regular grids and data at a set of locations without well defined topology (connectivity). Over the past decade GridSpec, UGRID, and SGRID conventions have been proposed and adopted to capture the topology of numerical models (GridSpec for mosaics of grids, UGRID for unstructured meshes, and SGRID for staggered data on structured grids). UGRID includes conventions for capturing 1D, 2D, and 3D unstructured mesh topologies. The 2D and layered 3D conventions have been adopted by various numerical code developers in the Earth Sciences. The subset of 1D conventions are however less well widely used to this date. In the process of converting our 1D model output to the combined CF and 1D UGRID conventions, we have noticed that it lacks a couple of features. UGRID assumes that the channel geometry between the "nodes" is straight while in most 1D models these channels can be curved. We propose an extension to the UGRID conventions to allow for a two-layered approach in which first a 1D generic channel network topology is defined, and then a 1D mesh topology on that channel network using "branch number" and "branch offset" as coordinate variables.

  3. Rgf1p (Rho1p GEF) is required for double-strand break repair in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Manjón, Elvira; Edreira, Tomás; Muñoz, Sofía; Sánchez, Yolanda

    2017-05-19

    Rho GTPases are conserved molecules that control cytoskeletal dynamics. These functions are expedited by Rho GEFs that stimulate the release of GDP to enable GTP binding, thereby allowing Rho proteins to initiate intracellular signaling. How Rho GEFs and Rho GTPases protect cells from DNA damage is unknown. Here, we explore the extreme sensitivity of a deletion mutation in the Rho1p exchange factor Rgf1p to the DNA break/inducing antibiotic phleomycin (Phl). The Rgf1p mutant cells are defective in reentry into the cell cycle following the induction of severe DNA damage. This phenotype correlates with the inability of rgf1Δ cells to efficiently repair fragmented chromosomes after Phl treatment. Consistent with this observation Rad11p (ssDNA binding protein, RPA), Rad52p, Rad54p and Rad51p, which facilitate strand invasion in the process of homology-directed repair (HDR), are permanently stacked in Phl-induced foci in rgf1Δ cells. These phenotypes are phenocopied by genetic inhibition of Rho1p. Our data provide evidence that Rgf1p/Rho1p activity positively controls a repair function that confers resistance against the anti-cancer drug Phl. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. D1/D5 dopamine receptors modulate spatial memory formation.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Weber C N; Köhler, Cristiano C; Radiske, Andressa; Cammarota, Martín

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effect of the intra-CA1 administration of the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH23390 and the D1/D5 receptor agonist SKF38393 on spatial memory in the water maze. When given immediately, but not 3h after training, SCH23390 hindered long-term spatial memory formation without affecting non-spatial memory or the normal functionality of the hippocampus. On the contrary, post-training infusion of SKF38393 enhanced retention and facilitated the spontaneous recovery of the original spatial preference after reversal learning. Our findings demonstrate that hippocampal D1/D5 receptors play an essential role in spatial memory processing.

  5. Mmb1p binds mitochondria to dynamic microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chuanhai; Jain, Deeptee; Costa, Judite; Velve-Casquillas, Guilhem; Tran, Phong T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Mitochondria form a dynamics tubular network within the cell. Proper mitochondria movement and distribution are critical for their localized function in cell metabolism, growth, and survival. In mammalian cells, mechanisms of mitochondria positioning appear dependent on the microtubule cytoskeleton, with kinesin or dynein motors carrying mitochondria as cargos and distributing them throughout the microtubule network. Interestingly, the timescale of microtubule dynamics occurs in seconds, and the timescale of mitochondria distribution occurs in minutes. How does the cell couple these two time constants? Results Fission yeast also relies on microtubules for mitochondria distribution. We report here a new microtubule-dependent but motor-independent mechanism for proper mitochondria positioning in fission yeast. We identify the protein mmb1p, which binds to mitochondria and microtubules. Mmb1p attaches the tubular mitochondria to the microtubule lattice at multiple discrete interaction sites. Mmb1 deletion causes mitochondria to aggregate, with the long-term consequence of defective mitochondria distribution and cell death. Mmb1p decreases microtubule dynamicity. Conclusion Mmb1p is a new microtubule-mitochondria binding protein. We propose that mmb1p act to couple long-term mitochondria distribution to short-term microtubule dynamics by attenuating microtubule dynamics, thus enhancing the mitochondria-microtubule interaction time. PMID:21856157

  6. Structural and electronic features of binary Li2S-P2S5 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Koji; Mitsui, Akio; Mori, Masahiro; Onodera, Yohei; Shiotani, Shinya; Koyama, Yukinori; Orikasa, Yuki; Murakami, Miwa; Shimoda, Keiji; Mori, Kazuhiro; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Arai, Hajime; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2016-02-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of binary Li2S-P2S5 glasses used as solid electrolytes are modeled by a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) simulation using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy data. The ratio of PSx polyhedral anions based on the Raman spectroscopic results is reflected in the glassy structures of the 67Li2S-33P2S5, 70Li2S-30P2S5, and 75Li2S-25P2S5 glasses, and the plausible structures represent the lithium ion distributions around them. It is found that the edge sharing between PSx and LiSy polyhedra increases at a high Li2S content, and the free volume around PSx polyhedra decreases. It is conjectured that Li+ ions around the face of PSx polyhedra are clearly affected by the polarization of anions. The electronic structure of the DFT/RMC model suggests that the electron transfer between the P ion and the bridging sulfur (BS) ion weakens the positive charge of the P ion in the P2S7 anions. The P2S7 anions of the weak electrostatic repulsion would causes it to more strongly attract Li+ ions than the PS4 and P2S6 anions, and suppress the lithium ionic conduction. Thus, the control of the edge sharing between PSx and LiSy polyhedra without the electron transfer between the P ion and the BS ion is expected to facilitate lithium ionic conduction in the above solid electrolytes.

  7. Structural and electronic features of binary Li2S-P2S5 glasses

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Koji; Mitsui, Akio; Mori, Masahiro; Onodera, Yohei; Shiotani, Shinya; Koyama, Yukinori; Orikasa, Yuki; Murakami, Miwa; Shimoda, Keiji; Mori, Kazuhiro; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Arai, Hajime; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2016-01-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of binary Li2S-P2S5 glasses used as solid electrolytes are modeled by a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) simulation using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy data. The ratio of PSx polyhedral anions based on the Raman spectroscopic results is reflected in the glassy structures of the 67Li2S-33P2S5, 70Li2S-30P2S5, and 75Li2S-25P2S5 glasses, and the plausible structures represent the lithium ion distributions around them. It is found that the edge sharing between PSx and LiSy polyhedra increases at a high Li2S content, and the free volume around PSx polyhedra decreases. It is conjectured that Li+ ions around the face of PSx polyhedra are clearly affected by the polarization of anions. The electronic structure of the DFT/RMC model suggests that the electron transfer between the P ion and the bridging sulfur (BS) ion weakens the positive charge of the P ion in the P2S7 anions. The P2S7 anions of the weak electrostatic repulsion would causes it to more strongly attract Li+ ions than the PS4 and P2S6 anions, and suppress the lithium ionic conduction. Thus, the control of the edge sharing between PSx and LiSy polyhedra without the electron transfer between the P ion and the BS ion is expected to facilitate lithium ionic conduction in the above solid electrolytes. PMID:26892385

  8. Del 1p36 syndrome: a newly emerging clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Agatino

    2005-08-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is a recently delineated contiguous gene syndrome, which is now considered to be the most common subtelomeric microdeletion syndrome. From the recent literature it appears as if 1p36 deletions account for 0.5-1.2% of idiopathic mental retardation. The deletions can be detected by high resolution cytogenetic studies in a minority of patients, and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is required in most. The deletions' parent of origin seems still unclear, although in one large series it was shown to be maternal. 1p36 deletion syndrome is characterized by distinct craniofacial features, associated with developmental delay/mental retardation, hypotonia, muscle hypotrophy, seizures, brain abnormalities, and heart defects. To help child neurologists and other professionals in the recognition of this emerging and common chromosomal syndrome, we have reviewed published articles on patients with this deletion.

  9. Measurement of the χ b (3 P) mass and of the relative rate of χ b1(1 P) and χ b2(1 P) production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Lespinasse, M.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-10-01

    The production of χ b mesons in proton-proton collisions is studied using a data sample collected by the LHCb detector, at centre-of-mass energies of =7 and 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1. The χ b mesons are identified through their decays to ϒ(1 S) γ and ϒ(2 S) γ using photons that converted to e + e - pairs in the detector. The relative prompt production rate of χ b1(1 P) and χ b2(1 P) mesons is measured as a function of the ϒ(1 S) transverse momentum in the χ b rapidity range 2.0 < y <4.5. A precise measurement of the χ b (3 P) mass is also performed. Assuming a mass splitting between the χ b1(3 P) and the χ b2(3 P) states of 10.5 MeV/c2, the measured mass of the χ b1(3 P) meson is

  10. Unfolded protein response regulates yeast small GTPase Arl1p activation at late Golgi via phosphorylation of Arf GEF Syt1p

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jia-Wei; Tang, Pei-Hua; Wang, I-Hao; Liu, Chia-Lun; Chen, Wen-Hui; Tsai, Pei-Chin; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Jung; Yu, Chia-Jung

    2016-01-01

    ADP ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are key regulators of membrane traffic at the Golgi complex. In yeast, Arf guanine nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) Syt1p activates Arf-like protein Arl1p, which was accompanied by accumulation of golgin Imh1p at late Golgi, but whether and how this function of Syt1p is regulated remains unclear. Here, we report that the inositol-requiring kinase 1 (Ire1p)-mediated unfolded protein response (UPR) modulated Arl1p activation at late Golgi. Arl1p activation was dependent on both kinase and endo-RNase activities of Ire1p. Moreover, constitutively active transcription factor Hac1p restored the Golgi localization of Arl1p and Imh1p in IRE1-deleted cells. Elucidating the mechanism of Ire1p–Hac1p axis actions, we found that it regulated phosphorylation of Syt1p, which enhances Arl1p activation, recruitment of Imh1p to the Golgi, and Syt1p interaction with Arl1p. Consistent with these findings, the induction of UPR by tunicamycin treatment increases phosphorylation of Syt1p, resulting in Arl1p activation. Thus, these findings clarify how the UPR influences the roles of Syt1p, Arl1p, and Imh1p in Golgi transport. PMID:26966233

  11. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia in Glut1D on Ketogenic Diet.

    PubMed

    Klepper, Joerg; Leiendecker, Baerbel; Heussinger, Nicole; Lausch, Ekkehart; Bosch, Friedrich

    2016-04-01

    High-fat ketogenic diets are the only treatment available for Glut1 deficiency (Glut1D). Here, we describe an 8-year-old girl with classical Glut1D responsive to a 3:1 ketogenic diet and ethosuximide. After 3 years on the diet a gradual increase of blood lipids was followed by rapid, severe asymptomatic hypertriglyceridemia (1,910 mg/dL). Serum lipid apheresis was required to determine liver, renal, and pancreatic function. A combination of medium chain triglyceride-oil and a reduction of the ketogenic diet to 1:1 ratio normalized triglyceride levels within days but triggered severe myoclonic seizures requiring comedication with sultiam. Severe hypertriglyceridemia in children with Glut1D on ketogenic diets may be underdiagnosed and harmful. In contrast to congenital hypertriglyceridemias, children with Glut1D may be treated effectively by dietary adjustments alone.

  12. 1D Nanostructures: Controlled Fabrication and Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Michael Z.

    2013-01-01

    Jian Wei, Xuchun Song, Chunli Yang, and Michael Z. Hu, 1D Nanostructures: Controlled Fabrication and Energy Applications, Journal of Nanomaterials, published special issue (http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnm/si/197254/) (2013).

  13. New approach to image coding using 1-D subband filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tian-Hu; Mitra, Sanjit K.

    1991-06-01

    Conventional subband coding for image data compression uses 2D separable QMF banks in which the analysis and synthesis filters are composed of 1D filters. Such an implementation produces a large size output image as a result of the convolution process. Various signal extension methods have been proposed to solve this problem. However, these methods have one or more of the following drawbacks: generation of boundary noise, inability to guarantee aliasing cancellation, and increased computation complexity. In this paper, we present an alternative solution to the problem by converting a 2D image array to a 1D array and then using a 1D QMF bank to process the 1D signal. In our approach, most of the above drawbacks mentioned above are eliminated. In addition, our approach offers more flexibility in the type of the filter that can be implemented.

  14. TBC1D24 genotype–phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    Balestrini, Simona; Milh, Mathieu; Castiglioni, Claudia; Lüthy, Kevin; Finelli, Mattea J.; Verstreken, Patrik; Cardon, Aaron; Stražišar, Barbara Gnidovec; Holder, J. Lloyd; Lesca, Gaetan; Mancardi, Maria M.; Poulat, Anne L.; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Banka, Siddharth; Bilo, Leonilda; Birkeland, Laura E.; Bosch, Friedrich; Brockmann, Knut; Cross, J. Helen; Doummar, Diane; Félix, Temis M.; Giuliano, Fabienne; Hori, Mutsuki; Hüning, Irina; Kayserili, Hulia; Kini, Usha; Lees, Melissa M.; Meenakshi, Girish; Mewasingh, Leena; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Peluso, Silvio; Mey, Antje; Rice, Gregory M.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Taylor, Jenny C.; Troester, Matthew M.; Stanley, Christine M.; Ville, Dorothee; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Falace, Antonio; Fassio, Anna; Lemke, Johannes R.; Biskup, Saskia; Tardif, Jessica; Ajeawung, Norbert F.; Tolun, Aslihan; Corbett, Mark; Gecz, Jozef; Afawi, Zaid; Howell, Katherine B.; Oliver, Karen L.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; de Falco, Fabrizio A.; Oliver, Peter L.; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in TBC1D24. Methods: We acquired new clinical, EEG, and neuroimaging data of 11 previously unreported and 37 published patients. TBC1D24 mutations, identified through various sequencing methods, can be found online (http://lovd.nl/TBC1D24). Results: Forty-eight patients were included (28 men, 20 women, average age 21 years) from 30 independent families. Eighteen patients (38%) had myoclonic epilepsies. The other patients carried diagnoses of focal (25%), multifocal (2%), generalized (4%), and unclassified epilepsy (6%), and early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (25%). Most patients had drug-resistant epilepsy. We detail EEG, neuroimaging, developmental, and cognitive features, treatment responsiveness, and physical examination. In silico evaluation revealed 7 different highly conserved motifs, with the most common pathogenic mutation located in the first. Neuronal outgrowth assays showed that some TBC1D24 mutations, associated with the most severe TBC1D24-associated disorders, are not necessarily the most disruptive to this gene function. Conclusions: TBC1D24-related epilepsy syndromes show marked phenotypic pleiotropy, with multisystem involvement and severity spectrum ranging from isolated deafness (not studied here), benign myoclonic epilepsy restricted to childhood with complete seizure control and normal intellect, to early-onset epileptic encephalopathy with severe developmental delay and early death. There is no distinct correlation with mutation type or location yet, but patterns are emerging. Given the phenotypic breadth observed, TBC1D24 mutation screening is indicated in a wide variety of epilepsies. A TBC1D24 consortium was formed to develop further research on this gene and its associated phenotypes. PMID:27281533

  15. Physical map of 1p36, placement of breakpoints in monosomy 1p36, and clinical characterization of the syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heilstedt, Heidi A; Ballif, Blake C; Howard, Leslie A; Lewis, Richard A; Stal, Samuel; Kashork, Catherine D; Bacino, Carlos A; Shapira, Stuart K; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2003-05-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common terminal deletion syndrome. This contiguous gene deletion syndrome is presumably caused by haploinsufficiency of a number of genes. We have constructed a contig of overlapping large-insert clones for the most distal 10.5 Mb of 1p36, evaluated the deletion sizes in 61 subjects with monosomy 1p36 from 60 families, and created a natural deletion panel. We found pure terminal deletions, interstitial deletions, derivative chromosomes, and more complex rearrangements. Breakpoints were "binned" into 0.5-Mb regions. Analyses revealed some clustering of breakpoints but no single common breakpoint. Determination of the parental origin showed that 60% of de novo 1p36 terminal deletions arose from the maternally inherited chromosome. Of the 61 subjects, 30 were examined systematically through a protocol at the Texas Children's Hospital General Clinical Research Center. Specifically, we report hearing evaluations, palatal and ophthalmological examinations, echocardiograms, neurological assessments, and thyroid function tests. To our knowledge, this systematic molecular and clinical characterization of monosomy 1p36 is the largest and most comprehensive study of this deletion syndrome to date. Many cytogenetically visible, apparent terminal deletions are more complex than anticipated by cytogenetics, as revealed at the molecular level by our study. Our clinical findings allow for the more accurate recognition of the syndrome and for proper medical evaluation.

  16. Remove H/sub 2/S selectively

    SciTech Connect

    Mortko, R.A.

    1984-06-01

    Innovative Selexol process schemes improve H/sub 2/S selectivity and overall CO/sub 2/ recovery for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Two such schemes, based on use of the Selexol Process show very good economics versus a conventional configuration even at modest CO/sub 2/ product values. These alternate schemes offer two different approaches to enhancing selectivity. One approach illustrates the tremendous effect on plant economics resulting from a small increase in CO/sub 2/ recovery. The other illustrates that CO/sub 2/ recovery levels approaching 99% are not only technically feasible but also economically viable even at very modest CO/sub 2/ product values. The feed gas chosen for evaluation is a typical southwestern Wyoming sour natural gas containing nearly 66% CO/sub 2/, 5% H/sub 2/S, and approximately 8% nitrogen with no hydrocarbons other than methane. Desired products are CO/sub 2/ for use in EOR, H/sub 2/S for sulfur recovery and methane as a product sales gas. Excess nitrogen in the methane sales gas stream is rejected to atmosphere. The Selexol Solvent Process is an excellent choice for treating this gas considering the need for selective acid gas removal, the high acid gas partial pressures and the absence of any ''heavy ends'' in the feed gas.

  17. Late-stage optimization of a tercyclic class of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Horan, Joshua C; Kuzmich, Daniel; Liu, Pingrong; DiSalvo, Darren; Lord, John; Mao, Can; Hopkins, Tamara D; Yu, Hui; Harcken, Christian; Betageri, Raj; Hill-Drzewi, Melissa; Patenaude, Lori; Patel, Monica; Fletcher, Kimberly; Terenzzio, Donna; Linehan, Brian; Xia, Heather; Patel, Mita; Studwell, Debbie; Miller, Craig; Hickey, Eugene; Levin, Jeremy I; Smith, Dustin; Kemper, Raymond A; Modis, Louise K; Bannen, Lynne C; Chan, Diva S; Mac, Morrison B; Ng, Stephanie; Wang, Yong; Xu, Wei; Lemieux, René M

    2016-01-15

    Poor solubility and cationic amphiphilic drug-likeness were liabilities identified for a lead series of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 agonists originally developed from a high-throughput screening campaign. This work describes the subsequent optimization of these leads by balancing potency, selectivity, solubility and overall molecular charge. Focused SAR studies revealed favorable structural modifications that, when combined, produced compounds with overall balanced profiles. The low brain exposure observed in rat suggests that these compounds would be best suited for the potential treatment of peripheral autoimmune disorders.

  18. 1D Measurement of Sodium Ion Flow in Hydrogel After a Bath Concentration Jump.

    PubMed

    Roos, R W; Pel, L; Huinink, H P; Huyghe, J M

    2015-07-01

    NMR is used to measure sodium flow driven by a 1D concentration gradient inside poly-acrylamid (pAA) hydrogel. A sodium concentration jump from 0.5 M NaCl to 0 M NaCl is applied at the bottom of a cylindrical pAA sample. The sodium level and hydrogen level are measured as a function of time and position inside the sample for 5 days. Then a reversed step is applied, and ion flow is measured for another 5 days. During the measurement, the cylindrical sample is radially confined and allowed to swell in the axial direction. At the same time, sodium and moisture in the sample are measured on a 1D spatial grid in the axial direction. A quadriphasic mixture model (Huyghe and Janssen in Int J Eng Sci 35:793, 1997) is used to simulate the results and estimate the diffusion coefficient of sodium and chloride. The best fit results were obtained for D[Formula: see text] cm(2)/s and D[Formula: see text] cm(2)/s, at 25 degrees centigrade. Different time constants were observed for swelling and deswelling.

  19. 2D photochemical model for forbidden oxygen line emission for comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, G.; De Keyser, J.; Maggiolo, R.; Rubin, M.; Gronoff, G.; Gibbons, A.; Jehin, E.; Dhooghe, F.; Gunell, H.; Vaeck, N.; Loreau, J.

    2016-11-01

    We present here a 2D model of photochemistry for computing the production and loss mechanisms of the O(1S) and O(1D) states, which are responsible for the emission lines at 577.7, 630, and 636.4 nm, in case of the comet 1P/Halley. The presence of O2 within cometary atmospheres, measured by the in situ Rosetta and Giotto missions, necessitates a revision of the usual photochemical models. Indeed, the photodissociation of molecular oxygen also leads to a significant production of oxygen in excited electronic states. In order to correctly model the solar ultraviolet (UV) flux absorption, we consider here a 2D configuration. While the green to red-doublet ratio is not affected by the solar UV flux absorption, estimates of the red-doublet and green lines emissions are, however, overestimated by a factor of 2 in the 1D model compared to the 2D model. Considering a spherical symmetry, emission maps can be deduced from the 2D model in order to be directly compared to ground and/or in situ observations.

  20. The Nuclear Export Receptor Xpo1p Forms Distinct Complexes with NES Transport Substrates and the Yeast Ran Binding Protein 1 (Yrb1p)

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Patrick; Redd, Michael; Solsbacher, Jens; Bischoff, F. Ralf; Greiner, Markus; Podtelejnikov, Alexandre V.; Mann, Matthias; Stade, Katrin; Weis, Karsten; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    2001-01-01

    Xpo1p (Crm1p) is the nuclear export receptor for proteins containing a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES). Xpo1p, the NES-containing protein, and GTP-bound Ran form a complex in the nucleus that translocates across the nuclear pore. We have identified Yrb1p as the major Xpo1p-binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts in the presence of GTP-bound Gsp1p (yeast Ran). Yrb1p is cytoplasmic at steady-state but shuttles continuously between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Nuclear import of Yrb1p is mediated by two separate nuclear targeting signals. Export from the nucleus requires Xpo1p, but Yrb1p does not contain a leucine-rich NES. Instead, the interaction of Yrb1p with Xpo1p is mediated by Gsp1p-GTP. This novel type of export complex requires the acidic C-terminus of Gsp1p, which is dispensable for the binding to importin β-like transport receptors. A similar complex with Xpo1p and Gsp1p-GTP can be formed by Yrb2p, a relative of Yrb1p predominantly located in the nucleus. Yrb1p also functions as a disassembly factor for NES/Xpo1p/Gsp1p-GTP complexes by displacing the NES protein from Xpo1p/Gsp1p. This Yrb1p/Xpo1p/Gsp1p complex is then completely dissociated after GTP hydrolysis catalyzed by the cytoplasmic GTPase activating protein Rna1p. PMID:11251069

  1. Inorganic Sn-X-complex-induced 1D, 2D, and 3D copper sulfide superstructures from anisotropic hexagonal nanoplate building blocks.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomin; Wang, Meijuan; Shen, Huaibin; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Hongzhe; Li, Lin Song

    2011-09-05

    A facile route was demonstrated for inorganic Sn-X-complex-induced syntheses of self-assembled 1D columnar, 2D raftlike, and 3D stratiform anisotropic Cu(2)S hexagonal nanoplates. The factors (reaction time, temperature, the concentration of Sn-X complex, and so on) that influence the size, phase, monodispersity, and self-assembly ability of the Cu(2)S hexagonal nanoplates were studied in detail. It was found that the Sn-X complex could inhibit the growth of the <001> direction of monoclinic Cu(2)S nanocrystals, which further induced the formation of the hexagonal lamellar structure. Furthermore, it revealed that the formation of the 1D arrangement was preferred as particles stacked in a face-to-face configuration by maximizing ligand-surface interactions. Then, high ligand density along the side of the 1D columnar arrangement induced well-defined 2D raftlike and 3D stratiform self-assembly.

  2. A third major locus for autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia maps to 1p34.1-p32.

    PubMed Central

    Varret, M; Rabès, J P; Saint-Jore, B; Cenarro, A; Marinoni, J C; Civeira, F; Devillers, M; Krempf, M; Coulon, M; Thiart, R; Kotze, M J; Schmidt, H; Buzzi, J C; Kostner, G M; Bertolini, S; Pocovi, M; Rosa, A; Farnier, M; Martinez, M; Junien, C; Boileau, C

    1999-01-01

    Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), one of the most frequent hereditary disorders, is characterized by an isolated elevation of LDL particles that leads to premature mortality from cardiovascular complications. It is generally assumed that mutations in the LDLR and APOB genes account for ADH. We identified one large French pedigree (HC2) and 12 additional white families with ADH in which we excluded linkage to the LDLR and APOB, implicating a new locus we named "FH3." A LOD score of 3.13 at a recombination fraction of 0 was obtained at markers D1S2892 and D1S2722. We localized the FH3 locus to a 9-cM interval at 1p34.1-p32. We tested four regional markers in another set of 12 ADH families. Positive LOD scores were obtained in three pedigrees, whereas linkage was excluded in the others. Heterogeneity tests indicated linkage to FH3 in approximately 27% of these non-LDLR/non-APOB ADH families and implied a fourth locus. Radiation hybrid mapping located four candidate genes at 1p34.1-p32, outside the critical region, showing no identity with FH3. Our results show that ADH is genetically more heterogeneous than conventionally accepted. PMID:10205269

  3. Ion-sensing properties of 1D vanadium pentoxide nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The application of one-dimensional (1D) V2O5·nH2O nanostructures as pH sensing material was evaluated. 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures were obtained by a hydrothermal method with systematic control of morphology forming different nanostructures: nanoribbons, nanowires and nanorods. Deposited onto Au-covered substrates, 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures were employed as gate material in pH sensors based on separative extended gate FET as an alternative to provide FET isolation from the chemical environment. 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures showed pH sensitivity around the expected theoretical value. Due to high pH sensing properties, flexibility and low cost, further applications of 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures comprise enzyme FET-based biosensors using immobilized enzymes. PMID:22709724

  4. Polar discontinuities and 1D interfaces in monolayered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Gordillo, Rafael; Pruneda, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Interfaces are the birthplace of a multitude of fascinating discoveries in fundamental science, and have enabled modern electronic devices, from transistors, to lasers, capacitors or solar cells. These interfaces between bulk materials are always bi-dimensional (2D) 'surfaces'. However the advent of graphene and other 2D crystals opened up a world of possibilities, as in this case the interfaces become one-dimensional (1D) lines. Although the properties of 1D nanoribbons have been extensively discussed in the last few years, 1D interfaces within infinite 2D systems had remained mostly unexplored until very recently. These include grain boundaries in polycrystalline samples, or interfaces in hybrid 2D sheets composed by segregated domains of different materials (as for example graphene/BN hybrids, or chemically different transition metal dichalcogenides). As for their 2D counterparts, some of these 1D interfaces exhibit polar characteristics, and can give rise to fascinating new physical properties. Here, recent experimental discoveries and theoretical predictions on the polar discontinuities that arise at these 1D interfaces will be reviewed, and the perspectives of this new research topic, discussed.

  5. QI2S - Quick Image Interpretation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghmouchi, Jamin; Aviely, Peleg; Ginosar, Ran; Ober, Giovanna; Bischoff, Ole; Nadler, Ron; Guiser, David; Citroen, Meira; Freddi, Riccardo; Berekovic, Mladen

    2015-09-01

    The evolution of the Earth Observation mission will be driven by many factors, and the deveploment of new processing paradigms to facilitate data downlink, handling and storage will be a key factor. Next generation EO satellites will generate a great amount of data at a very high data rate, both radar and optical. Real-time onboard processing can be the solution to reduce data downlink and management on ground. Radiometric, geometric, and atmospheric corrections of EO data as well as material/object detection in addition to the well-known needs for image compression and signal processing can be performed directly on board and the aim of QI2S project is to demonstrate this. QI2S, a concept prototype system for novel onboard image processing and image interpretation which has been designed, developed and validated in the framework of an EU FP7 project, targets these needs and makes a significant step towards exceeding current roadmaps of leading space agencies for future payload processors. The QI2S system features multiple chip components of the RC64, a novel rad-hard 64-core signal processing chip, which targets DSP performance of 75 GMACs (16bit), 150 GOPS and 38 single precision GFLOPS while dissipating less than 10 Watts. It integrates advanced DSP cores with a multibank shared memory and a hardware scheduler, also supporting DDR2/3 memory and twelve 3.125 Gbps full duplex high-speed serial links using SpaceFibre and other protocols. The processor is being developed within the European FP7 Framework Program and will be qualified to the highest space standards.

  6. Attenuation of cell motility observed with high doses of sphingosine 1-phosphate or phosphorylated FTY720 involves RGS2 through its interactions with the receptor S1P.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Takayuki; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) stimulation enhances cell motility via the G-protein coupled S1P receptor S1P1. This ligand-induced, receptor-mediated cell motility follows a typical bell-shaped dose-response curve, that is, stimulation with low concentrations of S1P enhances cell motility, whereas excess ligand stimulation does not enhance it. So far, the attenuation of the response at higher ligand concentrations has not been explained. We report here that S1P1 interacts with the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS)-2 protein, which is a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for heterotrimeric G proteins, in a concentration dependent manner. The RGS2-S1P1 complex dissociated at higher ligand concentrations, yet it was unaffected at low concentrations, suggesting that the dissociated RGS2 is involved in the concurrent decrease of cell motility. In RGS2 knockdown cells, the decrease of cell motility induced by high ligand concentrations was rescued. S1P1 internalization was not implicated in the attenuation of the response. Similar results were observed upon stimulation with the phosphorylated form of FTY720 (FTYP), which is an S1P1 agonist. In conclusion, the suppressed response in cell motility induced by excess S1P or FTYP via S1P1 is regulated by RGS2 functioning through a mechanism that is independent of S1P1 internalization.

  7. Pitch-based pattern splitting for 1D layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Ryo; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Koji; Tsujita, Koichiro; Yaegashi, Hidetami; Oyama, Kenichi; Smayling, Michael C.; Axelrad, Valery

    2015-07-01

    The pattern splitting algorithm for 1D Gridded-Design-Rules layout (1D layout) for sub-10 nm node logic devices is shown. It is performed with integer linear programming (ILP) based on the conflict graph created from a grid map for each designated pitch. The relation between the number of times for patterning and the minimum pitch is shown systematically with a sample pattern of contact layer for each node. From the result, the number of times for patterning for 1D layout is fewer than that for conventional 2D layout. Moreover, an experimental result including SMO and total integrated process with hole repair technique is presented with the sample pattern of contact layer whose pattern density is relatively high among critical layers (fin, gate, local interconnect, contact, and metal).

  8. 1D nanocrystals with precisely controlled dimensions, compositions, and architectures.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xinchang; He, Yanjie; Jung, Jaehan; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-09-16

    The ability to synthesize a diverse spectrum of one-dimensional (1D) nanocrystals presents an enticing prospect for exploring nanoscale size- and shape-dependent properties. Here we report a general strategy to craft a variety of plain nanorods, core-shell nanorods, and nanotubes with precisely controlled dimensions and compositions by capitalizing on functional bottlebrush-like block copolymers with well-defined structures and narrow molecular weight distributions as nanoreactors. These cylindrical unimolecular nanoreactors enable a high degree of control over the size, shape, architecture, surface chemistry, and properties of 1D nanocrystals. We demonstrate the synthesis of metallic, ferroelectric, upconversion, semiconducting, and thermoelectric 1D nanocrystals, among others, as well as combinations thereof.

  9. Nanodamage and Nanofailure of 1d Zno Nanomaterials and Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peifeng; Yang, Ya; Huang, Yunhua; Zhang, Yue

    2012-08-01

    One-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanomaterials include nanowires, nanobelts, and nanorods etc. The extensive applied fields and excellent properties of 1D ZnO nanomaterials can meet the requests of the electronic and electromechanical devices for "smaller, faster and colder", and would be applied in new energy convention, environmental protection, information science and technology, biomedical, security and defense fields. While micro porous, etching pits nanodamage and brittle fracture, dissolving, functional failure nanofailure phenomena of 1D ZnO nanomaterials and nanodevices are observed in some practical working environments like illumination, currents or electric fields, external forces, and some chemical gases or solvents. The more important thing is to discuss the mechanism and reduce or prohibit their generation.

  10. Flexible Photodetectors Based on 1D Inorganic Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Flexible photodetectors with excellent flexibility, high mechanical stability and good detectivity, have attracted great research interest in recent years. 1D inorganic nanostructures provide a number of opportunities and capabilities for use in flexible photodetectors as they have unique geometry, good transparency, outstanding mechanical flexibility, and excellent electronic/optoelectronic properties. This article offers a comprehensive review of several types of flexible photodetectors based on 1D nanostructures from the past ten years, including flexible ultraviolet, visible, and infrared photodetectors. High‐performance organic‐inorganic hybrid photodetectors, as well as devices with 1D nanowire (NW) arrays, are also reviewed. Finally, new concepts of flexible photodetectors including piezophototronic, stretchable and self‐powered photodetectors are examined to showcase the future research in this exciting field. PMID:27774404

  11. PC-1D installation manual and user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Basore, P.A.

    1991-05-01

    PC-1D is a software package for personal computers that uses finite-element analysis to solve the fully-coupled two-carrier semiconductor transport equations in one dimension. This program is particularly useful for analyzing the performance of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, but can be applied to any bipolar device whose carrier flows are primarily one-dimensional. This User's Guide provides the information necessary to install PC-1D, define a problem for solution, solve the problem, and examine the results. Example problems are presented which illustrate these steps. The physical models and numerical methods utilized are presented in detail. This document supports version 3.1 of PC-1D, which incorporates faster numerical algorithms with better convergence properties than previous versions of the program. 51 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. [An updated review of 1p36 deletion (monosomy) syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bello, Sabina; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    The Monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome is part of the group of diseases known as Rare Diseases. The objective of the present work is to review the characteristics of Monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome. The monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome phenotype includes: dysmorphic craniofacial features; large anterior fontanelle, unibrow, deep-set eyes, epicanthus, wide nasal root/bridge, mandible hypoplasia, abnormal location of the pinna, philtrum and pointed chin; neurological alterations: seizures and hydrocephalus (in some cases). Cerebral malformations: ventricular hypertrophy, increased subarachnoid space, morphological alterations of corpus callosum, cortical atrophy, delays in myelinisation, periventricular leukomalacia and periventricular heterotopia. These alterations produce intellectual disability and delays in motor growth, communication skills, language, social and adaptive behaviour. It is Hearing and vision impairments are also observed in subjects with this syndrome, as well as alterations of cardiac, endocrine and urinary systems and alterations at skin and skeletal level. Approximately 100 cases have been documented since 1981. This rare disease is the most common subtelomeric-micro-deletion syndrome. In situ hybridization with fluorescence (FISH) and array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH-array) are at present the two best diagnostic techniques. There is currently no effective medical treatment for this disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. The Hsp70 chaperone Ssq1p is dispensable for iron-sulfur cluster formation on the scaffold protein Isu1p.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Rafal; Marszalek, Jaroslaw; Schilke, Brenda; Craig, Elizabeth A; Lill, Roland; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2006-03-24

    The specialized yeast mitochondrial chaperone system, composed of the Hsp70 Ssq1p, its co-chaperone J-protein Jac1p, and the nucleotide release factor Mge1p, perform a critical function in the biogenesis of iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins. Using a spectroscopic assay, we have analyzed the potential role of the chaperones in Fe/S cluster assembly on the scaffold protein Isu1p in vitro in the presence of the cysteine desulfurase Nfs1p. In the absence of chaperones, the kinetics of Fe/S cluster formation on Isu1p were compatible with a chemical reconstitution pathway with Nfs1p functioning as a sulfide donor. Addition of Ssq1p improved the rates of Fe/S cluster assembly 3-fold. However, this stimulatory effect of Ssq1p required neither ATP nor Jac1p and could be fully attributed to the activation of the Nfs1p desulfurase activity by Ssq1p. Furthermore, chaperone-stimulated Fe/S cluster assembly did not involve the specific interaction between Isu1p and Ssq1p, since the effect was observed with Isu1p mutant proteins defective in this interaction, suggesting that nonspecific binding of Ssq1p to Nfs1p helped to prevent its unfolding. Consistent with this idea, these Isu1p mutants were capable of binding an Fe/S cluster in vivo but failed to restore the growth and Fe/S cluster assembly defects of a Isu1p/Isu2p-deficient yeast strain. Taken together, these data suggest that Ssq1p/Jac1p/Mge1p are not important for Fe/S cluster synthesis on Isu1p. Hence, consistent with previous in vivo data, these chaperones likely function in steps subsequent to the de novo synthesis of the Fe/S cluster on Isu1p.

  14. Energy calculation of 2s2 1S, 2p2 1D, 3s2 1S, 3p2 1D, 3d2 1G, 4p2 1D, 4d2 1D, 4f2 1I doubly excited states using a new wave function to four terms for 2 ≤ Z ≤ 15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sow, B.; Sow, M.; Gning, Y.; Traore, A.; Ndao, A. S.; Wague, A.

    2016-06-01

    Calculation of the energy levels of atoms and ions with 2 ≤ Z ≤ 15 are carried out in this paper using a Hyllerass approximation. The method used is one of Screen Constant by Nuclear Charge Unit to calculate the total energy of two-electron atomic systems in ground and different doubly excited states. Employing a new wave function including correlation, we were able to calculate excited states (nl)2 (n ≤ 4). The Comparison of these results with the ones of other methods shows a good agreement.

  15. GIS-BASED 1-D DIFFUSIVE WAVE OVERLAND FLOW MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    KALYANAPU, ALFRED; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY N.; BURIAN, STEVEN J.

    2007-01-17

    This paper presents a GIS-based 1-d distributed overland flow model and summarizes an application to simulate a flood event. The model estimates infiltration using the Green-Ampt approach and routes excess rainfall using the 1-d diffusive wave approximation. The model was designed to use readily available topographic, soils, and land use/land cover data and rainfall predictions from a meteorological model. An assessment of model performance was performed for a small catchment and a large watershed, both in urban environments. Simulated runoff hydrographs were compared to observations for a selected set of validation events. Results confirmed the model provides reasonable predictions in a short period of time.

  16. RNA binding protein Pub1p regulates glycerol production and stress tolerance by controlling Gpd1p activity during winemaking.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Helena; Sepúlveda, Ana; Picazo, Cecilia; Matallana, Emilia; Aranda, Agustín

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol is a key yeast metabolite in winemaking because it contributes to improve the organoleptic properties of wine. It is also a cellular protective molecule that enhances the tolerance of yeasts to osmotic stress and promotes longevity. Thus, its production increases by genetic manipulation, which is of biotechnological and basic interest. Glycerol is produced by diverting glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate through the action of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (coded by genes GPD1 and GPD2). Here, we demonstrate that RNA-binding protein Pub1p regulates glycerol production by controlling Gpd1p activity. Its deletion does not alter GPD1 mRNA levels, but protein levels and enzymatic activity increase, which explains the higher intracellular glycerol concentration and greater tolerance to osmotic stress of the pub1∆ mutant. PUB1 deletion also enhances the activity of nicotinamidase, a longevity-promoting enzyme. Both enzymatic activities are partially located in peroxisomes, and we detected peroxisome formation during wine fermentation. The role of Pub1p in life span control depends on nutrient conditions and is related with the TOR pathway, and a major connection between RNA metabolism and the nutrient signaling response is established.

  17. Non-cooperative Brownian donkeys: A solvable 1D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez de Cisneros, B.; Reimann, P.; Parrondo, J. M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A paradigmatic 1D model for Brownian motion in a spatially symmetric, periodic system is tackled analytically. Upon application of an external static force F the system's response is an average current which is positive for F < 0 and negative for F > 0 (absolute negative mobility). Under suitable conditions, the system approaches 100% efficiency when working against the external force F.

  18. Energy harvesting and storage in 1D devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Xuemei; Peng, Huisheng

    2017-06-01

    Power systems and electronic devices that are bulky and rigid are not practical for use in wearable applications that require flexibility and breathability. To address this, a range of 1D energy harvesting and storage devices have been fabricated that show promise for such applications compared with their 2D and 3D counterparts. These 1D devices are based on fibres that are flexible and can accommodate deformation, for example, by twisting and stretching. The fibres can be woven into textiles and fabrics that breathe freely or can be integrated into different materials that fit the curved surface of the human body. In this Review, the development of fibre-based energy harvesting and storage devices is presented, focusing on dye-sensitized solar cells, lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors and their integrated devices. An emphasis is placed on the interface between the active materials and the electrodes or electrolyte in the 1D devices. The differing properties of these interfaces compared with those in 2D and 3D devices are derived from the curved surface and long charge transport path in 1D electrodes.

  19. 1D hyperspectral images of a light emitting diodes array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzica (Iordache), I.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Apostol, D.; Vasile, T.; Udrea, C.

    2015-02-01

    The paper present our first steps to realize a hyperspectral imaging system. Preliminary experiments in the domain have as purpose to test the capability of a monochromator with a 2D linear CCD camera, to create hyperspectral images. Using a Sciencetech 9055 model monochromator with a Hamamatsu CCD, we have analyzed an array of three LEDs of various colors, obtaining 1D hyperspectral images.

  20. Spectrum of epilepsy in terminal 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Guttierrez-Delicado, Eva; Soufflet, Christine; Rio, Marlène; Daire, Valérie Cormier; Lacombe, Didier; Héron, Delphine; Verloes, Alain; Zuberi, Sameer; Burglen, Lydie; Afenjar, Alexandra; Moutard, Marie Laure; Edery, Patrick; Novelli, Antonio; Bernardini, Laura; Dulac, Olivier; Nabbout, Rima; Plouin, Perrine; Battaglia, Agatino

    2008-03-01

    Previous reports have summarized the seizures types occurring in 1p36 deletion syndrome. To better define the spectrum of epilepsy, we studied 91 patients (median age 7.8 years) with confirmed 1p36 deletion. Based on clinical charts, we retrospectively analyzed the evolution of both the EEG findings and seizures. Epilepsy occurred in 53 patients (58.2%), with onset at a median 2.75 months. First seizures were generalized tonic (8 cases), tonic and clonic (6) or myoclonic (12), simple partial (6), or complex partial (14). Thereafter, 20 patients (21.9%) developed infantile spasms with hypsarrhythmia, at a median age of 5 months. High doses of oral steroids were tried in nine cases, with a prompt remission of seizures in six. Among them, five were seizure-free at the time of evaluation. Conversely, two of three nonresponders to steroids developed severe and refractory epilepsy. At the time of evaluation, 32 patients were seizure-free, from a median age of 1.8 years. Nineteen patients (20.9%) had developed refractory epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, including generalized tonic and tonic-clonic seizures (13) combined with myoclonic seizures (11) and atypical absences (3), atonic seizures (2), or complex partial seizures (3). The EEG showed focal, multifocal or generalized spikes, polyspike, and waves, with poverty of the usual background rhythmic activities. Early epilepsy is a frequent finding in 1p36 deletion syndrome with infantile spasms as of the most common features that can contribute to a poor clinical outcome. Early diagnosis and management of infantile spasm in this condition is mandatory.

  1. Ag nanoprisms with Ag2S attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shenglin; Xi, Baojuan; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Yifei; Jiang, Jianwen; Hu, Jiangyong; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2013-07-01

    Triangular Ag nanoprisms are a type of most-studied noble-metal nanostructures over the past decade owing to their special structural architecture and outstanding optical and catalytic properties for a wide range of applications. Nevertheless, in contrast to active research for the synthesis of phase-pure Ag nanoprisms, no asymmetric heterodimers containing Ag prisms have been developed so far, probably due to lack of suitable synthetic methods. Herein, we devise a simple ion-exchange method to synthesize Ag2S/Ag heterodimers at room temperature, through which Ag nanoprisms with controllable size and thickness can be fabricated. Formation chemistry and optical properties of the heterodimers have been investigated. These semiconductor/metal heterodimers have exhibited remarkable bactericidal activity to E. coli cells under visible light illumination.

  2. Final COMPASS results on the deuteron spin-dependent structure function g1d and the Bjorken sum rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Aghasyan, M.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N. V.; Anosov, V.; Augsten, K.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, M.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Birsa, R.; Bodlak, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S.-U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Dreisbach, Ch.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giarra, J.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; Hamar, G.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Jörg, P.; Kabuß, E.; Kerbizi, A.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O. M.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G. V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Roskot, M.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolik, J.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Subrt, O.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Thiel, A.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Vauth, A.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wallner, S.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2017-06-01

    Final results are presented from the inclusive measurement of deep-inelastic polarised-muon scattering on longitudinally polarised deuterons using a 6LiD target. The data were taken at 160 GeV beam energy and the results are shown for the kinematic range 1(GeV / c) 2 4GeV /c2 in the mass of the hadronic final state. The deuteron double-spin asymmetry A1d and the deuteron longitudinal-spin structure function g1d are presented in bins of x and Q2. Towards lowest accessible values of x, g1d decreases and becomes consistent with zero within uncertainties. The presented final g1d values together with the recently published final g1p values of COMPASS are used to again evaluate the Bjorken sum rule and perform the QCD fit to the g1 world data at next-to-leading order of the strong coupling constant. In both cases, changes in central values of the resulting numbers are well within statistical uncertainties. The flavour-singlet axial charge a0, which is identified in the MS ‾ renormalisation scheme with the total contribution of quark helicities to the nucleon spin, is extracted at next-to-leading order accuracy from only the COMPASS deuteron data: a0 (Q2 = 3(GeV / c) 2) = 0.32 ±0.02stat ±0.04syst ±0.05evol. Together with the recent results on the proton spin structure function g1p, the results on g1d constitute the COMPASS legacy on the measurements of g1 through inclusive spin-dependent deep inelastic scattering.

  3. MOLECULAR OXYGEN IN OORT CLOUD COMET 1P/HALLEY

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Dishoeck, E. F. van; Schwehm, G.

    2015-12-10

    Recently, the ROSINA mass spectrometer suite on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft discovered an abundant amount of molecular oxygen, O{sub 2}, in the coma of Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko of O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O = 3.80 ± 0.85%. It could be shown that O{sub 2} is indeed a parent species and that the derived abundances point to a primordial origin. Crucial questions are whether the O{sub 2} abundance is peculiar to comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko or Jupiter family comets in general, and also whether Oort cloud comets such as comet 1P/Halley contain similar amounts of molecular oxygen. We investigated mass spectra obtained by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer instrument during the flyby by the European Space Agency's Giotto probe of comet 1P/Halley. Our investigation indicates that a production rate of O{sub 2} of 3.7 ± 1.7% with respect to water is indeed compatible with the obtained Halley data and therefore that O{sub 2} might be a rather common and abundant parent species.

  4. Molecular Oxygen in Oort Cloud Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Schwehm, G.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the ROSINA mass spectrometer suite on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft discovered an abundant amount of molecular oxygen, O2, in the coma of Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko of O2/H2O = 3.80 ± 0.85%. It could be shown that O2 is indeed a parent species and that the derived abundances point to a primordial origin. Crucial questions are whether the O2 abundance is peculiar to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko or Jupiter family comets in general, and also whether Oort cloud comets such as comet 1P/Halley contain similar amounts of molecular oxygen. We investigated mass spectra obtained by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer instrument during the flyby by the European Space Agency's Giotto probe of comet 1P/Halley. Our investigation indicates that a production rate of O2 of 3.7 ± 1.7% with respect to water is indeed compatible with the obtained Halley data and therefore that O2 might be a rather common and abundant parent species.

  5. Theoretical studies on the reaction mechanism of O( 1D) with CH 3OCF 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-Xia; Liu, Jing-Yao; Zhang, Gang; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2009-03-01

    A detailed quantum chemical study was performed at the BMC-CCSD//B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level to explore the mechanism of the O( 1D) + CH 3OCF 3 reaction. Three feasible initial association intermediates ( a, b, and c) and six energetically allowed paths are located. Our calculations show that the primary products are P 2 and P 3, while P 1, P 4, and P 6 are less competitive. Due to the low-lying intermediates and transition states involved in the dominant paths, the reaction is expected to occur rapidly, which is consistent with the experimental measurement. The present theoretical studies may provide useful information on the issues of the reaction mechanism and product distributions.

  6. Glass structure and electrical conductivity in (As2S3 1-x (Ag2S)x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, C.; Chen, P.; Novita, D.; Boolchand, P.

    2006-03-01

    We have synthesized titled glasses in the 0 < x < 0.16 range, and have examined them in modulated DSC experiments. The starting materials, As2S3 and Ag2S lumps, were reacted in evacuated fused quartz tubings, and glasses synthesized by water-quench of homogenized melts. Thermal measurements used a TA instruments model 2920 operated at 3 C/min scan rate and 1 C/100s modulation rate. Preliminary results reveal a single glass transition in the 0 < x < 0.05 range, which steadily decrease from a value of 210 C at x = 0 to 182 C near x = 0.05. In contrast, bimodal glass transitions are observed at x > 0.09, with one Tg(1) near 167 C and the second, Tg(2) near 186 C, and with the endotherm associated with Tg(1) steadily increasing with x. Non-reversing enthalpies associated with Tgs are found to steadily decrease in the 0 < x < 0.09 range, to nearly vanish in the 0.10 < x < 0.12 range and to increase thereafter ( x > 0.12).These findings suggest that glasses at low x ( < 0.09) are Stressed- rigid, those at x > 0.12 Floppy while those in between in the Intermediate phase^1. The present results correlate well with earlier^2 electrical conductivity results in suggesting the possibility of an elastic origin to the conductivity thresholds in solid electrolyte glasses. 1. P. Boolchand, D.Georgiev and B. Goodman, J.Opto & Adm. Mater. 3, 703 (2001). 2. E.A. Kazakova and Z.U.Borisova, Fiz. Khim.Stekla 6, 424(1980).

  7. Plasmonic Excitations of 1D Metal-Dielectric Interfaces in 2D Systems: 1D Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Daniel R.; Menabde, Sergey G.; Yu, Sunkyu; Park, Namkyoo

    2014-04-01

    Surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) excitations of metal-dielectric interfaces are a fundamental light-matter interaction which has attracted interest as a route to spatial confinement of light far beyond that offered by conventional dielectric optical devices. Conventionally, SPPs have been studied in noble-metal structures, where the SPPs are intrinsically bound to a 2D metal-dielectric interface. Meanwhile, recent advances in the growth of hybrid 2D crystals, which comprise laterally connected domains of distinct atomically thin materials, provide the first realistic platform on which a 2D metal-dielectric system with a truly 1D metal-dielectric interface can be achieved. Here we show for the first time that 1D metal-dielectric interfaces support a fundamental 1D plasmonic mode (1DSPP) which exhibits cutoff behavior that provides dramatically improved light confinement in 2D systems. The 1DSPP constitutes a new basic category of plasmon as the missing 1D member of the plasmon family: 3D bulk plasmon, 2DSPP, 1DSPP, and 0D localized SP.

  8. Rab28 is a TBC1D1/TBC1D4 substrate involved in GLUT4 trafficking.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhou; Menzel, Franziska; Benninghoff, Tim; Chadt, Alexandra; Du, Chen; Holman, Geoffrey D; Al-Hasani, Hadi

    2017-01-01

    The Rab-GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 play important roles in the insulin-stimulated translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 from intracellular vesicles to the plasma membrane in muscle cells and adipocytes. We identified Rab28 as a substrate for the GAP domains of both TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 in vitro. Rab28 is expressed in adipose cells and skeletal muscle, and its GTP-binding state is acutely regulated by insulin. We found that in intact isolated mouse skeletal muscle, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Rab28 decreases basal glucose uptake. Conversely, in primary rat adipose cells, overexpression of Rab28-Q72L, a constitutively active mutant, increases basal cell surface levels of an epitope-tagged HA-GLUT4. Our results indicate that Rab28 is a novel GTPase involved in the intracellular retention of GLUT4 in insulin target cells. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. Synthesis and optical properties of Ga 2S 3-Na 2S-CsCl glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehlen, Markus P.; Bennett, Bryan L.; Castro, Alonso; Williams, Darrick J.; Tornga, Stephanie C.; Muenchausen, Ross E.

    2010-02-01

    Ga 2S 3-Na 2S-CsCl (GNC) glasses were synthesized in open crucibles under inert atmosphere. The evaporative loss of CsCl during glass melting was measured by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and corrected for by biasing the CsCl concentration in the mixture of starting materials to obtain glasses with accurately controlled stoichiometry. Glass-transition temperatures, refractive-index dispersions, visible and near-infrared transmittance, and band edge energies were measured for four GNC glasses with varying CsCl content, and the respective values were found to significantly improve over earlier studies that did not mitigate CsCl evaporative losses. Glass durability was assessed by a water immersion test at 74 °C. A respective weight loss rate of 39.2 ± 0.3 μg/(cm 2 h) was found for a GNC glass containing 14 mol% CsCl, indicating good glass durability despite the high CsCl content. The refractive-index dispersion measurements indicate that the Cs + and Cl - radii are 16% larger in GNC glass than in bulk crystalline CsCl. The band edge energy increases from 2.97 eV in Ga 2S 3-Na 2S glass to 3.32 eV in Ga 2S 3-Na 2S-CsCl glass containing 20 mol% CsCl as a result of introducing Cl - ions having a large optical electronegativity. The large bandgap of 3.32 eV, the low (450 cm -1) phonon energy, and the good chemical durability make GNC glass an attractive host material for rare-earth ions with radiative transitions in the near ultra-violet, visible, and near-infrared spectral regions.

  10. Plasmonic hollow gold nanoparticles induced high-performance Bi2S3 nanoribbon photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Feng-Xia; Ge, Cai-Wang; Zhang, Teng-Fei; Xie, Wei-Jie; Zhang, Deng-Yue; Zou, Yi-Feng; Zheng, Kun; Luo, Lin-Bao

    2017-03-01

    A high performance hollow gold nanoparticles (HGNs) decorated one-dimensional (1-D) Bi2S3 nanoribbon (NR) photodetector was fabricated for green light detection (560 nm). The single crystal 1-D Bi2S3 NRs with growth orientation along [001] were synthesized by a simple solvothermal approach. Optoelectronic analysis reveals that the performance of the plasmonic photodetector was greatly enhanced after decoration with HGNs. For example, the responsivity increases from 1.4 × 102 to 1.09 × 103 AW-1, the conductivity gain from 2.68 × 102 to 2.31 × 103, and the detectivity from 2.45 × 1012 to 2.78 × 1013, respectively. Such performance enhancement was attributed to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect caused by the HGNs according to both experiment and theoretical simulation. This study is believed to open up new opportunities for managing light and enhancing the device performance of other 1-D semiconductor nanostructures based optoelectronic devices and systems.

  11. Morphodynamics and sediment tracers in 1-D (MAST-1D): 1-D sediment transport that includes exchange with an off-channel sediment reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, J. Wesley; Viparelli, Enrica; Piégay, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    Bed material transported in geomorphically active gravel bed rivers often has a local source at nearby eroding banks and ends up sequestered in bars not far downstream. However, most 1-D numerical models for gravel transport assume that gravel originates from and deposits on the channel bed. In this paper, we present a 1-D framework for simulating morphodynamic evolution of bed elevation and size distribution in a gravel-bed river that actively exchanges sediment with its floodplain, which is represented as an off-channel sediment reservoir. The model is based on the idea that sediment enters the channel at eroding banks whose elevation depends on total floodplain sediment storage and on the average elevation of the floodplain relative to the channel bed. Lateral erosion of these banks occurs at a specified rate that can represent either net channel migration or channel widening. Transfer of material out of the channel depends on a typical bar thickness and a specified lateral exchange rate due either to net channel migration or narrowing. The model is implemented using an object oriented framework that allows users to explore relationships between bank supply, bed structure, and lateral change rates. It is applied to a ∼50-km reach of the Ain River, France, that experienced significant reduction in sediment supply due to dam construction during the 20th century. Results are strongly sensitive to lateral exchange rates, showing that in this reach, the supply of sand and gravel at eroding banks and the sequestration of gravel in point bars can have strong influence on overall reach-scale sediment budgets.

  12. Electrochemical cortisol immunosensors based on sonochemically synthesized zinc oxide 1D nanorods and 2D nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Kaushik, Ajeet; Pokhrel, Nimesh; Bhansali, Shekhar; Pala, Nezih

    2015-01-15

    We report on label free, highly sensitive and selective electrochemical immunosensors based on one-dimensional 1D ZnO nanorods (ZnO-NRs) and two-dimensional 2D ZnO nanoflakes (ZnO-NFs) which were synthesized on Au-coated substrates using simple one step sonochemical approach. Selective detection of cortisol using cyclic voltammetry (CV) is achieved by immobilizing anti-cortisol antibody (Anti-C(ab)) on the ZnO nanostructures (NSs). 1D ZnO-NRs and 2D ZnO-NFs provide unique sensing advantages over bulk materials. While 1D-NSs boast a high surface area to volume ratio, 2D-NSs with large area in polarized (0001) plane and high surface charge density could promote higher Anti-C(ab) loading and thus better sensing performance. Beside large surface area, ZnO-NSs also exhibit higher chemical stability, high catalytic activity, and biocompatibility. TEM studies showed that both ZnO-NSs are single crystalline oriented in (0001) plane. The measured sensing parameters are in the physiological range with a sensitivity of 11.86 µA/M exhibited by ZnO-NRs and 7.74 µA/M by ZnO-NFs with the lowest detection limit of 1 pM which is 100 times better than conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbant immunoassay (ELISA). ZnO-NSs based cortisol immunosensors were tested on human saliva samples and the performance were validated with conventional (ELISA) method which exhibits a remarkable correlation. The developed sensors can be integrated with microfluidic system and miniaturized potentiostat for point-of-care cortisol detection and such developed protocol can be used in personalized health monitoring/diagnostic.

  13. 1-D Numerical Analysis of ABCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Richard

    1999-01-01

    ABCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engine into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Except for the heat source, the basic operation of the ABCC is similar to the basic operation of the RBCC engine. The ABCC is intended to have a higher specific impulse than the RBCC for single stage Earth to orbit vehicle. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in ABCC propulsion system. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model using conservation of mass, linear momentum, and energy equations that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic ABCC engine following a flight path. At specific points during the development of the 1-D numerical model a myriad of tests were performed to prove the program produced consistent, realistic numbers that follow compressible flow theory for various inlet conditions.

  14. Developing 1D nanostructure arrays for future nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Polanyi, John C; Yang, JodySY; Wu, Zhanghua; Philipose, Usha; Xu, Tao; Yang, Susan; Kavanagh, KL; Liu, JQ; Yang, L; Wang, Y; Robbie, Kevin; Yang, J; Kaminska, K; Cooke, DG; Hegmann, FA; Budz, AJ; Haugen, HK

    2006-01-01

    There is intense and growing interest in one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures from the perspective of their synthesis and unique properties, especially with respect to their excellent optical response and an ability to form heterostructures. This review discusses alternative approaches to preparation and organization of such structures, and their potential properties. In particular, molecular-scale printing is highlighted as a method for creating organized pre-cursor structure for locating nanowires, as well as vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) templated growth using nano-channel alumina (NCA), and deposition of 1-D structures with glancing angle deposition (GLAD). As regards novel optical properties, we discuss as an example, finite size photonic crystal cavity structures formed from such nanostructure arrays possessing highQand small mode volume, and being ideal for developing future nanolasers.

  15. 1D Josephson quantum interference grids: diffraction patterns and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, M.; Badoni, D.; Corato, V.; Merlo, V.; Ottaviani, I.; Salina, G.; Cirillo, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Winkler, D.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the magnetic response of transmission lines with embedded Josephson junctions and thus generating a 1D underdamped array. The measured multi-junction interference patterns are compared with the theoretical predictions for Josephson supercurrent modulations when an external magnetic field couples both to the inter-junction loops and to the junctions themselves. The results provide a striking example of the analogy between Josephson phase modulation and 1D optical diffraction grid. The Fiske resonances in the current-voltage characteristics with voltage spacing {Φ0}≤ft(\\frac{{\\bar{c}}}{2L}\\right) , where L is the total physical length of the array, {Φ0} the magnetic flux quantum and \\bar{c} the speed of light in the transmission line, demonstrate that the discrete line supports stable dynamic patterns generated by the ac Josephson effect interacting with the cavity modes of the line.

  16. 1-D Numerical Analysis of ABCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Richard

    1999-01-01

    ABCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engine into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Except for the heat source, the basic operation of the ABCC is similar to the basic operation of the RBCC engine. The ABCC is intended to have a higher specific impulse than the RBCC for single stage Earth to orbit vehicle. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in ABCC propulsion system. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model using conservation of mass, linear momentum, and energy equations that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic ABCC engine following a flight path. At specific points during the development of the 1-D numerical model a myriad of tests were performed to prove the program produced consistent, realistic numbers that follow compressible flow theory for various inlet conditions.

  17. Nonreciprocity of edge modes in 1D magnonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenkov, I.; Kalyabin, D.; Osokin, S.; Klos, J. W.; Krawczyk, M.; Nikitov, S.

    2015-03-01

    Spin waves propagation in 1D magnonic crystals is investigated theoretically. Mathematical model based on plane wave expansion method is applied to different types of magnonic crystals, namely bi-component magnonic crystal with symmetric/asymmetric boundaries and ferromagnetic film with periodically corrugated top surface. It is shown that edge modes in magnonic crystals may exhibit nonreciprocal behaviour at much lower frequencies than in homogeneous films.

  18. Polarization independence of extraordinary transmission trough 1D metallic gratings.

    PubMed

    Ongarello, T; Romanato, F; Zilio, P; Massari, M

    2011-05-09

    Extraordinary optical transmission of 1D metallic gratings is studied. Experimental samples are fabricated by means of Electron Beam Lithography. The optical characterization is focused on far field transmission properties and in particular on polarization dependence of the incident light. A peculiar symmetry in transmission spectra at different polarization angles is shown; this symmetry is studied both experimentally, and numerically with FEM method. A comparison between numerical and experimental data is provided. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  19. Ultrahigh-Q nanocavity with 1D photonic gap.

    PubMed

    Notomi, M; Kuramochi, E; Taniyama, H

    2008-07-21

    Recently, various wavelength-sized cavities with theoretical Q values of approximately 10(8) have been reported, however, they all employ 2D or 3D photonic band gaps to realize strong light confinement. Here we numerically demonstrate that ultrahigh-Q (2.0x10(8)) and wavelength-sized (V(eff) approximately 1.4(lambda/n)3) cavities can be achieved by employing only 1D periodicity.

  20. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Milka; Hinojosa, Marcela; Trombly, Daniel; Morin, Violeta; Stein, Janet; Stein, Gary; Javed, Amjad; Gutierrez, Soraya E.

    2016-01-01

    RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX), is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5’UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription. PMID:26901859

  1. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Milka; Hinojosa, Marcela; Trombly, Daniel; Morin, Violeta; Stein, Janet; Stein, Gary; Javed, Amjad; Gutierrez, Soraya E

    2016-01-01

    RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX), is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5'UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription.

  2. Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The current global energy problem can be attributed to insufficient fossil fuel supplies and excessive greenhouse gas emissions resulting from increasing fossil fuel consumption. The huge demand for clean energy potentially can be met by solar-to-electricity conversions. The large-scale use of solar energy is not occurring due to the high cost and inadequate efficiencies of existing solar cells. Nanostructured materials have offered new opportunities to design more efficient solar cells, particularly one-dimensional (1-D) nanomaterials for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. These 1-D nanostructures, including nanotubes, nanowires, and nanorods, offer significant opportunities to improve efficiencies of solar cells by facilitating photon absorption, electron transport, and electron collection; however, tremendous challenges must be conquered before the large-scale commercialization of such cells. This review specifically focuses on the use of 1-D nanostructures for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. Other nanostructured solar cells or solar cells based on bulk materials are not covered in this review. Major topics addressed include dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells, and p-n junction solar cells.

  3. Development of 1D Liner Compression Code for IDL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, Akihisa; Slough, John; Pancotti, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    A 1D liner compression code is developed to model liner implosion dynamics in the Inductively Driven Liner Experiment (IDL) where FRC plasmoid is compressed via inductively-driven metal liners. The driver circuit, magnetic field, joule heating, and liner dynamics calculations are performed at each time step in sequence to couple these effects in the code. To obtain more realistic magnetic field results for a given drive coil geometry, 2D and 3D effects are incorporated into the 1D field calculation through use of correction factor table lookup approach. Commercial low-frequency electromagnetic fields solver, ANSYS Maxwell 3D, is used to solve the magnetic field profile for static liner condition at various liner radius in order to derive correction factors for the 1D field calculation in the code. The liner dynamics results from the code is verified to be in good agreement with the results from commercial explicit dynamics solver, ANSYS Explicit Dynamics, and previous liner experiment. The developed code is used to optimize the capacitor bank and driver coil design for better energy transfer and coupling. FRC gain calculations are also performed using the liner compression data from the code for the conceptual design of the reactor sized system for fusion energy gains.

  4. CD1d-restricted NKT cells: an interstrain comparison.

    PubMed

    Hammond, K J; Pellicci, D G; Poulton, L D; Naidenko, O V; Scalzo, A A; Baxter, A G; Godfrey, D I

    2001-08-01

    CD1d-restricted Valpha14-Jalpha281 invariant alphabetaTCR(+) (NKT) cells are well defined in the C57BL/6 mouse strain, but they remain poorly characterized in non-NK1.1-expressing strains. Surrogate markers for NKT cells such as alphabetaTCR(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) and DX5(+)CD3(+) have been used in many studies, although their effectiveness in defining this lineage remains to be verified. Here, we compare NKT cells among C57BL/6, NK1.1-congenic BALB/c, and NK1.1-congenic nonobese diabetic mice. NKT cells were identified and compared using a range of approaches: NK1.1 expression, surrogate phenotypes used in previous studies, labeling with CD1d/alpha-galactosylceramide tetramers, and cytokine production. Our results demonstrate that NKT cells and their CD4/CD8-defined subsets are present in all three strains, and confirm that nonobese diabetic mice have a numerical and functional deficiency in these cells. We also highlight the hazards of using surrogate phenotypes, none of which accurately identify NKT cells, and one in particular (DX5(+)CD3(+)) actually excludes these cells. Finally, our results support the concept that NK1.1 expression may not be an ideal marker for CD1d-restricted NKT cells, many of which are NK1.1-negative, especially within the CD4(+) subset and particularly in NK1.1-congenic BALB/c mice.

  5. The stability of 1-D soliton in transverse direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Deepa; Bera, Ratan Kumar; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman

    2016-12-01

    The complete characterization of the exact 1-D solitary wave solutions (both stationary and propagating) for light plasma coupled system have been studied extensively in the parameter space of light frequency and the group speed [Poornakala et al., Phys. Plasmas 9(5), 1820 (2002)]. It has been shown in 1-D that solutions with single light wave peak and paired structures are stable and hence long lived. However, solutions having multiple peaks of light wave are unstable due to Raman scattering instability [Saxena et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 072307 (2007)]. Here, we have shown with the help of 2-D fluid simulation that single peak and paired solutions too get destabilized by the transverse filamentation instability. The numerical growth rates obtained from simulations is seen to compare well with the analytical values. It is also shown that multiple peaks solitons first undergo the regular 1-D forward Raman scattering instability. Subsequently, they undergo a distinct second phase of destabilization through transverse filamentation instability. This is evident from the structure as well as the plot of the perturbed energy which shows a second phase of growth after saturating initially. The growth rate of the filamentation instability being comparatively slower than the forward Raman instability this phase comes quite late and is clearly distinguishable.

  6. Examining Prebiotic Chemistry Using O(^1D) Insertion Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Brian M.; Laas, Jacob C.; Weaver, Susanna L. Widicus

    2013-06-01

    Aminomethanol, methanediol, and methoxymethanol are all prebiotic molecules expected to form via photo-driven grain surface chemistry in the interstellar medium (ISM). These molecules are expected to be precursors for larger, biologically-relevant molecules in the ISM such as sugars and amino acids. These three molecules have not yet been detected in the ISM because of the lack of available rotational spectra. A high resolution (sub)millimeter spectrometer coupled to a molecular source is being used to study these molecules using O(^1D) insertion reactions. The O(^1D) chemistry is initiated using an excimer laser, and the products of the insertion reactions are adiabatically cooled using a supersonic expansion. Experimental parameters are being optimized by examination of methanol formed from O(^1D) insertion into methane. Theoretical studies of the structure and reaction energies for aminomethanol, methanediol, and methoxymethanol have been conducted to guide the laboratory studies once the methanol experiment has been optimized. The results of the calculations and initial experimental results will be presented.

  7. Observation of the {sup 1}P{sub 1} state of charmonium

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, P.; Cawlfield, C.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Gollin, G.D.; Karliner, I.; Kim, D.; Lowrey, N.; Naik, P.; Sedlack, C.; Selen, M.; White, E. J.; Williams, J.; Wiss, J.; Edwards, K.W.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T.K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K.Y.; Gong, D.T.; Hietala, J.

    2005-11-01

    The spin-singlet P-wave state of charmonium, h{sub c}({sup 1}P{sub 1}), has been observed in the decay {psi}(2S){yields}{pi}{sup 0}h{sub c} followed by h{sub c}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}. Inclusive and exclusive analyses of the M(h{sub c}) spectrum have been performed. Two complementary inclusive analyses select either a range of energies for the photon emitted in h{sub c}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c} or a range of values of M({eta}{sub c}). These analyses, consistent with one another within statistics, yield M(h{sub c})=[3524.9{+-}0.7 (stat){+-}0.4 (sys)] MeV/c{sup 2} and a product of the branching ratios B{sub {psi}}({psi}(2S){yields}{pi}{sup 0}h{sub c})xB{sub h}(h{sub c}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c})=[3.5{+-}1.0 (stat){+-}0.7 (sys)]x10{sup -4}. When the {eta}{sub c} is reconstructed in seven exclusive decay modes, 17.5{+-}4.5 h{sub c} events are seen with an average mass M(h{sub c})=[3523.6{+-}0.9 (stat){+-}0.5 (sys)] MeV/c{sup 2}, and B{sub {psi}}B{sub h}=[5.3{+-}1.5 (stat){+-}1.0 (sys)]x10{sup -4}. If combined, the inclusive and exclusive data samples yield an overall mass M(h{sub c})=[3524.4{+-}0.6 (stat){+-}0.4 (sys)] MeV/c{sup 2} and product of branching ratios B{sub {psi}}B{sub h}=[4.0{+-}0.8 (stat){+-}0.7 (sys)]x10{sup -4}. The h{sub c} mass implies a P-wave hyperfine splitting {delta}M{sub HF}(1P){identical_to}-M(1{sup 1}P{sub 1})=[1.0{+-}0.6 (stat){+-}0.4 (sys)] MeV/c{sup 2}.

  8. Search for {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}(2S) via fully reconstructed {eta}{sub c}(2S) decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Gong, D. T.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Poling, R.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tan, B. J. Y.; Tomaradze, A.; Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.

    2010-03-01

    We report a search for the decay {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}(2S) in a sample of 25.9x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events collected with the CLEO-c detector. No signals are observed in any of the 11 exclusive {eta}{sub c}(2S) decay modes studied, or in their sum. Product branching fraction upper limits are determined as a function of {Gamma}[{eta}{sub c}(2S)] for the 11 individual modes.

  9. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. CII: Pharmacological Modulation of H2S Levels: H2S Donors and H2S Biosynthesis Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Csaba; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Over the last decade, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important endogenous gasotransmitter in mammalian cells and tissues. Similar to the previously characterized gasotransmitters nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, H2S is produced by various enzymatic reactions and regulates a host of physiologic and pathophysiological processes in various cells and tissues. H2S levels are decreased in a number of conditions (e.g., diabetes mellitus, ischemia, and aging) and are increased in other states (e.g., inflammation, critical illness, and cancer). Over the last decades, multiple approaches have been identified for the therapeutic exploitation of H2S, either based on H2S donation or inhibition of H2S biosynthesis. H2S donation can be achieved through the inhalation of H2S gas and/or the parenteral or enteral administration of so-called fast-releasing H2S donors (salts of H2S such as NaHS and Na2S) or slow-releasing H2S donors (GYY4137 being the prototypical compound used in hundreds of studies in vitro and in vivo). Recent work also identifies various donors with regulated H2S release profiles, including oxidant-triggered donors, pH-dependent donors, esterase-activated donors, and organelle-targeted (e.g., mitochondrial) compounds. There are also approaches where existing, clinically approved drugs of various classes (e.g., nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories) are coupled with H2S-donating groups (the most advanced compound in clinical trials is ATB-346, an H2S-donating derivative of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compound naproxen). For pharmacological inhibition of H2S synthesis, there are now several small molecule compounds targeting each of the three H2S-producing enzymes cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine-γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase. Although many of these compounds have their limitations (potency, selectivity), these molecules, especially in combination with genetic approaches, can be instrumental for the delineation of the

  10. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 signaling regulates receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) expression in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, Harunori; Kitano, Masayasu; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sato, Chieri; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto; Miyazawa, Keiji; Hla, Timothy; Sano, Hajime

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of S1P in MH7A cells was inhibited by specific Gi/Go inhibitors. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) signaling plays an important role in synovial cell proliferation and inflammatory gene expression by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synoviocytes. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of S1P/S1P1 signaling in the expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) in RA synoviocytes and CD4{sup +} T cells. We demonstrated MH7A cells, a human RA synovial cell line, and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Surprisingly, S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, S1P enhanced RANKL expression induced by stimulation with TNF-{alpha} in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. These effects of S1P in MH7A cells were inhibited by pretreatment with PTX, a specific Gi/Go inhibitor. These findings suggest that S1P/S1P1 signaling may play an important role in RANKL expression by MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling of RA synoviocytes is closely connected with synovial hyperplasia, inflammation, and RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RA. Thus, regulation of S1P/S1P1 signaling may become a novel therapeutic target for RA.

  11. Ultralong In2S3 Nanotubes on Graphene Substrate with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sheng-qi; Chen, Xue; Hu, Fang-zhong; Zhang, Qi-chun; Liu, Lu

    2015-09-16

    Ultralong one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures including nanowires or nanotubes have been extensively studied because of their widespread applications in many fields. Although a lot of methods have been reported to prepare In2S3 nanotubes, approaching these nanotubes through one-pot solution synthesis is still extremely difficult, probably because of the intrinsic isotropic crystal growth characteristic of In2S3. In this article, we demonstrated a self-assembly approach for hydrothermal synthesis of In2S3 nanotubes/graphene composites, which contain ultralong (up to 10 μm) In2S3 nanotubes on graphene substrate. The influence of several important synthetic parameters on the final products has been systematically investigated. Importantly, the as-prepared In2S3 nanotubes/graphene composites can be easily cast on FTO to form a film, which can be used as a counter electrode. Our research indicates that the as-fabricated counter electrode exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the iodide species (I-/I3-) reduction reaction and very high energy conversion efficiency (8.01%) in dye-sensitized solar cells.

  12. Tensor network simulation of QED on infinite lattices: Learning from (1 +1 ) d , and prospects for (2 +1 ) d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapp, Kai; Orús, Román

    2017-06-01

    The simulation of lattice gauge theories with tensor network (TN) methods is becoming increasingly fruitful. The vision is that such methods will, eventually, be used to simulate theories in (3 +1 ) dimensions in regimes difficult for other methods. So far, however, TN methods have mostly simulated lattice gauge theories in (1 +1 ) dimensions. The aim of this paper is to explore the simulation of quantum electrodynamics (QED) on infinite lattices with TNs, i.e., fermionic matter fields coupled to a U (1 ) gauge field, directly in the thermodynamic limit. With this idea in mind we first consider a gauge-invariant infinite density matrix renormalization group simulation of the Schwinger model—i.e., QED in (1 +1 ) d . After giving a precise description of the numerical method, we benchmark our simulations by computing the subtracted chiral condensate in the continuum, in good agreement with other approaches. Our simulations of the Schwinger model allow us to build intuition about how a simulation should proceed in (2 +1 ) dimensions. Based on this, we propose a variational ansatz using infinite projected entangled pair states (PEPS) to describe the ground state of (2 +1 ) d QED. The ansatz includes U (1 ) gauge symmetry at the level of the tensors, as well as fermionic (matter) and bosonic (gauge) degrees of freedom both at the physical and virtual levels. We argue that all the necessary ingredients for the simulation of (2 +1 ) d QED are, a priori, already in place, paving the way for future upcoming results.

  13. Thrifty Tbc1d1 and Tbc1d4 proteins link signalling and membrane trafficking pathways

    PubMed Central

    Koumanov, Françoise; Holman, Geoffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    Establishing a complete pathway which links occupancy of the insulin receptor to GLUT4 translocation has been particularly elusive because of the complexities involved in studying both signalling and membrane trafficking processes. However, Lienhard's group has now discovered two related molecules that could function in this linking role. These proteins, Tbc1d4 (also known as AS160) and now Tbc1d1, as reported in this issue of the Biochemical Journal, have been demonstrated to be Rab GAPs (GTPase-activating proteins) that link upstream to Akt (protein kinase B) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase and downstream to Rabs involved in trafficking of GLUT4 vesicles. The data from Leinhard and colleagues suggest that high levels of Rab GAP activity lead to suppression of GLUT4 translocation and this observation has wide significance and is likely to be relevant to the recent discovery that mutations in the Tbc1d1 gene lead to some cases of severe human obesity. PMID:17376030

  14. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E; O'Carroll, Simon J; Graham, E Scott

    2016-01-27

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

  15. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E.; O’Carroll, Simon J.; Graham, E. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. PMID:26813587

  16. Yos1p is a novel subunit of the Yip1p-Yif1p complex and is required for transport between the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Heidtman, Matthew; Chen, Catherine Z; Collins, Ruth N; Barlowe, Charles

    2005-04-01

    Yeast Yip1p is a member of a conserved family of transmembrane proteins that interact with Rab GTPases. Previous studies also have indicated a role for Yip1p in the biogenesis of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived COPII transport vesicles. In this report, we describe the identification and characterization of the uncharacterized open reading frame YER074W-A as a novel multicopy suppressor of the thermosensitive yip1-4 strain. We have termed this gene Yip One Suppressor 1 (YOS1). Yos1p is essential for growth and for function of the secretory pathway; depletion or inactivation of Yos1p blocks transport between the ER and the Golgi complex. YOS1 encodes an integral membrane protein of 87 amino acids that is conserved in eukaryotes. Yos1p localizes to ER and Golgi membranes and is efficiently packaged into ER-derived COPII transport vesicles. Yos1p associates with Yip1p and Yif1p, indicating Yos1p is a novel subunit of the Yip1p-Yif1p complex.

  17. Selective coupling of the S1P3 receptor subtype to S1P-mediated RhoA activation and cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Yung, Bryan S; Brand, Cameron S; Xiang, Sunny Y; Gray, Charles B B; Means, Christopher K; Rosen, Hugh; Chun, Jerold; Purcell, Nicole H; Brown, Joan Heller; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2017-02-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lysophospholipid, is generated and released at sites of tissue injury in the heart and can act on S1P1, S1P2, and S1P3 receptor subtypes to affect cardiovascular responses. We established that S1P causes little phosphoinositide hydrolysis and does not induce hypertrophy indicating that it does not cause receptor coupling to Gq. We previously demonstrated that S1P confers cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion by activating RhoA and its downstream effector PKD. The S1P receptor subtypes and G proteins that regulate RhoA activation and downstream responses in the heart have not been determined. Using siRNA or pertussis toxin to inhibit different G proteins in NRVMs we established that S1P regulates RhoA activation through Gα13 but not Gα12, Gαq, or Gαi. Knockdown of the three major S1P receptors using siRNA demonstrated a requirement for S1P3 in RhoA activation and subsequent phosphorylation of PKD, and this was confirmed in studies using isolated hearts from S1P3 knockout (KO) mice. S1P treatment reduced infarct size induced by ischemia/reperfusion in Langendorff perfused wild-type (WT) hearts and this protection was abolished in the S1P3 KO mouse heart. CYM-51736, an S1P3-specific agonist, also decreased infarct size after ischemia/reperfusion to a degree similar to that achieved by S1P. The finding that S1P3 receptor- and Gα13-mediated RhoA activation is responsible for protection against ischemia/reperfusion suggests that selective targeting of S1P3 receptors could provide therapeutic benefits in ischemic heart disease.

  18. Bottomonium spectroscopy and radiative transitions involving the χb J(1 P ,2 P ) states at BaBar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Roehrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We use (121 ±1 ) million Υ (3 S ) and (98 ±1 ) million Υ (2 S ) mesons recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider at SLAC to perform a study of radiative transitions involving the χb J(1 P ,2 P ) states in exclusive decays with μ+μ- γ γ final states. We reconstruct twelve channels in four cascades using two complementary methods. In the first we identify both signal photon candidates in the electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC), employ a calorimeter timing-based technique to reduce backgrounds, and determine branching-ratio products and fine mass splittings. These results include the best observational significance yet for the χb 0(2 P )→γ Υ (2 S ) and χb 0(1 P )→γ Υ (1 S ) transitions. In the second method, we identify one photon candidate in the EMC and one which has converted into an e+e- pair due to interaction with detector material, and we measure absolute product branching fractions. This method is particularly useful for measuring Υ (3 S )→γ χb 1 ,2(1 P ) decays. Additionally, we provide the most up-to-date derived branching fractions, matrix elements and mass splittings for χb transitions in the bottomonium system. Using a new technique, we also measure the two lowest-order spin-dependent coefficients in the nonrelativistic QCD Hamiltonian.

  19. HTLV-1 p30II: selective repressor of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Green, Patrick L

    2004-11-24

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a complex retrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 pX ORF II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II whose roles are beginning to be defined in the virus life cycle. Previous studies indicate the importance of these viral proteins in the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads and persist in an animal model of HTLV-1 infection. Intriguing new studies indicate that p30II is a multifunctional regulator that differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300 and specifically binds and represses tax/rex mRNA nuclear export. A new study characterized the role of p30II in regulation of cellular gene expression using comprehensive human gene arrays. Interestingly, p30II is an overall repressor of cellular gene expression, while selectively favoring the expression of regulatory gene pathways important to T lymphocytes. These new findings suggest that HTLV-1, which is associated with lymphoproliferative diseases, uses p30II to selectively repress cellular and viral gene expression to favor the survival of cellular targets ultimately resulting in leukemogenesis.

  20. Functional analysis of the Zygosaccharomyces rouxii Fps1p homologue.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xue-Ming; Kayingo, Gerald; Prior, Bernard A

    2005-05-01

    The osmotolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii accumulates the polyols glycerol and D-arabitol intracellularly in response to hyperosmotic stress, but the membrane transport proteins regulating polyol accumulation have not been studied. We have cloned and characterized a FPS1 homologue in Z. rouxii NRRL Y2547, and its sequence revealed a 2709 bp open reading frame encoding a peptide of 692 deduced amino acids with 56.9% identity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fps1p. The role of this putative membrane channel protein in polyol accumulation and release during osmoregulation was investigated. The Z. rouxii FPS1 (ZrFPS1) complemented the S. cerevisiae fps1Delta growth defect and glycerol release upon hypo-osmotic shock. Deletion of ZrFPS1 did not affect growth on glycerol as sole carbon source, suggesting that other transport proteins are involved in the uptake of glycerol. However, mutants lacking ZrFPS1 exhibited a significant decrease in glycerol and D-arabitol efflux and poor growth during hypo-osmotic conditions, suggesting that ZrFPS1 might be involved in D-arabitol transport in addition to glycerol. This is the first demonstration of a yeast gene that affects D-arabitol transport. The full-length ZrFPS1 gene sequence including upstream promoter has been deposited in the public database under Accession No. AY488133.

  1. Extended-Range Ultrarefractive 1D Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal has been made to exploit the special wavelength-dispersive characteristics of devices of the type described in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms (NPO-30232) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 10a. A photonic crystal is an optical component that has a periodic structure comprising two dielectric materials with high dielectric contrast (e.g., a semiconductor and air), with geometrical feature sizes comparable to or smaller than light wavelengths of interest. Experimental superprisms have been realized as photonic crystals having three-dimensional (3D) structures comprising regions of amorphous Si alternating with regions of SiO2, fabricated in a complex process that included sputtering. A photonic crystal of the type to be exploited according to the present proposal is said to be one-dimensional (1D) because its contrasting dielectric materials would be stacked in parallel planar layers; in other words, there would be spatial periodicity in one dimension only. The processes of designing and fabricating 1D photonic crystal superprisms would be simpler and, hence, would cost less than do those for 3D photonic crystal superprisms. As in 3D structures, 1D photonic crystals may be used in applications such as wavelength-division multiplexing. In the extended-range configuration, it is also suitable for spectrometry applications. As an engineered structure or artificially engineered material, a photonic crystal can exhibit optical properties not commonly found in natural substances. Prior research had revealed several classes of photonic crystal structures for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden in certain frequency ranges, denoted photonic bandgaps. It had also been found that in narrow frequency bands just outside the photonic bandgaps, the angular wavelength dispersion of electromagnetic waves propagating in photonic crystal superprisms is much stronger than is the angular wavelength dispersion obtained

  2. Conical-intersection quantum dynamics of OH(A2Σ+) + H(2S) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamallo, Pablo; Akpinar, Sinan; Defazio, Paolo; Petrongolo, Carlo

    2013-09-01

    We present the conical-intersection quantum dynamics of the nonreactive quenching (NQ) OH(A2Σ+) + H'(2S) → OH(X2Π) + H'(2S), exchange (X) OH(A2Σ+) + H'(2S) → OH'(A2Σ+) + H(2S), exchange-quenching (XQ) OH(A2Σ+) + H'(2S) → OH'(X2Π) + H(2S), and reaction (R) OH(A2Σ+) + H'(2S) → O(1D) + H2( {Xsideset{1}{g+}{Σ}}) collisions. We obtain initial-state-resolved reaction probabilities, cross sections, and rate constants by considering OH in the ground vibrational state and in the rotational levels j0 = 0, 1, 2, and 5. Coupled-channel real wavepackets (WPs) on the tilde Xsideset{1}{^'{A} and tilde Bsideset{1}{^'{A} coupled electronic states are propagated by using the Dobbyn and Knowles diabatic potential surfaces and coupling [A. J. Dobbyn and P. J. Knowles, Mol. Phys. 91, 1107 (1997), 10.1080/002689797170842 and A. J. Dobbyn and P. J. Knowles, Faraday Discuss. 110, 207 (1998)], 10.1039/FD110207, and performing asymptotic or flux analysis. NQ is the preferred product channel, followed by XQ, R, and X. Moreover, the nonadiabatic quenching processes account for more than 80% of the total rate constants. WP snapshots show a reaction mechanism in good agreement with reaction probabilities. NQ, XQ, and R cross sections, and NQ rate constants decrease with the collision energy and j0, whereas the X reactivity increases, and XQ and R rates are nearly constant with j0. In general, quantum rate constants are smaller than experimental or quasiclassical data.

  3. Nanofluidic sustainable energy conversion using a 1D nanofluidic network.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hui; Kwak, Seungmin; Han, Sung Il; Chun, Dong Won; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Kim, Jinseok; Lee, Jeong Hoon

    2014-05-01

    We propose a 1-dimensional (1D) nanofluidic energy conversion device by implementing a surface-patterned Nafion membrane for the direct energy conversion of the pressure to electrical power. By implementing a -200-nm-thick nano-bridge with a 5-nm pore size between two microfluidic channels, we acquired an effective streaming potential of 307 mV and output power of 94 pW with 0.1 mM KCI under pressure difference of 45 MPa. The experimental results show both the effects of applied pressure differences and buffer concentrations on the effective streaming potential, and are consistent with the analytical prediction.

  4. Deconvolution/identification techniques for 1-D transient signals

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.M.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses a variety of nonparametric deconvolution and identification techniques that we have developed for application to 1-D transient signal problems. These methods are time-domain techniques that use direct methods for matrix inversion. Therefore, they are not appropriate for large data'' problems. These techniques involve various regularization methods and permit the use of certain kinds of a priori information in estimating the unknown. These techniques have been implemented in a package using standard FORTRAN that should make the package readily transportable to most computers. This paper is also meant to be an instruction manual for the package. 25 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Breakdown of 1D water wires inside charged carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Shashank

    2016-11-01

    Using molecular dynamics approach we investigated the structure and dynamics of water confined inside pristine and charged 6,6 carbon nanotubes (CNTs). This study reports the breakdown of 1D water wires and the emergence of triangular faced water on incorporating charges in 6,6 CNTs. Incorporation of charges results in high potential barriers to flipping of water molecules due to the formation of large number of hydrogen bonds. The PMF analyses show the presence of ∼2 kcal/mol barrier for the movement of water inside pristine CNT and almost negligible barrier in charged CNTs.

  6. Spatial coherence of polaritons in a 1D channel

    SciTech Connect

    Savenko, I. G.; Iorsh, I. V.; Kaliteevski, M. A.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2013-01-15

    We analyze time evolution of spatial coherence of a polariton ensemble in a quantum wire (1D channel) under constant uniform resonant pumping. Using the theoretical approach based on the Lindblad equation for a one-particle density matrix, which takes into account the polariton-phonon and excitonexciton interactions, we study the behavior of the first-order coherence function g{sup 1} for various pump intensities and temperatures in the range of 1-20 K. Bistability and hysteresis in the dependence of the first-order coherence function on the pump intensity is demonstrated.

  7. Nonlocal order parameters for the 1D Hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Montorsi, Arianna; Roncaglia, Marco

    2012-12-07

    We characterize the Mott-insulator and Luther-Emery phases of the 1D Hubbard model through correlators that measure the parity of spin and charge strings along the chain. These nonlocal quantities order in the corresponding gapped phases and vanish at the critical point U(c)=0, thus configuring as hidden order parameters. The Mott insulator consists of bound doublon-holon pairs, which in the Luther-Emery phase turn into electron pairs with opposite spins, both unbinding at U(c). The behavior of the parity correlators is captured by an effective free spinless fermion model.

  8. Nonlocal Order Parameters for the 1D Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montorsi, Arianna; Roncaglia, Marco

    2012-12-01

    We characterize the Mott-insulator and Luther-Emery phases of the 1D Hubbard model through correlators that measure the parity of spin and charge strings along the chain. These nonlocal quantities order in the corresponding gapped phases and vanish at the critical point Uc=0, thus configuring as hidden order parameters. The Mott insulator consists of bound doublon-holon pairs, which in the Luther-Emery phase turn into electron pairs with opposite spins, both unbinding at Uc. The behavior of the parity correlators is captured by an effective free spinless fermion model.

  9. ESO science data product standard for 1D spectral products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micol, Alberto; Arnaboldi, Magda; Delmotte, Nausicaa A. R.; Mascetti, Laura; Retzlaff, Joerg

    2016-07-01

    The ESO Phase 3 process allows the upload, validation, storage, and publication of reduced data through the ESO Science Archive Facility. Since its introduction, 2 million data products have been archived and published; 80% of them are one-dimensional extracted and calibrated spectra. Central to Phase3 is the ESO science data product standard that defines metadata and data format of any product. This contribution describes the ESO data standard for 1d-spectra, its adoption by the reduction pipelines of selected instrument modes for in-house generation of reduced spectra, the enhanced archive legacy value. Archive usage statistics are provided.

  10. 1-D blood flow modelling in a running human body.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Viktor; Halász, Gábor

    2017-04-10

    In this paper an attempt was made to simulate blood flow in a mobile human arterial network, specifically, in a running human subject. In order to simulate the effect of motion, a previously published immobile 1-D model was modified by including an inertial force term into the momentum equation. To calculate inertial force, gait analysis was performed at different levels of speed. Our results show that motion has a significant effect on the amplitudes of the blood pressure and flow rate but the average values are not effected significantly.

  11. Leptin Reduces the Expression and Increases the Phosphorylation of the Negative Regulators of GLUT4 Traffic TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 in Muscle of ob/ob Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sáinz, Neira; Rodríguez, Amaia; Catalán, Victoria; Becerril, Sara; Ramírez, Beatriz; Lancha, Andoni; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2012-01-01

    Leptin improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. Our goal was to determine whether proteins controlling GLUT4 traffic are altered by leptin deficiency and in vivo leptin administration in skeletal muscle of wild type and ob/ob mice. Leptin-deficient ob/ob mice were divided in three groups: control, leptin-treated (1 mg/kg/d) and leptin pair-fed ob/ob mice. Microarray analysis revealed that 1,546 and 1,127 genes were regulated by leptin deficiency and leptin treatment, respectively. Among these, we identified 24 genes involved in intracellular vesicle-mediated transport in ob/ob mice. TBC1 domain family, member 1 (Tbc1d1), a negative regulator of GLUT4 translocation, was up-regulated (P = 0.001) in ob/ob mice as compared to wild types. Importantly, leptin treatment reduced the transcript levels of Tbc1d1 (P<0.001) and Tbc1d4 (P = 0.004) in the leptin-treated ob/ob as compared to pair-fed ob/ob animals. In addition, phosphorylation levels of TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 were enhanced in leptin-treated ob/ob as compared to control ob/ob (P = 0.015 and P = 0.023, respectively) and pair-fed ob/ob (P = 0.036 and P = 0.034, respectively) mice. Despite similar GLUT4 protein expression in wild type and ob/ob groups a different immunolocalization of this protein was evidenced in muscle sections. Leptin treatment increased GLUT4 immunoreactivity in gastrocnemius and extensor digitorum longus sections of leptin-treated ob/ob mice. Moreover, GLUT4 protein detected in immunoprecipitates from TBC1D4 was reduced by leptin replacement compared to control ob/ob (P = 0.013) and pair-fed ob/ob (P = 0.037) mice. Our findings suggest that leptin enhances the intracellular GLUT4 transport in skeletal muscle of ob/ob animals by reducing the expression and activity of the negative regulators of GLUT4 traffic TBC1D1 and TBC1D4. PMID:22253718

  12. S1P lyase in thymic perivascular spaces promotes egress of mature thymocytes via up-regulation of S1P receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yasuhiro; Yagi, Hideki; Takemoto, Kana; Utsumi, Hiroyuki; Fukunari, Atsushi; Sugahara, Kunio; Masuko, Takashi; Chiba, Kenji

    2014-05-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) play an important role in the egress of mature CD4 or CD8 single-positive (SP) thymocytes from the thymus. Fingolimod hydrochloride (FTY720), an S1P1 functional antagonist, induced significant accumulation of CD62L(high)CD69(low) mature SP thymocytes in the thymic medulla. Immunohistochemical staining using anti-S1P1 antibody revealed that S1P1 is predominantly expressed on thymocytes in the thymic medulla and is strongly down-regulated even at 3h after FTY720 administration. 2-Acetyl-4-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI), an S1P lyase inhibitor, also induced accumulation of mature SP thymocytes in the thymic medulla with an enlargement of the perivascular spaces (PVS). At 6h after THI administration, S1P1-expressing thymocytes reduced partially as if to form clusters and hardly existed in the proximity of CD31-expressing blood vessels in the thymic medulla, suggesting S1P lyase expression in the cells constructing thymic medullary PVS. To determine the cells expressing S1P lyase in the thymus, we newly established a mAb (YK19-2) specific for mouse S1P lyase. Immunohistochemical staining with YK19-2 revealed that S1P lyase is predominantly expressed in non-lymphoid thymic stromal cells in the thymic medulla. In the thymic medullary PVS, S1P lyase was expressed in ER-TR7-positive cells (reticular fibroblasts and pericytes) and CD31-positive vascular endothelial cells. Our findings suggest that S1P lyase expressed in the thymic medullary PVS keeps the tissue S1P concentration low around the vessels and promotes thymic egress via up-regulation of S1P1.

  13. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 1 (S1P1) Upregulation and Amelioration of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by an S1P1 Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Cahalan, Stuart M.; Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J.; Nguyen, Nhan; Guerrero, Miguel; Cisar, Elizabeth A. George; Leaf, Nora B.; Brown, Steven J.; Roberts, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) is a G protein–coupled receptor that is critical for proper lymphocyte development and recirculation. Agonists to S1P1 are currently in use clinically for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, and these drugs may act on both S1P1 expressed on lymphocytes and S1P1 expressed within the central nervous system. Agonists to S1P1 and deficiency in S1P1 both cause lymphocyte sequestration in the lymph nodes. In the present study, we show that S1P1 antagonism induces lymphocyte sequestration in the lymph nodes similar to that observed with S1P1 agonists while upregulating S1P1 on lymphocytes and endothelial cells. Additionally, we show that S1P1 antagonism reverses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice without acting on S1P1 expressed within the central nervous system, demonstrating that lymphocyte sequestration via S1P1 antagonism is sufficient to alleviate autoimmune pathology. PMID:23204443

  14. The effect of the bioactive sphingolipids S1P and C1P on multipotent stromal cells--new opportunities in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Jeleń, Marta; Chrząstek, Klaudia; Grzesiak, Jakub; Meissner, Justyna

    2015-09-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) belong to a family of bioactive sphingolipids that act as important extracellular signaling molecules and chemoattractants. This study investigated the influence of S1P and C1P on the morphology, proliferation activity and osteogenic properties of rat multipotent stromal cells derived from bone marrow (BMSCs) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASCs). We show that S1P and C1P can influence mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), each in a different manner. S1P stimulation promoted the formation of cellular aggregates of BMSCs and ASCs, while C1P had an effect on the regular growth pattern and expanded intercellular connections, thereby increasing the proliferative activity. Although osteogenic differentiation of MSCs was enhanced by the addition of S1P, the effectiveness of osteoblast differentiation was more evident in BMSCs, particularly when biochemical and molecular marker levels were considered. The results of the functional osteogenic differentiation assay, which includes an evaluation of the efficiency of extracellular matrix mineralization (SEM-EDX), revealed the formation of numerous mineral aggregates in BMSC cultures stimulated with S1P. Our data demonstrated that in an appropriate combination, the bioactive sphingolipids S1P and C1P may find wide application in regenerative medicine, particularly in bone regeneration with the use of MSCs.

  15. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P(1)) upregulation and amelioration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by an S1P(1) antagonist.

    PubMed

    Cahalan, Stuart M; Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J; Nguyen, Nhan; Guerrero, Miguel; Cisar, Elizabeth A George; Leaf, Nora B; Brown, Steven J; Roberts, Edward; Rosen, Hugh

    2013-02-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P(1)) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is critical for proper lymphocyte development and recirculation. Agonists to S1P(1) are currently in use clinically for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, and these drugs may act on both S1P(1) expressed on lymphocytes and S1P(1) expressed within the central nervous system. Agonists to S1P(1) and deficiency in S1P(1) both cause lymphocyte sequestration in the lymph nodes. In the present study, we show that S1P(1) antagonism induces lymphocyte sequestration in the lymph nodes similar to that observed with S1P(1) agonists while upregulating S1P(1) on lymphocytes and endothelial cells. Additionally, we show that S1P(1) antagonism reverses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice without acting on S1P(1) expressed within the central nervous system, demonstrating that lymphocyte sequestration via S1P(1) antagonism is sufficient to alleviate autoimmune pathology.

  16. The checkpoint-dependent nuclear accumulation of Rho1p exchange factor Rgf1p is important for tolerance to chronic replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Sofía; Manjón, Elvira; García, Patricia; Sunnerhagen, Per; Sánchez, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors control many aspects of cell morphogenesis by turning on Rho-GTPases. The fission yeast exchange factor Rgf1p (Rho gef1) specifically regulates Rho1p during polarized growth and localizes to cortical sites. Here we report that Rgf1p is relocalized to the cell nucleus during the stalled replication caused by hydroxyurea (HU). Import to the nucleus is mediated by a nuclear localization sequence at the N-terminus of Rgf1p, whereas release into the cytoplasm requires two leucine-rich nuclear export sequences at the C-terminus. Moreover, Rgf1p nuclear accumulation during replication arrest depends on the 14-3-3 chaperone Rad24p and the DNA replication checkpoint kinase Cds1p. Both proteins control the nuclear accumulation of Rgf1p by inhibition of its nuclear export. A mutant, Rgf1p-9A, that substitutes nine serine potential phosphorylation Cds1p sites for alanine fails to accumulate in the nucleus in response to replication stress, and this correlates with a severe defect in survival in the presence of HU. In conclusion, we propose that the regulation of Rgf1p could be part of the mechanism by which Cds1p and Rad24p promote survival in the presence of chronic replication stress. It will be of general interest to understand whether the same is true for homologues of Rgf1p in budding yeast and higher eukaryotes. PMID:24478458

  17. Hyperoxia-induced p47phox activation and ROS generation is mediated through S1P transporter Spns2, and S1P/S1P1&2 signaling axis in lung endothelium.

    PubMed

    Harijith, Anantha; Pendyala, Srikanth; Ebenezer, David L; Ha, Alison W; Fu, Panfeng; Wang, Yue-Ting; Ma, Ke; Toth, Peter T; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; Kanteti, Prasad; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2016-08-01

    Hyperoxia-induced lung injury adversely affects ICU patients and neonates on ventilator assisted breathing. The underlying culprit appears to be reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced lung damage. The major contributor of hyperoxia-induced ROS is activation of the multiprotein enzyme complex NADPH oxidase. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling is known to be involved in hyperoxia-mediated ROS generation; however, the mechanism(s) of S1P-induced NADPH oxidase activation is unclear. Here, we investigated various steps in the S1P signaling pathway mediating ROS production in response to hyperoxia in lung endothelium. Of the two closely related sphingosine kinases (SphKs)1 and 2, which synthesize S1P from sphingosine, only Sphk1(-/-) mice conferred protection against hyperoxia-induced lung injury. S1P is metabolized predominantly by S1P lyase and partial deletion of Sgpl1 (Sgpl1(+/-)) in mice accentuated lung injury. Hyperoxia stimulated S1P accumulation in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs), and downregulation of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (Spns2) or S1P receptors S1P1&2, but not S1P3, using specific siRNA attenuated hyperoxia-induced p47(phox) translocation to cell periphery and ROS generation in HLMVECs. These results suggest a role for Spns2 and S1P1&2 in hyperoxia-mediated ROS generation. In addition, p47(phox) (phox:phagocyte oxidase) activation and ROS generation was also reduced by PF543, a specific SphK1 inhibitor in HLMVECs. Our data indicate a novel role for Spns2 and S1P1&2 in the activation of p47(phox) and production of ROS involved in hyperoxia-mediated lung injury in neonatal and adult mice.

  18. The Photometric lightcurve of Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bair, Allison N.; Schleicher, David G.

    2014-11-01

    Comet 1P/Halley is considered an important object for a number of reasons. Not only is it the first-identified and brightest periodic comet, being the only periodic comet visible to the naked eye at every apparition, but in 1986 Halley became the first comet to be imaged by fly-by spacecraft. The NASA-funded International Halley Watch (IHW) directly supported the spacecraft by providing narrowband filters for groundbased photometric observations, and until the arrival of Hale-Bopp (1995 O1), Halley was the subject of the largest groundbased observational campaign in history. Following considerable controversy regarding its rotation period, it was eventually determined to be in complex rotation -- the first comet to be so identified. While the overall brightness variations of the coma repeated with a period of about 7.4 days, the detailed period and shape of the lightcurve constantly evolved. The determination of the specific characteristics of each of the two components of its non-principal axis rotational state has remained elusive.To resolve this situation we have now incorporated all of the narrowband photometry, taken by 21 telescopes from around the world and submitted to the IHW archive, to create the most complete homogeneous lightcurve possible. Using measurements of three gas species and the dust, the lightcurve was investigated and found to alternate between a double- and triple-peaked shape, with no single feature being present throughout the entire duration of our dataset (316 days). The apparent period as a function of time was extracted and seen to vary in a step-wise manner between 7.27 and 7.60 days. Taken together, these results were used to produce a synthetic lightcurve revealing Halley's behavior even when no data were available. Details of this and other results, to be used to constrain future detailed modeling, will be presented. This research is supported by NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program.

  19. A simple quasi-1D model of Fibonacci anyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasen, David; Mong, Roger; Clarke, David; Alicea, Jason; Fendley, Paul

    2015-03-01

    There exists various ways of understanding the topological properties of Ising anyons--from simple free-fermion toy models to formal topological quantum field theory. For other types of anyons simple toy models rarely exist; their properties have to be obtained using formal self-consistency relations. We explore a family of gapped 1D local bosonic models that in a certain limit become trivial to solve and provide an intuitive picture for Fibonacci anyons. One can interpret this model as a quasi-1D wire that forms the building block of a 2D topological phase with Fibonacci anyons. With this interpretation all topological properties of the Fibonacci anyons become manifest including ground state degeneracy and braid relations. We conjecture that the structure of the model is protected by an emergent symmetry analogous to fermion parity. 1) NSF Grant DMR-1341822 2) Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, an NSF physics frontier center with support from the Moore Foundation. 3) NSERC-PGSD.

  20. Tunability and Sensing Properties of Plasmonic/1D Photonic Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Shaban, Mohamed; Ahmed, Ashour M.; Abdel-Rahman, Ehab; Hamdy, Hany

    2017-01-01

    Gold/one-dimensional photonic crystal (Au/1D-PC) is fabricated and applied for sensitive sensing of glucose and different chemical molecules of various refractive indices. The Au layer thickness is optimized to produce surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at the right edge of the photonic band gap (PBG). As the Au deposition time increased to 60 sec, the PBG width is increased from 46 to 86 nm in correlation with the behavior of the SPR. The selectivity of the optimized Au/1D-PC sensor is tested upon the increase of the environmental refractive index of the detected molecules. The resonance wavelength and the PBG edges increased linearly and the transmitted intensity increased nonlinearly as the environment refractive index increased. The SPR splits to two modes during the detection of chloroform molecules based on the localized capacitive coupling of Au particles. Also, this structure shows high sensitivity at different glucose concentrations. The PBG and SPR are shifted to longer wavelengths, and PBG width is decreased linearly with a rate of 16.04 Å/(μg/mm3) as the glucose concentration increased. The proposed structure merits; operation at room temperature, compact size, and easy fabrication; suggest that the proposed structure can be efficiently used for the biomedical and chemical application. PMID:28176799

  1. Engineered atom-light interactions in 1D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael J.; Hung, Chen-Lung; Yu, Su-Peng; Goban, Akihisa; Muniz, Juan A.; Hood, Jonathan D.; Norte, Richard; McClung, Andrew C.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Lee, Jae Hoon; Peng, Lucas; Painter, Oskar; Kimble, H. Jeff

    2014-05-01

    Nano- and microscale optical systems offer efficient and scalable quantum interfaces through enhanced atom-field coupling in both resonators and continuous waveguides. Beyond these conventional topologies, new opportunities emerge from the integration of ultracold atomic systems with nanoscale photonic crystals. One-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides can be engineered for both stable trapping configurations and strong atom-photon interactions, enabling novel cavity QED and quantum many-body systems, as well as distributed quantum networks. We present the experimental realization of such a nanophotonic quantum interface based on a nanoscale photonic crystal waveguide, demonstrating a fractional waveguide coupling of Γ1 D /Γ' of 0 . 32 +/- 0 . 08 , where Γ1 D (Γ') is the atomic emission rate into the guided (all other) mode(s). We also discuss progress towards intra-waveguide trapping of ultracold Cs. This work was supported by the IQIM, an NSF Physics Frontiers Center with support from the Moore Foundation, the DARPA ORCHID program, the AFOSR QuMPASS MURI, the DoD NSSEFF program, NSF, and the Kavli Nanoscience Institute (KNI) at Caltech.

  2. Tunability and Sensing Properties of Plasmonic/1D Photonic Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaban, Mohamed; Ahmed, Ashour M.; Abdel-Rahman, Ehab; Hamdy, Hany

    2017-02-01

    Gold/one-dimensional photonic crystal (Au/1D-PC) is fabricated and applied for sensitive sensing of glucose and different chemical molecules of various refractive indices. The Au layer thickness is optimized to produce surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at the right edge of the photonic band gap (PBG). As the Au deposition time increased to 60 sec, the PBG width is increased from 46 to 86 nm in correlation with the behavior of the SPR. The selectivity of the optimized Au/1D-PC sensor is tested upon the increase of the environmental refractive index of the detected molecules. The resonance wavelength and the PBG edges increased linearly and the transmitted intensity increased nonlinearly as the environment refractive index increased. The SPR splits to two modes during the detection of chloroform molecules based on the localized capacitive coupling of Au particles. Also, this structure shows high sensitivity at different glucose concentrations. The PBG and SPR are shifted to longer wavelengths, and PBG width is decreased linearly with a rate of 16.04 Å/(μg/mm3) as the glucose concentration increased. The proposed structure merits; operation at room temperature, compact size, and easy fabrication; suggest that the proposed structure can be efficiently used for the biomedical and chemical application.

  3. Constitutive modeling and control of 1D smart composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Jonathan P.; Ostrowski, James P.; Ponte-Castaneda, Pedro

    1998-07-01

    Homogenization techniques for determining effective properties of composite materials may provide advantages for control of stiffness and strain in systems using hysteretic smart actuators embedded in a soft matrix. In this paper, a homogenized model of a 1D composite structure comprised of shape memory alloys and a rubber-like matrix is presented. With proportional and proportional/integral feedback, using current as the input state and global strain as an error state, implementation scenarios include the use of tractions on the boundaries and a nonlinear constitutive law for the matrix. The result is a simple model which captures the nonlinear behavior of the smart composite material system and is amenable to experiments with various control paradigms. The success of this approach in the context of the 1D model suggests that the homogenization method may prove useful in investigating control of more general smart structures. Applications of such materials could include active rehabilitation aids, e.g. wrist braces, as well as swimming/undulating robots, or adaptive molds for manufacturing processes.

  4. Blood flow quantification using 1D CFD parameter identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosig, Richard; Kowarschik, Markus; Maday, Peter; Katouzian, Amin; Demirci, Stefanie; Navab, Nassir

    2014-03-01

    Patient-specific measurements of cerebral blood flow provide valuable diagnostic information concerning cerebrovascular diseases rather than visually driven qualitative evaluation. In this paper, we present a quantitative method to estimate blood flow parameters with high temporal resolution from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) image sequences. Using a 3D DSA dataset and a 2D+t DSA sequence, the proposed algorithm employs a 1D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for estimation of time-dependent flow values along a cerebral vessel, combined with an additional Advection Diffusion Equation (ADE) for contrast agent propagation. The CFD system, followed by the ADE, is solved with a finite volume approximation, which ensures the conservation of mass. Instead of defining a new imaging protocol to obtain relevant data, our cost function optimizes the bolus arrival time (BAT) of the contrast agent in 2D+t DSA sequences. The visual determination of BAT is common clinical practice and can be easily derived from and be compared to values, generated by a 1D-CFD simulation. Using this strategy, we ensure that our proposed method fits best to clinical practice and does not require any changes to the medical work flow. Synthetic experiments show that the recovered flow estimates match the ground truth values with less than 12% error in the mean flow rates.

  5. Entanglement and Nonlocality in Infinite 1D Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zizhu; Singh, Sukhwinder; Navascués, Miguel

    2017-06-01

    We consider the problem of detecting entanglement and nonlocality in one-dimensional (1D) infinite, translation-invariant (TI) systems when just near-neighbor information is available. This issue is deeper than one might think a priori, since, as we show, there exist instances of local separable states (classical boxes) which admit only entangled (nonclassical) TI extensions. We provide a simple characterization of the set of local states of multiseparable TI spin chains and construct a family of linear witnesses which can detect entanglement in infinite TI states from the nearest-neighbor reduced density matrix. Similarly, we prove that the set of classical TI boxes forms a polytope and devise a general procedure to generate all Bell inequalities which characterize it. Using an algorithm based on matrix product states, we show how some of them can be violated by distant parties conducting identical measurements on an infinite TI quantum state. All our results can be easily adapted to detect entanglement and nonlocality in large (finite, not TI) 1D condensed matter systems.

  6. Error analysis of subaperture processing in 1-D ultrasound arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kang-Qiao; Bjåstad, Tore Gruner; Kristoffersen, Kjell

    2015-04-01

    To simplify the medical ultrasound system and reduce the cost, several techniques have been proposed to reduce the interconnections between the ultrasound probe and the back-end console. Among them, subaperture processing (SAP) is the most straightforward approach and is widely used in commercial products. This paper reviews the most important error sources of SAP, such as static focusing, delay quantization, linear delay profile, and coarse apodization, and the impacts introduced by these errors are shown. We propose to use main lobe coherence loss as a simple classification of the quality of the beam profile for a given design. This figure-ofmerit (FoM) is evaluated by simulations with a 1-D ultrasound subaperture array setup. The analytical expressions and the coherence loss can work as a quick guideline in subaperture design by equalizing the merit degradations from different error sources, as well as minimizing the average or maximum loss over ranges. For the evaluated 1-D array example, a good balance between errors and cost was achieved using a subaperture size of 5 elements, focus at 40 mm range, and a delay quantization step corresponding to a phase of π/4.

  7. Tunability and Sensing Properties of Plasmonic/1D Photonic Crystal.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Mohamed; Ahmed, Ashour M; Abdel-Rahman, Ehab; Hamdy, Hany

    2017-02-08

    Gold/one-dimensional photonic crystal (Au/1D-PC) is fabricated and applied for sensitive sensing of glucose and different chemical molecules of various refractive indices. The Au layer thickness is optimized to produce surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at the right edge of the photonic band gap (PBG). As the Au deposition time increased to 60 sec, the PBG width is increased from 46 to 86 nm in correlation with the behavior of the SPR. The selectivity of the optimized Au/1D-PC sensor is tested upon the increase of the environmental refractive index of the detected molecules. The resonance wavelength and the PBG edges increased linearly and the transmitted intensity increased nonlinearly as the environment refractive index increased. The SPR splits to two modes during the detection of chloroform molecules based on the localized capacitive coupling of Au particles. Also, this structure shows high sensitivity at different glucose concentrations. The PBG and SPR are shifted to longer wavelengths, and PBG width is decreased linearly with a rate of 16.04 Å/(μg/mm(3)) as the glucose concentration increased. The proposed structure merits; operation at room temperature, compact size, and easy fabrication; suggest that the proposed structure can be efficiently used for the biomedical and chemical application.

  8. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-08-26

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3-4 compared to those with 0-2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target.

  9. Electrical and magnetic properties of CuTi 2S 4 and CuZr 2S 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Hagino, Takatsugu; Taniguchi, Kouji; Chikazawa, Susumu; Nagata, Shoichi

    2000-07-01

    CuTi 2S 4 and CuZr 2S 4 have the normal-spinel type structure. Electrical and magnetic properties of polycrystals of these compounds have been studied. CuTi 2S 4 shows simple metallic conductivity. Conversely, the resistivity ρ of CuZr 2S 4 is about three orders of magnitude higher than that of CuTi 2S 4 and exhibits the temperature dependence of weak negative temperature coefficient d ρ/d T. The temperature-independent part of susceptibility of CuZr 2S 4 is somewhat smaller than that of CuTi 2S 4. The density of states at the Fermi energy has been estimated to be 1.88 states/eV atom for CuTi 2S 4 and 1.26 states/eV atom for CuZr 2S 4.

  10. Prediction of {sup 1}P Rydberg energy levels of beryllium based on calculations with explicitly correlated Gaussians

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-01-14

    Benchmark variational calculations are performed for the seven lowest 1s{sup 2}2s np ({sup 1}P), n = 2…8, states of the beryllium atom. The calculations explicitly include the effect of finite mass of {sup 9}Be nucleus and account perturbatively for the mass-velocity, Darwin, and spin-spin relativistic corrections. The wave functions of the states are expanded in terms of all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. Basis sets of up to 12 500 optimized Gaussians are used. The maximum discrepancy between the calculated nonrelativistic and experimental energies of 1s{sup 2}2s np ({sup 1}P) →1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2} ({sup 1}S) transition is about 12 cm{sup −1}. The inclusion of the relativistic corrections reduces the discrepancy to bellow 0.8 cm{sup −1}.

  11. Fluorescent Probes for H2S Detection and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Dymock, Brian W

    2015-01-01

    Many diverse, sensitive and structurally novel fluorescent probes have recently been reported for H2S detection. Quantification of H2S requires a selective chemosensor which will react only with H2S against a background of high concentrations of other thiols or reducing agents. Most published probes are able to quantify H2S selectively in a simple in vitro system with the most sensitive probes able to detect H2S at below 100 nM concentrations. A subset of probes also have utility in sensing H2S in living cells, and there are now several with specific sub-cellular localization and a few cases of in vivo applications. Biologists studying H2S now have a wide range of tools to assist them to aid further understanding of the role of H2S in biology.

  12. S1P promotes murine progenitor cell egress and mobilization via S1P1-mediated ROS signaling and SDF-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Karin; Vagima, Yaron; Ludin, Aya; Itkin, Tomer; Cohen-Gur, Shiri; Kalinkovich, Alexander; Kollet, Orit; Kim, Chihwa; Schajnovitz, Amir; Ovadya, Yossi; Lapid, Kfir; Shivtiel, Shoham; Morris, Andrew J.; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of hematopoietic progenitor cell egress and clinical mobilization are not fully understood. Herein, we report that in vivo desensitization of Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors by FTY720 as well as disruption of S1P gradient toward the blood, reduced steady state egress of immature progenitors and primitive Sca-1+/c-Kit+/Lin− (SKL) cells via inhibition of SDF-1 release. Administration of AMD3100 or G-CSF to mice with deficiencies in either S1P production or its receptor S1P1, or pretreated with FTY720, also resulted in reduced stem and progenitor cell mobilization. Mice injected with AMD3100 or G-CSF demonstrated transient increased S1P levels in the blood mediated via mTOR signaling, as well as an elevated rate of immature c-Kit+/Lin− cells expressing surface S1P1 in the bone marrow (BM). Importantly, we found that S1P induced SDF-1 secretion from BM stromal cells including Nestin+ mesenchymal stem cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Moreover, elevated ROS production by hematopoietic progenitor cells is also regulated by S1P. Our findings reveal that the S1P/S1P1 axis regulates progenitor cell egress and mobilization via activation of ROS signaling on both hematopoietic progenitors and BM stromal cells, and SDF-1 release. The dynamic cross-talk between S1P and SDF-1 integrates BM stromal cells and hematopoeitic progenitor cell motility. PMID:22279055

  13. Downregulation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 by dexamethasone inhibits S1P-induced mesangial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Koch, Alexander; Jäger, Manuel; Völzke, Anja; Grammatikos, Georgios; Zu Heringdorf, Dagmar Meyer; Huwiler, Andrea; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2015-06-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is generated by sphingosine kinase (SK)-1 and -2 and acts mainly as an extracellular ligand at five specific receptors, denoted S1P1-5. After activation, S1P receptors regulate important processes in the progression of renal diseases, such as mesangial cell migration and survival. Previously, we showed that dexamethasone enhances SK-1 activity and S1P formation, which protected mesangial cells from stress-induced apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that dexamethasone treatment lowered S1P1 mRNA and protein expression levels in rat mesangial cells. This effect was abolished in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-486. In addition, in vivo studies showed that dexamethasone downregulated S1P1 expression in glomeruli isolated from mice treated with dexamethasone (10 mg/kg body weight). Functionally, we identified S1P1 as a key player mediating S1P-induced mesangial cell migration. We show that dexamethasone treatment significantly lowered S1P-induced migration of mesangial cells, which was again reversed in the presence of RU-486. In summary, we suggest that dexamethasone inhibits S1P-induced mesangial cell migration via downregulation of S1P1. Overall, these results demonstrate that dexamethasone has functional important effects on sphingolipid metabolism and action in renal mesangial cells.

  14. Phase relations in the system Cu 2S-In 2S 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binsma, J. J. M.; Giling, L. J.; Bloem, J.

    1980-10-01

    The T-x phase diagram of the binary system Cu 2S-In 2S 3 has been determined by differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. Two ternary semiconducting phases are found, CuInS 2 and CuIn 5S 8. It appears that CuInS 2 exists in three modifications, up to 980°C in the well known chalcopyrite structure, between 980°C and 1045°C in the zincblende structure, and above 1045°C up to the melting point at 1090°C, in a still unknown structure which tentatively is assumed to be wurtzite. These two solid state phase transitions in CuInS 2 will from a severe obstacle for obtaining large single crystals with the chalcopyrite structure from its own melt. The second semiconductor, CuIn 5S 8, has the spinel structure over the whole temperature range of 20°C to the melting point at 1085°C. The chalcopyrite to zincblende phase transition in CuInS 2 which takes place at 980°C corresponds to disordering of the cation sublattice. It will be shown that the transition chalcopyrite to zincblende is a general phenomenon which is observed for chalcopyrites with an axial ratio c/a larger than 1.95. Ternaries for which the axial ratio is smaller than 1.95 remain in the ordered chalcopyrite structure even at high temperatures.

  15. Axion string dynamics I: 2+1D

    SciTech Connect

    Fleury, Leesa M.; Moore, Guy D.

    2016-05-03

    If the axion exists and if the initial axion field value is uncorrelated at causally disconnected points, then it should be possible to predict the efficiency of cosmological axion production, relating the axionic dark matter density to the axion mass. The main obstacle to making this prediction is correctly treating the axion string cores. We develop a new algorithm for treating the axionic string cores correctly in 2+1 dimensions. When the axionic string cores are given their full physical string tension, axion production is about twice as efficient as in previous simulations. We argue that the string network in 2+1 dimensions should behave very differently than in 3+1 dimensions, so this result cannot be simply carried over to the physical case. We outline how to extend our method to 3+1D axion string dynamics.

  16. Uniform Propagation of Chaos for Kac's 1D Particle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we study Kac's 1D particle system, consisting of the velocities of N particles colliding at constant rate and randomly exchanging energies. We prove uniform (in time) propagation of chaos in Wasserstein distance with explicit polynomial rates in N, for both the squared (i.e., the energy) and non-squared particle system. These rates are of order N^{-1/3} (almost, in the non-squared case), assuming that the initial distribution of the limit nonlinear equation has finite moments of sufficiently high order (4+ɛ is enough when using the 2-Wasserstein distance). The proof relies on a convenient parametrization of the collision recently introduced by Hauray, as well as on a coupling technique developed by Cortez and Fontbona.

  17. The molecular spin filter constructed from 1D organic chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Ning; Wang, Baolin; Bian, Baoan

    2014-06-01

    We proposed a molecular spin filter, which is constructed from the 1D metallic organic chain (Fen+1(C6H4)n). The spin-polarized transport properties of the molecular spin filter are explored by combining density functional theory with nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. Theoretical results reveal that Fen+1(C6H4)n molecular chain exhibits robust spin filtering effect, and only the spin-down electrons can transmit through the molecular chain. At the given bias voltage window [-1 eV,1 eV], the calculated spin filter efficiency is close to 100% in the case of n≥3. We find that the effect of spin polarization origin from both Fen+1 and (C6H4)n. In addition, negative difference resistance behavior appears in Fen+1(C6H4)n molecular chain. The results can help us understand the spin transport properties of organic molecular chain.

  18. Statistical analysis of 1D HRR target features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, David C.; Schmitz, James L.; Williams, Robert L.

    2000-08-01

    Automatic target recognition (ATR) and feature-aided tracking (FAT) algorithms that use one-dimensional (1-D) high range resolution (HRR) profiles require unique or distinguishable target features. This paper explores the use of statistical measures to quantify the separability and stability of ground target features found in HRR profiles. Measures of stability, such as the mean and variance, can be used to determine the stability of a target feature as a function of the target aspect and elevation angle. Statistical measures of feature predictability and separability, such as the Fisher and Bhattacharyya measures, demonstrate the capability to adequately predict the desired target feature over a specified aspect angular region. These statistical measures for separability and stability are explained in detail and their usefulness is demonstrated with measured HRR data.

  19. Effective theory of black holes in the 1/D expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emparan, Roberto; Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Ryotaku; Tanabe, Kentaro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2015-06-01

    The gravitational field of a black hole is strongly localized near its horizon when the number of dimensions D is very large. In this limit, we can effectively replace the black hole with a surface in a background geometry (e.g. Minkowski or Anti-deSitter space). The Einstein equations determine the effective equations that this `black hole surface' (or membrane) must satisfy. We obtain them up to next-to-leading order in 1/ D for static black holes of the Einstein-(A)dS theory. To leading order, and also to next order in Minkowski backgrounds, the equations of the effective theory are the same as soap-film equations, possibly up to a redshift factor. In particular, the Schwarzschild black hole is recovered as a spherical soap bubble. Less trivially, we find solutions for `black droplets', i.e. black holes localized at the boundary of AdS, and for non-uniform black strings.

  20. Connected components of irreducible maps and 1D quantum phases

    SciTech Connect

    Szehr, Oleg; Wolf, Michael M.

    2016-08-15

    We investigate elementary topological properties of sets of completely positive (CP) maps that arise in quantum Perron-Frobenius theory. We prove that the set of primitive CP maps of fixed Kraus rank is path-connected and we provide a complete classification of the connected components of irreducible CP maps at given Kraus rank and fixed peripheral spectrum in terms of a multiplicity index. These findings are then applied to analyse 1D quantum phases by studying equivalence classes of translational invariant matrix product states that correspond to the connected components of the respective CP maps. Our results extend the previously obtained picture in that they do not require blocking of physical sites, they lead to analytic paths, and they allow us to decompose into ergodic components and to study the breaking of translational symmetry.

  1. Combinatorial approach to exactly solve the 1D Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Swarnadeep

    2017-01-01

    The Ising model is a well known statistical model which can be solved exactly by various methods. The most familiar one is the transfer matrix method. Sometimes it can be difficult to approach the open boundary case rather than periodic boundary ones in higher dimensions. But physically it is more intuitive to study the open boundary case, as it gives a closer view of the real system. We have introduced a new method called the pairing method to determine the exact partition function for the simplest case, a 1D Ising lattice. This method simplifies the problem's complexities and reduces it to a pure combinatorial problem. The study also reveals that it is possible to apply this pairing method in the case of a 2D square lattice. The obtained results agree perfectly with the values in the literature and this new approach provides an algorithmic insight to deal with such problems.

  2. Axion string dynamics I: 2+1D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Leesa M.; Moore, Guy D.

    2016-05-01

    If the axion exists and if the initial axion field value is uncorrelated at causally disconnected points, then it should be possible to predict the efficiency of cosmological axion production, relating the axionic dark matter density to the axion mass. The main obstacle to making this prediction is correctly treating the axion string cores. We develop a new algorithm for treating the axionic string cores correctly in 2+1 dimensions. When the axionic string cores are given their full physical string tension, axion production is about twice as efficient as in previous simulations. We argue that the string network in 2+1 dimensions should behave very differently than in 3+1 dimensions, so this result cannot be simply carried over to the physical case. We outline how to extend our method to 3+1D axion string dynamics.

  3. Conductance anomalies in quantum point contacts and 1D wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mukunda P.; Green, Frederick

    2017-06-01

    Over the last decade, interest in 1D charge transport has progressed from the seminal discovery of Landauer quantization of conductance, as a function of carrier density, to finer-scale phenomena at the onset of quantization. This has come to be called the ‘0.7 anomaly’, rather connoting a theoretical mystery of some profundity and universality, which remains open to date. Its somewhat imaginative appellation may tend to mislead, since the anomaly manifests itself over a range of conductance values: anywhere between 0.25-0.95 Landauer quanta. In this paper we offer a critique of the 0.7 anomaly and discuss the extent to which it represents a deep question of physics. Keynote talk at 8th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology (IWAMSN2016), 8-12 November 2016, Ha Long City, Vietnam.

  4. 1-D ELECTRO-OPTIC BEAM STEERING DEVICE.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Tsui, Chi Leung

    2011-06-05

    In this paper, we present the design and fabrication of a 1D beam steering device based on planar electro-optic thermal-plastic prisms and a collimator lens array. With the elimination of moving parts, the proposed device is able to overcome the mechanical limitations of present scanning devices, such as fatigue and low operating frequency, while maintaining a small system footprint (~0.5mm×0.5mm). From experimental data, our prototype device is able to achieve a maximum deflection angle of 5.6° for a single stage prism design and 29.2° for a cascaded three prisms stage design. The lens array shows a 4µm collimated beam diameter.

  5. 1-D ELECTRO-OPTIC BEAM STEERING DEVICE

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Tsui, Chi Leung

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and fabrication of a 1D beam steering device based on planar electro-optic thermal-plastic prisms and a collimator lens array. With the elimination of moving parts, the proposed device is able to overcome the mechanical limitations of present scanning devices, such as fatigue and low operating frequency, while maintaining a small system footprint (~0.5mm×0.5mm). From experimental data, our prototype device is able to achieve a maximum deflection angle of 5.6° for a single stage prism design and 29.2° for a cascaded three prisms stage design. The lens array shows a 4µm collimated beam diameter. PMID:22199458

  6. Evaluating 1d Seismic Models of the Lunar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Thorne, M. S.; Weber, R. C.; Schmerr, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    A four station seismic network was established on the Moon from 1969 to 1977 as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP). A total of nine 1D seismic velocity models were generated using a variety of different techniques. In spite of the fact that these models were generated from the same data set, significant differences exist between them. We evaluate these models by comparing predicted travel-times to published catalogs of lunar events. We generate synthetic waveform predictions for 1D lunar models using a modified version of the Green's Function of the Earth by Minor Integration (GEMINI) technique. Our results demonstrate that the mean square errors between predicted and measured P-wave travel times are smaller than those for S-wave travel times in all cases. Moreover, models fit travel times for artificial and meteoroid impacts better than for shallow and deep moonquakes. Overall, models presented by Nakamura [Nakamura, 1983] and Garcia et al. [Garcia et al., 2011] predicted the observed travel times better than all other models and were comparable in their explanation of travel-times. Nevertheless, significant waveform differences exist between these models. In particular, the seismic velocity structure of the lunar crust and regolith strongly affect the waveform characteristics predicted by these models. Further complexity is added by possible mantle discontinuity structure that exists in a subset of these models. We show synthetic waveform predictions for these models demonstrating the role that crustal structure has in generating long duration seismic coda inherent in the lunar waveforms.

  7. Lanczos diagonalizations of the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, E.Y.; Campbell, D.K.; Gammel, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    In studies of interacting electrons in reduced dimensions'' one is trapped between the Scylla of exponential growth of the number of states in any exact many-body basis and the Charybdis of the failure of mean-field theories to capture adequately the effects of interactions. In the present article we focus on one technique -- the Lanczos method -- which, at least in the case of the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model, appears to allow us to sail the narrow channel between these two hazards. In contrast to Quantum Monte Carlo methods, which circumvent the exponential growth of states by statistical techniques and importance sampling, the Lanczos approach attacks this problem head-on by diagonalizing the full Hamiltonian. Given the restrictions of present computers, this approach is thus limited to studying finite clusters of roughly 12--14 sites. Fortunately, in one dimension, such clusters are usually sufficient for extracting many of the properties of the infinite system provided that one makes full use of the ability to vary the boundary conditions. In this article we shall apply the Lanczos methodology and novel phase randomization'' techniques to study the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model, with particular emphasis on the optical absorption properties, including the spectrum of absorptions as a function of photon energy. Despite the discreteness of the eigenstates in our finite clusters, we are able to obtain optical spectra that, in cases where independent tests can be made, agree well with the known exact results for the infinite system. Thus we feel that this combination of techniques represents an important and viable means of studying many interesting novel materials involving strongly correlated electrons. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Evidence against dopamine D1/D2 receptor heteromers.

    PubMed

    Frederick, A L; Yano, H; Trifilieff, P; Vishwasrao, H D; Biezonski, D; Mészáros, J; Urizar, E; Sibley, D R; Kellendonk, C; Sonntag, K C; Graham, D L; Colbran, R J; Stanwood, G D; Javitch, J A

    2015-11-01

    Hetero-oligomers of G-protein-coupled receptors have become the subject of intense investigation, because their purported potential to manifest signaling and pharmacological properties that differ from the component receptors makes them highly attractive for the development of more selective pharmacological treatments. In particular, dopamine D1 and D2 receptors have been proposed to form hetero-oligomers that couple to Gαq proteins, and SKF83959 has been proposed to act as a biased agonist that selectively engages these receptor complexes to activate Gαq and thus phospholipase C. D1/D2 heteromers have been proposed as relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of depression and schizophrenia. We used in vitro bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, ex vivo analyses of receptor localization and proximity in brain slices, and behavioral assays in mice to characterize signaling from these putative dimers/oligomers. We were unable to detect Gαq or Gα11 protein coupling to homomers or heteromers of D1 or D2 receptors using a variety of biosensors. SKF83959-induced locomotor and grooming behaviors were eliminated in D1 receptor knockout (KO) mice, verifying a key role for D1-like receptor activation. In contrast, SKF83959-induced motor responses were intact in D2 receptor and Gαq KO mice, as well as in knock-in mice expressing a mutant Ala(286)-CaMKIIα that cannot autophosphorylate to become active. Moreover, we found that, in the shell of the nucleus accumbens, even in neurons in which D1 and D2 receptor promoters are both active, the receptor proteins are segregated and do not form complexes. These data are not compatible with SKF83959 signaling through Gαq or through a D1/D2 heteromer and challenge the existence of such a signaling complex in the adult animals that we used for our studies.

  9. Organelle-Targeted H2S Probes Enable Visualization of the Subcellular Distribution of H2S Donors.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Leticia A; Pluth, Michael D

    2016-06-07

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an essential biological signaling molecule in diverse biological regulatory pathways. To provide new chemical tools for H2S imaging, we report here a fluorescent H2S detection platform (HSN2-BG) that is compatible with subcellular localization SNAP-tag fusion protein methodologies and use appropriate fusion protein constructs to demonstrate mitochondrial and lysosomal localization. We also demonstrate the efficacy of this detection platform to image endogenous H2S in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and use the developed constructs to report on the subcellular H2S distributions provided by common H2S donor molecules AP39, ADT-OH, GYY4137, and diallyltrisulfide (DATS). The developed constructs provide a platform poised to provide new insights into the subcellular distribution of common H2S donors and a useful tool for investigating H2S biochemistry.

  10. The box H/ACA RNP assembly factor Naf1p contains a domain homologous to Gar1p mediating its interaction with Cbf5p.

    PubMed

    Leulliot, Nicolas; Godin, Katherine S; Hoareau-Aveilla, Coralie; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie; Varani, Gabriele; Henry, Yves; Van Tilbeurgh, Herman

    2007-08-31

    Naf1 is an essential protein involved in the maturation of box H/ACA ribonucleoproteins, a group of particles required for ribosome biogenesis, modification of spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs and telomere synthesis. Naf1 participates in the assembly of the RNP at transcription sites and in the nuclear trafficking of the complex. The crystal structure of a domain of yeast Naf1p, Naf1Delta1p, reveals a striking structural homology with the core domain of archaeal Gar1, an essential protein component of the mature RNP; it suggests that Naf1p and Gar1p have a common binding site on the enzymatic protein component of the particle, Cbf5p. We propose that Naf1p is a competitive binder for Cbf5p, which is replaced by Gar1p during maturation of the H/ACA particle. The exchange of Naf1p by Gar1p might be prompted by external factors that alter the oligomerisation state of Naf1p and Gar1p. The structural homology with Gar1 suggests that the function of Naf1 involves preventing non-cognate RNAs from being loaded during transport of the particle by inducing a non-productive conformation of Cbf5.

  11. H2S regulation of nitric oxide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kolluru, Gopi K.; Yuan, Shuai; Shen, Xinggui; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are two major gaseous signaling molecules that regulate diverse physiological functions. Recent publications indicate the regulatory role of H2S on NO metabolism. In this chapter, we discuss the latest findings on H2S-NO interactions through formation of novel chemical derivatives, and experimental approaches to study these adducts. This chapter also addresses potential H2S interference on various NO detection techniques, along with precautions for analyzing biological samples from various sources. This information will facilitate critical evaluation and clearer insight into H2S regulation of NO signaling and its influence on various physiological functions. PMID:25725527

  12. A Comprehensive Membrane Interactome Mapping of Sho1p Reveals Fps1p as a Novel Key Player in the Regulation of the HOG Pathway in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Mandy Hiu Yi; Snider, Jamie; Rehal, Monique; Wong, Victoria; Aboualizadeh, Farzaneh; Drecun, Luka; Wong, Olivia; Jubran, Bellal; Li, Meirui; Ali, Mehrab; Jessulat, Matthew; Deineko, Viktor; Miller, Rachel; Lee, Mid eum; Park, Hay-Oak; Davidson, Alan; Babu, Mohan; Stagljar, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Sho1p, an integral membrane protein, plays a vital role in the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activated under conditions of high osmotic stress, it interacts with other HOG pathway proteins to mediate cell signaling events, ensuring that yeast cells can adapt and remain viable. In an attempt to further understand how the function of Sho1p is regulated through its protein–protein interactions (PPIs), we identified 49 unique Sho1p PPIs through the use of membrane yeast two-hybrid (MYTH), an assay specifically suited to identify PPIs of full-length integral membrane proteins in their native membrane environment. Secondary validation by literature search, or two complementary PPI assays, confirmed 80% of these interactions, resulting in a high-quality Sho1p interactome. This set of putative PPIs included both previously characterized interactors, along with a large subset of interactors that have not been previously identified as binding to Sho1p. The SH3 domain of Sho1p was found to be important for binding to many of these interactors. One particular novel interactor of interest is the glycerol transporter Fps1p, which was shown to require the SH3 domain of Sho1p for binding via its N-terminal soluble regulatory domain. Furthermore, we found that Fps1p is involved in the positive regulation of Sho1p function and plays a role in the phosphorylation of the downstream kinase Hog1p. This study represents the largest membrane interactome analysis of Sho1p to date and complements past studies on the HOG pathway by increasing our understanding of Sho1p regulation. PMID:25644660

  13. [Role and related mechanism of S1P/S1P1 signal pathway during post conditioning of hypertrophic cardiomyocytes].

    PubMed

    Bao, X H; Li, H X; Tao, J; Li, X M; Yang, Y N; Ma, Y T; Chen, B D

    2016-05-24

    To study the role and mechanism of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/ sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1(S1P1) signal pathway during post conditioning of hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were isolated and cultured, then stimulated by norepinephrine (NE) to induce cardiomyocytes hypertrophy. Using tri-gas incubator to create hypoxia and reoxygenation enviroment to mimic ischemia-reperfusion and postconditioning. Hypertrophic cardiomyoctyes were divided into five groups according to the presence or absence of various drugs and postconditiong and relevant signal pathways changes were detected: (1) IPost group (hypoxia+ postconditioning); (2) IPost+ S1P group (cells were pretreated with S1P (1 μmol/L) for 2 h before IPost); (3) IPost+ W-146+ S1P group (cells in IPost+ W-146+ S1P group were pretreated with S1P1 inhibitor W-146 (0.4 μmol/L) for 20 min); (4) IPost+ PD98059+ S1P group (cells in IPost+ S1P group were pretreated with MAPK antagonist PD98059 (125 μmol/L) for 20 min); (5) IPost+ LY-294002+ S1P group (cells in IPost+ S1P group were pretreated with PI3K antagonist LY294002 (0.1 μmol/L) for 20 min). Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and protein expression of relevant signal pathways were detected by Western blot. (1)Apoptosis rate was significantly increased in hypoxia/reoxygenation (27.90±4.49)% group compared with normal control group (7.97±2.18)%, which could be significantly reduced in IPost group (15.90±1.77)% (all P<0.05). (2)Apoptosis rate and caspase-3 expression were both significantly lower in IPost+ S1P and IPost+ S1P+ LY-294002 groups than in IPost and IPost+ S1P+ W-146 and IPost+ S1P+ PD98059 group (all P<0.05). (3)p-ERK1/2 expression was significantly higher in IPost+ S1P and IPost+ S1P+ LY-294002 group than in IPost and IPost+ S1P+ W-146 group and IPost+ S1P+ PD98059 group (all P<0.05) while p-Akt expression was similar among IPost, IPost+ S1P+ W-146 and IPost+ S1P+ PD98059 groups. p-ERK1/2 and p-Akt levels in

  14. Refined FISH characterization of a de novo 1p22-p36.2 paracentric inversion and associated 1p21-22 deletion in a patient with signs of 1p36 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finelli, P; Giardino, D; Russo, S; Gottardi, G; Cogliati, F; Grugni, G; Natacci, F; Larizza, L

    2001-04-01

    We report on a 10-year-old boy presenting with obesity, moderate mental retardation, large anterior fontanelle at birth, mild physical anomalies including mid-face hypoplasia, deep-set eyes, long philtrum, and small mouth. He was found to carry a paracentric inversion inv(1)(p22p36.2) associated with a 10 cM deletion at the proximal breakpoint. By YAC FISH, the boundaries of the deletion were established at IB1028 (1p21) and WI-5166 (1p22) STSs contained in YACs 781E8 and 954F6, respectively. This large region, covering about 10 cM, contains the COL11A1 and AMY2B genes, whose haploinsufficiency does not seem to contribute significantly to the clinical phenotype. On the other hand, the patient's clinical manifestations, also including visual problems and moderate mental retardation, are those typically observed in the 1p36 deletion syndrome. Refined mapping of the telomeric 1p36.2 inversion breakpoint was obtained by FISH of a PAC contig constructed to encompass this subinterval of the 1p36 microdeletion syndrome region. PACs 1024B10 and 884E7 were found to span the breakpoint, suggesting that the clinical signs of the 1p36 microdeletion syndrome might be due to disruption of a sequence lying at 1p36.2.

  15. Novel selective allosteric and bitopic ligands for the S1P(3) receptor.

    PubMed

    Jo, Euijung; Bhhatarai, Barun; Repetto, Emanuela; Guerrero, Miguel; Riley, Sean; Brown, Steven J; Kohno, Yasushi; Roberts, Edward; Schürer, Stephan C; Rosen, Hugh

    2012-12-21

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid signaling molecule that regulates important biological functions, including lymphocyte trafficking and vascular development, by activating G protein-coupled receptors for S1P, namely, S1P(1) through S1P(5). Here, we map the S1P(3) binding pocket with a novel allosteric agonist (CYM-5541), an orthosteric agonist (S1P), and a novel bitopic antagonist (SPM-242). With a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, ligand competition assay, and molecular modeling, we concluded that S1P and CYM-5541 occupy different chemical spaces in the ligand binding pocket of S1P(3). CYM-5541 allowed us to identify an allosteric site where Phe263 is a key gate-keeper residue for its affinity and efficacy. This ligand lacks a polar moiety, and the novel allosteric hydrophobic pocket permits S1P(3) selectivity of CYM-5541 within the highly similar S1P receptor family. However, a novel S1P(3)-selective antagonist, SPM-242, in the S1P(3) pocket occupies the ligand binding spaces of both S1P and CYM-5541, showing its bitopic mode of binding. Therefore, our coordinated approach with biochemical data and molecular modeling, based on our recently published S1P(1) crystal structure data in a highly conserved set of related receptors with a shared ligand, provides a strong basis for the successful optimization of orthosteric, allosteric, and bitopic modulators of S1P(3).

  16. Identification of H2S3 and H2S produced by 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuka; Toyofuku, Yukiko; Koike, Shin; Shibuya, Norihiro; Nagahara, Noriyuki; Lefer, David; Ogasawara, Yuki; Kimura, Hideo

    2015-10-06

    Hydrogen polysulfides (H2Sn) have a higher number of sulfane sulfur atoms than hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which has various physiological roles. We recently found H2Sn in the brain. H2Sn induced some responses previously attributed to H2S but with much greater potency than H2S. However, the number of sulfur atoms in H2Sn and its producing enzyme were unknown. Here, we detected H2S3 and H2S, which were produced from 3-mercaptopyruvate (3 MP) by 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST), in the brain. High performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FL) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses showed that H2S3 and H2S were produced from 3 MP in the brain cells of wild-type mice but not 3MST knockout (3MST-KO) mice. Purified recombinant 3MST and lysates of COS cells expressing 3MST produced H2S3 from 3 MP, while those expressing defective 3MST mutants did not. H2S3 was localized in the cytosol of cells. H2S3 was also produced from H2S by 3MST and rhodanese. H2S2 was identified as a minor H2Sn, and 3 MP did not affect the H2S5 level. The present study provides new insights into the physiology of H2S3 and H2S, as well as novel therapeutic targets for diseases in which these molecules are involved.

  17. Na2S, a fast-releasing H2S donor, given as suppository lowers blood pressure in rats.

    PubMed

    Tomasova, Lenka; Drapala, Adrian; Jurkowska, Halina; Wróbel, Maria; Ufnal, Marcin

    2017-04-19

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in blood pressure control. The available slow-releasing H2S-donors are poorly soluble in water and their ability to release H2S in biologically relevant amounts under physiological conditions is questionable. Therefore, new slow-releasing donors or new experimental approaches to fast-releasing H2S donors are needed. Hemodynamics and ECG were recorded in male, anesthetized Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) and in Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) at baseline and after: 1) intravenous (iv) infusion of vehicle or Na2S; 2) administration of vehicle suppositories or Na2S suppositories. Intravenously administered vehicle and vehicle suppositories did not affect mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and heart rate (HR). Na2S administered iv caused a significant, but transient (2-5min) decrease in MABP. Na2S suppositories produced a dose-dependent hypotensive response that lasted ∼45min in WKY and ∼75-80min in SHR. It was accompanied by a decrease in HR in WKY, and an increase in HR in SHR. Na2S suppositories did not produce a significant change in corrected QT, an indicator of cardiotoxicity. Na2S suppositories increased blood level of thiosulfates, products of H2S oxidation. Na2S administered in suppositories exerts a prolonged hypotensive effect in rats, with no apparent cardiotoxic effect. SHR and WKY differ in hemodynamic response to the H2S donor. Suppository formulation of fast-releasing H2S donors may be useful in research, if a reference slow-releasing H2S donor is not available. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. Pub1p C-terminal RRM domain interacts with Tif4631p through a conserved region neighbouring the Pab1p binding site.

    PubMed

    Santiveri, Clara M; Mirassou, Yasmina; Rico-Lastres, Palma; Martínez-Lumbreras, Santiago; Pérez-Cañadillas, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Pub1p, a highly abundant poly(A)+ mRNA binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, influences the stability and translational control of many cellular transcripts, particularly under some types of environmental stresses. We have studied the structure, RNA and protein recognition modes of different Pub1p constructs by NMR spectroscopy. The structure of the C-terminal RRM domain (RRM3) shows a non-canonical N-terminal helix that packs against the canonical RRM fold in an original fashion. This structural trait is conserved in Pub1p metazoan homologues, the TIA-1 family, defining a new class of RRM-type domains that we propose to name TRRM (TIA-1 C-terminal domain-like RRM). Pub1p TRRM and the N-terminal RRM1-RRM2 tandem bind RNA with high selectivity for U-rich sequences, with TRRM showing additional preference for UA-rich ones. RNA-mediated chemical shift changes map to β-sheet and protein loops in the three RRMs. Additionally, NMR titration and biochemical in vitro cross-linking experiments determined that Pub1p TRRM interacts specifically with the N-terminal region (1-402) of yeast eIF4G1 (Tif4631p), very likely through the conserved Box1, a short sequence motif neighbouring the Pab1p binding site in Tif4631p. The interaction involves conserved residues of Pub1p TRRM, which define a protein interface that mirrors the Pab1p-Tif4631p binding mode. Neither protein nor RNA recognition involves the novel N-terminal helix, whose functional role remains unclear. By integrating these new results with the current knowledge about Pub1p, we proposed different mechanisms of Pub1p recruitment to the mRNPs and Pub1p-mediated mRNA stabilization in which the Pub1p/Tif4631p interaction would play an important role.

  19. Smad3 deficiency leads to mandibular condyle degradation via the sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P3 signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hiroki; Izawa, Takashi; Tanaka, Eiji

    2015-10-01

    Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease that is characterized by permanent cartilage destruction. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β is one of the most abundant cytokines in the bone matrix and is shown to regulate the migration of osteoprogenitor cells. It is hypothesized that TGF-β/Smad3 signaling affects cartilage homeostasis by influencing sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor signaling and chondrocyte migration. We therefore investigated the molecular mechanisms by which crosstalk may occur between TGF-β/Smad3 and S1P/S1P receptor signaling to maintain condylar cartilage and to prevent temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis. Abnormalities in the condylar subchondral bone, including dynamic changes in bone mineral density and microstructure, were observed in Smad3(-/-) mice by microcomputed tomography. Cell-free regions and proteoglycan loss characterized the cartilage degradation present, and increased numbers of apoptotic chondrocytes and matrix metalloproteinase 13(+) chondrocytes were also detected. Furthermore, expression of S1P receptor 3 (S1P3), but not S1P1 or S1P2, was significantly down-regulated in the condylar cartilage of Smad3(-/-) mice. By using RNA interference technology and pharmacologic tools, S1P was found to transactivate Smad3 in an S1P3/TGF-β type II receptor-dependent manner, and S1P3 was found to be required for TGF-β-induced migration of chondrocyte cells and downstream signal transduction via Rac1, RhoA, and Cdc42. Taken together, these results indicate that the Smad3/S1P3 signaling pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis.

  20. Assembling carbon fiber-graphene-carbon fiber hetero-structures into 1D-2D-1D junction fillers and patterned structures for improved microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huimin; Liu, Lin; Li, Hai-Bing; Song, Wei-Li; Bian, Xing-Ming; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Chen, Mingji; Yuan, Xujin; Chen, Haosen; Fang, Daining

    2017-04-01

    Since carbon-based structures of various dimensions, including one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes, two-dimensional (2D) graphene and three-dimensional (3D) carbon foams, have attracted significant attention as microwave absorption fillers, we present an exceptional hetero-junction filler with a 1D-2D-1D feature, achieved by manipulating 2D graphene into 1D carbon fibers in the fiber-extruding process under the electric field. The as-fabricated 1D-2D-1D structural fillers exhibited much-improved dielectric properties and promoted microwave absorption performance in their composites, which is linked to the establishment of enhanced polarization capability, the generation of increased electric loss pathway and the creation of more favorable electromagnetic energy consumption conditions. The results suggest that employing 2D graphene in the 1D-2D-1D nanostructures played the critical role in tuning the electromagnetic response ability, because of its intrinsic electric advantages and dimensional features. To broaden the effective absorption bandwidth, periodic pattern-absorbing structures were designed, which showed combined absorption advantages for various thicknesses. Our strategy for fabricating 1D-2D-1D structural fillers illuminates a universal approach for manipulating dimensions and structures in the nanotechnology.

  1. Roles of TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 in insulin- and exercise-stimulated glucose transport of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cartee, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on two paralogue Rab GTPase activating proteins known as TBC1D1 Tre-2/BUB2/cdc 1 domain family (TBC1D) 1 and TBC1D4 (also called Akt Substrate of 160 kDa, AS160) and their roles in controlling skeletal muscle glucose transport in response to the independent and combined effects of insulin and exercise. Convincing evidence implicates Akt2-dependent TBC1D4 phosphorylation on T642 as a key part of the mechanism for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by skeletal muscle. TBC1D1 phosphorylation on several insulin-responsive sites (including T596, a site corresponding to T642 in TBC1D4) does not appear to be essential for in vivo insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by skeletal muscle. In vivo exercise or ex vivo contraction of muscle result in greater TBC1D1 phosphorylation on S237 that is likely to be secondary to increased AMP-activated protein kinase activity and potentially important for contraction-stimulated glucose uptake. Several studies that evaluated both normal and insulin-resistant skeletal muscle stimulated with a physiological insulin concentration after a single exercise session found that greater post-exercise insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was accompanied by greater TBC1D4 phosphorylation on several sites. In contrast, enhanced post-exercise insulin sensitivity was not accompanied by greater insulin-stimulated TBC1D1 phosphorylation. The mechanism for greater TBC1D4 phosphorylation in insulin-stimulated muscles after acute exercise is uncertain, and a causal link between enhanced TBC1D4 phosphorylation and increased post-exercise insulin sensitivity has yet to be established. In summary, TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 have important, but distinct roles in regulating muscle glucose transport in response to insulin and exercise.

  2. {sup 1}D states of the beryllium atom: Quantum mechanical nonrelativistic calculations employing explicitly correlated Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, Keeper L.; Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2011-10-15

    Very accurate finite-nuclear-mass variational nonrelativistic calculations are performed for the lowest five {sup 1}D states (1s{sup 2} 2p{sup 2}, 1s{sup 2} 2s{sup 1} 3d{sup 1}, 1s{sup 2} 2s{sup 1} 4d{sup 1}, 1s{sup 2} 2s{sup 1} 5d{sup 1}, and 1s{sup 2} 2s{sup 1} 6d{sup 1}) of the beryllium atom ({sup 9}Be). The wave functions of the states are expanded in terms of all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. The exponential parameters of the Gaussians are optimized using the variational method with the aid of the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to those parameters. The calculations exemplify the level of accuracy that is now possible with Gaussians in describing bound states of a four-electron system where some of the electrons are excited into higher angular states.

  3. Full pharmacological efficacy of a novel S1P1 agonist that does not require S1P-like head-group interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J.; Jo, Euijung; Sanna, M. Germana; Brown, Steven; Leaf, Nora; Marsolais, David; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Cameron, Michael; Guerrero, Miguel; Roberts, Edward; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for interactions of zwitterionic phosphate and amine groups in Sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) to conserved R and E residues present at the extracellular face of transmembrane-3 (TM3) of S1P receptors. The contribution of R120 and E121 for high affinity ligand-receptor interactions is essential, as single-point R120A or E121A S1P1 mutants neither bind S1P nor transduce S1P function. Because S1P receptors are therapeutically interesting, identifying potent selective agonists with different binding modes and in vivo efficacy is of pharmacological importance. Here we describe a modestly water-soluble highly-selective S1P1 agonist (CYM-5442) that does not require R120 or E121 residues for activating S1P1-dependent p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation, which defines a new hydrophobic pocket in S1P1. CYM-5442 is a full agonist in vitro for S1P1 internalization, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Importantly, CYM-5442 was a full agonist for induction and maintenance of S1P1-dependent lymphopenia, decreasing B-lymphocytes by 65% and T-lymphocytes by 85% of vehicle. Induction of CYM-5442 lymphopenia was dose and time-dependent, requiring serum concentrations in the 50 nM range. In vitro measures of S1P1 activation by CYM-5442 were non-competitively inhibited by a specific S1P1 antagonist (W146), competitive for S1P, FTY720-P and SEW2871. In addition, lymphopenia by CYM-5442 was reversed by W146 administration or upon pharmacokinetic agonist clearance. Pharmacokinetics in mice also indicated that CYM-5442 partitions significantly in central nervous tissue. These data show that CYM-5442 activates S1P1-dependent pathways in vitro and to levels of full efficacy in vivo through a hydrophobic pocket, separable from the orthosteric site of S1P binding that is headgroup dependent. PMID:18708635

  4. Ligand-binding pocket shape differences between S1P1 and S1P3 determine efficiency of chemical probe identification by uHTS

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, Stephan C.; Brown, Steven J.; Cabrera, Pedro Gonzales; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Jo, Euijung; Chase, Peter; Spicer, Tim; Hodder, Peter; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor system to better understand why certain molecular targets within a closely related family are much more tractable when identifying compelling chemical leads. Five medically important G protein-coupled receptors for S1P regulate heart rate, coronary artery caliber, endothelial barrier integrity, and lymphocyte trafficking. Selective S1P receptor agonist probes would be of great utility to study receptor subtype-specific function. Through systematic screening of the same libraries, we identified novel selective agonists chemotypes for each of the S1P1 and S1P3 receptors. uHTS for S1P1 was more effective than for S1P3, with many selective, low nanomolar hits of proven mechanism emerging for. Receptor structure modeling and ligand docking reveal differences between the receptor binding pockets, which are the basis for sub-type selectivity. Novel selective agonists interact primarily in the hydrophobic pocket of the receptor in the absence of head-group interactions. Chemistry-space and shape-based analysis of the screening libraries in combination with the binding models explain the observed differential hit rates and enhanced efficiency for lead discovery for S1P1 vs. S1P3 in this closely related receptor family. PMID:18590333

  5. Bms1p, a G-domain-containing protein, associates with Rcl1p and is required for 18S rRNA biogenesis in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Wegierski, T; Billy, E; Nasr, F; Filipowicz, W

    2001-01-01

    Maturation of 18S rRNA and biogenesis of the 40S ribosomes in yeast requires a large number of trans-acting factors, including the U3 small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (U3 snoRNP), and the recently characterized cyclase-like protein Rcl1p. U3 snoRNP is a key particle orchestrating early 35S rRNA cleavage events. A unique property of Rcl1p is that it specifically associates with U3 snoRNP, but this association appears to occur only at the level of nascent ribosomes and not with the U3 monoparticle. Here we report the characterization of Bms1p, a protein that associates with Rcl1p in multiple structures, including a specific complex sedimenting at around 10S. Like Rcl1p, Bms1p is an essential, evolutionarily conserved, nucleolar protein, and its depletion interferes with processing of the 35S pre-rRNA at sites A0, A1, and A2, and the formation of 40S subunits. The N-terminal domain of Bms1p has structural features found in regulatory GTPases and we demonstrate that mutations of amino acids implicated in GTP/GDP binding affect Bms1p activity in vivo. The results indicate that Bms1p may act as a molecular switch during maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit in the nucleolus. PMID:11565748

  6. Hydrogen polysulfide (H2S n ) signaling along with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO).

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hideo

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a physiological mediator with various roles, including neuro-modulation, vascular tone regulation, and cytoprotection against ischemia-reperfusion injury, angiogenesis, and oxygen sensing. Hydrogen polysulfide (H2S n ), which possesses a higher number of sulfur atoms than H2S, recently emerged as a potential signaling molecule that regulates the activity of ion channels, a tumor suppressor, transcription factors, and protein kinases. Some of the previously reported effects of H2S are now attributed to the more potent H2S n . H2S n is produced by 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST) from 3-mercaptopyruvate (3MP) and is generated by the chemical interaction of H2S with nitric oxide (NO). H2S n sulfhydrates (sulfurates) cysteine residues of target proteins and modifies their activity, whereas H2S sulfurates oxidized cysteine residues as well as reduces cysteine disulfide bonds. This review focuses on the recent progress made in studies concerning the production and physiological roles of H2S n and H2S.

  7. Modeling of H2S migration through landfill cover materials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiyong; Powell, Jon; Jain, Pradeep; Townsend, Timothy

    2014-01-15

    The emission of H2S from landfills in the United States is an emergent problem because measured concentrations within the waste mass and in ambient air have been observed at potentially unsafe levels for on-site workers and at levels that can cause a nuisance and potentially deleterious health impacts to surrounding communities. Though recent research has provided data on H2S concentrations that may be observed at landfills, facility operators and landfill engineers have limited predictive tools to anticipate and plan for potentially harmful H2S emissions. A one-dimensional gas migration model was developed to assist engineers and practitioners better evaluate and predict potential emission levels of H2S based on four factors: concentration of H2S below the landfill surface (C0), advection velocity (v), H2S effective diffusion coefficient (D), and H2S adsorption coefficient of landfill cover soil (μ). Model simulations indicated that H2S migration into the atmosphere can be mitigated by reducing H2S diffusion and advection or using alternative cover soils with a high H2S adsorption coefficient. Laboratory column experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the four parameters on H2S migration in cover soils and to calculate the adsorption coefficient of different cover materials. The model was validated by comparing results with laboratory column experiments. Based on the results, the laboratory column provides an effective way to estimate the H2S adsorption coefficient, which can then be incorporated into the developed model to predict the depth of cover soil required to reduce emitted H2S concentrations below a desired level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Working with "H2S": facts and apparent artifacts.

    PubMed

    Wedmann, Rudolf; Bertlein, Sarah; Macinkovic, Igor; Böltz, Sebastian; Miljkovic, Jan Lj; Muñoz, Luis E; Herrmann, Martin; Filipovic, Milos R

    2014-09-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important signaling molecule with physiological endpoints similar to those of nitric oxide (NO). Growing interest in its physiological roles and pharmacological potential has led to large sets of contradictory data. The principle cause of these discrepancies can be the common neglect of some of the basic H2S chemistry. This study investigates how the experimental outcome when working with H2S depends on its source and dose and the methodology employed. We show that commercially available NaHS should be avoided and that traces of metal ions should be removed because these can reduce intramolecular disulfides and change protein structure. Furthermore, high H2S concentrations may lead to a complete inhibition of cell respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and superoxide generation, which should be considered when discussing the biological effects observed upon treatment with high concentrations of H2S. In addition, we provide chemical evidence that H2S can directly react with superoxide. H2S is also capable of reducing cytochrome c(3+) with the concomitant formation of superoxide. H2S does not directly react with nitrite but with NO electrodes that detect H2S. In addition, H2S interferes with the Griess reaction and should therefore be removed from the solution by Cd(2+) or Zn(2+) precipitation prior to nitrite quantification. 2-Phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO) is reduced by H2S, and its use should be avoided in combination with H2S. All these constraints must be taken into account when working with H2S to ensure valid data.

  9. Energy eigenfunctions of the 1D Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marojević, Želimir; Göklü, Ertan; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2013-08-01

    We developed a new and powerful algorithm by which numerical solutions for excited states in a gravito-optical surface trap have been obtained. They represent solutions in the regime of strong nonlinearities of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. In this context we also briefly review several approaches which allow, in principle, for calculating excited state solutions. It turns out that without modifications these are not applicable to strongly nonlinear Gross-Pitaevskii equations. The importance of studying excited states of Bose-Einstein condensates is also underlined by a recent experiment of Bücker et al. in which vibrational state inversion of a Bose-Einstein condensate has been achieved by transferring the entire population of the condensate to the first excited state. Here we focus on demonstrating the applicability of our algorithm for three different potentials by means of numerical results for the energy eigenstates and eigenvalues of the 1D Gross-Pitaevskii-equation. We compare the numerically found solutions and find out that they completely agree with the case of known analytical solutions.

  10. Low complexity 1D IDCT for 16-bit parallel architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivolarski, Lazar

    2007-09-01

    This paper shows that using the Loeffler, Ligtenberg, and Moschytz factorization of 8-point IDCT [2] one-dimensional (1-D) algorithm as a fast approximation of the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and using only 16 bit numbers, it is possible to create in an IEEE 1180-1990 compliant and multiplierless algorithm with low computational complexity. This algorithm as characterized by its structure is efficiently implemented on parallel high performance architectures as well as due to its low complexity is sufficient for wide range of other architectures. Additional constraint on this work was the requirement of compliance with the existing MPEG standards. The hardware implementation complexity and low resources where also part of the design criteria for this algorithm. This implementation is also compliant with the precision requirements described in MPEG IDCT precision specification ISO/IEC 23002-1. Complexity analysis is performed as an extension to the simple measure of shifts and adds for the multiplierless algorithm as additional operations are included in the complexity measure to better describe the actual transform implementation complexity.

  11. 1-D Modeling of Massive Particle Injection (MPI) in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Parks, P. B.; Izzo, V. A.

    2008-11-01

    A 1-D Fast Current Quench (FCQ) model is developed to study current evolution and runaway electron suppression under massive density increase. The model consists of coupled toroidal electric field and energy equations, and it is solved numerically for DIII-D and ITER operating conditions. Simulation results suggest that fast shutdown by D2 liquid jet/pellet injection is in principle achievable for the desired plasma cooling time (˜15 ms for DIII-D and ˜50 ms for ITER) under ˜150x or higher densification. The current density and pressure profile are practically unaltered during the initial phase of jet propagation when dilution cooling dominates. With subsequent radiation cooling, the densified discharge enters the strongly collisional regime where Pfirsch-Schluter thermal diffusion can inhibit current contraction on the magnetic axis. Often the 1/1 kink instability, addressed by Kadomtsev's magnetic reconnection model, can be prevented. Our results are compared with NIMROD simulations in which the plasma is suddenly densified by ˜100x and experiences instantaneous dilution cooling, allowing for use of actual (lower) Lundquist numbers.

  12. Dynamic decoupling in the presence of 1D random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Arnab; Chakraborty, Ipsita; Bhattacharyya, Rangeet

    2016-05-01

    In the recent past, many dynamic decoupling sequences have been proposed for the suppression of decoherence of spins connected to thermal baths of various natures. Dynamic decoupling schemes for suppressing decoherence due to Gaussian diffusion have also been developed. In this work, we study the relative performances of dynamic decoupling schemes in the presence of a non-stationary Gaussian noise such as a 1D random walk. Frequency domain analysis is not suitable to determine the performances of various dynamic decoupling schemes in suppressing decoherence due to such a process. Thus, in this work, we follow a time domain calculation to arrive at the following conclusions: in the presence of such a noise, we show that (i) the traditional Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence outperforms Uhrig’s dynamic decoupling scheme, (ii) CPMG remains the optimal sequence for suppression of decoherence due to random walk in the presence of an external field gradient. Later, the theoretical predictions are experimentally verified by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on spin 1/2 particles diffusing in a liquid medium.

  13. 1D X-ray Beam Compressing Monochromators

    SciTech Connect

    Korytar, D.; Dobrocka, E.; Konopka, P.; Zaprazny, Z.; Ferrari, C.; Mikulik, P.; Vagovic, P.; Ac, V.; Erko, A.; Abrosimov, N.

    2010-04-06

    A total beam compression of 5 and 10 corresponding to the asymmetry angles of 9 deg. and 12 deg. is achieved with V-5 and V-10 monochromators, respectively, in standard single crystal pure germanium (220) X-ray beam compressing (V-shaped) monochromators for CuKalpha{sub 1} radiation. A higher 1D compression of X-ray beam is possible using larger angles of asymmetry, however it is achieved at the expense of the total intensity, which is decreased due to the refraction effect. To increase the monochromator intensity, several ways are considered both theoretically and experimentally. Linearly graded germanium rich Ge{sub x}Si{sub (1-x)} single crystal was used to prepare a V-21 single crystal monochromator with 15 deg. asymmetry angles (compression factor of 21). Its temperature gradient version is discussed for CuKalpha{sub 1} radiation. X-ray diffraction measurements on the graded GeSi monochromator showed more than 3-times higher intensity at the output compared with that of a pure Ge monochromator.

  14. An implicit solver for 1D arterial network models.

    PubMed

    Carson, Jason; Van Loon, Raoul

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the 1D blood flow equations are solved using a newly proposed enhanced trapezoidal rule method (ETM), which is an extension to the simplified trapezoidal rule method. At vessel junctions, the conservation of mass and conservation of total pressure are held as system constraints using Lagrange multipliers that can be physically interpreted as external flow rates. The ETM scheme is compared with published arterial network benchmark problems and a dam break problem. Strengths of the ETM scheme include being simple to implement, intuitive connection to lumped parameter models, and no restrictive stability criteria such as the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) number. The ETM scheme does not require the use of characteristics at vessel junctions, or for inlet and outlet boundary conditions. The ETM forms an implicit system of equations, which requires only one global solve per time step for pressure, followed by flow rate update on the elemental system of equations; thus, no iterations are required per time step. Consistent results are found for all benchmark cases, and for a 56-vessel arterial network problem, it gives very satisfactory solutions at a spatial and time discretization that results in a maximum CFL of 3, taking 4.44 seconds per cardiac cycle. By increasing the time step and element size to produce a maximum CFL number of 15, the method takes only 0.39 second per cardiac cycle with only a small compromise on accuracy. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Control and imaging of O(1D2) precession.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiou-Min; Radenovic, Dragana Č; van der Zande, Wim J; Groenenboom, Gerrit C; Parker, David H; Vallance, Claire; Zare, Richard N

    2011-01-01

    Larmor precession of a quantum mechanical angular momentum vector about an applied magnetic field forms the basis for a range of magnetic resonance techniques, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging. We have used a polarized laser pump-probe scheme with velocity-map imaging detection to visualize, for the first time, the precessional motion of a quantum mechanical angular momentum vector. Photodissociation of O(2) at 157 nm provides a clean source of fast-moving O((1)D(2)) atoms, with their electronic angular momentum vector strongly aligned perpendicular to the recoil direction. In the presence of an external magnetic field, the distribution of atomic angular momenta precesses about the field direction, and polarization-sensitive images of the atomic scattering distribution recorded as a function of field strength yield 'time-lapse-photography' style movies of the precessional motion. We present movies recorded in various experimental geometries, and discuss potential consequences and applications in atmospheric chemistry and reaction dynamics.

  16. 1-D Numerical Analysis of RBCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1998-01-01

    An RBCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engines into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Considerable research pertaining to RBCC propulsion was performed during the 1960's and these engines were revisited recently as a candidate propulsion system for either a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) or two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) launch vehicle. There are a variety of RBCC configurations that had been evaluated and new designs are currently under development. However, the basic configuration of all RBCC systems is built around the ejector scramjet engine originally developed for the hypersonic airplane. In this configuration, a rocket engine plays as an ejector in the air-augmented initial acceleration mode, as a fuel injector in scramjet mode and the rocket in all rocket mode for orbital insertion. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in RBCC propulsion systems. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic RBCC engine following a flight path.

  17. Cavitation Influence in 1D Part-load Vortex Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörfler, P. K.

    2016-11-01

    Residual swirl in the draft tube of Francis turbines may cause annoying low- frequency pulsation of pressure and power output, in particular during part-load operation. A 1D analytical model for these dynamic phenomena would enable simulation by some conventional method for computing hydraulic transients. The proper structure of such a model has implications for the prediction of prototype behaviour based on laboratory tests. The source of excitation as well as the dynamic transmission behaviour of the draft tube flow may both be described either by lumped or distributed parameters. The distributed version contains more information and, due to limited possibilities of identification, some data must be estimated. The distributed cavitation compliance is an example for this dilemma. In recent publications, the customary assumption of a constant wave speed has produced dubious results. The paper presents a more realistic model for distributed compressibility. The measured influence of the Thoma number is applied with the local cavitation factor. This concept is less sensitive to modelling errors and explains both the Thoma and Froude number influence. The possible effect of the normally unknown non-condensable gas content in the vortex cavity is shortly commented. Its measurement in future tests is recommended. It is also recommended to check the available analytical vortex models for possible dispersion effects.

  18. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) carrier-dependent regulation of endothelial barrier: high density lipoprotein (HDL)-S1P prolongs endothelial barrier enhancement as compared with albumin-S1P via effects on levels, trafficking, and signaling of S1P1.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Brent A; Grass, G Daniel; Wing, Shane B; Argraves, W Scott; Argraves, Kelley M

    2012-12-28

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a blood-borne lysosphingolipid that acts to promote endothelial cell (EC) barrier function. In plasma, S1P is associated with both high density lipoproteins (HDL) and albumin, but it is not known whether the carriers impart different effects on S1P signaling. Here we establish that HDL-S1P sustains EC barrier longer than albumin-S1P. We showed that the sustained barrier effects of HDL-S1P are dependent on signaling by the S1P receptor, S1P1, and involve persistent activation of Akt and endothelial NOS (eNOS), as well as activity of the downstream NO target, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Total S1P1 protein levels were found to be higher in response to HDL-S1P treatment as compared with albumin-S1P, and this effect was not associated with increased S1P1 mRNA or dependent on de novo protein synthesis. Several pieces of evidence indicate that long term EC barrier enhancement activity of HDL-S1P is due to specific effects on S1P1 trafficking. First, the rate of S1P1 degradation, which is proteasome-mediated, was slower in HDL-S1P-treated cells as compared with cells treated with albumin-S1P. Second, the long term barrier-promoting effects of HDL-S1P were abrogated by treatment with the recycling blocker, monensin. Finally, cell surface levels of S1P1 and levels of S1P1 in caveolin-enriched microdomains were higher after treatment with HDL-S1P as compared with albumin-S1P. Together, the findings reveal S1P carrier-specific effects on S1P1 and point to HDL as the physiological mediator of sustained S1P1-PI3K-Akt-eNOS-sGC-dependent EC barrier function.

  19. HDL-associated ApoM is anti-apoptotic by delivering sphingosine 1-phosphate to S1P1 & S1P3 receptors on vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Mario; Okada, Hiromi; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2017-02-08

    High-density Lipoprotein (HDL) attenuates endothelial cell apoptosis induced by different cell-death stimuli such as oxidation or growth factor deprivation. HDL is the main plasma carrier of the bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which it is a signaling molecule that promotes cell survival in response to several apoptotic stimuli. In HDL, S1P is bound to Apolipoprotein M (ApoM), a Lipocalin that is only present in around 5% of the HDL particles. The goal of this study is to characterize ApoM-bound S1P role in endothelial apoptosis protection and the signaling pathways involved. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultures were switched to serum/grow factor deprivation medium to induce apoptosis and the effect caused by the addition of ApoM and S1P analyzed. The addition of HDL(+ApoM) or recombinant ApoM-bound S1P promoted cell viability and blocked apoptosis, whereas HDL(-ApoM) had no protective effect. Remarkably, S1P exerted a more potent anti-apoptotic effect when carried by ApoM as compared to albumin, or when added as free molecule. Mechanistically, cooperation between S1P1 and S1P3 was required for the HDL/ApoM/S1P-mediated anti-apoptotic ability. Furthermore, AKT and ERK phosphorylation was also necessary to achieve the anti-apoptotic effect of the HDL/ApoM/S1P complex. Altogether, our results indicate that ApoM and S1P are key elements of the anti-apoptotic activity of HDL and promote optimal endothelial function.

  20. SUN Family Proteins Sun4p, Uth1p and Sim1p Are Secreted from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Produced Dependently on Oxygen Level

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Kučerová, Helena; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2013-01-01

    The SUN family is comprised of proteins that are conserved among various yeasts and fungi, but that are absent in mammals and plants. Although the function(s) of these proteins are mostly unknown, they have been linked to various, often unrelated cellular processes such as those connected to mitochondrial and cell wall functions. Here we show that three of the four Saccharomyces cerevisiae SUN family proteins, Uth1p, Sim1p and Sun4p, are efficiently secreted out of the cells in different growth phases and their production is affected by the level of oxygen. The Uth1p, Sim1p, Sun4p and Nca3p are mostly synthesized during the growth phase of both yeast liquid cultures and colonies. Culture transition to slow-growing or stationary phases is linked with a decreased cellular concentration of Sim1p and Sun4p and with their efficient release from the cells. In contrast, Uth1p is released mainly from growing cells. The synthesis of Uth1p and Sim1p, but not of Sun4p, is repressed by anoxia. All four proteins confer cell sensitivity to zymolyase. In addition, Uth1p affects cell sensitivity to compounds influencing cell wall composition and integrity (such as Calcofluor white and Congo red) differently when growing on fermentative versus respiratory carbon sources. In contrast, Uth1p is essential for cell resistance to boric acids irrespective of carbon source. In summary, our novel findings support the hypothesis that SUN family proteins are involved in the remodeling of the yeast cell wall during the various phases of yeast culture development and under various environmental conditions. The finding that Uth1p is involved in cell sensitivity to boric acid, i.e. to a compound that is commonly used as an important antifungal in mycoses, opens up new possibilities of investigating the mechanisms of boric acid’s action. PMID:24040106

  1. A Prokaryotic S1P Lyase Degrades Extracellular S1P In Vitro and In Vivo: Implication for Treating Hyperproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Huwiler, Andrea; Bourquin, Florence; Kotelevets, Nataliya; Pastukhov, Oleksandr; Capitani, Guido; Grütter, Markus G.; Zangemeister-Wittke, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates a broad spectrum of fundamental cellular processes like proliferation, death, migration and cytokine production. Therefore, elevated levels of S1P may be causal to various pathologic conditions including cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and aberrant angiogenesis. Here we report that S1P lyase from the prokaryote Symbiobacterium thermophilum (StSPL) degrades extracellular S1P in vitro and in blood. Moreover, we investigated its effect on cellular responses typical of fibrosis, cancer and aberrant angiogenesis using renal mesangial cells, endothelial cells, breast (MCF-7) and colon (HCT 116) carcinoma cells as disease models. In all cell types, wild-type StSPL, but not an inactive mutant, disrupted MAPK phosphorylation stimulated by exogenous S1P. Functionally, disruption of S1P receptor signaling by S1P depletion inhibited proliferation and expression of connective tissue growth factor in mesangial cells, proliferation, migration and VEGF expression in carcinoma cells, and proliferation and migration of endothelial cells. Upon intravenous injection of StSPL in mice, plasma S1P levels rapidly declined by 70% within 1 h and then recovered to normal 6 h after injection. Using the chicken chorioallantoic membrane model we further demonstrate that also under in vivo conditions StSPL, but not the inactive mutant, inhibited tumor cell-induced angiogenesis as an S1P-dependent process. Our data demonstrate that recombinant StSPL is active under extracellular conditions and holds promise as a new enzyme therapeutic for diseases associated with increased levels of S1P and S1P receptor signaling. PMID:21829623

  2. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists mediate pro-fibrotic responses in normal human lung fibroblasts via S1P2 and S1P3 receptors and Smad-independent signaling.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Katrin; Menyhart, Katalin; Killer, Nina; Renault, Bérengère; Bauer, Yasmina; Studer, Rolf; Steiner, Beat; Bolli, Martin H; Nayler, Oliver; Gatfield, John

    2013-05-24

    Synthetic sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 modulators constitute a new class of drugs for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling, however, is also involved in the development of fibrosis. Using normal human lung fibroblasts, we investigated the induction of fibrotic responses by the S1P receptor (S1PR) agonists S1P, FTY720-P, ponesimod, and SEW2871 and compared them with the responses induced by the known fibrotic mediator TGF-β1. In contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not induce expression of the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin. However, TGF-β1, S1P, and FTY720-P caused robust stimulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and increased pro-fibrotic marker gene expression including connective tissue growth factor. Ponesimod showed limited and SEW2871 showed no pro-fibrotic potential in these readouts. Analysis of pro-fibrotic signaling pathways showed that in contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not activate Smad2/3 signaling but rather activated PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling to induce ECM synthesis. The strong induction of ECM synthesis by the nonselective agonists S1P and FTY720-P was due to the stimulation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptors, whereas the weaker induction of ECM synthesis at high concentrations of ponesimod was due to a low potency activation of S1P3 receptors. Finally, in normal human lung fibroblast-derived myofibroblasts that were generated by TGF-β1 pretreatment, S1P and FTY720-P were effective stimulators of ECM synthesis, whereas ponesimod was inactive, because of the down-regulation of S1P3R expression in myofibroblasts. These data demonstrate that S1PR agonists are pro-fibrotic via S1P2R and S1P3R stimulation using Smad-independent pathways.

  3. Synthesis and Functions of Ag2S Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chunyan; Li, Xiaoru; Liu, Jixian; Hou, Yongchao; Zhao, Yuqing; Zhong, Guocheng

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents a review about synthesis and applications of Ag2S nanostructures. As the modern photoelectric and biological materials, Ag2S nanomaterials are potentially useful for both structure and function purposes. Ag2S is a direction narrow band gap semiconductor with special properties. Ag2S nanostructures have been widely researched in chemistry and biochemistry fields because of their unusual optical, electrical, and mechanical properties. It can also be used in many fields, such as photovoltaic cells and infrared detector. In the past few years, Ag2S nanostructures have been synthesized by various methods. The article mainly discusses the four types of preparation methods. Moreover, this article shows a detailed review on the new properties, fabrication, and applications of Ag2S nanocrystals.

  4. The yeast dynamin-related GTPase Vps1p functions in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton via interaction with Sla1p.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xianwen; Cai, Mingjie

    2004-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the function of the large GTPase dynamin in endocytosis in mammalian cells may comprise a modulation of actin cytoskeleton. The role of dynamin in actin cytoskeleton organization in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has remained undefined. In this report, we found that one of the yeast dynamin-related proteins, Vps1p, is required for normal actin cytoskeleton organization. At both permissive and non-permissive temperatures, the vps1 mutants exhibited various degrees of phenotypes commonly associated with actin cytoskeleton defects: depolarized and aggregated actin structures, hypersensitivity to the actin cytoskeleton toxin latrunculin-A, randomized bud site selection and chitin deposition, and impaired efficiency in the internalization of membrane receptors. Over-expression of the GTPase mutants of vps1 also led to actin abnormalities. Consistent with these actin-related defects, Vps1p was found to interact physically, and partially co-localize, with the actin-regulatory protein Sla1p. The normal cellular localization of Sla1p required Vps1p and could be altered by over-expression of a region of Vps1p that was involved in the interaction with Sla1p. The same region also promoted mis-sorting of the vacuolar protein carboxypeptidase Y upon over-expression. These findings suggest that the functions of the dynamin-related protein Vps1p in actin cytoskeleton dynamics and vacuolar protein sorting are probably related to each other.

  5. Identification and subcellular localization of a novel mammalian dynamin-related protein homologous to yeast Vps1p and Dnm1p.

    PubMed

    Shin, H W; Shinotsuka, C; Torii, S; Murakami, K; Nakayama, K

    1997-09-01

    The dynamin family of GTP-binding proteins are implicated in vesicular transport. These include mammalian dynamins I, II, III, and yeast Vps1p and Dnm1p. Dynamin is involved in the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles at the plasma membrane. On the other hand, Vps1p and Dnm1p appear to be involved in transport from the late Golgi compartment to vacuoles and in an endocytic process, respectively. In this study, we identified a novel human protein, named Dnm1p/Vps1p-like protein (DVLP). It resembled more closely Dnm1p and Vps1p than dynamins not only in the primary structure but also in the domain organization. DVLP mRNA was expressed ubiquitously, suggesting that this protein plays a fundamental role in cellular function. Immunofluorescence analysis of cells expressing epitope-tagged DVLP revealed that it showed a diffused perinuclear staining pattern that was not superimposed on that of the marker protein for the Golgi apparatus, trans-Golgi network, lysosomes, endosomes, or endoplasmic reticulum. These data suggest that DVLP is not involved in the formation of known coated vesicles.

  6. Observations of the H2S toward OMC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minh, Y. C.; Irvine, W. M.; Mcgonagle, D.; Ziurys, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the 1(10) - 1(01) transition of interstellar H2S and its isotopes toward OMC-1 are reported. The fractional abundance of H2S in the quiescent regions of OMC-1 seems difficult to explain by currently known ion-molecular reactions. The fractional abundance of H2S relative to H2 is enhanced by a factor of 1000 in the hot core and the plateau relative to the quiescent clouds. The (HDS)/(H2S) abundance ratio in the hot core is estimated at 0.02 or less.

  7. H2S and Blood Vessels: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guangdong; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The physiological and biomedical importance of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been fully recognized in the cardiovascular system as well as in the rest of the body. In blood vessels, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) is a major H2S-producing enzyme expressed in both smooth muscle and endothelium as well as periadventitial adipose tissues. Regulation of H2S production from CSE is controlled by a complex integration of transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational mechanisms in blood vessels. In smooth muscle cells, H2S regulates cell apoptosis, phenotypic switch, relaxation and contraction, and calcification. In endothelial cells, H2S controls cell proliferation, cellular senescence, oxidative stress, inflammation, etc. H2S interacts with nitric oxide and acts as an endothelium-derived relaxing factor and an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. H2S generated from periadventitial adipose tissues acts as an adipocyte-derived relaxing factor and modulates the vascular tone. Extensive evidence has demonstrated the beneficial roles of the CSE/H2S system in various blood vessel diseases, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and aortic aneurysm. The important roles signaling in the cardiovascular system merit further intensive and extensive investigation. H2S-releasing agents and CSE activators will find their great applications in the prevention and treatment of blood vessel-related disorders.

  8. Observations of the H2S toward OMC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minh, Y. C.; Irvine, W. M.; Mcgonagle, D.; Ziurys, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the 1(10) - 1(01) transition of interstellar H2S and its isotopes toward OMC-1 are reported. The fractional abundance of H2S in the quiescent regions of OMC-1 seems difficult to explain by currently known ion-molecular reactions. The fractional abundance of H2S relative to H2 is enhanced by a factor of 1000 in the hot core and the plateau relative to the quiescent clouds. The (HDS)/(H2S) abundance ratio in the hot core is estimated at 0.02 or less.

  9. H2S: a novel gasotransmitter that signals by sulfhydration

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Bindu D.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a member of the growing family of gasotransmitters. Once regarded as a noxious molecule predominantly present in the atmosphere, H2S is now known to be synthesized endogenously in mammals. H2S participates in a myriad of physiological processes ranging from regulation of blood pressure to neuroprotection. Its chemical nature precludes H2S from being stored in vesicles and acting on receptor proteins in the fashion of other chemical messengers. Thus, novel cellular mechanisms have evolved to mediate its effects. This article focuses on sulfhydration (or persulfidation), which appears to be the principal post-translational modification elicited by H2S. PMID:26439534

  10. Restrained dark U (1 )d at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Fagner C.; Fajfer, Svjetlana

    2016-12-01

    We investigate a spontaneously broken U (1 )d gauge symmetry with a muon-specific dark Higgs. Our first goal is to verify how the presence of a new dark Higgs, ϕ , and a dark gauge boson, V , can simultaneously face the anomalies from the muon magnetic moment and the proton charge radius. Second, by assuming that V must decay to an electron-positron pair, we explore the corresponding parameter space determined with the low-energy constraints coming from K →μ X , electron (g -2 )e, K →μ νμe+e-, K →μ νμμ+μ-, and τ →ντμ νμe+e-. We focus on the scenario where the V mass is below ˜2 mμ and the ϕ mass runs from few MeV to 250 MeV, with V -photon mixing of the order ˜O (10-3). Among weak process at low energies, we check the influence of the new light vector on kaon decays as well as on the scattering e+e-→μ+μ-e+e- and discuss the impact of the dark Higgs on e+e-→μ+μ-μ+μ-. Finally, we consider contributions of the V -photon mixing in the decays π0→γ e+e-, η →γ e+e-, ρ →π e+e-, K*→K e+e-, and ϕ (1020 )→η e+e-.

  11. Evidence against dopamine D1/D2 receptor heteromers

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, Aliya L.; Yano, Hideaki; Trifilieff, Pierre; Vishwasrao, Harshad D.; Biezonski, Dominik; Mészáros, József; Sibley, David R.; Kellendonk, Christoph; Sonntag, Kai C.; Graham, Devon L.; Colbran, Roger J.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Javitch, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Hetero-oligomers of G-protein-coupled receptors have become the subject of intense investigation because their purported potential to manifest signaling and pharmacological properties that differ from the component receptors makes them highly attractive for the development of more selective pharmacological treatments. In particular, dopamine D1 and D2 receptors have been proposed to form hetero-oligomers that couple to Gαq proteins, and SKF83959 has been proposed to act as a biased agonist that selectively engages these receptor complexes to activate Gαq and thus phospholipase C. D1/D2 heteromers have been proposed as relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of depression and schizophrenia. We used in vitro bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), ex vivo analyses of receptor localization and proximity in brain slices, and behavioral assays in mice to characterize signaling from these putative dimers/oligomers. We were unable to detect Gαq or Gα11 protein coupling to homomers or heteromers of D1 or D2 receptors using a variety of biosensors. SKF83959-induced locomotor and grooming behaviors were eliminated in D1 receptor knockout mice, verifying a key role for D1-like receptor activation. In contrast, SKF83959-induced motor responses were intact in D2 receptor and Gαq knockout mice, as well as in knock-in mice expressing a mutant Ala286-CaMKIIα, that cannot autophosphorylate to become active. Moreover, we found that in the shell of the nucleus accumbens, even in neurons in which D1 and D2 receptor promoters are both active, the receptor proteins are segregated and do not form complexes. These data are not compatible with SKF83959 signaling through Gαq or through a D1–D2 heteromer and challenge the existence of such a signaling complex in the adult animals that we used for our studies. PMID:25560761

  12. A new general 1-D vadose zone flow solution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Fred L.; Lai, Wencong; Steinke, Robert C.; Zhu, Jianting; Talbot, Cary A.; Wilson, John L.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed an alternative to the one-dimensional partial differential equation (PDE) attributed to Richards (1931) that describes unsaturated porous media flow in homogeneous soil layers. Our solution is a set of three ordinary differential equations (ODEs) derived from unsaturated flux and mass conservation principles. We used a hodograph transformation, the Method of Lines, and a finite water-content discretization to produce ODEs that accurately simulate infiltration, falling slugs, and groundwater table dynamic effects on vadose zone fluxes. This formulation, which we refer to as "finite water-content", simulates sharp fronts and is guaranteed to conserve mass using a finite-volume solution. Our ODE solution method is explicitly integrable, does not require iterations and therefore has no convergence limits and is computationally efficient. The method accepts boundary fluxes including arbitrary precipitation, bare soil evaporation, and evapotranspiration. The method can simulate heterogeneous soils using layers. Results are presented in terms of fluxes and water content profiles. Comparing our method against analytical solutions, laboratory data, and the Hydrus-1D solver, we find that predictive performance of our finite water-content ODE method is comparable to or in some cases exceeds that of the solution of Richards' equation, with or without a shallow water table. The presented ODE method is transformative in that it offers accuracy comparable to the Richards (1931) PDE numerical solution, without the numerical complexity, in a form that is robust, continuous, and suitable for use in large watershed and land-atmosphere simulation models, including regional-scale models of coupled climate and hydrology.

  13. Modeling shear band interaction in 1D torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda; Hanina, Erez

    2017-01-01

    When two shear bands are being formed at close distance from each other they interact, and further development of one of them may be quenched down. As a result there should be a minimum distance between shear bands. In the literature there are at least three analytical models for this minimum distance. Predictions of these models do not generally agree with each other and with test results. Recently we developed a 1D numerical scheme to predict the formation of shear bands in a torsion test of a thin walled pipe. We validated our code by reproducing results of the pioneering experiments of Marchand and Duffy, and then used it to investigate the mechanics of shear localization and shear band formation. We describe our shear band code in a separate publication, and here we use it only as a tool to investigate the interaction between two neighboring shear bands during the process of their formation. We trigger the formation of shear bands by specifying two perturbations of the initial strength. We vary the perturbations in terms of their amplitude and/or their width. Usually, the stronger perturbation triggers a faster developing shear band, which then prevails and quenches the development of the other shear band. We change the distance between the two shear bands and find, that up to a certain distance one of the shear bands becomes fully developed, and the other stays only partially developed. Beyond this distance the two shear bands are both fully developed. Finally, we check the influence of certain material and loading parameters on the interaction between the two shear bands, and compare the results to predictions of the analytical models from the literature.

  14. Nonlinear electrical conductivity in a 1D granular medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcon, E.; Castaing, B.; Creyssels, M.

    2004-04-01

    We report on observations of the electrical transport within a chain of metallic beads (slightly oxidized) under an applied stress. A transition from an insulating to a conductive state is observed as the applied current is increased. The voltage-current ( U- I) characteristics are nonlinear and hysteretic, and saturate to a low voltage per contact (0.4 V). Our 1D experiment allows us to understand phenomena (such as the “Branly effect”) related to this conduction transition by focusing on the nature of the contacts instead of the structure of the granular network. We show that this transition comes from an electro-thermal coupling in the vicinity of the microcontacts between each bead - the current flowing through these contact points generates their local heating which leads to an increase of their contact areas, and thus enhances their conduction. This current-induced temperature rise (up to 1050 ^{circ}C) results in the microsoldering of the contact points (even for voltages as low as 0.4 V). Based on this self-regulated temperature mechanism, an analytical expression for the nonlinear U- I back trajectory is derived, and is found to be in very good agreement with the experiments. In addition, we can determine the microcontact temperature with no adjustable parameters. Finally, the stress dependence of the resistance is found to be strongly non-hertzian due to the presence of the surface films. This dependence cannot be usually distinguished from the one due to the disorder of the granular contact network in 2D or 3D experiments.

  15. Spatio-temporal stability of 1D Kerr cavity solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelens, L.; Parra-Rivas, P.; Leo, F.; Gomila, D.; Matias, Manuel A.; Coen, S.

    2014-05-01

    The Lugiato-Lefever equation (LLE) has been extensively studied since its derivation in 1987, when this meanfield model was introduced to describe nonlinear optical cavities. The LLE was originally derived to describe a ring cavity or a Fabry-Perot resonator with a transverse spatial extension and partially filled with a nonlinear medium but it has also been shown to be applicable to other types of cavities, such as fiber resonators and microresonators. Depending on the parameters used, the LLE can present a monostable or bistable input-output response curve. A large number of theoretical studies have been done in the monostable regime, but the bistable regime has remained widely unexplored. One of the reasons for this was that previous experimental setups were not able to works in such regimes of the parameter space. Nowadays the possibility of reaching such parameter regimes experimentally has renewed the interest in the LLE. In this contribution, we present an in-depth theoretical study of the different dynamical regimes that can appear in parameter space, focusing on the dynamics of localized solutions, also known as cavity solitons (CSs). We show that time-periodic oscillations of a 1D CS appear naturally in a broad region of parameter space. More than this oscillatory regime, which has been recently demonstrated experimentally,1 we theoretically report on several kinds of chaotic dynamics. We show that the existence of CSs and their dynamics is related with the spatial dynamics of the system and with the presence of a codimension-2 point known as a Fold-Hopf bifurcation point. These dynamical regimes can become accessible by using devices such as microresonators, for instance widely used for creating optical frequency combs.

  16. Synthesis, characterization, and physical properties of 1D nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, Peter Mchael

    The roster of materials exhibiting metal---insulator transitions with sharply discontinuous switching of electrical conductivity close to room temperature remains rather sparse despite the fundamental interest in the electronic instabilities manifested in such materials and the plethora of potential technological applications, ranging from frequency-agile metamaterials to electrochromic coatings and Mott field-effect transistors. Vanadium oxide bronzes with the general formula MxV2O 5, provide a wealth of compositions and frameworks where strong electron correlation can be systematically (albeit thus far only empirically) tuned. Charge fluctuations along the quasi-1D frameworks of MxV 2O5 bronzes have evinced much recent interest owing to the manifestation of colossal metal---insulator transitions and superconductivity. We start with a general review on the phase transitions, both electronic and structural, of vanadium oxide bronzes in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we demonstrate an unprecedented reversible transformation between double-layered (delta) and tunnel (beta) quasi-1D geometries for nanowires of a divalent vanadium bronze CaxV2O5 (x ˜0.23) upon annealing-induced dehydration and hydrothermally-induced hydration. Such a facile hydration/dehydration-induced interconversion between two prominent quasi-1D structures (accompanied by a change in charge ordering motifs) has not been observed in the bulk and is posited to result from the ease of propagation of crystallographic slip processes across the confined nanowire widths for the delta→beta conversion and the facile diffusion of water molecules within the tunnel geometries for the beta→delta reversion. We demonstrate in Chapter 3 unprecedented pronounced metal-insulator transitions induced by application of a voltage for nanowires of a vanadium oxide bronze with intercalated divalent cations, beta-PbxV 2O5 (x ˜0.33). The induction of the phase transition through application of an electric field at room

  17. SCCRO3 (DCUN1D3) Antagonizes the Neddylation and Oncogenic Activity of SCCRO (DCUN1D1)*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guochang; Stock, Cameron; Bommeljé, Claire C.; Weeda, Víola B.; Shah, Kushyup; Bains, Sarina; Buss, Elizabeth; Shaha, Manish; Rechler, Willi; Ramanathan, Suresh Y.; Singh, Bhuvanesh

    2014-01-01

    The activity of cullin-RING type ubiquitination E3 ligases is regulated by neddylation, a process analogous to ubiquitination that culminates in covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 to cullins. As a component of the E3 for neddylation, SCCRO/DCUN1D1 plays a key regulatory role in neddylation and, consequently, cullin-RING ligase activity. The essential contribution of SCCRO to neddylation is to promote nuclear translocation of the cullin-ROC1 complex. The presence of a myristoyl sequence in SCCRO3, one of four SCCRO paralogues present in humans that localizes to the membrane, raises questions about its function in neddylation. We found that although SCCRO3 binds to CAND1, cullins, and ROC1, it does not efficiently bind to Ubc12, promote cullin neddylation, or conform to the reaction processivity paradigms, suggesting that SCCRO3 does not have E3 activity. Expression of SCCRO3 inhibits SCCRO-promoted neddylation by sequestering cullins to the membrane, thereby blocking its nuclear translocation. Moreover, SCCRO3 inhibits SCCRO transforming activity. The inhibitory effects of SCCRO3 on SCCRO-promoted neddylation and transformation require both an intact myristoyl sequence and PONY domain, confirming that membrane localization and binding to cullins are required for in vivo functions. Taken together, our findings suggest that SCCRO3 functions as a tumor suppressor by antagonizing the neddylation activity of SCCRO. PMID:25349211

  18. Kinetic Model for 1D aggregation of yeast ``prions''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunes, Kay; Cox, Daniel; Singh, Rajiv

    2004-03-01

    Mammalian prion proteins (PrP) are of public health interest because of mad cow and chronic wasting diseases. Yeast have proteins which can undergo similar reconformation and aggregation processes to PrP; yeast forms are simpler to experimentally study and model. Recent in vitro studies of the SUP35 protein(1), showed long aggregates and pure exponential growth of the misfolded form. To explain this data, we have extended a previous model of aggregation kinetics(2). The model assumes reconformation only upon aggregation, and includes aggregate fissioning and an initial nucleation barrier. We find for sufficiently small nucleation rates or seeding by small dimer concentrations that we can achieve the requisite exponential growth and long aggregates. We will compare to a more realistic stochastic kinetics model and present prelimary attempts to describe recent experiments on SUP35 strains. *-Supported by U.S. Army Congressionally Mandated Research Fund. 1) P. Chien and J.S. Weissman, Nature 410, 223 (2001); http://online.kitp.ucsb.edu/online/bionet03/collins/. 2) J. Masel, V.A.> Jansen, M.A. Nowak, Biophys. Chem. 77, 139 (1999).

  19. Applications of subseasonal-to-seasonal (S2S) predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Christopher; Lamb, Rob; Carlsen, Henrik; Robertson, Andrew; Klein, Richard; Lazo, Jeffrey; Kumar, Arun; Vitart, Frederic; Coughlan de Perez, Erin; Ray, Andrea; Murray, Virginia; Graham, Richard; Buontempo, Carlo

    2017-04-01

    While long-range seasonal outlooks have been operational for many years, until recently the extended-range timescale - referred to as 'subseasonal-to-seasonal' (S2S) and which sits between the medium- to long-range forecasting timescales - has received relatively little attention. The S2S timescale has long been seen as a 'predictability desert', yet a new generation of S2S predictions are starting to bridge the gap between weather forecasts and longer-range prediction. Decisions in a range of sectors are made in this extended-range lead time, therefore there is a strong demand for this new generation of predictions. At least ten international weather centres now have some capability for issuing experimental or operational S2S predictions, including the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that now have operational S2S outputs. International efforts are now underway to identify key sources of predictability, improve forecast skill and operationalise aspects of S2S forecasts, however challenges remain in advancing this new frontier. If S2S predictions are to be utilised effectively, it is important that along with science advances, we learn how to develop, communicate and apply these forecasts appropriately. In this study, we present the potential of the emerging operational S2S forecasts to the wider weather and climate applications community by undertaking the first comprehensive review of sectoral applications of S2S predictions, including public health, disaster preparedness, water management, energy and agriculture. We explore the value of applications-relevant S2S predictions, and highlight the opportunities and challenges facing their uptake. We show how social sciences can be integrated with S2S development - from communication to decision-making and valuation of forecasts - to enhance the benefits of 'climate services' approaches for extended-range forecasting. We

  20. Resolution-optimized NMR measurement of (1)D(CH), (1)D(CC) and (2)D(CH) residual dipolar couplings in nucleic acid bases.

    PubMed

    Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Bryce, David L; O'neil-Cabello, Erin; Nikonowicz, Edward P; Bax, Ad

    2004-11-01

    New methods are described for accurate measurement of multiple residual dipolar couplings in nucleic acid bases. The methods use TROSY-type pulse sequences for optimizing resolution and sensitivity, and rely on the E.COSY principle to measure the relatively small two-bond (2)D(CH) couplings at high precision. Measurements are demonstrated for a 24-nt stem-loop RNA sequence, uniformly enriched in (13)C, and aligned in Pf1. The recently described pseudo-3D method is used to provide homonuclear (1)H-(1)H decoupling, which minimizes cross-correlation effects and optimizes resolution. Up to seven (1)H-(13)C and (13)C-(13)C couplings are measured for pyrimidines (U and C), including (1)D(C5H5), (1)D(C6H6), (2)D(C5H6), (2)D(C6H5), (1)D(C5C4), (1)D(C5C6), and (2)D(C4H5). For adenine, four base couplings ((1)D(C2H2), (1)D(C8H8), (1)D(C4C5), and (1)D(C5C6)) are readily measured whereas for guanine only three couplings are accessible at high relative accuracy ((1)D(C8H8), (1)D(C4C5), and (1)D(C5C6)). Only three dipolar couplings are linearly independent in planar structures such as nucleic acid bases, permitting cross validation of the data and evaluation of their accuracies. For the vast majority of dipolar couplings, the error is found to be less than +/-3% of their possible range, indicating that the measurement accuracy is not limiting when using these couplings as restraints in structure calculations. Reported isotropic values of the one- and two-bond J couplings cluster very tightly for each type of nucleotide.

  1. HDL-S1P: cardiovascular functions, disease-associated alterations, and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid contained in High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and has drawn considerable attention in the lipoprotein field as numerous studies have demonstrated its contribution to several functions inherent to HDL. Some of them are partly and some entirely due to the S1P contained in HDL (HDL-S1P). Despite the presence of over 1000 different lipids in HDL, S1P stands out as it possesses its own cell surface receptors through which it exercises key physiological functions. Most of the S1P in human plasma is associated with HDL, and the amount of HDL-S1P influences the quality and quantity of HDL-dependent functions. The main binding partner of S1P in HDL is apolipoprotein M but others may also exist particularly under conditions of acute S1P elevations. HDL not only exercise functions through their S1P content but have also an impact on genuine S1P signaling by influencing S1P bioactivity and receptor presentation. HDL-S1P content is altered in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Low HDL-S1P has also been linked to impaired HDL functions associated with these disorders. Although the pathophysiological and molecular reasons for such disease-associated shifts in HDL-S1P are little understood, there have been successful approaches to circumvent their adverse implications by pharmacologically increasing HDL-S1P as means to improve HDL function. This mini-review will cover the current understanding of the contribution of HDL-S1P to physiological HDL function, its alteration in disease and ways for its restoration to correct HDL dysfunction. PMID:26539121

  2. HDL-S1P: cardiovascular functions, disease-associated alterations, and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid contained in High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and has drawn considerable attention in the lipoprotein field as numerous studies have demonstrated its contribution to several functions inherent to HDL. Some of them are partly and some entirely due to the S1P contained in HDL (HDL-S1P). Despite the presence of over 1000 different lipids in HDL, S1P stands out as it possesses its own cell surface receptors through which it exercises key physiological functions. Most of the S1P in human plasma is associated with HDL, and the amount of HDL-S1P influences the quality and quantity of HDL-dependent functions. The main binding partner of S1P in HDL is apolipoprotein M but others may also exist particularly under conditions of acute S1P elevations. HDL not only exercise functions through their S1P content but have also an impact on genuine S1P signaling by influencing S1P bioactivity and receptor presentation. HDL-S1P content is altered in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Low HDL-S1P has also been linked to impaired HDL functions associated with these disorders. Although the pathophysiological and molecular reasons for such disease-associated shifts in HDL-S1P are little understood, there have been successful approaches to circumvent their adverse implications by pharmacologically increasing HDL-S1P as means to improve HDL function. This mini-review will cover the current understanding of the contribution of HDL-S1P to physiological HDL function, its alteration in disease and ways for its restoration to correct HDL dysfunction.

  3. H2S, a novel gasotransmitter, involves in gastric accommodation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ailin; Wang, Hongjuan; Lu, Xin; Zhu, Jianchun; Huang, Di; Xu, Tonghui; Guo, Jianqiang; Liu, Chuanyong; Li, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    H2S is produced mainly by two enzymes:cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), using L-cysteine (L-Cys) as the substrate. In this study, we investigated the role of H2S in gastric accommodation using CBS+/− mice, immunohistochemistry, immunoblot, methylene blue assay, intragastric pressure (IGP) recording and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Mouse gastric fundus expressed H2S-generating enzymes (CBS and CSE) and generated detectable amounts of H2S. The H2S donor, NaHS or L-Cys, caused a relaxation in either gastric fundus or body. The gastric compliance was significantly increased in the presence of L-Cys (1 mM). On the contrary, AOAA, an inhibitor for CBS, largely inhibited gastric compliance. Consistently, CBS+/− mice shows a lower gastric compliance. However, PAG, a CSE inhibitor, had no effect on gastric compliances. L-Cys enhances the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxation of fundus strips, but AOAA reduces the magnitude of relaxations to EFS. Notably, the expression level of CBS but not CSE protein was elevated after feeding. Consistently, the production of H2S was also increased after feeding in mice gastric fundus. In addition, AOAA largely reduced food intake and body weight in mice. Furthermore, a metabolic aberration of H2S was found in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD). In conclusion, endogenous H2S, a novel gasotransmitter, involves in gastric accommodation. PMID:26531221

  4. Role of H2S Donors in Cancer Biology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Zheng-Wei; Deng, Lih-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donors including organosulfur compounds (OSC), inorganic sulfide salts, and synthetic compounds are useful tools in studies to elucidate the effects of H2S in cancer biology. Studies using such donors have shown the ability of H2S to suppress tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo, with some of them suggesting the selectivity of its cytotoxic effects to cancer cells. In addition to promoting cancer cell death, H2S donors were also found to inhibit cancer angiogenesis and metastasis. The underlying mechanisms for the anticancer activities of H2S involve (1) cell signaling pathways, such as MAPK and STAT; (2) cell cycle regulation; (3) microRNAs regulation; and (4) cancer metabolism and pH regulation. Altogether, compiling evidences have demonstrated the great potential of using H2S donors as anticancer agents. Nevertheless, the application and development of H2S for therapy are still facing challenges as identification of molecular targets of H2S awaits further investigation.

  5. H2S, a novel gasotransmitter, involves in gastric accommodation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ailin; Wang, Hongjuan; Lu, Xin; Zhu, Jianchun; Huang, Di; Xu, Tonghui; Guo, Jianqiang; Liu, Chuanyong; Li, Jingxin

    2015-11-04

    H2S is produced mainly by two enzymes:cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), using L-cysteine (L-Cys) as the substrate. In this study, we investigated the role of H2S in gastric accommodation using CBS(+/-) mice, immunohistochemistry, immunoblot, methylene blue assay, intragastric pressure (IGP) recording and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Mouse gastric fundus expressed H2S-generating enzymes (CBS and CSE) and generated detectable amounts of H2S. The H2S donor, NaHS or L-Cys, caused a relaxation in either gastric fundus or body. The gastric compliance was significantly increased in the presence of L-Cys (1 mM). On the contrary, AOAA, an inhibitor for CBS, largely inhibited gastric compliance. Consistently, CBS(+/-) mice shows a lower gastric compliance. However, PAG, a CSE inhibitor, had no effect on gastric compliances. L-Cys enhances the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxation of fundus strips, but AOAA reduces the magnitude of relaxations to EFS. Notably, the expression level of CBS but not CSE protein was elevated after feeding. Consistently, the production of H2S was also increased after feeding in mice gastric fundus. In addition, AOAA largely reduced food intake and body weight in mice. Furthermore, a metabolic aberration of H2S was found in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD). In conclusion, endogenous H2S, a novel gasotransmitter, involves in gastric accommodation.

  6. Endogenous mitigation of H2S inside of the landfills.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Zhong, Zhong; Shen, Dongsheng; Du, Yao; Xu, Jing; Long, Yuyang

    2016-02-01

    Vast quantities of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emitted from landfill sites require urgent disposal. The current study focused on source control and examined the migration and conversion behavior of sulfur compounds in two lab-scale simulated landfills with different operation modes. It aimed to explore the possible strategies and mechanisms for H2S endogenous mitigation inside of landfills during decomposition. It was found that the strength of H2S emissions from the landfill sites was dependent on the municipal solid waste (MSW) degradation speed and vertical distribution of sulfide. Leachate recirculation can shorten both the H2S influence period and pollution risk to the surrounding environment. H2S endogenous mitigation may be achieved by chemical oxidation, biological oxidation, adsorption, and/or precipitation in different stages. Migration and conversion mainly affected H2S release behavior during the initial stabilization phase in the landfill. Microbial activities related to sulfur, nitrogen, and iron can further promote H2S endogenous mitigation during the high reducing phase. Thus, H2S endogenous mitigation can be effectively enhanced via control of the aforementioned processes.

  7. Crystal growth simulations of H(2)S hydrate.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuai; Kusalik, Peter G

    2010-07-29

    In this paper, we report a molecular simulation study exploring the crystal growth behavior of H(2)S hydrates within two-phase (H(2)S hydrate crystal and H(2)S aqueous solution) and three-phase (H(2)S hydrate crystal, liquid H(2)S, and H(2)S aqueous solution) systems. The microscopic mechanisms of growth, as well as the interfacial properties during the heterogeneous crystal growth process, are probed. We find that the H(2)S hydrate can be grown at a higher rate than methane hydrates under comparable conditions (Vatamanu, J.; Kusalik, P. G. J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110, 15896). The three-phase simulations, which also allow us to identify the simulation conditions on the experimental phase diagram, demonstrate that the present models reasonably reproduce the phase behavior of this system. We find that the crystal interface has a strong affinity for water molecules. We observed a relatively low level of defects in the newly formed H(2)S hydrate crystal.

  8. S1P3 confers differential S1P migration by autoreactive and non-autoreactive immature B cells and is required for normal B cell development

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Erin E.; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY During B cell development, immature B cell fate is determined by whether the B cell antigen receptor is engaged in the bone marrow. Immature B cells that are non-autoreactive continue maturation and emigrate from the marrow whereas autoreactive immature B cells remain and are tolerized. However, the microenvironment where these events occur and the chemoattractants responsible for immature B cell trafficking within and out of the bone marrow remain largely undefined. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a chemoattractant that directs lymphocyte trafficking and thymocyte egress and in this study we investigated whether S1P contributed to B cell development, egress and positioning within the bone marrow. Our findings show that immature B cells are chemotactic towards S1P but that this response is dependent on antigen receptor specificity: non-autoreactive, but not autoreactive, immature B cells migrate towards S1P and are shown to require S1P3 receptor for this response. Despite this response, S1P3 is shown not to facilitate immature B cell egress but is required for normal B cell development including the positioning of transitional B cells within bone marrow sinusoids. These data indicate that S1P3 signaling directs immature B cells to a bone marrow microenvironment important for both tolerance induction and maturation. PMID:20039302

  9. A shunt pathway limits the CaaX processing of Hsp40 Ydj1p and regulates Ydj1p-dependent phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Emily R; Cheng, Michael; Zhao, Peng; Kim, June H; Wells, Lance; Schmidt, Walter K

    2016-01-01

    The modifications occurring to CaaX proteins have largely been established using few reporter molecules (e.g. Ras, yeast a-factor mating pheromone). These proteins undergo three coordinated COOH-terminal events: isoprenylation of the cysteine, proteolytic removal of aaX, and COOH-terminal methylation. Here, we investigated the coupling of these modifications in the context of the yeast Ydj1p chaperone. We provide genetic, biochemical, and biophysical evidence that the Ydj1p CaaX motif is isoprenylated but not cleaved and carboxylmethylated. Moreover, we demonstrate that Ydj1p-dependent thermotolerance and Ydj1p localization are perturbed when alternative CaaX motifs are transplanted onto Ydj1p. The abnormal phenotypes revert to normal when post-isoprenylation events are genetically interrupted. Our findings indicate that proper Ydj1p function requires an isoprenylatable CaaX motif that is resistant to post-isoprenylation events. These results expand on the complexity of protein isoprenylation and highlight the impact of post-isoprenylation events in regulating the function of Ydj1p and perhaps other CaaX proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15899.001 PMID:27525482

  10. Oncogenic S1P signalling in EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma activates AKT and promotes cell migration through S1P receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui Min; Lo, Kwok-Wai; Wei, Wenbin; Tsao, Sai Wah; Chung, Grace Tin Yun; Ibrahim, Maha Hafez; Dawson, Christopher W; Murray, Paul G; Paterson, Ian C; Yap, Lee Fah

    2017-02-27

    Undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a cancer with high metastatic potential that is consistently associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. In this study, we have investigated the functional contribution of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signalling to the pathogenesis of NPC. We show that EBV infection or ectopic expression of the EBV-encoded latent genes (EBNA1, LMP1 and LMP2A) can up-regulate sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1), the key enzyme that produces S1P, in NPC cell lines. Exogenous addition of S1P promotes the migration of NPC cells through the activation of AKT; shRNA knockdown of SPHK1 resulted in a reduction in the levels of activated AKT and inhibition of cell migration. We also show that S1P receptor 3 (S1PR3) mRNA is over-expressed in EBV-positive NPC patient-derived xenografts and a subset of primary NPC tissues, and that knockdown of S1PR3 suppressed the activation of AKT and the S1P-induced migration of NPC cells. Taken together, our data point to a central role for EBV in mediating the oncogenic effects of S1P in NPC and identify S1P signalling as a potential therapeutic target in this disease.

  11. From nonfinite to finite 1D arrays of origami tiles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsai Chin; Rahman, Masudur; Norton, Michael L

    2014-06-17

    average solution structures for blocks is more readily achieved using computer models than using direct imaging methods. The development of scalable 1D-origami arrays composed of uniquely addressable components is a logical, if not necessary, step in the evolution of higher order fully addressable structures. Our research into the fabrication of arrays has led us to generate a listing of several important areas of future endeavor. Of high importance is the re-enforcement of the mechanical properties of the building blocks and the organization of multiple arrays on a surface of technological importance. While addressing this short list of barriers to progress will prove challenging, coherent development along each of these lines of inquiry will accelerate the appearance of commercial scale molecular manufacturing.

  12. Polysulfides Link H2S to Protein Thiol Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Romy; Pálinkás, Zoltán; Bäsell, Katrin; Becher, Dörte; Antelmann, Haike; Nagy, Péter

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is suggested to act as a gaseous signaling molecule in a variety of physiological processes. Its molecular mechanism of action was proposed to involve protein S-sulfhydration, that is, conversion of cysteinyl thiolates (Cys-S−) to persulfides (Cys-S-S−). A central and unresolved question is how H2S—that is, a molecule with sulfur in its lowest possible oxidation state (−2)—can lead to oxidative thiol modifications. Results: Using the lipid phosphatase PTEN as a model protein, we find that the “H2S donor” sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) leads to very rapid reversible oxidation of the enzyme in vitro. We identify polysulfides formed in NaHS solutions as the oxidizing species, and present evidence that sulfane sulfur is added to the active site cysteine. Polysulfide-mediated oxidation of PTEN was induced by all “H2S donors” tested, including sodium sulfide (Na2S), gaseous H2S, and morpholin-4-ium 4-methoxyphenyl(morpholino) phosphinodithioate (GYY4137). Moreover, we show that polysulfides formed in H2S solutions readily modify PTEN inside intact cells. Innovation: Our results shed light on the previously unresolved question of how H2S leads to protein thiol oxidation, and suggest that polysulfides formed in solutions of H2S mediate this process. Conclusion: This study suggests that the effects that have been attributed to H2S in previous reports may in fact have been mediated by polysulfides. It also supports the notion that sulfane sulfur rather than sulfide is the actual in vivo agent of H2S signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1749–1765. PMID:23646934

  13. Interaction of integrin β4 with S1P receptors in S1P- and HGF-induced endothelial barrier enhancement.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiuqin; Epshtein, Yulia; Chen, Weiguo; Zhou, Tingting; Xie, Lishi; Garcia, Joe G N; Jacobson, Jeffrey R

    2014-06-01

    We previously reported sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) augment endothelial cell (EC) barrier function and attenuate murine acute lung inury (ALI). While the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood, S1P and HGF both transactivate the S1P receptor, S1PR1 and integrin β4 (ITGB4) at membrane caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEMs). In the current study, we investigated the roles of S1PR2 and S1PR3 in S1P/HGF-mediated EC signaling and their associations with ITGB4. Our studies confirmed ITGB4 and S1PR2/3 are recruited to CEMs in human lung EC in response to either S1P (1 µM, 5 min) or HGF (25 ng/ml, 5 min). Co-immunoprecipitation experiments identified an S1P/HGF-mediated interaction of ITGB4 with both S1PR2 and S1PR3. We then employed an in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) to confirm a direct ITGB4-S1PR3 association induced by S1P/HGF although a direct association was not detectable between S1PR2 and ITGB4. S1PR1 knockdown (siRNA), however, abrogated S1P/HGF-induced ITGB4-S1PR2 associations while there was no effect on ITGB4-S1PR3 associations. Moreover, PLA confirmed a direct association between S1PR1 and S1PR2 induced by S1P and HGF. Finally, silencing of S1PR2 significantly attenuated S1P/HGF-induced EC barrier enhancement as measured by transendothelial resistance while silencing of S1PR3 significantly augmented S1P/HGF-induced barrier enhancement. These results confirm an important role for S1PR2 and S1PR3 in S1P/HGF-mediated EC barrier responses that are associated with their complex formation with ITGB4. Our findings elucidate novel mechanisms of EC barrier regulation that may ultimately lead to new therapeutic targets for disorders characterized by increased vascular permeability including ALI.

  14. PPM1D exerts its oncogenic properties in human pancreatic cancer through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Guo, Bo-Min; Kang, Jie; Deng, Xian-Zhao; Fan, You-Ben; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Ai, Kai-Xing

    2016-03-01

    Protein phosphatase, Mg(2+)/Mn(2+) dependent, 1D (PPM1D) is emerging as an oncogene by virtue of its negative control on several tumor suppressor pathways. However, the clinical significance of PPM1D in pancreatic cancer (PC) has not been defined. In this study, we determined PPM1D expression in human PC tissues and cell lines and their irrespective noncancerous controls. We subsequently investigated the functional role of PPM1D in the migration, invasion, and apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 PC cells in vitro and explored the signaling pathways involved. Furthermore, we examined the role of PPM1D in PC tumorigenesis in vivo. Our results showed that PPM1D is overexpressed in human PC tissues and cell lines and significantly correlated with tumor growth and metastasis. PPM1D promotes PC cell migration and invasion via potentiation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway through downregulation of apoptosis-stimulating of p53 protein 2 (ASPP2). In contrast to PPM1D, our results showed that ASPP2 is downregulated in PC tissues. Additionally, PPM1D suppresses PC cell apoptosis via inhibition of the p38 MAPK/p53 pathway through both dephosphorylation of p38 MAPK and downregulation of ASPP2. Furthermore, PPM1D promotes PC tumor growth in vivo. Our results demonstrated that PPM1D is an oncogene in PC.

  15. Large Area Synthesis of 1D-MoSe2 Using Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Poh, Sock Mui; Tan, Sherman J R; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Chen, Zhongxin; Abdelwahab, Ibrahim; Fu, Deyi; Xu, Hai; Bao, Yang; Zhou, Wu; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-01-23

    Large area synthesis of 1D-MoSe2 nanoribbons on both insulating and conducting substrates via molecular beam epitaxy is presented. Dimensional controlled growth of 2D, 1D-MoSe2 , and 1D-2D-MoSe2 hybrid heterostructure is achieved by tuning the growth temperature or Mo:Se precursor ratio.

  16. Preliminary abatement device evaluation: 1D-2D KGM cyclone design

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cyclones are predominately used in controlling cotton gin particulate matter (PM) emissions. The most commonly used cyclone designs are the 2D-2D and 1D-3D; however other designs such as the 1D-2D KGM have or are currently being used. A 1D-2D cyclone has a barrel length equal to the barrel diamete...

  17. S1P differentially regulates migration of human ovarian cancer and human ovarian surface epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongmei; Zhao, Zhenwen; Caperell-Grant, Andrea; Yang, Gong; Mok, Samuel C.; Liu, Jinsong; Bigsby, Robert M.; Xu, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) arises from the epithelial layer covering the surface of ovaries and intra-peritoneal metastasis is commonly observed at diagnosis. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid signaling molecule, is potentially involved in EOC tumorigenesis. We have found that S1P is elevated in human EOC ascites. We show that physiologically relevant concentrations of S1P stimulate migration and invasion of EOC cells, but inhibit migration of human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells. In addition, S1P inhibits lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced cell migration in HOSE, but not in EOC cells. We have provided the first line of evidence that the expression levels of S1P receptor subtypes are not the only determinants for how cells respond to S1P. Even though S1P1 is expressed and functional in HOSE cells, the inhibitory effect mediated by S1P2 is dominant in those cells. The cellular pre-existing stress fibers are also important determinants for the migratory response to S1P. Differential S1P-induced morphology changes are noted in EOC and HOSE cells. Pre-existing stress fibers in HOSE cells are further enhanced by S1P treatment, resulting in the negative migratory response to S1P. By contrast, EOC cells lost stress fibers and S1P treatment induces filopodium-like structures at cell edges, which correlates with increased cell motility. In addition, inhibition of the protein kinase C pathway is likely to be involved in the inhibitory effect of S1P on LPA-induced cell migration in HOSE cells. These findings are important for the development of new therapeutics targeting S1P and LPA in EOC. PMID:18645009

  18. EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopy of intact mitochondria isolated from Yah1p-depleted Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ren; Martinho, Marlène; Morales, Jessica Garber; Kim, Hansoo; Ellis, E Ann; Lill, Roland; Hendrich, Michael P; Münck, Eckard; Lindahl, Paul A

    2008-09-16

    Yah1p, an [Fe 2S 2]-containing ferredoxin located in the matrix of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria, functions in the synthesis of Fe/S clusters and heme a prosthetic groups. EPR, Mossbauer spectroscopy, and electron microscopy were used to characterize the Fe that accumulates in Yah1p-depleted isolated intact mitochondria. Gal- YAH1 cells were grown in standard rich media (YPD and YPGal) under O 2 or argon atmospheres. Mitochondria were isolated anaerobically, then prepared in the as-isolated redox state, the dithionite-treated state, and the O 2-treated state. The absence of strong EPR signals from Fe/S clusters when Yah1p was depleted confirms that Yah1p is required in Fe/S cluster assembly. Yah1p-depleted mitochondria, grown with O 2 bubbling through the media, accumulated excess Fe (up to 10 mM) that was present as 2-4 nm diameter ferric nanoparticles, similar to those observed in mitochondria from yfh1Delta cells. These particles yielded a broad isotropic EPR signal centered around g = 2, characteristic of superparamagnetic relaxation. Treatment with dithionite caused Fe (3+) ions of the nanoparticles to become reduced and largely exported from the mitochondria. Fe did not accumulate in mitochondria isolated from cells grown under Ar; a significant portion of the Fe in these organelles was in the high-spin Fe (2+) state. This suggests that the O 2 used during growth of Gal- YAH1 cells is responsible, either directly or indirectly, for Fe accumulation and for oxidizing Fe (2+) --> Fe (3+) prior to aggregation. Models are proposed in which the accumulation of ferric nanoparticles is caused either by the absence of a ligand that prevents such precipitation in wild-type mitochondria or by a more oxidizing environment within the mitochondria of Yah1p-depleted cells exposed to O 2. The efficacy of reducing accumulated Fe along with chelating it should be considered as a strategy for its removal in diseases involving such accumulations.

  19. AP2S1 and GNA11 mutations - not a common cause of familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Silje; Rejnmark, Lars; Ladefoged, Søren A; Nissen, Peter H

    2017-02-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) type 1 is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR). Recently, mutations affecting codon 15 in the gene AP2S1 have been shown to cause FHH type 3 in up to 26% of CASR-negative FHH patients. Similarly, mutations in the gene GNA11 have been shown to cause FHH type 2. We hypothesized that mutations in AP2S1 and GNA11 are causative in Danish patients with suspected FHH and that these mutations are not found in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), which is the main differential diagnostic disorder. Cross-sectional study. We identified patients with unexplained hyperparathyroid hypercalcemia and a control group of verified PHPT patients through review of 421 patients tested for CASR mutations in the period 2006-2014. DNA sequencing of all amino acid coding exons including intron-exon boundaries in AP2S1 and GNA11 was performed. In 33 CASR-negative patients with suspected FHH, we found two (~6%) with a mutation in AP2S1 (p.Arg15Leu and p.Arg15His). Family screening confirmed the genotype-phenotype correlations. We did not identify any pathogenic mutations in GNA11. No pathogenic mutations were found in the PHPT control group. We suggest that the best diagnostic approach to hyperparathyroid hypercalcemic patients suspected to have FHH is to screen the CASR and AP2S1 codon 15 for mutations. If the results are negative and there is still suspicion of an inherited condition (i.e. family history), then GNA11 should be examined. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  20. The Clinically-tested S1P Receptor Agonists, FTY720 and BAF312, Demonstrate Subtype-Specific Bradycardia (S1P1) and Hypertension (S1P3) in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Ryan M.; Muthukumarana, Akalushi; Harrison, Paul C.; Nodop Mazurek, Suzanne; Chen, Rong Rhonda; Harrington, Kyle E.; Dinallo, Roger M.; Horan, Joshua C.; Patnaude, Lori; Modis, Louise K.; Reinhart, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phospate (S1P) and S1P receptor agonists elicit mechanism-based effects on cardiovascular function in vivo. Indeed, FTY720 (non-selective S1PX receptor agonist) produces modest hypertension in patients (2–3 mmHg in 1-yr trial) as well as acute bradycardia independent of changes in blood pressure. However, the precise receptor subtypes responsible is controversial, likely dependent upon the cardiovascular response in question (e.g. bradycardia, hypertension), and perhaps even species-dependent since functional differences in rodent, rabbit, and human have been suggested. Thus, we characterized the S1P receptor subtype specificity for each compound in vitro and, in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of FTY720 and the more selective S1P1,5 agonist, BAF312, were tested during acute i.v. infusion in anesthetized rats and after oral administration for 10 days in telemetry-instrumented conscious rats. Acute i.v. infusion of FTY720 (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 mg/kg/20 min) or BAF312 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/20 min) elicited acute bradycardia in anesthetized rats demonstrating an S1P1 mediated mechanism-of-action. However, while FTY720 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/d) elicited dose-dependent hypertension after multiple days of oral administration in rat at clinically relevant plasma concentrations (24-hr mean blood pressure = 8.4, 12.8, 16.2 mmHg above baseline vs. 3 mmHg in vehicle controls), BAF312 (0.3, 3.0, 30.0 mg/kg/d) had no significant effect on blood pressure at any dose tested suggesting that hypertension produced by FTY720 is mediated S1P3 receptors. In summary, in vitro selectivity results in combination with studies performed in anesthetized and conscious rats administered two clinically tested S1P agonists, FTY720 or BAF312, suggest that S1P1 receptors mediate bradycardia while hypertension is mediated by S1P3 receptor activation. PMID:23285242

  1. H2S2014 in Kyoto: the 3rd International Conference on H2S in Biology and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hideo

    2015-04-30

    About 20 years ago, a pungent gas was found to be the physiological mediator of cognitive function and vascular tone. Since then, studies on hydrogen sulfide (H2S) have uncovered its numerous physiological roles such as protecting various tissues/organs from ischemia and regulating inflammation, cell growth, oxygen sensing, and senescence. These effects of H2S were extensively studied, and some of the corresponding mechanisms were also studied in detail. Previous studies on the synergistic interaction between H2S and nitric oxide (NO) have led to the discovery of several potential signaling molecules. Polysulfides are considerably potent and are one of the most active forms of H2S. H2S has a significant therapeutic potential, which is evident from the large number of novel H2S-donating compounds and substances developed for manipulating endogenous levels of H2S. The Third International Conference on H2S was held in Kyoto in June 2014. One hundred and sixty participants from 21 countries convened in Kyoto to report new advances, discuss conflicting findings, and make plans for future research. This article summarizes each oral presentation presented at the conference. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Phytosphingosine 1-phosphate: a high affinity ligand for the S1P(4)/Edg-6 receptor.

    PubMed

    Candelore, Mari Rios; Wright, Michael J; Tota, Laurie M; Milligan, James; Shei, Gan-ju; Bergstrom, James D; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2002-09-27

    It has been reported recently that the phosphorylated form of the immunomodulator FTY720 activates sphingosine 1-phosphate G protein-coupled receptors. Therefore, understanding the biology of this new class of receptors will be important in clarifying the immunological function of bioactive lysosphingolipid ligands. The S1P(4) receptor has generated interest due to its lymphoid tissue distribution. While the S1P(4) receptor binds the prototypical ligand, S1P, a survey of other lysosphingolipids demonstrated that 4D-hydroxysphinganine 1-phosphate, more commonly known as phytosphingosine 1-phosphate (PhS1P), binds to S1P(4) with higher affinity. Using radiolabeled S1P (S133P), the affinity of PhS1P for the S1P(4) receptor is 1.6nM, while that of S1P is nearly 50-fold lower (119+/-20nM). Radiolabeled PhS1P proved to be superior to S133P in routine binding assays due to improved signal-to-noise ratio. The present study demonstrates the utility of a novel radiolabeled probe, PhS133P, for in vitro studies of the S1P(4) receptor pharmacology.

  3. The Membrane Dynamics of Pexophagy Are Influenced by Sar1p in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Schroder, Laura A.; Ortiz, Michael V.

    2008-01-01

    Several Sec proteins including a guanosine diphosphate/guanosine triphosphate exchange factor for Sar1p have been implicated in autophagy. In this study, we investigated the role of Sar1p in pexophagy by expressing dominant-negative mutant forms of Sar1p in Pichia pastoris. When expressing sar1pT34N or sar1pH79G, starvation-induced autophagy, glucose-induced micropexophagy, and ethanol-induced macropexophagy are dramatically suppressed. These Sar1p mutants did not affect the initiation or expansion of the sequestering membranes nor the trafficking of Atg11p and Atg9p to these membranes during micropexophagy. However, the lipidation of Atg8p and assembly of the micropexophagic membrane apparatus, which are essential to complete the incorporation of the peroxisomes into the degradative vacuole, were inhibited when either Sar1p mutant protein was expressed. During macropexophagy, the expression of sar1pT34N inhibited the formation of the pexophagosome, whereas sar1pH79G suppressed the delivery of the peroxisome from the pexophagosome to the vacuole. The pexophagosome contained Atg8p in wild-type cells, but in cells expressing sar1pH79G these organelles contain both Atg8p and endoplasmic reticulum components as visualized by DsRFP-HDEL. Our results demonstrate key roles for Sar1p in both micro- and macropexophagy. PMID:18768759

  4. Allergenicity of an enzymatic hydrolysate of soybean 2S protein.

    PubMed

    Sung, Dongeun; Ahn, Kang Mo; Lim, Seung-Yong; Oh, Sangsuk

    2014-09-01

    This study was performed to examine how the characteristics of soybean 2S protein influence allergenicity after enzymatic hydrolysis. Soybean 2S protein was extracted and enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using pepsin and chymotrypsin. Allergenicity was observed using soybean-sensitive patients' sera. Only 13.3% (6/45) of soybean-sensitive patients reacted to soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (SKTI), known as the major allergen of soybean 2S protein. After peptic hydrolysis for 90 min at pH 1.2, the intensity of SKTI decreased to 25% but was still visible on SDS-PAGE. Chymotryptic hydrolysis following peptic hydrolysis at pH 8 for 60 min showed a limited hydrolytic effect on soybean 2S protein. Peptic hydrolysis of soybean 2S protein partially reduced the allergenicity of soybean 2S protein, while chymotryptic hydrolysis following peptic hydrolysis increased slightly the allergenicity. Food allergy caused by soybean 2S protein occurred in part of the soybean-sensitive patients. SKTI was partially digested after peptic hydrolysis for 90 min. The allergenicity was decreased with peptic hydrolysis, while subsequent treatment of chymotrypsin increased slightly the allergenicity. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Reduced adipose tissue H2S in obesity.

    PubMed

    Katsouda, Antonia; Szabo, Csaba; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2017-10-02

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced signaling molecule synthesized by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST). Given that H2S exerts significant effects on bioenergetics and metabolism, the goal of the current study was to determine the expression of H2S-producing enzymes in adipose tissues in models of obesity and metabolic disruption. Mice fed a western diet expressed lower mRNA levels of all three enzymes in epididymal fat (EWAT), while only CSE and 3-MST were reduced in brown adipose tissue (BAT). At the protein level 3-MST was reduced in all fat depots studied. Using db/db mice, a genetic model of obesity, we found that CSE, CBS and 3-MST mRNA were reduced in white fat, while only CSE was reduced in BAT. CBS and CSE protein levels were suppressed in all three fat depots. In a model of age-related weight gain, no reduction in the mRNA of any of the enzymes was noted. Smaller amounts of 3-MST protein were found in EWAT, while both CSE and 3-MST were reduced in BAT. Tissue levels of H2S were lower in WAT in HFD mice; both WAT and BAT contained lower H2S amounts in db/db animals. Taken together, our data suggest that obesity is associated with a decreased expression of H2S-synthesizing enzymes and reduced H2S levels in adipose tissues of mice. We propose that the reduction in H2S may contribute to the metabolic response associated with obesity. Further work is needed to determine whether restoring H2S levels during obesity may have a beneficial effect on obesity-associated metabolic alterations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Improved H{sub 2}S caustic scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Heisler, S.M.; Cassinis, R.B.; Massey, S.J.

    1997-05-01

    An improved design reduced the operating expense of an H{sub 2}S Caustic Scrubber by over 75%. The scrubber removes approximately 1,300 lb/day H{sub 2}S from 1800 MSCFD of produced gas containing 8,000 ppm H{sub 2}S with mercaptans and 40% CO{sub 2}. The scrubber is based on Dow Chemical`s US Patent No. 2,747,962. The Dow H{sub 2}S Caustic Scrubber principle is based on contacting gas with dilute caustic (5--20% NaOH) then separating the gas from the liquid. H{sub 2}S reacts with the NaOH to produce NaHS, a water soluble salt that can be disposed of in an oilfield waterflood injection or waste water disposal well. Unfortunately, CO{sub 2} also reacts with NaOH to produce Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, thereby increasing caustic consumption. Caustic contact time is kept between 0.01 and 0.03 seconds in order to maximize H{sub 2}S removal while minimizing CO{sub 2} removal. Approximately 80--90% of the H{sub 2}S can be removed per stage while removing only 1% of the CO{sub 2}. Improvements to the H{sub 2}S Caustic Scrubber comprise: Redesigning the H{sub 2}S-Caustic contactor; Reducing the dilute caustic concentration; and Optimizing the number of scrubber stages required by polishing with SulfaTreat{reg_sign}.

  7. Fabrication of Infrared Optical Ceramics in the CaLa2S4 - La2S3 Solid Solution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, J. A.; Lewis, K. L.; Kinsman, B. E.; Wilson, A. R.; Riddle, R.

    1986-12-01

    Calcium lanthanum sulphide optical ceramic has been identified as a potential 8-12 μm infrared window material. However, since there is a solid solution region in the phase diagram between CaLa2S4 and La2S3 other compositions from this region may also be of interest. The most promising synthesis route, also used in the present work, appears to be that of sintering a pure sulphide powder to closed porosity followed by hot isostatic pressing to achieve full density. A mixed oxide precursor powder has been made by the evaporative decomposition of solution (EDS) synthesis route in which a mixed nitrate solution was sprayed through a hot furnace. The mixed oxide powder was then fired in an H2S containing gas to synthesise a very fine sulphide powder of a number of compositions in the CaLa2S4 - La2S3 phase diagram. The evolution of the powder synthesis and ceramic processing techniques has enabled a continued improvement in ceramic quality. For example in 1983 a dark brown CaLa2S4 ceramic partially transmitting in the visible and IR but showing extrinsic S03= and SO4= absorptions was prepared by hot pressing followed by annealing in H2S. By 1985 extrinsic absorption free CaS 45 La2S3 55 mole % material transmitting in the visible and IR but showing visible and near IR scatter has been synthesised by sintering and hot isostatic pressing. In 1986 a range of compositions in the CaLa2S4 - La2S3 phase diagram have been prepared in a similar manner.

  8. H2S concentrations in the heart after acute H2S administration: methodological and physiological considerations.

    PubMed

    Sonobe, Takashi; Haouzi, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we have tried to characterize the limits of the approach typically used to determine H2S concentrations in the heart based on the amount of H2S evaporating from heart homogenates-spontaneously, after reaction with a strong reducing agent, or in a very acidic solution. Heart homogenates were prepared from male rats in control conditions or after H2S infusion induced a transient cardiogenic shock (CS) or cardiac asystole (CA). Using a method of determination of gaseous H2S with a detection limit of 0.2 nmol, we found that the process of homogenization could lead to a total disappearance of free H2S unless performed in alkaline conditions. Yet, after restoration of neutral pH, free H2S concentration from samples processed in alkaline and nonalkaline milieus were similar and averaged ∼0.2-0.4 nmol/g in both control and CS homogenate hearts and up to 100 nmol/g in the CA group. No additional H2S was released from control, CS, or CA hearts by using the reducing agent tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine or a strong acidic solution (pH < 2) to "free" H2S from combined pools. Of note, the reducing agent DTT produced a significant sulfide artifact and was not used. These data suggest that 1) free H2S found in heart homogenates is not a reflection of H2S present in a "living" heart and 2) the pool of combined sulfides, released in a strong reducing or acidic milieu, does not increase in the heart in a measurable manner even after toxic exposure to sulfide. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Crystal Splitting in the Growth of Bi2S3

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jing; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-06-15

    Novel Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanostructures with a sheaf-like morphology are obtained via reaction of bismuth acetate-oleic acid complex with elemental sulfur in 1-octadecence. We propose these structures form by the splitting crystal growth mechanism, which is known to account for the morphology some mineral crystals assume in nature. By controlling the synthetic parameters, different forms of splitting, analogous to observed in minerals, are obtained in our case of Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3}. These new and complex Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanostructures are characterized by TEM, SEM, XRD and ED.

  10. H2S Activated Drug Release from Protein Cages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weijian; Zhang, Yajie; Li, Xiao; Chen, Hong; Sun, Jian; Feng, Fude

    2017-09-15

    We took advantage of gasotransmitter H2S as a chemical reaction-based trigger for controlled release of doxorubicin which is pre-coordinated by copper ions and enclosed in horse spleen apoferritin. The nanocomposite is stable at physiological pH and temperature before H2S activation. The drug release strategy avoids disassembly of protein shells and is controllable by the strong affinity of sulfide with copper ions. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay indicates the antitumor effect of doxorubicin toward tumor cells could be achievable by H2S activation.

  11. Bioactive lipids S1P and C1P are prometastatic factors in human rhabdomyosarcoma, and their tissue levels increase in response to radio/chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gabriela; Bryndza, Ewa; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Ratajczak, Janina; Maj, Magdalena; Tarnowski, Maciej; Klyachkin, Yuri M; Houghton, Peter; Morris, Andrew J; Vater, Axel; Klussmann, Sven; Kucia, Magdalena; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2013-07-01

    Evidence suggests that bioactive lipids may regulate pathophysiologic functions such as cancer cell metastasis. Therefore, we determined that the bioactive lipid chemoattractants sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) strongly enhanced the in vitro motility and adhesion of human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells. Importantly, this effect was observed at physiologic concentrations for both bioactive lipids, which are present in biologic fluids, and were much stronger than the effects observed in response to known RMS prometastatic factors such as stromal derived factors-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) or hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF). We also present novel evidence that the levels of S1P and C1P were increased in several organs after γ-irradiation or chemotherapy, which indicates an unwanted prometastatic environment related to treatment. Critically, we found that the metastasis of RMS cells in response to S1P can be effectively inhibited in vivo with the S1P-specific binder NOX-S93 that is based on a high-affinity Spiegelmer. These data indicate that bioactive lipids play a vital role in dissemination of RMS and contribute to the unwanted side effects of radio/chemotherapy by creating a prometastatic microenvironment.

  12. The alpha(1D)-adrenergic receptor directly regulates arterial blood pressure via vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Akito; Nasa, Yoshihisa; Koshimizu, Takaaki; Shinoura, Hitomi; Oshikawa, Sayuri; Kawai, Takayuki; Sunada, Sachie; Takeo, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2002-03-01

    To investigate the physiological role of the alpha(1D)-adrenergic receptor (alpha(1D)-AR) subtype, we created mice lacking the alpha(1D)-AR (alpha(1D)(-/-)) by gene targeting and characterized their cardiovascular function. In alpha(1D)-/- mice, the RT-PCR did not detect any transcript of the alpha(1D)-AR in any tissue examined, and there was no apparent upregulation of other alpha(1)-AR subtypes. Radioligand binding studies showed that alpha(1)-AR binding capacity in the aorta was lost, while that in the heart was unaltered in alpha(1D)-/- mice. Non-anesthetized alpha(1D)-/- mice maintained significantly lower basal systolic and mean arterial blood pressure conditions, relative to wild-type mice, and they showed no significant change in heart rate or in cardiac function, as assessed by echocardiogram. Besides hypotension, the pressor responses to phenylephrine and norepinephrine were decreased by 30-40% in alpha(1D)-/- mice. Furthermore, the contractile response of the aorta and the pressor response of isolated perfused mesenteric arterial beds to alpha(1)-AR stimulation were markedly reduced in alpha(1D)-/- mice. We conclude that the alpha(1D)-AR participates directly in sympathetic regulation of systemic blood pressure by vasoconstriction.

  13. Analysis of the rotational structure in the high-resolution infrared spectra of trans-hexatriene-1,1-d2 and -cis-1-d1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Fuson, Hannah A.; Tian, Hengfeng; Blake, Thomas A.

    2012-09-01

    Mixtures of trans-hexatriene-1,1-d2, -cis-1-d1, and -trans-1-d1 have been synthesized. Anharmonic frequencies and harmonic intensities were predicted with the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ model for the out-of-plane (a″) modes of the three isotopologues. Assignments are proposed for most of the a″ vibrational modes above 500 cm-1. Ground state (GS) rotational constants have been determined for the 1,1-d2 and cis-1-d1 species from the analysis of rotational structure of C-type bands in the high-resolution (0.0015 cm-1) infrared spectra in a mixture of the three isotopologues. The GS constants for the 1,1-d2 species are A0 = 0.8018850(6), B0 = 0.0418540(6), and C0 = 0.0397997(4) cm-1. The GS constants for the cis-1-d1 species are A0 = 0.809388(1), B0 = 0.043532(2), and C0 = 0.041320(1) cm-1. Small inertial defects confirm planarity for both species. These ground state rotational constants are intended for use in determining a semiexperimental equilibrium structure and evaluating the influence of chain length on π-electron delocalization in polyenes.

  14. EEF1D modulates proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Flores, Isadora L; Kawahara, Rebeca; Miguel, Márcia C C; Granato, Daniela C; Domingues, Romênia R; Macedo, Carolina C S; Carnielli, Carolina M; Yokoo, Sami; Rodrigues, Priscila C; Monteiro, Bárbara V B; Oliveira, Carine E; Salmon, Cristiane R; Nociti, Francisco H; Lopes, Márcio A; Santos-Silva, Alan; Winck, Flavia V; Coletta, Ricardo D; Paes Leme, Adriana F

    2016-05-01

    EEF1D (eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1δ) is a subunit of the elongation factor 1 complex of proteins that mediates the elongation process during protein synthesis via enzymatic delivery of aminoacyl-tRNAs to the ribosome. Although the functions of EEF1D in the translation process are recognized, EEF1D expression was found to be unbalanced in tumours. In the present study, we demonstrate the overexpression of EEF1D in OSCC (oral squamous cell carcinoma), and revealed that EEF1D and protein interaction partners promote the activation of cyclin D1 and vimentin proteins. EEF1D knockdown in OSCC reduced cell proliferation and induced EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transition) phenotypes, including cell invasion. Taken together, these results define EEF1D as a critical inducer of OSCC proliferation and EMT. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  15. Hyperfine Quenching of the 2s2p 3P0 State of Berylliumlike Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K T; Chen, M H; Johnson, W R

    2008-03-13

    The hyperfine-induced 2s2p {sup 3}P{sub 0}-2s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} transition rate for Be-like {sup 47}Ti{sup 18+} was recently measured in a storage-ring experiment by Schippers et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 033001 (2007)]. The measured value of 0.56(3) s{sup -1} is almost 60% larger than the theoretical value of 0.356 s{sup -1} from a multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculation by Marques et al. [Phys. Rev. A 47, 929 (1993)]. In this work, we use a large-scale relativistic configuration-interaction method to calculate these hyperfine-induced rates for ions with Z = 6-92. Coherent hyperfine-quenching effects between the 2s2p {sup 1,3}P{sub 1} states are included in a perturbative as well as a radiation damping approach. Contrary to the claims of Marques et al., contributions from the {sup 1}P{sub 1} state are substantial and lead to a hyperfine-induced rate of 0.67 s{sup -1}, in better agreement with, though larger than, the measured value.

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis and structural characterization of two 1-D and 2-D Dawson-based phosphotungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Junwei; Zheng Shoutian; Liu Wei; Yang Guoyu

    2008-03-15

    Two new Dawson-based phosphotungstates (H{sub 2}en){sub 0.5}H[Cu(en){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}{l_brace}[Cu(en){sub 2}]({alpha}{sub 1}-P{sub 2}W{sub 17}CuO{sub 61}){r_brace}.8H{sub 2}O (1) (en=ethylenediamine) and [4,4'-H{sub 2}bpy]{sub 2}{l_brace}[Cu(4,4'-bpy){sub 3}][Cu(4,4'-bpy){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 2}[Cu(4,4'-bpy)][{alpha}-P{sub 2}W{sub 1=} 8O{sub 62}]{sub 2}{r_brace}.6H{sub 2}O (2) (4,4'-bpy=4,4'-bipyridine) have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. 1 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1 with a=11.7626(17), b=13.246(2), c=29.350(5) A, {alpha}=87.355(5), {beta}=79.583(5), {gamma}=66.993(3){sup o}, V=4138.3(11) A{sup 3}, Z=2, GOF=1.089, R{sub 1}=0.0563 and wR{sub 2}=0.1505, whereas 2 belongs to the orthorhombic space group Iba2 with a=22.277(8), b=47.04(2), c=22.153(8) A, V=23215(17) A{sup 3}, Z=4, GOF=1.051, R{sub 1}=0.0627 and wR{sub 2}=0.1477. 1 consists of a 1-D linear chain structure constructed from monocopper{sup II}-substituted Dawson polyoxoanions, while 2 represents the first 2-D sheet-like structure with a (4,4)-connected topological net built up from plenary Dawson-type polyoxoanions and Cu{sup II}-4,4'-bpy complex cations in polyoxometalate chemistry. - Graphical abstract: Two Dawson-based phosphotungstates (H{sub 2}en){sub 0.5}H[Cu(en){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}{l_brace}[Cu(en){sub 2}]({alpha}{sub 1}-P{sub 2}W{sub 17}CuO{sub 61}){r_brace}.8H{sub 2}O (1) and [4,4'-H{sub 2}bpy]{sub 2}{l_brace}[Cu(4,4'-bpy){sub 3}][Cu(4,4'-bpy){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 2}[Cu(4,4'-bpy)][{alpha}-P{sub 2}W{sub 1=} 8O{sub 62}]{sub 2}{r_brace}.6H{sub 2}O (2) have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. 1 consists of a 1-D linear chain structure constructed from monocopper-substituted Dawson polyoxoanions, while 2 represents the first 2-D sheet-like structure with a (4,4)-connected topological net built up from saturated Dawson-type polyoxoanions and Cu{sup II}-4,4'-bpy complex cations in

  17. Baseline Elvs: Delta 2 7920 and Titan 2S SLV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The baseline mission profiles for two expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) are presented in viewgraph format. The two expendable stage vehicles are the Delta 2 and the Titan 2S. Descriptions are given for both ELV configurations.

  18. Baseline ELVs: Delta 2 7920 and Titan 2S SLV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-09-01

    The baseline mission profiles for two expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) are presented in viewgraph format. The two expendable stage vehicles are the Delta 2 and the Titan 2S. Descriptions are given for both ELV configurations.

  19. Photoexcited Carrier Dynamics of Cu2S Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Riha, Shannon C; Schaller, Richard D; Gosztola, David J; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Martinson, Alex B F

    2014-11-20

    Copper sulfide is a simple binary material with promising attributes for low-cost thin film photovoltaics. However, stable Cu2S-based device efficiencies approaching 10% free from cadmium have yet to be realized. In this Letter, transient absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate the dynamics of the photoexcited state of isolated Cu2S thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition or vapor-based cation exchange of ZnS. While a number of variables including film thickness, carrier concentration, surface oxidation, and grain boundary passivation were examined, grain structure alone was found to correlate with longer lifetimes. A map of excited state dynamics is deduced from the spectral evolution from 300 fs to 300 μs. Revealing the effects of grain morphology on the photophysical properties of Cu2S is a crucial step toward reaching high efficiencies in operationally stable Cu2S thin film photovoltaics.

  20. Spectroscopy of the UPSILON(2S) with the Crystal Ball

    SciTech Connect

    Irion, J.

    1985-04-01

    The Crystal Ball experiment has been taking data at the DORIS II storage ring at DESY/Hamburg on the UPSILON(2S) and UPSILON(1S) resonances since summer 1982. Results on the hadronic transitions between the UPSILON(2S) and the UPSILON(1S) are presented as well as measurements of the radiative decays of the UPSILON(2S) to the chi/sub b/ states in inclusive and exclusive channels. The exclusive UPSILON(2S) ..-->.. ..gamma..chi/sub b/ ..-->.. ..gamma gamma..UPSILON(1S) ..-->.. ..gamma gamma..l/sup +/l/sup -/ sample allows a study of the spins of the chi/sub b/ states. Also discussed is the present status of the zeta(8.3) in the radiative decays of the UPSILON(1S). 22 refs., 14 figs.

  1. Measurement of the muonium 1S-2S transition frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann, K.; Baird, P. E. G.; Barr, J. R. M.; Berkeland, D.; Boshier, M. G.; Braun, B.; Eaton, G. H.; Ferguson, A. I.; Geerds, H.; Hughes, V. W.; Maas, F.; Matthias, B. E.; Matousek, P.; Persaud, M.; Putlitz, G. zu; Reinhard, I.; Riis, E.; Sandars, P. G. H.; Schwarz, W.; Toner, W. T.

    1995-04-01

    Resonant ionization spectroscopy has been employed for measuring the 1{sup 2}S1/2-2{sup 2}S1/2 frequency difference in the hydrogen-like muonium atom to 2 455 529 002(33)(46) MHz. The 1S-2S two-photon transition was induced Doppler-free using two counter-propagating laser beams. The 2S state was photo-ionized by a third photon from the same laser field. The measurement agrees with QED theory within two standard deviations. The mass of the positive muon can be extracted from the isotope shifts in this transition to hydrogen and deuterium to 105.658 80(29)(43) MeV/c{sup 2}.

  2. Observation of the ηb(2S) Meson in Υ(2S)→γηb(2S), ηb(2S)→ hadrons and confirmation of the ηb(1S) meson.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Tomaradze, A; Xiao, T; Seth, Kamal K

    2012-08-24

    The data for 9.3 million Υ(2S) and 20.9 million Υ(1S) taken with the CLEO III detector have been used to study the radiative population of states identified by their decay into 26 different exclusive hadronic final states. In the Υ(2S) decays, an enhancement is observed at a ~5σ level at a mass of 9974.6±2.3(stat)±2.1(syst) MeV. It is attributed to η(b)(2S) and corresponds to the Υ(2S) hyperfine splitting of 48.7±2.3(stat)±2.1(syst) MeV. In the Υ(1S) decays, the identification of η(b)(1S) is confirmed at a ~3σ level with M[η(b)(1S)] in agreement with its known value.

  3. The role of H2S bioavailability in endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Szabo, Csaba; Ichinose, Fumito; Ahmed, Asif; Whiteman, Matthew; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction reflects pathophysiological changes in the phenotype and functions of endothelial cells that result from and/or contribute to a plethora of cardiovascular diseases. Here we review the role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction, one of the fastest advanced and hottest research topics. Conventionally treated as an environment pollutant, H2S is also produced in endothelial cells and participates in the fine regulation of endothelial integrity and functions. Disturbed H2S bioavailability has been suggested to be a novel indicator of the progress and prognosis of endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction appears to exhibit in different forms in different pathologies but therapeutics aimed at remedying the altered H2S bioavailability may benefit all. PMID:26071118

  4. Photoexcited Carrier Dynamics of Cu2S Thin Films

    DOE PAGES

    Riha, Shannon C.; Schaller, Richard D.; Gosztola, David J.; ...

    2014-11-11

    Copper sulfide is a simple binary material with promising attributes for low-cost thin film photovoltaics. However, stable Cu2S-based device efficiencies approaching 10% free from cadmium have yet to be realized. In this paper, transient absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate the dynamics of the photoexcited state of isolated Cu2S thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition or vapor-based cation exchange of ZnS. While a number of variables including film thickness, carrier concentration, surface oxidation, and grain boundary passivation were examined, grain structure alone was found to correlate with longer lifetimes. A map of excited state dynamics is deduced from themore » spectral evolution from 300 fs to 300 μs. Finally, revealing the effects of grain morphology on the photophysical properties of Cu2S is a crucial step toward reaching high efficiencies in operationally stable Cu2S thin film photovoltaics.« less

  5. Quantitative photoabsorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of H2S and D2S at 49-240 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Wang, Xiuyan; Suto, Masako

    1987-01-01

    Photoabsorption and fluorescence cross sections of H2S and D2S were measured in the 49-240 nm region using synchrotron radiation as a light source. Fluorescence from photoexcitation of H2S appears at 49-97 nm, but not in the long wavelength region. Fluorescence spectra were dispersed, and used to identify the emitters to be H2S(+) (A), SH(+)(A), and H(n greater than 2). The fluorescence quantum yield is about 6 percent. Photoexcitation of D2S at 49-96 nm produces fluorescence with a quantum yield of about 5 percent. The emitters are identified from the fluorescence spectra to be D2S(+)(A), SD(+)(A), and D(n greater than 2). The Franck-Condon factors for the SH(+) and SD(+) (A-X) transitions were determined. The SD(A-X) fluorescence was observed from photoexcitation of D2S at 100-151 nm, for which the fluorescence cross section and quantum yield were measured.

  6. Heterologous expression of Candida albicans Pma1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Keniya, Mikhail V.; Cannon, Richard D.; Nguyễn, ẤnBình; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Monk, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of opportunistic and life-threatening systemic fungal infections, especially in the immunocompromised. The plasma membrane proton pumping ATPase (Pma1p) is an essential enzyme that generates the electrochemical gradient required for cell growth. We expressed C. albicans Pma1p (CaPma1p) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to facilitate screening for inhibitors. Replacement of S. cerevisiae PMA1 with C. albicans PMA1 gave clones expressing CaPma1p that grew slowly at low pH. CaPma1p was expressed at significantly lower levels and had lower specific activity than the native Pma1p. It also conferred pH sensitivity, hygromycin B resistance and low levels of glucose-dependent proton pumping. Recombination between CaPMA1 and the homologous non-essential ScPMA2 resulted in chimeric suppressor mutants that expressed functional CaPma1p with improved H+-ATPase activity and growth rates at low pH. Molecular models of suppressor mutants identified specific amino acids (between 531-595 in CaPma1p) that may affect regulation of the activity of Pma1p oligomers in S. cerevisiae. A modified CaPma1p chimeric construct containing only 5 amino acids from ScPma2p enabled the expression of a fully functional enzyme for drug screens and structural resolution. PMID:23374681

  7. Multiple functions of the vacuolar sorting protein Ccz1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman-Sommer, Marta; Migdalski, Andrzej; Rytka, Joanna; Kucharczyk, Roza . E-mail: roza@ibb.waw.pl

    2005-04-01

    The CCZ1 (YBR131w) gene encodes a protein required for fusion of various transport intermediates with the vacuole. Ccz1p, in a complex with Mon1p, is a close partner of Ypt7p in the processes of fusion of endosomes to vacuoles and homotypic vacuole fusion. In this work, we exploited the Ca{sup 2+}-sensitivity of the ccz1{delta} mutant to identify genes specifically interacting with CCZ1, basing on functional multicopy suppression of calcium toxicity. The presented results indicate that Ccz1p functions in the cell either in association with Mon1p and Ypt7p in fusion at the vacuolar membrane, or-separately-with Arl1p at early steps of vacuolar transport. We also show that suppression of calcium toxicity by the calcium pumps Pmr1p and Pmc1p is restricted only to the subset of mutants defective in vacuole morphology. The mechanisms of Ca{sup 2+}-pump-mediated suppression also differ from each other, since the action of Pmr1p, but not Pmc1p, appears to require Arl1p function.

  8. Metal Oxide/Zeolite Combination Absorbs H2S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1989-01-01

    Mixed copper and molybdenum oxides supported in pores of zeolite found to remove H2S from mixture of gases rich in hydrogen and steam, at temperatures from 256 to 538 degree C. Absorber of H2S needed to clean up gas streams from fuel processors that incorporate high-temperature steam reformers or hydrodesulfurizing units. Zeolites chosen as supporting materials because of their high porosity, rigidity, alumina content, and variety of both composition and form.

  9. Metal Oxide/Zeolite Combination Absorbs H2S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1989-01-01

    Mixed copper and molybdenum oxides supported in pores of zeolite found to remove H2S from mixture of gases rich in hydrogen and steam, at temperatures from 256 to 538 degree C. Absorber of H2S needed to clean up gas streams from fuel processors that incorporate high-temperature steam reformers or hydrodesulfurizing units. Zeolites chosen as supporting materials because of their high porosity, rigidity, alumina content, and variety of both composition and form.

  10. Cse1p Is Involved in Export of Yeast Importin α from the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Solsbacher, Jens; Maurer, Patrick; Bischoff, F. Ralf; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    1998-01-01

    Proteins bearing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) are targeted to the nucleus by the heterodimeric transporter importin. Importin α binds to the NLS and to importin β, which carries it through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Importin disassembles in the nucleus, evidently by binding of RanGTP to importin β. The importin subunits are exported separately. We investigated the role of Cse1p, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue of human CAS, in nuclear export of Srp1p (yeast importin α). Cse1p is located predominantly in the nucleus but also is present in the cytoplasm and at the NPC. We analyzed the in vivo localization of the importin subunits fused to the green fluorescent protein in wild-type and cse1-1 mutant cells. Srp1p but not importin β accumulated in nuclei of cse1-1 mutants, which are defective in NLS import but not defective in NLS-independent import pathways. Purified Cse1p binds with high affinity to Srp1p only in the presence of RanGTP. The complex is dissociated by the cytoplasmic RanGTP-binding protein Yrb1p. Combined with the in vivo results, this suggests that a complex containing Srp1p, Cse1p, and RanGTP is exported from the nucleus and is subsequently disassembled in the cytoplasm by Yrb1p. The formation of the trimeric Srp1p-Cse1p-RanGTP complex is inhibited by NLS peptides, indicating that only NLS-free Srp1p will be exported to the cytoplasm. PMID:9774694

  11. Not all 1p/19q non-codeleted oligodendroglial tumors are astrocytic

    PubMed Central

    Aibaidula, Abudumijiti; Chen, Hong; Tang, Qisheng; Li, Kay Ka-Wai; Chung, Nellie Yuk-Fei; Chan, Danny Tat-Ming; Poon, Wai Sang; Mao, Ying; Wu, Jinsong; Zhou, Liangfu; Chan, Aden Ka-yin; Ng, Ho-Keung

    2016-01-01

    Although 1p/19q codeletion is the genetic hallmark defining oligodendrogliomas, approximately 30-40% of oligodendroglial tumors have intact 1p/19q in the literature and they demonstrate a worse prognosis. This group of 1p/19q intact oligodendroglial tumors is frequently suggested to be astrocytic in nature with TP53 and ATRX mutations but actually remains under-investigated. In the present study, we provided evidence that not all 1p/19q intact oligodendroglial tumors are astrocytic through histologic and molecular approaches. We examined 1p/19q status by FISH in a large cohort of 337 oligodendroglial tumors and identified 39.8% lacking 1p/19q codeletion which was independently associated with poor prognosis. Among this 1p/19q intact oligodendroglial tumor cohort, 58 cases demonstrated classic oligodendroglial histology which showed older patient age, better prognosis, association with grade III histology, PDGFRA expression, TERTp mutation, as well as frequent IDH mutation. More than half of the 1p/19q intact oligodendroglial tumors showed lack of astrocytic defining markers, p53 expression and ATRX loss. TP53 mutational analysis was additionally conducted in 45 cases of the 1p/19q intact oligodendroglial tumors. Wild-type TP53 was detected in 71.1% of cases which was associated with classic oligodendroglial histology. Importantly, IDH and TERTp co-occurred in 75% of 1p/19q intact, TP53 wild-type oligodendrogliomas, highlighting the potential of the co-mutations in assisting diagnosis of oligodendrogliomas in tumors with clear cell morphology and non-codeleted 1p/19q status. In summary, our study demonstrated that not all 1p/19q intact oligodendroglial tumors are astrocytic and co-evaluation of IDH and TERTp mutation could potentially serve as an adjunct for diagnosing 1p/19q intact oligodendrogliomas. PMID:27556304

  12. Analysis of cardiovascular responses to the H2S donors Na2S and NaHS in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Daniel; Jupiter, Ryan C.; Pankey, Edward A.; Reddy, Vishwaradh G.; Edward, Justin A.; Swan, Kevin W.; Peak, Taylor C.; Mostany, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous molecule formed from L-cysteine in vascular tissue. In the present study, cardiovascular responses to the H2S donors Na2S and NaHS were investigated in the anesthetized rat. The intravenous injections of Na2S and NaHS 0.03–0.5 mg/kg produced dose-related decreases in systemic arterial pressure and heart rate, and at higher doses decreases in cardiac output, pulmonary arterial pressure, and systemic vascular resistance. H2S infusion studies show that decreases in systemic arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance are well-maintained, and responses to Na2S are reversible. Decreases in heart rate were not blocked by atropine, suggesting that the bradycardia was independent of parasympathetic activation and was mediated by an effect on the sinus node. The decreases in systemic arterial pressure were not attenuated by hexamethonium, glybenclamide, Nw-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, sodium meclofenamate, ODQ, miconazole, 5-hydroxydecanoate, or tetraethylammonium, suggesting that ATP-sensitive potassium channels, nitric oxide, arachidonic acid metabolites, cyclic GMP, p450 epoxygenase metabolites, or large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels are not involved in mediating hypotensive responses to the H2S donors in the rat and that responses are not centrally mediated. The present data indicate that decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to the H2S donors can be mediated by decreases in vascular resistance and cardiac output and that the donors have an effect on the sinus node independent of the parasympathetic system. The present data indicate that the mechanism of the peripherally mediated hypotensive response to the H2S donors is uncertain in the intact rat. PMID:26071540

  13. Analysis of cardiovascular responses to the H2S donors Na2S and NaHS in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Daniel; Jupiter, Ryan C; Pankey, Edward A; Reddy, Vishwaradh G; Edward, Justin A; Swan, Kevin W; Peak, Taylor C; Mostany, Ricardo; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2015-08-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous molecule formed from L-cysteine in vascular tissue. In the present study, cardiovascular responses to the H2S donors Na2S and NaHS were investigated in the anesthetized rat. The intravenous injections of Na2S and NaHS 0.03-0.5 mg/kg produced dose-related decreases in systemic arterial pressure and heart rate, and at higher doses decreases in cardiac output, pulmonary arterial pressure, and systemic vascular resistance. H2S infusion studies show that decreases in systemic arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance are well-maintained, and responses to Na2S are reversible. Decreases in heart rate were not blocked by atropine, suggesting that the bradycardia was independent of parasympathetic activation and was mediated by an effect on the sinus node. The decreases in systemic arterial pressure were not attenuated by hexamethonium, glybenclamide, N(w)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, sodium meclofenamate, ODQ, miconazole, 5-hydroxydecanoate, or tetraethylammonium, suggesting that ATP-sensitive potassium channels, nitric oxide, arachidonic acid metabolites, cyclic GMP, p450 epoxygenase metabolites, or large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels are not involved in mediating hypotensive responses to the H2S donors in the rat and that responses are not centrally mediated. The present data indicate that decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to the H2S donors can be mediated by decreases in vascular resistance and cardiac output and that the donors have an effect on the sinus node independent of the parasympathetic system. The present data indicate that the mechanism of the peripherally mediated hypotensive response to the H2S donors is uncertain in the intact rat. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Are ILC2s Jekyll and Hyde in airway inflammation?

    PubMed

    Ealey, Kafi N; Moro, Kazuyo; Koyasu, Shigeo

    2017-07-01

    Asthma is a complex heterogeneous disease of the airways characterized by lung inflammation, airway hyperreactivity (AHR), mucus overproduction, and remodeling of the airways. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) play a crucial role in the initiation and propagation of type 2 inflammatory programs in allergic asthma models, independent of adaptive immunity. In response to allergen, helminths or viral infection, damaged airway epithelial cells secrete IL-33, IL-25, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), which activate ILC2s to produce type 2 cytokines such as IL-5, IL-13, and IL-9. Furthermore, ILC2s coordinate a network of cellular responses and interact with numerous cell types to propagate the inflammatory response and repair lung damage. ILC2s display functional plasticity in distinct asthma phenotypes, enabling them to respond to very different immune microenvironments. Thus, in the context of non-allergic asthma, triggered by exposure to environmental factors, ILC2s transdifferentiate to ILC1-like cells and activate type 1 inflammatory programs in the lung. In this review, we summarize accumulating evidence on the heterogeneity, plasticity, regulatory mechanisms, and pleiotropic roles of ILC2s in allergic inflammation as well as mechanisms for their suppression in the airways. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Glutathione-complexed [2Fe-2S] clusters function in Fe-S cluster storage and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Fidai, Insiya; Wachnowsky, Christine; Cowan, J A

    2016-10-01

    Glutathione-coordinated [2Fe-2S] complex is a non-protein-bound [2Fe-2S] cluster that is capable of reconstituting the human iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein IscU. This complex demonstrates physiologically relevant solution chemistry and is a viable substrate for iron-sulfur cluster transport by Atm1p exporter protein. Herein, we report on some of the possible functional and physiological roles for this novel [2Fe-2S](GS4) complex in iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis and quantitatively characterize its role in the broader network of Fe-S cluster transfer reactions. UV-vis and circular dichroism spectroscopy have been used in kinetic studies to determine second-order rate constants for [2Fe-2S] cluster transfer from [2Fe-2S](GS4) complex to acceptor proteins, such as human IscU, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Isa1, human and yeast glutaredoxins (human Grx2 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Grx3), and human ferredoxins. Second-order rate constants for cluster extraction from these holo proteins were also determined by varying the concentration of glutathione, and a likely common mechanism for cluster uptake was determined by kinetic analysis. The results indicate that the [2Fe-2S](GS4) complex is stable under physiological conditions, and demonstrates reversible cluster exchange with a wide range of Fe-S cluster proteins, thereby supporting a possible physiological role for such centers.

  16. Highly efficient and stereoselective biosynthesis of (2S,5S)-hexanediol with a dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Müller, Marion; Katzberg, Michael; Bertau, Martin; Hummel, Werner

    2010-04-07

    The enantiopure (2S,5S)-hexanediol serves as a versatile building block for the production of various fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. For industrial and commercial scale, the diol is currently obtained through bakers' yeast-mediated reduction of 2,5-hexanedione. However, this process suffers from its insufficient space-time yield of about 4 g L(-1) d(-1) (2S,5S)-hexanediol. Thus, a new synthesis route is required that allows for higher volumetric productivity. For this reason, the enzyme which is responsible for 2,5-hexanedione reduction in bakers' yeast was identified after purification to homogeneity and subsequent MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy analysis. As a result, the dehydrogenase Gre2p was shown to be responsible for the majority of the diketone reduction, by comparison to a Gre2p deletion strain lacking activity towards 2,5-hexanedione. Bioreduction using the recombinant enzyme afforded the (2S,5S)-hexanediol with >99% conversion yield and in >99.9% de and ee. Moreover, the diol was obtained with an unsurpassed high volumetric productivity of 70 g L(-1) d(-1) (2S,5S)-hexanediol. Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies have shown that Gre2p is capable of catalysing both the reduction of 2,5-hexanedione as well as the oxidation of (2S,5S)-hexanediol, but the catalytic efficiency of the reduction is three times higher. Furthermore, the enzyme's ability to reduce other keto-compounds, including further diketones, was studied, revealing that the application can be extended to alpha-diketones and aldehydes.

  17. Synthesis, crystal structure and properties of [(dien)2Mn]Ge2S4 with mixed-valent Ge centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Cheng-Yang; Yuan, Zhuang-Dong; Zhang, Lu-Ge; Wang, Ya-Bai; Liu, Guo-Dong; Gong, Liao-Kuo; Lei, Xiao-Wu

    2013-10-01

    One new manganese thiogermanate, [(dien)2Mn]Ge2S4 (dien=diethylenetriamine), was prepared under mild solvothermal conditions and structurally and spectroscopically characterized. The title compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system, chiral space group P212121 (no. 19) with a=9.113(4) Å, b=12.475(5) Å, c=17.077(7) Å, V=1941.5(15) Å3 and Z=4. Its structure features a three-dimensional (3D) network composed of a one-dimensional (1D) [Ge2S4]2- anionic chain and a [(dien)2Mn]2+ complex interconnected via various hydrogen bonds. The most interesting structural feature of the compound is the presence of two different oxidation states of germanium centers in the 1D [Ge2S4]2- chain, which is also supported by the result of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement. The optical property of the title compound has also been studied by UV-vis spectra.

  18. A girl with 1p36 deletion syndrome and congenital fiber type disproportion myopathy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Toribe, Yasuhisa; Nakajima, Tohru; Okinaga, Takeshi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Nonaka, Ikuya; Shimokawa, Osamu; Matsumoto, Noamichi

    2002-01-01

    Chromosome 1p36 deletion syndrome is characterized by hypotonia, moderate to severe developmental and growth retardation, and characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism. Muscle hypotonia and delayed motor development are almost constant features of the syndrome. We report a 4-year-old Japanese girl with 1p36 deletion syndrome whose muscle pathology showed congenital fiber type disproportion (CFTD) myopathy. This is the first case report of 1p36 deletion associated with CFTD. This association may indicate that one of the CFTD loci is located at 1p36. Ski proto-oncogene -/- mice have phenotypes that resemble some of the features observed in patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome. Because fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the human SKI gene is deleted in our patient, some genes in 1p36, including SKI proto-oncogene, may be involved in muscle hypotonia and delayed motor development in this syndrome.

  19. XPB Induces C1D Expression to Counteract UV-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang; Liu, Juhong; Abu-Asab, Mones; Masabumi, Shibuya; Maru, Yoshiro

    2010-01-01

    Although C1D has been shown to be involved in DNA double-strand breaks repair, how C1D expression was induced and the mechanism(s) by which C1D facilitates DNA repair in mammalian cells remain poorly understood. We and others have previously shown that expression of XPB protein efficiently compensated the UV-irradiation sensitive phenotype of 27-1 cells which lacks functional XPB. To further explore XPB-regulated genes that could be involved in UV-induced DNA repair, Differential Display analysis of mRNA level from CHO-9, 27-1 and 27-1 complemented with wild-type XPB were performed and C1D gene was identified as one of the major genes whose expression was significantly up-regulated by restoring XPB function. We found that XPB is essential to induce C1D transcription after UV-irradiation. The increase of C1D expression effectively compensates the UV-induced proteolysis of C1D and thus maintains cellular C1D level to cope with DNA damage inflicted by UV-irradiation. We further showed that although insufficient to rescue 27-1 cells from UV-induced apoptosis by itself, C1D facilitates XPB DNA repair through direct interaction with XPB. Our findings provided direct evidence that C1D is associated with DNA repair complex and may promote repair of UV-induced DNA damage. PMID:20530579

  20. Zerumbone modulates CD1d expression and lipid antigen presentation pathway in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shyanti, Ritis K; Sehrawat, Anuradha; Singh, Shivendra V; Mishra, J P N; Singh, Rana P

    2017-10-01

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells based cancer immunotherapy is an evolving area of cancer therapy, but tumors escape from this treatment modality by altering CD1d expression and its antigen presentation pathway. Here, we have studied the relation of CD1d expression in various breast cancer cell lines to their viability and progression. We observed a novel phenomenon that CD1d expression level increases with the progressive stage of the cancer. A small molecule, zerumbone (ZER) caused down-regulation of CD1d that was accompanied by breast cancer cell growth in vitro. The growth inhibitory effect of ZER against breast cancer cells was augmented by treatment with anti-CD1d mAb. This effect was mediated by G1-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction coupled with an increase in mitochondrial membrane depolarization. CD1d expression and cell proliferation were inhibited by both CD1d siRNA and ZER. The α-galactosylceramide, a ligand for CD1d, showed increased CD1d expression as well as cell proliferation which was opposite to the effects of ZER. This study shows that, CD1d overexpression is associated with the progressive stages of breast cancer and ZER could be an adjuvant to potentiate cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Role of Pex21p for Piggyback Import of Gpd1p and Pnc1p into Peroxisomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Effelsberg, Daniel; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Tonillo, Jason; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Proteins designated for peroxisomal protein import harbor one of two common peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the oleate-induced PTS2-dependent import of the thiolase Fox3p into peroxisomes is conducted by the soluble import receptor Pex7p in cooperation with the auxiliary Pex18p, one of two supposedly redundant PTS2 co-receptors. Here, we report on a novel function for the co-receptor Pex21p, which cannot be fulfilled by Pex18p. The data establish Pex21p as a general co-receptor in PTS2-dependent protein import, whereas Pex18p is especially important for oleate-induced import of PTS2 proteins. The glycerol-producing PTS2 protein glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase Gpd1p shows a tripartite localization in peroxisomes, in the cytosol, and in the nucleus under osmotic stress conditions. We show the following: (i) Pex21p is required for peroxisomal import of Gpd1p as well as a key enzyme of the NAD+ salvage pathway, Pnc1p; (ii) Pnc1p, a nicotinamidase without functional PTS2, is co-imported into peroxisomes by piggyback transport via Gpd1p. Moreover, the specific transport of these two enzymes into peroxisomes suggests a novel regulatory role for peroxisomes under various stress conditions. PMID:26276932

  2. Role of Pex21p for Piggyback Import of Gpd1p and Pnc1p into Peroxisomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Effelsberg, Daniel; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Tonillo, Jason; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-10-16

    Proteins designated for peroxisomal protein import harbor one of two common peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the oleate-induced PTS2-dependent import of the thiolase Fox3p into peroxisomes is conducted by the soluble import receptor Pex7p in cooperation with the auxiliary Pex18p, one of two supposedly redundant PTS2 co-receptors. Here, we report on a novel function for the co-receptor Pex21p, which cannot be fulfilled by Pex18p. The data establish Pex21p as a general co-receptor in PTS2-dependent protein import, whereas Pex18p is especially important for oleate-induced import of PTS2 proteins. The glycerol-producing PTS2 protein glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase Gpd1p shows a tripartite localization in peroxisomes, in the cytosol, and in the nucleus under osmotic stress conditions. We show the following: (i) Pex21p is required for peroxisomal import of Gpd1p as well as a key enzyme of the NAD(+) salvage pathway, Pnc1p; (ii) Pnc1p, a nicotinamidase without functional PTS2, is co-imported into peroxisomes by piggyback transport via Gpd1p. Moreover, the specific transport of these two enzymes into peroxisomes suggests a novel regulatory role for peroxisomes under various stress conditions. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Stp1p, Stp2p and Abf1p are involved in regulation of expression of the amino acid transporter gene BAP3 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Marco de; Nielsen, Peter S.; Bebelman, Jan-Paul; Heerikhuizen, Harm van; Andersen, Helge A.; Planta, Rudi J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the BAP3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a branched chain amino acid permease, is induced in response to the availability of several naturally occurring amino acids in the medium. This induction is mediated via an upstream activating sequence (called UASaa) in the BAP3 promoter, and dependent on Stp1p, a nuclear protein with zinc finger domains, suggesting that Stp1p is a transcription factor involved in BAP3 expression. In this paper, we show that Stp2p, a protein with considerable similarity to Stp1p, is also involved in the induction of BAP3 expression. To gain more insight into the roles of STP1 and STP2, we have overexpressed both Stp1p and Stp2p in yeast cells. Gel shift assays with the UASaa as a probe show that the UASaa can form two major complexes. One complex is dependent on Stp2p overexpression and the other is formed independently of STP1 or STP2, suggesting that the UASaa is also bound by another factor. Here we show that the other factor is Abf1p, which binds specifically to the UASaa of BAP3. PMID:10648791

  4. Testing the early Mars H2-CO2 greenhouse hypothesis with a 1-D photochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natasha; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Ramirez, Ramses; Kasting, James F.

    2015-09-01

    A recent study by Ramirez et al. (Ramirez, R.M. et al. [2014]. Nat. Geosci. 7(1), 59-63. http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ngeo2000 (accessed 16.09.14)) demonstrated that an atmosphere with 1.3-4 bar of CO2 and H2O, in addition to 5-20% H2, could have raised the mean annual and global surface temperature of early Mars above the freezing point of water. Such warm temperatures appear necessary to generate the rainfall (or snowfall) amounts required to carve the ancient martian valleys. Here, we use our best estimates for early martian outgassing rates, along with a 1-D photochemical model, to assess the conversion efficiency of CO, CH4, and H2S to CO2, SO2, and H2. Our outgassing estimates assume that Mars was actively recycling volatiles between its crust and interior, as Earth does today. H2 production from serpentinization and deposition of banded iron-formations is also considered. Under these assumptions, maintaining an H2 concentration of ˜1-2% by volume is achievable, but reaching 5% H2 requires additional H2 sources or a slowing of the hydrogen escape rate below the diffusion limit. If the early martian atmosphere was indeed H2-rich, we might be able to see evidence of this in the rock record. The hypothesis proposed here is consistent with new data from the Curiosity Rover, which show evidence for a long-lived lake in Gale Crater near Mt. Sharp. It is also consistent with measured oxygen fugacities of martian meteorites, which show evidence for progressive mantle oxidation over time.

  5. Bcl-xL regulates CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells by altering CD1d trafficking through the endocytic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B.; Carey, Gregory B.; Webb, Tonya J.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of T cells that recognize glycolipid antigens presented in the context of CD1d molecules. NKT cells mount strong anti-tumor responses and are a major focus in developing effective cancer immunotherapy. It is known that CD1d molecules are constantly internalized from the cell surface, recycled through the endocytic compartments, and re-expressed on the cell surface. However, very little is known about the regulation of CD1d-mediated antigen processing and presentation in B cell lymphoma. Pro-survival factors of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bcl-xL are often upregulated in B cell lymphomas, and are intimately linked to sphingolipid metabolism as well as the endocytic compartments. We hypothesized that Bcl-xL can regulate CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells. We found that over-expression or induction of Bcl-xL led to increased antigen presentation to NKT cells. Conversely, the inhibition or knockdown of Bcl-xL led to decreased NKT cell activation. Furthermore, knockdown of Bcl-xL resulted in the loss of CD1d trafficking to LAMPl+ compartments. Rab7, a late endosomal protein was upregulated and CD1d molecules accumulated in the Rab7+ late endosomal compartment. These results demonstrate that Bcl-xL regulates CD1d-mediated antigen processing and presentation to NKT cells by altering the late endosomal compartment and changing the intracellular localization of CD1d. PMID:25070854

  6. Measurement of the Branching Fractions for psi(2S) --> e+e- and psi(2S)-->mu+mu-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2004-02-10

    The authors measure the branching fractions of the {psi}(2S) meson to the leptonic final states e{sup +}e{sup -} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} relative to that for {psi}(2S) {yields} J/{psi} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The method uses {psi}(2S) mesons produced in the decay of B mesons at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance in a data sample collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Using previous measurements for the {psi}(2S) {yields} J/{psi} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} branching fraction, they determine the e{sup +}e{sup -} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} branching fractions to be 0.0078 {+-} 0.0009 {+-} 0.0008 and 0.0067 {+-} 0.0008 {+-} 0.0007 respectively.

  7. Measurement of the branching fractions for ψ(2S)-->e+e- and ψ(2S)-->μ+μ-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Clark, A. R.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Liu, T.; Lynch, G.; Oddone, P. J.; Perazzo, A.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Andress, J. C.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; de Groot, N.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; McFall, J. D.; Wallom, D.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Jolly, S.; McKemey, A. K.; Tinslay, J.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Bukin, D. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Salnikov, A. A.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Telnov, V. I.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Stoker, D. P.; Ahsan, A.; Arisaka, K.; Buchanan, C.; Chun, S.; Branson, J. G.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Prell, S.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Raven, G.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Hart, P. A.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S.; Beringer, J.; Dorfan, D. E.; Eisner, A. M.; Grillo, A. A.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Johnson, R. P.; Lockman, W. S.; Pulliam, T.; Sadrozinski, H.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Metzler, S.; Oyang, J.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Weaver, M.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Barillari, T.; Bloom, P.; Dima, M. O.; Fahey, S.; Ford, W. T.; Johnson, D. R.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Sen, S.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Wagner, D. L.; Blouw, J.; Harton, J. L.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Ferrag, S.; Roussot, E.; T'Jampens, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Falbo, M.; Borean, C.; Bozzi, C.; Dittongo, S.; Piemontese, L.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Xie, Y.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Morii, M.; Bartoldus, R.; Hamilton, R.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Fischer, P.-A.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Grosdidier, G.; Hast, C.; Höcker, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Laplace, S.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Lange, D. J.; Mugge, M.; van Bibber, K.; Wright, D. M.; Carroll, M.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Kay, M.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gunawardane, N. J.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Smith, D.; Azzopardi, D. E.; Back, J. J.; Dixon, P.; Harrison, P. F.; Potter, R. J.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Williams, M. I.; Cowan, G.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McGrath, P.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Scott, I.; Vaitsas, G.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Boyd, J. T.; Forti, A. C.; Fullwood, J.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Savvas, N.; Simopoulos, E. T.; Weatherall, J. H.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Olsen, J.; Roberts, D. A.; Schieck, J. R.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. G.; Moore, T. B.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Brau, B.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Martin, J. P.; Nief, J. Y.; Seitz, R.; Taras, P.; Zacek, V.; Nicholson, H.; Sutton, C. S.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Losecco, J. M.; Alsmiller, J. R.; Gabriel, T. A.; Handler, T.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Colecchia, F.; dal Corso, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Michelon, G.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Torassa, E.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Le Diberder, F.; Leruste, Ph.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; Versillé, S.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Frank, E. D.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Simi, G.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Turnbull, L.; Wagoner, D. E.; Albert, J.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; McDonald, K. T.; Miftakov, V.; Schaffner, S. F.; Smith, A. J.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Lamanna, E.; Leonardi, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; de Domenico, G.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Serfass, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Copty, N.; Purohit, M. V.; Singh, H.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Adam, I.; Anthony, P. L.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.; Berger, N.; Bloom, E.; Boyarski, A. M.; Bulos, F.; Calderini, G.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Coward, D. H.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G. L.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grosso, P.; Haas, T.; Himel, T.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Moffeit, K. C.; Mount, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Quinn, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Rochester, L. S.; Roodman, A.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Serbo, V. V.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Cheng, C. H.; Kirkby, D.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Henderson, R.; Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Weidemann, A. W.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gamba, D.; Smol, A.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Brown, C. M.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Charles, E.; Dasu, S.; di Lodovico, F.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Liu, R.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Scott, I. J.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Kordich, T. M.; Neal, H.

    2002-02-01

    We measure the branching fractions of the ψ(2S) meson to the leptonic final states e+e- and μ+μ- relative to that for ψ(2S)-->J/ψπ+π-. The method uses ψ(2S) mesons produced in the decay of B mesons at the Υ(4S) resonance in a data sample collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Using previous measurements for the ψ(2S)-->J/ψπ+π- branching fraction, we determine the e+e- and μ+μ- branching fractions to be 0.0078+/-0.0009+/-0.0008 and 0.0067+/-0.0008+/-0.0007, respectively.

  8. α-In2S3 and β-In2S3 phases produced by SILAR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turan, E.; Zor, M.; Kul, M.; Aybek, A. S.; Taskopru, T.

    2012-05-01

    In2S3 films have been deposited by the successive ionic adsorption and reaction technique (SILAR) at room temperature. The films have been examined to evaluate the structural and optical properties. X-ray diffraction spectra have revealed the presence of both the α-In2S3 (cubic) and β-In2S3 (tetragonal) phases. The presence of the α-In2S3 phase at room temperature is attributed to the richness of In in the deposited materials. The presence of both phases is also supported by FESEM observations. The crystallinity of the material has been observed to improve with increasing thickness. Direct band gap of the deposits decreased from 2.89 to 2.37 eV with increasing thickness.

  9. Discovery of a novel series of potent S1P1 agonists.

    PubMed

    Crosignani, Stefano; Bombrun, Agnes; Covini, David; Maio, Maurizio; Marin, Delphine; Quattropani, Anna; Swinnen, Dominique; Simpson, Don; Sauer, Wolfgang; Françon, Bernard; Martin, Thierry; Cambet, Yves; Nichols, Anthony; Martinou, Isabelle; Burgat-Charvillon, Fabienne; Rivron, Delphine; Donini, Cristina; Schott, Olivier; Eligert, Valerie; Novo-Perez, Laurence; Vitte, Pierre-Alain; Arrighi, Jean-François

    2010-03-01

    The discovery of a novel series of S1P1 agonists is described. Starting from a micromolar HTS positive, iterative optimization gave rise to several single-digit nanomolar S1P1 agonists. The compounds were able to induce internalization of the S1P1 receptor, and a selected compound was shown to be able to induce lymphopenia in mice after oral dosing.

  10. Biophysical Characterization of the Iron in Mitochondria from Atm1p-depleted Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ren; Kim, Hansoo; Koppolu, Uma Mahendra Kumar; Ellis, E. Ann; Scott, Robert A.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Atm1p is an ABC transporter localized in the mitochondrial inner membrane; it functions to export an unknown species into the cytosol and is involved in cellular iron metabolism. Depletion or deletion of Atm1p causes Fe accumulation in mitochondria and a defect in cytosolic Fe/S cluster assembly, but reportedly not a defect in mitochondrial Fe/S cluster assembly. In this study the nature of the accumulated Fe was examined using Mössbauer spectroscopy, EPR, electronic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and electron microscopy. The Fe that accumulated in aerobically grown cells was in the form of Fe(III) phosphate nanoparticles similar to that which accumulates in yeast frataxin Yfh1p-deleted or yeast ferredoxin Yah1p-depleted cells. Relative to WT mitochondria, Fe/S cluster and heme levels in Atm1p-depleted mitochondria from aerobic cells were significantly diminished. Atm1p-depletion also caused a build-up of nonheme Fe(II) ions in the mitochondria and an increase in oxidative damage. Atm1p-depleted mitochondria isolated from anaerobically grown cells exhibited WT levels of Fe/S clusters and hemes, and they did not hyper-accumulate Fe. Atm1p-depleted cells lacked Leu1p activity, regardless of whether they were grown aerobically or anaerobically. These results indicate that Atm1p does not participate in mitochondrial Fe/S cluster assembly, and that the species exported by Atm1p is required for cytosolic Fe/S cluster assembly. The Fe/S cluster defect and the Fe-accumulation phenotype, resulting from the depletion of Atm1p in aerobic cells (but not in anaerobic cells), may be secondary effects that are observed only when cells are exposed to oxygen during growth. Reactive oxygen species generated under these conditions might degrade iron-sulfur clusters and lower heme levels in the organelle. PMID:19761223

  11. Hadronic Production of Ψ(2S) Cross section and Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kwangzoo

    2008-05-01

    The hadronic production cross section and the polarization of Ψ(2S) meson are measured by using the data from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The datasets used correspond to integrated luminosity of 1.1 fb-1 and 800 pb-1, respectively. The decay Ψ(2S) → μ+μ- is used to reconstruct Ψ(2S) mesons in the rapidity range |y(Ψ(2S))| < 0.6. The coverage of the pT range is 2.0 GeV/c ≤ pT (Ψ(2S)) < 30 GeV/c for the cross section analysis and pT ≥ 5 GeV/c for the polarization analysis. For events with pT (Ψ(2S)) > 2 GeV/c the integrated inclusive cross section multiplied by the branching ratio for dimuon decay is 3.17 ± 0.04 ± 0.28 nb . This result agrees with the CDF Run I measurement considering the increased center-of-mass energy from 1.8 TeV to 1.96 TeV. The polarization of the promptly produced Ψ(2S) mesons is found to be increasingly longitudinal as pT increases from 5 GeV/c to 30 GeV/c. The result is compared to contemporary theory models.

  12. Steps in reductive activation of the disulfide-generating enzyme Ero1p

    PubMed Central

    Heldman, Nimrod; Vonshak, Ohad; Sevier, Carolyn S; Vitu, Elvira; Mehlman, Tevie; Fass, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Ero1p is the primary catalyst of disulfide bond formation in the yeast endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Ero1p contains a pair of essential disulfide bonds that participate directly in the electron transfer pathway from substrate thiol groups to oxygen. Remarkably, elimination of certain other Ero1p disulfides by mutation enhances enzyme activity. In particular, the C150A/C295A Ero1p mutant exhibits increased thiol oxidation in vitro and in vivo and interferes with redox homeostasis in yeast cells by hyperoxidizing the ER. Inhibitory disulfides of Ero1p are thus important for enzyme regulation. To visualize the differences between de-regulated and wild-type Ero1p, we determined the crystal structure of Ero1p C150A/C295A. The structure revealed local changes compared to the wild-type enzyme around the sites of mutation, but no conformational transitions within 25 Å of the active site were observed. To determine how the C150—C295 disulfide nonetheless participates in redox regulation of Ero1p, we analyzed using mass spectrometry the changes in Ero1p disulfide connectivity as a function of time after encounter with reducing substrates. We found that the C150—C295 disulfide sets a physiologically appropriate threshold for enzyme activation by guarding a key neighboring disulfide from reduction. This study illustrates the diverse and interconnected roles that disulfides can play in redox regulation of protein activity. PMID:20669236

  13. FRG1P-mediated aggregation of proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    van Koningsbruggen, Silvana; Straasheijm, Kirsten R; Sterrenburg, Ellen; de Graaf, Natascha; Dauwerse, Hans G; Frants, Rune R; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2007-02-01

    FRG1 is considered a candidate gene for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) based on its location at chromosome 4qter and its upregulation in FSHD muscle. The FRG1 protein (FRG1P) localizes to nucleoli, Cajal bodies (and speckles), and has been suggested to be a component of the human spliceosome but its exact function is unknown. Recently, transgenic mice overexpressing high levels of FRG1P in skeletal muscle were described to present with muscular dystrophy. Moreover, upregulation of FRG1P was demonstrated to correlate with missplicing of specific pre-mRNAs. In this study, we have combined colocalization studies with yeast two-hybrid screens to identify proteins that associate with FRG1P. We demonstrate that artificially induced nucleolar aggregates of VSV-FRG1P specifically sequester proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing. In addition, we have identified SMN, PABPN1, and FAM71B, a novel speckle and Cajal body protein, as binding partners of FRG1P. All these proteins are, or seem to be, involved in RNA biogenesis. Our data confirm the presence of FRG1P in protein complexes containing human spliceosomes and support a potential role of FRG1P in either splicing or another step in nuclear RNA biogenesis. Intriguingly, among FRG1P-associated proteins are SMN and PABPN1, both being involved in neuromuscular disorders, possibly through RNA biogenesis-related processes.

  14. Flow-regulated endothelial S1P receptor-1 signaling sustains vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bongnam; Obinata, Hideru; Galvani, Sylvain; Mendelson, Karen; Ding, Bisen; Skoura, Athanasia; Kinzel, Bernd; Brinkmann, Volker; Rafii, Shahin; Evans, Todd; Hla, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY During angiogenesis, nascent vascular sprouts fuse to form vascular networks enabling efficient circulation. Mechanisms that stabilize the vascular plexus are not well understood. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a blood-borne lipid mediator implicated in the regulation of vascular and immune systems. Here we describe a mechanism by which the G protein-coupled S1P receptor-1 (S1P1) stabilizes the primary vascular network. A gradient of S1P1 expression from the mature regions of the vascular network to the growing vascular front was observed. In the absence of endothelial S1P1, adherens junctions are destabilized, barrier function is breached, and flow is perturbed resulting in abnormal vascular hypersprouting. Interestingly, S1P1 responds to S1P as well as laminar shear stress to transduce flow-mediated signaling in endothelial cells both in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that blood flow and circulating S1P activate endothelial S1P1 to stabilize blood vessels in development and homeostasis. PMID:22975328

  15. Young-Simpson syndrome (YSS), a variant of del(1)(p36) syndrome?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Deanne Mraz; Meagher, Cecilia C; Orlowski, Craig C; Lagoe, Erin Caine; Fong, Chin-To

    2008-06-15

    The Young-Simpson syndrome (YSS) and 1p36 deletion syndrome are both characterized by facial and heart abnormalities, congenital hypothyroidism, and severe growth and developmental retardation. However, the YSS is characterized by the presence of blepharophimosis and epicanthus inversus, findings not described in monosomy 1p36 patients. We describe a girl with YSS, who presented with the typical facial findings, global retardation, congenital hypothyroidism, and congenital dilated cardiomyopathy. Comparative genomic hybridization chromosomal microarray analysis showed a 1p36.3 deletion, a finding not previously reported in other YSS cases. We propose that YSS is a variant of the 1p36 deletion syndrome.

  16. Neutron scattering study on CuV 2S 4 and CuTi 2S 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mücksch, M.; Krimmel, A.; Koza, M. M.; Mutka, H.; Horn, S.

    2006-05-01

    The metallic thiospinel CuV 2S 4 shows an enhanced value of the low-temperature specific heat with γ=C/T≈60 mJ/mol K, suggesting magnetic or electronic correlations. To elucidate the nature of this low-temperature phase with respect to possible magnetic fluctuations, inelastic neutron scattering measurements were performed on polycrystalline CuV 2S 4 and CuTi 2S 4. Both compounds show an inelastic response dominated by phonons. The low-energy phonon response of CuTi 2S 4 is centered around 13 meV and depends only weakly on temperature. The corresponding phonon intensity in the low energy transfer region of CuV 2S 4 is centered at around 6 meV ( T=120 K). The center of gravity of this intensity shifts to about 10 meV ( T=1.8 K) below the structural phase transition at T≈90 K .The significant difference in the low-energy phonon response between both compounds, which display the same lattice symmetry at 120 K, and the strong renormalization of the phonon energies below the structural transition might reflect the influence of strong electron-phonon coupling in CuV 2S 4.

  17. Novel function of α1D L-type calcium channel in the atria.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ujala; Aromolaran, Ademuyiwa S; Fabris, Frank; Lazaro, Deana; Kassotis, John; Qu, Yongxia; Boutjdir, Mohamed

    2017-01-22

    Ca entry through atrial L-type Calcium channels (α1C and α1D) play an important role in muscular contraction, regulation of gene expression, and release of hormones including atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). α1D Ca channel is exclusively expressed in atria, and has been shown to play a key role in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. Recent data have shown that the small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel, SK4 is also atrial specific and also contributes prominently to the secretion of ANP and BNP. However, its functional role in the heart is still poorly understood. Here we used α1D gene heterozygous (α1D(+/-)) mice and HL-1 cells to determine the functional contribution of SK4 channels to α1D-dependent regulation of ANP and BNP secretion in response to endothelin (ET), and/or mechanical stretch. Immunoprecipitation with α1D specific antibody and western blotting with SK4 specific antibody on the immuno-precipitated protein complex showed a band at 50 KDa confirming the presence of SK4 in the complex and provided evidence of interaction between SK4 and α1D channels. Using RT-PCR, we observed a 2.9 fold decrease in expression of Cacna1d (gene encoding α1D) mRNA in atria from α1D(+/-)mice. The decrease in α1D mRNA corresponded with a 4.2 fold decrease in Kcnn4 (gene encoding SK4) mRNA from α1D(+/-) mice. These changes were paralleled with a 77% decrease in BNP serum levels from α1D(+/-) mice. When α1D was knocked down in HL-1cardiomyocytes using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, a 97% decrease in secreted BNP was observed even in cells subjected to stretch and endothelin. In conclusion, our data are first to show that α1D Ca and SK4 channels are coupled in the atria, and that deletion of α1D leads to decreased SK4 mRNA and BNP secretion providing evidence for a novel role of α1D in atrial endocrine function. Elucidating the regulatory factors that underlie the secretory function of atria will identify

  18. Synthesis, crystal structure and properties of [(dien){sub 2}Mn]Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4} with mixed-valent Ge centers

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Cheng-Yang; Yuan, Zhuang-Dong; Zhang, Lu-Ge; Wang, Ya-Bai; Liu, Guo-Dong; Gong, Liao-Kuo; Lei, Xiao-Wu

    2013-10-15

    One new manganese thiogermanate, [(dien){sub 2}Mn]Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4} (dien=diethylenetriamine), was prepared under mild solvothermal conditions and structurally and spectroscopically characterized. The title compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system, chiral space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (no. 19) with a=9.113(4) Å, b=12.475(5) Å, c=17.077(7) Å, V=1941.5(15) Å{sup 3} and Z=4. Its structure features a three-dimensional (3D) network composed of a one-dimensional (1D) [Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4}]{sup 2−} anionic chain and a [(dien){sub 2}Mn]{sup 2+} complex interconnected via various hydrogen bonds. The most interesting structural feature of the compound is the presence of two different oxidation states of germanium centers in the 1D [Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4}]{sup 2−} chain, which is also supported by the result of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement. The optical property of the title compound has also been studied by UV–vis spectra. - Graphical abstract: One new thiogermanate, [(dien){sub 2}Mn]Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4}, contains a one-dimensional [Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4}]{sup 2−} anionic chain with two different oxidation states of germanium centers. Display Omitted - Highlights: • One new manganese thiogermanate [(dien){sub 2}Mn]Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4} was prepared. • The compound features 1D [Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4}]{sup 2−} chain composed of [Ge{sup II}S{sub 4}] and [Ge{sup IV}S{sub 4}] tetrahedra. • The first example of inorganic–organic hybrid thiogermanates with mixed valent Ge centers.

  19. Pathophysiological Consequences of a Break in S1P1-Dependent Homeostasis of Vascular Permeability Revealed by S1P1 Competitive Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Bigaud, Marc; Dincer, Zuhal; Bollbuck, Birgit; Dawson, Janet; Beckmann, Nicolau; Beerli, Christian; Fishli-Cavelti, Gina; Nahler, Michaela; Angst, Daniela; Janser, Philipp; Otto, Heike; Rosner, Elisabeth; Hersperger, Rene; Bruns, Christian; Quancard, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Rational Homeostasis of vascular barriers depends upon sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling via the S1P1 receptor. Accordingly, S1P1 competitive antagonism is known to reduce vascular barrier integrity with still unclear pathophysiological consequences. This was explored in the present study using NIBR-0213, a potent and selective S1P1 competitive antagonist. Results NIBR-0213 was tolerated at the efficacious oral dose of 30 mg/kg BID in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AiA) model, with no sign of labored breathing. However, it induced dose-dependent acute vascular pulmonary leakage and pleural effusion that fully resolved within 3–4 days, as evidenced by MRI monitoring. At the supra-maximal oral dose of 300 mg/kg QD, NIBR-0213 impaired lung function (with increased breathing rate and reduced tidal volume) within the first 24 hrs. Two weeks of NIBR-0213 oral dosing at 30, 100 and 300 mg/kg QD induced moderate pulmonary changes, characterized by alveolar wall thickening, macrophage accumulation, fibrosis, micro-hemorrhage, edema and necrosis. In addition to this picture of chronic inflammation, perivascular edema and myofiber degeneration observed in the heart were also indicative of vascular leakage and its consequences. Conclusions Overall, these observations suggest that, in the rat, the lung is the main target organ for the S1P1 competitive antagonism-induced acute vascular leakage, which appears first as transient and asymptomatic but could lead, upon chronic dosing, to lung remodeling with functional impairments. Hence, this not only raises the question of organ specificity in the homeostasis of vascular barriers, but also provides insight into the pre-clinical evaluation of a potential safety window for S1P1 competitive antagonists as drug candidates. PMID:28005953

  20. Distinct roles of galactose-1P in galactose-mediated growth arrest of yeast deficient in galactose-1P uridylyltransferase (GALT) and UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE).

    PubMed

    Mumma, Jane Odhiambo; Chhay, Juliet S; Ross, Kerry L; Eaton, Jana S; Newell-Litwa, Karen A; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2008-02-01

    Galactose is metabolized in humans and other species by the three-enzyme Leloir pathway comprised of galactokinase (GALK), galactose 1-P uridylyltransferase (GALT), and UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). Impairment of GALT or GALE in humans results in the potentially lethal disorder galactosemia, and loss of either enzyme in yeast results in galactose-dependent growth arrest of cultures despite the availability of an alternate carbon source. In contrast, loss of GALK in humans is not life-threatening, and in yeast has no impact on the growth of cultures challenged with galactose. Further, the growth of both GALT-null and GALE-null yeast challenged with galactose is rescued by loss of GALK, thereby implicating the GALK reaction product, gal-1P, for a role in the galactose-sensitivity of both strains. However, the nature of that relationship has remained unclear. Here we have developed and applied a doxycycline-repressible allele of galactokinase to define the quantitative relationship between galactokinase activity, gal-1P accumulation, and growth arrest of galactose-challenged GALT or GALE-deficient yeast. Our results demonstrate a clear threshold relationship between gal-1P accumulation and galactose-mediated growth arrest in both GALT-null and GALE-null yeast, however, the threshold for the two strains is distinct. Further, we tested the galactose-sensitivity of yeast double-null for GALT and GALE, and found that although loss of GALT barely changed accumulation of gal-1P, it significantly lowered the accumulation of UDP-gal, and also dramatically rescued growth of the GALE-null cells. Together, these data suggest that while gal-1P alone may account for the galactose-sensitivity of GALT-null cells, other factors, likely to include UDP-gal accumulation, must contribute to the galactose-sensitivity of GALE-null cells.

  1. Tandem repeats modify the structure of the canine CD1D gene.

    PubMed

    Looringh van Beeck, F A; Leegwater, P A J; Herrmann, T; Broere, F; Rutten, V P M G; Willemse, T; Van Rhijn, I

    2013-06-01

    Among the CD1 proteins that present lipid antigens to T cells, CD1d is the only one that stimulates a population of T cells with an invariant T-cell receptor known as NKT cells. Sequencing of a 722 nucleotide gap in the dog (Canis lupus familiaris) genome revealed that the canine CD1D gene lacks a sequence homologous to exon 2 of human CD1D, coding for the start codon and signal peptide. Also, the canine CD1D gene contains three different short tandem repeats that disrupt the expected gene structure. Because canine CD1D cDNA lacks sequences homologous to human exon 2 and 3, the functionality of canine CD1d protein may be affected, and this could have consequences for the development and activation of canine NKT cells.

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of CS-2100, a potent, orally active and S1P(3)- sparing S1P(1) agonist.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tsuyoshi; Asano, Masayoshi; Sekiguchi, Yukiko; Mizuno, Yumiko; Tamaki, Kazuhiko; Nara, Futoshi; Kawase, Yumi; Yabe, Yoshiyuki; Nakai, Daisuke; Kamiyama, Emi; Urasaki-Kaneno, Yoko; Shimozato, Takaichi; Doi-Komuro, Hiromi; Kagari, Takashi; Tomisato, Wataru; Inoue, Ryotaku; Nagasaki, Miyuki; Yuita, Hiroshi; Oguchi-Oshima, Keiko; Kaneko, Reina; Nishi, Takahide

    2012-05-01

    Modulators of sphingosine phosphate receptor-1 (S1P(1)) have recently been focused as a suppressant of autoimmunity. We have discovered a 4-ethylthiophene-based S1P(1) agonist 1-({4-Ethyl-5-[5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]-2-thienyl}methyl)azetidine-3-carboxylic acid (CS-2100, 8) showing potent S1P(1) agonist activity against S1P(3) and an excellent in vivo potency. We report herein the synthesis of CS-2100 (8) and pharmacological effects such as S1P(1) and S1P(3) agonist activity in vitro, peripheral blood lymphocyte lowering effects and the suppressive effects on adjuvant-induced arthritis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in animal models. The pharmacokinetic data were also reported. CS-2100 (8) had >5000-fold greater agonist activity for human S1P(1) (EC(50); 4.0 nM) relative to S1P(3) (EC(50); >20,000 nM). Following administration of single oral doses of 0.1 and 1 mg/kg of CS-2100 (8) in rats, lymphocyte counts decreased significantly, with a nadir at 8 and/or 12 h post-dose and recovery to vehicle control levels by 24-48 h post-dose. CS-2100 (8) is efficacious in the adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats (ID(50); 0.44 mg/kg). In the EAE model compared to the vehicle-treated group, significant decreases in the cumulative EAE scores were observed for 0.3 and 1 mg/kg CS-2100 (8) groups in mice. While CS-2100 (8) showed potent efficacy in various animal disease models, it was also revealed that the central 1,2,4-oxadiazole ring of CS-2100 (8) was decomposed by enterobacteria in intestine of rats and monkeys, implicating the latent concern about an external susceptibility in its metabolic process in the upcoming clinical studies.

  3. Construction of CuO/In2S3/ZnO heterostructure arrays for enhanced photocatalytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Cheng; Guo, Jin-You; Chen, Chien-Ming; Di, Hsin-Wei; Hsu, Chao-Chun

    2017-09-14

    Novel one-dimensional (1D) heterostructure arrays composed of CuO nanowire cores, intermediate In2S3 nanostructures, and ZnO nanorod sheaths (i.e. CuO/In2S3/ZnO heterostructure arrays) have been successfully synthesized by a multi-step process. First, single-crystalline CuO nanowires were directly grown on flexible Cu mesh substrates using a one-step annealing process under ambient conditions. Second, In2S3 nanostructures and ZnO nanorods were sequentially grown on the CuO nanowires by a two-step hydrothermal method at low reaction temperature. The morphology, crystal structures, and optical properties of the CuO/In2S3/ZnO heterostructure arrays were studied by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The resultant ternary CuO/In2S3/ZnO heterostructure arrays exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity in the photodegradation of rhodamine 6G (R6G) under 10 W UV light irradiation, which is much higher than that of single-component (CuO nanowire arrays) or two-component systems (CuO/In2S3 heterostructure arrays). Furthermore, the reusability test demonstrates that the CuO/In2S3/ZnO heterostructure arrays on the Cu mesh still maintain high photocatalytic activity in the degradation of three kinds of organic pollutants even after five cycles, without any significant decline. These findings provide an insight into the design and synthesis of new CuO-based composites to effectively improve their photocatalytic performance.

  4. Examination of 1D Solar Cell Model Limitations Using 3D SPICE Modeling: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, W. E.; Olson, J. M.; Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    To examine the limitations of one-dimensional (1D) solar cell modeling, 3D SPICE-based modeling is used to examine in detail the validity of the 1D assumptions as a function of sheet resistance for a model cell. The internal voltages and current densities produced by this modeling give additional insight into the differences between the 1D and 3D models.

  5. Lymphatic endothelial S1P promotes mitochondrial function and survival in naive T cells.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Alejandra; Fang, Victoria; Chen, Cynthia; Serasinghe, Madhavika; Verma, Akanksha; Muller, James; Chaluvadi, V Sai; Dustin, Michael L; Hla, Timothy; Elemento, Olivier; Chipuk, Jerry E; Schwab, Susan R

    2017-06-01

    Effective adaptive immune responses require a large repertoire of naive T cells that migrate throughout the body, rapidly identifying almost any foreign peptide. Because the production of T cells declines with age, naive T cells must be long-lived. However, it remains unclear how naive T cells survive for years while constantly travelling. The chemoattractant sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) guides T cell circulation among secondary lymphoid organs, including spleen, lymph nodes and Peyer's patches, where T cells search for antigens. The concentration of S1P is higher in circulatory fluids than in lymphoid organs, and the S1P1 receptor (S1P1R) directs the exit of T cells from the spleen into blood, and from lymph nodes and Peyer's patches into lymph. Here we show that S1P is essential not only for the circulation of naive T cells, but also for their survival. Using transgenic mouse models, we demonstrate that lymphatic endothelial cells support the survival of T cells by secreting S1P via the transporter SPNS2, that this S1P signals through S1P1R on T cells, and that the requirement for S1P1R is independent of the established role of the receptor in guiding exit from lymph nodes. S1P signalling maintains the mitochondrial content of naive T cells, providing cells with the energy to continue their constant migration. The S1P signalling pathway is being targeted therapeutically to inhibit autoreactive T cell trafficking, and these findings suggest that it may be possible simultaneously to target autoreactive or malignant cell survival.

  6. Abdominal paraganglioma in a young woman with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Miki; Takasawa, Kei; Nishioka, Masato; Asakawa, Masahiro; Kashimada, Kenichi; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Takekoshi, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Shimohira, Masayuki

    2017-02-01

    1p36 deletion syndrome is the most common terminal deletion syndrome, and the genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36 deletion syndrome-related phenotypes were recently identified. Deletions in the 1p36 region have been documented in various tumor tissues, which indicates correlation between loss of heterozygosity of 1p36 and tumor development, and the existence of tumor suppressors in this region. Therefore, it was suspected that patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome have a higher risk of tumor development; however, only a few child cases of neuroblastoma with 1p36 deletion syndrome have been reported. We report the first case of 1p36 deletion syndrome with paraganglioma (PGL) and include genetic investigation. The 24-year-old woman with 1p36 deletion syndrome had severe intellectual disability, dilated cardiomyopathy, and distinct dysmorphic features, and presented with persistent vomiting accompanied by hypertension (178/115 mmHg). Abdominal CT revealed a 40 × 50 mm retroperitoneal mass and substantial elevations of plasma and urine norepinephrine (15.4 nmol/L and 1022 µmol/mol creatinine, respectively); abnormal uptake of (123) I-MIBG in the tumor led to PGL diagnosis. The patient was not able to have surgery because of substantial surgical risks; however, a combination of α- and β-blockade was effective for blood pressure control. Array CGH revealed a deletion over 4.5 Mb, from the 1p telomere but excluding the SDHB region. Comprehensive mutational analysis of PGL-associated genes (RET, VHL, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHA/B/C/D) was negative. These results indicate that the germline 1p36 deletion might be "1st hit" of tumor development, and PGL might be a novel complication of 1p36 deletion syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Tunable Design of Structural Colors Produced by Pseudo-1D Photonic Crystals of Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Tong, Liping; Qi, Wei; Wang, Mengfan; Huang, Renliang; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-07-01

    It is broadly observed that graphene oxide (GO) films appear transparent with a thickness of about several nanometers, whereas they appear dark brown or almost black with thickness of more than 1 μm. The basic color mechanism of GO film on a sub-micrometer scale, however, is not well understood. This study reports on GO pseudo-1D photonic crystals (p1D-PhCs) exhibiting tunable structural colors in the visible wavelength range owing to its 1D Bragg nanostructures. Striking structural colors of GO p1D-PhCs could be tuned by simply changing either the volume or concentration of the aqueous GO dispersion during vacuum filtration. Moreover, the quantitative relationship between thickness and reflection wavelength of GO p1D-PhCs has been revealed, thereby providing a theoretical basis to rationally design structural colors of GO p1D-PhCs. The spectral response of GO p1D-PhCs to humidity is also obtained clearly showing the wavelength shift of GO p1D-PhCs at differently relative humidity values and thus encouraging the integration of structural color printing and the humidity-responsive property of GO p1D-PhCs to develop a visible and fast-responsive anti-counterfeiting label. The results pave the way for a variety of potential applications of GO in optics, structural color printing, sensing, and anti-counterfeiting.

  8. Engineering 1D Quantum Stripes from Superlattices of 2D Layered Materials.

    PubMed

    Gruenewald, John H; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Heung Sik; Johnson, Jared M; Hwang, Jinwoo; Souri, Maryam; Terzic, Jasminka; Chang, Seo Hyoung; Said, Ayman; Brill, Joseph W; Cao, Gang; Kee, Hae-Young; Seo, Sung S Ambrose

    2017-01-01

    Dimensional tunability from two dimensions to one dimension is demonstrated for the first time using an artificial superlattice method in synthesizing 1D stripes from 2D layered materials. The 1D confinement of layered Sr2 IrO4 induces distinct 1D quantum-confined electronic states, as observed from optical spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. This 1D superlattice approach is generalizable to a wide range of layered materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Sensing properties of assembled Bi2S3 nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunakova, G.; Meija, R.; Bite, I.; Prikulis, J.; Kosmaca, J.; Varghese, J.; Holmes, J. D.; Erts, Donats

    2015-09-01

    Bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3) nanowires were grown in porous aluminium oxide template and a selective chemical etching was applied to transfer the nanowires to a solution. Well aligned nanowire arrays were assembled on pre-patterned silicon substrates employing dielectrophoresis. Electron beam lithography was used to connect aligned individual nanowires to the common macroelectrode. In order to evaluate the conductometric sensing performance of the Bi2S3 nanowires, current-voltage characteristics were measured at different relative humidity (RH) levels (5-80%) / argon medium. The response of the Bi2S3 nanowires depending of RH is found to be considerably different from those reported for other types of nanowire RH sensor devices.

  10. Oxidation of H2S in mammalian cells and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hamdan, Abbas; Guedouari-Bounihi, Hala; Lenoir, Véronique; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Blachier, François; Bouillaud, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third gasotransmitter described in mammals. These gasotransmitters (H2S, CO, and NO) are small molecules able to diffuse freely across membranes and thus susceptible to reach easily intracellular targets, one of which is the respiratory enzyme cytochrome oxidase subject to complete inhibition by low micromolar concentrations of these gases. However in contrast to NO or CO, H2S can be metabolized by a sulfide quinone reductase feeding the mitochondrial respiratory chain with the hydrogen atoms of sulfide. Sulfide is thus a two-sided molecule: substrate or poison according to the concentration. The aim of this chapter is to present a mean to monitor sulfide oxidation by isolated mitochondria or cells and to summarize how the properties of this amazing couple (mitochondria and sulfide) translate into practical and conceptual consequences.

  11. Electrochemical fabrication of ordered Bi2S3 nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, X. S.; Meng, G. W.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, L. X.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. W.; Zhang, L. D.

    2001-11-01

    We have successfully fabricated ordered, well-crystallized Bi2S3 nanowire arrays embedded in the nanochannels of porous anodic aluminium oxide templates by direct current electrodeposition from a dimethylsulfoxide solution containing BiCl3 and elemental sulfur. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction investigations demonstrate that the Bi2S3 nanowires have an orthorhombic uniform structure. Electromicroscopy results show that the nanowires are quite ordered with diameters of about 40 nm and lengths up to 5 µm. X-ray energy dispersion analysis indicates that the atomic composition of Bi and S is very close to a 2 : 3 stoichiometry. The optical properties of these nanowires were characterized by optical absorption techniques. These studies reveal that the annealed Bi2S3 nanowires have an optical band edge (direct) of about 1.56 eV.

  12. Differential pharmacology between the guinea-pig and the gorilla 5-HT1D receptor as probed with isochromans (5-HT1D-selective ligands).

    PubMed

    Pregenzer, J F; Alberts, G L; Im, W B; Slightom, J L; Ennis, M D; Hoffman, R L; Ghazal, N B; TenBrink, R E

    1999-05-01

    1. Both the 5-HT1D and 5-HT1B receptors are implicated in migraine pathophysiology. Recently isochromans have been discovered to bind primate 5-HT1D receptors with much higher affinity than 5-HT1B receptors. In the guinea-pig, a primary animal model for anti-migraine drug testing, however, isochromans bound the 5-HT1D receptor with lower affinity than the gorilla receptor. 2. This species-specific pharmacology was investigated, using site-directed mutagenesis on cloned guinea-pig receptors heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Mutations of threonine 100 and arginine 102 at the extracellular side of transmembrane II of the guinea-pig 5-HT1D receptor to the corresponding primate residues, isoleucine and histidine, respectively, enhanced its affinity for isochromans to that of the gorilla receptor, with little effects on its affinities for serotonin, sumatriptan and metergoline. Free energy change from the R102H mutation was about twice as much as that from the T100I mutation. 3. For G protein-coupling, serotonin marginally enhanced GTPgamma35S binding in membranes expressing the guinea-pig 5-HT1D receptor and its mutants, but robustly in membranes expressing the gorilla receptor. Sumatriptan enhanced GTPgamma35S binding in the latter nearly as much as serotonin, and several isochromans by 30-60% of serotonin. 4. We discovered key differences in the function and binding properties of guinea-pig and gorilla 5-HT1D receptors, and identified contributions of I100 and H102 of primate 5-HT1D receptors to isochroman binding. Among common experimental animals, only the rabbit shares I100 and H102 with primates, and could be useful for studying isochroman actions in vivo.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) in urban ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtidis, K.; Kelesis, A.; Petrakakis, M.

    Despite indications of high hydrogen sulfide levels in some urban environments, only sparse measurements have been reported in the literature. Here we present one full year of hydrogen sulfide measurements in an urban traffic site in the city of Thessaloniki, Greece. In this 1-million-population city the H 2S concentrations were surprisingly high, with a mean annual concentration of 8 μg m -3 and wintertime mean monthly concentrations up to 20 μg m -3 (12.9 ppb). Daily mean concentrations in the winter were up to 30 μg m -3 (19.3 ppb), while hourly concentrations were up to 54 μg m -3 (34.8 ppb). During calm (wind velocity < 0.5 m s -1) conditions, mainly encountered during night-time hours, hourly values of H 2S were highly correlated with those of CO ( r2 = 0.75) and SO 2 ( r2 = 0.70), pointing to a common traffic source from catalytic converters. Annual mean concentrations are above the WHO recommendation for odor annoyance; hence, H 2S might play a role to the malodorous episodes that the city occasionally experiences. The high ambient H 2S levels might also be relevant to the implementation of preservation efforts for outdoor marble and limestone historical monuments that have been targeting SO 2 emissions as an atmospheric acidity source, since the measurements presented here suggest that about 19% of the annual sulfur (SO 2 + H 2S) emissions in Thessaloniki are in the form of H 2S.

  14. To stay or to leave: Stem cells and progenitor cells navigating the S1P gradient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Hsu, Andrew; Lee, Jen-Fu; Cramer, Daniel E; Lee, Menq-Jer

    2011-01-26

    Most hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in bone marrow (BM), but a small amount of HSPCs have been found to circulate between BM and tissues through blood and lymph. Several lines of evidence suggest that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) gradient triggers HSPC egression to blood circulation after mobilization from BM stem cell niches. Stem cells also visit certain tissues. After a temporary 36 h short stay in local tissues, HSPCs go to lymph in response to S1P gradient between lymph and tissue and eventually enter the blood circulation. S1P also has a role in the guidance of the primitive HSPCs homing to BM in vivo, as S1P analogue FTY720 treatment can improve HSPC BM homing and engraftment. In stress conditions, various stem cells or progenitor cells can be attracted to local injured tissues and participate in local tissue cell differentiation and tissue rebuilding through modulation the expression level of S1P(1), S1P(2) or S1P(3) receptors. Hence, S1P is important for stem cells circulation in blood system to accomplish its role in body surveillance and injury recovery.

  15. To fingolimod and beyond: The rich pipeline of drug candidates that target S1P signaling.

    PubMed

    Chew, Wee Siong; Wang, Wei; Herr, Deron R

    2016-11-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an extracellular lipid signaling molecule that acts as a selective, high-affinity ligand for a family of five G protein-coupled receptors. This signaling system was first identified twenty years ago, and has since been shown to regulate a diverse range of physiological processes and disease states, such as cardiovascular development, immune function, hypoxic responses, and cancer. The therapeutic potential of targeting this system took center stage when it was demonstrated that the immune modulator, fingolimod (FTY720/Gilenya), exerts it lymphopenic effect by acting on S1P receptors, primarily on S1P receptor 1 (S1P1). In 2010, fingolimod became the first oral medication approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Since then, second-generation S1P receptor modulators have been under development in an effort to provide improved safety and efficacy profiles for MS, and to broaden their use to other autoimmune indications. Beyond the development of S1P1-modulators, there has been considerable effort in targeting other components of the S1P signaling pathway for the treatment of other diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, sepsis, and cancer. This manuscript provides an overview of the clinical and preclinical development of drugs targeting S1P signaling.

  16. Inp1p is a peroxisomal membrane protein required for peroxisome inheritance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fagarasanu, Monica; Fagarasanu, Andrei; Tam, Yuen Yi C; Aitchison, John D; Rachubinski, Richard A

    2005-06-06

    Cells have evolved molecular mechanisms for the efficient transmission of organelles during cell division. Little is known about how peroxisomes are inherited. Inp1p is a peripheral membrane protein of peroxisomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that affects both the morphology of peroxisomes and their partitioning during cell division. In vivo 4-dimensional video microscopy showed an inability of mother cells to retain a subset of peroxisomes in dividing cells lacking the INP1 gene, whereas cells overexpressing INP1 exhibited immobilized peroxisomes that failed to be partitioned to the bud. Overproduced Inp1p localized to both peroxisomes and the cell cortex, supporting an interaction of Inp1p with specific structures lining the cell periphery. The levels of Inp1p vary with the cell cycle. Inp1p binds Pex25p, Pex30p, and Vps1p, which have been implicated in controlling peroxisome division. Our findings are consistent with Inp1p acting as a factor that retains peroxisomes in cells and controls peroxisome division. Inp1p is the first peroxisomal protein directly implicated in peroxisome inheritance.

  17. Faraday effect in Sn2P2S6 crystals.

    PubMed

    Krupych, Oleh; Adamenko, Dmytro; Mys, Oksana; Grabar, Aleksandr; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2008-11-10

    We have revealed a large Faraday rotation in tin thiohypodiphosphate (Sn(2)P(2)S(6)) crystals, which makes this material promising for magneto-optics. The effective Faraday tensor component and the Verdet constant for the direction of the optic axis have been determined by measuring the pure Faraday rotation in Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals with both the single-ray and small-angular polarimetric methods at the normal conditions and a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The effective Verdet constant is found to be equal to 115 rad/T x m.

  18. Effects of H2S on molten carbonate fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remick, R. J.; Anderson, G. L.

    1984-04-01

    The results of a literature survey conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) under Phase 1 of a multiphase program to investigate and identify the mechanism(s) responsible for molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) performance losses when operating on sulfur containing gases are discussed. The objective was twofold: to review the reported data on the interaction of H2S with nickel containing materials; and to review reported investigations on the specific effects of H2S on the electrochemical oxidation of H2 in MCFC. The ultimate goal of the literature review was to determine the poisoning mechanism.

  19. Evidence for the h_b(1P) meson in the decay Upsilon(3S) --> pi0 h_b(1P)

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.

    2011-08-12

    Using a sample of 122 million {Upsilon}(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC, we search for the h{sub b}(1P) spin-singlet partner of the P-wave {chi}{sub b}(1P) states in the sequential decay {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup 0}h{sub b}(1P), h{sub b}(1P) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S). We observe an excess of events above background in the distribution of the recoil mass against the {pi}{sup 0} at mass 9902 {+-} 4(stat.) {+-} 1(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. The width of the observed signal is consistent with experimental resolution, and its significance is 3.0 {sigma}, including systematic uncertainties. We obtain the value (3.7 {+-} 1.1 (stat.) {+-} 0.7 (syst.)) x 10{sup -4} for the product branching fraction {Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup 0}h{sub b}) x {Beta}(h{sub b} {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}).

  20. Mild craniosynostosis with 1p36.3 trisomy and 1p36.3 deletion syndrome caused by familial translocation t(Y;1).

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Yoko; Fujita, Hiroko; Yamamori, Shunji; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Eguchi, Maki; Harada, Naoki; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2006-08-15

    We report on a 20-year-old man and a 16-year-old woman with a chromosomal imbalance derived from a balanced translocation, t(Y;1)(q12;p36.3) of the father. The man had a partial trisomy for 1p36.3-pter [46,X,der(Y)t(Y:1)(q12;p36.3)] and mild craniosynostosis of metopic and sagittal sutures as well as a borderline mental impairment, while the woman with a deletion for 1p36.3-pter [46,XX,der(1)t(Y;1)(q12;p36.3)] showed dysmorphic face with large anterior fontanel and severe developmental delay. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that his trisomy spanned the 5.3-Mb region from 1p telomere harboring the critical region for craniosynostosis. To our knowledge, the man is the first case of a pure type of simple 1p36.3 trisomy as the effect of heterochromatic Yq12-qter deletion likely does not affect phenotype.

  1. Basis for regulated RNA cleavage by functional analysis of RNase L and Ire1p.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, B; Niwa, M; Walter, P; Silverman, R H

    2001-01-01

    RNase L and Ire1p are members of a superfamily of regulated endoribonucleases that play essential roles in mediating diverse types of cellular stress responses. 2'-5' oligoadenylates, produced in response to interferon treatment and viral double-stranded RNA, are necessary to activate RNase L. In contrast, unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum activate Ire1p, a transmembrane serine/threonine kinase and endoribonuclease. To probe their similarities and differences, molecular properties of wild-type and mutant forms of human RNase L and yeast Ire1p were compared. Surprisingly, RNase L and Ire1p showed mutually exclusive RNA substrate specificity and partially overlapping but not identical requirements for phylogenetically conserved amino acid residues in their nuclease domains. A functional model for RNase L was generated based on the comparative analysis with Ire1p that assigns novel roles for ankyrin repeats and kinase-like domains. PMID:11333017

  2. pH-dependent localization of Btn1p in the yeast model for Batten disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Devin M.; Padilla-Lopez, Sergio; Vitiello, Seasson Phillips; Pearce, David A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Btn1p the yeast homolog of human CLN3, which is associated with juvenile Batten disease has been implicated in several cellular pathways. Yeast cells lacking BTN1 are unable to couple ATP hydrolysis and proton pumping activities by the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase). In this work, we demonstrate that changes in extracellular pH result in altered transcription of BTN1, as well as a change in the glycosylation state and localization of Btn1p. At high pH, Btn1p expression was increased and the protein was mainly located in vacuolar membranes. However, low pH decreased Btn1p expression and changed its location to undefined punctate membranes. Moreover, our results suggest that differential Btn1p localization may be regulated by its glycosylation state. Underlying pathogenic implications for Batten disease of altered cellular distribution of CLN3 are discussed. PMID:20959629

  3. The pressure-induced phase transition studies of In2S3 and In2S3:Ce nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Binbin; Zhu, Hongyang; Wang, Shuangming; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Mingzhe

    2014-02-01

    A novel method, gas-liquid phase chemical deposition is developed to prepare In2S3 and In2S3:Ce nanoparticles. The structural, morphology and composition feature of these two nanoparticles is studied by XRD, HRTEM, and XPS. In situ high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies were carried out by using a diamond-anvil cell. The doping does not influence the tetragonal-to-cubic phase transition path while results in a lower phase transition pressure of In2S3:Ce nanoparticles (4.3 GPa) than that of In2S3 nanoparticles (7.1 GPa). The bulk moduli of tetragonal phases are B0=87.1±4.3 GPa and B0=55.6±4.1 GPa, respectively. The distinct high-pressure behaviors can be explained in term of the doped ions, causing lattice distortion and reducing structural stability of the In2S3 nanoparticles and further accelerating the phase transition.

  4. Dual nature of pseudouridylation in U2 snRNA: Pus1p-dependent and Pus1p-independent activities in yeasts and higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gall, Joseph G

    2017-07-01

    The pseudouridine at position 43 in vertebrate U2 snRNA is one of the most conserved post-transcriptional modifications of spliceosomal snRNAs; the equivalent position is pseudouridylated in U2 snRNAs in different phyla including fungi, insects, and worms. Pseudouridine synthase Pus1p acts alone on U2 snRNA to form this pseudouridine in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mouse. Furthermore, in S. cerevisiae, Pus1p is the only pseudouridine synthase for this position. Using an in vivo yeast cell system, we tested enzymatic activity of Pus1p from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and the frog Xenopus tropicalis We demonstrated that Pus1p from C. elegans has no enzymatic activity on U2 snRNA when expressed in yeast cells, whereas in similar experiments, position 44 in yeast U2 snRNA (equivalent to position 43 in vertebrates) is a genuine substrate for Pus1p from S. cerevisiae, S. pombe, Drosophila, Xenopus, and mouse. However, when we analyzed U2 snRNAs from Pus1 knockout mice and the pus1Δ S. pombe strain, we could not detect any changes in their modification patterns when compared to wild-type U2 snRNAs. In S. pombe, we found a novel box H/ACA RNA encoded downstream from the RPC10 gene and experimentally verified its guide RNA activity for positioning Ψ43 and Ψ44 in U2 snRNA. In vertebrates, we showed that SCARNA8 (also known as U92 scaRNA) is a guide for U2-Ψ43 in addition to its previously established targets U2-Ψ34/Ψ44. © 2017 Deryusheva and Gall; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Lathyrol and epoxylathyrol derivatives: Modulation of Cdr1p and Mdr1p drug-efflux transporters of Candida albicans in Saccharomyces cerevisiae model.

    PubMed

    Mónico, Andreia; Nim, Shweta; Duarte, Noélia; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Prasad, Rajendra; Di Pietro, Attilio; Ferreira, Maria-José U

    2017-07-01

    Macrocyclic diterpenes were previously found to be able to modulate the efflux pump activity of Candida albicans multidrug transporters. Most of these compounds were jatrophanes, but only a few number of lathyrane-type diterpenes was evaluated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of nineteen structurally-related lathyrane diterpenes (1-19) to overcome the drug-efflux activity of Cdr1p and Mdr1p transporters of C. albicans, and get some insights on their structure-activity relationships. The transport assay was performed by monitoring Nile Red (NR) efflux in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain overexpressing the referred efflux pumps from C. albicans. Moreover, a chemosensitization assay was performed in order to evaluate the type of interaction between the inhibitory compounds and the antifungal drug fluconazole. Compounds 1-13 were previously isolated from Euphorbia boetica or obtained by derivatization, and compounds 14-19 were prepared by chemical transformations of compound 4. In the transport assays, compounds 14-19 revealed the strongest inhibitory activity of the Cdr1p efflux pump, ranging from 65 to 85%. Concerning Mdr1p efflux pump, the most active compounds were 1, 3, 6, 8, and 12 (75-85%). When used in combination with fluconazole, epoxyboetirane K (2) and euphoboetirane N (18) revealed synergistic effects in the AD-CDR1 yeast strain, overexpressing the Cdr1p transporter, through their ability to reduce the effective concentration of the antifungal drug by 23- and 52-fold, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The yeast Sks1p kinase signaling network regulates pseudohyphal growth and glucose response.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Cole; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Sheidy, Daniel; Shively, Christian A; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Andrews, Philip C; Kumar, Anuj

    2014-03-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic growth transition from its unicellular form to a filamentous state, marked by the formation of pseudohyphal filaments of elongated and connected cells. Yeast pseudohyphal growth is regulated by signaling pathways responsive to reductions in the availability of nitrogen and glucose, but the molecular link between pseudohyphal filamentation and glucose signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identify the glucose-responsive Sks1p kinase as a signaling protein required for pseudohyphal growth induced by nitrogen limitation and coupled nitrogen/glucose limitation. To identify the Sks1p signaling network, we applied mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, profiling over 900 phosphosites for phosphorylation changes dependent upon Sks1p kinase activity. From this analysis, we report a set of novel phosphorylation sites and highlight Sks1p-dependent phosphorylation in Bud6p, Itr1p, Lrg1p, Npr3p, and Pda1p. In particular, we analyzed the Y309 and S313 phosphosites in the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit Pda1p; these residues are required for pseudohyphal growth, and Y309A mutants exhibit phenotypes indicative of impaired aerobic respiration and decreased mitochondrial number. Epistasis studies place SKS1 downstream of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR1 and the G-protein RAS2 but upstream of or at the level of cAMP-dependent PKA. The pseudohyphal growth and glucose signaling transcription factors Flo8p, Mss11p, and Rgt1p are required to achieve wild-type SKS1 transcript levels. SKS1 is conserved, and deletion of the SKS1 ortholog SHA3 in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans results in abnormal colony morphology. Collectively, these results identify Sks1p as an important regulator of filamentation and glucose signaling, with additional relevance towards understanding stress-responsive signaling in C. albicans.

  7. S1P and LPA trigger Schwann cell actin changes and migration.

    PubMed

    Barber, Siân C; Mellor, Harry; Gampel, Alex; Scolding, Neil J

    2004-06-01

    The processes by which a Schwann cell (SC) migrates towards, wraps around and, in some cases, myelinates an axon are incompletely understood. The complex morphological rearrangements involved in these events require fundamental changes in the actin cytoskeleton. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) are two modulators of the actin cytoskeleton, and receptors for these signalling lipids are expressed on SCs at the time of differentiation. Previous work has revealed a role for LPA in SC survival, morphology and differentiation, but the effects of S1P have received less attention. Here we show that S1P and LPA both cause major rearrangements to the actin cytoskeleton in primary rat SCs and the SCL4.1/F7 rat SC line. S1P and LPA caused formation of lamellipodia and a circular geodesic actin network. We also show that S1P and LPA increased cell migration. The small GTPases RhoA and Rac1 were both activated by S1P/LPA treatment, but the actin rearrangements were dependent on Rac1 and not RhoA. These effects of S1P/LPA could be mimicked by SCL4.1/F7 cell-conditioned medium, which was found to contain S1P. Reduction in cellular synthesis of S1P by adding the sphingosine kinase inhibitor dimethyl sphingosine during medium conditioning reduced the ability of conditioned medium to cause actin rearrangements. These results support a role for S1P as an autocrine signal regulating the actin cytoskeleton during Schwann cell development.

  8. Electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer efficiency in the O/1 D/-N2 and O/1 D/-CO systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Black, G.

    1974-01-01

    With the aid of a molecular resonance fluorescence technique, which utilizes optical pumping from the v = 1 level of the ground state of CO by A 1 Pi-X 1 Sigma radiation, a study is made of the efficiency of E-V transfer from O(1 D) to CO. O(1 D) is generated at a known rate by O2 photodissociation at 1470 A in an intermittent mode, and the small modulation of the fluorescent signal associated with CO (v = 1) above the normal thermal background is interpreted in terms of E-V transfer efficiency. The CO (v = 1) lifetime in this system is determined mainly by resonance trapping of the IR fundamental band, and is found to be up to ten times longer than the natural radiative lifetime. For CO, (40 plus or minus 8)% of the O(1 D) energy is converted into vibrational energy. By observing the effect of N2 on the CO (v = 1) fluorescent intensity and lifetime, it is possible to obtain the E-V transfer efficiency for the system O(1 D)-N2 relative to that for O(1 D)-CO. The results indicate that the efficiency for N2 is (83 plus or minus 10)% of that for CO.

  9. Analysis of Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared Spectra of the TRANS-HEXATRIENE-1,1-D2 and -CIS-1-D1 Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Fuson, Hannah A.; Tian, Hengfeng; Blake, Thomas A.

    2011-06-01

    Hexatriene-1,1-D2 with some admixture of the cis-1-D1 and trans-1-D1 species was synthesized by reaction of 2,4-pentadienal and (methyl-D3)-triphenylphosphonium iodide (Wittig reagent). The trans isomer was isolated by preparative gas chromatography, and the high-resolution (0.0015 Cm-1) infrared spectrum was recorded on a Bruker IFS 125HR instrument. The rotational structure in two C-type bands for the 1,1-D2 species was analyzed. For this species the bands at 902.043 and 721.864 Cm-1 yielded composite ground state rotational constants of A0 = 0.801882(1), B0 = 0.041850(2), and C0 = 0.039804(1) Cm-1. For the cis-1-D1 species the C-type band at 803.018 Cm-1 gave A0 = 0.809384(2), B0 = 0.043530(3), and C0 = 0.041321(2) Cm-1. By iodine-catalyzed isomerization, we have obtained some of the much less favored cis isomer and hope to obtain microwave spectra for its three deuterium-substituted species. The rotational constants reported here contribute to data needed for determining a semi-experimental structure for trans-hexatriene, which should show that the structural consequences of pi-electron delocalization increase with the chain length of polyenes.

  10. Electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer efficiency in the O/1 D/-N2 and O/1 D/-CO systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Black, G.

    1974-01-01

    With the aid of a molecular resonance fluorescence technique, which utilizes optical pumping from the v = 1 level of the ground state of CO by A 1 Pi-X 1 Sigma radiation, a study is made of the efficiency of E-V transfer from O(1 D) to CO. O(1 D) is generated at a known rate by O2 photodissociation at 1470 A in an intermittent mode, and the small modulation of the fluorescent signal associated with CO (v = 1) above the normal thermal background is interpreted in terms of E-V transfer efficiency. The CO (v = 1) lifetime in this system is determined mainly by resonance trapping of the IR fundamental band, and is found to be up to ten times longer than the natural radiative lifetime. For CO, (40 plus or minus 8)% of the O(1 D) energy is converted into vibrational energy. By observing the effect of N2 on the CO (v = 1) fluorescent intensity and lifetime, it is possible to obtain the E-V transfer efficiency for the system O(1 D)-N2 relative to that for O(1 D)-CO. The results indicate that the efficiency for N2 is (83 plus or minus 10)% of that for CO.

  11. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical.

  12. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical. PMID:25751125

  13. Therapeutic implications of CD1d expression and tumor-infiltrating macrophages in pediatric medulloblastomas.

    PubMed

    Teo, Wan-Yee; Elghetany, M Tarek; Shen, Jianhe; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Li, Xiaonan; Chintagumpala, Murali; Su, Jack Meng Fen; Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William; Adesina, Adekunle M; Lau, Ching C

    2014-11-01

    Immunobiology of medulloblastoma (MB), the most common malignant brain tumor in children, is poorly understood. Although tumor cells in some MBs were recently shown to express CD1d and be susceptible to Vα24-invariant natural killer T (NKT)-cell cytotoxicity, the clinical relevance of CD1d expression in MB patients remains unknown. We investigated the expression of CD1d in pediatric MBs and correlated with molecular and clinical characteristics. Specifically, we explored if NKT cell therapy can be targeted at a subset of pediatric MBs with poorer prognosis. Particularly, infantile MBs have a worse outcome because radiotherapy is delayed to avoid neurocognitive sequelae. Immunohistochemistry for CD1d was performed on a screening set of 38 primary pediatric MBs. Gene expression of the membrane form of M2 macrophage marker, CD163, was studied in an expanded cohort of 60 tumors. Outcome data was collected prospectively. Thirteen of 38 MBs (34.2 %) expressed CD1d on immunohistochemistry. CD1d was expressed mainly on MB tumor cells, and on some tumor-associated macrophages. Majority (18/22, 82 %) of non sonic-hedgehog/Wingless-activated MBs (group 3 and 4) were CD1d-negative (p = 0.05). A subset of infantile MBs (4/9, 44.4 %) expressed CD1d. Macrophages infiltrating MB expressed CD163 apart from CD1d. Molecular subtypes demonstrated statistical differences in CD163 expression, SHH-tumors were the most enriched (p = 0.006). Molecular and clinical subtypes of pediatric MB exhibit distinct differences in CD1d expression, which have important therapeutic implications. High CD1d expression in infantile MBs offers potential new immunotherapeutic treatment with NKT cell therapy in infants, where treatment is suboptimal due delayed radiotherapy.

  14. The decomposition of H 2S on Ni(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntley, D. R.

    1990-12-01

    Adsorbed H 2S decomposes on Ni(110) to form primarily surface S and H for coverages of less than 0.5 ML. The hydrogen evolves in two separate TPD peaks, characteristic of hydrogen recombination and desorption from the clean surface and from regions perturbed by chemisorbed sulfur. XPS and HREELS indicate the presence of SH and possibly H 2S groups on the surface at 110 K. The XPS data indicates that for coverages less than about 0.5 ML, the concentration of molecular H 2S is small, but it is difficult to asess the coverage of SH groups. However, all of the molecular species decompose prior to hydrogen desorption (for high coverage, 180 K). Physisorbed H 2S is observed on the surface for coverages greater than about 0.5 ML. The sulfur Auger lineshape was observed to be a function of both coverage and temperature. The changes in the lineshape were attributed to perturbations in local bonding interactions between the S and the Ni surface, perhaps involving some change in either bonding sites or distances but not involving SH bond scission. The decomposition reaction was modeled using a bond order conservation method which successfully reproduced the experimental results.

  15. 2S Albumin Storage Proteins: What Makes them Food Allergens?

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, F. Javier; Clemente, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    2S albumin storage proteins are becoming of increasing interest in nutritional and clinical studies as they have been reported as major food allergens in seeds of many mono- and di-cotyledonous plants. This review describes the main biochemical, structural and functional properties of these proteins thought to play a role in determining their potential allergenicity. 2S albumins are considered to sensitize directly via the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The high stability of their intrinsic protein structure, dominated by a well-conserved skeleton of cysteine residues, to the harsh conditions present in the GIT suggests that these proteins are able to cross the gut mucosal barrier to sensitize the mucosal immune system and/or elicit an allergic response. The flexible and solvent-exposed hypervariable region of these proteins is immunodominant and has the ability to bind IgE from allergic patients´ sera. Several linear IgE-binding epitopes of 2S albumins spanning this region have been described to play a major role in allergenicity; the role of conformational epitopes of these proteins in food allergy is far from being understood and need to be investigated. Finally, the interaction of these proteins with other components of the food matrix might influence the absorption rates of immunologically reactive 2S albumins but also in their immune response. PMID:18949071

  16. H2S during circulatory shock: Some unresolved questions

    PubMed Central

    McCook, Oscar; Radermacher, Peter; Volani, Chiara; Asfar, Pierre; Ignatius, Anita; Kemmler, Julia; Möller, Peter; Szabó, Csaba; Whiteman, Matthew; Wood, Mark E.; Wang, Rui; Georgieff, Michael; Wachter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Numerous papers have been published on the role of H2S during circulatory shock. Consequently, knowledge about vascular sulfide concentrations may assume major importance, in particular in the context of “acute on chronic disease”, i.e., during circulatory shock in animals with pre-existing chronic disease. This review addresses the questions i) of the “real” sulfide levels during circulatory shock, and, ii) to which extent injury and pre-existing co-morbidity may affect the expression of H2S producing enzymes under these conditions. In the literature there is a huge range on sulfide blood levels during circulatory shock, in part as a result of the different analytical methods used, but also due to the variable of the models and species studied. Clearly, some of the very high levels reported should be questioned in the context of the well-known H2S toxicity. As long as “real” sulfide levels during circulatory shock are unknown and/or undetectable “on line” due to the lack of appropriate techniques, it appears to be premature to correlate the measured blood levels of hydrogen sulfide with the severity of shock or the H2S therapy-related biological outcomes. The available data on the tissue expression of the H2S-releasing enzymes during circulatory shock suggest that a “constitutive” CSE expression may play a crucial role of for the maintenance of organ function, at least in the kidney. The data also indicate that increased CBS and CSE expression, in particular in the lung and the liver, represents an adaptive response to stress states. PMID:24650697

  17. Inhibition of Ser/Thr phosphatase PPM1D induces neutrophil differentiation in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Rui; Kudoh, Fuki; Yoshimura, Fumihiko; Tanino, Keiji; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2017-05-09

    Protein phosphatase Magnesium-dependent 1, Delta (PPM1D) is a wild-type p53-inducible Ser/Thr phosphatase that acts as a negative regulator of the p53 tumor suppressor. Gene amplification and overexpression of PPM1D have been reported in various cancers including leukemia and neuroblastoma. Therefore, PPM1D is a promising target in cancer therapy. It has been reported that PPM1D knockout mice exhibit neutrophilia in blood and show a defective immune response. Here, we found that inhibition of PPM1D induced neutrophil differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60. The combination of a PPM1D inhibitor and all-trans retinoic acid significantly increased their differentiation efficiency. The PPM1D inhibitor also induced G1 arrest in HL-60 cells. Our results suggest that PPM1D may be a potential therapeutic target for blood cell diseases including leukemia. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  18. X(3872) as a {sup 1}D{sub 2} charmonium state

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashnikova, Yu. S.; Nefediev, A. V.

    2010-11-01

    The {sup 1}D{sub 2} charmonium assignment for the X(3872) meson is considered, as prompted by a recent result from the BABAR Collaboration, favoring 2{sup -+} quantum numbers for X. It is shown that established properties of X(3872) are in a drastic conflict with the {sup 1}D{sub 2} cc assignment.

  19. A rational route to SCM materials based on a 1-D cobalt selenocyanato coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Boeckmann, Jan; Näther, Christian

    2011-07-07

    Thermal annealing of a discrete complex with terminal SeCN anions and monodentate coligands enforces the formation of a 1D cobalt selenocyanato coordination polymer that shows slow relaxation of the magnetization. Therefore, this approach offers a rational route to 1D materials that might show single chain magnetic behaviour.

  20. Fluconazole transport into Candida albicans secretory vesicles by the membrane proteins Cdr1p, Cdr2p, and Mdr1p.

    PubMed

    Basso, Luiz R; Gast, Charles E; Mao, Yuxin; Wong, Brian

    2010-06-01

    A major cause of azole resistance in Candida albicans is overexpression of CDR1, CDR2, and/or MDR1, which encode plasma membrane efflux pumps. To analyze the catalytic properties of these pumps, we used ACT1- and GAL1-regulated expression plasmids to overexpress CDR1, CDR2, or MDR1 in a C. albicans cdr1 cdr2 mdr1-null mutant. When the genes of interest were expressed, the resulting transformants were more resistant to multiple azole antifungals, and accumulated less [(3)H]fluconazole intracellularly, than empty-vector controls. Next, we used a GAL1-regulated dominant negative sec4 allele to cause cytoplasmic accumulation of post-Golgi secretory vesicles (PGVs), and we found that PGVs isolated from CDR1-, CDR2-, or MDR1-overexpressing cells accumulated much more [(3)H]fluconazole than did PGVs from empty-vector controls. The K(m)s (expressed in micromolar concentrations) and V(max)s (expressed in picomoles per milligram of protein per minute), respectively, for [(3)H]fluconazole transport were 0.8 and 0.91 for Cdr1p, 4.3 and 0.52 for Cdr2p, and 3.5 and 0.59 for Mdr1p. [(3)H]fluconazole transport by Cdr1p and Cdr2p required ATP and was unaffected by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), whereas [(3)H]fluconazole transport by Mdr1p did not require ATP and was inhibited by CCCP. [(3)H]fluconazole uptake by all 3 pumps was inhibited by all other azoles tested, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s; expressed as proportions of the [(3)H]fluconazole concentration) of 0.2 to 5.6 for Cdr1p, 0.3 to 3.1 for Cdr2p, and 0.3 to 3.1 for Mdr1p. The methods used in this study may also be useful for studying other plasma membrane transporters in C. albicans and other medically important fungi.

  1. Fluconazole Transport into Candida albicans Secretory Vesicles by the Membrane Proteins Cdr1p, Cdr2p, and Mdr1p

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Luiz R.; Gast, Charles E.; Mao, Yuxin; Wong, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A major cause of azole resistance in Candida albicans is overexpression of CDR1, CDR2, and/or MDR1, which encode plasma membrane efflux pumps. To analyze the catalytic properties of these pumps, we used ACT1- and GAL1-regulated expression plasmids to overexpress CDR1, CDR2, or MDR1 in a C. albicans cdr1 cdr2 mdr1-null mutant. When the genes of interest were expressed, the resulting transformants were more resistant to multiple azole antifungals, and accumulated less [3H]fluconazole intracellularly, than empty-vector controls. Next, we used a GAL1-regulated dominant negative sec4 allele to cause cytoplasmic accumulation of post-Golgi secretory vesicles (PGVs), and we found that PGVs isolated from CDR1-, CDR2-, or MDR1-overexpressing cells accumulated much more [3H]fluconazole than did PGVs from empty-vector controls. The Kms (expressed in micromolar concentrations) and Vmaxs (expressed in picomoles per milligram of protein per minute), respectively, for [3H]fluconazole transport were 0.8 and 0.91 for Cdr1p, 4.3 and 0.52 for Cdr2p, and 3.5 and 0.59 for Mdr1p. [3H]fluconazole transport by Cdr1p and Cdr2p required ATP and was unaffected by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), whereas [3H]fluconazole transport by Mdr1p did not require ATP and was inhibited by CCCP. [3H]fluconazole uptake by all 3 pumps was inhibited by all other azoles tested, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s; expressed as proportions of the [3H]fluconazole concentration) of 0.2 to 5.6 for Cdr1p, 0.3 to 3.1 for Cdr2p, and 0.3 to 3.1 for Mdr1p. The methods used in this study may also be useful for studying other plasma membrane transporters in C. albicans and other medically important fungi. PMID:20348384

  2. The organic anion transport polypeptide 1d1 (Oatp1d1) mediates hepatocellular uptake of phalloidin and microcystin into skate liver

    SciTech Connect

    Meier-Abt, F.; Hammann-Haenni, A.; Stieger, B.; Ballatori, N.; Boyer, J.L. . E-mail: james.boyer@yale.edu

    2007-02-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (rodent Oatp; human OATP) mediate cellular uptake of numerous organic compounds including xenobiotic toxins into mammalian hepatocytes. In the little skate Leucoraja erinacea a liver-specific Oatp (Oatp1d1, also called sOatp) has been identified and suggested to represent an evolutionarily ancient precursor of the mammalian liver OATP1B1 (human), Oatp1b2 (rat), and OATP1B3 (human). The present study tested whether Oatp1d1 shares functional transport activity of the xenobiotic oligopeptide toxins phalloidin and microcystin with the mammalian liver Oatps/OATPs. The phalloidin analogue [{sup 3}H]-demethylphalloin was taken up into skate hepatocytes with high affinity (Km {approx} 0.4 {mu}M), and uptake could be inhibited by phalloidin and a variety of typical Oatp/OATP substrates such as bromosulfophthalein, bile salts, estrone-3-sulfate, cyclosporine A and high concentrations of microcystin-LR (Ki {approx} 150 {mu}M). When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes Oatp1d1 increased uptake of demethylphalloin (Km {approx} 2.2 {mu}M) and microcystin-LR (Km {approx} 27 {mu}M) 2- to 3-fold over water-injected oocytes, whereas the alternative skate liver organic anion transporter, the dimeric Ost{alpha}/{beta}, exhibited no phalloidin and only minor microcystin-LR transport. Also, the closest mammalian Oatp1d1 orthologue, the human brain and testis OATP1C1, did not show any phalloidin transport activity. These results demonstrate that the evolutionarily ancient Oatp1d1 is able to mediate uptake of cyclic oligopeptide toxins into skate liver. The findings support the notion that Oatp1d1 is a precursor of the liver-specific mammalian Oatps/OATPs and that its transport properties are closely associated with certain forms of toxic liver injury such as for example protein phosphatase inhibition by the water-borne toxin microcystin.

  3. Identification of a pepducin acting as S1P3 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Severino, Beatrice; Incisivo, Giuseppina Maria; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Bertolino, Antonio; Frecentese, Francesco; Barbato, Francesco; Manganelli, Serena; Maggioni, Giada; Capasso, Domenica; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Santagada, Vincenzo; Sorrentino, Raffaella; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Perissutti, Elisa

    2013-11-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid with key functions in the immune, inflammatory, and cardiovascular systems. S1P exerts its action through the interaction with a family of five known G protein-coupled receptors, named S1P(1-5). Among them, S1P(3) has been implicated in the pathological processes of a number of diseases, including sepsis and cancer. KRX-725 (compound 1) is a pepducin that mimics the effects of S1P by triggering specifically S1P(3). Here, aiming to identify novel S1P(3) antagonists, we carried out an alanine scanning analysis to address the contribution of the side chains of each amino acid residue to the peptide function. Then, deleted peptides from both the C- and N-terminus were prepared in order to determine the minimal sequence for activity and to identify the structural requirements for agonistic and, possibly, antagonistic behaviors. The pharmacological results of the Ala-scan derived compounds (2-10) suggested a high tolerance of the pepducin 1 to amino acid substitutions. Importantly, the deleted peptide 16 has the ability to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, both pepducin 1-induced vasorelaxation and fibroblast proliferation. Finally, a computational analysis was performed on the prepared compounds, showing that the supposed antagonists 16 and 17 appeared to be aligned with each other but not with the others. These results suggested a correlation between specific conformations and activities.

  4. Lip1p: a novel subunit of acyl-CoA ceramide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Béatrice; Riezman, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Ceramide plays a crucial role as a basic building block of sphingolipids, but also as a signalling molecule mediating the fate of the cell. Although Lac1p and Lag1p have been shown recently to be involved in acyl-CoA-dependent ceramide synthesis, ceramide synthase is still poorly characterized. In this study, we expressed tagged versions of Lac1p and Lag1p and purified them to near homogeneity. They copurified with ceramide synthase activity, giving unequivocal evidence that they are subunits of the enzyme. In purified form, the acyl-CoA dependence, fatty acyl-CoA chain length specificity, and Fumonisin B1/Australifungin sensitivity of the ceramide synthase were the same as in cells, showing that these are properties of the enzyme and do not depend upon the membrane environment or other factors. SDS–PAGE analysis of purified ceramide synthase revealed the presence of a novel subunit of the enzyme, Lip1p. Lip1p is a single-span ER membrane protein that is required for ceramide synthesis in vivo and in vitro. The Lip1p regions required for ceramide synthesis are localized within the ER membrane or lumen. PMID:15692566

  5. Sec1p Binds to Snare Complexes and Concentrates at Sites of Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Chavela M.; Grote, Eric; Munson, Mary; Hughson, Frederick M.; Novick, Peter J.

    1999-01-01

    Proteins of the Sec1 family have been shown to interact with target-membrane t-SNAREs that are homologous to the neuronal protein syntaxin. We demonstrate that yeast Sec1p coprecipitates not only the syntaxin homologue Ssop, but also the other two exocytic SNAREs (Sec9p and Sncp) in amounts and in proportions characteristic of SNARE complexes in yeast lysates. The interaction between Sec1p and Ssop is limited by the abundance of SNARE complexes present in sec mutants that are defective in either SNARE complex assembly or disassembly. Furthermore, the localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Sec1p coincides with sites of vesicle docking and fusion where SNARE complexes are believed to assemble and function. The proposal that SNARE complexes act as receptors for Sec1p is supported by the mislocalization of GFP-Sec1p in a mutant defective for SNARE complex assembly and by the robust localization of GFP-Sec1p in a mutant that fails to disassemble SNARE complexes. The results presented here place yeast Sec1p at the core of the exocytic fusion machinery, bound to SNARE complexes and localized to sites of secretion. PMID:10427089

  6. Extracellular export of sphingosine kinase-1a contributes to the vascular S1P gradient

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Krishnan; Thangada, Shobha; Michaud, Jason; Oo, Myat Lin; Ai, Youxi; Lee, Yong-Moon; Wu, Mingtao; Parikh, Nehal S.; Khan, Faraz; Proia, Richard L.; Hla, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), produced by Sphks (sphingosine kinases), is a multifunctional lipid mediator that regulates immune cell trafficking and vascular development. Mammals maintain a large concentration gradient of S1P between vascular and extravascular compartments. Mechanisms by which S1P is released from cells and concentrated in the plasma are poorly understood. We recently demonstrated [Ancellin, Colmont, Su, Li, Mittereder, Chae, Stefansson, Liau and Hla (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 6667–6675] that Sphk1 activity is constitutively secreted by vascular endothelial cells. In the present study, we show that among the five Sphk isoforms expressed in endothelial cells, the Sphk-1a isoform is selectively secreted in HEK-293 cells (human embryonic kidney cells) and human umbilical-vein endothelial cells. In sharp contrast, Sphk2 is not secreted. The exported Sphk-1a isoform is enzymatically active and produced sufficient S1P to induce S1P receptor internalization. Wild-type mouse plasma contains significant Sphk activity (179 pmol·min−1·g−1). In contrast, Sphk1−/− mouse plasma has undetectable Sphk activity and approx. 65% reduction in S1P levels. Moreover, human plasma contains enzymatically active Sphk1 (46 pmol·min−1·g−1). These results suggest that export of Sphk-1a occurs under physiological conditions and may contribute to the establishment of the vascular S1P gradient. PMID:16623665

  7. Lack of evidence for monosomy 1p36 in patients with Prader-Willi-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, V R; Mazzucato, L F; Pina-Neto, J M

    2008-08-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common subtelomeric microdeletion syndrome with an incidence rate estimated to be 1 in 5000 births. A hypothesis of a similarity between patients with 1p36 deletion and those with Prader-Willi syndrome and the existence of two different phenotypes for 1p36 microdeletion has been suggested. The main objective of the present study was to determine the existence of 1p36 microdeletion in a sample of patients with mental retardation, obesity and hyperphagia who tested negative by the methylation test for Prader-Willi syndrome. Sixteen patients (7 females, 9 males), 16-26 years old, were evaluated with high-resolution cytogenetic analysis at 550-850 band levels and with 11 polymorphic microsatellite markers located in the 1p36 region. All patients had normal cytogenetic and molecular results. The results obtained by high-resolution cytogenetic methodology were confirmed by the molecular analyses. We did not detect a 1p36 microdeletion in 16 subjects with the Prader-Willi-like phenotype, which reinforces that no correlation seems to exist between Prader-Willi-like phenotype and the 1p36 microdeletion syndrome.

  8. Severe lysosomal storage disease of liver in del(1)(p36): a new presentation.

    PubMed

    Haimi, Motti; Iancu, Theodore C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Lerner, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    1p36 deletion is the most common terminal deletion syndrome with an estimated occurrence of 1:5000 live births. The deletion is of variable size. It usually involves less than 10 Mb in the 1pter-1p36.23 interval. Variability of the phenotype is partially related to the extent of the deletion. Some children with a 1p36 deletion were reported with obesity and hyperphagia, raising the question of possible phenotypic overlap with Prader-Willi syndrome. Correlation between presence of obesity and the size of the deletion has only been documented in one case. We report a 11-year-old girl with 1p36 deletion and the classical dysmorphological features. In late infancy, she developed an uncontrolled voracious appetite, overweight, truncal obesity and elevated serum transaminases. Liver biopsy disclosed severe steatosis. The hepatocytes contained accumulation of lipofuscins. Lipolysosomes were abnormally numerous and extremely enlarged. These features have not been previously reported in 1p36 deletion. Oligonucleotide-based microarray analysis showed a subtelomeric 2.2 Mb deletion at 1p36.33p36.32. This suggests that this chromosome segment is a critical region for obesity and hyperphagia. The accumulation in the liver with abnormal ultrastructure may be an additional feature of this form of syndromal obesity. 1p36 deletion syndrome should be considered in patients with obesity, hyperphagia and liver fat accumulation.

  9. Molecular characterization of a monosomy 1p36 presenting as an Aicardi syndrome phenocopy.

    PubMed

    Bursztejn, Anne-Claire; Bronner, Myriam; Peudenier, Sylviane; Grégoire, Marie-José; Jonveaux, Philippe; Nemos, Christophe

    2009-11-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most frequent terminal deletion known in Humans. Typical craniofacial features, developmental delay/mental retardation, seizures and sensorineural defects characterize 1p36 deletion syndrome. Aicardi syndrome (AIS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by chorioretinal lacunae, corpus callosum agenesis and infantile spasms responsible for mental retardation. By screening DNA from diagnosed AIS patients with oligonucleotide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), we report a 1p36 monosomy in this study. There were no other deletions or duplications. Regarding clinical criteria, the patient did not have the typical facial appearance commonly described for 1p36 monosomy patients. We showed that this 1p36 monosomy corresponded to combined interstitial and terminal de novo deletions of the chromosome 1 leading to an 11.73 Mb deletion confirmed with qPCR. By microsatellite markers and FISH analyses, we have concluded that this deletion occurred on maternal chromosome 1 during oogenesis. We did find some clinical features shared by the 1p36 monosomy and AIS: infantile spasms, corpus callosum dysgenesis, ophthalmological abnormalities, and skeletal malformations. To date, no relationship between these two phenotypes has been established. We conclude that the monosomy 1p36 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of AIS.

  10. Mot1p is essential for TBP recruitment to selected promoters during in vivo gene activation.

    PubMed

    Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Van Oevelen, Chris J C; Van Teeffelen, Hetty A A M; Weil, P Anthony; Holstege, Frank C P; Timmers, H Th Marc

    2002-10-01

    Recruitment of TATA-binding protein (TBP) is central to activation of transcription by RNA polymerase II (pol II). This depends upon co-activator proteins including TBP-associated factors (TAFs). Yeast Mot1p was identified as a general transcriptional repressor in genetic screens and is also found associated with TBP. To obtain insight into Mot1p function in vivo, we determined the mRNA expression profile of the mot1-1 temperature-sensitive (Ts) strain. Unexpectedly, this indicated that Mot1p mostly plays a positive role for transcription. For one potential activation target, HXT2, we analyzed promoter recruitment of Mot1p, TBP, Taf1p (Taf130p) and pol II by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Whereas TBP becomes stably associated upon activation of the HXT2 and HXT4 promoters, Mot1p showed only a transient association. TBP recruitment was compromised in two different mot1 mutant strains, but was only moderately affected in a taf1 Ts strain. Together, our data indicate that Mot1p can assist in recruitment of TBP on promoters during gene activation in vivo.

  11. Evidence that the Yeast Desaturase Ole1p Exists as a Dimer In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Y.; Shanklin, J.

    2010-06-18

    Desaturase enzymes are composed of two classes, the structurally well characterized soluble class found predominantly in the plastids of higher plants and the more widely distributed but poorly structurally defined integral membrane class. Despite their distinct evolutionary origins, the two classes both require an iron cofactor and molecular oxygen for activity and are inhibited by azide and cyanide, suggesting strong mechanistic similarities. The fact that the soluble desaturase is active as a homodimer prompted us test the hypothesis that an archetypal integral membrane desaturase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the {Delta}{sup o}-acyl-Co-A desaturase Ole1p, also exhibits a dimeric organization. Ole1p was chosen because it is one of the best characterized integral membrane desaturase and because it retains activity when fused with epitope tags. FLAG-Ole1p was detected by Western blotting of immunoprecipitates in which anti-Myc antibodies were used for capture from yeast extracts co-expressing Ole1p-Myc and Ole1p-FLAG. Interaction was confirmed by two independent bimolecular complementation assays (i.e. the split ubiquitin system and the split luciferase system). Co-expression of active and inactive Ole1p subunits resulted in an {approx}75% suppression of the accumulation of palmitoleic acid, demonstrating that the physiologically active form of Ole1p in vivo is the dimer in which both protomers must be functional.

  12. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Stm1p facilitates ribosome preservation during quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, Natalya; Chanchorn, Ekkawit; Van Dyke, Michael W.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p confers increased resistance to the macrolide starvation-mimic rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p maintains 80S ribosome integrity during stationary phase-induced quiescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates polysome formation following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates protein synthesis following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p is a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation. -- Abstract: Once cells exhaust nutrients from their environment, they enter an alternative resting state known as quiescence, whereby proliferation ceases and essential nutrients are obtained through internal stores and through the catabolism of existing macromolecules and organelles. One example of this is ribophagy, the degradation of ribosomes through the process of autophagy. However, some ribosomes need to be preserved for an anticipated recovery from nutrient deprivation. We found that the ribosome-associated protein Stm1p greatly increases the quantity of 80S ribosomes present in quiescent yeast cells and that these ribosomes facilitate increased protein synthesis rates once nutrients are restored. These findings suggest that Stm1p can act as a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation and restoration.

  13. Synthesis and Electron Field-Emission of 1-D Carbon-Related Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Han C.

    2002-10-01

    field emission characteristics of the 1-D carbon-related nanostructures were measured by the conventional diode method at an ambient pressure of 1.3X10-3 Pa (10-5 Torr). The films (1X1-cm^2) were separated from the anode by ITO (indium tin oxide) coated glass, where a glass fiber spacer was maintained at 150 μm from the cathode. The current density and electric field characteristics were measured using a Keithley 237 electrometer. A range of onset electron emission field from 3.5 to 1.5 V/μm and an emission current density up to 1 mA/cm^2 at 3V/μm have been achieved in this study, apparently superior to other carbon-based electron field emitters[3]. The results were reproducible over a period of weeks and the nanotubes did not degrade physically when exposing to a humid air of RH 90using the Fowler-Nordheim model, I=aV^2 exp (-bΦ_e^3/2/V) , where a and b are constants. The turn-on voltage was estimated as the voltage deviating from ln(I/V^2)-1/V curve. The effective work function (Φ_e=Φ/β) of the arrayed carbon nanotubes was calculated from the slope of the Fowler-Nordheim plot, where the value of β, the field enhancement factor, was found to be 1517. This value increased to 3357 when nitrogen was doped, but decreased to 974 when boron was doped. The incorporation of nitrogen or boron into the carbon network apparently changes the original nanostructure and the chemical bonding. The structural and compositional modification by the incorporation of nitrogen, boron, or hydrogen into the 1-D carbon-related nanostructured materials were analyzed by FTIR , XPS , Raman spectroscopy , and FE-SEM . Various forms in connection with 1-D nanostructured materials applicable to the NEMS , e.g. , nanowelding of nanotubes[4], tubes on tube , open-end nanotubes and coils of nanofiber and nanotubes have been produced in this research depending on the plasma chemistry, catalytic effect and the design of template. [1]. S. Iijima, Nature 354, 56 (1991). [2]. S. L. Sung, S. H. Tsai

  14. Non-thermal distribution of O(1D) atoms in the night-time thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Jeng-Hwa

    1988-01-01

    The 6300 A O(1D-3P) emission has been used for many years to remotely monitor the thermospheric temperature from the Doppler width of its line profile. The O(1D) atoms in the nighttime thermosphere are initially produced by the dissociative recombination of O2(+) ions with kinetic energy much greater than the thermal energy of the ambient neutrals. The validity of the technique to monitor neutral ambient temperature by measuring O(1D) 6300 A emission depends on the degree of thermalization of the O(1D) atoms. The object of this study is to calculate the velocity distribution of the O(1D) atoms and to examine the effect of nonthermal distribution on the nighttime thermospheric neutral temperature determined.

  15. Yeast Pah1p phosphatidate phosphatase is regulated by proteasome-mediated degradation.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Florencia; Hsieh, Lu-Sheng; Soto-Cardalda, Aníbal; Carman, George M

    2014-04-04

    Yeast PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase is the enzyme responsible for the production of the diacylglycerol used for the synthesis of triacylglycerol that accumulates in the stationary phase of growth. Paradoxically, the growth phase-mediated inductions of PAH1 and phosphatidate phosphatase activity do not correlate with the amount of Pah1p; enzyme abundance declined in a growth phase-dependent manner. Pah1p from exponential phase cells was a relatively stable protein, and its abundance was not affected by incubation with an extract from stationary phase cells. Recombinant Pah1p was degraded upon incubation with the 100,000 × g pellet fraction of stationary phase cells, although the enzyme was stable when incubated with the same fraction of exponential phase cells. MG132, an inhibitor of proteasome function, prevented degradation of the recombinant enzyme. Endogenously expressed and plasmid-mediated overexpressed levels of Pah1p were more abundant in the stationary phase of cells treated with MG132. Pah1p was stabilized in mutants with impaired proteasome (rpn4Δ, blm10Δ, ump1Δ, and pre1 pre2) and ubiquitination (hrd1Δ, ubc4Δ, ubc7Δ, ubc8Δ, and doa4Δ) functions. The pre1 pre2 mutations that eliminate nearly all chymotrypsin-like activity of the 20 S proteasome had the greatest stabilizing effect on enzyme levels. Taken together, these results supported the conclusion that Pah1p is subject to proteasome-mediated degradation in the stationary phase. That Pah1p abundance was stabilized in pah1Δ mutant cells expressing catalytically inactive forms of Pah1p and dgk1Δ mutant cells with induced expression of DGK1-encoded diacylglycerol kinase indicated that alteration in phosphatidate and/or diacylglycerol levels might be the signal that triggers Pah1p degradation.

  16. Yeast Pah1p Phosphatidate Phosphatase Is Regulated by Proteasome-mediated Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Florencia; Hsieh, Lu-Sheng; Soto-Cardalda, Aníbal; Carman, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Yeast PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase is the enzyme responsible for the production of the diacylglycerol used for the synthesis of triacylglycerol that accumulates in the stationary phase of growth. Paradoxically, the growth phase-mediated inductions of PAH1 and phosphatidate phosphatase activity do not correlate with the amount of Pah1p; enzyme abundance declined in a growth phase-dependent manner. Pah1p from exponential phase cells was a relatively stable protein, and its abundance was not affected by incubation with an extract from stationary phase cells. Recombinant Pah1p was degraded upon incubation with the 100,000 × g pellet fraction of stationary phase cells, although the enzyme was stable when incubated with the same fraction of exponential phase cells. MG132, an inhibitor of proteasome function, prevented degradation of the recombinant enzyme. Endogenously expressed and plasmid-mediated overexpressed levels of Pah1p were more abundant in the stationary phase of cells treated with MG132. Pah1p was stabilized in mutants with impaired proteasome (rpn4Δ, blm10Δ, ump1Δ, and pre1 pre2) and ubiquitination (hrd1Δ, ubc4Δ, ubc7Δ, ubc8Δ, and doa4Δ) functions. The pre1 pre2 mutations that eliminate nearly all chymotrypsin-like activity of the 20 S proteasome had the greatest stabilizing effect on enzyme levels. Taken together, these results supported the conclusion that Pah1p is subject to proteasome-mediated degradation in the stationary phase. That Pah1p abundance was stabilized in pah1Δ mutant cells expressing catalytically inactive forms of Pah1p and dgk1Δ mutant cells with induced expression of DGK1-encoded diacylglycerol kinase indicated that alteration in phosphatidate and/or diacylglycerol levels might be the signal that triggers Pah1p degradation. PMID:24563465

  17. Characterization of the roles of Blt1p in fission yeast cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Goss, John W; Kim, Sunhee; Bledsoe, Hannah; Pollard, Thomas D

    2014-07-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of cytokinesis is essential for cell division, yet the mechanisms that control the formation and constriction of the contractile ring are incompletely understood. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe proteins that contribute to the cytokinetic contractile ring accumulate during interphase in nodes-precursor structures around the equatorial cortex. During mitosis, additional proteins join these nodes, which condense to form the contractile ring. The cytokinesis protein Blt1p is unique in being present continuously in nodes from early interphase through to the contractile ring until cell separation. Blt1p was shown to stabilize interphase nodes, but its functions later in mitosis were unclear. We use analytical ultracentrifugation to show that purified Blt1p is a tetramer. We find that Blt1p interacts physically with Sid2p and Mob1p, a protein kinase complex of the septation initiation network, and confirm known interactions with F-BAR protein Cdc15p. Contractile rings assemble normally in blt1∆ cells, but the initiation of ring constriction and completion of cell division are delayed. We find three defects that likely contribute to this delay. Without Blt1p, contractile rings recruited and retained less Sid2p/Mob1p and Clp1p phosphatase, and β-glucan synthase Bgs1p accumulated slowly at the cleavage site. © 2014 Goss et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  18. Tctex1d2 Is a Negative Regulator of GLUT4 Translocation and Glucose Uptake.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yoko; Okada, Shuichi; Yamada, Eijiro; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Yamada, Masanobu

    2015-10-01

    Tctex1d2 (Tctex1 domain containing 2) is an open reading frame that encodes for a functionally unknown protein that contains a Tctex1 domain found in dynein light chain family members. Examination of gene expression during adipogenesis demonstrated a marked increase in Tctex1d2 protein expression that was essentially undetectable in preadipocytes and markedly induced during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Tctex1d2 overexpression significantly inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation and 2-deoxyglucose uptake. In contrast, Tctex1d2 knockdown significantly increased insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and 2-deoxyglucose uptake. However, acute insulin stimulation (up to 30 min) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes with overexpression or knockdown of Tctex1d2 had no effect on Akt phosphorylation, a critical signal transduction target required for GLUT4 translocation. Although overexpression of Tctex1d2 had no significant effect on GLUT4 internalization, Tctex1d2 was found to associate with syntaxin 4 in an insulin-dependent manner and inhibit Doc2b binding to syntaxin 4. In addition, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide rescued the Tctex1d2 inhibition of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation by suppressing the Tctex1d2-syntaxin 4 interaction and increasing Doc2b-Synatxin4 interactions. Taking these results together, we hypothesized that Tctex1d2 is a novel syntaxin 4 binding protein that functions as a negative regulator of GLUT4 plasma membrane translocation through inhibition of the Doc2b-syntaxin 4 interaction.

  19. Translocation involving 1p and 17q is a recurrent genetic alteration of human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savelyeva, L.; Corvi, R.; Schwab, M. )

    1994-08-01

    Human neuroblastoma cells often are monosomic for the distal portion of 1p (1p36). The authors report that the deleted 1p material in cells of neuroblastoma lines is preferentially replaced by material from chromosome 17, resulting from an unbalanced 1;17 translocation. Chromosome 17 often acquires instability, followed by the integration of fragments into various marker chromosomes. As a consequence, 17q material can increase over 17p material. The nonrandom frequency of 1;17 translocations appears to indicate an as-yet-undefined contribution to neuroblastoma development. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Novel airway findings in a patient with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferril, Geoffrey R; Barham, Henry P; Prager, Jeremy D

    2014-01-01

    1p36 deletion syndrome comprises a phenotypic presentation that includes central nervous system, cardiac, and craniofacial anomalies. There has been no report of associated airway anomalies with this syndrome. We present here a case report and literature review. Prenatally, amniocentesis for chromosomal analysis was performed on our patient, with results consistent with 1p36 deletion syndrome. Respiratory distress and unsuccessful attempts at intubation prompted transfer to Children's Hospital of Colorado. Microlaryngoscopy was subsequently performed, revealing a persistent buccopharyngeal membrane and unidentifiable larynx. Emergent tracheostomy was then performed to secure the airway. Airway anomalies may be associated with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

  1. A patient with monosomy 1p36, atypical features and phenotypic similarities with Cantu syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tiong Yang; Bankier, Agnes; Slater, Howard R; Northrop, Emma L; Zacharin, Margaret; Savarirayan, Ravi

    2005-12-15

    We report on a 16-year-old boy with a distal 1p36 deletion with some clinical features consistent with Cantu syndrome (OMIM#239850). He also has hypercholesterolemia, type II diabetes, recurrent bony fractures, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, not previously described in either condition. The 1p36 deletion was detected in a screen of all chromosome subtelomeres using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and was verified using FISH with a region-specific BAC clone. We suggest that patients suspected of having Cantu syndrome, especially those with unusual or more severe manifestations be analyzed for distal 1p36 deletions.

  2. Bethe-Salpeter wave functions of ηc(2 S ) and ψ (2 S ) states from full lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nochi, Kazuki; Kawanai, Taichi; Sasaki, Shoichi

    2016-12-01

    We discuss the internal structure of radially excited charmonium mesons based on the equal-time and Coulomb gauge Bethe-Salpeter (BS) amplitudes, which are obtained in lattice QCD. Our simulations are performed with a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quark on the (2 +1 )-flavor PACS-CS gauge configurations at the lightest pion mass, Mπ=156 (7 ) MeV . The variational method is applied to the study of the optimal charmonium operators for ground and first excited states of S -wave charmonia. We successfully calculate the BS wave functions of ηc(2 S ) and ψ (2 S ) states, as well as ηc(1 S ) and J /ψ states, and then estimate the root-mean-square radii of both the 1 S and 2 S charmonium states. We also examine whether a series of the BS wave functions from the ground state to excited states can be described by a single set of the spin-independent and spin-dependent interquark potentials with a unique quark mass. It is found that the quark kinetic mass and both the central and the spin-spin charmonium potentials, determined from the 2 S wave functions, fairly agree with the ones from the 1 S wave functions. This strongly supports the validity of the potential description for the charmonium system—at least, below the open-charm threshold.

  3. Looking for SO_2 and H_2S on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, B. H.; Nash, D. B.

    1996-09-01

    We consider how to best look for frozen SO_2 and H_2S on Europa with Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS), in part by creating simulated NIMS spectra based upon our lab spectroscopic reflectance data [e.g. 1,2] of H_2S, SO_2, and H_2O ices. The presence or absence, abundance, and location of SO_2 or H_2S on Europa could have significant implications for understanding Europa's geologic and even biologic history. IUE and HST data of Europa show a band in the UV that [3] interpret as most likely due to frozen SO_2; and [4] interpret continuum slope of UV/Visible data as consistent with sulfur compounds or allotropes. In groundbased data, many of the strongest SO_2 and H_2S bands overlap with Europa's saturated 3 mu m water ice band. Even so, [5,6] indicate some SO_2 bands near 4 mu m may be barely visible. With better spatial resolution and sensitivity, NIMS may be able to detect SO_2 using the strong 4.1 mu m band, particularly in areas that are enriched in SO_2 or depleted somewhat in water ice relative to global averages. Perhaps even better to look for is the weaker SO_2 2.54 mu m band because it lies outside the main water bands. It is much weaker than the 4 mu m SO_2 band, but strong enough that it should be visible in pixels where SO_2 averages a mm or more in thickness on the surface [1]. H_2S will be a challenge to observe because the optimum bands, near 3.9 and 2.7 mu m, both overlap with spectral areas saturated by water ice in groundbased data. However, even thin (0.1 to 1 mm) H_2S frosts create very deep bands at these wavelengths [7], and NIMS' vastly better spatial resolution, as well as greater sensitivity, may allow looking for these bands. References. [1] Nash, D. B. and B. H. Betts, Icarus, 117, 402-419, 1995. [2] Nash, D. B. and R. Howell, Science, 244, 454-457, 1989. [3] Noll, K. S. et al., J. Geophys. Res., 100, 19057-19060, 1995. [4] Spencer et al., J. Geophys. Res., 100, 19049-19056, 1995. [5] Calvin, W. M. et al., J. Geophys

  4. A Role for Myosin-I in Actin Assembly through Interactions with Vrp1p, Bee1p, and the Arp2/3 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Marie; Klebl, Bert M.; Tong, Amy H.Y.; Webb, Bradley A.; Leeuw, Thomas; Leberer, Ekkehard; Whiteway, Malcolm; Thomas, David Y.; Boone, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Type I myosins are highly conserved actin-based molecular motors that localize to the actin-rich cortex and participate in motility functions such as endocytosis, polarized morphogenesis, and cell migration. The COOH-terminal tail of yeast myosin-I proteins, Myo3p and Myo5p, contains an Src homology domain 3 (SH3) followed by an acidic domain. The myosin-I SH3 domain interacted with both Bee1p and Vrp1p, yeast homologues of human WASP and WIP, adapter proteins that link actin assembly and signaling molecules. The myosin-I acidic domain interacted with Arp2/3 complex subunits, Arc40p and Arc19p, and showed both sequence similarity and genetic redundancy with the COOH-terminal acidic domain of Bee1p (Las17p), which controls Arp2/3-mediated actin nucleation. These findings suggest that myosin-I proteins may participate in a diverse set of motility functions through a role in actin assembly. PMID:10648568

  5. Loss of CDC5 function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to defects in Swe1p regulation and Bfa1p/Bub2p-independent cytokinesis.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chong Jin; Song, Sukgil; Lee, Philip R; Shou, Wenying; Deshaies, Raymond J; Lee, Kyung S

    2003-01-01

    In many organisms, polo kinases appear to play multiple roles during M-phase progression. To provide new insights into the function of budding yeast polo kinase Cdc5p, we generated novel temperature-sensitive cdc5 mutants by mutagenizing the C-terminal domain. Here we show that, at a semipermissive temperature, the cdc5-3 mutant exhibited a synergistic bud elongation and growth defect with loss of HSL1, a component important for normal G(2)/M transition. Loss of SWE1, which phosphorylates and inactivates the budding yeast Cdk1 homolog Cdc28p, suppressed the cdc5-3 hsl1Delta defect, suggesting that Cdc5p functions at a point upstream of Swe1p. In addition, the cdc5-4 and cdc5-7 mutants exhibited chained cell morphologies with shared cytoplasms between the connected cell bodies, indicating a cytokinetic defect. Close examination of these mutants revealed delayed septin assembly at the incipient bud site and loosely organized septin rings at the mother-bud neck. Components in the mitotic exit network (MEN) play important roles in normal cytokinesis. However, loss of BFA1 or BUB2, negative regulators of the MEN, failed to remedy the cytokinetic defect of these mutants, indicating that Cdc5p promotes cytokinesis independently of Bfa1p and Bub2p. Thus, Cdc5p contributes to the activation of the Swe1p-dependent Cdc28p/Clb pathway, normal septin function, and cytokinesis. PMID:12586693

  6. Observation of {chi}{sub bJ}(1P,2P) decays to light hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Reed, J.; Briere, R. A.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.

    2008-11-01

    Analyzing {upsilon}(nS) decays acquired with the CLEO detector operating at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we measure for the first time the product branching fractions B[{upsilon}(nS){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub bJ}((n-1)P)]B[{chi}{sub bJ}(n-1)P){yields}X{sub i}] for n=2 and 3, where X{sub i} denotes, for each i, one of the 14 exclusive light-hadron final states for which we observe significant signals in both {chi}{sub bJ}(1P) and {chi}{sub bJ}(2P) decays. We also determine upper limits for the electric dipole (E1) transitions {upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub bJ}(1P)

  7. Measurement of the muonium 1S-2S transition frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann, K.; Baird, P.E.G.; Barr, J.R.M.; Berkeland, D.; Boshier, M.G.; Braun, B.; Eaton, G.H.; Ferguson, A.I.; Geerds, H.; Hughes, V.W.; Maas, F.; Matthias, B.E.; Matousek, P.; Persaud, M.; zu Putlitz, G.; Reinhard, I.; Riis, E.; Sandars, P.G.H.; Schwarz, W.; Toner, W.T.; Towrie, M.; Willmann, L.; Woodle, K.A.; Woodman, G.

    1995-04-01

    Resonant ionization spectroscopy has been employed for measuring the 1{sup 2}{ital S}{sub 1/2}{minus}2{sup 2}{ital S}{sub 1/2} frequency difference in the hydrogen-like muonium atom to 2 455 529 002(33)(46) MHz. The 1S-2S two-photon transition was induced Doppler-free using two counter-propagating laser beams. The 2S state was photo-ionized by a third photon from the same laser field. The measurement agrees with QED theory within two standard deviations. The mass of the positive muon can be extracted from the isotope shifts in this transition to hydrogen and deuterium to 105.658 80(29)(43) MeV/c{sup 2}. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  8. Hot gas, regenerative, supported H.sub.2 S sorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor); Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Efficient, regenerable sorbents for removal of H.sub.2 S from moderately high temperature (usually 200.degree. C.-550.degree.C.) gas streams comprise a porous, high surface area aluminosilicate support, suitably a zeolite, and most preferably a sodium deficient zeolite containing 1 to 20 weight percent of binary metal oxides. The binary oxides are a mixture of a Group VB or VIB metal oxide with a Group IB, IIB or VIII metal oxide such as V-Zn-O, V-Cu-O, Cu-Mo-O, Zn-Mo-O or Fe-Mo-O contained in the support. The sorbent effectively removes H.sub.2 S from the host gas stream in high efficiency and can be repetitively regenerated at least 10 times without loss of activity.

  9. Optical Properties of In2S3 Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, I. V.; Polubok, V. A.

    2014-11-01

    Laser deposition on substrates at temperatures of 480, 610, and 720 K has been used to produce films of the compound In2S3. Single crystals of this compound grown by the Bridgeman-Stockbarger method are used as targets. The composition is determined by x-ray spectral analysis and the structure of the resulting crystals and films is determined by x-ray methods. Both the crystals and the films crystallize into a tetragonal spinel structure. Transmission spectra in the region of the intrinsic absorption edge are used to determine the width of the band gap and the refractive index of the In2S3 films. The band gap width is found to increase as the substrate temperature is raised.

  10. Magic Wavelength for the Hydrogen 1S-2S Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Akio

    2016-05-01

    The state of the art precision measurement of the transition frequencies of neutral atoms is performed with atoms trapped by the magic wavelength optical lattice that cancels the ac Stark shift of the transitions. Trapping with magic wavelength lattice is also expected to improve the precision of the hydrogen 1S-2S transition frequency, which so far has been measured only with the atomic beam. In this talk, I discuss the magic wavelength for the hydrogen 1S-2S transition, and the possibility of implementing the optical lattice trapping for hydrogen. Optical trapping of hydrogen also opens the way to perform magnetic field free spectroscopy of antihydrogen for the test of CPT theorem.

  11. The 2S(+) - 2P separation in KO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Dyall, Kenneth G.

    1991-01-01

    The 2S(+) - 2P separation in KO is investigated using large basis sets and high levels of correlation treatment. Relativistic effects are included at the Dirac-Fock level and reduce the separation only slightly. The basis set superposition error is considered in detail. On the basis of these calculations, our best estimate places the 2p sub 3/2 state about 200 cm(exp -1) above the ground 2 sigma(+) state in agreement with our previous estimate.

  12. Hot ductility of steel 09G2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, N. A.

    2009-03-01

    Hot ductility of steel 09G2S is studied in a temperature range of 600 - 1000°C on the branch of cooling after heating to a high (1150°C) temperature. The causes of the nonmonotonic variation of the hot ductility are determined, and ways for removing the ductility dip are suggested. Recommendations are given for developing the modes of forming of sheet preforms.

  13. Isd11p Prote