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Sample records for 1p 1d 2s

  1. Chromosome 1p36 in migraine with aura: association study of the 5HT(1D) locus.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Miles D; Noble-Topham, Sandra; Percy, Maire E; Andrade, Danielle M; Ebers, George C

    2012-01-01

    Migraine with aura (MA) may share some but not all risk factors with other forms of migraine. As common migraine without aura (MO) has been associated with the chromosome 1p36 locus, we tested its involvement in MA by using two-point parametric linkage analysis to analyze 64 multiplex MA families. A logarithm of the odds score of 1.9 was suggestive of chromosome 1p36 linkage to MA. The transmission disequilibrium test analysis was then performed in 79 nuclear families with one MA parent and one MA offspring. We identified the presence of genetic association at chromosome 1p36 with MA (P=0.045, Bonferroni corrected): the locus encoding the 5HT(1D) receptor gene. Although these data suggest that the 1p36 locus may protect against MA, consistent with the role of the 5HT(1D) receptor in migraine treatment with triptan drugs, the study is subject to the limitations associated with studying a small number of affected families. As a result, we contrast evidence suggesting that the chromosome 1p36 locus is strongly MO associated with our finding that 1p36 has a more limited contribution to MA in the families we analyzed. Further work using a genome-wide association study approach in familial typical migraine, consisting of those affected by MO or MA, will serve to further distinguish how and why MA differs from MO.

  2. Polychalcogenophosphate flux synthesis of 1D-KInP 2Se 6 and 1D and 3D-NaCrP 2S 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coste, Servane; Kopnin, Evgeni; Evain, Michel; Jobic, Stéphane; Brec, Raymond; Chondroudis, Konstantinos; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2002-04-01

    Three new chalcogenophosphates, 1D-KInP 2Se 6 ( I), 1D-NaCrP 2S 6 ( II) and 3D-NaCrP 2S 6 ( III), have been synthesized and their structure determined from single crystal diffraction analysis. ( I) and ( II) crystallize in the monoclinic system (space group P2 1/n, No. 14) with cell parameters a=7.5112(11), b=6.4861(5), c=22.789(2) Å and β=98.912(16)° ( V=1096.9(2) Å 3), Z=4 and R/ Rw( F2)=0.0234/0.0387 (for 900 observed reflections and 92 refined parameters) for ( I) and a=7.0279(5), b=5.8797(2), c=21.2578(14) Å and β=92.110(3)° ( V=877.82(9) Å 3), Z=4 and R/ Rw( F2)=0.0572/0.1151 (for 1455 observed reflections and 92 refined parameters) for ( II). Both materials exhibit 1/ ∞[MP 2Q 6] - chains built upon [MQ 6] octahedra (M=In, Cr; Q=Se, S) sharing edges to define 1/ ∞[MQ 4] 5- zigzag fibers which are capped by tetradentate ethane-like [P 2Q 6] groups. ( III) crystallizes in the orthorhombic system (space group Fdd2, No. 43) with cell parameters a=10.9742(7), b=7.9828(6), c=20.8590(19) Å ( V=1827.3(4) Å 3), Z=8 and R/ Rw=0.0184/0.0378 (for 967 observed reflections and 47 refined parameters), and displays a three-dimensional framework arrangement. Its structure is similar to that of TiP 2S 6 where titanium atoms are substituted for the chromium, the sodium atoms being inserted in the empty tunnels to ensure the charge balance. The exfoliation properties of 1D-NaCrP 2S 6 in polar solvents are reported.

  3. Measurement of Absolute Cross Sections for Excitation of the 2s^2 ^1S - 2s2p ^1P^o Transition in O^4+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Berrington, K. A.

    2005-05-01

    Experimental electron excitation cross sections are reported for the 2s^2 1S - 2s2p^ 1P^o transitions in O^4+ located at 19.689 eV. The JPL electron-cyclotron resonance ion source is utilized [1], along with the electron energy loss method, in a merged electron-ion beams geometry[2]. The center-of-mass interaction energies for the measurements are in the range 18 eV (below threshold) to 30 eV. Data are compared with results of a 26-term R-matrix calculation that includes fine structure explicitly via the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian [3]. There is good agreement with theoretical results and with previous electron energy-loss measurements [3]. Clear resonance enhancement is observed in both experiment and theoretical results near threshold for this ^1S - ^1P^o transition. J. Lozano and N. Djuric acknowledge support through the NASA-NRC program. This work was carried out at JPL/Caltech and was supported by NASA. [1] J. B. Greenwood, S. J. Smith, A.Chutjian, and E. Pollack, Phys. Rev. A 59 1348, (1999). [2] A. Chutjian, Physica Scripta T110, 203 (2004). [3] M. Bannister et al., Int.J. Mass Spectrometry 192, 39 (1999).

  4. Combined study of 2 S and 1 D open-charm mesons with natural spin-parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Ailin

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we perform a combined study of 2 S and 1 D open-charm mesons with natural spin-parity. Our results indicate that D1*(2600 )/Ds1 *(2700 ) and D1*(2760 )/Ds1 *(2860 ) are predominantly the 2 3S1 3 and 1 3D1 charmed/charmed-strange mesons, respectively, while D3*(2760 )/Ds3 *(2860 ) can be regarded as the 1 3<.SUP>D3 3 charmed/charmed-strange mesons. In addition, some typical ratios of partial widths of the discussed natural states are predicted, by which future experiments can test these assignments, especially for the 2 S -1 D mixing scheme existing in D1*(2600 )/D1*(2760 ) and Ds1 *(2700 )/Ds1 *(2860 ).

  5. Antisite Defects in Layered Multiferroic CuCr0.9In0.1P2S6

    DOE PAGESBeta

    He, Qian; Belianinov, Alex; Dziaugys, Andrius; Maksymovych, Petro; Vysochanskii, Yulian; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Borisevich, Albina Y.

    2015-10-06

    The CuCr1-xInxP2S6 system represents a large family of metal chalcogenophosphates that are unique and promising candidates for 2D materials with functionalities such as ferroelectricity. We carried out detailed microstructural and chemical characterization of these compounds using aberration-corrected STEM, in order to understand the origin of these different ordering phenomena. Quantitative STEM-HAADF imaging and analysis identified the stacking order of an 8-layer thin flake, which leads to the identification of anti-site In3+(Cu+) doping. We believe that these findings will pave the way towards understanding the ferroic coupling phenomena in van der Waals lamellar compounds, as well as the potential applications inmore » 2-D electronics.« less

  6. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2) attenuates reactive oxygen species formation and inhibits cell death: implications for otoprotective therapy.

    PubMed

    Herr, Deron R; Reolo, Marie J Y; Peh, Yee Xin; Wang, Wei; Lee, Chang-Wook; Rivera, Rich; Paterson, Ian C; Chun, Jerold

    2016-04-15

    Ototoxic drugs, such as platinum-based chemotherapeutics, often lead to permanent hearing loss through apoptosis of neuroepithelial hair cells and afferent neurons of the cochlea. There is no approved therapy for preventing or reversing this process. Our previous studies identified a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), S1P2, as a potential mediator of otoprotection. We therefore sought to identify a pharmacological approach to prevent cochlear degeneration via activation of S1P2. The cochleae of S1pr2(-/-) knockout mice were evaluated for accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. This showed that loss of S1P2 results in accumulation of ROS that precedes progressive cochlear degeneration as previously reported. These findings were supported by in vitro cell-based assays to evaluate cell viability, induction of apoptosis, and accumulation of ROS following activation of S1P2 in the presence of cisplatin. We show for the first time, that activation of S1P2 with a selective receptor agonist increases cell viability and reduces cisplatin-mediated cell death by reducing ROS. Cumulatively, these results suggest that S1P2 may serve as a therapeutic target for attenuating cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity.

  7. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2) attenuates reactive oxygen species formation and inhibits cell death: implications for otoprotective therapy

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Deron R.; Reolo, Marie J. Y.; Peh, Yee Xin; Wang, Wei; Lee, Chang-Wook; Rivera, Rich; Paterson, Ian C.; Chun, Jerold

    2016-01-01

    Ototoxic drugs, such as platinum-based chemotherapeutics, often lead to permanent hearing loss through apoptosis of neuroepithelial hair cells and afferent neurons of the cochlea. There is no approved therapy for preventing or reversing this process. Our previous studies identified a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), S1P2, as a potential mediator of otoprotection. We therefore sought to identify a pharmacological approach to prevent cochlear degeneration via activation of S1P2. The cochleae of S1pr2−/− knockout mice were evaluated for accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. This showed that loss of S1P2 results in accumulation of ROS that precedes progressive cochlear degeneration as previously reported. These findings were supported by in vitro cell-based assays to evaluate cell viability, induction of apoptosis, and accumulation of ROS following activation of S1P2 in the presence of cisplatin. We show for the first time, that activation of S1P2 with a selective receptor agonist increases cell viability and reduces cisplatin-mediated cell death by reducing ROS. Cumulatively, these results suggest that S1P2 may serve as a therapeutic target for attenuating cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity. PMID:27080739

  8. Co-nucleus 1D/2D Heterostructures with Bi2S3 Nanowire and MoS2 Monolayer: One-Step Growth and Defect-Induced Formation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; Huang, Le; Li, Bo; Wang, Xiaoting; Zhou, Ziqi; Li, Jingbo; Wei, Zhongming

    2016-09-27

    Heterostructures constructed by low-dimensional (such as 0D, 1D, and 2D) materials have opened up opportunities for exploring interesting physical properties and versatile (opto)electronics. Recently, 2D/2D heterostructures, in particular, atomically thin graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenides, including graphene/MoS2, WSe2/MoS2, and WS2/WSe2, were efficiently prepared (by transfer techniques, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth, etc.) and systematically studied. In contrast, investigation of 1D/2D heterostructures was still very challenging and rarely reported, and the understanding of such heterostructures was also not well established. Herein, we demonstrate the one-step growth of a heterostructure on the basis of a 1D-Bi2S3 nanowire and a 2D-MoS2 monolayer through the CVD method. Multimeans were employed, and the results proved the separated growth of a Bi2S3 nanowire and a MoS2 sheet in the heterostructure rather than forming a BixMo1-xSy alloy due to their large lattice mismatch. Defect-induced co-nucleus growth, which was an important growth mode in 1D/2D heterostructures, was also experimentally confirmed and systematically investigated in our research. Such 1D/2D heterostructures were further fabricated and utilized in (opto)electronic devices, such as field-effect transistors and photodetectors, and revealed their potential for multifunctional design in electrical properties. The direct growth of such nanostructures will help us to gain a better comprehension of these specific configurations and allow device functionalities in potential applications.

  9. Dimensional reductions from 2-D Nb 4P 2S 21 to 1-D ANb 2PS 10 ( A=Na, K, Rb, Cs, Tl) and to 0-D Tl 5[Nb 2S 4C l8]Cl using halide molten salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Hyunjin; Kim, Youngmee; Kim, Seri; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2008-08-01

    We found new synthetic routes to obtain 1-D quaternary thiophosphate compounds and a 0-D molecular complex containing a Nb 2S 4 core from a 2-D ternary thiophosphate, Nb 4P 2S 21. When Nb 4P 2S 21 was reacted with alkali metal halides ( ACl; A=Na, K, Rb, Cs) or TlCl at 500-700 °C, the -S-S-S- bridges in 2-D Nb 2PS 10-S-S 10PNb 2 were excised to form a 1-D chain, and cations were inserted between the chains to form ANb 2PS 10 ( A=Na, K, Rb, Cs, Tl). We also found that thallium chloride (TlCl) is an excellent reagent for further excision, and it substitutes chloride ligands for the sulfur ligands of 2-D Nb 4P 2S 21 to form the molecular complex Tl 5[Nb 2S 4Cl 8]Cl. Crystal data for TlNb 2PS 10: monoclinic, Pn, a=6.9452(11) Å, b=7.3761(12) Å, 12.873(2) Å, β=104.472(3)°, and Z=2. Crystal data for Tl 5[Nb 2S 4Cl 8]Cl: orthorhombic, Immm, a=7.001(5) Å, b=9.509(7) Å, c=15.546(11) Å, and Z=2.

  10. O1, P1, N2 models of the global ocean tide on an elastic earth plus surface potential and spherical harmonic decompositions for M2, S2, and K1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parke, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    The models of M2, S2, and K1 presented in Parke and Hendershott (1980) are supplemented with models of O1, P1, and N2. The models satisfy specified elevation boundary conditions and are generated by fighting a small number of test functions to island data. Maps are presented of the geocentric tide, the induced free space potential, the induced vertical component of the solid earth tide, and the induced vertical component of the gravitational field for each new component. Maps of the tidal potential seen by an observer fixed to the surface of the solid earth are also presented for all six constituents. Spherical harmonic coefficients up to order four and the rms magnitude of the coefficients to order fifteen are presented for each constituent. The rms magnitudes of the P1 and K1 coefficients normalized by their respective equilibrium amplitudes are compared to determine the effect of the diurnal core resonance.

  11. A new potential energy surface for the H2S system and dynamics study on the S(1D) + H2(X1Σg+) reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jiuchuang; He, Di; Chen, Maodu

    2015-01-01

    We constructed a new global potential energy surface (PES) for the electronic ground state (1A′) of H2S based on 21,300 accurate ab initio energy points over a large configuration space. The ab initio energies are obtained from multireference configuration interaction calculations with a Davidson correction using basis sets of quadruple zeta quality. The neural network method is applied to fit the PES, and the root mean square error of fitting is small (1.68 meV). Time-dependent wave packet studies for the S(1D) + H2(X1Σg+) → H(2S) + SH(X2Π) reaction on the new PES are conducted to study the reaction dynamics. The calculated integral cross sections decrease with increasing collision energy and remain fairly constant within the high collision energy range. Both forward and backward scatterings can be observed as expected for a barrierless reaction with a deep well on the PES. The calculated integral cross sections and differential cross sections are in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:26435516

  12. Singlet-triplet energy splitting between 1D and 3D (1s2 2s nd), n = 3, 4, 5, and 6, Rydberg states of the beryllium atom (9Be) calculated with all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, Keeper L.; Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-11-01

    Accurate variational nonrelativistic quantum-mechanical calculations are performed for the five lowest 1D and four lowest 3D states of the 9Be isotope of the beryllium atom. All-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian (ECG) functions are used in the calculations and their nonlinear parameters are optimized with the aid of the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to these parameters. The effect of the finite nuclear mass is directly included in the Hamiltonian used in the calculations. The singlet-triplet energy gaps between the corresponding 1D and 3D states, are reported.

  13. Local duality in spin structure functions g1(p) and g1(d)

    SciTech Connect

    Yelena Prok

    2006-02-01

    Inclusive double spin asymmetries obtained by scattering polarized electrons off polarized protons and deuterons have been analyzed to address the issue of quark hadron duality in the polarized spin structure functions gp 1 and gd 1. A polarized electron beam, solid polarized NH3 and ND3 targets and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) in Hall B were used to collect the data. The resulting gp 1 and gd 1 were averaged over the nucleon resonance energy region (M

  14. Quark-Hadron Duality in Spin Structure Functions $g_1^p$ and $g_1^d$

    SciTech Connect

    P.E. Bosted; K.V. Dharmawardane; G.E. Dodge; T.A. Forest; S.E. Kuhn; Y. Prok

    2006-07-25

    New measurements of the spin structure functions of the proton and deuteron g{sub 1}{sup p}(x, Q{sup 2}) and g{sub 1}{sup d}(x, Q{sup 2}) in the nucleon resonance region are compared with extrapolations of target-mass-corrected next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD fits to higher energy data. Averaged over the entire resonance region (W < 2 GeV), the data and QCD fits are in good agreement in both magnitude and Q{sup 2} dependence for Q{sup 2} > 1.7 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}. This ''global'' duality appears to result from cancellations among the prominent ''local'' resonance regions: in particular strong {sigma}{sub 3/2} contributions in the {Delta}(1232) region appear to be compensated by strong {sigma}{sub 1/2} contributions in the resonance region centered on 1.5 GeV. These results are encouraging for the extension of NLO QCD fits to lower W and Q{sup 2} than have been used previously.

  15. Highly selective and potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 (S1P1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Vachal, Petr; Toth, Leslie M; Hale, Jeffrey J; Yan, Lin; Mills, Sander G; Chrebet, Gary L; Koehane, Carol A; Hajdu, Richard; Milligan, James A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Mandala, Suzanne

    2006-07-15

    Novel series of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists were developed through a systematic SAR aimed to achieve high selectivity for a single member of the S1P family of receptors, S1P1. The optimized structure represents a highly S1P1-selective and efficacious agonist: S1P1/S1P2, S1P1/S1P3, S1P1/S1P4>10,000-fold, S1P1/S1P5>600-fold, while EC50 (S1P1) <0.2 nM. In vivo experiments are consistent with S1P1 receptor agonism alone being sufficient for achieving desired lymphocyte-lowering effect.

  16. Cex1p facilitates Rna1p-mediated dissociation of the Los1p-tRNA-Gsp1p-GTP export complex.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Andrew T; Mangroo, Dev

    2012-02-01

    Nuclear tRNA export plays an essential role in key cellular processes such as regulation of protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, response to nutrient availability and DNA damage and development. Like other nuclear export processes, assembly of the nuclear tRNA export complex in the nucleus is dependent on Ran-GTP/Gsp1p-GTP, and dissociation of the export receptor-tRNA-Ran-GTP/Gsp1p-GTP complex in the cytoplasm requires RanBP1/Yrb1p and RanGAP/Rna1p to activate the GTPase activity of Ran-GTP/Gsp1p-GTP. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cex1p and Human Scyl1 have also been proposed to participate in unloading of the tRNA export receptors at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Here, we provide evidence suggesting that Cex1p is required for activation of the GTPase activity of Gsp1p and dissociation of the receptor-tRNA-Gsp1p export complex in S. cerevisiae. The data suggest that Cex1p recruits Rna1p from the cytoplasm to the NPC and facilitates Rna1p activation of the GTPase activity of Gsp1p by enabling Rna1p to gain access to Gsp1p-GTP bound to the export receptor tRNA complex. It is possible that this tRNA unloading mechanism is conserved in evolutionarily diverse organisms and that other Gsp1p-GTP-dependent export processes use a pathway-specific component to recruit Rna1p to the NPC.

  17. 1p36 deletion syndrome: an update.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Valerie K; Zaveri, Hitisha P; Scott, Daryl A

    2015-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are the most common terminal deletions in humans. Medical problems commonly caused by terminal deletions of 1p36 include developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, short stature, distinctive facial features, brain anomalies, orofacial clefting, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. Although 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered clinically recognizable, there is significant phenotypic variation among affected individuals. This variation is due, at least in part, to the genetic heterogeneity seen in 1p36 deletions which include terminal and interstitial deletions of varying lengths located throughout the 30 Mb of DNA that comprise chromosome 1p36. Array-based copy number variant analysis can easily identify genomic regions of 1p36 that are deleted in an affected individual. However, predicting the phenotype of an individual based solely on the location and extent of their 1p36 deletion remains a challenge since most of the genes that contribute to 1p36-related phenotypes have yet to be identified. In addition, haploinsufficiency of more than one gene may contribute to some phenotypes. In this article, we review recent successes in the effort to map and identify the genes and genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36-related phenotypes. In particular, we highlight evidence implicating MMP23B, GABRD, SKI, PRDM16, KCNAB2, RERE, UBE4B, CASZ1, PDPN, SPEN, ECE1, HSPG2, and LUZP1 in various 1p36 deletion phenotypes.

  18. Specialized Rap1p/Gcr1p Transcriptional Activation through Gcr1p DNA Contacts Requires Gcr2p, as Does Hyperphosphorylation of Gcr1p

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, X.; Deminoff, S. J.; Santangelo, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    The multifunctional regulatory factor Rap1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae accomplishes one of its tasks, transcriptional activation, by complexing with Gcr1p. An unusual feature of this heteromeric complex is its apparent capacity to contact simultaneously two adjacent DNA elements (UAS(RPG) and the CT box, bound specifically by Rap1p and Gcr1p, respectively). The complex can activate transcription through isolated UAS(RPG) but not CT elements. In promoters that contain both DNA signals its activity is enhanced, provided the helical spacing between the two elements is appropriate; this suggests that at least transient DNA loop formation is involved. We show here that this CT box-dependent augmentation of Rap1p/Gcr1p activation requires the presence of a third protein Gcr2p; the Gcr2(-) growth defect appears to result from a genome-wide loss of the CT box effect. Interestingly, a hyperphosphorylated form of Gcr1p disappears in Δgcr2 cells but reappears if they harbor a doubly point-mutated GCR1 allele that bypasses the Gcr2(-) growth defect. Gcr2p therefore appears to induce a conformation change in Gcr1p and/or stimulate its hyperphosphorylation; one or both of these effects can be mimicked in the absence of GCR2 by mutation of GCR1. This improved view of Rap1p/Gcr1p/Gcr2p function reveals a new aspect of eukaryotic gene regulation: modification of an upstream activator, accompanied by at least transient DNA loop formation, mediates its improved capacity to activate transcription. PMID:9335588

  19. Carboxyarabinitol-1-P phosphatase of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Kobza, J.; Moore, B.d.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The activity of carboxyarabinitol-1-P (CA1P) phosphatase was detected in clarified stromal extracts by the generation of {sup 14}C-carboxyarabinitol from {sup 14}C-CA1P. Carboxyribitol-1-P dependent activity was 3% of the CA1P dependent activity, indicating the enzyme was specific for CA1P. Inclusion of DTT in the assay was required for maximum velocity, but it appears that the enzyme is not regulated by thioredoxin in vivo. Activity o f the CA1P phosphatase was stimulated by RuBP, NADPH and FBP, though the latter two metabolites were required at nonphysiological concentrations in order to achieve significant stimulation. Contrary to a previous report on purified tobacco enzyme, ATP stimulated the CA1P phosphatase activity. In the presence of 1 mM RuBP or ATP, rates of 2 or 3 {mu}mol mg{sup {minus}1} Chl h{sup {minus}1}, respectively, were observed at 1 mM CA1P. These rates were 3-4 fold higher than the rate observed in the absence of effectors and are 2-4 times the in vivo rate of degradation of CA1P during dark/light transitions. The rates from bean were about 7 fold higher than rates reported for the enzyme from tobacco. Changes in the levels of ATP and RuBP associated with dark/light transitions could modulate the enzyme activity in vivo, but it remains to be established if this is the only mechanism for the required regulation of the enzyme.

  20. 1p36 deletion syndrome: an update

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Valerie K; Zaveri, Hitisha P; Scott, Daryl A

    2015-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are the most common terminal deletions in humans. Medical problems commonly caused by terminal deletions of 1p36 include developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, short stature, distinctive facial features, brain anomalies, orofacial clefting, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. Although 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered clinically recognizable, there is significant phenotypic variation among affected individuals. This variation is due, at least in part, to the genetic heterogeneity seen in 1p36 deletions which include terminal and interstitial deletions of varying lengths located throughout the 30 Mb of DNA that comprise chromosome 1p36. Array-based copy number variant analysis can easily identify genomic regions of 1p36 that are deleted in an affected individual. However, predicting the phenotype of an individual based solely on the location and extent of their 1p36 deletion remains a challenge since most of the genes that contribute to 1p36-related phenotypes have yet to be identified. In addition, haploinsufficiency of more than one gene may contribute to some phenotypes. In this article, we review recent successes in the effort to map and identify the genes and genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36-related phenotypes. In particular, we highlight evidence implicating MMP23B, GABRD, SKI, PRDM16, KCNAB2, RERE, UBE4B, CASZ1, PDPN, SPEN, ECE1, HSPG2, and LUZP1 in various 1p36 deletion phenotypes. PMID:26345236

  1. Measurement of absolute cross sections for excitation of the 2s(2) S-1 -> 2s2p P-1 degrees transition in O+4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Djuric, N.; Lozano, J. A.; Berrington, K. A.; Chutjian, A.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental cross sections are reported for the 1s(2)2s(2) S-1 -> 1s(2)2s2p P-1(o) transition in O+4 located at 19.689 eV. Use is made of the electron energy-loss method, using a merged electron-ion beam geometry. The center-of-mass interaction energies for the measurements in the S-1 -> P-1(o) transition are in the range 18 eV ( below the threshold) to 30 eV. Data are compared with other previous electron energy-loss measurements and with results of a 26 term R-matrix calculation that includes fine structure explicitly via the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. Clear resonance enhancement is observed in all experimental and theoretical results near the threshold for this S-1 -> P-1(o) transition.

  2. Identification of benzoxazole analogs as novel, S1P(3) sparing S1P(1) agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guanghui; Meng, Qinghua; Liu, Qian; Xu, Xuesong; Xu, Qiongfeng; Ren, Feng; Guo, Taylor B; Lu, Hongtao; Xiang, Jia-Ning; Elliott, John D; Lin, Xichen

    2012-06-15

    A novel series of benzoxazole-derived S1P(1) agonists were designed based on scaffold hopping molecular design strategy combined with computational approaches. Extensive SAR studies led to the discovery of compound 17d as a selective S1P(1) agonist (over S1P(3)) with high CNS penetration and favorable DMPK properties. 17d also demonstrated in vivo pharmacological efficacy to reduce blood lymphocyte in mice after oral administration.

  3. Bet1p activates the v-SNARE Bos1p.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, S; Sacher, M; Mao, Y; Carr, C; Lyons, P; Quinn, A M; Ferro-Novick, S

    1997-01-01

    Bet1p is a type II membrane protein that is required for vesicular transport between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A domain of Bet1p, that shows potential to be involved in a coiled-coil interaction, is homologous to a region of the neuronal protein SNAP-25. Here, we used in vitro binding studies to demonstrate that Bet1p plays a role in potentiating soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) interactions. Mutational analysis points to the coiled-coil region as necessary for Bet1p function, and circular dichroism experiments support this theory. In vitro binding studies were also used to demonstrate that a direct interaction between Bet1p and Bos1p is required for the efficient interaction of the vesicle SNARE with its SNARE target. Genetic studies suggest that the interactions of Bet1p with Bos1p are regulated by the small GTP-binding protein Ypt1p. Images PMID:9243499

  4. Dynamic, Rho1p-dependent localization of Pkc1p to sites of polarized growth.

    PubMed

    Andrews, P D; Stark, M J

    2000-08-01

    In eukaryotes, the Rho GTPases and their effectors are key regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking and secretion, cell growth, cell cycle progression and cytokinesis. Budding yeast Pkc1p, a protein kinase C-like enzyme involved in cell wall biosynthesis and cytoskeletal polarity, is structurally and functionally related to the Rho-associated kinases (PRK/ROCK) of mammalian cells. In this study, localization of Pkc1p was monitored in live cells using a GFP fusion (Pkc1p-GFP). Pkc1p-GFP showed dynamic spatial and temporal localization at sites of polarized growth. Early in the cell cycle, Pkc1p-GFP was found at the pre-bud site and bud tips, becoming delocalized as the cell progressed further and finally relocalizing around the mother-daughter bud neck in an incomplete ring, which persisted until cell separation. Bud localization was actin-dependent but stability of Pkc1p-GFP at the neck was actin-independent, although localization at both sites required functional Rho1p. In addition, Pkc1p-GFP showed rapid relocalization after cell wall damage. These results suggest that the roles of Pkc1p in both polarized growth and the response to cell wall stress are mediated by dynamic changes in its localization, and suggest an additional potential role in cytokinesis.

  5. Expression of S1P metabolizing enzymes and receptors correlate with survival time and regulate cell migration in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Bien-Möller, Sandra; Lange, Sandra; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Paland, Heiko; Küpper, Johannes; Herzog, Susann; Weitmann, Kerstin; Havemann, Christoph; Vogelgesang, Silke; Marx, Sascha; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Henry W.S.; Rauch, Bernhard H.

    2016-01-01

    A signaling molecule which is involved in proliferation and migration of malignant cells is the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). There are hints for a potential role of S1P signaling in malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) which is characterized by a poor prognosis. Therefore, a comprehensive expression analysis of S1P receptors (S1P1-S1P5) and S1P metabolizing enzymes in human GBM (n = 117) compared to healthy brain (n = 10) was performed to evaluate their role for patient's survival. Furthermore, influence of S1P receptor inhibition on proliferation and migration were studied in LN18 GBM cells. Compared to control brain, mRNA levels of S1P1, S1P2, S1P3 and S1P generating sphingosine kinase-1 were elevated in GBM. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated an association between S1P1 and S1P2 with patient's survival times. In vitro, an inhibitory effect of the SphK inhibitor SKI-II on viability of LN18 cells was shown. S1P itself had no effect on viability but stimulated LN18 migration which was blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P2. The participation of S1P1 and S1P2 in LN18 migration was further supported by siRNA-mediated silencing of these receptors. Immunoblots and inhibition experiments suggest an involvement of the PI3-kinase/AKT1 pathway in the chemotactic effect of S1P in LN18 cells. In summary, our data argue for a role of S1P signaling in proliferation and migration of GBM cells. Individual components of the S1P pathway represent prognostic factors for patients with GBM. Perspectively, a selective modulation of S1P receptor subtypes could represent a therapeutic approach for GBM patients and requires further evaluation. PMID:26887055

  6. Crystal Structures of Human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 (AS160) RabGTPase-activating Protein (RabGAP) Domains Reveal Critical Elements for GLUT4 Translocation

    SciTech Connect

    S Park; W Jin; S Shoelson

    2011-12-31

    We have solved the x-ray crystal structures of the RabGAP domains of human TBC1D1 and human TBC1D4 (AS160), at 2.2 and 3.5 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Like the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP domain, whose structure was solved previously in complex with mouse Rab33B, the human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 domains both have 16 {alpha}-helices and no {beta}-sheet elements. We expected the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP/mouse Rab33B structure to predict the corresponding interfaces between cognate mammalian RabGAPs and Rabs, but found that residues were poorly conserved. We further tested the relevance of this model by Ala-scanning mutagenesis, but only one of five substitutions within the inferred binding site of the TBC1D1 RabGAP significantly perturbed catalytic efficiency. In addition, substitution of TBC1D1 residues with corresponding residues from Gyp1p did not enhance catalytic efficiency. We hypothesized that biologically relevant RabGAP/Rab partners utilize additional contacts not described in the yeast Gyp1p/mouse Rab33B structure, which we predicted using our two new human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 structures. Ala substitution of TBC1D1 Met{sup 930}, corresponding to a residue outside of the Gyp1p/Rab33B contact, substantially reduced catalytic activity. GLUT4 translocation assays confirmed the biological relevance of our findings. Substitutions with lowest RabGAP activity, including catalytically dead RK and Met{sup 930} and Leu{sup 1019} predicted to perturb Rab binding, confirmed that biological activity requires contacts between cognate RabGAPs and Rabs beyond those in the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP/mouse Rab33B structure.

  7. Measurements of branching fractions for electromagnetic transitions involving the χbJ(1P) states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornicer, M.; Mitchell, R. E.; Tarbert, C. M.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Hietala, J.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Brisbane, S.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Spradlin, P.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; Ecklund, K. M.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Pearson, L. J.; Thorndike, E. H.; Yang, F.; Ricciardi, S.; Thomas, C.; Artuso, M.; Blusk, S.; Mountain, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Zhang, L. M.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Lincoln, A.; Smith, M. J.; Zhou, P.; Zhu, J.; Naik, P.; Rademacker, J.; Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Randrianarivony, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Briere, R. A.; Vogel, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Das, S.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Shi, X.; Sun, W. M.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Lowrey, N.; Mehrabyan, S.; Selen, M.; Wiss, J.; Libby, J.

    2011-03-01

    Using (9.32, 5.88) million Υ(2S,3S) decays taken with the CLEO III detector, we obtain five product branching fractions for the exclusive processes Υ(2S)→γχb0,1,2(1P)→γγΥ(1S) and Υ(3S)→γχb1,2(1P)→γγΥ(1S). We observe the transition χb0(1P)→γΥ(1S) for the first time. Using the known branching fractions for B[Υ(2S)→γχbJ(1P)], we extract values for B[χbJ(1P)→γΥ(1S)] for J=0, 1, 2. In turn, these values can be used to unfold the Υ(3S) product branching fractions to obtain values for B[Υ(3S)→γχb1,2(1P)] for the first time individually. Comparison of these with each other and with the branching fraction B[Υ(3S)→γχb0] previously measured by CLEO provides tests of relativistic corrections to electric dipole matrix elements.

  8. Upstream Design and 1D-CAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroyuki

    Recently, engineering design environment of Japan is changing variously. Manufacturing companies are being challenged to design and bring out products that meet the diverse demands of customers and are competitive against those produced by rising countries(1). In order to keep and strengthen the competitiveness of Japanese companies, it is necessary to create new added values as well as conventional ones. It is well known that design at the early stages has a great influence on the final design solution. Therefore, design support tools for the upstream design is necessary for creating new added values. We have established a research society for 1D-CAE (1 Dimensional Computer Aided Engineering)(2), which is a general term for idea, methodology and tools applicable for the upstream design support, and discuss the concept and definition of 1D-CAE. This paper reports our discussion about 1D-CAE.

  9. DESIGN PACKAGE 1D SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    L.R. Eisler

    1995-02-02

    The purpose of this analysis is to systematically identify and evaluate hazards related to the Yucca Mountain Project Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package 1D, Surface Facilities, (for a list of design items included in the package 1D system safety analysis see section 3). This process is an integral part of the systems engineering process; whereby safety is considered during planning, design, testing, and construction. A largely qualitative approach was used since a radiological System Safety analysis is not required. The risk assessment in this analysis characterizes the accident scenarios associated with the Design Package 1D structures/systems/components in terms of relative risk and includes recommendations for mitigating all identified risks. The priority for recommending and implementing mitigation control features is: (1) Incorporate measures to reduce risks and hazards into the structure/system/component (S/S/C) design, (2) add safety devices and capabilities to the designs that reduce risk, (3) provide devices that detect and warn personnel of hazardous conditions, and (4) develop procedures and conduct training to increase worker awareness of potential hazards, on methods to reduce exposure to hazards, and on the actions required to avoid accidents or correct hazardous conditions. The scope of this analysis is limited to the Design Package 1D structures/systems/components (S/S/Cs) during normal operations excluding hazards occurring during maintenance and ''off normal'' operations.

  10. Cometary gas relations 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, Marcos R.

    Photographic and photoelectric observations of comet 1P/Halley's ionised gas coma from CO+ at 4,250 Å and neutral gas coma from CN at 3,880 Å were part of the Bochum Halley Monitoring Program, conducted at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, from February 17 to April 17, 1986. In this spectral range it is possible to see the continuum formation, motion and expansion of plasma and neutral gas structures. To observe the morphology of these structures, 32 CO+ photos (glass plates) from comet 1P/Halley obtained by means of an interference filter have been analysed. They have a field of view of 28.6 × 28.6 degrees and were obtained from March 29 to April 17, 1986 with exposure times between 20 and 120 minutes. All photos were digitised with a PDS 2020 GM microdensitometer. After digitisation, the data were reduced to relative intensities, and those with proper calibrations were also converted to absolute intensities, expressed in terms of column densities. The CO+ absolute intensity values still contain the continuum intensity. To calculate the CO+ column density it is necessary to subtract this continuum intensity. The relations between CO+ and CN in average column density values (NCO+/NCN) are 11.6 for a circular diaphragm with average diameter (Φ) of 6.1 arcminutes which corresponds to a distance from the nucleus (ρ) equal to 6.3 × 104 km; 20.0 for Φ = 7.1 arcminutes and ρ = 7.3 × 104 km; 8.1 for Φ = 8.5 arcminutes and ρ = 8.7 × 104 km; 35.6 for Φ = 11.9 arcminutes and ρ = 1.2 × 105 km; and 31.3 for Φ = 16.7 arcminutes and ρ = 1.7 × 105 km. These values are in perfect agreement with the data for short distances (ρ from 3.9 × 103 to 1.2 × 104 km) and small slit diameters (Φ from 0.4 to 1.2 arcminutes). With the use of diaphragms with large diameters it is possible to get some information about the outer coma of the comet (in this paper, from 60,000 until 170,000 km away from the nucleus). At these distances, the CO+ column density

  11. Centrosome Positioning in 1D Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlerz, Katrina; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    During cell migration, the positioning of the centrosome and nucleus define a cell's polarity. For a cell migrating on a two-dimensional substrate the centrosome is positioned in front of the nucleus. Under one-dimensional confinement, however, the centrosome is positioned behind the nucleus in 60% of cells. It is known that the centrosome is positioned by CDC42 and dynein for cells moving on a 2D substrate in a wound-healing assay. It is currently unknown, however, if this is also true for cells moving under 1D confinement, where the centrosome position is often reversed. Therefore, centrosome positioning was studied in cells migrating under 1D confinement, which mimics cells migrating through 3D matrices. 3 to 5 μm fibronectin lines were stamped onto a glass substrate and cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei and centrosomes migrated on the lines. Our results show that when a cell changes directions the centrosome position is maintained. That is, when the centrosome is between the nucleus and the cell's trailing edge and the cell changes direction, the centrosome will be translocated across the nucleus to the back of the cell again. A dynein inhibitor did have an influence on centrosome positioning in 1D migration and change of directions.

  12. TBC1D1 reduces palmitate oxidation by inhibiting β-HAD activity in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Maher, A C; McFarlan, J; Lally, J; Snook, L A; Bonen, A

    2014-11-01

    In skeletal muscle the Rab-GTPase-activating protein TBC1D1 has been implicated in the regulation of fatty acid oxidation by an unknown mechanism. We determined whether TBC1D1 altered fatty acid utilization via changes in protein-mediated fatty acid transport and/or selected enzymes regulating mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. We also determined the effects of TBC1D1 on glucose transport and oxidation. Electrotransfection of mouse soleus muscles with TBC1D1 cDNA increased TBC1D1 protein after 2 wk (P<0.05), without altering its paralog AS160. TBC1D1 overexpression decreased basal palmitate oxidation (-22%) while blunting 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR)-stimulated palmitate oxidation (-18%). There was a tendency to increase fatty acid esterification (+10 nmol·g(-1)·60 min(-1), P=0.07), which reflected the reduction in fatty acid oxidation (-12 nmol·g(-1)·60 min(-1)). Concomitantly, basal (+21%) and AICAR-stimulated glucose oxidation (+8%) were increased in TBC1D1-transfected muscles relative to their respective controls (P<0.05), independent of changes in GLUT4 and glucose transport. The reductions in TBC1D1-mediated fatty acid oxidation could not be attributed to changes in the transporter FAT/CD36, muscle mitochondrial content, CPT1 expression or the expression and phosphorylation of AS160, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, or AMPK. However, TBC1D1 overexpression reduced β-HAD enzyme activity (-18%, P<0.05). In conclusion, TBC1D1-mediated reduction of muscle fatty acid oxidation appears to occur via inhibition of β-HAD activity.

  13. Hog1p activation by marasmic acid through inhibition of the histidine kinase Sln1p

    PubMed Central

    Schüffler, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND The histidine kinase (HK) MoHik1p within the high‐osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway is known to be the target of the fungicide fludioxonil. Treatment of the fungus with fludioxonil causes an uncontrolled hyperactivation of the pathway and cell death. In this study, we used a target‐based in vivo test system with mutant strains of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae to search for new fungicidal compounds having various target locations within the HOG pathway. Mutants with inactivated HOG signalling are resistant to fungicides having the target located in the HOG pathway. RESULTS The HK MoSln1p was identified as being involved in the new antifungal mode of action of marasmic acid, as single inactivation of the genes MoSLN1, MoSSK1, MoSSK2, MoPBS2 and MoHOG1 resulted in mutant strains resistant against the sesquiterpenoid, whereas the wild‐type strain and the ΔMohik1 mutant were susceptible. Western blot analysis of phosphorylated MoHog1p confirmed the hypothesis that marasmic acid interferes with the HOG pathway, as a strong phosphorylation of MoHog1p was detectable after sesquiterpenoid treatment in the wild‐type strain but not in the ΔMosln1 mutant. CONCLUSION This study provides evidence for marasmic acid activating the HOG pathway via the HK MoSln1p, and we propose that the sesquiterpenoid has a new mode of action in M. oryzae that differs from that of known HOG inhibitors, e.g. fludioxonil. © 2016 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26888741

  14. Electron-impact excitation of the n 1P levels of helium - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, David C.; Csanak, George; Trajmar, Sandor; Register, D. F.

    1992-01-01

    New experimental electron-energy-loss data have been used to extract differential and integral cross sections for excitation of the 2 1P level, and for the overlapping (3 1P, 3 1D, 3 3D) levels of helium, at 30-, 50-, and 100-eV incident electron energies. First-order many-body theory (FOMBT) has been used to calculate the differential and integral cross sections for excitation of the n 1P (n = 2,...,6) levels of helium by electron impact, for incident electron energies from threshold to 500 eV. Detailed comparisons between these two new sets of data are made as well as comparisons with appropriate published experimental and theoretical results. A simple scaling relationship is derived from the FOMBT results for n = 2,...,6 that provides differential and integral cross sections for all symmetry final levels of helium with n = 6 or greater.

  15. Mapping of the serotonin 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} autoreceptor gene (HTR1D) on chromosome 1 using a silent polymorphism in the coding region

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, N.; Lappalainen, J.; Linnoila, M.

    1995-04-24

    Serotonin (5-HT){sub ID} receptors are 5-HT release-regulating autoreceptors in the human brain. Abnormalities in brain 5-HT function have been hypothesized in the pathophysiology of various psychiatric disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, autism, mood disorders, eating disorders, impulsive violent behavior, and alcoholism. Thus, mutations occurring in 5-HT autoreceptors may cause or increase the vulnerability to any of these conditions. 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} and 5-HT{sub 1D{Beta}} subtypes have been previously localized to chromosomes 1p36.3-p34.3 and 6q13, respectively, using rodent-human hybrids and in situ localization. In this communication, we report the detection of a 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} receptor gene polymorphism by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding sequence. The polymorphism was used for fine scale linkage mapping of 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} on chromosome 1. This polymorphism should also be useful for linkage studies in populations and in families. Our analysis also demonstrates that functionally significant coding sequence variants of the 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} are probably not abundant either among alcoholics or in the general population. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. The IPP gene is assigned to human chromosome 1p32-1p22

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Yeh, A.; Huang, R.C.C. ); Jabs, E.W.; Li, Xiang ); Dracopoli, N.C. )

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported the isolation and characterization of a novel mouse gene that is promoted by an intracisternal A-particle (IAP) LTR and is expressed in placental tissue (mouse IAP-promoted placenta gene, Ipp). Based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) studies using inbred strains and recombinant inbred (RI) mice, we have established the linkage between the Ipp gene and several loci on distal mouse chromosome 4. In this publication, we report the partial sequence of a human cDNA clone isolated from a human placental library that has 83% identity to the 3[prime]region of the Ipp cDNA. For human chromosome mapping, two 20-base oligonucleotides within the homologous region were used as primers for polymerase chain reactions (PCR) to chromosome-specific DNAs from two somatic cell hybrid panels and several hybrid cell lines carrying breakpoints on human chromosome 1p. We have assigned this human homolog of the Ipp (IPP) gene to chromosome 1 at 1p32-1p22, based on analysis of PCR products. With this assignment, the homology between mouse chromosome 4 and human chromosome 1 is maintained (5). 7 refs., 1 fig.

  17. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  18. Exogenous S1P Exposure Potentiates Ischemic Stroke Damage That Is Reduced Possibly by Inhibiting S1P Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eunjung; Han, Jeong Eun; Jeon, Sejin; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Choi, Ji Woong; Chun, Jerold

    2015-01-01

    Initial and recurrent stroke produces central nervous system (CNS) damage, involving neuroinflammation. Receptor-mediated S1P signaling can influence neuroinflammation and has been implicated in cerebral ischemia through effects on the immune system. However, S1P-mediated events also occur within the brain itself where its roles during stroke have been less well studied. Here we investigated the involvement of S1P signaling in initial and recurrent stroke by using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (M/R) model combined with analyses of S1P signaling. Gene expression for S1P receptors and involved enzymes was altered during M/R, supporting changes in S1P signaling. Direct S1P microinjection into the normal CNS induced neuroglial activation, implicating S1P-initiated neuroinflammatory responses that resembled CNS changes seen during initial M/R challenge. Moreover, S1P microinjection combined with M/R potentiated brain damage, approximating a model for recurrent stroke dependent on S1P and suggesting that reduction in S1P signaling could ameliorate stroke damage. Delivery of FTY720 that removes S1P signaling with chronic exposure reduced damage in both initial and S1P-potentiated M/R-challenged brain, while reducing stroke markers like TNF-α. These results implicate direct S1P CNS signaling in the etiology of initial and recurrent stroke that can be therapeutically accessed by S1P modulators acting within the brain. PMID:26576074

  19. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P{sub 1} receptor by a novel competitive S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of a newly developed S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficacy of S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P{sub 1}) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P{sub 1} and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P{sub 1} antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  20. 1D fast coded aperture camera.

    PubMed

    Haw, Magnus; Bellan, Paul

    2015-04-01

    A fast (100 MHz) 1D coded aperture visible light camera has been developed as a prototype for imaging plasma experiments in the EUV/X-ray bands. The system uses printed patterns on transparency sheets as the masked aperture and an 80 channel photodiode array (9 V reverse bias) as the detector. In the low signal limit, the system has demonstrated 40-fold increase in throughput and a signal-to-noise gain of ≈7 over that of a pinhole camera of equivalent parameters. In its present iteration, the camera can only image visible light; however, the only modifications needed to make the system EUV/X-ray sensitive are to acquire appropriate EUV/X-ray photodiodes and to machine a metal masked aperture. PMID:25933861

  1. 1D fast coded aperture camera.

    PubMed

    Haw, Magnus; Bellan, Paul

    2015-04-01

    A fast (100 MHz) 1D coded aperture visible light camera has been developed as a prototype for imaging plasma experiments in the EUV/X-ray bands. The system uses printed patterns on transparency sheets as the masked aperture and an 80 channel photodiode array (9 V reverse bias) as the detector. In the low signal limit, the system has demonstrated 40-fold increase in throughput and a signal-to-noise gain of ≈7 over that of a pinhole camera of equivalent parameters. In its present iteration, the camera can only image visible light; however, the only modifications needed to make the system EUV/X-ray sensitive are to acquire appropriate EUV/X-ray photodiodes and to machine a metal masked aperture.

  2. 1D-VAR Retrieval Using Superchannels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel; Larar, Allen; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter; Mango, Stephen; SaintGermain, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Since modern ultra-spectral remote sensors have thousands of channels, it is difficult to include all of them in a 1D-var retrieval system. We will describe a physical inversion algorithm, which includes all available channels for the atmospheric temperature, moisture, cloud, and surface parameter retrievals. Both the forward model and the inversion algorithm compress the channel radiances into super channels. These super channels are obtained by projecting the radiance spectra onto a set of pre-calculated eigenvectors. The forward model provides both super channel properties and jacobian in EOF space directly. For ultra-spectral sensors such as Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed Interferometer (NAST), a compression ratio of more than 80 can be achieved, leading to a significant reduction in computations involved in an inversion process. Results will be shown applying the algorithm to real IASI and NAST data.

  3. Study of di-pion Bottomonium Transitions and Search for the h_b(1P) State

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-12-09

    We study inclusive di-pion decays using a sample of 108 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector. We search for the decay mode {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}h{sub b} (1P) and find no evidence for the bottomonium spin-singlet state h{sub b}(1P) in the invariant mass distribution recoiling against the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} system. Assuming the h{sub b}(1P) mass to be 9.900 GeV/c{sup 2}, we measure the upper limit on the branching fraction {Beta}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}h{sub b}(1P)] < 1.2 x 10{sup -4}, at 90% confidence level. We also investigate the {chi}{sub bJ}(2P) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {chi}{sub bJ}(1P), {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S), and {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S) di-pion transitions and present an improved measurement of the branching fraction of the {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S) decay and of the {Upsilon}(3S) - {Upsilon}(2S) mass difference.

  4. Measurements of branching fractions for electromagnetic transitions involving the {chi}{sub bJ}(1P) states

    SciTech Connect

    Kornicer, M.; Mitchell, R. E.; Tarbert, C. M.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Hietala, J.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Brisbane, S.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Spradlin, P.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.

    2011-03-01

    Using (9.32, 5.88) million {Upsilon}(2S,3S) decays taken with the CLEO III detector, we obtain five product branching fractions for the exclusive processes {Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub b0,1,2}(1P){yields}{gamma}{gamma}{Upsilon}(1S) and {Upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub b1,2}(1P){yields}{gamma}{gamma}{Upsilon}(1S). We observe the transition {chi}{sub b0}(1P){yields}{gamma}{Upsilon}(1S) for the first time. Using the known branching fractions for B[{Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub bJ}(1P)], we extract values for B[{chi}{sub bJ}(1P){yields}{gamma}{Upsilon}(1S)] for J=0, 1, 2. In turn, these values can be used to unfold the {Upsilon}(3S) product branching fractions to obtain values for B[{Upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub b1,2}(1P)] for the first time individually. Comparison of these with each other and with the branching fraction B[{Upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub b0}] previously measured by CLEO provides tests of relativistic corrections to electric dipole matrix elements.

  5. 1D-1D Coulomb drag in a 6 Million Mobility Bi-layer Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilodeau, Simon; Laroche, Dominique; Xia, Jian-Sheng; Lilly, Mike; Reno, John; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Gervais, Guillaume

    We report Coulomb drag measurements in vertically-coupled quantum wires. The wires are fabricated in GaAs/AlGaAs bilayer heterostructures grown from two different MBE chambers: one at Sandia National Laboratories (1.2M mobility), and the other at Princeton University (6M mobility). The previously observed positive and negative drag signals are seen in both types of devices, demonstrating the robustness of the result. However, attempts to determine the temperature dependence of the drag signal in the 1D regime proved challenging in the higher mobility heterostructure (Princeton), in part because of difficulties in aligning the wires within the same transverse subband configuration. Nevertheless, this work, performed at the Microkelvin laboratory of the University of Florida, is an important proof-of-concept for future investigations of the temperature dependence of the 1D-1D drag signal down to a few mK. Such an experiment could confirm the Luttinger charge density wave interlocking predicted to occur in the wires. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  6. Controlling H{sub 2}S emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Nagl, G.J.

    1997-03-01

    With its signature rotten egg smell, hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is not only odorous, but corrosive and toxic, too. It is produced naturally, by the anaerobic decomposition of sulfur-bearing materials, and synthetically, by a host of chemical process operations, including hydrogenation and hydrodesulfurization and coking. Many processes have been developed to convert H{sub 2}S to innocuous forms, such as elemental sulfur and sulfates. Selecting the best one depends on the overall composition and variability of the gas stream, the concentration of H{sub 2}S present, and the absolute quantity of H{sub 2}S to be removed. This article describes the advantages and disadvantages of seven H{sub 2}S removal systems. Described are: the Claus process, chemical oxidants, caustic scrubbers, adsorption, H{sub 2}S scavengers, amine absorption units, and liquid-phase oxidation systems.

  7. Human serotonin 1D receptor is encoded by a subfamily of two distinct genes: 5-HT1D alpha and 5-HT1D beta.

    PubMed Central

    Weinshank, R L; Zgombick, J M; Macchi, M J; Branchek, T A; Hartig, P R

    1992-01-01

    The serotonin 1D (5-HT1D) receptor is a pharmacologically defined binding site and functional receptor site. Observed variations in the properties of 5-HT1D receptors in different tissues have led to the speculation that multiple receptor proteins with slightly different properties may exist. We report here the cloning, deduced amino acid sequences, pharmacological properties, and second-messenger coupling of a pair of human 5-HT1D receptor genes, which we have designated 5-HT1D alpha and 5-HT1D beta due to their strong similarities in sequence, pharmacological properties, and second-messenger coupling. Both genes are free of introns in their coding regions, are expressed in the human cerebral cortex, and can couple to inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity. The pharmacological binding properties of these two human receptors are very similar, and match closely the pharmacological properties of human, bovine, and guinea pig 5-HT1D sites. Both receptors exhibit high-affinity binding of sumatriptan, a new anti-migraine medication, and thus are candidates for the pharmacological site of action of this drug. Images PMID:1565658

  8. CYP2S1: A short review

    SciTech Connect

    Saarikoski, Sirkku T. . E-mail: sirkku.saarikoski@ktl.fi; Rivera, Steven P.; Hankinson, Oliver; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti

    2005-09-01

    A new member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, CYP2S1, has recently been identified in human and mouse. In this paper, we review the data currently available for CYP2S1. The human CYP2S1 gene is located in chromosome 19q13.2 within a cluster including CYP2 family members CYP2A6, CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1. These genes also show the highest homology to the human CYP2S1. The gene has recently been found to harbor genetic polymorphism. CYP2S1 is inducible by dioxin, the induction being mediated by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) in a manner typical for CYP1 family members. In line with this, CYP2S1 has been shown to be inducible by coal tar, an abundant source of PAHs, and it was recently reported to metabolize naphthalene. This points to the involvement of CYP2S1 in the metabolism of toxic and carcinogenic compounds, similar to other dioxin-inducible CYPs. CYP2S1 is expressed in epithelial cells of a wide variety of extrahepatic tissues. The highest expression levels have been observed in the epithelial tissues frequently exposed to xenobiotics, e.g., the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and urinary tracts, and in the skin. The observed ubiquitous tissue distribution, as well as the expression of CYP2S1 throughout embryogenesis suggest that CYP2S1 is likely to metabolize important endogenous substrates; thus far, retinoic acid has been identified. In conclusion, CYP2S1 exhibits many features of interest for human health and thus warrants further investigation.

  9. Moments of the Spin Structure Functions g1p and g1d for 0.05 < Q2 < 3.0 GeV2

    SciTech Connect

    Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Burkert, Volker; Deur, Alexandre; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dodge, Gail; Griffioen, Keith; Kuhn, Sebastian; Minehart, Ralph; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, G.; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Beard, Kevin; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bonner, Billy; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Fersch, Robert; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Huertas, Marco; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Kim, Kyungmo; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klusman, Mike; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, K.; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O'Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, J.; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seely, Mikell; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, Jeffrey; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Suleiman, Riad; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; V

    2009-02-01

    The spin structure functions $g_1$ for the proton and the deuteron have been measured over a wide kinematic range in $x$ and \\Q2 using 1.6 and 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident upon polarized NH$_3$ and ND$_3$ targets at Jefferson Lab. Scattered electrons were detected in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, for $0.05 < Q^2 < 5 $\\ GeV$^2$ and $W < 3$ GeV. The first moments of $g_1$ for the proton and deuteron are presented -- both have a negative slope at low \\Q2, as predicted by the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule. The first result for the generalized forward spin polarizability of the proton $\\gamma_0^p$ is also reported, and shows evidence of scaling above $Q^2$ = 1.5 GeV$^2$. Although the first moments of $g_1$ are consistent with Chiral Perturbation Theory (\\ChPT) calculations up to approximately $Q^2 = 0.06$ GeV$^2$, a significant discrepancy is observed between the $\\gamma_0^p$ data and \\ChPT\\ for $\\gamma_0^p$,even at the lowest \\Q2.

  10. Structural Characterization of Tip20p and Dsl1p, Subunits of the Dsl1p Vesicle Tethering Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, A.; Ren, Y; Jeffrey, P; Hughson, F

    2009-01-01

    Multisubunit tethering complexes are essential for intracellular trafficking and have been proposed to mediate the initial interaction between vesicles and the membranes with which they fuse. Here we report initial structural characterization of the Dsl1p complex, whose three subunits are essential for trafficking from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Crystal structures reveal that two of the three subunits, Tip20p and Dsl1p, resemble known subunits of the exocyst complex, establishing a structural connection among several multisubunit tethering complexes and implying that many of their subunits are derived from a common progenitor. We show, moreover, that Tip20p and Dsl1p interact directly via N-terminal alpha-helices. Finally, we establish that different Dsl1p complex subunits bind independently to different ER SNARE proteins. Our results map out two alternative protein-interaction networks capable of tethering COPI-coated vesicles, via the Dsl1p complex, to ER membranes.

  11. Lifetime of the 7s6d {sup 1}D{sub 2} atomic state of radium.

    SciTech Connect

    Trimble, W. L.; Sulai, I. A.; Ahmad, I.; Bailey, K.; Graner, B.; Greene, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Korsch, W.; Lu, Z.-T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Physics; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Kentucky

    2009-01-01

    The lifetime of the 7s6d {sup 1}D{sub 2} state of atomic radium is determined to be 385(45) {mu}s using cold {sup 226}Ra atoms prepared in a magneto-optical trap. The {sup 1}D{sub 2} state is populated from the decay of the {sup 1}P{sub 1} state which is excited by a pulse of 483 nm light. The decay of the {sup 1}D{sub 2} state is observed by detecting delayed fluorescence at 714 nm from the last step in the decay sequence {sup 1}P{sub 1}-{sup 1}D{sub 2}-{sup 3}P{sub 1}-{sup 1}S{sub 0}. The measured lifetime is compared to a number of theoretical calculations. An improved value of the 7s7p {sup 1}P{sub 1} level of 20 715.598(6) cm{sup -1} is obtained.

  12. Growth patterns of patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sangu, Noriko; Shimojima, Keiko; Shimada, Shino; Ando, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-05-01

    1p36 deletion syndrome is one of the most common subtelomeric deletion syndromes. Obesity is frequently observed in patients with this syndrome. Thus, it is important to evaluate the growth status of an individual patient. For this purpose, we accumulated recorded growth data from 44 patients with this syndrome and investigated the growth patterns of patients. Most of the patients showed weight parameters within normal limits, whereas a few of these patients showed intrauterine growth delay and microcephaly. The length of the patients after birth was under the 50th centile in most patients. Many patients showed poor weight gain after birth, and only two female patients were overweight. These findings indicate two different phenotypes of the 1p36 deletion syndrome. The overweight patients with 1p36 deletion started excessive weight gain after two years of life. This characteristic of the patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome is similar to Prader-Willi syndrome.

  13. 1p36 tumor suppression--a matter of dosage?

    PubMed

    Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Schwab, Manfred; Westermann, Frank

    2012-12-01

    A broad range of human malignancies is associated with nonrandom 1p36 deletions, suggesting the existence of tumor suppressors encoded in this region. Evidence for tumor-specific inactivation of 1p36 genes in the classic "two-hit" manner is scarce; however, many tumor suppressors do not require complete inactivation but contribute to tumorigenesis by partial impairment. We discuss recent data derived from both human tumors and functional cancer models indicating that the 1p36 genes CHD5, CAMTA1, KIF1B, CASZ1, and miR-34a contribute to cancer development when reduced in dosage by genomic copy number loss or other mechanisms. We explore potential interactions among these candidates and propose a model where heterozygous 1p36 deletion impairs oncosuppressive pathways via simultaneous downregulation of several dosage-dependent tumor suppressor genes.

  14. Interstitial 1p32.1p32.3 deletion in a patient with multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kehrer, Martin; Schäferhoff, Karin; Bonin, Michael; Jauch, Anna; Bevot, Andrea; Tzschach, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Interstitial deletions encompassing chromosome bands 1p32.1p32.3 are rare. Only nine unrelated patients with partially overlapping 1p32.1p32.3 deletions of variable size and position have been reported to date. We report on a 17-month-old boy with choanal atresia, hearing loss, urogenital anomalies, and microcephaly in whom an interstitial de novo deletion of 6.4 Mb was detected in 1p32.1p32.3 (genomic position chr1:54,668,618-61,113,264 according to GRCh37/hg19). The deleted region harbors 31 RefSeq genes. Notable genes in the region are PCSK9, haploinsufficiency of which caused low LDL cholesterol plasma levels in the patient, and DAB1, which is a candidate gene for cognitive deficits, microcephaly, and cerebral abnormalities such as ventriculomegaly and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Choanal atresia, microcephaly, and severe hearing loss were previously not known to be associated with 1p32 deletions. Our reported patient thus broadens the spectrum of clinical findings in this chromosome region and further facilitates genotype-phenotype correlations. Additional patients with overlapping deletions and/or point mutations in genes of this region need to be identified to elucidate the role of individual genes for the complex clinical manifestations.

  15. Alkaline biofiltration of H2S odors.

    PubMed

    González-Sánchez, Armando; Revah, Sergio; Deshusses, Marc A

    2008-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a very common odor nuisance which is best controlled by chemical or biological scrubbing. Under alkaline pH, the amount of H2S that can be solubilized in a scrubbing liquid increases significantly, and therefore, gas-liquid mass transfer limitations can be reduced. To date, biological scrubbing of H2S has been limited to neutral or acidic pH, despite the potential benefit of reduced mass transfer limitations at alkaline pH. In the present paper, an alkaliphilic sulfoxidizing bacterial consortium was deployed in a laboratory-scale biotrickling filter treating H2S at pH 10. The gas contact time ranged from 1 to 6 s, and H2S inlet concentrations, from 2.5 to 18 ppm(v). The results showed that under most conditions, H2S removal exceeded 98% and the degradation end-product was sulfate. At the highest H2S concentrations and shortest gas contacttimes, when the loading exceeded 30 g m(-3) h(-1), the H2S removal efficiency decreased significantly due to biological reaction limitation, and incompletely oxidized sulfides were measured in the trickling liquid. An analysis of the process demonstrated that operating the biotrickling filter at high pH results in an enhancement of the mass transfer by a factor of 1700-11 000. Overall, alkaline biotrickling filtration was shown to be very effective at low concentration of H2S and very short gas contact time. This is the first demonstration of a biotrickling filter for air pollution control operated at high pH.

  16. Familial partial duplication (1)(p21p31)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoechstetter, L.; Soukup, S.; Schorry, E.K.

    1995-11-20

    A partial duplication (1)(p21p31), resulting from a maternal direct insertion (13,1) (q22p21p31), was found in a 30-year-old woman with mental retardation, cleft palate, and multiple minor anomalies. Two other affected and deceased relatives were presumed to have the same chromosome imbalance. Duplication 1p cases are reviewed. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Jen1p: A High Affinity Selenite Transporter in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Joseph R.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2010-01-01

    Selenium is a micronutrient in most eukaryotes, including humans, which is well known for having an extremely thin border between beneficial and toxic concentrations. Soluble tetravalent selenite is the predominant environmental form and also the form that is applied in the treatment of human diseases. To acquire this nutrient from low environmental concentrations as well as to avoid toxicity, a well-controlled transport system is required. Here we report that Jen1p, a proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter in S. cerevisiae, catalyzes high-affinity uptake of selenite. Disruption of JEN1 resulted in selenite resistance, and overexpression resulted in selenite hypersensitivity. Transport assay showed that overexpression of Jen1p enables selenite accumulation in yeast compared with a JEN1 knock out strain, indicating the Jen1p transporter facilitates selenite accumulation inside cells. Selenite uptake by Jen1p had a Km of 0.91 mM, which is comparable to the Km for lactate. Jen1p transported selenite in a proton-dependent manner which resembles the transport mechanism for lactate. In addition, selenite and lactate can inhibit the transport of each other competitively. Therefore, we postulate selenite is a molecular mimic of monocarboxylates which allows selenite to be transported by Jen1p. PMID:20861301

  18. Measurement of CA1P and CA in leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.d.; Kobza, J.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Carboxyarabinitol-1-phosphate (CA1P) and carboxyarabinitol (CA) were assayed in leaves by isotope dilution. {sup 14}C-labeled standards were synthesized from (2-{sup 14}C) CABP using acid (CA1P) or alkaline (CA) phosphatase. Either was added to boiling 80% EtOH along with liquid N{sub 2}-killed leaves. Each was largely purified by anion exchange chromatography. CA1P samples were subjected to 2D-TLE/TLC. The specific activity of the {sup 14}C-containing spot was measured using alkaline phosphatase. CA samples were run on an HPLC and the specific activity was determined using a UV monitor and a flow-through radioisotope detector. In 3 of the tested species, light/dark amount of CA1P (nmol/mg Chl) were kidney bean, 0.7/67; sugar beet, 0.8/33; and Alocasia, 0/3.4. Light/dark CA levels (nmol/mg Chl) in these respective species were 897/653, 3.2/3.5, and 5.7/4.6. These results support the hypothesis that CA is a product of CA1P metabolism in vivo under high light, but also indicate that CA is not the only intermediate involved in CA1P synthesis under low light/dark conditions.

  19. Channel specific rate constants for reactions of O(1D) with HCl and HBr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, P. H.; Wells, J. R.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    The absolute rate coefficients and product yields for reactions of O(1D) with HCl(1) and HBr(2) at 287 K are presently determined by means of the time-resolved resonance fluorescence detection of O(3P) and H(2S) in conjunction with pulsed laser photolysis of O3/HX/He mixtures. Total rate coefficients for O(1D) removal are found to be, in units of 10 to the -10th cu cm/molecule per sec, k(1) = 1.50 + or - 0.18 and k(2) 1.48 + or - 0.16; the absolute accuracy of these rate coefficients is estimated to be + or - 20 percent.

  20. Internally consistent database for sulfides and sulfosalts in the system Ag 2S-Cu 2S-ZnS-Sb 2S 3-As 2S 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Richard O.

    2000-11-01

    An updated thermodynamic database for Ag 2S-Cu 2S-ZnS-Sb 2S 3-As 2S 3 sulfides and sulfosalts applicable to temperatures above 119°C is developed to calculate phase relations for polybasite-pearceite- and fahlore-bearing assemblages. It is based on pre-existing and new constraints on activity-composition, Ag-Cu and As-Sb partitioning, and other relations, and on experiments (200-300°C, evacuated silica tubes) conducted to define the stability of the polybasite-pearceite [(Ag 1- x,Cu x) 16(Sb 1- y,As y) 2S 11] + ZnS sphalerite assemblage with respect to assemblages containing (Ag,Cu) 2S sulfides coexisting with (Cu, Ag) 10Zn 2(Sb,As) 4S 13 fahlore sulfosalts. It was found that the thermodynamics of mixing of bcc- and hcp-(Ag,Cu) 2S solutions, which are fast-ion conductors, may be described by using site multiplicities of metals α Ag,Cu > 2 and temperature-dependent regular solution parameters. We obtained estimates for the Gibbs energies of formation for Ag 16Sb 2S 11 and Cu 16Sb 2S 11 polybasite endmembers from the simple sulfides (Ag 2S, Cu 2S, and Sb 2S 3) of -30.79 and -4.07 kJ/gfw at 200°C, and -32.04 and -0.59 kJ/gfw at 400°C, respectively, that are about one half kJ/gfw more positive and about 6 kJ/gfw more negative than those estimated by Harlov and Sack (1995b). The corresponding estimates for formation energies of Ag 10Zn 2Sb 4S 13 and Cu 10Zn 2Sb 4S 13 fahlores (-20.29 and -105.29 kJ/gfw at 200°C and -23.72 and -105.76 kJ/gfw at 400°C) are comparable to, and roughly 110 kJ/gfw more positive than, the corresponding estimates of Ebel and Sack (1994). We also determined that the Gibbs energies of the As-Sb exchange reactions: 1/4Ag 10Zn2Sb4S13+1/2Ag 16As2S11=1/2Ag 16Sb2S11+1/4Ag 10Zn2As4S13Sb-fahlorepearceitepolybasiteAs-fahlore and Ag3SbS3+1/2Ag 16As2S11=1/2Ag 16Sb2S11+Ag3AsS3pyrargyritepearceitepolybasiteproustite are, respectively, 8.75 and 0.40 kJ/gfw in the range 150-350°C, and these predictions are consistent with As-Sb partitioning relations

  1. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  2. Unfolded protein response regulates yeast small GTPase Arl1p activation at late Golgi via phosphorylation of Arf GEF Syt1p

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jia-Wei; Tang, Pei-Hua; Wang, I-Hao; Liu, Chia-Lun; Chen, Wen-Hui; Tsai, Pei-Chin; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Jung; Yu, Chia-Jung

    2016-01-01

    ADP ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are key regulators of membrane traffic at the Golgi complex. In yeast, Arf guanine nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) Syt1p activates Arf-like protein Arl1p, which was accompanied by accumulation of golgin Imh1p at late Golgi, but whether and how this function of Syt1p is regulated remains unclear. Here, we report that the inositol-requiring kinase 1 (Ire1p)-mediated unfolded protein response (UPR) modulated Arl1p activation at late Golgi. Arl1p activation was dependent on both kinase and endo-RNase activities of Ire1p. Moreover, constitutively active transcription factor Hac1p restored the Golgi localization of Arl1p and Imh1p in IRE1-deleted cells. Elucidating the mechanism of Ire1p–Hac1p axis actions, we found that it regulated phosphorylation of Syt1p, which enhances Arl1p activation, recruitment of Imh1p to the Golgi, and Syt1p interaction with Arl1p. Consistent with these findings, the induction of UPR by tunicamycin treatment increases phosphorylation of Syt1p, resulting in Arl1p activation. Thus, these findings clarify how the UPR influences the roles of Syt1p, Arl1p, and Imh1p in Golgi transport. PMID:26966233

  3. Recruitment of Tup1p and Cti6p regulates heme-deficient expression of Aft1p target genes

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, Robert J; Adkins, Erika M; Kimmel, Emily; Kaplan, Jerry

    2006-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription of genes encoding for the high-affinity iron (FET3, FTR1) and copper (CTR1) transporters does not occur in the absence of heme. We show that the Aft1p binding region of the FET3 promoter or the Mac1p binding region of the CTR1 promoter is necessary and sufficient to mediate heme-deficient repression. Transcription is repressed in the absence of heme, and a genetic screen identified Tup1p and Hda1p as being required for transcriptional repression. In contrast to FET3 and CTR1, Aft1p target genes ARN1 and FIT1 are transcribed in the absence of heme. A 14 bp sequence in the ARN1 promoter is necessary and sufficient to permit transcription in the absence of heme. Transcription in the absence of heme required the presence of Cti6p to overcome the effect of Tup1p, and Cti6p was recruited to the ARN1 promoter in the absence of heme. We hypothesize that transcription of the siderophore transporter ARN1 permits yeast to accumulate iron in the absence of oxygen and to deny iron to competing organisms. PMID:16437160

  4. S1P-Yap1 signaling regulates endoderm formation required for cardiac precursor cell migration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hajime; Terai, Kenta; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Ayano; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2014-10-13

    To form the primary heart tube in zebrafish, bilateral cardiac precursor cells (CPCs) migrate toward the midline beneath the endoderm. Mutants lacking endoderm and fish with defective sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling exhibit cardia bifida. Endoderm defects lead to the lack of foothold for the CPCs, whereas the cause of cardia bifida in S1P signaling mutants remains unclear. Here we show that S1P signaling regulates CPC migration through Yes-associated protein 1 (Yap1)-dependent endoderm survival. Cardia bifida seen in spns2 (S1P transporter) morphants and s1pr2 (S1P receptor-2) morphants could be rescued by endodermal expression of nuclear localized form of yap1. yap1 morphants had decreased expression of the Yap1/Tead target connective tissue growth factor a (Ctgfa) and consequently increased endodermal cell apoptosis. Consistently, ctgfa morphants showed defects of the endodermal sheet and cardia bifida. Collectively, we show that S1pr2/Yap1-regulated ctgfa expression is essential for the proper endoderm formation required for CPC migration.

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Glycoprotein Quality Control Regulates CD1d Assembly and CD1d-mediated Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Kunte, Amit; Zhang, Wei; Paduraru, Crina; Veerapen, Natacha; Cox, Liam R.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The non-classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) homologue CD1d presents lipid antigens to innate-like lymphocytes called natural-killer T (NKT) cells. These cells, by virtue of their broad cytokine repertoire, shape innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we have assessed the role of endoplasmic reticulum glycoprotein quality control in CD1d assembly and function, specifically the role of a key component of the quality control machinery, the enzyme UDP glucose glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGT1). We observe that in UGT1-deficient cells, CD1d associates prematurely with β2-microglobulin (β2m) and is able to rapidly exit the endoplasmic reticulum. At least some of these CD1d-β2m heterodimers are shorter-lived and can be rescued by provision of a defined exogenous antigen, α-galactosylceramide. Importantly, we show that in UGT1-deficient cells the CD1d-β2m heterodimers have altered antigenicity despite the fact that their cell surface levels are unchanged. We propose that UGT1 serves as a quality control checkpoint during CD1d assembly and further suggest that UGT1-mediated quality control can shape the lipid repertoire of newly synthesized CD1d. The quality control process may play a role in ensuring stability of exported CD1d-β2m complexes, in facilitating presentation of low abundance high affinity antigens, or in preventing deleterious responses to self lipids. PMID:23615906

  6. Measurement of the χ b (3 P) mass and of the relative rate of χ b1(1 P) and χ b2(1 P) production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Lespinasse, M.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-10-01

    The production of χ b mesons in proton-proton collisions is studied using a data sample collected by the LHCb detector, at centre-of-mass energies of =7 and 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1. The χ b mesons are identified through their decays to ϒ(1 S) γ and ϒ(2 S) γ using photons that converted to e + e - pairs in the detector. The relative prompt production rate of χ b1(1 P) and χ b2(1 P) mesons is measured as a function of the ϒ(1 S) transverse momentum in the χ b rapidity range 2.0 < y <4.5. A precise measurement of the χ b (3 P) mass is also performed. Assuming a mass splitting between the χ b1(3 P) and the χ b2(3 P) states of 10.5 MeV/c2, the measured mass of the χ b1(3 P) meson is

  7. Interaction of environmental contaminants with zebrafish organic anion transporting polypeptide, Oatp1d1 (Slco1d1)

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko; Fent, Karl; Smital, Tvrtko

    2014-10-01

    Polyspecific transporters from the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP/Oatp) superfamily mediate the uptake of a wide range of compounds. In zebrafish, Oatp1d1 transports conjugated steroid hormones and cortisol. It is predominantly expressed in the liver, brain and testes. In this study we have characterized the transport of xenobiotics by the zebrafish Oatp1d1 transporter. We developed a novel assay for assessing Oatp1d1 interactors using the fluorescent probe Lucifer yellow and transient transfection in HEK293 cells. Our data showed that numerous environmental contaminants interact with zebrafish Oatp1d1. Oatp1d1 mediated the transport of diclofenac with very high affinity, followed by high affinity towards perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), nonylphenol, gemfibrozil and 17α-ethinylestradiol; moderate affinity towards carbaryl, diazinon and caffeine; and low affinity towards metolachlor. Importantly, many environmental chemicals acted as strong inhibitors of Oatp1d1. A strong inhibition of Oatp1d1 transport activity was found by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), chlorpyrifos-methyl, estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2), followed by moderate to low inhibition by diethyl phthalate, bisphenol A, 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4 tetrahydronapthalene and clofibrate. In this study we identified Oatp1d1 as a first Solute Carrier (SLC) transporter involved in the transport of a wide range of xenobiotics in fish. Considering that Oatps in zebrafish have not been characterized before, our work on zebrafish Oatp1d1 offers important new insights on the understanding of uptake processes of environmental contaminants, and contributes to the better characterization of zebrafish as a model species. - Highlights: • We optimized a novel assay for determination of Oatp1d1 interactors • Oatp1d1 is the first SLC characterized fish xenobiotic transporter • PFOS, nonylphenol, diclofenac, EE2, caffeine are high affinity Oatp1d1substrates • PFOA, chlorpyrifos

  8. D1/D5 dopamine receptors modulate spatial memory formation.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Weber C N; Köhler, Cristiano C; Radiske, Andressa; Cammarota, Martín

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effect of the intra-CA1 administration of the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH23390 and the D1/D5 receptor agonist SKF38393 on spatial memory in the water maze. When given immediately, but not 3h after training, SCH23390 hindered long-term spatial memory formation without affecting non-spatial memory or the normal functionality of the hippocampus. On the contrary, post-training infusion of SKF38393 enhanced retention and facilitated the spontaneous recovery of the original spatial preference after reversal learning. Our findings demonstrate that hippocampal D1/D5 receptors play an essential role in spatial memory processing.

  9. A human serotonin 1D receptor variant (5HT1D beta) encoded by an intronless gene on chromosome 6.

    PubMed Central

    Demchyshyn, L; Sunahara, R K; Miller, K; Teitler, M; Hoffman, B J; Kennedy, J L; Seeman, P; Van Tol, H H; Niznik, H B

    1992-01-01

    An intronless gene encoding a serotonin receptor (5HT1D beta) has been cloned and functionally expressed in mammalian fibroblast cultures. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence, the gene encodes a 390-amino acid protein displaying considerable homology, within putative transmembrane domains (approximately 75% identity) to the canine and human 5HT1D receptors. Membranes prepared from CHO cells stably expressing the receptor bound [3H]serotonin with high affinity (Kd 4 nM) and displayed a pharmacological profile consistent, but not identical, with that of the characterized serotonin 5HT1D receptor. Most notably, metergoline and serotonergic piperazine derivatives, as a group, display 3- to 8-fold lower affinity for the 5HT1D beta receptor than for the 5HT1D receptor, whereas both receptors display similar affinities for tryptamine derivatives, including the antimigraine drug sumatriptan. Northern blot analysis revealed an mRNA of approximately 5.5 kilobases expressed in human and monkey frontal cortex, medulla, striatum, hippocampus and amygdala but not in cerebellum, olfactory tubercle, and pituitary. The 5HT1D beta gene maps to human chromosome 6. The existence of multiple neuronal 5HT1D-like receptors may help account for some of the complexities associated with [3H]serotonin binding patterns in native membranes. Images PMID:1351684

  10. 60. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, D LOOP STEAM GENERATOR AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, D LOOP STEAM GENERATOR AND MAIN COOLANT PUMP LOOKING NORTHEAST (LOCATION OOO) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  11. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia in Glut1D on Ketogenic Diet.

    PubMed

    Klepper, Joerg; Leiendecker, Baerbel; Heussinger, Nicole; Lausch, Ekkehart; Bosch, Friedrich

    2016-04-01

    High-fat ketogenic diets are the only treatment available for Glut1 deficiency (Glut1D). Here, we describe an 8-year-old girl with classical Glut1D responsive to a 3:1 ketogenic diet and ethosuximide. After 3 years on the diet a gradual increase of blood lipids was followed by rapid, severe asymptomatic hypertriglyceridemia (1,910 mg/dL). Serum lipid apheresis was required to determine liver, renal, and pancreatic function. A combination of medium chain triglyceride-oil and a reduction of the ketogenic diet to 1:1 ratio normalized triglyceride levels within days but triggered severe myoclonic seizures requiring comedication with sultiam. Severe hypertriglyceridemia in children with Glut1D on ketogenic diets may be underdiagnosed and harmful. In contrast to congenital hypertriglyceridemias, children with Glut1D may be treated effectively by dietary adjustments alone. PMID:26902182

  12. 1D Nanostructures: Controlled Fabrication and Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Michael Z.

    2013-01-01

    Jian Wei, Xuchun Song, Chunli Yang, and Michael Z. Hu, 1D Nanostructures: Controlled Fabrication and Energy Applications, Journal of Nanomaterials, published special issue (http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnm/si/197254/) (2013).

  13. 2D-photochemical model for forbidden oxygen line emission for comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, G.; De Keyser, J.; Maggiolo, R.; Rubin, M.; Gronoff, G.; Gibbons, A.; Jehin, E.; Dhooghe, F.; Gunell, H.; Vaeck, N.; Loreau, J.

    2016-08-01

    We present here a 2D-model of photochemistry for computing the production and loss mechanisms of the O(1S) and O(1D) states, which are responsible for the emission lines at 577.7 nm, 630 nm, and 636.4 nm, in case of the comet 1P/Halley. The presence of O2 within cometary atmospheres, measured by the in-situ ROSETTA and GIOTTO missions, necessitates a revision of the usual photochemical models. Indeed, the photodissociation of molecular oxygen also leads to a significant production of oxygen in excited electronic states. In order to correctly model the solar UV flux absorption, we consider here a 2D configuration. While the green to red-doublet ratio is not affected by the solar UV flux absorption, estimates of the red-doublet and green lines emissions are, however, overestimated by a factor of two in the 1D model compared to the 2D model. Considering a spherical symmetry, emission maps can be deduced from the 2D model in order to be directly compared to ground and/or in-situ observations.

  14. Purification and Characterization of Put1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wanduragala, Srimevan; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Liang, Xinwen; Becker, Donald F.

    2010-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the PUT1 and PUT2 genes are required for the conversion of proline to glutamate. The PUT1 gene encodes Put1p, a proline dehydrogenase (PRODH)1 enzyme localized in the mitochondrion. Put1p was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli and shown to have a UV-visible absorption spectrum that is typical of a bound flavin cofactor. A Km value of 36 mM proline and a kcat = 27 s−1 were determined for Put1p using an artificial electron acceptor. Put1p also exhibited high activity using ubiquinone-1 (CoQ1) as an electron acceptor with a kcat = 9.6 s−1 and a Km of 33 µM for CoQ1. In addition, knockout strains of the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) homolog in S. cerevisiae were able to grow on proline as the sole nitrogen source demonstrating that ETF is not required for proline utilization in yeast. PMID:20450881

  15. TVENT1P. Gas-Dynamic Transients Flow Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Eyberger, L.

    1987-09-01

    TVENT1P predicts flows and pressures in a ventilation system or other air pathway caused by pressure transients, such as a tornado. For an analytical model to simulate an actual system, it must have (1) the same arrangement of components in a network of flow paths; (2) the same friction characteristics; (3) the same boundary pressures; (4) the same capacitance; and (5) the same forces that drive the air. A specific set of components used for constructing the analytical model includes filters, dampers, ducts, blowers, rooms, or volume connected at nodal points to form networks. The effects of a number of similar components can be lumped into a single one. TVENT1P contains a material transport algorithm and features for turning blowers off and on, changing blower speeds, changing the resistance of dampers and filters, and providing a filter model to handle very high flows. These features make it possible to depict a sequence of events during a single run. Component properties are varied using time functions. The filter model is not used by the code unless it is specified by the user. The basic results of a TVENT1P solution are flows in branches and pressures at nodes. A postprocessor program, PLTTEX, is included to produce the plots specified in the TVENT1P input. PLTTEX uses the proprietary CA-DISSPLA graphics software.

  16. Comparative enzymology of (2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine and (2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamate

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J. L.; Krasnikov, Boris F.; Pinto, John T.; Kung, Hank F.; Li, Jianyong; Ploessl, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Many cancer cells have a strong requirement for glutamine. As an aid for understanding this phenomenon the 18F-labeled 2S,4R stereoisomer of 4-fluoroglutamine [(2S,4R)4-FGln] was previously developed for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET). In the present work, comparative enzymological studies of unlabeled (2S,4R)4-FGln and its deamidated product (2S,4R)4-FGlu were conducted as an adjunct to these PET studies. Our findings are as follows: Rat kidney preparations catalyze the deamidation of (2S,4R)4-FGln. (2S,4R)4-FGln and (2S,4R)4-FGlu are substrates of various aminotransferases. (2S,4R)4-FGlu is a substrate of glutamate dehydrogenase, but not of sheep brain glutamine synthetase. The compound is, however, a strong inhibitor of this enzyme. Rat liver cytosolic fractions catalyze a γ-elimination reaction with (2S,4R)4-FGlu, generating α-ketoglutarate. Coupling of a deamidase reaction with this γ- elimination reaction provides an explanation for the previous detection of 18F− in tumors exposed to [18F](2S,4R)4-FGln. One enzyme contributing to this reaction was identified as alanine aminotransferase, which catalyzes competing γ-elimination and aminotransferase reactions with (2S,4R)4-FGlu. This appears to be the first description of an aminotransferase catalyzing a γ-elimination reaction. The present results demonstrate that (2S,4R)4-FGln and (2S,4R)4-FGlu are useful analogues for comparative studies of various glutamine- and glutamate-utilizing enzymes in normal and cancerous mammalian tissues, and suggest that tumors may metabolize (2S,4R)4-FGln in a generally similar fashion to glutamine. In plants, yeast and bacteria a major route for ammonia assimilation involves the consecutive action of glutamate synthase plus glutamine synthetase (glutamate synthase cycle). It is suggested that (2S,4R)4-FGln and (2S,4R)4-FGlu will be useful probes in studies of ammonia assimilation by the glutamate synthase pathway in these organisms. Finally, glutamine

  17. TBC1D24 genotype–phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    Balestrini, Simona; Milh, Mathieu; Castiglioni, Claudia; Lüthy, Kevin; Finelli, Mattea J.; Verstreken, Patrik; Cardon, Aaron; Stražišar, Barbara Gnidovec; Holder, J. Lloyd; Lesca, Gaetan; Mancardi, Maria M.; Poulat, Anne L.; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Banka, Siddharth; Bilo, Leonilda; Birkeland, Laura E.; Bosch, Friedrich; Brockmann, Knut; Cross, J. Helen; Doummar, Diane; Félix, Temis M.; Giuliano, Fabienne; Hori, Mutsuki; Hüning, Irina; Kayserili, Hulia; Kini, Usha; Lees, Melissa M.; Meenakshi, Girish; Mewasingh, Leena; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Peluso, Silvio; Mey, Antje; Rice, Gregory M.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Taylor, Jenny C.; Troester, Matthew M.; Stanley, Christine M.; Ville, Dorothee; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Falace, Antonio; Fassio, Anna; Lemke, Johannes R.; Biskup, Saskia; Tardif, Jessica; Ajeawung, Norbert F.; Tolun, Aslihan; Corbett, Mark; Gecz, Jozef; Afawi, Zaid; Howell, Katherine B.; Oliver, Karen L.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; de Falco, Fabrizio A.; Oliver, Peter L.; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in TBC1D24. Methods: We acquired new clinical, EEG, and neuroimaging data of 11 previously unreported and 37 published patients. TBC1D24 mutations, identified through various sequencing methods, can be found online (http://lovd.nl/TBC1D24). Results: Forty-eight patients were included (28 men, 20 women, average age 21 years) from 30 independent families. Eighteen patients (38%) had myoclonic epilepsies. The other patients carried diagnoses of focal (25%), multifocal (2%), generalized (4%), and unclassified epilepsy (6%), and early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (25%). Most patients had drug-resistant epilepsy. We detail EEG, neuroimaging, developmental, and cognitive features, treatment responsiveness, and physical examination. In silico evaluation revealed 7 different highly conserved motifs, with the most common pathogenic mutation located in the first. Neuronal outgrowth assays showed that some TBC1D24 mutations, associated with the most severe TBC1D24-associated disorders, are not necessarily the most disruptive to this gene function. Conclusions: TBC1D24-related epilepsy syndromes show marked phenotypic pleiotropy, with multisystem involvement and severity spectrum ranging from isolated deafness (not studied here), benign myoclonic epilepsy restricted to childhood with complete seizure control and normal intellect, to early-onset epileptic encephalopathy with severe developmental delay and early death. There is no distinct correlation with mutation type or location yet, but patterns are emerging. Given the phenotypic breadth observed, TBC1D24 mutation screening is indicated in a wide variety of epilepsies. A TBC1D24 consortium was formed to develop further research on this gene and its associated phenotypes. PMID:27281533

  18. The human paired domain gene PAX7 (Hup1) maps to chromosome 1p35-1p36. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, B.W. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1993-07-01

    The human PAX7 gene encodes a protein containing a domain homologous to the Drosophila paired box first described in three segmentation genes. In addition to the paired box, the gene contains the conserved octa-peptide and a paired-type homeobox. Two of the five known human PAX genes have been implicated in human disorders so far. Here the authors have used a somatic cell hybrid panel to localize PAX7 to human chromosome 1. In situ hybridization shows that PAX7 is confined to the short arm of chromosome 1 at 1p35-1p36.2. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Late-stage optimization of a tercyclic class of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Horan, Joshua C; Kuzmich, Daniel; Liu, Pingrong; DiSalvo, Darren; Lord, John; Mao, Can; Hopkins, Tamara D; Yu, Hui; Harcken, Christian; Betageri, Raj; Hill-Drzewi, Melissa; Patenaude, Lori; Patel, Monica; Fletcher, Kimberly; Terenzzio, Donna; Linehan, Brian; Xia, Heather; Patel, Mita; Studwell, Debbie; Miller, Craig; Hickey, Eugene; Levin, Jeremy I; Smith, Dustin; Kemper, Raymond A; Modis, Louise K; Bannen, Lynne C; Chan, Diva S; Mac, Morrison B; Ng, Stephanie; Wang, Yong; Xu, Wei; Lemieux, René M

    2016-01-15

    Poor solubility and cationic amphiphilic drug-likeness were liabilities identified for a lead series of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 agonists originally developed from a high-throughput screening campaign. This work describes the subsequent optimization of these leads by balancing potency, selectivity, solubility and overall molecular charge. Focused SAR studies revealed favorable structural modifications that, when combined, produced compounds with overall balanced profiles. The low brain exposure observed in rat suggests that these compounds would be best suited for the potential treatment of peripheral autoimmune disorders. PMID:26687487

  20. Structural and electronic features of binary Li2S-P2S5 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Koji; Mitsui, Akio; Mori, Masahiro; Onodera, Yohei; Shiotani, Shinya; Koyama, Yukinori; Orikasa, Yuki; Murakami, Miwa; Shimoda, Keiji; Mori, Kazuhiro; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Arai, Hajime; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2016-02-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of binary Li2S-P2S5 glasses used as solid electrolytes are modeled by a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) simulation using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy data. The ratio of PSx polyhedral anions based on the Raman spectroscopic results is reflected in the glassy structures of the 67Li2S-33P2S5, 70Li2S-30P2S5, and 75Li2S-25P2S5 glasses, and the plausible structures represent the lithium ion distributions around them. It is found that the edge sharing between PSx and LiSy polyhedra increases at a high Li2S content, and the free volume around PSx polyhedra decreases. It is conjectured that Li+ ions around the face of PSx polyhedra are clearly affected by the polarization of anions. The electronic structure of the DFT/RMC model suggests that the electron transfer between the P ion and the bridging sulfur (BS) ion weakens the positive charge of the P ion in the P2S7 anions. The P2S7 anions of the weak electrostatic repulsion would causes it to more strongly attract Li+ ions than the PS4 and P2S6 anions, and suppress the lithium ionic conduction. Thus, the control of the edge sharing between PSx and LiSy polyhedra without the electron transfer between the P ion and the BS ion is expected to facilitate lithium ionic conduction in the above solid electrolytes.

  1. Structural and electronic features of binary Li2S-P2S5 glasses

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Koji; Mitsui, Akio; Mori, Masahiro; Onodera, Yohei; Shiotani, Shinya; Koyama, Yukinori; Orikasa, Yuki; Murakami, Miwa; Shimoda, Keiji; Mori, Kazuhiro; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Arai, Hajime; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2016-01-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of binary Li2S-P2S5 glasses used as solid electrolytes are modeled by a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) simulation using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy data. The ratio of PSx polyhedral anions based on the Raman spectroscopic results is reflected in the glassy structures of the 67Li2S-33P2S5, 70Li2S-30P2S5, and 75Li2S-25P2S5 glasses, and the plausible structures represent the lithium ion distributions around them. It is found that the edge sharing between PSx and LiSy polyhedra increases at a high Li2S content, and the free volume around PSx polyhedra decreases. It is conjectured that Li+ ions around the face of PSx polyhedra are clearly affected by the polarization of anions. The electronic structure of the DFT/RMC model suggests that the electron transfer between the P ion and the bridging sulfur (BS) ion weakens the positive charge of the P ion in the P2S7 anions. The P2S7 anions of the weak electrostatic repulsion would causes it to more strongly attract Li+ ions than the PS4 and P2S6 anions, and suppress the lithium ionic conduction. Thus, the control of the edge sharing between PSx and LiSy polyhedra without the electron transfer between the P ion and the BS ion is expected to facilitate lithium ionic conduction in the above solid electrolytes. PMID:26892385

  2. A third major locus for autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia maps to 1p34.1-p32.

    PubMed Central

    Varret, M; Rabès, J P; Saint-Jore, B; Cenarro, A; Marinoni, J C; Civeira, F; Devillers, M; Krempf, M; Coulon, M; Thiart, R; Kotze, M J; Schmidt, H; Buzzi, J C; Kostner, G M; Bertolini, S; Pocovi, M; Rosa, A; Farnier, M; Martinez, M; Junien, C; Boileau, C

    1999-01-01

    Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), one of the most frequent hereditary disorders, is characterized by an isolated elevation of LDL particles that leads to premature mortality from cardiovascular complications. It is generally assumed that mutations in the LDLR and APOB genes account for ADH. We identified one large French pedigree (HC2) and 12 additional white families with ADH in which we excluded linkage to the LDLR and APOB, implicating a new locus we named "FH3." A LOD score of 3.13 at a recombination fraction of 0 was obtained at markers D1S2892 and D1S2722. We localized the FH3 locus to a 9-cM interval at 1p34.1-p32. We tested four regional markers in another set of 12 ADH families. Positive LOD scores were obtained in three pedigrees, whereas linkage was excluded in the others. Heterogeneity tests indicated linkage to FH3 in approximately 27% of these non-LDLR/non-APOB ADH families and implied a fourth locus. Radiation hybrid mapping located four candidate genes at 1p34.1-p32, outside the critical region, showing no identity with FH3. Our results show that ADH is genetically more heterogeneous than conventionally accepted. PMID:10205269

  3. Vsl1p cooperates with Fsv1p for vacuolar protein transport and homotypic fusion in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Akira; Higuchi, Yujiro; Yagi, Satoshi; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Members of the SNARE protein family participate in the docking-fusion step of several intracellular vesicular transport events. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Vam7p was identified as a SNARE protein that acts in vacuolar protein transport and membrane fusion. However, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, there have been no reports regarding the counterpart of Vam7p. Here, we found that, although the SPCC594.06c gene has low similarity to Vam7p, the product of SPCC594.06c has a PX domain and SNARE motif like Vam7p, and thus we designated the gene Sch. pombe vsl1(+) (Vam7-like protein 1). The vsl1Δ cells showed no obvious defect in vacuolar protein transport. However, cells of the vsl1Δ mutant with a deletion of fsv1(+), which encodes another SNARE protein, displayed extreme defects in vacuolar protein transport and vacuolar morphology. Vsl1p was localized to the vacuolar membrane and prevacuolar compartment, and its PX domain was essential for proper localization. Expression of the fusion protein GFP-Vsl1p was able to suppress ZnCl2 sensitivity and the vacuolar protein sorting defect in the fsv1Δ cells. Moreover, GFP-Vsl1p was mislocalized in a pep12Δ mutant and in cells overexpressing fsv1(+). Importantly, overexpression of Sac. cerevisiae VAM7 could suppress the sensitivity to ZnCl2 of vsl1Δ cells and the vacuolar morphology defect of vsl1Δfsv1Δ cells in Sch. pombe. Taken together, these data suggest that Vsl1p and Fsv1p are required for vacuolar protein transport and membrane fusion, and they function cooperatively with Pep12p in the same membrane-trafficking step.

  4. Inclusive radiative {psi}(2S) decays

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; Ecklund, K. M.; He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.

    2009-10-01

    Using e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data taken with the CLEO-c detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have investigated the direct photon spectrum in the decay {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}gg. We determine the ratio of the inclusive direct photon decay rate to that of the dominant three-gluon decay rate {psi}(2S){yields}ggg (R{sub {gamma}}{identical_to}{gamma}({gamma}gg)/{gamma}(ggg)) to be R{sub {gamma}}(z{sub {gamma}}>0.4)=0.070{+-}0.002{+-}0.019{+-}0.011, with z{sub {gamma}} defined as the scaled photon energy relative to the beam energy. The errors shown are statistical, systematic, and that due to the uncertainty in the input branching fractions used to extract the ratio, respectively.

  5. MAGI2/S-SCAM outside brain.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Shunta; Kodaka, Manami; Iwasa, Hiroaki; Hata, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinase with an inverted arrangement of protein-protein interaction domains (MAGI)2 (also called synaptic scaffolding molecule (S-SCAM), atrophin-1-interacting protein 1, activin receptor-interacting protein 1) is a scaffold protein that binds a wide variety of receptors, cell adhesion molecules and signalling molecules. It also interacts with other scaffold proteins and adaptors, and forms a protein network that supports cell junctions. As it is highly expressed in brain, the study on its roles in synaptic organization initially preceded. However, mounting evidence indicates that MAGI2/S-SCAM functions as a tumour suppressor and plays essential roles to maintain the integrity of cell structures in non-neuronal tissues. We review the articles regarding to MAGI2/S-SCAM outside brain and discuss future perspectives for the research of MAGI family proteins.

  6. 1D nanocrystals with precisely controlled dimensions, compositions, and architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xinchang; He, Yanjie; Jung, Jaehan; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-09-01

    The ability to synthesize a diverse spectrum of one-dimensional (1D) nanocrystals presents an enticing prospect for exploring nanoscale size- and shape-dependent properties. Here we report a general strategy to craft a variety of plain nanorods, core-shell nanorods, and nanotubes with precisely controlled dimensions and compositions by capitalizing on functional bottlebrush-like block copolymers with well-defined structures and narrow molecular weight distributions as nanoreactors. These cylindrical unimolecular nanoreactors enable a high degree of control over the size, shape, architecture, surface chemistry, and properties of 1D nanocrystals. We demonstrate the synthesis of metallic, ferroelectric, upconversion, semiconducting, and thermoelectric 1D nanocrystals, among others, as well as combinations thereof.

  7. The GIRAFFE Archive: 1D and 3D Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, F.; Jégouzo, I.; Tajahmady, F.; Normand, J.; Chilingarian, I.

    2013-10-01

    The GIRAFFE Archive (http://giraffe-archive.obspm.fr) contains the reduced spectra observed with the intermediate and high resolution multi-fiber spectrograph installed at VLT/UT2 (ESO). In its multi-object configuration and the different integral field unit configurations, GIRAFFE produces 1D spectra and 3D spectra. We present here the status of the archive and the different functionalities to select and download both 1D and 3D data products, as well as the present content. The two collections are available in the VO: the 1D spectra (summed in the case of integral field observations) and the 3D field observations. These latter products can be explored using the VO Paris Euro3D Client (http://voplus.obspm.fr/ chil/Euro3D).

  8. PC-1D installation manual and user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Basore, P.A.

    1991-05-01

    PC-1D is a software package for personal computers that uses finite-element analysis to solve the fully-coupled two-carrier semiconductor transport equations in one dimension. This program is particularly useful for analyzing the performance of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, but can be applied to any bipolar device whose carrier flows are primarily one-dimensional. This User's Guide provides the information necessary to install PC-1D, define a problem for solution, solve the problem, and examine the results. Example problems are presented which illustrate these steps. The physical models and numerical methods utilized are presented in detail. This document supports version 3.1 of PC-1D, which incorporates faster numerical algorithms with better convergence properties than previous versions of the program. 51 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Pitch-based pattern splitting for 1D layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Ryo; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Koji; Tsujita, Koichiro; Yaegashi, Hidetami; Oyama, Kenichi; Smayling, Michael C.; Axelrad, Valery

    2015-07-01

    The pattern splitting algorithm for 1D Gridded-Design-Rules layout (1D layout) for sub-10 nm node logic devices is shown. It is performed with integer linear programming (ILP) based on the conflict graph created from a grid map for each designated pitch. The relation between the number of times for patterning and the minimum pitch is shown systematically with a sample pattern of contact layer for each node. From the result, the number of times for patterning for 1D layout is fewer than that for conventional 2D layout. Moreover, an experimental result including SMO and total integrated process with hole repair technique is presented with the sample pattern of contact layer whose pattern density is relatively high among critical layers (fin, gate, local interconnect, contact, and metal).

  10. 1D nanocrystals with precisely controlled dimensions, compositions, and architectures.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xinchang; He, Yanjie; Jung, Jaehan; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-09-16

    The ability to synthesize a diverse spectrum of one-dimensional (1D) nanocrystals presents an enticing prospect for exploring nanoscale size- and shape-dependent properties. Here we report a general strategy to craft a variety of plain nanorods, core-shell nanorods, and nanotubes with precisely controlled dimensions and compositions by capitalizing on functional bottlebrush-like block copolymers with well-defined structures and narrow molecular weight distributions as nanoreactors. These cylindrical unimolecular nanoreactors enable a high degree of control over the size, shape, architecture, surface chemistry, and properties of 1D nanocrystals. We demonstrate the synthesis of metallic, ferroelectric, upconversion, semiconducting, and thermoelectric 1D nanocrystals, among others, as well as combinations thereof. PMID:27634531

  11. Flexible Photodetectors Based on 1D Inorganic Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Flexible photodetectors with excellent flexibility, high mechanical stability and good detectivity, have attracted great research interest in recent years. 1D inorganic nanostructures provide a number of opportunities and capabilities for use in flexible photodetectors as they have unique geometry, good transparency, outstanding mechanical flexibility, and excellent electronic/optoelectronic properties. This article offers a comprehensive review of several types of flexible photodetectors based on 1D nanostructures from the past ten years, including flexible ultraviolet, visible, and infrared photodetectors. High‐performance organic‐inorganic hybrid photodetectors, as well as devices with 1D nanowire (NW) arrays, are also reviewed. Finally, new concepts of flexible photodetectors including piezophototronic, stretchable and self‐powered photodetectors are examined to showcase the future research in this exciting field. PMID:27774404

  12. GIS-BASED 1-D DIFFUSIVE WAVE OVERLAND FLOW MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    KALYANAPU, ALFRED; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY N.; BURIAN, STEVEN J.

    2007-01-17

    This paper presents a GIS-based 1-d distributed overland flow model and summarizes an application to simulate a flood event. The model estimates infiltration using the Green-Ampt approach and routes excess rainfall using the 1-d diffusive wave approximation. The model was designed to use readily available topographic, soils, and land use/land cover data and rainfall predictions from a meteorological model. An assessment of model performance was performed for a small catchment and a large watershed, both in urban environments. Simulated runoff hydrographs were compared to observations for a selected set of validation events. Results confirmed the model provides reasonable predictions in a short period of time.

  13. Observation of Dynamical Fermionization in 1D Bose Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvania, Neel; Xia, Lin; Xu, Wei; Wilson, Joshua M.; Zundel, Laura A.; Rigol, Marcos; Weiss, David S.

    2016-05-01

    The momentum distribution of a harmonically trapped 1D Bose gases in the Tonks-Girardeau limit is expected to undergo dynamical fermionization. That is, after the harmonic trap is suddenly turned off, the momentum distribution steadily transforms into that of an ideal Fermi gas in the same initial trap. We measure 1D momentum distributions at variable times after such a quench, and observe the predicted dynamical fermionization. In addition to working in the strong coupling limit, we also perform the experiment with intermediate coupling, where theoretical calculations are more challenging.

  14. RNA binding protein Pub1p regulates glycerol production and stress tolerance by controlling Gpd1p activity during winemaking.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Helena; Sepúlveda, Ana; Picazo, Cecilia; Matallana, Emilia; Aranda, Agustín

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol is a key yeast metabolite in winemaking because it contributes to improve the organoleptic properties of wine. It is also a cellular protective molecule that enhances the tolerance of yeasts to osmotic stress and promotes longevity. Thus, its production increases by genetic manipulation, which is of biotechnological and basic interest. Glycerol is produced by diverting glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate through the action of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (coded by genes GPD1 and GPD2). Here, we demonstrate that RNA-binding protein Pub1p regulates glycerol production by controlling Gpd1p activity. Its deletion does not alter GPD1 mRNA levels, but protein levels and enzymatic activity increase, which explains the higher intracellular glycerol concentration and greater tolerance to osmotic stress of the pub1∆ mutant. PUB1 deletion also enhances the activity of nicotinamidase, a longevity-promoting enzyme. Both enzymatic activities are partially located in peroxisomes, and we detected peroxisome formation during wine fermentation. The role of Pub1p in life span control depends on nutrient conditions and is related with the TOR pathway, and a major connection between RNA metabolism and the nutrient signaling response is established.

  15. QI2S - Quick Image Interpretation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghmouchi, Jamin; Aviely, Peleg; Ginosar, Ran; Ober, Giovanna; Bischoff, Ole; Nadler, Ron; Guiser, David; Citroen, Meira; Freddi, Riccardo; Berekovic, Mladen

    2015-09-01

    The evolution of the Earth Observation mission will be driven by many factors, and the deveploment of new processing paradigms to facilitate data downlink, handling and storage will be a key factor. Next generation EO satellites will generate a great amount of data at a very high data rate, both radar and optical. Real-time onboard processing can be the solution to reduce data downlink and management on ground. Radiometric, geometric, and atmospheric corrections of EO data as well as material/object detection in addition to the well-known needs for image compression and signal processing can be performed directly on board and the aim of QI2S project is to demonstrate this. QI2S, a concept prototype system for novel onboard image processing and image interpretation which has been designed, developed and validated in the framework of an EU FP7 project, targets these needs and makes a significant step towards exceeding current roadmaps of leading space agencies for future payload processors. The QI2S system features multiple chip components of the RC64, a novel rad-hard 64-core signal processing chip, which targets DSP performance of 75 GMACs (16bit), 150 GOPS and 38 single precision GFLOPS while dissipating less than 10 Watts. It integrates advanced DSP cores with a multibank shared memory and a hardware scheduler, also supporting DDR2/3 memory and twelve 3.125 Gbps full duplex high-speed serial links using SpaceFibre and other protocols. The processor is being developed within the European FP7 Framework Program and will be qualified to the highest space standards.

  16. Formation mechanism and properties of CdS-Ag2S nanorod superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Demchenko, Denis O.; Robinson, Richard D.; Sadtler, Bryce; Erdonmez, Can K.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2008-08-11

    The mechanism of formation of recently fabricated CdS-Ag{sub 2}S nanorod superlattices is considered and their elastic properties are predicted theoretically based on experimental structural data. We consider different possible mechanisms for the spontaneous ordering observed in these 1D nanostructures, such as diffusion-limited growth and ordering due to epitaxial strain. A simplified model suggests that diffusion-limited growth partially contributes to the observed ordering, but cannot account for the full extent of the ordering alone. The elastic properties of bulk Ag{sub 2}S are predicted using a first principles method and are fed into a classical valence force field (VFF) model of the nanostructure. The VFF results show significant repulsion between Ag{sub 2}S segments, strongly suggesting that the interplay between the chemical interface energy and strain due to the lattice mismatch between the two materials drives the spontaneous pattern formation.

  17. Non-cooperative Brownian donkeys: A solvable 1D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez de Cisneros, B.; Reimann, P.; Parrondo, J. M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A paradigmatic 1D model for Brownian motion in a spatially symmetric, periodic system is tackled analytically. Upon application of an external static force F the system's response is an average current which is positive for F < 0 and negative for F > 0 (absolute negative mobility). Under suitable conditions, the system approaches 100% efficiency when working against the external force F.

  18. 1D design style implications for mask making and CEBL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayling, Michael C.

    2013-09-01

    At advanced nodes, CMOS logic is being designed in a highly regular design style because of the resolution limitations of optical lithography equipment. Logic and memory layouts using 1D Gridded Design Rules (GDR) have been demonstrated to nodes beyond 12nm.[1-4] Smaller nodes will require the same regular layout style but with multiple patterning for critical layers. One of the significant advantages of 1D GDR is the ease of splitting layouts into lines and cuts. A lines and cuts approach has been used to achieve good pattern fidelity and process margin to below 12nm.[4] Line scaling with excellent line-edge roughness (LER) has been demonstrated with self-aligned spacer processing.[5] This change in design style has important implications for mask making: • The complexity of the masks will be greatly reduced from what would be required for 2D designs with very complex OPC or inverse lithography corrections. • The number of masks will initially increase, as for conventional multiple patterning. But in the case of 1D design, there are future options for mask count reduction. • The line masks will remain simple, with little or no OPC, at pitches (1x) above 80nm. This provides an excellent opportunity for continual improvement of line CD and LER. The line pattern will be processed through a self-aligned pitch division sequence to divide pitch by 2 or by 4. • The cut masks can be done with "simple OPC" as demonstrated to beyond 12nm.[6] Multiple simple cut masks may be required at advanced nodes. "Coloring" has been demonstrated to below 12nm for two colors and to 8nm for three colors. • Cut/hole masks will eventually be replaced by e-beam direct write using complementary e-beam lithography (CEBL).[7-11] This transition is gated by the availability of multiple column e-beam systems with throughput adequate for high- volume manufacturing. A brief description of 1D and 2D design styles will be presented, followed by examples of 1D layouts. Mask complexity for 1

  19. MOLECULAR OXYGEN IN OORT CLOUD COMET 1P/HALLEY

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Dishoeck, E. F. van; Schwehm, G.

    2015-12-10

    Recently, the ROSINA mass spectrometer suite on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft discovered an abundant amount of molecular oxygen, O{sub 2}, in the coma of Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko of O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O = 3.80 ± 0.85%. It could be shown that O{sub 2} is indeed a parent species and that the derived abundances point to a primordial origin. Crucial questions are whether the O{sub 2} abundance is peculiar to comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko or Jupiter family comets in general, and also whether Oort cloud comets such as comet 1P/Halley contain similar amounts of molecular oxygen. We investigated mass spectra obtained by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer instrument during the flyby by the European Space Agency's Giotto probe of comet 1P/Halley. Our investigation indicates that a production rate of O{sub 2} of 3.7 ± 1.7% with respect to water is indeed compatible with the obtained Halley data and therefore that O{sub 2} might be a rather common and abundant parent species.

  20. Molecular Oxygen in Oort Cloud Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Schwehm, G.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the ROSINA mass spectrometer suite on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft discovered an abundant amount of molecular oxygen, O2, in the coma of Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko of O2/H2O = 3.80 ± 0.85%. It could be shown that O2 is indeed a parent species and that the derived abundances point to a primordial origin. Crucial questions are whether the O2 abundance is peculiar to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko or Jupiter family comets in general, and also whether Oort cloud comets such as comet 1P/Halley contain similar amounts of molecular oxygen. We investigated mass spectra obtained by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer instrument during the flyby by the European Space Agency's Giotto probe of comet 1P/Halley. Our investigation indicates that a production rate of O2 of 3.7 ± 1.7% with respect to water is indeed compatible with the obtained Halley data and therefore that O2 might be a rather common and abundant parent species.

  1. Gas relations in comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon

    Photographic and photoelectric observations of comet 1P/Halley's ionised gas coma from CO+ and neutral gas coma from CN were part of the Bochum Halley Monitoring Program, conducted at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, from February 17 to April 17, 1986. In this spectral range it is possible to see the continuum formation and expansion of plasma and neutral gas structures. To observe the morphology of these structures, 32 CO+ photos from comet 1P/Halley obtained by means of an interference filter have been analysed. The data were reduced to relative intensities, and those with proper calibrations were also converted to absolute intensities, expressed in terms of column densities. The relations between CO+ and CN in average column density values are 11.6 for a circular diaphragm with an average diameter (Φ) of 6.1 arcminutes which corresponds to a distance from the nucleus (ρ) equal to 6.3 × 104 km. These values are in perfect agreement with the data for short distances and small slit diameters. With the use of diaphragms with large diameters it is possible to get some information about the outer coma of the comet. At these distances, the CO+ column density changes only due to the geometrical dilution, because the CO+ parent molecules are already photoionised or photodissociated.

  2. S1P metabolism in cancer and other pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Leong, Weng In; Saba, Julie D

    2010-06-01

    Nearly two decades ago, the sphingolipid metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate was discovered to function as a lipid mediator and regulator of cell proliferation. Since that time, sphingosine 1-phosphate has been shown to mediate a diverse array of fundamental biological processes including cell proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, vascular maturation and lymphocyte trafficking. Sphingosine 1-phosphate acts primarily via signaling through five ubiquitously expressed G protein-coupled receptors. Intracellular sphingosine 1-phosphate molecules are transported extracellularly and gain access to cognate receptors for autocrine and paracrine signaling and for signaling at distant sites reached through blood and lymphatic circulation systems. Intracellular pools of sphingosine 1-phosphate available for signaling are tightly regulated primarily by three enzymes: sphinosine kinase, S1P lyase and S1P phosphatase. Alterations in sphingosine 1-phosphate as well as the enzymes involved in its synthesis and catabolism have been observed in many types of malignancy. These enzymes are being evaluated for their role in mediating cancer formation and progression, as well as their potential to serve as targets of anti-cancer therapeutics. In this review, the impact of sphingosine 1-phosphate, its cognate receptors, and the enzymes of sphingosine 1-phosphate metabolism on cell survival, apoptosis, autophagy, cellular transformation, invasion, angiogenesis and hypoxia in relation to cancer biology and treatment are discussed.

  3. Antitumor Effects of OSU-2S, a Non-immunosuppressive Analogue of FTY720, in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Hany A.; Chou, Chih-Chien; Berman-Booty, Lisa D.; Ma, Yihui; Hung, Jui-Hsiang; Wang, Dasheng; Kogure, Takayuki; Patel, Tushar; Terracciano, Luigi; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Byrd, John C.; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2011-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests the therapeutic potential of the immunosuppressive agent FTY720 (fingolimod) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Based on our previous finding that FTY720 mediates apoptosis in HCC cells by activating reactive oxygen species (ROS)-protein kinase (PK)Cδ signaling independent of effects on sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors, we embarked on the pharmacological exploitation of FTY720 to develop a non-immunosuppressive analogue with antitumor activity. This effort led to the development of OSU-2S, which exhibits higher potency than FTY720 in suppressing HCC cell growth through PKCδ activation. In contrast to FTY720, OSU-2S was not phosphorylated by sphingosine kinase (SphK)2 in vitro, and did not cause S1P1 receptor internalization in HCC cells or T lymphocyte homing in immunocompetent mice. Though devoid of S1P1 receptor activity, OSU-2S exhibited higher in vitro antiproliferative efficacy relative to FTY720 against HCC cells without cytotoxicity in normal hepatocytes. Several lines of pharmacological and molecular genetic evidence indicate that ROS-PKCδ-caspase-3 signaling underlies OSU-2S-mediated antitumor effects, and that differences in the antitumor activity between FTY720 and OSU-2S were attributable to SphK2-mediated phosphorylation of FTY720, which represents a metabolic inactivation of its antitumor activity. Finally, OSU-2S exhibited high in vivo potency in suppressing xenograft tumor growth in both ectopic and orthotopic models without overt toxicity. Conclusion: Using the molecular platform of FTY720, we developed OSU-2S, a novel PKCδ-targeted antitumor agent, which is devoid of S1P1 receptor activity and is highly effective in suppressing HCC tumor growth in vivo. These findings suggest that OSU-2S has clinical value in therapeutic strategies for HCC and warrants continued investigation in this regard. PMID:21391227

  4. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 signaling regulates receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) expression in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, Harunori; Kitano, Masayasu; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sato, Chieri; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto; Miyazawa, Keiji; Hla, Timothy; Sano, Hajime

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of S1P in MH7A cells was inhibited by specific Gi/Go inhibitors. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) signaling plays an important role in synovial cell proliferation and inflammatory gene expression by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synoviocytes. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of S1P/S1P1 signaling in the expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) in RA synoviocytes and CD4{sup +} T cells. We demonstrated MH7A cells, a human RA synovial cell line, and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Surprisingly, S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, S1P enhanced RANKL expression induced by stimulation with TNF-{alpha} in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. These effects of S1P in MH7A cells were inhibited by pretreatment with PTX, a specific Gi/Go inhibitor. These findings suggest that S1P/S1P1 signaling may play an important role in RANKL expression by MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling of RA synoviocytes is closely connected with synovial hyperplasia, inflammation, and RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RA. Thus, regulation of S1P/S1P1 signaling may become a novel therapeutic target for RA.

  5. Numerical simulations of heavily polluted fine-grained sediment remobilization using 1D, 1D+, and 2D channel schematization.

    PubMed

    Kaiglová, Jana; Langhammer, Jakub; Jiřinec, Petr; Janský, Bohumír; Chalupová, Dagmar

    2015-03-01

    This article used various hydrodynamic and sediment transport models to analyze the potential and the limits of different channel schematizations. The main aim was to select and evaluate the most suitable simulation method for fine-grained sediment remobilization assessment. Three types of channel schematization were selected to study the flow potential for remobilizing fine-grained sediment in artificially modified channels. Schematization with a 1D cross-sectional horizontal plan, a 1D+ approach, splitting the riverbed into different functional zones, and full 2D mesh, adopted in MIKE by the DHI modeling suite, was applied to the study. For the case study, a 55-km stretch of the Bílina River, in the Czech Republic, Central Europe, which has been heavily polluted by the chemical and coal mining industry since the mid-twentieth century, was selected. Long-term exposure to direct emissions of toxic pollutants including heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) resulted in deposits of pollutants in fine-grained sediments in the riverbed. Simulations, based on three hydrodynamic model schematizations, proved that for events not exceeding the extent of the riverbed profile, the 1D schematization can provide comparable results to a 2D model. The 1D+ schematization can improve accuracy while keeping the benefits of high-speed simulation and low requirements of input DEM data, but the method's suitability is limited by the channel properties. PMID:25687259

  6. Bottomonium spectroscopy and radiative transitions involving the χb J(1 P ,2 P ) states at BaBar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Roehrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We use (121 ±1 ) million Υ (3 S ) and (98 ±1 ) million Υ (2 S ) mesons recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider at SLAC to perform a study of radiative transitions involving the χb J(1 P ,2 P ) states in exclusive decays with μ+μ- γ γ final states. We reconstruct twelve channels in four cascades using two complementary methods. In the first we identify both signal photon candidates in the electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC), employ a calorimeter timing-based technique to reduce backgrounds, and determine branching-ratio products and fine mass splittings. These results include the best observational significance yet for the χb 0(2 P )→γ Υ (2 S ) and χb 0(1 P )→γ Υ (1 S ) transitions. In the second method, we identify one photon candidate in the EMC and one which has converted into an e+e- pair due to interaction with detector material, and we measure absolute product branching fractions. This method is particularly useful for measuring Υ (3 S )→γ χb 1 ,2(1 P ) decays. Additionally, we provide the most up-to-date derived branching fractions, matrix elements and mass splittings for χb transitions in the bottomonium system. Using a new technique, we also measure the two lowest-order spin-dependent coefficients in the nonrelativistic QCD Hamiltonian.

  7. Discovery of potent 3,5-diphenyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole sphingosine-1-phosphate-1 (S1P1) receptor agonists with exceptional selectivity against S1P2 and S1P3.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Chen, Weirong; Hale, Jeffrey J; Lynch, Christopher L; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol Ann; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Parent, Stephen A; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Forrest, Michael; Quackenbush, Elizabeth J; Wickham, L Alexandra; Vargas, Hugo; Evans, Rose M; Rosen, Hugh; Mandala, Suzanne

    2005-10-01

    A class of 3,5-diphenyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole based compounds have been identified as potent sphingosine-1-phosphate-1 (S1P1) receptor agonists with minimal affinity for the S1P2 and S1P3 receptor subtypes. Analogue 26 (S1P1 IC50 = 0.6 nM) has an excellent pharmacokinetics profile in the rat and dog and is efficacious in a rat skin transplant model, indicating that S1P3 receptor agonism is not a component of immunosuppressive efficacy.

  8. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E; O'Carroll, Simon J; Graham, E Scott

    2016-01-27

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

  9. 1-D Numerical Analysis of ABCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Richard

    1999-01-01

    ABCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engine into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Except for the heat source, the basic operation of the ABCC is similar to the basic operation of the RBCC engine. The ABCC is intended to have a higher specific impulse than the RBCC for single stage Earth to orbit vehicle. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in ABCC propulsion system. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model using conservation of mass, linear momentum, and energy equations that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic ABCC engine following a flight path. At specific points during the development of the 1-D numerical model a myriad of tests were performed to prove the program produced consistent, realistic numbers that follow compressible flow theory for various inlet conditions.

  10. Phase diagram of a bulk 1d lattice Coulomb gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démery, V.; Monsarrat, R.; Dean, D. S.; Podgornik, R.

    2016-01-01

    The exact solution, via transfer matrix, of the simple one-dimensional lattice Coulomb gas (1d LCG) model can reproduce peculiar features of ionic liquid capacitors, such as overscreening, layering, and camel- and bell-shaped capacitance curves. Using the same transfer matrix method, we now compute the bulk properties of the 1d LCG in the constant voltage ensemble. We unveil a phase diagram with rich structure exhibiting low-density disordered and high-density ordered phases, separated by a first-order phase transition at low temperature; the solid state at full packing can be ordered or not, depending on the temperature. This phase diagram, which is strikingly similar to its three-dimensional counterpart, also sheds light on the behaviour of the confined system.

  11. 1D Josephson quantum interference grids: diffraction patterns and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, M.; Badoni, D.; Corato, V.; Merlo, V.; Ottaviani, I.; Salina, G.; Cirillo, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Winkler, D.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the magnetic response of transmission lines with embedded Josephson junctions and thus generating a 1D underdamped array. The measured multi-junction interference patterns are compared with the theoretical predictions for Josephson supercurrent modulations when an external magnetic field couples both to the inter-junction loops and to the junctions themselves. The results provide a striking example of the analogy between Josephson phase modulation and 1D optical diffraction grid. The Fiske resonances in the current-voltage characteristics with voltage spacing {Φ0}≤ft(\\frac{{\\bar{c}}}{2L}\\right) , where L is the total physical length of the array, {Φ0} the magnetic flux quantum and \\bar{c} the speed of light in the transmission line, demonstrate that the discrete line supports stable dynamic patterns generated by the ac Josephson effect interacting with the cavity modes of the line.

  12. Morphodynamics and sediment tracers in 1-D (MAST-1D): 1-D sediment transport that includes exchange with an off-channel sediment reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, J. Wesley; Viparelli, Enrica; Piégay, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    Bed material transported in geomorphically active gravel bed rivers often has a local source at nearby eroding banks and ends up sequestered in bars not far downstream. However, most 1-D numerical models for gravel transport assume that gravel originates from and deposits on the channel bed. In this paper, we present a 1-D framework for simulating morphodynamic evolution of bed elevation and size distribution in a gravel-bed river that actively exchanges sediment with its floodplain, which is represented as an off-channel sediment reservoir. The model is based on the idea that sediment enters the channel at eroding banks whose elevation depends on total floodplain sediment storage and on the average elevation of the floodplain relative to the channel bed. Lateral erosion of these banks occurs at a specified rate that can represent either net channel migration or channel widening. Transfer of material out of the channel depends on a typical bar thickness and a specified lateral exchange rate due either to net channel migration or narrowing. The model is implemented using an object oriented framework that allows users to explore relationships between bank supply, bed structure, and lateral change rates. It is applied to a ∼50-km reach of the Ain River, France, that experienced significant reduction in sediment supply due to dam construction during the 20th century. Results are strongly sensitive to lateral exchange rates, showing that in this reach, the supply of sand and gravel at eroding banks and the sequestration of gravel in point bars can have strong influence on overall reach-scale sediment budgets.

  13. Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The current global energy problem can be attributed to insufficient fossil fuel supplies and excessive greenhouse gas emissions resulting from increasing fossil fuel consumption. The huge demand for clean energy potentially can be met by solar-to-electricity conversions. The large-scale use of solar energy is not occurring due to the high cost and inadequate efficiencies of existing solar cells. Nanostructured materials have offered new opportunities to design more efficient solar cells, particularly one-dimensional (1-D) nanomaterials for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. These 1-D nanostructures, including nanotubes, nanowires, and nanorods, offer significant opportunities to improve efficiencies of solar cells by facilitating photon absorption, electron transport, and electron collection; however, tremendous challenges must be conquered before the large-scale commercialization of such cells. This review specifically focuses on the use of 1-D nanostructures for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. Other nanostructured solar cells or solar cells based on bulk materials are not covered in this review. Major topics addressed include dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells, and p-n junction solar cells.

  14. Constructing 3D interaction maps from 1D epigenomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yun; Chen, Zhao; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Mengchi; Medovoy, David; Whitaker, John W.; Ding, Bo; Li, Nan; Zheng, Lina; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The human genome is tightly packaged into chromatin whose functional output depends on both one-dimensional (1D) local chromatin states and three-dimensional (3D) genome organization. Currently, chromatin modifications and 3D genome organization are measured by distinct assays. An emerging question is whether it is possible to deduce 3D interactions by integrative analysis of 1D epigenomic data and associate 3D contacts to functionality of the interacting loci. Here we present EpiTensor, an algorithm to identify 3D spatial associations within topologically associating domains (TADs) from 1D maps of histone modifications, chromatin accessibility and RNA-seq. We demonstrate that active promoter–promoter, promoter–enhancer and enhancer–enhancer associations identified by EpiTensor are highly concordant with those detected by Hi-C, ChIA-PET and eQTL analyses at 200 bp resolution. Moreover, EpiTensor has identified a set of interaction hotspots, characterized by higher chromatin and transcriptional activity as well as enriched TF and ncRNA binding across diverse cell types, which may be critical for stabilizing the local 3D interactions. PMID:26960733

  15. Constructing 3D interaction maps from 1D epigenomes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Chen, Zhao; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Mengchi; Medovoy, David; Whitaker, John W; Ding, Bo; Li, Nan; Zheng, Lina; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The human genome is tightly packaged into chromatin whose functional output depends on both one-dimensional (1D) local chromatin states and three-dimensional (3D) genome organization. Currently, chromatin modifications and 3D genome organization are measured by distinct assays. An emerging question is whether it is possible to deduce 3D interactions by integrative analysis of 1D epigenomic data and associate 3D contacts to functionality of the interacting loci. Here we present EpiTensor, an algorithm to identify 3D spatial associations within topologically associating domains (TADs) from 1D maps of histone modifications, chromatin accessibility and RNA-seq. We demonstrate that active promoter-promoter, promoter-enhancer and enhancer-enhancer associations identified by EpiTensor are highly concordant with those detected by Hi-C, ChIA-PET and eQTL analyses at 200 bp resolution. Moreover, EpiTensor has identified a set of interaction hotspots, characterized by higher chromatin and transcriptional activity as well as enriched TF and ncRNA binding across diverse cell types, which may be critical for stabilizing the local 3D interactions. PMID:26960733

  16. Development of 1D Liner Compression Code for IDL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, Akihisa; Slough, John; Pancotti, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    A 1D liner compression code is developed to model liner implosion dynamics in the Inductively Driven Liner Experiment (IDL) where FRC plasmoid is compressed via inductively-driven metal liners. The driver circuit, magnetic field, joule heating, and liner dynamics calculations are performed at each time step in sequence to couple these effects in the code. To obtain more realistic magnetic field results for a given drive coil geometry, 2D and 3D effects are incorporated into the 1D field calculation through use of correction factor table lookup approach. Commercial low-frequency electromagnetic fields solver, ANSYS Maxwell 3D, is used to solve the magnetic field profile for static liner condition at various liner radius in order to derive correction factors for the 1D field calculation in the code. The liner dynamics results from the code is verified to be in good agreement with the results from commercial explicit dynamics solver, ANSYS Explicit Dynamics, and previous liner experiment. The developed code is used to optimize the capacitor bank and driver coil design for better energy transfer and coupling. FRC gain calculations are also performed using the liner compression data from the code for the conceptual design of the reactor sized system for fusion energy gains.

  17. Molecular characterization of zebrafish Oatp1d1 (Slco1d1), a novel organic anion-transporting polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko; Fent, Karl; Smital, Tvrtko

    2013-11-22

    The organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP/Oatp) superfamily includes a group of polyspecific transporters that mediate transport of large amphipathic, mostly anionic molecules across cell membranes of eukaryotes. OATPs/Oatps are involved in the disposition and elimination of numerous physiological and foreign compounds. However, in non-mammalian species, the functional properties of Oatps remain unknown. We aimed to elucidate the role of Oatp1d1 in zebrafish to gain insights into the functional and structural evolution of the OATP1/Oatp1 superfamily. We show that diversification of the OATP1/Oatp1 family occurs after the emergence of jawed fish and that the OATP1A/Oatp1a and OATP1B/Oatp1b subfamilies appeared at the root of tetrapods. The Oatp1d subfamily emerged in teleosts and is absent in tetrapods. The zebrafish Oatp1d1 is similar to mammalian OATP1A/Oatp1a and OATP1B/Oatp1b members, with the main physiological role in transport and balance of steroid hormones. Oatp1d1 activity is dependent upon pH gradient, which could indicate bicarbonate exchange as a mode of transport. Our analysis of evolutionary conservation and structural properties revealed that (i) His-79 in intracellular loop 3 is conserved within OATP1/Oatp1 family and is crucial for the transport activity; (ii) N-glycosylation impacts membrane targeting and is conserved within the OATP1/Oatp1 family with Asn-122, Asn-133, Asn-499, and Asn-512 residues involved; (iii) the evolutionarily conserved cholesterol recognition interaction amino acid consensus motif is important for membrane localization; and (iv) Oatp1d1 is present in dimeric and possibly oligomeric form in the cell membrane. In conclusion, we describe the first detailed characterization of a new Oatp transporter in zebrafish, offering important insights into the functional evolution of the OATP1/Oatp1 family and the physiological role of Oatp1d1.

  18. The Rho1p exchange factor Rgf1p signals upstream from the Pmk1 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Patricia; Tajadura, Virginia; Sanchez, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe exchange factor Rgf1p specifically regulates Rho1p during polarized growth. Rgf1p activates the beta-glucan synthase (GS) complex containing the catalytic subunit Bgs4p and is involved in the activation of growth at the second end, a transition that requires actin reorganization. In this work, we investigated Rgf1p signaling and observed that Rgf1p acted upstream from the Pck2p-Pmk1p MAPK signaling pathway. We noted that Rgf1p and calcineurin play antagonistic roles in Cl(-) homeostasis; rgf1Delta cells showed the vic phenotype (viable in the presence of immunosuppressant and chlorine ion) and were unable to grow in the presence of high salt concentrations, both phenotypes being characteristic of knockouts of the MAPK components. In addition, mutations that perturb signaling through the MAPK pathway resulted in defective cell integrity (hypersensitivity to caspofungin and beta-glucanase). Rgf1p acts by positively regulating a subset of stimuli toward the Pmk1p-cell integrity pathway. After osmotic shock and cell wall damage HA-tagged Pmk1p was phosphorylated in wild-type cells but not in rgf1Delta cells. Finally, we provide evidence to show that Rgf1p regulates Pmk1p activation in a process that involves the activation of Rho1p and Pck2p, and we demonstrate that Rgf1p is unique in this signaling process, because Pmk1p activation was largely independent of the other two Rho1p-specific GEFs, Rgf2p and Rgf3p. PMID:19037094

  19. Selecting against S1P3 enhances the acute cardiovascular tolerability of 3-(N-benzyl)aminopropylphosphonic acid S1P receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Hale, Jeffrey J; Doherty, George; Toth, Leslie; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol Ann; Rosenbach, Mark; Milligan, James; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Forrest, Michael; Sun, Shu-Yu; West, Sarah; Xie, Huijuan; Nomura, Naomi; Rosen, Hugh; Mandala, Suzanne

    2004-07-01

    Structurally modified 3-(N-benzylamino)propylphosphonic acid S1P receptor agonists that maintain affinity for S1P1, and have decreased affinity for S1P3 are efficacious, but exhibit decreased acute cardiovascular toxicity in rodents than do nonselective agonists.

  20. Leptin Reduces the Expression and Increases the Phosphorylation of the Negative Regulators of GLUT4 Traffic TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 in Muscle of ob/ob Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sáinz, Neira; Rodríguez, Amaia; Catalán, Victoria; Becerril, Sara; Ramírez, Beatriz; Lancha, Andoni; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2012-01-01

    Leptin improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. Our goal was to determine whether proteins controlling GLUT4 traffic are altered by leptin deficiency and in vivo leptin administration in skeletal muscle of wild type and ob/ob mice. Leptin-deficient ob/ob mice were divided in three groups: control, leptin-treated (1 mg/kg/d) and leptin pair-fed ob/ob mice. Microarray analysis revealed that 1,546 and 1,127 genes were regulated by leptin deficiency and leptin treatment, respectively. Among these, we identified 24 genes involved in intracellular vesicle-mediated transport in ob/ob mice. TBC1 domain family, member 1 (Tbc1d1), a negative regulator of GLUT4 translocation, was up-regulated (P = 0.001) in ob/ob mice as compared to wild types. Importantly, leptin treatment reduced the transcript levels of Tbc1d1 (P<0.001) and Tbc1d4 (P = 0.004) in the leptin-treated ob/ob as compared to pair-fed ob/ob animals. In addition, phosphorylation levels of TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 were enhanced in leptin-treated ob/ob as compared to control ob/ob (P = 0.015 and P = 0.023, respectively) and pair-fed ob/ob (P = 0.036 and P = 0.034, respectively) mice. Despite similar GLUT4 protein expression in wild type and ob/ob groups a different immunolocalization of this protein was evidenced in muscle sections. Leptin treatment increased GLUT4 immunoreactivity in gastrocnemius and extensor digitorum longus sections of leptin-treated ob/ob mice. Moreover, GLUT4 protein detected in immunoprecipitates from TBC1D4 was reduced by leptin replacement compared to control ob/ob (P = 0.013) and pair-fed ob/ob (P = 0.037) mice. Our findings suggest that leptin enhances the intracellular GLUT4 transport in skeletal muscle of ob/ob animals by reducing the expression and activity of the negative regulators of GLUT4 traffic TBC1D1 and TBC1D4. PMID:22253718

  1. Prediction of {sup 1}P Rydberg energy levels of beryllium based on calculations with explicitly correlated Gaussians

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-01-14

    Benchmark variational calculations are performed for the seven lowest 1s{sup 2}2s np ({sup 1}P), n = 2…8, states of the beryllium atom. The calculations explicitly include the effect of finite mass of {sup 9}Be nucleus and account perturbatively for the mass-velocity, Darwin, and spin-spin relativistic corrections. The wave functions of the states are expanded in terms of all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. Basis sets of up to 12 500 optimized Gaussians are used. The maximum discrepancy between the calculated nonrelativistic and experimental energies of 1s{sup 2}2s np ({sup 1}P) →1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2} ({sup 1}S) transition is about 12 cm{sup −1}. The inclusion of the relativistic corrections reduces the discrepancy to bellow 0.8 cm{sup −1}.

  2. Search for {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}(2S) via fully reconstructed {eta}{sub c}(2S) decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Gong, D. T.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Poling, R.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tan, B. J. Y.; Tomaradze, A.; Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.

    2010-03-01

    We report a search for the decay {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}(2S) in a sample of 25.9x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events collected with the CLEO-c detector. No signals are observed in any of the 11 exclusive {eta}{sub c}(2S) decay modes studied, or in their sum. Product branching fraction upper limits are determined as a function of {Gamma}[{eta}{sub c}(2S)] for the 11 individual modes.

  3. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3–4 compared to those with 0–2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target. PMID:27562371

  4. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3-4 compared to those with 0-2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target. PMID:27562371

  5. Involvement of sphingosine-1-phosphate and S1P1 in angiogenesis: analyses using a new S1P1 antagonist of non-sphingosine-1-phosphate analog.

    PubMed

    Yonesu, Kiyoaki; Kawase, Yumi; Inoue, Tatsuya; Takagi, Nana; Tsuchida, Jun; Takuwa, Yoh; Kumakura, Seiichiro; Nara, Futoshi

    2009-03-15

    Chemical lead 2 (CL2) is the first non-sphingosine-1-phosphate (Sph-1-P) analog type antagonist of endothelial differentiation gene-1 (Edg-1/S1P(1)), which is a member of the Sph-1-P receptor family. CL2 inhibits [(3)H]Sph-1-P/S1P(1) binding and shows concentration-dependent inhibition activity against both intracellular cAMP concentration decrease and cell invasion induced by the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway. It also inhibits normal tube formation in an angiogenesis culture model, indicating that CL2 has anti-angiogenesis activity. This compound improved the disease conditions in two angiogenic models in vivo. It significantly inhibited angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor in a rabbit cornea model as well as the swelling of mouse feet in an anti-type II collagen antibody-induced arthritis model. These results indicate that the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway would have an important role in disease-related angiogenesis, especially in the processes of migration/invasion and tube formation. In addition, CL2 would be a powerful tool for the pharmacological study of the mechanisms of the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway in rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes retinopathy, and solid tumor growth processes. PMID:19150609

  6. Induction of intranuclear membranes by overproduction of Opi1p and Scs2p, regulators for yeast phospholipid biosynthesis, suggests a mechanism for Opi1p nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Miki; Oshima, Ayaka; Noguchi, Tetsuko; Kagiwada, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the expression of phospholipid biosynthetic genes is suppressed by the Opi1p negative regulator. Opi1p enters into the nucleoplasm from the nuclear membrane to suppress the gene expression under repressing conditions. The binding of Opi1p to the nuclear membrane requires an integral membrane protein, Scs2p and phosphatidic acid (PA). Although it is demonstrated that the association of Opi1p with membranes is affected by PA levels, how Opi1p dissociates from Scs2p is unknown. Here, we found that fluorescently labelled Opi1p accumulated on a perinuclear region in an Scs2p-dependent manner. Electron microscopic analyses indicated that the perinuclear region consists of intranuclear membranes, which may be formed by the invagination of the nuclear membrane due to the accumulation of Opi1p and Scs2p in a restricted area. As expected, localization of Opi1p and Scs2p in the intranuclear membranes was detected by immunoelectron microscopy. Biochemical analysis showed that Opi1p recovered in the membrane fraction was detergent insoluble while Scs2p was soluble, implying that Opi1p behaves differently from Scs2p in the fraction. We hypothesize that Opi1p dissociates from Scs2p after targeting to the nuclear membrane, making it possible to be released from the membrane quickly when PA levels decrease. PMID:26590299

  7. Conical-intersection quantum dynamics of OH(A2Σ+) + H(2S) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamallo, Pablo; Akpinar, Sinan; Defazio, Paolo; Petrongolo, Carlo

    2013-09-01

    We present the conical-intersection quantum dynamics of the nonreactive quenching (NQ) OH(A2Σ+) + H'(2S) → OH(X2Π) + H'(2S), exchange (X) OH(A2Σ+) + H'(2S) → OH'(A2Σ+) + H(2S), exchange-quenching (XQ) OH(A2Σ+) + H'(2S) → OH'(X2Π) + H(2S), and reaction (R) OH(A2Σ+) + H'(2S) → O(1D) + H2( {Xsideset{1}{g+}{Σ}}) collisions. We obtain initial-state-resolved reaction probabilities, cross sections, and rate constants by considering OH in the ground vibrational state and in the rotational levels j0 = 0, 1, 2, and 5. Coupled-channel real wavepackets (WPs) on the tilde Xsideset{1}{^'{A} and tilde Bsideset{1}{^'{A} coupled electronic states are propagated by using the Dobbyn and Knowles diabatic potential surfaces and coupling [A. J. Dobbyn and P. J. Knowles, Mol. Phys. 91, 1107 (1997), 10.1080/002689797170842 and A. J. Dobbyn and P. J. Knowles, Faraday Discuss. 110, 207 (1998)], 10.1039/FD110207, and performing asymptotic or flux analysis. NQ is the preferred product channel, followed by XQ, R, and X. Moreover, the nonadiabatic quenching processes account for more than 80% of the total rate constants. WP snapshots show a reaction mechanism in good agreement with reaction probabilities. NQ, XQ, and R cross sections, and NQ rate constants decrease with the collision energy and j0, whereas the X reactivity increases, and XQ and R rates are nearly constant with j0. In general, quantum rate constants are smaller than experimental or quasiclassical data.

  8. Extended-Range Ultrarefractive 1D Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal has been made to exploit the special wavelength-dispersive characteristics of devices of the type described in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms (NPO-30232) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 10a. A photonic crystal is an optical component that has a periodic structure comprising two dielectric materials with high dielectric contrast (e.g., a semiconductor and air), with geometrical feature sizes comparable to or smaller than light wavelengths of interest. Experimental superprisms have been realized as photonic crystals having three-dimensional (3D) structures comprising regions of amorphous Si alternating with regions of SiO2, fabricated in a complex process that included sputtering. A photonic crystal of the type to be exploited according to the present proposal is said to be one-dimensional (1D) because its contrasting dielectric materials would be stacked in parallel planar layers; in other words, there would be spatial periodicity in one dimension only. The processes of designing and fabricating 1D photonic crystal superprisms would be simpler and, hence, would cost less than do those for 3D photonic crystal superprisms. As in 3D structures, 1D photonic crystals may be used in applications such as wavelength-division multiplexing. In the extended-range configuration, it is also suitable for spectrometry applications. As an engineered structure or artificially engineered material, a photonic crystal can exhibit optical properties not commonly found in natural substances. Prior research had revealed several classes of photonic crystal structures for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden in certain frequency ranges, denoted photonic bandgaps. It had also been found that in narrow frequency bands just outside the photonic bandgaps, the angular wavelength dispersion of electromagnetic waves propagating in photonic crystal superprisms is much stronger than is the angular wavelength dispersion obtained

  9. Non-linearity in Bayesian 1-D magnetotelluric inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rongwen; Dosso, Stan E.; Liu, Jianxin; Dettmer, Jan; Tong, Xiaozhong

    2011-05-01

    This paper applies a Bayesian approach to examine non-linearity for the 1-D magnetotelluric (MT) inverse problem. In a Bayesian formulation the posterior probability density (PPD), which combines data and prior information, is interpreted in terms of parameter estimates and uncertainties, which requires optimizing and integrating the PPD. Much work on 1-D MT inversion has been based on (approximate) linearized solutions, but more recently fully non-linear (numerical) approaches have been applied. This paper directly compares results of linearized and non-linear uncertainty estimation for 1-D MT inversion; to do so, advanced methods for both approaches are applied. In the non-linear formulation used here, numerical optimization is carried out using an adaptive-hybrid algorithm. Numerical integration applies Metropolis-Hastings sampling, rotated to a principal-component parameter space for efficient sampling of correlated parameters, and employing non-unity sampling temperatures to ensure global sampling. Since appropriate model parametrizations are generally not known a priori, both under- and overparametrized approaches are considered. For underparametrization, the Bayesian information criterion is applied to determine the number of layers consistent with the resolving power of the data. For overparametrization, prior information is included which favours simple structure in a manner similar to regularized inversion. The data variance and/or trade-off parameter regulating data and prior information are treated in several ways, including applying fixed optimal estimates (an empirical Bayesian approach) or including them as hyperparameters in the sampling (hierarchical Bayesian). The latter approach has the benefit of accounting for the uncertainty in the hyperparameters in estimating model parameter uncertainties. Non-linear and linearized inversion results are compared for synthetic test cases and for the measured COPROD1 MT data by considering marginal probability

  10. Viscous behavior in a quasi-1D fractal cluster glass.

    PubMed

    Etzkorn, S J; Hibbs, Wendy; Miller, Joel S; Epstein, A J

    2002-11-11

    The spin glass transition of a quasi-1D organic-based magnet ([MnTPP][TCNE]) is explored using both ac and dc measurements. A scaling analysis of the ac susceptibility shows a spin glass transition near 4 K, with a viscous decay of the thermoremanent magnetization recorded above 4 K. We propose an extension to a fractal cluster model of spin glasses that determines the dimension of the spin clusters (D) ranging from approximately 0.8 to over 1.5 as the glass transition is approached. Long-range dipolar interactions are suggested as the origin of this low value for the apparent lower critical dimension.

  11. Practical variational tomography for critical 1D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Yeon; Landon-Cardinal, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    We further investigate a recently introduced efficient quantum state reconstruction procedure targeted to states well-approximated by the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA). First, we introduce an improved optimization scheme that can be easily generalized for MERA states with larger bond dimension. Second, we provide a detailed analysis of the error propagation and quantify how it affects the distance between the experimental state and the reconstructed state. Third, we explain how to bound this distance using local data, providing an efficient scalable certification method. Fourth, we examine the performance of MERA tomography on the ground states of several 1D critical models.

  12. Structural stability of a 1D compressible viscoelastic fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Xiaokai; Yong, Wen-An

    2016-07-01

    This paper is concerned with a compressible viscoelastic fluid model proposed by Öttinger. Although the model has a convex entropy, the Hessian matrix of the entropy does not symmetrize the system of first-order partial differential equations due to the non-conservative terms in the constitutive equation. We show that the corresponding 1D model is symmetrizable hyperbolic and dissipative and satisfies the Kawashima condition. Based on these, we prove the global existence of smooth solutions near equilibrium and justify the compatibility of the model with the Navier-Stokes equations.

  13. Nonlocal Order Parameters for the 1D Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montorsi, Arianna; Roncaglia, Marco

    2012-12-01

    We characterize the Mott-insulator and Luther-Emery phases of the 1D Hubbard model through correlators that measure the parity of spin and charge strings along the chain. These nonlocal quantities order in the corresponding gapped phases and vanish at the critical point Uc=0, thus configuring as hidden order parameters. The Mott insulator consists of bound doublon-holon pairs, which in the Luther-Emery phase turn into electron pairs with opposite spins, both unbinding at Uc. The behavior of the parity correlators is captured by an effective free spinless fermion model.

  14. Deconvolution/identification techniques for 1-D transient signals

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.M.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses a variety of nonparametric deconvolution and identification techniques that we have developed for application to 1-D transient signal problems. These methods are time-domain techniques that use direct methods for matrix inversion. Therefore, they are not appropriate for large data'' problems. These techniques involve various regularization methods and permit the use of certain kinds of a priori information in estimating the unknown. These techniques have been implemented in a package using standard FORTRAN that should make the package readily transportable to most computers. This paper is also meant to be an instruction manual for the package. 25 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Coherent thermal conductance of 1-D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschikin, Maria; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age

    2012-10-01

    We present an exact calculation of coherent thermal conductance in 1-D multilayer photonic crystals using the S-matrix method. In particular, we study the thermal conductance in a bilayer structure of Si/vacuum or Al2O3/vacuum slabs by means of the exact radiative heat flux expression. Based on the results obtained for the Al2O3/vacuum structure we show by comparison with previous works that the material losses and (localized) surface modes supported by the inner layers play a fundamental role and cannot be omitted in the definition of thermal conductance. Our results could have significant implications in the conception of efficient thermal barriers.

  16. The Photometric lightcurve of Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bair, Allison N.; Schleicher, David G.

    2014-11-01

    Comet 1P/Halley is considered an important object for a number of reasons. Not only is it the first-identified and brightest periodic comet, being the only periodic comet visible to the naked eye at every apparition, but in 1986 Halley became the first comet to be imaged by fly-by spacecraft. The NASA-funded International Halley Watch (IHW) directly supported the spacecraft by providing narrowband filters for groundbased photometric observations, and until the arrival of Hale-Bopp (1995 O1), Halley was the subject of the largest groundbased observational campaign in history. Following considerable controversy regarding its rotation period, it was eventually determined to be in complex rotation -- the first comet to be so identified. While the overall brightness variations of the coma repeated with a period of about 7.4 days, the detailed period and shape of the lightcurve constantly evolved. The determination of the specific characteristics of each of the two components of its non-principal axis rotational state has remained elusive.To resolve this situation we have now incorporated all of the narrowband photometry, taken by 21 telescopes from around the world and submitted to the IHW archive, to create the most complete homogeneous lightcurve possible. Using measurements of three gas species and the dust, the lightcurve was investigated and found to alternate between a double- and triple-peaked shape, with no single feature being present throughout the entire duration of our dataset (316 days). The apparent period as a function of time was extracted and seen to vary in a step-wise manner between 7.27 and 7.60 days. Taken together, these results were used to produce a synthetic lightcurve revealing Halley's behavior even when no data were available. Details of this and other results, to be used to constrain future detailed modeling, will be presented. This research is supported by NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program.

  17. A simple quasi-1D model of Fibonacci anyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasen, David; Mong, Roger; Clarke, David; Alicea, Jason; Fendley, Paul

    2015-03-01

    There exists various ways of understanding the topological properties of Ising anyons--from simple free-fermion toy models to formal topological quantum field theory. For other types of anyons simple toy models rarely exist; their properties have to be obtained using formal self-consistency relations. We explore a family of gapped 1D local bosonic models that in a certain limit become trivial to solve and provide an intuitive picture for Fibonacci anyons. One can interpret this model as a quasi-1D wire that forms the building block of a 2D topological phase with Fibonacci anyons. With this interpretation all topological properties of the Fibonacci anyons become manifest including ground state degeneracy and braid relations. We conjecture that the structure of the model is protected by an emergent symmetry analogous to fermion parity. 1) NSF Grant DMR-1341822 2) Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, an NSF physics frontier center with support from the Moore Foundation. 3) NSERC-PGSD.

  18. A 1D analysis of two high order MOC methods

    SciTech Connect

    Everson, M. S.; Forget, B.

    2012-07-01

    The work presented here provides two different methods for evaluating angular fluxes along long characteristics. One is based off a projection of the 1D transport equation onto a complete set of Legendre polynomials, while the other uses the 1D integral transport equation to evaluate the angular flux values at specific points along each track passing through a cell. The Moment Long Characteristic (M-LC) method is shown to provide 2(P+1) spatial convergence and significant gains in accuracy with the addition of only a few spatial degrees of freedom. The M-LC method, though, is shown to be ill-conditioned at very high order and for optically thin geometries. The Point Long Characteristic (P-LC) method, while less accurate, significantly improves stability to problems with optically thin cells. The P-LC method is also more flexible, allowing for extra angular flux evaluations along a given track to give a more accurate representation of the shape along each track. This is at the expense of increasing the degrees of freedom of the system, though, and requires an increase in memory storage. This work concludes that both may be used simultaneously within the same geometry to provide the best mix of accuracy and stability possible. (authors)

  19. Engineered atom-light interactions in 1D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael J.; Hung, Chen-Lung; Yu, Su-Peng; Goban, Akihisa; Muniz, Juan A.; Hood, Jonathan D.; Norte, Richard; McClung, Andrew C.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Lee, Jae Hoon; Peng, Lucas; Painter, Oskar; Kimble, H. Jeff

    2014-05-01

    Nano- and microscale optical systems offer efficient and scalable quantum interfaces through enhanced atom-field coupling in both resonators and continuous waveguides. Beyond these conventional topologies, new opportunities emerge from the integration of ultracold atomic systems with nanoscale photonic crystals. One-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides can be engineered for both stable trapping configurations and strong atom-photon interactions, enabling novel cavity QED and quantum many-body systems, as well as distributed quantum networks. We present the experimental realization of such a nanophotonic quantum interface based on a nanoscale photonic crystal waveguide, demonstrating a fractional waveguide coupling of Γ1 D /Γ' of 0 . 32 +/- 0 . 08 , where Γ1 D (Γ') is the atomic emission rate into the guided (all other) mode(s). We also discuss progress towards intra-waveguide trapping of ultracold Cs. This work was supported by the IQIM, an NSF Physics Frontiers Center with support from the Moore Foundation, the DARPA ORCHID program, the AFOSR QuMPASS MURI, the DoD NSSEFF program, NSF, and the Kavli Nanoscience Institute (KNI) at Caltech.

  20. Htm1p-Pdi1p is a folding-sensitive mannosidase that marks N-glycoproteins for ER-associated protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Chang; Fujimori, Danica Galonić; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2016-07-12

    Our understanding of how the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) machinery efficiently targets terminally misfolded proteins while avoiding the misidentification of nascent polypeptides and correctly folded proteins is limited. For luminal N-glycoproteins, demannosylation of their N-glycan to expose a terminal α1,6-linked mannose is necessary for their degradation via ERAD, but whether this modification is specific to misfolded proteins is unknown. Here we report that the complex of the mannosidase Htm1p and the protein disulfide isomerase Pdi1p (Htm1p-Pdi1p) acts as a folding-sensitive mannosidase for catalyzing this first committed step in Saccharomyces cerevisiae We reconstitute this step in vitro with Htm1p-Pdi1p and model glycoprotein substrates whose structural states we can manipulate. We find that Htm1p-Pdi1p is a glycoprotein-specific mannosidase that preferentially targets nonnative glycoproteins trapped in partially structured states. As such, Htm1p-Pdi1p is suited to act as a licensing factor that monitors folding in the ER lumen and preferentially commits glycoproteins trapped in partially structured states for degradation. PMID:27357682

  1. The ρ(1S, 2S), ψ(1S, 2S), Υ(1S, 2S) and ψ t (1S, 2S) Mesons in a Double Pole QCD Sum Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maior de Sousa, M. S.; da Silva, R. Rodrigues

    2016-09-01

    We use the method of double pole QCD sum rule, which is basically a fit with two exponentials of the correlation function, where we can extract the masses and decay constants of mesons as a function of the Borel mass. We apply this method to study the mesons: ρ(1S,2S), ψ(1S,2S), Υ(1S,2S), and ψ t (1S,2S). We also present predictions for the toponiuns masses ψ t (1S,2S) of m(1S)=357 GeV and m(2S)=374 GeV.

  2. Full pharmacological efficacy of a novel S1P1 agonist that does not require S1P-like head-group interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J.; Jo, Euijung; Sanna, M. Germana; Brown, Steven; Leaf, Nora; Marsolais, David; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Cameron, Michael; Guerrero, Miguel; Roberts, Edward; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for interactions of zwitterionic phosphate and amine groups in Sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) to conserved R and E residues present at the extracellular face of transmembrane-3 (TM3) of S1P receptors. The contribution of R120 and E121 for high affinity ligand-receptor interactions is essential, as single-point R120A or E121A S1P1 mutants neither bind S1P nor transduce S1P function. Because S1P receptors are therapeutically interesting, identifying potent selective agonists with different binding modes and in vivo efficacy is of pharmacological importance. Here we describe a modestly water-soluble highly-selective S1P1 agonist (CYM-5442) that does not require R120 or E121 residues for activating S1P1-dependent p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation, which defines a new hydrophobic pocket in S1P1. CYM-5442 is a full agonist in vitro for S1P1 internalization, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Importantly, CYM-5442 was a full agonist for induction and maintenance of S1P1-dependent lymphopenia, decreasing B-lymphocytes by 65% and T-lymphocytes by 85% of vehicle. Induction of CYM-5442 lymphopenia was dose and time-dependent, requiring serum concentrations in the 50 nM range. In vitro measures of S1P1 activation by CYM-5442 were non-competitively inhibited by a specific S1P1 antagonist (W146), competitive for S1P, FTY720-P and SEW2871. In addition, lymphopenia by CYM-5442 was reversed by W146 administration or upon pharmacokinetic agonist clearance. Pharmacokinetics in mice also indicated that CYM-5442 partitions significantly in central nervous tissue. These data show that CYM-5442 activates S1P1-dependent pathways in vitro and to levels of full efficacy in vivo through a hydrophobic pocket, separable from the orthosteric site of S1P binding that is headgroup dependent. PMID:18708635

  3. Ligand-binding pocket shape differences between S1P1 and S1P3 determine efficiency of chemical probe identification by uHTS

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, Stephan C.; Brown, Steven J.; Cabrera, Pedro Gonzales; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Jo, Euijung; Chase, Peter; Spicer, Tim; Hodder, Peter; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor system to better understand why certain molecular targets within a closely related family are much more tractable when identifying compelling chemical leads. Five medically important G protein-coupled receptors for S1P regulate heart rate, coronary artery caliber, endothelial barrier integrity, and lymphocyte trafficking. Selective S1P receptor agonist probes would be of great utility to study receptor subtype-specific function. Through systematic screening of the same libraries, we identified novel selective agonists chemotypes for each of the S1P1 and S1P3 receptors. uHTS for S1P1 was more effective than for S1P3, with many selective, low nanomolar hits of proven mechanism emerging for. Receptor structure modeling and ligand docking reveal differences between the receptor binding pockets, which are the basis for sub-type selectivity. Novel selective agonists interact primarily in the hydrophobic pocket of the receptor in the absence of head-group interactions. Chemistry-space and shape-based analysis of the screening libraries in combination with the binding models explain the observed differential hit rates and enhanced efficiency for lead discovery for S1P1 vs. S1P3 in this closely related receptor family. PMID:18590333

  4. Activation of the Hog1p kinase in Isc1p-deficient yeast cells is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress sensitivity and premature aging.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, António Daniel; Graça, João; Mendes, Vanda; Chaves, Susana Rodrigues; Amorim, Maria Amélia; Mendes, Marta Vaz; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Costa, Vítor

    2012-05-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Isc1p, an orthologue of mammalian neutral sphingomyelinase 2, plays a key role in mitochondrial function, oxidative stress resistance and chronological lifespan. Isc1p functions upstream of the ceramide-activated protein phosphatase Sit4p through the modulation of ceramide levels. Here, we show that both ceramide and loss of Isc1p lead to the activation of Hog1p, the MAPK of the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway that is functionally related to mammalian p38 and JNK. The hydrogen peroxide sensitivity and premature aging of isc1Δ cells was partially suppressed by HOG1 deletion. Notably, Hog1p activation mediated the mitochondrial dysfunction and catalase A deficiency associated with oxidative stress sensitivity and premature aging of isc1Δ cells. Downstream of Hog1p, Isc1p deficiency activated the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway. Deletion of the SLT2 gene, which encodes for the MAPK of the CWI pathway, was lethal in isc1Δ cells and this mutant strain was hypersensitive to cell wall stress. However, the phenotypes of isc1Δ cells were not associated with cell wall defects. Our findings support a role for Hog1p in the regulation of mitochondrial function and suggest that constitutive activation of Hog1p is deleterious for isc1Δ cells under oxidative stress conditions and during chronological aging. PMID:22445853

  5. Axion string dynamics I: 2+1D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Leesa M.; Moore, Guy D.

    2016-05-01

    If the axion exists and if the initial axion field value is uncorrelated at causally disconnected points, then it should be possible to predict the efficiency of cosmological axion production, relating the axionic dark matter density to the axion mass. The main obstacle to making this prediction is correctly treating the axion string cores. We develop a new algorithm for treating the axionic string cores correctly in 2+1 dimensions. When the axionic string cores are given their full physical string tension, axion production is about twice as efficient as in previous simulations. We argue that the string network in 2+1 dimensions should behave very differently than in 3+1 dimensions, so this result cannot be simply carried over to the physical case. We outline how to extend our method to 3+1D axion string dynamics.

  6. 1D-transport properties of single superconducting lead nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michotte, S.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, S.; Piraux, L.

    2003-09-01

    We report on the transport properties of single superconducting lead nanowires grown by an electrodeposition technique, embedded in a nanoporous track-etched polymer membrane. The nanowires are granular, have uniform diameter of ∼40 nm and a very large aspect ratio (∼500). The diameter of the nanowire is small enough to ensure a 1D superconducting regime in a wide temperature range below Tc. The non-zero resistance in the superconducting state and its variation caused by fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter were measured versus temperature, magnetic field, and applied DC current (or voltage). The current induced breakdowns in the V- I characteristics may be explained by the formation of phase slip centers. Moreover, DC voltage driven measurements reveal the existence of a new S-shape behavior near the formation of these phase slip centers.

  7. Microlens Masses from 1-D Parallaxes and Heliocentric Proper Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    One-dimensional (1-D) microlens parallaxes can be combined with heliocentric lens-source relative proper motion measurements to derive the lens mass and distance, as suggested by Ghosh et al. (2004). Here I present the first mathematical anlysis of this procedure, which I show can be represented as a quadratic equation. Hence, it is formally subject to a two-fold degeneracy. I show that this degeneracy can be broken in many cases using the relatively crude 2-D parallax information that is often available for microlensing events. I also develop an explicit formula for the region of parameter space where it is more difficult to break this degeneracy. Although no mass/distance measurements have yet been made using this technique, it is likely to become quite common over the next decade.

  8. Quadratic Finite Element Method for 1D Deterministic Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tolar, Jr., D R; Ferguson, J M

    2004-01-06

    In the discrete ordinates, or SN, numerical solution of the transport equation, both the spatial ({und r}) and angular ({und {Omega}}) dependences on the angular flux {psi}{und r},{und {Omega}}are modeled discretely. While significant effort has been devoted toward improving the spatial discretization of the angular flux, we focus on improving the angular discretization of {psi}{und r},{und {Omega}}. Specifically, we employ a Petrov-Galerkin quadratic finite element approximation for the differencing of the angular variable ({mu}) in developing the one-dimensional (1D) spherical geometry S{sub N} equations. We develop an algorithm that shows faster convergence with angular resolution than conventional S{sub N} algorithms.

  9. Effective theory of black holes in the 1/D expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emparan, Roberto; Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Ryotaku; Tanabe, Kentaro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2015-06-01

    The gravitational field of a black hole is strongly localized near its horizon when the number of dimensions D is very large. In this limit, we can effectively replace the black hole with a surface in a background geometry (e.g. Minkowski or Anti-deSitter space). The Einstein equations determine the effective equations that this `black hole surface' (or membrane) must satisfy. We obtain them up to next-to-leading order in 1/ D for static black holes of the Einstein-(A)dS theory. To leading order, and also to next order in Minkowski backgrounds, the equations of the effective theory are the same as soap-film equations, possibly up to a redshift factor. In particular, the Schwarzschild black hole is recovered as a spherical soap bubble. Less trivially, we find solutions for `black droplets', i.e. black holes localized at the boundary of AdS, and for non-uniform black strings.

  10. Connected components of irreducible maps and 1D quantum phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szehr, Oleg; Wolf, Michael M.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate elementary topological properties of sets of completely positive (CP) maps that arise in quantum Perron-Frobenius theory. We prove that the set of primitive CP maps of fixed Kraus rank is path-connected and we provide a complete classification of the connected components of irreducible CP maps at given Kraus rank and fixed peripheral spectrum in terms of a multiplicity index. These findings are then applied to analyse 1D quantum phases by studying equivalence classes of translational invariant matrix product states that correspond to the connected components of the respective CP maps. Our results extend the previously obtained picture in that they do not require blocking of physical sites, they lead to analytic paths, and they allow us to decompose into ergodic components and to study the breaking of translational symmetry.

  11. Glycolipid antigen processing for presentation by CD1d molecules.

    PubMed

    Prigozy, T I; Naidenko, O; Qasba, P; Elewaut, D; Brossay, L; Khurana, A; Natori, T; Koezuka, Y; Kulkarni, A; Kronenberg, M

    2001-01-26

    The requirement for processing glycolipid antigens in T cell recognition was examined with mouse CD1d-mediated responses to glycosphingolipids (GSLs). Although some disaccharide GSL antigens can be recognized without processing, the responses to three other antigens, including the disaccharide GSL Gal(alpha1-->2)GalCer (Gal, galactose; GalCer, galactosylceramide), required removal of the terminal sugars to permit interaction with the T cell receptor. A lysosomal enzyme, alpha-galactosidase A, was responsible for the processing of Gal(alpha1-->2)GalCer to generate the antigenic monosaccharide epitope. These data demonstrate a carbohydrate antigen processing system analogous to that used for peptides and an ability of T cells to recognize processed fragments of complex glycolipids.

  12. A Prokaryotic S1P Lyase Degrades Extracellular S1P In Vitro and In Vivo: Implication for Treating Hyperproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Huwiler, Andrea; Bourquin, Florence; Kotelevets, Nataliya; Pastukhov, Oleksandr; Capitani, Guido; Grütter, Markus G.; Zangemeister-Wittke, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates a broad spectrum of fundamental cellular processes like proliferation, death, migration and cytokine production. Therefore, elevated levels of S1P may be causal to various pathologic conditions including cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and aberrant angiogenesis. Here we report that S1P lyase from the prokaryote Symbiobacterium thermophilum (StSPL) degrades extracellular S1P in vitro and in blood. Moreover, we investigated its effect on cellular responses typical of fibrosis, cancer and aberrant angiogenesis using renal mesangial cells, endothelial cells, breast (MCF-7) and colon (HCT 116) carcinoma cells as disease models. In all cell types, wild-type StSPL, but not an inactive mutant, disrupted MAPK phosphorylation stimulated by exogenous S1P. Functionally, disruption of S1P receptor signaling by S1P depletion inhibited proliferation and expression of connective tissue growth factor in mesangial cells, proliferation, migration and VEGF expression in carcinoma cells, and proliferation and migration of endothelial cells. Upon intravenous injection of StSPL in mice, plasma S1P levels rapidly declined by 70% within 1 h and then recovered to normal 6 h after injection. Using the chicken chorioallantoic membrane model we further demonstrate that also under in vivo conditions StSPL, but not the inactive mutant, inhibited tumor cell-induced angiogenesis as an S1P-dependent process. Our data demonstrate that recombinant StSPL is active under extracellular conditions and holds promise as a new enzyme therapeutic for diseases associated with increased levels of S1P and S1P receptor signaling. PMID:21829623

  13. SUN Family Proteins Sun4p, Uth1p and Sim1p Are Secreted from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Produced Dependently on Oxygen Level

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Kučerová, Helena; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2013-01-01

    The SUN family is comprised of proteins that are conserved among various yeasts and fungi, but that are absent in mammals and plants. Although the function(s) of these proteins are mostly unknown, they have been linked to various, often unrelated cellular processes such as those connected to mitochondrial and cell wall functions. Here we show that three of the four Saccharomyces cerevisiae SUN family proteins, Uth1p, Sim1p and Sun4p, are efficiently secreted out of the cells in different growth phases and their production is affected by the level of oxygen. The Uth1p, Sim1p, Sun4p and Nca3p are mostly synthesized during the growth phase of both yeast liquid cultures and colonies. Culture transition to slow-growing or stationary phases is linked with a decreased cellular concentration of Sim1p and Sun4p and with their efficient release from the cells. In contrast, Uth1p is released mainly from growing cells. The synthesis of Uth1p and Sim1p, but not of Sun4p, is repressed by anoxia. All four proteins confer cell sensitivity to zymolyase. In addition, Uth1p affects cell sensitivity to compounds influencing cell wall composition and integrity (such as Calcofluor white and Congo red) differently when growing on fermentative versus respiratory carbon sources. In contrast, Uth1p is essential for cell resistance to boric acids irrespective of carbon source. In summary, our novel findings support the hypothesis that SUN family proteins are involved in the remodeling of the yeast cell wall during the various phases of yeast culture development and under various environmental conditions. The finding that Uth1p is involved in cell sensitivity to boric acid, i.e. to a compound that is commonly used as an important antifungal in mycoses, opens up new possibilities of investigating the mechanisms of boric acid’s action. PMID:24040106

  14. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Receptor Agonists Mediate Pro-fibrotic Responses in Normal Human Lung Fibroblasts via S1P2 and S1P3 Receptors and Smad-independent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Katrin; Menyhart, Katalin; Killer, Nina; Renault, Bérengère; Bauer, Yasmina; Studer, Rolf; Steiner, Beat; Bolli, Martin H.; Nayler, Oliver; Gatfield, John

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 modulators constitute a new class of drugs for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling, however, is also involved in the development of fibrosis. Using normal human lung fibroblasts, we investigated the induction of fibrotic responses by the S1P receptor (S1PR) agonists S1P, FTY720-P, ponesimod, and SEW2871 and compared them with the responses induced by the known fibrotic mediator TGF-β1. In contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not induce expression of the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin. However, TGF-β1, S1P, and FTY720-P caused robust stimulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and increased pro-fibrotic marker gene expression including connective tissue growth factor. Ponesimod showed limited and SEW2871 showed no pro-fibrotic potential in these readouts. Analysis of pro-fibrotic signaling pathways showed that in contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not activate Smad2/3 signaling but rather activated PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling to induce ECM synthesis. The strong induction of ECM synthesis by the nonselective agonists S1P and FTY720-P was due to the stimulation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptors, whereas the weaker induction of ECM synthesis at high concentrations of ponesimod was due to a low potency activation of S1P3 receptors. Finally, in normal human lung fibroblast-derived myofibroblasts that were generated by TGF-β1 pretreatment, S1P and FTY720-P were effective stimulators of ECM synthesis, whereas ponesimod was inactive, because of the down-regulation of S1P3R expression in myofibroblasts. These data demonstrate that S1PR agonists are pro-fibrotic via S1P2R and S1P3R stimulation using Smad-independent pathways. PMID:23589284

  15. H2S: A Novel Gasotransmitter that Signals by Sulfhydration.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bindu D; Snyder, Solomon H

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a member of the growing family of gasotransmitters. Once regarded as a noxious molecule predominantly present in the atmosphere, H2S is now known to be synthesized endogenously in mammals. H2S participates in a myriad of physiological processes ranging from regulation of blood pressure to neuroprotection. Its chemical nature precludes H2S from being stored in vesicles and acting on receptor proteins in the fashion of other chemical messengers. Thus, novel cellular mechanisms have evolved to mediate its effects. This review focuses on sulfhydration (or persulfidation), which appears to be the principal post-translational modification elicited by H2S.

  16. H2S regulation of nitric oxide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kolluru, Gopi K.; Yuan, Shuai; Shen, Xinggui; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are two major gaseous signaling molecules that regulate diverse physiological functions. Recent publications indicate the regulatory role of H2S on NO metabolism. In this chapter, we discuss the latest findings on H2S-NO interactions through formation of novel chemical derivatives, and experimental approaches to study these adducts. This chapter also addresses potential H2S interference on various NO detection techniques, along with precautions for analyzing biological samples from various sources. This information will facilitate critical evaluation and clearer insight into H2S regulation of NO signaling and its influence on various physiological functions. PMID:25725527

  17. Roles of TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 in insulin- and exercise-stimulated glucose transport of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cartee, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on two paralogue Rab GTPase activating proteins known as TBC1D1 Tre-2/BUB2/cdc 1 domain family (TBC1D) 1 and TBC1D4 (also called Akt Substrate of 160 kDa, AS160) and their roles in controlling skeletal muscle glucose transport in response to the independent and combined effects of insulin and exercise. Convincing evidence implicates Akt2-dependent TBC1D4 phosphorylation on T642 as a key part of the mechanism for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by skeletal muscle. TBC1D1 phosphorylation on several insulin-responsive sites (including T596, a site corresponding to T642 in TBC1D4) does not appear to be essential for in vivo insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by skeletal muscle. In vivo exercise or ex vivo contraction of muscle result in greater TBC1D1 phosphorylation on S237 that is likely to be secondary to increased AMP-activated protein kinase activity and potentially important for contraction-stimulated glucose uptake. Several studies that evaluated both normal and insulin-resistant skeletal muscle stimulated with a physiological insulin concentration after a single exercise session found that greater post-exercise insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was accompanied by greater TBC1D4 phosphorylation on several sites. In contrast, enhanced post-exercise insulin sensitivity was not accompanied by greater insulin-stimulated TBC1D1 phosphorylation. The mechanism for greater TBC1D4 phosphorylation in insulin-stimulated muscles after acute exercise is uncertain, and a causal link between enhanced TBC1D4 phosphorylation and increased post-exercise insulin sensitivity has yet to be established. In summary, TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 have important, but distinct roles in regulating muscle glucose transport in response to insulin and exercise. PMID:25280670

  18. Cardiomyocyte S1P1 Receptor–mediated Extracellular Signal–related Kinase Signaling and Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rong; Hoover, Holly E.; Zhang, Jianqing; Honbo, Norman; Alano, Conrad C.; Karliner, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the ability of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) to desensitize extracellular signal–related kinase (ERK), a mitogen-activated protein kinase linked to antiapoptotic responses in the heart. In isolated adult mouse cardiomyocytes, S1P (10 nM–5 μM) induced ERK phosphorylation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. S1P stimulation of ERK was completely inhibited by an S1P1/3 subtype receptor antagonist (VPC23019), by a Gi protein inhibitor (pertussis toxin) and by a mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor (PD98059). A selective S1P3 receptor antagonist (CAY10444) had no effect on S1P-induced ERK activation. The selective S1P1 agonist SEW2871 also induced ERK phosphorylation. Activation of ERK by restimulation with 100 nM S1P was suppressed after 1 hour of preincubation with 100 nM S1P but recovered fully the next day, suggesting receptor recycling. Similar results were obtained in protein kinase Cε-null cardiomyocytes. Treatment with the nonselective S1P receptor agonist FTY720 for 1 hour also reduced phospho-ERK expression in response to subsequent S1P stimulation. In contrast to S1P, some desensitization to FTY720 persisted after overnight exposure. Cell death induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation was reduced by pretreatment with exogenous S1P. This enhanced survival was abrogated by pretreatment with PD98059, VPC23019, or pertussis toxin. Thus, exogenous S1P induces rapid and reversible S1P1-mediated ERK phosphorylation. S1P-induced adult mouse cardiomyocyte survival requires ERK activation mediated via an S1P1–Gi pathway. PMID:19433984

  19. Cargo sequences are important for Som1p-dependent signal peptide cleavage in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Liang, Haobo; Luo, Wentian; Green, Neil; Fang, Hong

    2004-09-17

    The inner membrane protease (IMP) has two catalytic subunits, Imp1p and Imp2p, that exhibit nonoverlapping substrate specificity in mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The IMP also has at least one noncatalytic subunit, Som1p, which is required to cleave signal peptides from a subset of Imp1p substrates. To understand how Som1p mediates Imp1p substrate specificity, we addressed the possibility that Som1p functions as a molecular chaperone, which binds to specific substrates and directs them to the catalytic site. Our results show that cargo sequences attached to the signal peptide are important for Som1p-dependent presequence cleavage; however, no specific cargo sequence is required. Indeed, we show that a substrate normally destined for Imp2p is cleaved in a Som1p-dependent manner when the substrate is directed to Imp1p. These results argue against the notion that Som1p is a molecular chaperone. Instead, we propose that the cargo of some Imp1p substrates can assume a conformation incompatible with presequence cleavage. Som1p could thus act through Imp1p to improve cleavage efficiency early during substrate maturation. PMID:15254042

  20. Bms1p, a novel GTP-binding protein, and the related Tsr1p are required for distinct steps of 40S ribosome biogenesis in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Gelperin, D; Horton, L; Beckman, J; Hensold, J; Lemmon, S K

    2001-01-01

    Bms1p and Tsr1p define a novel family of proteins required for synthesis of 40S ribosomal subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both are essential and localize to the nucleolus. Tsr1p shares two extended regions of similarity with Bms1p, but the two proteins function at different steps in 40S ribosome maturation. Inactivation of Bms1p blocks at an early step, leading to disappearance of 20S and 18S rRNA precursors. Also, slight accumulation of an aberrant 23S product and significant 35S accumulation are observed, indicating that pre-rRNA processing at sites A0, A1, and A2 is inhibited. In contrast, depletion of Tsr1p results in accumulation of 20S rRNA. Because processing of 20S to 18S rRNA occurs in the cytoplasm, this suggests that Tsr1p is required for assembly of a transport- or maturation-competent particle or is specifically required for transport of 43S pre-ribosomal particles, but not 60S ribosome precursors, from the nucleus to the cytosol. Finally, Bms1p is a GTP-binding protein, the first found to function in ribosome assembly or rRNA processing. PMID:11565749

  1. The RAP1GA1 locus for human Rap1-GTPase activating protein 1 maps to chromosome 1p36.1-->p35.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J; Rubinfeld, B; Polakis, P G; McCormick, F; Cavenee, W K; Arden, K C

    1994-01-01

    Using a panel of somatic cell hybrids we have mapped the locus for Rap1-GTPase activating protein 1 (RAP1GA1) to human chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments independently confirmed the chromosomal localization and refined it to 1p36.1-->p35.

  2. Chemiluminescent Detection of Enzymatically Produced H2S

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, T. Spencer; Pluth, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important biological signaling molecule. To better understand the multifaceted biological roles of H2S, the development of selective and sensitive biocompatible assays for H2S is becoming increasingly important. Motivated by these challenges, our laboratory is developing new methods to further detect and monitor biological H2S. Here, we describe in detail our recent advances in the development and the use of chemiluminescence-based H2S sensors to assist other investigators with use of these chemical tools. We highlight the use of these tools use by displaying their selectivity and high sensitivity toward H2S and provide examples of assays we have developed to detect enzymatically produced H2S. PMID:25725517

  3. Contiguous ∼16 Mb 1p36 deletion: Dominant features of classical distal 1p36 monosomy with haplo-lethality.

    PubMed

    Nicoulaz, A; Rubi, F; Lieder, L; Wolf, R; Goeggel-Simonetti, B; Steinlin, M; Wiest, R; Bonel, H M; Schaller, A; Gallati, S; Conrad, B

    2011-08-01

    Monosomy 1p36 results from heterozygous deletions of the terminal short chromosome 1 arm, the most common terminal deletion in humans. The microdeletion is split in two usually non-overlapping and clinically distinct classical distal and proximal 1p36 monosomy syndromes. Using comparative genome hybridization, MLPA and qPCR we identified the largest contiguous ∼16 Mb terminal 1p36 deletion reported to date. It covers both distal and proximal regions, causes a neonatally lethal variant with virtually exclusive features of distal 1p36 monosomy, highlighting the key importance of the gene-rich distal region for the "compound" 1p36 phenotype and a threshold deletion-size effect for haplo-lethality.

  4. The role of Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA repair enzymes Apn1p and Uve1p in the base excision repair of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites

    SciTech Connect

    Tanihigashi, Haruna; Yamada, Ayako; Igawa, Emi; Ikeda, Shogo . E-mail: ikeda@dbc.ous.ac.jp

    2006-09-08

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe the repair of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites is mainly initiated by AP lyase activity of DNA glycosylase Nth1p. In contrast, the major AP endonuclease Apn2p functions by removing 3'-{alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehyde ends induced by Nth1p, rather than by incising the AP sites. S. pombe possesses other minor AP endonuclease activities derived from Apn1p and Uve1p. In this study, we investigated the function of these two enzymes in base excision repair (BER) for methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) damage using the nth1 and apn2 mutants. Deletion of apn1 or uve1 from nth1{delta} cells did not affect sensitivity to MMS. Exogenous expression of Apn1p failed to suppress the MMS sensitivity of nth1{delta} cells. Although Apn1p and Uve1p incised the oligonucleotide containing an AP site analogue, these enzymes could not initiate repair of the AP sites in vivo. Despite this, expression of Apn1p partially restored the MMS sensitivity of apn2{delta} cells, indicating that the enzyme functions as a 3'-phosphodiesterase to remove 3'-blocked ends. Localization of Apn1p in the nucleus and cytoplasm hints at an additional function of the enzyme other than nuclear DNA repair. Heterologous expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue of Apn1p completely restored the MMS resistance of the nth1{delta} and apn2{delta} cells. This result confirms a difference in the major pathway for processing the AP site between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae cells.

  5. Identification of H2S3 and H2S produced by 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuka; Toyofuku, Yukiko; Koike, Shin; Shibuya, Norihiro; Nagahara, Noriyuki; Lefer, David; Ogasawara, Yuki; Kimura, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen polysulfides (H2Sn) have a higher number of sulfane sulfur atoms than hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which has various physiological roles. We recently found H2Sn in the brain. H2Sn induced some responses previously attributed to H2S but with much greater potency than H2S. However, the number of sulfur atoms in H2Sn and its producing enzyme were unknown. Here, we detected H2S3 and H2S, which were produced from 3-mercaptopyruvate (3 MP) by 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST), in the brain. High performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FL) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses showed that H2S3 and H2S were produced from 3 MP in the brain cells of wild-type mice but not 3MST knockout (3MST-KO) mice. Purified recombinant 3MST and lysates of COS cells expressing 3MST produced H2S3 from 3 MP, while those expressing defective 3MST mutants did not. H2S3 was localized in the cytosol of cells. H2S3 was also produced from H2S by 3MST and rhodanese. H2S2 was identified as a minor H2Sn, and 3 MP did not affect the H2S5 level. The present study provides new insights into the physiology of H2S3 and H2S, as well as novel therapeutic targets for diseases in which these molecules are involved. PMID:26437775

  6. HDL-S1P: cardiovascular functions, disease-associated alterations, and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid contained in High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and has drawn considerable attention in the lipoprotein field as numerous studies have demonstrated its contribution to several functions inherent to HDL. Some of them are partly and some entirely due to the S1P contained in HDL (HDL-S1P). Despite the presence of over 1000 different lipids in HDL, S1P stands out as it possesses its own cell surface receptors through which it exercises key physiological functions. Most of the S1P in human plasma is associated with HDL, and the amount of HDL-S1P influences the quality and quantity of HDL-dependent functions. The main binding partner of S1P in HDL is apolipoprotein M but others may also exist particularly under conditions of acute S1P elevations. HDL not only exercise functions through their S1P content but have also an impact on genuine S1P signaling by influencing S1P bioactivity and receptor presentation. HDL-S1P content is altered in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Low HDL-S1P has also been linked to impaired HDL functions associated with these disorders. Although the pathophysiological and molecular reasons for such disease-associated shifts in HDL-S1P are little understood, there have been successful approaches to circumvent their adverse implications by pharmacologically increasing HDL-S1P as means to improve HDL function. This mini-review will cover the current understanding of the contribution of HDL-S1P to physiological HDL function, its alteration in disease and ways for its restoration to correct HDL dysfunction. PMID:26539121

  7. 1D X-ray Beam Compressing Monochromators

    SciTech Connect

    Korytar, D.; Dobrocka, E.; Konopka, P.; Zaprazny, Z.; Ferrari, C.; Mikulik, P.; Vagovic, P.; Ac, V.; Erko, A.; Abrosimov, N.

    2010-04-06

    A total beam compression of 5 and 10 corresponding to the asymmetry angles of 9 deg. and 12 deg. is achieved with V-5 and V-10 monochromators, respectively, in standard single crystal pure germanium (220) X-ray beam compressing (V-shaped) monochromators for CuKalpha{sub 1} radiation. A higher 1D compression of X-ray beam is possible using larger angles of asymmetry, however it is achieved at the expense of the total intensity, which is decreased due to the refraction effect. To increase the monochromator intensity, several ways are considered both theoretically and experimentally. Linearly graded germanium rich Ge{sub x}Si{sub (1-x)} single crystal was used to prepare a V-21 single crystal monochromator with 15 deg. asymmetry angles (compression factor of 21). Its temperature gradient version is discussed for CuKalpha{sub 1} radiation. X-ray diffraction measurements on the graded GeSi monochromator showed more than 3-times higher intensity at the output compared with that of a pure Ge monochromator.

  8. 1-D Numerical Analysis of RBCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1998-01-01

    An RBCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engines into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Considerable research pertaining to RBCC propulsion was performed during the 1960's and these engines were revisited recently as a candidate propulsion system for either a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) or two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) launch vehicle. There are a variety of RBCC configurations that had been evaluated and new designs are currently under development. However, the basic configuration of all RBCC systems is built around the ejector scramjet engine originally developed for the hypersonic airplane. In this configuration, a rocket engine plays as an ejector in the air-augmented initial acceleration mode, as a fuel injector in scramjet mode and the rocket in all rocket mode for orbital insertion. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in RBCC propulsion systems. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic RBCC engine following a flight path.

  9. Dynamic decoupling in the presence of 1D random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Arnab; Chakraborty, Ipsita; Bhattacharyya, Rangeet

    2016-05-01

    In the recent past, many dynamic decoupling sequences have been proposed for the suppression of decoherence of spins connected to thermal baths of various natures. Dynamic decoupling schemes for suppressing decoherence due to Gaussian diffusion have also been developed. In this work, we study the relative performances of dynamic decoupling schemes in the presence of a non-stationary Gaussian noise such as a 1D random walk. Frequency domain analysis is not suitable to determine the performances of various dynamic decoupling schemes in suppressing decoherence due to such a process. Thus, in this work, we follow a time domain calculation to arrive at the following conclusions: in the presence of such a noise, we show that (i) the traditional Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) sequence outperforms Uhrig’s dynamic decoupling scheme, (ii) CPMG remains the optimal sequence for suppression of decoherence due to random walk in the presence of an external field gradient. Later, the theoretical predictions are experimentally verified by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on spin 1/2 particles diffusing in a liquid medium.

  10. Control and imaging of O(1D2) precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shiou-Min; Radenovic, Dragana Č.; van der Zande, Wim J.; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.; Parker, David H.; Vallance, Claire; Zare, Richard N.

    2011-01-01

    Larmor precession of a quantum mechanical angular momentum vector about an applied magnetic field forms the basis for a range of magnetic resonance techniques, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging. We have used a polarized laser pump-probe scheme with velocity-map imaging detection to visualize, for the first time, the precessional motion of a quantum mechanical angular momentum vector. Photodissociation of O2 at 157 nm provides a clean source of fast-moving O(1D2) atoms, with their electronic angular momentum vector strongly aligned perpendicular to the recoil direction. In the presence of an external magnetic field, the distribution of atomic angular momenta precesses about the field direction, and polarization-sensitive images of the atomic scattering distribution recorded as a function of field strength yield ‘time-lapse-photography’ style movies of the precessional motion. We present movies recorded in various experimental geometries, and discuss potential consequences and applications in atmospheric chemistry and reaction dynamics.

  11. The role of endogenous H2S in cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Nini; Gouliaev, Anja; Aalling, Mathilde; Simonsen, Ulf

    2011-09-01

    Recent research has shown that the endogenous gas hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a signalling molecule of considerable biological potential and has been suggested to be involved in a vast number of physiological processes. In the vascular system, H2S is synthesized from cysteine by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in smooth muscle cells (SMC) and 3- mercaptopyruvate sulfuresterase (3MST) and CSE in the endothelial cells. In pulmonary and systemic arteries, H2S induces relaxation and/or contraction dependent on the concentration of H2S, type of vessel and species. H2S relaxes SMC through a direct effect on KATP-channels or Kv-channels causing hyperpolarization and closure of voltage-dependent Ca2+-channels followed by a reduction in intracellular calcium. H2S also relaxes SMC through the release of endothelium- derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) and nitric oxide (NO) from the endothelium. H2S contracts SMC through a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) availability by reacting with NO forming a nitrosothiol compound and through an inhibitory effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) as well as a reduction in SMC cyclic AMP concentration. Evidence supports a role for H2S in oxygen sensing. Furthermore, reduced endogenous H2S production may also play a role in ischemic heart diseases and hypertension, and treatment with H2S donors and cysteine analogues may be beneficial in treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  12. Sources and sinks of atmospheric H/sub 2/S

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeschke, W.; Claude, H.; Herrmann, J.

    1980-10-20

    In recent years, trace concentrations of H/sub 2/S have been measured employing a fluorescence analytical method. Automatization of the method caused enhancement of its analytical capacity. Thus it became possible to observe variations of the H/sub 2/S concentration during days, months, and years at different sampling sites. The obtained data showed that swamps and tidal flats are natural sources of H/sub 2/S. Their contributions to the atmospheric sulfur cycle are compared with those of volcanic activity measured at Etna (Italy) and with those of anthropogenic activity measured in the environment of Frankfurt (Germany). The observed daily and seasonal variations of the H/sub 2/S concentrations showed that photochemical reactions are probably the main sink of atmospheric H/sub 2/S. The measured data of a vertical H/sub 2/S concentration profile were used to calculate a mean removal coefficient for H/sub 2/S of 2.27 x 10/sup -5/ s/sup -1/, corresponding to a mean lifetime of 12.2 hours. The removal coefficient is compared with the reaction constants of some photochemical processes which may determine the atmospheric removal of H/sub 2/S. This comparison leads to the conclusion that the reaction of H/sub 2/S with OH radicals is the main sink of atmospheric H/sub 2/S.

  13. Absolute rate constant determinations for the deactivation of O/1D/ by time resolved decay of O/1D/ yields O/3P/ emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. A.; Sadowski, C. M.; Schiff, H. I.; Howard, C. J.; Schmeltekopf, A. L.; Jennings, D. A.; Streit, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the deactivation of O(1D) atoms by some atmospheric gases have been determined by observing the time-resolved emission of O(1D) at 630 nm. O(1D) atoms were produced by the dissociation of ozone via repetitive laser pulses at 266 nm. Absolute rate constants for the relaxation of O(1D) at 298 K are reported for N2, O2, CO2, O3, H2, D2, CH4, HCl, NH3, H2O, N2O, and Ne. The results obtained are compared with previous relative and absolute measurements reported in the literature.

  14. EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopy of intact mitochondria isolated from Yah1p-depleted Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ren; Martinho, Marlène; Morales, Jessica Garber; Kim, Hansoo; Ellis, E Ann; Lill, Roland; Hendrich, Michael P; Münck, Eckard; Lindahl, Paul A

    2008-09-16

    Yah1p, an [Fe 2S 2]-containing ferredoxin located in the matrix of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria, functions in the synthesis of Fe/S clusters and heme a prosthetic groups. EPR, Mossbauer spectroscopy, and electron microscopy were used to characterize the Fe that accumulates in Yah1p-depleted isolated intact mitochondria. Gal- YAH1 cells were grown in standard rich media (YPD and YPGal) under O 2 or argon atmospheres. Mitochondria were isolated anaerobically, then prepared in the as-isolated redox state, the dithionite-treated state, and the O 2-treated state. The absence of strong EPR signals from Fe/S clusters when Yah1p was depleted confirms that Yah1p is required in Fe/S cluster assembly. Yah1p-depleted mitochondria, grown with O 2 bubbling through the media, accumulated excess Fe (up to 10 mM) that was present as 2-4 nm diameter ferric nanoparticles, similar to those observed in mitochondria from yfh1Delta cells. These particles yielded a broad isotropic EPR signal centered around g = 2, characteristic of superparamagnetic relaxation. Treatment with dithionite caused Fe (3+) ions of the nanoparticles to become reduced and largely exported from the mitochondria. Fe did not accumulate in mitochondria isolated from cells grown under Ar; a significant portion of the Fe in these organelles was in the high-spin Fe (2+) state. This suggests that the O 2 used during growth of Gal- YAH1 cells is responsible, either directly or indirectly, for Fe accumulation and for oxidizing Fe (2+) --> Fe (3+) prior to aggregation. Models are proposed in which the accumulation of ferric nanoparticles is caused either by the absence of a ligand that prevents such precipitation in wild-type mitochondria or by a more oxidizing environment within the mitochondria of Yah1p-depleted cells exposed to O 2. The efficacy of reducing accumulated Fe along with chelating it should be considered as a strategy for its removal in diseases involving such accumulations. PMID:18717590

  15. A shunt pathway limits the CaaX processing of Hsp40 Ydj1p and regulates Ydj1p-dependent phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Emily R; Cheng, Michael; Zhao, Peng; Kim, June H; Wells, Lance; Schmidt, Walter K

    2016-01-01

    The modifications occurring to CaaX proteins have largely been established using few reporter molecules (e.g. Ras, yeast a-factor mating pheromone). These proteins undergo three coordinated COOH-terminal events: isoprenylation of the cysteine, proteolytic removal of aaX, and COOH-terminal methylation. Here, we investigated the coupling of these modifications in the context of the yeast Ydj1p chaperone. We provide genetic, biochemical, and biophysical evidence that the Ydj1p CaaX motif is isoprenylated but not cleaved and carboxylmethylated. Moreover, we demonstrate that Ydj1p-dependent thermotolerance and Ydj1p localization are perturbed when alternative CaaX motifs are transplanted onto Ydj1p. The abnormal phenotypes revert to normal when post-isoprenylation events are genetically interrupted. Our findings indicate that proper Ydj1p function requires an isoprenylatable CaaX motif that is resistant to post-isoprenylation events. These results expand on the complexity of protein isoprenylation and highlight the impact of post-isoprenylation events in regulating the function of Ydj1p and perhaps other CaaX proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15899.001 PMID:27525482

  16. Synthesis and Functions of Ag2S Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chunyan; Li, Xiaoru; Liu, Jixian; Hou, Yongchao; Zhao, Yuqing; Zhong, Guocheng

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents a review about synthesis and applications of Ag2S nanostructures. As the modern photoelectric and biological materials, Ag2S nanomaterials are potentially useful for both structure and function purposes. Ag2S is a direction narrow band gap semiconductor with special properties. Ag2S nanostructures have been widely researched in chemistry and biochemistry fields because of their unusual optical, electrical, and mechanical properties. It can also be used in many fields, such as photovoltaic cells and infrared detector. In the past few years, Ag2S nanostructures have been synthesized by various methods. The article mainly discusses the four types of preparation methods. Moreover, this article shows a detailed review on the new properties, fabrication, and applications of Ag2S nanocrystals.

  17. Synthesis and Functions of Ag2S Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chunyan; Li, Xiaoru; Liu, Jixian; Hou, Yongchao; Zhao, Yuqing; Zhong, Guocheng

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents a review about synthesis and applications of Ag2S nanostructures. As the modern photoelectric and biological materials, Ag2S nanomaterials are potentially useful for both structure and function purposes. Ag2S is a direction narrow band gap semiconductor with special properties. Ag2S nanostructures have been widely researched in chemistry and biochemistry fields because of their unusual optical, electrical, and mechanical properties. It can also be used in many fields, such as photovoltaic cells and infrared detector. In the past few years, Ag2S nanostructures have been synthesized by various methods. The article mainly discusses the four types of preparation methods. Moreover, this article shows a detailed review on the new properties, fabrication, and applications of Ag2S nanocrystals. PMID:26525702

  18. Kinetic Model for 1D aggregation of yeast ``prions''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunes, Kay; Cox, Daniel; Singh, Rajiv

    2004-03-01

    Mammalian prion proteins (PrP) are of public health interest because of mad cow and chronic wasting diseases. Yeast have proteins which can undergo similar reconformation and aggregation processes to PrP; yeast forms are simpler to experimentally study and model. Recent in vitro studies of the SUP35 protein(1), showed long aggregates and pure exponential growth of the misfolded form. To explain this data, we have extended a previous model of aggregation kinetics(2). The model assumes reconformation only upon aggregation, and includes aggregate fissioning and an initial nucleation barrier. We find for sufficiently small nucleation rates or seeding by small dimer concentrations that we can achieve the requisite exponential growth and long aggregates. We will compare to a more realistic stochastic kinetics model and present prelimary attempts to describe recent experiments on SUP35 strains. *-Supported by U.S. Army Congressionally Mandated Research Fund. 1) P. Chien and J.S. Weissman, Nature 410, 223 (2001); http://online.kitp.ucsb.edu/online/bionet03/collins/. 2) J. Masel, V.A.> Jansen, M.A. Nowak, Biophys. Chem. 77, 139 (1999).

  19. The yeast aquaglyceroporin Fps1p is a bidirectional arsenite channel.

    PubMed

    Maciaszczyk-Dziubinska, Ewa; Migdal, Iwona; Migocka, Magdalena; Bocer, Tomasz; Wysocki, Robert

    2010-02-19

    The stress-activated kinase Hog1p mediates arsenic tolerance by decreasing arsenite influx through the aquaglyceroporin Fps1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Unexpectedly, we found that overexpression of FPS1 increased arsenite tolerance suggesting a physiological role of Fps1p in arsenic detoxification. Consistently, during arsenite treatment transcription of FPS1 gene was strongly upregulated, while Fps1p was not degraded and remained localized to the plasma membrane. Moreover, deletion of FPS1 gene resulted in arsenate sensitivity. Finally, transport experiments revealed that Fps1p in concert with the arsenite transporter Acr3p mediates arsenite efflux.

  20. Evidence against dopamine D1/D2 receptor heteromers

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, Aliya L.; Yano, Hideaki; Trifilieff, Pierre; Vishwasrao, Harshad D.; Biezonski, Dominik; Mészáros, József; Sibley, David R.; Kellendonk, Christoph; Sonntag, Kai C.; Graham, Devon L.; Colbran, Roger J.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Javitch, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Hetero-oligomers of G-protein-coupled receptors have become the subject of intense investigation because their purported potential to manifest signaling and pharmacological properties that differ from the component receptors makes them highly attractive for the development of more selective pharmacological treatments. In particular, dopamine D1 and D2 receptors have been proposed to form hetero-oligomers that couple to Gαq proteins, and SKF83959 has been proposed to act as a biased agonist that selectively engages these receptor complexes to activate Gαq and thus phospholipase C. D1/D2 heteromers have been proposed as relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of depression and schizophrenia. We used in vitro bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), ex vivo analyses of receptor localization and proximity in brain slices, and behavioral assays in mice to characterize signaling from these putative dimers/oligomers. We were unable to detect Gαq or Gα11 protein coupling to homomers or heteromers of D1 or D2 receptors using a variety of biosensors. SKF83959-induced locomotor and grooming behaviors were eliminated in D1 receptor knockout mice, verifying a key role for D1-like receptor activation. In contrast, SKF83959-induced motor responses were intact in D2 receptor and Gαq knockout mice, as well as in knock-in mice expressing a mutant Ala286-CaMKIIα, that cannot autophosphorylate to become active. Moreover, we found that in the shell of the nucleus accumbens, even in neurons in which D1 and D2 receptor promoters are both active, the receptor proteins are segregated and do not form complexes. These data are not compatible with SKF83959 signaling through Gαq or through a D1–D2 heteromer and challenge the existence of such a signaling complex in the adult animals that we used for our studies. PMID:25560761

  1. Dynamical functions of a 1D correlated quantum liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Bozi, D.; Penc, K.

    2008-10-01

    The dynamical correlation functions in one-dimensional electronic systems show power-law behaviour at low energies and momenta close to integer multiples of the charge and spin Fermi momenta. These systems are usually referred to as Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids. However, near well defined lines of the (k,ω) plane the power-law behaviour extends beyond the low-energy cases mentioned above, and also appears at higher energies, leading to singular features in the photoemission spectra and other dynamical correlation functions. The general spectral-function expressions derived in this paper were used in recent theoretical studies of the finite-energy singular features in photoemission of the organic compound tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) metallic phase. They are based on a so-called pseudofermion dynamical theory (PDT), which allows us to systematically enumerate and describe the excitations in the Hubbard model starting from the Bethe ansatz, as well as to calculate the charge and spin object phase shifts appearing as exponents of the power laws. In particular, we concentrate on the spin-density m\\rightarrow 0 limit and on effects in the vicinity of the singular border lines, as well as close to half filling. Our studies take into account spectral contributions from types of microscopic processes that do not occur for finite values of the spin density. In addition, the specific processes involved in the spectral features of TTF-TCNQ are studied. Our results are useful for the further understanding of the unusual spectral properties observed in low-dimensional organic metals and also provide expressions for the one- and two-atom spectral functions of a correlated quantum system of ultracold fermionic atoms in a 1D optical lattice with on-site two-atom repulsion.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, and physical properties of 1D nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, Peter Mchael

    The roster of materials exhibiting metal---insulator transitions with sharply discontinuous switching of electrical conductivity close to room temperature remains rather sparse despite the fundamental interest in the electronic instabilities manifested in such materials and the plethora of potential technological applications, ranging from frequency-agile metamaterials to electrochromic coatings and Mott field-effect transistors. Vanadium oxide bronzes with the general formula MxV2O 5, provide a wealth of compositions and frameworks where strong electron correlation can be systematically (albeit thus far only empirically) tuned. Charge fluctuations along the quasi-1D frameworks of MxV 2O5 bronzes have evinced much recent interest owing to the manifestation of colossal metal---insulator transitions and superconductivity. We start with a general review on the phase transitions, both electronic and structural, of vanadium oxide bronzes in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we demonstrate an unprecedented reversible transformation between double-layered (delta) and tunnel (beta) quasi-1D geometries for nanowires of a divalent vanadium bronze CaxV2O5 (x ˜0.23) upon annealing-induced dehydration and hydrothermally-induced hydration. Such a facile hydration/dehydration-induced interconversion between two prominent quasi-1D structures (accompanied by a change in charge ordering motifs) has not been observed in the bulk and is posited to result from the ease of propagation of crystallographic slip processes across the confined nanowire widths for the delta→beta conversion and the facile diffusion of water molecules within the tunnel geometries for the beta→delta reversion. We demonstrate in Chapter 3 unprecedented pronounced metal-insulator transitions induced by application of a voltage for nanowires of a vanadium oxide bronze with intercalated divalent cations, beta-PbxV 2O5 (x ˜0.33). The induction of the phase transition through application of an electric field at room

  3. Synthesis, characterization, and physical properties of 1D nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, Peter Mchael

    The roster of materials exhibiting metal---insulator transitions with sharply discontinuous switching of electrical conductivity close to room temperature remains rather sparse despite the fundamental interest in the electronic instabilities manifested in such materials and the plethora of potential technological applications, ranging from frequency-agile metamaterials to electrochromic coatings and Mott field-effect transistors. Vanadium oxide bronzes with the general formula MxV2O 5, provide a wealth of compositions and frameworks where strong electron correlation can be systematically (albeit thus far only empirically) tuned. Charge fluctuations along the quasi-1D frameworks of MxV 2O5 bronzes have evinced much recent interest owing to the manifestation of colossal metal---insulator transitions and superconductivity. We start with a general review on the phase transitions, both electronic and structural, of vanadium oxide bronzes in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we demonstrate an unprecedented reversible transformation between double-layered (delta) and tunnel (beta) quasi-1D geometries for nanowires of a divalent vanadium bronze CaxV2O5 (x ˜0.23) upon annealing-induced dehydration and hydrothermally-induced hydration. Such a facile hydration/dehydration-induced interconversion between two prominent quasi-1D structures (accompanied by a change in charge ordering motifs) has not been observed in the bulk and is posited to result from the ease of propagation of crystallographic slip processes across the confined nanowire widths for the delta→beta conversion and the facile diffusion of water molecules within the tunnel geometries for the beta→delta reversion. We demonstrate in Chapter 3 unprecedented pronounced metal-insulator transitions induced by application of a voltage for nanowires of a vanadium oxide bronze with intercalated divalent cations, beta-PbxV 2O5 (x ˜0.33). The induction of the phase transition through application of an electric field at room

  4. SCCRO3 (DCUN1D3) Antagonizes the Neddylation and Oncogenic Activity of SCCRO (DCUN1D1)*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guochang; Stock, Cameron; Bommeljé, Claire C.; Weeda, Víola B.; Shah, Kushyup; Bains, Sarina; Buss, Elizabeth; Shaha, Manish; Rechler, Willi; Ramanathan, Suresh Y.; Singh, Bhuvanesh

    2014-01-01

    The activity of cullin-RING type ubiquitination E3 ligases is regulated by neddylation, a process analogous to ubiquitination that culminates in covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 to cullins. As a component of the E3 for neddylation, SCCRO/DCUN1D1 plays a key regulatory role in neddylation and, consequently, cullin-RING ligase activity. The essential contribution of SCCRO to neddylation is to promote nuclear translocation of the cullin-ROC1 complex. The presence of a myristoyl sequence in SCCRO3, one of four SCCRO paralogues present in humans that localizes to the membrane, raises questions about its function in neddylation. We found that although SCCRO3 binds to CAND1, cullins, and ROC1, it does not efficiently bind to Ubc12, promote cullin neddylation, or conform to the reaction processivity paradigms, suggesting that SCCRO3 does not have E3 activity. Expression of SCCRO3 inhibits SCCRO-promoted neddylation by sequestering cullins to the membrane, thereby blocking its nuclear translocation. Moreover, SCCRO3 inhibits SCCRO transforming activity. The inhibitory effects of SCCRO3 on SCCRO-promoted neddylation and transformation require both an intact myristoyl sequence and PONY domain, confirming that membrane localization and binding to cullins are required for in vivo functions. Taken together, our findings suggest that SCCRO3 functions as a tumor suppressor by antagonizing the neddylation activity of SCCRO. PMID:25349211

  5. H2S and Blood Vessels: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guangdong; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The physiological and biomedical importance of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been fully recognized in the cardiovascular system as well as in the rest of the body. In blood vessels, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) is a major H2S-producing enzyme expressed in both smooth muscle and endothelium as well as periadventitial adipose tissues. Regulation of H2S production from CSE is controlled by a complex integration of transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational mechanisms in blood vessels. In smooth muscle cells, H2S regulates cell apoptosis, phenotypic switch, relaxation and contraction, and calcification. In endothelial cells, H2S controls cell proliferation, cellular senescence, oxidative stress, inflammation, etc. H2S interacts with nitric oxide and acts as an endothelium-derived relaxing factor and an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. H2S generated from periadventitial adipose tissues acts as an adipocyte-derived relaxing factor and modulates the vascular tone. Extensive evidence has demonstrated the beneficial roles of the CSE/H2S system in various blood vessel diseases, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and aortic aneurysm. The important roles signaling in the cardiovascular system merit further intensive and extensive investigation. H2S-releasing agents and CSE activators will find their great applications in the prevention and treatment of blood vessel-related disorders. PMID:26162830

  6. Observations of the H2S toward OMC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minh, Y. C.; Irvine, W. M.; Mcgonagle, D.; Ziurys, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the 1(10) - 1(01) transition of interstellar H2S and its isotopes toward OMC-1 are reported. The fractional abundance of H2S in the quiescent regions of OMC-1 seems difficult to explain by currently known ion-molecular reactions. The fractional abundance of H2S relative to H2 is enhanced by a factor of 1000 in the hot core and the plateau relative to the quiescent clouds. The (HDS)/(H2S) abundance ratio in the hot core is estimated at 0.02 or less.

  7. The Clinically-tested S1P Receptor Agonists, FTY720 and BAF312, Demonstrate Subtype-Specific Bradycardia (S1P1) and Hypertension (S1P3) in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Ryan M.; Muthukumarana, Akalushi; Harrison, Paul C.; Nodop Mazurek, Suzanne; Chen, Rong Rhonda; Harrington, Kyle E.; Dinallo, Roger M.; Horan, Joshua C.; Patnaude, Lori; Modis, Louise K.; Reinhart, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phospate (S1P) and S1P receptor agonists elicit mechanism-based effects on cardiovascular function in vivo. Indeed, FTY720 (non-selective S1PX receptor agonist) produces modest hypertension in patients (2–3 mmHg in 1-yr trial) as well as acute bradycardia independent of changes in blood pressure. However, the precise receptor subtypes responsible is controversial, likely dependent upon the cardiovascular response in question (e.g. bradycardia, hypertension), and perhaps even species-dependent since functional differences in rodent, rabbit, and human have been suggested. Thus, we characterized the S1P receptor subtype specificity for each compound in vitro and, in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of FTY720 and the more selective S1P1,5 agonist, BAF312, were tested during acute i.v. infusion in anesthetized rats and after oral administration for 10 days in telemetry-instrumented conscious rats. Acute i.v. infusion of FTY720 (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 mg/kg/20 min) or BAF312 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/20 min) elicited acute bradycardia in anesthetized rats demonstrating an S1P1 mediated mechanism-of-action. However, while FTY720 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/d) elicited dose-dependent hypertension after multiple days of oral administration in rat at clinically relevant plasma concentrations (24-hr mean blood pressure = 8.4, 12.8, 16.2 mmHg above baseline vs. 3 mmHg in vehicle controls), BAF312 (0.3, 3.0, 30.0 mg/kg/d) had no significant effect on blood pressure at any dose tested suggesting that hypertension produced by FTY720 is mediated S1P3 receptors. In summary, in vitro selectivity results in combination with studies performed in anesthetized and conscious rats administered two clinically tested S1P agonists, FTY720 or BAF312, suggest that S1P1 receptors mediate bradycardia while hypertension is mediated by S1P3 receptor activation. PMID:23285242

  8. Discovery of Tetrahydropyrazolopyridine as Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 3 (S1P3)-Sparing S1P1 Agonists Active at Low Oral Doses.

    PubMed

    Demont, Emmanuel H; Bailey, James M; Bit, Rino A; Brown, Jack A; Campbell, Colin A; Deeks, Nigel; Dowell, Simon J; Eldred, Colin; Gaskin, Pam; Gray, James R J; Haynes, Andrea; Hirst, David J; Holmes, Duncan S; Kumar, Umesh; Morse, Mary A; Osborne, Greg J; Renaux, Jessica F; Seal, Gail A L; Smethurst, Chris A; Taylor, Simon; Watson, Robert; Willis, Robert; Witherington, Jason

    2016-02-11

    FTY720 is the first oral small molecule approved for the treatment of people suffering from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. It is a potent agonist of the S1P1 receptor, but its lack of selectivity against the S1P3 receptor has been linked to most of the cardiovascular side effects observed in the clinic. These findings have triggered intensive efforts toward the identification of a second generation of S1P3-sparing S1P1 agonists. We have recently disclosed a series of orally active tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ) compounds matching these criteria. In this paper we describe how we defined and implemented a strategy aiming at the discovery of selective structurally distinct follow-up agonists. This effort culminated with the identification of a series of orally active tetrahydropyrazolopyridines. PMID:26751273

  9. 1-D Tremor Streaks: Implications for a Streak Source Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, H.; Ghosh, A.; Vidale, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Recent observations of non-volcanic tremor in Cascadia and Japan show “streaks” of tremor moving up and down dip in a convergence-parallel direction at “driving velocities” (i.e., 30 to 120 km/hr). Streak lengths of 30 to 40 km are occasionally observed. We explore the implications of these observations for a source model and spectrum of tremor. Key elements involve the extreme geometry and slow “rupture velocity” implied by the streaks. The source spectrum of tremor and other ETS seismic radiation exhibits a spectral falloff roughly as the inverse of frequency (1/f) in contrast to that of earthquakes, which follow a spectral falloff of 1/f squared above a corner frequency. Nevertheless, several observations suggest that the deformation that generates tremor is shear slip in the plate convergence direction. A fundamental question, then, has been what slip source could produce such an observed 1/f falloff over a wide frequency range. We propose a kinematic model, consistent with the 1-D geometry of the tremor streaks, in which fault displacement and width are strongly limited and rupture growth occurs only along fault length, which is oriented in a convergence-parallel direction (up or down dip). This is a version of the well-known Haskell model in which the durations of the two boxcars are very different. A 1/f spectral falloff holds between the corner frequencies associated with the two durations. Thus, the frequency range of the observed 1/f spectral falloff of tremor provides constraints on the durations of the boxcars. Further constraints involve the maximum likely displacement in an ETS event, the rupture velocities of the streaks, and the moment release rate. The narrow streak geometry implies fairly high strain and stress drops, in contrast to the low overall stress drops inferred from tidal modulation of tremor and the low strain across the entire ETS region. The observation of tremor streaks migrating at 10's of km/hour, in conjunction with the

  10. A novel autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing impairment locus (DFNB47) maps to chromosome 2p25.1-p24.3

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Santos, Regie Lyn P.; Rafiq, Muhammad Arshad; Chahrour, Maria H.; Pham, Thanh L.; Wajid, Muhammad; Hijab, Nadine; Wambangco, Michael; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ansar, Muhammad; Yan, Kai; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary hearing impairment (HI) displays extensive genetic heterogeneity. Autosomal recessive (AR) forms of prelingual HI account for ~75% of cases with a genetic etiology. A novel AR non-syndromic HI locus (DFNB47) was mapped to chromosome 2p25.1-p24.3, in two distantly related Pakistani kindreds. Genome scan and fine mapping were carried out using microsatellite markers. Multipoint linkage analysis resulted in a maximum LOD score of 4.7 at markers D2S1400 and D2S262. The three-unit support interval was bounded by D2S330 and D2S131. The region of homozygosity was found within the three-unit support interval and flanked by markers D2S2952 and D2S131, which corresponds to 13.2 cM according to the Rutgers combined linkage-physical map. This region contains 5.3 Mb according to the sequence-based physical map. Three candidate genes, KCNF1, ID2 and ATP6V1C2 were sequenced, and were found to be negative for functional sequence variants. PMID:16261342

  11. Precision polarizability measurements of atomic cesium's 8 s 2S1 / 2 and 9 s 2S1 / 2 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Hannah; Kortyna, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    We report hyperfine-resolved scalar polarizabilities for cesium's 8 s 2S1 / 2 and 9 s 2S1 / 2 states using resonant two-photon spectroscopy. Two single-mode, external-cavity diode lasers drive the 6 s 2S1 / 2 --> 6 p 2P1 / 2 --> ns 2S1 / 2 transition (n = 8 or 9). Both laser beams are split and counter-propagate through an effusive beam and a vapor cell. An electric field applied across two parallel plates imposes Stark shifts on the ns 2S1 / 2 levels in the effusive beam. Electric-field strengths are measured in situ. The laser frequency is calibrated in the vapor cell using a phase modulation technique, with the modulation frequency referenced to the ground-state hyperfine splitting of atomic rubidium. Our measured 8 s 2S1 / 2 polarizability, 38370 +/- 380 a03, agrees with previous theory and experiments. Our measured 9 s 2S1 / 2 polarizability, 150700 +/- 1100 a03, agrees within two sigma of theory, but we are unaware of previous measurements. We also verify that these polarizabilities are independent of the hyperfine levels, placing upper limits on the differential polarizabilities of 200 +/- 260 a03 for the 8 s 2S1 / 2 state and 490 +/- 450 a03 for the 9 s 2S1 / 2 state. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-0653107.

  12. Human CD1d knock-in mouse model demonstrates potent antitumor potential of human CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiangshu; Rao, Ping; Carreño, Leandro J.; Kim, Seil; Lawrenczyk, Agnieszka; Porcelli, Steven A.; Cresswell, Peter; Yuan, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    Despite a high degree of conservation, subtle but important differences exist between the CD1d antigen presentation pathways of humans and mice. These differences may account for the minimal success of natural killer T (NKT) cell-based antitumor therapies in human clinical trials, which contrast strongly with the powerful antitumor effects in conventional mouse models. To develop an accurate model for in vivo human CD1d (hCD1d) antigen presentation, we have generated a hCD1d knock-in (hCD1d-KI) mouse. In these mice, hCD1d is expressed in a native tissue distribution pattern and supports NKT cell development. Reduced numbers of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells were observed, but at an abundance comparable to that in most normal humans. These iNKT cells predominantly expressed mouse Vβ8, the homolog of human Vβ11, and phenotypically resembled human iNKT cells in their reduced expression of CD4. Importantly, iNKT cells in hCD1d knock-in mice exert a potent antitumor function in a melanoma challenge model. Our results show that replacement of mCD1d by hCD1d can select a population of functional iNKT cells closely resembling human iNKT cells. These hCD1d knock-in mice will allow more accurate in vivo modeling of human iNKT cell responses and will facilitate the preclinical assessment of iNKT cell-targeted antitumor therapies. PMID:23382238

  13. Prognostic significance of relative 1p/19q codeletion in oligodendroglial tumors.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Marc C; Born, Donald

    2015-11-01

    1p/19q codeletion is a favorable prognostic marker for oligodendroglial tumors (OT). Compare outcome in OT with simple deletions of 1p or 19q to those with relative deletions defined as the presence of both increased copy number (polysomy) and 1p/19q codeletion. 525 cases were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using dual color probes to determine the deletion status of chromosome arms 1p and 19q. Categories included simple deletions defined as a proportion of either 1p32 or 19q13 FISH signals compared to 1q42 or 19p13 signals less than 0.80 and relative deletions (1p or 19q) defined as the combination of a <0.80 proportion with >30 % of nuclei showing increased chromosome number (based on enumeration of 1q25 or 19p13). 464 (80 %) were WHO Grade II or III OT of which 209 (48 %) had both 1p and 19q deleted (codeletion). 72 (16 %) had relative deletions for either one or both 1p and 19q of which 28 (6 %) had relative deletions of 1p and 19q (relative codeletion). Overall survival in WHO Grade II OT was 13 + years when 1p/19q codeleted (n = 156); 5 + years in uni- or nondeleted (n = 86); 6 + years in relative deletion for either 1p or 19q (n = 41); and 6 + years in relative 1p/19q codeletion (n = 15). Similarly in WHO Grade III OT (n = 168) overall survival was 11 + years in 1p/19q codeleted (n = 54) OT; 2.5 years in uni- or nondeleted (n = 70); 3 years in relative deletion for one or both 1p or 19q (n = 31); and 4 + years in relative 1p/19q codeletion (n = 13). Survival for OT regardless of grade with relative codeletion of 1p/19q was approximately one half that of 1p/19q codeleted tumors. The presence of relative 1p/19q codeletion is of prognostic significance. PMID:26341371

  14. Crystal growth simulations of H(2)S hydrate.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuai; Kusalik, Peter G

    2010-07-29

    In this paper, we report a molecular simulation study exploring the crystal growth behavior of H(2)S hydrates within two-phase (H(2)S hydrate crystal and H(2)S aqueous solution) and three-phase (H(2)S hydrate crystal, liquid H(2)S, and H(2)S aqueous solution) systems. The microscopic mechanisms of growth, as well as the interfacial properties during the heterogeneous crystal growth process, are probed. We find that the H(2)S hydrate can be grown at a higher rate than methane hydrates under comparable conditions (Vatamanu, J.; Kusalik, P. G. J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110, 15896). The three-phase simulations, which also allow us to identify the simulation conditions on the experimental phase diagram, demonstrate that the present models reasonably reproduce the phase behavior of this system. We find that the crystal interface has a strong affinity for water molecules. We observed a relatively low level of defects in the newly formed H(2)S hydrate crystal.

  15. H2S, a novel gasotransmitter, involves in gastric accommodation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ailin; Wang, Hongjuan; Lu, Xin; Zhu, Jianchun; Huang, Di; Xu, Tonghui; Guo, Jianqiang; Liu, Chuanyong; Li, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    H2S is produced mainly by two enzymes:cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), using L-cysteine (L-Cys) as the substrate. In this study, we investigated the role of H2S in gastric accommodation using CBS+/− mice, immunohistochemistry, immunoblot, methylene blue assay, intragastric pressure (IGP) recording and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Mouse gastric fundus expressed H2S-generating enzymes (CBS and CSE) and generated detectable amounts of H2S. The H2S donor, NaHS or L-Cys, caused a relaxation in either gastric fundus or body. The gastric compliance was significantly increased in the presence of L-Cys (1 mM). On the contrary, AOAA, an inhibitor for CBS, largely inhibited gastric compliance. Consistently, CBS+/− mice shows a lower gastric compliance. However, PAG, a CSE inhibitor, had no effect on gastric compliances. L-Cys enhances the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxation of fundus strips, but AOAA reduces the magnitude of relaxations to EFS. Notably, the expression level of CBS but not CSE protein was elevated after feeding. Consistently, the production of H2S was also increased after feeding in mice gastric fundus. In addition, AOAA largely reduced food intake and body weight in mice. Furthermore, a metabolic aberration of H2S was found in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD). In conclusion, endogenous H2S, a novel gasotransmitter, involves in gastric accommodation. PMID:26531221

  16. H2S, a novel gasotransmitter, involves in gastric accommodation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ailin; Wang, Hongjuan; Lu, Xin; Zhu, Jianchun; Huang, Di; Xu, Tonghui; Guo, Jianqiang; Liu, Chuanyong; Li, Jingxin

    2015-11-04

    H2S is produced mainly by two enzymes:cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), using L-cysteine (L-Cys) as the substrate. In this study, we investigated the role of H2S in gastric accommodation using CBS(+/-) mice, immunohistochemistry, immunoblot, methylene blue assay, intragastric pressure (IGP) recording and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Mouse gastric fundus expressed H2S-generating enzymes (CBS and CSE) and generated detectable amounts of H2S. The H2S donor, NaHS or L-Cys, caused a relaxation in either gastric fundus or body. The gastric compliance was significantly increased in the presence of L-Cys (1 mM). On the contrary, AOAA, an inhibitor for CBS, largely inhibited gastric compliance. Consistently, CBS(+/-) mice shows a lower gastric compliance. However, PAG, a CSE inhibitor, had no effect on gastric compliances. L-Cys enhances the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxation of fundus strips, but AOAA reduces the magnitude of relaxations to EFS. Notably, the expression level of CBS but not CSE protein was elevated after feeding. Consistently, the production of H2S was also increased after feeding in mice gastric fundus. In addition, AOAA largely reduced food intake and body weight in mice. Furthermore, a metabolic aberration of H2S was found in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD). In conclusion, endogenous H2S, a novel gasotransmitter, involves in gastric accommodation.

  17. Endogenous mitigation of H2S inside of the landfills.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Zhong, Zhong; Shen, Dongsheng; Du, Yao; Xu, Jing; Long, Yuyang

    2016-02-01

    Vast quantities of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emitted from landfill sites require urgent disposal. The current study focused on source control and examined the migration and conversion behavior of sulfur compounds in two lab-scale simulated landfills with different operation modes. It aimed to explore the possible strategies and mechanisms for H2S endogenous mitigation inside of landfills during decomposition. It was found that the strength of H2S emissions from the landfill sites was dependent on the municipal solid waste (MSW) degradation speed and vertical distribution of sulfide. Leachate recirculation can shorten both the H2S influence period and pollution risk to the surrounding environment. H2S endogenous mitigation may be achieved by chemical oxidation, biological oxidation, adsorption, and/or precipitation in different stages. Migration and conversion mainly affected H2S release behavior during the initial stabilization phase in the landfill. Microbial activities related to sulfur, nitrogen, and iron can further promote H2S endogenous mitigation during the high reducing phase. Thus, H2S endogenous mitigation can be effectively enhanced via control of the aforementioned processes.

  18. Gene expression profiling of 1p35-36 genes in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Novikov, Eugene; Monteiro, Marta; Gruel, Nadège; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Loriod, Béatrice; Nguyen, Catherine; Delattre, Olivier

    2004-08-01

    Deletion of the chromosome 1p36 region is a frequent abnormality in neuroblastoma. To gain further insights into the role of this alteration in oncogenesis, we have constructed a specific cDNA microarray representing most known genes and ESTs from the 1p35-36 region and analysed the expression profiles of 15 neuroblastoma cell lines and 28 neuroblastoma tumours. Hierarchical clustering using expression levels of 320 cDNAs from 1p35-36 separated localized or 4S cases without 1p deletion from advanced stages and cell lines. Supervised learning classification enabled to predict reliably the status of chromosome 1p according to its expression profile. Around 15% of the genes or ESTs presented a significantly decreased expression in samples with 1p deletion as compared to 1p-normal samples suggesting that 1p deletion results in a gene dosage effect on a subset of genes critical for the development of 1p-deleted neuroblastoma. Several genes presumed to have functions in neural differentiation (CDC42, VAMP3, CLSTN1), signal transduction in neural cells (GNB1) and cell cycle regulation (STMN1, RPA2, RBAF600, FBXO6, MAD2L2) exhibited a decreased expression in samples presenting 1p deletion. The identification of such genes provides baseline information for further studies to elucidate how these genes could individually or collectively play a critical role in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. PMID:15195138

  19. Multiple functions of the vacuolar sorting protein Ccz1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman-Sommer, Marta; Migdalski, Andrzej; Rytka, Joanna; Kucharczyk, Roza . E-mail: roza@ibb.waw.pl

    2005-04-01

    The CCZ1 (YBR131w) gene encodes a protein required for fusion of various transport intermediates with the vacuole. Ccz1p, in a complex with Mon1p, is a close partner of Ypt7p in the processes of fusion of endosomes to vacuoles and homotypic vacuole fusion. In this work, we exploited the Ca{sup 2+}-sensitivity of the ccz1{delta} mutant to identify genes specifically interacting with CCZ1, basing on functional multicopy suppression of calcium toxicity. The presented results indicate that Ccz1p functions in the cell either in association with Mon1p and Ypt7p in fusion at the vacuolar membrane, or-separately-with Arl1p at early steps of vacuolar transport. We also show that suppression of calcium toxicity by the calcium pumps Pmr1p and Pmc1p is restricted only to the subset of mutants defective in vacuole morphology. The mechanisms of Ca{sup 2+}-pump-mediated suppression also differ from each other, since the action of Pmr1p, but not Pmc1p, appears to require Arl1p function.

  20. Proteasome-mediated degradation antagonizes critical levels of the apoptosis-inducing C1D protein

    PubMed Central

    Rothbarth, Karsten; Stammer, Hermann; Werner, Dieter

    2002-01-01

    The C1D gene is expressed in a broad spectrum of mammalian cells and tissues but its product induces apoptotic cell death when exceeding a critical level. Critical levels are achieved in a fraction of cells by transient transfection with EGFP-tagged C1D expression constructs. However, transfected cells expressing sub-critical levels of C1D(EGFP) escape apoptotic cell death by activation of a proteasome-mediated rescue mechanism. Inhibition of the proteasome-dependent degradation of the C1D(EGFP) protein results in a parallel increase of the intracellular C1D level and in the fraction of apoptotic cells. PMID:12379155

  1. Polysulfides Link H2S to Protein Thiol Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Romy; Pálinkás, Zoltán; Bäsell, Katrin; Becher, Dörte; Antelmann, Haike; Nagy, Péter

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is suggested to act as a gaseous signaling molecule in a variety of physiological processes. Its molecular mechanism of action was proposed to involve protein S-sulfhydration, that is, conversion of cysteinyl thiolates (Cys-S−) to persulfides (Cys-S-S−). A central and unresolved question is how H2S—that is, a molecule with sulfur in its lowest possible oxidation state (−2)—can lead to oxidative thiol modifications. Results: Using the lipid phosphatase PTEN as a model protein, we find that the “H2S donor” sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) leads to very rapid reversible oxidation of the enzyme in vitro. We identify polysulfides formed in NaHS solutions as the oxidizing species, and present evidence that sulfane sulfur is added to the active site cysteine. Polysulfide-mediated oxidation of PTEN was induced by all “H2S donors” tested, including sodium sulfide (Na2S), gaseous H2S, and morpholin-4-ium 4-methoxyphenyl(morpholino) phosphinodithioate (GYY4137). Moreover, we show that polysulfides formed in H2S solutions readily modify PTEN inside intact cells. Innovation: Our results shed light on the previously unresolved question of how H2S leads to protein thiol oxidation, and suggest that polysulfides formed in solutions of H2S mediate this process. Conclusion: This study suggests that the effects that have been attributed to H2S in previous reports may in fact have been mediated by polysulfides. It also supports the notion that sulfane sulfur rather than sulfide is the actual in vivo agent of H2S signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1749–1765. PMID:23646934

  2. The yeast histidine protein kinase, Sln1p, mediates phosphotransfer to two response regulators, Ssk1p and Skn7p.

    PubMed Central

    Li, S; Ault, A; Malone, C L; Raitt, D; Dean, S; Johnston, L H; Deschenes, R J; Fassler, J S

    1998-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sln1 protein is a 'two-component' regulator involved in osmotolerance. Two-component regulators are a family of signal-transduction molecules with histidine kinase activity common in prokaryotes and recently identified in eukaryotes. Phosphorylation of Sln1p inhibits the HOG1 MAP kinase osmosensing pathway via a phosphorelay mechanism including Ypd1p and the response regulator, Ssk1p. SLN1 also activates an MCM1-dependent reporter gene, P-lacZ, but this function is independent of Ssk1p. We present genetic and biochemical evidence that Skn7p is the response regulator for this alternative Sln1p signaling pathway. Thus, the yeast Sln1 phosphorelay is actually more complex than appreciated previously; the Sln1 kinase and Ypd1 phosphorelay intermediate regulate the activity of two distinct response regulators, Ssk1p and Skn7p. The established role of Skn7p in oxidative stress is independent of the conserved receiver domain aspartate, D427. In contrast, we show that Sln1p activation of Skn7p requires phosphorylation of D427. The expression of TRX2, previously shown to exhibit Skn7p-dependent oxidative-stress activation, is also regulated by the SLN1 phosphorelay functions of Skn7p. The identification of genes responsive to both classes of Skn7p function suggests a central role for Skn7p and the SLN1-SKN7 pathway in integrating and coordinating cellular response to various types of environmental stress. PMID:9843501

  3. Grid Cell Responses in 1D Environments Assessed as Slices through a 2D Lattice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, KiJung; Lewallen, Sam; Kinkhabwala, Amina A; Tank, David W; Fiete, Ila R

    2016-03-01

    Grid cells, defined by their striking periodic spatial responses in open 2D arenas, appear to respond differently on 1D tracks: the multiple response fields are not periodically arranged, peak amplitudes vary across fields, and the mean spacing between fields is larger than in 2D environments. We ask whether such 1D responses are consistent with the system's 2D dynamics. Combining analytical and numerical methods, we show that the 1D responses of grid cells with stable 1D fields are consistent with a linear slice through a 2D triangular lattice. Further, the 1D responses of comodular cells are well described by parallel slices, and the offsets in the starting points of the 1D slices can predict the measured 2D relative spatial phase between the cells. From these results, we conclude that the 2D dynamics of these cells is preserved in 1D, suggesting a common computation during both types of navigation behavior. PMID:26898777

  4. Glutathione-complexed [2Fe-2S] clusters function in Fe-S cluster storage and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Fidai, Insiya; Wachnowsky, Christine; Cowan, J A

    2016-10-01

    Glutathione-coordinated [2Fe-2S] complex is a non-protein-bound [2Fe-2S] cluster that is capable of reconstituting the human iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein IscU. This complex demonstrates physiologically relevant solution chemistry and is a viable substrate for iron-sulfur cluster transport by Atm1p exporter protein. Herein, we report on some of the possible functional and physiological roles for this novel [2Fe-2S](GS4) complex in iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis and quantitatively characterize its role in the broader network of Fe-S cluster transfer reactions. UV-vis and circular dichroism spectroscopy have been used in kinetic studies to determine second-order rate constants for [2Fe-2S] cluster transfer from [2Fe-2S](GS4) complex to acceptor proteins, such as human IscU, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Isa1, human and yeast glutaredoxins (human Grx2 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Grx3), and human ferredoxins. Second-order rate constants for cluster extraction from these holo proteins were also determined by varying the concentration of glutathione, and a likely common mechanism for cluster uptake was determined by kinetic analysis. The results indicate that the [2Fe-2S](GS4) complex is stable under physiological conditions, and demonstrates reversible cluster exchange with a wide range of Fe-S cluster proteins, thereby supporting a possible physiological role for such centers. PMID:27590019

  5. Role of Pex21p for Piggyback Import of Gpd1p and Pnc1p into Peroxisomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Effelsberg, Daniel; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Tonillo, Jason; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-10-16

    Proteins designated for peroxisomal protein import harbor one of two common peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the oleate-induced PTS2-dependent import of the thiolase Fox3p into peroxisomes is conducted by the soluble import receptor Pex7p in cooperation with the auxiliary Pex18p, one of two supposedly redundant PTS2 co-receptors. Here, we report on a novel function for the co-receptor Pex21p, which cannot be fulfilled by Pex18p. The data establish Pex21p as a general co-receptor in PTS2-dependent protein import, whereas Pex18p is especially important for oleate-induced import of PTS2 proteins. The glycerol-producing PTS2 protein glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase Gpd1p shows a tripartite localization in peroxisomes, in the cytosol, and in the nucleus under osmotic stress conditions. We show the following: (i) Pex21p is required for peroxisomal import of Gpd1p as well as a key enzyme of the NAD(+) salvage pathway, Pnc1p; (ii) Pnc1p, a nicotinamidase without functional PTS2, is co-imported into peroxisomes by piggyback transport via Gpd1p. Moreover, the specific transport of these two enzymes into peroxisomes suggests a novel regulatory role for peroxisomes under various stress conditions.

  6. Naf1 p is a box H/ACA snoRNP assembly factor.

    PubMed Central

    Fatica, Alessandro; Dlakić, Mensur; Tollervey, David

    2002-01-01

    Box H/ACA small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particles (snoRNPs) contain four essential proteins, Cbf5p, Gar1p, Nhp2p, and Nop10p, each of which, with the exception of Gar1p, is required for box H/ACA snoRNA accumulation. Database searches identified a novel essential protein, which we termed Naf1p, with a region of homology to the RNA-binding domain of Gar1p and other features in common with hnRNP-like proteins. Naf1p is localized to the nucleus and is not a stable component of the H/ACA snoRNPs, but it is required for the accumulation of all box H/ACA snoRNAs. This requirement is not at the level of snoRNA transcription initiation or termination. Naf1 p shows in vitro RNA-binding activity and also binds directly to Cbf5p and Nhp2p. Naf1p was shown to bind to the CTD in vivo in a two-hybrid assay, and the phosphorylated CTD, but not the nonphosphorylated CTD, was shown to precipitate tagged Naf1p from a cell lysate. We propose that Naf1 p is recruited to the CTD of RNA polymerase II and binds to nascent box H/ACA snoRNAs promoting snoRNP assembly. PMID:12515383

  7. Loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 1p in different solid human tumours: association with survival

    PubMed Central

    Ragnarsson, G; Eiriksdottir, G; Johannsdottir, J Th; Jonasson, J G; Egilsson, V; Ingvarsson, S

    1999-01-01

    The distal half of chromosome 1p was analysed with 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers in 683 human solid tumours at different locations. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was observed at least at one site in 369 cases or 54% of the tumours. LOHs detected ranged from 30–64%, depending on tumour location. The major results regarding LOH at different tumour locations were as follows: stomach, 20/38 (53%); colon and rectum, 60/109 (55%); lung, 38/63 (60%); breast, 145/238 (61%); endometrium, 18/25 (72%); ovary, 17/31 (55%); testis, 11/30 (37%); kidney, 22/73 (30%); thyroid, 4/14 (29%); and sarcomas, 9/14 (64%). High percentages of LOH were seen in the 1p36.3, 1p36.1, 1p35–p34.3, 1p32 and 1p31 regions, suggesting the presence of tumour-suppressor genes. All these regions on chromosome 1p show high LOH in more than one tumour type. However, distinct patterns of LOH were detected at different tumour locations. There was a significant separation of survival curves, with and without LOH at chromosome 1p, in the breast cancer patients. Multivariate analysis showed that LOH at 1p in breast tumours is a better indicator for prognosis than the other variables tested in our model, including nodal metastasis. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10188892

  8. Identification of the Candida albicans Cap1p Regulon ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Znaidi, Sadri; Barker, Katherine S.; Weber, Sandra; Alarco, Anne-Marie; Liu, Teresa T.; Boucher, Geneviève; Rogers, P. David; Raymond, Martine

    2009-01-01

    Cap1p, a transcription factor of the basic region leucine zipper family, regulates the oxidative stress response (OSR) in Candida albicans. Alteration of its C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD) results in Cap1p nuclear retention and transcriptional activation. To better understand the function of Cap1p in C. albicans, we used genome-wide location profiling (chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip) to identify its transcriptional targets in vivo. A triple-hemagglutinin (HA3) epitope was introduced at the C terminus of wild-type Cap1p (Cap1p-HA3) or hyperactive Cap1p with an altered CRD (Cap1p-CSE-HA3). Location profiling using whole-genome oligonucleotide tiling microarrays identified 89 targets bound by Cap1p-HA3 or Cap1p-CSE-HA3 (the binding ratio was at least twofold; P ≤ 0.01). Strikingly, Cap1p binding was detected not only at the promoter region of its target genes but also at their 3′ ends and within their open reading frames, suggesting that Cap1p may associate with the transcriptional or chromatin remodeling machinery to exert its activity. Overrepresented functional groups of the Cap1p targets (P ≤ 0.02) included 11 genes involved in the OSR (CAP1, GLR1, TRX1, SOD1, CAT1, and others), 13 genes involved in response to drugs (PDR16, MDR1, FLU1, YCF1, FCR1, and others), 4 genes involved in phospholipid transport (PDR16, GIT1, RTA2, and orf19.932), and 3 genes involved in the regulation of nitrogen utilization (GST3, orf19.2693, and orf19.3121), suggesting that Cap1p has other cellular functions in addition to the OSR. Bioinformatic analyses of the bound sequences suggest that Cap1p recognizes the DNA motif 5′-MTKASTMA. Finally, transcriptome analyses showed that increased expression generally accompanies Cap1p binding at its targets, indicating that Cap1p functions as a transcriptional activator. PMID:19395663

  9. Characterization of the roles of Blt1p in fission yeast cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Goss, John W.; Kim, Sunhee; Bledsoe, Hannah; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of cytokinesis is essential for cell division, yet the mechanisms that control the formation and constriction of the contractile ring are incompletely understood. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe proteins that contribute to the cytokinetic contractile ring accumulate during interphase in nodes—precursor structures around the equatorial cortex. During mitosis, additional proteins join these nodes, which condense to form the contractile ring. The cytokinesis protein Blt1p is unique in being present continuously in nodes from early interphase through to the contractile ring until cell separation. Blt1p was shown to stabilize interphase nodes, but its functions later in mitosis were unclear. We use analytical ultracentrifugation to show that purified Blt1p is a tetramer. We find that Blt1p interacts physically with Sid2p and Mob1p, a protein kinase complex of the septation initiation network, and confirm known interactions with F-BAR protein Cdc15p. Contractile rings assemble normally in blt1∆ cells, but the initiation of ring constriction and completion of cell division are delayed. We find three defects that likely contribute to this delay. Without Blt1p, contractile rings recruited and retained less Sid2p/Mob1p and Clp1p phosphatase, and β-glucan synthase Bgs1p accumulated slowly at the cleavage site. PMID:24790095

  10. Crystal Splitting in the Growth of Bi2S3

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jing; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-06-15

    Novel Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanostructures with a sheaf-like morphology are obtained via reaction of bismuth acetate-oleic acid complex with elemental sulfur in 1-octadecence. We propose these structures form by the splitting crystal growth mechanism, which is known to account for the morphology some mineral crystals assume in nature. By controlling the synthetic parameters, different forms of splitting, analogous to observed in minerals, are obtained in our case of Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3}. These new and complex Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanostructures are characterized by TEM, SEM, XRD and ED.

  11. Functional domains of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mlh1p and Pms1p DNA mismatch repair proteins and their relevance to human hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer-associated mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Q; Prolla, T A; Liskay, R M

    1997-01-01

    The MutL protein is an essential component of the Escherichia coli methyl-directed mismatch repair system but has no known enzymatic function. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the MutL equivalent, an Mlh1p and Pms1p heterodimer, interacts with Msh2p bound to mismatch-containing DNA. Little is known of the functional domains of Mlh1p and Pms1p. In this report, we define the Mlh1p and Pms1p domains required for Mlh1p-Pms1p interaction. The Mlh1p-interactive domain of Pms1p is comprised of 260 amino acids near the carboxyl terminus while the Pms1p-interactive domain of Mlh1p resides in the final 212 residues. The two domains are sufficient for Mlh1p-Pms1p interaction, as determined by the two-hybrid assay and by in vitro protein affinity chromatography. Deletions within the domains completely eliminated Mlh1p-Pms1p interaction. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we altered a number of highly conserved residues in the Mlh1p and Pms1p proteins, including some alterations that mimic germline mutations observed for human hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. Alterations either in the consensus MutL box located in the amino-terminal portion of each protein or in the carboxyl-terminal homology motif of Mlh1p eliminated DNA mismatch repair function but had no effect on Mlh1p-Pms1p interaction. In addition, certain MLH1 and PMS1 mutant alleles caused a dominant negative mutator effect when overexpressed. We discuss the implications of these findings for the structural organization of the Mlh1p and Pms1p proteins and the importance of Mlh1p-Pms1p interaction. PMID:9234704

  12. Testing the early Mars H2-CO2 greenhouse hypothesis with a 1-D photochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natasha; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Ramirez, Ramses; Kasting, James F.

    2015-09-01

    A recent study by Ramirez et al. (Ramirez, R.M. et al. [2014]. Nat. Geosci. 7(1), 59-63.) demonstrated that an atmosphere with 1.3-4 bar of CO2 and H2O, in addition to 5-20% H2, could have raised the mean annual and global surface temperature of early Mars above the freezing point of water. Such warm temperatures appear necessary to generate the rainfall (or snowfall) amounts required to carve the ancient martian valleys. Here, we use our best estimates for early martian outgassing rates, along with a 1-D photochemical model, to assess the conversion efficiency of CO, CH4, and H2S to CO2, SO2, and H2. Our outgassing estimates assume that Mars was actively recycling volatiles between its crust and interior, as Earth does today. H2 production from serpentinization and deposition of banded iron-formations is also considered. Under these assumptions, maintaining an H2 concentration of ˜1-2% by volume is achievable, but reaching 5% H2 requires additional H2 sources or a slowing of the hydrogen escape rate below the diffusion limit. If the early martian atmosphere was indeed H2-rich, we might be able to see evidence of this in the rock record. The hypothesis proposed here is consistent with new data from the Curiosity Rover, which show evidence for a long-lived lake in Gale Crater near Mt. Sharp. It is also consistent with measured oxygen fugacities of martian meteorites, which show evidence for progressive mantle oxidation over time.

  13. The role of H2S bioavailability in endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Szabo, Csaba; Ichinose, Fumito; Ahmed, Asif; Whiteman, Matthew; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial dysfunction (EDF) reflects pathophysiological changes in the phenotype and functions of endothelial cells that result from and/or contribute to a plethora of cardiovascular diseases. We review the role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the pathogenesis of EDF, one of the fastest advancing research topics. Conventionally treated as an environment pollutant, H2S is also produced in endothelial cells and participates in the fine regulation of endothelial integrity and functions. Disturbed H2S bioavailability has been suggested to be a novel indicator of EDF progress and prognosis. EDF manifests in different forms in multiple pathologies, but therapeutics aimed at remedying altered H2S bioavailability may benefit all. PMID:26071118

  14. The role of H2S bioavailability in endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Szabo, Csaba; Ichinose, Fumito; Ahmed, Asif; Whiteman, Matthew; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction reflects pathophysiological changes in the phenotype and functions of endothelial cells that result from and/or contribute to a plethora of cardiovascular diseases. Here we review the role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction, one of the fastest advanced and hottest research topics. Conventionally treated as an environment pollutant, H2S is also produced in endothelial cells and participates in the fine regulation of endothelial integrity and functions. Disturbed H2S bioavailability has been suggested to be a novel indicator of the progress and prognosis of endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction appears to exhibit in different forms in different pathologies but therapeutics aimed at remedying the altered H2S bioavailability may benefit all. PMID:26071118

  15. Quantitative photoabsorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of H2S and D2S at 49-240 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Wang, Xiuyan; Suto, Masako

    1987-01-01

    Photoabsorption and fluorescence cross sections of H2S and D2S were measured in the 49-240 nm region using synchrotron radiation as a light source. Fluorescence from photoexcitation of H2S appears at 49-97 nm, but not in the long wavelength region. Fluorescence spectra were dispersed, and used to identify the emitters to be H2S(+) (A), SH(+)(A), and H(n greater than 2). The fluorescence quantum yield is about 6 percent. Photoexcitation of D2S at 49-96 nm produces fluorescence with a quantum yield of about 5 percent. The emitters are identified from the fluorescence spectra to be D2S(+)(A), SD(+)(A), and D(n greater than 2). The Franck-Condon factors for the SH(+) and SD(+) (A-X) transitions were determined. The SD(A-X) fluorescence was observed from photoexcitation of D2S at 100-151 nm, for which the fluorescence cross section and quantum yield were measured.

  16. Metal Oxide/Zeolite Combination Absorbs H2S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1989-01-01

    Mixed copper and molybdenum oxides supported in pores of zeolite found to remove H2S from mixture of gases rich in hydrogen and steam, at temperatures from 256 to 538 degree C. Absorber of H2S needed to clean up gas streams from fuel processors that incorporate high-temperature steam reformers or hydrodesulfurizing units. Zeolites chosen as supporting materials because of their high porosity, rigidity, alumina content, and variety of both composition and form.

  17. Analysis of cardiovascular responses to the H2S donors Na2S and NaHS in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Daniel; Jupiter, Ryan C.; Pankey, Edward A.; Reddy, Vishwaradh G.; Edward, Justin A.; Swan, Kevin W.; Peak, Taylor C.; Mostany, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous molecule formed from L-cysteine in vascular tissue. In the present study, cardiovascular responses to the H2S donors Na2S and NaHS were investigated in the anesthetized rat. The intravenous injections of Na2S and NaHS 0.03–0.5 mg/kg produced dose-related decreases in systemic arterial pressure and heart rate, and at higher doses decreases in cardiac output, pulmonary arterial pressure, and systemic vascular resistance. H2S infusion studies show that decreases in systemic arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance are well-maintained, and responses to Na2S are reversible. Decreases in heart rate were not blocked by atropine, suggesting that the bradycardia was independent of parasympathetic activation and was mediated by an effect on the sinus node. The decreases in systemic arterial pressure were not attenuated by hexamethonium, glybenclamide, Nw-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, sodium meclofenamate, ODQ, miconazole, 5-hydroxydecanoate, or tetraethylammonium, suggesting that ATP-sensitive potassium channels, nitric oxide, arachidonic acid metabolites, cyclic GMP, p450 epoxygenase metabolites, or large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels are not involved in mediating hypotensive responses to the H2S donors in the rat and that responses are not centrally mediated. The present data indicate that decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to the H2S donors can be mediated by decreases in vascular resistance and cardiac output and that the donors have an effect on the sinus node independent of the parasympathetic system. The present data indicate that the mechanism of the peripherally mediated hypotensive response to the H2S donors is uncertain in the intact rat. PMID:26071540

  18. Synthesis, crystal structure and properties of [(dien){sub 2}Mn]Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4} with mixed-valent Ge centers

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Cheng-Yang; Yuan, Zhuang-Dong; Zhang, Lu-Ge; Wang, Ya-Bai; Liu, Guo-Dong; Gong, Liao-Kuo; Lei, Xiao-Wu

    2013-10-15

    One new manganese thiogermanate, [(dien){sub 2}Mn]Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4} (dien=diethylenetriamine), was prepared under mild solvothermal conditions and structurally and spectroscopically characterized. The title compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system, chiral space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (no. 19) with a=9.113(4) Å, b=12.475(5) Å, c=17.077(7) Å, V=1941.5(15) Å{sup 3} and Z=4. Its structure features a three-dimensional (3D) network composed of a one-dimensional (1D) [Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4}]{sup 2−} anionic chain and a [(dien){sub 2}Mn]{sup 2+} complex interconnected via various hydrogen bonds. The most interesting structural feature of the compound is the presence of two different oxidation states of germanium centers in the 1D [Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4}]{sup 2−} chain, which is also supported by the result of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement. The optical property of the title compound has also been studied by UV–vis spectra. - Graphical abstract: One new thiogermanate, [(dien){sub 2}Mn]Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4}, contains a one-dimensional [Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4}]{sup 2−} anionic chain with two different oxidation states of germanium centers. Display Omitted - Highlights: • One new manganese thiogermanate [(dien){sub 2}Mn]Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4} was prepared. • The compound features 1D [Ge{sub 2}S{sub 4}]{sup 2−} chain composed of [Ge{sup II}S{sub 4}] and [Ge{sup IV}S{sub 4}] tetrahedra. • The first example of inorganic–organic hybrid thiogermanates with mixed valent Ge centers.

  19. Crystal Structure of a Ube2S-Ubiquitin Conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Sonja; Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Feiler, Christian; Rape, Michael; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination occurs through the sequential formation and reorganization of specific protein-protein interfaces. Ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) enzymes, such as Ube2S, catalyze the formation of an isopeptide linkage between the C-terminus of a “donor” ubiquitin and a primary amino group of an “acceptor” ubiquitin molecule. This reaction involves an intermediate, in which the C-terminus of the donor ubiquitin is thioester-bound to the active site cysteine of the E2 and a functionally important interface is formed between the two proteins. A docked model of a Ube2S-donor ubiquitin complex was generated previously, based on chemical shift mapping by NMR, and predicted contacts were validated in functional studies. We now present the crystal structure of a covalent Ube2S-ubiquitin complex. The structure contains an interface between Ube2S and ubiquitin in trans that resembles the earlier model in general terms, but differs in detail. The crystallographic interface is more hydrophobic than the earlier model and is stable in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Remarkably, the docked Ube2S-donor complex converges readily to the configuration seen in the crystal structure in 3 out of 8 MD trajectories. Since the crystallographic interface is fully consistent with mutational effects, this indicates that the structure provides an energetically favorable representation of the functionally critical Ube2S-donor interface. PMID:26828794

  20. Feedback control of Swe1p degradation in the yeast morphogenesis checkpoint.

    PubMed

    King, Kindra; Kang, Hui; Jin, Michelle; Lew, Daniel J

    2013-04-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exposed to a variety of physiological stresses transiently delay bud emergence or bud growth. To maintain coordination between bud formation and the cell cycle in such circumstances, the morphogenesis checkpoint delays nuclear division via the mitosis-inhibitory Wee1-family kinase, Swe1p. Swe1p is degraded during G2 in unstressed cells but is stabilized and accumulates following stress. Degradation of Swe1p is preceded by its recruitment to the septin scaffold at the mother-bud neck, mediated by the Swe1p-binding protein Hsl7p. Following osmotic shock or actin depolymerization, Swe1p is stabilized, and previous studies suggested that this was because Hsl7p was no longer recruited to the septin scaffold following stress. However, we now show that Hsl7p is in fact recruited to the septin scaffold in stressed cells. Using a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) mutant that is immune to checkpoint-mediated inhibition, we show that Swe1p stabilization following stress is an indirect effect of CDK inhibition. These findings demonstrate the physiological importance of a positive-feedback loop in which Swe1p activity inhibits the CDK, which then ceases to target Swe1p for degradation. They also highlight the difficulty in disentangling direct checkpoint pathways from the effects of positive-feedback loops active at the G2/M transition.

  1. Expression of CD1d protein in human testis showing normal and abnormal spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adly, Mohamed A; Abdelwahed Hussein, Mahmoud-Rezk

    2011-05-01

    CD1d is a member of CD1 family of transmembrane glycoproteins, which represent antigen-presenting molecules. Immunofluorescent staining methods were utilized to examine expression pattern of CD1d in human testicular specimens. In testis showing normal spermatogenesis, a strong CD1d cytoplasmic expression was seen the Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, and Leydig cells. A moderate expression was observed in the spermatocytes. In testes showing maturation arrest, CD1d expression was strong in the Sertoli cells and weak in spermatogonia and spermatocytes compared to testis with normal spermatogenesis. In Sertoli cell only syndrome, CD1d expression was strong in the Sertoli and Leydig cells. This preliminary study displayed testicular infertility-related changes in CD1d expression. The ultrastructural changes associated with with normal and abnormal spermatogenesis are open for further investigations.

  2. Evidence for the h_b(1P) meson in the decay Upsilon(3S) --> pi0 h_b(1P)

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.

    2011-08-12

    Using a sample of 122 million {Upsilon}(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC, we search for the h{sub b}(1P) spin-singlet partner of the P-wave {chi}{sub b}(1P) states in the sequential decay {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup 0}h{sub b}(1P), h{sub b}(1P) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S). We observe an excess of events above background in the distribution of the recoil mass against the {pi}{sup 0} at mass 9902 {+-} 4(stat.) {+-} 1(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. The width of the observed signal is consistent with experimental resolution, and its significance is 3.0 {sigma}, including systematic uncertainties. We obtain the value (3.7 {+-} 1.1 (stat.) {+-} 0.7 (syst.)) x 10{sup -4} for the product branching fraction {Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup 0}h{sub b}) x {Beta}(h{sub b} {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}).

  3. The Yeast Sks1p Kinase Signaling Network Regulates Pseudohyphal Growth and Glucose Response

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Cole; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Sheidy, Daniel; Shively, Christian A.; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Andrews, Philip C.; Kumar, Anuj

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic growth transition from its unicellular form to a filamentous state, marked by the formation of pseudohyphal filaments of elongated and connected cells. Yeast pseudohyphal growth is regulated by signaling pathways responsive to reductions in the availability of nitrogen and glucose, but the molecular link between pseudohyphal filamentation and glucose signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identify the glucose-responsive Sks1p kinase as a signaling protein required for pseudohyphal growth induced by nitrogen limitation and coupled nitrogen/glucose limitation. To identify the Sks1p signaling network, we applied mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, profiling over 900 phosphosites for phosphorylation changes dependent upon Sks1p kinase activity. From this analysis, we report a set of novel phosphorylation sites and highlight Sks1p-dependent phosphorylation in Bud6p, Itr1p, Lrg1p, Npr3p, and Pda1p. In particular, we analyzed the Y309 and S313 phosphosites in the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit Pda1p; these residues are required for pseudohyphal growth, and Y309A mutants exhibit phenotypes indicative of impaired aerobic respiration and decreased mitochondrial number. Epistasis studies place SKS1 downstream of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR1 and the G-protein RAS2 but upstream of or at the level of cAMP-dependent PKA. The pseudohyphal growth and glucose signaling transcription factors Flo8p, Mss11p, and Rgt1p are required to achieve wild-type SKS1 transcript levels. SKS1 is conserved, and deletion of the SKS1 ortholog SHA3 in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans results in abnormal colony morphology. Collectively, these results identify Sks1p as an important regulator of filamentation and glucose signaling, with additional relevance towards understanding stress-responsive signaling in C. albicans. PMID:24603354

  4. Examination of 1D Solar Cell Model Limitations Using 3D SPICE Modeling: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, W. E.; Olson, J. M.; Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    To examine the limitations of one-dimensional (1D) solar cell modeling, 3D SPICE-based modeling is used to examine in detail the validity of the 1D assumptions as a function of sheet resistance for a model cell. The internal voltages and current densities produced by this modeling give additional insight into the differences between the 1D and 3D models.

  5. When is a Distribution Not a Distribution, and Why Would You Care: Single-Molecule Measurements of Repressor Protein 1-D Diffusion on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. M.; Flyvbjerg, H.; Cox, E. C.; Austin, R. H.

    We address the long-standing puzzle of why some proteins find their targets faster than allowed by 3D diffusion. To this end, we measured the onedimensional diffusion of LacI repressor proteins along elongated Lambda DNA using single molecule imaging techniques. We find that (1) LacI diffuses along nonspecific sequences of DNA in the form of 1D Brownian motion; (2) the observed 1D diffusion coefficients DDNA vary over an unexpectedly large range, from 2.3×10-12 cm2/s to 1.3 × 10-9 cm2/s; (3) the lengths of DNA covered by these 1D diffusions vary from 120nm to 2920 nm; and (4) the mean values of DDNA and the diffusional lengths indeed predict a LacI target binding rate 90 times faster than the 3D diffusion limit. The first half of this chapter is a tutorial on the models we use to think about the physics, the limited and noisy data, and how to squeeze the maximum amount of physics from these data. The second half is about our experiments and results.

  6. Tunable Design of Structural Colors Produced by Pseudo-1D Photonic Crystals of Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Tong, Liping; Qi, Wei; Wang, Mengfan; Huang, Renliang; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-07-01

    It is broadly observed that graphene oxide (GO) films appear transparent with a thickness of about several nanometers, whereas they appear dark brown or almost black with thickness of more than 1 μm. The basic color mechanism of GO film on a sub-micrometer scale, however, is not well understood. This study reports on GO pseudo-1D photonic crystals (p1D-PhCs) exhibiting tunable structural colors in the visible wavelength range owing to its 1D Bragg nanostructures. Striking structural colors of GO p1D-PhCs could be tuned by simply changing either the volume or concentration of the aqueous GO dispersion during vacuum filtration. Moreover, the quantitative relationship between thickness and reflection wavelength of GO p1D-PhCs has been revealed, thereby providing a theoretical basis to rationally design structural colors of GO p1D-PhCs. The spectral response of GO p1D-PhCs to humidity is also obtained clearly showing the wavelength shift of GO p1D-PhCs at differently relative humidity values and thus encouraging the integration of structural color printing and the humidity-responsive property of GO p1D-PhCs to develop a visible and fast-responsive anti-counterfeiting label. The results pave the way for a variety of potential applications of GO in optics, structural color printing, sensing, and anti-counterfeiting.

  7. Exercise increases TBC1D1 phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jessen, Niels; An, Ding; Lihn, Aina S.; Nygren, Jonas; Hirshman, Michael F.; Thorell, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Exercise and weight loss are cornerstones in the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes, and both interventions function to increase insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake into skeletal muscle. Studies in rodents demonstrate that the underlying mechanism for glucose uptake in muscle involves site-specific phosphorylation of the Rab-GTPase-activating proteins AS160 (TBC1D4) and TBC1D1. Multiple kinases, including Akt and AMPK, phosphorylate TBC1D1 and AS160 on distinct residues, regulating their activity and allowing for GLUT4 translocation. In contrast to extensive rodent-based studies, the regulation of AS160 and TBC1D1 in human skeletal muscle is not well understood. In this study, we determined the effects of dietary intervention and a single bout of exercise on TBC1D1 and AS160 site-specific phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle. Ten obese (BMI 33.4 ± 2.4, M-value 4.3 ± 0.5) subjects were studied at baseline and after a 2-wk dietary intervention. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the subjects in the resting (basal) state and immediately following a 30-min exercise bout (70% V̇o2 max). Muscle lysates were analyzed for AMPK activity and Akt phosphorylation and for TBC1D1 and AS160 phosphorylation on known or putative AMPK and Akt sites as follows: AS160 Ser711 (AMPK), TBC1D1 Ser231 (AMPK), TBC1D1 Ser660 (AMPK), TBC1D1 Ser700 (AMPK), and TBC1D1 Thr590 (Akt). The diet intervention that consisted of a major shift in the macronutrient composition resulted in a 4.2 ± 0.4 kg weight loss (P < 0.001) and a significant increase in insulin sensitivity (M value 5.6 ± 0.6), but surprisingly, there was no effect on expression or phosphorylation of any of the muscle-signaling proteins. Exercise increased muscle AMPKα2 activity but did not increase Akt phosphorylation. Exercise increased phosphorylation on AS160 Ser711, TBC1D1 Ser231, and TBC1D1 Ser660 but had no effect on TBC1D1 Ser700. Exercise did not increase TBC1D1 Thr590 phosphorylation or TBC1D1/AS160 PAS

  8. Hadronic Production of Ψ(2S) Cross section and Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kwangzoo

    2008-05-01

    The hadronic production cross section and the polarization of Ψ(2S) meson are measured by using the data from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The datasets used correspond to integrated luminosity of 1.1 fb-1 and 800 pb-1, respectively. The decay Ψ(2S) → μ+μ- is used to reconstruct Ψ(2S) mesons in the rapidity range |y(Ψ(2S))| < 0.6. The coverage of the pT range is 2.0 GeV/c ≤ pT (Ψ(2S)) < 30 GeV/c for the cross section analysis and pT ≥ 5 GeV/c for the polarization analysis. For events with pT (Ψ(2S)) > 2 GeV/c the integrated inclusive cross section multiplied by the branching ratio for dimuon decay is 3.17 ± 0.04 ± 0.28 nb . This result agrees with the CDF Run I measurement considering the increased center-of-mass energy from 1.8 TeV to 1.96 TeV. The polarization of the promptly produced Ψ(2S) mesons is found to be increasingly longitudinal as pT increases from 5 GeV/c to 30 GeV/c. The result is compared to contemporary theory models.

  9. The S1P/S1PR2 axis regulates early airway T cell infiltration in murine mast cell-dependent acute allergic responses

    PubMed Central

    Oskeritzian, Carole A.; Hait, Nitai C.; Wedman, Piper; Chumanevich, Alena; Kolawole, Elizabeth M.; Price, Megan M.; Falanga, Yves T.; Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B.; Ryan, John J.; Milstien, Sheldon; Sabbadini, Roger; Spiegel, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Background Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid produced by mast cells (MC) upon cross-linking of their high affinity receptors for IgE by antigen (Ag) that can amplify MC responses by binding to its S1P receptors. Acute MC-dependent allergic reaction can lead to systemic shock but the early events of its development in lung tissues have not been investigated, and S1P functions in the onset of allergic processes remain to be examined. Objective We used a highly specific neutralizing anti-S1P antibody (mAb) and an S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2) antagonist, JTE-013, to study S1P and S1PR2 signaling contributions to MC- and IgE-dependent airway allergic responses in mice within minutes after Ag challenge. Methods Allergic reaction was triggered by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of Ag in sensitized mice pre-treated i.p. with anti-S1P or isotype control mAb, or JTE-013 or vehicle prior to Ag challenge. Results Kinetics experiments revealed early pulmonary infiltration of mostly T cells around blood vessels of sensitized mice 20 minutes post-Ag exposure. Pre-treatment with anti-S1P mAb inhibited in vitro MC activation, as well as in vivo development of airway infiltration and MC activation, reducing serum levels of histamine, cytokines and the chemokines MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and RANTES/CCL5. S1PR2 antagonism or deficiency, or MC deficiency recapitulated these results. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated MC S1PR2 dependency for chemokine release and the necessity for signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) activation. Conclusion Activation of S1PR2 by S1P and downstream Stat3 signaling in MC regulate early T cell recruitment to antigen-challenged lungs by chemokine production. PMID:25512083

  10. Evidence that the Yeast Desaturase Ole1p Exists as a Dimer In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Y.; Shanklin, J.

    2010-06-18

    Desaturase enzymes are composed of two classes, the structurally well characterized soluble class found predominantly in the plastids of higher plants and the more widely distributed but poorly structurally defined integral membrane class. Despite their distinct evolutionary origins, the two classes both require an iron cofactor and molecular oxygen for activity and are inhibited by azide and cyanide, suggesting strong mechanistic similarities. The fact that the soluble desaturase is active as a homodimer prompted us test the hypothesis that an archetypal integral membrane desaturase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the {Delta}{sup o}-acyl-Co-A desaturase Ole1p, also exhibits a dimeric organization. Ole1p was chosen because it is one of the best characterized integral membrane desaturase and because it retains activity when fused with epitope tags. FLAG-Ole1p was detected by Western blotting of immunoprecipitates in which anti-Myc antibodies were used for capture from yeast extracts co-expressing Ole1p-Myc and Ole1p-FLAG. Interaction was confirmed by two independent bimolecular complementation assays (i.e. the split ubiquitin system and the split luciferase system). Co-expression of active and inactive Ole1p subunits resulted in an {approx}75% suppression of the accumulation of palmitoleic acid, demonstrating that the physiologically active form of Ole1p in vivo is the dimer in which both protomers must be functional.

  11. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Stm1p facilitates ribosome preservation during quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, Natalya; Chanchorn, Ekkawit; Van Dyke, Michael W.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p confers increased resistance to the macrolide starvation-mimic rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p maintains 80S ribosome integrity during stationary phase-induced quiescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates polysome formation following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates protein synthesis following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p is a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation. -- Abstract: Once cells exhaust nutrients from their environment, they enter an alternative resting state known as quiescence, whereby proliferation ceases and essential nutrients are obtained through internal stores and through the catabolism of existing macromolecules and organelles. One example of this is ribophagy, the degradation of ribosomes through the process of autophagy. However, some ribosomes need to be preserved for an anticipated recovery from nutrient deprivation. We found that the ribosome-associated protein Stm1p greatly increases the quantity of 80S ribosomes present in quiescent yeast cells and that these ribosomes facilitate increased protein synthesis rates once nutrients are restored. These findings suggest that Stm1p can act as a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation and restoration.

  12. Capillary electrophoresis of seed 2S albumins from Lupinus species.

    PubMed

    Salmanowicz, B P

    2000-10-13

    Two modes of capillary electrophoresis (CE)--free-solution capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and sodium dodecyl sulfate capillary electrophoresis (SDS-CE) using a non-gel sieving matrix--have been developed for comparative analysis of low-molecular-mass 2S albumin isoforms from lupins. The albumin fraction and 2S albumins were separated in uncoated fused-silica capillary by CZE with 0.02 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.3, containing the sodium salt of phytic acid. The use of phytic acid (0.025 M) as buffer modifier and ion-pairing agent improved migration reproducibility, peak shape and separation efficiency. The reduced 2S albumins were separated by SDS-CE using a high concentration (0.3-0.5 M) mixture of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and borate buffers in uncoated fused-silica capillary. Of the various polymers used as non-gel sieving matrix, SDS-CE with a 10% dextran solution was found to be suitable for separation of 2S albumin polypeptides with molecular masses of 4,000-7,000 and 8,000-11,000. The addition of glycerol or ethylene glycol to the SDS separating buffer improved the resolution of polypeptides. The examined Lupinus species showed species-specific CZE and SDS-CE migration profiles of the 2S albumins.

  13. Yeast Pah1p phosphatidate phosphatase is regulated by proteasome-mediated degradation.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Florencia; Hsieh, Lu-Sheng; Soto-Cardalda, Aníbal; Carman, George M

    2014-04-01

    Yeast PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase is the enzyme responsible for the production of the diacylglycerol used for the synthesis of triacylglycerol that accumulates in the stationary phase of growth. Paradoxically, the growth phase-mediated inductions of PAH1 and phosphatidate phosphatase activity do not correlate with the amount of Pah1p; enzyme abundance declined in a growth phase-dependent manner. Pah1p from exponential phase cells was a relatively stable protein, and its abundance was not affected by incubation with an extract from stationary phase cells. Recombinant Pah1p was degraded upon incubation with the 100,000 × g pellet fraction of stationary phase cells, although the enzyme was stable when incubated with the same fraction of exponential phase cells. MG132, an inhibitor of proteasome function, prevented degradation of the recombinant enzyme. Endogenously expressed and plasmid-mediated overexpressed levels of Pah1p were more abundant in the stationary phase of cells treated with MG132. Pah1p was stabilized in mutants with impaired proteasome (rpn4Δ, blm10Δ, ump1Δ, and pre1 pre2) and ubiquitination (hrd1Δ, ubc4Δ, ubc7Δ, ubc8Δ, and doa4Δ) functions. The pre1 pre2 mutations that eliminate nearly all chymotrypsin-like activity of the 20 S proteasome had the greatest stabilizing effect on enzyme levels. Taken together, these results supported the conclusion that Pah1p is subject to proteasome-mediated degradation in the stationary phase. That Pah1p abundance was stabilized in pah1Δ mutant cells expressing catalytically inactive forms of Pah1p and dgk1Δ mutant cells with induced expression of DGK1-encoded diacylglycerol kinase indicated that alteration in phosphatidate and/or diacylglycerol levels might be the signal that triggers Pah1p degradation.

  14. Characterization of interactions among the Cef1p-Prp19p-associated splicing complex.

    PubMed Central

    Ohi, Melanie D; Gould, Kathleen L

    2002-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Sp) Cdc5p and its Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) ortholog, Cef1p, are essential components of the spliceosome. In S. cerevisiae, a subcomplex of the spliceosome that includes Cef1p can be isolated on its own; this has been termed the nineteen complex (Ntc) because it contains Prp19p. Components of the Ntc include Cef1p, Snt309p, Syf2p/Ntc31p, Ntc30p/lsy1p, Ntc20p and at least six unidentified proteins. We recently identified approximately 30 proteins that copurified with Cdc5p and Cef1p. Previously unidentified S. pombe proteins in this purification were called Cwfs for complexed with five and novel S. cerevisiae proteins were called Cwcs for complexed with Cef1p. Using these proteomics data coupled with available information regarding Ntc composition, we have investigated protein identities and interactions among Ntc components. Our data indicate that Cwc2p, Prp46p, Clf1p, and Syf1p most likely represent Ntc40p, Ntc50p, Ntc77p, and Ntc90p, respectively. We show that Sc Cwc2p interacts with Prp19p and is involved in pre-mRNA splicing. Sp cwf2+, the homolog of Sc CWC2, is allelic with the previously identified Sp prp3+. We present evidence that Sp Cwf7p, an essential protein with obvious homologs in many eukaryotes but not S. cerevisiae, is a functional counterpart of Sc Snt309p and binds Sp Cwf8p (a homolog of Sc Prp19p). Further, our data indicate that a mutation in the U-box of Prp19p disrupts these numerous protein interactions causing Cef1p degradation and Ntc instability. PMID:12088152

  15. 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangements in small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hongyang; Xu, Haimiao; Xie, Fajun; Qin, Jing; Han, Na; Fan, Yun; Mao, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is poor despite reports suggesting modest improvement in survival. To date, chemotherapy remains the cornerstone treatment for SCLC patients, and many studies have focused on identifying the molecular characteristics of SCLC, which serve as the basis for precision treatments that improve the prognosis of SCLC. For instance, the therapeutic effect of temozolomide, recommended for patients with relapsed SCLC, is linked to 1p/19q codeletion in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors. A subpopulation of SCLC patients may derive benefit from tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting RET. In order to identify 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangement in SCLC patients, 32 SCLC resected specimens were retrospectively collected between 2008 and 2014 from the Zhejiang Cancer Hospital in People’s Republic of China. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to detect 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangement in the specimens. A 1p single deletion was detected in eight specimens, 19q single deletion was detected in three specimens, and only three specimens had a 1p/19q codeletion. None of the specimens had a RET rearrangement. The three patients whose specimens had a 1p/19q codeletion were alive after 58, 50, and 30 months of follow-up care. There was a trend toward prolonged overall survival for the patients with codeletion compared to no codeletion, 1p single deletion, 19q single deletion, and without 1p and 19q deletion (P=0.113, 0.168, 0.116, and 0.122, respectively). Our data showed that RET rearrangement may be not an ideal molecular target for SCLC therapies in People’s Republic of China. Instead, 1p/19q codeletion is a promising marker for a good prognosis and treatment with temozolomide in SCLC. PMID:27366094

  16. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical.

  17. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical. PMID:25751125

  18. Fluconazole transport into Candida albicans secretory vesicles by the membrane proteins Cdr1p, Cdr2p, and Mdr1p.

    PubMed

    Basso, Luiz R; Gast, Charles E; Mao, Yuxin; Wong, Brian

    2010-06-01

    A major cause of azole resistance in Candida albicans is overexpression of CDR1, CDR2, and/or MDR1, which encode plasma membrane efflux pumps. To analyze the catalytic properties of these pumps, we used ACT1- and GAL1-regulated expression plasmids to overexpress CDR1, CDR2, or MDR1 in a C. albicans cdr1 cdr2 mdr1-null mutant. When the genes of interest were expressed, the resulting transformants were more resistant to multiple azole antifungals, and accumulated less [(3)H]fluconazole intracellularly, than empty-vector controls. Next, we used a GAL1-regulated dominant negative sec4 allele to cause cytoplasmic accumulation of post-Golgi secretory vesicles (PGVs), and we found that PGVs isolated from CDR1-, CDR2-, or MDR1-overexpressing cells accumulated much more [(3)H]fluconazole than did PGVs from empty-vector controls. The K(m)s (expressed in micromolar concentrations) and V(max)s (expressed in picomoles per milligram of protein per minute), respectively, for [(3)H]fluconazole transport were 0.8 and 0.91 for Cdr1p, 4.3 and 0.52 for Cdr2p, and 3.5 and 0.59 for Mdr1p. [(3)H]fluconazole transport by Cdr1p and Cdr2p required ATP and was unaffected by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), whereas [(3)H]fluconazole transport by Mdr1p did not require ATP and was inhibited by CCCP. [(3)H]fluconazole uptake by all 3 pumps was inhibited by all other azoles tested, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s; expressed as proportions of the [(3)H]fluconazole concentration) of 0.2 to 5.6 for Cdr1p, 0.3 to 3.1 for Cdr2p, and 0.3 to 3.1 for Mdr1p. The methods used in this study may also be useful for studying other plasma membrane transporters in C. albicans and other medically important fungi.

  19. Translocation involving 1p and 17q is a recurrent genetic alteration of human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savelyeva, L.; Corvi, R.; Schwab, M. )

    1994-08-01

    Human neuroblastoma cells often are monosomic for the distal portion of 1p (1p36). The authors report that the deleted 1p material in cells of neuroblastoma lines is preferentially replaced by material from chromosome 17, resulting from an unbalanced 1;17 translocation. Chromosome 17 often acquires instability, followed by the integration of fragments into various marker chromosomes. As a consequence, 17q material can increase over 17p material. The nonrandom frequency of 1;17 translocations appears to indicate an as-yet-undefined contribution to neuroblastoma development. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Novel airway findings in a patient with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferril, Geoffrey R; Barham, Henry P; Prager, Jeremy D

    2014-01-01

    1p36 deletion syndrome comprises a phenotypic presentation that includes central nervous system, cardiac, and craniofacial anomalies. There has been no report of associated airway anomalies with this syndrome. We present here a case report and literature review. Prenatally, amniocentesis for chromosomal analysis was performed on our patient, with results consistent with 1p36 deletion syndrome. Respiratory distress and unsuccessful attempts at intubation prompted transfer to Children's Hospital of Colorado. Microlaryngoscopy was subsequently performed, revealing a persistent buccopharyngeal membrane and unidentifiable larynx. Emergent tracheostomy was then performed to secure the airway. Airway anomalies may be associated with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

  1. Electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer efficiency in the O/1 D/-N2 and O/1 D/-CO systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Black, G.

    1974-01-01

    With the aid of a molecular resonance fluorescence technique, which utilizes optical pumping from the v = 1 level of the ground state of CO by A 1 Pi-X 1 Sigma radiation, a study is made of the efficiency of E-V transfer from O(1 D) to CO. O(1 D) is generated at a known rate by O2 photodissociation at 1470 A in an intermittent mode, and the small modulation of the fluorescent signal associated with CO (v = 1) above the normal thermal background is interpreted in terms of E-V transfer efficiency. The CO (v = 1) lifetime in this system is determined mainly by resonance trapping of the IR fundamental band, and is found to be up to ten times longer than the natural radiative lifetime. For CO, (40 plus or minus 8)% of the O(1 D) energy is converted into vibrational energy. By observing the effect of N2 on the CO (v = 1) fluorescent intensity and lifetime, it is possible to obtain the E-V transfer efficiency for the system O(1 D)-N2 relative to that for O(1 D)-CO. The results indicate that the efficiency for N2 is (83 plus or minus 10)% of that for CO.

  2. A Membrane Reactor for H2S Decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Edlund, D.

    1996-12-31

    This program consisted of experimental evaluation of new metal- membrane compositions, experimental evaluation of the corrosion resistance of structural alloys and coatings for use in fabricating membrane reactors, development and evaluation of new membrane reactor designs, and economic analysis of the membrane reactor-based process for H{sub 2}S thermolysis and membrane-reactor fabrication. The results are described. Preliminary economic analyses indicate that the membrane-reactor process will ultimately be a cost-effective, energy-efficient, and environmentally acceptable means for the separation and treatment of H{sub 2}S from hot coal-gasifier streams. We estimate that the proposed process will separate and decompose H{sub 2}S at a cost that is one-half to one-fifth that of conventional technology for this application-amine scrubbers coupled with the Claus process.

  3. Crystal splitting in the growth of Bi2S3.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2006-12-01

    Bi2S3 nanostructures with a sheaflike morphology are obtained via reaction of bismuth acetate-oleic acid complex with elemental sulfur in 1-octadecence. These structures may form by the splitting crystal growth mechanism, which is known to account for the morphology some mineral crystals assume in nature. By control of the synthetic parameters, different shapes are obtained, analogous to those which have been observed to occur by crystal splitting in minerals. These new and complex Bi2S3 nanostructures are characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and electron and X-ray diffraction.

  4. Photocatalytic Au-Bi2S3 heteronanostructures.

    PubMed

    Manna, Goutam; Bose, Riya; Pradhan, Narayan

    2014-06-23

    Au-Bi2S3 heteronanostructure photocatalysts were designed in which the coupling of a metal plasmon and a semiconductor exciton aids the absorption of solar light, enhances charge separation, and results in improved catalytic activity. Furthermore, these nanostructures show a unique pattern of structural combination, with Au nanoparticles positioned at the center of Bi2S3 nanorods. The chemistry of formation of these nanostructures, their epitaxy at the junction, and their photoconductance were studied, as well as their photoresponse properties. PMID:24844409

  5. Assay Methods for H2S Biogenesis and Catabolism Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ruma; Chiku, Taurai; Kabil, Omer; Libiad, Marouane; Motl, Nicole; Yadav, Pramod K.

    2015-01-01

    H2S is produced from sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and homocysteine, or a catabolite, 3-mercaptopyruvate, by three known enzymes: cystathionine β-synthase, γ-cystathionase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase. Of these, the first two enzymes reside in the cytoplasm and comprise the transsulfuration pathway, while the third enzyme is found both in the cytoplasm and in the mitochondrion. The following mitochondrial enzymes oxidize H2S: sulfide quinone oxidoreductase, sulfur dioxygenase, rhodanese, and sulfite oxidase. The products of the sulfide oxidation pathway are thiosulfate and sulfate. Assays for enzymes involved in the production and oxidative clearance of sulfide to thiosulfate are described in this chapter. PMID:25725523

  6. Faraday effect in Sn2P2S6 crystals.

    PubMed

    Krupych, Oleh; Adamenko, Dmytro; Mys, Oksana; Grabar, Aleksandr; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2008-11-10

    We have revealed a large Faraday rotation in tin thiohypodiphosphate (Sn(2)P(2)S(6)) crystals, which makes this material promising for magneto-optics. The effective Faraday tensor component and the Verdet constant for the direction of the optic axis have been determined by measuring the pure Faraday rotation in Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals with both the single-ray and small-angular polarimetric methods at the normal conditions and a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The effective Verdet constant is found to be equal to 115 rad/T x m.

  7. A new locus for autosomal recessive non-syndromic mental retardation maps to 1p21.1-p13.3.

    PubMed

    Uyguner, O; Kayserili, H; Li, Y; Karaman, B; Nürnberg, G; Hennies, Hc; Becker, C; Nürnberg, P; Başaran, S; Apak, M Y; Wollnik, B

    2007-03-01

    Autosomal recessive inheritance of non-syndromic mental retardation (ARNSMR) may account for approximately 25% of all patients with non-specific mental retardation (NSMR). Although many X-linked genes have been identified as a cause of NSMR, only three autosomal genes are known to cause ARNSMR. We present here a large consanguineous Turkish family with four mentally retarded individuals from different branches of the family. Clinical tests showed cognitive impairment but no neurological, skeletal, and biochemical involvements. Genome-wide mapping using Human Mapping 10K Array showed a single positive locus with a parametric LOD score of 4.92 in a region on chromosome 1p21.1-p13.3. Further analyses using polymorphic microsatellite markers defined a 6.6-Mb critical region containing approximately 130 known genes. This locus is the fourth one linked to ARNSMR.

  8. Neodymium 1D systems: targeting new sources for field-induced slow magnetization relaxation.

    PubMed

    Jassal, Amanpreet Kaur; Aliaga-Alcalde, Núria; Corbella, Montserrat; Aravena, Daniel; Ruiz, Eliseo; Hundal, Geeta

    2015-09-28

    Two non-isostructural homometallic 1D neodymium species displaying field-induced slow magnetization relaxations are presented together with theoretical studies. It is established that both systems are better described as organized 1D single molecule magnets (SMMs). Studies show great potential of Nd(III) ions to provide homometallic chains with slow magnetic relaxation.

  9. Characterization of the fraction components using 1D TOCSY and 1D ROESY experiments. Four new spirostane saponins from Agave brittoniana Trel. spp. Brachypus.

    PubMed

    Macías, Francisco A; Guerra, José O; Simonet, Ana M; Nogueiras, Clara M

    2007-07-01

    A careful NMR analysis, especially 1D TOCSY and 1D ROESY, of two refined saponin fractions allowed us to determine the structures of four new saponins from a polar extract of the Agave brittoniana Trel. spp. Brachypus leaves. A full assignment of the 1H and 13C spectral data for these new saponins, agabrittonosides A-D (1-4), and one previously known saponin, karatavioside A (5) is reported. Their structures were established using a combination of 1D and 2D (1H, 1H-COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, g-HSQC, g-HMBC and g-HSQC-TOCSY) NMR techniques and ESI-MS. Moreover, the work represents a new approach to structural elucidation of saponins in refined fractions by NMR investigations.

  10. Decays B(s)→a1(b1)D(s), a1(b1)D(s)* in the perturbative QCD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Qing

    2013-04-01

    Within the framework of the perturbative QCD approach, we study the branching ratios of the two-body charmed decays B(s)→a1(b1)D(s), a1(b1)D(s)*, which, including Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa, allowed and suppressed decays. Our calculations are consistent with the currently available data and the experimental upper limits. Certainly, many of these predicted channels have not been measured by experiments and can be confronted with the future experimental data. We also discuss the polarization factions of the decays B(s)→a1(b1)D(s)*, some of which are sensitive to the distinct Gegenbauer moments of the wave functions and the decay constants of mesons a1 and b1.

  11. Adsorption of insoluble polysulfides Li2S(x) (x = 1, 2) on Li2S surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhixiao; Hubble, Dion; Balbuena, Perla B; Mukherjee, Partha P

    2015-04-14

    In lithium-sulfur batteries, the growth of insulating discharge product Li2S film affects the cathode microstructure and the related electron as well as lithium ion transport properties. In this study, chemical reactions of insoluble lithium polysulfides Li2Sx (x = 1, 2) on crystal Li2S substrate are investigated by a first-principles approach. First-principles atomistic thermodynamics predicts that the stoichiometric (111) and (110) surfaces are stable around the operating cell voltage. Li2Sx adsorption is an exothermic reaction with the (110) surface being more active to react with the polysulfides than the stoichiometric (111) surface. There is no obvious charge transfer between the adsorbed molecule and the crystal Li2S substrate. Analysis of the charge density difference suggests that the adsorbate interacts with the substrate via a strong covalent bond. The growth mechanism of thermodynamically stable surfaces is investigated in the present study. It is found that direct Li2S deposition is energetically favored over Li2S2 deposition and reduction process. PMID:25752296

  12. Loss of CDC5 function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to defects in Swe1p regulation and Bfa1p/Bub2p-independent cytokinesis.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chong Jin; Song, Sukgil; Lee, Philip R; Shou, Wenying; Deshaies, Raymond J; Lee, Kyung S

    2003-01-01

    In many organisms, polo kinases appear to play multiple roles during M-phase progression. To provide new insights into the function of budding yeast polo kinase Cdc5p, we generated novel temperature-sensitive cdc5 mutants by mutagenizing the C-terminal domain. Here we show that, at a semipermissive temperature, the cdc5-3 mutant exhibited a synergistic bud elongation and growth defect with loss of HSL1, a component important for normal G(2)/M transition. Loss of SWE1, which phosphorylates and inactivates the budding yeast Cdk1 homolog Cdc28p, suppressed the cdc5-3 hsl1Delta defect, suggesting that Cdc5p functions at a point upstream of Swe1p. In addition, the cdc5-4 and cdc5-7 mutants exhibited chained cell morphologies with shared cytoplasms between the connected cell bodies, indicating a cytokinetic defect. Close examination of these mutants revealed delayed septin assembly at the incipient bud site and loosely organized septin rings at the mother-bud neck. Components in the mitotic exit network (MEN) play important roles in normal cytokinesis. However, loss of BFA1 or BUB2, negative regulators of the MEN, failed to remedy the cytokinetic defect of these mutants, indicating that Cdc5p promotes cytokinesis independently of Bfa1p and Bub2p. Thus, Cdc5p contributes to the activation of the Swe1p-dependent Cdc28p/Clb pathway, normal septin function, and cytokinesis. PMID:12586693

  13. Involvement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae hydrolase Ldh1p in lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Debelyy, Mykhaylo O; Thoms, Sven; Connerth, Melanie; Daum, Günther; Erdmann, Ralf

    2011-06-01

    Here, we report the functional characterization of the newly identified lipid droplet hydrolase Ldh1p. Recombinant Ldh1p exhibits esterase and triacylglycerol lipase activities. Mutation of the serine in the hydrolase/lipase motif GXSXG completely abolished esterase activity. Ldh1p is required for the maintenance of a steady-state level of the nonpolar and polar lipids of lipid droplets. A characteristic feature of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δldh1 strain is the appearance of giant lipid droplets and an excessive accumulation of nonpolar lipids and phospholipids upon growth on medium containing oleic acid as a sole carbon source. Ldh1p is thought to play a role in maintaining the lipid homeostasis in yeast by regulating both phospholipid and nonpolar lipid levels. PMID:21478434

  14. Yeast calcineurin regulates nuclear localization of the Crz1p transcription factor through dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Stathopoulos-Gerontides, Angelike; Guo, Jim Jun; Cyert, Martha S.

    1999-01-01

    Calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein phosphatase, regulates Ca2+-dependent processes in a wide variety of cells. In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, calcineurin effects Ca2+-dependent changes in gene expression through regulation of the Crz1p transcription factor. We show here that calcineurin dephosphorylates Crz1p and that this results in translocation of Crz1p to the nucleus. We identify a region of Crz1p that is required for calcineurin-dependent regulation of its phosphorylation, localization, and activity, and show that this region has significant sequence simlarity to a portion of NF-AT, a family of mammalian transcription factors whose localization is also regulated by calcineurin. Thus, the mechanism of Ca2+/calcineurin-dependent signaling shows remarkable conservation between yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:10197980

  15. Observation of {chi}{sub bJ}(1P,2P) decays to light hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Reed, J.; Briere, R. A.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.

    2008-11-01

    Analyzing {upsilon}(nS) decays acquired with the CLEO detector operating at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we measure for the first time the product branching fractions B[{upsilon}(nS){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub bJ}((n-1)P)]B[{chi}{sub bJ}(n-1)P){yields}X{sub i}] for n=2 and 3, where X{sub i} denotes, for each i, one of the 14 exclusive light-hadron final states for which we observe significant signals in both {chi}{sub bJ}(1P) and {chi}{sub bJ}(2P) decays. We also determine upper limits for the electric dipole (E1) transitions {upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub bJ}(1P)

  16. Carbon Source-dependent assembly of the Snf1p kinase complex in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Corvey, Carsten; Koetter, Peter; Beckhaus, Tobias; Hack, Jeremy; Hofmann, Sandra; Hampel, Martin; Stein, Torsten; Karas, Michael; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2005-07-01

    The Snf1p/AMP-activated kinases are involved in transcriptional, metabolic, and developmental regulation in response to stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Snf1p (Cat1p) is one of the key regulators of carbohydrate metabolism, and cat1 (snf1) mutants fail to grow with non-fermentable carbon sources. In Candida albicans, Snf1p is an essential protein and cells depend on a functional Snf1 kinase even with glucose as carbon source. We investigated the CaSnf1p complex after tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometric analysis and show that the complex composition changes with the carbon source provided. Three subunits were identified, one of which was named CaSnf4p because of its homology to the ScSnf4 protein and the respective CaSNF4 gene could complement a S. cerevisiae snf4 mutant. The other two proteins revealed similarities to the S. cerevisiae kinase beta subunits ScGal83p, ScSip2p, and ScSip1p. Both genes complemented the scaffold function in a S. cerevisiae gal83,sip1,sip2 triple deletion mutant and were named according to their scaffold function as CaKIS1p and CaKIS2p. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization peptide mass fingerprint analysis indicated that CaKis2p is N-terminal myristoylated and the incorporation of CaKis2p in the Snf1p complex was reduced when compared with cells grown with glucose as a carbon source. To verify the different complex assemblies, a stable isotope labeling technique (iTraqtrade mark) was employed, confirming a 3-fold decrease of CaKis2p with ethanol. Yeast two-hybrid analysis confirmed the interaction partners, and these results showed an activator domain for the CaKis2 protein that has not been reported for S. cerevisiae scaffold subunits.

  17. FXR1P is a GSK3β substrate regulating mood and emotion processing.

    PubMed

    Del'Guidice, Thomas; Latapy, Camille; Rampino, Antonio; Khlghatyan, Jivan; Lemasson, Morgane; Gelao, Barbara; Quarto, Tiziana; Rizzo, Giuseppe; Barbeau, Annie; Lamarre, Claude; Bertolino, Alessandro; Blasi, Giuseppe; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin

    2015-08-18

    Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is a shared action believed to be involved in the regulation of behavior by psychoactive drugs such as antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. However, little is known about the identity of the substrates through which GSK3β affects behavior. We identified fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 (FXR1P), a RNA binding protein associated to genetic risk for schizophrenia, as a substrate for GSK3β. Phosphorylation of FXR1P by GSK3β is facilitated by prior phosphorylation by ERK2 and leads to its down-regulation. In contrast, behaviorally effective chronic mood stabilizer treatments in mice inhibit GSK3β and increase FXR1P levels. In line with this, overexpression of FXR1P in the mouse prefrontal cortex also leads to comparable mood-related responses. Furthermore, functional genetic polymorphisms affecting either FXR1P or GSK3β gene expression interact to regulate emotional brain responsiveness and stability in humans. These observations uncovered a GSK3β/FXR1P signaling pathway that contributes to regulating mood and emotion processing. Regulation of FXR1P by GSK3β also provides a mechanistic framework that may explain how inhibition of GSK3β can contribute to the regulation of mood by psychoactive drugs in mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder. Moreover, this pathway could potentially be implicated in other biological functions, such as inflammation and cell proliferation, in which FXR1P and GSK3 are known to play a role. PMID:26240334

  18. [Turner syndrome and monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome misdiagnosed as thyropenia: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Meng, Xubiao; Li, Zhiming; Liu, Tingting; Wen, Zhiming

    2013-12-01

    A 21-year-old woman with a short stature presented with primary amenorrhoea and a 45X karyotype, and comparative genomic hybridization revealed 1p36 deletion and abnormal genes in multiple chromosomes to support the diagnosis of Turner syndrome and monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome. The main clinical features of this condition include microsomia, poor sexual development, menoschesis, gigantorectum, absence of internal genitalia, sometimes with thyropenia and low intelligence. This disease can be easily diagnosed for its heterogeneous clinical manifestations.

  19. Mini-Review: Monosomy 1p36 syndrome: reviewing the correlation between deletion sizes and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rocha, C F; Vasques, R B; Santos, S R; Paiva, C L A

    2016-01-01

    The major clinical features of monosomy 1p36 deletion are developmental delay and hypotonia associated with short stature and craniofacial dysmorphisms. The objective of this study was to review the cases of 1p36 deletion that was reported between 1999 and 2014, in order to identify a possible correlation between the size of the 1p36-deleted segment and the clinical phenotype of the disease. Scientific articles published in the (National Center for Biotechnology Information; NCBI http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) and Scientific Electronic Library Online (www.scielo.com.br) databases were searched using key word combinations, such as "1p36 deletion", "monosomy 1p36 deletion", and "1p36 deletion syndrome". Articles in English or Spanish reporting the correlation between deletion sizes and the respective clinical phenotypes were retrieved, while letters, reviews, guidelines, and studies with mouse models were excluded. Among the 746 retrieved articles, only 17 (12 case reports and 5 series of cases), comprising 29 patients (9 males and 20 females, aged 0 months (neonate) to 22 years) bearing the 1p36 deletions and whose clinical phenotypes were described, met the inclusion criteria. The genotype-phenotype correlation in monosomy 1p36 is a challenge because of the variability in the size of the deleted segment, as well as in the clinical manifestations of similar size deletions. Therefore, the severity of the clinical features was not always associated with the deletion size, possibly because of the other influences, such as stochastic factors, epigenetic events, or reduced penetration of the deleted genes.

  20. FXR1P is a GSK3β substrate regulating mood and emotion processing

    PubMed Central

    Del’Guidice, Thomas; Latapy, Camille; Rampino, Antonio; Khlghatyan, Jivan; Lemasson, Morgane; Gelao, Barbara; Quarto, Tiziana; Rizzo, Giuseppe; Barbeau, Annie; Lamarre, Claude; Bertolino, Alessandro; Blasi, Giuseppe; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is a shared action believed to be involved in the regulation of behavior by psychoactive drugs such as antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. However, little is known about the identity of the substrates through which GSK3β affects behavior. We identified fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 (FXR1P), a RNA binding protein associated to genetic risk for schizophrenia, as a substrate for GSK3β. Phosphorylation of FXR1P by GSK3β is facilitated by prior phosphorylation by ERK2 and leads to its down-regulation. In contrast, behaviorally effective chronic mood stabilizer treatments in mice inhibit GSK3β and increase FXR1P levels. In line with this, overexpression of FXR1P in the mouse prefrontal cortex also leads to comparable mood-related responses. Furthermore, functional genetic polymorphisms affecting either FXR1P or GSK3β gene expression interact to regulate emotional brain responsiveness and stability in humans. These observations uncovered a GSK3β/FXR1P signaling pathway that contributes to regulating mood and emotion processing. Regulation of FXR1P by GSK3β also provides a mechanistic framework that may explain how inhibition of GSK3β can contribute to the regulation of mood by psychoactive drugs in mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder. Moreover, this pathway could potentially be implicated in other biological functions, such as inflammation and cell proliferation, in which FXR1P and GSK3 are known to play a role. PMID:26240334

  1. Loss of APD1 in Yeast Confers Hydroxyurea Sensitivity Suppressed by Yap1p Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hei-Man Vincent; Pan, Kewu; Kong, Ka-Yiu Edwin; Hu, Ligang; Chan, Ling-Chim; Siu, Kam-Leung; Sun, Hongzhe; Wong, Chi-Ming; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxins are iron-sulfur proteins that play important roles in electron transport and redox homeostasis. Yeast Apd1p is a novel member of the family of thioredoxin-like ferredoxins. In this study, we characterized the hydroxyurea (HU)-hypersensitive phenotype of apd1Δ cells. HU is an inhibitor of DNA synthesis, a cellular stressor and an anticancer agent. Although the loss of APD1 did not influence cell proliferation or cell cycle progression, it resulted in HU sensitivity. This sensitivity was reverted in the presence of antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine, implicating a role for intracellular redox. Mutation of the iron-binding motifs in Apd1p abrogated its ability to rescue HU sensitivity in apd1Δ cells. The iron-binding activity of Apd1p was verified by a color assay. By mass spectrometry two irons were found to be incorporated into one Apd1p protein molecule. Surprisingly, ribonucleotide reductase genes were not induced in apd1Δ cells and the HU sensitivity was unaffected when dNTP production was boosted. A suppressor screen was performed and the expression of stress-regulated transcription factor Yap1p was found to effectively rescue the HU sensitivity in apd1Δ cells. Taken together, our work identified Apd1p as a new ferredoxin which serves critical roles in cellular defense against HU. PMID:25600293

  2. Reporter mRNAs cleaved by Rnt1p are exported and degraded in the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Meaux, Stacie; Lavoie, Mathieu; Gagnon, Jules; Abou Elela, Sherif; van Hoof, Ambro

    2011-01-01

    For most protein coding genes, termination of transcription by RNA polymerase II is preceded by an endonucleolytic cleavage of the nascent transcript. The 3′ product of this cleavage is rapidly degraded via the 5′ exoribonuclease Rat1p which is thought to destabilize the RNA polymerase II complex. It is not clear whether RNA cleavage is sufficient to trigger nuclear RNA degradation and transcription termination or whether the fate of the RNA depends on additional elements. For most mRNAs, this cleavage is mediated by the cleavage and polyadenylation machinery, but it can also be mediated by Rnt1p. We show that Rnt1p cleavage of an mRNA is not sufficient to trigger nuclear degradation or transcription termination. Insertion of an Rnt1p target site into a reporter mRNA did not block transcription downstream of the cleavage site, but instead produced two unstable cleavage products, neither of which were stabilized by inactivation of Rat1p. In contrast, the 3′ and 5′ cleavage products were stabilized by the deletion of the cytoplasmic 5′ exoribonuclease (Xrn1p) or by inactivation of the cytoplasmic RNA exosome. These data indicate that transcription termination and nuclear degradation is not the default fate of cleaved RNAs and that specific promoter and/or sequence elements are required to determine the fate of the cleavage products. PMID:21821655

  3. The Na+/H+ exchanger Nhx1p regulates the initiation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuole fusion.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Quan-Sheng; Fratti, Rutilio A

    2010-10-01

    Nhx1p is a Na(+)(K(+))/H(+) antiporter localized at the vacuolar membrane of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nhx1p regulates the acidification of cytosol and vacuole lumen, and is involved in membrane traffic from late endosomes to the vacuole. Deletion of the gene leads to aberrant vacuolar morphology and defective vacuolar protein sorting. These phenotypes are hallmarks of malfunctioning vacuole homeostasis and indicate that membrane fusion is probably altered. Here, we investigated the role of Nhx1p in the regulation of homotypic vacuole fusion. Vacuoles isolated from nhx1Δ yeast showed attenuated fusion. Assays configured to differentiate between the first round of fusion and ongoing rounds showed that nhx1Δ vacuoles were only defective in the first round of fusion, suggesting that Nhx1p regulates an early step in the pathway. Although fusion was impaired on nhx1Δ vacuoles, SNARE complex formation was indistinguishable from wild-type vacuoles. Fusion could be rescued by adding the soluble SNARE Vam7p. However, Vam7p only activated the first round of nhx1Δ vacuole fusion. Once fusion was initiated, nhx1Δ vacuoles appeared behave in a wild-type manner. Complementation studies showed that ion transport function was required for Nhx1p-mediated support of fusion. In addition, the weak base chloroquine restored nhx1Δ fusion to wild-type levels. Together, these data indicate that Nhx1p regulates the initiation of fusion by controlling vacuole lumen pH.

  4. 2S Albumin Storage Proteins: What Makes them Food Allergens?

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, F. Javier; Clemente, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    2S albumin storage proteins are becoming of increasing interest in nutritional and clinical studies as they have been reported as major food allergens in seeds of many mono- and di-cotyledonous plants. This review describes the main biochemical, structural and functional properties of these proteins thought to play a role in determining their potential allergenicity. 2S albumins are considered to sensitize directly via the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The high stability of their intrinsic protein structure, dominated by a well-conserved skeleton of cysteine residues, to the harsh conditions present in the GIT suggests that these proteins are able to cross the gut mucosal barrier to sensitize the mucosal immune system and/or elicit an allergic response. The flexible and solvent-exposed hypervariable region of these proteins is immunodominant and has the ability to bind IgE from allergic patients´ sera. Several linear IgE-binding epitopes of 2S albumins spanning this region have been described to play a major role in allergenicity; the role of conformational epitopes of these proteins in food allergy is far from being understood and need to be investigated. Finally, the interaction of these proteins with other components of the food matrix might influence the absorption rates of immunologically reactive 2S albumins but also in their immune response. PMID:18949071

  5. Observations of H2S toward OMC-1.

    PubMed

    Minh, Y C; Ziurys, L M; Irvine, W M; McGonagle, D

    1990-09-01

    Interstellar hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and its isotopic variant (H2(34)S) have been observed toward several positions in OMC-1 via their 1(10)-1(01) transitions near 168 GHz using the FCRAO 14 m telescope. We derive total column densities toward Orion(KL) for the extended ridge, for the plateau, and for the hot core, in addition to values for other positions in OMC-1. The fractional abundance of H2S (approximately 10(-9)) in the quiescent regions of OMC-1 seems to be difficult to explain by currently known ion-molecule reactions. The fractional abundance of H2S relative to H2 is enhanced by a factor of 1000 in the hot core and the plateau relative to the quiescent clouds. This enhancement may be a result of grain surface chemistry and/or of high-temperature gas-phase chemistry. From the nondetection of HDS in its 2(11)-2(12) transition, we estimate the abundance ratio [HDS]/H2S] < or = 0.02 in the hot core.

  6. H2S during circulatory shock: Some unresolved questions

    PubMed Central

    McCook, Oscar; Radermacher, Peter; Volani, Chiara; Asfar, Pierre; Ignatius, Anita; Kemmler, Julia; Möller, Peter; Szabó, Csaba; Whiteman, Matthew; Wood, Mark E.; Wang, Rui; Georgieff, Michael; Wachter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Numerous papers have been published on the role of H2S during circulatory shock. Consequently, knowledge about vascular sulfide concentrations may assume major importance, in particular in the context of “acute on chronic disease”, i.e., during circulatory shock in animals with pre-existing chronic disease. This review addresses the questions i) of the “real” sulfide levels during circulatory shock, and, ii) to which extent injury and pre-existing co-morbidity may affect the expression of H2S producing enzymes under these conditions. In the literature there is a huge range on sulfide blood levels during circulatory shock, in part as a result of the different analytical methods used, but also due to the variable of the models and species studied. Clearly, some of the very high levels reported should be questioned in the context of the well-known H2S toxicity. As long as “real” sulfide levels during circulatory shock are unknown and/or undetectable “on line” due to the lack of appropriate techniques, it appears to be premature to correlate the measured blood levels of hydrogen sulfide with the severity of shock or the H2S therapy-related biological outcomes. The available data on the tissue expression of the H2S-releasing enzymes during circulatory shock suggest that a “constitutive” CSE expression may play a crucial role of for the maintenance of organ function, at least in the kidney. The data also indicate that increased CBS and CSE expression, in particular in the lung and the liver, represents an adaptive response to stress states. PMID:24650697

  7. Mycobacterial phosphatidylinositol mannoside is a natural antigen for CD1d-restricted T cells

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Karsten; Scotet, Emmanuel; Niemeyer, Marcus; Koebernick, Heidrun; Zerrahn, Jens; Maillet, Sophie; Hurwitz, Robert; Kursar, Mischo; Bonneville, Marc; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Schaible, Ulrich E.

    2004-01-01

    A group of T cells recognizes glycolipids presented by molecules of the CD1 family. The CD1d-restricted natural killer T cells (NKT cells) are primarily considered to be self-reactive. By employing CD1d-binding and T cell assays, the following structural parameters for presentation by CD1d were defined for a number of mycobacterial and mammalian lipids: two acyl chains facilitated binding, and a polar head group was essential for T cell recognition. Of the mycobacterial lipids tested, only a phosphatidylinositol mannoside (PIM) fulfilled the requirements for CD1d binding and NKT cell stimulation. This PIM activated human and murine NKT cells via CD1d, thereby triggering antigen-specific IFN-γ production and cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and PIM-loaded CD1d tetramers identified a subpopulation of murine and human NKT cells. This phospholipid, therefore, represents a mycobacterial antigen recognized by T cells in the context of CD1d. PMID:15243159

  8. Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Human Steroid 5-Reductase (AKR1D1)

    SciTech Connect

    Costanzo, L.; Drury, J; Christianson, D; Penning, T

    2009-01-01

    Human steroid 5{beta}-reductase (aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1D1) catalyzes reduction of {Delta}{sup 4}-ene double bonds in steroid hormones and bile acid precursors. We have reported the structures of an AKR1D1-NADP{sup +} binary complex, and AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-cortisone, AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-progesterone and AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-testosterone ternary complexes at high resolutions. Recently, structures of AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-5{beta}-dihydroprogesterone complexes showed that the product is bound unproductively. Two quite different mechanisms of steroid double bond reduction have since been proposed. However, site-directed mutagenesis supports only one mechanism. In this mechanism, the 4-pro-R hydride is transferred from the re-face of the nicotinamide ring to C5 of the steroid substrate. E120, a unique substitution in the AKR catalytic tetrad, permits a deeper penetration of the steroid substrate into the active site to promote optimal reactant positioning. It participates with Y58 to create a 'superacidic' oxyanion hole for polarization of the C3 ketone. A role for K87 in the proton relay proposed using the AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-5{beta}-dihydroprogesterone structure is not supported.

  9. TBC1D14 regulates autophagy via the TRAPP complex and ATG9 traffic.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Christopher A; Nühlen, Stefanie; Judith, Delphine; Frith, David; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Behrends, Christian; Tooze, Sharon A

    2016-02-01

    Macroautophagy requires membrane trafficking and remodelling to form the autophagosome and deliver its contents to lysosomes for degradation. We have previously identified the TBC domain-containing protein, TBC1D14, as a negative regulator of autophagy that controls delivery of membranes from RAB11-positive recycling endosomes to forming autophagosomes. In this study, we identify the TRAPP complex, a multi-subunit tethering complex and GEF for RAB1, as an interactor of TBC1D14. TBC1D14 binds to the TRAPP complex via an N-terminal 103 amino acid region, and overexpression of this region inhibits both autophagy and secretory traffic. TRAPPC8, the mammalian orthologue of a yeast autophagy-specific TRAPP subunit, forms part of a mammalian TRAPPIII-like complex and both this complex and TBC1D14 are needed for RAB1 activation. TRAPPC8 modulates autophagy and secretory trafficking and is required for TBC1D14 to bind TRAPPIII. Importantly, TBC1D14 and TRAPPIII regulate ATG9 trafficking independently of ULK1. We propose a model whereby TBC1D14 and TRAPPIII regulate a constitutive trafficking step from peripheral recycling endosomes to the early Golgi, maintaining the cycling pool of ATG9 required for initiation of autophagy. PMID:26711178

  10. Role and regulation of CD1d in normal and pathological B cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Mohammed S.; Karadimitris, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a non-polymorphic, MHC class I-like molecule, which presents phosphoand glycosphingo-lipid antigens to a subset of CD1d-restricted T cells called invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. This CD1d-iNKT cell axis regulates nearly all aspects of both the innate and adaptive immune response. Expression of CD1d on B cells is suggestive of the ability of these cells to present antigen to and form cognate interactions with iNKT cells. Herein we summarise key evidence regarding the role and regulation of CD1d in normal B cells and in humoral immunity. We then extend the discussion to B cell disorders, with emphasis on autoimmune disease, viral infection and neoplastic transformation of B lineage cells, where CD1d expression can be altered as a mechanism of immune evasion, and can have both diagnostic and prognostic importance. Finally we highlight current and future therapeutic strategies that aim to target the CD1d-iNKT axis in B cells. PMID:25381357

  11. Calreticulin Controls the Rate of Assembly of CD1d Molecules in the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yajuan; Zhang, Wei; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal; Cresswell, Peter

    2010-01-01

    CD1d is an MHC class I-like molecule comprised of a transmembrane glycoprotein (heavy chain) associated with β2-microglobulin (β2m) that presents lipid antigens to NKT cells. Initial folding of the heavy chain involves its glycan-dependent association with calreticulin (CRT), calnexin (CNX), and the thiol oxidoreductase ERp57, and is followed by assembly with β2m to form the heterodimer. Here we show that in CRT-deficient cells CD1d heavy chains convert to β2m-associated dimers at an accelerated rate, indicating faster folding of the heavy chain, while the rate of intracellular transport after assembly is unaffected. Unlike the situation with MHC class I molecules, antigen presentation by CD1d is not impaired in the absence of CRT. Instead, there are elevated levels of stable and functional CD1d on the surface of CRT-deficient cells. Association of the heavy chains with the ER chaperones Grp94 and Bip is observed in the absence of CRT, and these may replace CRT in mediating CD1d folding and assembly. ER retention of free CD1d heavy chains is impaired in CRT-deficient cells, allowing their escape and subsequent expression on the plasma membrane. However, these free heavy chains are rapidly internalized and degraded in lysosomes, indicating that β2m association is required for the exceptional resistance of CD1d to lysosomal degradation that is normally observed. PMID:20861015

  12. The FC-1D: The profitable alternative Flying Circus Commercial Aviation Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meza, Victor J.; Alvarez, Jaime; Harrington, Brook; Lujan, Michael A.; Mitlyng, David; Saroughian, Andy; Silva, Alex; Teale, Tim

    1994-01-01

    The FC-1D was designed as an advanced solution for a low cost commercial transport meeting or exceeding all of the 1993/1994 AIAA/Lockheed request for proposal requirements. The driving philosophy behind the design of the FC-1D was the reduction of airline direct operating costs. Every effort was made during the design process to have the customer in mind. The Flying Circus Commercial Aviation Group targeted reductions in drag, fuel consumption, manufacturing costs, and maintenance costs. Flying Circus emphasized cost reduction throughout the entire design program. Drag reduction was achieved by implementation of the aft nacelle wing configuration to reduce cruise drag and increase cruise speeds. To reduce induced drag, rather than increasing the wing span of the FC-1D, spiroids were included in the efficient wing design. Profile and friction drag are reduced by using riblets in place of paint around the fuselage and empennage of the FC-1D. Choosing a single aisle configuration enabled the Flying Circus to optimize the fuselage diameter. Thus, reducing fuselage drag while gaining high structural efficiency. To further reduce fuel consumption a weight reduction program was conducted through the use of composite materials. An additional quality of the FC-1D is its design for low cost manufacturing and assembly. As a result of this design attribute, the FC-1D will have fewer parts which reduces weight as well as maintenance and assembly costs. The FC-1D is affordable and effective, the apex of commercial transport design.

  13. Mild developmental delay and obesity in two patients with mosaic 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Shino; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Osawa, Makiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    We identified mosaic 1p36 deletions in two patients with developmental delay, distinctive features, and obesity, who can walk alone and communicate with others. Thus, their neurological defects are milder than those in typical patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome because most patients with 1p36 deletion cannot acquire expressive language. Chromosomal microarray testing revealed 3.0 and 4.5 Mb aberrations in the subtelomeric region of the short arm of chromosome 1. Mean signal ratios of the identified aberrations were -0.4 and -0.5, indicating mosaicism, which was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with a mosaic ratio of 70% and 77%, respectively. Previous studies demonstrated that deletion of the distal 2-3 Mb region would be responsible for hyperphagia and obesity seen in patients. On the other hand, the severity of the neurological defect often correlates with the size of the terminal deletion of 1p36, and patients with larger deletions of 1p36 would usually show severely impaired developmental milestones and be immobile and aphasic. In such cases, hyperphagia and obesity could be clinically masked. In this study, two patients with mosaic deletions of 1p36 showed obesity as a consequence of hyperphagia. This study suggests that patients with 1p36 deletion would be at risk for hyperphagia and obesity when they have both risk factors, that is, (1) deletions including the 2-3 Mb critical region and (2) milder phenotypes that allow them to reach food on their own and to overeat.

  14. NAD+-dependent deacetylase Hst1p controls biosynthesis and cellular NAD+ levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bedalov, Antonio; Hirao, Maki; Posakony, Jeffrey; Nelson, Melisa; Simon, Julian A

    2003-10-01

    Nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) performs key roles in electron transport reactions, as a substrate for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases. In the latter two processes, NAD(+) is consumed and converted to ADP-ribose and nicotinamide. NAD(+) levels can be maintained by regeneration of NAD(+) from nicotinamide via a salvage pathway or by de novo synthesis of NAD(+) from tryptophan. Both pathways are conserved from yeast to humans. We describe a critical role of the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase Hst1p as a sensor of NAD(+) levels and regulator of NAD(+) biosynthesis. Using transcript arrays, we show that low NAD(+) states specifically induce the de novo NAD(+) biosynthesis genes while the genes in the salvage pathway remain unaffected. The NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase activity of Hst1p represses de novo NAD(+) biosynthesis genes in the absence of new protein synthesis, suggesting a direct effect. The known Hst1p binding partner, Sum1p, is present at promoters of highly inducible NAD(+) biosynthesis genes. The removal of HST1-mediated repression of the NAD(+) de novo biosynthesis pathway leads to increased cellular NAD(+) levels. Transcript array analysis shows that reduction in cellular NAD(+) levels preferentially affects Hst1p-regulated genes in comparison to genes regulated with other NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases (Sir2p, Hst2p, Hst3p, and Hst4p). In vitro experiments demonstrate that Hst1p has relatively low affinity toward NAD(+) in comparison to other NAD(+)-dependent enzymes. These findings suggest that Hst1p serves as a cellular NAD(+) sensor that monitors and regulates cellular NAD(+) levels. PMID:12972620

  15. On the current drive capability of low dimensional semiconductors: 1D versus 2D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Y.; Appenzeller, J.

    2015-10-29

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Lastly, our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  16. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport.

    PubMed

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R; Mans, Dorus A; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J F; Taylor, S Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A; Scambler, Peter J; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M; Beales, Philip L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M; Witman, George B

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  17. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R.; Mans, Dorus A.; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Taylor, S. Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A.; Scambler, Peter J.; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M.; Beales, Philip L.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Witman, George B.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Anney, Richard; Antony, Dinu; Asimit, Jennifer; Ayub, Mohammad; Barrett, Jeff; Barroso, Inês; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Blackwood, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Bochukova, Elena; Bolton, Patrick; Boustred, Chris; Breen, Gerome; Brion, Marie-Jo; Brown, Andrew; Calissano, Mattia; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Chen, Lu; Cirak, Sebhattin; Clapham, Peter; Clement, Gail; Coates, Guy; Collier, David; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Tony; Craddock, Nick; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah; Daly, Allan; Danecek, Petr; Smith, George Davey; Day-Williams, Aaron; Day, Ian; Durbin, Richard; Edkins, Sarah; Ellis, Peter; Evans, David; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fitzpatrick, David; Flicek, Paul; Floyd, Jamie; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Gallagher, Louise; Gaunt, Tom; Geschwind, Daniel; Greenwood, Celia; Grozeva, Detelina; Guo, Xiaosen; Gurling, Hugh; Hart, Deborah; Hendricks, Audrey; Holmans, Peter; Huang, Jie; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; Hysi, Pirro; Jackson, David; Jamshidi, Yalda; Jewell, David; Chris, Joyce; Kaye, Jane; Keane, Thomas; Kemp, John; Kennedy, Karen; Kent, Alastair; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Lachance, Genevieve; Langford, Cordelia; Lee, Irene; Li, Rui; Li, Yingrui; Ryan, Liu; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lopes, Margarida; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Massimo, Mangino; Marchini, Jonathan; Maslen, John; McCarthy, Shane; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew; McKechanie, Andrew; McQuillin, Andrew; Memari, Yasin; Metrustry, Sarah; Min, Josine; Moayyeri, Alireza; Morris, James; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; Northstone, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Oualkacha, Karim; Owen, Michael; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Parker, Victoria; Parr, Jeremy; Paternoster, Lavinia; Paunio, Tiina; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John; Pietilainen, Olli; Plagnol, Vincent; Quail, Michael A.; Quaye, Lydia; Raymond, Lucy; Rehnström, Karola; Brent Richards, J.; Ring, Sue; Ritchie, Graham R S; Savage, David B.; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert K.; Serra, Eva; Shihab, Hashem; Shin, So-Youn; Skuse, David; Small, Kerrin; Smee, Carol; Soler, Artigas María; Soranzo, Nicole; Southam, Lorraine; Spector, Tim; St Pourcain, Beate; St. Clair, David; Stalker, Jim; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tian, Jing; Timpson, Nic; Tobin, Martin; Valdes, Ana; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Wain, Louise; Walter, Klaudia; Wang, Jun; Ward, Kirsten; Wheeler, Ellie; Whittall, Ros; Williams, Hywel; Williamson, Kathy; Wilson, Scott G.; Wong, Kim; Whyte, Tamieka; ChangJiang, Xu; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhang, Feng; Zheng, Hou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  18. Comet Halley O(1D) and H2O production rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magee-Sauer, K.; Scherb, F.; Roesler, F. L.; Harlander, J.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-based dual-etalon Fabry-Perot spectrometer observations have been made of Comet Halley's forbidden O I 6300 A emission. The 0.2 A resolution of the spectral scans was sufficient to resolve the O I forbidden line emissions from both nearby cometary NH2 and telluric emissions. On the basis of these measurements, the production rate Q of O(1D) was determined; it is then found, by taking into account the photodissociation of H2O and OH as sources of O(1D), that the ratio of H2O/O(1D) production rates is of the order of 6.

  19. On the Current Drive Capability of Low Dimensional Semiconductors: 1D versus 2D.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Appenzeller, J

    2015-12-01

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  20. A practical process for the preparation of [32P]S1P and binding assay for S1P receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Adam J.; Liu, Hui; Tu, Zhude

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) are important regulators of vascular permeability, inflammation, angiogenesis and vascular maturation. Identifying a specific S1PR PET radioligand is imperative, but it is hindered by the complexity and variability of current for binding affinity measurement procedures. Herein, we report a streamlined protocol for radiosynthesis of [32P]S1P with good radiochemical yield (36 – 50%) and high radiochemical purity (>99%). We also report a reproducible procedure for determining the binding affinity for compounds targeting S1PRs in vitro. PMID:25931137

  1. Roles of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors in malignant behavior of glioma cells. Differential effects of S1P{sub 2} on cell migration and invasiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Nicholas; Van Brocklyn, James R. . E-mail: james.vanbrocklyn@osumc.edu

    2007-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid that signals through a family of five G-protein-coupled receptors, termed S1P{sub 1-5}. S1P stimulates growth and invasiveness of glioma cells, and high expression levels of the enzyme that forms S1P, sphingosine kinase-1, correlate with short survival of glioma patients. In this study we examined the mechanism of S1P stimulation of glioma cell proliferation and invasion by either overexpressing or knocking down, by RNA interference, S1P receptor expression in glioma cell lines. S1P{sub 1}, S1P{sub 2} and S1P{sub 3} all contribute positively to S1P-stimulated glioma cell proliferation, with S1P{sub 1} being the major contributor. Stimulation of glioma cell proliferation by these receptors correlated with activation of ERK MAP kinase. S1P{sub 5} blocks glioma cell proliferation, and inhibits ERK activation. S1P{sub 1} and S1P{sub 3} enhance glioma cell migration and invasion. S1P{sub 2} inhibits migration through Rho activation, Rho kinase signaling and stress fiber formation, but unexpectedly, enhances glioma cell invasiveness by stimulating cell adhesion. S1P{sub 2} also potently enhances expression of the matricellular protein CCN1/Cyr61, which has been implicated in tumor cell adhesion, and invasion as well as tumor angiogenesis. A neutralizing antibody to CCN1 blocked S1P{sub 2}-stimulated glioma invasion. Thus, while S1P{sub 2} decreases glioma cell motility, it may enhance invasion through induction of proteins that modulate glioma cell interaction with the extracellular matrix.

  2. Hal2p functions in Bdf1p-involved salt stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Liu, Liangyu; Wang, Mingpeng; Fu, Jiafang; Zhang, Zhaojie; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bdf1p associates with the basal transcription complexes TFIID and acts as a transcriptional regulator. Lack of Bdf1p is salt sensitive and displays abnormal mitochondrial function. The nucleotidase Hal2p detoxifies the toxic compound 3' -phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphate (pAp), which blocks the biosynthesis of methionine. Hal2p is also a target of high concentration of Na(+). Here, we reported that HAL2 overexpression recovered the salt stress sensitivity of bdf1Δ. Further evidence demonstrated that HAL2 expression was regulated indirectly by Bdf1p. The salt stress response mechanisms mediated by Bdf1p and Hal2p were different. Unlike hal2Δ, high Na(+) or Li(+) stress did not cause pAp accumulation in bdf1Δ and methionine supplementation did not recover its salt sensitivity. HAL2 overexpression in bdf1Δ reduced ROS level and improved mitochondrial function, but not respiration. Further analyses suggested that autophagy was apparently defective in bdf1Δ, and autophagy stimulated by Hal2p may play an important role in recovering mitochondrial functions and Na(+) sensitivity of bdf1Δ. Our findings shed new light towards our understanding about the molecular mechanism of Bdf1p-involved salt stress response in budding yeast.

  3. Neuropathology of brain and spinal malformations in a case of monosomy 1p36

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common subtelomeric chromosomal deletion linked to mental retardation and seizures. Neuroimaging studies suggest that monosomy 1p36 is associated with brain malformations including polymicrogyria and nodular heterotopia, but the histopathology of these lesions is unknown. Here we present postmortem neuropathological findings from a 10 year-old girl with monosomy 1p36, who died of respiratory complications. The findings included micrencephaly, periventricular nodular heterotopia in occipitotemporal lobes, cortical dysgenesis resembling polymicrogyria in dorsolateral frontal lobes, hippocampal malrotation, callosal hypoplasia, superiorly rotated cerebellum with small vermis, and lumbosacral hydromyelia. The abnormal cortex exhibited “festooned” (undulating) supragranular layers, but no significant fusion of the molecular layer. Deletion mapping demonstrated single copy loss of a contiguous 1p36 terminal region encompassing many important neurodevelopmental genes, among them four HES genes implicated in regulating neural stem cell differentiation, and TP73, a monoallelically expressed gene. Our results suggest that brain and spinal malformations in monosomy 1p36 may be more extensive than previously recognized, and may depend on the parental origin of deleted genes. More broadly, our results suggest that specific genetic disorders may cause distinct forms of cortical dysgenesis. PMID:24252393

  4. Molecular and cellular pathways associated with chromosome 1p deletions during colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Claire M; Crowley-Skillicorn, Cheray; Bernstein, Carol; Holubec, Hana; Bernstein, Harris

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal instability is a major pathway of sporadic colon carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p appears to be one of the “hot spots” in the non-neoplastic mucosa that, when deleted, is associated with the initiation of carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p contains genes associated with DNA repair, spindle checkpoint function, apoptosis, multiple microRNAs, the Wnt signaling pathway, tumor suppression, antioxidant activities, and defense against environmental toxins. Loss of 1p is dangerous since it would likely contribute to genomic instability leading to tumorigenesis. The 1p deletion-associated colon carcinogenesis pathways are reviewed at the molecular and cellular levels. Sporadic colon cancer is strongly linked to a high-fat/low-vegetable/low-micronutrient, Western-style diet. We also consider how selected dietary-related compounds (eg, excess hydrophobic bile acids, and low levels of folic acid, niacin, plant-derived antioxidants, and other modulatory compounds) might affect processes leading to chromosomal deletions, and to the molecular and cellular pathways specifically altered by chromosome 1p loss. PMID:21753893

  5. Neuropathology of brain and spinal malformations in a case of monosomy 1p36.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Naoko; Daza, Ray A M; Shaffer, Lisa G; Barkovich, A James; Dobyns, William B; Hevner, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common subtelomeric chromosomal deletion linked to mental retardation and seizures. Neuroimaging studies suggest that monosomy 1p36 is associated with brain malformations including polymicrogyria and nodular heterotopia, but the histopathology of these lesions is unknown. Here we present postmortem neuropathological findings from a 10 year-old girl with monosomy 1p36, who died of respiratory complications. The findings included micrencephaly, periventricular nodular heterotopia in occipitotemporal lobes, cortical dysgenesis resembling polymicrogyria in dorsolateral frontal lobes, hippocampal malrotation, callosal hypoplasia, superiorly rotated cerebellum with small vermis, and lumbosacral hydromyelia. The abnormal cortex exhibited "festooned" (undulating) supragranular layers, but no significant fusion of the molecular layer. Deletion mapping demonstrated single copy loss of a contiguous 1p36 terminal region encompassing many important neurodevelopmental genes, among them four HES genes implicated in regulating neural stem cell differentiation, and TP73, a monoallelically expressed gene. Our results suggest that brain and spinal malformations in monosomy 1p36 may be more extensive than previously recognized, and may depend on the parental origin of deleted genes. More broadly, our results suggest that specific genetic disorders may cause distinct forms of cortical dysgenesis.

  6. Refinement of 1p36 alterations not involving PRDM16 in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Duhoux, Francois P; Ameye, Geneviève; Lambot, Virginie; Herens, Christian; Lambert, Frédéric; Raynaud, Sophie; Wlodarska, Iwona; Michaux, Lucienne; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Labis, Elise; Taviaux, Sylvie; Chapiro, Elise; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Khac, Florence Nguyen; Struski, Stéphanie; Dobbelstein, Sophie; Dastugue, Nicole; Lippert, Eric; Speleman, Frank; Van Roy, Nadine; De Weer, An; Rack, Katrina; Talmant, Pascaline; Richebourg, Steven; Mugneret, Francine; Tigaud, Isabelle; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle; Laibe, Sophy; Nadal, Nathalie; Terré, Christine; Libouton, Jeanne-Marie; Decottignies, Anabelle; Vikkula, Miikka; Poirel, Hélène A

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed to characterize 81 cases of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies with cytogenetic 1p36 alterations not affecting the PRDM16 locus. In total, three subgroups were identified: balanced translocations (N = 27) and telomeric rearrangements (N = 15), both mainly observed in myeloid disorders; and unbalanced non-telomeric rearrangements (N = 39), mainly observed in lymphoid proliferations and frequently associated with a highly complex karyotype. The 1p36 rearrangement was isolated in 12 cases, mainly myeloid disorders. The breakpoints on 1p36 were more widely distributed than previously reported, but with identifiable rare breakpoint cluster regions, such as the TP73 locus. We also found novel partner loci on 1p36 for the known multi-partner genes HMGA2 and RUNX1. We precised the common terminal 1p36 deletion, which has been suggested to have an adverse prognosis, in B-cell lymphomas [follicular lymphomas and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas with t(14;18)(q32;q21) as well as follicular lymphomas without t(14;18)]. Intrachromosomal telomeric repetitive sequences were detected in at least half the cases of telomeric rearrangements. It is unclear how the latter rearrangements occurred and whether they represent oncogenic events or result from chromosomal instability during oncogenesis.

  7. Cch1p mediates Ca2+ influx to protect Saccharomyces cerevisiae against eugenol toxicity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Stephen K; McAinsh, Martin; Widdicks, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Eugenol has antifungal activity and is recognised as having therapeutic potential. However, little is known of the cellular basis of its antifungal activity and a better understanding of eugenol tolerance should lead to better exploitation of eugenol in antifungal therapies. The model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expressing apoaequorin was used to show that eugenol induces cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. We investigated the eugenol Ca(2+) signature in further detail and show that exponentially growing cells exhibit Ca(2+) elevation resulting exclusively from the influx of Ca(2+) across the plasma membrane whereas in stationary growth phase cells Ca(2+) influx from intracellular and extracellular sources contribute to the eugenol-induced Ca(2+) elevation. Ca(2+) channel deletion yeast mutants were used to identify the pathways mediating Ca(2+) influx; intracellular Ca(2+) release was mediated by the vacuolar Ca(2+) channel, Yvc1p, whereas the Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane could be resolved into Cch1p-dependent and Cch1p-independent pathways. We show that the growth of yeast devoid the plasma membrane Ca(2+) channel, Cch1p, was hypersensitive to eugenol and that this correlated with reduced Ca(2+) elevations. Taken together, these results indicate that a cch1p-mediated Ca(2+) influx is part of an intracellular signal which protects against eugenol toxicity. This study provides fresh insight into the mechanisms employed by fungi to tolerate eugenol toxicity which should lead to better exploitation of eugenol in antifungal therapies.

  8. Nud1p, the yeast homolog of Centriolin, regulates spindle pole body inheritance in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Oren; Taxis, Christof; Keller, Philipp J; Benjak, Aleksander; Stelzer, Ernst H K; Simchen, Giora; Knop, Michael

    2006-08-23

    Nud1p, a protein homologous to the mammalian centrosome and midbody component Centriolin, is a component of the budding yeast spindle pole body (SPB), with roles in anchorage of microtubules and regulation of the mitotic exit network during vegetative growth. Here we analyze the function of Nud1p during yeast meiosis. We find that a nud1-2 temperature-sensitive mutant has two meiosis-related defects that reflect genetically distinct functions of Nud1p. First, the mutation affects spore formation due to its late function during spore maturation. Second, and most important, the mutant loses its ability to distinguish between the ages of the four spindle pole bodies, which normally determine which SPB would be preferentially included in the mature spores. This affects the regulation of genome inheritance in starved meiotic cells and leads to the formation of random dyads instead of non-sister dyads under these conditions. Both functions of Nud1p are connected to the ability of Spc72p to bind to the outer plaque and half-bridge (via Kar1p) of the SPB. PMID:16888627

  9. Hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1 axis controls energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vagner R R; Micheletti, Thayana O; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Katashima, Carlos K; Lenhare, Luciene; Morari, Joseane; Mendes, Maria Carolina S; Razolli, Daniela S; Rocha, Guilherme Z; de Souza, Claudio T; Ryu, Dongryeol; Prada, Patrícia O; Velloso, Lício A; Carvalheira, José B C; Pauli, José Rodrigo; Cintra, Dennys E; Ropelle, Eduardo R

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) that has a role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that the S1P/S1PR1 signalling pathway in hypothalamic neurons regulates energy homeostasis in rodents. We demonstrate that S1PR1 protein is highly enriched in hypothalamic POMC neurons of rats. Intracerebroventricular injections of the bioactive lipid, S1P, reduce food consumption and increase rat energy expenditure through persistent activation of STAT3 and the melanocortin system. Similarly, the selective disruption of hypothalamic S1PR1 increases food intake and reduces the respiratory exchange ratio. We further show that STAT3 controls S1PR1 expression in neurons via a positive feedback mechanism. Interestingly, several models of obesity and cancer anorexia display an imbalance of hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 axis, whereas pharmacological intervention ameliorates these phenotypes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the neuronal S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 signalling axis plays a critical role in the control of energy homeostasis in rats. PMID:25255053

  10. Novel S1P(1) receptor agonists--part 3: from thiophenes to pyridines.

    PubMed

    Bolli, Martin H; Abele, Stefan; Birker, Magdalena; Bravo, Roberto; Bur, Daniel; de Kanter, Ruben; Kohl, Christopher; Grimont, Julien; Hess, Patrick; Lescop, Cyrille; Mathys, Boris; Müller, Claus; Nayler, Oliver; Rey, Markus; Scherz, Michael; Schmidt, Gunther; Seifert, Jürgen; Steiner, Beat; Velker, Jörg; Weller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In preceding communications we summarized our medicinal chemistry efforts leading to the identification of potent, selective, and orally active S1P1 agonists such as the thiophene derivative 1. As a continuation of these efforts, we replaced the thiophene in 1 by a 2-, 3-, or 4-pyridine and obtained less lipophilic, potent, and selective S1P1 agonists (e.g., 2) efficiently reducing blood lymphocyte count in the rat. Structural features influencing the compounds' receptor affinity profile and pharmacokinetics are discussed. In addition, the ability to penetrate brain tissue has been studied for several compounds. As a typical example for these pyridine based S1P1 agonists, compound 53 showed EC50 values of 0.6 and 352 nM for the S1P1 and S1P3 receptor, respectively, displayed favorable PK properties, and penetrated well into brain tissue. In the rat, compound 53 maximally reduced the blood lymphocyte count for at least 24 h after oral dosing of 3 mg/kg. PMID:24367923

  11. Yeast lipin 1 orthologue pah1p regulates vacuole homeostasis and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Sasser, Terry; Qiu, Quan-Sheng; Karunakaran, Surya; Padolina, Mark; Reyes, Anna; Flood, Blake; Smith, Sheena; Gonzales, Chad; Fratti, Rutilio A

    2012-01-13

    Vacuole homotypic fusion requires a group of regulatory lipids that includes diacylglycerol, a fusogenic lipid that is produced through multiple metabolic pathways including the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA). Here we examined the relationship between membrane fusion and PA phosphatase activity. Pah1p is the single yeast homologue of the Lipin family of PA phosphatases. Deletion of PAH1 was sufficient to cause marked vacuole fragmentation and abolish vacuole fusion. The function of Pah1p solely depended on its phosphatase activity as complementation studies showed that wild type Pah1p restored fusion, whereas the phosphatase dead mutant Pah1p(D398E) had no effect. We discovered that the lack of PA phosphatase activity blocked fusion by inhibiting the binding of SNAREs to Sec18p, an N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor homologue responsible for priming inactive cis-SNARE complexes. In addition, pah1Δ vacuoles were devoid of the late endosome/vacuolar Rab Ypt7p, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase Vps34p, and Vps39p, a subunit of the HOPS (homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting) tethering complex, all of which are required for vacuole fusion. The lack of Vps34p resulted in the absence of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, a lipid required for SNARE activity and vacuole fusion. These findings demonstrate that Pah1p and PA phosphatase activity are critical for vacuole homeostasis and fusion.

  12. Magic Wavelength for the Hydrogen 1S-2S Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Akio

    2016-05-01

    The state of the art precision measurement of the transition frequencies of neutral atoms is performed with atoms trapped by the magic wavelength optical lattice that cancels the ac Stark shift of the transitions. Trapping with magic wavelength lattice is also expected to improve the precision of the hydrogen 1S-2S transition frequency, which so far has been measured only with the atomic beam. In this talk, I discuss the magic wavelength for the hydrogen 1S-2S transition, and the possibility of implementing the optical lattice trapping for hydrogen. Optical trapping of hydrogen also opens the way to perform magnetic field free spectroscopy of antihydrogen for the test of CPT theorem.

  13. Hot gas, regenerative, supported H.sub.2 S sorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor); Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Efficient, regenerable sorbents for removal of H.sub.2 S from moderately high temperature (usually 200.degree. C.-550.degree.C.) gas streams comprise a porous, high surface area aluminosilicate support, suitably a zeolite, and most preferably a sodium deficient zeolite containing 1 to 20 weight percent of binary metal oxides. The binary oxides are a mixture of a Group VB or VIB metal oxide with a Group IB, IIB or VIII metal oxide such as V-Zn-O, V-Cu-O, Cu-Mo-O, Zn-Mo-O or Fe-Mo-O contained in the support. The sorbent effectively removes H.sub.2 S from the host gas stream in high efficiency and can be repetitively regenerated at least 10 times without loss of activity.

  14. Total syntheses of (2S)-antafumicins A and B.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Y; Ukita, T; Miyagawa, H; Tsurushima, T; Irie, H; Nishimura, K; Ueno, T

    1994-09-01

    To clarify the absolute configurations of antafumicins A and B, which are antifungal substances from Aspergillus niger NH-401, the total synthesis of (2S)-antafumicins was accomplished by starting from (S)-malic acid in 12 steps. Based upon the physicochemical data of the synthetic samples, the absolute configurations of naturally occurring antafumicins A and B were determined as (2R,4S)- and (2R,4R)-4-(3-acetyl-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)-2-methoxy-4-butanolide, respectively.

  15. Ubiquitination and degradation of the hominoid-specific oncoprotein TBC1D3 is regulated by protein palmitoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Chen; Lange, Jeffrey J.; Samovski, Dmitri; Su, Xiong; Liu, Jialiu; Sundaresan, Sinju; Stahl, Philip D.

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Hominoid-specific oncogene TBC1D3 is targeted to plasma membrane by palmitoylation. •TBC1D3 is palmitoylated on two cysteine residues: 318 and 325. •TBC1D3 palmitoylation governs growth factors-induced TBC1D3 degradation. •Post-translational modifications may regulate oncogenic properties of TBC1D3. -- Abstract: Expression of the hominoid-specific oncoprotein TBC1D3 promotes enhanced cell growth and proliferation by increased activation of signal transduction through several growth factors. Recently we documented the role of CUL7 E3 ligase in growth factors-induced ubiquitination and degradation of TBC1D3. Here we expanded our study to discover additional molecular mechanisms that control TBC1D3 protein turnover. We report that TBC1D3 is palmitoylated on two cysteine residues: 318 and 325. The expression of double palmitoylation mutant TBC1D3:C318/325S resulted in protein mislocalization and enhanced growth factors-induced TBC1D3 degradation. Moreover, ubiquitination of TBC1D3 via CUL7 E3 ligase complex was increased by mutating the palmitoylation sites, suggesting that depalmitoylation of TBC1D3 makes the protein more available for ubiquitination and degradation. The results reported here provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern TBC1D3 protein degradation. Dysregulation of these mechanisms in vivo could potentially result in aberrant TBC1D3 expression and promote oncogenesis.

  16. PROVISIONAL ADVISORY LEVELS (PALs) FOR HYDROGEN SULFIDE (H2S)

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Thomas C; Dorman, David; Gardner, Donald; Adeshina, Femi; Ross, Robert Hord

    2009-01-01

    Application of PAL protocols was performed for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as experimental data permitted. The data base includes human experimental studies, worker exposure evaluations, as well as case studies on acute and repeated exposure. The data base of animal studies is substantial covering multiple species and addressing acute, repeated, and subchronic exposure scenarios. PAL estimates were approved by the Expert Consultation Panel for Provisional Advisory Levels in November 2006. No reliable data were found on oral exposure, making it impractical to estimate PALs for drinking water. Since H2S exists as a gas, partitioning to air is likely to occur with an environmental release. H2S inhalation PAL values for 24 hr exposure are: PAL 1 = 1.2 ppm; PAL 2 = 7.0 ppm; and PAL 3 = 27 ppm; the 30-d and 90-d inhalation exposure values are: PAL 1 = 0.85 ppm and PAL 2 = 3.0 ppm. PAL 3 values for 30-d and 90-d are not recommended due to insufficient data. Long-term data were insufficient to estimate 2-year inhalation PALs.

  17. H2S mediated thermal and photochemical methane activation

    PubMed Central

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; de Graaf, Coen; Broer, Ria; Patterson, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable, low temperature methods of natural gas activation are critical in addressing current and foreseeable energy and hydrocarbon feedstock needs. Large portions of natural gas resources are still too expensive to process due to their high content of hydrogen sulfide gas (H2S) in mixture with methane, CH4, altogether deemed as sub-quality or “sour” gas. We propose a unique method for activating this “sour” gas to form a mixture of sulfur-containing hydrocarbon intermediates, CH3SH and CH3SCH3, and an energy carrier, such as H2. For this purpose, we computationally investigated H2S mediated methane activation to form a reactive CH3SH species via direct photolysis of sub-quality natural gas. Photoexcitation of hydrogen sulfide in the CH4+H2S complex results in a barrier-less relaxation via a conical intersection to form a ground state CH3SH+H2 complex. The resulting CH3SH can further be heterogeneously coupled over acidic catalysts to form higher hydrocarbons while the H2 can be used as a fuel. This process is very different from a conventional thermal or radical-based processes and can be driven photolytically at low temperatures, with enhanced controllability over the process conditions currently used in industrial oxidative natural gas activation. Finally, the proposed process is CO2 neutral, as opposed to the currently industrially used methane steam reforming (SMR). PMID:24150813

  18. The oxidation of H 2S in Black Sea waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millero, Frank J.

    The oxidation of H 2S with oxygen was measured in Black Sea waters at 25°C. The measurements were made on mixtures of deep waters and surface waters. The oxidation rates were found to be 10 times faster than the rates for surface seawater (Black Sea and Gulf Stream) with added H 2S. Since the rates were the same for filtered (0.2 μm) and unfiltered waters, the increase in the rates appears to be abiotic and caused by solutes dissolved in the deep waters. Laboratory measurements indicate that dissolved Fe 2+ is the likely cause of the rate increase. The oxidation of Fe(II) yields particulate Fe(III) that can catalyse the oxidation and also oxidize H 2S. Preliminary measurements of the rates of oxidation of SO 32- and S 2O 32- in oxygenated deep Black Sea waters are also presented. These measurements indicate that particulate Fe(III) also may accelerate the rates of oxidation of SO 32-.

  19. Pru du 2S albumin or Pru du vicilin?

    PubMed

    Garino, Cristiano; De Paolis, Angelo; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Arlorio, Marco

    2015-06-01

    A short partial sequence of 28 amino acids is all the information we have so far about the putative allergen 2S albumin from almond. The aim of this work was to analyze this information using mainly bioinformatics tools, in order to verify its rightness. Based on the results reported in the paper describing this allergen from almond, we analyzed the original data of amino acids sequencing through available software. The degree of homology of the almond 12kDa protein with any other known 2S albumin appears to be much lower than the one reported in the paper that firstly described it. In a publicly available cDNA library we discovered an expressed sequence tag which translation generates a protein that perfectly matches both of the sequencing outputs described in the same paper. A further analysis indicated that the latter protein seems to belong to the vicilin superfamily rather than to the prolamin one. The fact that also vicilins are seed storage proteins known to be highly allergenic would explain the IgE reactivity originally observed. Based on our observations we suggest that the IgE reactive 12kDa protein from almond currently known as Pru du 2S albumin is in reality the cleaved N-terminal region of a 7S vicilin like protein.

  20. Thermodynamics and kinetics of defects in Li2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan; Kaghazchi, Payam

    2016-05-01

    Li2S is the final product of lithiation of sulfur cathodes in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. In this work, we study formation and diffusion of defects in Li2S. It is found that for a wide range of voltages (referenced to metal Li) between 0.17 V and 2.01 V, positively charged interstitial Li (Li+) is the most favorable defect type with a fixed formation energy of 1.02 eV. The formation energy of negatively charged Li vacancy ( VL i - ) is also constant, and it is only 0.13 eV higher than that of Li+. For a narrow range of voltages between 0.00 V and 0.17 V, the formation energy of neutral S vacancy is the lowest and it decreases with decreasing the cell voltage. The energy barrier for Li+ diffusion (0.45 eV), which takes place via an exchange mechanism, is 0.18 eV higher than that for VL i - (0.27 eV), which takes place via a single vacancy hopping. Considering formation energies and diffusion barriers, we find that ionic conductivity in Li2S is due to both Li+ and VL i - , but the latter mechanism being slightly more favorable.

  1. Superconductivity in semimetallic Bi3O2S3

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, L.; Parker, D.; Babkevich, P.; Yang, L.; Ronnow, H. M.; Sefat, A. S.

    2015-03-12

    We report in this paper a further investigation on the thermodynamic and transport properties, and an assessment of theoretical calculations, for the BiS2-layered Bi3O2S3 superconductor. The polycrystalline sample is synthesized with a superconducting transition temperature of Tconset=5.75K and Tczero=4.03K (≈Tcmag) that drops to 3.3 K by applying a hydrostatic pressure of 6 kbar. Density-of-states (DOS) calculations give substantial hybridization between Bi, O, and S, with Bi the largest component of DOS, which supports the idea that the BiS2 layer is relevant for producing electron-phonon coupling. An analysis of previously published specific heat data for Bi3O2S3 is additionally suggestive of amore » strong electron-phonon interaction in the Bi-O-S system. The analysis of the Seebeck coefficient results strongly suggests that Bi3O2S3 is a semimetal. In fact, we found the semimetallic or narrow band gap behavior may occur in certain other materials in the BiS2-layered class of materials, such as Bi4O4S3.« less

  2. FISH analysis of a patient with a constitutional 1p36 deletion defines a region for a neuroblastoma tumor suppressor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Biegel, J.; Hilliard, C.; White, P.

    1994-09-01

    Molecular and cytogenetic studies of neuroblastoma have implicated the presence of one or more tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 1p. We previously reported a neuroblastoma patient with a constitutional interstitial deletion of 1p36. As one means of further defining the deleted region, we have analyzed a series of chromosome 1p36 specific probes by FISH to metaphase chromosomes from a lymphoblastoid cell line established from the patient. We have also tested these probes on a neuroblastoma cell line, NGP, which has a t(1;15) translocation involving 1p36. The probes analyzed to date in order from centromere to telomere include ID-3 (heir-1), D1S56, D1S160, and CDC2L1 (p58). Cosmids for ID-3 and D1S56 were present in 2 copies and proximal to the breakpoint in the constitutional case, and retained on the derivative 1 in NGP. CDC2L1 was also present in 2 copies in the constitutional case, but is distal to the deletion. In NGP, CDC2L1 was translocated to the derivative 15. The D1S160 locus was deleted from one of the chromosomes 1 in the constitutional case, and was present in three copies in NGP: on the normal chromosome 1, the derivative chromosome 1, and the derivative chromosome 15. Molecular studies have suggested that there is a duplication involving this region in NGP, and so it is not clear where the translocation breakpoint is in this cell line. These studies have localized a critical region for a neuroblastoma tumor suppressor gene to 1p36.2, distal to D1S56, proximal to CDC2L1, and including D1S160. This region overlaps with the smallest area of deletion defined by loss of heterozygosity studies of primary neuroblastomas and neuroblastoma cell lines. Additional studies with probes that flank the D1S160 locus will facilitate a molecular cloning approach for a neuroblastoma tumor suppressor gene.

  3. Morbid obesity in a child with monosomy 1p36 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zagalo, Ana; Dias, Patricia; Pereira, Carla; Sampaio, Maria de Lurdes

    2012-01-01

    The monosomy 1p36 syndrome is a cause of syndromic obesity. It is characterised by psychomotor delay, hypotonia and typical craniofacial dysmorphism. Other features commonly associated are behavioural anomalies including hyperphagia and self-injuring, seizures, congenital heart disease and hypothyroidism. The authors report the case of a 9-year and 5-month-boy referred to the paediatric endocrinology clinics for morbid obesity. Clinical findings were generalised obesity with a body mass index >95th centile, acanthosis nigricans of the neck, arms with self inflicted lesions, deep-set eyes, straight eyebrows, broad nasal bridge and pointed chin. He was unable to walk and had no expressive language. Cytogenetic analysis identified 1p36.33-pter deletion (~139 Mb terminal deletion in chromosome 1 short arm) and Y chromosome duplication. The blood analysis showed insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. The authors emphasise the need to consider monosomy 1p36 as a cause of severe psychomotor delay and obesity. PMID:22605691

  4. Division of labor in an oligomer of the DEAD-box RNA helicase Ded1p

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Andrea A.; Gao, Zhaofeng; Liu, Fei; Jia, Huijue; Yang, Quansheng

    2015-01-01

    Most aspects of RNA metabolism involve DEAD-box RNA helicases, enzymes that bind and remodel RNA and RNA-protein complexes in an ATP-dependent manner. Here we show that the DEAD-box helicase Ded1p oligomerizes in the cell and in vitro, and unwinds RNA as a trimer. Two protomers bind the single stranded region of RNA substrates and load a third protomer to the duplex, which then separates the strands. ATP utilization differs between the strand separating protomer and those bound to the single stranded region. Binding of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4G to Ded1p interferes with oligomerization and thereby modulates unwinding activity and RNA affinity of the helicase. Our data reveal a strict division of labor between the Ded1p protomers in the oligomer. This mode of oligomerization fundamentally differs from other helicases. Oligomerization represents a previously unappreciated level of regulation for DEAD-box helicase activities. PMID:26212457

  5. Morbid obesity in a child with monosomy 1p36 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zagalo, Ana; Dias, Patricia; Pereira, Carla; Sampaio, Maria de Lurdes

    2012-01-01

    The monosomy 1p36 syndrome is a cause of syndromic obesity. It is characterised by psychomotor delay, hypotonia and typical craniofacial dysmorphism. Other features commonly associated are behavioural anomalies including hyperphagia and self-injuring, seizures, congenital heart disease and hypothyroidism. The authors report the case of a 9-year and 5-month-boy referred to the paediatric endocrinology clinics for morbid obesity. Clinical findings were generalised obesity with a body mass index >95th centile, acanthosis nigricans of the neck, arms with self inflicted lesions, deep-set eyes, straight eyebrows, broad nasal bridge and pointed chin. He was unable to walk and had no expressive language. Cytogenetic analysis identified 1p36.33-pter deletion (~139 Mb terminal deletion in chromosome 1 short arm) and Y chromosome duplication. The blood analysis showed insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. The authors emphasise the need to consider monosomy 1p36 as a cause of severe psychomotor delay and obesity.

  6. Polymicrogyria and infantile spasms in a patient with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Kubota, Masaya; Kurosawa, Kenji; Ichihashi, Izumi; Kaneko, Yuu; Hattori, Ayako; Komaki, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2011-05-01

    A 3-months-old boy presented with partial seizures that soon evolved into infantile spasms. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria with right-sided predominance. ACTH therapy successfully controlled epilepsy and electroencephalograms were normalized. Conventional G-banded chromosomal analysis was performed due to his distinctive features and a derivative chromosome 1 derived from parental balanced translocation with a karyoptype of 46,XY,der(1)t(1;4)(p36.23;q35) was detected. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis confirmed the deleted region of 1p36 as large as 8.6Mb. This is the first delineation of concurrent complications of infantile spasms and polymicrogyria in patient with 1p36 deletion. 1p36 deletion syndrome should be broadly recognized as a differential diagnosis of regional polymicrogyria and/or infantile spasms.

  7. Division of Labor in an Oligomer of the DEAD-Box RNA Helicase Ded1p.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Andrea A; Gao, Zhaofeng; Liu, Fei; Jia, Huijue; Yang, Quansheng; Jankowsky, Eckhard

    2015-08-20

    Most aspects of RNA metabolism involve DEAD-box RNA helicases, enzymes that bind and remodel RNA and RNA-protein complexes in an ATP-dependent manner. Here we show that the DEAD-box helicase Ded1p oligomerizes in the cell and in vitro, and unwinds RNA as a trimer. Two protomers bind the single-stranded region of RNA substrates and load a third protomer to the duplex, which then separates the strands. ATP utilization differs between the strand-separating protomer and those bound to the single-stranded region. Binding of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4G to Ded1p interferes with oligomerization and thereby modulates unwinding activity and RNA affinity of the helicase. Our data reveal a strict division of labor between the Ded1p protomers in the oligomer. This mode of oligomerization fundamentally differs from other helicases. Oligomerization represents a previously unappreciated level of regulation for DEAD-box helicase activities.

  8. Combined PDF and Rietveld studies of ADORable zeolites and the disordered intermediate IPC-1P.

    PubMed

    Morris, Samuel A; Wheatley, Paul S; Položij, Miroslav; Nachtigall, Petr; Eliášová, Pavla; Čejka, Jiří; Lucas, Tim C; Hriljac, Joseph A; Pinar, Ana B; Morris, Russell E

    2016-09-28

    The disordered intermediate of the ADORable zeolite UTL has been structurally confirmed using the pair distribution function (PDF) technique. The intermediate, IPC-1P, is a disordered layered compound formed by the hydrolysis of UTL in 0.1 M hydrochloric acid solution. Its structure is unsolvable by traditional X-ray diffraction techniques. The PDF technique was first benchmarked against high-quality synchrotron Rietveld refinements of IPC-2 (OKO) and IPC-4 (PCR) - two end products of IPC-1P condensation that share very similar structural features. An IPC-1P starting model derived from density functional theory was used for the PDF refinement, which yielded a final fit of Rw = 18% and a geometrically reasonable structure. This confirms the layers do stay intact throughout the ADOR process and shows PDF is a viable technique for layered zeolite structure determination. PMID:27527381

  9. Roadblock termination by reb1p restricts cryptic and readthrough transcription.

    PubMed

    Colin, Jessie; Candelli, Tito; Porrua, Odil; Boulay, Jocelyne; Zhu, Chenchen; Lacroute, François; Steinmetz, Lars M; Libri, Domenico

    2014-12-01

    Widely transcribed compact genomes must cope with the major challenge of frequent overlapping or concurrent transcription events. Efficient and timely transcription termination is crucial to control pervasive transcription and prevent transcriptional interference. In yeast, transcription termination of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) occurs via two possible pathways that both require recognition of termination signals on nascent RNA by specific factors. We describe here an additional mechanism of transcription termination for RNAPII and demonstrate its biological significance. We show that the transcriptional activator Reb1p bound to DNA is a roadblock for RNAPII, which pauses and is ubiquitinated, thus triggering termination. Reb1p-dependent termination generates a class of cryptic transcripts that are degraded in the nucleus by the exosome. We also observed transcriptional interference between neighboring genes in the absence of Reb1p. This work demonstrates the importance of roadblock termination for controlling pervasive transcription and preventing transcription through gene regulatory regions.

  10. Dynamical Relativistic Effects in Quasielastic 1p -Shell Proton Knockout from O{sup 16}

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Aniol, K. A.; Auerbach, L.; Baker, F. T.; Berthot, J.; Bertin, P.-Y.; Boeglin, W. U.

    2000-04-10

    We have measured the cross section for quasielastic 1p -shell proton knockout in the {sup 16}O( e, e{sup '}p) reaction at {omega}=0.439 GeV and Q{sup 2}=0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2} for missing momentum P{sub miss}{<=}355 MeV /c . We have extracted the response functions R{sub L+TT} , R{sub T} , R{sub LT} , and the left-right asymmetry, A{sub LT} , for the 1p{sub 1/2} and the 1p{sub 3/2} states. The data are well described by relativistic distorted wave impulse approximation calculations. At large P{sub miss} , the structure observed in A{sub LT} indicates the existence of dynamical relativistic effects. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Pseudo 1-D Micro/Nanofluidic Device for Exact Electrokinetic Responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junsuk; Kim, Ho-Young; Lee, Hyomin; Kim, Sung Jae

    2016-06-28

    Conventionally, a 1-D micro/nanofluidic device, whose nanochannel bridged two microchannels, was widely chosen in the fundamental electrokinetic studies; however, the configuration had intrinsic limitations of the time-consuming and labor intensive tasks of filling and flushing the microchannel due to the high fluidic resistance of the nanochannel bridge. In this work, a pseudo 1-D micro/nanofluidic device incorporating air valves at each microchannel was proposed for mitigating these limitations. High Laplace pressure formed at liquid/air interface inside the microchannels played as a virtual valve only when the electrokinetic operations were conducted. The identical electrokinetic behaviors of the propagation of ion concentration polarization layer and current-voltage responses were obtained in comparison with the conventional 1-D micro/nanofluidic device by both experiments and numerical simulations. Therefore, the suggested pseudo 1-D micro/nanofluidic device owned not only experimental conveniences but also exact electrokinetic responses. PMID:27248856

  12. Quantum and semi-classical transport in RTDs using NEMO 1-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimeck, G.; Stout, P.; Bowen, R. C.

    2003-01-01

    NEMO 1-D has been developed primarily for the simulation of resonant tunneling diodes, and quantitative and predictive agreements with experimental high performance, high current density devices have been achieved in the past.

  13. Structural insights into how Yrb2p accelerates the assembly of the Xpo1p nuclear export complex.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Masako; Shirai, Natsuki; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    Proteins and ribonucleoproteins containing a nuclear export signal (NES) assemble with the exportin Xpo1p (yeast CRM1) and Gsp1p-GTP (yeast Ran-GTP) in the nucleus and exit through the nuclear pore complex. In the cytoplasm, Yrb1p (yeast RanBP1) displaces NES from Xpo1p. Efficient export of NES-cargoes requires Yrb2p (yeast RanBP3), a primarily nuclear protein containing nucleoporin-like phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats and a low-affinity Gsp1p-binding domain (RanBD). Here, we show that Yrb2p strikingly accelerates the association of Gsp1p-GTP and NES to Xpo1p. We have solved the crystal structure of the Xpo1p-Yrb2p-Gsp1p-GTP complex, a key assembly intermediate that can bind cargo rapidly. Although the NES-binding cleft of Xpo1p is closed in this intermediate, our data suggest that preloading of Gsp1p-GTP onto Xpo1p by Yrb2p, conformational flexibility of Xpo1p, and the low affinity of RanBD enable active displacement of Yrb2p RanBD by NES to occur effectively. The structure also reveals the major binding sites for FG repeats on Xpo1p.

  14. Novel electronic structures of self-organized 1D surface nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Han Woong

    2002-03-01

    Recently we have searched for the exotic physical properties of the nanostructures formed on semiconductor surfaces by STM and photoelectron spectroscopy [1]. The major objects have been the 1D chains of metal adsorbates on Si or SiC surfaces. It now seems obvious that such (sub)nanometer-scale atomic chains possess significant technological implications for the future device technology. Furthermore those systems provide very attractive and unprecedented opportunity to study exotic physical properties of 1D electronic systems in detail, such as Peierls instability, charge density wave (CDW), electron correlation, non-Fermi liquid behavior, and interplay of defects with 1D excitations (1D solitons, 1D domain walls and etc). The present talk focuses on the recent experimental and theoretical studies for the novel electronic properties of the 1D atomic chain systems on the Si(111) surface such as Si(111)4x1-In [2], Si(111)5x2-Au [3], Si(557)5x2-Au [4], and Si(111)3x2-Ba(or Ca) [5]. These systems have well defined one dimensional electronic bands, which exhibit intriguing properties challenging our present understanding. The major points of debates right now are the origin of the periodicity-doubling phase transition of Si(111)4x1-In in relation to 1D CDW [2], the nature of the band gap (or pseudo gap) of Si(111)5x2-Au (also related to 1D CDW idea) [3], the Si(111)3x2-Ba (or Ca) surface (1D Mott-Hubbard system ?) [5], and the nature of the band dispersion of the Si(557)5x2-Au surface (any Luttinger liquid behavior ?) [4]. Some new aspects of these systems are introduced such as the doping dependence of the 1D CDW system and the transport measurements across the 1D CDW transition. References [1] For a recent review, see H. W. Yeom, J. Electron Spectro. and Rel. Phenom., 114-116, 283 (2001). [2] H.W. Yeom et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 4898 (1999); C. Kumpf et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 4916 (2001); H.W. Yeom et al., submitted; G. Le Lay et al., submitted; J.-H. Cho et al

  15. Design, Synthesis, and Functional Activity of Labeled CD1d Glycolipid Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are restricted by CD1d molecules and activated upon CD1d-mediated presentation of glycolipids to T cell receptors (TCRs) located on the surface of the cell. Because the cytokine response profile is governed by the structure of the glycolipid, we sought a method for labeling various glycolipids to study their in vivo behavior. The prototypical CD1d agonist, α-galactosyl ceramide (α-GalCer) 1, instigates a powerful immune response and the generation of a wide range of cytokines when it is presented to iNKT cell TCRs by CD1d molecules. Analysis of crystal structures of the TCR−α-GalCer–CD1d ternary complex identified the α-methylene unit in the fatty acid side chain, and more specifically the pro-S hydrogen at this position, as a site for incorporating a label. We postulated that modifying the glycolipid in this way would exert a minimal impact on the TCR–glycolipid–CD1d ternary complex, allowing the labeled molecule to function as a good mimic for the CD1d agonist under investigation. To test this hypothesis, the synthesis of a biotinylated version of the CD1d agonist threitol ceramide (ThrCer) was targeted. Both diastereoisomers, epimeric at the label tethering site, were prepared, and functional experiments confirmed the importance of substituting the pro-S, and not the pro-R, hydrogen with the label for optimal activity. Significantly, functional experiments revealed that biotinylated ThrCer (S)-10 displayed behavior comparable to that of ThrCer 5 itself and also confirmed that the biotin residue is available for streptavidin and antibiotin antibody recognition. A second CD1d agonist, namely α-GalCer C20:2 4, was modified in a similar way, this time with a fluorescent label. The labeled α-GalCer C20:2 analogue (11) again displayed functional behavior comparable to that of its unlabeled substrate, supporting the notion that the α-methylene unit in the fatty acid amide chain should be a suitable site for

  16. Internally consistent database for sulfides and sulfosalts in the system Ag 2S-Cu 2S-ZnS-FeS-Sb 2S 3-As 2S 3: Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Richard O.

    2005-03-01

    The thermodynamic database for Ag 2S-Cu 2S-ZnS-FeS-Sb 2S 3-As 2S 3 sulfides and sulfosalts applicable to temperatures above 119°C has been updated based on the results of recent petrologic, experimental, and theoretical studies. Solution and end-member properties of fahlore [˜(Ag,Cu) 10(Fe,Zn) 2(Sb,As) 4S 13] have been adjusted to allow for (1) revisions of the description of Fe-Zn partitioning with sphalerite that incorporate sphalerite activity-composition relations derived from the cluster variation method (CVM) model of a previous study, (2) the assumption that the miscibility gaps observed in high-Ag fahlores from the Husky Mine (Yukon, Canada) approximate a temperature of 170°C, and (3) an increase in the Ag-Cu partitioning between fahlore and polybasite (Ag,Cu) 16(Sb,As) 2S 11 required to reproduce compositions of fahlore in the polybasite + Sb-fahlore + ZnS sphalerite assemblage reported in previous experimental studies. The resulting minor parameter adjustments produce a database that demonstrably reproduces the composition data reported for a wide-range of sulfide ore deposits. They result in revised estimates for the Gibbs energies of formation of end-member fahlore components from the simple sulfides that, except for Cu 10Zn 2Sb 4S 13, are less temperature dependent than those previously inferred (at 200 and 400°C: -23.27 and -24.84 kJ/gfw for Ag 10Zn 2Sb 4S 13, -115.18 and -116.57 kJ/gfw for Cu 10Zn 2Sb 4S 13, -85.14 and -75.20 kJ/gfw for Cu 10Fe 2Sb 4S 13, and -3.81 and 9.10 kJ/gfw for Ag 10Fe 2Sb 4S 13). The database is extended to PbS-bearing supersystems containing the galena + fahlore + sphalerite assemblage. Predicted initial Ag-contents of galena calculated from this database agree with those inferred from petrological studies of Ag-Pb-Zn ores from the Coeur d'Alene district, Idaho, USA and Julcani, Peru.

  17. Actinometric measurement of j(O3-O(1D)) using a luminol detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bairai, Solomon T.; Stedman, Donald H.

    1992-01-01

    The photolysis frequency of ozone to singlet D oxygen atoms has been measured by means of a chemical actinometer using a luminol based detector. The instrument measures j(O3-O(1D)) with a precision of 10 percent. The data collected in winter and spring of 1991 is in agreement with model predictions and previously measured values. Data from a global solar radiometer can be used to estimate the effects of local cloudiness on j(O3-O(1D)).

  18. Structural resistance of chemically modified 1-D nanostructured titanates in inorganic acid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Marinkovic, Bojan A.; Fredholm, Yann C.; Morgado, Edisson

    2010-10-15

    Sodium containing one-dimensional nanostructured layered titanates (1-D NSLT) were produced both from commercial anatase powder and Brazilian natural rutile mineral sands by alkali hydrothermal process. The 1-D NSLT were chemically modified with proton, cobalt or iron via ionic exchange and all products were additionally submitted to intensive inorganic acid aging (pH = 0.5) for 28 days. The morphology and crystal structure transformations of chemically modified 1-D NSLT were followed by transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was found that the original sodium rich 1-D NSLT and cobalt substituted 1-D NSLT were completely converted to rutile nanoparticles, while the protonated form was transformed in a 70%-30% (by weight) anatase-rutile nanoparticles mixture, very similar to that of the well-known TiO{sub 2}-photocatalyst P25 (Degussa). The iron substituted 1-D NSLT presented better acid resistance as 13% of the original structure and morphology remained, the rest being converted in rutile. A significant amount of remaining 1-D NSLT was also observed after the acid treatment of the product obtained from rutile sand. The results showed that phase transformation of NSLT into titanium dioxide polymorph in inorganic acid conditions were controllable by varying the exchanged cations. Finally, the possibility to transform, through acid aging, 1-D NSLT obtained from Brazilian natural rutile sand into TiO{sub 2}-polymorphs was demonstrated for the first time to the best of authors' knowledge, opening path for producing TiO{sub 2}-nanoproducts with different morphologies through a simple process and from a low cost precursor.

  19. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation and Space Charge for a 1-D Bunch on an Arbitrary Planar Orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Warnock, R.L.; /SLAC

    2008-01-08

    Realistic modeling of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and the space charge force in single-pass systems and rings usually requires at least a two-dimensional (2-D) description of the charge/current density of the bunch. Since that leads to costly computations, one often resorts to a 1-D model of the bunch for first explorations. This paper provides several improvements to previous 1-D theories, eliminating unnecessary approximations and physical restrictions.

  20. NR1D1 ameliorates Mycobacterium tuberculosis clearance through regulation of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Vemika; Bhagyaraj, Ella; Nanduri, Ravikanth; Ahuja, Nancy; Gupta, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    NR1D1 (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1), an adopted orphan nuclear receptor, is widely known to orchestrate the expression of genes involved in various biological processes such as adipogenesis, skeletal muscle differentiation, and lipid and glucose metabolism. Emerging evidence suggests that various members of the nuclear receptor superfamily perform a decisive role in the modulation of autophagy. Recently, NR1D1 has been implicated in augmenting the antimycobacterial properties of macrophages and providing protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by downregulating the expression of the IL10 gene in human macrophages. This antiinfective property of NR1D1 suggests the need for an improved understanding of its role in other host-associated antimycobacterial pathways. The results presented here demonstrate that in human macrophages either ectopic expression of NR1D1 or treatment with its agonist, GSK4112, enhanced the number of acidic vacuoles as well as the level of MAP1LC3-II, a signature molecule for determination of autophagy progression, in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Conversely, a decrease in NR1D1 in knockdown cells resulted in the reduced expression of lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1, LAMP1, commensurate with a decrease in the level of transcription factor EB, TFEB. This is indicative of that NR1D1 may have a regulatory role in lysosome biogenesis. NR1D1 being a repressor, its positive regulation on LAMP1 and TFEB is suggestive of an indirect byzantine mechanism of action. Its role in the modulation of autophagy and lysosome biogenesis together with its ability to repress IL10 gene expression supports the theory that NR1D1 has a pivotal antimycobacterial function in human macrophages. PMID:26390081

  1. Analysis of CYP21A1P and the duplicated CYP21A2 genes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Ping; Lee, Hsien-Hsiung

    2012-09-10

    The RCCX module on chromosome 6p21.3 has 3 possible forms: monomodular, bimodular, and trimodular. Chromosomes with 4 RCCX modules are very rare. In the monomodule, most of the CYP21A1P genes do not exist. However, haplotypes of the RCCX module with more than one CYP21A2 gene were observed. Obviously, the gene located downstream of the XA gene can possibly include the CYP21A2 as well as the CYP21A1P gene.

  2. New, potent P1/P2-morpholinone-based HIV-protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kazmierski, Wieslaw M; Furfine, Eric; Spaltenstein, Andrew; Wright, Lois L

    2006-10-01

    We have developed efficient synthesis of morpholinone-based cyclic mimetics of the P1/P2 portion of the HIV-1 protease inhibitor Amprenavir. This effort led to discovery of allyl- and spiro-cyclopropyl-P2-substituted inhibitors 17 and 31, both 500 times more potent than the parent inhibitor 1. These results support morpholinones as novel mimetics of the P1/P2 portion of Amprenavir and potentially of other HIV-protease inhibitors, and thus provide a novel medicinal chemistry template for optimization toward more potent and drug-like inhibitors. PMID:16904316

  3. Three unrelated cases of paracentric inversions of 1p in individuals with abnormal phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Estop, A.M.; Karlin, S.M.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W.; Bansal, V.; Surti, U.; Lin, A.; Levinson, F.

    1994-02-15

    Paracentric inversions, involving a rearrangement within one chromosome arm, are rare. Although carriers of balanced paracentric inversions should theoretically not be at risk for abnormal offspring, such cases have been reported. The authors report on 2 unrelated cases of inherited paracentric inversions of 1p with breakpoints at p32 and p36.1 and p32.3 and p36.22 in individuals with abnormal phenotypes. Another case of 2 abnormal monozygotic twins with a de novo paracentric inversion of 1p with breakpoints at p22 and p34 is presented as well. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. New fluorinated agonists for targeting the sphingosin-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P(1)).

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rizwan S; Keul, Petra; Schäfers, Michael; Levkau, Bodo; Haufe, Günter

    2015-11-15

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P1) is involved in fundamental biological processes such as regulation of immune cell trafficking, vascular barrier function and angiogenesis. This Letter presents multistep syntheses of various fluorine substituted 12-aryl analogues of the drug fingolimod (FTY720) and a seven-steps route to 2-amino-17,17-difluoro-2-(hydroxymethyl)heptadecan-1-ol. In vitro and in vivo tests proved all these compounds as potent S1P1 receptor agonists.

  5. Excitations of {sup 1}P levels of zinc by electron impact on the ground state

    SciTech Connect

    Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor; Panajotovic, R.; Sevic, D.; Pejcev, V.; Marinkovic, B.P.; Filipovic, D.M.

    2005-07-15

    We present results of a joint theoretical and experimental investigation of electron scattering from the 4s{sup 2} {sup 1}S ground state of zinc. The 4s4p {sup 1}P{sup o} and 4s5p {sup 1}P{sup o} differential cross sections were measured at scattering angles between 10 degree sign and 150 degree sign and electron-energies of 15, 20, 25, 40, and 60 eV. Corresponding convergent close-coupling calculations have been performed and are compared with experiment.

  6. PPM1D controls nucleolar formation by up-regulating phosphorylation of nucleophosmin.

    PubMed

    Kozakai, Yuuki; Kamada, Rui; Furuta, Junya; Kiyota, Yuhei; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2016-01-01

    An increase of nucleolar number and size has made nucleoli essential markers for cytology and tumour development. However, the underlying basis for their structural integrity and abundance remains unclear. Protein phosphatase PPM1D was found to be up-regulated in different carcinomas including breast cancers. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that PPM1D regulates nucleolar formation via inducing an increased phosphorylation of the nucleolar protein NPM. We show that PPM1D overexpression induces an increase in the nucleolar number regardless of p53 status. We also demonstrated that specific sequential phosphorylation of NPM is important for nucleolar formation and that PPM1D is a novel upstream regulator of this phosphorylation pathway. These results enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern nucleoli formation by demonstrating that PPM1D regulates nucleolar formation by regulating NPM phosphorylation status through a novel signalling pathway, PPM1D-CDC25C-CDK1-PLK1. PMID:27619510

  7. Epigenetic activation of a cryptic TBC1D16 transcript enhances melanoma progression by targeting EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Vizoso, Miguel; Ferreira, Humberto J; Lopez-Serra, Paula; Javier Carmona, F; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Girotti, Maria Romina; Villanueva, Alberto; Guil, Sonia; Moutinho, Catia; Liz, Julia; Portela, Anna; Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, August; Martinez-Iniesta, Maria; Manzano, Jose L; Fernandez-Figueras, Maria Teresa; Elez, Elena; Muñoz-Couselo, Eva; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Berrocal, Alfonso; Pontén, Fredrik; van den Oord, Joost; Gallagher, William M; Frederick, Dennie T; Flaherty, Keith T; McDermott, Ultan; Lorigan, Paul; Marais, Richard; Esteller, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for most cancer-related deaths, and, among common tumor types, melanoma is one with great potential to metastasize. Here we study the contribution of epigenetic changes to the dissemination process by analyzing the changes that occur at the DNA methylation level between primary cancer cells and metastases. We found a hypomethylation event that reactivates a cryptic transcript of the Rab GTPase activating protein TBC1D16 (TBC1D16-47 kDa; referred to hereafter as TBC1D16-47KD) to be a characteristic feature of the metastatic cascade. This short isoform of TBC1D16 exacerbates melanoma growth and metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. By combining immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we identified RAB5C as a new TBC1D16 target and showed that it regulates EGFR in melanoma cells. We also found that epigenetic reactivation of TBC1D16-47KD is associated with poor clinical outcome in melanoma, while conferring greater sensitivity to BRAF and MEK inhibitors. PMID:26030178

  8. PPM1D controls nucleolar formation by up-regulating phosphorylation of nucleophosmin

    PubMed Central

    Kozakai, Yuuki; Kamada, Rui; Furuta, Junya; Kiyota, Yuhei; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2016-01-01

    An increase of nucleolar number and size has made nucleoli essential markers for cytology and tumour development. However, the underlying basis for their structural integrity and abundance remains unclear. Protein phosphatase PPM1D was found to be up-regulated in different carcinomas including breast cancers. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that PPM1D regulates nucleolar formation via inducing an increased phosphorylation of the nucleolar protein NPM. We show that PPM1D overexpression induces an increase in the nucleolar number regardless of p53 status. We also demonstrated that specific sequential phosphorylation of NPM is important for nucleolar formation and that PPM1D is a novel upstream regulator of this phosphorylation pathway. These results enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern nucleoli formation by demonstrating that PPM1D regulates nucleolar formation by regulating NPM phosphorylation status through a novel signalling pathway, PPM1D-CDC25C-CDK1-PLK1. PMID:27619510

  9. The Role of O(1D) in the Oxidation of Si(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaspar, Tiffany C. ); Tuan, Allan C. ); Tonkyn, Russell G. ); Hess, Wayne P. ); Rogers, Jr., J. W.; Ono, Yoshi

    2003-03-20

    Oxidation of silicon with neutral atomic oxygen species generated in a rare gas plasma has recently been shown to produce high-quality thin oxides. It has been speculated that atomic oxygen in the first excited state, O(1D), is a dominant reactive species in the oxidation mechanism. In this study, we investigate the role of O(1D) in silicon oxidation in the absence of other oxidizing species. The O(1D) is generated by laser-induced photodissociation of N2O at 193 nm. We find that, at 400?C, O(1D) is effective in the initial stages of oxidation, but the oxide growth rate falls dramatically past 1.5 nm. Oxide films thicker than 2 nm were unachievable regardless of oxidation time or N2O partial pressure (0.5-90 mTorr), indicating O(1D) cannot be a dominant reactive species in thicker oxidation mechanisms. We suggest that quenching of O(1D) to O(3P) (ground state) during diffusion through thicker oxides results in drastically slower oxidation kinetics. In contrast, oxidation with a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) excimer lamp operating at 172 nm resulted in oxide thicknesses up to 4 nm. Thus, other species produced in plasmas and excimer lamps, such as molecular and atomic ions, photons, and free and conduction band electrons, play a dominant role in the rapid oxidation mechanism of thicker oxides (> 2 nm).

  10. Epigenetic activation of a cryptic TBC1D16 transcript enhances melanoma progression by targeting EGFR.

    PubMed

    Vizoso, Miguel; Ferreira, Humberto J; Lopez-Serra, Paula; Carmona, F Javier; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Girotti, Maria Romina; Villanueva, Alberto; Guil, Sonia; Moutinho, Catia; Liz, Julia; Portela, Anna; Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, August; Martinez-Iniesta, Maria; Manzano, Jose L; Fernandez-Figueras, Maria Teresa; Elez, Elena; Muñoz-Couselo, Eva; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Berrocal, Alfonso; Pontén, Fredrik; Oord, Joost van den; Gallagher, William M; Frederick, Dennie T; Flaherty, Keith T; McDermott, Ultan; Lorigan, Paul; Marais, Richard; Esteller, Manel

    2015-07-01

    Metastasis is responsible for most cancer-related deaths, and, among common tumor types, melanoma is one with great potential to metastasize. Here we study the contribution of epigenetic changes to the dissemination process by analyzing the changes that occur at the DNA methylation level between primary cancer cells and metastases. We found a hypomethylation event that reactivates a cryptic transcript of the Rab GTPase activating protein TBC1D16 (TBC1D16-47 kDa; referred to hereafter as TBC1D16-47KD) to be a characteristic feature of the metastatic cascade. This short isoform of TBC1D16 exacerbates melanoma growth and metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. By combining immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we identified RAB5C as a new TBC1D16 target and showed that it regulates EGFR in melanoma cells. We also found that epigenetic reactivation of TBC1D16-47KD is associated with poor clinical outcome in melanoma, while conferring greater sensitivity to BRAF and MEK inhibitors.

  11. Cell wall glycosphingolipids of Sphingomonas paucimobilis are CD1d-specific ligands for NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Venkataraman; Du, Wenjun; Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2005-06-01

    The current consensus on characterization of NKT cells is based on their reactivity to the synthetic glycolipid, alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) in a CD1d-dependent manner. Because of the limited availability of alpha-GalCer, there is a constant search for CD1d-presented ligands that activate NKT cells. The alpha-anomericity of the carbohydrate is considered to be an important requisite for the CD1d-specific activation of NKT cells. The gram-negative, lipopolysaccharide-free bacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis is known to contain glycosphingolipids (GSL) with alpha-anomeric sugars attached to the lipid chain. Here, we report that GSL extracted from this bacterium are able to stimulate NKT cells in a CD1d-specific manner. In addition, soluble CD1d-Ig dimers loaded with this lipid extract specifically bind to NKT cells (but not conventional T cells). Further studies on the S. paucimobilis GSL could potentially lead to other natural sources of CD1d-specific ligands useful for NKT cell analyses and aimed at identifying novel therapies for a variety of disease states.

  12. Photochemistry of O(1D) and O(1S) lines in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, Gaël; De Keyser, Johan; Maggiolo, Romain; Gibbons, Andrew; Gronoff, Guillaume; Gunell, Herbert; Dhooghe, Frederik; Loreau, Jérôme; Vaeck, Nathalie; Altwegg, Kathrin; Bieler, Andre; Briois, Christelle; Calmonte, Ursina; Combi, Michael; Fuselier, Stephen; Gombosi, Tamas; Haessig, Myrtha; Le Roy, Lena; Neefs, Eddy; Rubin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    We present here a chemistry-emission coupled model to study the production and loss mechanisms of the O(1D) and O(1S) states, for comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The recent discovery of O2 in significant abundance relative to water (3.80% +/- 0.85%, Bieler et al. 2015) within the coma of 67P has been taken into consideration for the first time in such models. We evaluate the effect of the presence of O2 on the green to red-doublet emission intensity ratio, which is traditionally used to assess the CO2 abundance within cometary atmospheres. Model simulations, solving the continuity equation with transport, show that not taking O2 into account leads to an underestimation of the CO2 abundance within 67P. This strongly suggests that the green to red-doublet emission intensity ratio alone is not a proper tool for determining the CO2 abundance, as previously suggested. O2 might indeed be a rather common and abundant parent species, following the re-analysis of the comet 1P/Halley data (Rubin et al. 2015). Therefore, it is likely that earlier determinations of the CO2 abundance in cometary atmospheres have to be revisited.

  13. A new approach: Li2S-P2S5 thin-films prepared by thermal evaporation as solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sung Pil; Kakati, Nitul; Kim, In Yea; Lee, Seok Hee; Yoon, Young Soo

    2016-08-01

    Li2S-P2S5 thin-film solid electrolytes are synthesized by using room-temperature thermal evaporation for use as lithium-ion conductors for all-solid-state Li-ion batteries. The local structures of 75.51Li2S:24.49P2S5 and 77.64Li2S:22.36P2S5 prepared in this way have hetero units that facilitate lithium-ion mobility. The lithium-ion conductivity at room temperature for the 77.64Li2S:22.36P2S5 thin-film (4.0 × 10-6 S cm-1) is higher than that for the 75.51Li2S:24.49P2S5 thin-film (1.2 × 10-6 S cm-1). The increased ion conductivity in the 77.64Li2S:22.36P2S5 film is due to the additional local P2S7 4- structure that forms a glassy state during the thermal evaporation process. The local structure can lead to a high mobility of Li+ ions in the Li2S-P2S5 system due to the non-bridging sulfide ions. Lithium-ion-conducting thin-films prepared by using thermal evaporation, as reported in this study, are promising solid electrolytes.

  14. Potential Link between the Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) System and Defective Alveolar Macrophage Phagocytic Function in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Barnawi, Jameel; Tran, Hai; Jersmann, Hubertus; Pitson, Stuart; Roscioli, Eugene; Hodge, Greg; Meech, Robyn; Haberberger, Rainer; Hodge, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We previously reported that alveolar macrophages from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are defective in their ability to phagocytose apoptotic cells, with a similar defect in response to cigarette smoke. The exact mechanisms for this defect are unknown. Sphingolipids including ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are involved in diverse cellular processes and we hypothesised that a comprehensive analysis of this system in alveolar macrophages in COPD may help to delineate the reasons for defective phagocytic function. Methods We compared mRNA expression of sphingosine kinases (SPHK1/2), S1P receptors (S1PR1-5) and S1P-degrading enzymes (SGPP1, SGPP2, SGPL1) in bronchoalveolar lavage-derived alveolar macrophages from 10 healthy controls, 7 healthy smokers and 20 COPD patients (10 current- and 10 ex-smokers) using Real-Time PCR. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells was investigated using flow cytometry. Functional associations were assessed between sphingosine signalling system components and alveolar macrophage phagocytic ability in COPD. To elucidate functional effects of increased S1PR5 on macrophage phagocytic ability, we performed the phagocytosis assay in the presence of varying concentrations of suramin, an antagonist of S1PR3 and S1PR5. The effects of cigarette smoking on the S1P system were investigated using a THP-1 macrophage cell line model. Results We found significant increases in SPHK1/2 (3.4- and 2.1-fold increases respectively), S1PR2 and 5 (4.3- and 14.6-fold increases respectively), and SGPL1 (4.5-fold increase) in COPD vs. controls. S1PR5 and SGPL1 expression was unaffected by smoking status, suggesting a COPD “disease effect” rather than smoke effect per se. Significant associations were noted between S1PR5 and both lung function and phagocytosis. Cigarette smoke extract significantly increased mRNA expression of SPHK1, SPHK2, S1PR2 and S1PR5 by THP-1 macrophages, confirming the results in

  15. Influence of annealing on ionic transfer and storage stability of Li2S-P2S5 solid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Junjun; Kim, Hyea; Lee, Dong-Chan; Hu, Renzhong; Wu, FeiXiang; Zhao, Hailei; Alamgir, Faisal M.; Yushin, Gleb

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the impact of annealing treatment on the ionic transfer and storage stability of 70Li2S-30P2S5 glass-ceramic solid electrolyte (SE) pellets are investigated. The ionic conductivity is enhanced from 1 to 1.5 mS cm-1, while the total interfacial resistance of Li/SE/Li cell is reduced by over an order of magnitude with increasing annealing temperature up to 250 °C. Higher annealing temperature induced formation of a low conductivity Li4P2S6 phase, which increased ionic and interfacial resistances. Storage stability is also improved by annealing treatments. Preparation of exemplary Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) electrodes involving mechanical milling with SE particles undesirably induces formation of a TiS2 phase at the interfaces. Annealing the cells at 250 °C induces further reaction between LTO and SE, increasing TiS2 content and reducing cell rate performance. High reactivity between metal oxides and sulfide-based SE may be an obstacle for the preparation of high performance rechargeable solid state Li ion batteries.

  16. Genetic Evidence for Involvement of Neuronally Expressed S1P1 Receptor in Nociceptor Sensitization and Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Norbert; Benetti, Camilla; Andratsch, Manfred; Leitner, Michael G.; Constantin, Cristina E.; Camprubí-Robles, Maria; Quarta, Serena; Biasio, Wolfgang; Kuner, Rohini; Gibbins, Ian L.; Kress, Michaela; Haberberger, Rainer V.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a key regulator of immune response. Immune cells, epithelia and blood cells generate high levels of S1P in inflamed tissue. However, it is not known if S1P acts on the endings of nociceptive neurons, thereby contributing to the generation of inflammatory pain. We found that the S1P1 receptor for S1P is expressed in subpopulations of sensory neurons including nociceptors. Both S1P and agonists at the S1P1 receptor induced hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation in vitro and in vivo. S1P-induced hypersensitivity was strongly attenuated in mice lacking TRPV1 channels. S1P and inflammation-induced hypersensitivity was significantly reduced in mice with a conditional nociceptor-specific deletion of the S1P1 receptor. Our data show that neuronally expressed S1P1 receptors play a significant role in regulating nociceptor function and that S1P/S1P1 signaling may be a key player in the onset of thermal hypersensitivity and hyperalgesia associated with inflammation. PMID:21359147

  17. Assessing 1D Atmospheric Solar Radiative Transfer Models: Interpretation and Handling of Unresolved Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, H. W.; Stephens, G. L.; Partain, P. T.; Bergman, J. W.; Bonnel, B.; Campana, K.; Clothiaux, E. E.; Clough, S.; Cusack, S.; Delamere, J.; Edwards, J.; Evans, K. F.; Fouquart, Y.; Freidenreich, S.; Galin, V.; Hou, Y.; Kato, S.; Li, J.;  Mlawer, E.;  Morcrette, J.-J.;  O'Hirok, W.;  Räisänen, P.;  Ramaswamy, V.;  Ritter, B.;  Rozanov, E.;  Schlesinger, M.;  Shibata, K.;  Sporyshev, P.;  Sun, Z.;  Wendisch, M.;  Wood, N.;  Yang, F.

    2003-08-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to assess the performance of 1D solar radiative transfer codes that are used currently both for research and in weather and climate models. Emphasis is on interpretation and handling of unresolved clouds. Answers are sought to the following questions: (i) How well do 1D solar codes interpret and handle columns of information pertaining to partly cloudy atmospheres? (ii) Regardless of the adequacy of their assumptions about unresolved clouds, do 1D solar codes perform as intended?One clear-sky and two plane-parallel, homogeneous (PPH) overcast cloud cases serve to elucidate 1D model differences due to varying treatments of gaseous transmittances, cloud optical properties, and basic radiative transfer. The remaining four cases involve 3D distributions of cloud water and water vapor as simulated by cloud-resolving models. Results for 25 1D codes, which included two line-by-line (LBL) models (clear and overcast only) and four 3D Monte Carlo (MC) photon transport algorithms, were submitted by 22 groups. Benchmark, domain-averaged irradiance profiles were computed by the MC codes. For the clear and overcast cases, all MC estimates of top-of-atmosphere albedo, atmospheric absorptance, and surface absorptance agree with one of the LBL codes to within ±2%. Most 1D codes underestimate atmospheric absorptance by typically 15-25 W m-2 at overhead sun for the standard tropical atmosphere regardless of clouds.Depending on assumptions about unresolved clouds, the 1D codes were partitioned into four genres: (i) horizontal variability, (ii) exact overlap of PPH clouds, (iii) maximum/random overlap of PPH clouds, and (iv) random overlap of PPH clouds. A single MC code was used to establish conditional benchmarks applicable to each genre, and all MC codes were used to establish the full 3D benchmarks. There is a tendency for 1D codes to cluster near their respective conditional benchmarks, though intragenre variances typically exceed those for

  18. Plasma Effects on the Metastable Neutral HYDROGEN(2S) Atom.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, John Ferns, Jr.

    Atomic radiative processes which occur in plasmas have long been of interest of plasma physicists. The process we are investigating is atomic dipole transitions, specifically transitions from the metastable 2s to the 2p in hydrogen, which are induced by processes which occur in the plasma. An experiment was done to measure the rate of transitions from 2s to 2p in hydrogen. This experiment was divided into two sections. The first was to measure the transition rate in a near equilibrium plasma. The second section measured the transition rate when RF oscillations were imposed on the plasma. The results of the first part of the experiment show that microscopic fluctuating electric fields which are produced by the motions of the charged particles induce transitions from 2s to 2p in hydrogen. The magnitude of this effect is compared to predicted transition rates due to collisions with electrons and ions and to rates predicted for an equilibrium plasma. In the second part of the experiment, the plasma was shown to act as a filter, preventing transitions from being caused by the RF unless the RF was in the range where plasma waves could be launched. The interpretation we give for this effect is that when the oscillations are inducing transitions, it is because plasma waves are being launched in the plasma and it is these waves which are inducing the transitions. These results have a couple of important applications. The results for the equilibrium part of the experiment can be used to explain a limit in the current which is produced by the Lamb-shift polarized ion source. The other important application is the possible use of the effect seen in the RF case as a non-perturbing diagnostic for plasma waves. Since dipole transition rates are proportional to E('2) and very sensitive near resonance, this effect could prove to be more accurate and more sensitive than methods currently used.

  19. Engagement of S1P1-degradative mechanisms leads to vascular leak in mice

    PubMed Central

    Oo, Myat Lin; Chang, Sung-Hee; Thangada, Shobha; Wu, Ming-Tao; Rezaul, Karim; Blaho, Victoria; Hwang, Sun-Il; Han, David K.; Hla, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    GPCR inhibitors are highly prevalent in modern therapeutics. However, interference with complex GPCR regulatory mechanisms leads to both therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects. Recently, the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor inhibitor FTY720 (also known as Fingolimod), which induces lymphopenia and prevents neuroinflammation, was adopted as a disease-modifying therapeutic in multiple sclerosis. Although highly efficacious, dose-dependent increases in adverse events have tempered its utility. We show here that FTY720P induces phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) at multiple sites, resulting in GPCR internalization, polyubiquitinylation, and degradation. We also identified the ubiquitin E3 ligase WWP2 in the GPCR complex and demonstrated its requirement in FTY720-induced receptor degradation. GPCR degradation was not essential for the induction of lymphopenia, but was critical for pulmonary vascular leak in vivo. Prevention of receptor phosphorylation, internalization, and degradation inhibited vascular leak, which suggests that discrete mechanisms of S1P receptor regulation are responsible for the efficacy and adverse events associated with this class of therapeutics. PMID:21555855

  20. Identification of 1p36 deletion syndrome in patients with facial dysmorphism and developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Go Hun; Kim, Ja Hye; Cho, Ja Hyang; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Seo, Eul-Ju; Lee, Beom Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The 1p36 deletion syndrome is a microdeletion syndrome characterized by developmental delays/intellectual disability, craniofacial dysmorphism, and other congenital anomalies. To date, many cases of this syndrome have been reported worldwide. However, cases with this syndrome have not been reported in Korean populations anywhere. This study was performed to report the clinical and molecular characteristics of five Korean patients with the 1p36 deletion syndrome. Methods The clinical characteristics of the 5 patients were reviewed. Karyotyping and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analyses were performed for genetic diagnoses. Results All 5 patients had typical dysmorphic features including frontal bossing, flat right parietal bone, low-set ears, straight eyebrows, down-slanting palpebral fissure, hypotelorism, flat nasal roots, midface hypoplasia, pointed chins, small lips, and variable degrees of developmental delay. Each patient had multiple and variable anomalies such as a congenital heart defect including ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and patent duct arteriosus, ventriculomegaly, cryptorchism, or hearing loss. Karyotyping revealed the 1p36 deletion in only 1 patient, although it was confirmed in all 5 patients by MLPA analyses. Conclusion All the patients had the typical features of 1p36 deletion. These hallmarks can be used to identify other patients with this condition in their early years in order to provide more appropriate care. PMID:26893599

  1. Partial monosomy of chromosome 1p36.3: A distinctive phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Reish, O.; Berry, S.A.; King. R.A.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a series of five patients with a partial monosomy of 1p36.3 presenting with a similar syndromic appearance. The phenotype of deletion 1p36.3 patients includes abnormal facies, multiple congenital malformations, and mental retardation.The ages of the patients in our series ranged from 3 to 50 years. As the deletion is very small, detection in the present cases relied upon high resolution G-band analyses and was confirmed with FISH in cases 3 and 5. Patients 2 and 3 were diagnosed as adults; thus smaller deletions in 1p36.33 may be associated with longer life expectancy, but include the critical region for the above phenotype. We noted that the dysmorphic features of the patients are more prominent with older age and are difficult to appreciate in infancy. Observation of this specific 1p36 appears as a white, terminal G-band; detection of a small partial deletion or rearrangement may require greater than 550 band level resolution. FISH utilizing a probe to 1pter can facilitate and confirm these analyses.

  2. Delineating the phenotype of 1p36 deletion in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Brazil, Ashley; Stanford, Kevin; Smolarek, Teresa; Hopkin, Robert

    2014-10-01

    1p36 deletion is the most common telomeric deletion syndrome, with an incidence of 1/5,000-1/10,000. A variety of clinical complications have been reported including seizures, hypotonia, heart malformations, cardiomyopathy, vision problems, and hearing loss. Approximately 90% are reported to have severe to profound intellectual disability and 75% to have absent expressive language. Little is known about long-term outcomes. The current literature suggests a poor prognosis for most patients. This study attempted to assess medical conditions and function of adolescent and adult patients with 1p36 deletion. A survey was distributed through three support groups to identify patients >12 years of age to assess functional status and medical problems in older patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome. 40 patients were identified between 12 and 46 years old. Among our survey sample, medical complications including seizures, hypotonia, structural heart defects, hearing loss, and vision problems, were similar to previous reports. However, functional skills were better than anticipated, with an overwhelming majority reported to independently sit, walk, and receive the majority of nutrition orally. Forty-four percent were reported to use complex speech abilities. While medical problems in patients with 1p36 deletion were similar to those that have been previously reported, we also demonstrated these same concerns persist into adolescence and adulthood. Additionally, patients were reported to have better functional skills than anticipated. Thus, quality of life and level of function appear to be better than anticipated from previous studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The Yeast Cell Fusion Protein Prm1p Requires Covalent Dimerization to Promote Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Alex; Aguilar, Pablo S.; Walter, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Prm1p is a multipass membrane protein that promotes plasma membrane fusion during yeast mating. The mechanism by which Prm1p and other putative regulators of developmentally controlled cell-cell fusion events facilitate membrane fusion has remained largely elusive. Here, we report that Prm1p forms covalently linked homodimers. Covalent Prm1p dimer formation occurs via intermolecular disulfide bonds of two cysteines, Cys-120 and Cys-545. PRM1 mutants in which these cysteines have been substituted are fusion defective. These PRM1 mutants are normally expressed, retain homotypic interaction and can traffic to the fusion zone. Because prm1-C120S and prm1-C545S mutants can form covalent dimers when coexpressed with wild-type PRM1, an intermolecular C120-C545 disulfide linkage is inferred. Cys-120 is adjacent to a highly conserved hydrophobic domain. Mutation of a charged residue within this hydrophobic domain abrogates formation of covalent dimers, trafficking to the fusion zone, and fusion-promoting activity. The importance of intermolecular disulfide bonding informs models regarding the mechanism of Prm1-mediated cell-cell fusion. PMID:20485669

  4. Histone chaperone Chz1p regulates H2B ubiquitination and subtelomeric anti-silencing

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yakun; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Lin, Chan-Hsien; Arens, Christina E.; Saleem, Ramsey A.; Smith, Jennifer J.; Aitchison, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Chz1p is a histone chaperone that interacts physically and functionally with the histone variant Htz1p, which has been implicated in establishing and maintaining boundaries between transcriptionally inactive heterochromatin and active euchromatin. To investigate the role of Chz1p in chromatin organization, we performed genome-wide expression arrays and chromatin immunoprecipitations of SIR complex components and modified histones in a CHZ1 deletion strain. Deletion of CHZ1 led to reduced ubiquitination of subtelomere-associated H2B, reduced subtelomeric H3K79 di-methylation, and increased binding of Sir3p, and Sir4p at telomere-distal euchromatin regions, correlating with decreased gene expression in subtelomeric regions. This anti-silencing defect appears to be mediated by enhanced association of de-ubiquitinase Ubp10p with subtelomeric DNA, as detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. In support of this, we show that deletion of UBP10 can antagonize the subtelomeric silencing phenotype of Δchz1. Taken together, the results demonstrate a novel role for Chz1p in epigenetic regulation, through H2B de-ubiquitination by Ubp10p. PMID:20008511

  5. Increased sensitivity of HIV-1 p24 ELISA using a photochemical signal amplification system

    PubMed Central

    Bystryak, Simon; Santockyte, Rasa

    2016-01-01

    In this study we describe a photochemical signal amplification method (PSAM) for increasing of the sensitivity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for determination of HIV-1 p24 antigen. This method can be used for both commercially available and in-house ELISA tests, and has the advantage of being considerably simpler and less costly than alternative signal amplification methods. The photochemical signal amplification method is based on an autocatalytic photochemical reaction of a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrate, orthophenylenediamine (OPD). To compare the performance of PSAM-boosted ELISA with a conventional colorimetric ELISA for determination of HIV-1 p24 antigen we employed a PerkinElmer HIV-1 p24 ELISA kit, using conventional ELISA alongside ELISA + PSAM. In the present study, we show that PSAM technology allows one to increase the analytical sensitivity and dynamic range of a commercial HIV-1 p24 ELISA kit, with and without immune-complex disruption (ICD and Non-ICD ELISA), by a factor of approximately 40-fold. ELISA + PSAM is compatible with commercially available microtiter plate readers, requires only an inexpensive illumination device, and the PSAM amplification step takes no longer than 15 min. PMID:26090753

  6. Fission yeast mtr1p regulates interphase microtubule cortical dwell-time

    PubMed Central

    Carlier-Grynkorn, Frédérique; Ji, Liang; Fraisier, Vincent; Lombard, Berangère; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Paoletti, Anne; Ronot, Xavier; Tran, Phong T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The microtubule cytoskeleton plays important roles in cell polarity, motility and division. Microtubules inherently undergo dynamic instability, stochastically switching between phases of growth and shrinkage. In cells, some microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) and molecular motors can further modulate microtubule dynamics. We present here the fission yeast mtr1+, a new regulator of microtubule dynamics that appears to be not a MAP or a motor. mtr1-deletion (mtr1Δ) primarily results in longer microtubule dwell-time at the cell tip cortex, suggesting that mtr1p acts directly or indirectly as a destabilizer of microtubules. mtr1p is antagonistic to mal3p, the ortholog of mammalian EB1, which stabilizes microtubules. mal3Δ results in short microtubules, but can be partially rescued by mtr1Δ, as the double mutant mal3Δ mtr1Δ exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant. By sequence homology, mtr1p is predicted to be a component of the ribosomal quality control complex. Intriguingly, deletion of a predicted ribosomal gene, rps1801, also resulted in longer microtubule dwell-time similar to mtr1Δ. The double-mutant mal3Δ rps1801Δ also exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant alone. Our study suggests a possible involvement of mtr1p and the ribosome complex in modulating microtubule dynamics. PMID:24928430

  7. Fission yeast mtr1p regulates interphase microtubule cortical dwell-time.

    PubMed

    Carlier-Grynkorn, Frédérique; Ji, Liang; Fraisier, Vincent; Lombard, Berangère; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Paoletti, Anne; Ronot, Xavier; Tran, Phong T

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton plays important roles in cell polarity, motility and division. Microtubules inherently undergo dynamic instability, stochastically switching between phases of growth and shrinkage. In cells, some microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) and molecular motors can further modulate microtubule dynamics. We present here the fission yeast mtr1(+), a new regulator of microtubule dynamics that appears to be not a MAP or a motor. mtr1-deletion (mtr1Δ) primarily results in longer microtubule dwell-time at the cell tip cortex, suggesting that mtr1p acts directly or indirectly as a destabilizer of microtubules. mtr1p is antagonistic to mal3p, the ortholog of mammalian EB1, which stabilizes microtubules. mal3Δ results in short microtubules, but can be partially rescued by mtr1Δ, as the double mutant mal3Δ mtr1Δ exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant. By sequence homology, mtr1p is predicted to be a component of the ribosomal quality control complex. Intriguingly, deletion of a predicted ribosomal gene, rps1801, also resulted in longer microtubule dwell-time similar to mtr1Δ. The double-mutant mal3Δ rps1801Δ also exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant alone. Our study suggests a possible involvement of mtr1p and the ribosome complex in modulating microtubule dynamics. PMID:24928430

  8. SKI-1/S1P inhibitor PF-429242 impairs the onset of HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Matthieu; Sureau, Camille; Guévin, Carl; Seidah, Nabil G; Labonté, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Worldwide, approximately 170 million individuals are afflicted with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To prevent the development of inherent diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, tremendous efforts have been made, leading to the development of promising new treatments. However, their efficiency is still dependent on the viral genotype. Additionally, these treatments that target the virus directly can trigger the emergence of resistant variants. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a long-term (72h) inhibition of SKI-1/S1P, a master lipogenic pathway regulator through activation of SREBP, resulted in impaired HCV genome replication and infectious virion secretion. In the present study, we sought to investigate the antiviral effect of the SKI-1/S1P small molecule inhibitor PF-429242 at the early steps of the HCV lifecycle. Our results indicate a very potent antiviral effect of the inhibitor early in the viral lifecycle and that the overall action of the compound relies on two different contributions. The first one is SREBP/SKI-1/S1P dependent and involves LDLR and NPC1L1 proteins, while the second one is SREBP independent. Overall, our study confirms that SKI-1/S1P is a relevant target to impair HCV infection and that PF-429242 could be a promising candidate in the field of HCV infection treatment.

  9. Mp1p Is a Virulence Factor in Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongmin; Lo, Raymond K. C.; Cai, Jian-Pao; Au-Yeung, Rex K. H.; Ng, Wing-Fung; Tse, Herman; Wong, Samson S. Y.; Xu, Simin; Lam, Wai Hei; Tse, Man-Kit; Sze, Kong Hung; Kao, Richard Y.; Reiner, Neil E.; Hao, Quan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Background Talaromyces marneffei is an opportunistic dimorphic fungus prevalent in Southeast Asia. We previously demonstrated that Mp1p is an immunogenic surface and secretory mannoprotein of T. marneffei. Since Mp1p is a surface protein that can generate protective immunity, we hypothesized that Mp1p and/or its homologs are virulence factors. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the pathogenic roles of Mp1p and its homologs in a mouse model. All mice died 21 and 30 days after challenge with wild-type T. marneffei PM1 and MP1 complemented mutant respectively. None of the mice died 60 days after challenge with MP1 knockout mutant (P<0.0001). Seventy percent of mice died 60 days after challenge with MP1 knockdown mutant (P<0.0001). All mice died after challenge with MPLP1 to MPLP13 knockdown mutants, suggesting that only Mp1p plays a significant role in virulence. The mean fungal loads of PM1 and MP1 complemented mutant in the liver, lung, kidney and spleen were significantly higher than those of the MP1 knockout mutant. Similarly, the mean load of PM1 in the liver, lung and spleen were significantly higher than that of the MP1 knockdown mutant. Histopathological studies showed an abundance of yeast in the kidney, spleen, liver and lung with more marked hepatic and splenic necrosis in mice challenged with PM1 compared to MP1 knockout and MP1 knockdown mutants. Likewise, a higher abundance of yeast was observed in the liver and spleen of mice challenged with MP1 complemented mutant compared to MP1 knockout mutant. PM1 and MP1 complemented mutant survived significantly better than MP1 knockout mutant in macrophages at 48 hours (P<0.01) post-infection. The mean fungal counts of Pichia pastoris GS115-MP1 in the liver (P<0.001) and spleen (P<0.05) of mice were significantly higher than those of GS115 at 24 hours post-challenge. Conclusions/Significance Mp1p is a key virulence factor of T. marneffei. Mp1p mediates virulence by improving the survival of T. marneffei

  10. Radiative processes in Alpha-ZnAl_2S4: Ti spinel type single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulyuk, Leonid; Klokishner, Sophia; Sushkevich, Konstantin; Koshchug, Dmitrii; Boulon, Georges; Brenier, Alain; Fortin, Emery

    2008-06-01

    The radiative properties of the alpha-ZnAl_2S4 wide band -gap semiconductor (E_g=3.4eV) doped with Ti-ions are investigated . It is shown, that the ZnAl_2S_4:Ti spinel type crystals exhibit a IR luminescence in the spectral range 0.8-1.4 micrometers. The observed spectroscopic and temporal characteristics are assigned to the emission bands arising from the ligand - -Ti^4+ charge transfer for octahedral sites of titanium. Bulk stoichiometric alpha-ZnAl2S4:Ti crystals with impurity concentration 0.1-0.5 at % were grown by a closed tube vapor method with halogen as a transport agent. At temperatures T=2-300K the steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) studies, as well as the optical absorption measurements , were carried out in the spectral range 0.4-1.5 μm using a liquid nitrogen cooled Ge-detector or photomultiplier. The steady-state PL excitation was provided by Ar^+ (λ_ex1=514nm) and He-Ne (Lambda_ex2=633nm) lasers. The PL kinetics has been examined under pulsed excitation (tau_P~10^-8 s) with wavelengths: "green"-λ_ex1P=532nm and "red"-λ_ex2P=630nm (dye laser and OPO) close to Lambda_ex1 and λ_ex2. The EPR studies of the samples have been carried out as well. Under the "green" excitation (λ_ex1), that corresponds to the maximum of the Ti-impurity absorption (λ_abs~510nm), the steady -state PL spectra of ZnAl^2S^4:Ti crystals consist of 2 broad bands centered at λ_1=1.1μm and Lambda_20.8μm. Τhe first component λ_1 dominates in the spectrum at low temperatures (T<200K). At T~300K the shape of the integral spectrum practically is determined by the second broad band Lambda_2. At "red" excitation (λ_ex2, λ_ex2P) the main contribution to the PL spectra in the whole temperature range is provided by the second component, the kinetics of which obeys the exponential law with a single decay time. In contrast to the second band , the emission decay can be described by the superposition of two exponents with different lifetimes. At low

  11. Phosphorylation of ORF1p is required for L1 retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Pamela R.; Jones, Charles E.; Furano, Anthony V.

    2015-01-01

    Although members of the L1 (LINE-1) clade of non-LTR retrotransposons can be deleterious, the L1 clade has remained active in most mammals for ∼100 million years and generated almost 40% of the human genome. The details of L1–host interaction are largely unknown, however. Here we report that L1 activity requires phosphorylation of the protein encoded by the L1 ORF1 (ORF1p). Critical phospho-acceptor residues (two serines and two threonines) reside in four conserved proline-directed protein kinase (PDPK) target sites. The PDPK family includes mitogen-activated protein kinases and cyclin-dependent kinases. Mutation of any PDPK phospho-acceptor inhibits L1 retrotransposition. The phosphomimetic aspartic acid can restore activity at the two serine sites, but not at either threonine site, where it is strongly inhibitory. ORF1p also contains conserved PDPK docking sites, which promote specific interaction of PDPKs with their targets. As expected, mutations in these sites also inhibit L1 activity. PDPK mutations in ORF1p that inactivate L1 have no significant effect on the ability of ORF1p to anneal RNA in vitro, an important biochemical property of the protein. We show that phosphorylated PDPK sites in ORF1p are required for an interaction with the peptidyl prolyl isomerase 1 (Pin1), a critical component of PDPK-mediated regulation. Pin1 acts via isomerization of proline side chains at phosphorylated PDPK motifs, thereby affecting substrate conformation and activity. Our demonstration that L1 activity is dependent on and integrated with cellular phosphorylation regulatory cascades significantly increases our understanding of interactions between L1 and its host. PMID:25831499

  12. Phosphorylation of ORF1p is required for L1 retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Cook, Pamela R; Jones, Charles E; Furano, Anthony V

    2015-04-01

    Although members of the L1 (LINE-1) clade of non-LTR retrotransposons can be deleterious, the L1 clade has remained active in most mammals for ∼100 million years and generated almost 40% of the human genome. The details of L1-host interaction are largely unknown, however. Here we report that L1 activity requires phosphorylation of the protein encoded by the L1 ORF1 (ORF1p). Critical phospho-acceptor residues (two serines and two threonines) reside in four conserved proline-directed protein kinase (PDPK) target sites. The PDPK family includes mitogen-activated protein kinases and cyclin-dependent kinases. Mutation of any PDPK phospho-acceptor inhibits L1 retrotransposition. The phosphomimetic aspartic acid can restore activity at the two serine sites, but not at either threonine site, where it is strongly inhibitory. ORF1p also contains conserved PDPK docking sites, which promote specific interaction of PDPKs with their targets. As expected, mutations in these sites also inhibit L1 activity. PDPK mutations in ORF1p that inactivate L1 have no significant effect on the ability of ORF1p to anneal RNA in vitro, an important biochemical property of the protein. We show that phosphorylated PDPK sites in ORF1p are required for an interaction with the peptidyl prolyl isomerase 1 (Pin1), a critical component of PDPK-mediated regulation. Pin1 acts via isomerization of proline side chains at phosphorylated PDPK motifs, thereby affecting substrate conformation and activity. Our demonstration that L1 activity is dependent on and integrated with cellular phosphorylation regulatory cascades significantly increases our understanding of interactions between L1 and its host. PMID:25831499

  13. The topology of the Lcb1p subunit of yeast serine palmitoyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Han, Gongshe; Gable, Ken; Yan, Lianying; Natarajan, Mukil; Krishnamurthy, Jayasree; Gupta, Sita D; Borovitskaya, Anna; Harmon, Jeffrey M; Dunn, Teresa M

    2004-12-17

    The structural organization and topology of the Lcb1p subunit of yeast and mammalian serine palmitoyltransferases (SPT) were investigated. In the yeast protein, three membrane-spanning domains were identified by insertion of glycosylation and factor Xa cleavage sites at various positions. The first domain of the yeast protein, located between residues 50 and 84, was not required for the stability, membrane association, interaction with Lcb2p, or enzymatic activity. Deletion of the comparable domain of the mammalian protein SPTLC1 also had little effect on its function, demonstrating that this region is not required for membrane localization or heterodimerization with SPTLC2. The second and third membrane-spanning domains of yeast Lcb1p, located between residues 342 and 371 and residues 425 and 457, respectively, create a luminal loop of approximately 60 residues. In contrast to the first membrane-spanning domain, the second and third membrane-spanning domains were both required for Lcb1p stability. In addition, mutations in the luminal loop destabilized the SPT heterodimer indicating that this region of the protein is important for SPT structure and function. Mutations in the extreme carboxyl-terminal region of Lcb1p also disrupted heterodimer formation. Taken together, these data suggest that in contrast to other members of the alpha-oxoamine synthases that are soluble homodimers, the Lcb1p and Lcb2p subunits of the SPT heterodimer may interact in the cytosol, as well as within the membrane and/or the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:15485854

  14. Rapid detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen using magnetic immuno-chromatography (MICT).

    PubMed

    Workman, Shon; Wells, Susan K; Pau, Chou-Pong; Owen, S Michele; Dong, X Fan; LaBorde, Ron; Granade, Timothy C

    2009-09-01

    Detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections has been enhanced by incorporating p24 antigen detection with current HIV antibody detection using enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). However, screening for HIV antibodies has increased through the use of rapid, lateral-flow HIV antibody detection assays that currently do not have the capability to detect HIV p24 antigen. In this report, a lateral-flow based assay using super-paramagnetic particles as the detection marker was developed for the detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen. This magnetic immuno-chromatographic test (MICT) uses an inexpensive, low-maintenance instrument that detects the magnetic moment of the super-paramagnetic particles in a magnetic field. MICT is simple to perform, provides a numerical output for easier determination of reactive results and can be completed in 40min. The lower limit of detection for HIV-1 p24 spiked into assay sample buffer and 50% plasma was 30pg/ml for both. Detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen at 50pg/ml was reproducible in both inter-run and intra-run assays with coefficients of variation of <13%. Furthermore, the MICT p24 assay was able to detect intact virus spiked into 50% plasma (lower detection limit of approximately 250,000 viral RNA copies/ml). MICT detection of increasing HIV-1 p24 levels in commercially available seroconversion panels by MICT was only slightly later than that detected by much more complex EIAs. MICT could provide a simple, low-cost, and portable method for rapid HIV-1 p24 detection in a variety of testing environments. PMID:19482361

  15. Benchmarks and models for 1-D radiation transport in stochastic participating media

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D S

    2000-08-21

    Benchmark calculations for radiation transport coupled to a material temperature equation in a 1-D slab and 1-D spherical geometry binary random media are presented. The mixing statistics are taken to be homogeneous Markov statistics in the 1-D slab but only approximately Markov statistics in the 1-D sphere. The material chunk sizes are described by Poisson distribution functions. The material opacities are first taken to be constant and then allowed to vary as a strong function of material temperature. Benchmark values and variances for time evolution of the ensemble average of material temperature energy density and radiation transmission are computed via a Monte Carlo type method. These benchmarks are used as a basis for comparison with three other approximate methods of solution. One of these approximate methods is simple atomic mix. The second approximate model is an adaptation of what is commonly called the Levermore-Pomraning model and which is referred to here as the standard model. It is shown that recasting the temperature coupling as a type of effective scattering can be useful in formulating the third approximate model, an adaptation of a model due to Su and Pomraning which attempts to account for the effects of scattering in a stochastic context. This last adaptation shows consistent improvement over both the atomic mix and standard models when used in the 1-D slab geometry but shows limited improvement in the 1-D spherical geometry. Benchmark values are also computed for radiation transmission from the 1-D sphere without material heating present. This is to evaluate the performance of the standard model on this geometry--something which has never been done before. All of the various tests demonstrate the importance of stochastic structure on the solution. Also demonstrated are the range of usefulness and limitations of a simple atomic mix formulation.

  16. Turned on by danger: activation of CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Victoria

    2012-09-01

    CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells bear characteristics of innate and adaptive lymphocytes, which allow them to bridge the two halves of the immune response and play roles in many disease settings. Recent work has characterized precisely how their activation is initiated and regulated. Novel antigens from important pathogens have been identified, as has an abundant self-antigen, β-glucopyranosylcaramide, capable of mediating an iNKT-cell response. Studies of the iNKT T-cell receptor (TCR)-antigen-CD1d complex show how docking between CD1d-antigen and iNKT TCR is highly conserved, and how small sequence differences in the TCR establish intrinsic variation in iNKT TCR affinity. The sequence of the TCR CDR3β loop determines iNKT TCR affinity for ligand-CD1d, independent of ligand identity. CD1d ligands can promote T helper type 1 (Th1) or Th2 biased cytokine responses, depending on the composition of their lipid tails. Ligands loaded into CD1d on the cell surface promote Th2 responses, whereas ligands with long hydrophobic tails are loaded endosomally and promote Th1 responses. This information is informing the design of synthetic iNKT-cell antigens. The iNKT cells may be activated by exogenous antigen, or by a combination of dendritic cell-derived interleukin-12 and iNKT TCR-self-antigen-CD1d engagement. The iNKT-cell activation is further modulated by recent foreign or self-antigen encounter. Activation of dendritic cells through pattern recognition receptors alters their antigen presentation and cytokine production, strongly influencing iNKT-cell activation. In a range of bacterial infections, dendritic cell-dependent innate activation of iNKT cells through interleukin-12 is the dominant influence on their activity.

  17. Magnetic Ordering in FeSc2 S4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, K. W.; Morey, J. R.; Ruff, J. P. C.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; McQueen, T. M.; Koohpayeh, S. M.; Broholm, C. L.

    FeSc2S4 is a cubic spinel where orbitally active Fe2+ ions occupy the A-site diamond sublattice. Despite a high spin (S=2) state and Curie Weiss temperature of 45 K thermodynamic measurements show no indication of a phase transition and the material has been proposed as a unique example of a spin-orbital liquid. This ground state might arise from competition between on site spin-orbit coupling and Kugel-Khomskii exchange. We report neutron scattering measurements on polycrystalline samples of FeSc2S4 which bring this picture into question. They reveal a previously unreported magnetically ordered state below 11 K. No structural distortions are visible with neutron or x-ray scattering. The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the magnetic excitation spectrum was also explored and found to be minimal. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Material Sciences and Engineering, under Grant No. DEFG02-08ER46544.

  18. Open Standards and Technologies in the S2S Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, A. R.; Rozell, E. A.; West, P.; Zednik, S.; Fox, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    The S2S Search Interface Framework provides tools and services to build customized user interfaces. It also serves as a focal point for repository managers to develop science data services and reusable components for search interfaces. The framework has been used to design a faceted browsing platform for web services, including OpenSearch and SAWSDL. This exemplar faceted browsing platform has been applied in our development of search interfaces for 1) an international open government dataset catalog and 2) a metadata catalog for biological and chemical oceanography. S2S was designed from the ground up using open standards and technologies. The framework was initially created to develop "data dashboard" interfaces on top of OpenSearch services, but has been generalized to support web services and standards with semantic annotation capabilities. We apply OWL, a W3C standard for ontologies on the Web, to create a vocabulary for the description of framework metadata. Our faceted browsing platform is heavily focused on the use of jQuery; we have created reusable user interface "widgets" that leverage OpenLayers and MapServer technology in geospatial selection and visualization, which can be used in this and future platforms. The use of open standards and technologies has enabled rapid iterations over software development lifecycles, and has kept the framework agile as new use cases and ideas have emerged.

  19. Quantum Criticality in FeSc2S4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ish, Daniel; Balents, Leon

    2015-03-01

    Despite possessing a local spin 2 moment on the iron site and a Curie-Weiss temperature of 45 K , the A site spinel FeSc2S4 does not magnetically order down to 50mK. Previous theoretical work by Chen and Balents advanced an explanation for this observation in the form of the ``J2- λ'' model which places FeSc2S4 close to a quantum critical point on the disordered side of a quantum phase transition between a Néel ordered phase and a ``Spin-Orbital Liquid'' in which spins and orbitals are entangled, quenching the magnetization. We present new theoretical studies of the optical properties of the J2- λ model, including a computation of the dispersion relation for the quasiparticle excitations and the form of the collective response to electric field. We argue that the latter directly probes a low energy excitation continuum characteristic of quantum criticality, and that our results reinforce the consistency of this model with experiment.

  20. Discovery of 3-arylpropionic acids as potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1P1) with high selectivity against all other known S1P receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Huo, Pei; Doherty, George; Toth, Lesile; Hale, Jeffrey J; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Quackenbush, Elizabeth; Wickham, Alexandra; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2006-07-15

    A series of 3-arylpropionic acids were synthesized as S1P1 receptor agonists. Structure-activity relationship studies on the pendant phenyl ring revealed several structural features offering selectivity of S1P1 binding against S1P2-5. These highly selective S1P1 agonists induced peripheral blood lymphocyte lowering in mice and one of them was found to be efficacious in a rat skin transplantation model, supporting that S1P1 agonism is primarily responsible for the immunosuppressive efficacy observed in preclinical animal models.

  1. Designing Heterogeneous 1D Nanostructure Arrays Based on AAO Templates for Energy Applications.

    PubMed

    Wen, Liaoyong; Wang, Zhijie; Mi, Yan; Xu, Rui; Yu, Shu-Hong; Lei, Yong

    2015-07-01

    In order to fulfill the multiple requirements for energy production, storage, and utilization in the future, the conventional planar configuration of current energy conversion/storage devices has to be reformed, since technological evolution has promoted the efficiency of the corresponding devices to be close to the theoretical values. One promising strategy is to construct multifunctional 1D nanostructure arrays to replace their planar counterparts for device fabrication, ascribing to the significant superiorities of such 1D nanostructure arrays. In the last three decades, technologies based on anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) templates have turned out to be valuable meaning for the realization of 1D nanostructures and have attracted tremendous interest. In this review, recent progress in energy-related devices equipped with heterogeneous 1D nanostructure arrays that fabricated through the assistance of AAO templates is highlighted. Particular emphasis is given on how to develop efficient devices via optimizing the componential and morphological parameters of the 1D nanostructure arrays. Finally, aspects relevant to the further improvement of device performance are discussed.

  2. Crystal orbital studies on the 1D silic-diyne nanoribbons and nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Bai, Hongcun; Huang, Yuanhe

    2016-02-01

    This work presents crystal orbital studies on novel one-dimensional (1D) nanoscale materials derived from a Si-diyne sheet, based on the density functional theory. The two-dimensional (2D) Si-diyne layer is observed to be carbo-merized silicene, with a similar structure to graphdiyne. The 2D Si-diyne and its 1D ribbons and tubes, of different size and chirality, have been addressed systematically. The low dimensional Si-diyne materials studied exhibit relatively high stability, according to phonon-frequency calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. With comparable diameters, the Si-diyne tubes have lower strain energies than silicene and silicon carbide nanotubes. The Si-diyne layer and its 1D derivatives are all semiconductors, regardless of the size and chirality of the strips and tubes. In addition, the band gaps of the 1D Si-diyne nanoribbons and nanotubes with different chirality, always monotonically decrease as their sizes increases. A quantitative relationship between the band gap and the size of the ribbons and tubes was obtained. The mobility of charge carriers for the 1D Si-diyne structures was also investigated. It was found that both hole and electron mobility of the ribbons and tubes exhibit linear increase with increasing size. The electrons have greater mobility than the holes for each strip and tube. In addition, the mechanical properties of the Si-diyne nanostructures were also investigated by calculation of the Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio. PMID:26744378

  3. VES/TEM 1D joint inversion by using Controlled Random Search (CRS) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolozo, Cassiano Antonio; Porsani, Jorge Luís; Santos, Fernando Acácio Monteiro dos; Almeida, Emerson Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Electrical (DC) and Transient Electromagnetic (TEM) soundings are used in a great number of environmental, hydrological, and mining exploration studies. Usually, data interpretation is accomplished by individual 1D models resulting often in ambiguous models. This fact can be explained by the way as the two different methodologies sample the medium beneath surface. Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) is good in marking resistive structures, while Transient Electromagnetic sounding (TEM) is very sensitive to conductive structures. Another difference is VES is better to detect shallow structures, while TEM soundings can reach deeper layers. A Matlab program for 1D joint inversion of VES and TEM soundings was developed aiming at exploring the best of both methods. The program uses CRS - Controlled Random Search - algorithm for both single and 1D joint inversions. Usually inversion programs use Marquadt type algorithms but for electrical and electromagnetic methods, these algorithms may find a local minimum or not converge. Initially, the algorithm was tested with synthetic data, and then it was used to invert experimental data from two places in Paraná sedimentary basin (Bebedouro and Pirassununga cities), both located in São Paulo State, Brazil. Geoelectric model obtained from VES and TEM data 1D joint inversion is similar to the real geological condition, and ambiguities were minimized. Results with synthetic and real data show that 1D VES/TEM joint inversion better recovers simulated models and shows a great potential in geological studies, especially in hydrogeological studies.

  4. A Mathematical Model of T1D Acceleration and Delay by Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Moore, James R; Adler, Fred

    2016-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is often triggered by a viral infection, but the T1D prevalence is rising among populations that have a lower exposure to viral infection. In an animal model of T1D, the NOD mouse, viral infection at different ages may either accelerate or delay disease depending on the age of infection and the type of virus. Viral infection may affect the progression of T1D via multiple mechanisms: triggering inflammation, bystander activation of self-reactive T-cells, inducing a competitive immune response, or inducing a regulatory immune response. In this paper, we create mathematical models of the interaction of viral infection with T1D progression, incorporating each of these four mechanisms. Our goal is to understand how each viral mechanism interacts with the age of infection. The model predicts that each viral mechanism has a unique pattern of interaction with disease progression. Viral inflammation always accelerates disease, but the effect decreases with age of infection. Bystander activation has little effect at younger ages and actually decreases incidence at later ages while accelerating disease in mice that do get the disease. A competitive immune response to infection can decrease incidence at young ages and increase it at older ages, with the effect decreasing over time. Finally, an induced Treg response decreases incidence at any age of infection, but the effect decreases with age. Some of these patterns resemble those seen experimentally. PMID:27030351

  5. Fabrication and characterization of hexagonally patterned quasi-1D ZnO nanowire arrays

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) ZnO nanowire arrays with hexagonal pattern have been successfully synthesized via the vapor transport process without any metal catalyst. By utilizing polystyrene microsphere self-assembled monolayer, sol–gel-derived ZnO thin films were used as the periodic nucleation sites for the growth of ZnO nanowires. High-quality quasi-1D ZnO nanowires were grown from nucleation sites, and the original hexagonal periodicity is well-preserved. According to the experimental results, the vapor transport solid condensation mechanism was proposed, in which the sol–gel-derived ZnO film acting as a seed layer for nucleation. This simple method provides a favorable way to form quasi-1D ZnO nanostructures applicable to diverse fields such as two-dimensional photonic crystal, nanolaser, sensor arrays, and other optoelectronic devices. PMID:24521308

  6. Measurement of tropospheric 300 nm solar ultraviolet flux for determination of O/1D/ photoproduction rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, B.; Hanser, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    The tropospheric importance of the OH radical, and the reaction scheme that leads to its formation, are now being widely investigated. Ozone photolysis at wavelengths no greater than 318 nm produces O(1D), a small fraction of which then reacts with water vapor to yield OH. Although experimental data are available for the O(1D) quantum yield, as well as the O3 absorption cross section, all previous tropospheric photochemical models have had to use theoretical calculations to determine the UV flux. Discussed in this paper are aircraft spectral measurements of the solar UV flux at two altitudes - 2 and 6 km. These results have been compared with three theoretical approaches. The measured experimental fluxes have been combined here with recent quantum yield data to calculate the O(1D) photoproduction rate for various albedo values. This rate is larger than that used in models by about a factor of 2 for reasonable values of assumed albedo.

  7. A comparison of 1D and 2D LSTM architectures for the recognition of handwritten Arabic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Mohammad Reza; Soheili, Mohammad Reza; Breuel, Thomas M.; Stricker, Didier

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present an Arabic handwriting recognition method based on recurrent neural network. We use the Long Short Term Memory (LSTM) architecture, that have proven successful in different printed and handwritten OCR tasks. Applications of LSTM for handwriting recognition employ the two-dimensional architecture to deal with the variations in both vertical and horizontal axis. However, we show that using a simple pre-processing step that normalizes the position and baseline of letters, we can make use of 1D LSTM, which is faster in learning and convergence, and yet achieve superior performance. In a series of experiments on IFN/ENIT database for Arabic handwriting recognition, we demonstrate that our proposed pipeline can outperform 2D LSTM networks. Furthermore, we provide comparisons with 1D LSTM networks trained with manually crafted features to show that the automatically learned features in a globally trained 1D LSTM network with our normalization step can even outperform such systems.

  8. Collective mode damping and viscosity in a 1D unitary Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punk, M.; Zwerger, W.

    2006-08-01

    We calculate the damping of the Bogoliubov Anderson mode in a one-dimensional (1D) two-component attractive Fermi gas for arbitrary coupling strength within a quantum hydrodynamic approach. Using the Bethe-ansatz solution of the 1D BCS-BEC crossover problem, we derive analytic results for the viscosity covering the full range from a Luther Emery liquid of weakly bound pairs to a Lieb Liniger gas of strongly bound bosonic dimers. At the unitarity point, the system is a Tonks Girardeau gas with a universal constant αζ = 0.38 in the viscosity ζ = αζplanck n for T = 0. For the trapped case, we calculate the Q-factor of the breathing mode and show that the damping provides a sensitive measure of temperature in 1D Fermi gases.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of hexagonally patterned quasi-1D ZnO nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Shou-Yi; Lin, Hsin-I.

    2014-02-01

    Quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) ZnO nanowire arrays with hexagonal pattern have been successfully synthesized via the vapor transport process without any metal catalyst. By utilizing polystyrene microsphere self-assembled monolayer, sol-gel-derived ZnO thin films were used as the periodic nucleation sites for the growth of ZnO nanowires. High-quality quasi-1D ZnO nanowires were grown from nucleation sites, and the original hexagonal periodicity is well-preserved. According to the experimental results, the vapor transport solid condensation mechanism was proposed, in which the sol-gel-derived ZnO film acting as a seed layer for nucleation. This simple method provides a favorable way to form quasi-1D ZnO nanostructures applicable to diverse fields such as two-dimensional photonic crystal, nanolaser, sensor arrays, and other optoelectronic devices.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of hexagonally patterned quasi-1D ZnO nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shou-Yi; Lin, Hsin-I

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) ZnO nanowire arrays with hexagonal pattern have been successfully synthesized via the vapor transport process without any metal catalyst. By utilizing polystyrene microsphere self-assembled monolayer, sol-gel-derived ZnO thin films were used as the periodic nucleation sites for the growth of ZnO nanowires. High-quality quasi-1D ZnO nanowires were grown from nucleation sites, and the original hexagonal periodicity is well-preserved. According to the experimental results, the vapor transport solid condensation mechanism was proposed, in which the sol-gel-derived ZnO film acting as a seed layer for nucleation. This simple method provides a favorable way to form quasi-1D ZnO nanostructures applicable to diverse fields such as two-dimensional photonic crystal, nanolaser, sensor arrays, and other optoelectronic devices. PMID:24521308

  11. TBC1D24 mutation causes autosomal-dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Azaiez, Hela; Booth, Kevin T; Bu, Fengxiao; Huygen, Patrick; Shibata, Seiji B; Shearer, A Eliot; Kolbe, Diana; Meyer, Nicole; Black-Ziegelbein, E Ann; Smith, Richard J H

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is extremely heterogeneous. Over 70 genes have been identified to date, and with the advent of massively parallel sequencing, the pace of novel gene discovery has accelerated. In a family segregating progressive autosomal-dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL), we used OtoSCOPE® to exclude mutations in known deafness genes and then performed segregation mapping and whole-exome sequencing to identify a unique variant, p.Ser178Leu, in TBC1D24 that segregates with the hearing loss phenotype. TBC1D24 encodes a GTPase-activating protein expressed in the cochlea. Ser178 is highly conserved across vertebrates and its change is predicted to be damaging. Other variants in TBC1D24 have been associated with a panoply of clinical symptoms including autosomal recessive NSHL, syndromic hearing impairment associated with onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures (DOORS syndrome), and a wide range of epileptic disorders. PMID:24729539

  12. ISUAL side-way observations of the OI(1D) night airglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, C.; Chang, T.; Lin, C.; Rajesh, P.; Liu, J.; Chen, A. B.; Su, H.; Hsu, R.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, ISUAL/FORMOSAT-2 Satellite has devoted more observation time to investigate the OI(1D) nightglow from the sideway, which provides the first comprehensive survey of 630.0nm emission in the pre- midnight sector at F layer. It is found that the OI(1D) nightglow enhancement exhibited remarkable seasonal variations. In this study, we want to highlight the following three points. First, semiannual anomaly and winter anomaly existed in the form of the brightening emission in the region of equatorial anomaly. Second, the data indicates that the tidally enhanced regions show significant longitudinal variability. Third, the latitudinal variability of OI(1D) nightglow can be contributed to both the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) effect and the upward propagation tides.

  13. S-duality constraints on 1D patterns associated with fractional quantum Hall states.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Alexander

    2010-07-01

    Using the modular invariance of the torus, constraints on the 1D patterns are derived that are associated with various fractional quantum Hall ground states, e.g., through the thin torus limit. In the simplest case, these constraints enforce the well-known odd-denominator rule, which is seen to be a necessary property of all 1D patterns associated to quantum Hall states with minimum torus degeneracy. However, the same constraints also have implications for the non-Abelian states possible within this framework. In simple cases, including the ν=1 Moore-Read state and the ν=3/2 level 3 Read-Rezayi state, the filling factor and the torus degeneracy uniquely specify the possible patterns, and thus all physical properties that are encoded in them. It is also shown that some states, such as the "strong p-wave pairing state," cannot in principle be described through 1D patterns.

  14. Single step transformation of sulphur to Li2S2/Li2S in Li-S batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helen, M.; Reddy, M. Anji; Diemant, Thomas; Golla-Schindler, Ute; Behm, R. Jürgen; Kaiser, Ute; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2015-07-01

    Lithium-sulphur batteries have generated tremendous research interest due to their high theoretical energy density and potential cost-effectiveness. The commercial realization of Li-S batteries is still hampered by reduced cycle life associated with the formation of electrolyte soluble higher-order polysulphide (Li2Sx, x = 4-8) intermediates, leading to capacity fading, self-discharge, and a multistep voltage profile. Herein, we have realized a practical approach towards a direct transformation of sulphur to Li2S2/Li2S in lithium-sulphur batteries by alteration of the reaction pathway. A coconut shell derived ultramicroporous carbon-sulphur composite cathode has been used as reaction directing template for the sulphur. The lithiation/delithiation and capacity fading mechanism of microporous carbon confined sulphur composite was revealed by analyzing the subsurface using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. No higher-order polysulphides were detected in the electrolyte, on the surface, and in the subsurface of the cathode composite. The altered reaction pathway is reflected by a single-step profile in the discharge/charge of a lithium-sulphur cell.

  15. Single step transformation of sulphur to Li2S2/Li2S in Li-S batteries

    PubMed Central

    Helen, M.; Reddy, M. Anji; Diemant, Thomas; Golla-Schindler, Ute; Behm, R. Jürgen; Kaiser, Ute; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-sulphur batteries have generated tremendous research interest due to their high theoretical energy density and potential cost-effectiveness. The commercial realization of Li-S batteries is still hampered by reduced cycle life associated with the formation of electrolyte soluble higher-order polysulphide (Li2Sx, x = 4–8) intermediates, leading to capacity fading, self-discharge, and a multistep voltage profile. Herein, we have realized a practical approach towards a direct transformation of sulphur to Li2S2/Li2S in lithium-sulphur batteries by alteration of the reaction pathway. A coconut shell derived ultramicroporous carbon-sulphur composite cathode has been used as reaction directing template for the sulphur. The lithiation/delithiation and capacity fading mechanism of microporous carbon confined sulphur composite was revealed by analyzing the subsurface using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. No higher-order polysulphides were detected in the electrolyte, on the surface, and in the subsurface of the cathode composite. The altered reaction pathway is reflected by a single-step profile in the discharge/charge of a lithium-sulphur cell. PMID:26173723

  16. Complex structural rearrangement features suggesting chromoanagenesis mechanism in a case of 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zanardo, Évelin Aline; Piazzon, Flavia Balbo; Dutra, Roberta Lelis; Dias, Alexandre Torchio; Montenegro, Marília Moreira; Novo-Filho, Gil Monteiro; Costa, Thaís Virgínia Moura Machado; Nascimento, Amom Mendes; Kim, Chong Ae; Kulikowski, Leslie Domenici

    2014-12-01

    Genome rearrangements are caused by the erroneous repair of DNA double-strand breaks, leading to several alterations that result in loss or gain of the structural genomic of a dosage-sensitive genes. However, the mechanisms that promote the complexity of rearrangements of congenital or developmental defects in human disease are unclear. The investigation of complex genomic abnormalities could help to elucidate the mechanisms and causes for the formation and facilitate the understanding of congenital or developmental defects in human disease. We here report one case of a patient with atypical clinical features of the 1p36 syndrome and the use of cytogenomic techniques to characterize the genomic alterations. Analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array revealed a complex rearrangement in the 1p36.3 region with deletions and duplication interspaced by normal sequences. We also suggest that chromoanagenesis could be a possible mechanism involved in the repair and stabilization of this rearrangement.

  17. Flocculation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by RNA/DNA helicase Sen1p.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikash; Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Sariki, Santhosh Kumar; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2015-10-01

    The Nrd1-Nab3-Sen1 (NNS) complex terminates transcription of non-coding RNA genes and mediates degradation of the produced transcript by the nuclear exosome. The NNS complex also represses some stress response genes, by stimulating premature termination. A well-characterized stress response in yeast is flocculation, where cells aggregate to form flocs under expression of lectin-encoding genes designated as FLOs. In this study, we demonstrated the role of the NNS complex and Rrp6p in the expression of flocculation genes: FLO1, FLO5, FLO9, and FLO10. Furthermore, a deletion mutant of the RNA processing machinery (RNT1), and SEN1 mutants that are unable to interact with Rnt1p, exhibit a flocculation phenotype. In summary, we have identified a cooperative role of Rnt1p, Rrp6p and the NNS complex in the repression of FLO genes.

  18. Characterization of Avt1p as a vacuolar proton/amino acid antiporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tone, Junichi; Yoshimura, Ayumi; Manabe, Kunio; Murao, Nami; Sekito, Takayuki; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Several genes for vacuolar amino acid transport were reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but have not well been investigated. We characterized AVT1, a member of the AVT vacuolar transporter family, which is reported to be involved in lifespan of yeast. ATP-dependent uptake of isoleucine and histidine by the vacuolar vesicles of an AVT exporter mutant was lost by introducing avt1∆ mutation. Uptake activity was inhibited by the V-ATPase inhibitor: concanamycin A and a protonophore. Isoleucine uptake was inhibited by various neutral amino acids and histidine, but not by γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and aspartate. V-ATPase-dependent acidification of the vesicles was declined by the addition of isoleucine or histidine, depending upon Avt1p. Taken together with the data of the amino acid contents of vacuolar fractions in cells, the results suggested that Avt1p is a proton/amino acid antiporter important for vacuolar compartmentalization of various amino acids.

  19. Atheroprotective role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P).

    PubMed

    Potì, Francesco; Simoni, Manuela; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2014-08-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies documented an inverse relationship between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and the extent of atherosclerotic disease. However, clinical interventions targeting HDL cholesterol failed to show clinical benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk reduction, suggesting that HDL components distinct from cholesterol may account for anti-atherogenic effects attributed to this lipoprotein. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-a lysosphingolipid exerting its biological activity via binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors and regulating a wide array of biological responses in a variety of different organs and tissues including the cardiovascular system-has been identified as an integral constituent of HDL particles. In the present review, we discuss current evidence from epidemiological studies, experimental approaches in vitro, and animal models of atherosclerosis, suggesting that S1P contributes to atheroprotective effects exerted by HDL particles. PMID:24891400

  20. Molecular background of oligodendroglioma: 1p/19q, IDH, TERT, CIC and FUBP1.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Daniel P; Louis, David N; Cairncross, John Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendroglioma is the quintessential molecularly-defined brain tumor. The characteristic whole-arm loss of the long arm of chromosome 1 and the short arm of chromosome 19 (1p/19q-codeletion) within the genome of these tumors facilitated the reproducible molecular identification of this subcategory of gliomas. More recently, recurrent molecular genetic alterations have been identified to occur concurrently with 1p/19q-codeletion, and definitively identify these tumors, including mutations in IDH1/2, CIC, FUBP1, and the TERT promoter, as well as the absence of ATRX and TP53 alterations. These findings provide a foundation for the consistent diagnosis of this tumor type, upon which a generation of clinical investigators have assembled a strong evidence base for the effective treatment of this disease with radiation and chemotherapy. PMID:26545048

  1. Effects of H2S on molten carbonate fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remick, R. J.

    1984-07-01

    The identification of the poisoning mechanism(s) responsible for performance losses of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) when operating on sulfur containing gases was analyzed. The focusing was on out of cell and in cell experiments on single mechanistic issues, followed by incorporation of the results into a model that correlates cell potential decline to contaminants(s) concentration. When coupled with gas cleanup cost projections, the model can be used to conduct trade off studies which lead to the selection of optimum feed gas compositions for MCFC power plants. The degree to which H2S and other contaminants must be removed from typical MCFC fuels has a profound effect on the cost of cleaning the fuel gas, especially if contaminant levels lower than 0.1 ppM are required. The anticipated product from the overall program is a justifiable specification for gas cleanup requirements for MCFC power plants.

  2. Modification of polytetrafluoroethylene surfaces using H2S plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesel, Alenka; Kovac, Janez; Zaplotnik, Rok; Modic, Martina; Mozetic, Miran

    2015-12-01

    A process for modifying the surface properties of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) polymer using sulfur-containing gaseous plasma is presented in this paper. Samples of PTFE foils were treated in pure H2S gaseous plasma sustained by an electrode-less radio-frequency discharge in the E-mode. The samples were kept at a floating potential. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy were used to determine the evolution of the surface functionalities and morphology. An extremely thin film of chemically bonded sulfur was formed on the surface after a few seconds of plasma treatment, whereas a treatment duration of more than a minute resulted in the deposition of pure sulfur. The deposited film remained as thin as a few nanometers, even after half an hour of treatment.

  3. Phonon drag of electrons in Ag{sub 2}S

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, S. A.; Aliev, F. F. Gasanov, Z. S.; Abdullayev, S. M.; Selim-zade, R. I.

    2010-06-15

    The temperature dependences of the heat-conductivity coefficient {chi} and the thermopower 6h of Ag{sub 2}S are investigated in the range of 4.2-300 K. It is found that the value of 6h sharply increases (6h {infinity} T{sup -3}) with decreasing T at T < 100 K and passes through a maximum at 16-18 K. The heat-conductivity coefficient passes through a maximum at {approx}30 K. The sharp increase in 6h is found to be caused by the effect of long-wavelength-phonon drag of electrons. It is shown that the shift of the 6h and {chi} peaks, as well as the temperature dependence of the phonon thermopower 6h{sub ph} {infinity} T{sup -3}, agrees with the Herring theory.

  4. User's Manual for TMY2s - Typical Meteorological Years

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This user's manual describes typical meteorological year (TMY) data sets derived from the 1961-1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB). Because they are based on more recent and accurate data and will make possible more accurate performance and economic analyses of energy systems, these data sets are ecommended for use in place of earlier TMY data sets derived from the 1952-1975 SOLMET/ERSATZ data base. To distinguish between the old and new TMY data sets, the new TMY data sets are referred to as TMY2s. TMY and TMY2 data sets cannot be used interchangeably because of differences in time (solar versus local), formats, elements, and units. Unless they are revised, computer programs designed for TMY data will not work with TMY2 data.

  5. Targeted disruption of CD1d prevents NKT cell development in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guan; Artiaga, Bianca L.; Hackmann, Timothy J.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Walters, Eric M; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Driver, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in mice genetically lacking natural killer T (NKT) cells show that these lymphocytes make important contributions to both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the usefulness of murine models to study human NKT cells is limited by the many differences between mice and humans, including that their NKT cell frequencies, subsets and distribution are dissimilar. A more suitable model may be swine that share many metabolic, physiological and growth characteristics with humans and are also similar for NKT cells. Thus, we analyzed genetically modified pigs made deficient for CD1d that is required for the development of Type I invariant NKT (iNKT) cells that express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) and Type II NKT cells that use variable TCRs. Peripheral blood analyzed by flow cytometry and interferon-γ (IFNγ) enzyme-linked immuno spot (ELISPOT) assays demonstrated that CD1d-knockout pigs completely lack iNKT cells while other leukocyte populations remain intact. CD1d and NKT cells have been shown to be involved in shaping the composition of the commensal microbiota in mice. Therefore, we also compared the fecal microbiota profile between pigs expressing and lacking NKT cells. However, no differences were found between pigs lacking or expressing CD1d. Our results are the first to show that knocking-out CD1d prevents the development of iNKT cells in a non-rodent species. CD1d-deficient pigs should offer a useful model to more accurately determine the contribution of NKT cells for human immune responses. They also have potential for understanding how NKT cells impact the health of commercial swine. PMID:25930071

  6. Characterisation and improvement of j(O1D) filter radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Birger; Heard, Dwayne E.; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Plass-Dülmer, Christian; Schmitt, Rainer; Whalley, Lisa K.

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric O3 → O(1D) photolysis frequencies j(O1D) are crucial parameters for atmospheric photochemistry because of their importance for primary OH formation. Filter radiometers have been used for many years for in situ field measurements of j(O1D). Typically the relationship between the output of the instruments and j(O1D) is non-linear because of changes in the shape of the solar spectrum dependent on solar zenith angles and total ozone columns. These non-linearities can be compensated for by a correction method based on laboratory measurements of the spectral sensitivity of the filter radiometer and simulated solar actinic flux density spectra. Although this correction is routinely applied, the results of a previous field comparison study of several filter radiometers revealed that some corrections were inadequate. In this work the spectral characterisations of seven instruments were revised, and the correction procedures were updated and harmonised considering recent recommendations of absorption cross sections and quantum yields of the photolysis process O3 → O(1D). Previous inconsistencies were largely removed using these procedures. In addition, optical interference filters were replaced to improve the spectral properties of the instruments. Successive determinations of spectral sensitivities and field comparisons of the modified instruments with a spectroradiometer reference confirmed the improved performance. Overall, filter radiometers remain a low-maintenance alternative of spectroradiometers for accurate measurements of j(O1D) provided their spectral properties are known and potential drifts in sensitivities are monitored by regular calibrations with standard lamps or reference instruments.

  7. Cloning and characterization of CpG islands of the human chromosome 1p36 region

    SciTech Connect

    Ellmeier, W.; Barnas, C.; Kobrna, A.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the localization of CpG islands to human chromosome 1p36 as a means for the isolation of genes using hybridization techniques. Two cDNA clones encode the human transcription factor E2F-2 and the dominant-negative helix-loop-helix gene ID3. Further information regarding the organization of human chromosome 1 was accomplished using electrophoresis. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  8. IDH mutation, 1p19q codeletion and ATRX loss in WHO grade II gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Leeper, Heather E.; Caron, Alissa A.; Decker, Paul A.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Giannini, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Background Epigenetic, genetic, and molecular studies have identified several diagnostic and prognostic markers in diffuse gliomas. Their importance for evaluating WHO grade II gliomas has yet to be specifically delineated. Methods We analyzed markers, including IDH mutation(IDHmut), 1p19q codeletion(1p19qcodel), ATRX expression loss(ATRX loss) and p53 overexpression, and outcomes in 159 patients with WHO grade II oligodendroglioma, oligoastrocytoma, and astrocytoma (2003–2012). Results IDHmut was found in 141(91%) and ATRX loss in 64(87%) of IDHmut-noncodel tumors (p = 0.003). All codeleted tumors (n = 66) were IDHmut. Four subgroups were identified: IDHmut-codel, 66(43%); IDHmut-noncodel-ATRX loss, 60(39%); IDHmut-noncodel-ATRXwt, 9(6%); IDHwt, 14(9%). Median survival among 4 groups was significantly different (p = 0.038), particularly in IDHmut-codel (median survival 15.6 years) compared to the remaining 3 groups (p = 0.025). Survival by histology was not significant. Overall (OS), but not progression-free (PFS), survival was significantly longer with gross total resection vs. biopsy only (p = 0.042). Outcomes for patients with subtotal resection were not significantly different from those with biopsy only. Among these uniformly treated patients, OS far exceeds PFS, particularly in those with 1p/19q codeletion. Conclusions For WHO grade II diffuse glioma, molecular classification using 1p/19qcodel, IDHmut, and ATRX loss more accurately predicts outcome and should be incorporated in the neuropathologic evaluation. PMID:26210286

  9. Synthesis and characterization of 1D iron(II) spin crossover coordination polymers with hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Wolfgang; Lochenie, Charles; Weber, Birgit

    2014-02-01

    Purposeful ligand design was used for the synthesis of eight new 1D iron(II) spin crossover coordination polymers aiming for cooperative spin transitions with hysteresis. The results from magnetic measurements and X-ray structure analysis show that the combination of rigid linkers and a hydrogen bond network between the 1D chains is a promising tool to reach this goal. Five of the eight new samples show a cooperative spin transition with hysteresis with up to 43 K wide hysteresis loops.

  10. Quench dynamics of 1D spin-imbalanced Fermi-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiao; Radzihovsky, Leo

    We study a non-equilibrium dynamics of a 1D spin-imbalanced Fermi-Hubbard model following a quantum quench of on-site interaction, using bosonization and exact analysis. By focusing on the evolution of singlet-, triplet-, density and magnetization correlation functions, we find that the evolution and the final state display a strong dependence on the initial state. Thus, we demonstrate that such quantum quench may be used as a new approach to identify and probe the 1D gapless analogue of the elusive FFLO state. Supported by NSF through DMR-1001240 and by Simons Investigator award from Simons.

  11. Opto-digital image encryption by using Baker mapping and 1-D fractional Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Li, She; Liu, Wei; Liu, Shutian

    2013-03-01

    We present an optical encryption method based on the Baker mapping in one-dimensional fractional Fourier transform (1D FrFT) domains. A thin cylinder lens is controlled by computer for implementing 1D FrFT at horizontal direction or vertical direction. The Baker mapping is introduced to scramble the amplitude distribution of complex function. The amplitude and phase of the output of encryption system are regarded as encrypted image and key. Numerical simulation has been performed for testing the validity of this encryption scheme.

  12. 50 CFR Table 1d to Part 660... - At-Sea Whiting Fishery Annual Set-Asides, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false At-Sea Whiting Fishery Annual Set-Asides, 2013 1d Table 1d to Part 660, Subpart C Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Pt. 660, Subpt. C, Table 1d...

  13. 50 CFR Table 1d to Part 660... - At-Sea Whiting Fishery Annual Set-Asides, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false At-Sea Whiting Fishery Annual Set-Asides, 2013 1d Table 1d to Part 660, Subpart C Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Pt. 660, Subpt. C, Table 1d...

  14. The Rtr1p CTD phosphatase autoregulates its mRNA through a degradation pathway involving the REX exonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Hodko, Domagoj; Ward, Taylor; Chanfreau, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Rtr1p is a phosphatase that impacts gene expression by modulating the phosphorylation status of the C-terminal domain of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II. Here, we show that Rtr1p is a component of a novel mRNA degradation pathway that promotes its autoregulation through turnover of its own mRNA. We show that the 3′UTR of the RTR1 mRNA contains a cis element that destabilizes this mRNA. RTR1 mRNA turnover is achieved through binding of Rtr1p to the RTR1 mRNP in a manner that is dependent on this cis element. Genetic evidence shows that Rtr1p-mediated decay of the RTR1 mRNA involves the 5′-3′ DExD/H-box RNA helicase Dhh1p and the 3′-5′ exonucleases Rex2p and Rex3p. Rtr1p and Rex3p are found associated with Dhh1p, suggesting a model for recruiting the REX exonucleases to the RTR1 mRNA for degradation. Rtr1p-mediated decay potentially impacts additional transcripts, including the unspliced BMH2 pre-mRNA. We propose that Rtr1p may imprint its RNA targets cotranscriptionally and determine their downstream degradation mechanism by directing these transcripts to a novel turnover pathway that involves Rtr1p, Dhh1p, and the REX family of exonucleases. PMID:26843527

  15. ER-associated SNAREs and Sey1p mediate nuclear fusion at two distinct steps during yeast mating.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jason V; Arlow, Tim; Inkellis, Elizabeth R; Koo, Timothy S; Rose, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    During yeast mating, two haploid nuclei fuse membranes to form a single diploid nucleus. However, the known proteins required for nuclear fusion are unlikely to function as direct fusogens (i.e., they are unlikely to directly catalyze lipid bilayer fusion) based on their predicted structure and localization. Therefore we screened known fusogens from vesicle trafficking (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors [SNAREs]) and homotypic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fusion (Sey1p) for additional roles in nuclear fusion. Here we demonstrate that the ER-localized SNAREs Sec20p, Ufe1p, Use1p, and Bos1p are required for efficient nuclear fusion. In contrast, Sey1p is required indirectly for nuclear fusion; sey1Δ zygotes accumulate ER at the zone of cell fusion, causing a block in nuclear congression. However, double mutants of Sey1p and Sec20p, Ufe1p, or Use1p, but not Bos1p, display extreme ER morphology defects, worse than either single mutant, suggesting that retrograde SNAREs fuse ER in the absence of Sey1p. Together these data demonstrate that SNAREs mediate nuclear fusion, ER fusion after cell fusion is necessary to complete nuclear congression, and there exists a SNARE-mediated, Sey1p-independent ER fusion pathway.

  16. Involvement of sphingosine 1-phosphate (SIP)/S1P3 signaling in cholestasis-induced liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Changyong; Jiang, Xiangming; Yang, Lin; Liu, Xihong; Yue, Shi; Li, Liying

    2009-10-01

    Bioactive sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and S1P receptors (S1PRs) have been implicated in many critical cellular events, including inflammation, cancer, and angiogenesis. However, the role of S1P/S1PR signaling in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis has not been well documented. In this study, we found that S1P levels and S1P(3) receptor expression in liver tissue were markedly up-regulated in a mouse model of cholestasis-induced liver fibrosis. In addition, the S1P(3) receptor was also expressed in green fluorescent protein transgenic bone marrow (BM)-derived cells found in the damaged liver of transplanted chimeric mice that underwent bile duct ligation. Silencing of S1P(3) expression significantly inhibited S1P-induced BM cell migration in vitro. Furthermore, a selective S1P(3) receptor antagonist, suramin, markedly reduced the number of BM-derived cells during cholestasis. Interestingly, suramin administration clearly ameliorated bile duct ligation-induced hepatic fibrosis, as demonstrated by attenuated deposition of collagen type I and III, reduced smooth muscle alpha-actin expression, and decreased total hydroxyproline content. In conclusion, our data suggest that S1P/S1P(3) signaling plays an important role in cholestasis-induced liver fibrosis through mediating the homing of BM cells. Modulation of S1PR activity may therefore represent a new antifibrotic strategy.

  17. Cdc42p and Rho1p are sequentially activated and mechanistically linked to vacuole membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Michael R.; Jones, Lynden; Eitzen, Gary

    2010-03-26

    Small monomeric GTPases act as molecular switches, regulating many biological functions via activation of membrane localized signaling cascades. Activation of their switch function is controlled by GTP binding and hydrolysis. Two Rho GTPases, Cdc42p and Rho1p, are localized to the yeast vacuole where they regulate membrane fusion. Here, we define a method to directly examine vacuole membrane Cdc42p and Rho1p activation based on their affinity to probes derived from effectors. Cdc42p and Rho1p showed unique temporal activation which aligned with distinct subreactions of in vitro vacuole fusion. Cdc42p was rapidly activated in an ATP-independent manner while Rho1p activation was kinetically slower and required ATP. Inhibitors that are known to block vacuole membrane fusion were examined for their effect on Cdc42p and Rho1p activation. Rdi1p, which inhibits the dissociation of GDP from Rho proteins, blocked both Cdc42p and Rho1p activation. Ligands of PI(4,5)P{sub 2} specifically inhibited Rho1p activation while pre-incubation with U73122, which targets Plc1p function, increased Rho1p activation. These results define unique activation mechanisms for Cdc42p and Rho1p, which may be linked to the vacuole membrane fusion mechanism.

  18. The membrane remodeling protein Pex11p activates the GTPase Dnm1p during peroxisomal fission

    PubMed Central

    Opalinski, Lukasz; Landgraf, Christiane; Costello, Joseph; Schrader, Michael; Krikken, Arjen M.; Knoops, Kèvin; Kram, Anita M.; Volkmer, Rudolf; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2015-01-01

    The initial phase of peroxisomal fission requires the peroxisomal membrane protein Peroxin 11 (Pex11p), which remodels the membrane, resulting in organelle elongation. Here, we identify an additional function for Pex11p, demonstrating that Pex11p also plays a crucial role in the final step of peroxisomal fission: dynamin-like protein (DLP)-mediated membrane scission. First, we demonstrate that yeast Pex11p is necessary for the function of the GTPase Dynamin-related 1 (Dnm1p) in vivo. In addition, our data indicate that Pex11p physically interacts with Dnm1p and that inhibiting this interaction compromises peroxisomal fission. Finally, we demonstrate that Pex11p functions as a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for Dnm1p in vitro. Similar observations were made for mammalian Pex11β and the corresponding DLP Drp1, indicating that DLP activation by Pex11p is conserved. Our work identifies a previously unknown requirement for a GAP in DLP function. PMID:25941407

  19. The yeast vacuolar ABC transporter Ybt1p regulates membrane fusion through Ca2+ transport modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sasser, Terry L.; Padolina, Mark; Fratti, Rutilio A.

    2013-01-01

    Ybt1p is a class C ABC transporter (ATP-binding cassette transporter) that is localized to the vacuole of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although Ybt1p was originally identified as a bile acid transporter, it has also been found to function in other capacities, including the translocation of phosphatidylcholine to the vacuole lumen, and the regulation of Ca2+ homoeostasis. In the present study we found that deletion of YBT1 enhanced in vitro homotypic vacuole fusion by up to 50 % relative to wild-type vacuoles. The increased vacuole fusion was not due to aberrant protein sorting of SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein receptors) or recruitment of factors from the cytosol such as Ypt7p and the HOPS (homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting) tethering complex. In addition, ybt1Δ vacuoles displayed no observable differences in the formation of SNARE complexes, interactions between SNAREs and HOPS, or formation of vertex microdomains. However, the absence of Ybt1p caused significant changes in Ca2+ transport during fusion. One difference was the prolonged Ca2+ influx exhibited by ybt1Δ vacuoles at the start of the fusion reaction. We also observed a striking delay in SNARE-dependent Ca2+ efflux. As vacuole fusion can be inhibited by high Ca2+ concentrations, we suggest that the delayed efflux in ybt1Δ vacuoles leads to the enhanced SNARE function. PMID:22970809

  20. Comparing CN Features in Two Comets: 1P/Halley and 103P/Hartley 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Lejoly, Cassandra; Barrera, Jose; Mueller, Beatrice; Schleicher, David

    2015-11-01

    Comets 1P/Halley and 103P/Hartley 2 show distinct CN features in their respecive comae. Both comets are non-principal-axis rotators. 1P/Halley is the proto-type for Halley-type comets with the Oort Cloud as its possible source region, whereas 103P/Hartley 2 is a Jupiter-Family comet that possibly originated from the Kuiper Belt. Both comets were spacecraft targets and studied widely from both space and from the ground.We will discuss the properties of CN features, and in particular the behavior of the derived outflow velocities based on the CN features present in the groundbased coma images of these two comets. The corresponding heliocentric distances for CN images of comet 1P/Halley range from approximately 0.8 AU to 2.0 AU (during its post-perihelion leg of the 1986 apparition). For CN images of comet 103P/Hartley 2, the corresponding heliocentric distances range from 1.31 AU through the perihelion (at 1.06 AU) to 1.25 AU (during its 2010 apparition).Ultimately, these results will be used to understand the rotational states and the activity behaviors of these two comets.

  1. Cap1p attenuates the apoptosis of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bao-Di; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Lan-Xue; Li, De-Dong; Li, Ming-Bang; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Candida albicans is the most common opportunistic fungal pathogen and its apoptosis is inducible by environmental stress. Based on our previous finding that transcription factor Cap1p was involved in baicalein-induced apoptosis, the present study aimed to further clarify the role of Cap1p in apoptosis by observing the impact of CAP1 deletion on cell fate. It was found that apoptotic stimulation with amphotericin B, acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide increased the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells, caspase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, whereas it decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP level in the cap1Δ/Δ mutant. The cell fate was, at least partly, caused by glutathione depletion and attenuation of the expression of the glutathione reductase gene in the cap1Δ/Δ mutant. Collectively, our data suggest that Cap1p participated in the apoptosis of C. albicans by regulating the expression of the glutathione reductase gene and glutathione content. PMID:23517286

  2. On F-algebras M(p)   (1 < p < ∞) of holomorphic functions.

    PubMed

    Meštrović, Romeo

    2014-01-01

    We consider the classes M(p)  (1 < p < ∞) of holomorphic functions on the open unit disk in the complex plane. These classes are in fact generalizations of the class M introduced by Kim (1986). The space M (p) equipped with the topology given by the metric ρ p defined by ρp (f, g) = ||f - g|| p = (∫0(2π) log(p) (1 + M(f - g)(θ))(dθ/2π))(1/p), with f, g ∈ M (p) and Mf(θ) = sup 0 ⩽ r<1 ⁡|f(re(iθ))|, becomes an F-space. By a result of Stoll (1977), the Privalov space N(p)  (1 < p < ∞) with the topology given by the Stoll metric d p is an F-algebra. By using these two facts, we prove that the spaces M(p) and N(p) coincide and have the same topological structure. Consequently, we describe a general form of continuous linear functionals on M(p) (with respect to the metric ρp). Furthermore, we give a characterization of bounded subsets of the spaces M(p). Moreover, we give the examples of bounded subsets of M(p) that are not relatively compact. PMID:24672388

  3. Is 1p36 deletion associated with anterior body wall defects?

    PubMed

    Çöllü, Medis; Yüksel, Şirin; Şirin, Başak Kumbasar; Abbasoğlu, Latif; Alanay, Yasemin

    2016-07-01

    Epispadias and exstrophy of the cloaca, also known as OEIS complex (omphalocele, exstrophy, imperforate anus, spinal defects), respectively constitute the most benign and severe ends of the bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC) spectrum. In 2009, El-Hattab et al. reported the first patient with OEIS complex associated with a chromosome 1p36 deletion. Here we report a second patient with 1p36 deletion who also has classic bladder exstrophy, supporting the possible role of genes in this region in the development of BEEC. The absence of omphalocele and imperforate anus in our patient places him toward classic bladder exstrophy while presence of spina bifida and the absence of coccyx suggest an overlap with OEIS complex. An additional differential diagnosis is the pentalogy of Cantrell in our patient as he also has a diaphragmatic hernia and an incomplete sternum. This is the second observation of a ventral midline birth defect in association with 1p36 deletion syndrome, following El-Hattab et al.'s report [2009]. The three genes (NOCL2, DVL1, and MMP23B) discussed as possible candidates are also among the deleted ones in our patient, supporting the possible role of these genes in BEEC spectrum. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Recurrent interstitial 1p36 deletions: Evidence for germline mosaicism and complex rearrangement breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Gajecka, Marzena; Saitta, Sulagna C; Gentles, Andrew J; Campbell, Lindsey; Ciprero, Karen; Geiger, Elizabeth; Catherwood, Anne; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Shaikh, Tamim; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2010-12-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 are one of the most frequently encountered subtelomeric alterations. Clinical features of monosomy 1p36 include neurocognitive impairment, hearing loss, seizures, cardiac defects, and characteristic facial features. The majority of cases have occurred sporadically, implying that genomic instability plays a role in the prevalence of the syndrome. Here, we report two siblings with mild phenotypic features of the deletion syndrome, including developmental delay, hearing loss, and left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC). Microarray analysis using bacterial artificial chromosome and oligonucleotide microarrays indicated the deletions were identical, suggesting germline mosaicism. Parental phenotypes were normal, and analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) did not show mosaicism. These small interstitial deletions were not detectable by conventional subtelomeric FISH analysis. To investigate the mechanism of deletion further, the breakpoints were cloned and sequenced, demonstrating the presence of a complex rearrangement. Sequence analysis of genes in the deletion interval did not reveal any mutations on the intact homologue that may have contributed to the LVNC seen in both children. This is the first report of apparent germline mosaicism for this disorder. Thus, our findings have important implications for diagnostic approaches and for recurrence risk counseling in families with a child with monosomy 1p36. In addition, our results further refine the minimal critical region for LVNC and hearing loss.

  5. S1P lyase regulates DNA damage responses through a novel sphingolipid feedback mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Oskouian, B; Fyrst, H; Zhang, M; Paris, F; Saba, J D

    2011-01-01

    The injurious consequences of ionizing radiation (IR) to normal human cells and the acquired radioresistance of cancer cells represent limitations to cancer radiotherapy. IR induces DNA damage response pathways that orchestrate cell cycle arrest, DNA repair or apoptosis such that irradiated cells are either repaired or eliminated. Concomitantly and independent of DNA damage, IR activates acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), which generates ceramide, thereby promoting radiation-induced apoptosis. However, ceramide can also be metabolized to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which acts paradoxically as a radioprotectant. Thus, sphingolipid metabolism represents a radiosensitivity pivot point, a notion supported by genetic evidence in IR-resistant cancer cells. S1P lyase (SPL) catalyzes the irreversible degradation of S1P in the final step of sphingolipid metabolism. We show that SPL modulates the kinetics of DNA repair, speed of recovery from G2 cell cycle arrest and the extent of apoptosis after IR. SPL acts through a novel feedback mechanism that amplifies stress-induced ceramide accumulation, and downregulation/inhibition of either SPL or ASMase prevents premature cell cycle progression and mitotic death. Further, oral administration of an SPL inhibitor to mice prolonged their survival after exposure to a lethal dose of total body IR. Our findings reveal SPL to be a regulator of ASMase, the G2 checkpoint and DNA repair and a novel target for radioprotection.

  6. Analysis of the promoter region of a cardiac specific phospholipase A{sub 2} gene located at 1p35

    SciTech Connect

    Winstead, M.V.; Chen, J.; Tischfield, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Phospholipases may play an important role in the pathology of tissue damage and in membrane remodeling. We have previously shown that the Group II PLA{sub 2} gene and two PLA{sub 2}-like gene fragments map to 1p35. We have since shown that at least one of the fragments is part of a cardiac-specific PLA{sub 2} gene. Thus the identification and characterization of the regulatory regions of this new phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) may be important for understanding the regulation of this gene under normal and pathologic conditions. HPLA2-10, mainly expressed in heart, is a low molecular weight, Ca{sup 2+}-dependent PLA{sub 2} that we have classified as a new group (Group III) based on structural considerations. The 5{prime} regulatory region of HPLA2-10 was isolated from a human genomic DNA bacteriophage library and cloned into pUC19. Computer analysis of the region`s DNA sequence indicates the presence of multiple transcription factor binding sites. A comparison between the human promoter region and the promoter region of the rat homologue, RPLA2-10, indicates that at least two putative transcription factor binding sites are conserved between the two species. These include a CCAAT box and an AGTCCT hexanucleotide, which has been implicated as a binding site for the glucocorticoid receptor. DNA footprint analysis is being performed to determine whether or not these putative regions are sites of protein binding. Also, a proposed view of the evolution of the distinct groups of low molecular weight PLA{sub 2}s will be presented.

  7. Epitaxial 1D electron transport layers for high-performance perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Gill Sang; Chung, Hyun Suk; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kim, Byeong Jo; Lee, Jin-Wook; Park, Nam-Gyu; Cho, In Sun; Lee, Jung-Kun; Lee, Sangwook; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate high-performance perovskite solar cells with excellent electron transport properties using a one-dimensional (1D) electron transport layer (ETL). The 1D array-based ETL is comprised of 1D SnO2 nanowires (NWs) array grown on a F:SnO2 transparent conducting oxide substrate and rutile TiO2 nanoshells epitaxially grown on the surface of the 1D SnO2 NWs. The optimized devices show more than 95% internal quantum yield at 750 nm, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.2%. The high quantum yield is attributed to dramatically enhanced electron transport in the epitaxial TiO2 layer, compared to that in conventional nanoparticle-based mesoporous TiO2 (mp-TiO2) layers. In addition, the open space in the 1D array-based ETL increases the prevalence of uniform TiO2/perovskite junctions, leading to reproducible device performance with a high fill factor. This work offers a method to achieve reproducible, high-efficiency perovskite solar cells with high-speed electron transport.We demonstrate high-performance perovskite solar cells with excellent electron transport properties using a one-dimensional (1D) electron transport layer (ETL). The 1D array-based ETL is comprised of 1D SnO2 nanowires (NWs) array grown on a F:SnO2 transparent conducting oxide substrate and rutile TiO2 nanoshells epitaxially grown on the surface of the 1D SnO2 NWs. The optimized devices show more than 95% internal quantum yield at 750 nm, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.2%. The high quantum yield is attributed to dramatically enhanced electron transport in the epitaxial TiO2 layer, compared to that in conventional nanoparticle-based mesoporous TiO2 (mp-TiO2) layers. In addition, the open space in the 1D array-based ETL increases the prevalence of uniform TiO2/perovskite junctions, leading to reproducible device performance with a high fill factor. This work offers a method to achieve reproducible, high-efficiency perovskite solar cells with high-speed electron transport

  8. Transport of H2S and HS(-) across the human red blood cell membrane: rapid H2S diffusion and AE1-mediated Cl(-)/HS(-) exchange.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Michael L

    2013-11-01

    The rates of H2S and HS(-) transport across the human erythrocyte membrane were estimated by measuring rates of dissipation of pH gradients in media containing 250 μM H2S/HS(-). Net acid efflux is caused by H2S/HS(-) acting analogously to CO2/HCO3(-) in the Jacobs-Stewart cycle. The steps are as follows: 1) H2S efflux through the lipid bilayer and/or a gas channel, 2) extracellular H2S deprotonation, 3) HS(-) influx in exchange for Cl(-), catalyzed by the anion exchange protein AE1, and 4) intracellular HS(-) protonation. Net acid transport by the Cl(-)/HS(-)/H2S cycle is more efficient than by the Cl(-)/HCO3(-)/CO2 cycle because of the rapid H2S-HS(-) interconversion in cells and medium. The rates of acid transport were analyzed by solving the mass flow equations for the cycle to produce estimates of the HS(-) and H2S transport rates. The data indicate that HS(-) is a very good substrate for AE1; the Cl(-)/HS(-) exchange rate is about one-third as rapid as Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange. The H2S permeability coefficient must also be high (>10(-2) cm/s, half time <0.003 s) to account for the pH equilibration data. The results imply that H2S and HS(-) enter erythrocytes very rapidly in the microcirculation of H2S-producing tissues, thereby acting as a sink for H2S and lowering the local extracellular concentration, and the fact that HS(-) is a substrate for a Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger indicates that some effects of exogenous H2S/HS(-) may not result from a regulatory role of H2S but, rather, from net acid flux by H2S and HS(-) transport in a Jacobs-Stewart cycle.

  9. 1D-TlInSe2: Band Structure, Dielectric Function and Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Nazim; Wakita, Kazuki; Akita, Seiji; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2005-01-01

    Linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) analysis of the electronic band states has been completed for one-dimensional (1D) TlInSe2 having rod-like ground state shape of bulky crystal. The total scenario of the occurrence of the band states from the atomic states has been established. According to this scenario, in dipole approximation the optical transitions at band gap (point T of Brillouin zone) are either entirely forbidden or allowed for T2-T10 transitions in e\\perpc configuration provided that either initial or terminate state has T2 symmetry and both are Se-like. As a whole, the obtained results on the electronic spectrum, including dielectric function, are applicable to all obtained 1D-TlInSe2 nanorods which were as thin as 30--50 nm in cross-section, and apparently preserved tetragonal crystal structure of bulky material. The thermal instabilities developing already in bulky samples of 1D-TlInSe2 are considered to be an ultimate source of the nanoparticles emerging in plenty during nanorods preparation. The nanoplates of a chemically similar but 2D material, TlInS2, are demonstrated for comparison to show the absence of nanoparticles in that case. A possibility of nanoparticle preparation using laser excited coherent phonon trains in the nanorods of 1D-TlInSe2 is figured out.

  10. A South American Prehistoric Mitogenome: Context, Continuity, and the Origin of Haplogroup C1d

    PubMed Central

    Sans, Mónica; Figueiro, Gonzalo; Hughes, Cris E.; Lindo, John; Hidalgo, Pedro C.; Malhi, Ripan S.

    2015-01-01

    Based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), it has been estimated that at least 15 founder haplogroups peopled the Americas. Subhaplogroup C1d3 was defined based on the mitogenome of a living individual from Uruguay that carried a lineage previously identified in hypervariable region I sequences from ancient and modern Uruguayan individuals. When complete mitogenomes were studied, additional substitutions were found in the coding region of the mitochondrial genome. Using a complete ancient mitogenome and three modern mitogenomes, we aim to clarify the ancestral state of subhaplogroup C1d3 and to better understand the peopling of the region of the Río de la Plata basin, as well as of the builders of the mounds from which the ancient individuals were recovered. The ancient mitogenome, belonging to a female dated to 1,610±46 years before present, was identical to the mitogenome of one of the modern individuals. All individuals share the mutations defining subhaplogroup C1d3. We estimated an age of 8,974 (5,748–12,261) years for the most recent common ancestor of C1d3, in agreement with the initial peopling of the geographic region. No individuals belonging to the defined lineage were found outside of Uruguay, which raises questions regarding the mobility of the prehistoric inhabitants of the country. Moreover, the present study shows the continuity of Native lineages over at least 6,000 years. PMID:26509686

  11. Combustion synthesis as a novel method for production of 1-D SiC nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Huczko, Andrzej; Bystrzejewski, Michał; Lange, Hubert; Fabianowska, Agnieszka; Cudziło, Stanisław; Panas, Andrzej; Szala, Mateusz

    2005-09-01

    1-D nanostructures of cubic phase silicon carbide (beta-SiC) were efficiently produced by combustion synthesis of mixtures containing Si-containing compounds and halocarbons in a calorimetric bomb. The influence of the operating parameters on 1-D SiC formation yield was studied. The heat release, the heating rate, and the chamber pressure increase were monitored during the process. The composition and structural features of the products were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis/ thermogravimetric technique, Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. This self-induced growth process can produce SiC nanofibers and nanotubes ca. 20-100 nm in diameter with the aspect ratio higher than 1000. Bulk scale Raman studies showed the product to be comprised of mostly cubic polytype of SiC and that finite size effects are present. We believe that the nucleation mechanism involving radical gaseous species is responsible for 1-D nanostructures growth. The present study has enlarged the family of nanofibers and nanotubes available and offers a possible, new general route to 1-D crystalline materials. PMID:16853065

  12. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Niemitz, Matthias; Bisson, Jonathan; Lodewyk, Michael W; Soldi, Cristian; Shaw, Jared T; Tantillo, Dean J; Saya, Jordy M; Vos, Klaas; Kleinnijenhuis, Roel A; Hiemstra, Henk; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Friesen, J Brent

    2016-02-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of "structural correctness" depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D (1)H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D (1)H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by (1)H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D (1)H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  13. Energy transformation of plasmonic photocatalytic oxidation on 1D quantum well of platinum thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hung Ji; Liu, Bo-Heng

    2015-12-01

    The energy transformation of vertical incident light into energy for a chemical reaction is demonstrated in the endothermic oxidation of ammonium ions in a spinning disk reactor. The plasmonic enhancement on photocatalytic reaction demonstrated the generation of quantum hot charge on 1D quantum well of platinum thin film.

  14. α(1D)-Adrenergic receptors constitutive activity and reduced expression at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    García-Sáinz, J Adolfo; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Medina, Luz Del Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors are a heterogeneous family of the G protein-coupled receptors that mediate the actions of adrenaline and noradrenaline. Adrenergic receptors comprise three subfamilies (α(1), α(2), and β, with three members each) and the α(1D)-adrenergic receptor is one of the members of the α(1) subfamily with some interesting traits. The α(1D)-adrenergic receptor is difficult to express, seems predominantly located intracellularly, and exhibits constitutive activity. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the conditions and procedures used to determine changes in intracellular free calcium concentration which has been instrumental to define the constitutive activity of these receptors. Taking advantage of the fact that truncation of the first 79 amino acids of α(1D)-adrenergic receptors markedly increased their membrane expression, we were able to show that constitutive activity is present in receptors truncated at the amino and carboxyl termini, which indicates that such domains are dispensable for this action. Constitutive activity could be observed in cells expressing either the rat or human α(1D)-adrenergic receptor orthologs. Such constitutive activity has been observed in native rat arteries and we will discuss the possible functional implications that it might have in the regulation of blood pressure.

  15. Quasi 1-D Study of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Blowdown Gasdynamics and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2002-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) offer potential performance improvements over conventional designs, but represent a challenging modeling task. A quasi 1-D, finite-rate chemistry CFD model for a PDRE is described and implemented. A parametric study of the effect of blowdown pressure ratio on the performance of several different PDRE nozzle configurations is reported.

  16. Recent developments in testing techniques for elastic mechanical properties of 1-D nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weidong; Li, Shuai; Zhang, Hongti; Lu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional (1-D) nanomaterials exhibit great potentials in their applications to functional materials, nano-devices and systems owing to their excellent properties. In the past decade, considerable studies have been done, with new patents being developed, on these 1-D building blocks for for their mechanical properties, especially elastic properties, which provide a solid foundation for the design of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) and predictions of reliability and longevity for their devices. This paper reviews some of the recent investigations on techniques as well as patents available for the quantitative characterization of the elastic behaviors of various 1-D nanomaterials, with particular focus on on-chip testing system. The review begins with an overview of major testing methods for 1-D nanostructures' elastic properties, including nanoindentation testing, AFM (atomic force microscopy) testing, in situ SEM (scanning electron microscopy) testing, in situ TEM (transmission electron microscopy) testing and the testing system on the basis of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) technology, followed by advantages and challenges of each testing approach. This review also focuses on the MEMS-based testing apparatus, which can be actuated and measured inside SEM and TEM with ease, allowing users to highly magnify the continuous images of the specimen while measuring load electronically and independently. The combination of on-chip technologies and the in situ electron microscopy is expected to be a potential testing technique for nanomechanics. Finally, details are presented on the key challenges and possible solutions in the implementation of the testing techniques referred above.

  17. Millimeter and Submillimeter Studies of O(^1D) Insertion Reactions to Form Molecules of Astrophysical Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Brian; Wehres, Nadine; Deprince, Bridget Alligood; Roy, Althea A. M.; Laas, Jacob; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2015-06-01

    While both the number of detected interstellar molecules and their chemical complexity continue to increase, understanding of the processes leading to their formation is lacking. Our research group combines laboratory spectroscopy, observational astronomy, and astrochemical modeling for an interdisciplinary examination of the chemistry of star and planet formation. This talk will focus on our laboratory studies of O(^1D) insertion reactions with organic molecules to produce molecules of astrophysical interest. By employing these reactions in a supersonic expansion, we are able to produce interstellar organic reaction intermediates that are unstable under terrestrial conditions; we then probe the products using millimeter and submillimeter spectroscopy. We benchmarked this setup using the well-studied O(^1D) + methane reaction to form methanol. After optimizing methanol production, we moved on to study the O(^1D) + ethylene reaction to form vinyl alcohol (CH_2CHOH), and the O(^1D) + methyl amine reaction to form aminomethanol (NH_2CH_2OH). Vinyl alcohol measurements have now been extended up to 450 GHz, and the associated spectral analysis is complete. A possible detection of aminomethanol has also been made, and continued spectral studies and analysis are underway. We will present the results from these experiments and discuss future applications of these molecular and spectroscopic techniques.

  18. Build up An Operational Flood Simulation from Existing 1D Channel Flow Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Che-Hao; Hsu, Chih-Tsung; Wu, Shiang-Jen; Lien, Ho-Cheng; Shen, Jhih-Cyuan; Chung, Ming-Ko

    2016-04-01

    Several 2D flood simulations will be developed for urban area in recent years in Taiwan. Original ideas focus on the static flood maps produced by the 2D flood simulation with respect to design events, which could be useful no matter for planning or disaster awareness. However, an extra bonus is expected to see if we can reuse the 2D flood simulation framework for operational use or not. Such a project goal inspire us to setup a standard operation procedure before any progress from existing 1D channel flow works. 3 key issues are taken into account in the SOP: 1. High Resolution Terrain: A 1m resolution digital terrain model (DTM) is considered as a reference. The Channels and structures should be setup in 1D channel flow works if we can identify under such high resolution. One should examine the existing 1D channel flow works consistent with the DTM or not. 2. Meteo Stations Referenced: Real time precipitation would be send to referenced location in RR models during an operational forecast. Existing 1D channels flow works are usually specifically for design events which are not necessarily equipped with such references. 3. Time Consuming: A full scale 2D flood simulation needs a lot of computation resources. A solution should be derived within practical time limits. Under the above consideration, some impacts and procedures will be analyzed and developed to setup the SOP for further model modification.

  19. Plasma as a tool for growth of 1D and 2D nanomaterials and their conversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvelbar, Uros

    2015-09-01

    The growth of 1D and 2D nanostructures in low pressure oxygen plasma is presented with the special stress on metal-oxide nanowires and their deterministic growth mechanisms. Since the resulting nanostructures not always have required properties for applications their modifications are required. Therefore their conversions into different oxides or sulphites/nitrides are required with either molecules, atoms, electrons or photons.

  20. Observing the 1D-3D Crossover in a Spin-Imbalanced Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revelle, Melissa C.; Fry, Jacob A.; Olsen, Ben A.; Hulet, Randall G.

    2016-05-01

    Trapped two-component Fermi gases phase separate into superfluid and normal phases when their spin populations are imbalanced. In 3D, a balanced superfluid core is surrounded by shells of partially polarized and normal phases, while in 1D, the balanced superfluid occupies the low density wings. We explored the crossover from 3D to 1D using a two-spin component ultracold atomic gas of 6 Li prepared in the lowest two hyperfine sublevels, where the interactions are tuned by a Feshbach resonance. The atoms are confined to 1D tubes where the tunneling rate t between tubes is varied by changing the depth of a 2D optical lattice. We observe the transition from 1D to 3D-like phase separation by varying t and interaction strength which changes the pair binding energy ɛB. We find a universal scaling of the dimensional crossover with t /ɛB , in agreement with previous theory. The crossover region is believed to be the most promising to find the exotic FFLO superfluid phase. Supported by the NSF and the Welch Foundation.

  1. Behavioral Responses in Animal Model of Congenital Muscular Dystrophy 1D.

    PubMed

    Comim, Clarissa M; Schactae, Aryadnne L; Soares, Jaime A; Ventura, Letícia; Freiberger, Viviane; Mina, Francielle; Dominguini, Diogo; Vainzof, Mariz; Quevedo, João

    2016-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies 1D (CMD1D) present a mutation on the LARGE gene and are characterized by an abnormal glycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG), strongly implicated as having a causative role in the development of central nervous system abnormalities such as cognitive impairment seen in patients. However, in the animal model of CMD1D, the brain involvement remains unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the cognitive involvement in the Large(myd) mice. To this aim, we used adult homozygous, heterozygous, and wild-type mice. The mice underwent six behavioral tasks: habituation to an open field, step-down inhibitory avoidance, continuous multiple trials step-down inhibitory avoidance task, object recognition, elevated plus-maze, and forced swimming test. It was observed that Large(myd) individuals presented deficits on the habituation to the open field, step down inhibitory avoidance, continuous multiple-trials step-down inhibitory avoidance, object recognition, and forced swimming. This study shows the first evidence that abnormal glycosylation of α-DG may be affecting memory storage and restoring process in an animal model of CMD1D.

  2. Formation of 1D adsorbed water structures on CaO(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xunhua; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Ghiringhelli, Luca M.; Levchenko, Sergey V.; Scheffler, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of water with oxide surfaces is of fundamental importance for basic and engineering sciences. Recently, a spontaneous formation of one-dimensional (1D) adsorbed water structures have been observed on CaO(001). Interestingly, at other alkaline earth metal oxides, in particular MgO(001) and SrO(001), such structures have not been found experimentally. We calculate the relative stability of adsorbed water structures on the three oxides using density-functional theory combined with the ab initio atomistic thermodynamics. Low-energy structures at different coverages are obtained with a first-principles genetic algorithm. Finite-temperature vibrational spectra are calculated using ab initio molecular dynamics. We find a range of (T, p) conditions where 1D structures are thermodynamically stable on CaO(001). The orientation and vibrational spectra of the 1D structures are in agreement with the experiments. The formation of the 1D structures is found to be actuated by a symmetry breaking in the adsorbed water tetramer, as well as by a balance between water-water and water-substrate interactions, determined by the lattice constant of the oxide.

  3. CD1d-restricted peripheral T cell lymphoma in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Bachy, Emmanuel; Urb, Mirjam; Chandra, Shilpi; Robinot, Rémy; Bricard, Gabriel; de Bernard, Simon; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Gazzo, Sophie; Blond, Olivier; Khurana, Archana; Baseggio, Lucile; Heavican, Tayla; Ffrench, Martine; Crispatzu, Giuliano; Mondière, Paul; Schrader, Alexandra; Taillardet, Morgan; Thaunat, Olivier; Martin, Nadine; Dalle, Stéphane; Le Garff-Tavernier, Magali; Salles, Gilles; Lachuer, Joel; Hermine, Olivier; Asnafi, Vahid; Roussel, Mikael; Lamy, Thierry; Herling, Marco; Iqbal, Javeed; Buffat, Laurent; Marche, Patrice N; Gaulard, Philippe; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Defrance, Thierry; Genestier, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a heterogeneous entity of neoplasms with poor prognosis, lack of effective therapies, and a largely unknown pathophysiology. Identifying the mechanism of lymphomagenesis and cell-of-origin from which PTCLs arise is crucial for the development of efficient treatment strategies. In addition to the well-described thymic lymphomas, we found that p53-deficient mice also developed mature PTCLs that did not originate from conventional T cells but from CD1d-restricted NKT cells. PTCLs showed phenotypic features of activated NKT cells, such as PD-1 up-regulation and loss of NK1.1 expression. Injections of heat-killed Streptococcus pneumonia, known to express glycolipid antigens activating NKT cells, increased the incidence of these PTCLs, whereas Escherichia coli injection did not. Gene expression profile analyses indicated a significant down-regulation of genes in the TCR signaling pathway in PTCL, a common feature of chronically activated T cells. Targeting TCR signaling pathway in lymphoma cells, either with cyclosporine A or anti-CD1d blocking antibody, prolonged mice survival. Importantly, we identified human CD1d-restricted lymphoma cells within Vδ1 TCR-expressing PTCL. These results define a new subtype of PTCL and pave the way for the development of blocking anti-CD1d antibody for therapeutic purposes in humans. PMID:27069116

  4. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of “structural correctness” depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D 1H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by 1H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D 1H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  5. A South American Prehistoric Mitogenome: Context, Continuity, and the Origin of Haplogroup C1d.

    PubMed

    Sans, Mónica; Figueiro, Gonzalo; Hughes, Cris E; Lindo, John; Hidalgo, Pedro C; Malhi, Ripan S

    2015-01-01

    Based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), it has been estimated that at least 15 founder haplogroups peopled the Americas. Subhaplogroup C1d3 was defined based on the mitogenome of a living individual from Uruguay that carried a lineage previously identified in hypervariable region I sequences from ancient and modern Uruguayan individuals. When complete mitogenomes were studied, additional substitutions were found in the coding region of the mitochondrial genome. Using a complete ancient mitogenome and three modern mitogenomes, we aim to clarify the ancestral state of subhaplogroup C1d3 and to better understand the peopling of the region of the Río de la Plata basin, as well as of the builders of the mounds from which the ancient individuals were recovered. The ancient mitogenome, belonging to a female dated to 1,610±46 years before present, was identical to the mitogenome of one of the modern individuals. All individuals share the mutations defining subhaplogroup C1d3. We estimated an age of 8,974 (5,748-12,261) years for the most recent common ancestor of C1d3, in agreement with the initial peopling of the geographic region. No individuals belonging to the defined lineage were found outside of Uruguay, which raises questions regarding the mobility of the prehistoric inhabitants of the country. Moreover, the present study shows the continuity of Native lineages over at least 6,000 years. PMID:26509686

  6. A new EEG measure using the 1D cluster variation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maren, Alianna J.; Szu, Harold H.

    2015-05-01

    A new information measure, drawing on the 1-D Cluster Variation Method (CVM), describes local pattern distributions (nearest-neighbor and next-nearest neighbor) in a binary 1-D vector in terms of a single interaction enthalpy parameter h for the specific case where the fractions of elements in each of two states are the same (x1=x2=0.5). An example application of this method would be for EEG interpretation in Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs), especially in the frontier of invariant biometrics based on distinctive and invariant individual responses to stimuli containing an image of a person with whom there is a strong affiliative response (e.g., to a person's grandmother). This measure is obtained by mapping EEG observed configuration variables (z1, z2, z3 for next-nearest neighbor triplets) to h using the analytic function giving h in terms of these variables at equilibrium. This mapping results in a small phase space region of resulting h values, which characterizes local pattern distributions in the source data. The 1-D vector with equal fractions of units in each of the two states can be obtained using the method for transforming natural images into a binarized equi-probability ensemble (Saremi & Sejnowski, 2014; Stephens et al., 2013). An intrinsically 2-D data configuration can be mapped to 1-D using the 1-D Peano-Hilbert space-filling curve, which has demonstrated a 20 dB lower baseline using the method compared with other approaches (cf. SPIE ICA etc. by Hsu & Szu, 2014). This CVM-based method has multiple potential applications; one near-term one is optimizing classification of the EEG signals from a COTS 1-D BCI baseball hat. This can result in a convenient 3-D lab-tethered EEG, configured in a 1-D CVM equiprobable binary vector, and potentially useful for Smartphone wireless display. Longer-range applications include interpreting neural assembly activations via high-density implanted soft, cellular-scale electrodes.

  7. Experimental use of TRMM precipitation radar observations in 1D+4D-Var assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Angela; Lopez, Philippe; Bauer, Peter; Moreau, Emmanuel

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents a new application of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) observations for indirect assimilation into the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model. The PR reflectivities are first processed using a one-dimensional variational (1D-Var) method to adjust model temperature and specific humidity. The retrieved Total Column Water Vapour (TCWV) is then assimilated into the operational four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) system. The applicability of the 1D+4D-Var approach to the radar observations is discussed in detail.Several case studies were run to assess the feasibility and the effectiveness of assimilating PR reflectivities with a 1D-Var approach. Results show good behaviour of the 1D-Var system in terms of convergence and stability. Its performance in terms of retrieved TCWV is comparable to that of other 1D-Vars which make use of TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) observations. When the 1D-Var TCWV pseudo-observations are input into the 4D-Var system, a positive impact is shown in the analysis and the subsequent forecasts, both on moisture-related fields and also on winds and surface pressure. The quality of the forecast is verified using track observations for the tropical cyclones. The track forecasts from the experiments which include 1D-Var TCWV are generally closer to the observed track than a control run. Despite their much smaller spatial coverage than TMI observations, it is found that the PR data have a comparable impact, provided the satellite samples a meaningful portion of the storm, possibly its centre. This is possibly due to the fact that TCWV increments from PR and from TMI brightness temperature have similar magnitudes.These results show that active sensor data can provide indirect yet useful information on the moisture field and that this information can effectively be assimilated to improve the analysis and the forecast of tropical disturbances. Although this is a sub

  8. Gef1p, a New Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Cdc42p, Regulates Polarity in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Coll, Pedro M.; Trillo, Yadira; Ametzazurra, Amagoia; Perez, Pilar

    2003-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe cdc42+ regulates cell morphology and polarization of the actin cytoskeleton. Scd1p/Ral1p is the only described guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Cdc42p in S. pombe. We have identified a new GEF, named Gef1p, specifically regulating Cdc42p. Gef1p binds to inactive Cdc42p but not to other Rho GTPases in two-hybrid assays. Overexpression of gef1+ increases specifically the GTP-bound Cdc42p, and Gef1p is capable of stimulating guanine nucleotide exchange of Cdc42p in vitro. Overexpression of gef1+ causes changes in cell morphology similar to those caused by overexpression of the constitutively active cdc42G12V allele. Gef1p localizes to the septum. gef1+ deletion is viable but causes a mild cell elongation and defects in bipolar growth and septum formation, suggesting a role for Gef1p in the control of cell polarity and cytokinesis. The double mutant gef1Δ scd1Δ is not viable, indicating that they share an essential function as Cdc42p activators. However, both deletion and overexpression of either gef1+ or scd1+ causes different morphological phenotypes, which suggest different functions. Genetic evidence revealed a link between Gef1p and the signaling pathway of Shk1/Orb2p and Orb6p. In contrast, no genetic interaction between Gef1p and Shk2p-Mkh1p pathway was observed. PMID:12529446

  9. Growth rate controlled synthesis of hierarchical Bi2S3/In2S3 core/shell microspheres with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juan; Tian, Guohui; Chen, Yajie; Shi, Yunhan; Tian, Chungui; Pan, Kai; Fu, Honggang

    2014-01-01

    Core/shell heterostructure composite has great potential applications in photocatalytic field because the introduction of core can remarkably improve charge transport and enhance the electron-hole separation. Herein, hierarchical Bi2S3/In2S3 core/shell structured microspheres were prepared via a simple one-pot hydrothermal process based on different growth rate of the two kinds of sulphides. The results showed that, the as-prepared hierarchical Bi2S3/In2S3 core/shell heterostructure exhibits significant visible light photocatalytic activity for degradation of 2, 4-dichlorophenol. The introduction of Bi2S3 core can not only improve charge transport and enhance the electron-hole separation, but also broaden the visible light response. The hierarchical porous folwer-like shell of In2S3 could increase the specific surface area and remarkably enhanced the chemical stability of Bi2S3 against oxidation. PMID:24504084

  10. Fus3p and Kss1p control G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through a balance of distinct arrest and proliferative functions that operate in parallel with Far1p.

    PubMed Central

    Cherkasova, V; Lyons, D M; Elion, E A

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mating pheromones activate two MAP kinases (MAPKs), Fus3p and Kss1p, to induce G1 arrest prior to mating. Fus3p is known to promote G1 arrest by activating Far1p, which inhibits three Clnp/Cdc28p kinases. To analyze the contribution of Fus3p and Kss1p to G1 arrest that is independent of Far1p, we constructed far1 CLN strains that undergo G1 arrest from increased activation of the mating MAP kinase pathway. We find that Fus3p and Kss1p both control G1 arrest through multiple functions that operate in parallel with Far1p. Fus3p and Kss1p together promote G1 arrest by repressing transcription of G1/S cyclin genes (CLN1, CLN2, CLB5) by a mechanism that blocks their activation by Cln3p/Cdc28p kinase. In addition, Fus3p and Kss1p counteract G1 arrest through overlapping and distinct functions. Fus3p and Kss1p together increase the expression of CLN3 and PCL2 genes that promote budding, and Kss1p inhibits the MAP kinase cascade. Strikingly, Fus3p promotes proliferation by a novel function that is not linked to reduced Ste12p activity or increased levels of Cln2p/Cdc28p kinase. Genetic analysis suggests that Fus3p promotes proliferation through activation of Mcm1p transcription factor that upregulates numerous genes in G1 phase. Thus, Fus3p and Kss1p control G1 arrest through a balance of arrest functions that inhibit the Cdc28p machinery and proliferative functions that bypass this inhibition. PMID:10049917

  11. Ascites Specific Inhibition of CD1d-Mediated Activation of NKT cells

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Tonya J.; Giuntoli, Robert L.; Rogers, Ophelia; Schneck, Jonathan; Oelke, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Natural killer T (NKT) cells recognize lipid antigen presented by CD1 molecules. NKT cells can both directly, through cytotoxicity, and indirectly, through activation of other effector cells, mediate anti-tumor immunity. However, it has been shown that tumor associated lipids are frequently shed into the tumor microenvironment, which can mediate immunosuppressive activity. Given that ovarian cancer associated ascites has been reported to have increased levels of gangliosides, we examined the effect of tumor associated and other ascites on CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells. Experimental Design To investigate the effects of ascites on NKT cell activation, we pretreated CD1d-expressing cells with the ascites and measured their ability to stimulate cytokine production in NKT cells. To determine whether antigen processing or editing was necessary, CD1d-Ig-based artificial Antigen Presenting Cells (aAPC) were also incubated with ascites. In addition, to examine specificity, we analyzed whether ascites fluid could influence the activation of classical CD8+ T cells. Results Pretreatment of CD1d-expressing cells with ascites from the majority of patients inhibited the cells’ ability to stimulate/activate NKT cells in a dose-dependent manner. Ascites treatment also partially blocked the ability of α-GalCer loaded CD1d-Ig-based artificial Antigen Presenting Cells (aAPC) to activate NKT cells. In addition, our data demonstrate that treatment with ascites does not inhibit HLA-A2 mediated activation of classical CD8+ T cells. Conclusions Together, these data suggest that ovarian and other cancers may have developed immune evasion mechanisms specifically targeting the CD1/NKT cell system. PMID:19047090

  12. The D1-D2 region of the large subunit ribosomal DNA as barcode for ciliates.

    PubMed

    Stoeck, T; Przybos, E; Dunthorn, M

    2014-05-01

    Ciliates are a major evolutionary lineage within the alveolates, which are distributed in nearly all habitats on our planet and are an essential component for ecosystem function, processes and stability. Accurate identification of these unicellular eukaryotes through, for example, microscopy or mating type reactions is reserved to few specialists. To satisfy the demand for a DNA barcode for ciliates, which meets the standard criteria for DNA barcodes defined by the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL), we here evaluated the D1-D2 region of the ribosomal DNA large subunit (LSU-rDNA). Primer universality for the phylum Ciliophora was tested in silico with available database sequences as well as in the laboratory with 73 ciliate species, which represented nine of 12 ciliate classes. Primers tested in this study were successful for all tested classes. To test the ability of the D1-D2 region to resolve conspecific and congeneric sequence divergence, 63 Paramecium strains were sampled from 24 mating species. The average conspecific D1-D2 variation was 0.18%, whereas congeneric sequence divergence averaged 4.83%. In pairwise genetic distance analyses, we identified a D1-D2 sequence divergence of <0.6% as an ideal threshold to discriminate Paramecium species. Using this definition, only 3.8% of all conspecific and 3.9% of all congeneric sequence comparisons had the potential of false assignments. Neighbour-joining analyses inferred monophyly for all taxa but for two Paramecium octaurelia strains. Here, we present a protocol for easy DNA amplification of single cells and voucher deposition. In conclusion, the presented data pinpoint the D1-D2 region as an excellent candidate for an official CBOL barcode for ciliated protists.

  13. Pressure Dependence of Electrical Transport in the Triangular Antiferromagnetic Insulators FeGa2S4 and Fe2Ga2S5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Takahiro; Nambu, Yusuke; Nakatsuji, Satoru; Koeda, Shinji; Hedo, Masato; Uwatoko, Yoshiya

    2009-09-01

    NiGa2S4, FeGa2S4, and Fe2Ga2S5 are layered triangular lattice antiferromagnets. Although the single-layer systems NiGa2S4 with S=1 and FeGa2S4 with S=2 are both insulators and have two-dimensional (2D) spin-disordered states, the bilayer system Fe2Ga2S5, which has an effective buckled honeycomb lattice of S=2, is a semiconductor and exhibits an antiferromagnetic long-range order at 110 K. Here, we present our results of the resistivity measurements of single crystals of FeGa2S4 and Fe2Ga2S5 under pressures of up to 8 GPa. We have observed a kink in the temperature dependence of the resistivity ρ(T) of FeGa2S4 under a pressure of 8 GPa, which is attributable to a transition from a 2D frozen spin-disordered state to a three-dimensional (3D) spin-ordered state. In either FeGa2S4 or Fe2Ga2S5, we have observed no transition into a metallic state within pressure range of up to 8 GPa, despite the fact that the resistivities of both FeGa2S4 and Fe2Ga2S5 show decreases with an increase in pressure at room temperature. The energy gap of FeGa2S4 estimated from the temperature dependences of the resistivities show negative pressure dependences.

  14. What causes the large extensions of red supergiant atmospheres?. Comparisons of interferometric observations with 1D hydrostatic, 3D convection, and 1D pulsating model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo-Torres, B.; Wittkowski, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Scholz, M.; Freytag, B.; Marcaide, J. M.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Wood, P. R.; Abellan, F. J.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: This research has two main goals. First, we present the atmospheric structure and the fundamental parameters of three red supergiants (RSGs), increasing the sample of RSGs observed by near-infrared spectro-interferometry. Additionally, we test possible mechanisms that may explain the large observed atmospheric extensions of RSGs. Methods: We carried out spectro-interferometric observations of the RSGs V602 Car, HD 95687, and HD 183589 in the near-infrared K-band (1.92-2.47 μm) with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution (R ~ 1500). To categorize and comprehend the extended atmospheres, we compared our observational results to predictions by available hydrostatic PHOENIX, available 3D convection, and new 1D self-excited pulsation models of RSGs. Results: Our near-infrared flux spectra of V602 Car, HD 95687, and HD 183589 are well reproduced by the PHOENIX model atmospheres. The continuum visibility values are consistent with a limb-darkened disk as predicted by the PHOENIX models, allowing us to determine the angular diameter and the fundamental parameters of our sources. Nonetheless, in the case of V602 Car and HD 95686, the PHOENIX model visibilities do not predict the large observed extensions of molecular layers, most remarkably in the CO bands. Likewise, the 3D convection models and the 1D pulsation models with typical parameters of RSGs lead to compact atmospheric structures as well, which are similar to the structure of the hydrostatic PHOENIX models. They can also not explain the observed decreases in the visibilities and thus the large atmospheric molecular extensions. The full sample of our RSGs indicates increasing observed atmospheric extensions with increasing luminosity and decreasing surface gravity, and no correlation with effective temperature or variability amplitude. Conclusions: The location of our RSG sources in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is confirmed to be consistent with the red limits of recent evolutionary tracks

  15. High temperature regenerative H.sub.2 S sorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flytani-Stephanopoulos, Maria (Inventor); Gavalas, George R. (Inventor); Tamhankar, Satish S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Efficient, regenerable sorbents for removal of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas streams comprise porous, high surface area particles. A first class of sorbents comprise a thin film of binary oxides that form a eutectic at the temperature of the gas stream coated onto a porous, high surface area refractory support. The binary oxides are a mixture of a Group VB or VIB metal oxide with a Group IB, IIB or VIII metal oxide such as a film of V-Zn-O, V-Cu-O, Cu-Mo-O, Zn-Mo-O or Fe-Mo-O coated on an alumina support. A second class of sorbents consist of particles of unsupported mixed oxides in the form of highly dispersed solid solutions of solid compounds characterized by small crystallite size, high porosity and relatively high surface area. The mixed oxide sorbents contain one Group IB, IIB or VIIB metal oxide such as copper, zinc or manganese and one or more oxides of Groups IIIA, VIB or VII such as aluminum, iron or molybdenum. The presence of iron or aluminum maintains the Group IB, IIB or VIIB metal in its oxidized state. Presence of molybdenum results in eutectic formation at sulfidation temperature and improves the efficiency of the sorbent.

  16. Reducing H[sub 2]S curbs odor and corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Field, W.; Proctor, B. ); Miller, J. )

    1993-03-01

    A study was conducted for the city of Mankato, Minn., to address H[sub 2]S problems in its wastewater collection and treatment system. The source of the problem was thought to be a large soybean processing plant that released an average of 973,000 liters of high-sulfate sewage each day. The study's primary goal was to locate all sources contributing unusually large amounts of sulfur compounds to the city's main sewer line. Each secondary line was sampled to determine the concentration of sulfate, sulfite and hydrogen sulfide present. The second goal was to establish values for biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS), pH and temperature factors that directly affect the reduction of sulfate. These values were determined at each sampling site. The third goal was to determine a mass balance on the total sulfur in the system while taking into account the dilution caused by the secondary lines so the presence, origins and ultimate fate of any sulfur compounds present in the prescribed area could be determined.

  17. The Dellistrique 2S - A 200 Channel Streak Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, S.

    1985-02-01

    Despite a great deal of effort to improve time resolution of streak cameras, the best reported time resolution remained just under one picosecond for more than a decade. However, the sensitivity and resolution of these devices have improved substantially over this time. In this paper the design of a very high performance streak camera, capable of resolving one picosecond on 200 parallel channels with single photo-electron detection capability: the Dellistrique 2S. The system comprises of a streak tube type Picotron 200 with a photocathode resolving 200 spatial channels along a slit and with an extraction field near the photocathode of greater than 16 KV per cm and with a non saturating phosphor screen as the main component. There is post streak tube intensification of 30,000 at the streak tube output wavelength which increases both the sensitivity of the system. The intensifier is coupled to a CCD readout device fibre-optically for producing a two dimensional image with a dynamic range of greater than 500. The camera can be operated at a repetition rate of between 80 MHz and 240 MHz using R.F. scanning methods. Upto 20 parallel channels have been tried with parallel information recording, which is well below the tube's capability of recording 200 independent channels. The image is virtually distortion free across the whole usable screen length of 45 mm for a large screen tube.

  18. Deletion of the Rab GAP Tbc1d1 modifies glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hargett, Stefan R; Walker, Natalie N; Hussain, Syed S; Hoehn, Kyle L; Keller, Susanna R

    2015-08-01

    Tbc1d1 is a Rab GTPase-activating protein (GAP) implicated in regulating intracellular retention and cell surface localization of the glucose transporter GLUT4 and thus glucose uptake in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Tbc1d1 is most abundant in skeletal muscle but is expressed at varying levels among different skeletal muscles. Previous studies with male Tbc1d1-deficient (Tbc1d1(-/-)) mice on standard and high-fat diets established a role for Tbc1d1 in glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis. Here we describe similar, but also additional abnormalities in male and female Tbc1d1(-/-) mice. We corroborate that Tbc1d1 loss leads to skeletal muscle-specific and skeletal muscle type-dependent abnormalities in GLUT4 expression and glucose uptake in female and male mice. Using subcellular fractionation, we show that Tbc1d1 controls basal intracellular GLUT4 retention in large skeletal muscles. However, cell surface labeling of extensor digitorum longus muscle indicates that Tbc1d1 does not regulate basal GLUT4 cell surface exposure as previously suggested. Consistent with earlier observations, female and male Tbc1d1(-/-) mice demonstrate increased energy expenditure and skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation. Interestingly, we observe sex-dependent differences in in vivo phenotypes. Female, but not male, Tbc1d1(-/-) mice have decreased body weight and impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, but only male Tbc1d1(-/-) mice show increased lipid clearance after oil gavage. We surmise that similar changes at the tissue level cause differences in whole-body metabolism between male and female Tbc1d1(-/-) mice and between male Tbc1d1(-/-) mice in different studies due to variations in body composition and nutrient handling.

  19. Deletion of the Rab GAP Tbc1d1 modifies glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hargett, Stefan R; Walker, Natalie N; Hussain, Syed S; Hoehn, Kyle L; Keller, Susanna R

    2015-08-01

    Tbc1d1 is a Rab GTPase-activating protein (GAP) implicated in regulating intracellular retention and cell surface localization of the glucose transporter GLUT4 and thus glucose uptake in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Tbc1d1 is most abundant in skeletal muscle but is expressed at varying levels among different skeletal muscles. Previous studies with male Tbc1d1-deficient (Tbc1d1(-/-)) mice on standard and high-fat diets established a role for Tbc1d1 in glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis. Here we describe similar, but also additional abnormalities in male and female Tbc1d1(-/-) mice. We corroborate that Tbc1d1 loss leads to skeletal muscle-specific and skeletal muscle type-dependent abnormalities in GLUT4 expression and glucose uptake in female and male mice. Using subcellular fractionation, we show that Tbc1d1 controls basal intracellular GLUT4 retention in large skeletal muscles. However, cell surface labeling of extensor digitorum longus muscle indicates that Tbc1d1 does not regulate basal GLUT4 cell surface exposure as previously suggested. Consistent with earlier observations, female and male Tbc1d1(-/-) mice demonstrate increased energy expenditure and skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation. Interestingly, we observe sex-dependent differences in in vivo phenotypes. Female, but not male, Tbc1d1(-/-) mice have decreased body weight and impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, but only male Tbc1d1(-/-) mice show increased lipid clearance after oil gavage. We surmise that similar changes at the tissue level cause differences in whole-body metabolism between male and female Tbc1d1(-/-) mice and between male Tbc1d1(-/-) mice in different studies due to variations in body composition and nutrient handling. PMID:26015432

  20. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Hisani N.; Chung, Charles C.; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Iwata, Hiroji; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H.; ven den Berg, David; Smeets, Ann; Zhao, Hui; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J.; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Marchand, Loic Le; Goldberg, Mark S.; Teo, Soo H.; Taib, Nur A. M.; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha; Winqvist, Robert; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Harrington, Patricia; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799–121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000–120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive. PMID:27556229

  1. 1p/19q-driven prognostic molecular classification for high-grade oligodendroglial tumors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haihui; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Xiaohui; Zeng, Wei; Jia, Wenqing; Wang, Junmei; Lin, Song

    2014-12-01

    The subjectivity in pathological diagnosis of anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) and uncertainty in designation of glioblastoma with oligodendroglioma component (GBMO) were two major dilemmas which puzzled neuro-pathologists and neurosurgeons. The present study was designed to project a molecular classification scheme based on the status of chromosome 1p and 19q. Patients (n = 117) with histological diagnosis of primary high-grade oligodendroglial tumors (HGOs) enrolled in the study. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosomes 1p and 19q was performed. Univariate analysis showed that higher tumor grade, 1p/19q maintenance and 1q/19p co polysomy were confirmed as risk factors in HGOs (P < 0.01). Accordingly, patients with HGOs were divided into four subtypes which conferred remarkably distinct prognosis based on the number of risk factors (0 risk factor: HGOs-1, 1 risk factor: HGOs-2, 2 risk factors: HGOs-3, 3 risk factors: HGOs-4). Cox regression model revealed that the tumor grade was no longer independently associated with survival, while the molecular classification scheme showed a marked prognostic significance (HR = 0.359, 95 % CI 0.261-0.494, P < 0.001 for progression-free survival (PFS); HR = 0.393, 95 % CI 0.283-0.546, P < 0.001 for overall survival (OS)). The classification scheme incorporating traditional pathology with molecular information can be served as a supplement of the current WHO classification system and contribute to the personalized treatment decision-making. PMID:25151507

  2. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus.

    PubMed

    Horne, Hisani N; Chung, Charles C; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Iwata, Hiroji; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H; Ven den Berg, David; Smeets, Ann; Zhao, Hui; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Marchand, Loic Le; Goldberg, Mark S; Teo, Soo H; Taib, Nur A M; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha; Winqvist, Robert; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Harrington, Patricia; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas F; Chanock, Stephen J; Dunning, Alison M; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799-121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000-120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive.

  3. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus.

    PubMed

    Horne, Hisani N; Chung, Charles C; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Iwata, Hiroji; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H; Ven den Berg, David; Smeets, Ann; Zhao, Hui; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Marchand, Loic Le; Goldberg, Mark S; Teo, Soo H; Taib, Nur A M; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha; Winqvist, Robert; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Harrington, Patricia; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas F; Chanock, Stephen J; Dunning, Alison M; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799-121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000-120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive. PMID:27556229

  4. Late-onset Stargardt-like macular dystrophy maps to chromosome 1p13

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.; Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Stargardt`s disease (MIM 248200), originally described in 1909, is an autosomal recessive condition of childhood, characterized by a sudden and bilateral loss of central vision. Typically, it has an early onset (7 to 12 years), a rapidly progressive course and a poor final outcome. The central area of the retina (macula) displays pigmentary changes in a ring form with depigmentation and atrophy of the retinal pigmentary epithelium (RPE). Perimacular yellowish spots, termed fundus flavimaculatus, are observed in a high percentage of patients. We have recently reported the genetic mapping of Stargardt`s disease to chromosome 1p13. On the other hand, considering that fundus flavimaculatus (MIM 230100) is another form of fleck fundus disease, with a Stargardt-like retinal aspect but with a late-onset and a more progressive course, we decided to test the hypothesis of allelism between typical Stargardt`s disease and late-onset autosomal recessive fundus flavimaculatus. Significant pairwise lod scores were obtained in each of four multiplex families (11 affected individuals, 12 relatives) with four markers of the 1p13 region (Z = 4.79, 4.64, 3.07, 3.16 at loci D1S435, D1S424, D1S236, and D1S415, respectively at {theta} = 0). Multipoint analysis showed that the best estimate for location of the disease gene is between D1S424 and D1S236 (maximum lod score of 5.20) as also observed in Stargardt`s disease. Our results are consistent with the location of the gene responsible of the late-onset Stargardt-like macular dystrophy in the 1p13 region and raise the hypothesis of either allelic mutational events or contiguous genes in this chromosomal region. The question of possible relationship with some age-related macular dystrophies in now open to debate.

  5. Multimodal Assessment of Protein Functional Deficiency Supports Pathogenicity of BRCA1 p.V1688del

    PubMed Central

    De Nicolo, Arcangela; Parisini, Emilio; Zhong, Quan; Palma, Maurizia Dalla; Stoeckert, Kathryn A.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Caligo, Maria A.; Vidal, Marc; Cusick, Michael E.; Garber, Judy E.

    2009-01-01

    Unequivocal discrimination between neutral variants and deleterious mutations is crucial for appropriate counseling of individuals with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 sequence change. An increasing number of variants of uncertain significance (VUSs) are being identified, whose unclassified biological effect poses clinical concerns. A multifactorial likelihood-based approach recently suggested disease causality for BRCA1 p.V1688del, a VUS recurrent in Italian breast/ovarian cancer families. Whether and how this single amino acid deletion in the BRCA1 BRCT domain affects the function of the mutant protein (ΔValBRCA1) has not been elucidated. We undertook comprehensive functional characterization of ΔValBRCA1, comprising comparative structural modeling, analysis of protein stability and associations, and analysis of DNA repair function. Our model predicted BRCT domain destabilization and folding disruption caused by BRCA1 p.V1688del. Consistently, the recombinant ΔValBRCA1 was less stable than wtBRCA1 and, unlike the latter, failed to associate with BRIP1, CtIP, and Rap80, and to re-localize to sites of DNA damage. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed a compromised interaction with FHL2 and with KPNA2, which is likely responsible for improper subcellular localization of ΔValBRCA1. In addition, we found four new breast/ovarian cancer families of Italian ancestry who carried this sequence alteration. These results provide the first evidence of the effect of BRCA1 p.V1688del on protein stability and function, supporting the view that it is a deleterious mutation. Multimodal analyses like ours could advance understanding of tumor suppression by BRCA1, and ultimately contribute to developing efficient strategies for screening and characterization of VUSs. PMID:19706752

  6. Interaction of Pik1p and Sjl proteins in membrane trafficking.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Peter H; Hasek, Jiri; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Romero, Carlos; Choi, Jae H; Vancura, Ales

    2005-02-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) phosphates are involved in signal transduction, cytoskeletal organization, and membrane traffic. PtdIns 4-phosphate [PtdIns(4)P], produced in yeast by PtdIns 4-kinase (Pik1p), appears to regulate Golgi secretory function. PtdIns(4)P is also produced by dephosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2], catalyzed by one of the three yeast Sjl proteins, homologs of the mammalian synaptic vesicle-associated PtdIns(4,5)P2 5-phosphatase, synaptojanin. To determine whether Pik1p and Sjl proteins operate in the same pathway or regulate the same process, we used a genetic approach. Mutation in the PIK1 gene displays synthetic genetic interactions with deletions of individual SJL genes. Deletion of SJL3 gene is synthetically lethal with pik1ts, and deletions of SJL1 or SJL2 genes in pik1ts cells exacerbate the temperature sensitivity, neomycin sensitivity, and defect in invertase secretion. A diminished level of PtdIns(4)P and increased level of PtdIns(4,5)P2 in pik1(ts)sjl1delta and pik1(ts)sjl2delta cells, compared with pik1ts cells, indicate that PtdIns(4)P is specifically required for secretion. Collectively, our results suggest that Pik1p and the Sjl proteins coordinately function to regulate the dynamic phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of the polar heads of phosphoinositides, and this process appears to be important for membrane trafficking pathways.

  7. Quantum wave packet and quasiclassical trajectory studies of the reaction H(2S) + CH(X2 Π; v = 0, j = 1) → C(1D) + H2 (X1 Σg+): Coriolis coupling effects and stereodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ruifeng; Wang, Yunhui; Deng, Kaiming

    2013-07-30

    The quantum mechanics (QM) and quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations have been carried out for the title reaction with the ground minimal allowed rotational state of CH (j = 1) on the 1 (1)A' potential energy surface. For the reaction probability at total angular momentum J = 0, a similar trend of the QM and QCT calculations is observed, and the QM results are larger than the latter almost in the whole considered energy range (0.1-1.5 eV). The QCT integral cross sections are larger than the QM results with centrifugal sudden approximation, while smaller than those from QM method including Coriolis coupling for collision energies bigger than 0.25 eV. The quantum wave-packet computations show that the Coriolis coupling effects get more and more pronounced with increasing of J. In addition to the scalar properties, the stereodynamical properties, such as the average rotational alignment factor , the angular distributions P(θr ), P(ϕr ), P(θr ,ϕr ), and the polarization-dependent generalized differential cross sections have been explored in detail by QCT approach.

  8. A convenient synthesis of benzo[c]naphtho[2,1-p]chrysene

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, S.; Scott, L.T.

    1996-10-04

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) benzo[c]-naphtho[2,1-p]chrysene (1) has recently attracted renewed attention as a potential precursor for the synthesis of bowl-shaped fullerene substructures. The published synthetic approaches to 1, however, are lengthy and entail one or more photocyclizations of stilbene-type compounds that suffer from competing [2 + 2]cycloaddition reactions at normal concentrations and are thereby rendered quite inefficient. The authors report here a convenient four-step synthesis of 1 that can be performed on a multigram scale starting from the commercially available {alpha}-tetralone (2) and 2-bromonaphthalene. 12 refs.

  9. RAP1GA1: A candidate tumor suppressor locus in 1p36.1

    SciTech Connect

    Ranade, K.; Hussussian, C.J.; Higgins, P.

    1994-09-01

    The rap1/Krev-1 gene (RAP1A) encodes a p21-related protein that suppresses transformation by activated p21{sup ras}. The GTPase activating protein (GAP) gene for p21{sup rap1A} (RAP1GA1) has recently been assigned to chromosome 1p36.1-p35, a region of the genome that is frequently involved in deletions and rearrangements in several different tumors including breast, colon and hepatocellular carcinomas, melanoma, and neuroblastoma. GAP genes negatively regulate the activity of p21 proteins by catalyzing the conversion of the active GTP-bound forms to the inactive GDP-bound forms. The physiological function of p21{sup rap1A}-GAP makes it a strong candidate as a tumor suppressor gene that may have a role in the development of one or more of these malignancies. We have refined the localization of RAP1GA1 by linkage analysis with a highly informative (CA){sub n} repeat contained within the gene, and demonstrated that it is within the minimal deleted region for breast and colon carcinomas, and that it is excluded from the minimally deleted region in melanoma and neuroblastoma. Genetic mapping in the mouse demonstrated that Rap1ga1 is located {approximately}10 cM proximal to Pnd and therefore maps within the interval containing the modifier of Min gene (Mom-1) and the plasmocytoma susceptibility locus (Pcts). The human RAP1GA1 gene contains at least 27 exons. The coding region contains 22 exons, and there are at least five 5{prime}-UT exons that are assembled in a complex pattern of alternative splicing in different tissues. The localization of RAP1GA1 makes it a very strong candidate for a role as a modifier gene involved in the common secondary abnormalities involving 1p36 in several different carcinomas. The potential role of RAP1GA1 in these malignancies is currently being investigated by sequence analysis of breast and colon carcinomas with loss of heterozygosity in 1p36.

  10. Dying at 23 with 1p36 deletion syndrome: Laura's family story.

    PubMed

    Tandy, P A

    2012-09-01

    Laura was unusual. She had always been different and at times difficult. She was born with a genetic disorder, diagnosed as 1p36 deletion syndrome when she was 21 years old. At 23 she suffered her first cardiac arrest at home and entered the hospital system for the first time apart from infancy. After initially appearing to do well, she suffered a second cardiac arrest 10 weeks after admission. This was followed by an irreversible deterioration and she died 14 weeks after admission. We her family had been with her throughout her traumatic experience. This is our story.

  11. Capitulation in Abelian extensions of some fields ℚ (√{p1p2q , }i )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Abdelmalek; Zekhnini, Abdelkader; Taous, Mohammed

    2016-02-01

    We study the capitulation of the 2-ideal classes of an infinite family of imaginary biquadratic number fields consisting of fields k =ℚ (√{p1p2q , }i ), where i =√{-1 } and p1 ≡ p2 ≡ -q ≡ 1 (mod 4) are different primes. For each of the three quadratic extensions K /k inside the absolute genus field k(*) of k , we compute the capitulation kernel of K /k . Then we deduce that each strongly ambiguous class of k /ℚ (i ) capitulates already in k(*), which is smaller than the relative genus field (k/ℚ (i )) *.

  12. Modeling of impurity spectroscopy in the divertor and SOL of DIII-D using the 1D multifluid model NEWT1D

    SciTech Connect

    West, W.P.; Evans, T.E.; Brooks, N.H.

    1996-10-01

    NEWT1D, a one dimensional multifluid model of the scrape-off layer and divertor plasma, has been used to model the plasma including the distribution of carbon ionization states in the SOL and divertor of ELMing H-mode at two injected power levels in DIII-D. Comparison of the code predictions to the measured divertor and scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma density and temperature shows good agreement. Comparison of the predicted line emissions to the spectroscopic data suggests that physically sputtered carbon from the strike point is not transported up the flux tube; a distributed source of carbon a few centimeters up the flux tube is required to achieve reasonable agreement.

  13. H2S concentrations in the arterial blood during H2S administration in relation to its toxicity and effects on breathing

    PubMed Central

    Klingerman, Candice M.; Trushin, Neil; Prokopczyk, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to establish in spontaneously breathing urethane-anesthetized rats, the relationship between the concentrations of H2S transported in the blood and the corresponding clinical manifestations, i.e., breathing stimulation and inhibition, during and following infusion of NaHS at increasing rates. The gaseous concentration of H2S (CgH2S, one-third of the total soluble form) was computed from the continuous determination of H2S partial pressure in the alveolar gas, while H2S, both dissolved and combined to hemoglobin, was measured at specific time points by sulfide complexation with monobromobimane (CMBBH2S). We found that using a potent reducing agent in vitro, H2S added to the whole blood had little interaction with the plasma proteins, as sulfide appeared to be primarily combined and then oxidized by hemoglobin. In vivo, H2S was undetectable in the blood in its soluble form in baseline conditions, while CMBBH2S averaged 0.7 ± 0.5 μM. During NaHS infusion, H2S was primarily present in nonsoluble form in the arterial blood: CMBBH2S was about 50 times higher than CgH2S at the lowest levels of exposure and 5 or 6 times at the levels wherein fatal apnea occurred. CgH2S averaged only 1.1 ± 0.7 μM when breathing increased, corresponding to a CMBBH2S of 11.1 ± 5.4 μM. Apnea occurred at CgH2S above 5.1 μM and CMBBH2S above 25.4 μM. At the cessation of exposure, CMBBH2S remained elevated, at about 3 times above baseline for at least 15 min. These data provide a frame of reference for studying the putative effects of endogenous H2S and for testing antidotes against its deadly effects. PMID:23904109

  14. First Observation of the P-Wave Spin-Singlet Bottomonium States hb(1P) and hb(2P)

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bondar, A.; Bracko, Marko; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, Thomas E.; Chang, P.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I- S.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Esen, Sevda; Fast, James E.; Feindt, M.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Hara, Takanori; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, N.; Koblitz, S.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Li, J.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Macnaughton, Jimmy N.; Matvienko, D.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mussa, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Neubauer, S.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Nozaki, T.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, Stephen L.; Onuki, Y.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, M.; Piilonen, Leo E.; Poluektov, A.; Ritter, M.; Rohrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, Himansu B.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, Martin E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanic, S.; Stanic, M.; Sumihama, M.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Teramoto, Y.; Tikhomirov, I.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Vahsen, S. E.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wicht, J.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-01-18

    We report the observation of the hb(1P) and hb(2P) spin-singlet bottomonium states produced in the reaction e⁺e⁻ → hb(nP)π⁺π⁻ with significances of 5.5σ and 11.2σ, respectively. We find that M[hb(1P)] = (9898.25±1.06+1.03 –1.07 )MeV/c² and M[hb(2P)] = (10259.76±0.64+1.43 –1.03 )MeV/c2, which correspond to measurements of the P-wave hyperfine splittings ΔMHF = (1.62 ± 1.52)MeV/c² and (0.48+1.57 –1.22)MeV/c², respectively. We also report measurements of the cross sections for e⁺e⁻ → hb(nP)π⁺π⁻ relative to the cross section for the e⁺e⁻ Υ(2S)π⁺π⁻ reaction. These results are obtained from a 121.4 fb⁻¹ data sample collected with the Belle detector near the Υ(5S) resonance at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider.

  15. The mannose-specific lectin domains of Flo1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lg-Flo1p from S. pastorianus: crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the adhesin-carbohydrate complexes.

    PubMed

    Ielasi, Francesco S; Goyal, Parveen; Sleutel, Mike; Wohlkonig, Alexandre; Willaert, Ronnie G

    2013-07-01

    Flo1p and Lg-Flo1p are two cell-wall adhesins belonging to the Flo (flocculation) protein family from the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. pastorianus. The main function of these modular proteins endowed with calcium-dependent lectin activity is to mediate cell-cell adhesion events during yeast flocculation, a process which is well known at the cellular level but still not fully characterized from a molecular perspective. Recently, structural features of the N-terminal Flo lectin domains, including the N-terminal domain of Lg-Flo1p (N-Lg-Flo1p), and their interactions with carbohydrate molecules have been investigated. However, structural data concerning the N-terminal domain of Flo1p (N-Flo1p), which is the most specific among the Flo proteins, are missing and information about the N-Lg-Flo1p-carbohydrate interaction still lacks detailed structural insight. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the apo form and the mannose complex of N-Flo1p and X-ray analysis of N-Lg-Flo1p crystals soaked in α-1,2-mannobiose are reported. The N-Flo1p crystals diffracted to a resolution of 1.43 Å in the case of the apo form and to 2.12 Å resolution for the mannose complex. Both crystals were orthorhombic and belonged to space group P212121, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The N-Lg-Flo1p-α-1,2-mannobiose complex crystal diffracted to 1.73 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P1211 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  16. The turbomachine blading design using S2-S1 approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, T. S.; Bencherif, L.; Viney, B.; Duc, J. M. Nguyen

    1991-01-01

    The boundary conditions corresponding to the design problem when the blades being simulated by the bound vorticity distribution are presented. The 3D flow is analyzed by the two steps S2 - S1 approach. In the first step, the number of blades is supposed to be infinite, the vortex distribution is transformed into an axisymmetric one, so that the flow field can be analyzed in a meridional plane. The thickness distribution of the blade producing the flow channel striction is taken into account by the modification of metric tensor in the continuity equation. Using the meridional stream function to define the flow field, the mass conservation is satisfied automatically. The governing equation is deduced from the relation between the azimuthal component of the vorticity and the meridional velocity. The value of the azimuthal component of the vorticity is provided by the hub to shroud equilibrium condition. This step leads to the determination of the axisymmetric stream sheets as well as the approximate camber surface of the blade. In the second step, the finite number of blades is taken into account, the inverse problem corresponding to the blade to blade flow confined in each stream sheet is analyzed. The momentum equation implies that the free vortex of the absolute velocity must be tangential to the stream sheet. The governing equation for the blade to blade flow stream function is deduced from this condition. At the beginning, the upper and the lower surfaces of the blades are created from the camber surface obtained from the first step with the assigned thickness distribution. The bound vorticity distribution and the penetrating flux conservation applied on the presumed blade surface constitute the boundary conditions of the inverse problem. The detection of this flux leads to the rectification of the geometry of the blades.

  17. O(1D) kinetic study of key ozone depleting substances and greenhouse gases.

    PubMed

    Baasandorj, Munkhbayar; Fleming, Eric L; Jackman, Charles H; Burkholder, James B

    2013-03-28

    A key stratospheric loss process for ozone depleting substances (ODSs) and greenhouse gases (GHGs) is reaction with the O((1)D) atom. In this study, rate coefficients, k, for the O((1)D) atom reaction were measured for the following key halocarbons: chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) CFCl3 (CFC-11), CF2Cl2 (CFC-12), CFCl2CF2Cl (CFC-113), CF2ClCF2Cl (CFC-114), CF3CF2Cl (CFC-115); hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) CHF2Cl (HCFC-22), CH3CClF2 (HCFC-142b); and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) CHF3 (HFC-23), CHF2CF3 (HFC-125), CH3CF3 (HFC-143a), and CF3CHFCF3 (HFC-227ea). Total rate coefficients, kT, corresponding to the loss of the O((1)D) atom, were measured over the temperature range 217-373 K using a competitive reactive technique. kT values for the CFC and HCFC reactions were >1 × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), except for CFC-115, and the rate coefficients for the HFCs were in the range (0.095-0.72) × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). Rate coefficients for the CFC-12, CFC-114, CFC-115, HFC-23, HFC-125, HFC-143a, and HFC-227ea reactions were observed to have a weak negative temperature dependence, E/R ≈ -25 K. Reactive rate coefficients, kR, corresponding to the loss of the halocarbon, were measured for CFC-11, CFC-115, HCFC-22, HCFC-142b, HFC-23, HFC-125, HFC-143a, and HFC-227ea using a relative rate technique. The reactive branching ratio obtained was dependent on the composition of the halocarbon and the trend in O((1)D) reactivity with the extent of hydrogen and chlorine substitution is discussed. The present results are critically compared with previously reported kinetic data and the discrepancies are discussed. 2D atmospheric model calculations were used to evaluate the local and global annually averaged atmospheric lifetimes of the halocarbons and the contribution of O((1)D) chemistry to their atmospheric loss. The O((1)D) reaction was found to be a major global loss process for CFC-114 and CFC-115 and a secondary global loss process for the other molecules included

  18. The Taz1p transacylase is imported and sorted into the outer m