Science.gov

Sample records for 1p loh 19q

  1. Prognostic significance of relative 1p/19q codeletion in oligodendroglial tumors.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Marc C; Born, Donald

    2015-11-01

    1p/19q codeletion is a favorable prognostic marker for oligodendroglial tumors (OT). Compare outcome in OT with simple deletions of 1p or 19q to those with relative deletions defined as the presence of both increased copy number (polysomy) and 1p/19q codeletion. 525 cases were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using dual color probes to determine the deletion status of chromosome arms 1p and 19q. Categories included simple deletions defined as a proportion of either 1p32 or 19q13 FISH signals compared to 1q42 or 19p13 signals less than 0.80 and relative deletions (1p or 19q) defined as the combination of a <0.80 proportion with >30 % of nuclei showing increased chromosome number (based on enumeration of 1q25 or 19p13). 464 (80 %) were WHO Grade II or III OT of which 209 (48 %) had both 1p and 19q deleted (codeletion). 72 (16 %) had relative deletions for either one or both 1p and 19q of which 28 (6 %) had relative deletions of 1p and 19q (relative codeletion). Overall survival in WHO Grade II OT was 13 + years when 1p/19q codeleted (n = 156); 5 + years in uni- or nondeleted (n = 86); 6 + years in relative deletion for either 1p or 19q (n = 41); and 6 + years in relative 1p/19q codeletion (n = 15). Similarly in WHO Grade III OT (n = 168) overall survival was 11 + years in 1p/19q codeleted (n = 54) OT; 2.5 years in uni- or nondeleted (n = 70); 3 years in relative deletion for one or both 1p or 19q (n = 31); and 4 + years in relative 1p/19q codeletion (n = 13). Survival for OT regardless of grade with relative codeletion of 1p/19q was approximately one half that of 1p/19q codeleted tumors. The presence of relative 1p/19q codeletion is of prognostic significance. PMID:26341371

  2. 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangements in small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hongyang; Xu, Haimiao; Xie, Fajun; Qin, Jing; Han, Na; Fan, Yun; Mao, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is poor despite reports suggesting modest improvement in survival. To date, chemotherapy remains the cornerstone treatment for SCLC patients, and many studies have focused on identifying the molecular characteristics of SCLC, which serve as the basis for precision treatments that improve the prognosis of SCLC. For instance, the therapeutic effect of temozolomide, recommended for patients with relapsed SCLC, is linked to 1p/19q codeletion in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors. A subpopulation of SCLC patients may derive benefit from tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting RET. In order to identify 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangement in SCLC patients, 32 SCLC resected specimens were retrospectively collected between 2008 and 2014 from the Zhejiang Cancer Hospital in People’s Republic of China. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to detect 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangement in the specimens. A 1p single deletion was detected in eight specimens, 19q single deletion was detected in three specimens, and only three specimens had a 1p/19q codeletion. None of the specimens had a RET rearrangement. The three patients whose specimens had a 1p/19q codeletion were alive after 58, 50, and 30 months of follow-up care. There was a trend toward prolonged overall survival for the patients with codeletion compared to no codeletion, 1p single deletion, 19q single deletion, and without 1p and 19q deletion (P=0.113, 0.168, 0.116, and 0.122, respectively). Our data showed that RET rearrangement may be not an ideal molecular target for SCLC therapies in People’s Republic of China. Instead, 1p/19q codeletion is a promising marker for a good prognosis and treatment with temozolomide in SCLC. PMID:27366094

  3. A t(1;19)(q10;p10) mediates the combined deletions of 1p and 19q and predicts a better prognosis of patients with oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Robert B; Blair, Hilary; Ballman, Karla V; Giannini, Caterina; Arusell, Robert M; Law, Mark; Flynn, Heather; Passe, Sandra; Felten, Sara; Brown, Paul D; Shaw, Edward G; Buckner, Jan C

    2006-10-15

    Combined deletion of chromosomes 1p and 19q is associated with improved prognosis and responsiveness to therapy in patients with anaplastic oligodendroglioma. The deletions usually involve whole chromosome arms, suggesting a t(1;19)(q10;p10). Using stem cell medium, we cultured a few tumors. Paraffin-embedded tissue was obtained from 21 Mayo Clinic patients and 98 patients enrolled in 2 North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) low-grade glioma trials. Interphase fusion of CEP1 and 19p12 probes detected the t(1;19). 1p/19q deletions were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Upon culture, one oligodendroglioma contained an unbalanced 45,XX,t(1;19)(q10;p10). CEP1/19p12 fusion was observed in all metaphases and 74% of interphase nuclei. Among Mayo Clinic oligodendrogliomas, the prevalence of fusion was 81%. Among NCCTG patients, CEP1/19p12 fusion prevalence was 55%, 47%, and 0% among the oligodendrogliomas, mixed oligoastrocytomas, and astrocytomas, respectively. Ninety-one percent of NCCTG gliomas with 1p/19q deletion and 12% without 1p/19q deletion had CEP1/19p12 fusion (P < 0.001, chi(2) test). The median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 8.1 years without fusion and 11.9 years with fusion (P = 0.003). The median OS for patients with low-grade oligodendroglioma was 9.1 years without fusion and 13.0 years with fusion (P = 0.01). Similar significant median OS differences were observed for patients with combined 1p/19q deletions. The absence of alterations was associated with a significantly shorter OS for patients who received higher doses of radiotherapy. Our results strongly suggest that a t(1;19)(q10;p10) mediates the combined 1p/19q deletion in human gliomas. Like combined 1p/19q deletion, the 1;19 translocation is associated with superior OS and progression-free survival in low-grade glioma patients.

  4. Molecular background of oligodendroglioma: 1p/19q, IDH, TERT, CIC and FUBP1.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Daniel P; Louis, David N; Cairncross, John Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendroglioma is the quintessential molecularly-defined brain tumor. The characteristic whole-arm loss of the long arm of chromosome 1 and the short arm of chromosome 19 (1p/19q-codeletion) within the genome of these tumors facilitated the reproducible molecular identification of this subcategory of gliomas. More recently, recurrent molecular genetic alterations have been identified to occur concurrently with 1p/19q-codeletion, and definitively identify these tumors, including mutations in IDH1/2, CIC, FUBP1, and the TERT promoter, as well as the absence of ATRX and TP53 alterations. These findings provide a foundation for the consistent diagnosis of this tumor type, upon which a generation of clinical investigators have assembled a strong evidence base for the effective treatment of this disease with radiation and chemotherapy. PMID:26545048

  5. Molecular imaging of 1p/19q deletion in oligodendroglial tumours with 11C-methionine positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Iwadate, Yasuo; Shinozaki, Natsuki; Matsutani, Tomoo; Uchino, Yoshio; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chromosome 1p/19q deletion is an established prognostic and predictive marker in the WHO grade III oligodendroglial tumours (OT). To estimate the genetic status preoperatively, the authors investigated the correlation between the uptake of 11C-methionine in positron emission tomography (PET) and the 1p/19q status in grades II and III OT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 144 patients with gliomas who received 11C-methionine PET. 66 cases with grades II–III oligodendrogliomas or oligoastrocytomas underwent fluorescence in situ hybridisation to determine the 1p/19q status. The tissue uptake of 11C-methionine was expressed as the ratio of the maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) in tumour areas to the mean SUV (SUVmean) in the contralateral normal brain (tumour-to-normal tissue (T/N) ratio). Results The T/N ratio in 11C-methionine PET was significantly higher in grade III OT than in grade II tumours. The mean T/N ratio of the grade II tumours without 1p/19q deletion was significantly higher than that of the grade II tumours with 1p/19q deletion (mean 2.67 vs 1.94, respectively; p=0.0457). In grade III tumours, the mean T/N ratio of the tumours without 1p/19q deletion was also significantly higher than that of the tumours with 1p/19q deletion (mean 4.83 vs 3.49, respectively; p=0.0261). The rate of IDH1 mutation was lower and the rate of contrast enhancement on MRIs was higher in the 1p/19q non-deleted OT than those with 1p/19q deletion, which may contribute to the high T/N ratio. Conclusions Among suspected OT, 11C-methionine PET may help us preoperatively discriminate tumours with and without 1p/19q deletion. PMID:26848169

  6. Molecular genetic analysis of oligodendroglial tumors shows preferential allelic deletions on 19q and 1p.

    PubMed Central

    Reifenberger, J.; Reifenberger, G.; Liu, L.; James, C. D.; Wechsler, W.; Collins, V. P.

    1994-01-01

    The molecular genetic alterations of oligodendroglial tumors and mixed gliomas of the central nervous system were studied in a series of 37 cases (8 oligodendrogliomas, 13 anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, 8 oligoastrocytomas, and 8 anaplastic oligoastrocytomas). A total of 180 polymorphic loci and 5 nonpolymorphic gene loci, distributed over all chromosomes, were examined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Loss of heterozygosity was most frequently observed for loci on 19q with a commonly deleted region at 19q13.2-q13.4 distal to the CYP2a gene and proximal to the D19S22 locus. The incidence of allelic loss on 19q was particularly high (81%) in oligodendroglial tumors and equal to 31% in mixed gliomas. More than 75% of the tumors with allelic deletions on 19q also showed loss of heterozygosity for loci on 1p with one tumor showing only loss of alleles distal to the NGFB gene (1p13-pter). Seven (19%) tumors had lost alleles from 17p with the deleted region including the TP53 tumor suppressor gene in all cases. Sequencing of the TP53 transcripts from exons 2 to 10, however, did not reveal mutations of the remaining allele in any of these tumors. Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas demonstrated an increased incidence of additional allelic losses involving most frequently chromosomes 9p and 10. Gene amplification was detected in two anaplastic tumors, affecting the epidermal growth factor receptor gene in both cases, with additional amplification of the renin gene at 1q32 in one of these cases. In total our results indicate both differences and similarities between the molecular genetic alterations in tumors with oligodendroglial and astrocytic differentiation. The loss of genetic information from 19q and 1p as well as the rarity of TP53 mutations in oligodendroglial tumors suggests that the early events in their oncogenesis are distinct from those associated with astrocytic tumors. However, similarities are indicated by the

  7. 1p/19q-driven prognostic molecular classification for high-grade oligodendroglial tumors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haihui; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Xiaohui; Zeng, Wei; Jia, Wenqing; Wang, Junmei; Lin, Song

    2014-12-01

    The subjectivity in pathological diagnosis of anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) and uncertainty in designation of glioblastoma with oligodendroglioma component (GBMO) were two major dilemmas which puzzled neuro-pathologists and neurosurgeons. The present study was designed to project a molecular classification scheme based on the status of chromosome 1p and 19q. Patients (n = 117) with histological diagnosis of primary high-grade oligodendroglial tumors (HGOs) enrolled in the study. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosomes 1p and 19q was performed. Univariate analysis showed that higher tumor grade, 1p/19q maintenance and 1q/19p co polysomy were confirmed as risk factors in HGOs (P < 0.01). Accordingly, patients with HGOs were divided into four subtypes which conferred remarkably distinct prognosis based on the number of risk factors (0 risk factor: HGOs-1, 1 risk factor: HGOs-2, 2 risk factors: HGOs-3, 3 risk factors: HGOs-4). Cox regression model revealed that the tumor grade was no longer independently associated with survival, while the molecular classification scheme showed a marked prognostic significance (HR = 0.359, 95 % CI 0.261-0.494, P < 0.001 for progression-free survival (PFS); HR = 0.393, 95 % CI 0.283-0.546, P < 0.001 for overall survival (OS)). The classification scheme incorporating traditional pathology with molecular information can be served as a supplement of the current WHO classification system and contribute to the personalized treatment decision-making. PMID:25151507

  8. IDH mutation, 1p19q codeletion and ATRX loss in WHO grade II gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Leeper, Heather E.; Caron, Alissa A.; Decker, Paul A.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Giannini, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Background Epigenetic, genetic, and molecular studies have identified several diagnostic and prognostic markers in diffuse gliomas. Their importance for evaluating WHO grade II gliomas has yet to be specifically delineated. Methods We analyzed markers, including IDH mutation(IDHmut), 1p19q codeletion(1p19qcodel), ATRX expression loss(ATRX loss) and p53 overexpression, and outcomes in 159 patients with WHO grade II oligodendroglioma, oligoastrocytoma, and astrocytoma (2003–2012). Results IDHmut was found in 141(91%) and ATRX loss in 64(87%) of IDHmut-noncodel tumors (p = 0.003). All codeleted tumors (n = 66) were IDHmut. Four subgroups were identified: IDHmut-codel, 66(43%); IDHmut-noncodel-ATRX loss, 60(39%); IDHmut-noncodel-ATRXwt, 9(6%); IDHwt, 14(9%). Median survival among 4 groups was significantly different (p = 0.038), particularly in IDHmut-codel (median survival 15.6 years) compared to the remaining 3 groups (p = 0.025). Survival by histology was not significant. Overall (OS), but not progression-free (PFS), survival was significantly longer with gross total resection vs. biopsy only (p = 0.042). Outcomes for patients with subtotal resection were not significantly different from those with biopsy only. Among these uniformly treated patients, OS far exceeds PFS, particularly in those with 1p/19q codeletion. Conclusions For WHO grade II diffuse glioma, molecular classification using 1p/19qcodel, IDHmut, and ATRX loss more accurately predicts outcome and should be incorporated in the neuropathologic evaluation. PMID:26210286

  9. Glioma Groups Based on 1p/19q, IDH, and TERT Promoter Mutations in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Decker, Paul A.; Sicotte, Hugues; Pekmezci, Melike; Rice, Terri; Kosel, Matt L.; Smirnov, Ivan V.; Sarkar, Gobinda; Caron, Alissa A.; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; Praska, Corinne E.; Chada, Anisha R.; Halder, Chandralekha; Hansen, Helen M.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Bracci, Paige M.; Marshall, Roxanne; Zheng, Shichun; Reis, Gerald F.; Pico, Alexander R.; O’Neill, Brian P.; Buckner, Jan C.; Giannini, Caterina; Huse, Jason T.; Perry, Arie; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchell S.; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.; Wiemels, Joseph; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Jenkins, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prediction of clinical behavior, response to therapy, and outcome of infiltrative glioma is challenging. On the basis of previous studies of tumor biology, we defined five glioma molecular groups with the use of three alterations: mutations in the TERT promoter, mutations in IDH, and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion). We tested the hypothesis that within groups based on these features, tumors would have similar clinical variables, acquired somatic alterations, and germline variants. METHODS We scored tumors as negative or positive for each of these markers in 1087 gliomas and compared acquired alterations and patient characteristics among the five primary molecular groups. Using 11,590 controls, we assessed associations between these groups and known glioma germline variants. RESULTS Among 615 grade II or III gliomas, 29% had all three alterations (i.e., were triplepositive), 5% had TERT and IDH mutations, 45% had only IDH mutations, 7% were triple-negative, and 10% had only TERT mutations; 5% had other combinations. Among 472 grade IV gliomas, less than 1% were triple-positive, 2% had TERT and IDH mutations, 7% had only IDH mutations, 17% were triple-negative, and 74% had only TERT mutations. The mean age at diagnosis was lowest (37 years) among patients who had gliomas with only IDH mutations and was highest (59 years) among patients who had gliomas with only TERT mutations. The molecular groups were independently associated with overall survival among patients with grade II or III gliomas but not among patients with grade IV gliomas. The molecular groups were associated with specific germline variants. CONCLUSIONS Gliomas were classified into five principal groups on the basis of three tumor markers. The groups had different ages at onset, overall survival, and associations with germline variants, which implies that they are characterized by distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:26061753

  10. Integrated multi-omics analysis of oligodendroglial tumours identifies three subgroups of 1p/19q co-deleted gliomas.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Aurélie; Idbaih, Ahmed; Dehais, Caroline; Elarouci, Nabila; Carpentier, Catherine; Letouzé, Eric; Colin, Carole; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Sanson, Marc; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Ducray, François

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendroglial tumours (OT) are a heterogeneous group of gliomas. Three molecular subgroups are currently distinguished on the basis of the IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion. Here we present an integrated analysis of the transcriptome, genome and methylome of 156 OT. Not only does our multi-omics classification match the current classification but also reveals three subgroups within 1p/19q co-deleted tumours, associated with specific expression patterns of nervous system cell types: oligodendrocyte, oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) and neuronal lineage. We confirm the validity of these three subgroups using public datasets. Importantly, the OPC-like group is associated with more aggressive clinical and molecular patterns, including MYC activation. We show that the MYC activation occurs through various alterations, including MYC genomic gain, MAX genomic loss, MYC hypomethylation and microRNA-34b/c down-regulation. In the lower grade glioma TCGA dataset, the OPC-like group is associated with a poorer outcome independently of histological grade. Our study reveals previously unrecognized heterogeneity among 1p/19q co-deleted tumours. PMID:27090007

  11. Allelic loss of 9p21.3 is a prognostic factor in 1p/19q codeleted anaplastic gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Alentorn, Agustí; Dehais, Caroline; Ducray, François; Carpentier, Catherine; Mokhtari, Karima; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Chinot, Olivier; Cohen-Moyal, Elisabeth; Ramirez, Carole; Loiseau, Hugues; Elouahdani-Hamdi, Selma; Beauchesne, Patrick; Langlois, Olivier; Desenclos, Christine; Guillamo, Jean-Sébastien; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Ghiringhelli, François; Colin, Philippe; Godard, Joel; Parker, Fabrice; Dhermain, Frédéric; Carpentier, Antoine F.; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Menei, Philippe; Bauchet, Luc; Faillot, Thierry; Fesneau, Mélanie; Fontaine, Denys; Motuo-Fotso, Marie-Jeannette; Vauleon, Elodie; Gaultier, Claude; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Gueye, Edouard-Marcel; Noel, Georges; Desse, Nicolas; Durando, Xavier; Barrascout, Eduardo; Wager, Michel; Ricard, Damien; Carpiuc, Ioana; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to study the potential clinical relevance of 9p allelic loss, with or without copy number variation, in 1p/19q codeleted anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors (AOTs). Methods: This study enrolled 216 patients with 1p/19q codeleted AOT. The prognostic value of 9p allelic loss was investigated using a French nation-wide prospective registry, POLA (prise en charge des tumeurs oligodendrogliales anaplasiques) and high-density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays. We validated our results using the Repository of Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data (REMBRANDT) dataset. Results: The minimal common region of allelic loss in chromosome arm 9p was 9p21.3. Allelic loss of 9p21.3, detected in 41.7% of tumors, was associated with shorter progression-free and overall survival rates in univariate (p = 0.008 and p < 0.001, respectively) and multivariate analyses (p = 0.009 and p = 0.009, respectively). This finding was validated in the REMBRANDT dataset in univariate and multivariate analysis (p = 0.01 and p = 0.01, respectively). Conclusion: Our study highlights a novel potential prognostic biomarker in 1p/19q codeleted AOT. Further prospective studies are warranted to investigate our finding. PMID:26385879

  12. ImmunoFISH Is a Reliable Technique for the Assessment of 1p and 19q Status in Oligodendrogliomas

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Céline; de Tayrac, Marie; Sanschagrin, François; Michaud, Karine; Gould, Peter Vincent; Saikali, Stéphan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a new ImmunoFISH technique for the study of oligodendrogliomas by combining a standard immunohistochemical stain using MIB-1 antibody with a standard FISH technique using commercial 1p36 and 19q13 chromosomal probes. Methods Validation was performed by two observers on a series of 36 pre-selected oligodendrogliomas and compared to the results previously determined by FISH alone. Results The ImFISH technique is easy to perform and to analyze and is no more time-consuming than the usual FISH technique. Our results show that the inter-observer reliability of ImFISH is high (κ = 0.86 and 0.95 respectively for 1p and 19q). Compared to FISH, the ImFISH exhibits a very high sensitivity (∼100%) and specificity (∼90%) for 1p and/or 19q deleted cases. The sensitivity is high for normal cases (∼85%) and imbalanced cases (∼90%) with a specificity ranging between 50 and 85%. Finally, there were no significant differences between FISH and ImFISH results calculated on 60, 40 or 20 cells. Conclusion Our study demonstrates the reliability of the ImFISH technique in oligodendrogliomas and emphasizes its advantage in poorly cellular tumoral specimen. PMID:24949947

  13. Integrated multi-omics analysis of oligodendroglial tumours identifies three subgroups of 1p/19q co-deleted gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kamoun, Aurélie; Idbaih, Ahmed; Dehais, Caroline; Elarouci, Nabila; Carpentier, Catherine; Letouzé, Eric; Colin, Carole; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Sanson, Marc; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Ducray, François; Adam, Clovis; Andraud, Marie; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Bauchet, Luc; Beauchesne, Patrick; Bielle, Franck; Blechet, Claire; Campone, Mario; Carpentier, Antoine F.; Carpiuc, Ioana; Cazals-Hatem, Dominique; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Chiforeanu, Danchristian; Chinot, Olivier; Cohen-Moyal, Elisabeth; Colin, Philippe; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Desenclos, Christine; Desse, Nicolas; Dhermain, Frederic; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Eimer, Sandrine; Faillot, Thierry; Fesneau, Mélanie; Fontaine, Denys; Gaillard, Stéphane; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Gaultier, Claude; Ghiringhelli, François; Godard, Joel; Gueye, Edouard Marcel; Guillamo, Jean Sebastien; Hamdi-Elouadhani, Selma; Honnorat, Jerome; Kemeny, Jean Louis; Khallil, Toufik; Labrousse, François; Langlois, Olivier; Laquerriere, Annie; Larrieu-Ciron, Delphine; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Guérinel, Caroline Le; Levillain, Pierre-Marie; Loiseau, Hugues; Loussouarn, Delphine; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Menei, Philippe; Motsuo Fotso, Marie Janette; Noel, Georges; Parker, Fabrice; Peoc'h, Michel; Polivka, Marc; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Ramirez, Carole; Ricard, Damien; Richard, Pomone; Rigau, Valérie; Rousseau, Audrey; Runavot, Gwenaelle; Sevestre, Henri; Tortel, Marie Christine; Vandenbos, Fanny; Vauleon, Elodie; Viennet, Gabriel; Villa, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendroglial tumours (OT) are a heterogeneous group of gliomas. Three molecular subgroups are currently distinguished on the basis of the IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion. Here we present an integrated analysis of the transcriptome, genome and methylome of 156 OT. Not only does our multi-omics classification match the current classification but also reveals three subgroups within 1p/19q co-deleted tumours, associated with specific expression patterns of nervous system cell types: oligodendrocyte, oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) and neuronal lineage. We confirm the validity of these three subgroups using public datasets. Importantly, the OPC-like group is associated with more aggressive clinical and molecular patterns, including MYC activation. We show that the MYC activation occurs through various alterations, including MYC genomic gain, MAX genomic loss, MYC hypomethylation and microRNA-34b/c down-regulation. In the lower grade glioma TCGA dataset, the OPC-like group is associated with a poorer outcome independently of histological grade. Our study reveals previously unrecognized heterogeneity among 1p/19q co-deleted tumours. PMID:27090007

  14. Automated Analysis of 1p/19q Status by FISH in Oligodendroglial Tumors: Rationale and Proposal of an Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Céline; de Tayrac, Marie; Michaud, Karine; Cabillic, Florian; Paquet, Claudie; Gould, Peter Vincent; Saikali, Stéphan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To propose a new algorithm facilitating automated analysis of 1p and 19q status by FISH technique in oligodendroglial tumors with software packages available in the majority of institutions using this technique. Methods We documented all green/red (G/R) probe signal combinations in a retrospective series of 53 oligodendroglial tumors according to literature guidelines (Algorithm 1) and selected only the most significant combinations for a new algorithm (Algorithm 2). This second algorithm was then validated on a prospective internal series of 45 oligodendroglial tumors and on an external series of 36 gliomas. Results Algorithm 2 utilizes 24 G/R combinations which represent less than 40% of combinations observed with Algorithm 1. The new algorithm excludes some common G/R combinations (1/1, 3/2) and redefines the place of others (defining 1/2 as compatible with normal and 3/3, 4/4 and 5/5 as compatible with imbalanced chromosomal status). The new algorithm uses the combination + ratio method of signal probe analysis to give the best concordance between manual and automated analysis on samples of 100 tumor cells (91% concordance for 1p and 89% concordance for 19q) and full concordance on samples of 200 tumor cells. This highlights the value of automated analysis as a means to identify cases in which a larger number of tumor cells should be studied by manual analysis. Validation of this algorithm on a second series from another institution showed a satisfactory concordance (89%, κ = 0.8). Conclusion Our algorithm can be easily implemented on all existing FISH analysis software platforms and should facilitate multicentric evaluation and standardization of 1p/19q assessment in gliomas with reduction of the professional and technical time required. PMID:26135922

  15. Favorable long-term outcome of low-grade oligodendrogliomas irrespective of 1p/19q status when treated without radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Yasuo; Matsutani, Tomoo; Hasegawa, Yuzo; Shinozaki, Natsuki; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2011-05-01

    Despite the accumulating evidences of high chemosensitivity especially in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas with loss of chromosomes 1p and 19q, the optimal management strategy for low-grade tumors using the 1p/19q information remains controversial. We have treated all low-grade oligodendrogliomas by a chemotherapy-preceding strategy without radiotherapy, and here we analyzed the survival outcomes of 36 consecutive patients in relation to 1p/19q status. The treatment protocol was as follows: (1) simple observation after gross total resection, and (2) modified PCV chemotherapy for postoperative residual tumors or recurrence after total resection. The 1p and 19q status were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The median follow-up period was 7.5 years and no patient was lost during the follow-up periods. 1p/19q co-deletion was observed in 72% of the patients, and there was no significant association between 1p/19q co-deletion and chemotherapy response rate. The 5- and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate was 75.1 and 46.9%, respectively, and the median PFS was 121 months for 1p/19q-deleted tumors and 101 months for non-deleted tumors (log-rank test: P = 0.894). Extent of surgery did not affect PFS (P = 0.685). In contrast, the elder patients (>50) had significantly shorter PFS (P = 0.0458). Recurrent tumors were well controlled by chemotherapy irrespective of 1p/19q status, and 35 out of 36 patients survived without receiving radiotherapy. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 100 and 93.8%, respectively. Two of the patients in their sixties (29%) suffered from severe cognitive dysfunctions and marked brain atrophy following chemotherapy alone. These results show that low-grade oligodendrogliomas could be successfully treated by surgical resection and nitrosourea-based chemotherapy alone without radiotherapy irrespective of 1p/19q status.

  16. Spinal cord glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands with 1p/19q deletion in an adult with low-grade cerebral oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Fraum, Tyler J; Barak, Stephanie; Pack, Svetlana; Lonser, Russell R; Fine, Howard A; Quezado, Martha; Iwamoto, Fabio M

    2012-04-01

    Glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands (GTNI) is considered a rare variant of astrocytoma, characterized by discrete aggregates of cells expressing neuronal markers that punctuate a GFAP-positive glial background. Of the 24 published GTNI cases, only two occurred in adult spinal cords; none occurred concurrent with another CNS tumor; and none of those tested exhibited the 1p/19q deletion typical of oligodendroglioma. A 48-year-old man without significant past medical history was diagnosed with a WHO grade II oligodendroglioma by stereotactic biopsy of a lesion discovered after the patient suffered a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. By FISH analysis, this tumor exhibited the 1p/19q deletion present in up to 80% of oligodendrogliomas. The patient received 14 monthly cycles of temozolomide, and his cerebral tumor had a minor response. When the patient subsequently reported progressive paresthesias of his lower extremities, an MRI revealed an enhancing, cystic tumor of the thoracic spinal cord that was diagnosed as GTNI by histological analysis. By FISH analysis, this lesion exhibited the same 1p/19q deletion present in the concurrent cerebral oligodendroglioma. This case of a spinal cord GTNI with 1p/19q deletions constitutes the third report of a spinal cord GTNI in an adult patient; the first report of a GTNI in an individual with a separate CNS neoplasm; and the first report of a GTNI with 1p/19q deletions. This case establishes a potential genetic kinship between GTNI and oligodendroglioma that warrants further investigation.

  17. Contrast enhancement in 1p/19q-codeleted anaplastic oligodendrogliomas is associated with 9p loss, genomic instability, and angiogenic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Botero, German; Dehais, Caroline; Idbaih, Ahmed; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Lahutte, Marion; Carpentier, Catherine; Letouzé, Eric; Chinot, Olivier; Loiseau, Hugues; Honnorat, Jerome; Ramirez, Carole; Moyal, Elisabeth; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Ducray, François; Desenclos, Christine; Sevestre, Henri; Menei, Philippe; Michalak, Sophie; Al Nader, Edmond; Godard, Joel; Viennet, Gabriel; Carpentier, Antoine; Eimer, Sandrine; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Verrelle, Pierre; Faillot, Thierry; Gaultier, Claude; Tortel, Marie Christine; Christov, Christo; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Ghiringhelli, Francois; Berger, François; Lacroix, Catherine; Parker, Fabrice; Dubois, François; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Gueye, Edouard-Marcel; Labrousse, Francois; Jouvet, Anne; Bauchet, Luc; Rigau, Valérie; Beauchesne, Patrick; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Campone, Mario; Loussouarn, Delphine; Fontaine, Denys; Vandenbos, Fanny; Campello, Chantal; Roger, Pascal; Fesneau, Melanie; Heitzmann, Anne; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Elouadhani, Selma; Mokhtari, Karima; Polivka, Marc; Ricard, Damien; Levillain, Pierre-Marie; Wager, Michel; Colin, Philippe; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Chiforeanu, Dan; Vauleon, Elodie; Langlois, Olivier; Laquerriere, Annie; Motsuo Fotso, Marie Janette; Peoc'h, Michel; Andraud, Marie; Mouton, Servane; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Noel, Georges; Desse, Nicolas; Soulard, Raoulin; Amiel-Benouaich, Alexandra; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Dhermain, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to correlate MRI features and molecular characteristics in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs). Methods The MRI characteristics of 50 AO patients enrolled in the French national network for high-grade oligodendroglial tumors were analyzed. The genomic profiles and IDH mutational statuses were assessed using high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and direct sequencing, respectively. The gene expression profiles of 25 1p/19q-codeleted AOs were studied on Affymetrix expression arrays. Results Most of the cases were frontal lobe contrast-enhanced tumors (52%), but the radiological presentations of these cases were heterogeneous, ranging from low-grade glioma-like aspects (26%) to glioblastoma-like aspects (22%). The 1p/19q codeletion (n = 39) was associated with locations in the frontal lobe (P = .001), with heterogeneous intratumoral signal intensities (P = .003) and with no or nonmeasurable contrast enhancements (P = .01). The IDH wild-type AOs (n = 7) more frequently displayed ringlike contrast enhancements (P = .03) and were more frequently located outside of the frontal lobe (P = .01). However, no specific imaging pattern could be identified for the 1p/19q-codeleted AO or the IDH-mutated AO. Within the 1p/19q-codeleted AO, the contrast enhancement was associated with larger tumor volumes (P = .001), chromosome 9p loss and CDKN2A loss (P = .006), genomic instability (P = .03), and angiogenesis-related gene expression (P < .001), particularly for vascular endothelial growth factor A and angiopoietin 2. Conclusion In AOs, the 1p/19q codeletion and the IDH mutation are associated with preferential (but not with specific) imaging characteristics. Within 1p/19q-codeleted AO, imaging heterogeneity is related to additional molecular alterations, especially chromosome 9p loss, which is associated with contrast enhancement and larger tumor volume. PMID:24353325

  18. Co-Deletion of Chromosome 1p/19q and IDH1/2 Mutation in Glioma Subsets of Brain Tumors in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaohui; Cui, Xiangli; Lin, Song; Wang, Junmei; Jiang, Zhongli; Sui, Dali; Li, Jing; Wang, Zhongcheng

    2012-01-01

    Objective To characterize co-deletion of chromosome 1p/19q and IDH1/2 mutation in Chinese brain tumor patients and to assess their associations with clinical features. Methods In a series of 528 patients with gliomas, pathological and radiological materials were reviewed. Pathological constituents of tumor subsets, incidences of 1p/19q co-deletion and IDH1/2 mutation in gliomas by regions and sides in the brain were analyzed. Results Overall, 1p and 19q was detected in 339 patients by FISH method while the sequence of IDH1/2 was determined in 280 patients. Gliomas of frontal, temporal and insular origin had significantly different pathological constituents of tumor subsets (P<0.001). Gliomas of frontal origin had significantly higher incidence of 1p/19q co-deletion (50.4%) and IDH1/2 mutation (73.5%) than those of non-frontal origin (27.0% and 48.5%, respectively) (P<0.001), while gliomas of temporal origin had significantly lower incidence of 1p/19q co-deletion (23.9%) and IDH1/2 mutation (41.7%) than those of non-temporal origin (39.9% and 63.2%, respectively) (P = 0.013 and P = 0.003, respectively). Subgroup analysis confirmed these findings in oligoastrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors, respectively. Although the difference of 1p/19q co-deletion was not statistically significant in temporal oligodendroglial tumors, the trend was marginally significant (P = 0.082). However, gliomas from different sides of the brain did not show significant different pathological constituents, incidences of 1p/19q co-deletion or IDH1/2 mutation. Conclusion Preferential distribution of pathological subsets, 1p/19q co-deletion and IDH1/2 mutation were confirmed in some brain regions in Chinese glioma patients, implying their distinctive tumor genesis and predictive value for prognosis. PMID:22427879

  19. Impact of 1p/19q Codeletion and Histology on Outcomes of Anaplastic Gliomas Treated With Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide

    SciTech Connect

    Speirs, Christina K.; Simpson, Joseph R.; Robinson, Clifford G.; DeWees, Todd A.; Tran, David D.; Linette, Gerry; Chicoine, Michael R.; Dacey, Ralph G.; Rich, Keith M.; Dowling, Joshua L.; Leuthardt, Eric C.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Kim, Albert H.; Huang, Jiayi

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Anaplastic gliomas represent a heterogeneous group of primary high-grade brain tumors, and the optimal postoperative treatment remains controversial. In this report, we present our institutional data on the clinical outcomes of radiation therapy (RT) plus temozolomide (RT + TMZ) for anaplastic gliomas, stratified by histology and 1p/19q codeletion. Methods and Materials: A single-institution retrospective review was conducted of patients with supratentorial anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO), mixed anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA), and anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). After surgery, RT was delivered at a median total dose of 60 Gy (range, 31.6-63 Gy) in daily fractions. All patients received standard concurrent TMZ, with or without adjuvant TMZ. Histological/molecular subtypes were defined as codeleted AO/AOA, non-codeleted AO/AOA, and AA. Results: From 2000 to 2012, 111 cases met study criteria and were evaluable. Codeleted AO/AOA had superior overall survival (OS) to non-codeleted AO/AOA (91% vs 68% at 5 years, respectively, P=.02), whereas progression-free survival (PFS) was not significantly different (70% vs 46% at 5 years, respectively, P=.10). AA had inferior OS to non-codeleted AO/AOA (37% vs 68% at 5 years, respectively, P=.007) and inferior PFS (27% vs 46%, respectively, P=.03). On multivariate analysis, age, performance status, and histological or molecular subtype were independent predictors for both PFS and OS. Compared to historical controls, RT + TMZ provided comparable OS to RT with procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (RT + PCV) for codeleted AO/AOA, superior OS to RT alone for non-codeleted AO/AOA, and similar OS to RT alone for AA. Conclusions: RT + TMZ may be a promising treatment for both codeleted and non-codeleted AO/AOA, but its role for AA remains unclear.

  20. Mitotic index, microvascular proliferation, and necrosis define 3 groups of 1p/19q codeleted anaplastic oligodendrogliomas associated with different genomic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Mokhtari, Karima; Dehais, Caroline; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Colin, Carole; Carpentier, Catherine; Forest, Fabien; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Polivka, Marc; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Eimer, Sandrine; Viennet, Gabriel; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Loussouarn, Delphine; Lacroix, Catherine; Rigau, Valérie; Laquerrière, Annie; Vandenbos, Fanny; Michalak, Sophie; Sevestre, Henri; Peoch, Michel; Labrousse, François; Christov, Christo; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Chiforeanu, Danchristian; Ducray, François; Idbaih, Ahmed; Desenclos, Christine; Menei, Philippe; Al Nader, Edmond; Godard, Joel; Servagi-Vernat, Stéphanie; Carpentier, Antoine; Loiseau, Hugues; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Guillamo, Jean Sebastien; Emery, Evelyne; Verelle, Pierre; Durando, Xavier; Faillot, Thierry; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Ghiringhelli, François; Parker, Fabrice; Adam, Clovis; Dubois, François; Ramirez, Carole; Gueye, Edouard Marcel; Honnorat, Jerome; Chinot, Olivier; Bauchet, Luc; Beauchesne, Patrick; Campone, Mario; Frenel, Jean Sébastien; Fontaine, Denys; Campello, Chantal; Roger, Pascal; Heitzmann, Anne; Fesneau, Mélanie; Delattre, Jean Yves; Elouadhani-Hamdi, Selma; Ricard, Damien; Colin, Philippe; Vauléon, Elodie; Langlois, Olivier; Fotso, Marie Janette Motsuo; Andraud, Marie; Mouton, Servane; Noel, Georges; Desse, Nicolas; Soulard, Raoulin; Cohen-Moyal, Elisabeth; Lubrano, Vincent; Dhermain, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to correlate histological features and molecular characteristics in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs). Methods The histological characteristics of 203 AO patients, enrolled in the French national network POLA, were analyzed. The genomic profiles of 191 cases were studied using genomic arrays. IDH mutational status was assessed by immunohistochemistry and direct sequencing. Results 1p/19q codeletion was present in 79% of cases and was associated with alpha-internexin expression (P < 10−4), IDH1/2 mutation (P < 10−4), chromosome 4 loss (P < 10−3), and better overall survival (P < 10−4). Based on mitotic index, microvascular proliferation (MVP), and necrosis, 3 groups of 1p/19q codeleted AOs were identified: (group 1) AO with more than 5 mitoses per 10-HPF, no MVP, and no necrosis; (group 2) AO with MVP and no necrosis; and (group 3) AO with MVP and necrosis. Compared with group 1, groups 2 and 3 AOs had a higher mean Ki-67 proliferation index and a higher rate of 9p and 9q losses. Compared with group 2, group 3 AOs had a higher number of chromosomal alterations including chromosome 4 loss. In the subgroup of 157 1p/19q codeleted AOs, chromosomal instability was associated with shorter progression-free survival (P = .024) and shorter overall survival (P = .023). Conclusions The present study shows that oligodendrogliomas with classic histological features remain a molecularly heterogeneous entity and should be stratified according to 1p/19q status because of its major prognostic relevance. Moreover, 1p/19q codeleted AOs are also heterogeneous. Interestingly, mitotic index, MVP, and necrosis help to classify them into 3 groups associated with distinct genomic alterations. PMID:24723566

  1. [Diagnostic and prognostic values of 1p and 19q deletions in adult gliomas: critical review of the literature and implications in daily clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Fontaine, D; Vandenbos, F; Lebrun, C; Paquis, V; Frenay, M

    2008-01-01

    Losses of chromosomes 1p and 19q are deemed correlated with diagnosis of oligodendroglioma, higher chemosensitivity and better prognosis. We reviewed the literature to evaluate the usefulness of these correlations in daily clinical practice. The rates of deletions relative to histology (WHO classifications) were extracted from 33 studies, including 2666 patients. The 1p deletions and 1p19q codeletion mean rates were respectively 65.4 and 63.3% in oligodendrogliomas, 28.7 and 21.6% in oligoastrocytomas, 13.2 and 7.5% in astrocytomas, 11.6 and 2.9% in glioblastomas. The presence of 1p deletion and 1p19q codeletion were strongly correlated with the histological diagnosis corresponding to oligodendroglioma. Calculation of specificity, sensitivity, predictive positive values and false negative rates suggests that presence of deletion 1p or codeletion represents a strong argument in favor of the diagnosis of oligodendroglioma. However, considering the high false negative rate, absence of such deletions does not rule out the diagnosis. In grade 3 oligodendroglial tumors, the probability of responding to chemotherapy, and the duration of response, were higher when codeletions were present. This suggests that, in these tumors, the presence of codeletion is a strong argument in favor of adjuvant chemotherapy. However, chemotherapy should not be systematically excluded when codeletions are absent, as the chances of response are about 33% in this situation. Data concerning low-grade gliomas were more controversial. Oligodendroglial tumors with 1p deletion or 1p19q codeletion seemed to have a better prognosis, as five-year survival rates were 50% higher than in tumors without deletion. This might be explained by the correlation between 1p deletion and other identified prognosis factors: (1) higher chemosensitivity, (2) tumor location more frequently in the frontal lobe, leading to better resection and lower risk of neurological deficit, (3) slower growth rate, (4) higher risk

  2. Personalized care in neuro-oncology coming of age: why we need MGMT and 1p/19q testing for malignant glioma patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Weller, Michael; Stupp, Roger; Hegi, Monika E; van den Bent, Martin; Tonn, Joerg C; Sanson, Marc; Wick, Wolfgang; Reifenberger, Guido

    2012-09-01

    Histological subtyping and grading by malignancy are the cornerstones of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. They shall provide clinicians with guidance as to the course of disease to be expected and the choices of treatment to be made. Nonetheless, patients with histologically identical tumors may have very different outcomes, notably in patients with astrocytic and oligodendroglial gliomas of WHO grades II and III. In gliomas of adulthood, 3 molecular markers have undergone extensive studies in recent years: 1p/19q chromosomal codeletion, O(6)-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2. However, the assessment of these molecular markers has so far not been implemented in clinical routine because of the lack of therapeutic implications. In fact, these markers were considered to be prognostic irrespective of whether patients were receiving radiotherapy (RT), chemotherapy, or both (1p/19q, IDH1/2), or of limited value because testing is too complex and no chemotherapy alternative to temozolomide was available (MGMT). In 2012, this situation has changed: long-term follow-up of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9402 and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer 26951 trials demonstrated an overall survival benefit from the addition to RT of chemotherapy with procarbazine/CCNU/vincristine confined to patients with anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors with (vs without) 1p/19q codeletion. Furthermore, in elderly glioblastoma patients, the NOA-08 and the Nordic trial of RT alone versus temozolomide alone demonstrated a profound impact of MGMT promoter methylation on outcome by therapy and thus established MGMT as a predictive biomarker in this patient population. These recent results call for the routine implementation of 1p/19q and MGMT testing at least in subpopulations of malignant glioma patients and represent an

  3. Prediction of anaplastic transformation in low-grade oligodendrogliomas based on magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 1p/19q codeletion status.

    PubMed

    Bourdillon, Pierre; Hlaihel, Chadi; Guyotat, Jacques; Guillotton, Laurent; Honnorat, Jérôme; Ducray, François; Cotton, François

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether combining multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the determination of the 1p/19q codeletion status could improve the ability to predict anaplastic transformation in low-grade oligodendrogliomas. Twenty patients with grade II oligodendrogliomas were followed-up using multimodal MR [proton MR spectroscopy (MRS), perfusion, and conventional MR imaging]. All patients diagnoses were histologically proven, and 1p/19q codeletion status was analyzed for all patients. Median follow-up was 30.5 ± 11.4 months. Anaplastic transformation was observed in six patients. The only MRI feature that was associated with anaplastic transformation was an elevation of the choline/creatine ratio >2.4 which was observed in 4 out of 6 patients with anaplastic transformation versus 1 out of 14 patients without anaplastic transformation. In patients without 1p/19q codeletion, an elevation of the choline/creatine ratio >2.4 was associated with the occurrence of anaplastic transformation in all cases (4 out of 4 patients), with a mean time of 12 months. In contrast, in patients with a 1p/19q codeletion, no anaplastic transformation was observed in the patient who had an elevation of >2.4 of the choline/creatine ratio and two patients demonstrated an anaplastic transformation without any elevation of this ratio.Prospective validation in a larger series is needed, yet the present study suggests that combining data from in vivo proton MRS and genetic analysis could be a promising strategy to predict time to anaplastic transformation at the individual level in patients with low-grade oligodendrogliomas and may help deciding when chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy should be initiated in these tumors.

  4. Radio-chemotherapy improves survival in IDH-mutant, 1p/19q non-codeleted secondary high-grade astrocytoma patients.

    PubMed

    Juratli, Tareq A; Lautenschläger, Tim; Geiger, Kathrin D; Pinzer, Thomas; Krause, Mechthild; Schackert, Gabriele; Krex, Dietmar

    2015-09-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations are beginning to drive decisions on therapy for glioma patients. Here we sought to determine the impact of adjuvant treatment in patients with IDH-mutant, 1p/19q non-codeleted secondary high-grade astrocytoma (sHGA) WHO grades III/IV. Clinical data of 109 sHGA patients grades III/IV, in addition to IDH mutation-, 1p/19q-codeletion- and MGMT-promoter methylation status-were retrospectively analyzed. Survival analysis in relation to adjuvant treatment modalities and molecular profiling were performed. Out of 109 patients, 88 patients (80.7 %) harbored IDH mutations, 30 patients had a 1p/19q-codeletion (27.5 %) and 69 patients (63.3 %) exhibited a methylated MGMT-promoter status. At a median follow-up of 9.8 years, 62 patients (57 %) died. The postsurgical treatment included: radio-chemotherapy (RT-CT; 54.5 %), RT alone (19.3 %), and CT alone (22.7 %). The median overall survival (OS) in the entire group was 3.4 years (1.9-6.7 years). Patients who received RT-CT had a significantly longer OS compared with those who underwent RT alone (6.5 vs. 1.2 years, HR 0.35, CI 0.32-0.51, p = 0.011). In the IDH-mutant 1p/19q non-codeleted sHGA subgroup the RT-CT cohort had a significantly longer OS in comparison to the RT cohort (6.4 vs. 1.2 years, HR 2.7, CI 1.1-6.5, p = 0.022). In the stepwise multivariable Cox model for OS of all 88 IDH-mutant sHGA patients, survival was strongly associated with only one factor, namely, adjuvant RT-CT at diagnosis of a sHGA. This retrospective long-term study demonstrates that RT and CT (mostly PCV) significantly improves progression-free and overall survival in IDH-mutant secondary high-grade astrocytoma patients, regardless of 1p/19q-codeletion status. PMID:26033545

  5. Homozygous deletion of TNFRSF4, TP73, PPAP2B and DPYD at 1p and PDCD5 at 19q identified by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis in pediatric anaplastic glioma with questionable oligodendroglial component

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric oligodendrogliomas are rare and appear to show a different molecular profile from adult tumors. Some gliomas display allelic losses at 1p/19q in pediatric patients, although less frequently than in adult patients, but this is rare in tumors with an oligodendroglial component. The molecular basis of this genomic abnormality is unknown in pediatric gliomas, but it represents a relatively common finding in pediatric oligodendroglioma-like neoplasms with leptomeningeal dissemination. Results Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis using SALSA P088-B1 for the analysis of the 1p/19q allelic constitution in a pediatric anaplastic (oligodendro)-glioma showed homozygous co-deletion for markers: TNFRSF4 (located at 1p36.33), TP73 (1p36.32), PPAP2B (1pter-p22.1), DPYD (1p21.3), and PDCD5 (19q13.12), and hemizygous deletion of BAX (19q13.3-q13.4). No sequence changes for R132 and R172 of the IDH1/2 genes were identified. Conclusions The molecular findings in this pediatric anaplastic glioma do not allow for a clearly definitive pathological diagnosis. However, the findings provide data on a number of 1p/19q genomic regions that, because of homozygotic deletion, might be the location of genes that are important for the development and clinical evolution of some malignant gliomas in children. PMID:24387276

  6. Assessing CpG island methylator phenotype, 1p/19q codeletion, and MGMT promoter methylation from epigenome-wide data in the biomarker cohort of the NOA-04 trial

    PubMed Central

    Wiestler, Benedikt; Capper, David; Hovestadt, Volker; Sill, Martin; Jones, David T.W.; Hartmann, Christian; Felsberg, Joerg; Platten, Michael; Feiden, Wolfgang; Keyvani, Kathy; Pfister, Stefan M.; Wiestler, Otmar D.; Meyermann, Richard; Reifenberger, Guido; Pietsch, Thorsten; von Deimling, Andreas; Weller, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular biomarkers including isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/2) mutation, 1p/19q codeletion, and O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation may improve prognostication and guide treatment decisions for patients with World Health Organization (WHO) anaplastic gliomas. At present, each marker is individually tested by distinct assays. Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip arrays (HM450) enable the determination of large-scale methylation profiles and genome-wide DNA copy number changes. Algorithms have been developed to detect the glioma CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP) associated with IDH1/2 mutation, 1p/19q codeletion, and MGMT promoter methylation using a single assay. Methods Here, we retrospectively investigated the diagnostic and prognostic performance of these algorithms in comparison to individual marker testing and patient outcome in the biomarker cohort (n = 115 patients) of the NOA-04 trial. Results Concordance for IDH and 1p/19q status was very high: In 92% of samples, the HM450 and reference data agreed. In discordant samples, survival analysis by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses suggested a more accurate assessment of biological phenotype by the HM450 analysis. The HM450-derived MGMT-STP27 model to calculate MGMT promoter methylation probability revealed this aberration in a significantly higher fraction of samples than conventional methylation-specific PCR, with 87 of 91 G-CIMP tumors predicted as MGMT promoter-methylated. Pyrosequencing of discordant samples confirmed the HM450 assessment in 14 of 17 cases. Conclusions G-CIMP and 1p/19q codeletion are reliably detectable by HM450 analysis and are associated with prognosis in the NOA-04 trial. For MGMT, HM450 suggests promoter methylation in the vast majority of G-CIMP tumors, which is supported by pyrosequencing. PMID:25028501

  7. Optimal aeroassisted guidance using Loh's term approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceneaney, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents three guidance algorithms for aerocapture and/or aeroassisted orbital transfer with plane change. All three algorithms are based on the approximate solution of an optimal control problem at each guidance update. The chief assumption is that Loh's term may be modeled as a function of the independent variable only. The first two algorithms maximize exit speed for fixed exit altitude, flight path angle and heading angle. The third minimizes, in one sense, the control effort for fixed exit altitude, flight path angle, heading angle and speed. Results are presented which indicate the near optimality of the solutions generated by the first two algorithms. Results are also presented which indicate the performance of the third algorithm in a simulation with unmodeled atmospheric density disturbances.

  8. Loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 1p in different solid human tumours: association with survival

    PubMed Central

    Ragnarsson, G; Eiriksdottir, G; Johannsdottir, J Th; Jonasson, J G; Egilsson, V; Ingvarsson, S

    1999-01-01

    The distal half of chromosome 1p was analysed with 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers in 683 human solid tumours at different locations. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was observed at least at one site in 369 cases or 54% of the tumours. LOHs detected ranged from 30–64%, depending on tumour location. The major results regarding LOH at different tumour locations were as follows: stomach, 20/38 (53%); colon and rectum, 60/109 (55%); lung, 38/63 (60%); breast, 145/238 (61%); endometrium, 18/25 (72%); ovary, 17/31 (55%); testis, 11/30 (37%); kidney, 22/73 (30%); thyroid, 4/14 (29%); and sarcomas, 9/14 (64%). High percentages of LOH were seen in the 1p36.3, 1p36.1, 1p35–p34.3, 1p32 and 1p31 regions, suggesting the presence of tumour-suppressor genes. All these regions on chromosome 1p show high LOH in more than one tumour type. However, distinct patterns of LOH were detected at different tumour locations. There was a significant separation of survival curves, with and without LOH at chromosome 1p, in the breast cancer patients. Multivariate analysis showed that LOH at 1p in breast tumours is a better indicator for prognosis than the other variables tested in our model, including nodal metastasis. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10188892

  9. Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-Hypothesis)

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovskii, Victor; Kadyshevich, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The paper develops the Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-hypothesis), according to which living-matter simplest elements (LMSEs, which are N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, nucleotides), DNA- and RNA-like molecules, amino-acids, and proto-cells repeatedly originated on the basis of thermodynamically controlled, natural, and inevitable processes governed by universal physical and chemical laws from CH4, niters, and phosphates under the Earth's surface or seabed within the crystal cavities of the honeycomb methane-hydrate structure at low temperatures; the chemical processes passed slowly through all successive chemical steps in the direction that is determined by a gradual decrease in the Gibbs free energy of reacting systems. The hypothesis formulation method is based on the thermodynamic directedness of natural movement and consists ofan attempt to mentally backtrack on the progression of nature and thus reveal principal milestones alongits route. The changes in Gibbs free energy are estimated for different steps of the living-matter origination process; special attention is paid to the processes of proto-cell formation. Just the occurrence of the gas-hydrate periodic honeycomb matrix filled with LMSEs almost completely in its final state accounts for size limitation in the DNA functional groups and the nonrandom location of N-bases in the DNA chains. The slowness of the low-temperature chemical transformations and their “thermodynamic front” guide the gross process of living matter origination and its successive steps. It is shown that the hypothesis is thermodynamically justified and testable and that many observed natural phenomena count in its favor. PMID:25382120

  10. Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-Hypothesis).

    PubMed

    Ostrovskii, Victor; Kadyshevich, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The paper develops the Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-hypothesis), according to which living-matter simplest elements (LMSEs, which are N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, nucleotides), DNA- and RNA-like molecules, amino-acids, and proto-cells repeatedly originated on the basis of thermodynamically controlled, natural, and inevitable processes governed by universal physical and chemical laws from CH4, niters, and phosphates under the Earth's surface or seabed within the crystal cavities of the honeycomb methane-hydrate structure at low temperatures; the chemical processes passed slowly through all successive chemical steps in the direction that is determined by a gradual decrease in the Gibbs free energy of reacting systems. The hypothesis formulation method is based on the thermodynamic directedness of natural movement and consists ofan attempt to mentally backtrack on the progression of nature and thus reveal principal milestones alongits route. The changes in Gibbs free energy are estimated for different steps of the living-matter origination process; special attention is paid to the processes of proto-cell formation. Just the occurrence of the gas-hydrate periodic honeycomb matrix filled with LMSEs almost completely in its final state accounts for size limitation in the DNA functional groups and the nonrandom location of N-bases in the DNA chains. The slowness of the low-temperature chemical transformations and their "thermodynamic front" guide the gross process of living matter origination and its successive steps. It is shown that the hypothesis is thermodynamically justified and testable and that many observed natural phenomena count in its favor. PMID:25382120

  11. Integration of transcript expression, copy number and LOH analysis of infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A major challenge in the interpretation of genomic profiling data generated from breast cancer samples is the identification of driver genes as distinct from bystander genes which do not impact tumorigenesis. One way to assess the relative importance of alterations in the transcriptome profile is to combine parallel analyses that assess changes in the copy number alterations (CNAs). This integrated analysis permits the identification of genes with altered expression that map within specific chromosomal regions which demonstrate copy number alterations, providing a mechanistic approach to identify the 'driver genes'. Methods We have performed whole genome analysis of CNAs using the Affymetrix 250K Mapping array on 22 infiltrating ductal carcinoma samples (IDCs). Analysis of transcript expression alterations was performed using the Affymetrix U133 Plus2.0 array on 16 IDC samples. Fourteen IDC samples were analyzed using both platforms and the data integrated. We also incorporated data from loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis to identify genes showing altered expression in LOH regions. Results Common chromosome gains and amplifications were identified at 1q21.3, 6p21.3, 7p11.2-p12.1, 8q21.11 and 8q24.3. A novel amplicon was identified at 5p15.33. Frequent losses were found at 1p36.22, 8q23.3, 11p13, 11q23, and 22q13. Over 130 genes were identified with concurrent increases or decreases in expression that mapped to these regions of copy number alterations. LOH analysis revealed three tumors with whole chromosome or p arm allelic loss of chromosome 17. Genes were identified that mapped to copy neutral LOH regions. LOH with accompanying copy loss was detected on Xp24 and Xp25 and genes mapping to these regions with decreased expression were identified. Gene expression data highlighted the PPARα/RXRα Activation Pathway as down-regulated in the tumor samples. Conclusion We have demonstrated the utility of the application of integrated analysis using high

  12. A case of mosaic trisomy 19q12-q13.2 with high BMI, macrocephaly, and speech delay: does USF2 determine size in the 19q phenotypes?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brian T; Newby, Rachel; Watts, Kathryn; Hellens, Stephen W; Zwolinski, Simon A; Splitt, Miranda P

    2012-01-01

    Hall et al. (2010) describe a boy with mosaic trisomy of the proximal part of 19q, with obesity, macrocephaly and global developmental delay. The patient is interesting with regard to his cytogenetic abnormality, which is smaller than those previously reported, and does not include the candidate obesity and insulin-resistance genes identified by other authors (Zung et al., 2007; Davidsson et al., 2010) as possible causes of the overweight/obesity seen in four of five previously documented patients. This suggests that a novel obesity locus may reside in the duplicated region 19q13.11–q13.2. We present a phenotypically similar boy with intrachromosomal insertion of material derived from proximal 19q into proximal 19p, causing mosaic trisomy 19q12–q13.2, and consider the role of USF2, a master transcriptional regulator of metabolic genes, in 19q phenotypes. PMID:22107929

  13. Deletion of 19q13 reveals clinical overlap with Dubowitz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Urquhart, Jill E; Williams, Simon G; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Bowers, Naomi; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Newman, William G

    2015-12-01

    Dubowitz syndrome is a presumed autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities: microcephaly, learning and developmental delay, growth failure, and a predisposition to allergies and eczema. There have been more than 150 individuals reported to have this diagnosis, but no unifying genetic alteration has been identified indicating genetic heterogeneity. We report on a pair of monozygotic twins diagnosed clinically with Dubowitz syndrome by Professor Dubowitz over 30 years ago and identified to have a de novo heterozygous 3.2-Mb deletion at 19q13.11q13.12. Exome sequencing did not identify either a putative pathogenic variant on the trans allele supporting recessive inheritance or any other causative sequence variants. Comparison of the phenotype in our cases shows considerable overlap with the 19q13.11 microdeletion syndrome, suggesting that a subset of individuals diagnosed with Dubowitz syndrome may be due to deletions at 19q13. Our finding further reinforces the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of Dubowitz syndrome. PMID:26377242

  14. Refinement of the cone-rod retinal dystrophy locus on chromosome 19q

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, C.Y.; Evans, K.; Bhattacharya, S.S.; Whittaker, J.L.; Fryer, A.; Weissenbach, J.

    1994-11-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) is a severe example of an inherited retinal dystrophy: ophthalmic diseases that as a group constitute the commonest causes of blindness in children in the developed world and account for a significant proportion of visual handicap in adults. Two case reports suggested loci for CRD-causing genes on chromosomes 18q and chromosome 17q. Recently, we reported the results of a total genome search that localized an autosomal dominant form of CRD to chromosome 19q in the region 19q13.1-q13.2. Since then, using data from a short tandem repeat-polymorphism linkage map of chromosome 19 and recently developed microsatellite markers in this region, we have been able to further refine the localization of the chromosome 19q CRD-causing gene. Seven new microsatellite markers were used to genotype 34 affected subjects, 22 unaffected subjects, and 15 spouses. Two-point, multipoint, and FASTMAP analyses were performed. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  15. A region of consistent deletion in neuroblastoma maps within human chromosome 1p36.2-36.3

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.S.; Maris, J.M.; Beltinger, C.

    1995-06-06

    Deletion of the short arm of human chromosome 1 is the most common cytogenetic abnormality observed in neuroblastoma. To characterize the region of consistent deletion, we performed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies on 122 neuroblastoma tumor samples with 30 distal chromosome 1p polymorphisms. LOH was detected in 32 of the 122 tumors (26%). A single region of LOH, marked distally by D1Z2 and proximally by D1S228, was detected in all tumors demonstrating loss. Also, cells from a patient with a constitutional deletion of 1p36, and from a neuroblastoma cell line with a small 1p36 deletion, were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cells from both sources had interstitial deletions of 1p36.2-36.3 which overlapped the consensus region of LOH defined by the tumors. Interstitial deletion in the constitutional case was confirmed by allelic loss studies using the panel of polymorphic markers. Four proposed candidate genes-DAN, ID3 (heir-1), CDC2L1 (p58), and TNFR2-were shown to lie outside of the consensus region of allelic loss, as defined by the above deletions. These results more precisely define the location of a neuroblastoma suppressor gene within 1p36.2-36.3, eliminating 33 centimorgans of proximal 1p36 from consideration. Furthermore, a consensus region of loss, which excludes the four leading candidate genes, was found in all tumors with 1p36 LOH. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Patterns of allelic loss (LOH) in vulvar squamous carcinomas and adjacent noninvasive epithelia.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, M. C.; Mutter, G. L.; Trivijisilp, P.; Boynton, K. A.; Sun, D.; Crum, C. P.

    1998-01-01

    The pathogenesis of carcinoma of the vulva is diverse and includes both human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative pathways. The objective of this study was to correlate the morphology with patterns of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) within four vulvar carcinomas and in adjacent vulvar epithelia. Tumors were categorized as HPV positive or negative by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. Forty-one different sites of normal squamous mucosa, hyperplasia, vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), and carcinoma were microdissected in duplicate, and each extracted DNA was analyzed in duplicate for LOH at 10 chromosomal loci by PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patterns of LOH were compared within different sites of tumors and between the tumor and the noninvasive epithelia. Of three tumors with multiple invasive foci analyzed, divergent patterns of LOH were identified in two, correlating in one with differences in tumor grade. In one HPV-16-positive case, multiple sites of VIN displayed heterogeneity for LOH consistent with divergent clonal or subclonal populations, some of which were not shared by the tumor. In one HPV-negative case, LOH was found in foci of hyperplasia and differentiated VIN (atypical hyperplasia), the latter sharing LOH with the invasive carcinoma at some but not all chromosomal loci. This study suggests that a genetic relationship exists between VIN and carcinoma, irrespective of HPV involvement. It also suggests that in HPV-negative tumors, allelic loss may predate the onset of invasive carcinoma and, in some cases, cellular atypia (VIN). However, the divergent patterns of LOH observed imply that many genetic alterations in the adjacent vulvar epithelium are not directly related to the invasive carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9588899

  17. A genome-wide association study of COPD identifies a susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Michael H.; Castaldi, Peter J.; Wan, Emily S.; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Hersh, Craig P.; Demeo, Dawn L.; Himes, Blanca E.; Sylvia, Jody S.; Klanderman, Barbara J.; Ziniti, John P.; Lange, Christoph; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Sparrow, David; Regan, Elizabeth A.; Make, Barry J.; Hokanson, John E.; Murray, Tanda; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B.; Pillai, Sreekumar G.; Kong, Xiangyang; Anderson, Wayne H.; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Lomas, David A.; Coxson, Harvey O.; Edwards, Lisa D.; MacNee, William; Vestbo, Jørgen; Yates, Julie C.; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M.A.; Celli, Bartolome; Crim, Courtney; Rennard, Stephen; Wouters, Emiel; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are still largely unknown. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of limited size have identified several novel risk loci for COPD at CHRNA3/CHRNA5/IREB2, HHIP and FAM13A; additional loci may be identified through larger studies. We performed a GWAS using a total of 3499 cases and 1922 control subjects from four cohorts: the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE); the Normative Aging Study (NAS) and National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT); Bergen, Norway (GenKOLS); and the COPDGene study. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms with additional markers imputed using 1000 Genomes data; results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis. We identified a new genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 19q13 (rs7937, OR = 0.74, P = 2.9 × 10−9). Genotyping this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and another nearby SNP in linkage disequilibrium (rs2604894) in 2859 subjects from the family-based International COPD Genetics Network study (ICGN) demonstrated supportive evidence for association for COPD (P = 0.28 and 0.11 for rs7937 and rs2604894), pre-bronchodilator FEV1 (P = 0.08 and 0.04) and severe (GOLD 3&4) COPD (P = 0.09 and 0.017). This region includes RAB4B, EGLN2, MIA and CYP2A6, and has previously been identified in association with cigarette smoking behavior. PMID:22080838

  18. Genome-wide linkage scan of prostate cancer Gleason score and confirmation of chromosome 19q.

    PubMed

    Schaid, Daniel J; Stanford, Janet L; McDonnell, Shannon K; Suuriniemi, Miia; McIntosh, Laura; Karyadi, Danielle M; Carlson, Erin E; Deutsch, Kerry; Janer, Marta; Hood, Lee; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2007-07-01

    Despite evidence that prostate cancer has a genetic etiology, it has been extremely difficult to confirm genetic linkage results across studies, emphasizing the large extent of genetic heterogeneity associated with this disease. Because prostate cancer is common--approximately one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their life--genetic linkage studies are likely plagued by phenocopies (i.e., men with prostate cancer due to environmental or lifestyle factors), weakly penetrant alleles, or a combination of both, making it difficult to replicate linkage findings. One way to account for heterogeneous causes is to use clinical information that is related to the aggressiveness of disease as an endpoint for linkage analyses. Gleason grade is a measure of prostate tumor differentiation, with higher grades associated with more aggressive disease. This semi-quantitative score has been used as a quantitative trait for linkage analysis in several prior studies. Our aim was to determine if prior linkage reports of Gleason grade to specific loci could be replicated, and to ascertain if new regions of linkage could be found. Gleason scores were available for 391 affected sib pairs from 183 hereditary prostate cancer pedigrees as part of the PROGRESS study. Analyzing Gleason score as a quantitative trait, and using microsatellite markers, suggestive evidence for linkage (P-value 19q and 5q, with P-values 19q and suggest new loci for further investigation.

  19. 19q13.33→qter trisomy in a girl with intellectual impairment and seizures.

    PubMed

    Carvalheira, Gianna; Oliveira, Mariana Moysés; Takeno, Sylvia; Lima, Fernanda Teresa de; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2014-12-01

    Rearrangements in chromosome 19 are rare. Among the 35 patients with partial 19q trisomy described, only six have a breakpoint defined by array. The 19q duplication results in a variable phenotype, including dysmorphisms, intellectual disability and seizure. In a female patient, although G-banding at 550 band-resolution was normal, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique and genomic array showed a 10.6 Mb terminal duplication of chromosome 19q13. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed that the duplicated region was attached to the short arm of chromosome 21 and silver staining showed four small acrocentrics with nucleolar organization region (NOR) activity, suggesting that the breakpoint in chromosome 21 was at p13. This is the first de novo translocation between 19q13.33 and 21p13 described in liveborn. The chromosome 19 is known to be rich in coding and non-coding regions, and chromosomal rearrangements involving this chromosome are very harmful. Furthermore, the 19q13.33→qter region is dense in pseudogenes and microRNAs, which are potent regulators of gene expression. The trisomic level of this region may contribute to deregulation of global gene expression, and consequently, may lead to abnormal development on the carriers of these rearrangements. PMID:25606462

  20. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in familial tumors of BRCA1 kindreds

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhausen, S.L.; Marshall, C.J.; Goldgar, D.E.

    1994-09-01

    In this study, we examined two families previously linked to BRCA1. Identification of recombinants in kindreds K2082 and K2035 had narrowed the region to between D17S776 and D17S1184, respectively. Further delineation of the region may be accomplished by examining loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in familial tumors. Five ovarian and six breast tumors from kindred K2082 (including two from sporadic breast cases) and three breast tumors from kindred K2035 were tested for LOH using six BRCA1-linked polymorphic STR markers and one marker at TP53. The two tumors from K2082 which did not share the linked haplotype did not show LOH in the BRCA1 region, nor did one of the tumors from a 17q-linked breast cancer case. Four ovarian and three breast tumors showed complete loss for the BRCA1 region. One ovarian and three breast tumors showed LOH only within the BRCA1 region. In all instances where LOH in the BRCA1 region was observed, the wild type allele was lost. These results therefore confirm the observation of Smith et al. (1992), and provide additional evidence that BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor gene. One of the breast tumors which showed loss within the BRCA1 region allowed us to narrow the region further.

  1. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Wei; Xia, Yingying; Wang, Chongzhi; Tang, Y Tom; Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  2. Bimodal expressivity in dominant retinitis pigmentosa genetically linked to chromosome 19q.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, K; al-Maghtheh, M; Fitzke, F W; Moore, A T; Jay, M; Inglehearn, C F; Arden, G B; Bird, A C

    1995-01-01

    A clinical, psychophysical, and electrophysiologic study was undertaken of two autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa pedigrees with a genetic mutation assigned to chromosome 19q by linkage analysis. Members with the abnormal haplotype were either symptomatic with adolescent onset nyctalopia, restricted visual fields, and non-detectable electroretinographic responses by 30 years of age, or asymptomatic with normal fundus appearance and minimal or no psychophysical or electroretinographic abnormalities. There was no correlation in the severity in parents and their offspring. Pedigree analysis suggested that although the offspring of parents with the genetic mutation were at 50% risk of having the genetic defect, the risk of being symptomatic during a working lifetime was only 31%. Such bimodal phenotypic expressivity in these particular pedigrees may be explained by a second, allelic genetic influence and may be a phenomenon unique to this genetic locus. Genetic counselling in families expressing this phenotype can only be based on haplotype analysis since clinical investigations, even in the most elderly, would not preclude the presence of the mutant gene. PMID:7488604

  3. PCR artifacts in LOH and MSI analysis of microdissected tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sieben, N L; ter Haar, N T; Cornelisse, C J; Fleuren, G J; Cleton-Jansen, A M

    2000-11-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to study loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI) in tumors is widely used. Microdissection techniques are applied to obtain tumor-specific tissue cells. By microdissection, however, the amount of template DNA extracted may vary considerably and interfere with optimal PCR amplification. To circumvent LOH and MSI misinterpretations due to low DNA input, we have assessed the critical level of DNA input for reliable PCR analysis. PCR analysis was performed by using 18 polymorphic markers (mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide) on DNA derived from both paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed, and fresh frozen tumor specimens at template input levels ranging from 0.05 to 25.0 ng. We show a highly significant relation between DNA input and the occurrence of LOH and MSI artifacts. Furthermore, for DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded material, the percentage of LOH artifacts is significantly higher compared with DNA extracted from frozen tissue. For reliable PCR analyses using a mono-, di-, tri-, or tetranucleotide marker, a minimum of 10.0 ng DNA is required when DNA is isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue and 5.0 ng when isolated from fresh frozen tissue. HUM PATHOL 31:1414-1419.

  4. Genomic alterations in cervical carcinoma: Losses of chromosome heterozygosity (LOH) correlated with cytogenetic, HPV, and p53 evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, H.P.; Mullokandov, M.; Khollodilov, N.G.

    1994-09-01

    This study was undertaken to obtain indications of chromosomes likely to carry tumorigenicity suppressor genes the loss of function of which play a role in the origin or progression of cervical carcinomas. PCR and electrophoresis with primers for 73 highly polymorphic microsatellite chromosome markers were used to determine the incidence of LOH of all of the autosomes in 38 cervical carcinomas. According to these criteria 14 of the autosomes are involved in LOH in 24% to 42% of the tumors. This involves chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, 16, 18 and 19. Most frequently involved are chromosomes 3 and 6 with LOH in 42% of the tumors. The chromosomes next most frequently involved are 4, 7, 11 and 18, with LOH in 31-32% of cases. Chromosomes 1, 2, 5, 8 and 16 each had LOH in 29% of the tumors; 9 and 13 each in 26%; and 19 in 24% of the tumors. All other autosomes had LOH in 18% or fewer of the tumors. Cytogenetic analyses performed on direct preparations from many of the same tumors agreed well with the molecular LOH assays. Correlation of the information obtained with both of these methods provides considerable insight into the mechanisms involved in the occurrence of these chromosome alterations. Chromosome 3 is the third most frequent chromosome involved in LOH in all types of cancer. In cervical carcinomas the region most frequently involved is 3p13-p25, which is a segment within which suppressors have been implicated in several other types of malignancies. Chromosome 6 on the other hand is rarely involved in other neoplasias and this appears to be unique to cervical carcinomas. Of interest was the finding that many of the HPV-negative tumors had LOH of chromosome 17 and many of these expressed mutant p53. The latter tumors occur in older women and are on the average much more aggressive than the HPV-positive tumors.

  5. Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Mudge, Joanne [NCGR

    2016-07-12

    Joanne Mudge on "Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Mutation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  6. Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Mudge, Joanne

    2012-06-01

    Joanne Mudge on "Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Mutation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  7. Comparative analysis of a conserved zinc finger gene cluster on human chromosome 19q and mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, M.; Mucenski, M.L.; Stubbs, L.

    1996-04-01

    Several lines of evidence now suggest that many of the zinc-finger-containing (ZNF) genes in the human genome are arranged in clusters. However, little is known about the structure or function of the clusters or about their conservation throughout evolution. Here, we report the analysis of a conserved ZNF gene cluster located in human chromosome 19q13.2 and mouse chromosome 7. Our results indicate that the human cluster consists of at least 10 related Kruppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing ZNF genes organized in tandem over a distance of 350-450 kb. Two cDNA clones representing genes in the murine cluster have been studied in detail. The KRAB A domains of these genes are nearly identical and are highly similar to human 19q13.2-derived KRAB sequences, but DNA-binding ZNF domains and other portions of the genes differ considerably. The two murine genes display distinct expression patterns, but are coexpressed in some adult tissues. These studies pave the way for a systematic analysis of the evolution of structure and function of genes within the numerous clustered ZNF families located on human chromosome 19 and elsewhere in the human and mouse genomes. 32 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Localization, by linkage analysis, of the cystinuria type III gene to chromosome 19q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Bisceglia, L.; Totaro, A.; Melchionda, S.

    1997-03-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive aminoaciduria in which three urinary phenotypes (I, II, and III) have been described. An amino acid transporter gene, SLC3A1 (formerly rBAT), was found to be responsible for this disorder. Mutational and linkage analysis demonstrated the presence of genetic heterogeneity in which the SLC3A1 gene is responsible for type I cystinuria but not for type II or type III. In this study, we report the identification of the cystinuria type III locus on the long arm of chromosome 19 (19q13.1), obtained after a genomewide search. Pairwise linkage analysis in a series of type III or type II families previously excluded from linkage to the cystinuria type I locus (SLC3A1 gene) revealed a significant maximum LOD score (Z{sub max}) of 13.11 at a maximum recombination fraction ({theta}{sub max}) of .00, with marker D19S225. Multipoint linkage analysis performed with the use of additional markers from the region placed the cystinuria type III locus between D19S414 and D19S220. Preliminary data on type II families also seem to place the disease locus for this rare type of cystinuria at 19q13.1 (significant Z{sub max} = 3.11 at {theta}{sub max} of .00, with marker D19S225). 33 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Fine mapping and haplotype analysis of the locus for congenital nephrotic syndrome on chromosome 19q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Maennikkoe, M.; Kestilae, M.; Tryggvason, K.

    1995-12-01

    We have recently localized the gene for congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type (CNF) to chromosome 19q12-13.1. On the basis of observed recombination events, the gene was localized between markers D19S416/D19S425/D19S213/D19S208/D19S191 and D19S224. Here we have extended the mapping efforts, on the basis of a detailed physical map of the region. By means of three new polymorphic markers - D19S608, D19S609, and D19S610 - developed in this study, the critical candidate region could be further restricted. Significant linkage disequilibrium was observed with marker D19S610, D19S608, D19S224, and D19S220, the strongest allelic association being 84% with marker D19S610 at 19q13.1. This suggests that the CNF gene locus lies in close proximity to marker D19S610. Combination of the informative markers revealed four main haplotype categories. Different geographic distribution was observed between these haplotype groups when they were placed on the map of Finland according to the birthplaces of grandparents. 38 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) and the explanation of the biological diversification.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskii, Victor E; Kadyshevich, Elena A

    2014-12-01

    The Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) considers the life origination process as a sequence of thermodynamically caused regular and inevitable chemical transformations regulated by universal physical and chemical laws. The LOH-Theory bears on a number of experimental, thermodynamic, observation, and simulation researches. N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, and nucleotides and DNAs and RNAs are formed repeatedly within structural cavities of localizations of underground and underseabed honeycomb CH4-hydrate deposits from CH4 and nitrate and phosphate ions that diffused into the hydrate structures; proto-cells and their agglomerates originated from these DNAs and from the same minerals in the semi-liquid soup after liquation of the hydrate structures. Each localization gave rise to a multitude of different DNAs and living organisms. The species diversity is caused by the spatial and temporal repeatability of the processes of living matter origination under similar but not identical conditions, multiplicity of the DNA forms in each living matter origination event, variations in the parameters of the native medium, intraspecific variations, and interspecific variations. The contribution of the last to the species diversity is, likely, significant for prokaryotes and those eukaryotes that are only at low steps of their biological organization; however, in the light of the LOH-Theory, of available long-term paleontological investigations, and of studies of reproduction of proliferous organisms, we conclude that, in toto, the contribution of interspecific variations to the species diversity was earlier overestimated by some researchers. The reason of this overestimation is that origination of scores of «spores» of different organisms in any one event and multiple reproductions of such events in time and Earth's space were not taken into consideration.

  11. An application of LOH analysis for detecting the genetic influences of space environmental radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatagai, F.; Umebayashi, Y.; Honma, M.; Abe, T.; Suzuki, H.; Shimazu, T.; Ishioka, N.; Iwaki, M.

    To detect the genetic influence of space environmental radiation at the chromosome level we proposed an application of loss of heterozygosity LOH analysis system for the mutations induced in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells Surprisingly we succeeded the mutation detection in the frozen dells which were exposed to a low-dose 10 cGy of carbon-ion beam irradiation Mutation assays were performed within a few days or after about one month preservation at --80 r C following irradiation The results showed an increase in mutation frequency at the thymidine kinase TK gene locus 1 6-fold 2 5 X 10 -6 to 3 9 X 10 -6 and 2 1-fold 2 5 X 10 -6 to 5 3 X 10 -6 respectively Although the relative distributions of mutation classes were not changed by the radiation exposure in either assay an interesting characteristic was detected using this LOH analysis system two TK locus markers and eleven microsatellite loci spanning chromosome 17 The radiation-specific patterns of interstitial deletions were observed in the hemizygous LOH mutants which were considered as a result of end-joining repair of carbon ion-induced DNA double-strand breaks These results clearly demonstrate that this analysis can be used for the detection of low-dose ionizing radiation effects in the frozen cells In addition we performed so called adaptive response experiments in which TK6 cells were pre-irradiated with low-dose 2 5 sim 10 cGy of X-ray and then exposed to challenging dose 2Gy of X-rays Interestingly the

  12. Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) and the explanation of the biological diversification.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskii, Victor E; Kadyshevich, Elena A

    2014-12-01

    The Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) considers the life origination process as a sequence of thermodynamically caused regular and inevitable chemical transformations regulated by universal physical and chemical laws. The LOH-Theory bears on a number of experimental, thermodynamic, observation, and simulation researches. N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, and nucleotides and DNAs and RNAs are formed repeatedly within structural cavities of localizations of underground and underseabed honeycomb CH4-hydrate deposits from CH4 and nitrate and phosphate ions that diffused into the hydrate structures; proto-cells and their agglomerates originated from these DNAs and from the same minerals in the semi-liquid soup after liquation of the hydrate structures. Each localization gave rise to a multitude of different DNAs and living organisms. The species diversity is caused by the spatial and temporal repeatability of the processes of living matter origination under similar but not identical conditions, multiplicity of the DNA forms in each living matter origination event, variations in the parameters of the native medium, intraspecific variations, and interspecific variations. The contribution of the last to the species diversity is, likely, significant for prokaryotes and those eukaryotes that are only at low steps of their biological organization; however, in the light of the LOH-Theory, of available long-term paleontological investigations, and of studies of reproduction of proliferous organisms, we conclude that, in toto, the contribution of interspecific variations to the species diversity was earlier overestimated by some researchers. The reason of this overestimation is that origination of scores of «spores» of different organisms in any one event and multiple reproductions of such events in time and Earth's space were not taken into consideration. PMID:25179143

  13. Partial trisomy of distal 19q detected by quantitative real-time PCR and FISH in a girl with mild facial dysmorphism, hypotonia and developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Sauter, S M; Böhm, Detlef; Bartels, Iris; Burfeind, Peter; Laccone, Franco A; Neesen, Jürgen; Wilken, Bernd; Liehr, Thomas; Zoll, Barbara

    2007-05-15

    We report on a 2 7/12-year-old girl who was referred to us because of psychomotor developmental delay. She is the second child of healthy, non-consanguineous parents. Pregnancy and birth were uneventful. Milestones of motor development were delayed: grasping at 6 months, sitting without support at 16 months, crawling at 16 months and walking at 2 4/12 years of age. She spoke about five words and followed simple instructions. Banding cytogenetics revealed a numerically and structurally normal female karyotype of 46,XX. By quantitative real-time PCR analysis of all subtelomeric regions, a partial trisomy of the subtelomeric region of 19q could be detected. This result was confirmed by FISH-analysis with a subtelomeric probe for 19q. The additional material of chromosome 19q was localized on chromosome 6q. However, a deletion of the subtelomeric region of 6q could not be detected with a subtelomeric FISH probe for 6q. Conventional cytogenetic analysis as well as FISH with subtelomeric probes for 19q and 6q showed normal results in the parents. The detected chromosomal aberration probably occurred de novo. The clinical features are very likely to be caused solely by the partial trisomy 19q.

  14. Assignment of the gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) to chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, M.; Fernald, A.A.; Bell, G.I.; Le Beau, M.M.

    1995-08-10

    The gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) was localized, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to human chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is a potent stimulator of insulin secretion and mutations in the GIPR gene may be related to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). 13 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Chromosomal localization of the human natural killer cell class I receptor family genes to 19q13.4 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Suto, Yumiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; yabe, Toshio

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the localization of the human natural killer cell I receptor family genes to human chromosome 19q13.4 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. These genes mediate the inhibition of the cytotoxicity of subsets of natural killer cells. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP)-Based Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) Testing by Real Time PCR in Patients Suspect of Myeloproliferative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huijsmans, Cornelis J. J.; Poodt, Jeroen; Damen, Jan; van der Linden, Johannes C.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.; Pruijt, Johannes F. M.; Hilbink, Mirrian; Hermans, Mirjam H. A.

    2012-01-01

    During tumor development, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) often occurs. When LOH is preceded by an oncogene activating mutation, the mutant allele may be further potentiated if the wild-type allele is lost or inactivated. In myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) somatic acquisition of JAK2V617F may be followed by LOH resulting in loss of the wild type allele. The occurrence of LOH in MPN and other proliferative diseases may lead to a further potentiating the mutant allele and thereby increasing morbidity. A real time PCR based SNP profiling assay was developed and validated for LOH detection of the JAK2 region (JAK2LOH). Blood of a cohort of 12 JAK2V617F-positive patients (n = 6 25–50% and n = 6>50% JAK2V617F) and a cohort of 81 patients suspected of MPN was stored with EDTA and subsequently used for validation. To generate germ-line profiles, non-neoplastic formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from each patient was analyzed. Results of the SNP assay were compared to those of an established Short Tandem Repeat (STR) assay. Both assays revealed JAK2LOH in 1/6 patients with 25–50% JAK2V617F. In patients with >50% JAK2V617F, JAK2LOH was detected in 6/6 by the SNP assay and 5/6 patients by the STR assay. Of the 81 patients suspected of MPN, 18 patients carried JAK2V617F. Both the SNP and STR assay demonstrated the occurrence of JAK2LOH in 5 of them. In the 63 JAK2V617F-negative patients, no JAK2LOH was observed by SNP and STR analyses. The presented SNP assay reliably detects JAK2LOH and is a fast and easy to perform alternative for STR analyses. We therefore anticipate the SNP approach as a proof of principle for the development of LOH SNP-assays for other clinically relevant LOH loci. PMID:22768290

  17. Life origination and development hydrate theory (LOH-Theory) in the context of biological, physicochemical, astrophysical, and paleontological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskii, V. E.; Kadyshevich, E. A.

    2014-04-01

    Till now, we formulated and developed the Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) and Mitosis and Replication Hydrate Theory (MRHTheory) as the instruments for understanding the physical and chemical mechanisms applied by Nature for the living matter origination and propagation. This work is aimed at coordination of these theories with the paleontological and astrophysical knowledges and hypotheses of the Earth and Solar System remote histories.

  18. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria with copy number-neutral 6pLOH in GPI (+) but not in GPI (-) granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yasutaka; Nishimura, Jun-ichi; Murakami, Yoshiko; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Kinoshita, Taroh; Kanakura, Yuzuru; Young, Neal S

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired bone marrow disorder caused by expansion of a clone of hematopoietic cells lacking glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane proteins. Multiple lines of evidence suggest immune attack on normal hematopoietic stem cells provides a selective growth advantage to PNH clones. Recently, frequent loss of HLA alleles associated with copy number-neutral loss of heterozygosity in chromosome 6p (CN-6pLOH) in aplastic anemia (AA) patients was reported, suggesting that AA hematopoiesis 'escaped' from immune attack by loss of HLA alleles. We report here the first case of CN-6pLOH in a Japanese PNH patient only in GPI-anchored protein positive (59%) granulocytes, but not in GPI-anchored protein negative (41%) granulocytes. CN-6pLOH resulted in loss of the alleles A*02:06-DRB1*15:01-DQB1*06:02, which have been reported to be dominant in Japanese PNH patients. Our patient had maintained nearly normal blood count for several years. Our case supports the hypothesis that a hostile immune environment drives selection of resistant hematopoietic cell clones and indicates that clonal evolution may occur also in normal phenotype (non-PNH) cells in some cases.

  19. Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) and Mitosis and Replication Hydrate Theory (MRH-Theory): three-dimensional PC validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyshevich, E. A.; Dzyabchenko, A. V.; Ostrovskii, V. E.

    2014-04-01

    Size compatibility of the CH4-hydrate structure II and multi-component DNA fragments is confirmed by three-dimensional simulation; it is validation of the Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory).

  20. Novel genomic amplification targeting the microRNA cluster at 19q13.42 in a pediatric embryonal tumor with abundant neuropil and true rosettes.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Stefan; Remke, Marc; Castoldi, Mirco; Bai, Alfa H C; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Kulozik, Andreas; von Deimling, Andreas; Pscherer, Armin; Lichter, Peter; Korshunov, Andrey

    2009-04-01

    Embryonal tumors with abundant neuropil and true rosettes (ETANTR) comprise a rare variant of embryonal brain tumors usually occurring in infants. Only 13 cases have been reported in the literature to date and little is known about the molecular pathogenesis of these tumors. Here, we describe a case of ETANTR in a 2-year-old girl presenting with a large tumor in the vermis of the cerebellum. Histological examination showed clusters of small-undifferentiated cells including ependymoblastic-like rosettes admixed with large fibrillar and paucicellular neuropil-like areas indicative for ETANTR. Genomic imbalances were detected by using array-based comparative genomic hybridization. In addition to trisomy of chromosome 2, which has been previously described in ETANTR, array-CGH revealed high-level genomic amplification of 0.89 Mb at chromosome band 19q13.42 covering a microRNA cluster and several protein-coding genes. This aberration has not been described in any other brain tumor to date, indicating a specific aberration in ETANTR. MicroRNAs contained in the microRNA cluster at 19q13.42 including oncomirs miRNA-372 and miRNA-373 were highly up-regulated in the tumor when compared to normal cerebellum or whole brain. In summary, this is the first report on a potentially specific genetic aberration in ETANTR, supporting the hypothesis of a distinct tumor entity.

  1. Assembly of a 1-Mb restriction-mapped cosmid contig spanning the candidate region for Finnish congenital nephrosis (NPHS1) in 19q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, A.S.; Georgescu, A.; Johnson, S.; Carrano, A.V.

    1996-06-01

    We describe the assembly of a 1-Mb cosmid contig and restriction map spanning the candidate region for Finnish congenital nephrosis (NPHS1) in 19q13.1. The map was constructed from 16 smaller contigs assembled by fingerprinting, a BAC and a PAC clone, and 42 previously unmapped cosmids. In most cases, single-step cosmid walks were sufficient to join two previously assembled contigs, and all but one gap was filled from this cosmid contig library. The remaining gap of about 19 kb was spanned with a single BAC and a single PAC clone. EcoRI mapping of a dense set of overlapping clones validated the assembly of the map and indicated a length of 1040 kb for the contig. This high-resolution clone map provides an ideal resource for gene identification through cDNA selection, exon trapping, and DNA sequencing. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Haplotype frequencies in a sub-region of chromosome 19q13.3, related to risk and prognosis of cancer, differ dramatically between ethnic groups

    PubMed Central

    Schierup, Mikkel H; Mailund, Thomas; Li, Heng; Wang, Jun; Tjønneland, Anne; Vogel, Ulla; Bolund, Lars; Nexø, Bjørn A

    2009-01-01

    Background A small region of about 70 kb on human chromosome 19q13.3 encompasses 4 genes of which 3, ERCC1, ERCC2, and PPP1R13L (aka RAI) are related to DNA repair and cell survival, and one, CD3EAP, aka ASE1, may be related to cell proliferation. The whole region seems related to the cellular response to external damaging agents and markers in it are associated with risk of several cancers. Methods We downloaded the genotypes of all markers typed in the 19q13.3 region in the HapMap populations of European, Asian and African descent and inferred haplotypes. We combined the European HapMap individuals with a Danish breast cancer case-control data set and inferred the association between HapMap haplotypes and disease risk. Results We found that the susceptibility haplotype in our European sample had increased from 2 to 50 percent very recently in the European population, and to almost the same extent in the Asian population. The cause of this increase is unknown. The maximal proportion of overall genetic variation due to differences between groups for Europeans versus Africans and Europeans versus Asians (the Fst value) closely matched the putative location of the susceptibility variant as judged from haplotype-based association mapping. Conclusion The combined observation that a common haplotype causing an increased risk of cancer in Europeans and a high differentiation between human populations is highly unusual and suggests a causal relationship with a recent increase in Europeans caused either by genetic drift overruling selection against the susceptibility variant or a positive selection for the same haplotype. The data does not allow us to distinguish between these two scenarios. The analysis suggests that the region is not involved in cancer risk in Africans and that the susceptibility variants may be more finely mapped in Asian populations. PMID:19257887

  3. Genomic Changes in Gliomas Detected Using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Shuko; Henderson, Lindsay B.; Eshleman, James R.; Gocke, Christopher D.; Burger, Peter; Griffin, Constance A.; Batista, Denise A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Deletion or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in chromosomes 1p and 19q in oligodendrogliomas (ODGs) have diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. Current clinical assays are limited because the probes or primers interrogate only limited genomic segments. We investigated the use of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays for identifying genomic changes in gliomas from FFPE tissues. DNA was extracted from FFPE tissues of 30 brain tumor cases (15 ODGs and 15 non-ODGs) and assayed on the Illumina array with 300,000 markers. SNP results were compared with standard short tandem repeat (STR) assays of chromosomes 1p and 19q. Fifteen ODGs had LOH by STR and deletion by array on both 1p and 19q. Ten non-ODGs had no evidence of LOH on 1p and 19q by STR, seven of which had no abnormalities for these chromosomes; three had partial deletions by SNP array. Five non-ODG cases had partial LOH or deletion by both assays. No major discordance was found between SNP array and STR results. Advantages of SNP arrays include no need for an accompanying normal sample, the ability to find small segmental deletions, the potential to distinguish between deletions and copy neutral LOH, and whole-genome screening to allow discovery of new, significant loci. Assessment of genomic changes in routine glioma specimens using SNP arrays is feasible and has great potential as an accurate clinical diagnostic test. PMID:21726663

  4. Total Syntheses of the Resorcylic Acid Lactones Paecilomycin F and Cochliomycin C Using an Intramolecular Loh-Type α-Allylation Reaction for Macrolide Formation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiang; Bolte, Benoit; Banwell, Martin G; Willis, Anthony C

    2016-09-01

    Subjection of the resorcylic ester 16 to a Nozaki-Hiyama-Kishi reaction afforded the 12-membered lactone 17, while treatment of it under the Loh-type α-allylation conditions using indium metal gave the isomeric, 14-membered macrolide 18. Compound 18 was readily elaborated to the resorcylic acid lactone type natural products paecilomycin F and cochliomycin C. PMID:27541929

  5. Life Origination and Development Hydrate theory (LOH-Theory): new approaches to the problems of the optimal nutrition and life prolongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyshevich, E. A.; Ostrovskii, V. E.

    2014-04-01

    Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) and Mitosis and Replication Hydrate Theory (MRHTheory), both grounded on the notion of honeycomb gas-hydrate structures formation/destruction as the physicochemical phenomenon governing the DNA origination and replication, allow new approaches to the optimal nutrition and life prolongation problems.

  6. Organization of the human gene for nucleobindin (NUC) and its chromosomal assignment to 19q13.2-q13.4.

    PubMed

    Miura, K; Hirai, M; Kanai, Y; Kurosawa, Y

    1996-06-01

    Nucleobindin (Nuc) was first identified as a secreted protein of 55 kDa that promotes production of DNA-specific antibodies in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice. Analysis of cDNA that encoded Nuc revealed that the protein is composed of a signal peptide, a DNA-binding site, two calcium-binding motifs (EF-hand motifs), and a leucine zipper. In the present study, we analyzed the organization of the human gene for Nuc (NUC). It consists of 13 exons that are distributed in a region of 32 kb. The functional motifs listed above are encoded in corresponding exons. NUC was expressed in all organs examined. Comparison of nucleotide sequences in the promoter regions between human and mouse NUC genes revealed several conserved sequences. Among them, two Sp1-binding sites and a CCAAT box are of particular interest. The promoter is of the TATA-less type, and transcription starts at multiple sites in both the human and the mouse genes. These features suggest that NUC might normally play a role as a housekeeping gene. NUC was located at human chromosome 19q13.2-q13.4.

  7. Mechanisms leading to Prader-Willi syndrome in a patient with a de novo 46, XY, t(15; 19)(q12; q13.41)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Hainline, B.E.; Palmer, C.G.

    1994-09-01

    A three year and six month-old boy with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) was found to have a de novo 46, XY, t(15; 19) (q12; q13.41) karyotype. PCR studies of microsatellite loci showed heterozygosity, including biparental inheritance. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies were performed with cosmid probes D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10, and GABRB3 and no deletion was found. The chromosomal breakage occurred inside the SNRPN contig, which contains two overlapping cosmids. Each cosmid shows signals with FISH on both the der(15) and the der(19), and on the normal chromosome 15. Additional FISH studies using cosmid subfragments demonstrated that the breakage occurred upstream to coding exons of the SNRPN gene. SNRPN contains 10 exons, including two recently identified upstream exons, exon-1 and exon-0. A probe from an RT-PCR product (1020bp) of total human brain mRNA spanning exons 1-8 and an exon1-specific probe were used on genome DNA Southern hybridizaiton. An extra DNA band 20kb in size was detected specifically from our patients genomic DNA using BamHl when compared to his normal parents and normal individuals. Further studies revealed that the breakage occurred between exon 0 and exon 1 of the SNRPN gene.

  8. Evidence for a major retinitis pigmentosa locus on 19q13.4 (RP11), and association with a unique bimodal expressivity phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Maghtheh, M.; Vithana, E.; Tarttelin, E.; Evans, K.

    1996-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the name given to a heterogeneous group of retinal degenerations mapping to at least 16 loci. The autosomal dominant form (adRP), accounting for {approximately}25% of cases, can be caused by mutations in two genes, rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS, and by at least six other loci identified by linkage analysis. The RP11 locus for adRP has previously been mapped to chromosome 19q13.4 in a large English family. This linkage has been independently confirmed in a Japanese family, and we now report three additional unrelated linked U.K. families, suggesting that this is a major locus for RP. Linkage analysis in the U.K. families refines the RP11 interval to 5 cM between markers D19S180 and AFMc001yb1. All linked families exhibit incomplete penetrance; some obligate gene carriers remain asymptomatic throughout their lives, whereas symptomatic individuals experience night blindness and visual field loss in their teens and are generally registered as blind by their 30s. This {open_quotes}bimodal expressivity{close_quotes} contrasts with the variable-expressivity RP mapping to chromosome 7p (RP9) in another family, which has implications for diagnosis and counseling of RP11 families. These results may also imply that a proportion of sporadic RP, previously assumed to be recessive, might result from mutations at this locus. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Organization of the human gene for nucleobindin (NUC) and its chromosomal assignment to 19q13.2-q13.4

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Keiji; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Hirai, Momoki

    1996-06-01

    Nucleobindin (Nuc) was first identified as a secreted protein of 55 kDa that promotes production of DNA-specific antibodies in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice. Analysis of cDNA that encoded Nuc revealed that the protein is composed of a signal peptide, a DNA-binding site, two calcium-binding motifs (EF-hand motifs), and a leucine zipper. In the present study, we analysed the organization of the human gene for Nuc (NUC). It consists of 13 exons that are distributed in a region of 32 kb. The functional motifs listed above are encoded in corresponding exons. NUC was expressed in all organs examined. Comparison of nucleotide sequences in the promotre regions between human and mouse NCU genes revealed several conserved sequences. Among them, two Sp1-binding sites and a CCAAT box are of particular interest. The promoter is of the TATA-less type, and transcription starts at multiple sites in both the human and the mouse genes. These features suggest that NUC might normally play a role as a housekeeping gene. NUC was located at human chromosome 19q13.2-q13.4. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Characterization of the human and rat phospholemman (PLM) cDNAs and localization of the human PLM gene to chromosome 19q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ling-Sing K.; Lo, C.F.; Numann, R.; Cuddy, M.

    1997-05-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that the phospholemman (PLM), a 72-residue plasma-membrane protein enriched in skeletal muscle and heart, is a major substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin and adrenergic stimulation. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of human and rat PLM cDNA from the heart. Both PLM proteins share significant nucleotide and amino acid sequence and structural similarities with the previously published canine PLM and, to a lesser degree, with Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase {gamma} subunit, Mat-8 protein, and CHIF protein. Despite the functional diversity, all these proteins are quite small and possess a single transmembrane domain. Human PLM appears to be a unique gene localized on chromosome 19q13.1. The PLM mRNA is widely distributed in human tissues, with the highest expression in skeletal muscle and heart, suggesting a functional role in muscle contraction. Like canine PLM, both human and rat PLM induce a hyperpolarization-activated chloride current when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The high degree of sequence and functional conservation among the mammalian PLM proteins indicates that this gene is conserved throughout evolution. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Evidence for a major retinitis pigmentosa locus on 19q13.4 (RP11) and association with a unique bimodal expressivity phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maghtheh, M.; Vithana, E.; Tarttelin, E.; Jay, M.; Evans, K.; Moore, T.; Bhattacharya, S.; Inglehearn, C. F.

    1996-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the name given to a heterogeneous group of retinal degenerations mapping to at least 16 loci. The autosomal dominant form (ARP), accounting for approximately 25% of cases, can be caused by mutations in two genes, rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS, and by at least six other loci identified by linkage analysis. The RP11 locus for adRP has previously been mapped to chromosome 19q13.4 in a large English family. This linkage has been independently confirmed in a Japanese family, and we now report three additional unrelated linked U.K. families, suggesting that this is a major locus for RP. Linkage analysis in the U.K. families refines the RP11 interval to 5 cM between markers D19S180 and AFMc001yb1. All linked families exhibit incomplete penetrance; some obligate gene carriers remain asymptomatic throughout their lives, whereas symptomatic individuals experience night blindness and visual field loss in their teens and are generally registered as blind by their 30s. This "bimodal expressivity" contrasts with the variable-expressivity RP mapping to chromosome 7p (RP9) in another family, which has implications for diagnosis and counseling of RP11 families. These results may also imply that a proportion of sporadic RP, previously assumed to be recessive, might result from mutations at this locus. PMID:8808602

  12. Twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 19q13.2-13.3: linkage disequilibria and associations with basal cell carcinoma in Danish psoriatic patients.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jiaoyang; Vogel, Ulla; Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Dybdahl, Marianne; Bolund, Lars; Nexø, Bjørn Andersen

    2003-02-01

    The genetic susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma (BCC) among Danish psoriatic patients was investigated in association studies with 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 19q13.2-3. The results show a significant association between BCC and the A-allele of a polymorphism in ERCCI exon4 (Odds ratio 12;95% Confidence Interval 1.17-124; p(chi2, two-side) = 0.019) and to a lesser extent with XPD exon6 (p = 0.06). This is in accordance with recent studies of a different group of BCC cases (Rockenbauer et al. (in press) Carcinogenesis; Yin et al. (manuscript submitted for publication). Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev), which places two highly influential markers between these two genes. The analysis also confirmed that considerable linkage disequilibrium exists between SNPs both within genes and between genes in this region. The combined studies suggest that genetic variation in nucleotide excision repair is of importance for the development of BCC.

  13. Characterization of the human and rat phospholemman (PLM) cDNAs and localization of the human PLM gene to chromosome 19q13.1.

    PubMed

    Chen, L S; Lo, C F; Numann, R; Cuddy, M

    1997-05-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that the phospholemman (PLM), a 72-residue plasma-membrane protein enriched in skeletal muscle and heart, is a major substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin and adrenergic stimulation. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of human and rat PLM cDNA from the heart. Both PLM proteins share significant nucleotide and amino acid sequence and structural similarities with the previously published canine PLM and, to a lesser degree, with Na+/K(+)-ATPase gamma subunit, Mat-8 protein, and CHIF protein. Despite the functional diversity, all these proteins are quite small and possess a single transmembrane domain. Human PLM appears to be a unique gene localized on chromosome 19q13.1. The PLM mRNA is widely distributed in human tissues, with the highest expression in skeletal muscle and heart, suggesting a functional role in muscle contraction. Like canine PLM, both human and rat PLM induce a hyperpolarization-activated chloride current when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The high degree of sequence and functional conservation among the mammalian PLM proteins indicates that this gene is conserved throughout evolution.

  14. hHSS1: a novel secreted factor and suppressor of glioma growth located at chromosome 19q13.33.

    PubMed

    Junes-Gill, Katiana S; Gallaher, Timothy K; Gluzman-Poltorak, Zoya; Miller, Joseph D; Wheeler, Christopher J; Fan, Xuemo; Basile, Lena A

    2011-04-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project resulted in discovery of many unknown novel genes. This feat paved the way for the future development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of human disease based on novel biological functions and pathways. Towards this aim, we undertook a bioinformatics analysis of in-house microarray data derived from purified hematopoietic stem cell populations. This effort led to the discovery of HSS1 (Hematopoietic Signal peptide-containing Secreted 1) and its splice variant HSM1 (Hematopoietic Signal peptide-containing Membrane domain-containing 1). HSS1 gene is evolutionarily conserved across species, phyla and even kingdoms, including mammals, invertebrates and plants. Structural analysis showed no homology between HSS1 and known proteins or known protein domains, indicating that it was a truly novel protein. Interestingly, the human HSS1 (hHSS1) gene is located at chromosome 19q13.33, a genomic region implicated in various cancers, including malignant glioma. Stable expression of hHSS1 in glioma-derived A172 and U87 cell lines greatly reduced their proliferation rates compared to mock-transfected cells. hHSS1 expression significantly affected the malignant phenotype of U87 cells both in vitro and in vivo. Further, preliminary immunohistochemical analysis revealed an increase in hHSS1/HSM1 immunoreactivity in two out of four high-grade astrocytomas (glioblastoma multiforme, WHO IV) as compared to low expression in all four low-grade diffuse astrocytomas (WHO grade II). High-expression of hHSS1 in high-grade gliomas was further supported by microarray data, which indicated that mesenchymal subclass gliomas exclusively up-regulated hHSS1. Our data reveal that HSS1 is a truly novel protein defining a new class of secreted factors, and that it may have an important role in cancer, particularly glioma.

  15. Cloning of ELL, a gene that fuses to MLL in a t(11; 19)(q23; p13. 1) in acute myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Thirman, M.J.; Levitan, D.A.; Kobayashi, H.; Simon, M.C.; Rowley, J.D. )

    1994-12-06

    To characterize the functions of MLL fusion transcripts, we cloned the gene that fuses to MLL in the translocation t(11;19)(q23;p13.1). This translocation is distinct from another type of 11;19 translocation with a 19p13.3 breakpoint that results in the fusion of MLL to the ENL gene. By PCR screening of a cDNA library prepared from a patient's leukemia cells with this translocation, we obtained a fusion transcript containing exon 7 of MLL and sequence of an unknown gene. The sequence of this gene was amplified and used as a probe to screen a fetal brain cDNA library. On Northern blot analysis, this cDNA detected a 4.4-kb transcript that was abundant in peripheral blood leukocytes, skeletal muscle, placenta, and testis and expressed at lower levels in spleen, thymus, heart, brain, lung, kidney, liver, and ovary. In addition, a 2.8-kb transcript was present in peripheral blood, testis, and placenta. On [open quotes]zoo blots,[close quotes] this gene was shown to be evolutionarily conserved in 10 mammalian species as well as in chicken, frog, and fish. We have named this gene ELL (for eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukemia gene). A highly basic, lysine-rich motif of the predicted ELL protein is homologous to similar regions of several proteins, including the DNA-binding domain of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The characterization of the normal functions of ELL as well as its altered function when fused to MLL will be critical to further our understanding of the mechanisms of leukemogenesis. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Cex1p facilitates Rna1p-mediated dissociation of the Los1p-tRNA-Gsp1p-GTP export complex.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Andrew T; Mangroo, Dev

    2012-02-01

    Nuclear tRNA export plays an essential role in key cellular processes such as regulation of protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, response to nutrient availability and DNA damage and development. Like other nuclear export processes, assembly of the nuclear tRNA export complex in the nucleus is dependent on Ran-GTP/Gsp1p-GTP, and dissociation of the export receptor-tRNA-Ran-GTP/Gsp1p-GTP complex in the cytoplasm requires RanBP1/Yrb1p and RanGAP/Rna1p to activate the GTPase activity of Ran-GTP/Gsp1p-GTP. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cex1p and Human Scyl1 have also been proposed to participate in unloading of the tRNA export receptors at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Here, we provide evidence suggesting that Cex1p is required for activation of the GTPase activity of Gsp1p and dissociation of the receptor-tRNA-Gsp1p export complex in S. cerevisiae. The data suggest that Cex1p recruits Rna1p from the cytoplasm to the NPC and facilitates Rna1p activation of the GTPase activity of Gsp1p by enabling Rna1p to gain access to Gsp1p-GTP bound to the export receptor tRNA complex. It is possible that this tRNA unloading mechanism is conserved in evolutionarily diverse organisms and that other Gsp1p-GTP-dependent export processes use a pathway-specific component to recruit Rna1p to the NPC.

  17. A case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an unreported combination of chromosomal abnormalities: gain of isochromosome 5p, tetrasomy 8 and unbalanced translocation der(19)t(17;19)(q23;p13)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) comprises a spectrum of myeloid malignancies which are often associated with distinct chromosomal abnormalities, and the analysis of such abnormalities provides us with important information for disease classification, treatment selection and prognosis. Some chromosomal abnormalities albeit recurrent are rare such as tetrasomy 8 or isochromosome 5p. In addition, erratic chromosomal rearrangements may occur in AML, sometimes unbalanced and also accompanied by other abnormalities. Knowledge on the contribution of rare abnormalities to AML disease, progression and prognosis is limited. Here we report a unique case of acute monoblastic leukemia with gain of i(5)(p10), tetrasomy 8, an unbalanced translocation der(19)t(17;19)(q23;p13.3) and mutated NPM1. Results Bone marrow cells were examined by conventional karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and mutation analysis at diagnosis and follow-up. At diagnosis we detected trisomy 8, an unbalanced translocation der(19)t(17;19)(q23;p13.3) and mutated NPM1. During the course of the disease we observed clonal evolution with gain of i(5)(p10), tetrasomy 8 and eventually duplication of der(19)t(17;19)(q23;p13.3). By using the der(19)t(17;19) as clonal marker, we found that i(5)(p10) and tetrasomy 8 were secondary genetic events and that tetrasomy 8 had clonally evolved from trisomy 8. Conclusions This case of acute monoblastic leukemia presents a combination of rare chromosomal abnormalities including the unbalanced translocation der(19)t(17;19)(q23;p13.3), hitherto un-reported in AML. In addition, our case supports the hypothesis of a step-wise clonal evolution from trisomy 8 to tetrasomy 8 in AML. Reporting and collecting data of rare chromosomal abnormalities will add information to AML disease, progression and prognosis, and may eventually translate to improved patient management. PMID:24079663

  18. Acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 1p as a molecular event associated with marrow fibrosis in MPL-mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Pietra, Daniela; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bordoni, Roberta; Casetti, Ilaria; Milanesi, Chiara; Sant’Antonio, Emanuela; Ferretti, Virginia; Pancrazzi, Alessandro; Rotunno, Giada; Severgnini, Marco; Pietrelli, Alessandro; Astori, Cesare; Fugazza, Elena; Pascutto, Cristiana; Boveri, Emanuela; Passamonti, Francesco; De Bellis, Gianluca; Vannucchi, Alessandro; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-01-01

    We studied mutations of MPL exon 10 in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) or primary myelofibrosis (PMF), first investigating a cohort of 892 consecutive patients. MPL mutation scanning was performed on granulocyte genomic DNA by using a high-resolution melt assay, and the mutant allele burden was evaluated by using deep sequencing. Somatic mutations of MPL, all but one involving codon W515, were detected in 26/661 (4%) patients with ET, 10/187 (5%) with PMF, and 7/44 (16%) patients with post-ET myelofibrosis. Comparison of JAK2 (V617F)–mutated and MPL-mutated patients showed only minor phenotypic differences. In an extended group of 62 MPL-mutated patients, the granulocyte mutant allele burden ranged from 1% to 95% and was significantly higher in patients with PMF or post-ET myelofibrosis compared with those with ET. Patients with higher mutation burdens had evidence of acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) of chromosome 1p in granulocytes, consistent with a transition from heterozygosity to homozygosity for the MPL mutation in clonal cells. A significant association was found between MPL-mutant allele burden greater than 50% and marrow fibrosis. These observations suggest that acquired CN-LOH of chromosome 1p involving the MPL location may represent a molecular mechanism of fibrotic transformation in MPL-mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:23575445

  19. A t(17;19)(q22;p13.3) Involving TCF3, a t(1;9)(p13;p13), and a 5' IGH Deletion in a Case of Adult B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chow, R; Shabsovich, D; Schiller, G; Kallen, M; Tirado, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    TCF3 (19p13.3) abnormalities are relatively common in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). The t(1;19)(q23;p13) involving PBX1 is the most common of these rearrangements. The t(17;19)(q22;p13.3), resulting in the TCF3-HLF fusion gene, is also seen in B-ALL and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Herein, we present the case of a 25-year-old male diagnosed with B-ALL whose initial karyotype showed a t(17;19)(q22p13.3). FISH confirmed TCF3 involvement and also revealed a 5' IGH deletion. After treatment, the patient relapsed, at which point conventional cytogenetic studies showed a t(17;19), loss of the 5' IGH region, and a t(3;10) not seen in initial studies. After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the patient relapsed again, at which point conventional cytogenetic studies showed a complex karyotype with t(17;19), t(1;9)(p13;p13), and structural anomalies involving chromosomes 5, 7, and 14, but no IGH abnormalities by FISH. The t(1;9) has been shown to involve PAX5, which plays numerous regulatory roles in B-cell differentiation. Other PAX5 rearrangements have been detected in B-ALL cases of young adults and adolescents, but with unclear clinical significance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of t(17;19)-ALL with concomitant 5' IGH deletion and t(1;9)(p13;p13) potentially involving PAX5, albeit at different time points in disease progression. This case provides insight into the clonal evolution of t(17;19)-ALL and the potential involvement of PAX5 and IGH aberrations in the evolution of this malignancy. PMID:27183380

  20. 1p36 deletion syndrome: an update.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Valerie K; Zaveri, Hitisha P; Scott, Daryl A

    2015-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are the most common terminal deletions in humans. Medical problems commonly caused by terminal deletions of 1p36 include developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, short stature, distinctive facial features, brain anomalies, orofacial clefting, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. Although 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered clinically recognizable, there is significant phenotypic variation among affected individuals. This variation is due, at least in part, to the genetic heterogeneity seen in 1p36 deletions which include terminal and interstitial deletions of varying lengths located throughout the 30 Mb of DNA that comprise chromosome 1p36. Array-based copy number variant analysis can easily identify genomic regions of 1p36 that are deleted in an affected individual. However, predicting the phenotype of an individual based solely on the location and extent of their 1p36 deletion remains a challenge since most of the genes that contribute to 1p36-related phenotypes have yet to be identified. In addition, haploinsufficiency of more than one gene may contribute to some phenotypes. In this article, we review recent successes in the effort to map and identify the genes and genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36-related phenotypes. In particular, we highlight evidence implicating MMP23B, GABRD, SKI, PRDM16, KCNAB2, RERE, UBE4B, CASZ1, PDPN, SPEN, ECE1, HSPG2, and LUZP1 in various 1p36 deletion phenotypes.

  1. Specialized Rap1p/Gcr1p Transcriptional Activation through Gcr1p DNA Contacts Requires Gcr2p, as Does Hyperphosphorylation of Gcr1p

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, X.; Deminoff, S. J.; Santangelo, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    The multifunctional regulatory factor Rap1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae accomplishes one of its tasks, transcriptional activation, by complexing with Gcr1p. An unusual feature of this heteromeric complex is its apparent capacity to contact simultaneously two adjacent DNA elements (UAS(RPG) and the CT box, bound specifically by Rap1p and Gcr1p, respectively). The complex can activate transcription through isolated UAS(RPG) but not CT elements. In promoters that contain both DNA signals its activity is enhanced, provided the helical spacing between the two elements is appropriate; this suggests that at least transient DNA loop formation is involved. We show here that this CT box-dependent augmentation of Rap1p/Gcr1p activation requires the presence of a third protein Gcr2p; the Gcr2(-) growth defect appears to result from a genome-wide loss of the CT box effect. Interestingly, a hyperphosphorylated form of Gcr1p disappears in Δgcr2 cells but reappears if they harbor a doubly point-mutated GCR1 allele that bypasses the Gcr2(-) growth defect. Gcr2p therefore appears to induce a conformation change in Gcr1p and/or stimulate its hyperphosphorylation; one or both of these effects can be mimicked in the absence of GCR2 by mutation of GCR1. This improved view of Rap1p/Gcr1p/Gcr2p function reveals a new aspect of eukaryotic gene regulation: modification of an upstream activator, accompanied by at least transient DNA loop formation, mediates its improved capacity to activate transcription. PMID:9335588

  2. Carboxyarabinitol-1-P phosphatase of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Kobza, J.; Moore, B.d.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The activity of carboxyarabinitol-1-P (CA1P) phosphatase was detected in clarified stromal extracts by the generation of {sup 14}C-carboxyarabinitol from {sup 14}C-CA1P. Carboxyribitol-1-P dependent activity was 3% of the CA1P dependent activity, indicating the enzyme was specific for CA1P. Inclusion of DTT in the assay was required for maximum velocity, but it appears that the enzyme is not regulated by thioredoxin in vivo. Activity o f the CA1P phosphatase was stimulated by RuBP, NADPH and FBP, though the latter two metabolites were required at nonphysiological concentrations in order to achieve significant stimulation. Contrary to a previous report on purified tobacco enzyme, ATP stimulated the CA1P phosphatase activity. In the presence of 1 mM RuBP or ATP, rates of 2 or 3 {mu}mol mg{sup {minus}1} Chl h{sup {minus}1}, respectively, were observed at 1 mM CA1P. These rates were 3-4 fold higher than the rate observed in the absence of effectors and are 2-4 times the in vivo rate of degradation of CA1P during dark/light transitions. The rates from bean were about 7 fold higher than rates reported for the enzyme from tobacco. Changes in the levels of ATP and RuBP associated with dark/light transitions could modulate the enzyme activity in vivo, but it remains to be established if this is the only mechanism for the required regulation of the enzyme.

  3. 1p36 deletion syndrome: an update

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Valerie K; Zaveri, Hitisha P; Scott, Daryl A

    2015-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are the most common terminal deletions in humans. Medical problems commonly caused by terminal deletions of 1p36 include developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, short stature, distinctive facial features, brain anomalies, orofacial clefting, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. Although 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered clinically recognizable, there is significant phenotypic variation among affected individuals. This variation is due, at least in part, to the genetic heterogeneity seen in 1p36 deletions which include terminal and interstitial deletions of varying lengths located throughout the 30 Mb of DNA that comprise chromosome 1p36. Array-based copy number variant analysis can easily identify genomic regions of 1p36 that are deleted in an affected individual. However, predicting the phenotype of an individual based solely on the location and extent of their 1p36 deletion remains a challenge since most of the genes that contribute to 1p36-related phenotypes have yet to be identified. In addition, haploinsufficiency of more than one gene may contribute to some phenotypes. In this article, we review recent successes in the effort to map and identify the genes and genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36-related phenotypes. In particular, we highlight evidence implicating MMP23B, GABRD, SKI, PRDM16, KCNAB2, RERE, UBE4B, CASZ1, PDPN, SPEN, ECE1, HSPG2, and LUZP1 in various 1p36 deletion phenotypes. PMID:26345236

  4. Assignment of the gene (UQCRFS1) for the Rieske iron-sulfur protein subunit of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc[sub 1] complex to the 22q13 and 19q12-q13. 1 regions of the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.M.V.; Anderson, L. ); Duff, C.; Worton, R. ); Ozawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hiroshi ); Rozen, R. Montreal Children's Hospital )

    1994-05-01

    In this report, the authors used in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrid mapping to localize the human gene for the Rieske iron-sulfur protein. The assignment of the gene for the Rieske iron-sulfur protein to human chromosomes 22q13 and 19q12-q13.1 confirms that it is encoded by the nuclear genome. The localization of four subunits of complex III to different human chromosomes - 8, 16, and 22/19 - precludes the existence of a gene cluster for this complex within the human genome. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for markers on chromosome 8q in a human chondrosarcoma cell line and in a tumor that developed in a man with Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME)

    SciTech Connect

    Raskind, W.H.; Conrad, E.U.; Robbins, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    HME is an autosomal dominant disorder in which multiple benign cartilage-capped lesions develop on otherwise histologically normal bones. The majority of chondrosarcomas are sporadic, but the presence of HME greatly increases the risk to develop this tumor. Sarcoma may also arise in sporadically-occurring exostoses. The study of inherited disorders that predispose to malignant diseases has led to discoveries regarding molecular changes involved in carcinogenesis in general. In an analogous manner, somatic mutations in HME genes may be responsible for sporadic exostoses and/or chondrosarcomas. HME is genetically heterogeneous; EXT genes have been assigned to 8q24, the pericentromeric region of 11 and 19p11-p13. We compared chondrosarcoma cell DNA to DNA from white blood cells for LOH at polymorphic loci in these 3 regions. LOH for 4 of 5 markers in 8q24 was detected in a chondrosarcoma that arose in a man with HME. Heterozygosity was retained for markers and chromosomes 11 and 19. We then evaluated cultured cells from 10 sporadic chondrosarcomas. LOH for multiple markers in 8q24 was detected in a cell line, Ch-1, established from an aggressive tumor, but not in 9 other tumors. Of the 9 tumors studied, only the Ch-1 line exhibited LOH for chromosome 11 markers. LOH for a 19p marker was not detected in any of 6 tumors examined, including Ch-1. The karyotype of Ch-1 contains many structurally rearranged chromosomes. The two chromosome 11s appear normal but both chromosome 8 homologues have been replaced by der(8)t(5;8)(q22;q21.2). LOH at 8q24 was also detected in the uncultured tumor. These results suggest that genes responsible for HME may have tumor suppressor functions whose loss may be related to the development of a subset of chondrosarcomas.

  6. Genome-wide screening of copy number alterations and LOH events in renal cell carcinomas and integration with gene expression profile

    PubMed Central

    Cifola, Ingrid; Spinelli, Roberta; Beltrame, Luca; Peano, Clelia; Fasoli, Ester; Ferrero, Stefano; Bosari, Silvano; Signorini, Stefano; Rocco, Francesco; Perego, Roberto; Proserpio, Vanessa; Raimondo, Francesca; Mocarelli, Paolo; Battaglia, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    Background Clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC) is the most common and invasive adult renal cancer. For the purpose of identifying RCC biomarkers, we investigated chromosomal regions and individual genes modulated in RCC pathology. We applied the dual strategy of assessing and integrating genomic and transcriptomic data, today considered the most effective approach for understanding genetic mechanisms of cancer and the most sensitive for identifying cancer-related genes. Results We performed the first integrated analysis of DNA and RNA profiles of RCC samples using Affymetrix technology. Using 100K SNP mapping arrays, we assembled a genome-wide map of DNA copy number alterations and LOH areas. We thus confirmed the typical genetic signature of RCC but also identified other amplified regions (e.g. on chr. 4, 11, 12), deleted regions (chr. 1, 9, 22) and LOH areas (chr. 1, 2, 9, 13). Simultaneously, using HG-U133 Plus 2.0 arrays, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in tumor vs. normal samples. Combining genomic and transcriptomic data, we identified 71 DEGs in aberrant chromosomal regions and observed, in amplified regions, a predominance of up-regulated genes (27 of 37 DEGs) and a trend to clustering. Functional annotation of these genes revealed some already implicated in RCC pathology and other cancers, as well as others that may be novel tumor biomarkers. Conclusion By combining genomic and transcriptomic profiles from a collection of RCC samples, we identified specific genomic regions with concordant alterations in DNA and RNA profiles and focused on regions with increased DNA copy number. Since the transcriptional modulation of up-regulated genes in amplified regions may be attributed to the genomic alterations characteristic of RCC, these genes may encode novel RCC biomarkers actively involved in tumor initiation and progression and useful in clinical applications. PMID:18194544

  7. Identification of benzoxazole analogs as novel, S1P(3) sparing S1P(1) agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guanghui; Meng, Qinghua; Liu, Qian; Xu, Xuesong; Xu, Qiongfeng; Ren, Feng; Guo, Taylor B; Lu, Hongtao; Xiang, Jia-Ning; Elliott, John D; Lin, Xichen

    2012-06-15

    A novel series of benzoxazole-derived S1P(1) agonists were designed based on scaffold hopping molecular design strategy combined with computational approaches. Extensive SAR studies led to the discovery of compound 17d as a selective S1P(1) agonist (over S1P(3)) with high CNS penetration and favorable DMPK properties. 17d also demonstrated in vivo pharmacological efficacy to reduce blood lymphocyte in mice after oral administration.

  8. Bet1p activates the v-SNARE Bos1p.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, S; Sacher, M; Mao, Y; Carr, C; Lyons, P; Quinn, A M; Ferro-Novick, S

    1997-01-01

    Bet1p is a type II membrane protein that is required for vesicular transport between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A domain of Bet1p, that shows potential to be involved in a coiled-coil interaction, is homologous to a region of the neuronal protein SNAP-25. Here, we used in vitro binding studies to demonstrate that Bet1p plays a role in potentiating soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) interactions. Mutational analysis points to the coiled-coil region as necessary for Bet1p function, and circular dichroism experiments support this theory. In vitro binding studies were also used to demonstrate that a direct interaction between Bet1p and Bos1p is required for the efficient interaction of the vesicle SNARE with its SNARE target. Genetic studies suggest that the interactions of Bet1p with Bos1p are regulated by the small GTP-binding protein Ypt1p. Images PMID:9243499

  9. Dynamic, Rho1p-dependent localization of Pkc1p to sites of polarized growth.

    PubMed

    Andrews, P D; Stark, M J

    2000-08-01

    In eukaryotes, the Rho GTPases and their effectors are key regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking and secretion, cell growth, cell cycle progression and cytokinesis. Budding yeast Pkc1p, a protein kinase C-like enzyme involved in cell wall biosynthesis and cytoskeletal polarity, is structurally and functionally related to the Rho-associated kinases (PRK/ROCK) of mammalian cells. In this study, localization of Pkc1p was monitored in live cells using a GFP fusion (Pkc1p-GFP). Pkc1p-GFP showed dynamic spatial and temporal localization at sites of polarized growth. Early in the cell cycle, Pkc1p-GFP was found at the pre-bud site and bud tips, becoming delocalized as the cell progressed further and finally relocalizing around the mother-daughter bud neck in an incomplete ring, which persisted until cell separation. Bud localization was actin-dependent but stability of Pkc1p-GFP at the neck was actin-independent, although localization at both sites required functional Rho1p. In addition, Pkc1p-GFP showed rapid relocalization after cell wall damage. These results suggest that the roles of Pkc1p in both polarized growth and the response to cell wall stress are mediated by dynamic changes in its localization, and suggest an additional potential role in cytokinesis.

  10. Regional chromosomal assignments for four members of the myocyte-specific enhancer-binding factor 2 (MEF2) gene family to human chromosomes 15q, 19q, 5q, and 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, G.M.; Funanage, V.L.; Krahe, R.

    1994-09-01

    MEF2 genes belong to the MADS box family of transcription factors and encode proteins that bind as homo- and heterodimers to a consensus CTA(T/A){sub 4}TAG/A sequence present in the regulatory regions of numerous muscle-specific and growth inducible genes. Sequence analysis of human MEF2 cDNA clones suggested that they arose from alternatively spliced transcripts of four different genes, termed MEF2A-D. We have mapped the MEF2 genes to human chromosomal regions by identifying unique sequences in the 5{prime} or 3{prime} untranslated regions of each clone and using these sequences as PCR primers on the DNA of a human-rodent hybrid clone panel informative for different regions of the human genome. The localization of MEF2A to chromosome 15q, MEF2B to 19q, MEF2C to 5q, and MEF2D to 1q verifies the existence of at least four distinct loci for members of this gene family. The same PCR primers were used to identify individual YAC clones for each gene. Such isolated clones are now being used for fluorescence in situ hybridization for high resolution chromosomal regional assignment.

  11. Cometary gas relations 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, Marcos R.

    Photographic and photoelectric observations of comet 1P/Halley's ionised gas coma from CO+ at 4,250 Å and neutral gas coma from CN at 3,880 Å were part of the Bochum Halley Monitoring Program, conducted at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, from February 17 to April 17, 1986. In this spectral range it is possible to see the continuum formation, motion and expansion of plasma and neutral gas structures. To observe the morphology of these structures, 32 CO+ photos (glass plates) from comet 1P/Halley obtained by means of an interference filter have been analysed. They have a field of view of 28.6 × 28.6 degrees and were obtained from March 29 to April 17, 1986 with exposure times between 20 and 120 minutes. All photos were digitised with a PDS 2020 GM microdensitometer. After digitisation, the data were reduced to relative intensities, and those with proper calibrations were also converted to absolute intensities, expressed in terms of column densities. The CO+ absolute intensity values still contain the continuum intensity. To calculate the CO+ column density it is necessary to subtract this continuum intensity. The relations between CO+ and CN in average column density values (NCO+/NCN) are 11.6 for a circular diaphragm with average diameter (Φ) of 6.1 arcminutes which corresponds to a distance from the nucleus (ρ) equal to 6.3 × 104 km; 20.0 for Φ = 7.1 arcminutes and ρ = 7.3 × 104 km; 8.1 for Φ = 8.5 arcminutes and ρ = 8.7 × 104 km; 35.6 for Φ = 11.9 arcminutes and ρ = 1.2 × 105 km; and 31.3 for Φ = 16.7 arcminutes and ρ = 1.7 × 105 km. These values are in perfect agreement with the data for short distances (ρ from 3.9 × 103 to 1.2 × 104 km) and small slit diameters (Φ from 0.4 to 1.2 arcminutes). With the use of diaphragms with large diameters it is possible to get some information about the outer coma of the comet (in this paper, from 60,000 until 170,000 km away from the nucleus). At these distances, the CO+ column density

  12. Hog1p activation by marasmic acid through inhibition of the histidine kinase Sln1p

    PubMed Central

    Schüffler, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND The histidine kinase (HK) MoHik1p within the high‐osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway is known to be the target of the fungicide fludioxonil. Treatment of the fungus with fludioxonil causes an uncontrolled hyperactivation of the pathway and cell death. In this study, we used a target‐based in vivo test system with mutant strains of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae to search for new fungicidal compounds having various target locations within the HOG pathway. Mutants with inactivated HOG signalling are resistant to fungicides having the target located in the HOG pathway. RESULTS The HK MoSln1p was identified as being involved in the new antifungal mode of action of marasmic acid, as single inactivation of the genes MoSLN1, MoSSK1, MoSSK2, MoPBS2 and MoHOG1 resulted in mutant strains resistant against the sesquiterpenoid, whereas the wild‐type strain and the ΔMohik1 mutant were susceptible. Western blot analysis of phosphorylated MoHog1p confirmed the hypothesis that marasmic acid interferes with the HOG pathway, as a strong phosphorylation of MoHog1p was detectable after sesquiterpenoid treatment in the wild‐type strain but not in the ΔMosln1 mutant. CONCLUSION This study provides evidence for marasmic acid activating the HOG pathway via the HK MoSln1p, and we propose that the sesquiterpenoid has a new mode of action in M. oryzae that differs from that of known HOG inhibitors, e.g. fludioxonil. © 2016 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26888741

  13. Combined Dup(7)(q22.1q32.2), Inv(7)(q31.31q31.33), and Ins(7;19)(q22.1;p13.2p13.2) in a 12-year-old boy with developmental delay and various dysmorphism.

    PubMed

    Frühmesser, Anne; Erdel, Martin; Duba, Hans-Christoph; Fauth, Christine; Amberger, Albert; Utermann, Gerd; Zschocke, Johannes; Kotzot, Dieter

    2013-07-01

    De novo combined duplications/inversions are very rare chromosomal rearrangements. For chromosome 7 just some dozen cases of duplications of various parts of the long arm have been published. We report on a 12-year-old boy with muscular hypotonia, global developmental delay, short stature, and various facial dysmorphism including frontal bossing, temporal narrowing, slightly down-slanting palpebral fissures, a broad nasal root, a long philtrum, a thin and tented upper lip, a drooping lower lip, micrognathia, prominent ears, a short neck, and a low posterior hairline. Karyotype analysis and molecular investigations revealed a complex de novo chromosomal rearrangement on 7q. FISH analysis with locus specific YACs and BACs and SNP array with the Illumina(®) HumanOmni1-Quad v1.0 BeadChip disclosed a direct duplication in the long arm of chromosome 7 (q22.1→q32.2) and an inversion located at the breakpoint between the two copies of the duplication (q31.31→q31.33). In addition, breakpoint characterization at the molecular level revealed a 386 bp insertion carrying two Alu elements of chromosome 19p13.2 between the two copies of the duplication. By a comparison of the SNP haplotypes of the derivative chromosome of the patient and both parents a two-step formation during spermatogenesis was suggested as the most likely mechanism of formation. PMID:23608969

  14. The IPP gene is assigned to human chromosome 1p32-1p22

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Yeh, A.; Huang, R.C.C. ); Jabs, E.W.; Li, Xiang ); Dracopoli, N.C. )

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported the isolation and characterization of a novel mouse gene that is promoted by an intracisternal A-particle (IAP) LTR and is expressed in placental tissue (mouse IAP-promoted placenta gene, Ipp). Based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) studies using inbred strains and recombinant inbred (RI) mice, we have established the linkage between the Ipp gene and several loci on distal mouse chromosome 4. In this publication, we report the partial sequence of a human cDNA clone isolated from a human placental library that has 83% identity to the 3[prime]region of the Ipp cDNA. For human chromosome mapping, two 20-base oligonucleotides within the homologous region were used as primers for polymerase chain reactions (PCR) to chromosome-specific DNAs from two somatic cell hybrid panels and several hybrid cell lines carrying breakpoints on human chromosome 1p. We have assigned this human homolog of the Ipp (IPP) gene to chromosome 1 at 1p32-1p22, based on analysis of PCR products. With this assignment, the homology between mouse chromosome 4 and human chromosome 1 is maintained (5). 7 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Exogenous S1P Exposure Potentiates Ischemic Stroke Damage That Is Reduced Possibly by Inhibiting S1P Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eunjung; Han, Jeong Eun; Jeon, Sejin; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Choi, Ji Woong; Chun, Jerold

    2015-01-01

    Initial and recurrent stroke produces central nervous system (CNS) damage, involving neuroinflammation. Receptor-mediated S1P signaling can influence neuroinflammation and has been implicated in cerebral ischemia through effects on the immune system. However, S1P-mediated events also occur within the brain itself where its roles during stroke have been less well studied. Here we investigated the involvement of S1P signaling in initial and recurrent stroke by using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (M/R) model combined with analyses of S1P signaling. Gene expression for S1P receptors and involved enzymes was altered during M/R, supporting changes in S1P signaling. Direct S1P microinjection into the normal CNS induced neuroglial activation, implicating S1P-initiated neuroinflammatory responses that resembled CNS changes seen during initial M/R challenge. Moreover, S1P microinjection combined with M/R potentiated brain damage, approximating a model for recurrent stroke dependent on S1P and suggesting that reduction in S1P signaling could ameliorate stroke damage. Delivery of FTY720 that removes S1P signaling with chronic exposure reduced damage in both initial and S1P-potentiated M/R-challenged brain, while reducing stroke markers like TNF-α. These results implicate direct S1P CNS signaling in the etiology of initial and recurrent stroke that can be therapeutically accessed by S1P modulators acting within the brain. PMID:26576074

  16. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P{sub 1} receptor by a novel competitive S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of a newly developed S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficacy of S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P{sub 1}) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P{sub 1} and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P{sub 1} antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  17. Structural Characterization of Tip20p and Dsl1p, Subunits of the Dsl1p Vesicle Tethering Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, A.; Ren, Y; Jeffrey, P; Hughson, F

    2009-01-01

    Multisubunit tethering complexes are essential for intracellular trafficking and have been proposed to mediate the initial interaction between vesicles and the membranes with which they fuse. Here we report initial structural characterization of the Dsl1p complex, whose three subunits are essential for trafficking from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Crystal structures reveal that two of the three subunits, Tip20p and Dsl1p, resemble known subunits of the exocyst complex, establishing a structural connection among several multisubunit tethering complexes and implying that many of their subunits are derived from a common progenitor. We show, moreover, that Tip20p and Dsl1p interact directly via N-terminal alpha-helices. Finally, we establish that different Dsl1p complex subunits bind independently to different ER SNARE proteins. Our results map out two alternative protein-interaction networks capable of tethering COPI-coated vesicles, via the Dsl1p complex, to ER membranes.

  18. Growth patterns of patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sangu, Noriko; Shimojima, Keiko; Shimada, Shino; Ando, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-05-01

    1p36 deletion syndrome is one of the most common subtelomeric deletion syndromes. Obesity is frequently observed in patients with this syndrome. Thus, it is important to evaluate the growth status of an individual patient. For this purpose, we accumulated recorded growth data from 44 patients with this syndrome and investigated the growth patterns of patients. Most of the patients showed weight parameters within normal limits, whereas a few of these patients showed intrauterine growth delay and microcephaly. The length of the patients after birth was under the 50th centile in most patients. Many patients showed poor weight gain after birth, and only two female patients were overweight. These findings indicate two different phenotypes of the 1p36 deletion syndrome. The overweight patients with 1p36 deletion started excessive weight gain after two years of life. This characteristic of the patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome is similar to Prader-Willi syndrome.

  19. 1p36 tumor suppression--a matter of dosage?

    PubMed

    Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Schwab, Manfred; Westermann, Frank

    2012-12-01

    A broad range of human malignancies is associated with nonrandom 1p36 deletions, suggesting the existence of tumor suppressors encoded in this region. Evidence for tumor-specific inactivation of 1p36 genes in the classic "two-hit" manner is scarce; however, many tumor suppressors do not require complete inactivation but contribute to tumorigenesis by partial impairment. We discuss recent data derived from both human tumors and functional cancer models indicating that the 1p36 genes CHD5, CAMTA1, KIF1B, CASZ1, and miR-34a contribute to cancer development when reduced in dosage by genomic copy number loss or other mechanisms. We explore potential interactions among these candidates and propose a model where heterozygous 1p36 deletion impairs oncosuppressive pathways via simultaneous downregulation of several dosage-dependent tumor suppressor genes.

  20. Interstitial 1p32.1p32.3 deletion in a patient with multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kehrer, Martin; Schäferhoff, Karin; Bonin, Michael; Jauch, Anna; Bevot, Andrea; Tzschach, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Interstitial deletions encompassing chromosome bands 1p32.1p32.3 are rare. Only nine unrelated patients with partially overlapping 1p32.1p32.3 deletions of variable size and position have been reported to date. We report on a 17-month-old boy with choanal atresia, hearing loss, urogenital anomalies, and microcephaly in whom an interstitial de novo deletion of 6.4 Mb was detected in 1p32.1p32.3 (genomic position chr1:54,668,618-61,113,264 according to GRCh37/hg19). The deleted region harbors 31 RefSeq genes. Notable genes in the region are PCSK9, haploinsufficiency of which caused low LDL cholesterol plasma levels in the patient, and DAB1, which is a candidate gene for cognitive deficits, microcephaly, and cerebral abnormalities such as ventriculomegaly and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Choanal atresia, microcephaly, and severe hearing loss were previously not known to be associated with 1p32 deletions. Our reported patient thus broadens the spectrum of clinical findings in this chromosome region and further facilitates genotype-phenotype correlations. Additional patients with overlapping deletions and/or point mutations in genes of this region need to be identified to elucidate the role of individual genes for the complex clinical manifestations.

  1. Familial partial duplication (1)(p21p31)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoechstetter, L.; Soukup, S.; Schorry, E.K.

    1995-11-20

    A partial duplication (1)(p21p31), resulting from a maternal direct insertion (13,1) (q22p21p31), was found in a 30-year-old woman with mental retardation, cleft palate, and multiple minor anomalies. Two other affected and deceased relatives were presumed to have the same chromosome imbalance. Duplication 1p cases are reviewed. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Jen1p: A High Affinity Selenite Transporter in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Joseph R.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2010-01-01

    Selenium is a micronutrient in most eukaryotes, including humans, which is well known for having an extremely thin border between beneficial and toxic concentrations. Soluble tetravalent selenite is the predominant environmental form and also the form that is applied in the treatment of human diseases. To acquire this nutrient from low environmental concentrations as well as to avoid toxicity, a well-controlled transport system is required. Here we report that Jen1p, a proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter in S. cerevisiae, catalyzes high-affinity uptake of selenite. Disruption of JEN1 resulted in selenite resistance, and overexpression resulted in selenite hypersensitivity. Transport assay showed that overexpression of Jen1p enables selenite accumulation in yeast compared with a JEN1 knock out strain, indicating the Jen1p transporter facilitates selenite accumulation inside cells. Selenite uptake by Jen1p had a Km of 0.91 mM, which is comparable to the Km for lactate. Jen1p transported selenite in a proton-dependent manner which resembles the transport mechanism for lactate. In addition, selenite and lactate can inhibit the transport of each other competitively. Therefore, we postulate selenite is a molecular mimic of monocarboxylates which allows selenite to be transported by Jen1p. PMID:20861301

  3. Measurement of CA1P and CA in leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.d.; Kobza, J.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Carboxyarabinitol-1-phosphate (CA1P) and carboxyarabinitol (CA) were assayed in leaves by isotope dilution. {sup 14}C-labeled standards were synthesized from (2-{sup 14}C) CABP using acid (CA1P) or alkaline (CA) phosphatase. Either was added to boiling 80% EtOH along with liquid N{sub 2}-killed leaves. Each was largely purified by anion exchange chromatography. CA1P samples were subjected to 2D-TLE/TLC. The specific activity of the {sup 14}C-containing spot was measured using alkaline phosphatase. CA samples were run on an HPLC and the specific activity was determined using a UV monitor and a flow-through radioisotope detector. In 3 of the tested species, light/dark amount of CA1P (nmol/mg Chl) were kidney bean, 0.7/67; sugar beet, 0.8/33; and Alocasia, 0/3.4. Light/dark CA levels (nmol/mg Chl) in these respective species were 897/653, 3.2/3.5, and 5.7/4.6. These results support the hypothesis that CA is a product of CA1P metabolism in vivo under high light, but also indicate that CA is not the only intermediate involved in CA1P synthesis under low light/dark conditions.

  4. A study of loss of heterozygosity at 70 loci in anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme with implications for tumor evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, E. C.; Fults, D.; Duggirala, R.; Williams, K.; Kyritsis, A. P.; Bondy, M. L.; Levin, V. A.; O'Connell, P.

    1999-01-01

    Cancers that arise from astrocytes in the adult CNS present as either anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs) or as more aggressive glioblastomas multiforme (GBMs). GBMs either form de novo or progress from AAs. We proposed to examine the molecular genetic relationship between these CNS tumors by conducting a genome-wide allelic imbalance analysis that included 70 loci on examples of AA and GBM. We found significant loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 13 discrete chromosomal loci in both AAs and GBMs. Loss was significant in both AAs and GBMs at 9 of these loci. AAs show the highest rates of LOH at chromosomes 1p, 4q, 6p, 9p, 11p, 11q, 13q, 14q, 15p, 17p, 17q, and 19q. GBMs showed the greatest losses at 1p, 6q, 8p, 9p, 10p, 10q, 11p, 13q, 17p, 17q, 18p, 18q, and 19q. GBMs also demonstrated significant amplification at the epidermal growth factor receptor locus (7p12). These data suggest that there are three classes of loci involved in glioma evolution. First are loci that are likely involved in early events in the evolution of both AAs and GBMs. The second class consists of AA-specific loci, typified by higher LOH frequency than observed in GBMs (4q, 6p, 17p, 17q, 19q). The third class consists of GBM-specific loci (6q, 8p, 10, 18q). Damage at these loci may either lead to de novo GBMs or permit existing AAs to progress to GBMs. Glioma-related LOH profiles may have prognostic implications that could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of brain cancer patients. PMID:11550311

  5. Unfolded protein response regulates yeast small GTPase Arl1p activation at late Golgi via phosphorylation of Arf GEF Syt1p

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jia-Wei; Tang, Pei-Hua; Wang, I-Hao; Liu, Chia-Lun; Chen, Wen-Hui; Tsai, Pei-Chin; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Jung; Yu, Chia-Jung

    2016-01-01

    ADP ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are key regulators of membrane traffic at the Golgi complex. In yeast, Arf guanine nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) Syt1p activates Arf-like protein Arl1p, which was accompanied by accumulation of golgin Imh1p at late Golgi, but whether and how this function of Syt1p is regulated remains unclear. Here, we report that the inositol-requiring kinase 1 (Ire1p)-mediated unfolded protein response (UPR) modulated Arl1p activation at late Golgi. Arl1p activation was dependent on both kinase and endo-RNase activities of Ire1p. Moreover, constitutively active transcription factor Hac1p restored the Golgi localization of Arl1p and Imh1p in IRE1-deleted cells. Elucidating the mechanism of Ire1p–Hac1p axis actions, we found that it regulated phosphorylation of Syt1p, which enhances Arl1p activation, recruitment of Imh1p to the Golgi, and Syt1p interaction with Arl1p. Consistent with these findings, the induction of UPR by tunicamycin treatment increases phosphorylation of Syt1p, resulting in Arl1p activation. Thus, these findings clarify how the UPR influences the roles of Syt1p, Arl1p, and Imh1p in Golgi transport. PMID:26966233

  6. Recruitment of Tup1p and Cti6p regulates heme-deficient expression of Aft1p target genes

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, Robert J; Adkins, Erika M; Kimmel, Emily; Kaplan, Jerry

    2006-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription of genes encoding for the high-affinity iron (FET3, FTR1) and copper (CTR1) transporters does not occur in the absence of heme. We show that the Aft1p binding region of the FET3 promoter or the Mac1p binding region of the CTR1 promoter is necessary and sufficient to mediate heme-deficient repression. Transcription is repressed in the absence of heme, and a genetic screen identified Tup1p and Hda1p as being required for transcriptional repression. In contrast to FET3 and CTR1, Aft1p target genes ARN1 and FIT1 are transcribed in the absence of heme. A 14 bp sequence in the ARN1 promoter is necessary and sufficient to permit transcription in the absence of heme. Transcription in the absence of heme required the presence of Cti6p to overcome the effect of Tup1p, and Cti6p was recruited to the ARN1 promoter in the absence of heme. We hypothesize that transcription of the siderophore transporter ARN1 permits yeast to accumulate iron in the absence of oxygen and to deny iron to competing organisms. PMID:16437160

  7. Purification and Characterization of Put1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wanduragala, Srimevan; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Liang, Xinwen; Becker, Donald F.

    2010-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the PUT1 and PUT2 genes are required for the conversion of proline to glutamate. The PUT1 gene encodes Put1p, a proline dehydrogenase (PRODH)1 enzyme localized in the mitochondrion. Put1p was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli and shown to have a UV-visible absorption spectrum that is typical of a bound flavin cofactor. A Km value of 36 mM proline and a kcat = 27 s−1 were determined for Put1p using an artificial electron acceptor. Put1p also exhibited high activity using ubiquinone-1 (CoQ1) as an electron acceptor with a kcat = 9.6 s−1 and a Km of 33 µM for CoQ1. In addition, knockout strains of the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) homolog in S. cerevisiae were able to grow on proline as the sole nitrogen source demonstrating that ETF is not required for proline utilization in yeast. PMID:20450881

  8. TVENT1P. Gas-Dynamic Transients Flow Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Eyberger, L.

    1987-09-01

    TVENT1P predicts flows and pressures in a ventilation system or other air pathway caused by pressure transients, such as a tornado. For an analytical model to simulate an actual system, it must have (1) the same arrangement of components in a network of flow paths; (2) the same friction characteristics; (3) the same boundary pressures; (4) the same capacitance; and (5) the same forces that drive the air. A specific set of components used for constructing the analytical model includes filters, dampers, ducts, blowers, rooms, or volume connected at nodal points to form networks. The effects of a number of similar components can be lumped into a single one. TVENT1P contains a material transport algorithm and features for turning blowers off and on, changing blower speeds, changing the resistance of dampers and filters, and providing a filter model to handle very high flows. These features make it possible to depict a sequence of events during a single run. Component properties are varied using time functions. The filter model is not used by the code unless it is specified by the user. The basic results of a TVENT1P solution are flows in branches and pressures at nodes. A postprocessor program, PLTTEX, is included to produce the plots specified in the TVENT1P input. PLTTEX uses the proprietary CA-DISSPLA graphics software.

  9. The human paired domain gene PAX7 (Hup1) maps to chromosome 1p35-1p36. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, B.W. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1993-07-01

    The human PAX7 gene encodes a protein containing a domain homologous to the Drosophila paired box first described in three segmentation genes. In addition to the paired box, the gene contains the conserved octa-peptide and a paired-type homeobox. Two of the five known human PAX genes have been implicated in human disorders so far. Here the authors have used a somatic cell hybrid panel to localize PAX7 to human chromosome 1. In situ hybridization shows that PAX7 is confined to the short arm of chromosome 1 at 1p35-1p36.2. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Late-stage optimization of a tercyclic class of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Horan, Joshua C; Kuzmich, Daniel; Liu, Pingrong; DiSalvo, Darren; Lord, John; Mao, Can; Hopkins, Tamara D; Yu, Hui; Harcken, Christian; Betageri, Raj; Hill-Drzewi, Melissa; Patenaude, Lori; Patel, Monica; Fletcher, Kimberly; Terenzzio, Donna; Linehan, Brian; Xia, Heather; Patel, Mita; Studwell, Debbie; Miller, Craig; Hickey, Eugene; Levin, Jeremy I; Smith, Dustin; Kemper, Raymond A; Modis, Louise K; Bannen, Lynne C; Chan, Diva S; Mac, Morrison B; Ng, Stephanie; Wang, Yong; Xu, Wei; Lemieux, René M

    2016-01-15

    Poor solubility and cationic amphiphilic drug-likeness were liabilities identified for a lead series of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 agonists originally developed from a high-throughput screening campaign. This work describes the subsequent optimization of these leads by balancing potency, selectivity, solubility and overall molecular charge. Focused SAR studies revealed favorable structural modifications that, when combined, produced compounds with overall balanced profiles. The low brain exposure observed in rat suggests that these compounds would be best suited for the potential treatment of peripheral autoimmune disorders. PMID:26687487

  11. A third major locus for autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia maps to 1p34.1-p32.

    PubMed Central

    Varret, M; Rabès, J P; Saint-Jore, B; Cenarro, A; Marinoni, J C; Civeira, F; Devillers, M; Krempf, M; Coulon, M; Thiart, R; Kotze, M J; Schmidt, H; Buzzi, J C; Kostner, G M; Bertolini, S; Pocovi, M; Rosa, A; Farnier, M; Martinez, M; Junien, C; Boileau, C

    1999-01-01

    Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), one of the most frequent hereditary disorders, is characterized by an isolated elevation of LDL particles that leads to premature mortality from cardiovascular complications. It is generally assumed that mutations in the LDLR and APOB genes account for ADH. We identified one large French pedigree (HC2) and 12 additional white families with ADH in which we excluded linkage to the LDLR and APOB, implicating a new locus we named "FH3." A LOD score of 3.13 at a recombination fraction of 0 was obtained at markers D1S2892 and D1S2722. We localized the FH3 locus to a 9-cM interval at 1p34.1-p32. We tested four regional markers in another set of 12 ADH families. Positive LOD scores were obtained in three pedigrees, whereas linkage was excluded in the others. Heterogeneity tests indicated linkage to FH3 in approximately 27% of these non-LDLR/non-APOB ADH families and implied a fourth locus. Radiation hybrid mapping located four candidate genes at 1p34.1-p32, outside the critical region, showing no identity with FH3. Our results show that ADH is genetically more heterogeneous than conventionally accepted. PMID:10205269

  12. Vsl1p cooperates with Fsv1p for vacuolar protein transport and homotypic fusion in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Akira; Higuchi, Yujiro; Yagi, Satoshi; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Members of the SNARE protein family participate in the docking-fusion step of several intracellular vesicular transport events. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Vam7p was identified as a SNARE protein that acts in vacuolar protein transport and membrane fusion. However, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, there have been no reports regarding the counterpart of Vam7p. Here, we found that, although the SPCC594.06c gene has low similarity to Vam7p, the product of SPCC594.06c has a PX domain and SNARE motif like Vam7p, and thus we designated the gene Sch. pombe vsl1(+) (Vam7-like protein 1). The vsl1Δ cells showed no obvious defect in vacuolar protein transport. However, cells of the vsl1Δ mutant with a deletion of fsv1(+), which encodes another SNARE protein, displayed extreme defects in vacuolar protein transport and vacuolar morphology. Vsl1p was localized to the vacuolar membrane and prevacuolar compartment, and its PX domain was essential for proper localization. Expression of the fusion protein GFP-Vsl1p was able to suppress ZnCl2 sensitivity and the vacuolar protein sorting defect in the fsv1Δ cells. Moreover, GFP-Vsl1p was mislocalized in a pep12Δ mutant and in cells overexpressing fsv1(+). Importantly, overexpression of Sac. cerevisiae VAM7 could suppress the sensitivity to ZnCl2 of vsl1Δ cells and the vacuolar morphology defect of vsl1Δfsv1Δ cells in Sch. pombe. Taken together, these data suggest that Vsl1p and Fsv1p are required for vacuolar protein transport and membrane fusion, and they function cooperatively with Pep12p in the same membrane-trafficking step.

  13. RNA binding protein Pub1p regulates glycerol production and stress tolerance by controlling Gpd1p activity during winemaking.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Helena; Sepúlveda, Ana; Picazo, Cecilia; Matallana, Emilia; Aranda, Agustín

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol is a key yeast metabolite in winemaking because it contributes to improve the organoleptic properties of wine. It is also a cellular protective molecule that enhances the tolerance of yeasts to osmotic stress and promotes longevity. Thus, its production increases by genetic manipulation, which is of biotechnological and basic interest. Glycerol is produced by diverting glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate through the action of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (coded by genes GPD1 and GPD2). Here, we demonstrate that RNA-binding protein Pub1p regulates glycerol production by controlling Gpd1p activity. Its deletion does not alter GPD1 mRNA levels, but protein levels and enzymatic activity increase, which explains the higher intracellular glycerol concentration and greater tolerance to osmotic stress of the pub1∆ mutant. PUB1 deletion also enhances the activity of nicotinamidase, a longevity-promoting enzyme. Both enzymatic activities are partially located in peroxisomes, and we detected peroxisome formation during wine fermentation. The role of Pub1p in life span control depends on nutrient conditions and is related with the TOR pathway, and a major connection between RNA metabolism and the nutrient signaling response is established.

  14. Highly selective and potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 (S1P1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Vachal, Petr; Toth, Leslie M; Hale, Jeffrey J; Yan, Lin; Mills, Sander G; Chrebet, Gary L; Koehane, Carol A; Hajdu, Richard; Milligan, James A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Mandala, Suzanne

    2006-07-15

    Novel series of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists were developed through a systematic SAR aimed to achieve high selectivity for a single member of the S1P family of receptors, S1P1. The optimized structure represents a highly S1P1-selective and efficacious agonist: S1P1/S1P2, S1P1/S1P3, S1P1/S1P4>10,000-fold, S1P1/S1P5>600-fold, while EC50 (S1P1) <0.2 nM. In vivo experiments are consistent with S1P1 receptor agonism alone being sufficient for achieving desired lymphocyte-lowering effect.

  15. [Neuropathology and molecular pathology of gliomas].

    PubMed

    Janzer, Robert-Charles

    2009-07-15

    Gliomas are the most frequent primary brain tumours. The WHO classification is essentially based on histological and immunohistochemical criteria. More recently multiple cytogenetic and molecular alterations associated with initiation and progression have been shown and the genetic profiles of tumour entities have been incorporated in the WHO classifiacation. Molecular testing of the MGMT promotor methylation in glioblastoma, predictive for the response to combined radio-/chimiothérapie, and the LOH 1p/19q in oligodendroglial tumours, as prognostic factor supplements the histopathological diagnosis. In the near futur array-based profiling techniques will contribute to a refinement of glioma classification and identify targets for more individualized glioma therapies.

  16. MOLECULAR OXYGEN IN OORT CLOUD COMET 1P/HALLEY

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Dishoeck, E. F. van; Schwehm, G.

    2015-12-10

    Recently, the ROSINA mass spectrometer suite on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft discovered an abundant amount of molecular oxygen, O{sub 2}, in the coma of Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko of O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O = 3.80 ± 0.85%. It could be shown that O{sub 2} is indeed a parent species and that the derived abundances point to a primordial origin. Crucial questions are whether the O{sub 2} abundance is peculiar to comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko or Jupiter family comets in general, and also whether Oort cloud comets such as comet 1P/Halley contain similar amounts of molecular oxygen. We investigated mass spectra obtained by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer instrument during the flyby by the European Space Agency's Giotto probe of comet 1P/Halley. Our investigation indicates that a production rate of O{sub 2} of 3.7 ± 1.7% with respect to water is indeed compatible with the obtained Halley data and therefore that O{sub 2} might be a rather common and abundant parent species.

  17. Molecular Oxygen in Oort Cloud Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Schwehm, G.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the ROSINA mass spectrometer suite on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft discovered an abundant amount of molecular oxygen, O2, in the coma of Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko of O2/H2O = 3.80 ± 0.85%. It could be shown that O2 is indeed a parent species and that the derived abundances point to a primordial origin. Crucial questions are whether the O2 abundance is peculiar to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko or Jupiter family comets in general, and also whether Oort cloud comets such as comet 1P/Halley contain similar amounts of molecular oxygen. We investigated mass spectra obtained by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer instrument during the flyby by the European Space Agency's Giotto probe of comet 1P/Halley. Our investigation indicates that a production rate of O2 of 3.7 ± 1.7% with respect to water is indeed compatible with the obtained Halley data and therefore that O2 might be a rather common and abundant parent species.

  18. Gas relations in comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon

    Photographic and photoelectric observations of comet 1P/Halley's ionised gas coma from CO+ and neutral gas coma from CN were part of the Bochum Halley Monitoring Program, conducted at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, from February 17 to April 17, 1986. In this spectral range it is possible to see the continuum formation and expansion of plasma and neutral gas structures. To observe the morphology of these structures, 32 CO+ photos from comet 1P/Halley obtained by means of an interference filter have been analysed. The data were reduced to relative intensities, and those with proper calibrations were also converted to absolute intensities, expressed in terms of column densities. The relations between CO+ and CN in average column density values are 11.6 for a circular diaphragm with an average diameter (Φ) of 6.1 arcminutes which corresponds to a distance from the nucleus (ρ) equal to 6.3 × 104 km. These values are in perfect agreement with the data for short distances and small slit diameters. With the use of diaphragms with large diameters it is possible to get some information about the outer coma of the comet. At these distances, the CO+ column density changes only due to the geometrical dilution, because the CO+ parent molecules are already photoionised or photodissociated.

  19. S1P metabolism in cancer and other pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Leong, Weng In; Saba, Julie D

    2010-06-01

    Nearly two decades ago, the sphingolipid metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate was discovered to function as a lipid mediator and regulator of cell proliferation. Since that time, sphingosine 1-phosphate has been shown to mediate a diverse array of fundamental biological processes including cell proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, vascular maturation and lymphocyte trafficking. Sphingosine 1-phosphate acts primarily via signaling through five ubiquitously expressed G protein-coupled receptors. Intracellular sphingosine 1-phosphate molecules are transported extracellularly and gain access to cognate receptors for autocrine and paracrine signaling and for signaling at distant sites reached through blood and lymphatic circulation systems. Intracellular pools of sphingosine 1-phosphate available for signaling are tightly regulated primarily by three enzymes: sphinosine kinase, S1P lyase and S1P phosphatase. Alterations in sphingosine 1-phosphate as well as the enzymes involved in its synthesis and catabolism have been observed in many types of malignancy. These enzymes are being evaluated for their role in mediating cancer formation and progression, as well as their potential to serve as targets of anti-cancer therapeutics. In this review, the impact of sphingosine 1-phosphate, its cognate receptors, and the enzymes of sphingosine 1-phosphate metabolism on cell survival, apoptosis, autophagy, cellular transformation, invasion, angiogenesis and hypoxia in relation to cancer biology and treatment are discussed.

  20. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 signaling regulates receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) expression in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, Harunori; Kitano, Masayasu; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sato, Chieri; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto; Miyazawa, Keiji; Hla, Timothy; Sano, Hajime

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of S1P in MH7A cells was inhibited by specific Gi/Go inhibitors. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) signaling plays an important role in synovial cell proliferation and inflammatory gene expression by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synoviocytes. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of S1P/S1P1 signaling in the expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) in RA synoviocytes and CD4{sup +} T cells. We demonstrated MH7A cells, a human RA synovial cell line, and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Surprisingly, S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, S1P enhanced RANKL expression induced by stimulation with TNF-{alpha} in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. These effects of S1P in MH7A cells were inhibited by pretreatment with PTX, a specific Gi/Go inhibitor. These findings suggest that S1P/S1P1 signaling may play an important role in RANKL expression by MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling of RA synoviocytes is closely connected with synovial hyperplasia, inflammation, and RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RA. Thus, regulation of S1P/S1P1 signaling may become a novel therapeutic target for RA.

  1. Discovery of potent 3,5-diphenyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole sphingosine-1-phosphate-1 (S1P1) receptor agonists with exceptional selectivity against S1P2 and S1P3.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Chen, Weirong; Hale, Jeffrey J; Lynch, Christopher L; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol Ann; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Parent, Stephen A; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Forrest, Michael; Quackenbush, Elizabeth J; Wickham, L Alexandra; Vargas, Hugo; Evans, Rose M; Rosen, Hugh; Mandala, Suzanne

    2005-10-01

    A class of 3,5-diphenyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole based compounds have been identified as potent sphingosine-1-phosphate-1 (S1P1) receptor agonists with minimal affinity for the S1P2 and S1P3 receptor subtypes. Analogue 26 (S1P1 IC50 = 0.6 nM) has an excellent pharmacokinetics profile in the rat and dog and is efficacious in a rat skin transplant model, indicating that S1P3 receptor agonism is not a component of immunosuppressive efficacy.

  2. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E; O'Carroll, Simon J; Graham, E Scott

    2016-01-27

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

  3. The Rho1p exchange factor Rgf1p signals upstream from the Pmk1 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Patricia; Tajadura, Virginia; Sanchez, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe exchange factor Rgf1p specifically regulates Rho1p during polarized growth. Rgf1p activates the beta-glucan synthase (GS) complex containing the catalytic subunit Bgs4p and is involved in the activation of growth at the second end, a transition that requires actin reorganization. In this work, we investigated Rgf1p signaling and observed that Rgf1p acted upstream from the Pck2p-Pmk1p MAPK signaling pathway. We noted that Rgf1p and calcineurin play antagonistic roles in Cl(-) homeostasis; rgf1Delta cells showed the vic phenotype (viable in the presence of immunosuppressant and chlorine ion) and were unable to grow in the presence of high salt concentrations, both phenotypes being characteristic of knockouts of the MAPK components. In addition, mutations that perturb signaling through the MAPK pathway resulted in defective cell integrity (hypersensitivity to caspofungin and beta-glucanase). Rgf1p acts by positively regulating a subset of stimuli toward the Pmk1p-cell integrity pathway. After osmotic shock and cell wall damage HA-tagged Pmk1p was phosphorylated in wild-type cells but not in rgf1Delta cells. Finally, we provide evidence to show that Rgf1p regulates Pmk1p activation in a process that involves the activation of Rho1p and Pck2p, and we demonstrate that Rgf1p is unique in this signaling process, because Pmk1p activation was largely independent of the other two Rho1p-specific GEFs, Rgf2p and Rgf3p. PMID:19037094

  4. Selecting against S1P3 enhances the acute cardiovascular tolerability of 3-(N-benzyl)aminopropylphosphonic acid S1P receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Hale, Jeffrey J; Doherty, George; Toth, Leslie; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol Ann; Rosenbach, Mark; Milligan, James; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Forrest, Michael; Sun, Shu-Yu; West, Sarah; Xie, Huijuan; Nomura, Naomi; Rosen, Hugh; Mandala, Suzanne

    2004-07-01

    Structurally modified 3-(N-benzylamino)propylphosphonic acid S1P receptor agonists that maintain affinity for S1P1, and have decreased affinity for S1P3 are efficacious, but exhibit decreased acute cardiovascular toxicity in rodents than do nonselective agonists.

  5. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3–4 compared to those with 0–2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target. PMID:27562371

  6. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3-4 compared to those with 0-2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target. PMID:27562371

  7. Involvement of sphingosine-1-phosphate and S1P1 in angiogenesis: analyses using a new S1P1 antagonist of non-sphingosine-1-phosphate analog.

    PubMed

    Yonesu, Kiyoaki; Kawase, Yumi; Inoue, Tatsuya; Takagi, Nana; Tsuchida, Jun; Takuwa, Yoh; Kumakura, Seiichiro; Nara, Futoshi

    2009-03-15

    Chemical lead 2 (CL2) is the first non-sphingosine-1-phosphate (Sph-1-P) analog type antagonist of endothelial differentiation gene-1 (Edg-1/S1P(1)), which is a member of the Sph-1-P receptor family. CL2 inhibits [(3)H]Sph-1-P/S1P(1) binding and shows concentration-dependent inhibition activity against both intracellular cAMP concentration decrease and cell invasion induced by the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway. It also inhibits normal tube formation in an angiogenesis culture model, indicating that CL2 has anti-angiogenesis activity. This compound improved the disease conditions in two angiogenic models in vivo. It significantly inhibited angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor in a rabbit cornea model as well as the swelling of mouse feet in an anti-type II collagen antibody-induced arthritis model. These results indicate that the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway would have an important role in disease-related angiogenesis, especially in the processes of migration/invasion and tube formation. In addition, CL2 would be a powerful tool for the pharmacological study of the mechanisms of the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway in rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes retinopathy, and solid tumor growth processes. PMID:19150609

  8. Induction of intranuclear membranes by overproduction of Opi1p and Scs2p, regulators for yeast phospholipid biosynthesis, suggests a mechanism for Opi1p nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Miki; Oshima, Ayaka; Noguchi, Tetsuko; Kagiwada, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the expression of phospholipid biosynthetic genes is suppressed by the Opi1p negative regulator. Opi1p enters into the nucleoplasm from the nuclear membrane to suppress the gene expression under repressing conditions. The binding of Opi1p to the nuclear membrane requires an integral membrane protein, Scs2p and phosphatidic acid (PA). Although it is demonstrated that the association of Opi1p with membranes is affected by PA levels, how Opi1p dissociates from Scs2p is unknown. Here, we found that fluorescently labelled Opi1p accumulated on a perinuclear region in an Scs2p-dependent manner. Electron microscopic analyses indicated that the perinuclear region consists of intranuclear membranes, which may be formed by the invagination of the nuclear membrane due to the accumulation of Opi1p and Scs2p in a restricted area. As expected, localization of Opi1p and Scs2p in the intranuclear membranes was detected by immunoelectron microscopy. Biochemical analysis showed that Opi1p recovered in the membrane fraction was detergent insoluble while Scs2p was soluble, implying that Opi1p behaves differently from Scs2p in the fraction. We hypothesize that Opi1p dissociates from Scs2p after targeting to the nuclear membrane, making it possible to be released from the membrane quickly when PA levels decrease. PMID:26590299

  9. The Photometric lightcurve of Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bair, Allison N.; Schleicher, David G.

    2014-11-01

    Comet 1P/Halley is considered an important object for a number of reasons. Not only is it the first-identified and brightest periodic comet, being the only periodic comet visible to the naked eye at every apparition, but in 1986 Halley became the first comet to be imaged by fly-by spacecraft. The NASA-funded International Halley Watch (IHW) directly supported the spacecraft by providing narrowband filters for groundbased photometric observations, and until the arrival of Hale-Bopp (1995 O1), Halley was the subject of the largest groundbased observational campaign in history. Following considerable controversy regarding its rotation period, it was eventually determined to be in complex rotation -- the first comet to be so identified. While the overall brightness variations of the coma repeated with a period of about 7.4 days, the detailed period and shape of the lightcurve constantly evolved. The determination of the specific characteristics of each of the two components of its non-principal axis rotational state has remained elusive.To resolve this situation we have now incorporated all of the narrowband photometry, taken by 21 telescopes from around the world and submitted to the IHW archive, to create the most complete homogeneous lightcurve possible. Using measurements of three gas species and the dust, the lightcurve was investigated and found to alternate between a double- and triple-peaked shape, with no single feature being present throughout the entire duration of our dataset (316 days). The apparent period as a function of time was extracted and seen to vary in a step-wise manner between 7.27 and 7.60 days. Taken together, these results were used to produce a synthetic lightcurve revealing Halley's behavior even when no data were available. Details of this and other results, to be used to constrain future detailed modeling, will be presented. This research is supported by NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program.

  10. Htm1p-Pdi1p is a folding-sensitive mannosidase that marks N-glycoproteins for ER-associated protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Chang; Fujimori, Danica Galonić; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2016-07-12

    Our understanding of how the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) machinery efficiently targets terminally misfolded proteins while avoiding the misidentification of nascent polypeptides and correctly folded proteins is limited. For luminal N-glycoproteins, demannosylation of their N-glycan to expose a terminal α1,6-linked mannose is necessary for their degradation via ERAD, but whether this modification is specific to misfolded proteins is unknown. Here we report that the complex of the mannosidase Htm1p and the protein disulfide isomerase Pdi1p (Htm1p-Pdi1p) acts as a folding-sensitive mannosidase for catalyzing this first committed step in Saccharomyces cerevisiae We reconstitute this step in vitro with Htm1p-Pdi1p and model glycoprotein substrates whose structural states we can manipulate. We find that Htm1p-Pdi1p is a glycoprotein-specific mannosidase that preferentially targets nonnative glycoproteins trapped in partially structured states. As such, Htm1p-Pdi1p is suited to act as a licensing factor that monitors folding in the ER lumen and preferentially commits glycoproteins trapped in partially structured states for degradation. PMID:27357682

  11. Enhancing Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Therapeutic Outcome Prediction of Gliomas Using Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Sibenaller, Zita; Agarwal, Supreet; Al-Keilani, Maha S.; Alqudah, Mohammad A.Y.; Ryken, Timothy C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Malignant gliomas are the most frequent type of primary brain tumors. Patients' outcome has not improved despite new therapeutics, thus underscoring the need for a better understanding of their genetics and a fresh approach to treatment. The lack of reproducibility in the classification of many gliomas presents an opportunity where genomics may be paramount for accurate diagnosis and therefore best for therapeutic decisions. The aim of this work is to identify large and focal copy number abnormalities (CNA) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events in a malignant glioma population. We hypothesized that these explorations will allow discovery of genetic markers that may improve diagnosis and predict outcome. DNA from glioma specimens were subjected to CNA and LOH analyses. Our studies revealed more than 4000 CNA and several LOH loci. Losses of chromosomes 1p and/or 19q, 10, 13, 14, and 22 and gains of 7, 19, and 20 were found. Several of these alterations correlated significantly with histology and grade. Further, LOH was detected at numerous chromosomes. Interestingly, several of these loci harbor genes with potential or reported tumor suppressor properties. These novel genetic signatures may lead to critical insights into diagnosis, classification, prognosis, and design of individualized therapies. PMID:22401657

  12. Full pharmacological efficacy of a novel S1P1 agonist that does not require S1P-like head-group interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J.; Jo, Euijung; Sanna, M. Germana; Brown, Steven; Leaf, Nora; Marsolais, David; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Cameron, Michael; Guerrero, Miguel; Roberts, Edward; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for interactions of zwitterionic phosphate and amine groups in Sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) to conserved R and E residues present at the extracellular face of transmembrane-3 (TM3) of S1P receptors. The contribution of R120 and E121 for high affinity ligand-receptor interactions is essential, as single-point R120A or E121A S1P1 mutants neither bind S1P nor transduce S1P function. Because S1P receptors are therapeutically interesting, identifying potent selective agonists with different binding modes and in vivo efficacy is of pharmacological importance. Here we describe a modestly water-soluble highly-selective S1P1 agonist (CYM-5442) that does not require R120 or E121 residues for activating S1P1-dependent p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation, which defines a new hydrophobic pocket in S1P1. CYM-5442 is a full agonist in vitro for S1P1 internalization, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Importantly, CYM-5442 was a full agonist for induction and maintenance of S1P1-dependent lymphopenia, decreasing B-lymphocytes by 65% and T-lymphocytes by 85% of vehicle. Induction of CYM-5442 lymphopenia was dose and time-dependent, requiring serum concentrations in the 50 nM range. In vitro measures of S1P1 activation by CYM-5442 were non-competitively inhibited by a specific S1P1 antagonist (W146), competitive for S1P, FTY720-P and SEW2871. In addition, lymphopenia by CYM-5442 was reversed by W146 administration or upon pharmacokinetic agonist clearance. Pharmacokinetics in mice also indicated that CYM-5442 partitions significantly in central nervous tissue. These data show that CYM-5442 activates S1P1-dependent pathways in vitro and to levels of full efficacy in vivo through a hydrophobic pocket, separable from the orthosteric site of S1P binding that is headgroup dependent. PMID:18708635

  13. Ligand-binding pocket shape differences between S1P1 and S1P3 determine efficiency of chemical probe identification by uHTS

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, Stephan C.; Brown, Steven J.; Cabrera, Pedro Gonzales; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Jo, Euijung; Chase, Peter; Spicer, Tim; Hodder, Peter; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor system to better understand why certain molecular targets within a closely related family are much more tractable when identifying compelling chemical leads. Five medically important G protein-coupled receptors for S1P regulate heart rate, coronary artery caliber, endothelial barrier integrity, and lymphocyte trafficking. Selective S1P receptor agonist probes would be of great utility to study receptor subtype-specific function. Through systematic screening of the same libraries, we identified novel selective agonists chemotypes for each of the S1P1 and S1P3 receptors. uHTS for S1P1 was more effective than for S1P3, with many selective, low nanomolar hits of proven mechanism emerging for. Receptor structure modeling and ligand docking reveal differences between the receptor binding pockets, which are the basis for sub-type selectivity. Novel selective agonists interact primarily in the hydrophobic pocket of the receptor in the absence of head-group interactions. Chemistry-space and shape-based analysis of the screening libraries in combination with the binding models explain the observed differential hit rates and enhanced efficiency for lead discovery for S1P1 vs. S1P3 in this closely related receptor family. PMID:18590333

  14. Activation of the Hog1p kinase in Isc1p-deficient yeast cells is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress sensitivity and premature aging.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, António Daniel; Graça, João; Mendes, Vanda; Chaves, Susana Rodrigues; Amorim, Maria Amélia; Mendes, Marta Vaz; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Costa, Vítor

    2012-05-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Isc1p, an orthologue of mammalian neutral sphingomyelinase 2, plays a key role in mitochondrial function, oxidative stress resistance and chronological lifespan. Isc1p functions upstream of the ceramide-activated protein phosphatase Sit4p through the modulation of ceramide levels. Here, we show that both ceramide and loss of Isc1p lead to the activation of Hog1p, the MAPK of the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway that is functionally related to mammalian p38 and JNK. The hydrogen peroxide sensitivity and premature aging of isc1Δ cells was partially suppressed by HOG1 deletion. Notably, Hog1p activation mediated the mitochondrial dysfunction and catalase A deficiency associated with oxidative stress sensitivity and premature aging of isc1Δ cells. Downstream of Hog1p, Isc1p deficiency activated the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway. Deletion of the SLT2 gene, which encodes for the MAPK of the CWI pathway, was lethal in isc1Δ cells and this mutant strain was hypersensitive to cell wall stress. However, the phenotypes of isc1Δ cells were not associated with cell wall defects. Our findings support a role for Hog1p in the regulation of mitochondrial function and suggest that constitutive activation of Hog1p is deleterious for isc1Δ cells under oxidative stress conditions and during chronological aging. PMID:22445853

  15. A Prokaryotic S1P Lyase Degrades Extracellular S1P In Vitro and In Vivo: Implication for Treating Hyperproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Huwiler, Andrea; Bourquin, Florence; Kotelevets, Nataliya; Pastukhov, Oleksandr; Capitani, Guido; Grütter, Markus G.; Zangemeister-Wittke, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates a broad spectrum of fundamental cellular processes like proliferation, death, migration and cytokine production. Therefore, elevated levels of S1P may be causal to various pathologic conditions including cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and aberrant angiogenesis. Here we report that S1P lyase from the prokaryote Symbiobacterium thermophilum (StSPL) degrades extracellular S1P in vitro and in blood. Moreover, we investigated its effect on cellular responses typical of fibrosis, cancer and aberrant angiogenesis using renal mesangial cells, endothelial cells, breast (MCF-7) and colon (HCT 116) carcinoma cells as disease models. In all cell types, wild-type StSPL, but not an inactive mutant, disrupted MAPK phosphorylation stimulated by exogenous S1P. Functionally, disruption of S1P receptor signaling by S1P depletion inhibited proliferation and expression of connective tissue growth factor in mesangial cells, proliferation, migration and VEGF expression in carcinoma cells, and proliferation and migration of endothelial cells. Upon intravenous injection of StSPL in mice, plasma S1P levels rapidly declined by 70% within 1 h and then recovered to normal 6 h after injection. Using the chicken chorioallantoic membrane model we further demonstrate that also under in vivo conditions StSPL, but not the inactive mutant, inhibited tumor cell-induced angiogenesis as an S1P-dependent process. Our data demonstrate that recombinant StSPL is active under extracellular conditions and holds promise as a new enzyme therapeutic for diseases associated with increased levels of S1P and S1P receptor signaling. PMID:21829623

  16. SUN Family Proteins Sun4p, Uth1p and Sim1p Are Secreted from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Produced Dependently on Oxygen Level

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Kučerová, Helena; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2013-01-01

    The SUN family is comprised of proteins that are conserved among various yeasts and fungi, but that are absent in mammals and plants. Although the function(s) of these proteins are mostly unknown, they have been linked to various, often unrelated cellular processes such as those connected to mitochondrial and cell wall functions. Here we show that three of the four Saccharomyces cerevisiae SUN family proteins, Uth1p, Sim1p and Sun4p, are efficiently secreted out of the cells in different growth phases and their production is affected by the level of oxygen. The Uth1p, Sim1p, Sun4p and Nca3p are mostly synthesized during the growth phase of both yeast liquid cultures and colonies. Culture transition to slow-growing or stationary phases is linked with a decreased cellular concentration of Sim1p and Sun4p and with their efficient release from the cells. In contrast, Uth1p is released mainly from growing cells. The synthesis of Uth1p and Sim1p, but not of Sun4p, is repressed by anoxia. All four proteins confer cell sensitivity to zymolyase. In addition, Uth1p affects cell sensitivity to compounds influencing cell wall composition and integrity (such as Calcofluor white and Congo red) differently when growing on fermentative versus respiratory carbon sources. In contrast, Uth1p is essential for cell resistance to boric acids irrespective of carbon source. In summary, our novel findings support the hypothesis that SUN family proteins are involved in the remodeling of the yeast cell wall during the various phases of yeast culture development and under various environmental conditions. The finding that Uth1p is involved in cell sensitivity to boric acid, i.e. to a compound that is commonly used as an important antifungal in mycoses, opens up new possibilities of investigating the mechanisms of boric acid’s action. PMID:24040106

  17. An 8.9 Mb 19p13 duplication associated with precocious puberty and a sporadic 3.9 Mb 2q23.3q24.1 deletion containing NR4A2 in mentally retarded members of a family with an intrachromosomal 19p-into-19q between-arm insertion

    PubMed Central

    Lybæk, Helle; ørstavik, Karen Helene; Prescott, Trine; Hovland, Randi; Breilid, Harald; Stansberg, Christine; Steen, Vidar Martin; Houge, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    In a 2 and a half-year-old girl with onset of puberty before the age of 5 months, short stature, hand anomalies and severe mental retardation, an 8.9 Mb interstitial 19p13 duplication containing 215 predicted genes was detected. It was initially assumed that the duplication involved the kisspeptin receptor gene, GPR54, known to stimulate induction of puberty, but more refined duplication mapping excluded this possibility. In an attempt to further understand the genotype–phenotype correlation, global gene expression was measured in skin fibroblasts. The overall expression pattern was quite similar to controls, and only about 25% of the duplicated genes had an expression level that was increased by more than 1.3-fold, with no obvious changes that could explain the precocious puberty. The proband's mother carried a balanced between-arm insertion of the duplicated segment that resembled a pericentric inversion. The same insertion was found in several other family members, including one who had lost a daughter with severe mental retardation and menarche at the age of 10 years. Another close relative was severely mentally retarded, but neither dysmorphic nor microcephalic. His phenotype was initially ascribed to a presumed cryptic chromosome 19 imbalance caused by the 19p-into19q insertion, but subsequent array-CGH detected a 3.9-Mb deletion of 2q23.3q24.1. This novel microdeletion involves seven genes, of which FMNL2, a suggested regulator of Rho-GTPases, and NR4A2, an essential gene for differentiation of dopaminergic neurons, may be critical genes for the proposed 2q23q24 microdeletion syndrome. PMID:19156171

  18. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Receptor Agonists Mediate Pro-fibrotic Responses in Normal Human Lung Fibroblasts via S1P2 and S1P3 Receptors and Smad-independent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Katrin; Menyhart, Katalin; Killer, Nina; Renault, Bérengère; Bauer, Yasmina; Studer, Rolf; Steiner, Beat; Bolli, Martin H.; Nayler, Oliver; Gatfield, John

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 modulators constitute a new class of drugs for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling, however, is also involved in the development of fibrosis. Using normal human lung fibroblasts, we investigated the induction of fibrotic responses by the S1P receptor (S1PR) agonists S1P, FTY720-P, ponesimod, and SEW2871 and compared them with the responses induced by the known fibrotic mediator TGF-β1. In contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not induce expression of the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin. However, TGF-β1, S1P, and FTY720-P caused robust stimulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and increased pro-fibrotic marker gene expression including connective tissue growth factor. Ponesimod showed limited and SEW2871 showed no pro-fibrotic potential in these readouts. Analysis of pro-fibrotic signaling pathways showed that in contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not activate Smad2/3 signaling but rather activated PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling to induce ECM synthesis. The strong induction of ECM synthesis by the nonselective agonists S1P and FTY720-P was due to the stimulation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptors, whereas the weaker induction of ECM synthesis at high concentrations of ponesimod was due to a low potency activation of S1P3 receptors. Finally, in normal human lung fibroblast-derived myofibroblasts that were generated by TGF-β1 pretreatment, S1P and FTY720-P were effective stimulators of ECM synthesis, whereas ponesimod was inactive, because of the down-regulation of S1P3R expression in myofibroblasts. These data demonstrate that S1PR agonists are pro-fibrotic via S1P2R and S1P3R stimulation using Smad-independent pathways. PMID:23589284

  19. Cardiomyocyte S1P1 Receptor–mediated Extracellular Signal–related Kinase Signaling and Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rong; Hoover, Holly E.; Zhang, Jianqing; Honbo, Norman; Alano, Conrad C.; Karliner, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the ability of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) to desensitize extracellular signal–related kinase (ERK), a mitogen-activated protein kinase linked to antiapoptotic responses in the heart. In isolated adult mouse cardiomyocytes, S1P (10 nM–5 μM) induced ERK phosphorylation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. S1P stimulation of ERK was completely inhibited by an S1P1/3 subtype receptor antagonist (VPC23019), by a Gi protein inhibitor (pertussis toxin) and by a mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor (PD98059). A selective S1P3 receptor antagonist (CAY10444) had no effect on S1P-induced ERK activation. The selective S1P1 agonist SEW2871 also induced ERK phosphorylation. Activation of ERK by restimulation with 100 nM S1P was suppressed after 1 hour of preincubation with 100 nM S1P but recovered fully the next day, suggesting receptor recycling. Similar results were obtained in protein kinase Cε-null cardiomyocytes. Treatment with the nonselective S1P receptor agonist FTY720 for 1 hour also reduced phospho-ERK expression in response to subsequent S1P stimulation. In contrast to S1P, some desensitization to FTY720 persisted after overnight exposure. Cell death induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation was reduced by pretreatment with exogenous S1P. This enhanced survival was abrogated by pretreatment with PD98059, VPC23019, or pertussis toxin. Thus, exogenous S1P induces rapid and reversible S1P1-mediated ERK phosphorylation. S1P-induced adult mouse cardiomyocyte survival requires ERK activation mediated via an S1P1–Gi pathway. PMID:19433984

  20. Cargo sequences are important for Som1p-dependent signal peptide cleavage in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Liang, Haobo; Luo, Wentian; Green, Neil; Fang, Hong

    2004-09-17

    The inner membrane protease (IMP) has two catalytic subunits, Imp1p and Imp2p, that exhibit nonoverlapping substrate specificity in mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The IMP also has at least one noncatalytic subunit, Som1p, which is required to cleave signal peptides from a subset of Imp1p substrates. To understand how Som1p mediates Imp1p substrate specificity, we addressed the possibility that Som1p functions as a molecular chaperone, which binds to specific substrates and directs them to the catalytic site. Our results show that cargo sequences attached to the signal peptide are important for Som1p-dependent presequence cleavage; however, no specific cargo sequence is required. Indeed, we show that a substrate normally destined for Imp2p is cleaved in a Som1p-dependent manner when the substrate is directed to Imp1p. These results argue against the notion that Som1p is a molecular chaperone. Instead, we propose that the cargo of some Imp1p substrates can assume a conformation incompatible with presequence cleavage. Som1p could thus act through Imp1p to improve cleavage efficiency early during substrate maturation. PMID:15254042

  1. Bms1p, a novel GTP-binding protein, and the related Tsr1p are required for distinct steps of 40S ribosome biogenesis in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Gelperin, D; Horton, L; Beckman, J; Hensold, J; Lemmon, S K

    2001-01-01

    Bms1p and Tsr1p define a novel family of proteins required for synthesis of 40S ribosomal subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both are essential and localize to the nucleolus. Tsr1p shares two extended regions of similarity with Bms1p, but the two proteins function at different steps in 40S ribosome maturation. Inactivation of Bms1p blocks at an early step, leading to disappearance of 20S and 18S rRNA precursors. Also, slight accumulation of an aberrant 23S product and significant 35S accumulation are observed, indicating that pre-rRNA processing at sites A0, A1, and A2 is inhibited. In contrast, depletion of Tsr1p results in accumulation of 20S rRNA. Because processing of 20S to 18S rRNA occurs in the cytoplasm, this suggests that Tsr1p is required for assembly of a transport- or maturation-competent particle or is specifically required for transport of 43S pre-ribosomal particles, but not 60S ribosome precursors, from the nucleus to the cytosol. Finally, Bms1p is a GTP-binding protein, the first found to function in ribosome assembly or rRNA processing. PMID:11565749

  2. The RAP1GA1 locus for human Rap1-GTPase activating protein 1 maps to chromosome 1p36.1-->p35.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J; Rubinfeld, B; Polakis, P G; McCormick, F; Cavenee, W K; Arden, K C

    1994-01-01

    Using a panel of somatic cell hybrids we have mapped the locus for Rap1-GTPase activating protein 1 (RAP1GA1) to human chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments independently confirmed the chromosomal localization and refined it to 1p36.1-->p35.

  3. Contiguous ∼16 Mb 1p36 deletion: Dominant features of classical distal 1p36 monosomy with haplo-lethality.

    PubMed

    Nicoulaz, A; Rubi, F; Lieder, L; Wolf, R; Goeggel-Simonetti, B; Steinlin, M; Wiest, R; Bonel, H M; Schaller, A; Gallati, S; Conrad, B

    2011-08-01

    Monosomy 1p36 results from heterozygous deletions of the terminal short chromosome 1 arm, the most common terminal deletion in humans. The microdeletion is split in two usually non-overlapping and clinically distinct classical distal and proximal 1p36 monosomy syndromes. Using comparative genome hybridization, MLPA and qPCR we identified the largest contiguous ∼16 Mb terminal 1p36 deletion reported to date. It covers both distal and proximal regions, causes a neonatally lethal variant with virtually exclusive features of distal 1p36 monosomy, highlighting the key importance of the gene-rich distal region for the "compound" 1p36 phenotype and a threshold deletion-size effect for haplo-lethality.

  4. The role of Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA repair enzymes Apn1p and Uve1p in the base excision repair of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites

    SciTech Connect

    Tanihigashi, Haruna; Yamada, Ayako; Igawa, Emi; Ikeda, Shogo . E-mail: ikeda@dbc.ous.ac.jp

    2006-09-08

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe the repair of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites is mainly initiated by AP lyase activity of DNA glycosylase Nth1p. In contrast, the major AP endonuclease Apn2p functions by removing 3'-{alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehyde ends induced by Nth1p, rather than by incising the AP sites. S. pombe possesses other minor AP endonuclease activities derived from Apn1p and Uve1p. In this study, we investigated the function of these two enzymes in base excision repair (BER) for methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) damage using the nth1 and apn2 mutants. Deletion of apn1 or uve1 from nth1{delta} cells did not affect sensitivity to MMS. Exogenous expression of Apn1p failed to suppress the MMS sensitivity of nth1{delta} cells. Although Apn1p and Uve1p incised the oligonucleotide containing an AP site analogue, these enzymes could not initiate repair of the AP sites in vivo. Despite this, expression of Apn1p partially restored the MMS sensitivity of apn2{delta} cells, indicating that the enzyme functions as a 3'-phosphodiesterase to remove 3'-blocked ends. Localization of Apn1p in the nucleus and cytoplasm hints at an additional function of the enzyme other than nuclear DNA repair. Heterologous expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue of Apn1p completely restored the MMS resistance of the nth1{delta} and apn2{delta} cells. This result confirms a difference in the major pathway for processing the AP site between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae cells.

  5. HDL-S1P: cardiovascular functions, disease-associated alterations, and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid contained in High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and has drawn considerable attention in the lipoprotein field as numerous studies have demonstrated its contribution to several functions inherent to HDL. Some of them are partly and some entirely due to the S1P contained in HDL (HDL-S1P). Despite the presence of over 1000 different lipids in HDL, S1P stands out as it possesses its own cell surface receptors through which it exercises key physiological functions. Most of the S1P in human plasma is associated with HDL, and the amount of HDL-S1P influences the quality and quantity of HDL-dependent functions. The main binding partner of S1P in HDL is apolipoprotein M but others may also exist particularly under conditions of acute S1P elevations. HDL not only exercise functions through their S1P content but have also an impact on genuine S1P signaling by influencing S1P bioactivity and receptor presentation. HDL-S1P content is altered in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Low HDL-S1P has also been linked to impaired HDL functions associated with these disorders. Although the pathophysiological and molecular reasons for such disease-associated shifts in HDL-S1P are little understood, there have been successful approaches to circumvent their adverse implications by pharmacologically increasing HDL-S1P as means to improve HDL function. This mini-review will cover the current understanding of the contribution of HDL-S1P to physiological HDL function, its alteration in disease and ways for its restoration to correct HDL dysfunction. PMID:26539121

  6. A shunt pathway limits the CaaX processing of Hsp40 Ydj1p and regulates Ydj1p-dependent phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Emily R; Cheng, Michael; Zhao, Peng; Kim, June H; Wells, Lance; Schmidt, Walter K

    2016-01-01

    The modifications occurring to CaaX proteins have largely been established using few reporter molecules (e.g. Ras, yeast a-factor mating pheromone). These proteins undergo three coordinated COOH-terminal events: isoprenylation of the cysteine, proteolytic removal of aaX, and COOH-terminal methylation. Here, we investigated the coupling of these modifications in the context of the yeast Ydj1p chaperone. We provide genetic, biochemical, and biophysical evidence that the Ydj1p CaaX motif is isoprenylated but not cleaved and carboxylmethylated. Moreover, we demonstrate that Ydj1p-dependent thermotolerance and Ydj1p localization are perturbed when alternative CaaX motifs are transplanted onto Ydj1p. The abnormal phenotypes revert to normal when post-isoprenylation events are genetically interrupted. Our findings indicate that proper Ydj1p function requires an isoprenylatable CaaX motif that is resistant to post-isoprenylation events. These results expand on the complexity of protein isoprenylation and highlight the impact of post-isoprenylation events in regulating the function of Ydj1p and perhaps other CaaX proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15899.001 PMID:27525482

  7. Clonal Analysis in Recurrent Astrocytic, Oligoastrocytic and Oligodendroglial Tumors Implicates IDH1- Mutation as Common Tumor Initiating Event

    PubMed Central

    von Eckardstein, Kajetan; Kiwit, Jürgen; Stockhammer, Florian; Horaczek, Jörn A.; Veelken, Julian; Herold-Mende, Christel; Jeuken, Judith; von Deimling, Andreas; Mueller, Wolf

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate the dynamics of inter- and intratumoral molecular alterations during tumor progression in recurrent gliomas. Methodology/Principal Findings To address intertumoral heterogeneity we investigated non- microdissected tumor tissue of 106 gliomas representing 51 recurrent tumors. To address intratumoral heterogeneity a set of 16 gliomas representing 7 tumor pairs with at least one recurrence, and 4 single mixed gliomas were investigated by microdissection of distinct oligodendroglial and astrocytic tumor components. All tumors and tumor components were analyzed for allelic loss of 1p/19q (LOH 1p/19q), for TP53- mutations and for R132 mutations in the IDH1 gene. The investigation of non- microdissected tumor tissue revealed clonality in 75% (38/51). Aberrant molecular alterations upon recurrence were detected in 25% (13/51). 64% (9/14) of these were novel and associated with tumor progression. Loss of previously detected alterations was observed in 36% (5/14). One tumor pair (1/14; 7%) was significant for both. Intratumoral clonality was detected in 57% (4/7) of the microdissected tumor pairs and in 75% (3/4) of single microdissected tumors. 43% (3/7) of tumor pairs and one single tumor (25%) revealed intratumoral heterogeneity. While intratumoral heterogeneity affected both the TP53- mutational status and the LOH1p/19q status, all tumors with intratumoral heterogeneity shared the R132 IDH1- mutation as a common feature in both their microdissected components. Conclusions/Significance The majority of recurrent gliomas are of monoclonal origin. However, the detection of divertive tumor cell clones in morphological distinct tumor components sharing IDH1- mutations as early event may provide insight into the tumorigenesis of true mixed gliomas. PMID:22844452

  8. The yeast aquaglyceroporin Fps1p is a bidirectional arsenite channel.

    PubMed

    Maciaszczyk-Dziubinska, Ewa; Migdal, Iwona; Migocka, Magdalena; Bocer, Tomasz; Wysocki, Robert

    2010-02-19

    The stress-activated kinase Hog1p mediates arsenic tolerance by decreasing arsenite influx through the aquaglyceroporin Fps1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Unexpectedly, we found that overexpression of FPS1 increased arsenite tolerance suggesting a physiological role of Fps1p in arsenic detoxification. Consistently, during arsenite treatment transcription of FPS1 gene was strongly upregulated, while Fps1p was not degraded and remained localized to the plasma membrane. Moreover, deletion of FPS1 gene resulted in arsenate sensitivity. Finally, transport experiments revealed that Fps1p in concert with the arsenite transporter Acr3p mediates arsenite efflux.

  9. The Clinically-tested S1P Receptor Agonists, FTY720 and BAF312, Demonstrate Subtype-Specific Bradycardia (S1P1) and Hypertension (S1P3) in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Ryan M.; Muthukumarana, Akalushi; Harrison, Paul C.; Nodop Mazurek, Suzanne; Chen, Rong Rhonda; Harrington, Kyle E.; Dinallo, Roger M.; Horan, Joshua C.; Patnaude, Lori; Modis, Louise K.; Reinhart, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phospate (S1P) and S1P receptor agonists elicit mechanism-based effects on cardiovascular function in vivo. Indeed, FTY720 (non-selective S1PX receptor agonist) produces modest hypertension in patients (2–3 mmHg in 1-yr trial) as well as acute bradycardia independent of changes in blood pressure. However, the precise receptor subtypes responsible is controversial, likely dependent upon the cardiovascular response in question (e.g. bradycardia, hypertension), and perhaps even species-dependent since functional differences in rodent, rabbit, and human have been suggested. Thus, we characterized the S1P receptor subtype specificity for each compound in vitro and, in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of FTY720 and the more selective S1P1,5 agonist, BAF312, were tested during acute i.v. infusion in anesthetized rats and after oral administration for 10 days in telemetry-instrumented conscious rats. Acute i.v. infusion of FTY720 (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 mg/kg/20 min) or BAF312 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/20 min) elicited acute bradycardia in anesthetized rats demonstrating an S1P1 mediated mechanism-of-action. However, while FTY720 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/d) elicited dose-dependent hypertension after multiple days of oral administration in rat at clinically relevant plasma concentrations (24-hr mean blood pressure = 8.4, 12.8, 16.2 mmHg above baseline vs. 3 mmHg in vehicle controls), BAF312 (0.3, 3.0, 30.0 mg/kg/d) had no significant effect on blood pressure at any dose tested suggesting that hypertension produced by FTY720 is mediated S1P3 receptors. In summary, in vitro selectivity results in combination with studies performed in anesthetized and conscious rats administered two clinically tested S1P agonists, FTY720 or BAF312, suggest that S1P1 receptors mediate bradycardia while hypertension is mediated by S1P3 receptor activation. PMID:23285242

  10. Discovery of Tetrahydropyrazolopyridine as Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 3 (S1P3)-Sparing S1P1 Agonists Active at Low Oral Doses.

    PubMed

    Demont, Emmanuel H; Bailey, James M; Bit, Rino A; Brown, Jack A; Campbell, Colin A; Deeks, Nigel; Dowell, Simon J; Eldred, Colin; Gaskin, Pam; Gray, James R J; Haynes, Andrea; Hirst, David J; Holmes, Duncan S; Kumar, Umesh; Morse, Mary A; Osborne, Greg J; Renaux, Jessica F; Seal, Gail A L; Smethurst, Chris A; Taylor, Simon; Watson, Robert; Willis, Robert; Witherington, Jason

    2016-02-11

    FTY720 is the first oral small molecule approved for the treatment of people suffering from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. It is a potent agonist of the S1P1 receptor, but its lack of selectivity against the S1P3 receptor has been linked to most of the cardiovascular side effects observed in the clinic. These findings have triggered intensive efforts toward the identification of a second generation of S1P3-sparing S1P1 agonists. We have recently disclosed a series of orally active tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ) compounds matching these criteria. In this paper we describe how we defined and implemented a strategy aiming at the discovery of selective structurally distinct follow-up agonists. This effort culminated with the identification of a series of orally active tetrahydropyrazolopyridines. PMID:26751273

  11. The “Grep” Command But Not FusionMap, FusionFinder or ChimeraScan Captures the CIC-DUX4 Fusion Gene from Whole Transcriptome Sequencing Data on a Small Round Cell Tumor with t(4;19)(q35;q13)

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Heim, Sverre

    2014-01-01

    Whole transcriptome sequencing was used to study a small round cell tumor in which a t(4;19)(q35;q13) was part of the complex karyotype but where the initial reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) examination did not detect a CIC-DUX4 fusion transcript previously described as the crucial gene-level outcome of this specific translocation. The RNA sequencing data were analysed using the FusionMap, FusionFinder, and ChimeraScan programs which are specifically designed to identify fusion genes. FusionMap, FusionFinder, and ChimeraScan identified 1017, 102, and 101 fusion transcripts, respectively, but CIC-DUX4 was not among them. Since the RNA sequencing data are in the fastq text-based format, we searched the files using the “grep” command-line utility. The “grep” command searches the text for specific expressions and displays, by default, the lines where matches occur. The “specific expression” was a sequence of 20 nucleotides from the coding part of the last exon 20 of CIC (Reference Sequence: NM_015125.3) chosen since all the so far reported CIC breakpoints have occurred here. Fifteen chimeric CIC-DUX4 cDNA sequences were captured and the fusion between the CIC and DUX4 genes was mapped precisely. New primer combinations were constructed based on these findings and were used together with a polymerase suitable for amplification of GC-rich DNA templates to amplify CIC-DUX4 cDNA fragments which had the same fusion point found with “grep”. In conclusion, FusionMap, FusionFinder, and ChimeraScan generated a plethora of fusion transcripts but did not detect the biologically important CIC-DUX4 chimeric transcript; they are generally useful but evidently suffer from imperfect both sensitivity and specificity. The “grep” command is an excellent tool to capture chimeric transcripts from RNA sequencing data when the pathological and/or cytogenetic information strongly indicates the presence of a specific fusion gene. PMID:24950227

  12. Gene expression profiling of 1p35-36 genes in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Novikov, Eugene; Monteiro, Marta; Gruel, Nadège; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Loriod, Béatrice; Nguyen, Catherine; Delattre, Olivier

    2004-08-01

    Deletion of the chromosome 1p36 region is a frequent abnormality in neuroblastoma. To gain further insights into the role of this alteration in oncogenesis, we have constructed a specific cDNA microarray representing most known genes and ESTs from the 1p35-36 region and analysed the expression profiles of 15 neuroblastoma cell lines and 28 neuroblastoma tumours. Hierarchical clustering using expression levels of 320 cDNAs from 1p35-36 separated localized or 4S cases without 1p deletion from advanced stages and cell lines. Supervised learning classification enabled to predict reliably the status of chromosome 1p according to its expression profile. Around 15% of the genes or ESTs presented a significantly decreased expression in samples with 1p deletion as compared to 1p-normal samples suggesting that 1p deletion results in a gene dosage effect on a subset of genes critical for the development of 1p-deleted neuroblastoma. Several genes presumed to have functions in neural differentiation (CDC42, VAMP3, CLSTN1), signal transduction in neural cells (GNB1) and cell cycle regulation (STMN1, RPA2, RBAF600, FBXO6, MAD2L2) exhibited a decreased expression in samples presenting 1p deletion. The identification of such genes provides baseline information for further studies to elucidate how these genes could individually or collectively play a critical role in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. PMID:15195138

  13. Multiple functions of the vacuolar sorting protein Ccz1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman-Sommer, Marta; Migdalski, Andrzej; Rytka, Joanna; Kucharczyk, Roza . E-mail: roza@ibb.waw.pl

    2005-04-01

    The CCZ1 (YBR131w) gene encodes a protein required for fusion of various transport intermediates with the vacuole. Ccz1p, in a complex with Mon1p, is a close partner of Ypt7p in the processes of fusion of endosomes to vacuoles and homotypic vacuole fusion. In this work, we exploited the Ca{sup 2+}-sensitivity of the ccz1{delta} mutant to identify genes specifically interacting with CCZ1, basing on functional multicopy suppression of calcium toxicity. The presented results indicate that Ccz1p functions in the cell either in association with Mon1p and Ypt7p in fusion at the vacuolar membrane, or-separately-with Arl1p at early steps of vacuolar transport. We also show that suppression of calcium toxicity by the calcium pumps Pmr1p and Pmc1p is restricted only to the subset of mutants defective in vacuole morphology. The mechanisms of Ca{sup 2+}-pump-mediated suppression also differ from each other, since the action of Pmr1p, but not Pmc1p, appears to require Arl1p function.

  14. The yeast histidine protein kinase, Sln1p, mediates phosphotransfer to two response regulators, Ssk1p and Skn7p.

    PubMed Central

    Li, S; Ault, A; Malone, C L; Raitt, D; Dean, S; Johnston, L H; Deschenes, R J; Fassler, J S

    1998-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sln1 protein is a 'two-component' regulator involved in osmotolerance. Two-component regulators are a family of signal-transduction molecules with histidine kinase activity common in prokaryotes and recently identified in eukaryotes. Phosphorylation of Sln1p inhibits the HOG1 MAP kinase osmosensing pathway via a phosphorelay mechanism including Ypd1p and the response regulator, Ssk1p. SLN1 also activates an MCM1-dependent reporter gene, P-lacZ, but this function is independent of Ssk1p. We present genetic and biochemical evidence that Skn7p is the response regulator for this alternative Sln1p signaling pathway. Thus, the yeast Sln1 phosphorelay is actually more complex than appreciated previously; the Sln1 kinase and Ypd1 phosphorelay intermediate regulate the activity of two distinct response regulators, Ssk1p and Skn7p. The established role of Skn7p in oxidative stress is independent of the conserved receiver domain aspartate, D427. In contrast, we show that Sln1p activation of Skn7p requires phosphorylation of D427. The expression of TRX2, previously shown to exhibit Skn7p-dependent oxidative-stress activation, is also regulated by the SLN1 phosphorelay functions of Skn7p. The identification of genes responsive to both classes of Skn7p function suggests a central role for Skn7p and the SLN1-SKN7 pathway in integrating and coordinating cellular response to various types of environmental stress. PMID:9843501

  15. Role of Pex21p for Piggyback Import of Gpd1p and Pnc1p into Peroxisomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Effelsberg, Daniel; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Tonillo, Jason; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-10-16

    Proteins designated for peroxisomal protein import harbor one of two common peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the oleate-induced PTS2-dependent import of the thiolase Fox3p into peroxisomes is conducted by the soluble import receptor Pex7p in cooperation with the auxiliary Pex18p, one of two supposedly redundant PTS2 co-receptors. Here, we report on a novel function for the co-receptor Pex21p, which cannot be fulfilled by Pex18p. The data establish Pex21p as a general co-receptor in PTS2-dependent protein import, whereas Pex18p is especially important for oleate-induced import of PTS2 proteins. The glycerol-producing PTS2 protein glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase Gpd1p shows a tripartite localization in peroxisomes, in the cytosol, and in the nucleus under osmotic stress conditions. We show the following: (i) Pex21p is required for peroxisomal import of Gpd1p as well as a key enzyme of the NAD(+) salvage pathway, Pnc1p; (ii) Pnc1p, a nicotinamidase without functional PTS2, is co-imported into peroxisomes by piggyback transport via Gpd1p. Moreover, the specific transport of these two enzymes into peroxisomes suggests a novel regulatory role for peroxisomes under various stress conditions.

  16. Naf1 p is a box H/ACA snoRNP assembly factor.

    PubMed Central

    Fatica, Alessandro; Dlakić, Mensur; Tollervey, David

    2002-01-01

    Box H/ACA small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particles (snoRNPs) contain four essential proteins, Cbf5p, Gar1p, Nhp2p, and Nop10p, each of which, with the exception of Gar1p, is required for box H/ACA snoRNA accumulation. Database searches identified a novel essential protein, which we termed Naf1p, with a region of homology to the RNA-binding domain of Gar1p and other features in common with hnRNP-like proteins. Naf1p is localized to the nucleus and is not a stable component of the H/ACA snoRNPs, but it is required for the accumulation of all box H/ACA snoRNAs. This requirement is not at the level of snoRNA transcription initiation or termination. Naf1 p shows in vitro RNA-binding activity and also binds directly to Cbf5p and Nhp2p. Naf1p was shown to bind to the CTD in vivo in a two-hybrid assay, and the phosphorylated CTD, but not the nonphosphorylated CTD, was shown to precipitate tagged Naf1p from a cell lysate. We propose that Naf1 p is recruited to the CTD of RNA polymerase II and binds to nascent box H/ACA snoRNAs promoting snoRNP assembly. PMID:12515383

  17. Identification of the Candida albicans Cap1p Regulon ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Znaidi, Sadri; Barker, Katherine S.; Weber, Sandra; Alarco, Anne-Marie; Liu, Teresa T.; Boucher, Geneviève; Rogers, P. David; Raymond, Martine

    2009-01-01

    Cap1p, a transcription factor of the basic region leucine zipper family, regulates the oxidative stress response (OSR) in Candida albicans. Alteration of its C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD) results in Cap1p nuclear retention and transcriptional activation. To better understand the function of Cap1p in C. albicans, we used genome-wide location profiling (chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip) to identify its transcriptional targets in vivo. A triple-hemagglutinin (HA3) epitope was introduced at the C terminus of wild-type Cap1p (Cap1p-HA3) or hyperactive Cap1p with an altered CRD (Cap1p-CSE-HA3). Location profiling using whole-genome oligonucleotide tiling microarrays identified 89 targets bound by Cap1p-HA3 or Cap1p-CSE-HA3 (the binding ratio was at least twofold; P ≤ 0.01). Strikingly, Cap1p binding was detected not only at the promoter region of its target genes but also at their 3′ ends and within their open reading frames, suggesting that Cap1p may associate with the transcriptional or chromatin remodeling machinery to exert its activity. Overrepresented functional groups of the Cap1p targets (P ≤ 0.02) included 11 genes involved in the OSR (CAP1, GLR1, TRX1, SOD1, CAT1, and others), 13 genes involved in response to drugs (PDR16, MDR1, FLU1, YCF1, FCR1, and others), 4 genes involved in phospholipid transport (PDR16, GIT1, RTA2, and orf19.932), and 3 genes involved in the regulation of nitrogen utilization (GST3, orf19.2693, and orf19.3121), suggesting that Cap1p has other cellular functions in addition to the OSR. Bioinformatic analyses of the bound sequences suggest that Cap1p recognizes the DNA motif 5′-MTKASTMA. Finally, transcriptome analyses showed that increased expression generally accompanies Cap1p binding at its targets, indicating that Cap1p functions as a transcriptional activator. PMID:19395663

  18. Characterization of the roles of Blt1p in fission yeast cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Goss, John W.; Kim, Sunhee; Bledsoe, Hannah; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of cytokinesis is essential for cell division, yet the mechanisms that control the formation and constriction of the contractile ring are incompletely understood. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe proteins that contribute to the cytokinetic contractile ring accumulate during interphase in nodes—precursor structures around the equatorial cortex. During mitosis, additional proteins join these nodes, which condense to form the contractile ring. The cytokinesis protein Blt1p is unique in being present continuously in nodes from early interphase through to the contractile ring until cell separation. Blt1p was shown to stabilize interphase nodes, but its functions later in mitosis were unclear. We use analytical ultracentrifugation to show that purified Blt1p is a tetramer. We find that Blt1p interacts physically with Sid2p and Mob1p, a protein kinase complex of the septation initiation network, and confirm known interactions with F-BAR protein Cdc15p. Contractile rings assemble normally in blt1∆ cells, but the initiation of ring constriction and completion of cell division are delayed. We find three defects that likely contribute to this delay. Without Blt1p, contractile rings recruited and retained less Sid2p/Mob1p and Clp1p phosphatase, and β-glucan synthase Bgs1p accumulated slowly at the cleavage site. PMID:24790095

  19. Functional domains of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mlh1p and Pms1p DNA mismatch repair proteins and their relevance to human hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer-associated mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Q; Prolla, T A; Liskay, R M

    1997-01-01

    The MutL protein is an essential component of the Escherichia coli methyl-directed mismatch repair system but has no known enzymatic function. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the MutL equivalent, an Mlh1p and Pms1p heterodimer, interacts with Msh2p bound to mismatch-containing DNA. Little is known of the functional domains of Mlh1p and Pms1p. In this report, we define the Mlh1p and Pms1p domains required for Mlh1p-Pms1p interaction. The Mlh1p-interactive domain of Pms1p is comprised of 260 amino acids near the carboxyl terminus while the Pms1p-interactive domain of Mlh1p resides in the final 212 residues. The two domains are sufficient for Mlh1p-Pms1p interaction, as determined by the two-hybrid assay and by in vitro protein affinity chromatography. Deletions within the domains completely eliminated Mlh1p-Pms1p interaction. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we altered a number of highly conserved residues in the Mlh1p and Pms1p proteins, including some alterations that mimic germline mutations observed for human hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. Alterations either in the consensus MutL box located in the amino-terminal portion of each protein or in the carboxyl-terminal homology motif of Mlh1p eliminated DNA mismatch repair function but had no effect on Mlh1p-Pms1p interaction. In addition, certain MLH1 and PMS1 mutant alleles caused a dominant negative mutator effect when overexpressed. We discuss the implications of these findings for the structural organization of the Mlh1p and Pms1p proteins and the importance of Mlh1p-Pms1p interaction. PMID:9234704

  20. Feedback control of Swe1p degradation in the yeast morphogenesis checkpoint.

    PubMed

    King, Kindra; Kang, Hui; Jin, Michelle; Lew, Daniel J

    2013-04-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exposed to a variety of physiological stresses transiently delay bud emergence or bud growth. To maintain coordination between bud formation and the cell cycle in such circumstances, the morphogenesis checkpoint delays nuclear division via the mitosis-inhibitory Wee1-family kinase, Swe1p. Swe1p is degraded during G2 in unstressed cells but is stabilized and accumulates following stress. Degradation of Swe1p is preceded by its recruitment to the septin scaffold at the mother-bud neck, mediated by the Swe1p-binding protein Hsl7p. Following osmotic shock or actin depolymerization, Swe1p is stabilized, and previous studies suggested that this was because Hsl7p was no longer recruited to the septin scaffold following stress. However, we now show that Hsl7p is in fact recruited to the septin scaffold in stressed cells. Using a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) mutant that is immune to checkpoint-mediated inhibition, we show that Swe1p stabilization following stress is an indirect effect of CDK inhibition. These findings demonstrate the physiological importance of a positive-feedback loop in which Swe1p activity inhibits the CDK, which then ceases to target Swe1p for degradation. They also highlight the difficulty in disentangling direct checkpoint pathways from the effects of positive-feedback loops active at the G2/M transition.

  1. Evidence for the h_b(1P) meson in the decay Upsilon(3S) --> pi0 h_b(1P)

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.

    2011-08-12

    Using a sample of 122 million {Upsilon}(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC, we search for the h{sub b}(1P) spin-singlet partner of the P-wave {chi}{sub b}(1P) states in the sequential decay {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup 0}h{sub b}(1P), h{sub b}(1P) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S). We observe an excess of events above background in the distribution of the recoil mass against the {pi}{sup 0} at mass 9902 {+-} 4(stat.) {+-} 1(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. The width of the observed signal is consistent with experimental resolution, and its significance is 3.0 {sigma}, including systematic uncertainties. We obtain the value (3.7 {+-} 1.1 (stat.) {+-} 0.7 (syst.)) x 10{sup -4} for the product branching fraction {Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup 0}h{sub b}) x {Beta}(h{sub b} {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}).

  2. The Yeast Sks1p Kinase Signaling Network Regulates Pseudohyphal Growth and Glucose Response

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Cole; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Sheidy, Daniel; Shively, Christian A.; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Andrews, Philip C.; Kumar, Anuj

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic growth transition from its unicellular form to a filamentous state, marked by the formation of pseudohyphal filaments of elongated and connected cells. Yeast pseudohyphal growth is regulated by signaling pathways responsive to reductions in the availability of nitrogen and glucose, but the molecular link between pseudohyphal filamentation and glucose signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identify the glucose-responsive Sks1p kinase as a signaling protein required for pseudohyphal growth induced by nitrogen limitation and coupled nitrogen/glucose limitation. To identify the Sks1p signaling network, we applied mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, profiling over 900 phosphosites for phosphorylation changes dependent upon Sks1p kinase activity. From this analysis, we report a set of novel phosphorylation sites and highlight Sks1p-dependent phosphorylation in Bud6p, Itr1p, Lrg1p, Npr3p, and Pda1p. In particular, we analyzed the Y309 and S313 phosphosites in the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit Pda1p; these residues are required for pseudohyphal growth, and Y309A mutants exhibit phenotypes indicative of impaired aerobic respiration and decreased mitochondrial number. Epistasis studies place SKS1 downstream of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR1 and the G-protein RAS2 but upstream of or at the level of cAMP-dependent PKA. The pseudohyphal growth and glucose signaling transcription factors Flo8p, Mss11p, and Rgt1p are required to achieve wild-type SKS1 transcript levels. SKS1 is conserved, and deletion of the SKS1 ortholog SHA3 in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans results in abnormal colony morphology. Collectively, these results identify Sks1p as an important regulator of filamentation and glucose signaling, with additional relevance towards understanding stress-responsive signaling in C. albicans. PMID:24603354

  3. Evidence that the Yeast Desaturase Ole1p Exists as a Dimer In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Y.; Shanklin, J.

    2010-06-18

    Desaturase enzymes are composed of two classes, the structurally well characterized soluble class found predominantly in the plastids of higher plants and the more widely distributed but poorly structurally defined integral membrane class. Despite their distinct evolutionary origins, the two classes both require an iron cofactor and molecular oxygen for activity and are inhibited by azide and cyanide, suggesting strong mechanistic similarities. The fact that the soluble desaturase is active as a homodimer prompted us test the hypothesis that an archetypal integral membrane desaturase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the {Delta}{sup o}-acyl-Co-A desaturase Ole1p, also exhibits a dimeric organization. Ole1p was chosen because it is one of the best characterized integral membrane desaturase and because it retains activity when fused with epitope tags. FLAG-Ole1p was detected by Western blotting of immunoprecipitates in which anti-Myc antibodies were used for capture from yeast extracts co-expressing Ole1p-Myc and Ole1p-FLAG. Interaction was confirmed by two independent bimolecular complementation assays (i.e. the split ubiquitin system and the split luciferase system). Co-expression of active and inactive Ole1p subunits resulted in an {approx}75% suppression of the accumulation of palmitoleic acid, demonstrating that the physiologically active form of Ole1p in vivo is the dimer in which both protomers must be functional.

  4. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Stm1p facilitates ribosome preservation during quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, Natalya; Chanchorn, Ekkawit; Van Dyke, Michael W.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p confers increased resistance to the macrolide starvation-mimic rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p maintains 80S ribosome integrity during stationary phase-induced quiescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates polysome formation following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates protein synthesis following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p is a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation. -- Abstract: Once cells exhaust nutrients from their environment, they enter an alternative resting state known as quiescence, whereby proliferation ceases and essential nutrients are obtained through internal stores and through the catabolism of existing macromolecules and organelles. One example of this is ribophagy, the degradation of ribosomes through the process of autophagy. However, some ribosomes need to be preserved for an anticipated recovery from nutrient deprivation. We found that the ribosome-associated protein Stm1p greatly increases the quantity of 80S ribosomes present in quiescent yeast cells and that these ribosomes facilitate increased protein synthesis rates once nutrients are restored. These findings suggest that Stm1p can act as a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation and restoration.

  5. Yeast Pah1p phosphatidate phosphatase is regulated by proteasome-mediated degradation.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Florencia; Hsieh, Lu-Sheng; Soto-Cardalda, Aníbal; Carman, George M

    2014-04-01

    Yeast PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase is the enzyme responsible for the production of the diacylglycerol used for the synthesis of triacylglycerol that accumulates in the stationary phase of growth. Paradoxically, the growth phase-mediated inductions of PAH1 and phosphatidate phosphatase activity do not correlate with the amount of Pah1p; enzyme abundance declined in a growth phase-dependent manner. Pah1p from exponential phase cells was a relatively stable protein, and its abundance was not affected by incubation with an extract from stationary phase cells. Recombinant Pah1p was degraded upon incubation with the 100,000 × g pellet fraction of stationary phase cells, although the enzyme was stable when incubated with the same fraction of exponential phase cells. MG132, an inhibitor of proteasome function, prevented degradation of the recombinant enzyme. Endogenously expressed and plasmid-mediated overexpressed levels of Pah1p were more abundant in the stationary phase of cells treated with MG132. Pah1p was stabilized in mutants with impaired proteasome (rpn4Δ, blm10Δ, ump1Δ, and pre1 pre2) and ubiquitination (hrd1Δ, ubc4Δ, ubc7Δ, ubc8Δ, and doa4Δ) functions. The pre1 pre2 mutations that eliminate nearly all chymotrypsin-like activity of the 20 S proteasome had the greatest stabilizing effect on enzyme levels. Taken together, these results supported the conclusion that Pah1p is subject to proteasome-mediated degradation in the stationary phase. That Pah1p abundance was stabilized in pah1Δ mutant cells expressing catalytically inactive forms of Pah1p and dgk1Δ mutant cells with induced expression of DGK1-encoded diacylglycerol kinase indicated that alteration in phosphatidate and/or diacylglycerol levels might be the signal that triggers Pah1p degradation.

  6. Characterization of interactions among the Cef1p-Prp19p-associated splicing complex.

    PubMed Central

    Ohi, Melanie D; Gould, Kathleen L

    2002-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Sp) Cdc5p and its Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) ortholog, Cef1p, are essential components of the spliceosome. In S. cerevisiae, a subcomplex of the spliceosome that includes Cef1p can be isolated on its own; this has been termed the nineteen complex (Ntc) because it contains Prp19p. Components of the Ntc include Cef1p, Snt309p, Syf2p/Ntc31p, Ntc30p/lsy1p, Ntc20p and at least six unidentified proteins. We recently identified approximately 30 proteins that copurified with Cdc5p and Cef1p. Previously unidentified S. pombe proteins in this purification were called Cwfs for complexed with five and novel S. cerevisiae proteins were called Cwcs for complexed with Cef1p. Using these proteomics data coupled with available information regarding Ntc composition, we have investigated protein identities and interactions among Ntc components. Our data indicate that Cwc2p, Prp46p, Clf1p, and Syf1p most likely represent Ntc40p, Ntc50p, Ntc77p, and Ntc90p, respectively. We show that Sc Cwc2p interacts with Prp19p and is involved in pre-mRNA splicing. Sp cwf2+, the homolog of Sc CWC2, is allelic with the previously identified Sp prp3+. We present evidence that Sp Cwf7p, an essential protein with obvious homologs in many eukaryotes but not S. cerevisiae, is a functional counterpart of Sc Snt309p and binds Sp Cwf8p (a homolog of Sc Prp19p). Further, our data indicate that a mutation in the U-box of Prp19p disrupts these numerous protein interactions causing Cef1p degradation and Ntc instability. PMID:12088152

  7. Fluconazole transport into Candida albicans secretory vesicles by the membrane proteins Cdr1p, Cdr2p, and Mdr1p.

    PubMed

    Basso, Luiz R; Gast, Charles E; Mao, Yuxin; Wong, Brian

    2010-06-01

    A major cause of azole resistance in Candida albicans is overexpression of CDR1, CDR2, and/or MDR1, which encode plasma membrane efflux pumps. To analyze the catalytic properties of these pumps, we used ACT1- and GAL1-regulated expression plasmids to overexpress CDR1, CDR2, or MDR1 in a C. albicans cdr1 cdr2 mdr1-null mutant. When the genes of interest were expressed, the resulting transformants were more resistant to multiple azole antifungals, and accumulated less [(3)H]fluconazole intracellularly, than empty-vector controls. Next, we used a GAL1-regulated dominant negative sec4 allele to cause cytoplasmic accumulation of post-Golgi secretory vesicles (PGVs), and we found that PGVs isolated from CDR1-, CDR2-, or MDR1-overexpressing cells accumulated much more [(3)H]fluconazole than did PGVs from empty-vector controls. The K(m)s (expressed in micromolar concentrations) and V(max)s (expressed in picomoles per milligram of protein per minute), respectively, for [(3)H]fluconazole transport were 0.8 and 0.91 for Cdr1p, 4.3 and 0.52 for Cdr2p, and 3.5 and 0.59 for Mdr1p. [(3)H]fluconazole transport by Cdr1p and Cdr2p required ATP and was unaffected by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), whereas [(3)H]fluconazole transport by Mdr1p did not require ATP and was inhibited by CCCP. [(3)H]fluconazole uptake by all 3 pumps was inhibited by all other azoles tested, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s; expressed as proportions of the [(3)H]fluconazole concentration) of 0.2 to 5.6 for Cdr1p, 0.3 to 3.1 for Cdr2p, and 0.3 to 3.1 for Mdr1p. The methods used in this study may also be useful for studying other plasma membrane transporters in C. albicans and other medically important fungi.

  8. Translocation involving 1p and 17q is a recurrent genetic alteration of human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savelyeva, L.; Corvi, R.; Schwab, M. )

    1994-08-01

    Human neuroblastoma cells often are monosomic for the distal portion of 1p (1p36). The authors report that the deleted 1p material in cells of neuroblastoma lines is preferentially replaced by material from chromosome 17, resulting from an unbalanced 1;17 translocation. Chromosome 17 often acquires instability, followed by the integration of fragments into various marker chromosomes. As a consequence, 17q material can increase over 17p material. The nonrandom frequency of 1;17 translocations appears to indicate an as-yet-undefined contribution to neuroblastoma development. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Novel airway findings in a patient with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferril, Geoffrey R; Barham, Henry P; Prager, Jeremy D

    2014-01-01

    1p36 deletion syndrome comprises a phenotypic presentation that includes central nervous system, cardiac, and craniofacial anomalies. There has been no report of associated airway anomalies with this syndrome. We present here a case report and literature review. Prenatally, amniocentesis for chromosomal analysis was performed on our patient, with results consistent with 1p36 deletion syndrome. Respiratory distress and unsuccessful attempts at intubation prompted transfer to Children's Hospital of Colorado. Microlaryngoscopy was subsequently performed, revealing a persistent buccopharyngeal membrane and unidentifiable larynx. Emergent tracheostomy was then performed to secure the airway. Airway anomalies may be associated with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

  10. SNP-based mapping arrays reveal high genomic complexity in monoclonal gammopathies, from MGUS to myeloma status.

    PubMed

    López-Corral, L; Sarasquete, M E; Beà, S; García-Sanz, R; Mateos, M V; Corchete, L A; Sayagués, J M; García, E M; Bladé, J; Oriol, A; Hernández-García, M T; Giraldo, P; Hernández, J; González, M; Hernández-Rivas, J M; San Miguel, J F; Gutiérrez, N C

    2012-12-01

    Genetic events mediating transformation from premalignant monoclonal gammopathies (MG) to multiple myeloma (MM) are unknown. To obtain a comprehensive genomic profile of MG from the early to late stages, we performed high-resolution analysis of purified plasma cells from 20 MGUS, 20 smoldering MM (SMM) and 34 MM by high-density 6.0 SNP array. A progressive increase in the incidence of copy number abnormalities (CNA) from MGUS to SMM and to MM (median 5, 7.5 and 12 per case, respectively) was observed (P=0.006). Gains on 1q, 3p, 6p, 9p, 11q, 19p, 19q and 21q along with 1p, 16q and 22q deletions were significantly less frequent in MGUS than in MM. Although 11q and 21q gains together with 16q and 22q deletions were apparently exclusive of MM status, we observed that these abnormalities were also present in minor subclones in MGUS. Overall, a total of 65 copy number-neutral LOH (CNN-LOH) were detected. Their frequency was higher in active MM than in the asymptomatic entities (P=0.047). A strong association between genetic lesions and fragile sites was also detected. In summary, our study shows an increasing genomic complexity from MGUS to MM and identifies new chromosomal regions involved in CNA and CNN-LOH. PMID:22565645

  11. A new locus for autosomal recessive non-syndromic mental retardation maps to 1p21.1-p13.3.

    PubMed

    Uyguner, O; Kayserili, H; Li, Y; Karaman, B; Nürnberg, G; Hennies, Hc; Becker, C; Nürnberg, P; Başaran, S; Apak, M Y; Wollnik, B

    2007-03-01

    Autosomal recessive inheritance of non-syndromic mental retardation (ARNSMR) may account for approximately 25% of all patients with non-specific mental retardation (NSMR). Although many X-linked genes have been identified as a cause of NSMR, only three autosomal genes are known to cause ARNSMR. We present here a large consanguineous Turkish family with four mentally retarded individuals from different branches of the family. Clinical tests showed cognitive impairment but no neurological, skeletal, and biochemical involvements. Genome-wide mapping using Human Mapping 10K Array showed a single positive locus with a parametric LOD score of 4.92 in a region on chromosome 1p21.1-p13.3. Further analyses using polymorphic microsatellite markers defined a 6.6-Mb critical region containing approximately 130 known genes. This locus is the fourth one linked to ARNSMR.

  12. Expression of S1P metabolizing enzymes and receptors correlate with survival time and regulate cell migration in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Bien-Möller, Sandra; Lange, Sandra; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Paland, Heiko; Küpper, Johannes; Herzog, Susann; Weitmann, Kerstin; Havemann, Christoph; Vogelgesang, Silke; Marx, Sascha; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Henry W.S.; Rauch, Bernhard H.

    2016-01-01

    A signaling molecule which is involved in proliferation and migration of malignant cells is the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). There are hints for a potential role of S1P signaling in malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) which is characterized by a poor prognosis. Therefore, a comprehensive expression analysis of S1P receptors (S1P1-S1P5) and S1P metabolizing enzymes in human GBM (n = 117) compared to healthy brain (n = 10) was performed to evaluate their role for patient's survival. Furthermore, influence of S1P receptor inhibition on proliferation and migration were studied in LN18 GBM cells. Compared to control brain, mRNA levels of S1P1, S1P2, S1P3 and S1P generating sphingosine kinase-1 were elevated in GBM. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated an association between S1P1 and S1P2 with patient's survival times. In vitro, an inhibitory effect of the SphK inhibitor SKI-II on viability of LN18 cells was shown. S1P itself had no effect on viability but stimulated LN18 migration which was blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P2. The participation of S1P1 and S1P2 in LN18 migration was further supported by siRNA-mediated silencing of these receptors. Immunoblots and inhibition experiments suggest an involvement of the PI3-kinase/AKT1 pathway in the chemotactic effect of S1P in LN18 cells. In summary, our data argue for a role of S1P signaling in proliferation and migration of GBM cells. Individual components of the S1P pathway represent prognostic factors for patients with GBM. Perspectively, a selective modulation of S1P receptor subtypes could represent a therapeutic approach for GBM patients and requires further evaluation. PMID:26887055

  13. Loss of CDC5 function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to defects in Swe1p regulation and Bfa1p/Bub2p-independent cytokinesis.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chong Jin; Song, Sukgil; Lee, Philip R; Shou, Wenying; Deshaies, Raymond J; Lee, Kyung S

    2003-01-01

    In many organisms, polo kinases appear to play multiple roles during M-phase progression. To provide new insights into the function of budding yeast polo kinase Cdc5p, we generated novel temperature-sensitive cdc5 mutants by mutagenizing the C-terminal domain. Here we show that, at a semipermissive temperature, the cdc5-3 mutant exhibited a synergistic bud elongation and growth defect with loss of HSL1, a component important for normal G(2)/M transition. Loss of SWE1, which phosphorylates and inactivates the budding yeast Cdk1 homolog Cdc28p, suppressed the cdc5-3 hsl1Delta defect, suggesting that Cdc5p functions at a point upstream of Swe1p. In addition, the cdc5-4 and cdc5-7 mutants exhibited chained cell morphologies with shared cytoplasms between the connected cell bodies, indicating a cytokinetic defect. Close examination of these mutants revealed delayed septin assembly at the incipient bud site and loosely organized septin rings at the mother-bud neck. Components in the mitotic exit network (MEN) play important roles in normal cytokinesis. However, loss of BFA1 or BUB2, negative regulators of the MEN, failed to remedy the cytokinetic defect of these mutants, indicating that Cdc5p promotes cytokinesis independently of Bfa1p and Bub2p. Thus, Cdc5p contributes to the activation of the Swe1p-dependent Cdc28p/Clb pathway, normal septin function, and cytokinesis. PMID:12586693

  14. Involvement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae hydrolase Ldh1p in lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Debelyy, Mykhaylo O; Thoms, Sven; Connerth, Melanie; Daum, Günther; Erdmann, Ralf

    2011-06-01

    Here, we report the functional characterization of the newly identified lipid droplet hydrolase Ldh1p. Recombinant Ldh1p exhibits esterase and triacylglycerol lipase activities. Mutation of the serine in the hydrolase/lipase motif GXSXG completely abolished esterase activity. Ldh1p is required for the maintenance of a steady-state level of the nonpolar and polar lipids of lipid droplets. A characteristic feature of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δldh1 strain is the appearance of giant lipid droplets and an excessive accumulation of nonpolar lipids and phospholipids upon growth on medium containing oleic acid as a sole carbon source. Ldh1p is thought to play a role in maintaining the lipid homeostasis in yeast by regulating both phospholipid and nonpolar lipid levels. PMID:21478434

  15. Yeast calcineurin regulates nuclear localization of the Crz1p transcription factor through dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Stathopoulos-Gerontides, Angelike; Guo, Jim Jun; Cyert, Martha S.

    1999-01-01

    Calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein phosphatase, regulates Ca2+-dependent processes in a wide variety of cells. In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, calcineurin effects Ca2+-dependent changes in gene expression through regulation of the Crz1p transcription factor. We show here that calcineurin dephosphorylates Crz1p and that this results in translocation of Crz1p to the nucleus. We identify a region of Crz1p that is required for calcineurin-dependent regulation of its phosphorylation, localization, and activity, and show that this region has significant sequence simlarity to a portion of NF-AT, a family of mammalian transcription factors whose localization is also regulated by calcineurin. Thus, the mechanism of Ca2+/calcineurin-dependent signaling shows remarkable conservation between yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:10197980

  16. Observation of {chi}{sub bJ}(1P,2P) decays to light hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Reed, J.; Briere, R. A.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.

    2008-11-01

    Analyzing {upsilon}(nS) decays acquired with the CLEO detector operating at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we measure for the first time the product branching fractions B[{upsilon}(nS){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub bJ}((n-1)P)]B[{chi}{sub bJ}(n-1)P){yields}X{sub i}] for n=2 and 3, where X{sub i} denotes, for each i, one of the 14 exclusive light-hadron final states for which we observe significant signals in both {chi}{sub bJ}(1P) and {chi}{sub bJ}(2P) decays. We also determine upper limits for the electric dipole (E1) transitions {upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub bJ}(1P)

  17. Carbon Source-dependent assembly of the Snf1p kinase complex in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Corvey, Carsten; Koetter, Peter; Beckhaus, Tobias; Hack, Jeremy; Hofmann, Sandra; Hampel, Martin; Stein, Torsten; Karas, Michael; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2005-07-01

    The Snf1p/AMP-activated kinases are involved in transcriptional, metabolic, and developmental regulation in response to stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Snf1p (Cat1p) is one of the key regulators of carbohydrate metabolism, and cat1 (snf1) mutants fail to grow with non-fermentable carbon sources. In Candida albicans, Snf1p is an essential protein and cells depend on a functional Snf1 kinase even with glucose as carbon source. We investigated the CaSnf1p complex after tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometric analysis and show that the complex composition changes with the carbon source provided. Three subunits were identified, one of which was named CaSnf4p because of its homology to the ScSnf4 protein and the respective CaSNF4 gene could complement a S. cerevisiae snf4 mutant. The other two proteins revealed similarities to the S. cerevisiae kinase beta subunits ScGal83p, ScSip2p, and ScSip1p. Both genes complemented the scaffold function in a S. cerevisiae gal83,sip1,sip2 triple deletion mutant and were named according to their scaffold function as CaKIS1p and CaKIS2p. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization peptide mass fingerprint analysis indicated that CaKis2p is N-terminal myristoylated and the incorporation of CaKis2p in the Snf1p complex was reduced when compared with cells grown with glucose as a carbon source. To verify the different complex assemblies, a stable isotope labeling technique (iTraqtrade mark) was employed, confirming a 3-fold decrease of CaKis2p with ethanol. Yeast two-hybrid analysis confirmed the interaction partners, and these results showed an activator domain for the CaKis2 protein that has not been reported for S. cerevisiae scaffold subunits.

  18. FXR1P is a GSK3β substrate regulating mood and emotion processing.

    PubMed

    Del'Guidice, Thomas; Latapy, Camille; Rampino, Antonio; Khlghatyan, Jivan; Lemasson, Morgane; Gelao, Barbara; Quarto, Tiziana; Rizzo, Giuseppe; Barbeau, Annie; Lamarre, Claude; Bertolino, Alessandro; Blasi, Giuseppe; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin

    2015-08-18

    Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is a shared action believed to be involved in the regulation of behavior by psychoactive drugs such as antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. However, little is known about the identity of the substrates through which GSK3β affects behavior. We identified fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 (FXR1P), a RNA binding protein associated to genetic risk for schizophrenia, as a substrate for GSK3β. Phosphorylation of FXR1P by GSK3β is facilitated by prior phosphorylation by ERK2 and leads to its down-regulation. In contrast, behaviorally effective chronic mood stabilizer treatments in mice inhibit GSK3β and increase FXR1P levels. In line with this, overexpression of FXR1P in the mouse prefrontal cortex also leads to comparable mood-related responses. Furthermore, functional genetic polymorphisms affecting either FXR1P or GSK3β gene expression interact to regulate emotional brain responsiveness and stability in humans. These observations uncovered a GSK3β/FXR1P signaling pathway that contributes to regulating mood and emotion processing. Regulation of FXR1P by GSK3β also provides a mechanistic framework that may explain how inhibition of GSK3β can contribute to the regulation of mood by psychoactive drugs in mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder. Moreover, this pathway could potentially be implicated in other biological functions, such as inflammation and cell proliferation, in which FXR1P and GSK3 are known to play a role. PMID:26240334

  19. [Turner syndrome and monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome misdiagnosed as thyropenia: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Meng, Xubiao; Li, Zhiming; Liu, Tingting; Wen, Zhiming

    2013-12-01

    A 21-year-old woman with a short stature presented with primary amenorrhoea and a 45X karyotype, and comparative genomic hybridization revealed 1p36 deletion and abnormal genes in multiple chromosomes to support the diagnosis of Turner syndrome and monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome. The main clinical features of this condition include microsomia, poor sexual development, menoschesis, gigantorectum, absence of internal genitalia, sometimes with thyropenia and low intelligence. This disease can be easily diagnosed for its heterogeneous clinical manifestations.

  20. Mini-Review: Monosomy 1p36 syndrome: reviewing the correlation between deletion sizes and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rocha, C F; Vasques, R B; Santos, S R; Paiva, C L A

    2016-01-01

    The major clinical features of monosomy 1p36 deletion are developmental delay and hypotonia associated with short stature and craniofacial dysmorphisms. The objective of this study was to review the cases of 1p36 deletion that was reported between 1999 and 2014, in order to identify a possible correlation between the size of the 1p36-deleted segment and the clinical phenotype of the disease. Scientific articles published in the (National Center for Biotechnology Information; NCBI http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) and Scientific Electronic Library Online (www.scielo.com.br) databases were searched using key word combinations, such as "1p36 deletion", "monosomy 1p36 deletion", and "1p36 deletion syndrome". Articles in English or Spanish reporting the correlation between deletion sizes and the respective clinical phenotypes were retrieved, while letters, reviews, guidelines, and studies with mouse models were excluded. Among the 746 retrieved articles, only 17 (12 case reports and 5 series of cases), comprising 29 patients (9 males and 20 females, aged 0 months (neonate) to 22 years) bearing the 1p36 deletions and whose clinical phenotypes were described, met the inclusion criteria. The genotype-phenotype correlation in monosomy 1p36 is a challenge because of the variability in the size of the deleted segment, as well as in the clinical manifestations of similar size deletions. Therefore, the severity of the clinical features was not always associated with the deletion size, possibly because of the other influences, such as stochastic factors, epigenetic events, or reduced penetration of the deleted genes.

  1. FXR1P is a GSK3β substrate regulating mood and emotion processing

    PubMed Central

    Del’Guidice, Thomas; Latapy, Camille; Rampino, Antonio; Khlghatyan, Jivan; Lemasson, Morgane; Gelao, Barbara; Quarto, Tiziana; Rizzo, Giuseppe; Barbeau, Annie; Lamarre, Claude; Bertolino, Alessandro; Blasi, Giuseppe; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is a shared action believed to be involved in the regulation of behavior by psychoactive drugs such as antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. However, little is known about the identity of the substrates through which GSK3β affects behavior. We identified fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 (FXR1P), a RNA binding protein associated to genetic risk for schizophrenia, as a substrate for GSK3β. Phosphorylation of FXR1P by GSK3β is facilitated by prior phosphorylation by ERK2 and leads to its down-regulation. In contrast, behaviorally effective chronic mood stabilizer treatments in mice inhibit GSK3β and increase FXR1P levels. In line with this, overexpression of FXR1P in the mouse prefrontal cortex also leads to comparable mood-related responses. Furthermore, functional genetic polymorphisms affecting either FXR1P or GSK3β gene expression interact to regulate emotional brain responsiveness and stability in humans. These observations uncovered a GSK3β/FXR1P signaling pathway that contributes to regulating mood and emotion processing. Regulation of FXR1P by GSK3β also provides a mechanistic framework that may explain how inhibition of GSK3β can contribute to the regulation of mood by psychoactive drugs in mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder. Moreover, this pathway could potentially be implicated in other biological functions, such as inflammation and cell proliferation, in which FXR1P and GSK3 are known to play a role. PMID:26240334

  2. Measurements of branching fractions for electromagnetic transitions involving the χbJ(1P) states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornicer, M.; Mitchell, R. E.; Tarbert, C. M.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Hietala, J.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Brisbane, S.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Spradlin, P.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; Ecklund, K. M.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Pearson, L. J.; Thorndike, E. H.; Yang, F.; Ricciardi, S.; Thomas, C.; Artuso, M.; Blusk, S.; Mountain, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Zhang, L. M.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Lincoln, A.; Smith, M. J.; Zhou, P.; Zhu, J.; Naik, P.; Rademacker, J.; Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Randrianarivony, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Briere, R. A.; Vogel, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Das, S.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Shi, X.; Sun, W. M.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Lowrey, N.; Mehrabyan, S.; Selen, M.; Wiss, J.; Libby, J.

    2011-03-01

    Using (9.32, 5.88) million Υ(2S,3S) decays taken with the CLEO III detector, we obtain five product branching fractions for the exclusive processes Υ(2S)→γχb0,1,2(1P)→γγΥ(1S) and Υ(3S)→γχb1,2(1P)→γγΥ(1S). We observe the transition χb0(1P)→γΥ(1S) for the first time. Using the known branching fractions for B[Υ(2S)→γχbJ(1P)], we extract values for B[χbJ(1P)→γΥ(1S)] for J=0, 1, 2. In turn, these values can be used to unfold the Υ(3S) product branching fractions to obtain values for B[Υ(3S)→γχb1,2(1P)] for the first time individually. Comparison of these with each other and with the branching fraction B[Υ(3S)→γχb0] previously measured by CLEO provides tests of relativistic corrections to electric dipole matrix elements.

  3. Loss of APD1 in Yeast Confers Hydroxyurea Sensitivity Suppressed by Yap1p Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hei-Man Vincent; Pan, Kewu; Kong, Ka-Yiu Edwin; Hu, Ligang; Chan, Ling-Chim; Siu, Kam-Leung; Sun, Hongzhe; Wong, Chi-Ming; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxins are iron-sulfur proteins that play important roles in electron transport and redox homeostasis. Yeast Apd1p is a novel member of the family of thioredoxin-like ferredoxins. In this study, we characterized the hydroxyurea (HU)-hypersensitive phenotype of apd1Δ cells. HU is an inhibitor of DNA synthesis, a cellular stressor and an anticancer agent. Although the loss of APD1 did not influence cell proliferation or cell cycle progression, it resulted in HU sensitivity. This sensitivity was reverted in the presence of antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine, implicating a role for intracellular redox. Mutation of the iron-binding motifs in Apd1p abrogated its ability to rescue HU sensitivity in apd1Δ cells. The iron-binding activity of Apd1p was verified by a color assay. By mass spectrometry two irons were found to be incorporated into one Apd1p protein molecule. Surprisingly, ribonucleotide reductase genes were not induced in apd1Δ cells and the HU sensitivity was unaffected when dNTP production was boosted. A suppressor screen was performed and the expression of stress-regulated transcription factor Yap1p was found to effectively rescue the HU sensitivity in apd1Δ cells. Taken together, our work identified Apd1p as a new ferredoxin which serves critical roles in cellular defense against HU. PMID:25600293

  4. Reporter mRNAs cleaved by Rnt1p are exported and degraded in the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Meaux, Stacie; Lavoie, Mathieu; Gagnon, Jules; Abou Elela, Sherif; van Hoof, Ambro

    2011-01-01

    For most protein coding genes, termination of transcription by RNA polymerase II is preceded by an endonucleolytic cleavage of the nascent transcript. The 3′ product of this cleavage is rapidly degraded via the 5′ exoribonuclease Rat1p which is thought to destabilize the RNA polymerase II complex. It is not clear whether RNA cleavage is sufficient to trigger nuclear RNA degradation and transcription termination or whether the fate of the RNA depends on additional elements. For most mRNAs, this cleavage is mediated by the cleavage and polyadenylation machinery, but it can also be mediated by Rnt1p. We show that Rnt1p cleavage of an mRNA is not sufficient to trigger nuclear degradation or transcription termination. Insertion of an Rnt1p target site into a reporter mRNA did not block transcription downstream of the cleavage site, but instead produced two unstable cleavage products, neither of which were stabilized by inactivation of Rat1p. In contrast, the 3′ and 5′ cleavage products were stabilized by the deletion of the cytoplasmic 5′ exoribonuclease (Xrn1p) or by inactivation of the cytoplasmic RNA exosome. These data indicate that transcription termination and nuclear degradation is not the default fate of cleaved RNAs and that specific promoter and/or sequence elements are required to determine the fate of the cleavage products. PMID:21821655

  5. The Na+/H+ exchanger Nhx1p regulates the initiation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuole fusion.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Quan-Sheng; Fratti, Rutilio A

    2010-10-01

    Nhx1p is a Na(+)(K(+))/H(+) antiporter localized at the vacuolar membrane of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nhx1p regulates the acidification of cytosol and vacuole lumen, and is involved in membrane traffic from late endosomes to the vacuole. Deletion of the gene leads to aberrant vacuolar morphology and defective vacuolar protein sorting. These phenotypes are hallmarks of malfunctioning vacuole homeostasis and indicate that membrane fusion is probably altered. Here, we investigated the role of Nhx1p in the regulation of homotypic vacuole fusion. Vacuoles isolated from nhx1Δ yeast showed attenuated fusion. Assays configured to differentiate between the first round of fusion and ongoing rounds showed that nhx1Δ vacuoles were only defective in the first round of fusion, suggesting that Nhx1p regulates an early step in the pathway. Although fusion was impaired on nhx1Δ vacuoles, SNARE complex formation was indistinguishable from wild-type vacuoles. Fusion could be rescued by adding the soluble SNARE Vam7p. However, Vam7p only activated the first round of nhx1Δ vacuole fusion. Once fusion was initiated, nhx1Δ vacuoles appeared behave in a wild-type manner. Complementation studies showed that ion transport function was required for Nhx1p-mediated support of fusion. In addition, the weak base chloroquine restored nhx1Δ fusion to wild-type levels. Together, these data indicate that Nhx1p regulates the initiation of fusion by controlling vacuole lumen pH.

  6. Mild developmental delay and obesity in two patients with mosaic 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Shino; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Osawa, Makiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    We identified mosaic 1p36 deletions in two patients with developmental delay, distinctive features, and obesity, who can walk alone and communicate with others. Thus, their neurological defects are milder than those in typical patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome because most patients with 1p36 deletion cannot acquire expressive language. Chromosomal microarray testing revealed 3.0 and 4.5 Mb aberrations in the subtelomeric region of the short arm of chromosome 1. Mean signal ratios of the identified aberrations were -0.4 and -0.5, indicating mosaicism, which was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with a mosaic ratio of 70% and 77%, respectively. Previous studies demonstrated that deletion of the distal 2-3 Mb region would be responsible for hyperphagia and obesity seen in patients. On the other hand, the severity of the neurological defect often correlates with the size of the terminal deletion of 1p36, and patients with larger deletions of 1p36 would usually show severely impaired developmental milestones and be immobile and aphasic. In such cases, hyperphagia and obesity could be clinically masked. In this study, two patients with mosaic deletions of 1p36 showed obesity as a consequence of hyperphagia. This study suggests that patients with 1p36 deletion would be at risk for hyperphagia and obesity when they have both risk factors, that is, (1) deletions including the 2-3 Mb critical region and (2) milder phenotypes that allow them to reach food on their own and to overeat.

  7. NAD+-dependent deacetylase Hst1p controls biosynthesis and cellular NAD+ levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bedalov, Antonio; Hirao, Maki; Posakony, Jeffrey; Nelson, Melisa; Simon, Julian A

    2003-10-01

    Nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) performs key roles in electron transport reactions, as a substrate for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases. In the latter two processes, NAD(+) is consumed and converted to ADP-ribose and nicotinamide. NAD(+) levels can be maintained by regeneration of NAD(+) from nicotinamide via a salvage pathway or by de novo synthesis of NAD(+) from tryptophan. Both pathways are conserved from yeast to humans. We describe a critical role of the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase Hst1p as a sensor of NAD(+) levels and regulator of NAD(+) biosynthesis. Using transcript arrays, we show that low NAD(+) states specifically induce the de novo NAD(+) biosynthesis genes while the genes in the salvage pathway remain unaffected. The NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase activity of Hst1p represses de novo NAD(+) biosynthesis genes in the absence of new protein synthesis, suggesting a direct effect. The known Hst1p binding partner, Sum1p, is present at promoters of highly inducible NAD(+) biosynthesis genes. The removal of HST1-mediated repression of the NAD(+) de novo biosynthesis pathway leads to increased cellular NAD(+) levels. Transcript array analysis shows that reduction in cellular NAD(+) levels preferentially affects Hst1p-regulated genes in comparison to genes regulated with other NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases (Sir2p, Hst2p, Hst3p, and Hst4p). In vitro experiments demonstrate that Hst1p has relatively low affinity toward NAD(+) in comparison to other NAD(+)-dependent enzymes. These findings suggest that Hst1p serves as a cellular NAD(+) sensor that monitors and regulates cellular NAD(+) levels. PMID:12972620

  8. A practical process for the preparation of [32P]S1P and binding assay for S1P receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Adam J.; Liu, Hui; Tu, Zhude

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) are important regulators of vascular permeability, inflammation, angiogenesis and vascular maturation. Identifying a specific S1PR PET radioligand is imperative, but it is hindered by the complexity and variability of current for binding affinity measurement procedures. Herein, we report a streamlined protocol for radiosynthesis of [32P]S1P with good radiochemical yield (36 – 50%) and high radiochemical purity (>99%). We also report a reproducible procedure for determining the binding affinity for compounds targeting S1PRs in vitro. PMID:25931137

  9. Roles of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors in malignant behavior of glioma cells. Differential effects of S1P{sub 2} on cell migration and invasiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Nicholas; Van Brocklyn, James R. . E-mail: james.vanbrocklyn@osumc.edu

    2007-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid that signals through a family of five G-protein-coupled receptors, termed S1P{sub 1-5}. S1P stimulates growth and invasiveness of glioma cells, and high expression levels of the enzyme that forms S1P, sphingosine kinase-1, correlate with short survival of glioma patients. In this study we examined the mechanism of S1P stimulation of glioma cell proliferation and invasion by either overexpressing or knocking down, by RNA interference, S1P receptor expression in glioma cell lines. S1P{sub 1}, S1P{sub 2} and S1P{sub 3} all contribute positively to S1P-stimulated glioma cell proliferation, with S1P{sub 1} being the major contributor. Stimulation of glioma cell proliferation by these receptors correlated with activation of ERK MAP kinase. S1P{sub 5} blocks glioma cell proliferation, and inhibits ERK activation. S1P{sub 1} and S1P{sub 3} enhance glioma cell migration and invasion. S1P{sub 2} inhibits migration through Rho activation, Rho kinase signaling and stress fiber formation, but unexpectedly, enhances glioma cell invasiveness by stimulating cell adhesion. S1P{sub 2} also potently enhances expression of the matricellular protein CCN1/Cyr61, which has been implicated in tumor cell adhesion, and invasion as well as tumor angiogenesis. A neutralizing antibody to CCN1 blocked S1P{sub 2}-stimulated glioma invasion. Thus, while S1P{sub 2} decreases glioma cell motility, it may enhance invasion through induction of proteins that modulate glioma cell interaction with the extracellular matrix.

  10. Hal2p functions in Bdf1p-involved salt stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Liu, Liangyu; Wang, Mingpeng; Fu, Jiafang; Zhang, Zhaojie; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bdf1p associates with the basal transcription complexes TFIID and acts as a transcriptional regulator. Lack of Bdf1p is salt sensitive and displays abnormal mitochondrial function. The nucleotidase Hal2p detoxifies the toxic compound 3' -phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphate (pAp), which blocks the biosynthesis of methionine. Hal2p is also a target of high concentration of Na(+). Here, we reported that HAL2 overexpression recovered the salt stress sensitivity of bdf1Δ. Further evidence demonstrated that HAL2 expression was regulated indirectly by Bdf1p. The salt stress response mechanisms mediated by Bdf1p and Hal2p were different. Unlike hal2Δ, high Na(+) or Li(+) stress did not cause pAp accumulation in bdf1Δ and methionine supplementation did not recover its salt sensitivity. HAL2 overexpression in bdf1Δ reduced ROS level and improved mitochondrial function, but not respiration. Further analyses suggested that autophagy was apparently defective in bdf1Δ, and autophagy stimulated by Hal2p may play an important role in recovering mitochondrial functions and Na(+) sensitivity of bdf1Δ. Our findings shed new light towards our understanding about the molecular mechanism of Bdf1p-involved salt stress response in budding yeast.

  11. Neuropathology of brain and spinal malformations in a case of monosomy 1p36

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common subtelomeric chromosomal deletion linked to mental retardation and seizures. Neuroimaging studies suggest that monosomy 1p36 is associated with brain malformations including polymicrogyria and nodular heterotopia, but the histopathology of these lesions is unknown. Here we present postmortem neuropathological findings from a 10 year-old girl with monosomy 1p36, who died of respiratory complications. The findings included micrencephaly, periventricular nodular heterotopia in occipitotemporal lobes, cortical dysgenesis resembling polymicrogyria in dorsolateral frontal lobes, hippocampal malrotation, callosal hypoplasia, superiorly rotated cerebellum with small vermis, and lumbosacral hydromyelia. The abnormal cortex exhibited “festooned” (undulating) supragranular layers, but no significant fusion of the molecular layer. Deletion mapping demonstrated single copy loss of a contiguous 1p36 terminal region encompassing many important neurodevelopmental genes, among them four HES genes implicated in regulating neural stem cell differentiation, and TP73, a monoallelically expressed gene. Our results suggest that brain and spinal malformations in monosomy 1p36 may be more extensive than previously recognized, and may depend on the parental origin of deleted genes. More broadly, our results suggest that specific genetic disorders may cause distinct forms of cortical dysgenesis. PMID:24252393

  12. Molecular and cellular pathways associated with chromosome 1p deletions during colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Claire M; Crowley-Skillicorn, Cheray; Bernstein, Carol; Holubec, Hana; Bernstein, Harris

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal instability is a major pathway of sporadic colon carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p appears to be one of the “hot spots” in the non-neoplastic mucosa that, when deleted, is associated with the initiation of carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p contains genes associated with DNA repair, spindle checkpoint function, apoptosis, multiple microRNAs, the Wnt signaling pathway, tumor suppression, antioxidant activities, and defense against environmental toxins. Loss of 1p is dangerous since it would likely contribute to genomic instability leading to tumorigenesis. The 1p deletion-associated colon carcinogenesis pathways are reviewed at the molecular and cellular levels. Sporadic colon cancer is strongly linked to a high-fat/low-vegetable/low-micronutrient, Western-style diet. We also consider how selected dietary-related compounds (eg, excess hydrophobic bile acids, and low levels of folic acid, niacin, plant-derived antioxidants, and other modulatory compounds) might affect processes leading to chromosomal deletions, and to the molecular and cellular pathways specifically altered by chromosome 1p loss. PMID:21753893

  13. Neuropathology of brain and spinal malformations in a case of monosomy 1p36.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Naoko; Daza, Ray A M; Shaffer, Lisa G; Barkovich, A James; Dobyns, William B; Hevner, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common subtelomeric chromosomal deletion linked to mental retardation and seizures. Neuroimaging studies suggest that monosomy 1p36 is associated with brain malformations including polymicrogyria and nodular heterotopia, but the histopathology of these lesions is unknown. Here we present postmortem neuropathological findings from a 10 year-old girl with monosomy 1p36, who died of respiratory complications. The findings included micrencephaly, periventricular nodular heterotopia in occipitotemporal lobes, cortical dysgenesis resembling polymicrogyria in dorsolateral frontal lobes, hippocampal malrotation, callosal hypoplasia, superiorly rotated cerebellum with small vermis, and lumbosacral hydromyelia. The abnormal cortex exhibited "festooned" (undulating) supragranular layers, but no significant fusion of the molecular layer. Deletion mapping demonstrated single copy loss of a contiguous 1p36 terminal region encompassing many important neurodevelopmental genes, among them four HES genes implicated in regulating neural stem cell differentiation, and TP73, a monoallelically expressed gene. Our results suggest that brain and spinal malformations in monosomy 1p36 may be more extensive than previously recognized, and may depend on the parental origin of deleted genes. More broadly, our results suggest that specific genetic disorders may cause distinct forms of cortical dysgenesis.

  14. Refinement of 1p36 alterations not involving PRDM16 in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Duhoux, Francois P; Ameye, Geneviève; Lambot, Virginie; Herens, Christian; Lambert, Frédéric; Raynaud, Sophie; Wlodarska, Iwona; Michaux, Lucienne; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Labis, Elise; Taviaux, Sylvie; Chapiro, Elise; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Khac, Florence Nguyen; Struski, Stéphanie; Dobbelstein, Sophie; Dastugue, Nicole; Lippert, Eric; Speleman, Frank; Van Roy, Nadine; De Weer, An; Rack, Katrina; Talmant, Pascaline; Richebourg, Steven; Mugneret, Francine; Tigaud, Isabelle; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle; Laibe, Sophy; Nadal, Nathalie; Terré, Christine; Libouton, Jeanne-Marie; Decottignies, Anabelle; Vikkula, Miikka; Poirel, Hélène A

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed to characterize 81 cases of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies with cytogenetic 1p36 alterations not affecting the PRDM16 locus. In total, three subgroups were identified: balanced translocations (N = 27) and telomeric rearrangements (N = 15), both mainly observed in myeloid disorders; and unbalanced non-telomeric rearrangements (N = 39), mainly observed in lymphoid proliferations and frequently associated with a highly complex karyotype. The 1p36 rearrangement was isolated in 12 cases, mainly myeloid disorders. The breakpoints on 1p36 were more widely distributed than previously reported, but with identifiable rare breakpoint cluster regions, such as the TP73 locus. We also found novel partner loci on 1p36 for the known multi-partner genes HMGA2 and RUNX1. We precised the common terminal 1p36 deletion, which has been suggested to have an adverse prognosis, in B-cell lymphomas [follicular lymphomas and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas with t(14;18)(q32;q21) as well as follicular lymphomas without t(14;18)]. Intrachromosomal telomeric repetitive sequences were detected in at least half the cases of telomeric rearrangements. It is unclear how the latter rearrangements occurred and whether they represent oncogenic events or result from chromosomal instability during oncogenesis.

  15. Cch1p mediates Ca2+ influx to protect Saccharomyces cerevisiae against eugenol toxicity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Stephen K; McAinsh, Martin; Widdicks, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Eugenol has antifungal activity and is recognised as having therapeutic potential. However, little is known of the cellular basis of its antifungal activity and a better understanding of eugenol tolerance should lead to better exploitation of eugenol in antifungal therapies. The model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expressing apoaequorin was used to show that eugenol induces cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. We investigated the eugenol Ca(2+) signature in further detail and show that exponentially growing cells exhibit Ca(2+) elevation resulting exclusively from the influx of Ca(2+) across the plasma membrane whereas in stationary growth phase cells Ca(2+) influx from intracellular and extracellular sources contribute to the eugenol-induced Ca(2+) elevation. Ca(2+) channel deletion yeast mutants were used to identify the pathways mediating Ca(2+) influx; intracellular Ca(2+) release was mediated by the vacuolar Ca(2+) channel, Yvc1p, whereas the Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane could be resolved into Cch1p-dependent and Cch1p-independent pathways. We show that the growth of yeast devoid the plasma membrane Ca(2+) channel, Cch1p, was hypersensitive to eugenol and that this correlated with reduced Ca(2+) elevations. Taken together, these results indicate that a cch1p-mediated Ca(2+) influx is part of an intracellular signal which protects against eugenol toxicity. This study provides fresh insight into the mechanisms employed by fungi to tolerate eugenol toxicity which should lead to better exploitation of eugenol in antifungal therapies.

  16. Nud1p, the yeast homolog of Centriolin, regulates spindle pole body inheritance in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Oren; Taxis, Christof; Keller, Philipp J; Benjak, Aleksander; Stelzer, Ernst H K; Simchen, Giora; Knop, Michael

    2006-08-23

    Nud1p, a protein homologous to the mammalian centrosome and midbody component Centriolin, is a component of the budding yeast spindle pole body (SPB), with roles in anchorage of microtubules and regulation of the mitotic exit network during vegetative growth. Here we analyze the function of Nud1p during yeast meiosis. We find that a nud1-2 temperature-sensitive mutant has two meiosis-related defects that reflect genetically distinct functions of Nud1p. First, the mutation affects spore formation due to its late function during spore maturation. Second, and most important, the mutant loses its ability to distinguish between the ages of the four spindle pole bodies, which normally determine which SPB would be preferentially included in the mature spores. This affects the regulation of genome inheritance in starved meiotic cells and leads to the formation of random dyads instead of non-sister dyads under these conditions. Both functions of Nud1p are connected to the ability of Spc72p to bind to the outer plaque and half-bridge (via Kar1p) of the SPB. PMID:16888627

  17. Hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1 axis controls energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vagner R R; Micheletti, Thayana O; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Katashima, Carlos K; Lenhare, Luciene; Morari, Joseane; Mendes, Maria Carolina S; Razolli, Daniela S; Rocha, Guilherme Z; de Souza, Claudio T; Ryu, Dongryeol; Prada, Patrícia O; Velloso, Lício A; Carvalheira, José B C; Pauli, José Rodrigo; Cintra, Dennys E; Ropelle, Eduardo R

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) that has a role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that the S1P/S1PR1 signalling pathway in hypothalamic neurons regulates energy homeostasis in rodents. We demonstrate that S1PR1 protein is highly enriched in hypothalamic POMC neurons of rats. Intracerebroventricular injections of the bioactive lipid, S1P, reduce food consumption and increase rat energy expenditure through persistent activation of STAT3 and the melanocortin system. Similarly, the selective disruption of hypothalamic S1PR1 increases food intake and reduces the respiratory exchange ratio. We further show that STAT3 controls S1PR1 expression in neurons via a positive feedback mechanism. Interestingly, several models of obesity and cancer anorexia display an imbalance of hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 axis, whereas pharmacological intervention ameliorates these phenotypes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the neuronal S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 signalling axis plays a critical role in the control of energy homeostasis in rats. PMID:25255053

  18. Novel S1P(1) receptor agonists--part 3: from thiophenes to pyridines.

    PubMed

    Bolli, Martin H; Abele, Stefan; Birker, Magdalena; Bravo, Roberto; Bur, Daniel; de Kanter, Ruben; Kohl, Christopher; Grimont, Julien; Hess, Patrick; Lescop, Cyrille; Mathys, Boris; Müller, Claus; Nayler, Oliver; Rey, Markus; Scherz, Michael; Schmidt, Gunther; Seifert, Jürgen; Steiner, Beat; Velker, Jörg; Weller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In preceding communications we summarized our medicinal chemistry efforts leading to the identification of potent, selective, and orally active S1P1 agonists such as the thiophene derivative 1. As a continuation of these efforts, we replaced the thiophene in 1 by a 2-, 3-, or 4-pyridine and obtained less lipophilic, potent, and selective S1P1 agonists (e.g., 2) efficiently reducing blood lymphocyte count in the rat. Structural features influencing the compounds' receptor affinity profile and pharmacokinetics are discussed. In addition, the ability to penetrate brain tissue has been studied for several compounds. As a typical example for these pyridine based S1P1 agonists, compound 53 showed EC50 values of 0.6 and 352 nM for the S1P1 and S1P3 receptor, respectively, displayed favorable PK properties, and penetrated well into brain tissue. In the rat, compound 53 maximally reduced the blood lymphocyte count for at least 24 h after oral dosing of 3 mg/kg. PMID:24367923

  19. Yeast lipin 1 orthologue pah1p regulates vacuole homeostasis and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Sasser, Terry; Qiu, Quan-Sheng; Karunakaran, Surya; Padolina, Mark; Reyes, Anna; Flood, Blake; Smith, Sheena; Gonzales, Chad; Fratti, Rutilio A

    2012-01-13

    Vacuole homotypic fusion requires a group of regulatory lipids that includes diacylglycerol, a fusogenic lipid that is produced through multiple metabolic pathways including the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA). Here we examined the relationship between membrane fusion and PA phosphatase activity. Pah1p is the single yeast homologue of the Lipin family of PA phosphatases. Deletion of PAH1 was sufficient to cause marked vacuole fragmentation and abolish vacuole fusion. The function of Pah1p solely depended on its phosphatase activity as complementation studies showed that wild type Pah1p restored fusion, whereas the phosphatase dead mutant Pah1p(D398E) had no effect. We discovered that the lack of PA phosphatase activity blocked fusion by inhibiting the binding of SNAREs to Sec18p, an N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor homologue responsible for priming inactive cis-SNARE complexes. In addition, pah1Δ vacuoles were devoid of the late endosome/vacuolar Rab Ypt7p, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase Vps34p, and Vps39p, a subunit of the HOPS (homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting) tethering complex, all of which are required for vacuole fusion. The lack of Vps34p resulted in the absence of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, a lipid required for SNARE activity and vacuole fusion. These findings demonstrate that Pah1p and PA phosphatase activity are critical for vacuole homeostasis and fusion.

  20. Measurement of the χ b (3 P) mass and of the relative rate of χ b1(1 P) and χ b2(1 P) production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Lespinasse, M.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-10-01

    The production of χ b mesons in proton-proton collisions is studied using a data sample collected by the LHCb detector, at centre-of-mass energies of =7 and 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1. The χ b mesons are identified through their decays to ϒ(1 S) γ and ϒ(2 S) γ using photons that converted to e + e - pairs in the detector. The relative prompt production rate of χ b1(1 P) and χ b2(1 P) mesons is measured as a function of the ϒ(1 S) transverse momentum in the χ b rapidity range 2.0 < y <4.5. A precise measurement of the χ b (3 P) mass is also performed. Assuming a mass splitting between the χ b1(3 P) and the χ b2(3 P) states of 10.5 MeV/c2, the measured mass of the χ b1(3 P) meson is

  1. Morbid obesity in a child with monosomy 1p36 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zagalo, Ana; Dias, Patricia; Pereira, Carla; Sampaio, Maria de Lurdes

    2012-01-01

    The monosomy 1p36 syndrome is a cause of syndromic obesity. It is characterised by psychomotor delay, hypotonia and typical craniofacial dysmorphism. Other features commonly associated are behavioural anomalies including hyperphagia and self-injuring, seizures, congenital heart disease and hypothyroidism. The authors report the case of a 9-year and 5-month-boy referred to the paediatric endocrinology clinics for morbid obesity. Clinical findings were generalised obesity with a body mass index >95th centile, acanthosis nigricans of the neck, arms with self inflicted lesions, deep-set eyes, straight eyebrows, broad nasal bridge and pointed chin. He was unable to walk and had no expressive language. Cytogenetic analysis identified 1p36.33-pter deletion (~139 Mb terminal deletion in chromosome 1 short arm) and Y chromosome duplication. The blood analysis showed insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. The authors emphasise the need to consider monosomy 1p36 as a cause of severe psychomotor delay and obesity. PMID:22605691

  2. Division of labor in an oligomer of the DEAD-box RNA helicase Ded1p

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Andrea A.; Gao, Zhaofeng; Liu, Fei; Jia, Huijue; Yang, Quansheng

    2015-01-01

    Most aspects of RNA metabolism involve DEAD-box RNA helicases, enzymes that bind and remodel RNA and RNA-protein complexes in an ATP-dependent manner. Here we show that the DEAD-box helicase Ded1p oligomerizes in the cell and in vitro, and unwinds RNA as a trimer. Two protomers bind the single stranded region of RNA substrates and load a third protomer to the duplex, which then separates the strands. ATP utilization differs between the strand separating protomer and those bound to the single stranded region. Binding of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4G to Ded1p interferes with oligomerization and thereby modulates unwinding activity and RNA affinity of the helicase. Our data reveal a strict division of labor between the Ded1p protomers in the oligomer. This mode of oligomerization fundamentally differs from other helicases. Oligomerization represents a previously unappreciated level of regulation for DEAD-box helicase activities. PMID:26212457

  3. Morbid obesity in a child with monosomy 1p36 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zagalo, Ana; Dias, Patricia; Pereira, Carla; Sampaio, Maria de Lurdes

    2012-01-01

    The monosomy 1p36 syndrome is a cause of syndromic obesity. It is characterised by psychomotor delay, hypotonia and typical craniofacial dysmorphism. Other features commonly associated are behavioural anomalies including hyperphagia and self-injuring, seizures, congenital heart disease and hypothyroidism. The authors report the case of a 9-year and 5-month-boy referred to the paediatric endocrinology clinics for morbid obesity. Clinical findings were generalised obesity with a body mass index >95th centile, acanthosis nigricans of the neck, arms with self inflicted lesions, deep-set eyes, straight eyebrows, broad nasal bridge and pointed chin. He was unable to walk and had no expressive language. Cytogenetic analysis identified 1p36.33-pter deletion (~139 Mb terminal deletion in chromosome 1 short arm) and Y chromosome duplication. The blood analysis showed insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. The authors emphasise the need to consider monosomy 1p36 as a cause of severe psychomotor delay and obesity.

  4. Polymicrogyria and infantile spasms in a patient with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Kubota, Masaya; Kurosawa, Kenji; Ichihashi, Izumi; Kaneko, Yuu; Hattori, Ayako; Komaki, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2011-05-01

    A 3-months-old boy presented with partial seizures that soon evolved into infantile spasms. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria with right-sided predominance. ACTH therapy successfully controlled epilepsy and electroencephalograms were normalized. Conventional G-banded chromosomal analysis was performed due to his distinctive features and a derivative chromosome 1 derived from parental balanced translocation with a karyoptype of 46,XY,der(1)t(1;4)(p36.23;q35) was detected. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis confirmed the deleted region of 1p36 as large as 8.6Mb. This is the first delineation of concurrent complications of infantile spasms and polymicrogyria in patient with 1p36 deletion. 1p36 deletion syndrome should be broadly recognized as a differential diagnosis of regional polymicrogyria and/or infantile spasms.

  5. Division of Labor in an Oligomer of the DEAD-Box RNA Helicase Ded1p.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Andrea A; Gao, Zhaofeng; Liu, Fei; Jia, Huijue; Yang, Quansheng; Jankowsky, Eckhard

    2015-08-20

    Most aspects of RNA metabolism involve DEAD-box RNA helicases, enzymes that bind and remodel RNA and RNA-protein complexes in an ATP-dependent manner. Here we show that the DEAD-box helicase Ded1p oligomerizes in the cell and in vitro, and unwinds RNA as a trimer. Two protomers bind the single-stranded region of RNA substrates and load a third protomer to the duplex, which then separates the strands. ATP utilization differs between the strand-separating protomer and those bound to the single-stranded region. Binding of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4G to Ded1p interferes with oligomerization and thereby modulates unwinding activity and RNA affinity of the helicase. Our data reveal a strict division of labor between the Ded1p protomers in the oligomer. This mode of oligomerization fundamentally differs from other helicases. Oligomerization represents a previously unappreciated level of regulation for DEAD-box helicase activities.

  6. Electron-impact excitation of the n 1P levels of helium - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, David C.; Csanak, George; Trajmar, Sandor; Register, D. F.

    1992-01-01

    New experimental electron-energy-loss data have been used to extract differential and integral cross sections for excitation of the 2 1P level, and for the overlapping (3 1P, 3 1D, 3 3D) levels of helium, at 30-, 50-, and 100-eV incident electron energies. First-order many-body theory (FOMBT) has been used to calculate the differential and integral cross sections for excitation of the n 1P (n = 2,...,6) levels of helium by electron impact, for incident electron energies from threshold to 500 eV. Detailed comparisons between these two new sets of data are made as well as comparisons with appropriate published experimental and theoretical results. A simple scaling relationship is derived from the FOMBT results for n = 2,...,6 that provides differential and integral cross sections for all symmetry final levels of helium with n = 6 or greater.

  7. Combined PDF and Rietveld studies of ADORable zeolites and the disordered intermediate IPC-1P.

    PubMed

    Morris, Samuel A; Wheatley, Paul S; Položij, Miroslav; Nachtigall, Petr; Eliášová, Pavla; Čejka, Jiří; Lucas, Tim C; Hriljac, Joseph A; Pinar, Ana B; Morris, Russell E

    2016-09-28

    The disordered intermediate of the ADORable zeolite UTL has been structurally confirmed using the pair distribution function (PDF) technique. The intermediate, IPC-1P, is a disordered layered compound formed by the hydrolysis of UTL in 0.1 M hydrochloric acid solution. Its structure is unsolvable by traditional X-ray diffraction techniques. The PDF technique was first benchmarked against high-quality synchrotron Rietveld refinements of IPC-2 (OKO) and IPC-4 (PCR) - two end products of IPC-1P condensation that share very similar structural features. An IPC-1P starting model derived from density functional theory was used for the PDF refinement, which yielded a final fit of Rw = 18% and a geometrically reasonable structure. This confirms the layers do stay intact throughout the ADOR process and shows PDF is a viable technique for layered zeolite structure determination. PMID:27527381

  8. Roadblock termination by reb1p restricts cryptic and readthrough transcription.

    PubMed

    Colin, Jessie; Candelli, Tito; Porrua, Odil; Boulay, Jocelyne; Zhu, Chenchen; Lacroute, François; Steinmetz, Lars M; Libri, Domenico

    2014-12-01

    Widely transcribed compact genomes must cope with the major challenge of frequent overlapping or concurrent transcription events. Efficient and timely transcription termination is crucial to control pervasive transcription and prevent transcriptional interference. In yeast, transcription termination of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) occurs via two possible pathways that both require recognition of termination signals on nascent RNA by specific factors. We describe here an additional mechanism of transcription termination for RNAPII and demonstrate its biological significance. We show that the transcriptional activator Reb1p bound to DNA is a roadblock for RNAPII, which pauses and is ubiquitinated, thus triggering termination. Reb1p-dependent termination generates a class of cryptic transcripts that are degraded in the nucleus by the exosome. We also observed transcriptional interference between neighboring genes in the absence of Reb1p. This work demonstrates the importance of roadblock termination for controlling pervasive transcription and preventing transcription through gene regulatory regions.

  9. Dynamical Relativistic Effects in Quasielastic 1p -Shell Proton Knockout from O{sup 16}

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Aniol, K. A.; Auerbach, L.; Baker, F. T.; Berthot, J.; Bertin, P.-Y.; Boeglin, W. U.

    2000-04-10

    We have measured the cross section for quasielastic 1p -shell proton knockout in the {sup 16}O( e, e{sup '}p) reaction at {omega}=0.439 GeV and Q{sup 2}=0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2} for missing momentum P{sub miss}{<=}355 MeV /c . We have extracted the response functions R{sub L+TT} , R{sub T} , R{sub LT} , and the left-right asymmetry, A{sub LT} , for the 1p{sub 1/2} and the 1p{sub 3/2} states. The data are well described by relativistic distorted wave impulse approximation calculations. At large P{sub miss} , the structure observed in A{sub LT} indicates the existence of dynamical relativistic effects. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  10. Structural insights into how Yrb2p accelerates the assembly of the Xpo1p nuclear export complex.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Masako; Shirai, Natsuki; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    Proteins and ribonucleoproteins containing a nuclear export signal (NES) assemble with the exportin Xpo1p (yeast CRM1) and Gsp1p-GTP (yeast Ran-GTP) in the nucleus and exit through the nuclear pore complex. In the cytoplasm, Yrb1p (yeast RanBP1) displaces NES from Xpo1p. Efficient export of NES-cargoes requires Yrb2p (yeast RanBP3), a primarily nuclear protein containing nucleoporin-like phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats and a low-affinity Gsp1p-binding domain (RanBD). Here, we show that Yrb2p strikingly accelerates the association of Gsp1p-GTP and NES to Xpo1p. We have solved the crystal structure of the Xpo1p-Yrb2p-Gsp1p-GTP complex, a key assembly intermediate that can bind cargo rapidly. Although the NES-binding cleft of Xpo1p is closed in this intermediate, our data suggest that preloading of Gsp1p-GTP onto Xpo1p by Yrb2p, conformational flexibility of Xpo1p, and the low affinity of RanBD enable active displacement of Yrb2p RanBD by NES to occur effectively. The structure also reveals the major binding sites for FG repeats on Xpo1p.

  11. Analysis of CYP21A1P and the duplicated CYP21A2 genes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Ping; Lee, Hsien-Hsiung

    2012-09-10

    The RCCX module on chromosome 6p21.3 has 3 possible forms: monomodular, bimodular, and trimodular. Chromosomes with 4 RCCX modules are very rare. In the monomodule, most of the CYP21A1P genes do not exist. However, haplotypes of the RCCX module with more than one CYP21A2 gene were observed. Obviously, the gene located downstream of the XA gene can possibly include the CYP21A2 as well as the CYP21A1P gene.

  12. New, potent P1/P2-morpholinone-based HIV-protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kazmierski, Wieslaw M; Furfine, Eric; Spaltenstein, Andrew; Wright, Lois L

    2006-10-01

    We have developed efficient synthesis of morpholinone-based cyclic mimetics of the P1/P2 portion of the HIV-1 protease inhibitor Amprenavir. This effort led to discovery of allyl- and spiro-cyclopropyl-P2-substituted inhibitors 17 and 31, both 500 times more potent than the parent inhibitor 1. These results support morpholinones as novel mimetics of the P1/P2 portion of Amprenavir and potentially of other HIV-protease inhibitors, and thus provide a novel medicinal chemistry template for optimization toward more potent and drug-like inhibitors. PMID:16904316

  13. Three unrelated cases of paracentric inversions of 1p in individuals with abnormal phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Estop, A.M.; Karlin, S.M.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W.; Bansal, V.; Surti, U.; Lin, A.; Levinson, F.

    1994-02-15

    Paracentric inversions, involving a rearrangement within one chromosome arm, are rare. Although carriers of balanced paracentric inversions should theoretically not be at risk for abnormal offspring, such cases have been reported. The authors report on 2 unrelated cases of inherited paracentric inversions of 1p with breakpoints at p32 and p36.1 and p32.3 and p36.22 in individuals with abnormal phenotypes. Another case of 2 abnormal monozygotic twins with a de novo paracentric inversion of 1p with breakpoints at p22 and p34 is presented as well. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. New fluorinated agonists for targeting the sphingosin-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P(1)).

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rizwan S; Keul, Petra; Schäfers, Michael; Levkau, Bodo; Haufe, Günter

    2015-11-15

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P1) is involved in fundamental biological processes such as regulation of immune cell trafficking, vascular barrier function and angiogenesis. This Letter presents multistep syntheses of various fluorine substituted 12-aryl analogues of the drug fingolimod (FTY720) and a seven-steps route to 2-amino-17,17-difluoro-2-(hydroxymethyl)heptadecan-1-ol. In vitro and in vivo tests proved all these compounds as potent S1P1 receptor agonists.

  15. Excitations of {sup 1}P levels of zinc by electron impact on the ground state

    SciTech Connect

    Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor; Panajotovic, R.; Sevic, D.; Pejcev, V.; Marinkovic, B.P.; Filipovic, D.M.

    2005-07-15

    We present results of a joint theoretical and experimental investigation of electron scattering from the 4s{sup 2} {sup 1}S ground state of zinc. The 4s4p {sup 1}P{sup o} and 4s5p {sup 1}P{sup o} differential cross sections were measured at scattering angles between 10 degree sign and 150 degree sign and electron-energies of 15, 20, 25, 40, and 60 eV. Corresponding convergent close-coupling calculations have been performed and are compared with experiment.

  16. Genetic Evidence for Involvement of Neuronally Expressed S1P1 Receptor in Nociceptor Sensitization and Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Norbert; Benetti, Camilla; Andratsch, Manfred; Leitner, Michael G.; Constantin, Cristina E.; Camprubí-Robles, Maria; Quarta, Serena; Biasio, Wolfgang; Kuner, Rohini; Gibbins, Ian L.; Kress, Michaela; Haberberger, Rainer V.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a key regulator of immune response. Immune cells, epithelia and blood cells generate high levels of S1P in inflamed tissue. However, it is not known if S1P acts on the endings of nociceptive neurons, thereby contributing to the generation of inflammatory pain. We found that the S1P1 receptor for S1P is expressed in subpopulations of sensory neurons including nociceptors. Both S1P and agonists at the S1P1 receptor induced hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation in vitro and in vivo. S1P-induced hypersensitivity was strongly attenuated in mice lacking TRPV1 channels. S1P and inflammation-induced hypersensitivity was significantly reduced in mice with a conditional nociceptor-specific deletion of the S1P1 receptor. Our data show that neuronally expressed S1P1 receptors play a significant role in regulating nociceptor function and that S1P/S1P1 signaling may be a key player in the onset of thermal hypersensitivity and hyperalgesia associated with inflammation. PMID:21359147

  17. Engagement of S1P1-degradative mechanisms leads to vascular leak in mice

    PubMed Central

    Oo, Myat Lin; Chang, Sung-Hee; Thangada, Shobha; Wu, Ming-Tao; Rezaul, Karim; Blaho, Victoria; Hwang, Sun-Il; Han, David K.; Hla, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    GPCR inhibitors are highly prevalent in modern therapeutics. However, interference with complex GPCR regulatory mechanisms leads to both therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects. Recently, the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor inhibitor FTY720 (also known as Fingolimod), which induces lymphopenia and prevents neuroinflammation, was adopted as a disease-modifying therapeutic in multiple sclerosis. Although highly efficacious, dose-dependent increases in adverse events have tempered its utility. We show here that FTY720P induces phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) at multiple sites, resulting in GPCR internalization, polyubiquitinylation, and degradation. We also identified the ubiquitin E3 ligase WWP2 in the GPCR complex and demonstrated its requirement in FTY720-induced receptor degradation. GPCR degradation was not essential for the induction of lymphopenia, but was critical for pulmonary vascular leak in vivo. Prevention of receptor phosphorylation, internalization, and degradation inhibited vascular leak, which suggests that discrete mechanisms of S1P receptor regulation are responsible for the efficacy and adverse events associated with this class of therapeutics. PMID:21555855

  18. Identification of 1p36 deletion syndrome in patients with facial dysmorphism and developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Go Hun; Kim, Ja Hye; Cho, Ja Hyang; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Seo, Eul-Ju; Lee, Beom Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The 1p36 deletion syndrome is a microdeletion syndrome characterized by developmental delays/intellectual disability, craniofacial dysmorphism, and other congenital anomalies. To date, many cases of this syndrome have been reported worldwide. However, cases with this syndrome have not been reported in Korean populations anywhere. This study was performed to report the clinical and molecular characteristics of five Korean patients with the 1p36 deletion syndrome. Methods The clinical characteristics of the 5 patients were reviewed. Karyotyping and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analyses were performed for genetic diagnoses. Results All 5 patients had typical dysmorphic features including frontal bossing, flat right parietal bone, low-set ears, straight eyebrows, down-slanting palpebral fissure, hypotelorism, flat nasal roots, midface hypoplasia, pointed chins, small lips, and variable degrees of developmental delay. Each patient had multiple and variable anomalies such as a congenital heart defect including ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and patent duct arteriosus, ventriculomegaly, cryptorchism, or hearing loss. Karyotyping revealed the 1p36 deletion in only 1 patient, although it was confirmed in all 5 patients by MLPA analyses. Conclusion All the patients had the typical features of 1p36 deletion. These hallmarks can be used to identify other patients with this condition in their early years in order to provide more appropriate care. PMID:26893599

  19. Partial monosomy of chromosome 1p36.3: A distinctive phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Reish, O.; Berry, S.A.; King. R.A.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a series of five patients with a partial monosomy of 1p36.3 presenting with a similar syndromic appearance. The phenotype of deletion 1p36.3 patients includes abnormal facies, multiple congenital malformations, and mental retardation.The ages of the patients in our series ranged from 3 to 50 years. As the deletion is very small, detection in the present cases relied upon high resolution G-band analyses and was confirmed with FISH in cases 3 and 5. Patients 2 and 3 were diagnosed as adults; thus smaller deletions in 1p36.33 may be associated with longer life expectancy, but include the critical region for the above phenotype. We noted that the dysmorphic features of the patients are more prominent with older age and are difficult to appreciate in infancy. Observation of this specific 1p36 appears as a white, terminal G-band; detection of a small partial deletion or rearrangement may require greater than 550 band level resolution. FISH utilizing a probe to 1pter can facilitate and confirm these analyses.

  20. Delineating the phenotype of 1p36 deletion in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Brazil, Ashley; Stanford, Kevin; Smolarek, Teresa; Hopkin, Robert

    2014-10-01

    1p36 deletion is the most common telomeric deletion syndrome, with an incidence of 1/5,000-1/10,000. A variety of clinical complications have been reported including seizures, hypotonia, heart malformations, cardiomyopathy, vision problems, and hearing loss. Approximately 90% are reported to have severe to profound intellectual disability and 75% to have absent expressive language. Little is known about long-term outcomes. The current literature suggests a poor prognosis for most patients. This study attempted to assess medical conditions and function of adolescent and adult patients with 1p36 deletion. A survey was distributed through three support groups to identify patients >12 years of age to assess functional status and medical problems in older patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome. 40 patients were identified between 12 and 46 years old. Among our survey sample, medical complications including seizures, hypotonia, structural heart defects, hearing loss, and vision problems, were similar to previous reports. However, functional skills were better than anticipated, with an overwhelming majority reported to independently sit, walk, and receive the majority of nutrition orally. Forty-four percent were reported to use complex speech abilities. While medical problems in patients with 1p36 deletion were similar to those that have been previously reported, we also demonstrated these same concerns persist into adolescence and adulthood. Additionally, patients were reported to have better functional skills than anticipated. Thus, quality of life and level of function appear to be better than anticipated from previous studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The Yeast Cell Fusion Protein Prm1p Requires Covalent Dimerization to Promote Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Alex; Aguilar, Pablo S.; Walter, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Prm1p is a multipass membrane protein that promotes plasma membrane fusion during yeast mating. The mechanism by which Prm1p and other putative regulators of developmentally controlled cell-cell fusion events facilitate membrane fusion has remained largely elusive. Here, we report that Prm1p forms covalently linked homodimers. Covalent Prm1p dimer formation occurs via intermolecular disulfide bonds of two cysteines, Cys-120 and Cys-545. PRM1 mutants in which these cysteines have been substituted are fusion defective. These PRM1 mutants are normally expressed, retain homotypic interaction and can traffic to the fusion zone. Because prm1-C120S and prm1-C545S mutants can form covalent dimers when coexpressed with wild-type PRM1, an intermolecular C120-C545 disulfide linkage is inferred. Cys-120 is adjacent to a highly conserved hydrophobic domain. Mutation of a charged residue within this hydrophobic domain abrogates formation of covalent dimers, trafficking to the fusion zone, and fusion-promoting activity. The importance of intermolecular disulfide bonding informs models regarding the mechanism of Prm1-mediated cell-cell fusion. PMID:20485669

  2. Histone chaperone Chz1p regulates H2B ubiquitination and subtelomeric anti-silencing

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yakun; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Lin, Chan-Hsien; Arens, Christina E.; Saleem, Ramsey A.; Smith, Jennifer J.; Aitchison, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Chz1p is a histone chaperone that interacts physically and functionally with the histone variant Htz1p, which has been implicated in establishing and maintaining boundaries between transcriptionally inactive heterochromatin and active euchromatin. To investigate the role of Chz1p in chromatin organization, we performed genome-wide expression arrays and chromatin immunoprecipitations of SIR complex components and modified histones in a CHZ1 deletion strain. Deletion of CHZ1 led to reduced ubiquitination of subtelomere-associated H2B, reduced subtelomeric H3K79 di-methylation, and increased binding of Sir3p, and Sir4p at telomere-distal euchromatin regions, correlating with decreased gene expression in subtelomeric regions. This anti-silencing defect appears to be mediated by enhanced association of de-ubiquitinase Ubp10p with subtelomeric DNA, as detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. In support of this, we show that deletion of UBP10 can antagonize the subtelomeric silencing phenotype of Δchz1. Taken together, the results demonstrate a novel role for Chz1p in epigenetic regulation, through H2B de-ubiquitination by Ubp10p. PMID:20008511

  3. Increased sensitivity of HIV-1 p24 ELISA using a photochemical signal amplification system

    PubMed Central

    Bystryak, Simon; Santockyte, Rasa

    2016-01-01

    In this study we describe a photochemical signal amplification method (PSAM) for increasing of the sensitivity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for determination of HIV-1 p24 antigen. This method can be used for both commercially available and in-house ELISA tests, and has the advantage of being considerably simpler and less costly than alternative signal amplification methods. The photochemical signal amplification method is based on an autocatalytic photochemical reaction of a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrate, orthophenylenediamine (OPD). To compare the performance of PSAM-boosted ELISA with a conventional colorimetric ELISA for determination of HIV-1 p24 antigen we employed a PerkinElmer HIV-1 p24 ELISA kit, using conventional ELISA alongside ELISA + PSAM. In the present study, we show that PSAM technology allows one to increase the analytical sensitivity and dynamic range of a commercial HIV-1 p24 ELISA kit, with and without immune-complex disruption (ICD and Non-ICD ELISA), by a factor of approximately 40-fold. ELISA + PSAM is compatible with commercially available microtiter plate readers, requires only an inexpensive illumination device, and the PSAM amplification step takes no longer than 15 min. PMID:26090753

  4. Fission yeast mtr1p regulates interphase microtubule cortical dwell-time

    PubMed Central

    Carlier-Grynkorn, Frédérique; Ji, Liang; Fraisier, Vincent; Lombard, Berangère; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Paoletti, Anne; Ronot, Xavier; Tran, Phong T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The microtubule cytoskeleton plays important roles in cell polarity, motility and division. Microtubules inherently undergo dynamic instability, stochastically switching between phases of growth and shrinkage. In cells, some microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) and molecular motors can further modulate microtubule dynamics. We present here the fission yeast mtr1+, a new regulator of microtubule dynamics that appears to be not a MAP or a motor. mtr1-deletion (mtr1Δ) primarily results in longer microtubule dwell-time at the cell tip cortex, suggesting that mtr1p acts directly or indirectly as a destabilizer of microtubules. mtr1p is antagonistic to mal3p, the ortholog of mammalian EB1, which stabilizes microtubules. mal3Δ results in short microtubules, but can be partially rescued by mtr1Δ, as the double mutant mal3Δ mtr1Δ exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant. By sequence homology, mtr1p is predicted to be a component of the ribosomal quality control complex. Intriguingly, deletion of a predicted ribosomal gene, rps1801, also resulted in longer microtubule dwell-time similar to mtr1Δ. The double-mutant mal3Δ rps1801Δ also exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant alone. Our study suggests a possible involvement of mtr1p and the ribosome complex in modulating microtubule dynamics. PMID:24928430

  5. Fission yeast mtr1p regulates interphase microtubule cortical dwell-time.

    PubMed

    Carlier-Grynkorn, Frédérique; Ji, Liang; Fraisier, Vincent; Lombard, Berangère; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Paoletti, Anne; Ronot, Xavier; Tran, Phong T

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton plays important roles in cell polarity, motility and division. Microtubules inherently undergo dynamic instability, stochastically switching between phases of growth and shrinkage. In cells, some microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) and molecular motors can further modulate microtubule dynamics. We present here the fission yeast mtr1(+), a new regulator of microtubule dynamics that appears to be not a MAP or a motor. mtr1-deletion (mtr1Δ) primarily results in longer microtubule dwell-time at the cell tip cortex, suggesting that mtr1p acts directly or indirectly as a destabilizer of microtubules. mtr1p is antagonistic to mal3p, the ortholog of mammalian EB1, which stabilizes microtubules. mal3Δ results in short microtubules, but can be partially rescued by mtr1Δ, as the double mutant mal3Δ mtr1Δ exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant. By sequence homology, mtr1p is predicted to be a component of the ribosomal quality control complex. Intriguingly, deletion of a predicted ribosomal gene, rps1801, also resulted in longer microtubule dwell-time similar to mtr1Δ. The double-mutant mal3Δ rps1801Δ also exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant alone. Our study suggests a possible involvement of mtr1p and the ribosome complex in modulating microtubule dynamics. PMID:24928430

  6. SKI-1/S1P inhibitor PF-429242 impairs the onset of HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Matthieu; Sureau, Camille; Guévin, Carl; Seidah, Nabil G; Labonté, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Worldwide, approximately 170 million individuals are afflicted with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To prevent the development of inherent diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, tremendous efforts have been made, leading to the development of promising new treatments. However, their efficiency is still dependent on the viral genotype. Additionally, these treatments that target the virus directly can trigger the emergence of resistant variants. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a long-term (72h) inhibition of SKI-1/S1P, a master lipogenic pathway regulator through activation of SREBP, resulted in impaired HCV genome replication and infectious virion secretion. In the present study, we sought to investigate the antiviral effect of the SKI-1/S1P small molecule inhibitor PF-429242 at the early steps of the HCV lifecycle. Our results indicate a very potent antiviral effect of the inhibitor early in the viral lifecycle and that the overall action of the compound relies on two different contributions. The first one is SREBP/SKI-1/S1P dependent and involves LDLR and NPC1L1 proteins, while the second one is SREBP independent. Overall, our study confirms that SKI-1/S1P is a relevant target to impair HCV infection and that PF-429242 could be a promising candidate in the field of HCV infection treatment.

  7. Mp1p Is a Virulence Factor in Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongmin; Lo, Raymond K. C.; Cai, Jian-Pao; Au-Yeung, Rex K. H.; Ng, Wing-Fung; Tse, Herman; Wong, Samson S. Y.; Xu, Simin; Lam, Wai Hei; Tse, Man-Kit; Sze, Kong Hung; Kao, Richard Y.; Reiner, Neil E.; Hao, Quan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Background Talaromyces marneffei is an opportunistic dimorphic fungus prevalent in Southeast Asia. We previously demonstrated that Mp1p is an immunogenic surface and secretory mannoprotein of T. marneffei. Since Mp1p is a surface protein that can generate protective immunity, we hypothesized that Mp1p and/or its homologs are virulence factors. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the pathogenic roles of Mp1p and its homologs in a mouse model. All mice died 21 and 30 days after challenge with wild-type T. marneffei PM1 and MP1 complemented mutant respectively. None of the mice died 60 days after challenge with MP1 knockout mutant (P<0.0001). Seventy percent of mice died 60 days after challenge with MP1 knockdown mutant (P<0.0001). All mice died after challenge with MPLP1 to MPLP13 knockdown mutants, suggesting that only Mp1p plays a significant role in virulence. The mean fungal loads of PM1 and MP1 complemented mutant in the liver, lung, kidney and spleen were significantly higher than those of the MP1 knockout mutant. Similarly, the mean load of PM1 in the liver, lung and spleen were significantly higher than that of the MP1 knockdown mutant. Histopathological studies showed an abundance of yeast in the kidney, spleen, liver and lung with more marked hepatic and splenic necrosis in mice challenged with PM1 compared to MP1 knockout and MP1 knockdown mutants. Likewise, a higher abundance of yeast was observed in the liver and spleen of mice challenged with MP1 complemented mutant compared to MP1 knockout mutant. PM1 and MP1 complemented mutant survived significantly better than MP1 knockout mutant in macrophages at 48 hours (P<0.01) post-infection. The mean fungal counts of Pichia pastoris GS115-MP1 in the liver (P<0.001) and spleen (P<0.05) of mice were significantly higher than those of GS115 at 24 hours post-challenge. Conclusions/Significance Mp1p is a key virulence factor of T. marneffei. Mp1p mediates virulence by improving the survival of T. marneffei

  8. Phosphorylation of ORF1p is required for L1 retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Pamela R.; Jones, Charles E.; Furano, Anthony V.

    2015-01-01

    Although members of the L1 (LINE-1) clade of non-LTR retrotransposons can be deleterious, the L1 clade has remained active in most mammals for ∼100 million years and generated almost 40% of the human genome. The details of L1–host interaction are largely unknown, however. Here we report that L1 activity requires phosphorylation of the protein encoded by the L1 ORF1 (ORF1p). Critical phospho-acceptor residues (two serines and two threonines) reside in four conserved proline-directed protein kinase (PDPK) target sites. The PDPK family includes mitogen-activated protein kinases and cyclin-dependent kinases. Mutation of any PDPK phospho-acceptor inhibits L1 retrotransposition. The phosphomimetic aspartic acid can restore activity at the two serine sites, but not at either threonine site, where it is strongly inhibitory. ORF1p also contains conserved PDPK docking sites, which promote specific interaction of PDPKs with their targets. As expected, mutations in these sites also inhibit L1 activity. PDPK mutations in ORF1p that inactivate L1 have no significant effect on the ability of ORF1p to anneal RNA in vitro, an important biochemical property of the protein. We show that phosphorylated PDPK sites in ORF1p are required for an interaction with the peptidyl prolyl isomerase 1 (Pin1), a critical component of PDPK-mediated regulation. Pin1 acts via isomerization of proline side chains at phosphorylated PDPK motifs, thereby affecting substrate conformation and activity. Our demonstration that L1 activity is dependent on and integrated with cellular phosphorylation regulatory cascades significantly increases our understanding of interactions between L1 and its host. PMID:25831499

  9. Phosphorylation of ORF1p is required for L1 retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Cook, Pamela R; Jones, Charles E; Furano, Anthony V

    2015-04-01

    Although members of the L1 (LINE-1) clade of non-LTR retrotransposons can be deleterious, the L1 clade has remained active in most mammals for ∼100 million years and generated almost 40% of the human genome. The details of L1-host interaction are largely unknown, however. Here we report that L1 activity requires phosphorylation of the protein encoded by the L1 ORF1 (ORF1p). Critical phospho-acceptor residues (two serines and two threonines) reside in four conserved proline-directed protein kinase (PDPK) target sites. The PDPK family includes mitogen-activated protein kinases and cyclin-dependent kinases. Mutation of any PDPK phospho-acceptor inhibits L1 retrotransposition. The phosphomimetic aspartic acid can restore activity at the two serine sites, but not at either threonine site, where it is strongly inhibitory. ORF1p also contains conserved PDPK docking sites, which promote specific interaction of PDPKs with their targets. As expected, mutations in these sites also inhibit L1 activity. PDPK mutations in ORF1p that inactivate L1 have no significant effect on the ability of ORF1p to anneal RNA in vitro, an important biochemical property of the protein. We show that phosphorylated PDPK sites in ORF1p are required for an interaction with the peptidyl prolyl isomerase 1 (Pin1), a critical component of PDPK-mediated regulation. Pin1 acts via isomerization of proline side chains at phosphorylated PDPK motifs, thereby affecting substrate conformation and activity. Our demonstration that L1 activity is dependent on and integrated with cellular phosphorylation regulatory cascades significantly increases our understanding of interactions between L1 and its host. PMID:25831499

  10. The topology of the Lcb1p subunit of yeast serine palmitoyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Han, Gongshe; Gable, Ken; Yan, Lianying; Natarajan, Mukil; Krishnamurthy, Jayasree; Gupta, Sita D; Borovitskaya, Anna; Harmon, Jeffrey M; Dunn, Teresa M

    2004-12-17

    The structural organization and topology of the Lcb1p subunit of yeast and mammalian serine palmitoyltransferases (SPT) were investigated. In the yeast protein, three membrane-spanning domains were identified by insertion of glycosylation and factor Xa cleavage sites at various positions. The first domain of the yeast protein, located between residues 50 and 84, was not required for the stability, membrane association, interaction with Lcb2p, or enzymatic activity. Deletion of the comparable domain of the mammalian protein SPTLC1 also had little effect on its function, demonstrating that this region is not required for membrane localization or heterodimerization with SPTLC2. The second and third membrane-spanning domains of yeast Lcb1p, located between residues 342 and 371 and residues 425 and 457, respectively, create a luminal loop of approximately 60 residues. In contrast to the first membrane-spanning domain, the second and third membrane-spanning domains were both required for Lcb1p stability. In addition, mutations in the luminal loop destabilized the SPT heterodimer indicating that this region of the protein is important for SPT structure and function. Mutations in the extreme carboxyl-terminal region of Lcb1p also disrupted heterodimer formation. Taken together, these data suggest that in contrast to other members of the alpha-oxoamine synthases that are soluble homodimers, the Lcb1p and Lcb2p subunits of the SPT heterodimer may interact in the cytosol, as well as within the membrane and/or the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:15485854

  11. Rapid detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen using magnetic immuno-chromatography (MICT).

    PubMed

    Workman, Shon; Wells, Susan K; Pau, Chou-Pong; Owen, S Michele; Dong, X Fan; LaBorde, Ron; Granade, Timothy C

    2009-09-01

    Detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections has been enhanced by incorporating p24 antigen detection with current HIV antibody detection using enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). However, screening for HIV antibodies has increased through the use of rapid, lateral-flow HIV antibody detection assays that currently do not have the capability to detect HIV p24 antigen. In this report, a lateral-flow based assay using super-paramagnetic particles as the detection marker was developed for the detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen. This magnetic immuno-chromatographic test (MICT) uses an inexpensive, low-maintenance instrument that detects the magnetic moment of the super-paramagnetic particles in a magnetic field. MICT is simple to perform, provides a numerical output for easier determination of reactive results and can be completed in 40min. The lower limit of detection for HIV-1 p24 spiked into assay sample buffer and 50% plasma was 30pg/ml for both. Detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen at 50pg/ml was reproducible in both inter-run and intra-run assays with coefficients of variation of <13%. Furthermore, the MICT p24 assay was able to detect intact virus spiked into 50% plasma (lower detection limit of approximately 250,000 viral RNA copies/ml). MICT detection of increasing HIV-1 p24 levels in commercially available seroconversion panels by MICT was only slightly later than that detected by much more complex EIAs. MICT could provide a simple, low-cost, and portable method for rapid HIV-1 p24 detection in a variety of testing environments. PMID:19482361

  12. Discovery of 3-arylpropionic acids as potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1P1) with high selectivity against all other known S1P receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Huo, Pei; Doherty, George; Toth, Lesile; Hale, Jeffrey J; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Quackenbush, Elizabeth; Wickham, Alexandra; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2006-07-15

    A series of 3-arylpropionic acids were synthesized as S1P1 receptor agonists. Structure-activity relationship studies on the pendant phenyl ring revealed several structural features offering selectivity of S1P1 binding against S1P2-5. These highly selective S1P1 agonists induced peripheral blood lymphocyte lowering in mice and one of them was found to be efficacious in a rat skin transplantation model, supporting that S1P1 agonism is primarily responsible for the immunosuppressive efficacy observed in preclinical animal models.

  13. Complex structural rearrangement features suggesting chromoanagenesis mechanism in a case of 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zanardo, Évelin Aline; Piazzon, Flavia Balbo; Dutra, Roberta Lelis; Dias, Alexandre Torchio; Montenegro, Marília Moreira; Novo-Filho, Gil Monteiro; Costa, Thaís Virgínia Moura Machado; Nascimento, Amom Mendes; Kim, Chong Ae; Kulikowski, Leslie Domenici

    2014-12-01

    Genome rearrangements are caused by the erroneous repair of DNA double-strand breaks, leading to several alterations that result in loss or gain of the structural genomic of a dosage-sensitive genes. However, the mechanisms that promote the complexity of rearrangements of congenital or developmental defects in human disease are unclear. The investigation of complex genomic abnormalities could help to elucidate the mechanisms and causes for the formation and facilitate the understanding of congenital or developmental defects in human disease. We here report one case of a patient with atypical clinical features of the 1p36 syndrome and the use of cytogenomic techniques to characterize the genomic alterations. Analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array revealed a complex rearrangement in the 1p36.3 region with deletions and duplication interspaced by normal sequences. We also suggest that chromoanagenesis could be a possible mechanism involved in the repair and stabilization of this rearrangement.

  14. Flocculation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by RNA/DNA helicase Sen1p.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikash; Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Sariki, Santhosh Kumar; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2015-10-01

    The Nrd1-Nab3-Sen1 (NNS) complex terminates transcription of non-coding RNA genes and mediates degradation of the produced transcript by the nuclear exosome. The NNS complex also represses some stress response genes, by stimulating premature termination. A well-characterized stress response in yeast is flocculation, where cells aggregate to form flocs under expression of lectin-encoding genes designated as FLOs. In this study, we demonstrated the role of the NNS complex and Rrp6p in the expression of flocculation genes: FLO1, FLO5, FLO9, and FLO10. Furthermore, a deletion mutant of the RNA processing machinery (RNT1), and SEN1 mutants that are unable to interact with Rnt1p, exhibit a flocculation phenotype. In summary, we have identified a cooperative role of Rnt1p, Rrp6p and the NNS complex in the repression of FLO genes.

  15. Characterization of Avt1p as a vacuolar proton/amino acid antiporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tone, Junichi; Yoshimura, Ayumi; Manabe, Kunio; Murao, Nami; Sekito, Takayuki; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Several genes for vacuolar amino acid transport were reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but have not well been investigated. We characterized AVT1, a member of the AVT vacuolar transporter family, which is reported to be involved in lifespan of yeast. ATP-dependent uptake of isoleucine and histidine by the vacuolar vesicles of an AVT exporter mutant was lost by introducing avt1∆ mutation. Uptake activity was inhibited by the V-ATPase inhibitor: concanamycin A and a protonophore. Isoleucine uptake was inhibited by various neutral amino acids and histidine, but not by γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and aspartate. V-ATPase-dependent acidification of the vesicles was declined by the addition of isoleucine or histidine, depending upon Avt1p. Taken together with the data of the amino acid contents of vacuolar fractions in cells, the results suggested that Avt1p is a proton/amino acid antiporter important for vacuolar compartmentalization of various amino acids.

  16. Atheroprotective role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P).

    PubMed

    Potì, Francesco; Simoni, Manuela; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2014-08-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies documented an inverse relationship between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and the extent of atherosclerotic disease. However, clinical interventions targeting HDL cholesterol failed to show clinical benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk reduction, suggesting that HDL components distinct from cholesterol may account for anti-atherogenic effects attributed to this lipoprotein. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-a lysosphingolipid exerting its biological activity via binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors and regulating a wide array of biological responses in a variety of different organs and tissues including the cardiovascular system-has been identified as an integral constituent of HDL particles. In the present review, we discuss current evidence from epidemiological studies, experimental approaches in vitro, and animal models of atherosclerosis, suggesting that S1P contributes to atheroprotective effects exerted by HDL particles. PMID:24891400

  17. Cloning and characterization of CpG islands of the human chromosome 1p36 region

    SciTech Connect

    Ellmeier, W.; Barnas, C.; Kobrna, A.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the localization of CpG islands to human chromosome 1p36 as a means for the isolation of genes using hybridization techniques. Two cDNA clones encode the human transcription factor E2F-2 and the dominant-negative helix-loop-helix gene ID3. Further information regarding the organization of human chromosome 1 was accomplished using electrophoresis. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  18. The Rtr1p CTD phosphatase autoregulates its mRNA through a degradation pathway involving the REX exonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Hodko, Domagoj; Ward, Taylor; Chanfreau, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Rtr1p is a phosphatase that impacts gene expression by modulating the phosphorylation status of the C-terminal domain of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II. Here, we show that Rtr1p is a component of a novel mRNA degradation pathway that promotes its autoregulation through turnover of its own mRNA. We show that the 3′UTR of the RTR1 mRNA contains a cis element that destabilizes this mRNA. RTR1 mRNA turnover is achieved through binding of Rtr1p to the RTR1 mRNP in a manner that is dependent on this cis element. Genetic evidence shows that Rtr1p-mediated decay of the RTR1 mRNA involves the 5′-3′ DExD/H-box RNA helicase Dhh1p and the 3′-5′ exonucleases Rex2p and Rex3p. Rtr1p and Rex3p are found associated with Dhh1p, suggesting a model for recruiting the REX exonucleases to the RTR1 mRNA for degradation. Rtr1p-mediated decay potentially impacts additional transcripts, including the unspliced BMH2 pre-mRNA. We propose that Rtr1p may imprint its RNA targets cotranscriptionally and determine their downstream degradation mechanism by directing these transcripts to a novel turnover pathway that involves Rtr1p, Dhh1p, and the REX family of exonucleases. PMID:26843527

  19. ER-associated SNAREs and Sey1p mediate nuclear fusion at two distinct steps during yeast mating.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jason V; Arlow, Tim; Inkellis, Elizabeth R; Koo, Timothy S; Rose, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    During yeast mating, two haploid nuclei fuse membranes to form a single diploid nucleus. However, the known proteins required for nuclear fusion are unlikely to function as direct fusogens (i.e., they are unlikely to directly catalyze lipid bilayer fusion) based on their predicted structure and localization. Therefore we screened known fusogens from vesicle trafficking (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors [SNAREs]) and homotypic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fusion (Sey1p) for additional roles in nuclear fusion. Here we demonstrate that the ER-localized SNAREs Sec20p, Ufe1p, Use1p, and Bos1p are required for efficient nuclear fusion. In contrast, Sey1p is required indirectly for nuclear fusion; sey1Δ zygotes accumulate ER at the zone of cell fusion, causing a block in nuclear congression. However, double mutants of Sey1p and Sec20p, Ufe1p, or Use1p, but not Bos1p, display extreme ER morphology defects, worse than either single mutant, suggesting that retrograde SNAREs fuse ER in the absence of Sey1p. Together these data demonstrate that SNAREs mediate nuclear fusion, ER fusion after cell fusion is necessary to complete nuclear congression, and there exists a SNARE-mediated, Sey1p-independent ER fusion pathway.

  20. Involvement of sphingosine 1-phosphate (SIP)/S1P3 signaling in cholestasis-induced liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Changyong; Jiang, Xiangming; Yang, Lin; Liu, Xihong; Yue, Shi; Li, Liying

    2009-10-01

    Bioactive sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and S1P receptors (S1PRs) have been implicated in many critical cellular events, including inflammation, cancer, and angiogenesis. However, the role of S1P/S1PR signaling in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis has not been well documented. In this study, we found that S1P levels and S1P(3) receptor expression in liver tissue were markedly up-regulated in a mouse model of cholestasis-induced liver fibrosis. In addition, the S1P(3) receptor was also expressed in green fluorescent protein transgenic bone marrow (BM)-derived cells found in the damaged liver of transplanted chimeric mice that underwent bile duct ligation. Silencing of S1P(3) expression significantly inhibited S1P-induced BM cell migration in vitro. Furthermore, a selective S1P(3) receptor antagonist, suramin, markedly reduced the number of BM-derived cells during cholestasis. Interestingly, suramin administration clearly ameliorated bile duct ligation-induced hepatic fibrosis, as demonstrated by attenuated deposition of collagen type I and III, reduced smooth muscle alpha-actin expression, and decreased total hydroxyproline content. In conclusion, our data suggest that S1P/S1P(3) signaling plays an important role in cholestasis-induced liver fibrosis through mediating the homing of BM cells. Modulation of S1PR activity may therefore represent a new antifibrotic strategy.

  1. Cdc42p and Rho1p are sequentially activated and mechanistically linked to vacuole membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Michael R.; Jones, Lynden; Eitzen, Gary

    2010-03-26

    Small monomeric GTPases act as molecular switches, regulating many biological functions via activation of membrane localized signaling cascades. Activation of their switch function is controlled by GTP binding and hydrolysis. Two Rho GTPases, Cdc42p and Rho1p, are localized to the yeast vacuole where they regulate membrane fusion. Here, we define a method to directly examine vacuole membrane Cdc42p and Rho1p activation based on their affinity to probes derived from effectors. Cdc42p and Rho1p showed unique temporal activation which aligned with distinct subreactions of in vitro vacuole fusion. Cdc42p was rapidly activated in an ATP-independent manner while Rho1p activation was kinetically slower and required ATP. Inhibitors that are known to block vacuole membrane fusion were examined for their effect on Cdc42p and Rho1p activation. Rdi1p, which inhibits the dissociation of GDP from Rho proteins, blocked both Cdc42p and Rho1p activation. Ligands of PI(4,5)P{sub 2} specifically inhibited Rho1p activation while pre-incubation with U73122, which targets Plc1p function, increased Rho1p activation. These results define unique activation mechanisms for Cdc42p and Rho1p, which may be linked to the vacuole membrane fusion mechanism.

  2. The membrane remodeling protein Pex11p activates the GTPase Dnm1p during peroxisomal fission

    PubMed Central

    Opalinski, Lukasz; Landgraf, Christiane; Costello, Joseph; Schrader, Michael; Krikken, Arjen M.; Knoops, Kèvin; Kram, Anita M.; Volkmer, Rudolf; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2015-01-01

    The initial phase of peroxisomal fission requires the peroxisomal membrane protein Peroxin 11 (Pex11p), which remodels the membrane, resulting in organelle elongation. Here, we identify an additional function for Pex11p, demonstrating that Pex11p also plays a crucial role in the final step of peroxisomal fission: dynamin-like protein (DLP)-mediated membrane scission. First, we demonstrate that yeast Pex11p is necessary for the function of the GTPase Dynamin-related 1 (Dnm1p) in vivo. In addition, our data indicate that Pex11p physically interacts with Dnm1p and that inhibiting this interaction compromises peroxisomal fission. Finally, we demonstrate that Pex11p functions as a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for Dnm1p in vitro. Similar observations were made for mammalian Pex11β and the corresponding DLP Drp1, indicating that DLP activation by Pex11p is conserved. Our work identifies a previously unknown requirement for a GAP in DLP function. PMID:25941407

  3. The yeast vacuolar ABC transporter Ybt1p regulates membrane fusion through Ca2+ transport modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sasser, Terry L.; Padolina, Mark; Fratti, Rutilio A.

    2013-01-01

    Ybt1p is a class C ABC transporter (ATP-binding cassette transporter) that is localized to the vacuole of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although Ybt1p was originally identified as a bile acid transporter, it has also been found to function in other capacities, including the translocation of phosphatidylcholine to the vacuole lumen, and the regulation of Ca2+ homoeostasis. In the present study we found that deletion of YBT1 enhanced in vitro homotypic vacuole fusion by up to 50 % relative to wild-type vacuoles. The increased vacuole fusion was not due to aberrant protein sorting of SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein receptors) or recruitment of factors from the cytosol such as Ypt7p and the HOPS (homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting) tethering complex. In addition, ybt1Δ vacuoles displayed no observable differences in the formation of SNARE complexes, interactions between SNAREs and HOPS, or formation of vertex microdomains. However, the absence of Ybt1p caused significant changes in Ca2+ transport during fusion. One difference was the prolonged Ca2+ influx exhibited by ybt1Δ vacuoles at the start of the fusion reaction. We also observed a striking delay in SNARE-dependent Ca2+ efflux. As vacuole fusion can be inhibited by high Ca2+ concentrations, we suggest that the delayed efflux in ybt1Δ vacuoles leads to the enhanced SNARE function. PMID:22970809

  4. Comparing CN Features in Two Comets: 1P/Halley and 103P/Hartley 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Lejoly, Cassandra; Barrera, Jose; Mueller, Beatrice; Schleicher, David

    2015-11-01

    Comets 1P/Halley and 103P/Hartley 2 show distinct CN features in their respecive comae. Both comets are non-principal-axis rotators. 1P/Halley is the proto-type for Halley-type comets with the Oort Cloud as its possible source region, whereas 103P/Hartley 2 is a Jupiter-Family comet that possibly originated from the Kuiper Belt. Both comets were spacecraft targets and studied widely from both space and from the ground.We will discuss the properties of CN features, and in particular the behavior of the derived outflow velocities based on the CN features present in the groundbased coma images of these two comets. The corresponding heliocentric distances for CN images of comet 1P/Halley range from approximately 0.8 AU to 2.0 AU (during its post-perihelion leg of the 1986 apparition). For CN images of comet 103P/Hartley 2, the corresponding heliocentric distances range from 1.31 AU through the perihelion (at 1.06 AU) to 1.25 AU (during its 2010 apparition).Ultimately, these results will be used to understand the rotational states and the activity behaviors of these two comets.

  5. Cap1p attenuates the apoptosis of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bao-Di; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Lan-Xue; Li, De-Dong; Li, Ming-Bang; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Candida albicans is the most common opportunistic fungal pathogen and its apoptosis is inducible by environmental stress. Based on our previous finding that transcription factor Cap1p was involved in baicalein-induced apoptosis, the present study aimed to further clarify the role of Cap1p in apoptosis by observing the impact of CAP1 deletion on cell fate. It was found that apoptotic stimulation with amphotericin B, acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide increased the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells, caspase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, whereas it decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP level in the cap1Δ/Δ mutant. The cell fate was, at least partly, caused by glutathione depletion and attenuation of the expression of the glutathione reductase gene in the cap1Δ/Δ mutant. Collectively, our data suggest that Cap1p participated in the apoptosis of C. albicans by regulating the expression of the glutathione reductase gene and glutathione content. PMID:23517286

  6. On F-algebras M(p)   (1 < p < ∞) of holomorphic functions.

    PubMed

    Meštrović, Romeo

    2014-01-01

    We consider the classes M(p)  (1 < p < ∞) of holomorphic functions on the open unit disk in the complex plane. These classes are in fact generalizations of the class M introduced by Kim (1986). The space M (p) equipped with the topology given by the metric ρ p defined by ρp (f, g) = ||f - g|| p = (∫0(2π) log(p) (1 + M(f - g)(θ))(dθ/2π))(1/p), with f, g ∈ M (p) and Mf(θ) = sup 0 ⩽ r<1 ⁡|f(re(iθ))|, becomes an F-space. By a result of Stoll (1977), the Privalov space N(p)  (1 < p < ∞) with the topology given by the Stoll metric d p is an F-algebra. By using these two facts, we prove that the spaces M(p) and N(p) coincide and have the same topological structure. Consequently, we describe a general form of continuous linear functionals on M(p) (with respect to the metric ρp). Furthermore, we give a characterization of bounded subsets of the spaces M(p). Moreover, we give the examples of bounded subsets of M(p) that are not relatively compact. PMID:24672388

  7. Is 1p36 deletion associated with anterior body wall defects?

    PubMed

    Çöllü, Medis; Yüksel, Şirin; Şirin, Başak Kumbasar; Abbasoğlu, Latif; Alanay, Yasemin

    2016-07-01

    Epispadias and exstrophy of the cloaca, also known as OEIS complex (omphalocele, exstrophy, imperforate anus, spinal defects), respectively constitute the most benign and severe ends of the bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC) spectrum. In 2009, El-Hattab et al. reported the first patient with OEIS complex associated with a chromosome 1p36 deletion. Here we report a second patient with 1p36 deletion who also has classic bladder exstrophy, supporting the possible role of genes in this region in the development of BEEC. The absence of omphalocele and imperforate anus in our patient places him toward classic bladder exstrophy while presence of spina bifida and the absence of coccyx suggest an overlap with OEIS complex. An additional differential diagnosis is the pentalogy of Cantrell in our patient as he also has a diaphragmatic hernia and an incomplete sternum. This is the second observation of a ventral midline birth defect in association with 1p36 deletion syndrome, following El-Hattab et al.'s report [2009]. The three genes (NOCL2, DVL1, and MMP23B) discussed as possible candidates are also among the deleted ones in our patient, supporting the possible role of these genes in BEEC spectrum. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Recurrent interstitial 1p36 deletions: Evidence for germline mosaicism and complex rearrangement breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Gajecka, Marzena; Saitta, Sulagna C; Gentles, Andrew J; Campbell, Lindsey; Ciprero, Karen; Geiger, Elizabeth; Catherwood, Anne; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Shaikh, Tamim; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2010-12-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 are one of the most frequently encountered subtelomeric alterations. Clinical features of monosomy 1p36 include neurocognitive impairment, hearing loss, seizures, cardiac defects, and characteristic facial features. The majority of cases have occurred sporadically, implying that genomic instability plays a role in the prevalence of the syndrome. Here, we report two siblings with mild phenotypic features of the deletion syndrome, including developmental delay, hearing loss, and left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC). Microarray analysis using bacterial artificial chromosome and oligonucleotide microarrays indicated the deletions were identical, suggesting germline mosaicism. Parental phenotypes were normal, and analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) did not show mosaicism. These small interstitial deletions were not detectable by conventional subtelomeric FISH analysis. To investigate the mechanism of deletion further, the breakpoints were cloned and sequenced, demonstrating the presence of a complex rearrangement. Sequence analysis of genes in the deletion interval did not reveal any mutations on the intact homologue that may have contributed to the LVNC seen in both children. This is the first report of apparent germline mosaicism for this disorder. Thus, our findings have important implications for diagnostic approaches and for recurrence risk counseling in families with a child with monosomy 1p36. In addition, our results further refine the minimal critical region for LVNC and hearing loss.

  9. S1P lyase regulates DNA damage responses through a novel sphingolipid feedback mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Oskouian, B; Fyrst, H; Zhang, M; Paris, F; Saba, J D

    2011-01-01

    The injurious consequences of ionizing radiation (IR) to normal human cells and the acquired radioresistance of cancer cells represent limitations to cancer radiotherapy. IR induces DNA damage response pathways that orchestrate cell cycle arrest, DNA repair or apoptosis such that irradiated cells are either repaired or eliminated. Concomitantly and independent of DNA damage, IR activates acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), which generates ceramide, thereby promoting radiation-induced apoptosis. However, ceramide can also be metabolized to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which acts paradoxically as a radioprotectant. Thus, sphingolipid metabolism represents a radiosensitivity pivot point, a notion supported by genetic evidence in IR-resistant cancer cells. S1P lyase (SPL) catalyzes the irreversible degradation of S1P in the final step of sphingolipid metabolism. We show that SPL modulates the kinetics of DNA repair, speed of recovery from G2 cell cycle arrest and the extent of apoptosis after IR. SPL acts through a novel feedback mechanism that amplifies stress-induced ceramide accumulation, and downregulation/inhibition of either SPL or ASMase prevents premature cell cycle progression and mitotic death. Further, oral administration of an SPL inhibitor to mice prolonged their survival after exposure to a lethal dose of total body IR. Our findings reveal SPL to be a regulator of ASMase, the G2 checkpoint and DNA repair and a novel target for radioprotection.

  10. Genetic and epigenetic characterization of low-grade gliomas reveals frequent methylation of the MLH3 gene.

    PubMed

    Lhotska, Halka; Zemanova, Zuzana; Cechova, Hana; Ransdorfova, Sarka; Lizcova, Libuse; Kramar, Filip; Krejcik, Zdenek; Svobodova, Karla; Bystricka, Dagmar; Hrabal, Petr; Dohnalova, Alena; Michalova, Kyra

    2015-11-01

    Diffuse astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas (WHO grade II) are the most common histological subtypes of low-grade gliomas (LGGs). Several molecular and epigenetic markers have been identified that predict tumor progression. Our aim was in detail to investigate the genetic and epigenetic background of LGGs and to identify new markers that might play a role in tumor behavior. Twenty-three patients with oligodendroglioma or oligoastrocytoma (LGO) and 22 patients with diffuse astrocytoma (LGA) were investigated using several molecular-cytogenetic and molecular methods to assess their copy number variations, mutational status and level of promoter methylation. The most frequent findings were a 1p/19q codeletion in 83% of LGO and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) of 17p in 72% of LGA. Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) genes were detected in 96% of LGO and 91% of LGA. The O-6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter was methylated in 83% of LGO and 59% of LGA. MutL homolog 3 (MLH3) promoter methylation was observed in 61% of LGO and 27% of LGA. Methylation of the MGMT promoter, 1p/19q codeletion, mutated IDH1, and CN-LOH of 17p were the most frequent genetic aberrations in LGGs. The findings were more diverse in LGA than in LGO. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time description of methylation of the MLH3 gene promoter in LGGs. Further studies are required to determine the role of the methylated MLH3 promoter and the other aberrations detected.

  11. Gef1p, a New Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Cdc42p, Regulates Polarity in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Coll, Pedro M.; Trillo, Yadira; Ametzazurra, Amagoia; Perez, Pilar

    2003-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe cdc42+ regulates cell morphology and polarization of the actin cytoskeleton. Scd1p/Ral1p is the only described guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Cdc42p in S. pombe. We have identified a new GEF, named Gef1p, specifically regulating Cdc42p. Gef1p binds to inactive Cdc42p but not to other Rho GTPases in two-hybrid assays. Overexpression of gef1+ increases specifically the GTP-bound Cdc42p, and Gef1p is capable of stimulating guanine nucleotide exchange of Cdc42p in vitro. Overexpression of gef1+ causes changes in cell morphology similar to those caused by overexpression of the constitutively active cdc42G12V allele. Gef1p localizes to the septum. gef1+ deletion is viable but causes a mild cell elongation and defects in bipolar growth and septum formation, suggesting a role for Gef1p in the control of cell polarity and cytokinesis. The double mutant gef1Δ scd1Δ is not viable, indicating that they share an essential function as Cdc42p activators. However, both deletion and overexpression of either gef1+ or scd1+ causes different morphological phenotypes, which suggest different functions. Genetic evidence revealed a link between Gef1p and the signaling pathway of Shk1/Orb2p and Orb6p. In contrast, no genetic interaction between Gef1p and Shk2p-Mkh1p pathway was observed. PMID:12529446

  12. Molecular Analysis of Pediatric Oligodendrogliomas Highlights Genetic Differences with Adult Counterparts and Other Pediatric Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Nauen, David; Haley, Lisa; Lin, Ming-Tseh; Perry, Arie; Giannini, Caterina; Burger, Peter C.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendroglioma represents a distinctive neoplasm in adults but similar neoplasms occur rarely in children. We studied 20 cases of pediatric oligodendroglioma by SNP array (median age 9 years, range 1–19; 15 grade II and 5 grade III). Cytogenetic abnormalities were present in 8 (53%) grade II and all five anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Most changes were in the form of deletion and copy neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The most common abnormality was 1p deletion (n = 5). Whole arm 1p19q co-deletion was present in three cases from adolescent patients and 9p loss in 3, including one low-grade oligodendroglioma with CDKN2A homozygous deletion. Common losses were largely limited to the anaplastic subset (n = 5) and included 3q29 (n = 3), 11p (n = 3), 17q (n = 3), 4q (n = 2), 6p (n = 2), 13q (n = 2), 14q (n = 2), 17p (n = 2) and whole Ch 18 loss (n = 2). Gains were non-recurrent except for whole Ch 7 (n = 2) and gain on 12q (n = 2) including the MDM2 locus. Possible germ line LOH (or uniparental disomy) was present in seven cases (35%), with one focal abnormality (22q13.1-13.2) in two. BRAF-KIAA1549 fusions and BRAF p.V600E mutations were absent (n = 13 and 8). In summary, cytogenetic alterations in pediatric oligodendrogliomas are characterized mostly by genomic losses, particularly in anaplastic tumors. PMID:26206478

  13. Fus3p and Kss1p control G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through a balance of distinct arrest and proliferative functions that operate in parallel with Far1p.

    PubMed Central

    Cherkasova, V; Lyons, D M; Elion, E A

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mating pheromones activate two MAP kinases (MAPKs), Fus3p and Kss1p, to induce G1 arrest prior to mating. Fus3p is known to promote G1 arrest by activating Far1p, which inhibits three Clnp/Cdc28p kinases. To analyze the contribution of Fus3p and Kss1p to G1 arrest that is independent of Far1p, we constructed far1 CLN strains that undergo G1 arrest from increased activation of the mating MAP kinase pathway. We find that Fus3p and Kss1p both control G1 arrest through multiple functions that operate in parallel with Far1p. Fus3p and Kss1p together promote G1 arrest by repressing transcription of G1/S cyclin genes (CLN1, CLN2, CLB5) by a mechanism that blocks their activation by Cln3p/Cdc28p kinase. In addition, Fus3p and Kss1p counteract G1 arrest through overlapping and distinct functions. Fus3p and Kss1p together increase the expression of CLN3 and PCL2 genes that promote budding, and Kss1p inhibits the MAP kinase cascade. Strikingly, Fus3p promotes proliferation by a novel function that is not linked to reduced Ste12p activity or increased levels of Cln2p/Cdc28p kinase. Genetic analysis suggests that Fus3p promotes proliferation through activation of Mcm1p transcription factor that upregulates numerous genes in G1 phase. Thus, Fus3p and Kss1p control G1 arrest through a balance of arrest functions that inhibit the Cdc28p machinery and proliferative functions that bypass this inhibition. PMID:10049917

  14. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Hisani N.; Chung, Charles C.; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Iwata, Hiroji; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H.; ven den Berg, David; Smeets, Ann; Zhao, Hui; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J.; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Marchand, Loic Le; Goldberg, Mark S.; Teo, Soo H.; Taib, Nur A. M.; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha; Winqvist, Robert; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Harrington, Patricia; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799–121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000–120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive. PMID:27556229

  15. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus.

    PubMed

    Horne, Hisani N; Chung, Charles C; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Iwata, Hiroji; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H; Ven den Berg, David; Smeets, Ann; Zhao, Hui; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Marchand, Loic Le; Goldberg, Mark S; Teo, Soo H; Taib, Nur A M; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha; Winqvist, Robert; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Harrington, Patricia; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas F; Chanock, Stephen J; Dunning, Alison M; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799-121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000-120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive.

  16. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus.

    PubMed

    Horne, Hisani N; Chung, Charles C; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Iwata, Hiroji; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H; Ven den Berg, David; Smeets, Ann; Zhao, Hui; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Marchand, Loic Le; Goldberg, Mark S; Teo, Soo H; Taib, Nur A M; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha; Winqvist, Robert; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Harrington, Patricia; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas F; Chanock, Stephen J; Dunning, Alison M; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799-121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000-120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive. PMID:27556229

  17. Late-onset Stargardt-like macular dystrophy maps to chromosome 1p13

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.; Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Stargardt`s disease (MIM 248200), originally described in 1909, is an autosomal recessive condition of childhood, characterized by a sudden and bilateral loss of central vision. Typically, it has an early onset (7 to 12 years), a rapidly progressive course and a poor final outcome. The central area of the retina (macula) displays pigmentary changes in a ring form with depigmentation and atrophy of the retinal pigmentary epithelium (RPE). Perimacular yellowish spots, termed fundus flavimaculatus, are observed in a high percentage of patients. We have recently reported the genetic mapping of Stargardt`s disease to chromosome 1p13. On the other hand, considering that fundus flavimaculatus (MIM 230100) is another form of fleck fundus disease, with a Stargardt-like retinal aspect but with a late-onset and a more progressive course, we decided to test the hypothesis of allelism between typical Stargardt`s disease and late-onset autosomal recessive fundus flavimaculatus. Significant pairwise lod scores were obtained in each of four multiplex families (11 affected individuals, 12 relatives) with four markers of the 1p13 region (Z = 4.79, 4.64, 3.07, 3.16 at loci D1S435, D1S424, D1S236, and D1S415, respectively at {theta} = 0). Multipoint analysis showed that the best estimate for location of the disease gene is between D1S424 and D1S236 (maximum lod score of 5.20) as also observed in Stargardt`s disease. Our results are consistent with the location of the gene responsible of the late-onset Stargardt-like macular dystrophy in the 1p13 region and raise the hypothesis of either allelic mutational events or contiguous genes in this chromosomal region. The question of possible relationship with some age-related macular dystrophies in now open to debate.

  18. Multimodal Assessment of Protein Functional Deficiency Supports Pathogenicity of BRCA1 p.V1688del

    PubMed Central

    De Nicolo, Arcangela; Parisini, Emilio; Zhong, Quan; Palma, Maurizia Dalla; Stoeckert, Kathryn A.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Caligo, Maria A.; Vidal, Marc; Cusick, Michael E.; Garber, Judy E.

    2009-01-01

    Unequivocal discrimination between neutral variants and deleterious mutations is crucial for appropriate counseling of individuals with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 sequence change. An increasing number of variants of uncertain significance (VUSs) are being identified, whose unclassified biological effect poses clinical concerns. A multifactorial likelihood-based approach recently suggested disease causality for BRCA1 p.V1688del, a VUS recurrent in Italian breast/ovarian cancer families. Whether and how this single amino acid deletion in the BRCA1 BRCT domain affects the function of the mutant protein (ΔValBRCA1) has not been elucidated. We undertook comprehensive functional characterization of ΔValBRCA1, comprising comparative structural modeling, analysis of protein stability and associations, and analysis of DNA repair function. Our model predicted BRCT domain destabilization and folding disruption caused by BRCA1 p.V1688del. Consistently, the recombinant ΔValBRCA1 was less stable than wtBRCA1 and, unlike the latter, failed to associate with BRIP1, CtIP, and Rap80, and to re-localize to sites of DNA damage. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed a compromised interaction with FHL2 and with KPNA2, which is likely responsible for improper subcellular localization of ΔValBRCA1. In addition, we found four new breast/ovarian cancer families of Italian ancestry who carried this sequence alteration. These results provide the first evidence of the effect of BRCA1 p.V1688del on protein stability and function, supporting the view that it is a deleterious mutation. Multimodal analyses like ours could advance understanding of tumor suppression by BRCA1, and ultimately contribute to developing efficient strategies for screening and characterization of VUSs. PMID:19706752

  19. Interaction of Pik1p and Sjl proteins in membrane trafficking.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Peter H; Hasek, Jiri; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Romero, Carlos; Choi, Jae H; Vancura, Ales

    2005-02-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) phosphates are involved in signal transduction, cytoskeletal organization, and membrane traffic. PtdIns 4-phosphate [PtdIns(4)P], produced in yeast by PtdIns 4-kinase (Pik1p), appears to regulate Golgi secretory function. PtdIns(4)P is also produced by dephosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2], catalyzed by one of the three yeast Sjl proteins, homologs of the mammalian synaptic vesicle-associated PtdIns(4,5)P2 5-phosphatase, synaptojanin. To determine whether Pik1p and Sjl proteins operate in the same pathway or regulate the same process, we used a genetic approach. Mutation in the PIK1 gene displays synthetic genetic interactions with deletions of individual SJL genes. Deletion of SJL3 gene is synthetically lethal with pik1ts, and deletions of SJL1 or SJL2 genes in pik1ts cells exacerbate the temperature sensitivity, neomycin sensitivity, and defect in invertase secretion. A diminished level of PtdIns(4)P and increased level of PtdIns(4,5)P2 in pik1(ts)sjl1delta and pik1(ts)sjl2delta cells, compared with pik1ts cells, indicate that PtdIns(4)P is specifically required for secretion. Collectively, our results suggest that Pik1p and the Sjl proteins coordinately function to regulate the dynamic phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of the polar heads of phosphoinositides, and this process appears to be important for membrane trafficking pathways.

  20. A convenient synthesis of benzo[c]naphtho[2,1-p]chrysene

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, S.; Scott, L.T.

    1996-10-04

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) benzo[c]-naphtho[2,1-p]chrysene (1) has recently attracted renewed attention as a potential precursor for the synthesis of bowl-shaped fullerene substructures. The published synthetic approaches to 1, however, are lengthy and entail one or more photocyclizations of stilbene-type compounds that suffer from competing [2 + 2]cycloaddition reactions at normal concentrations and are thereby rendered quite inefficient. The authors report here a convenient four-step synthesis of 1 that can be performed on a multigram scale starting from the commercially available {alpha}-tetralone (2) and 2-bromonaphthalene. 12 refs.

  1. RAP1GA1: A candidate tumor suppressor locus in 1p36.1

    SciTech Connect

    Ranade, K.; Hussussian, C.J.; Higgins, P.

    1994-09-01

    The rap1/Krev-1 gene (RAP1A) encodes a p21-related protein that suppresses transformation by activated p21{sup ras}. The GTPase activating protein (GAP) gene for p21{sup rap1A} (RAP1GA1) has recently been assigned to chromosome 1p36.1-p35, a region of the genome that is frequently involved in deletions and rearrangements in several different tumors including breast, colon and hepatocellular carcinomas, melanoma, and neuroblastoma. GAP genes negatively regulate the activity of p21 proteins by catalyzing the conversion of the active GTP-bound forms to the inactive GDP-bound forms. The physiological function of p21{sup rap1A}-GAP makes it a strong candidate as a tumor suppressor gene that may have a role in the development of one or more of these malignancies. We have refined the localization of RAP1GA1 by linkage analysis with a highly informative (CA){sub n} repeat contained within the gene, and demonstrated that it is within the minimal deleted region for breast and colon carcinomas, and that it is excluded from the minimally deleted region in melanoma and neuroblastoma. Genetic mapping in the mouse demonstrated that Rap1ga1 is located {approximately}10 cM proximal to Pnd and therefore maps within the interval containing the modifier of Min gene (Mom-1) and the plasmocytoma susceptibility locus (Pcts). The human RAP1GA1 gene contains at least 27 exons. The coding region contains 22 exons, and there are at least five 5{prime}-UT exons that are assembled in a complex pattern of alternative splicing in different tissues. The localization of RAP1GA1 makes it a very strong candidate for a role as a modifier gene involved in the common secondary abnormalities involving 1p36 in several different carcinomas. The potential role of RAP1GA1 in these malignancies is currently being investigated by sequence analysis of breast and colon carcinomas with loss of heterozygosity in 1p36.

  2. Dying at 23 with 1p36 deletion syndrome: Laura's family story.

    PubMed

    Tandy, P A

    2012-09-01

    Laura was unusual. She had always been different and at times difficult. She was born with a genetic disorder, diagnosed as 1p36 deletion syndrome when she was 21 years old. At 23 she suffered her first cardiac arrest at home and entered the hospital system for the first time apart from infancy. After initially appearing to do well, she suffered a second cardiac arrest 10 weeks after admission. This was followed by an irreversible deterioration and she died 14 weeks after admission. We her family had been with her throughout her traumatic experience. This is our story.

  3. Capitulation in Abelian extensions of some fields ℚ (√{p1p2q , }i )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Abdelmalek; Zekhnini, Abdelkader; Taous, Mohammed

    2016-02-01

    We study the capitulation of the 2-ideal classes of an infinite family of imaginary biquadratic number fields consisting of fields k =ℚ (√{p1p2q , }i ), where i =√{-1 } and p1 ≡ p2 ≡ -q ≡ 1 (mod 4) are different primes. For each of the three quadratic extensions K /k inside the absolute genus field k(*) of k , we compute the capitulation kernel of K /k . Then we deduce that each strongly ambiguous class of k /ℚ (i ) capitulates already in k(*), which is smaller than the relative genus field (k/ℚ (i )) *.

  4. The mannose-specific lectin domains of Flo1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lg-Flo1p from S. pastorianus: crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the adhesin-carbohydrate complexes.

    PubMed

    Ielasi, Francesco S; Goyal, Parveen; Sleutel, Mike; Wohlkonig, Alexandre; Willaert, Ronnie G

    2013-07-01

    Flo1p and Lg-Flo1p are two cell-wall adhesins belonging to the Flo (flocculation) protein family from the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. pastorianus. The main function of these modular proteins endowed with calcium-dependent lectin activity is to mediate cell-cell adhesion events during yeast flocculation, a process which is well known at the cellular level but still not fully characterized from a molecular perspective. Recently, structural features of the N-terminal Flo lectin domains, including the N-terminal domain of Lg-Flo1p (N-Lg-Flo1p), and their interactions with carbohydrate molecules have been investigated. However, structural data concerning the N-terminal domain of Flo1p (N-Flo1p), which is the most specific among the Flo proteins, are missing and information about the N-Lg-Flo1p-carbohydrate interaction still lacks detailed structural insight. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the apo form and the mannose complex of N-Flo1p and X-ray analysis of N-Lg-Flo1p crystals soaked in α-1,2-mannobiose are reported. The N-Flo1p crystals diffracted to a resolution of 1.43 Å in the case of the apo form and to 2.12 Å resolution for the mannose complex. Both crystals were orthorhombic and belonged to space group P212121, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The N-Lg-Flo1p-α-1,2-mannobiose complex crystal diffracted to 1.73 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P1211 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  5. The Taz1p transacylase is imported and sorted into the outer mitochondrial membrane via a membrane anchor domain.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Jenny D; Claypool, Steven M; Koehler, Carla M

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial transacylase tafazzin, Taz1p, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cause Barth syndrome, a disease of defective cardiolipin remodeling. Taz1p is an interfacial membrane protein that localizes to both the outer and inner membranes, lining the intermembrane space. Pathogenic point mutations in Taz1p that alter import and membrane insertion result in accumulation of monolysocardiolipin. In this study, we used yeast as a model to investigate the biogenesis of Taz1p. We show that to achieve this unique topology in mitochondria, Taz1p follows a novel import pathway in which it crosses the outer membrane via the translocase of the outer membrane and then uses the Tim9p-Tim10p complex of the intermembrane space to insert into the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taz1p is then transported to membranes of an intermediate density to reach a location in the inner membrane. Moreover, a pathogenic mutation within the membrane anchor (V224R) alters Taz1p import so that it bypasses the Tim9p-Tim10p complex and interacts with the translocase of the inner membrane, TIM23, to reach the matrix. Critical targeting information for Taz1p resides in the membrane anchor and flanking sequences, which are often mutated in Barth syndrome patients. These studies suggest that altering the mitochondrial import pathway of Taz1p may be important in understanding the molecular basis of Barth syndrome.

  6. Detection by fluorescence in situ hybridization of microdeletions at 1p36 in lymphomas, unidentified on cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rajgopal, Achuthan; Carr, Ian M; Leek, Jack P; Hodge, Donald; Bell, Sandra M; Roberts, Paul; Horgan, Kieran; Bonthron, David T; Selby, Peter J; Markham, Alexander F; MacLennan, Kenneth A

    2003-04-01

    The chromosomal band 1p36 exhibits frequent loss of heterozygosity in a variety of human malignancies, suggesting the presence of an as yet unidentified tumor suppressor gene. The faint terminal subbands often make cytogenetic analysis of 1p36 particularly difficult. Small deletions at this locus may therefore escape detection on analysis by conventional cytogenetics, a hypothesis that we have explored using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in malignant lymphoma. The study cohort consisted of 20 cases of lymphoma of various subtypes without any 1p abnormality on G-banded karyotyping. FISH was performed using a human chromosome 1 paint and a bacterial artificial chromosome probe RP4-755G5 localizing to 1p36.33, the most telomeric subband of 1p36. Tumors demonstrating 1p36.33 deletions were additionally analyzed by FISH using a second probe from the proximal 1p36.1 subband, to further define the breakpoint. Eight cases of follicular lymphoma (FL), 5 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL), 2 Hodgkin disease, 2 B-cell small lymphocytic lymphomas, 2 T-cell lymphomas, and 1 marginal zone lymphoma were analyzed. FISH identified deletions at 1p36.33 in 5 of the 20 cases: 3 DLBCL and 2 FL. FISH is considerably more sensitive for identifying lymphoma genetic alterations than conventional cytogenetics. Deletion of the distal part of the 1p36 may be a much more common aberration than previously recognized in lymphoma.

  7. Secretory Pathway-Dependent Localization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rho GTPase-Activating Protein Rgd1p at Growth Sites

    PubMed Central

    Lefèbvre, Fabien; Prouzet-Mauléon, Valérie; Hugues, Michel; Crouzet, Marc; Vieillemard, Aurélie; McCusker, Derek; Thoraval, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Establishment and maintenance of cell polarity in eukaryotes depends upon the regulation of Rho GTPases. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) Rgd1p stimulates the GTPase activities of Rho3p and Rho4p, which are involved in bud growth and cytokinesis, respectively. Consistent with the distribution of Rho3p and Rho4p, Rgd1p is found mostly in areas of polarized growth during cell cycle progression. Rgd1p was mislocalized in mutants specifically altered for Golgi apparatus-based phosphatidylinositol 4-P [PtdIns(4)P] synthesis and for PtdIns(4,5)P2 production at the plasma membrane. Analysis of Rgd1p distribution in different membrane-trafficking mutants suggested that Rgd1p was delivered to growth sites via the secretory pathway. Rgd1p may associate with post-Golgi vesicles by binding to PtdIns(4)P and then be transported by secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane. In agreement, we show that Rgd1p coimmunoprecipitated and localized with markers specific to secretory vesicles and cofractionated with a plasma membrane marker. Moreover, in vivo imaging revealed that Rgd1p was transported in an anterograde manner from the mother cell to the daughter cell in a vectoral manner. Our data indicate that secretory vesicles are involved in the delivery of RhoGAP Rgd1p to the bud tip and bud neck. PMID:22447923

  8. Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and the proton ATPase Pma1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, J. Allen; Chen, Janice S.; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2015-07-03

    In eukaryotes, the Cu/Zn containing superoxide dismutase (SOD1) plays a critical role in oxidative stress protection as well as in signaling. We recently demonstrated a function for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sod1p in signaling through CK1γ casein kinases and identified the essential proton ATPase Pma1p as one likely target. The connection between Sod1p and Pma1p was explored further by testing the impact of sod1Δ mutations on cells expressing mutant alleles of Pma1p that alter activity and/or post-translational regulation of this ATPase. We report here that sod1Δ mutations are lethal when combined with the T912D allele of Pma1p in the C-terminal regulatory domain. This “synthetic lethality” was reversed by intragenic suppressor mutations in Pma1p, including an A906G substitution that lies within the C-terminal regulatory domain and hyper-activates Pma1p. Surprisingly the effect of sod1Δ mutations on Pma1-T912D is not mediated through the Sod1p signaling pathway involving the CK1γ casein kinases. Rather, Sod1p sustains life of cells expressing Pma1-T912D through oxidative stress protection. The synthetic lethality of sod1Δ Pma1-T912D cells is suppressed by growing cells under low oxygen conditions or by treatments with manganese-based antioxidants. We now propose a model in which Sod1p maximizes Pma1p activity in two ways: one involving signaling through CK1γ casein kinases and an independent role for Sod1p in oxidative stress protection. - Highlights: • In yeast, the anti-oxidant enzyme SOD1 promotes activity of the proton ATPase Pma1p. • Cells expressing a T912D variant of Pma1p are not viable without SOD1. • SOD1 is needed to protect Pma1-T912D expressing cells from severe oxidative damage. • SOD1 activates Pma1p through casein kinase signaling and oxidative stress protection.

  9. Distinct roles for Khd1p in the localization and expression of bud-localized mRNAs in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yuko; Irie, Kenji; Gerber, André P.

    2008-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein Khd1p (KH-domain protein 1) is required for efficient localization of ASH1 mRNA to the bud-tip, probably acting as a translational repressor during mRNA transport in yeast. Here, we have systematically examined Khd1p mRNA targets and colocalization with known bud-tip-localized mRNAs in vivo. Affinity purification and DNA microarray analysis of Khd1p-associated mRNAs revealed hundreds of potential mRNAs targets, many of them encoding membrane-associated proteins. The putative targets include the messages for MID2, MTL1, WSC2, SRL1, EGT2, CLB2, ASH1, and Khd1p colocalizes with these mRNAs at the bud-tip. The combination of bioinformatics, RNA localization, and in vitro RNA-binding assays revealed that Khd1p binds to CNN repeats in coding regions of mRNA targets. Among the proteins encoded by previously known bud-tip-localized mRNAs, only Mtl1p levels were decreased in khd1Δ mutant cells, whereas Ash1p and Srl1p were reduced in cells overexpressing KHD1. Hence, Khd1p differentially affects gene expression possibly due to combinatorial arrangement with additional factors reflecting the redundant structure of post-transcriptional regulatory systems. PMID:18805955

  10. The Mtm1p carrier and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate cofactor trafficking in yeast mitochondria *

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Mei M.; Penmatsa, Aravind; Whittaker, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical communication between the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial subsystems of the cell depends on solute carriers in the mitochondrial inner membrane that transport metabolites between the two compartments. We have expressed and purified a yeast mitochondrial carrier protein (Mtm1p, YGR257cp), originally identified as a manganese ion carrier, for biochemical characterization aimed at resolving its function. High affinity, stoichiometric pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) cofactor binding was characterized by fluorescence titration and calorimetry, and the biochemical effects of mtm1 gene deletion on yeast mitochondria were investigated. The PLP status of the mitochondrial proteome (the mitochondrial ‘PLP-ome’) was probed by immunoblot analysis of mitochondria isolated from wild type (MTM1+) and knockout (MTM1−) yeast, revealing depletion of mitochondrial PLP in the latter. A direct activity assay of the enzyme catalyzing the first committed step of heme biosynthesis, the PLP-dependent mitochondrial enzyme 5-aminolevulinate synthase, extends these results, providing a specific example of PLP cofactor limitation. Together, these experiments support a role for Mtm1p in mitochondrial PLP trafficking and highlight the link between PLP cofactor transport and iron metabolism, a remarkable illustration of metabolic integration. PMID:25637770

  11. Inhibition of the Formation of the Spf1p Phosphoenzyme by Ca2.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Gerardo R; Czysezon, Nicolas A; Mazzitelli, Luciana R; Sarbia, Nicolas; Adamo, Hugo P

    2016-04-01

    P5-ATPases are important for processes associated with the endosomal-lysosomal system of eukaryotic cells. In humans, the loss of function of P5-ATPases causes neurodegeneration. In the yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae, deletion of P5-ATPase Spf1p gives rise to endoplasmic reticulum stress. The reaction cycle of P5-ATPases is poorly characterized. Here, we showed that the formation of the Spf1p catalytic phosphoenzyme was fast in a reaction medium containing ATP, Mg(2+), and EGTA. Low concentrations of Ca(2+)in the phosphorylation medium decreased the rate of phosphorylation and the maximal level of phosphoenzyme. Neither Mn(2+)nor Mg(2+)had an inhibitory effect on the formation of the phosphoenzyme similar to that of Ca(2+) TheKmfor ATP in the phosphorylation reaction was ∼1 μmand did not significantly change in the presence of Ca(2+) Half-maximal phosphorylation was attained at 8 μmMg(2+), but higher concentrations partially protected from Ca(2+)inhibition. In conditions similar to those used for phosphorylation, Ca(2+)had a small effect accelerating dephosphorylation and minimally affected ATPase activity, suggesting that the formation of the phosphoenzyme was not the limiting step of the ATP hydrolytic cycle. PMID:26858246

  12. Adherens junctional associated protein-1: a novel 1p36 tumor suppressor candidate in gliomas (Review).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Fee, Brian E; Rivas, Miriam V; Lin, James; Adamson, David Cory

    2014-07-01

    In a broad range of human cancers 1p36 has been a mutational hotspot which strongly suggests that the loss of tumor suppressor activity maps to this genomic region during tumorigenesis. Adherens junctional associated protein-1 (AJAP1; also known as Shrew1) was initially discovered as a novel transmembrane protein of adherent junctions in epithelial cells. Gene profiling showed AJAP1 on 1p36 is frequently lost or epigenetically silenced. AJAP1 may affect cell motility, migration, invasion and proliferation by unclear mechanisms. AJAP1 may be translocated to the nucleus, via its interaction with β-catenin complexes, where it can regulate gene transcription, then possibly have a potent impact on cell cycling and apoptosis. Significantly, loss of AJAP1 expression predicts poor clinical outcome of patients with malignant gliomas such as GBM and it may serve as a promising tumor suppressor-related target. In this review, we summarize and discuss current knowledge that may identify AJAP1 as a tumor suppressor in gliomas.

  13. Targeted Proteomics-Driven Computational Modeling of Macrophage S1P Chemosensing.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Angermann, Bastian R; Koppenol-Raab, Marijke; An, Eunkyung; Sjoelund, Virginie H; Sun, Jing; Ishii, Masaru; Germain, Ronald N; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-10-01

    Osteoclasts are monocyte-derived multinuclear cells that directly attach to and resorb bone. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)(1) regulates bone resorption by functioning as both a chemoattractant and chemorepellent of osteoclast precursors through two G-protein coupled receptors that antagonize each other in an S1P-concentration-dependent manner. To quantitatively explore the behavior of this chemosensing pathway, we applied targeted proteomics, transcriptomics, and rule-based pathway modeling using the Simmune toolset. RAW264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line) were used as model osteoclast precursors, RNA-seq was used to identify expressed target proteins, and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry using internal peptide standards was used to perform absolute abundance measurements of pathway proteins. The resulting transcript and protein abundance values were strongly correlated. Measured protein abundance values, used as simulation input parameters, led to in silico pathway behavior matching in vitro measurements. Moreover, once model parameters were established, even simulated responses toward stimuli that were not used for parameterization were consistent with experimental findings. These findings demonstrate the feasibility and value of combining targeted mass spectrometry with pathway modeling for advancing biological insight.

  14. Targeted Proteomics-Driven Computational Modeling of Macrophage S1P Chemosensing*

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Nathan P.; Angermann, Bastian R.; Koppenol-Raab, Marijke; An, Eunkyung; Sjoelund, Virginie H.; Sun, Jing; Ishii, Masaru; Germain, Ronald N.; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are monocyte-derived multinuclear cells that directly attach to and resorb bone. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)1 regulates bone resorption by functioning as both a chemoattractant and chemorepellent of osteoclast precursors through two G-protein coupled receptors that antagonize each other in an S1P-concentration-dependent manner. To quantitatively explore the behavior of this chemosensing pathway, we applied targeted proteomics, transcriptomics, and rule-based pathway modeling using the Simmune toolset. RAW264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line) were used as model osteoclast precursors, RNA-seq was used to identify expressed target proteins, and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry using internal peptide standards was used to perform absolute abundance measurements of pathway proteins. The resulting transcript and protein abundance values were strongly correlated. Measured protein abundance values, used as simulation input parameters, led to in silico pathway behavior matching in vitro measurements. Moreover, once model parameters were established, even simulated responses toward stimuli that were not used for parameterization were consistent with experimental findings. These findings demonstrate the feasibility and value of combining targeted mass spectrometry with pathway modeling for advancing biological insight. PMID:26199343

  15. Energy transfer kinetics of the np5(n + 1)p excited states of Ne and Kr.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Md Humayun; Heaven, Michael C

    2011-09-01

    Energy transfer rate constants for Ne(2p(5)3p) and Kr(4p(5)5p) atoms colliding with ground state rare gas atoms (Rg) have been measured. In part, this study is motivated by the possibility of using excited rare gas atoms as the active species in optically pumped laser systems. Rg(np(5)(n + 1)s) metastable states may be produced using low-power electrical discharges. The potential then exits for optical pumping and laser action on the np(5)(n + 1)p ↔ np(5)(n + 1)s transitions. Knowledge of the rate constants for collisional energy transfer and deactivation of the np(5)(n + 1)p states is required to evaluate the laser potential for various Rg + buffer gas combinations. In the present study we have characterized energy transfer processes for Ne (2p(5)3p) + He for the six lowest energy states of the multiplet. Rate constants for state-to-state transfer have been determined. Deactivation of the lowest energy level of Kr (4p(5)5p) by He, Ne, and Kr has also been characterized. Initial results suggest that Kr (4p(5)5p) + Ne mixtures may be the best suited for optically pumped laser applications.

  16. Targeted Proteomics-Driven Computational Modeling of Macrophage S1P Chemosensing.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Angermann, Bastian R; Koppenol-Raab, Marijke; An, Eunkyung; Sjoelund, Virginie H; Sun, Jing; Ishii, Masaru; Germain, Ronald N; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-10-01

    Osteoclasts are monocyte-derived multinuclear cells that directly attach to and resorb bone. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)(1) regulates bone resorption by functioning as both a chemoattractant and chemorepellent of osteoclast precursors through two G-protein coupled receptors that antagonize each other in an S1P-concentration-dependent manner. To quantitatively explore the behavior of this chemosensing pathway, we applied targeted proteomics, transcriptomics, and rule-based pathway modeling using the Simmune toolset. RAW264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line) were used as model osteoclast precursors, RNA-seq was used to identify expressed target proteins, and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry using internal peptide standards was used to perform absolute abundance measurements of pathway proteins. The resulting transcript and protein abundance values were strongly correlated. Measured protein abundance values, used as simulation input parameters, led to in silico pathway behavior matching in vitro measurements. Moreover, once model parameters were established, even simulated responses toward stimuli that were not used for parameterization were consistent with experimental findings. These findings demonstrate the feasibility and value of combining targeted mass spectrometry with pathway modeling for advancing biological insight. PMID:26199343

  17. A role for a eukaryotic GrpE-related protein, Mge1p, in protein translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Laloraya, S; Gambill, B D; Craig, E A

    1994-01-01

    The 70-kDa heat shock proteins (hsp70s) function as molecular chaperones in a wide variety of cellular processes through cycles of binding and release from substrate proteins coupled to cycles of ATP hydrolysis. In the prokaryote Escherichia coli, the hsp70 DnaK functions with two other proteins, DnaJ and GrpE, which modulate the activity of DnaK. While numerous hsp70s and DnaJ-related proteins have been identified in eukaryotes, to our knowledge no GrpE-related proteins have been reported. We report the isolation and characterization of a eukaryotic grpE-related gene, MGE1. MGE1, an essential nuclear gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encodes a soluble protein of the mitochondrial matrix. Cells with reduced expression of Mge1p accumulate the precursor form of a mitochondrial protein. Since mitochondrial hsp70 is required for translocation of precursors of mitochondrial proteins from the cytosol into the matrix of mitochondria, these data suggest that Mge1p acts in concert with mitochondrial hsp70 in protein translocation. Images PMID:8022808

  18. Modeling and estimation of C1-P1 bias in GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Lahaye, F.; Héroux, P.; Liao, X.; Beck, N.; Olynik, M.

    2001-01-01

    Modern dual-frequency global positioning system (GPS) receivers are capable of providing direct measurements of both L1 C/A (C1) and P code (P1) without the use of the Y-codes under Anti-Spoofing. A discrepancy or bias between the C1 and P1 measurements from these receivers has however been of concern to operators and users of GPS reference networks. For the purpose of modeling and estimation, the nature and characteristics of the discrepancy must be investigated. The research results presented indicate that the discrepancy between the C1 and P1 measurements contains two different types of components: one is of constant type while another is time variant. A method has been developed for their modeling and estimation. The residual C1-P1 time series after a satellite-dependent bias removal agree at a few-centimeter level, indicating the effectiveness of the proposed model. This allows the C1-P1 discrepancy, both constant and non-constant components, to be removed from GPS reference network solutions. Numerical results are provided to support the analysis.

  19. V-ATPase, ScNhx1p and yeast vacuole fusion.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Quan-Sheng

    2012-04-20

    Membrane fusion is the last step in trafficking pathways during which membrane vesicles fuse with target organelles to deliver cargos. It is a central cellular reaction that plays important roles in signal transduction, protein sorting and subcellular compartmentation. Recent progress in understanding the roles of ion transporters in vacuole fusion in yeast is summarized in this article. It is becoming increasingly evident that the vacuolar proton pump V-ATPase and vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter ScNhx1p are key components of the vacuole fusion machinery in yeast. Yeast ScNhx1p regulates vacuole fusion by controlling the luminal pH. V-ATPases serve a dual role in vacuolar integrity in which they regulate both vacuole fusion and fission reactions in yeast. Fission defects are epistatic to fusion defects. Vacuole fission depends on the proton translocation activity of the V-ATPase; by contrast, the fusion reaction does not need the transport activity but requires the physical presence of the proton pump. V0, the membrane-integral sector of the V-ATPase, forms trans-complexes between the opposing vacuoles in the terminal phase of vacuole fusion where the V0trans-complexes build a continuous proteolipid channel at the fusion site to mediate the bilayer fusion.

  20. FISH analysis of hematological neoplasias with 1p36 rearrangements allows the definition of a cluster of 2.5 Mb included in the minimal region deleted in 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lahortiga, Idoya; Vázquez, Iria; Belloni, Elena; Román, José P; Gasparini, Patrizia; Novo, Francisco J; Zudaire, Isabel; Pelicci, Pier G; Hernández, Jesús M; Calasanz, María J; Odero, María D

    2005-05-01

    Rearrangements in the distal region of the short arm of chromosome 1 are recurrent aberrations in a broad spectrum of human neoplasias. However, neither the location of the breakpoints (BP) on 1p36 nor the candidate genes have been fully determined. We have characterized, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the BP in 26 patients with hematological neoplasias and 1p36 rearrangements in the G-banding karyotype. FISH allowed a better characterization of all samples analyzed. Nine cases (35%) showed reciprocal translocations, 15 (58%) unbalanced rearrangements, and two (7%) deletions. We describe two new recurrent aberrations. In 18 of the 26 cases analyzed the BP were located in band 1p36, which is 25.5 Mb long. In 14 of these 18 cases (78%) and without distinction between myeloid and lymphoid neoplasias, the BP clustered in a 2.5 Mb region located between 1p36.32 and the telomere. Interestingly, this region is contained in the 10.5 Mb cluster on 1p36.22-1pter defined in cases with 1p36 deletion syndrome. The 2.5 Mb region, located on 1p36.32-1pter, has a higher frequency of occurrence of tandem repeats and segmental duplications larger than 1 kb, when compared with the 25.5 Mb of the complete 1p36 band. This could explain its proneness for involvement in chromosomal rearrangements in hematological neoplasias.

  1. Specific interactions between the Candida albicans ABC transporter Cdr1p ectodomain and a D-octapeptide derivative inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Kyoko; Harding, David R K; Holmes, Ann R; Lamping, Erwin; Niimi, Masakazu; Tyndall, Joel D A; Cannon, Richard D; Monk, Brian C

    2012-08-01

    Overexpression of the Candida albicans ATP-binding cassette transporter CaCdr1p causes clinically significant resistance to azole drugs including fluconazole (FLC). Screening of a ~1.89 × 10(6) member D-octapeptide combinatorial library that concentrates library members at the yeast cell surface identified RC21v3, a 4-methoxy-2,3,6-trimethylbenzenesulphonyl derivative of the D-octapeptide D-NH(2) -FFKWQRRR-CONH(2) , as a potent and stereospecific inhibitor of CaCdr1p. RC21v3 chemosensitized Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overexpressing CaCdr1p but not other fungal ABC transporters, the C. albicans MFS transporter CaMdr1p or the azole target enzyme CaErg11p, to FLC. RC21v3 also chemosensitized clinical C. albicans isolates overexpressing CaCDR1 to FLC, even when CaCDR2 was overexpressed. Specific targeting of CaCdr1p by RC21v3 was confirmed by spontaneous RC21v3 chemosensitization-resistant suppressor mutants of S. cerevisiae expressing CaCdr1p. The suppressor mutations introduced a positive charge beside, or within, extracellular loops 1, 3, 4 and 6 of CaCdr1p or an aromatic residue near the extracytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 5. The mutations did not affect CaCdr1p localization or CaCdr1p ATPase activity but some increased susceptibility to the CaCdr1p substrates FLC, rhodamine 6G, rhodamine 123 and cycloheximide. The suppressor mutations showed that the drug-like CaCdr1p inhibitors FK506, enniatin, milbemycin α11 and milbemycin β9 have modes of action similar to RC21v3. PMID:22788839

  2. Mitochondrial localization of the OAS1 p46 isoform associated with a common single nucleotide polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The expression of 2′-5′-Oligoadenylate synthetases (OASs) is induced by type 1 Interferons (IFNs) in response to viral infection. The OAS proteins have a unique ability to produce 2′-5′ Oligoadenylates, which bind and activate the ribonuclease RNase L. The RNase L degrades cellular RNAs which in turn inhibits protein translation and induces apoptosis. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the OAS1 gene have been associated with disease. We have investigated the functional effect of two common SNPs in the OAS1 gene. The SNP rs10774671 affects splicing to one of the exons in the OAS1 gene giving rise to differential expression of the OAS1 isoforms, and the SNP rs1131454 (former rs3741981) resides in exon 3 giving rise to OAS1 isoforms with either a Glycine or a Serine at position 162 in the core OAS unit. Results We have used three human cell lines with different genotypes in the OAS1 SNP rs10774671, HeLa cells with the AA genotype, HT1080 cells with AG, and Daudi cells with GG. The main OAS1 isoform expressed in Daudi and HT1080 cells was p46, and the main OAS1 isoform expressed in HeLa cells was p42. In addition, low levels of the OAS1 p52 mRNA was detected in HeLa cells and p48 mRNA in Daudi cells, and trace amounts of p44a mRNA were detected in the three cell lines treated with type 1 interferon. We show that the OAS1 p46 isoform was localized in the mitochondria in Daudi cells, whereas the OAS1 isoforms in HeLa cells were primarily localized in cytoplasmic vacuoles/lysosomes. By using recombinantly expressed OAS1 mutant proteins, we found that the OAS1 SNP rs1131454 (former rs3741981) did not affect the enzymatic OAS1 activity. Conclusions The SNP rs10774671 determines differential expression of the OAS1 isoforms. In Daudi and HT1080 cells the p46 isoform is the most abundantly expressed isoform associated with the G allele, whereas in HeLa cells the most abundantly expressed isoform is p42 associated with the A allele. The SNP rs

  3. Deletion or epigenetic silencing of AJAP1 on 1p36 in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ningjing; Di, Chunhui; Bortoff, Kathy; Fu, Jinrong; Truszkowski, Peter; Killela, Patrick; Duncan, Chris; McLendon, Roger; Bigner, Darell; Gregory, Simon; Adamson, David Cory

    2012-02-01

    Glioblastoma is universally fatal because of its propensity for rapid recurrence due to highly migratory tumor cells. Unraveling the genomic complexity that underlies this migratory characteristic could provide therapeutic targets that would greatly complement current surgical therapy. Using multiple high-resolution genomic screening methods, we identified a single locus, adherens junctional associated protein 1 (AJAP1) on chromosome 1p36 that is lost or epigenetically silenced in many glioblastomas. We found AJAP1 expression absent or reduced in 86% and 100% of primary glioblastoma tumors and cell lines, respectively, and the loss of expression correlates with AJAP1 methylation. Restoration of AJAP1 gene expression by transfection or demethylation agents results in decreased tumor cell migration in glioblastoma cell lines. This work shows the significant loss of expression of AJAP1 in glioblastoma and provides evidence of its role in the highly migratory characteristic of these tumors.

  4. Interactions within the yeast t-SNARE Sso1p that control SNARE complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Munson, M; Chen, X; Cocina, A E; Schultz, S M; Hughson, F M

    2000-10-01

    In the eukaryotic secretory and endocytic pathways, transport vesicles shuttle cargo among intracellular organelles and to and from the plasma membrane. Cargo delivery entails fusion of the transport vesicle with its target, a process thought to be mediated by membrane bridging SNARE protein complexes. Temporal and spatial control of intracellular trafficking depends in part on regulating the assembly of these complexes. In vitro, SNARE assembly is inhibited by the closed conformation adopted by the syntaxin family of SNAREs. To visualize this closed conformation directly, the X-ray crystal structure of a yeast syntaxin, Sso1p, has been determined and refined to 2.1 A resolution. Mutants designed to destabilize the closed conformation exhibit accelerated rates of SNARE assembly. Our results provide insight into the mechanism of SNARE assembly and its intramolecular and intermolecular regulation.

  5. Complex analysis of scattering 1p-shell nuclei in the framework of coupled channel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassurlla, M.; Burtebayev, N.; Duisebayev, A.; Burtebayeva, J.; Spitaleri, C.; Urkinbayev, A.; Rusek, K.; Piasecki, E.; Kliczewski, S.; Trzcinska, A.; Sakuta, S. B.; Boztosun, I.; Artemov, S. V.; Galanina, L. I.

    2016-04-01

    The scattering process on 1p-shell nuclei, having the cluster structure, can be seen in the anomaly increasing of cross sections for large angles. Most often, this increasing of cross sections is connected with mechanism of transfer of clusters or nucleons. The study of the α-cluster transfer mechanism in the elastic scattering of 20Ne ions on 16O nuclei is important for investigation burning process in evolution of the Universe immediately after the Big-Bang. Therefore new experiment on the heavy ion accelerator (Warsaw University) was carried out with a significant expansion of the range of angles up to 1700 in center mass system at E Lab =50.0 MeV. Data analysis of angular distribution was performed in framework of the optical model and coupled channel method. The optimal parameters of the optical potential were obtained and the spectroscopic factor was obtained 1 for 20Ne as α +16O.

  6. Mnd1p: an evolutionarily conserved protein required for meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Gerton, Jennifer L; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2002-05-14

    We used a functional genomics approach to identify a gene required for meiotic recombination, YGL183c or MND1. MND1 was spliced in meiotic cells, extending the annotated YGL183c ORF N terminus by 45 aa. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mnd1-1 mutants, in which the majority of the MND1 coding sequence was removed, arrested before the first meiotic division with a phenotype reminiscent of dmc1 mutants. Physical and genetic analysis showed that these cells initiated recombination, but did not form heteroduplex DNA or double Holliday junctions, suggesting that Mnd1p is involved in strand invasion. Orthologs of MND1 were identified in protists, several yeasts, plants, and mammals, suggesting that its function has been conserved throughout evolution.

  7. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like Disease Caused by AIMP1/p43 Homozygous Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Feinstein, Miora; Markus, Barak; Noyman, Iris; Shalev, Hannah; Flusser, Hagit; Shelef, Ilan; Liani-Leibson, Keren; Shorer, Zamir; Cohen, Idan; Khateeb, Shareef; Sivan, Sara; Birk, Ohad S.

    2010-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease is an X-linked hypomyelinating leukodystrophy caused by PLP1 mutations. A similar autosomal-recessive phenotype, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease (PMLD), has been shown to be caused by homozygous mutations in GJC2 or HSPD1. We report a consanguineous Israeli Bedouin kindred with clinical and radiological findings compatible with PMLD in which linkage to PLP1, GJC2, and HSPD1 was excluded. Through genome-wide homozygosity mapping and mutation analysis, we demonstrated in all affected individuals a homozygous frameshift mutation that fully abrogates the main active domain of AIMP1, encoding ARS-interacting multifunctional protein 1. The mutation fully segregates with the disease-associated phenotype and was not found in 250 Bedouin controls. Our findings are in line with the previously demonstrated inability of mutant mice lacking the AIMP1/p43 ortholog to maintain axon integrity in the central and peripheral neural system. PMID:21092922

  8. Analysis of chromosome band 1p36 alterations by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization with a microclone DNA bank.

    PubMed

    Zink, D; Weith, A; Martinsson, T; Schwab, M

    1991-09-01

    Alterations of the distal portion of chromosome Ip are a recurrent abnormality of several types of human cancer. In this study we show that chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization with a regional 1p36 DNA bank generated by microdissection and microcloning can be employed to detect translocations involving 1p36.

  9. Identification of critical regions and candidate genes for cardiovascular malformations and cardiomyopathy associated with deletions of chromosome 1p36.

    PubMed

    Zaveri, Hitisha P; Beck, Tyler F; Hernández-García, Andrés; Shelly, Katharine E; Montgomery, Tara; van Haeringen, Arie; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Patel, Chirag; Goel, Himanshu; Houge, Gunnar; Morrow, Bernice E; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R; Scott, Daryl A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations and cardiomyopathy are among the most common phenotypes caused by deletions of chromosome 1p36 which affect approximately 1 in 5000 newborns. Although these cardiac-related abnormalities are a significant source of morbidity and mortality associated with 1p36 deletions, most of the individual genes that contribute to these conditions have yet to be identified. In this paper, we use a combination of clinical and molecular cytogenetic data to define five critical regions for cardiovascular malformations and two critical regions for cardiomyopathy on chromosome 1p36. Positional candidate genes which may contribute to the development of cardiovascular malformations associated with 1p36 deletions include DVL1, SKI, RERE, PDPN, SPEN, CLCNKA, ECE1, HSPG2, LUZP1, and WASF2. Similarly, haploinsufficiency of PRDM16-a gene which was recently shown to be sufficient to cause the left ventricular noncompaction-SKI, PRKCZ, RERE, UBE4B and MASP2 may contribute to the development of cardiomyopathy. When treating individuals with 1p36 deletions, or providing prognostic information to their families, physicians should take into account that 1p36 deletions which overlie these cardiac critical regions may portend to cardiovascular complications. Since several of these cardiac critical regions contain more than one positional candidate gene-and large terminal and interstitial 1p36 deletions often overlap more than one cardiac critical region-it is likely that haploinsufficiency of two or more genes contributes to the cardiac phenotypes associated with many 1p36 deletions.

  10. Roles of fission yeast tea1p in the localization of polarity factors and in organizing the microtubular cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Ralf; Nurse, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The cylindrical shape of the fission yeast cell is generated by linear polarized growth from its cell ends. Using immunofluorescence and live imaging microscopy, we have investigated the roles of the cell end marker tea1p in generating linear polarized growth. We found that tea1p is primarily transported on plus ends of microtubules from the vicinity of the nucleus to the cell ends, and that its movement near the nucleus is independent of the kinesin tea2p. Deletion analysis identified a coiled-coil domain in tea1p essential for its retention at cell ends, and demonstrated that tea1p exerts different functions dependent on its location. On the tips of microtubules, tea1p prevents the curling of microtubules around the cell ends, whereas it is required for maintaining linear cell growth and for retention of polarity factors such as the Dyrk kinase pom1p, the CLIP170-like tip1p, and tea2p at the cell ends. We propose that tea1p has roles in organizing the microtubule cytoskeleton on the tips of microtubules, and in the retention of factors at the cell ends necessary for the cell to grow in a straight line. PMID:12034771

  11. 2,5-Disubstituted pyrrolidine carboxylates as potent, orally active sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Colandrea, Vincent J; Legiec, Irene E; Huo, Pei; Yan, Lin; Hale, Jeffrey J; Mills, Sander G; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Chebret, Gary; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol Ann; Milligan, James A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Shei, Gan-Ju; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2006-06-01

    A series of 2,5-cis-disubstituted pyrrolidines were synthesized and evaluated as S1P receptor agonists. Compounds 15-21 were identified with good selectivity over S1P3 which lowered circulating lymphocytes after oral administration in mice.

  12. C1P Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Preventing NF-κB Activation in Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Baudiß, Kristin; de Paula Vieira, Rodolfo; Cicko, Sanja; Ayata, Korcan; Hossfeld, Madelon; Ehrat, Nicolas; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio; Eltzschig, Holger K; Idzko, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Recently, ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) has been shown to modulate acute inflammatory events. Acute lung injury (Arnalich et al. 2000. Infect. Immun. 68: 1942-1945) is characterized by rapid alveolar injury, lung inflammation, induced cytokine production, neutrophil accumulation, and vascular leakage leading to lung edema. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of C1P during LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice. To evaluate the effect of C1P, we used a prophylactic and therapeutic LPS-induced ALI model in C57BL/6 male mice. Our studies revealed that intrapulmonary application of C1P before (prophylactic) or 24 h after (therapeutic) LPS instillation decreased neutrophil trafficking to the lung, proinflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage, and alveolar capillary leakage. Mechanistically, C1P inhibited the LPS-triggered NF-κB levels in lung tissue in vivo. In addition, ex vivo experiments revealed that C1P also attenuates LPS-induced NF-κB phosphorylation and IL-8 production in human neutrophils. These results indicate C1P playing a role in dampening LPS-induced acute lung inflammation and suggest that C1P could be a valuable candidate for treatment of ALI. PMID:26800872

  13. Increased expression of SUMO1P3 predicts poor prognosis and promotes tumor growth and metastasis in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Junhao; Chen, Mingwei; Chen, Xiaoying; Zhuang, Chengle; Liu, Li; Xu, Wen; Zhou, Qing; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Qiaoxia; Zhao, Guoping; Huang, Weiren

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs that play crucial roles in diverse biological processes. The pseudogene-expressed lncRNA is one major type of lncRNA family. Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) 1 pseudogene 3, (SUMO1P3) is a novel indentified lncRNA that was previously reported to be up-regulated in gastric cancer. However, we know nothing about the biological function and underlying mechanism of SUMO1P3 in tumor. Furthermore, the relationship between SUMO1P3 and bladder cancer is completely unknown. We hypothesized that SUMO1P3 also have roles in bladder cancer. In this study, we found that SUMO1P3 was significantly up-regulated in bladder cancer tissues compared with paired-adjacent nontumorous tissues in a cohort of 55 bladder cancer patients. Moreover, up-regulated SUMO1P3 expression was positively correlated with greater histological grade (P<0.05) and advanced TNM stage (P<0.05). Furthermore, we found cell proliferation / migration inhibition and apoptosis induction were also observed in SUMO1P3 siRNA-transfected bladder cancer cells. Our data suggest that SUMO1P3 plays oncogenic roles in bladder cancer and can be used as a potential prognostic and therapeutic target. PMID:26799188

  14. The Effect of Gender on the N1-P2 Auditory Complex while Listening and Speaking with Altered Auditory Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swink, Shannon; Stuart, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The effect of gender on the N1-P2 auditory complex was examined while listening and speaking with altered auditory feedback. Fifteen normal hearing adult males and 15 females participated. N1-P2 components were evoked while listening to self-produced nonaltered and frequency shifted /a/ tokens and during production of /a/ tokens during nonaltered…

  15. Sphingosine phosphate lyase regulates myogenic differentiation via S1P receptor-mediated effects on myogenic microRNA expression.

    PubMed

    de la Garza-Rodea, Anabel S; Baldwin, Dianna M; Oskouian, Babak; Place, Robert F; Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Kumar, Ashok; Saba, Julie D

    2014-01-01

    S1P lyase (SPL) catalyzes the irreversible degradation of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid whose signaling activities regulate muscle differentiation, homeostasis, and satellite cell (SC) activation. By regulating S1P levels, SPL also controls SC recruitment and muscle regeneration, representing a potential therapeutic target for muscular dystrophy. We found that SPL is induced during myoblast differentiation. To investigate SPL's role in myogenesis at the cellular level, we generated and characterized a murine myoblast SPL-knockdown (SPL-KD) cell line lacking SPL. SPL-KD cells accumulated intracellular and extracellular S1P and failed to form myotubes under conditions that normally stimulate myogenic differentiation. Under differentiation conditions, SPL-KD cells also demonstrated delayed induction of 3 myogenic microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-1, miR-206, and miR-486. SPL-KD cells successfully differentiated when treated with an S1P1 agonist, S1P2 antagonist, and combination treatments, which also increased myogenic miRNA levels. SPL-KD cells transfected with mimics for miR-1 or miR-206 also overcame the differentiation block. Thus, we show for the first time that the S1P/SPL/S1P-receptor axis regulates the expression of a number of miRNAs, thereby contributing to myogenic differentiation.

  16. Velocity-dependent optical potential for neutron elastic scattering from 1 p -shell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabar, I. N.; Jaghoub, M. I.

    2015-06-01

    Background: The conventional optical model is quite successful in describing the nucleon elastic scattering data from medium and heavy nuclei. However, its success in describing the light 1 p -shell nuclei is somewhat limited. The velocity-dependent optical potential resulted in a significant improvement in describing the elastic angular distributions for light nuclei in the low energy region. Purpose: To extend the formalism of the velocity-dependent potential to higher energies, and to assess its importance in describing neutron elastic scattering data from light 1 p -shell nuclei at high energies. Method: We fit the angular distribution data for neutron elastic scattering from 12C and 16O using (i) the velocity-dependent optical potential and (ii) the conventional optical potential. The results of the two models are then compared. At low energies, we compare our angular distribution fits with the fits of other works that exist in the literature. Furthermore, the total integrated cross sections in addition to the analyzing power are calculated using the velocity-dependent optical potential and compared to the experimental data. Results: The velocity-dependent potential resulted in significant improvements in describing the angular distributions particularly in the large-angle scattering region and for certain energy ranges. This model is important where the experimental data show structural effects from nuclear surface deformations, which are important in light nuclei. Furthermore, the calculated total elastic cross sections and analyzing power are in good agreement with the experimental data. Conclusions: The velocity-dependent potential gives rise to surface-peaked real terms in the optical model. Such terms account, at least partly, for the structural effects seen in the angular distribution data. The energy range over which the surface terms are needed is found to depend on the target nucleus. Other works that have introduced real surface terms in the optical

  17. Common variants at 1p36 are associated with superior frontal gyrus volume.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, R; Ikeda, M; Yamashita, F; Ohi, K; Yamamori, H; Yasuda, Y; Fujimoto, M; Fukunaga, M; Nemoto, K; Takahashi, T; Tochigi, M; Onitsuka, T; Yamasue, H; Matsuo, K; Iidaka, T; Iwata, N; Suzuki, M; Takeda, M; Kasai, K; Ozaki, N

    2014-01-01

    The superior frontal gyrus (SFG), an area of the brain frequently found to have reduced gray matter in patients with schizophrenia, is involved in self-awareness and emotion, which are impaired in schizophrenia. However, no genome-wide association studies of SFG volume have investigated in patients with schizophrenia. To identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with SFG volumes, we demonstrated a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of gray matter volumes in the right or left SFG of 158 patients with schizophrenia and 378 healthy subjects. We attempted to bioinformatically ascertain the potential effects of the top hit polymorphism on the expression levels of genes at the genome-wide region. We found associations between five variants on 1p36.12 and the right SFG volume at a widely used benchmark for genome-wide significance (P<5.0 × 10(-8)). The strongest association was observed at rs4654899, an intronic SNP in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 gamma, 3 (EIF4G3) gene on 1p36.12 (P=7.5 × 10(-9)). No SNP with genome-wide significance was found in the volume of the left SFG (P>5.0 × 10(-8)); however, the rs4654899 polymorphism was identified as the locus with the second strongest association with the volume of the left SFG (P=1.5 × 10(-6)). In silico analyses revealed a proxy SNP of rs4654899 had effect on gene expression of two genes, HP1BP3 lying 3' to EIF4G3 (P=7.8 × 10(-6)) and CAPN14 at 2p (P=6.3 × 10(-6)), which are expressed in moderate-to-high levels throughout the adult human SFG. These results contribute to understand genetic architecture of a brain structure possibly linked to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  18. A male-specific quantitative trait locus on 1p21 controlling human stature

    PubMed Central

    Sammalisto, S; Hiekkalinna, T; Suviolahti, E; Sood, K; Metzidis, A; Pajukanta, P; Lilja, H; Soro-Paavonen, A; Taskinen, M; Tuomi, T; Almgren, P; Orho-Melander, M; Groop, L; Peltonen, L; Perola, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Many genome-wide scans aimed at complex traits have been statistically underpowered due to small sample size. Combining data from several genome-wide screens with comparable quantitative phenotype data should improve statistical power for the localisation of genomic regions contributing to these traits. Objective: To perform a genome-wide screen for loci affecting adult stature by combined analysis of four previously performed genome-wide scans. Methods: We developed a web based computer tool, Cartographer, for combining genetic marker maps which positions genetic markers accurately using the July 2003 release of the human genome sequence and the deCODE genetic map. Using Cartographer, we combined the primary genotype data from four genome-wide scans and performed variance components (VC) linkage analyses for human stature on the pooled dataset of 1417 individuals from 277 families and performed VC analyses for males and females separately. Results: We found significant linkage to stature on 1p21 (multipoint LOD score 4.25) and suggestive linkages on 9p24 and 18q21 (multipoint LOD scores 2.57 and 2.39, respectively) in males-only analyses. We also found suggestive linkage to 4q35 and 22q13 (multipoint LOD scores 2.18 and 2.85, respectively) when we analysed both females and males and to 13q12 (multipoint LOD score 2.66) in females-only analyses. Conclusions: We strengthened the evidence for linkage to previously reported quantitative trait loci (QTL) for stature and also found significant evidence of a novel male-specific QTL on 1p21. Further investigation of several interesting candidate genes in this region will help towards characterisation of this first sex-specific locus affecting human stature. PMID:15827092

  19. Screening for hydrolytic enzymes reveals Ayr1p as a novel triacylglycerol lipase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ploier, Birgit; Scharwey, Melanie; Koch, Barbara; Schmidt, Claudia; Schatte, Jessica; Rechberger, Gerald; Kollroser, Manfred; Hermetter, Albin; Daum, Günther

    2013-12-13

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as other eukaryotes, preserves fatty acids and sterols in a biologically inert form, as triacylglycerols and steryl esters. The major triacylglycerol lipases of the yeast S. cerevisiae identified so far are Tgl3p, Tgl4p, and Tgl5p (Athenstaedt, K., and Daum, G. (2003) YMR313c/TGL3 encodes a novel triacylglycerol lipase located in lipid particles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 23317-23323; Athenstaedt, K., and Daum, G. (2005) Tgl4p and Tgl5p, two triacylglycerol lipases of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are localized to lipid particles. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 37301-37309). We observed that upon cultivation on oleic acid, triacylglycerol mobilization did not come to a halt in a yeast strain deficient in all currently known triacylglycerol lipases, indicating the presence of additional not yet characterized lipases/esterases. Functional proteome analysis using lipase and esterase inhibitors revealed a subset of candidate genes for yet unknown hydrolytic enzymes on peroxisomes and lipid droplets. Based on the conserved GXSXG lipase motif, putative functions, and subcellular localizations, a selected number of candidates were characterized by enzyme assays in vitro, gene expression analysis, non-polar lipid analysis, and in vivo triacylglycerol mobilization assays. These investigations led to the identification of Ayr1p as a novel triacylglycerol lipase of yeast lipid droplets and confirmed the hydrolytic potential of the peroxisomal Lpx1p in vivo. Based on these results, we discuss a possible link between lipid storage, lipid mobilization, and peroxisomal utilization of fatty acids as a carbon source.

  20. Monosomy 1p36 uncovers a role for OX40 in survival of activated CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Suhoski, M M; Perez, E E; Heltzer, M L; Laney, A; Shaffer, L G; Saitta, S; Nachman, S; Spinner, N B; June, C H; Orange, J S

    2008-08-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is a subtelomeric deletion syndrome associated with congenital anomalies presumably due to haploinsufficiency of multiple genes. Although immunodeficiency has not been reported, genes encoding costimulatory molecules of the TNF receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) are within 1p36 and may be affected. In one patient with monosomy 1p36, comparative genome hybridization and fluorescence in- situ hybridization confirmed that TNFRSF member OX40 was included within the subtelomeric deletion. T cells from this patient had decreased OX40 expression after stimulation. Specific, ex vivo T cell activation through OX40 revealed enhanced proliferation, and reduced viability of patient CD4+ T cells, providing evidence for the association of monosomy 1p36 with reduced OX40 expression, and decreased OX40-induced T cell survival. These results support a role for OX40 in human immunity, and calls attention to the potential for haploinsufficiency deletions of TNFRSF costimulatory molecules in monosomy 1p36.

  1. A previously unidentified activity of yeast and mouse RNA:pseudouridine synthases 1 (Pus1p) on tRNAs.

    PubMed

    Behm-Ansmant, Isabelle; Massenet, Séverine; Immel, Françoise; Patton, Jeffrey R; Motorin, Yuri; Branlant, Christiane

    2006-08-01

    Mouse pseudouridine synthase 1 (mPus1p) was the first vertebrate RNA:pseudouridine synthase that was cloned and characterized biochemically. The mPus1p was previously found to catalyze Psi formation at positions 27, 28, 34, and 36 in in vitro produced yeast and human tRNAs. On the other hand, the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae scPus1p protein was shown to modify seven uridine residues in tRNAs (26, 27, 28, 34, 36, 65, and 67) and U44 in U2 snRNA. In this work, we expressed mPus1p in yeast cells lacking scPus1p and studied modification of U2 snRNA and several yeast tRNAs. Our data showed that, in these in vivo conditions, the mouse enzyme efficiently modifies yeast U2 snRNA at position 44 and tRNAs at positions 27, 28, 34, and 36. However, a tRNA:Psi26-synthase activity of mPus1p was not observed. Furthermore, we found that both scPus1p and mPus1p, in vivo and in vitro, have a previously unidentified activity at position 1 in cytoplasmic tRNAArg(ACG). This modification can take place in mature tRNA, as well as in pre-tRNAs with 5' and/or 3' extensions. Thus, we identified the protein carrying one of the last missing yeast tRNA:Psi synthase activities. In addition, our results reveal an additional activity of mPus1p at position 30 in tRNA that scPus1p does not possess.

  2. Phospholipase C interacts with Sgd1p and is required for expression of GPD1 and osmoresistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lin, H; Nguyen, P; Vancura, A

    2002-05-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae PLC1 gene encodes a homolog of the delta isoform of mammalian phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C. Cells deleted for PLC1 ( plc1Delta) are viable, but display several phenotypes, including osmotic, temperature, and nocodazole sensitivity. We have used a two-hybrid screen to identify Plc1p-interacting proteins. One of the interacting proteins found was Sgd1p, a recently identified, essential, nuclear protein. The SGD1 gene was originally cloned by complementation of an osmostress-sensitive mutant. The Plc1p-Sgd1p interaction was confirmed biochemically by affinity chromatography. SGD1 interacts genetically with both PLC1 and HOG1 (which encodes an osmosensing mitogen-activated protein kinase). Overexpression of Sgd1p suppresses the temperature sensitivity of cells bearing the plc1-4 allele, and the double mutant strain plc1Delta sgd1-1 displays enhanced temperature and nocodazole sensitivity. The plc1Delta hog1Delta strain displays increased osmosensitivity, and has a synthetic defect in glycerol synthesis and the expression of GPD1 (which encodes the enzyme glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase that is involved in glycerol biosynthesis), suggesting that Plc1p and Hog1p function in independent pathways. The hog1Delta sgd1-1 double mutant displays enhanced osmosensitivity relative to that of either single mutant. The triple mutant plc1Delta hog1Delta sgd1-1 is inviable, while the plc1Delta hog1Delta sgd1-2 strain grows extremely slowly and is more osmosensitive than the plc1Delta hog1Delta or hog1Delta sgd1-2 strain. These results are consistent with a model in which Plc1p and Hog1p function in parallel pathways affecting osmoregulation, and signals from both these pathways converge, at least partly, on Sgd1p.

  3. Increased mRNA Levels of Sphingosine Kinases and S1P Lyase and Reduced Levels of S1P Were Observed in Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Association with Poorer Differentiation and Earlier Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Kurano, Makoto; Enooku, Kenichiro; Sato, Masaya; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Ishizawa, Takeaki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Although sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) has been reported to play an important role in cancer pathophysiology, little is known about S1P and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To clarify the relationship between S1P and HCC, 77 patients with HCC who underwent surgical treatment were consecutively enrolled in this study. In addition, S1P and its metabolites were quantitated by LC-MS/MS. The mRNA levels of sphingosine kinases (SKs), which phosphorylate sphingosine to generate S1P, were increased in HCC tissues compared with adjacent non-HCC tissues. Higher mRNA levels of SKs in HCC were associated with poorer differentiation and microvascular invasion, whereas a higher level of SK2 mRNA was a risk factor for intra- and extra-hepatic recurrence. S1P levels, however, were unexpectedly reduced in HCC compared with non-HCC tissues, and increased mRNA levels of S1P lyase (SPL), which degrades S1P, were observed in HCC compared with non-HCC tissues. Higher SPL mRNA levels in HCC were associated with poorer differentiation. Finally, in HCC cell lines, inhibition of the expression of SKs or SPL by siRNA led to reduced proliferation, invasion and migration, whereas overexpression of SKs or SPL enhanced proliferation. In conclusion, increased SK and SPL mRNA expression along with reduced S1P levels were more commonly observed in HCC tissues compared with adjacent non-HCC tissues and were associated with poor differentiation and early recurrence. SPL as well as SKs may be therapeutic targets for HCC treatment. PMID:26886371

  4. Emergence and Characterization of Unusual DS-1-Like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strains in Children with Diarrhea in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Satoshi; Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Haga, Kei; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kato, Takema; Ouchi, Yuya; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Tsuji, Takao; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2015-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of unusual DS-1-like G1P[8] rotaviruses in Japan have been recently reported. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand, three DS-1-like G1P[8] strains (RVA/Human-wt/THA/PCB-180/2013/G1P[8], RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-109/2013/G1P[8], and RVA/Human-wt/THA/SSKT-41/2013/G1P[8]) were identified in stool specimens from hospitalized children with severe diarrhea. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genomes of strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41. On whole genomic analysis, all three strains exhibited a unique genotype constellation including both genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G1-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2. This novel genotype constellation is shared with Japanese DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the G/P genes of strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41 appeared to have originated from human Wa-like G1P[8] strains. On the other hand, the non-G/P genes of the three strains were assumed to have originated from human DS-1-like strains. Thus, strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41 appeared to be derived through reassortment event(s) between Wa-like G1P[8] and DS-1-like human rotaviruses. Furthermore, strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41 were found to have the 11-segment genome almost indistinguishable from one another in their nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic lineages, indicating the derivation of the three strains from a common origin. Moreover, all the 11 genes of the three strains were closely related to those of Japanese DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Therefore, DS-1-like G1P[8] strains that have emerged in Thailand and Japan were assumed to have originated from a recent common ancestor. To our knowledge, this is the first report on whole genome-based characterization of DS-1-like G1P[8] strains that have emerged in an area other than Japan. Our observations will provide important insights into the evolutionary dynamics of emerging DS-1-like G1P[8] rotaviruses. PMID:26540260

  5. Partial monosomy of chromosome 1p36.3: Characterization of the critical region and delineation of a syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Reish, O.; Berry, S.A.; Hirsch, B.

    1995-12-04

    We describe 5 patients ranging in age from 3 to 47 years, with karyotypic abnormalities resulting in monosomy for portion of 1p36.3, microcephaly, mental retardation, prominent forehead, deep-set eyes, depressed nasal bridge, flat midface, relative prognathism, and abnormal ears. Four patients have small hands and feet. All exhibited selfabusive behavior. Additional findings in some of the patients include brain anomalies, optic atrophy, hearing loss and skeletal deformities. The breakpoints within chromosome 1 were designated at 1p36.31 (3 cases), 1p36.32 (1 case) and 1p36.33 (1 case). Thus, the smallest region of deletion overlap is 1p36.33{r_arrow}pter. Detection of the abnormal 1 relied on high resolution G-band analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) utilizing a DNA probe (Oncor D1Z2) containing the repetitive sequences in distal 1p36, confirmed a deletion of one 1 homologue in all 5 cases. The abnormal 1 resulted from a de novo deletion in only one patient. The remaining patients were either confirmed (3 cases) or suspected (1 case) to have unbalanced translocations. Despite the additional genetic imbalance present in these four cases, monosomy of 1p36.33 appears to be responsible for a specific clinical phenotype. Characterization of this phenotype should assist in the clinical diagnosis of this chromosome abnormality. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Accurate, fast and cost-effective diagnostic test for monosomy 1p36 using real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Pricila da Silva; Pena, Heloisa B; D'Angelo, Carla Sustek; Koiffmann, Celia P; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Shaffer, Lisa G; Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho

    2014-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is considered the most common subtelomeric deletion syndrome in humans and it accounts for 0.5-0.7% of all the cases of idiopathic intellectual disability. The molecular diagnosis is often made by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), which has the drawback of being a high-cost technique. However, patients with classic monosomy 1p36 share some typical clinical characteristics that, together with its common prevalence, justify the development of a less expensive, targeted diagnostic method. In this study, we developed a simple, rapid, and inexpensive real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for targeted diagnosis of monosomy 1p36, easily accessible for low-budget laboratories in developing countries. For this, we have chosen two target genes which are deleted in the majority of patients with monosomy 1p36: PRKCZ and SKI. In total, 39 patients previously diagnosed with monosomy 1p36 by aCGH, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) all tested positive on our qPCR assay. By simultaneously using these two genes we have been able to detect 1p36 deletions with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. We conclude that qPCR of PRKCZ and SKI is a fast and accurate diagnostic test for monosomy 1p36, costing less than 10 US dollars in reagent costs.

  7. Identification of a Nfs1p-bound persulfide intermediate in Fe-S cluster synthesis by intact mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Alok; Yoon, Heeyong; Lyver, Elise R; Dancis, Andrew; Pain, Debkumar

    2012-09-01

    Cysteine desulfurases generate a covalent persulfide intermediate from cysteine, and this activated form of sulfur is essential for the synthesis of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters. In yeast mitochondria, there is a complete machinery for Fe-S cluster synthesis, including a cysteine desulfurase, Nfs1p. Here we show that following supplementation of isolated mitochondria with [(35)S]cysteine, a radiolabeled persulfide could be detected on Nfs1p. The persulfide persisted under conditions that did not permit Fe-S cluster formation, such as nucleotide and/or iron depletion of mitochondria. By contrast, under permissive conditions, the radiolabeled Nfs1p persulfide was greatly reduced and radiolabeled aconitase was formed, indicating transfer of persulfide to downstream Fe-S cluster recipients. Nfs1p in mitochondria was found to be relatively more resistant to inactivation by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) as compared with a prokaryotic cysteine desulfurase. Mitochondria treated with NEM (1 mM) formed the persulfide on Nfs1p but failed to generate Fe-S clusters on aconitase, likely due to inactivation of downstream recipient(s) of the Nfs1p persulfide. Thus the Nfs1p-bound persulfide as described here represents a precursor en route to Fe-S cluster synthesis in mitochondria.

  8. Structures of the yeast dynamin-like GTPase Sey1p provide insight into homotypic ER fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Liming; Sun, Sha; Wang, Wei; Shi, Juanming; Hu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Shiyan; Su, Dan; Lou, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Homotypic membrane fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum is mediated by dynamin-like guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases), which include atlastin (ATL) in metazoans and Sey1p in yeast. In this paper, we determined the crystal structures of the cytosolic domain of Sey1p derived from Candida albicans. The structures reveal a stalk-like, helical bundle domain following the GTPase, which represents a previously unidentified configuration of the dynamin superfamily. This domain is significantly longer than that of ATL and critical for fusion. Sey1p forms a side-by-side dimer in complex with GMP-PNP or GDP/AlF4− but is monomeric with GDP. Surprisingly, Sey1p could mediate fusion without GTP hydrolysis, even though fusion was much more efficient with GTP. Sey1p was able to replace ATL in mammalian cells, and the punctate localization of Sey1p was dependent on its GTPase activity. Despite the common function of fusogenic GTPases, our results reveal unique features of Sey1p. PMID:26370501

  9. GPCR cell signaling pathways mediating embryonic chick retinal growth cone collapse induced by LPA and S1P

    PubMed Central

    Fincher, Jarod; Whiteneck, Canaan; Birgbauer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In the development of the nervous system, one of the critical aspects is the proper navigation of axons to their targets, the problem of axonal guidance. We are using the chick visual system as a model to investigate the role of the lysophospholipids lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) as potential axon guidance cues. We show that both LPA and S1P cause specific, dose-dependent growth cone collapse of retinal neurons in vitro in the chick model system, with slight differences to mouse, but very similar to Xenopus. Because LPA and S1P receptors are GPCRs, we analyzed the intracellular signaling pathways using pharmacological inhibitors in chick retinal neurons. Blocking rho kinase (ROCK) prevented growth cone collapse by LPA and S1P, while blocking PLC or chelating calcium had no effect on growth cone collapse. Inhibiting Gi/o with pertussis toxin resulted in a partial reduction of growth cone collapse, both with LPA and S1P. Inhibition of p38 blocked growth cone collapse mediated by LPA but not S1P. Thus, in addition to the involvement of the G12/13-ROCK pathway, LPA and S1P induced collapse of chick retinal growth cones has a partial requirement for Gi/o. PMID:25138637

  10. Accurate, Fast and Cost-Effective Diagnostic Test for Monosomy 1p36 Using Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Pricila da Silva; Pena, Heloisa B.; D'Angelo, Carla Sustek; Koiffmann, Celia P.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho

    2014-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is considered the most common subtelomeric deletion syndrome in humans and it accounts for 0.5–0.7% of all the cases of idiopathic intellectual disability. The molecular diagnosis is often made by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), which has the drawback of being a high-cost technique. However, patients with classic monosomy 1p36 share some typical clinical characteristics that, together with its common prevalence, justify the development of a less expensive, targeted diagnostic method. In this study, we developed a simple, rapid, and inexpensive real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for targeted diagnosis of monosomy 1p36, easily accessible for low-budget laboratories in developing countries. For this, we have chosen two target genes which are deleted in the majority of patients with monosomy 1p36: PRKCZ and SKI. In total, 39 patients previously diagnosed with monosomy 1p36 by aCGH, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) all tested positive on our qPCR assay. By simultaneously using these two genes we have been able to detect 1p36 deletions with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. We conclude that qPCR of PRKCZ and SKI is a fast and accurate diagnostic test for monosomy 1p36, costing less than 10 US dollars in reagent costs. PMID:24839341

  11. Correlation of modified Shimada classification with MYCN and 1p36 status detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Altungoz, Oguz; Aygun, Nevim; Tumer, Sait; Ozer, Erdener; Olgun, Nur; Sakizli, Meral

    2007-01-15

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a childhood cancer derived from neural crest cells, with a highly variable clinical course and biologic behavior. NB cells harbor complex genetic changes. Also, MYCN amplification is a well-known molecular marker for aggressive progression, and deletion of the short arm of chromosome 1 is frequently observed in NB. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between genetic markers and prognostic morphological parameters to address the biology and underlying the clinical complexity of NB. Therefore, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of chromosome band 1p36 and MYCN in a series of tumors from 43 cases classified according to the recommendation of International Neuroblastoma Pathology Committee (modification of Shimada classification). The correlations of MYCN amplification status and two distinct types of 1p36 alterations (deletion and imbalance) with Shimada classification and histologic prognostic factors were statistically analyzed. Amplification of MYCN and 1p36 deletion was present in 14 (32.6%) and 18 (41.9%) cases, respectively. Sixteen cases (37.2%) displayed a favorable histology, while 27 (62.8%) had an unfavorable histology. The 1p36 deletion was found to be an independent predictor of unfavorable histology by multivariate analysis (logistic regression test, P = 0.03), but the 1p36 imbalance did not show any significance. Both 1p36 deletion and MYCN amplification showed significant correlation with undifferentiated tumors (chi-square test, P = 0.002 and 0.03, respectively). Highly significant correlation was found between the higher mitotic karyorrhectic index (MKI) and MYCN amplification (chi-square test, P < 0.001), whereas neither 1p36 deletion nor 1p36 imbalance significantly correlated with a higher MKI (chi-square test, P > 0.05). We conclude that 1p36 deletion may be a reliable parameter in determining unfavorable histology and predicting prognosis in NB. Further studies with prognostic data

  12. Arginine methylation enhances the RNA chaperone activity of the West Nile virus host factor AUF1 p45.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Susann; Schmidt, Tobias; Schierhorn, Angelika; Lilie, Hauke; Szczepankiewicz, Grit; Bergs, Sandra; Liebert, Uwe G; Golbik, Ralph P; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2016-10-01

    A prerequisite for the intracellular replication process of the Flavivirus West Nile virus (WNV) is the cyclization of the viral RNA genome, which enables the viral replicase to initiate RNA synthesis. Our earlier studies indicated that the p45 isoform of the cellular AU-rich element binding protein 1 (AUF1) has an RNA chaperone activity, which supports RNA cyclization and viral RNA synthesis by destabilizing a stem structure at the WNV RNA's 3'-end. Here we show that in mammalian cells, AUF1 p45 is consistently modified by arginine methylation of its C terminus. By a combination of different experimental approaches, we can demonstrate that the methyltransferase PRMT1 is necessary and sufficient for AUF1 p45 methylation and that PRMT1 is required for efficient WNV replication. Interestingly, in comparison to the nonmethylated AUF1 p45, the methylated AUF1 p45(aDMA) exhibits a significantly increased affinity to the WNV RNA termini. Further data also revealed that the RNA chaperone activity of AUF1 p45(aDMA) is improved and the methylated protein stimulates viral RNA synthesis considerably more efficiently than the nonmethylated AUF1 p45. In addition to its destabilizing RNA chaperone activity, we identified an RNA annealing activity of AUF1 p45, which is not affected by methylation. Arginine methylation of AUF1 p45 thus represents a specific determinant of its RNA chaperone activity while functioning as a WNV host factor. Our data suggest that the methylation modifies the conformation of AUF1 p45 and in this way affects its RNA binding and restructuring activities.

  13. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae GATA Factors Dal80p and Deh1p Can Form Homo- and Heterodimeric Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Svetlov, Vladimir V.; Cooper, Terrance G.

    1998-01-01

    GATA family proteins Gln3p, Gat1p, Dal80p, and Deh1p mediate the regulation of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thus far, Gln3p, Dal80p, and Deh1p have been shown to bind to GATA sequences in NCR-sensitive promoters, in some cases to exactly the same GATA sequences. A minimal Gln3p binding site consists of a single GATA sequence, whereas a Dal80p binding site consists of two GATA sequences in specific orientation, 15 to 35 bp apart, suggesting that Dal80p may bind to DNA as a dimer. Additionally, both Dal80p and Deh1p are predicted to contain a leucine zipper motif near their C termini. Therefore, we tested whether they could form homo- and/or heterodimers in two-hybrid assays. We show that Dal80p-Dal80p, Dal80p-Dal80pLZ (leucine zipper), Dal80pLZ-Dal80pLZ, Dal80p-Deh1pLZ, Dal80pLZ-Deh1pLZ, and Deh1pLZ-Deh1pLZ complexes can form. Dal80p-Dal80p and Dal80pLZ-Dal80pLZ complexes yield 5- to 10-fold stronger signals than the other possible dimers. If Dal80p and Deh1p bind to DNA only after dimerization, then the difference in ability to form complexes could significantly affect their affinity for binding DNA and thus the degree of regulation exerted by each of the two factors. PMID:9791119

  14. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Induces Dose-Dependent Chemotaxis or Fugetaxis of T-ALL Blasts through S1P1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Messias, Carolina V.; Santana-Van-Vliet, Eliane; Lemos, Julia P.; Moreira, Otacilio C.; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinicius; Savino, Wilson; Mendes-da-Cruz, Daniella Arêas

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid involved in several physiological processes including cell migration and differentiation. S1P signaling is mediated through five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-S1P5). S1P1 is crucial to the exit of T-lymphocytes from the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs through a gradient of S1P. We have previously observed that T-ALL and T-LBL blasts express S1P1. Herein we analyzed the role of S1P receptors in the migratory pattern of human T-cell neoplastic blasts. S1P-triggered cell migration was directly related to S1P1 expression. T-ALL blasts expressing low levels of S1P1 mRNA (HPB-ALL) did not migrate toward S1P, whereas those expressing higher levels of S1P1 (MOLT-4, JURKAT and CEM) did migrate. The S1P ligand induced T-ALL cells chemotaxis in concentrations up to 500 nM and induced fugetaxis in higher concentrations (1000–10000 nM) through interactions with S1P1. When S1P1 was specifically blocked by the W146 compound, S1P-induced migration at lower concentrations was reduced, whereas higher concentrations induced cell migration. Furthermore, we observed that S1P/S1P1 interactions induced ERK and AKT phosphorylation, and modulation of Rac1 activity. Responding T-ALL blasts also expressed S1P3 mRNA but blockage of this receptor did not modify migratory responses. Our results indicate that S1P is involved in the migration of T-ALL/LBL blasts, which is dependent on S1P1 expression. Moreover, S1P concentrations in the given microenvironment might induce dose-dependent chemotaxis or fugetaxis of T-ALL blasts. PMID:26824863

  15. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Induces Dose-Dependent Chemotaxis or Fugetaxis of T-ALL Blasts through S1P1 Activation.

    PubMed

    Messias, Carolina V; Santana-Van-Vliet, Eliane; Lemos, Julia P; Moreira, Otacilio C; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinicius; Savino, Wilson; Mendes-da-Cruz, Daniella Arêas

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid involved in several physiological processes including cell migration and differentiation. S1P signaling is mediated through five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-S1P5). S1P1 is crucial to the exit of T-lymphocytes from the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs through a gradient of S1P. We have previously observed that T-ALL and T-LBL blasts express S1P1. Herein we analyzed the role of S1P receptors in the migratory pattern of human T-cell neoplastic blasts. S1P-triggered cell migration was directly related to S1P1 expression. T-ALL blasts expressing low levels of S1P1 mRNA (HPB-ALL) did not migrate toward S1P, whereas those expressing higher levels of S1P1 (MOLT-4, JURKAT and CEM) did migrate. The S1P ligand induced T-ALL cells chemotaxis in concentrations up to 500 nM and induced fugetaxis in higher concentrations (1000-10000 nM) through interactions with S1P1. When S1P1 was specifically blocked by the W146 compound, S1P-induced migration at lower concentrations was reduced, whereas higher concentrations induced cell migration. Furthermore, we observed that S1P/S1P1 interactions induced ERK and AKT phosphorylation, and modulation of Rac1 activity. Responding T-ALL blasts also expressed S1P3 mRNA but blockage of this receptor did not modify migratory responses. Our results indicate that S1P is involved in the migration of T-ALL/LBL blasts, which is dependent on S1P1 expression. Moreover, S1P concentrations in the given microenvironment might induce dose-dependent chemotaxis or fugetaxis of T-ALL blasts. PMID:26824863

  16. TVENT1P user's manual, a computer code for analyzing tornado-induced gas-dynamic transients in flow networks

    SciTech Connect

    Andrae, R.W.; Tang, P.K.; Gregory, W.S.

    1984-09-01

    TVENT1P is a revised version of the TVENT computer code, which was designed to predict the flows and pressures in a ventilation system subjected to a tornado. TVENT1P is essentially the same code, but we have added a material transport algorithm and features for turning blowers off and on, changing blower speeds, and changing the resistance of dampers and filters. These features make it possible to depict a sequence of events during a single run. Other features have been added to make the code more versatile. Example problems are included to demonstrate applications for TVENT1P.

  17. TRIM21 Ubiquitylates SQSTM1/p62 and Suppresses Protein Sequestration to Regulate Redox Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ji-An; Sun, Yu; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Bott, Alex J; Jaber, Nadia; Dou, Zhixun; Yang, Bin; Chen, Juei-Suei; Catanzaro, Joseph M; Du, Chunying; Ding, Wen-Xing; Diaz-Meco, Maria T; Moscat, Jorge; Ozato, Keiko; Lin, Richard Z; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2016-03-01

    TRIM21 is a RING finger domain-containing ubiquitin E3 ligase whose expression is elevated in autoimmune disease. While TRIM21 plays an important role in immune activation during pathogen infection, little is known about its inherent cellular function. Here we show that TRIM21 plays an essential role in redox regulation by directly interacting with SQSTM1/p62 and ubiquitylating p62 at lysine 7 (K7) via K63-linkage. As p62 oligomerizes and sequesters client proteins in inclusions, the TRIM21-mediated p62 ubiquitylation abrogates p62 oligomerization and sequestration of proteins including Keap1, a negative regulator of antioxidant response. TRIM21-deficient cells display an enhanced antioxidant response and reduced cell death in response to oxidative stress. Genetic ablation of TRIM21 in mice confers protection from oxidative damages caused by arsenic-induced liver insult and pressure overload heart injury. Therefore, TRIM21 plays an essential role in p62-regulated redox homeostasis and may be a viable target for treating pathological conditions resulting from oxidative damage. PMID:26942676

  18. Legionella pneumophila S1P-lyase targets host sphingolipid metabolism and restrains autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Rolando, Monica; Escoll, Pedro; Nora, Tamara; Botti, Joëlle; Boitez, Valérie; Daniels, Craig; Abraham, Gilu; Stogios, Peter J.; Skarina, Tatiana; Christophe, Charlotte; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Cazalet, Christel; Hilbi, Hubert; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W. T.; Tull, Dedreia; McConville, Malcolm J.; Ong, Sze Ying; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Codogno, Patrice; Levade, Thierry; Naderer, Thomas; Savchenko, Alexei; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential component of innate immunity, enabling the detection and elimination of intracellular pathogens. Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia in humans, is able to modulate autophagy through the action of effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell by the pathogen’s Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Many of these effectors share structural and sequence similarity with eukaryotic proteins. Indeed, phylogenetic analyses have indicated their acquisition by horizontal gene transfer from a eukaryotic host. Here we report that L. pneumophila translocates the effector protein sphingosine-1 phosphate lyase (LpSpl) to target the host sphingosine biosynthesis and to curtail autophagy. Our structural characterization of LpSpl and its comparison with human SPL reveals high structural conservation, thus supporting prior phylogenetic analysis. We show that LpSpl possesses S1P lyase activity that was abrogated by mutation of the catalytic site residues. L. pneumophila triggers the reduction of several sphingolipids critical for macrophage function in an LpSpl-dependent and -independent manner. LpSpl activity alone was sufficient to prevent an increase in sphingosine levels in infected host cells and to inhibit autophagy during macrophage infection. LpSpl was required for efficient infection of A/J mice, highlighting an important virulence role for this effector. Thus, we have uncovered a previously unidentified mechanism used by intracellular pathogens to inhibit autophagy, namely the disruption of host sphingolipid biosynthesis. PMID:26831115

  19. Legionella pneumophila S1P-lyase targets host sphingolipid metabolism and restrains autophagy.

    PubMed

    Rolando, Monica; Escoll, Pedro; Nora, Tamara; Botti, Joëlle; Boitez, Valérie; Bedia, Carmen; Daniels, Craig; Abraham, Gilu; Stogios, Peter J; Skarina, Tatiana; Christophe, Charlotte; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Cazalet, Christel; Hilbi, Hubert; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W T; Tull, Dedreia; McConville, Malcolm J; Ong, Sze Ying; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Codogno, Patrice; Levade, Thierry; Naderer, Thomas; Savchenko, Alexei; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-02-16

    Autophagy is an essential component of innate immunity, enabling the detection and elimination of intracellular pathogens. Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia in humans, is able to modulate autophagy through the action of effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell by the pathogen's Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Many of these effectors share structural and sequence similarity with eukaryotic proteins. Indeed, phylogenetic analyses have indicated their acquisition by horizontal gene transfer from a eukaryotic host. Here we report that L. pneumophila translocates the effector protein sphingosine-1 phosphate lyase (LpSpl) to target the host sphingosine biosynthesis and to curtail autophagy. Our structural characterization of LpSpl and its comparison with human SPL reveals high structural conservation, thus supporting prior phylogenetic analysis. We show that LpSpl possesses S1P lyase activity that was abrogated by mutation of the catalytic site residues. L. pneumophila triggers the reduction of several sphingolipids critical for macrophage function in an LpSpl-dependent and -independent manner. LpSpl activity alone was sufficient to prevent an increase in sphingosine levels in infected host cells and to inhibit autophagy during macrophage infection. LpSpl was required for efficient infection of A/J mice, highlighting an important virulence role for this effector. Thus, we have uncovered a previously unidentified mechanism used by intracellular pathogens to inhibit autophagy, namely the disruption of host sphingolipid biosynthesis.

  20. Enhanced arsenic accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae overexpressing transporters Fps1p or Hxt7p.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dhawal; Shen, Michael W Y; Chen, Wilfred; Da Silva, Nancy A

    2010-10-01

    Arsenic contamination of ground water affects the health of millions of people worldwide. Bioremediation has the potential to lower contaminant levels in cases where physical methods are either ineffective or cost prohibitive. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered for enhanced arsenite accumulation by overexpression of transporters responsible for the influx of the contaminant. The transporter genes FPS1 and HXT7 were cloned under the control of the late-phase ADH2-promoter. This allowed for protein production at high biomass levels without the addition of inducer. Following the transfer of stationary phase cells to buffer, the engineered strains were capable of 3-4-fold greater arsenic uptake as compared to control cells. Further, at trace levels of the metalloid, the cells overexpressing the Fps1p transporter removed ca. 40% more arsenite from the extracellular medium than the controls. Arsenic uptake was also evaluated in cells overexpressing the transporters coupled with high-level production of cytosolic As sequestors (phytochelatins or bacterial ArsRp) to act as an intracellular sink. This led to an up to 4-fold increase in As accumulation in the resting cell culture as compared to native cells. The results demonstrate important steps needed to engineer a yeast biosorbent with enhanced accumulation capabilities for this metalloid.

  1. Mapping of guanylin to murine chromosome 4 and human chromosome 1p34-p35

    SciTech Connect

    Sciaky, D.; Cohen, M.B.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1995-03-20

    Guanylin is a 15-amino-acid peptide similar in structure and in function to ST{sub a}, the heat stable enterotoxin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (4). Both guanylin and ST{sub a} bind guanylyl cyclase-C (GC-C), resulting in increased levels of intracellular cGMP and induction of Cl- secretion (4) via the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFM) (2). Guanylin is a highly regulated intestinal gene that is differentially expressed along the duodenal-to-colonic and villus-to-crypt axes. Guanylin mRNA abundance is maximal in the distal small intestine and proximal colon, where the mRNA is detected mainly in differentiated villus epithelial cells and superficial colonic epithelial cells, respectively. The murine guanylin gene (Guca2) has been isolated and sequenced; the gene is 1.7 kb and consists of 3 exons. We report here the mapping of Guca2 to mouse chromosome 4 by linkage analysis and to human chromosome region 1p34-p35 using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). 20 refs., 2 figs.

  2. A novel methyltransferase (Hmt1p) modifies poly(A)+-RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, M F; Silver, P A

    1996-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins play many essential roles in the metabolism of nuclear pre-mRNA. As such, they demonstrate a myriad of dynamic behaviors and modifications. In particular, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) contain the bulk of methylated arginine residues in eukaryotic cells. We have identified the first eukaryotic hnRNP-specific methyltransferase via a genetic screen for proteins that interact with an abundant poly(A)+-RNA-binding protein termed Npl3p. We have previously shown that npl3-1 mutants are temperature sensitive for growth and defective for export of mRNA from the nucleus. New mutants in interacting genes were isolated by their failure to survive in the presence of the npl3-1 allele. Four alleles of the same gene were identified in this manner. Cloning of the cognate gene revealed an encoded protein with similarity to methyltransferases that was termed HMT1 for hnRNP methyltransferase. HMT1 is not required for normal cell viability except when NPL3 is also defective. The Hmt1 protein is located in the nucleus. We demonstrate that Npl3p is methylated by Hmt1p both in vivo and in vitro. These findings now allow further exploration of the function of this previously uncharacterized class of enzymes. PMID:8668183

  3. 2D-photochemical model for forbidden oxygen line emission for comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, G.; De Keyser, J.; Maggiolo, R.; Rubin, M.; Gronoff, G.; Gibbons, A.; Jehin, E.; Dhooghe, F.; Gunell, H.; Vaeck, N.; Loreau, J.

    2016-08-01

    We present here a 2D-model of photochemistry for computing the production and loss mechanisms of the O(1S) and O(1D) states, which are responsible for the emission lines at 577.7 nm, 630 nm, and 636.4 nm, in case of the comet 1P/Halley. The presence of O2 within cometary atmospheres, measured by the in-situ ROSETTA and GIOTTO missions, necessitates a revision of the usual photochemical models. Indeed, the photodissociation of molecular oxygen also leads to a significant production of oxygen in excited electronic states. In order to correctly model the solar UV flux absorption, we consider here a 2D configuration. While the green to red-doublet ratio is not affected by the solar UV flux absorption, estimates of the red-doublet and green lines emissions are, however, overestimated by a factor of two in the 1D model compared to the 2D model. Considering a spherical symmetry, emission maps can be deduced from the 2D model in order to be directly compared to ground and/or in-situ observations.

  4. Negative Ion Chemistry in the Coma of Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    Negative ions (anions) were identified in the coma of comet 1P/Halley from in-situ measurements performed by the Giotto spacecraft in 1986. These anions were detected with masses in the range 7-110 amu, but with insufficient mass resolution to permit unambiguous identification. We present details of a new chemical-hydrodynamic model for the coma of comet Halley that includes - for the first time - atomic and molecular anions, in addition to a comprehensive hydrocarbon chemistry. Anion number densities arc calculated as a function of radius in the coma, and compared with the Giotto results. Important anion production mechanisms arc found to include radiative electron attachment, polar photodissociation, dissociative electron attachment, and proton transfer. The polyyne anions C4H(-) and C6H(-) arc found to be likely candidates to explain the Giotto anion mass spectrum in the range 49-73 amu. Thc CN(-) anion probably makes a significant contribution to the mass spectrum at 26 amu. Larger carbon-chain anions such as C8H(1) can explain the peak near 100 amu provided there is a source of large carbon-chain-bearing molecules from the cometary nucleus.

  5. NXF1/p15 heterodimers are essential for mRNA nuclear export in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Herold, A; Klymenko, T; Izaurralde, E

    2001-01-01

    The conserved family of NXF proteins has been implicated in the export of messenger RNAs from the nucleus. In metazoans, NXFs heterodimerize with p15. The yeast genome encodes a single NXF protein (Mex67p), but there are multiple nxf genes in metazoans. Whether metazoan NXFs are functionally redundant, or their multiplication reflects an adaptation to a greater substrate complexity or to tissue-specific requirements has not been established. The Drosophila genome encodes one p15 homolog and four putative NXF proteins (NXF1 to NXF4). Here we show that depletion of the endogenous pools of NXF1 or p15 from Drosophila cells inhibits growth and results in a rapid and robust accumulation of polyadenylated RNAs within the nucleus. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations show that export of both heat-shock and non-heat-shock mRNAs, as well as intron-containing and intronless mRNAs is inhibited. Depleting endogenous NXF2 or NXF3 has no apparent phenotype. Moreover, NXF4 is not expressed at detectable levels in cultured Drosophila cells. We conclude that Dm NXF1/p15 heterodimers only (but not NXF2-NXF4) mediate the export of the majority of mRNAs in Drosophila cells and that the other members of the NXF family play more specialized or different roles. PMID:11780633

  6. Triage of oxidation-prone proteins by Sqstm1/p62 within the mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Minjung; Shin, Jaekyoon

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} The mitochondrion contains its own protein quality control system. {yields} p62 localizes within the mitochondria and forms mega-dalton sized complexes. {yields} p62 interacts with oxidation-prone proteins and the proteins of quality control. {yields} In vitro delivery of p62 improves mitochondrial functions. {yields} p62 is implicated as a participant in mitochondrial protein quality control. -- Abstract: As the mitochondrion is vulnerable to oxidative stress, cells have evolved several strategies to maintain mitochondrial integrity, including mitochondrial protein quality control mechanisms and autophagic removal of damaged mitochondria. Involvement of an autophagy adaptor, Sqstm1/p62, in the latter process has been recently described. In the present study, we provide evidence that a portion of p62 directly localizes within the mitochondria and supports stable electron transport by forming heterogeneous protein complexes. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) of mitochondrial proteins co-purified with p62 revealed that p62 interacts with several oxidation-prone proteins, including a few components of the electron transport chain complexes, as well as multiple chaperone molecules and redox regulatory enzymes. Accordingly, p62-deficient mitochondria exhibited compromised electron transport, and the compromised function was partially restored by in vitro delivery of p62. These results suggest that p62 plays an additional role in maintaining mitochondrial integrity at the vicinity of target machineries through its function in relation to protein quality control.

  7. cep-1/p53-dependent dysplastic pathology of the aging C. elegans gonad.

    PubMed

    McGee, Mathew D; Day, Nicholas; Graham, Jill; Melov, Simon

    2012-04-01

    The C. elegans germline and somatic gonad are actively developing until the animal reaches adulthood, and then continue to undergo striking changes as the animal ages. Reported changes include a depletion of available sperm, a decrease in oocyte quality up till mid-life, a reduction in germline nuclei, a decrease in fertility, and an accumulation of DNA in the midbody of aging C. elegans. Here, we have focused on the aging gonad in old animals, and show in detail that the aging gonad undergoes a massive uterine growth composed of endoreduplicating oocytes, yolk, and expanses of chromatin. We use a novel series of imaging techniques in combination with histological methodology for reconstructing aged worms in 3-dimensions, and show in old animals growing masses swelling inside the uterus to occupy most of the diameter of the worm. We link this accelerated growth to the cep-1/p53 tumor suppressor. Because cep-1 is required for DNA damage induced apoptosis, and daf-2 limits longevity, these results suggest a role for age-related DNA damage in dysplastic uterine growths, which in some respects resemble premalignant changes that can occur in aging mammals.

  8. A multi-scale Q1/P0 approach to langrangian shock hydrodynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Shashkov, Mikhail (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM.); Love, Edward; Scovazzi, Guglielmo

    2006-03-01

    A new multi-scale, stabilized method for Q1/P0 finite element computations of Lagrangian shock hydrodynamics is presented. Instabilities (of hourglass type) are controlled by a stabilizing operator derived using the variational multi-scale analysis paradigm. The resulting stabilizing term takes the form of a pressure correction. With respect to currently implemented hourglass control approaches, the novelty of the method resides in its residual-based character. The stabilizing residual has a definite physical meaning, since it embeds a discrete form of the Clausius-Duhem inequality. Effectively, the proposed stabilization samples and acts to counter the production of entropy due to numerical instabilities. The proposed technique is applicable to materials with no shear strength, for which there exists a caloric equation of state. The stabilization operator is incorporated into a mid-point, predictor/multi-corrector time integration algorithm, which conserves mass, momentum and total energy. Encouraging numerical results in the context of compressible gas dynamics confirm the potential of the method.

  9. The origin of chaos in the orbit of comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekholt, T. C. N.; Pelupessy, F. I.; Heggie, D. C.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2016-10-01

    According to Muñoz-Gutiérrez et al. the orbit of comet 1P/Halley is chaotic with a surprisingly small Lyapunov time-scale of order its orbital period. In this work we analyse the origin of chaos in Halley's orbit and the growth of perturbations, in order to get a better understanding of this unusually short time-scale. We perform N-body simulations to model Halley's orbit in the Solar system and measure the separation between neighbouring trajectories. To be able to interpret the numerical results, we use a semi-analytical map to demonstrate different growth modes, i.e. linear, oscillatory or exponential, and transitions between these modes. We find the Lyapunov time-scale of Halley's orbit to be of order 300 yr, which is significantly longer than previous estimates in the literature. This discrepancy could be due to the different methods used to measure the Lyapunov time-scale. A surprising result is that next to Jupiter, also encounters with Venus contribute to the exponential growth in the next 3000 yr. Finally, we note an interesting application of the sub-linear, oscillatory growth mode to an ensemble of bodies moving through the Solar system. Whereas in the absence of encounters with a third body the ensemble spreads out linearly in time, the accumulation of weak encounters can increase the lifetime of such systems due to the oscillatory behaviour.

  10. A conserved amphipathic helix is required for membrane tubule formation by Yop1p

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Jacob P.; Claridge, Jolyon K.; Smith, Peter G.; Schnell, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    The integral membrane proteins of the DP1 (deleted in polyposis) and reticulon families are responsible for maintaining the high membrane curvature required for both smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules and the edges of ER sheets, and mutations in these proteins lead to motor neuron diseases, such as hereditary spastic paraplegia. Reticulon/DP1 proteins contain reticulon homology domains (RHDs) that have unusually long hydrophobic segments and are proposed to adopt intramembrane helical hairpins that stabilize membrane curvature. We have characterized the secondary structure and dynamics of the DP1 family protein produced from the YOP1 gene (Yop1p) and identified a C-terminal conserved amphipathic helix (APH) that, on its own, interacts strongly with negatively charged membranes and is necessary for membrane tubule formation. Analyses of DP1 and reticulon family members indicate that most, if not all, contain C-terminal sequences capable of forming APHs. Together, these results indicate that APHs play a previously unrecognized role in RHD membrane curvature stabilization. PMID:25646439

  11. A YAC contig encompassing the recessive Stargardt disease gene (STGD) on chromosome 1p

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.L.; Lewis, R.A.; Chinault, A.C.

    1995-12-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD) and fundus flavimaculatus are infrequent autosomal recessive conditions characterized by a juvenile macular dystrophy and variable degrees of peripheral retinal changes. Linkage analysis performed in 47 STGD/fundus flavimaculatus families demonstrated significant linkage to 13 polymorphic DNA markers on chromosome 1p. The maximum combined two-point lod score was 32.7 (maximum recombination fraction [{theta}{sub max}] = .006) with the polymorphic marker D1S188. Our data demonstrate that STGD and fundus flavimaculatus are the same disorder clinically and genetically and provide further evidence for genetic homogeneity of this phenotype. Analysis of recombination on disease chromosomes placed the STGD gene within a 4-cM interval between markers D1S435 and D1S236. A physical map was constructed of a YAC contig flanking STGD, from markers D1S500 to D1S495, and includes the critical interval delineated by historical recombinants. This contig spans {approximately}31 cM, with one gap (3-5 cM) that is outside the 4-cM critical region. Localization of STGD to a single YAC contig will facilitate its positional cloning. 75 refs., 3 figs., 21 tabs.

  12. Alcohol alters hepatic FoxO1, p53, and mitochondrial SIRT5 deacetylation function

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, Charles S. Leo, Maria Anna; Wang, Xiaolei; DeCarli, Leonore M.

    2008-08-22

    Chronic alcohol consumption affects the gene expression of a NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirtuis 1 (SIRT1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}). Our aim was to verify that it also alters the forkhead (FoxO1) and p53 transcription factor proteins, critical in the hepatic response to oxidative stress and regulated by SIRT1 through its deacetylating capacity. Accordingly, rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli alcohol-containing liquid diets for 28 days. Alcohol increased hepatic mRNA expression of FoxO1 (p = 0.003) and p53 (p = 0.001) while corresponding protein levels remained unchanged. However phospho-FoxO1 and phospho-Akt (protein kinase) were both decreased by alcohol consumption (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively) while hepatic p53 was found hyperacetylated (p = 0.017). Furthermore, mitochondrial SIRT5 was reduced (p = 0.0025), and PGC-1{alpha} hyperacetylated (p = 0.027), establishing their role in protein modification. Thus, alcohol consumption disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial interactions by post-translation protein modifications, which contribute to alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis through the newly discovered reduction of SIRT5.

  13. TRIM21 Ubiquitylates SQSTM1/p62 and Suppresses Protein Sequestration to Regulate Redox Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ji-An; Sun, Yu; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Bott, Alex J; Jaber, Nadia; Dou, Zhixun; Yang, Bin; Chen, Juei-Suei; Catanzaro, Joseph M; Du, Chunying; Ding, Wen-Xing; Diaz-Meco, Maria T; Moscat, Jorge; Ozato, Keiko; Lin, Richard Z; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2016-03-01

    TRIM21 is a RING finger domain-containing ubiquitin E3 ligase whose expression is elevated in autoimmune disease. While TRIM21 plays an important role in immune activation during pathogen infection, little is known about its inherent cellular function. Here we show that TRIM21 plays an essential role in redox regulation by directly interacting with SQSTM1/p62 and ubiquitylating p62 at lysine 7 (K7) via K63-linkage. As p62 oligomerizes and sequesters client proteins in inclusions, the TRIM21-mediated p62 ubiquitylation abrogates p62 oligomerization and sequestration of proteins including Keap1, a negative regulator of antioxidant response. TRIM21-deficient cells display an enhanced antioxidant response and reduced cell death in response to oxidative stress. Genetic ablation of TRIM21 in mice confers protection from oxidative damages caused by arsenic-induced liver insult and pressure overload heart injury. Therefore, TRIM21 plays an essential role in p62-regulated redox homeostasis and may be a viable target for treating pathological conditions resulting from oxidative damage.

  14. Characterization of the mouse TFF1 (pS2) gene promoter region.

    PubMed

    Terada, T; Sakagami, R; Tabuchi, Y; Maeda, M

    2001-02-01

    Trefoil peptides (TFFs) with a unique trefoil domain(s) are presumed to function in protection and repair of the gastrointestinal epithelial layer. Three peptide family members are differently distributed in the mouse gastrointestinal tract: TFF1/pS2 specifically in stomach, TFF2/SP mainly in stomach, pancreas and duodenum, and TFF3/ITF in intestine. We cloned and sequenced the mouse TFF1 gene 5'-upstream region by means of the genomic walking procedure. The cloned region was ligated to the luciferase reporter gene and then introduced into mouse gastric surface mucous GSM10 cells which express TFF1 and TFF2. The minimum promoter was located in the region containing the TATA-box between -39 and the transcriptional start site. Further upstream regions stimulated (-2192-- -1630bp, -641-- -243bp, -137-- -39bp) and inhibited (-1630-- -641bp, -243-- -137 bp) luciferase gene expression. These regions as well as short segments conserved in the mouse and human 5'-upstream sequences may be important for modulation of the mRNA level of the TFF1 gene.

  15. A YAC contig encompassing the recessive Stargardt disease gene (STGD) on chromosome 1p.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, K L; Baird, L; Lewis, R A; Chinault, A C; Otterud, B; Leppert, M; Lupski, J R

    1995-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD) and fundus flavimaculatus are infrequent autosomal recessive conditions characterized by a juvenile macular dystrophy and variable degrees of peripheral retinal changes. Linkage analysis performed in 47 STGD/fundus flavimaculatus families demonstrated significant linkage to 13 polymorphic DNA markers on chromosome 1p. The maximum combined two-point lod score was 32.7 (maximum recombination fraction [phi max] = .006) with the polymorphic marker D1S188. Our data demonstrate that STGD and fundus flavimaculatus are the same disorder clinically and genetically and provide further evidence for genetic homogeneity of this phenotype. Analysis of recombination events on disease chromosomes placed the STGD gene within a 4-cM interval between markers D1S435 and D1S236. A physical map was constructed of a YAC contig flanking STGD, from markers D1S500 to D1S495, and includes the critical interval delineated by historical recombinants. This contig spans approximately 31 cM, with one gap (3-5 cM) that is outside the 4-cM critical region. Localization of STGD to a single YAC contig will facilitate its positional cloning. Images Figure 3 PMID:8533764

  16. Comet 1P/Halley multifluid MHD model for the Giotto fly-by

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Combi, M. R.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Gombosi, T. I.; Hansen, K. C.; Shou, Y.; Tenishev, V. M.; Tóth, G.; Van der Holst, B.

    2014-02-01

    The interaction of comets with the solar wind has been the focus of many studies including numerical modeling. We compare the results of our multifluid MHD simulation of comet 1P/Halley to data obtained during the flyby of the European Space Agency's Giotto spacecraft in 1986. The model solves the full set of MHD equations for the individual fluids representing the solar wind protons, the cometary light and heavy ions, and the electrons. The mass loading, charge-exchange, dissociative ion-electron recombination, and collisional interactions between the fluids are taken into account. The computational domain spans over several million kilometers, and the close vicinity of the comet is resolved to the details of the magnetic cavity. The model is validated by comparison to the corresponding Giotto observations obtained by the Ion Mass Spectrometer, the Neutral Mass Spectrometer, the Giotto magnetometer experiment, and the Johnstone Plasma Analyzer instrument. The model shows the formation of the bow shock, the ion pile-up, and the diamagnetic cavity and is able to reproduce the observed temperature differences between the pick-up ion populations and the solar wind protons. We give an overview of the global interaction of the comet with the solar wind and then show the effects of the Lorentz force interaction between the different plasma populations.

  17. Immunoassays Based on Penicillium marneffei Mp1p Derived from Pichia pastoris Expression System for Diagnosis of Penicilliosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Fang; Cai, Jian-Piao; Wang, Ya-Di; Dong, Hui; Hao, Wei; Jiang, Ling-Xiao; Long, Jun; Chan, Cheman; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Che, Xiao-Yan

    2011-01-01

    Background Penicillium marneffei is a dimorphic fungus endemic in Southeast Asia. It can cause fatal penicilliosis in humans, particularly in HIV-infected people. Diagnosis of this infection is difficult because its clinical manifestations are not distinctive. Specialized laboratory tests are necessary to establish a definitive diagnosis for successful management. We have demonstrated previously that a cell wall mannoprotein Mp1p, abundant in P. marneffei, is a potential biomarker for diagnosis of P. marneffei infections. In the present study, we describe immunoassays based on Mp1p derived from the yeast Pichia pastoris expression system. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and rabbit polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) against Mp1p expressed in P. pastoris. Subsequently, we developed two Mp1p antigen capture ELISAs which employed MAbs for both the capture and detecting antibodies (MAb-MAb pair) or PAbs and MAbs as the capture and detecting antibodies (PAbs-MAb pair) respectively. The two Mp1p antigen ELISAs detected Mp1p specifically in cultures of P. marneffei yeast phase at 37–40°C and had no cross-reaction with other tested pathogenic fungi. The sensitivities and specificities of the two antigen assays were found to be 55% (11/20) and 99.6% (538/540) for MAb-MAb Mp1p ELISA, and 75% (15/20) and 99.4% (537/540) for PAbs-MAb Mp1p ELISA performed using 20 sera with culture-confirmed penicilliosis, and 540 control sera from 15 other mycosis patients and 525 healthy donors. Meanwhile, we also developed an anti-Mp1p IgG antibody ELISA with an evaluated sensitivity of 30% (6/20) and a specificity of 98.5% (532/540) using the same sera. Furthermore, combining the results of Mp1p antigen and antibody detection improved the sensitivity of diagnosis to 100% (20/20). Conclusions/Significance Simultaneous detection of antigen and antibody using the immunoassays based on Mp1p derived from P. pastoris greatly improves detection sensitivity. The

  18. 1p36.32 rearrangements and the role of PI-PLC η2 in nervous tumours.

    PubMed

    Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita

    2011-07-01

    Deletions in the distal region of the short arm of chromosome 1 (1p36) are widely diffuse, both in congenital 1p36 Deletion Syndrome and as somatic abnormalities in tumours. Rearrangements in 1p36 have been described in a broad spectrum of human neoplasias in addition to other chromosomal abnormalities. In neuroblastomas, wide hemizygous deletions in 1p36.23-1p36.32 have been described suggesting that the 1p36 region contains a tumour-suppressor gene involved in malignancy. A role for phosphoinositide (PI)-specific phospholipase C (PLC) η2, whose gene maps on 1p36.32, was suggested. PI-PLC η2 belongs to a family of enzymes related to the phosphoinositide signalling pathway, which provide an important intracellular signalling system involved in a variety of cell functions such as hormone secretion, neurotransmitter signal transduction, cell growth, membrane trafficking, ion channel activity, regulation of the cytoskeleton, cell cycle control and apoptosis. Expression of PI-PLC η2 occurs after birth and continues throughout the life. Synapse formation occurs during a short period of postnatal development. Thus, it is likely that PI-PLC η2 acts in formation and maintenance of the neuronal network in the brain. The fact that PI-PLC η2, a highly neuron-specific isozyme, is abundantly expressed in the postnatal brain suggests the importance of PI-PLC η2 in formation and maintenance of the neuronal network in the postnatal brain. Further studies are required to verify the possible involvement of PI-PLC η2 mutation/deletion in central nervous tumour tissues presenting abnormalities of the 1p36 chromosomal band.

  19. Analysis of Membrane Topology and Identification of Essential Residues for the Yeast Endoplasmic Reticulum Inositol Acyltransferase Gwt1p

    PubMed Central

    Sagane, Koji; Umemura, Mariko; Ogawa-Mitsuhashi, Kaoru; Tsukahara, Kappei; Yoko-o, Takehiko; Jigami, Yoshifumi

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) is a post-translational modification that anchors cell surface proteins to the plasma membrane, and GPI modifications occur in all eukaryotes. Biosynthesis of GPI starts on the cytoplasmic face of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, and GPI precursors flip from the cytoplasmic side to the luminal side of the ER, where biosynthesis of GPI precursors is completed. Gwt1p and PIG-W are inositol acyltransferases that transfer fatty acyl chains to the inositol moiety of GPI precursors in yeast and mammalian cells, respectively. To ascertain whether flipping across the ER membrane occurs before or after inositol acylation of GPI precursors, we identified essential residues of PIG-W and Gwt1p and determined the membrane topology of Gwt1p. Guided by algorithm-based predictions of membrane topology, we experimentally identified 13 transmembrane domains in Gwt1p. We found that Gwt1p, PIG-W, and their orthologs shared four conserved regions and that these four regions in Gwt1p faced the luminal side of the ER membrane. Moreover, essential residues of Gwt1p and PIG-W faced the ER lumen or were near the luminal edge of transmembrane domains. The membrane topology of Gwt1p suggested that inositol acylation occurred on the luminal side of the ER membrane. Rather than stimulate flipping of the GPI precursor across the ER membrane, inositol acylation of GPI precursors may anchor the precursors to the luminal side of the ER membrane, preventing flip-flops. PMID:21367863

  20. Whole genomic analysis of human G1P[8] rotavirus strains from different age groups in China.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Tsuzumi; Ghosh, Souvik; Wang, Yuan-Hong; Zhou, Xuan; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2012-08-01

    G1P[8] rotaviruses are an important cause of diarrhea in humans in China. To date, there are no reports on the whole genomic analysis of the Chinese G1P[8] rotaviruses. To determine the origin and overall genetic makeup of the recent Chinese G1P[8] strains, the whole genomes of three strains, RVA/Human-wt/CHN/E1911/2009/G1P[8], RVA/Human-tc/CHN/R588/2005/G1P[8] and RVA/Human-tc/CHN/Y128/2004/G1P[8], detected in an infant, a child and an adult, respectively, were analyzed. Strains E1911, R588 and Y128 exhibited a typical Wa-like genotype constellation. Except for the NSP3 gene of E1911, the whole genomes of strains E1911, R588 and Y128 were found to be more closely related to those of the recent Wa-like common human strains from different countries than those of the prototype G1P[8] strain, or other old strains. On the other hand, the NSP3 gene of E1911 was genetically distinct from those of Y128, R588, or other Wa-like common human strains, and appeared to share a common origin with those of the porcine-like human G9 strains, providing evidence for intergenotype reassortment events. Comparisons of the amino acid residues defining the VP7 and VP4 antigenic domains revealed several mismatches between these Chinese G1P[8] strains and the G1 and P[8] strains contained in the currently licensed rotavirus vaccines Rotarix(TM )and RotaTeq(TM). PMID:23012626

  1. Chl1p, a DNA helicase-like protein in budding yeast, functions in sister-chromatid cohesion.

    PubMed Central

    Skibbens, Robert V

    2004-01-01

    From the time of DNA replication until anaphase onset, sister chromatids remain tightly paired along their length. Ctf7p/Eco1p is essential to establish sister-chromatid pairing during S-phase and associates with DNA replication components. DNA helicases precede the DNA replication fork and thus will first encounter chromatin sites destined for cohesion. In this study, I provide the first evidence that a DNA helicase is required for proper sister-chromatid cohesion. Characterizations of chl1 mutant cells reveal that CHL1 interacts genetically with both CTF7/ECO1 and CTF18/CHL12, two genes that function in sister-chromatid cohesion. Consistent with genetic interactions, Chl1p physically associates with Ctf7p/Eco1p both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, a functional assay reveals that Chl1p is critical for sister-chromatid cohesion. Within the budding yeast genome, Chl1p exhibits the highest degree of sequence similarity to human CHL1 isoforms and BACH1. Previous studies revealed that human CHLR1 exhibits DNA helicase-like activities and that BACH1 is a helicase-like protein that associates with the tumor suppressor BRCA1 to maintain genome integrity. Our findings document a novel role for Chl1p in sister-chromatid cohesion and provide new insights into the possible mechanisms through which DNA helicases may contribute to cancer progression when mutated. PMID:15020404

  2. Binding of the replication terminator protein Fob1p to the Ter sites of yeast causes polar fork arrest.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bidyut K; Bastia, Deepak

    2004-01-16

    Fob1p protein has been implicated in the termination of replication forks at the two tandem termini present in the non-transcribed spacer region located between the sequences encoding the 35 S and the 5 S RNAs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the biochemistry and mode of action of this protein were previously unknown. We have purified the Fob1p protein to near-homogeneity, and we developed a novel technique to show that it binds specifically to the Ter1 and Ter2 sequences. Interestingly, the two sequences share no detectable homology. We present two lines of evidence showing that the interaction of the Fob1p with the Ter sites causes replication termination. First, a mutant of FOB1, L104S, that significantly reduced the binding of the mutant form of the protein to the tandem Ter sites, also failed to promote replication termination in vivo. The mutant did not diminish nucleolar transport, and interaction of the mutant form of Fob1p with itself and with another protein encoded in the locus YDR026C suggested that the mutation did not cause global misfolding of the protein. Second, DNA site mutations in the Ter sequences that separately and specifically abolished replication fork arrest at Ter1 or Ter2 also eliminated sequence-specific binding of the Fob1p to the two sites. The work presented here definitively established Ter DNA-Fob1p interaction as an important step in fork arrest.

  3. Posttranscriptional Regulation of Cell-Cell Interaction Protein-Encoding Transcripts by Zfs1p in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Melissa L.; Huang, Weichun; Li, Leping; Gerrish, Kevin E.; Fargo, David C.; Ozsolak, Fatih

    2012-01-01

    Members of the tristetraprolin (TTP) family of CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins can bind directly to AU-rich elements in mRNAs and promote transcript deadenylation and decay. The yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe expresses a single TTP family member, Zfs1p. In this study, we identified probable Zfs1p target mRNAs by comparing transcript levels in wild-type yeast and zfs1Δ mutants, using deep sequencing and microarray approaches. We also used direct RNA sequencing to determine polyadenylation site locations and to confirm the presence of potential Zfs1p target sequences within the target mRNA. These studies identified a set of transcripts containing potential Zfs1p binding sites that accumulated significantly in the zfs1Δ mutants; a subset of these transcripts decayed more slowly in the zfs1Δ mutants and bound directly to Zfs1p in coimmunoprecipitation assays. One apparent direct target encodes the transcription factor Cbf12p, which is known to increase cell-cell adhesion and flocculation when overexpressed. Studies of zfs1Δ cbf12Δ double mutants demonstrated that the increased flocculation seen in zfs1Δ mutants is due, at least in part, to a direct effect on the turnover of cbf12 mRNA. These data suggest that Zfs1p can both directly and indirectly regulate the levels of transcripts involved in cell-cell adhesion in this species. PMID:22907753

  4. Detection of Cell Wall Mannoprotein Mp1p in Culture Supernatants of Penicillium marneffei and in Sera of Penicilliosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Liang; Chan, King-Man; Chen, Daliang; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Lee, Cindy; Chan, Che-Man; Sirisanthana, Thira; Tsang, Dominic N. C.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    1999-01-01

    Mannoproteins are important and abundant structural components of fungal cell walls. The MP1 gene encodes a cell wall mannoprotein of the pathogenic fungus Penicillium marneffei. In the present study, we show that Mp1p is secreted into the cell culture supernatant at a level that can be detected by Western blotting. A sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) developed with antibodies against Mp1p was capable of detecting this protein from the cell culture supernatant of P. marneffei at 104 cells/ml. The anti-Mp1p antibody is specific since it fails to react with any protein-form lysates of Candida albicans, Histoplasma capsulatum, or Cryptococcus neoformans by Western blotting. In addition, this Mp1p antigen-based ELISA is also specific for P. marneffei since the cell culture supernatants of the other three fungi gave negative results. Finally, a clinical evaluation of sera from penicilliosis patients indicates that 17 of 26 (65%) patients are Mp1p antigen test positive. Furthermore, a Mp1p antibody test was performed with these serum specimens. The combined antibody and antigen tests for P. marneffei carry a sensitive of 88% (23 of 26), with a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 96%. The specificities of the tests are high since none of the 85 control sera was positive by either test. PMID:10074513

  5. Extending the phenotype of monosomy 1p36 syndrome and mapping of a critical region for obesity and hyperphagia.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Carla S; Kohl, Ilana; Varela, Monica Castro; de Castro, Cláudia I E; Kim, Chong A; Bertola, Débora R; Lourenço, Charles M; Koiffmann, Célia P

    2010-01-01

    Rearrangements of 1p36 are the most frequently detected abnormalities in diagnostic testing for chromosomal cryptic imbalances and include variably sized simple terminal deletions, derivative chromosomes, interstitial deletions, and complex rearrangements. These rearrangements result in the specific pattern of malformation and neurodevelopmental disabilities that characterizes monosomy 1p36 syndrome. Thus far, no individual gene within this region has been conclusively determined to be causative of any component of the phenotype. Nor is it known if the rearrangements convey phenotypes via a haploinsufficiency mechanism or through a position effect. We have used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to screen for deletions of 1p36 in a group of 154 hyperphagic and overweight/obese, PWS negative individuals, and in a separate group of 83 patients initially sent to investigate a variety of other conditions. The strategy allowed the identification and delineation of rearrangements in nine subjects with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. Our work reinforces the association of monosomy 1p36 and obesity and hyperphagia, and further suggests that these features may be associated with non-classical manifestations of this disorder in addition to a submicroscopic deletion of approximately 2-3 Mb in size. Multiplex ligation probe amplification using the monosomy 1p36 syndrome-specific kit coupled to the subtelomeric kit is an effective approach to identify and delineate rearrangements at 1p36.

  6. Chromosome 1p36 in migraine with aura: association study of the 5HT(1D) locus.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Miles D; Noble-Topham, Sandra; Percy, Maire E; Andrade, Danielle M; Ebers, George C

    2012-01-01

    Migraine with aura (MA) may share some but not all risk factors with other forms of migraine. As common migraine without aura (MO) has been associated with the chromosome 1p36 locus, we tested its involvement in MA by using two-point parametric linkage analysis to analyze 64 multiplex MA families. A logarithm of the odds score of 1.9 was suggestive of chromosome 1p36 linkage to MA. The transmission disequilibrium test analysis was then performed in 79 nuclear families with one MA parent and one MA offspring. We identified the presence of genetic association at chromosome 1p36 with MA (P=0.045, Bonferroni corrected): the locus encoding the 5HT(1D) receptor gene. Although these data suggest that the 1p36 locus may protect against MA, consistent with the role of the 5HT(1D) receptor in migraine treatment with triptan drugs, the study is subject to the limitations associated with studying a small number of affected families. As a result, we contrast evidence suggesting that the chromosome 1p36 locus is strongly MO associated with our finding that 1p36 has a more limited contribution to MA in the families we analyzed. Further work using a genome-wide association study approach in familial typical migraine, consisting of those affected by MO or MA, will serve to further distinguish how and why MA differs from MO.

  7. Measurements of branching fractions for electromagnetic transitions involving the {chi}{sub bJ}(1P) states

    SciTech Connect

    Kornicer, M.; Mitchell, R. E.; Tarbert, C. M.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Hietala, J.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Brisbane, S.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Spradlin, P.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.

    2011-03-01

    Using (9.32, 5.88) million {Upsilon}(2S,3S) decays taken with the CLEO III detector, we obtain five product branching fractions for the exclusive processes {Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub b0,1,2}(1P){yields}{gamma}{gamma}{Upsilon}(1S) and {Upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub b1,2}(1P){yields}{gamma}{gamma}{Upsilon}(1S). We observe the transition {chi}{sub b0}(1P){yields}{gamma}{Upsilon}(1S) for the first time. Using the known branching fractions for B[{Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub bJ}(1P)], we extract values for B[{chi}{sub bJ}(1P){yields}{gamma}{Upsilon}(1S)] for J=0, 1, 2. In turn, these values can be used to unfold the {Upsilon}(3S) product branching fractions to obtain values for B[{Upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub b1,2}(1P)] for the first time individually. Comparison of these with each other and with the branching fraction B[{Upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub b0}] previously measured by CLEO provides tests of relativistic corrections to electric dipole matrix elements.

  8. The fission yeast NIMA kinase Fin1p is required for spindle function and nuclear envelope integrity

    PubMed Central

    Krien, Michael J.E.; West, Robert R.; John, Ulrik P.; Koniaras, Kalli; McIntosh, J.Richard; O’Connell, Matthew J.

    2002-01-01

    NIMA kinases appear to be the least functionally conserved mitotic regulators, being implicated in chromosome condensation in fungi and in spindle function in metazoans. We demonstrate here that the fission yeast NIMA homologue, Fin1p, can induce profound chromosome condensation in the absence of the condensin and topoisomerase II, indicating that Fin1p-induced condensation differs from mitotic condensation. Fin1p expression is transcriptionally and post-translationally cell cycle-regulated, with Fin1p kinase activity maximal from the metaphase–anaphase transition to G1. Fin1p is localized to the spindle pole body and fin1Δ cells are hypersensitive to anti-microtubule drugs, synthetically lethal with a number of spindle mutants and require the spindle checkpoint for viability. Moreover, fin1Δ cells show unusual and extensive elaborations of the nuclear envelope. These data support a role for Fin1p in spindle function and nuclear envelope transactions at or after the metaphase– anaphase transition that may be generally applicable to other NIMA-family members. PMID:11927555

  9. Cytokinesis in yeast meiosis depends on the regulated removal of Ssp1p from the prospore membrane.

    PubMed

    Maier, Peter; Rathfelder, Nicole; Finkbeiner, Martin G; Taxis, Christof; Mazza, Massimiliano; Le Panse, Sophie; Haguenauer-Tsapis, Rosine; Knop, Michael

    2007-04-01

    Intracellular budding is a developmentally regulated type of cell division common to many fungi and protists. In Saccaromyces cerevisiae, intracellular budding requires the de novo assembly of membranes, the prospore membranes (PSMs) and occurs during spore formation in meiosis. Ssp1p is a sporulation-specific protein that has previously been shown to localize to secretory vesicles and to recruit the leading edge protein coat (LEP coat) proteins to the opening of the PSM. Here, we show that Ssp1p is a multidomain protein with distinct domains important for PI(4,5)P(2) binding, binding to secretory vesicles and inhibition of vesicle fusion, interaction with LEP coat components and that it is subject to sumoylation and degradation. We found non-essential roles for Ssp1p on the level of vesicle transport and an essential function of Ssp1p to regulate the opening of the PSM. Together, our results indicate that Ssp1p has a domain architecture that resembles to some extent the septin class of proteins, and that the regulated removal of Ssp1p from the PSM is the major step underlying cytokinesis in yeast sporulation.

  10. The DEAD-Box Protein Dhh1p Couples mRNA Decay and Translation by Monitoring Codon Optimality.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Aditya; Chen, Ying-Hsin; Martin, Sophie; Alhusaini, Najwa; Green, Rachel; Coller, Jeff

    2016-09-22

    A major determinant of mRNA half-life is the codon-dependent rate of translational elongation. How the processes of translational elongation and mRNA decay communicate is unclear. Here, we establish that the DEAD-box protein Dhh1p is a sensor of codon optimality that targets an mRNA for decay. First, we find mRNAs whose translation elongation rate is slowed by inclusion of non-optimal codons are specifically degraded in a Dhh1p-dependent manner. Biochemical experiments show Dhh1p is preferentially associated with mRNAs with suboptimal codon choice. We find these effects on mRNA decay are sensitive to the number of slow-moving ribosomes on an mRNA. Moreover, we find Dhh1p overexpression leads to the accumulation of ribosomes specifically on mRNAs (and even codons) of low codon optimality. Lastly, Dhh1p physically interacts with ribosomes in vivo. Together, these data argue that Dhh1p is a sensor for ribosome speed, targeting an mRNA for repression and subsequent decay. PMID:27641505

  11. First Observation of the Hadronic Transition ϒ(4S)→ηh(b)(1P) and New Measurement of the h(b)(1P) and η(b)(1S) Parameters.

    PubMed

    Tamponi, U; Mussa, R; Abdesselam, A; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Atmacan, H; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Badhrees, I; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S-K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hedges, M T; Hou, W-S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Julius, T; Kato, E; Katrenko, P; Kichimi, H; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, S H; Kinoshita, K; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Lange, J S; Lewis, P; Libby, J; Lukin, P; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mori, T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ostrowicz, W; Oswald, C; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T-A; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y-S; Sokolov, A; Starič, M; Steder, M; Stypula, J; Tanida, K; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Wang, M-Z; Wang, X L; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-10-01

    Using a sample of 771.6×10(6) ϒϒ(4S) decays collected by the Belle experiment at the KEKB e(+)e(-) collider, we observe, for the first time, the transition ϒ(4S)→ηh(b)(1P) with the branching fraction B[ϒ(4S)→ηh(b)(1P)]=(2.18±0.11±0.18)×10(-3) and we measure the h(b)(1P) mass M(h(b)(1P))=(9899.3±0.4±1.0)  MeV/c(2), corresponding to the hyperfine (HF) splitting ΔM(HF)(1P)=(0.6±0.4±1.0)  MeV/c(2). Using the transition h(b)(1P)→γη(b)(1S), we measure the η(b)(1S) mass M(η(b)(1S))=(9400.7±1.7±1.6)  MeV/c(2), corresponding to ΔM(HF)(1S)=(59.6±1.7±1.6)  MeV/c(2), the η(b)(1S) width Γ(η(b)(1S))=(8(-5)(+6)±5)  MeV/c(2) and the branching fraction B[h(b)(1P)→γη(b)(1S)]=(56±8±4)%. PMID:26551806

  12. First observation of the hadronic transition Υ(4S)→ηhb(1P) and new measurement of the hb(1P) and ηb(1S) parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Tamponi, Umberto; Mussa, Roberto; Abdesselam, A.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Atmacan, H.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, Bipul; Biswal, J.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Danilov, M.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, Alexey; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hedges, Michael T.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Julius, T.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kinoshita, Kay; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lewis, P.; Libby, J.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, Mikihiko; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, Shohei; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, Stephen L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Oswald, Christian; Pakhlova, Galina; Pal, Bilas K.; Park, H.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pesantez, L.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, ME; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sokolov, Anatoly; Staric, M.; Steder, M.; Stypula, J.; Tanida, K.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, Gary; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, Eun Il; Yamaoka, Jared AK; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-09-29

    Using a sample of 771.6 × 106 Υ(4S) decays collected by the Belle experiment at the KEKB e +e - collider, we observe for the first time the transition Υ(4S) → ηhb(1P) with the branching fraction B[Υ(4S) → ηhb(1P)] = (2.18 ± 0.11 ± 0.18) × 10-3 and we measure the hb(1P) mass Mhb(1P ) = (9899.3 ± 0.4 ± 1.0) MeV/c 2 , corresponding to the hyperfine splitting ΔMHF (1P) = (0.6 ± 0.4 ± 1.0) MeV/c 2 . Using the transition hb(1P) → γηb(1S), we measure the ηb(1S) mass Mηb(1S) = (9400.7 ± 1.7 ± 1.6) MeV/c 2 , corresponding to ΔMHF (1S) = (59.6 ± 1.7 ± 1.6) MeV/c 2 , the ηb(1S) width Γηb(1S) = (8+6 -5 ± 5) MeV/c 2 and the branching fraction B[hb(1P) → γηb(1S)] = (56 ± 8 ± 4)%.

  13. Birth of Archaeal Cells: Molecular Phylogenetic Analyses of G1P Dehydrogenase, G3P Dehydrogenases, and Glycerol Kinase Suggest Derived Features of Archaeal Membranes Having G1P Polar Lipids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria and Eukarya have cell membranes with sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), whereas archaeal membranes contain sn-glycerol-1-phosphate (G1P). Determining the time at which cells with either G3P-lipid membranes or G1P-lipid membranes appeared is important for understanding the early evolution of terrestrial life. To clarify this issue, we reconstructed molecular phylogenetic trees of G1PDH (G1P dehydrogenase; EgsA/AraM) which is responsible for G1P synthesis and G3PDHs (G3P dehydrogenase; GpsA and GlpA/GlpD) and glycerol kinase (GlpK) which is responsible for G3P synthesis. Together with the distribution of these protein-encoding genes among archaeal and bacterial groups, our phylogenetic analyses suggested that GlpA/GlpD in the Commonote (the last universal common ancestor of all extant life with a cellular form, Commonote commonote) acquired EgsA (G1PDH) from the archaeal common ancestor (Commonote archaea) and acquired GpsA and GlpK from a bacterial common ancestor (Commonote bacteria). In our scenario based on this study, the Commonote probably possessed a G3P-lipid membrane synthesized enzymatically, after which the archaeal lineage acquired G1PDH followed by the replacement of a G3P-lipid membrane with a G1P-lipid membrane. PMID:27774041

  14. Association of constitutive hyperphosphorylation of Hsf1p with a defective ethanol stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Chiemi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Zhou, Yan; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Modern sake yeast strains, which produce high concentrations of ethanol, are unexpectedly sensitive to environmental stress during sake brewing. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we investigated a well-characterized yeast stress response mediated by a heat shock element (HSE) and heat shock transcription factor Hsf1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast. The HSE-lacZ activity of sake yeast during sake fermentation and under acute ethanol stress was severely impaired compared to that of laboratory yeast. Moreover, the Hsf1p of modern sake yeast was highly and constitutively hyperphosphorylated, irrespective of the extracellular stress. Since HSF1 allele replacement did not significantly affect the HSE-mediated ethanol stress response or Hsf1p phosphorylation patterns in either sake or laboratory yeast, the regulatory machinery of Hsf1p is presumed to function differently between these types of yeast. To identify phosphatases whose loss affected the control of Hsf1p, we screened a series of phosphatase gene deletion mutants in a laboratory strain background. Among the 29 mutants, a Δppt1 mutant exhibited constitutive hyperphosphorylation of Hsf1p, similarly to the modern sake yeast strains, which lack the entire PPT1 gene locus. We confirmed that the expression of laboratory yeast-derived functional PPT1 recovered the HSE-mediated stress response of sake yeast. In addition, deletion of PPT1 in laboratory yeast resulted in enhanced fermentation ability. Taken together, these data demonstrate that hyperphosphorylation of Hsf1p caused by loss of the PPT1 gene at least partly accounts for the defective stress response and high ethanol productivity of modern sake yeast strains.

  15. Dual-function sRNA encoded peptide SR1P modulates moonlighting activity of B. subtilis GapA

    PubMed Central

    Gimpel, Matthias; Brantl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT SR1 is a dual-function sRNA from B. subtilis that acts as a base-pairing regulatory RNA and as a peptide-encoding mRNA. Both functions of SR1 are highly conserved. Previously, we uncovered that the SR1 encoded peptide SR1P binds the glycolytic enzyme GapA resulting in stabilization of gapA mRNA. Here, we demonstrate that GapA interacts with RNases Y and J1, and this interaction was RNA-independent. About 1% of GapA molecules purified from B. subtilis carry RNase J1 and about 2% RNase Y. In contrast to the GapA/RNase Y interaction, the GapA/RNaseJ1 interaction was stronger in the presence of SR1P. GapA/SR1P-J1/Y displayed in vitro RNase activity on known RNase J1 substrates. Moreover, the RNase J1 substrate SR5 has altered half-lives in a ΔgapA strain and a Δsr1 strain, suggesting in vivo functions of the GapA/SR1P/J1 interaction. Our results demonstrate that the metabolic enzyme GapA moonlights in recruiting RNases while GapA bound SR1P promotes binding of RNase J1 and enhances its activity. PMID:27449348

  16. A novel role for the transcription factor Cwt1p as a negative regulator of nitrosative stress in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sellam, Adnane; Tebbji, Faiza; Whiteway, Malcolm; Nantel, André

    2012-01-01

    The ability of Candida albicans to survive in the presence of nitrosative stress during the initial contact with the host immune system is crucial for its ability to colonize mammalian hosts. Thus, this fungus must activate robust mechanisms to neutralize and repair nitrosative-induced damage. Until now, very little was known regarding the regulatory circuits associated with reactive nitrogen species detoxification in fungi. To gain insight into the transcriptional regulatory networks controlling nitrosative stress response (NRS) in C. albicans a compilation of transcriptional regulator-defective mutants were screened. This led to the identification of Cwt1p as a negative regulator of NSR. By combining genome-wide location and expression analyses, we have characterized the Cwt1p regulon and demonstrated that Cwt1p is directly required for proper repression of the flavohemoglobin Yhb1p, a key NO-detoxification enzyme. Furthermore, Cwt1p operates both by activating and repressing genes of specific functions solicited upon NSR. Additionally, we used Gene Set Enrichment Analysis to reinvestigate the C. albicans NSR-transcriptome and demonstrate a significant similarity with the transcriptional profiles of C. albicans interacting with phagocytic host-cells. In summary, we have characterized a novel negative regulator of NSR and bring new insights into the transcriptional regulatory network governing fungal NSR.

  17. Study of di-pion Bottomonium Transitions and Search for the h_b(1P) State

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-12-09

    We study inclusive di-pion decays using a sample of 108 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector. We search for the decay mode {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}h{sub b} (1P) and find no evidence for the bottomonium spin-singlet state h{sub b}(1P) in the invariant mass distribution recoiling against the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} system. Assuming the h{sub b}(1P) mass to be 9.900 GeV/c{sup 2}, we measure the upper limit on the branching fraction {Beta}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}h{sub b}(1P)] < 1.2 x 10{sup -4}, at 90% confidence level. We also investigate the {chi}{sub bJ}(2P) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {chi}{sub bJ}(1P), {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S), and {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S) di-pion transitions and present an improved measurement of the branching fraction of the {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S) decay and of the {Upsilon}(3S) - {Upsilon}(2S) mass difference.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ndc1p Is a Shared Component of Nuclear Pore Complexes and Spindle Pole Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Chial, Heidi J.; Rout, Michael P.; Giddings, Thomas H.; Winey, Mark

    1998-01-01

    We report a novel connection between nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and spindle pole bodies (SPBs) revealed by our studies of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NDC1 gene. Although both NPCs and SPBs are embedded in the nuclear envelope (NE) in yeast, their known functions are quite distinct. Previous work demonstrated that NDC1 function is required for proper SPB duplication (Winey, M., M.A. Hoyt, C. Chan, L. Goetsch, D. Botstein, and B. Byers. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 122:743–751). Here, we show that Ndc1p is a membrane protein of the NE that localizes to both NPCs and SPBs. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy shows that Ndc1p displays punctate, nuclear peripheral localization that colocalizes with a known NPC component, Nup49p. Additionally, distinct spots of Ndc1p localization colocalize with a known SPB component, Spc42p. Immunoelectron microscopy shows that Ndc1p localizes to the regions of NPCs and SPBs that interact with the NE. The NPCs in ndc1-1 mutant cells appear to function normally at the nonpermissive temperature. Finally, we have found that a deletion of POM152, which encodes an abundant but nonessential nucleoporin, suppresses the SPB duplication defect associated with a mutation in the NDC1 gene. We show that Ndc1p is a shared component of NPCs and SPBs and propose a shared function in the assembly of these organelles into the NE. PMID:9864355

  19. S1P-Yap1 signaling regulates endoderm formation required for cardiac precursor cell migration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hajime; Terai, Kenta; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Ayano; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2014-10-13

    To form the primary heart tube in zebrafish, bilateral cardiac precursor cells (CPCs) migrate toward the midline beneath the endoderm. Mutants lacking endoderm and fish with defective sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling exhibit cardia bifida. Endoderm defects lead to the lack of foothold for the CPCs, whereas the cause of cardia bifida in S1P signaling mutants remains unclear. Here we show that S1P signaling regulates CPC migration through Yes-associated protein 1 (Yap1)-dependent endoderm survival. Cardia bifida seen in spns2 (S1P transporter) morphants and s1pr2 (S1P receptor-2) morphants could be rescued by endodermal expression of nuclear localized form of yap1. yap1 morphants had decreased expression of the Yap1/Tead target connective tissue growth factor a (Ctgfa) and consequently increased endodermal cell apoptosis. Consistently, ctgfa morphants showed defects of the endodermal sheet and cardia bifida. Collectively, we show that S1pr2/Yap1-regulated ctgfa expression is essential for the proper endoderm formation required for CPC migration.

  20. Monosomy 1p36 - a multifaceted and still enigmatic syndrome: four clinically diverse cases with shared white matter abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Õiglane-Shlik, Eve; Puusepp, Sanna; Talvik, Inga; Vaher, Ulvi; Rein, Reet; Tammur, Pille; Reimand, Tiia; Teek, Rita; Žilina, Olga; Tomberg, Tiiu; Õunap, Katrin

    2014-05-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common subtelomeric deletion syndrome seen in humans. Uniform features of the syndrome include early developmental delay and consequent intellectual disability, muscular hypotonia, and characteristic dysmorphic facial features. The gene-rich nature of the chromosomal band, inconsistent deletion sizes and overlapping clinical features have complicated relevant genotype-phenotype correlations. We describe four patients with isolated chromosome 1p36 deletions. All patients shared white matter abnormalities, allowing us to narrow the critical region for white matter involvement to the deletion size of up to 2.5 Mb from the telomere. We hypothesise that there might be a gene(s) responsible for myelin development in the 1p36 subtelomeric region. Other significant clinical findings were progressive spastic paraparesis, epileptic encephalopathy, various skeletal anomalies, Prader-Willi-like phenotype, neoplastic changes - a haemangioma and a benign skin tumour, and in one case, sleep myoclonus, a clinical entity not previously described in association with 1p36 monosomy. Combined with prior studies, our results suggest that the clinical features seen in monosomy 1p36 have more complex causes than a classical contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

  1. Refinement of causative genes in monosomy 1p36 through clinical and molecular cytogenetic characterization of small interstitial deletions.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Jill A; Crolla, John A; Tomkins, Susan; Bader, Patricia; Morrow, Bernice; Gorski, Jerome; Troxell, Robin; Forster-Gibson, Cynthia; Cilliers, Deirdre; Hislop, R Gordon; Lamb, Allen; Torchia, Beth; Ballif, Blake C; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2010-08-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common terminal deletion syndrome seen in humans, occurring in approximately 1 in 5,000 live births. Common features include mental retardation, characteristic dysmorphic features, hypotonia, seizures, hearing loss, heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and behavior abnormalities. Similar phenotypes are seen among patients with a variety of deletion sizes, including terminal and interstitial deletions, complex rearrangements, and unbalanced translocations. Consequently, critical regions harboring causative genes for each of these features have been difficult to identify. Here we report on five individuals with 200-823 kb overlapping deletions of proximal 1p36.33, four of which are apparently de novo. They present with features of monosomy 1p36, including developmental delay and mental retardation, dysmorphic features, hypotonia, behavioral abnormalities including hyperphagia, and seizures. The smallest region of deletion overlap is 174 kb and contains five genes; these genes are likely candidates for some of the phenotypic features in monosomy 1p36. Other genes deleted in a subset of the patients likely play a contributory role in the phenotypes, including GABRD and seizures, PRKCZ and neurologic features, and SKI and dysmorphic and neurologic features. Characterization of small deletions is important for narrowing critical intervals and for the identification of causative or candidate genes for features of monosomy 1p36 syndrome.

  2. Coupling between the DEAD-box RNA helicases Ded1p and eIF4A

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhaofeng; Putnam, Andrea A; Bowers, Heath A; Guenther, Ulf-Peter; Ye, Xuan; Kindsfather, Audrey; Hilliker, Angela K; Jankowsky, Eckhard

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation involves two conserved DEAD-box RNA helicases, eIF4A and Ded1p. Here we show that S. cerevisiae eIF4A and Ded1p directly interact with each other and simultaneously with the scaffolding protein eIF4G. We delineate a comprehensive thermodynamic framework for the interactions between Ded1p, eIF4A, eIF4G, RNA and ATP, which indicates that eIF4A, with and without eIF4G, acts as a modulator for activity and substrate preferences of Ded1p, which is the RNA remodeling unit in all complexes. Our results reveal and characterize an unexpected interdependence between the two RNA helicases and eIF4G, and suggest that Ded1p is an integral part of eIF4F, the complex comprising eIF4G, eIF4A, and eIF4E. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16408.001 PMID:27494274

  3. The lipid droplet enzyme Tgl1p hydrolyzes both steryl esters and triglycerides in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jandrositz, Anita; Petschnigg, Julia; Zimmermann, Robert; Natter, Klaus; Scholze, Hubert; Hermetter, Albin; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Leber, Regina

    2005-06-15

    Based on sequence homology to mammalian acid lipases, yeast reading frame YKL140w was predicted to encode a triacylglycerol (TAG) lipase in yeast and was hence named as TGL1, triglyceride lipase 1. A deletion of TGL1, however, resulted in an increase of the cellular steryl ester content. Fluorescently labeled lipid analogs that become covalently linked to the enzyme active site upon catalysis were used to discriminate between the lipase and esterase activities of Tgl1p. Tgl1p preferred single-chain esterase inhibitors over lipase inhibitors in vitro. Under assay conditions optimal for acid lipases, Tgl1p exhibited steryl esterase activity only and lacked any triglyceride lipase activity. In contrast, at pH 7.4, Tgl1p also exhibited TAG lipase activity; however, steryl ester hydrolase activity was still predominant. Tgl1p localized exclusively to lipid droplets which are the intracellular storage compartment of steryl esters and triacylglycerols in the yeast S. cerevisiae. In a tgl1 deletion mutant, the mobilization of steryl esters in vivo was delayed, but not abolished, suggesting the existence of additional enzymes involved in steryl ester mobilization.

  4. Csi1p recruits alp7p/TACC to the spindle pole bodies for bipolar spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Tianpeng; Jin, Dong-yan; Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Scheffler, Kathleen; Tran, Phong T.; Fu, Chuanhai

    2014-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation requires timely bipolar spindle formation during mitosis. The transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) family proteins and the ch-TOG family proteins are key players in bipolar spindle formation. They form a complex to stabilize spindle microtubules, mainly dependent on their localization to the centrosome (the spindle pole body [SPB] in yeast). The molecular mechanism underlying the targeting of the TACC–ch-TOG complex to the centrosome remains unclear. Here we show that the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe TACC orthologue alp7p is recruited to the SPB by csi1p. The csi1p-interacting region lies within the conserved TACC domain of alp7p, and the carboxyl-terminal domain of csi1p is responsible for interacting with alp7p. Compromised interaction between csi1p and alp7p impairs the localization of alp7p to the SPB during mitosis, thus delaying bipolar spindle formation and leading to anaphase B lagging chromosomes. Hence our study establishes that csi1p serves as a linking molecule tethering spindle-stabilizing factors to the SPB for promoting bipolar spindle assembly. PMID:25057016

  5. Behavioral Effects of SQSTM1/p62 Overexpression in Mice: Support for a Mitochondrial Role in Depression and Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Seibenhener, M. Lamar; Zhao, Ting; Du, Yifeng; Calderilla-Barbosa, Luis; Yan, Jin; Jiang, Jianxiong; Wooten, Marie W.; Wooten, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Affective spectrum and anxiety disorders have come to be recognized as the most prevalently diagnosed psychiatric disorders. Among a suite of potential causes, changes in mitochondrial energy metabolism and function have been associated with such disorders. Thus, proteins that specifically change mitochondrial functionality could be identified as molecular targets for drugs related to treatment for affective spectrum disorders. Here, we report generation of transgenic mice overexpressing the scaffolding and mitophagy related protein Sequestosome1 (SQSTM1/p62) or a single point mutant (P392L) in the UBA domain of SQSTM1/p62. We show that overexpression of SQSTM1/p62 increases mitochondrial energy output and improves transcription factor import into the mitochondrial matrix. These elevated levels of mitochondrial functionality correlate directly with discernible improvements in mouse behaviors related to affective spectrum and anxiety disorders. We also describe how overexpression of SQSTM1/p62 improves spatial learning and long term memory formation in these transgenic mice. These results suggest that SQSTM1/p62 provides an attractive target for therapeutic agents potentially suitable for the treatment of anxiety and affective spectrum disorders. PMID:23591541

  6. Magnetic Properties of Randomly Diluted Antiferromagnetic System: COBALT(P)MAGNESIUM(1-P)OXYGEN.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Raman

    In this work, the effect of randomly diluting CoO (a fcc antiferromagnet with Neel temperature T _{rm N} = 289 K) with MgO has been investigated using temperature dependent dc magnetic susceptibility measurements. About twenty samples of Co _{rm p}Mg _{rm 1-p}O with p = 0.10, 0.13, 0.17, 0.22, 0.23, 0.31, 0.33, 0.36, 0.41, 0.46, 0.49, 0.53, 0.56, 0.60, 0.64, 0.70, 0.80 and 0.87, were investigated in the temperature range of 1.6 K to 300 K. These powder samples were prepared starting from the nitrates, Co(NO _3)_2cdot6H _2O and Mg(NO_3)_2 cdot6H_2O. The samples were characterized by magnetic measurements for the presence of ferromagnetic impurities, by X-ray diffraction technique for the determination of crystal structure and lattice constants, and by atomic absorption spectroscopy for the determination of the composition parameter p. The lattice constant is found to vary linearly with p, in accordance with Vegard's Law. The magnetic susceptibility, chi , measurements were carried out with a Faraday balance, employing Lewis coils. The samples were cooled either in zero field (zfc) or in a field of 50 Oe (fc) to the lowest temperature (1.6 K or 4.2 K), followed by chi measurements in 50 Oe with increasing temperatures. A Neel temperature T_{ rm N}, as determined by d(chi T)/dT, is observed for all p >=q 0.17. By extrapolation and by the behavior of the low temperature magnetization, it is determined that the percolation threshold p_{rm c} = 0.13 +/- 0.01. This is in agreement with the theoretical estimate of p_{ rm c} = 0.136 for fcc lattice with nn and nnn included. The variation of T_{ rm N} with p is non-linear for p < 0.6. However no theoretical variation of T _{rm N} vs p is available for fcc lattice with both nn and nnn interactions included. For the high temperature region (T > T_{rm N}), the data is fit to the Curie-Weiss law and the Curie-Weiss temperature theta(p), the molar and gram Curie constants C_{rm M}(p) and C_{rm g}(p) respectively and the effective

  7. Cell Surface Display and Characterization of Rhizopus oryzae Lipase in Pichia pastoris Using Sed1p as an Anchor Protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenqian; Shi, Hao; Ding, Huaihai; Wang, Liangliang; Zhang, Yu; Li, Xun; Wang, Fei

    2015-07-01

    It has been investigated to conduct the surface displaying of lipase from Rhizopus oryzae onto the cells of Pichia pastoris yeast using Sed1p as an anchor protein. A yeast cell surface display plasmid pPICZαA-rol-histag-sed1p was constructed by fusing rol and sed1p gene fragments into the plasmid pPICZαA, followed by introducing recombinant plasmid into P. pastoris cells. Surface display levels were monitored by Western Blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. The activity of displaying lipase obtained from recombinant mutS reached at 60 U/g-dry cell. In addition, the displaying lipase was stable in broad ranges of temperatures and pH, with the optimum temperature at 40 °C and pH 7.5. These results indicate that the P. pastoris displaying lipase may have potential in whole-cell biocatalyst. PMID:26013444

  8. Nuclear Drosophila CerS Schlank regulates lipid homeostasis via the homeodomain, independent of the lag1p motif.

    PubMed

    Voelzmann, André; Wulf, Anna-Lena; Eckardt, Franka; Thielisch, Melanie; Brondolin, Mirco; Pesch, Yanina-Yasmin; Sociale, Mariangela; Bauer, Reinhard; Hoch, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Drosophila Ceramide Synthase (CerS) Schlank regulates both ceramide synthesis and fat metabolism. Schlank contains a catalytic lag1p motif and, like many CerS in other species, a homeodomain of unknown function. Here, we show that the Drosophila CerS Schlank is imported into the nucleus and requires two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) within its homeodomain and functional Importin-β import machinery. Expression of Schlank variants containing the homeodomain without functional lag1p motif rescued the fat metabolism phenotype of schlank mutants whereas a variant with a mutated NLS site did not rescue. Thus, the homeodomain of Schlank is involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism independent of the catalytic lag1p motif.

  9. A rationally engineered yeast pyruvyltransferase Pvg1p introduces sialylation-like properties in neo-human-type complex oligosaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Yoshinaga, Sho; Yoritsune, Ken-ichi; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Nakakita, Shin-ichi; Kanekiyo, Miho; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvylation onto the terminus of oligosaccharide, widely seen from prokaryote to eukaryote, confers negative charges on the cell surface and seems to be functionally similar to sialylation, which is found at the end of human-type complex oligosaccharide. However, detailed molecular mechanisms underlying pyruvylation have not been clarified well. Here, we first determined the crystal structure of fission yeast pyruvyltransferase Pvg1p at a resolution of 2.46 Å. Subsequently, by combining molecular modeling with mutational analysis of active site residues, we obtained a Pvg1p mutant (Pvg1pH168C) that efficiently transferred pyruvyl moiety onto a human-type complex glycopeptide. The resultant pyruvylated human-type complex glycopeptide recognized similar lectins on lectin arrays as the α2,6-sialyl glycopeptides. This newly-generated pyruvylation of human-type complex oligosaccharides would provide a novel method for glyco-bioengineering. PMID:27194449

  10. FTH1P3, a Novel H-Ferritin Pseudogene Transcriptionally Active, Is Ubiquitously Expressed and Regulated during Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Di Sanzo, Maddalena; Aversa, Ilenia; Santamaria, Gianluca; Gagliardi, Monica; Panebianco, Mariafranca; Biamonte, Flavia; Zolea, Fabiana; Faniello, Maria Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin, the major iron storage protein, performs its essential functions in the cytoplasm, nucleus and mitochondria. The variable assembly of 24 subunits of the Heavy (H) and Light (L) type composes the cytoplasmic molecule. In humans, two distinct genes code these subunits, both belonging to complex multigene families. Until now, one H gene has been identified with the coding sequence interrupted by three introns and more than 20 intronless copies widely dispersed on different chromosomes. Two of the intronless genes are actively transcribed in a tissue-specific manner. Herein, we report that FTH1P3, another intronless pseudogene, is transcribed. FTH1P3 transcript was detected in several cell lines and tissues, suggesting that its transcription is ubiquitary, as it happens for the parental ferritin H gene. Moreover, FTH1P3 expression is positively regulated during the cell differentiation process. PMID:26982978

  11. Chimeric CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 genes identified in Czech patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Vrzalová, Zuzana; Hrubá, Zuzana; Hrabincová, Eva Sťahlová; Vrábelová, Slávka; Votava, Felix; Koloušková, Stanislava; Fajkusová, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) comprises a group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by an enzymatic deficiency which impairs the biosynthesis of cortisol and, in the majority of severe cases, also the biosynthesis of aldosterone. Approximately 95% of all CAH cases are caused by mutations in the steroid 21-hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2). The CYP21A2 gene and its inactive pseudogene (CYP21A1P) are located within the HLA class III region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus on chromosome 6p21.3. In this study, we describe chimeric CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 genes detected in our patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). Chimeric CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 genes were present in 171 out of 508 mutated CYP21A2 alleles (33.8%). We detected four types of chimeric CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 genes: three of them have been described previously as CH-1, CH-3, CH-4, and one type is novel. The novel chimeric gene, termed CH-7, was detected in 21.4% of the mutant alleles. Possible causes of CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 formation are associated with 1) high recombination rate in the MHC locus, 2) high recombination rate between highly homologous genes and pseudogenes in the CYP21 gene area, and 3) the existence of chi-like sequences and repetitive minisatellite consensus sequences in CYP21A2 and CYP21A1P which play a role in promoting genetic recombination.

  12. Identification of potential target genes for Adr1p through characterization of essential nucleotides in UAS1.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, C; Kacherovsky, N; Dombek, K M; Camier, S; Thukral, S K; Rhim, E; Young, E T

    1994-01-01

    Adr1p is a regulatory protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that binds to and activates transcription from two sites in a perfect 22-bp inverted repeat, UAS1, in the ADH2 promoter. Binding requires two C2H2 zinc fingers and a region amino terminal to the fingers. The importance for DNA binding of each position within UAS1 was deduced from two types of assays. Both methods led to an identical consensus sequence containing only four essential base pairs: GG(A/G)G. The preferred sequence, TTGG(A/G)GA, is found in both halves of the inverted repeat. The region of Adr1p amino terminal to the fingers is important for phosphate contacts in the central region of UAS1. However, no base-specific contacts in this portion of UAS1 are important for DNA binding or for ADR1-dependent transcription in vivo. When the central 6 bp were deleted, only a single monomer of Adr1p was able to bind in vitro and activation in vivo was severely reduced. On the basis of these results and previous knowledge about the DNA binding site requirements, including constraints on the spacing and orientation of sites that affect activation in vivo, a consensus binding site for Adr1p was derived. By using this consensus site, potential Adr1p binding sites were located in the promoters of genes known to show ADR1-dependent expression. In addition, this consensus allowed the identification of new potential target genes for Adr1p. Images PMID:8196627

  13. S1P3-mediated cardiac fibrosis in sphingosine kinase 1 transgenic mice involves reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Takuwa, Noriko; Ohkura, Sei-Ichiro; Takashima, Shin-Ichiro; Ohtani, Keisuke; Okamoto, Yasuo; Tanaka, Tamotsu; Hirano, Kaoru; Usui, Soichiro; Wang, Fei; Du, Wa; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Banno, Yoshiko; Sasaki, Motoko; Ichi, Ikuyo; Okamura, Miwa; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Mizugishi, Kiyomi; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Ishii, Isao; Takamura, Masayuki; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kojo, Shosuke; Satouchi, Kiyoshi; Mitumori, Kunitoshi; Chun, Jerold; Takuwa, Yoh

    2010-01-01

    Aims Sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1), its product sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and S1P receptor subtypes have been suggested to play protective roles for cardiomyocytes in animal models of ischaemic preconditioning and cardiac ischaemia/reperfusion injury. To get more insight into roles for SPHK1 in vivo, we have generated SPHK1-transgenic (TG) mice and analysed the cardiac phenotype. Methods and results SPHK1-TG mice overexpressed SPHK1 in diverse tissues, with a nearly 20-fold increase in enzymatic activity. The TG mice grew normally with normal blood chemistry, cell counts, heart rate, and blood pressure. Unexpectedly, TG mice with high but not low expression levels of SPHK1 developed progressive myocardial degeneration and fibrosis, with upregulation of embryonic genes, elevated RhoA and Rac1 activity, stimulation of Smad3 phosphorylation, and increased levels of oxidative stress markers. Treatment of juvenile TG mice with pitavastatin, an established inhibitor of the Rho family G proteins, or deletion of S1P3, a major myocardial S1P receptor subtype that couples to Rho GTPases and transactivates Smad signalling, both inhibited cardiac fibrosis with concomitant inhibition of SPHK1-dependent Smad-3 phosphorylation. In addition, the anti-oxidant N-2-mercaptopropyonylglycine, which reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS), also inhibited cardiac fibrosis. In in vivo ischaemia/reperfusion injury, the size of myocardial infarct was 30% decreased in SPHK1-TG mice compared with wild-type mice. Conclusion These results suggest that chronic activation of SPHK1-S1P signalling results in both pathological cardiac remodelling through ROS mediated by S1P3 and favourable cardioprotective effects. PMID:19755413

  14. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor I with chromatin.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Daniel C B; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, CDC28, phosphorylates Cac1p on serines 94 and 515 in early S phase and regulates its association with chromatin, but not its association with PCNA. Mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites of CDC28 but not of CDC7 substantially reduce the in vivo phosphorylation of Cac1p. However, mutations in the putative CDC7 target sites on Cac1p reduce its stability. The association of CAF-I with chromatin is impaired in a cdc28-1 mutant and to a lesser extent in a cdc7-1 mutant. In addition, mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites by both CDC28 and CDC7 reduce gene silencing at the telomeres. We propose that this phosphorylation represents a regulatory step in the recruitment of CAF-I to chromatin in early S phase that is distinct from the association of CAF-I with PCNA. Hence, we implicate CDC28 in the regulation of chromatin reassembly during DNA replication. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights on the links between cell-cycle regulation, DNA replication and chromatin reassembly.

  15. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor i with chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Daniel CB; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, CDC28, phosphorylates Cac1p on serines 94 and 515 in early S phase and regulates its association with chromatin, but not its association with PCNA. Mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites of CDC28 but not of CDC7 substantially reduce the in vivo phosphorylation of Cac1p. However, mutations in the putative CDC7 target sites on Cac1p reduce its stability. The association of CAF-I with chromatin is impaired in a cdc28–1 mutant and to a lesser extent in a cdc7–1 mutant. In addition, mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites by both CDC28 and CDC7 reduce gene silencing at the telomeres. We propose that this phosphorylation represents a regulatory step in the recruitment of CAF-I to chromatin in early S phase that is distinct from the association of CAF-I with PCNA. Hence, we implicate CDC28 in the regulation of chromatin reassembly during DNA replication. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights on the links between cell-cycle regulation, DNA replication and chromatin reassembly. PMID:25602519

  16. Transcription factor Reb1p regulates DGK1-encoded diacylglycerol kinase and lipid metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yixuan; Fakas, Stylianos; Han, Gil-Soo; Barbosa, Antonio Daniel; Siniossoglou, Symeon; Carman, George M

    2013-10-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the DGK1-encoded diacylglycerol kinase catalyzes the CTP-dependent phosphorylation of diacylglycerol to form phosphatidate. This enzyme, in conjunction with PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase, controls the levels of phosphatidate and diacylglycerol for phospholipid synthesis, membrane growth, and lipid droplet formation. In this work, we showed that a functional level of diacylglycerol kinase is regulated by the Reb1p transcription factor. In the electrophoretic mobility shift assay, purified recombinant Reb1p was shown to specifically bind its consensus recognition sequence (CGGGTAA, -166 to -160) in the DGK1 promoter. Analysis of cells expressing the PDGK1-lacZ reporter gene showed that mutations (GT→TG) in the Reb1p-binding sequence caused an 8.6-fold reduction in β-galactosidase activity. The expression of DGK1(reb1), a DGK1 allele containing the Reb1p-binding site mutation, was greatly lower than that of the wild type allele, as indicated by analyses of DGK1 mRNA, Dgk1p, and diacylglycerol kinase activity. In the presence of cerulenin, an inhibitor of de novo fatty acid synthesis, the dgk1Δ mutant expressing DGK1(reb1) exhibited a significant defect in growth as well as in the synthesis of phospholipids from triacylglycerol mobilization. Unlike DGK1, the DGK1(reb1) expressed in the dgk1Δ pah1Δ mutant did not result in the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane expansion, which occurs in cells lacking phosphatidate phosphatase activity. Taken together, these results indicate that the Reb1p-mediated regulation of diacylglycerol kinase plays a major role in its in vivo functions in lipid metabolism.

  17. Mechanism of Folding and Activation of Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/Site-1 Protease (S1P).

    PubMed

    da Palma, Joel Ramos; Cendron, Laura; Seidah, Nabil Georges; Pasquato, Antonella; Kunz, Stefan

    2016-01-29

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/site-1 protease (S1P) is implicated in lipid homeostasis, the unfolded protein response, and lysosome biogenesis. The protease is further hijacked by highly pathogenic emerging viruses for the processing of their envelope glycoproteins. Zymogen activation of SKI-1/S1P requires removal of an N-terminal prodomain, by a multistep process, generating the mature enzyme. Here, we uncover a modular structure of the human SKI-1/S1P prodomain and define its function in folding and activation. We provide evidence that the N-terminal AB fragment of the prodomain represents an autonomous structural and functional unit that is necessary and sufficient for folding and partial activation. In contrast, the C-terminal BC fragment lacks a defined structure but is crucial for autoprocessing and full catalytic activity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the sequence of the AB domain is highly conserved, whereas the BC fragment shows considerable variation and seems even absent in some species. Notably, SKI-1/S1P of arthropods, like the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, contains a shorter prodomain comprised of full-length AB and truncated BC regions. Swapping the prodomain fragments between fly and human resulted in a fully mature and active SKI-1/S1P chimera. Our study suggests that primordial SKI-1/S1P likely contained a simpler prodomain consisting of the highly conserved AB fragment that represents an independent folding unit. The BC region appears as a later evolutionary acquisition, possibly allowing more subtle fine-tuning of the maturation process.

  18. Regulation of mitochondrial translation of the ATP8/ATP6 mRNA by Smt1p

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Malgorzata; Su, Chen Hsien; Xu, Jonathan Tong; Azpiroz, Ricardo; Singh, Angela Mohan; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the mitochondrially encoded ATP6 and ATP8 genes is translationally regulated by F1 ATPase. We report a translational repressor (Smt1p) of the ATP6/8 mRNA that, when mutated, restores translation of the encoded Atp6p and Atp8p subunits of the ATP synthase. Heterozygous smt1 mutants fail to rescue the translation defect, indicating that the mutations are recessive. Smt1p is an intrinsic inner membrane protein, which, based on its sedimentation, has a native size twice that of the monomer. Affinity purification of tagged Smt1p followed by reverse transcription of the associated RNA and PCR amplification of the resultant cDNA with gene-specific primers demonstrated the presence in mitochondria of Smt1p-ATP8/ATP6 and Smt1p-COB mRNA complexes. These results indicate that Smt1p is likely to be involved in translational regulation of both mRNAs. Applying Occam’s principle, we favor a mechanistic model in which translation of the ATP8/ATP6 bicistronic mRNA is coupled to the availability of F1 for subsequent assembly of the Atp6p and Atp8p products into the ATP synthase. The mechanism of this regulatory pathway is proposed to entail a displacement of the repressor from the translationally mute Smt1-ATP8/ATP6 complex by F1, thereby permitting the Atp22p activator to interact with and promote translation of the mRNA. PMID:26823015

  19. Substrate specificity and mapping of residues critical for transport in the high-affinity glutathione transporter Hgt1p.

    PubMed

    Zulkifli, Mohammad; Yadav, Shambhu; Thakur, Anil; Singla, Shiffalli; Sharma, Monika; Bachhawat, Anand Kumar

    2016-08-01

    The high-affinity glutathione transporter Hgt1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to a relatively new and structurally uncharacterized oligopeptide transporter (OPT) family. To understand the structural features required for interaction with Hgt1p, a quantitative investigation of substrate specificity of Hgt1p was carried out. Hgt1p showed a higher affinity for reduced glutathione (GSH), whereas it transported oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and other glutathione conjugates with lower affinity. To identify the residues of Hgt1p critical for substrate binding and translocation, all amino acid residues of the 13 predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs) have been subjected to mutagenesis. Functional evaluation of these 269 mutants by growth and biochemical assay followed by kinetic analysis of the severely defective mutants including previous mutagenic studies on this transporter have led to the identification of N124 (TMD1), V185 (TMD3), Q222, G225 and Y226 (TMD4), P292 (TMD5), Y374 (TMD6), L429 (TMD7) and F523 and Q526 (TMD9) as critical for substrate binding with at least 3-fold increase in Km upon mutagenesis to alanine. In addition residues Y226 and Y374 appeared to be important for differential substrate specificity. An ab initio model of Hgt1p was built and refined using these mutagenic data that yielded a helical arrangement that includes TMD3, TMD4, TMD5, TMD6, TMD7, TMD9 and TMD13 as pore-lining helices with the functionally important residues in a channel-facing orientation. Taken together the results of this study provides the first mechanistic insights into glutathione transport by a eukaryotic high-affinity glutathione transporter. PMID:27252386

  20. Angular distributions and polarization fractions of helium resonance radiation (n 1P - 1 1S) in the extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.; Misakian, M.; Jackson, W. M.; Faris, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Angular intensity distributions of helium (n 1P - 1 1S) resonance photons with respect to the exciting electron beam are presented. The angular intensity distributions were measured at selected electron impact energies from 25 eV (near threshold) to 150 eV. Polarization fractions (Pi) were obtained by analyzing the data in terms of the theoretical relation between angular intensity distribution and Pi, i.e. Iota (theta) = Iota (90) (1 - Pi sq cos theta). The experimental values for Pi are compared with recent theoretical results and with previous experimental values for the (3 1P - 2 1S) transition.

  1. Physical mapping of the retinoblastoma interacting zinc finger gene RIZ to D1S228 on chromosome 1p36

    SciTech Connect

    Buyse, I.M.; Huang, Shi; Takahashi, Ei-ichi

    1996-05-15

    The retinoblastoma interacting zinc finger gene RIZ is a member of the recently discovered PR domain family that includes the MDS1-EVI1 breakpoint gene involved in human leukemia. To help understand the role of RIZ in human diseases, we have determined the cytogenetic and physical localizations of the RIZ gene. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we determined that RIZ maps to 1p36. On the physical map, RIZ is adjacent to the polymorphic marker D1S228. We suggest that the RIZ gene may be a candidate target of 1p36 alterations that commonly occur in neuroendocrine, breast, liver, colon, and lymphoid tumors. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  2. The Metacaspase (Mca1p) has a Dual Role in Farnesol-induced Apoptosis in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Ounissi, Marwa; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Camadro, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Manipulating the apoptotic response of Candida albicans may help in the control of this opportunistic pathogen. The metacaspase Mca1p has been described as a key protease for apoptosis in C. albicans but little is known about its cleavage specificity and substrates. We therefore initiated a series of studies to describe its function. We used a strain disrupted for the MCA1 gene (mca1Δ/Δ) and compared its proteome to that of a wild-type isogenic strain, in the presence and absence of a known inducer of apoptosis, the quorum-sensing molecule farnesol. Label-free and TMT labeling quantitative proteomic analyses showed that both mca1 disruption and farnesol treatment significantly affected the proteome of the cells. The combination of both conditions led to an unexpected biological response: the strong overexpression of proteins implicated in the general stress. We studied sites cleaved by Mca1p using native peptidomic techniques, and a bottom-up approach involving GluC endoprotease: there appeared to be a “K/R” substrate specificity in P1 and a “D/E” specificity in P2. We also found 77 potential substrates of Mca1p, 13 of which validated using the most stringent filters, implicated in protein folding, protein aggregate resolubilization, glycolysis, and a number of mitochondrial functions. An immunoblot assay confirmed the cleavage of Ssb1p, a member of the HSP70 family of heat-shock proteins, in conditions where the metacaspase is activated. These various results indicate that Mca1p is involved in a limited and specific proteolysis program triggered by apoptosis. One of the main functions of Mca1p appears to be the degradation of several major heat-shock proteins, thereby contributing to weakening cellular defenses and amplifying the cell death process. Finally, Mca1p appears to contribute significantly to the control of mitochondria biogenesis and degradation. Consequently, Mca1p may be a link between the extrinsic and the intrinsic programmed cell death

  3. The metacaspase (Mca1p) has a dual role in farnesol-induced apoptosis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Léger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Ounissi, Marwa; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Camadro, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Manipulating the apoptotic response of Candida albicans may help in the control of this opportunistic pathogen. The metacaspase Mca1p has been described as a key protease for apoptosis in C. albicans but little is known about its cleavage specificity and substrates. We therefore initiated a series of studies to describe its function. We used a strain disrupted for the MCA1 gene (mca1Δ/Δ) and compared its proteome to that of a wild-type isogenic strain, in the presence and absence of a known inducer of apoptosis, the quorum-sensing molecule farnesol. Label-free and TMT labeling quantitative proteomic analyses showed that both mca1 disruption and farnesol treatment significantly affected the proteome of the cells. The combination of both conditions led to an unexpected biological response: the strong overexpression of proteins implicated in the general stress. We studied sites cleaved by Mca1p using native peptidomic techniques, and a bottom-up approach involving GluC endoprotease: there appeared to be a "K/R" substrate specificity in P1 and a "D/E" specificity in P2. We also found 77 potential substrates of Mca1p, 13 of which validated using the most stringent filters, implicated in protein folding, protein aggregate resolubilization, glycolysis, and a number of mitochondrial functions. An immunoblot assay confirmed the cleavage of Ssb1p, a member of the HSP70 family of heat-shock proteins, in conditions where the metacaspase is activated. These various results indicate that Mca1p is involved in a limited and specific proteolysis program triggered by apoptosis. One of the main functions of Mca1p appears to be the degradation of several major heat-shock proteins, thereby contributing to weakening cellular defenses and amplifying the cell death process. Finally, Mca1p appears to contribute significantly to the control of mitochondria biogenesis and degradation. Consequently, Mca1p may be a link between the extrinsic and the intrinsic programmed cell death pathways

  4. Trs65p, a subunit of the Ypt1p GEF TRAPPII, interacts with the Arf1p exchange factor Gea2p to facilitate COPI-mediated vesicle traffic.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuliang; Cai, Huaqing; Park, Sei-Kyoung; Menon, Shekar; Jackson, Catherine L; Ferro-Novick, Susan

    2011-10-01

    The TRAPP complexes are multimeric guanine exchange factors (GEFs) for the Rab GTPase Ypt1p. The three complexes (TRAPPI, TRAPPII, and TRAPPIII) share a core of common subunits required for GEF activity, as well as unique subunits (Trs130p, Trs120p, Trs85p, and Trs65p) that redirect the GEF from the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi pathway to different cellular locations where TRAPP mediates distinct membrane trafficking events. Roles for three of the four unique TRAPP subunits have been described before; however, the role of the TRAPPII-specific subunit Trs65p has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that Trs65p directly binds to the C-terminus of the Arf1p exchange factor Gea2p and provide in vivo evidence that this interaction is physiologically relevant. Gea2p and TRAPPII also bind to the yeast orthologue of the γ subunit of the COPI coat complex (Sec21p), a known Arf1p effector. These and previous findings reveal that TRAPPII is part of an Arf1p GEF-effector loop that appears to play a role in recruiting or stabilizing TRAPPII to membranes. In support of this proposal, we show that TRAPPII is more soluble in an arf1Δ mutant.

  5. Rho5p is involved in mediating the osmotic stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and its activity is regulated via Msi1p and Npr1p by phosphorylation and ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Annan, Robert B; Wu, Cunle; Waller, Daniel D; Whiteway, Malcolm; Thomas, David Y

    2008-09-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family act as molecular switches, and modulation of the GTP-bound state of Rho proteins is a well-characterized means of regulating their signaling activity in vivo. In contrast, the regulation of Rho-type GTPases by posttranslational modifications is poorly understood. Here, we present evidence of the control of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rho-type GTPase Rho5p by phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Rho5p binds to Ste50p, and the expression of the activated RHO5(Q91H) allele in an Deltaste50 strain is lethal under conditions of osmotic stress. An overexpression screen identified RGD2 and MSI1 as being high-copy suppressors of the osmotic sensitivity of this lethality. Rgd2p had been identified as being a possible Rho5p GTPase-activating protein based on an in vitro assay; this result supports its function as a regulator of Rho5p activity in vivo. MSI1 was previously identified as being a suppressor of hyperactive Ras/cyclic AMP signaling, where it antagonizes Npr1p kinase activity and promotes ubiquitination. Here, we show that Msi1p also acts via Npr1p to suppress activated Rho5p signaling. Rho5p is ubiquitinated, and its expression is lethal in a strain that is compromised for proteasome activity. These data identify Rho5p as being a target of Msi1p/Npr1p regulation and describe a regulatory circuit involving phosphorylation and ubiquitination. PMID:18621925

  6. Accurate long-range coefficients for two excited like isotope He atoms: He(2 {sup 1}P)-He(2 {sup 1}P), He(2 {sup 1}P)-He(2 {sup 3}P), and He(2 {sup 3}P)-He(2 {sup 3}P)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.-Y.; Yan, Z.-C.; Vrinceanu, D.; Babb, J. F.; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2007-07-15

    A general formalism is used to express the long-range potential energies in inverse powers of the separation distance between two like atomic or molecular systems with P symmetries. The long-range molecular interaction coefficients are calculated for the molecular symmetries {delta}, {pi}, and {sigma}, arising from the following interactions: He(2 {sup 1}P)-He(2 {sup 1}P), He(2 {sup 1}P)-He(2 {sup 3}P), and He(2 {sup 3}P)-He(2 {sup 3}P). The electric quadrupole-quadrupole term C{sub 5}, the van der Waals (dispersion) term C{sub 6}, and higher-order terms C{sub 8} and C{sub 10} are calculated ab initio using accurate variational wave functions in Hylleraas coordinates with finite nuclear mass effects. A comparison is made with previously published results where available.

  7. Mechanism Underlying the Iron-dependent Nuclear Export of the Iron-responsive Transcription Factor Aft1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ueta, Ryo; Fujiwara, Naoko

    2007-01-01

    Aft1p is an iron-responsive transcriptional activator that plays a central role in maintaining iron homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Aft1p is regulated primarily by iron-induced shuttling of the protein between the nucleus and cytoplasm, but its nuclear import is not regulated by iron. Here, we have shown that the nuclear export of Aft1p is promoted in the presence of iron and that Msn5p is the nuclear export receptor (exportin) for Aft1p. Msn5p recognizes Aft1p in the iron-replete condition. Phosphorylation of S210 and S224 in Aft1p, which is not iron dependent, and the iron-induced intermolecular interaction of Aft1p are both essential for its recognition by Msn5p. Mutation of Cys291 of Aft1p to Phe, which causes Aft1p to be retained in the nucleus and results in constitutive activation of Aft1-target genes, disrupts the intermolecular interaction of Aft1p. Collectively, these results suggest that iron induces a conformational change in Aft1p, in which Aft1p Cys291 plays a critical role, and that, in turn, Aft1p is recognized by Msn5p and exported into the cytoplasm in an iron-dependent manner. PMID:17538022

  8. Non-specific recognition is achieved in Pot1pC through the use of multiple binding modes

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Thayne H.; McKercher, Marissa A.; Wuttke, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pot1 is the protein responsible for binding to and protecting the 3’ single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) overhang at most eukaryotic telomeres. Here we present the crystal structure of one of the two OB-folds (Pot1pC) that make up the ssDNA-binding domain in S. pombe Pot1. Comparison with the homologous human domain reveals unexpected structural divergence in the mode of ligand binding that explains the differing ligand requirements between species. Despite the presence of apparently base-specific hydrogen bonds, Pot1pC is able to bind a wide range of ssDNA sequences with thermodynamic equivalence. To address how Pot1pC binds ssDNA with little to no specificity, multiple structures of Pot1pC bound to non-cognate ssDNA ligands were solved. These structures reveal that this promiscuity is implemented through new binding modes that thermodynamically compensate for base-substitutions through alternate stacking interactions and new H-bonding networks. PMID:23201273

  9. Nonspecific recognition is achieved in Pot1pC through the use of multiple binding modes.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Thayne H; McKercher, Marissa A; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2013-01-01

    Pot1 is the protein responsible for binding to and protecting the 3' single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) overhang at most eukaryotic telomeres. Here, we present the crystal structure of one of the two oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding folds (Pot1pC) that make up the ssDNA-binding domain in S. pombe Pot1. Comparison with the homologous human domain reveals unexpected structural divergence in the mode of ligand binding that explains the differing ligand requirements between species. Despite the presence of apparently base-specific hydrogen bonds, Pot1pC is able to bind a wide range of ssDNA sequences with thermodynamic equivalence. To address how Pot1pC binds ssDNA with little to no specificity, multiple structures of Pot1pC bound to noncognate ssDNA ligands were solved. These structures reveal that this promiscuity is implemented through new binding modes that thermodynamically compensate for base-substitutions through alternate stacking interactions and new H-bonding networks.

  10. Los1p, involved in yeast pre-tRNA splicing, positively regulates members of the SOL gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.C.; Stanford, D.R.; Hopper, A.K.

    1996-06-01

    To understand the role of Los1p in pre-tRNA splicing, we sought los1 multicopy suppressors. We found SOL1 that suppresses both point and null LOS1 mutations. Since, when fused to the Gal4p DNA-binding domain, Los1p activates transcription, we tested whether Los1p regulates SOL1. We found that los1 mutants have depleted levels of SOL1 mRNA and Sol1p. Thus, LOS1 appears to positively regulate SOL1. SOL1 belongs to a multigene family with at least two additional members, SOL2 and SOL3. Sol proteins have extensive similarity to an unusual group of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases (G6PDs). As the similarities are restricted to areas separate from the catalytic domain, these G6PDs may have more than one function. The SOL gene disruptions negatively affect tRNA-mediated nonsense suppression and the severity increases with the number of mutant SOL genes. However, tRNA levels do not vary with either multicopy SOL genes or with SOL disruptions. Therefore, the Sol proteins affect tRNA expression/function at steps other than transcription or splicing. We propose that LOS1 regulates gene products involved in tRNA expression/function as well as pre-tRNA splicing. 64 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Physiological lipid composition is vital for homotypic ER membrane fusion mediated by the dynamin-related GTPase Sey1p

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Shintaro; Mima, Joji

    2016-01-01

    Homotypic fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is required for generating and maintaining the characteristic reticular ER membrane structures. This organelle membrane fusion process depends on the ER-bound dynamin-related GTPases, such as atlastins in animals and Sey1p in yeast. Here, to investigate whether specific lipid molecules facilitate GTPase-dependent ER membrane fusion directly, we comprehensively evaluated membrane docking and lipid mixing of reconstituted proteoliposomes bearing purified Sey1p and a set of ER-mimicking lipids, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid, and ergosterol. Remarkably, we revealed that each specific lipid species contributed little to membrane docking mediated by Sey1p. Nevertheless, Sey1p-dependent lipid mixing was strongly reduced by omitting three major acidic lipids from the ER-mimicking set and, moreover, was entirely abolished by omitting either phosphatidylethanolamine or ergosterol. Our reconstitution studies thus established that physiological lipid composition is vital for lipid bilayer rearrangements in GTPase-mediated homotypic ER membrane fusion. PMID:26838333

  12. SKI-1/S1P inhibition: a promising surrogate to statins to block hepatitis C virus replication.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Matthieu; Seidah, Nabil G; Labonté, Patrick

    2012-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is often associated with steatosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Statins (HMG-CoAR inhibitors) have been shown to exert an antiviral effect in vitro, principally on replicon harboring cells, but the effect of their use alone in vivo remains controversial. In clinical trials, when used in combination with the standards of care (SOC), they led to an increased proportion of sustained virological responder (SVR). Here we investigated the implication of SKI-1/S1P, a master lipogenic pathways regulator upstream of HMG-CoAR, on different steps of HCV life cycle. We compared the HCV antiviral effect of the most potent SKI-1/S1P small molecule inhibitor (PF-429242) with a set of two statins on different steps of the viral life cycle, and showed that SKI-1/S1P inhibitor blocked HCVcc (strain JFH-1) RNA replication (EC(50)= 5.8 μM) more efficiently than statins. Moreover, we showed that PF-429242 could reduce lipid droplets accumulation in Huh7 cells. Interestingly, PF-429242 dramatically reduced infectious particles production (EC(90)= 4.8 μM). Such inhibition could not be achieved with statins. SKI-1/S1P activity is thus essential for viral production and its inhibition should be considered for antiviral drug development. PMID:22626636

  13. Cryo-EM structure of dodecameric Vps4p and its 2:1 complex with Vta1p

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiheng; Gonciarz, Malgorzata D.; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hill, Christopher P.; Jensen, Grant J.

    2008-01-01

    The type I AAA ATPase Vps4 and its co-factor Vta1p/LIP5 function in membrane remodeling events that accompany cytokinesis, multivesicular body biogenesis, and retrovirus budding, apparently by driving disassembly and recycling of membrane-associated ESCRT-III complexes. Here, we present cryo-EM reconstructions of dodecameric yeast Vps4p complexes with and without their MIT N-terminal domains and Vta1p co-factors. The ATPase domains of Vps4p form a bowl-like structure composed of stacked hexameric rings. The two rings adopt dramatically different conformations, with the “upper” ring forming an open assembly that defines the sides of the bowl and the lower ring forming a closed assembly that forms the bottom of the bowl. The N-terminal MIT domains of the upper ring localize on the symmetry axis above the cavity of the bowl, and the binding of six extended Vta1p monomers causes additional density to appear both above and below the bowl. The structures suggest models in which Vps4p MIT and Vta1p domains engage ESCRT-III substrates above the bowl and help transfer them into the bowl to be pumped through the center of the dodecameric assembly. PMID:18280501

  14. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients. PMID:27561113

  15. Disruption of chromosomal locus 1p36 differentially modulates TAp73 and ΔNp73 expression in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Hesham M.; Varney, Michelle L.; Jain, Smrati; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Singh, Rakesh K.; Dave, Bhavana J.

    2015-01-01

    The TP73 gene is located at the chromosome 1p36 locus that is commonly disrupted or deleted in follicular lymphoma (FL) with poor prognosis. Therefore, we analyzed the expression of the pro-apoptotic TAp73 and anti-apoptotic ΔNp73 isoforms in FL cases with normal or abnormal 1p36. We observed a significant increase in ΔNp73 expression and ΔNp73:TAp73 ratio, lower expression of cleaved caspase-3 and a higher frequency of Ki-67 and PCNA positive cells in FL cases with abnormal 1p36. A negative correlation between the ΔNp73:TAp73 ratio and cleaved caspase-3 expression, and a positive correlation between ΔNp73 expression and Ki-67 or PCNA were observed. The expression of TAp73 and its pro-apoptotic transcriptional targets Bim, Puma, and Noxa were significantly lower in FL compared to reactive follicular hyperplasia. Together, our data demonstrates that 1p36 disruption is associated with increased ΔNp73 expression, decreased apoptosis and increased proliferation in FL. PMID:24660851

  16. Rer1p maintains ciliary length and signaling by regulating γ-secretase activity and Foxj1a levels.

    PubMed

    Jurisch-Yaksi, Nathalie; Rose, Applonia J; Lu, Huiqi; Raemaekers, Tim; Munck, Sebastian; Baatsen, Pieter; Baert, Veerle; Vermeire, Wendy; Scales, Suzie J; Verleyen, Daphne; Vandepoel, Roel; Tylzanowski, Przemko; Yaksi, Emre; de Ravel, Thomy; Yost, H Joseph; Froyen, Guy; Arrington, Cammon B; Annaert, Wim

    2013-03-18

    Cilia project from the surface of most vertebrate cells and are important for several physiological and developmental processes. Ciliary defects are linked to a variety of human diseases, named ciliopathies, underscoring the importance of understanding signaling pathways involved in cilia formation and maintenance. In this paper, we identified Rer1p as the first endoplasmic reticulum/cis-Golgi-localized membrane protein involved in ciliogenesis. Rer1p, a protein quality control receptor, was highly expressed in zebrafish ciliated organs and regulated ciliary structure and function. Both in zebrafish and mammalian cells, loss of Rer1p resulted in the shortening of cilium and impairment of its motile or sensory function, which was reflected by hearing, vision, and left-right asymmetry defects as well as decreased Hedgehog signaling. We further demonstrate that Rer1p depletion reduced ciliary length and function by increasing γ-secretase complex assembly and activity and, consequently, enhancing Notch signaling as well as reducing Foxj1a expression.

  17. Rer1p maintains ciliary length and signaling by regulating γ-secretase activity and Foxj1a levels

    PubMed Central

    Jurisch-Yaksi, Nathalie; Rose, Applonia J.; Lu, Huiqi; Raemaekers, Tim; Munck, Sebastian; Baatsen, Pieter; Baert, Veerle; Vermeire, Wendy; Scales, Suzie J.; Verleyen, Daphne; Vandepoel, Roel; Tylzanowski, Przemko; Yaksi, Emre; de Ravel, Thomy; Yost, H. Joseph; Froyen, Guy; Arrington, Cammon B.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia project from the surface of most vertebrate cells and are important for several physiological and developmental processes. Ciliary defects are linked to a variety of human diseases, named ciliopathies, underscoring the importance of understanding signaling pathways involved in cilia formation and maintenance. In this paper, we identified Rer1p as the first endoplasmic reticulum/cis-Golgi–localized membrane protein involved in ciliogenesis. Rer1p, a protein quality control receptor, was highly expressed in zebrafish ciliated organs and regulated ciliary structure and function. Both in zebrafish and mammalian cells, loss of Rer1p resulted in the shortening of cilium and impairment of its motile or sensory function, which was reflected by hearing, vision, and left–right asymmetry defects as well as decreased Hedgehog signaling. We further demonstrate that Rer1p depletion reduced ciliary length and function by increasing γ-secretase complex assembly and activity and, consequently, enhancing Notch signaling as well as reducing Foxj1a expression. PMID:23479743

  18. Pathologic features of dilated cardiomyopathy with localized noncompaction in a child with deletion 1p36 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pearce, F Bennett; Litovsky, Silvio H; Dabal, Robert J; Robin, Nathaniel; Dure, Leon J; George, James F; Kirklin, James K

    2012-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy and ventricular noncompaction have been reported in association with deletion 1p36 syndrome. Previous descriptions include echocardiographic and/or gross pathologic descriptions. There are no previous reports of microscopic findings. We report a case with descriptions of echocardiographic, gross pathologic, and microscopic findings.

  19. Disruption of chromosomal locus 1p36 differentially modulates TAp73 and ΔNp73 expression in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hesham M; Varney, Michelle L; Jain, Smrati; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Singh, Rakesh K; Dave, Bhavana J

    2014-12-01

    The TP73 gene is located at the chromosome 1p36 locus that is commonly disrupted or deleted in follicular lymphoma (FL) with poor prognosis. Therefore, we analyzed the expression of the pro-apoptotic TAp73 and anti-apoptotic ΔNp73 isoforms in cases of FL with normal or abnormal 1p36. We observed a significant increase in ΔNp73 expression and ΔNp73:TAp73 ratio, lower expression of cleaved caspase-3 and a higher frequency of Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive cells in cases of FL with abnormal 1p36. A negative correlation between the ΔNp73:TAp73 ratio and cleaved caspase-3 expression, and a positive correlation between ΔNp73 expression and Ki-67 or PCNA, were observed. The expression of TAp73 and its pro-apoptotic transcriptional targets BIM. PUMA and NOXA were significantly lower in FL compared to reactive follicular hyperplasia. Together, our data demonstrate that 1p36 disruption is associated with increased ΔNp73 expression, decreased apoptosis and increased proliferation in FL.

  20. 2-Aryl(pyrrolidin-4-yl)acetic acids are potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Budhu, Richard; Huo, Pei; Lynch, Christopher L; Hale, Jeffrey J; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2006-07-01

    A series of 2-aryl(pyrrolidin-4-yl)acetic acids were synthesized and their biological activities were evaluated as agonists of S1P receptors. These analogs were able to induce lowering of lymphocyte counts in the peripheral blood of mice and were found to have good overall pharmacokinetic properties in rat.

  1. The spin structure function g1p of the proton and a test of the Bjorken sum rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chang, W.-C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse-Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; von Harrach, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; -Yu Hsieh, C.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jörg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rychter, A.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Selyunin, A.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2016-02-01

    New results for the double spin asymmetry A1p and the proton longitudinal spin structure function g1p are presented. They were obtained by the COMPASS Collaboration using polarised 200 GeV muons scattered off a longitudinally polarised NH3 target. The data were collected in 2011 and complement those recorded in 2007 at 160 GeV, in particular at lower values of x. They improve the statistical precision of g1p (x) by about a factor of two in the region x ≲ 0.02. A next-to-leading order QCD fit to the g1 world data is performed. It leads to a new determination of the quark spin contribution to the nucleon spin, ΔΣ, ranging from 0.26 to 0.36, and to a re-evaluation of the first moment of g1p. The uncertainty of ΔΣ is mostly due to the large uncertainty in the present determinations of the gluon helicity distribution. A new evaluation of the Bjorken sum rule based on the COMPASS results for the non-singlet structure function g1NS (x ,Q2) yields as ratio of the axial and vector coupling constants |gA /gV | = 1.22 ± 0.05 (stat.) ± 0.10 (syst.), which validates the sum rule to an accuracy of about 9%.

  2. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D J

    2016-01-01

    Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients. PMID:27561113

  3. The RAC1 P29S Hotspot Mutation in Melanoma Confers Resistance to Pharmacological Inhibition of RAF

    PubMed Central

    Cabeceiras, Peter K.; Mahdavi, Mozhdeh; Gutschner, Tony; Genovese, Giannicola; Wang, Guocan; Fang, Zhuangna; Tepper, James M.; Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Tsai, Kenneth Y.; Davies, Michael A.; Mills, Gordon B.

    2014-01-01

    Following mutations in BRAF and NRAS, the RAC1 c.85C>T single nucleotide variant (SNV) encoding P29S amino acid change represents the next most frequently observed protein-coding hotspot mutation in melanoma. However, the biological and clinical significance of the RAC1 P29S somatic mutation in approximately 4–9% of patients remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that melanoma cell lines possessing the RAC1 hotspot variant are resistant to RAF inhibitors (vemurafenib and dabrafenib). Enforced expression of RAC1 P29S in sensitive BRAF mutant melanoma cell lines confers resistance manifested by increased viability, decreased apoptosis and enhanced tumor growth in vivo upon treatment with RAF inhibitors. Conversely, RNAi mediated silencing of endogenous RAC1 P29S in a melanoma cell line with a co-occurring BRAF V600 mutation increased sensitivity to vemurafenib and dabrafenib. Our results suggest RAC1 P29S status may offer a predictive biomarker for RAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma patients, where it should be evaluated clinically. PMID:25056119

  4. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D J

    2016-01-01

    Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients.

  5. 76 FR 45309 - Social Security Ruling 11-1p; Titles II and XVI: Procedures for Handling Requests To File...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION Social Security Ruling 11-1p; Titles II and XVI: Procedures for Handling Requests To File... title and benefit type in our administrative review process. This change will allow us to more... Titles II and XVI: Procedures for Handling Requests To File Subsequent Applications for...

  6. Whole-genomic analysis of a human G1P[9] rotavirus strain reveals intergenogroup-reassortment events.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Souvik; Shintani, Tsuzumi; Urushibara, Noriko; Taniguchi, Koki; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2012-08-01

    Group A rotavirus (RVA) strain K8 (RVA/Human-tc/JPN/K8/1977/G1P[9]) was found to have Wa-like VP7 and NSP1 genes and AU-1-like VP4 and NSP5 genes. To determine the exact origin and overall genetic makeup of this unusual RVA strain, the remaining genes (VP1-VP3, VP6 and NSP2-NSP4) of K8 were analysed in this study. Strain K8 exhibited a G1-P[9]-I1-R3-C3-M3-A1-N1-T3-E3-H3 genotype constellation, not reported previously. The VP6 and NSP2 genes of strain K8 were related closely to those of common human Wa-like G1P[8] and/or G3P[8] strains, whilst its VP1-VP3, NSP3 and NSP4 genes were related more closely to those of AU-1-like RVAs and/or AU-1-like genes of multi-reassortant strains than to those of other RVAs. Therefore, strain K8 might have originated from intergenogroup-reassortment events involving acquisition of four Wa-like genes, possibly from G1P[8] RVAs, by an AU-1-like P[9] strain. Whole-genomic analysis of strain K8 has provided important insights into the complex genetic diversity of RVAs. PMID:22592265

  7. S1P1 Receptor Modulation with Cyclical Recovery from Lymphopenia Ameliorates Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J.; Cahalan, Stuart M.; Nguyen, Nhan; Sarkisyan, Gor; Leaf, Nora B.; Cameron, Michael D.; Kago, Tomoyuki

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) therapies modulate T-cell autoimmunity in the central nervous system (CNS) but may exacerbate latent infections. Fingolimod, a nonselective sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist that induces sustained lymphopenia and accumulates in the CNS, represents a new treatment modality for MS. We hypothesized that sustained lymphopenia would not be required for efficacy and that a selective, CNS-penetrant, peripherally short-acting, S1P1 agonist would show full efficacy in a mouse MS model. Using daily treatment with 10 mg/kg 2-(4-(5-(3,4-diethoxyphenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl amino)ethanol (CYM-5442) at the onset of clinical signs in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein MOG35–55- induced experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), we assessed clinical scores, CNS cellular infiltration, demyelination, and gliosis for 12 days with CYM-5442, vehicle, or fingolimod. CYM-5442 levels in CNS and plasma were determined at experiment termination, and blood lymphopenia was measured 3 and 24 h after the last injection. Plasma levels of cytokines were assayed at the end of the protocol. Changes in S1P1-enhanced green fluorescent protein expression on neurons and astrocytes during active EAE and upon CYM-5442 treatment were quantified with flow cytometry and Western blotting by using native-locus enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged S1P1 mice. S1P1 agonism alone reduced pathological features as did fingolimod (maximally lymphopenic throughout), despite full reversal of lymphopenia within each dosing interval. CYM-5442 levels in CNS but not in plasma were sustained. Neuronal and astrocytic S1P1 expression in EAE was suppressed by CYM-5442 treatment, relative to vehicle, and levels of key cytokines, such as interleukin 17A, were also significantly reduced in drug-treated mice. S1P1-selective agonists that induce reversible lymphopenia while persisting in the CNS may be effective MS treatments. PMID:22031473

  8. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C; McAllen, John K; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2015-08-08

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide.

  9. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C; McAllen, John K; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2015-09-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide. PMID:26254487

  10. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C.; McAllen, John K.; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide. PMID:26254487

  11. Significance of the small subtelomeric area of chromosome 1 (1p36.3) in the progression of malignant melanoma: FISH deletion screening with YAC DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Poetsch, M; Woenckhaus, C; Dittberner, T; Pambor, M; Lorenz, G; Herrmann, F H

    1999-08-01

    The short arm of chromosome 1 (1p), especially the subtelomeric region of 1p36, is a common site for abnormalities in malignant melanoma of the skin. In a recent study nodular melanomas displayed deletions of 1p36 in an augmented percentage of cases. To evaluate the dimension of these deletions and to study their significance for the progression of malignant melanoma we analyzed seven melanoma cell lines, 32 primary tumors, and 32 metastatic tumors by fluorescence in situ hybridization with the DNA probe D1Z2 in 1p36.3 and eight YAC DNA probes hybridizing to 1p36, 1p32, 1p31, and 1p21. All cell lines, 91% of the metastatic tumors and 63% of nodular melanomas showed a deletion of 1p36.3. In the YAC hybridization experiments, the most frequent deletions were found in 1p36 in all cell lines, in 13% of nodular melanoma, and in 44% of metastatic tumors. Deletions in 1p36 were mostly confined to a rather small area near the locus D1Z2. The frequent occurrence of this deletion in melanomas with a high metastatic potential and the abundant accumulation of this deletion in metastasis point to genes located on 1p36, which might be of significance for the metastatic capability of malignant melanoma.

  12. Genomic footprinting of the yeast zinc finger protein Rme1p and its roles in repression of the meiotic activator IME1.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, M; Li, W; Covitz, P A; Hara, M; Shindo, H; Mitchell, A P

    1998-01-01

    The zinc finger protein Rme1p is a negative regulator of the meiotic activator IME1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Prior studies have shown that Rme1p binds in vitro to a site near nt -2030 in the IME1 upstream region, but a genomic mutation in that site has little effect on repression of IME1 . To identify Rme1p binding sites in vivo , we have examined the binding of Rme1p to genomic sites through in vivo footprinting. We show that Rme1p binds to two sites in the IME1 upstream region, near nt -1950 and -2030. Mutations in both binding sites abolish repression of chromosomal IME1 by Rme1p, whereas a mutation in either single site causes partial derepression. Therefore, both Rme1p binding sites are essential for repression of IME1 . Prior studies have shown that repression by Rme1p depends upon RGR1 and SIN4 , which specify RNA polymerase II mediator subunits that are required for normal nucleosome density. We find that RGR1 and SIN4 are not simply required for Rme1p to bind to DNA in vivo . These results suggest that Rme1p functions directly as a repressor of IME1 and that Rgr1p and Sin4p are required for DNA-bound Rme1p to exert repression. PMID:9580682

  13. A Genome-wide Association Study Provides Evidence of Sex-specific Involvement of Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P) and Chr8p23.1 (HMGB1P46) With Diabetic Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Meng, Weihua; Deshmukh, Harshal A; Donnelly, Louise A; Torrance, Nicola; Colhoun, Helen M; Palmer, Colin N A; Smith, Blair H

    2015-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is defined as pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system and it affects around 1 in 4 diabetic patients in the UK. The purpose of this genome-wide association study (GWAS) was to identify genetic contributors to this disorder. Cases of neuropathic pain were defined as diabetic patients with a multiple prescription history of at least one of five drugs specifically indicated for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Controls were diabetic individuals who were not prescribed any of these drugs, nor amitriptyline, carbamazepine, or nortriptyline. Overall, 961 diabetic neuropathic pain cases and 3260 diabetic controls in the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research Tayside (GoDARTS) cohort were identified. We found a cluster in the Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P) with a lowest P value of 2.74 × 10(- 7) at rs71647933 in females and a cluster in the Chr8p23.1, next to HMGB1P46 with a lowest P value of 8.02 × 10(- 7) at rs6986153 in males. Sex-specific narrow sense heritability was higher in males (30.0%) than in females (14.7%). This GWAS on diabetic neuropathic pain provides evidence for the sex-specific involvement of Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P) and Chr8p23.1 (HMGB1P46) with the disorder, indicating the need for further research. PMID:26629533

  14. Interactions between the bud emergence proteins Bem1p and Bem2p and Rho- type GTPases in yeast

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The SH3 domain-containing protein Bem1p is needed for normal bud emergence and mating projection formation, two processes that require asymmetric reorganizations of the cortical cytoskeleton in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify proteins that functionally and/or physically interact with Bem1p, we screened for mutations that display synthetic lethality with a mutant allele of the BEM1 gene and for genes whose products display two-hybrid interactions with the Bem1 protein. CDC24, which is required for bud emergence and encodes a GEF (guanine- nucleotide exchange factor) for the essential Rho-type GTPase Cdc42p, was identified during both screens. The COOH-terminal 75 amino acids of Cdc24p, outside of the GEF domain, can interact with a portion of Bem1p that lacks both SH3 domains. Bacterially expressed Cdc24p and Bem1p bind to each other in vitro, indicating that no other yeast proteins are required for this interaction. The most frequently identified gene that arose from the bem1 synthetic-lethal screen was the bud-emergence gene BEM2 (Bender and Pringle. 1991. Mol. Cell Biol. 11:1295-1395), which is allelic with IPL2 (increase in ploidy; Chan and Botstein, 1993. Genetics. 135:677-691). Here we show that Bem2p contains a GAP (GTPase-activating protein) domain for Rho-type GTPases, and that this portion of Bem2p can stimulate in vitro the GTPase activity of Rho1p, a second essential yeast Rho-type GTPase. Cells deleted for BEM2 become large and multinucleate. These and other genetic, two-hybrid, biochemical, and phenotypic data suggest that multiple Rho-type GTPases control the reorganization of the cortical cytoskeleton in yeast and that the functions of these GTPases are tightly coupled. Also, these findings raise the possibility that Bem1p may regulate or be a target of action of one or more of these GTPases. PMID:7962098

  15. Interactions between the bud emergence proteins Bem1p and Bem2p and Rho-type GTPases in yeast.

    PubMed

    Peterson, J; Zheng, Y; Bender, L; Myers, A; Cerione, R; Bender, A

    1994-12-01

    The SH3 domain-containing protein Bem1p is needed for normal bud emergence and mating projection formation, two processes that require asymmetric reorganizations of the cortical cytoskeleton in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify proteins that functionally and/or physically interact with Bem1p, we screened for mutations that display synthetic lethality with a mutant allele of the BEM1 gene and for genes whose products display two-hybrid interactions with the Bem1 protein. CDC24, which is required for bud emergence and encodes a GEF (guanine-nucleotide exchange factor) for the essential Rho-type GTPase Cdc42p, was identified during both screens. The COOH-terminal 75 amino acids of Cdc24p, outside of the GEF domain, can interact with a portion of Bem1p that lacks both SH3 domains. Bacterially expressed Cdc24p and Bem1p bind to each other in vitro, indicating that no other yeast proteins are required for this interaction. The most frequently identified gene that arose from the bem1 synthetic-lethal screen was the bud-emergence gene BEM2 (Bender and Pringle. 1991. Mol. Cell Biol. 11:1295-1395), which is allelic with IPL2 (increase in ploidy; Chan and Botstein, 1993. Genetics. 135:677-691). Here we show that Bem2p contains a GAP (GTPase-activating protein) domain for Rho-type GTPases, and that this portion of Bem2p can stimulate in vitro the GTPase activity of Rho1p, a second essential yeast Rho-type GTPase. Cells deleted for BEM2 become large and multinucleate. These and other genetic, two-hybrid, biochemical, and phenotypic data suggest that multiple Rho-type GTPases control the reorganization of the cortical cytoskeleton in yeast and that the functions of these GTPases are tightly coupled. Also, these findings raise the possibility that Bem1p may regulate or be a target of action of one or more of these GTPases. PMID:7962098

  16. EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopy of intact mitochondria isolated from Yah1p-depleted Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ren; Martinho, Marlène; Morales, Jessica Garber; Kim, Hansoo; Ellis, E Ann; Lill, Roland; Hendrich, Michael P; Münck, Eckard; Lindahl, Paul A

    2008-09-16

    Yah1p, an [Fe 2S 2]-containing ferredoxin located in the matrix of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria, functions in the synthesis of Fe/S clusters and heme a prosthetic groups. EPR, Mossbauer spectroscopy, and electron microscopy were used to characterize the Fe that accumulates in Yah1p-depleted isolated intact mitochondria. Gal- YAH1 cells were grown in standard rich media (YPD and YPGal) under O 2 or argon atmospheres. Mitochondria were isolated anaerobically, then prepared in the as-isolated redox state, the dithionite-treated state, and the O 2-treated state. The absence of strong EPR signals from Fe/S clusters when Yah1p was depleted confirms that Yah1p is required in Fe/S cluster assembly. Yah1p-depleted mitochondria, grown with O 2 bubbling through the media, accumulated excess Fe (up to 10 mM) that was present as 2-4 nm diameter ferric nanoparticles, similar to those observed in mitochondria from yfh1Delta cells. These particles yielded a broad isotropic EPR signal centered around g = 2, characteristic of superparamagnetic relaxation. Treatment with dithionite caused Fe (3+) ions of the nanoparticles to become reduced and largely exported from the mitochondria. Fe did not accumulate in mitochondria isolated from cells grown under Ar; a significant portion of the Fe in these organelles was in the high-spin Fe (2+) state. This suggests that the O 2 used during growth of Gal- YAH1 cells is responsible, either directly or indirectly, for Fe accumulation and for oxidizing Fe (2+) --> Fe (3+) prior to aggregation. Models are proposed in which the accumulation of ferric nanoparticles is caused either by the absence of a ligand that prevents such precipitation in wild-type mitochondria or by a more oxidizing environment within the mitochondria of Yah1p-depleted cells exposed to O 2. The efficacy of reducing accumulated Fe along with chelating it should be considered as a strategy for its removal in diseases involving such accumulations. PMID:18717590

  17. Chain length specificity for activation of cPLA2alpha by C1P: use of the dodecane delivery system to determine lipid-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S; Subramanian, Preeti; Lamour, Nadia F; Gentile, Luciana B; Granado, Maria H; Bielawska, Alicja; Szulc, Zdzislaw; Gomez-Munoz, Antonio; Chalfant, Charles E

    2009-10-01

    Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) specifically activated group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)alpha) in vitro. In this study, we investigated the chain length specificity of this interaction. C1P with an acyl-chain of >or=6 carbons efficiently activated cPLA(2)alpha in vitro, whereas C(2)-C1P, was unable to do so. Delivery of C1P to cells via the newly characterized ethanol/dodecane system demonstrated a lipid-specific activation of cPLA(2)alpha, AA release, and PGE(2) synthesis (EC(50) = 400 nM) when compared to structurally similar lipids. C1P delivered as vesicles in water also induced a lipid-specific increase in AA release. Mass spectrometric analysis demonstrated that C1P delivered via ethanol/dodecane induced a 3-fold increase in endogenous C1P with little metabolism to ceramide. C1P was also more efficiently delivered (>3-fold) to internal membranes by ethanol/dodecane as compared to vesiculated C1P. Using this now established delivery method for lipids, C(2)-C1P was shown to be ineffective in the induction of AA release as compared with C(6)-C1P, C(16)-C1P, and C(18:1) C1P. Here, we demonstrate that C1P requires >or=6 carbon acyl-chain to activate cPLA(2)alpha. Thus, published reports on the biological activity of C(2)-C1P are not via eicosanoid synthesis. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that the alcohol/dodecane system can be used to efficiently deliver exogenous phospholipids to cells for the examination of specific biological effects.

  18. Reassortment of Human and Animal Rotavirus Gene Segments in Emerging DS-1-Like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strains.

    PubMed

    Komoto, Satoshi; Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Tsuji, Takao; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tharmaphornpilas, Piyanit; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of novel DS-1-like G1P[8] human rotaviruses in Japan were recently reported. More recently, such intergenogroup reassortant strains were identified in Thailand, implying the ongoing spread of unusual rotavirus strains in Asia. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand, three DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains having G3P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-281/2013/G3P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-289/2013/G3P[8]) and G2P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/LS-04/2013/G2P[8]) genotypes were identified in fecal samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genomes of strains SKT-281, SKT-289, and LS-04. On whole genomic analysis, all three strains exhibited unique genotype constellations including both genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G3-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strains SKT-281 and SKT-289, and G2-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strain LS-04. Except for the G genotype, the unique genotype constellation of the three strains (P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2) is commonly shared with DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. On phylogenetic analysis, nine of the 11 genes of strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 (VP4, VP6, VP1-3, NSP1-3, and NSP5) appeared to have originated from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains, while the remaining VP7 and NSP4 genes appeared to be of equine and bovine origin, respectively. Thus, strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 appeared to be reassortant strains as to DS-1-like G1P[8], animal-derived human, and/or animal rotaviruses. On the other hand, seven of the 11 genes of strain LS-04 (VP7, VP6, VP1, VP3, and NSP3-5) appeared to have originated from locally circulating DS-1-like G2P[4] human rotaviruses, while three genes (VP4, VP2, and NSP1) were assumed to be derived from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Notably, the remaining NSP2 gene of strain LS-04 appeared to be of bovine origin. Thus, strain LS-04 was assumed to be a multiple reassortment strain as to DS-1-like G1P[8], locally circulating

  19. Prediction of {sup 1}P Rydberg energy levels of beryllium based on calculations with explicitly correlated Gaussians

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-01-14

    Benchmark variational calculations are performed for the seven lowest 1s{sup 2}2s np ({sup 1}P), n = 2…8, states of the beryllium atom. The calculations explicitly include the effect of finite mass of {sup 9}Be nucleus and account perturbatively for the mass-velocity, Darwin, and spin-spin relativistic corrections. The wave functions of the states are expanded in terms of all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. Basis sets of up to 12 500 optimized Gaussians are used. The maximum discrepancy between the calculated nonrelativistic and experimental energies of 1s{sup 2}2s np ({sup 1}P) →1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2} ({sup 1}S) transition is about 12 cm{sup −1}. The inclusion of the relativistic corrections reduces the discrepancy to bellow 0.8 cm{sup −1}.

  20. Tumor suppressor PRSS8 targets Sphk1/S1P/Stat3/Akt signaling in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Li, Zexin; Yang, Yiqiong; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Jianguo; Zhao, Weixing; Zhang, Huijuan; Chen, Jiwang; Dong, Huali; Shen, Kui; Diamond, Alan M.; Yang, Wancai

    2016-01-01

    PRSS8 is a membrane-anchored serine protease prostasin and has been shown an association with carcinogenesis. Herein we found that PRSS8 expression was significantly reduced in colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The decreased PRSS8 was well correlated with clinical stages, poor differentiation and shorter survival time of colorectal cancer. Furthermore, increase of PRSS8 led to the inhibition of colorectal cancer cell proliferation, knockdown of PRSS8 accelerated cell proliferation in vitro, and overexpressing PRSS8 retarded cancer cell growth in nude mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that PRSS8 inhibited Sphk1/S1P/Stat3/Akt signaling pathway, in terms of inverse association between PRSS8 and Sphk1 in human colorectal cancers and in Sphk1-/− mice. In conclusion, PRSS8 acts as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting Sphk1/S1P/Stat3/Akt signaling pathway, and could be used as a biomarker to monitor colorectal carcinogenesis and predict outcomes. PMID:27050145

  1. Reassortment of Human and Animal Rotavirus Gene Segments in Emerging DS-1-Like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Satoshi; Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Tsuji, Takao; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tharmaphornpilas, Piyanit; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of novel DS-1-like G1P[8] human rotaviruses in Japan were recently reported. More recently, such intergenogroup reassortant strains were identified in Thailand, implying the ongoing spread of unusual rotavirus strains in Asia. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand, three DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains having G3P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-281/2013/G3P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-289/2013/G3P[8]) and G2P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/LS-04/2013/G2P[8]) genotypes were identified in fecal samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genomes of strains SKT-281, SKT-289, and LS-04. On whole genomic analysis, all three strains exhibited unique genotype constellations including both genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G3-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strains SKT-281 and SKT-289, and G2-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strain LS-04. Except for the G genotype, the unique genotype constellation of the three strains (P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2) is commonly shared with DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. On phylogenetic analysis, nine of the 11 genes of strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 (VP4, VP6, VP1-3, NSP1-3, and NSP5) appeared to have originated from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains, while the remaining VP7 and NSP4 genes appeared to be of equine and bovine origin, respectively. Thus, strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 appeared to be reassortant strains as to DS-1-like G1P[8], animal-derived human, and/or animal rotaviruses. On the other hand, seven of the 11 genes of strain LS-04 (VP7, VP6, VP1, VP3, and NSP3-5) appeared to have originated from locally circulating DS-1-like G2P[4] human rotaviruses, while three genes (VP4, VP2, and NSP1) were assumed to be derived from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Notably, the remaining NSP2 gene of strain LS-04 appeared to be of bovine origin. Thus, strain LS-04 was assumed to be a multiple reassortment strain as to DS-1-like G1P[8], locally circulating

  2. Tumor suppressor PRSS8 targets Sphk1/S1P/Stat3/Akt signaling in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yonghua; Li, Kai; Guo, Yongchen; Wang, Qian; Li, Zexin; Yang, Yiqiong; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Jianguo; Zhao, Weixing; Zhang, Huijuan; Chen, Jiwang; Dong, Huali; Shen, Kui; Diamond, Alan M; Yang, Wancai

    2016-05-01

    PRSS8 is a membrane-anchored serine protease prostasin and has been shown an association with carcinogenesis. Herein we found that PRSS8 expression was significantly reduced in colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The decreased PRSS8 was well correlated with clinical stages, poor differentiation and shorter survival time of colorectal cancer. Furthermore, increase of PRSS8 led to the inhibition of colorectal cancer cell proliferation, knockdown of PRSS8 accelerated cell proliferation in vitro, and overexpressing PRSS8 retarded cancer cell growth in nude mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that PRSS8 inhibited Sphk1/S1P/Stat3/Akt signaling pathway, in terms of inverse association between PRSS8 and Sphk1 in human colorectal cancers and in Sphk1-/- mice. In conclusion, PRSS8 acts as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting Sphk1/S1P/Stat3/Akt signaling pathway, and could be used as a biomarker to monitor colorectal carcinogenesis and predict outcomes. PMID:27050145

  3. Effects of social isolation and re-socialization on cognition and ADAR1 (p110) expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaoxin; Wang, Shiwei; Yu, Weizhi; Yu, Deqin; Zhao, Dan; Sun, Yiping; Deng, Wuguo; Tang, Yiyuan

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that social isolation stress could be a key factor that leads to cognitive deficit for both humans and rodent models. However, detailed mechanisms are not yet clear. ADAR1 (Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) is an enzyme involved in RNA editing that has a close relation to cognitive function. We have hypothesized that social isolation stress may impact the expression of ADAR1 in the brain of mice with cognitive deficit. To test our hypothesis, we evaluated the cognition ability of mice isolated for different durations (2, 4, and 8 weeks) using object recognition and object location tests; we also measured ADAR1 expression in hippocampus and cortex using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Our study showed that social isolation stress induced spatial and non-spatial cognition deficits of the tested mice. In addition, social isolation significantly increased both the immunoreactivity and protein expression of ADAR1 (p110) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Furthermore, re-socialization could not only recover the cognition deficits, but also bring ADAR1 (p110) immunoreactivity of hippocampus and frontal cortex, as well as ADAR1 (p110) protein expression of hippocampus back to the normal level for the isolated mice in adolescence. In conclusion, social isolation stress significantly increases ADAR1 (p110) expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the mice with cognitive deficit. This finding may open a window to better understand the reasons (e.g., epigenetic change) that are responsible for social isolation-induced cognitive deficit and help the development of novel therapies for the resulted diseases. PMID:27602277

  4. Variants of the CYP21A2 and CYP21A1P genes in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsien-Hsiung

    2013-03-15

    More than 90% of congenital adrenal hyperplasia cases are caused by mutation of the CYP21A2 gene which converted from the CYP21A1P pseudogene. Sizes of the 3.7-kb TaqI-produced fragment that exists downstream of the TNXB gene, representing the CYP21A2, and the 3.2-kb TaqI-produced fragment that exists downstream of the XA gene, representing the CYP21A1P pseudogene, are used as size markers in the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. However, the size of and location for distinguishing these two genes might not be completely precise or reliable. Recent studies indicated that the 3.2-kb TaqI fragment may include multiple variants of chimeric CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 genes, a haplotype with dual mutations of IVS2-12A/C>G and 707-714del, and a functional CYP21A2 gene caused by small-scale conversions of the 5' end of the CYP21A1P sequence. In addition, a 3.7-kb TaqI fragment with more than 4 haplotypes of CYP21A2-like downstream of the TNXA gene and a 6.2-kb TaqI fragment of the CYP21A2 that results from a nucleotide mutation in the 3' end sequence were also identified. Accordingly, these structural variants reveal that traditional recognition of these two genes based on the TaqI fragment size analysis may lead to misinterpretation and increasingly interfere with the molecular diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

  5. Effects of social isolation and re-socialization on cognition and ADAR1 (p110) expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaoxin; Wang, Shiwei; Yu, Weizhi; Yu, Deqin; Zhao, Dan; Sun, Yiping; Deng, Wuguo; Tang, Yiyuan

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that social isolation stress could be a key factor that leads to cognitive deficit for both humans and rodent models. However, detailed mechanisms are not yet clear. ADAR1 (Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) is an enzyme involved in RNA editing that has a close relation to cognitive function. We have hypothesized that social isolation stress may impact the expression of ADAR1 in the brain of mice with cognitive deficit. To test our hypothesis, we evaluated the cognition ability of mice isolated for different durations (2, 4, and 8 weeks) using object recognition and object location tests; we also measured ADAR1 expression in hippocampus and cortex using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Our study showed that social isolation stress induced spatial and non-spatial cognition deficits of the tested mice. In addition, social isolation significantly increased both the immunoreactivity and protein expression of ADAR1 (p110) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Furthermore, re-socialization could not only recover the cognition deficits, but also bring ADAR1 (p110) immunoreactivity of hippocampus and frontal cortex, as well as ADAR1 (p110) protein expression of hippocampus back to the normal level for the isolated mice in adolescence. In conclusion, social isolation stress significantly increases ADAR1 (p110) expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the mice with cognitive deficit. This finding may open a window to better understand the reasons (e.g., epigenetic change) that are responsible for social isolation-induced cognitive deficit and help the development of novel therapies for the resulted diseases.

  6. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B targets PITX1/p120RasGAP thus showing therapeutic potential in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Hao-Wei; Hung, Man-Hsin; Chen, Li-Ju; Chang, Mao-Ju; Hsieh, Feng-Shu; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Huang, Jui-Wen; Lin, Chih-Lung; Tseng, Hsiang-Wen; Kuo, Zong-Keng; Jiang, Jeng-Kai; Yang, Shung-Haur; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is known to promote the pathogenesis of diabetes and obesity by negatively regulating insulin and leptin pathways, but its role associated with colon carcinogenesis is still under debate. In this study, we demonstrated the oncogenic role of PTP1B in promoting colon carcinogenesis and predicting worse clinical outcomes in CRC patients. By co-immunoprecipitation, we showed that PITX1 was a novel substrate of PTP1B. Through direct dephosphorylation at Y160, Y175 and Y179, PTP1B destabilized PITX1, which resulted in downregulation of the PITX1/p120RasGAP axis. Interestingly, we found that regorafenib, the approved target agent for advanced CRC patients, exerted a novel property against PTP1B. By inhibiting PTP1B activity, regorafenib treatment augmented the stability of PITX1 protein and upregulated the expression of p120RasGAP in CRC. Importantly, we found that this PTP1B-dependant PITX1/p120RasGAP axis determines the in vitro anti-CRC effects of regorafenib. The above-mentioned effects of regorafenib were confirmed by the HT-29 xenograft tumor model. In conclusion, we demonstrated a novel oncogenic mechanism of PTP1B on affecting PITX1/p120RasGAP in CRC. Regorafenib inhibited CRC survival through reserving PTP1B-dependant PITX1/p120RasGAP downregulation. PTP1B may be a potential biomarker predicting regorafenib effectiveness, and a potential solution for CRC. PMID:27752061

  7. Fine mapping of the 1p36 deletion syndrome identifies mutation of PRDM16 as a cause of cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Anne-Karin; Schafer, Sebastian; Drenckhahn, Jorg-Detlef; Sabeh, M Khaled; Plovie, Eva R; Caliebe, Almuth; Klopocki, Eva; Musso, Gabriel; Werdich, Andreas A; Kalwa, Hermann; Heinig, Matthias; Padera, Robert F; Wassilew, Katharina; Bluhm, Julia; Harnack, Christine; Martitz, Janine; Barton, Paul J; Greutmann, Matthias; Berger, Felix; Hubner, Norbert; Siebert, Reiner; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Cook, Stuart A; MacRae, Calum A; Klaassen, Sabine

    2013-07-11

    Deletion 1p36 syndrome is recognized as the most common terminal deletion syndrome. Here, we describe the loss of a gene within the deletion that is responsible for the cardiomyopathy associated with monosomy 1p36, and we confirm its role in nonsyndromic left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). With our own data and publically available data from array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), we identified a minimal deletion for the cardiomyopathy associated with 1p36del syndrome that included only the terminal 14 exons of the transcription factor PRDM16 (PR domain containing 16), a gene that had previously been shown to direct brown fat determination and differentiation. Resequencing of PRDM16 in a cohort of 75 nonsyndromic individuals with LVNC detected three mutations, including one truncation mutant, one frameshift null mutation, and a single missense mutant. In addition, in a series of cardiac biopsies from 131 individuals with DCM, we found 5 individuals with 4 previously unreported nonsynonymous variants in the coding region of PRDM16. None of the PRDM16 mutations identified were observed in more than 6,400 controls. PRDM16 has not previously been associated with cardiac disease but is localized in the nuclei of cardiomyocytes throughout murine and human development and in the adult heart. Modeling of PRDM16 haploinsufficiency and a human truncation mutant in zebrafish resulted in both contractile dysfunction and partial uncoupling of cardiomyocytes and also revealed evidence of impaired cardiomyocyte proliferative capacity. In conclusion, mutation of PRDM16 causes the cardiomyopathy in 1p36 deletion syndrome as well as a proportion of nonsyndromic LVNC and DCM.

  8. Effects of social isolation and re-socialization on cognition and ADAR1 (p110) expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; An, Dong; Xu, Hong; Cheng, Xiaoxin; Wang, Shiwei; Yu, Weizhi; Yu, Deqin; Zhao, Dan; Sun, Yiping; Deng, Wuguo; Tang, Yiyuan; Yin, Shengming

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that social isolation stress could be a key factor that leads to cognitive deficit for both humans and rodent models. However, detailed mechanisms are not yet clear. ADAR1 (Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) is an enzyme involved in RNA editing that has a close relation to cognitive function. We have hypothesized that social isolation stress may impact the expression of ADAR1 in the brain of mice with cognitive deficit. To test our hypothesis, we evaluated the cognition ability of mice isolated for different durations (2, 4, and 8 weeks) using object recognition and object location tests; we also measured ADAR1 expression in hippocampus and cortex using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Our study showed that social isolation stress induced spatial and non-spatial cognition deficits of the tested mice. In addition, social isolation significantly increased both the immunoreactivity and protein expression of ADAR1 (p110) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Furthermore, re-socialization could not only recover the cognition deficits, but also bring ADAR1 (p110) immunoreactivity of hippocampus and frontal cortex, as well as ADAR1 (p110) protein expression of hippocampus back to the normal level for the isolated mice in adolescence. In conclusion, social isolation stress significantly increases ADAR1 (p110) expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the mice with cognitive deficit. This finding may open a window to better understand the reasons (e.g., epigenetic change) that are responsible for social isolation-induced cognitive deficit and help the development of novel therapies for the resulted diseases.

  9. Effects of social isolation and re-socialization on cognition and ADAR1 (p110) expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; An, Dong; Xu, Hong; Cheng, Xiaoxin; Wang, Shiwei; Yu, Weizhi; Yu, Deqin; Zhao, Dan; Sun, Yiping; Deng, Wuguo; Tang, Yiyuan; Yin, Shengming

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that social isolation stress could be a key factor that leads to cognitive deficit for both humans and rodent models. However, detailed mechanisms are not yet clear. ADAR1 (Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) is an enzyme involved in RNA editing that has a close relation to cognitive function. We have hypothesized that social isolation stress may impact the expression of ADAR1 in the brain of mice with cognitive deficit. To test our hypothesis, we evaluated the cognition ability of mice isolated for different durations (2, 4, and 8 weeks) using object recognition and object location tests; we also measured ADAR1 expression in hippocampus and cortex using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Our study showed that social isolation stress induced spatial and non-spatial cognition deficits of the tested mice. In addition, social isolation significantly increased both the immunoreactivity and protein expression of ADAR1 (p110) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Furthermore, re-socialization could not only recover the cognition deficits, but also bring ADAR1 (p110) immunoreactivity of hippocampus and frontal cortex, as well as ADAR1 (p110) protein expression of hippocampus back to the normal level for the isolated mice in adolescence. In conclusion, social isolation stress significantly increases ADAR1 (p110) expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the mice with cognitive deficit. This finding may open a window to better understand the reasons (e.g., epigenetic change) that are responsible for social isolation-induced cognitive deficit and help the development of novel therapies for the resulted diseases. PMID:27602277

  10. The period ratio P1/P2 of torsional Alfvén waves with steady flows in spicules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadi, H.; Shahmorad, S.; Vasheghani Farahani, S.

    2016-04-01

    The aim here is to model the standing torsional oscillations in solar spicules in the presence of density stratification, magnetic field expansion, and steady flows. By implementing cylindrical geometry, the eigenfrequencies, eigenfunctions, and the period ratio P1/P2 of these waves is obtained for finite plasma-β. The shifts created by the steady flow justifies the divergence of the observed period ratio for the first and second periods from the number 2.

  11. Regulation of the micromechanical properties of pulmonary endothelium by S1P and thrombin: role of cortactin.

    PubMed

    Arce, Fernando Terán; Whitlock, Jenny L; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G; Arnsdorf, Morton F; Lal, Ratnesh; Garcia, Joe G N; Dudek, Steven M

    2008-07-01

    Disruption of pulmonary endothelial cell (EC) barrier function is a critical pathophysiologic event in highly morbid inflammatory conditions such as sepsis and acute respiratory disease stress syndrome. Actin cytoskeleton, an essential regulator of endothelial permeability, is a dynamic structure whose stimuli-induced rearrangement is linked to barrier modulation. Here, we used atomic force microscopy to characterize structural and mechanical changes in the F-actin cytoskeleton of cultured human pulmonary artery EC in response to both barrier-enhancing (induced by sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)) and barrier-disrupting (induced by thrombin) conditions. Atomic force microscopy elasticity measurements show differential effects: for the barrier protecting molecule S1P, the elastic modulus was elevated significantly on the periphery; for the barrier-disrupting molecule thrombin, on the other hand, it was elevated significantly in the