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Sample records for 1p loh 19q

  1. Shared allelic losses on chromosomes 1p and 19q suggest a common origin of oligodendroglioma and oligoastrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, J.A.; Koopmann, J.; Kaskel, P.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in specific chromosomal regions, which are likely to harbor tumor suppressor genes, has been associated with human gliomas. In this study we have analyzed astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors for LOH on chromosomes 1 and 19. By microsatellite analysis LOH was found on chromosome arm 1p in 6/15 oligodendrogliomas WHO grade II and III, 12/25 oligoastrocytomas WHO grade II and III, 6/79 glioblastomas WHO grade IV, 5/44 astrocytomas WHO grade II and III and 0/23 pilocystic astrocytomas WHO grade I. The high incidence of LOH on chromosome arm 1p in oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas indicates that a putative tumor suppressor gene in this region is involved in the formation of gliomas with oligodendroglial features. Furthermore, the frequent involvement of chromosome arm 1p in oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas, but not in astrocytomas, suggests that genetically oligoastrocytoma is more similar to oligodendroglioma than to astrocytoma. In order to support this hypothesis, oligodendroglial and astrocytic areas in three mixed oligoastrocytomas were examined differentially for LOH 1p and for LOH 19q, the second genetic region believed to be affected in these tumors. All three tumors had LOH of 1p and LOH of 19q in both areas of oligodendroglial and of astrocytic differentiation. These findings show that the astrocytic and oligodendroglial portions of oligoastrocytoma share molecular genetic features and probably are of monoclonal origin. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Calcification on CT is a simple and valuable preoperative indicator of 1p/19q loss of heterozygosity in supratentorial brain tumors that are suspected grade II and III gliomas.

    PubMed

    Saito, Taiichi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Komori, Takashi; Tamura, Manabu; Nitta, Masayuki; Tsuzuki, Shunsuke; Kawamata, Takakazu

    2016-07-01

    Gliomas with 1p/19q loss of heterozygosity (LOH) are known to be associated with longer patient survival and higher sensitivity to treatment than tumors without 1p/19q LOH. This study was designed to clarify whether the preoperative finding of calcification on CT was correlated with 1p/19q LOH in patients with suspected WHO grade II and III gliomas. This study included 250 adult patients who underwent resection for primary supratentorial tumors at Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital. The tumors were suspected, based on MRI findings, to be WHO grade II or III gliomas. The presence of calcification on the patients' CT images was qualitatively evaluated before treatment. After surgery, the resected tumors were examined to determine their 1p/19q status and mutations of IDH1 and p53. The presence of calcification was significantly correlated with 1p/19q LOH (P < 0.0001), with a positive predictive value of 91 %. The tumors of all the 78 patients with calcification were diagnosed as oligodendroglial tumors. Seventy of these patients showed classic oligodendroglial features, while 8 patients showed non-classic features. Calcification on CT is a simple and valuable preoperative indicator of 1p/19q LOH in supratentorial brain tumors that are suspected to be WHO grade II and III gliomas. PMID:26849373

  3. 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangements in small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hongyang; Xu, Haimiao; Xie, Fajun; Qin, Jing; Han, Na; Fan, Yun; Mao, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is poor despite reports suggesting modest improvement in survival. To date, chemotherapy remains the cornerstone treatment for SCLC patients, and many studies have focused on identifying the molecular characteristics of SCLC, which serve as the basis for precision treatments that improve the prognosis of SCLC. For instance, the therapeutic effect of temozolomide, recommended for patients with relapsed SCLC, is linked to 1p/19q codeletion in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors. A subpopulation of SCLC patients may derive benefit from tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting RET. In order to identify 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangement in SCLC patients, 32 SCLC resected specimens were retrospectively collected between 2008 and 2014 from the Zhejiang Cancer Hospital in People’s Republic of China. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to detect 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangement in the specimens. A 1p single deletion was detected in eight specimens, 19q single deletion was detected in three specimens, and only three specimens had a 1p/19q codeletion. None of the specimens had a RET rearrangement. The three patients whose specimens had a 1p/19q codeletion were alive after 58, 50, and 30 months of follow-up care. There was a trend toward prolonged overall survival for the patients with codeletion compared to no codeletion, 1p single deletion, 19q single deletion, and without 1p and 19q deletion (P=0.113, 0.168, 0.116, and 0.122, respectively). Our data showed that RET rearrangement may be not an ideal molecular target for SCLC therapies in People’s Republic of China. Instead, 1p/19q codeletion is a promising marker for a good prognosis and treatment with temozolomide in SCLC. PMID:27366094

  4. Diagnostic Detection of Allelic Losses and Imbalances by Next-Generation Sequencing: 1p/19q Co-Deletion Analysis of Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Dubbink, Hendrikus J; Atmodimedjo, Peggy N; van Marion, Ronald; Krol, Niels M G; Riegman, Peter H J; Kros, Johan M; van den Bent, Martin J; Dinjens, Winand N M

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cells are genomically unstable and accumulate tumor type-specific molecular aberrations, which may represent hallmarks for predicting prognosis and targets for therapy. Co-deletion of chromosomes 1p and 19q marks gliomas with an oligodendroglioma component and predicts a better prognosis and response to chemotherapy. In the current study, we present a novel method to detect chromosome 1p/19q co-deletion or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in a diagnostic setting, based on single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS). We selected highly polymorphic SNPs distributed evenly over both chromosome arms. To experimentally determine the sensitivity and specificity of targeted SNP analysis, we used DNAs extracted from 49 routine formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded glioma tissues and compared the outcome with diagnostic microsatellite-based LOH analysis and calculated estimates. We show that targeted SNP analysis by NGS allows reliable detection of 1p and/or 19q deletion in a background of 70% of normal cells according to calculated outcomes, is more sensitive than microsatellite-based LOH analysis, and requires much less DNA. This specific and sensitive SNP assay is broadly applicable for simultaneous allelic imbalance analysis of multiple genomic regions and can be incorporated easily into NGS mutation analyses. The combined mutation and chromosomal imbalance analysis in a single NGS assay is suited perfectly for routine glioma diagnostics and other diagnostic molecular pathology applications. PMID:27461031

  5. P17.01CHROMOSOME ARM 9P LOSS OF HETEROZYGOSITY IS A MARKER OF SHORTER SURVIVAL IN 1P/19Q CO-DELETED ANAPLASTIC OLIGODENDROGLIOMA. A POLA NETWORK STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Alentorn, A.; Dehais, C.; Carpentier, C.; Mokhtari, K.; Ducray, F.; Figarella-Branger, D.; Delattre, J.; Idbaih, A.; (POLA)”, POLA Network “Prise en charge des OLigodendrogliomes Anaplasiques

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic or WHO grade III oligodendrogliomas (AO) are a heterogeneous subgroup of diffuse glial tumors in adults. Three major histomolecular subtypes with clinical relevance have been individualized: (i) 1p/19q co-deleted AO -80% of cases-, (ii) non 1p/19q co-deleted and IDH mutated AO -10% of cases- and (iii) non 1p/19q co-deleted and IDH wild-typeAO -10% of cases-. 1p/19q co-deleted AO, and to a lesser extent IDH mutated AO, have better prognosis and better response to treatment with a median survival of more than 10 years, as shown in two phase III international trials. We have recently shown that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in chromosome arm 9p, with copy number loss -CL LOH- or without -Copy Neutral LOH- is a frequent event in AO. Interestingly, 9p CN LOH, inducing gene under-expression, has biological significance. In the present study, we address the prognostic value of 9p loss in 1p/19q co-deleted AO. In the present study, 228 AO exhibiting 1p/19q co-deletion were included. All tumors were centrally reviewed in the setting of the French national network for high-grade oligodendroglial tumors (POLA network) that recruits prospectively newly diagnosed anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors. Tumor DNA was analyzed using high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis. In the entire series, 70/228 (1/3) harbored 9p loss including CN-LOH, homozygous loss or CL-LOH. 9p loss was associated with a worse prognosis in 1p19q co-deleted AO in univariate analysis (3-years OS of 98% vs. 74%, p < 0.001) whereas PFS at three years was not significantly different (3-years PFS of 88% vs. 66% p = 0.1). After adjustment for age, KPS, and treatment, multivariate analysis demonstrated 9p loss to be an independent prognostic factor for OS, p-value = 0.03, HR = 4.9 [1.2-16], but not for PFS. 1p19q co-deleted AO harboring 9p loss have shorter overall survival compared to their non 9p-lost counterparts in this prospective cohort. Further studies are needed to validate

  6. Molecular imaging of 1p/19q deletion in oligodendroglial tumours with 11C-methionine positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Iwadate, Yasuo; Shinozaki, Natsuki; Matsutani, Tomoo; Uchino, Yoshio; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chromosome 1p/19q deletion is an established prognostic and predictive marker in the WHO grade III oligodendroglial tumours (OT). To estimate the genetic status preoperatively, the authors investigated the correlation between the uptake of 11C-methionine in positron emission tomography (PET) and the 1p/19q status in grades II and III OT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 144 patients with gliomas who received 11C-methionine PET. 66 cases with grades II–III oligodendrogliomas or oligoastrocytomas underwent fluorescence in situ hybridisation to determine the 1p/19q status. The tissue uptake of 11C-methionine was expressed as the ratio of the maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) in tumour areas to the mean SUV (SUVmean) in the contralateral normal brain (tumour-to-normal tissue (T/N) ratio). Results The T/N ratio in 11C-methionine PET was significantly higher in grade III OT than in grade II tumours. The mean T/N ratio of the grade II tumours without 1p/19q deletion was significantly higher than that of the grade II tumours with 1p/19q deletion (mean 2.67 vs 1.94, respectively; p=0.0457). In grade III tumours, the mean T/N ratio of the tumours without 1p/19q deletion was also significantly higher than that of the tumours with 1p/19q deletion (mean 4.83 vs 3.49, respectively; p=0.0261). The rate of IDH1 mutation was lower and the rate of contrast enhancement on MRIs was higher in the 1p/19q non-deleted OT than those with 1p/19q deletion, which may contribute to the high T/N ratio. Conclusions Among suspected OT, 11C-methionine PET may help us preoperatively discriminate tumours with and without 1p/19q deletion. PMID:26848169

  7. 1p/19q-driven prognostic molecular classification for high-grade oligodendroglial tumors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haihui; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Xiaohui; Zeng, Wei; Jia, Wenqing; Wang, Junmei; Lin, Song

    2014-12-01

    The subjectivity in pathological diagnosis of anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) and uncertainty in designation of glioblastoma with oligodendroglioma component (GBMO) were two major dilemmas which puzzled neuro-pathologists and neurosurgeons. The present study was designed to project a molecular classification scheme based on the status of chromosome 1p and 19q. Patients (n = 117) with histological diagnosis of primary high-grade oligodendroglial tumors (HGOs) enrolled in the study. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosomes 1p and 19q was performed. Univariate analysis showed that higher tumor grade, 1p/19q maintenance and 1q/19p co polysomy were confirmed as risk factors in HGOs (P < 0.01). Accordingly, patients with HGOs were divided into four subtypes which conferred remarkably distinct prognosis based on the number of risk factors (0 risk factor: HGOs-1, 1 risk factor: HGOs-2, 2 risk factors: HGOs-3, 3 risk factors: HGOs-4). Cox regression model revealed that the tumor grade was no longer independently associated with survival, while the molecular classification scheme showed a marked prognostic significance (HR = 0.359, 95 % CI 0.261-0.494, P < 0.001 for progression-free survival (PFS); HR = 0.393, 95 % CI 0.283-0.546, P < 0.001 for overall survival (OS)). The classification scheme incorporating traditional pathology with molecular information can be served as a supplement of the current WHO classification system and contribute to the personalized treatment decision-making. PMID:25151507

  8. IDH mutation, 1p19q codeletion and ATRX loss in WHO grade II gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Leeper, Heather E.; Caron, Alissa A.; Decker, Paul A.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Giannini, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Background Epigenetic, genetic, and molecular studies have identified several diagnostic and prognostic markers in diffuse gliomas. Their importance for evaluating WHO grade II gliomas has yet to be specifically delineated. Methods We analyzed markers, including IDH mutation(IDHmut), 1p19q codeletion(1p19qcodel), ATRX expression loss(ATRX loss) and p53 overexpression, and outcomes in 159 patients with WHO grade II oligodendroglioma, oligoastrocytoma, and astrocytoma (2003–2012). Results IDHmut was found in 141(91%) and ATRX loss in 64(87%) of IDHmut-noncodel tumors (p = 0.003). All codeleted tumors (n = 66) were IDHmut. Four subgroups were identified: IDHmut-codel, 66(43%); IDHmut-noncodel-ATRX loss, 60(39%); IDHmut-noncodel-ATRXwt, 9(6%); IDHwt, 14(9%). Median survival among 4 groups was significantly different (p = 0.038), particularly in IDHmut-codel (median survival 15.6 years) compared to the remaining 3 groups (p = 0.025). Survival by histology was not significant. Overall (OS), but not progression-free (PFS), survival was significantly longer with gross total resection vs. biopsy only (p = 0.042). Outcomes for patients with subtotal resection were not significantly different from those with biopsy only. Among these uniformly treated patients, OS far exceeds PFS, particularly in those with 1p/19q codeletion. Conclusions For WHO grade II diffuse glioma, molecular classification using 1p/19qcodel, IDHmut, and ATRX loss more accurately predicts outcome and should be incorporated in the neuropathologic evaluation. PMID:26210286

  9. Glioma Groups Based on 1p/19q, IDH, and TERT Promoter Mutations in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Decker, Paul A.; Sicotte, Hugues; Pekmezci, Melike; Rice, Terri; Kosel, Matt L.; Smirnov, Ivan V.; Sarkar, Gobinda; Caron, Alissa A.; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; Praska, Corinne E.; Chada, Anisha R.; Halder, Chandralekha; Hansen, Helen M.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Bracci, Paige M.; Marshall, Roxanne; Zheng, Shichun; Reis, Gerald F.; Pico, Alexander R.; O’Neill, Brian P.; Buckner, Jan C.; Giannini, Caterina; Huse, Jason T.; Perry, Arie; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchell S.; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.; Wiemels, Joseph; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Jenkins, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prediction of clinical behavior, response to therapy, and outcome of infiltrative glioma is challenging. On the basis of previous studies of tumor biology, we defined five glioma molecular groups with the use of three alterations: mutations in the TERT promoter, mutations in IDH, and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion). We tested the hypothesis that within groups based on these features, tumors would have similar clinical variables, acquired somatic alterations, and germline variants. METHODS We scored tumors as negative or positive for each of these markers in 1087 gliomas and compared acquired alterations and patient characteristics among the five primary molecular groups. Using 11,590 controls, we assessed associations between these groups and known glioma germline variants. RESULTS Among 615 grade II or III gliomas, 29% had all three alterations (i.e., were triplepositive), 5% had TERT and IDH mutations, 45% had only IDH mutations, 7% were triple-negative, and 10% had only TERT mutations; 5% had other combinations. Among 472 grade IV gliomas, less than 1% were triple-positive, 2% had TERT and IDH mutations, 7% had only IDH mutations, 17% were triple-negative, and 74% had only TERT mutations. The mean age at diagnosis was lowest (37 years) among patients who had gliomas with only IDH mutations and was highest (59 years) among patients who had gliomas with only TERT mutations. The molecular groups were independently associated with overall survival among patients with grade II or III gliomas but not among patients with grade IV gliomas. The molecular groups were associated with specific germline variants. CONCLUSIONS Gliomas were classified into five principal groups on the basis of three tumor markers. The groups had different ages at onset, overall survival, and associations with germline variants, which implies that they are characterized by distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:26061753

  10. Integrated multi-omics analysis of oligodendroglial tumours identifies three subgroups of 1p/19q co-deleted gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kamoun, Aurélie; Idbaih, Ahmed; Dehais, Caroline; Elarouci, Nabila; Carpentier, Catherine; Letouzé, Eric; Colin, Carole; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Sanson, Marc; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Ducray, François; Adam, Clovis; Andraud, Marie; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Bauchet, Luc; Beauchesne, Patrick; Bielle, Franck; Blechet, Claire; Campone, Mario; Carpentier, Antoine F.; Carpiuc, Ioana; Cazals-Hatem, Dominique; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Chiforeanu, Danchristian; Chinot, Olivier; Cohen-Moyal, Elisabeth; Colin, Philippe; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Desenclos, Christine; Desse, Nicolas; Dhermain, Frederic; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Eimer, Sandrine; Faillot, Thierry; Fesneau, Mélanie; Fontaine, Denys; Gaillard, Stéphane; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Gaultier, Claude; Ghiringhelli, François; Godard, Joel; Gueye, Edouard Marcel; Guillamo, Jean Sebastien; Hamdi-Elouadhani, Selma; Honnorat, Jerome; Kemeny, Jean Louis; Khallil, Toufik; Labrousse, François; Langlois, Olivier; Laquerriere, Annie; Larrieu-Ciron, Delphine; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Guérinel, Caroline Le; Levillain, Pierre-Marie; Loiseau, Hugues; Loussouarn, Delphine; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Menei, Philippe; Motsuo Fotso, Marie Janette; Noel, Georges; Parker, Fabrice; Peoc'h, Michel; Polivka, Marc; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Ramirez, Carole; Ricard, Damien; Richard, Pomone; Rigau, Valérie; Rousseau, Audrey; Runavot, Gwenaelle; Sevestre, Henri; Tortel, Marie Christine; Vandenbos, Fanny; Vauleon, Elodie; Viennet, Gabriel; Villa, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendroglial tumours (OT) are a heterogeneous group of gliomas. Three molecular subgroups are currently distinguished on the basis of the IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion. Here we present an integrated analysis of the transcriptome, genome and methylome of 156 OT. Not only does our multi-omics classification match the current classification but also reveals three subgroups within 1p/19q co-deleted tumours, associated with specific expression patterns of nervous system cell types: oligodendrocyte, oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) and neuronal lineage. We confirm the validity of these three subgroups using public datasets. Importantly, the OPC-like group is associated with more aggressive clinical and molecular patterns, including MYC activation. We show that the MYC activation occurs through various alterations, including MYC genomic gain, MAX genomic loss, MYC hypomethylation and microRNA-34b/c down-regulation. In the lower grade glioma TCGA dataset, the OPC-like group is associated with a poorer outcome independently of histological grade. Our study reveals previously unrecognized heterogeneity among 1p/19q co-deleted tumours. PMID:27090007

  11. Integrated multi-omics analysis of oligodendroglial tumours identifies three subgroups of 1p/19q co-deleted gliomas.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Aurélie; Idbaih, Ahmed; Dehais, Caroline; Elarouci, Nabila; Carpentier, Catherine; Letouzé, Eric; Colin, Carole; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Sanson, Marc; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Ducray, François

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendroglial tumours (OT) are a heterogeneous group of gliomas. Three molecular subgroups are currently distinguished on the basis of the IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion. Here we present an integrated analysis of the transcriptome, genome and methylome of 156 OT. Not only does our multi-omics classification match the current classification but also reveals three subgroups within 1p/19q co-deleted tumours, associated with specific expression patterns of nervous system cell types: oligodendrocyte, oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) and neuronal lineage. We confirm the validity of these three subgroups using public datasets. Importantly, the OPC-like group is associated with more aggressive clinical and molecular patterns, including MYC activation. We show that the MYC activation occurs through various alterations, including MYC genomic gain, MAX genomic loss, MYC hypomethylation and microRNA-34b/c down-regulation. In the lower grade glioma TCGA dataset, the OPC-like group is associated with a poorer outcome independently of histological grade. Our study reveals previously unrecognized heterogeneity among 1p/19q co-deleted tumours. PMID:27090007

  12. P64QUANTITATIVE MGMT METHYLATION ANALYSIS BY PYROSEQUENCING REVEALS A STRONG CORRELATION BETWEEN 1P/19Q CO-DELETION AND HIGH LEVEL METHYLATION IN HIGH GRADE GLIOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Laxton, R.; Doey, L.; Aizpurua, M.; Bodi, I.; King, A.; Chandler, C.; Bhangoo, R.; Beaney, R.; Brazil, L.; Ashkan, K.; Al-Sarraj, S.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Pyrosequencing is a method that allows MGMT methylation to be measured in a quantitative manner. MGMT methylation, along with 1p/19q co-deletion and IDH1 mutation, is an important biomarker in high grade gliomas. MGMT methylation indicates an improved response to temozolomide chemotherapy; patients with 1p/19q co-deleted anaplastic oligodendrogliomas benefit from the addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy. Aim: To compare the average MGMT promoter methylation level of high grade gliomas and correlate it with other clinical parameters and markers including IDH1&2 mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion. METHOD: For 171 high grade gliomas MGMT methylation analysis was performed by pyrosequencing, mutations to IDH1 and IDH2 genes were also detected by pyrosequencing, or immunohistochemistry (n = 166). Screening for 1p/19q deletion was by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (n = 46). Statistical analysis was performed using R-Stats v2.15.2. RESULTS: The results show that higher methylation was correlated with lower grade and mutation to either IDH1 or IDH2 (27.0% vs. 16.6% p = 0.008; and 27.5 vs. 16.1 p = 0.002 respectively). Interestingly 1p/19q co-deletion versus non co-deletion was associated with a particularly high level of methylation (42.2% vs. 17.7% p = 0.001). No significant differences were seen for age or gender. CONCLUSION: The results offer a potential explanation for the improved prognosis seen in glioma patients with 1p/19q co-deletion and when combined with IDH mutation status may provide an extra control to confirm true 1p/19q co-deletion.

  13. Analysis of IDH mutation, 1p/19q deletion, and PTEN loss delineates prognosis in clinical low-grade diffuse gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Sabha, Nesrin; Knobbe, Christiane B.; Maganti, Majula; Al Omar, Soha; Bernstein, Mark; Cairns, Rob; Çako, Besmira; von Deimling, Andreas; Capper, David; Mak, Tak W.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Carvalho, Philippe; Garrett, Evelyn; Perry, Arie; Zadeh, Gelareh; Guha, Abhijit; Croul, Sidney

    2014-01-01

    Background Grades II and III gliomas have unpredictable rates of progression, making management decisions difficult. Currently, several clinical and radiological characteristics are utilized to predict progression and survival but collectively are suboptimal. Methods In this study, we analyzed a set of 108 nonenhancing hemispheric grade II–III gliomas. Demographic variables, including patient age, tumor diameter, extent of resection, and performance status, were combined with molecular data (IDH mutation status [mIDH], 1p/19q codeletion, PTEN deletion, and EGFR amplification). A complete dataset for all variables was compiled for 70 of the 108 patients. Both univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to determine whether the molecular data singly or in combination offer advantages over tumor type and grade for prediction of overall survival (OS) and/or progression-free rate (PFR). Results Patient age, clinical variables (tumor diameter, extent of resection, performance status), and pathology (tumor type and grade) were not predictive of OS or PFR. IDH mutation status alone was predictive of longer OS and PFR for the entire group of tumors; 1p/19q deletion alone was predictive of OS but not PFR. In the multivariable analysis, none of the clinical or demographic factors were predictive of OS or PFR. IDH mutation status, 1p/19q codeletion, and PTEN deletion were predictive of OS (P = .003, P = .005, P = .02, respectively). Both mIDH (P < .001) and the interaction term of 1p/19q and PTEN (P < .001) were found to be predictive of PFR. Conclusions We conclude that the combination of mIDH, 1p/19q codeletion, and PTEN deletion may be particularly effective in discriminating good prognosis from poor prognosis hemispheric gliomas. We propose that such a scheme merits testing on larger prospective cohorts. Should our findings be confirmed, routine clinical analysis of hemispheric gliomas for mIDH, 1p/19q codeletion, and PTEN deletion would be justified. PMID

  14. Contrast enhancement in 1p/19q-codeleted anaplastic oligodendrogliomas is associated with 9p loss, genomic instability, and angiogenic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Botero, German; Dehais, Caroline; Idbaih, Ahmed; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Lahutte, Marion; Carpentier, Catherine; Letouzé, Eric; Chinot, Olivier; Loiseau, Hugues; Honnorat, Jerome; Ramirez, Carole; Moyal, Elisabeth; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Ducray, François; Desenclos, Christine; Sevestre, Henri; Menei, Philippe; Michalak, Sophie; Al Nader, Edmond; Godard, Joel; Viennet, Gabriel; Carpentier, Antoine; Eimer, Sandrine; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Verrelle, Pierre; Faillot, Thierry; Gaultier, Claude; Tortel, Marie Christine; Christov, Christo; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Ghiringhelli, Francois; Berger, François; Lacroix, Catherine; Parker, Fabrice; Dubois, François; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Gueye, Edouard-Marcel; Labrousse, Francois; Jouvet, Anne; Bauchet, Luc; Rigau, Valérie; Beauchesne, Patrick; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Campone, Mario; Loussouarn, Delphine; Fontaine, Denys; Vandenbos, Fanny; Campello, Chantal; Roger, Pascal; Fesneau, Melanie; Heitzmann, Anne; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Elouadhani, Selma; Mokhtari, Karima; Polivka, Marc; Ricard, Damien; Levillain, Pierre-Marie; Wager, Michel; Colin, Philippe; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Chiforeanu, Dan; Vauleon, Elodie; Langlois, Olivier; Laquerriere, Annie; Motsuo Fotso, Marie Janette; Peoc'h, Michel; Andraud, Marie; Mouton, Servane; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Noel, Georges; Desse, Nicolas; Soulard, Raoulin; Amiel-Benouaich, Alexandra; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Dhermain, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to correlate MRI features and molecular characteristics in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs). Methods The MRI characteristics of 50 AO patients enrolled in the French national network for high-grade oligodendroglial tumors were analyzed. The genomic profiles and IDH mutational statuses were assessed using high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and direct sequencing, respectively. The gene expression profiles of 25 1p/19q-codeleted AOs were studied on Affymetrix expression arrays. Results Most of the cases were frontal lobe contrast-enhanced tumors (52%), but the radiological presentations of these cases were heterogeneous, ranging from low-grade glioma-like aspects (26%) to glioblastoma-like aspects (22%). The 1p/19q codeletion (n = 39) was associated with locations in the frontal lobe (P = .001), with heterogeneous intratumoral signal intensities (P = .003) and with no or nonmeasurable contrast enhancements (P = .01). The IDH wild-type AOs (n = 7) more frequently displayed ringlike contrast enhancements (P = .03) and were more frequently located outside of the frontal lobe (P = .01). However, no specific imaging pattern could be identified for the 1p/19q-codeleted AO or the IDH-mutated AO. Within the 1p/19q-codeleted AO, the contrast enhancement was associated with larger tumor volumes (P = .001), chromosome 9p loss and CDKN2A loss (P = .006), genomic instability (P = .03), and angiogenesis-related gene expression (P < .001), particularly for vascular endothelial growth factor A and angiopoietin 2. Conclusion In AOs, the 1p/19q codeletion and the IDH mutation are associated with preferential (but not with specific) imaging characteristics. Within 1p/19q-codeleted AO, imaging heterogeneity is related to additional molecular alterations, especially chromosome 9p loss, which is associated with contrast enhancement and larger tumor volume. PMID:24353325

  15. Impact of 1p/19q Codeletion and Histology on Outcomes of Anaplastic Gliomas Treated With Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide

    SciTech Connect

    Speirs, Christina K.; Simpson, Joseph R.; Robinson, Clifford G.; DeWees, Todd A.; Tran, David D.; Linette, Gerry; Chicoine, Michael R.; Dacey, Ralph G.; Rich, Keith M.; Dowling, Joshua L.; Leuthardt, Eric C.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Kim, Albert H.; Huang, Jiayi

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Anaplastic gliomas represent a heterogeneous group of primary high-grade brain tumors, and the optimal postoperative treatment remains controversial. In this report, we present our institutional data on the clinical outcomes of radiation therapy (RT) plus temozolomide (RT + TMZ) for anaplastic gliomas, stratified by histology and 1p/19q codeletion. Methods and Materials: A single-institution retrospective review was conducted of patients with supratentorial anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO), mixed anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA), and anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). After surgery, RT was delivered at a median total dose of 60 Gy (range, 31.6-63 Gy) in daily fractions. All patients received standard concurrent TMZ, with or without adjuvant TMZ. Histological/molecular subtypes were defined as codeleted AO/AOA, non-codeleted AO/AOA, and AA. Results: From 2000 to 2012, 111 cases met study criteria and were evaluable. Codeleted AO/AOA had superior overall survival (OS) to non-codeleted AO/AOA (91% vs 68% at 5 years, respectively, P=.02), whereas progression-free survival (PFS) was not significantly different (70% vs 46% at 5 years, respectively, P=.10). AA had inferior OS to non-codeleted AO/AOA (37% vs 68% at 5 years, respectively, P=.007) and inferior PFS (27% vs 46%, respectively, P=.03). On multivariate analysis, age, performance status, and histological or molecular subtype were independent predictors for both PFS and OS. Compared to historical controls, RT + TMZ provided comparable OS to RT with procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (RT + PCV) for codeleted AO/AOA, superior OS to RT alone for non-codeleted AO/AOA, and similar OS to RT alone for AA. Conclusions: RT + TMZ may be a promising treatment for both codeleted and non-codeleted AO/AOA, but its role for AA remains unclear.

  16. Identification of a novel population in high-grade oligodendroglial tumors not deleted on 1p/19q using array CGH.

    PubMed

    Talagas, Matthieu; Marcorelles, Pascale; Uguen, Arnaud; Redon, Sylvia; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Costa, Sebastian; Férec, Claude; Morel, Frédéric; Hieu, Phong Dam; De Braekeleer, Marc

    2012-09-01

    Oligodendroglial tumors (ODTs) are primary tumors of the central nervous system that show recurrent codeletion of whole chromosome arms 1p and 19q. Non-1p/19q-deleted high-grade ODTs can present other genetic aberrations, CDKN2A deletion (9p21.3), EGFR amplification (7p11.2) and/or chromosome 10 loss, which are associated with a poor prognosis. The identification of these abnormalities allowed drafting a histo-molecular classification. The aim of this study was to precisely identify, using array CGH, the genomic hallmarks of these tumors, particularly those that are not deleted on 1p/19q. We studied 14 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded high-grade ODTs using pangenomic oligonucleotide array CGH with an average resolution of 22.3 kb. The 1p/19q codeletion was found in five anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. The three genomic aberrations carrying a poor prognosis were found, most often associated, in five out of nine tumors not deleted on 1p/19q. In addition, four recurrent copy number alterations, involving genes that participate to cell growth and cycle, were found to be strongly associated in five tumors not deleted on 1p/19q: gain or amplification at 1q32.1 (MDM4, PIK3C2B genes), 12q14.1 (CDK4 gene), 12q14.3-q15 (MDM2 gene) and homozygous deletion at 22q13.1 (APOBEC3B gene). MDM2, MDM4, CDK4 and PIK3C2B are known for potentially being amplified or overexpressed in high-grade gliomas. However, the involvement of APOBEC3B, coding for mRNA edition enzyme, is described here for the first time. Our results show a strong association between these four alterations. Therefore, this can open a perspective for a novel subgroup in high-grade ODTs not deleted on 1p/19q. PMID:22825724

  17. Glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands (GTNI): a report of 8 cases with chromosome 1p/19q deletion analysis.

    PubMed

    Barbashina, Violetta; Salazar, Paulo; Ladanyi, Marc; Rosenblum, Marc K; Edgar, Mark A

    2007-08-01

    Glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands (GTNI) is a rare neoplasm harboring circumscribed loci of neuronal differentiation and diffusely infiltrating astroglial and oligodendrocytelike components. We report 8 previously unpublished examples of GTNI, specifically studied for chromosome 1p and 19q allelic losses. All tumors showed characteristic histologic features and immunoprofile. One primary tumor displayed frankly malignant histology with frequent mitoses, microvascular proliferation, and necrosis. This tumor progressed within months of the initial resection. Three other tumors (2 low-grade and 1 showing only focal microvascular proliferation) recurred at 2 years, 3 years, and 1 year, respectively. All cases were evaluated for 1p/19q allelic losses by standard polymerase chain reaction-based loss of heterozygosity assays. No evidence of 1p/19q losses was found in 7 of 8 tumors. One tumor demonstrated small interstitial deletions at 1p36 (at D1S1612 and D1S513, but not at D1S548 or D1S1592) and a small interstitial deletion at 19q13 (at D19S219 and D19S412, but not at PLA2G4C). The lack of large, whole-arm 1p/19q losses (such as those found in oligodendroglial tumors), aberrant p53 expression, and the predominance of astroglial components may indicate a biologic relationship of the GTNI to diffuse astrocytoma. Although GTNI shares some morphologic features with recently reported cases of oligodendroglioma with neurocytic differentiation, the 2 tumors appear different at the molecular genetic level. PMID:17667543

  18. Mitotic index, microvascular proliferation, and necrosis define 3 groups of 1p/19q codeleted anaplastic oligodendrogliomas associated with different genomic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Mokhtari, Karima; Dehais, Caroline; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Colin, Carole; Carpentier, Catherine; Forest, Fabien; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Polivka, Marc; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Eimer, Sandrine; Viennet, Gabriel; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Loussouarn, Delphine; Lacroix, Catherine; Rigau, Valérie; Laquerrière, Annie; Vandenbos, Fanny; Michalak, Sophie; Sevestre, Henri; Peoch, Michel; Labrousse, François; Christov, Christo; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Chiforeanu, Danchristian; Ducray, François; Idbaih, Ahmed; Desenclos, Christine; Menei, Philippe; Al Nader, Edmond; Godard, Joel; Servagi-Vernat, Stéphanie; Carpentier, Antoine; Loiseau, Hugues; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Guillamo, Jean Sebastien; Emery, Evelyne; Verelle, Pierre; Durando, Xavier; Faillot, Thierry; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Ghiringhelli, François; Parker, Fabrice; Adam, Clovis; Dubois, François; Ramirez, Carole; Gueye, Edouard Marcel; Honnorat, Jerome; Chinot, Olivier; Bauchet, Luc; Beauchesne, Patrick; Campone, Mario; Frenel, Jean Sébastien; Fontaine, Denys; Campello, Chantal; Roger, Pascal; Heitzmann, Anne; Fesneau, Mélanie; Delattre, Jean Yves; Elouadhani-Hamdi, Selma; Ricard, Damien; Colin, Philippe; Vauléon, Elodie; Langlois, Olivier; Fotso, Marie Janette Motsuo; Andraud, Marie; Mouton, Servane; Noel, Georges; Desse, Nicolas; Soulard, Raoulin; Cohen-Moyal, Elisabeth; Lubrano, Vincent; Dhermain, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to correlate histological features and molecular characteristics in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs). Methods The histological characteristics of 203 AO patients, enrolled in the French national network POLA, were analyzed. The genomic profiles of 191 cases were studied using genomic arrays. IDH mutational status was assessed by immunohistochemistry and direct sequencing. Results 1p/19q codeletion was present in 79% of cases and was associated with alpha-internexin expression (P < 10−4), IDH1/2 mutation (P < 10−4), chromosome 4 loss (P < 10−3), and better overall survival (P < 10−4). Based on mitotic index, microvascular proliferation (MVP), and necrosis, 3 groups of 1p/19q codeleted AOs were identified: (group 1) AO with more than 5 mitoses per 10-HPF, no MVP, and no necrosis; (group 2) AO with MVP and no necrosis; and (group 3) AO with MVP and necrosis. Compared with group 1, groups 2 and 3 AOs had a higher mean Ki-67 proliferation index and a higher rate of 9p and 9q losses. Compared with group 2, group 3 AOs had a higher number of chromosomal alterations including chromosome 4 loss. In the subgroup of 157 1p/19q codeleted AOs, chromosomal instability was associated with shorter progression-free survival (P = .024) and shorter overall survival (P = .023). Conclusions The present study shows that oligodendrogliomas with classic histological features remain a molecularly heterogeneous entity and should be stratified according to 1p/19q status because of its major prognostic relevance. Moreover, 1p/19q codeleted AOs are also heterogeneous. Interestingly, mitotic index, MVP, and necrosis help to classify them into 3 groups associated with distinct genomic alterations. PMID:24723566

  19. [Diagnostic and prognostic values of 1p and 19q deletions in adult gliomas: critical review of the literature and implications in daily clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Fontaine, D; Vandenbos, F; Lebrun, C; Paquis, V; Frenay, M

    2008-01-01

    Losses of chromosomes 1p and 19q are deemed correlated with diagnosis of oligodendroglioma, higher chemosensitivity and better prognosis. We reviewed the literature to evaluate the usefulness of these correlations in daily clinical practice. The rates of deletions relative to histology (WHO classifications) were extracted from 33 studies, including 2666 patients. The 1p deletions and 1p19q codeletion mean rates were respectively 65.4 and 63.3% in oligodendrogliomas, 28.7 and 21.6% in oligoastrocytomas, 13.2 and 7.5% in astrocytomas, 11.6 and 2.9% in glioblastomas. The presence of 1p deletion and 1p19q codeletion were strongly correlated with the histological diagnosis corresponding to oligodendroglioma. Calculation of specificity, sensitivity, predictive positive values and false negative rates suggests that presence of deletion 1p or codeletion represents a strong argument in favor of the diagnosis of oligodendroglioma. However, considering the high false negative rate, absence of such deletions does not rule out the diagnosis. In grade 3 oligodendroglial tumors, the probability of responding to chemotherapy, and the duration of response, were higher when codeletions were present. This suggests that, in these tumors, the presence of codeletion is a strong argument in favor of adjuvant chemotherapy. However, chemotherapy should not be systematically excluded when codeletions are absent, as the chances of response are about 33% in this situation. Data concerning low-grade gliomas were more controversial. Oligodendroglial tumors with 1p deletion or 1p19q codeletion seemed to have a better prognosis, as five-year survival rates were 50% higher than in tumors without deletion. This might be explained by the correlation between 1p deletion and other identified prognosis factors: (1) higher chemosensitivity, (2) tumor location more frequently in the frontal lobe, leading to better resection and lower risk of neurological deficit, (3) slower growth rate, (4) higher risk

  20. Radio-chemotherapy improves survival in IDH-mutant, 1p/19q non-codeleted secondary high-grade astrocytoma patients.

    PubMed

    Juratli, Tareq A; Lautenschläger, Tim; Geiger, Kathrin D; Pinzer, Thomas; Krause, Mechthild; Schackert, Gabriele; Krex, Dietmar

    2015-09-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations are beginning to drive decisions on therapy for glioma patients. Here we sought to determine the impact of adjuvant treatment in patients with IDH-mutant, 1p/19q non-codeleted secondary high-grade astrocytoma (sHGA) WHO grades III/IV. Clinical data of 109 sHGA patients grades III/IV, in addition to IDH mutation-, 1p/19q-codeletion- and MGMT-promoter methylation status-were retrospectively analyzed. Survival analysis in relation to adjuvant treatment modalities and molecular profiling were performed. Out of 109 patients, 88 patients (80.7 %) harbored IDH mutations, 30 patients had a 1p/19q-codeletion (27.5 %) and 69 patients (63.3 %) exhibited a methylated MGMT-promoter status. At a median follow-up of 9.8 years, 62 patients (57 %) died. The postsurgical treatment included: radio-chemotherapy (RT-CT; 54.5 %), RT alone (19.3 %), and CT alone (22.7 %). The median overall survival (OS) in the entire group was 3.4 years (1.9-6.7 years). Patients who received RT-CT had a significantly longer OS compared with those who underwent RT alone (6.5 vs. 1.2 years, HR 0.35, CI 0.32-0.51, p = 0.011). In the IDH-mutant 1p/19q non-codeleted sHGA subgroup the RT-CT cohort had a significantly longer OS in comparison to the RT cohort (6.4 vs. 1.2 years, HR 2.7, CI 1.1-6.5, p = 0.022). In the stepwise multivariable Cox model for OS of all 88 IDH-mutant sHGA patients, survival was strongly associated with only one factor, namely, adjuvant RT-CT at diagnosis of a sHGA. This retrospective long-term study demonstrates that RT and CT (mostly PCV) significantly improves progression-free and overall survival in IDH-mutant secondary high-grade astrocytoma patients, regardless of 1p/19q-codeletion status. PMID:26033545

  1. Homozygous deletion of TNFRSF4, TP73, PPAP2B and DPYD at 1p and PDCD5 at 19q identified by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis in pediatric anaplastic glioma with questionable oligodendroglial component

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric oligodendrogliomas are rare and appear to show a different molecular profile from adult tumors. Some gliomas display allelic losses at 1p/19q in pediatric patients, although less frequently than in adult patients, but this is rare in tumors with an oligodendroglial component. The molecular basis of this genomic abnormality is unknown in pediatric gliomas, but it represents a relatively common finding in pediatric oligodendroglioma-like neoplasms with leptomeningeal dissemination. Results Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis using SALSA P088-B1 for the analysis of the 1p/19q allelic constitution in a pediatric anaplastic (oligodendro)-glioma showed homozygous co-deletion for markers: TNFRSF4 (located at 1p36.33), TP73 (1p36.32), PPAP2B (1pter-p22.1), DPYD (1p21.3), and PDCD5 (19q13.12), and hemizygous deletion of BAX (19q13.3-q13.4). No sequence changes for R132 and R172 of the IDH1/2 genes were identified. Conclusions The molecular findings in this pediatric anaplastic glioma do not allow for a clearly definitive pathological diagnosis. However, the findings provide data on a number of 1p/19q genomic regions that, because of homozygotic deletion, might be the location of genes that are important for the development and clinical evolution of some malignant gliomas in children. PMID:24387276

  2. How to use molecular markers when caring for a patient with brain cancer: 1P/19Q as a predictive and prognostic marker in the neuro-oncology clinic.

    PubMed

    van den Bent, M J

    2013-01-01

    Although the central role of 1p/19q codeletion in oligodendroglioma was established almost two decades ago, apart from clear prognostic significance the implications for clinical care have been less clear. This has changed with the long-term follow-up analysis of the EORTC and RTOG trials on procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) chemotherapy in anaplastic oligodendroglioma. These have shown that 1p/19q loss in these tumors is predictive of overall survival benefit of the addition of PCV chemotherapy to radiotherapy. PMID:23714473

  3. Assessing CpG island methylator phenotype, 1p/19q codeletion, and MGMT promoter methylation from epigenome-wide data in the biomarker cohort of the NOA-04 trial

    PubMed Central

    Wiestler, Benedikt; Capper, David; Hovestadt, Volker; Sill, Martin; Jones, David T.W.; Hartmann, Christian; Felsberg, Joerg; Platten, Michael; Feiden, Wolfgang; Keyvani, Kathy; Pfister, Stefan M.; Wiestler, Otmar D.; Meyermann, Richard; Reifenberger, Guido; Pietsch, Thorsten; von Deimling, Andreas; Weller, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular biomarkers including isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/2) mutation, 1p/19q codeletion, and O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation may improve prognostication and guide treatment decisions for patients with World Health Organization (WHO) anaplastic gliomas. At present, each marker is individually tested by distinct assays. Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip arrays (HM450) enable the determination of large-scale methylation profiles and genome-wide DNA copy number changes. Algorithms have been developed to detect the glioma CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP) associated with IDH1/2 mutation, 1p/19q codeletion, and MGMT promoter methylation using a single assay. Methods Here, we retrospectively investigated the diagnostic and prognostic performance of these algorithms in comparison to individual marker testing and patient outcome in the biomarker cohort (n = 115 patients) of the NOA-04 trial. Results Concordance for IDH and 1p/19q status was very high: In 92% of samples, the HM450 and reference data agreed. In discordant samples, survival analysis by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses suggested a more accurate assessment of biological phenotype by the HM450 analysis. The HM450-derived MGMT-STP27 model to calculate MGMT promoter methylation probability revealed this aberration in a significantly higher fraction of samples than conventional methylation-specific PCR, with 87 of 91 G-CIMP tumors predicted as MGMT promoter-methylated. Pyrosequencing of discordant samples confirmed the HM450 assessment in 14 of 17 cases. Conclusions G-CIMP and 1p/19q codeletion are reliably detectable by HM450 analysis and are associated with prognosis in the NOA-04 trial. For MGMT, HM450 suggests promoter methylation in the vast majority of G-CIMP tumors, which is supported by pyrosequencing. PMID:25028501

  4. 19q13.32 microdeletion syndrome: three new cases.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Angela; Kramer, Nancy; Schwartz, Charles E; Miles, Judith H; DuPont, Barbara R; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Graham, John M

    2014-01-01

    A previous report described a unique phenotype associated with an apparently de novo 732 kb 19q13.32 microdeletion, consisting of intellectual disability, facial asymmetry, ptosis, oculomotor abnormalities, orofacial clefts, cardiac defects, scoliosis and chronic constipation. We report three unrelated patients with developmental delay and dysmorphic features, who were all found to have interstitial 19q13.32 microdeletions of varying sizes. Both the previously reported patient and our Patient 1 with a larger, 1.3-Mb deletion have distinctive dysmorphic features and medical problems, allowing us to define a recognizable 19q13.32 microdeletion syndrome. Patient 1 was hypotonic and dysmorphic at birth, with aplasia of the posterior corpus callosum, bilateral ptosis, oculomotor paralysis, down-slanting palpebral fissures, facial asymmetry, submucosal cleft palate, micrognathia, wide-spaced nipples, right-sided aortic arch, hypospadias, bilateral inguinal hernias, double toenail of the left second toe, partial 2-3 toe syndactyly, kyphoscoliosis and colonic atony. Therefore, the common features of the 19q13.32 microdeletion syndrome include facial asymmetry, ptosis, oculomotor paralysis, orofacial clefting, micrognathia, kyphoscoliosis, aortic defects and colonic atony. These findings are probably related to a deletion of some combination of the 20-23 genes in common between these two patients, especially NPAS1, NAPA, ARHGAP35, SLC8A2, DHX34, MEIS3, and ZNF541. These candidate genes are expressed in the brain parenchyma, glia, heart, gastrointestinal tract and musculoskeletal system and likely play a fundamental role in the expression of this phenotype. This report delineates the phenotypic spectrum associated with the haploinsufficiency of genes found in 19q13.32. PMID:25230004

  5. Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-Hypothesis)

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovskii, Victor; Kadyshevich, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The paper develops the Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-hypothesis), according to which living-matter simplest elements (LMSEs, which are N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, nucleotides), DNA- and RNA-like molecules, amino-acids, and proto-cells repeatedly originated on the basis of thermodynamically controlled, natural, and inevitable processes governed by universal physical and chemical laws from CH4, niters, and phosphates under the Earth's surface or seabed within the crystal cavities of the honeycomb methane-hydrate structure at low temperatures; the chemical processes passed slowly through all successive chemical steps in the direction that is determined by a gradual decrease in the Gibbs free energy of reacting systems. The hypothesis formulation method is based on the thermodynamic directedness of natural movement and consists ofan attempt to mentally backtrack on the progression of nature and thus reveal principal milestones alongits route. The changes in Gibbs free energy are estimated for different steps of the living-matter origination process; special attention is paid to the processes of proto-cell formation. Just the occurrence of the gas-hydrate periodic honeycomb matrix filled with LMSEs almost completely in its final state accounts for size limitation in the DNA functional groups and the nonrandom location of N-bases in the DNA chains. The slowness of the low-temperature chemical transformations and their “thermodynamic front” guide the gross process of living matter origination and its successive steps. It is shown that the hypothesis is thermodynamically justified and testable and that many observed natural phenomena count in its favor. PMID:25382120

  6. A 3 1/2 year old girl with distal trisomy 19q defined by FISH.

    PubMed Central

    James, C; Jauch, A; Robson, L; Watson, N; Smith, A

    1996-01-01

    A 3 1/2 year old girl was evaluated because of developmental delay. Short stature was evident with height between the 3rd and 10th centiles, while weight and head circumference were on the 50th centile. Dysmorphic features consisted of a high bossed forehead, pointed short ear lobes, small nose, bilateral convergent strabismus, left simian crease, a gap between the first and second toes bilaterally, mild clinodactyly, and a broad, barrel shaped thorax. Cytogenetic investigations showed an unbalanced karyotype, 46,XX,10q+, which was de novo in origin. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) using three library probes (from chromosomes 10, 19, and 19q) and a YAC probe (from 10q telomere) showed that the additional material on 10q was derived from chromosome 19q. The patient had an unbalanced translocation, 46,XX,-10,+der(10)t(10;19)(q26.3; q13.3), which resulted in distal trisomy 19q. Few other cases of proven distal trisomy 19q are available for comparison of clinical features. Images PMID:8880586

  7. Deletion of 19q13 reveals clinical overlap with Dubowitz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Urquhart, Jill E; Williams, Simon G; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Bowers, Naomi; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Newman, William G

    2015-12-01

    Dubowitz syndrome is a presumed autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities: microcephaly, learning and developmental delay, growth failure, and a predisposition to allergies and eczema. There have been more than 150 individuals reported to have this diagnosis, but no unifying genetic alteration has been identified indicating genetic heterogeneity. We report on a pair of monozygotic twins diagnosed clinically with Dubowitz syndrome by Professor Dubowitz over 30 years ago and identified to have a de novo heterozygous 3.2-Mb deletion at 19q13.11q13.12. Exome sequencing did not identify either a putative pathogenic variant on the trans allele supporting recessive inheritance or any other causative sequence variants. Comparison of the phenotype in our cases shows considerable overlap with the 19q13.11 microdeletion syndrome, suggesting that a subset of individuals diagnosed with Dubowitz syndrome may be due to deletions at 19q13. Our finding further reinforces the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of Dubowitz syndrome. PMID:26377242

  8. Refinement of the cone-rod retinal dystrophy locus on chromosome 19q

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, C.Y.; Evans, K.; Bhattacharya, S.S.; Whittaker, J.L.; Fryer, A.; Weissenbach, J.

    1994-11-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) is a severe example of an inherited retinal dystrophy: ophthalmic diseases that as a group constitute the commonest causes of blindness in children in the developed world and account for a significant proportion of visual handicap in adults. Two case reports suggested loci for CRD-causing genes on chromosomes 18q and chromosome 17q. Recently, we reported the results of a total genome search that localized an autosomal dominant form of CRD to chromosome 19q in the region 19q13.1-q13.2. Since then, using data from a short tandem repeat-polymorphism linkage map of chromosome 19 and recently developed microsatellite markers in this region, we have been able to further refine the localization of the chromosome 19q CRD-causing gene. Seven new microsatellite markers were used to genotype 34 affected subjects, 22 unaffected subjects, and 15 spouses. Two-point, multipoint, and FASTMAP analyses were performed. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  9. A region of consistent deletion in neuroblastoma maps within human chromosome 1p36.2-36.3

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.S.; Maris, J.M.; Beltinger, C.

    1995-06-06

    Deletion of the short arm of human chromosome 1 is the most common cytogenetic abnormality observed in neuroblastoma. To characterize the region of consistent deletion, we performed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies on 122 neuroblastoma tumor samples with 30 distal chromosome 1p polymorphisms. LOH was detected in 32 of the 122 tumors (26%). A single region of LOH, marked distally by D1Z2 and proximally by D1S228, was detected in all tumors demonstrating loss. Also, cells from a patient with a constitutional deletion of 1p36, and from a neuroblastoma cell line with a small 1p36 deletion, were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cells from both sources had interstitial deletions of 1p36.2-36.3 which overlapped the consensus region of LOH defined by the tumors. Interstitial deletion in the constitutional case was confirmed by allelic loss studies using the panel of polymorphic markers. Four proposed candidate genes-DAN, ID3 (heir-1), CDC2L1 (p58), and TNFR2-were shown to lie outside of the consensus region of allelic loss, as defined by the above deletions. These results more precisely define the location of a neuroblastoma suppressor gene within 1p36.2-36.3, eliminating 33 centimorgans of proximal 1p36 from consideration. Furthermore, a consensus region of loss, which excludes the four leading candidate genes, was found in all tumors with 1p36 LOH. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Wei; Xia, Yingying; Wang, Chongzhi; Tang, Y Tom; Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  11. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  12. A genome-wide association study of COPD identifies a susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13.

    PubMed

    Cho, Michael H; Castaldi, Peter J; Wan, Emily S; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Hersh, Craig P; Demeo, Dawn L; Himes, Blanca E; Sylvia, Jody S; Klanderman, Barbara J; Ziniti, John P; Lange, Christoph; Litonjua, Augusto A; Sparrow, David; Regan, Elizabeth A; Make, Barry J; Hokanson, John E; Murray, Tanda; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B; Pillai, Sreekumar G; Kong, Xiangyang; Anderson, Wayne H; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Lomas, David A; Coxson, Harvey O; Edwards, Lisa D; MacNee, William; Vestbo, Jørgen; Yates, Julie C; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M A; Celli, Bartolome; Crim, Courtney; Rennard, Stephen; Wouters, Emiel; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Silverman, Edwin K

    2012-02-15

    The genetic risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are still largely unknown. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of limited size have identified several novel risk loci for COPD at CHRNA3/CHRNA5/IREB2, HHIP and FAM13A; additional loci may be identified through larger studies. We performed a GWAS using a total of 3499 cases and 1922 control subjects from four cohorts: the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE); the Normative Aging Study (NAS) and National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT); Bergen, Norway (GenKOLS); and the COPDGene study. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms with additional markers imputed using 1000 Genomes data; results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis. We identified a new genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 19q13 (rs7937, OR = 0.74, P = 2.9 × 10(-9)). Genotyping this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and another nearby SNP in linkage disequilibrium (rs2604894) in 2859 subjects from the family-based International COPD Genetics Network study (ICGN) demonstrated supportive evidence for association for COPD (P = 0.28 and 0.11 for rs7937 and rs2604894), pre-bronchodilator FEV(1) (P = 0.08 and 0.04) and severe (GOLD 3&4) COPD (P = 0.09 and 0.017). This region includes RAB4B, EGLN2, MIA and CYP2A6, and has previously been identified in association with cigarette smoking behavior. PMID:22080838

  13. The 19q12 bladder cancer GWAS signal: association with cyclin E function and aggressive disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi-Ping; Kohaar, Indu; Moore, Lee E.; Lenz, Petra; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Tang, Wei; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Scott-Johnson, Alexandra; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Muchmore, Brian; Baris, Dalsu; Paquin, Ashley; Ylaya, Kris; Schwenn, Molly; Apolo, Andrea B.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Tarway, McAnthony; Johnson, Alison; Mumy, Adam; Schned, Alan; Guedez, Liliana; Jones, Michael A.; Kida, Masatoshi; Monawar Hosain, GM; Malats, Nuria; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardon, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Wu, Xifeng; Purdue, Mark; Andriole, Gerald L.; Grubb, Robert L.; Black, Amanda; Landi, Maria T.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Vineis, Paolo; Siddiq, Afshan; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ljungberg, Börje; Severi, Gianluca; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth C.; Tjønneland, Anne; Brennan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Prescott, Jennifer; Chen, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Govannucci, Edward; Hunter, David; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Gapstur, Susan M.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Kooperberg, Charles; Hohensee, Chancellor; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Conti, David V.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Stern, Mariana C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Haiman, Christopher A.; Cussenot, Olivier; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Porru, Stefano; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Grossman, H. Barton; Wang, Zhaoming; Deng, Xiang; Chung, Charles C.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Wheeler, William; Fraumeni, Joseph; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Silverman, Debra T.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bladder cancer identified a genetic marker rs8102137 within the 19q12 region as a novel susceptibility variant. This marker is located upstream of the CCNE1 gene, which encodes cyclin E, a cell cycle protein. We performed genetic fine mapping analysis of the CCNE1 region using data from two bladder cancer GWAS (5,942 cases and 10,857 controls). We found that the original GWAS marker rs8102137 represents a group of 47 linked SNPs (with r2≥0.7) associated with increased bladder cancer risk. From this group we selected a functional promoter variant rs7257330, which showed strong allele-specific binding of nuclear proteins in several cell lines. In both GWAS, rs7257330 was associated only with aggressive bladder cancer, with a combined per-allele odds ratio (OR) =1.18 (95%CI=1.09-1.27, p=4.67×10−5 vs. OR =1.01 (95%CI=0.93-1.10, p=0.79) for non-aggressive disease, with p=0.0015 for case-only analysis. Cyclin E protein expression analyzed in 265 bladder tumors was increased in aggressive tumors (p=0.013) and, independently, with each rs7257330-A risk allele (ptrend=0.024). Over-expression of recombinant cyclin E in cell lines caused significant acceleration of cell cycle. In conclusion, we defined the 19q12 signal as the first GWAS signal specific for aggressive bladder cancer. Molecular mechanisms of this genetic association may be related to cyclin E over-expression and alteration of cell cycle in carriers of CCNE1 risk variants. In combination with established bladder cancer risk factors and other somatic and germline genetic markers, the CCNE1 variants could be useful for inclusion into bladder cancer risk prediction models. PMID:25320178

  14. An informative panel of somatic cell hybrids for physical mapping on human chromosome 19q.

    PubMed Central

    Bachinski, L L; Krahe, R; White, B F; Wieringa, B; Shaw, D; Korneluk, R; Thompson, L H; Johnson, K; Siciliano, M J

    1993-01-01

    A panel of 22 somatic cell hybrids divides the q arm of human chromosome 19 into 22 ordered subregions. The panel was characterized with respect to 41 genetic markers. In most cases, a single fragment of chromosome 19 was present in each hybrid. In two cell lines the presence of multiple fragments of the chromosome was demonstrated by segregation of these fragments in subclones. On the basis of the results of marker analysis in this panel, the most likely order of the markers tested is MANB-D19S7-PEPD-D19S9-GPI-C/EBP-TGFB1++ +-(CYP2A,BCKDHA,CGM2,NCA)-PSG1-(D19S8, XRCC1)-(ATP1A3,D19S19)-(D19S37,APOC2)-C KM-ERCC2-ERCC1-(D19S116,D19S117)- (D19S118,D19S119, D19S63,p36.1,D19S112,D19S62,D19S51,D19S54, D19S55)-pW39-D19S6-(D19S50,TNNT1)-D19S2 2-(HRC,CGB,FTL,PRKCG)-qter. This gene order is generally consistent with published physical and genetic mapping orders, although some discrepancies exist. By means of a mapping function that relates the frequency of cosegregation of markers to the distance between them, estimates were made of the sizes, in megabases, of the 19q subregions. The relative physical distances between reference markers were compared with published genetic distances for 19q. Excellent correlation was observed, suggesting that the physical distances calculated by this method are predictive of genetic distances in this region of the genome and, therefore, are just as useful in estimating relative positions of markers. Images Figure 1 PMID:8430698

  15. 19q13.33→qter trisomy in a girl with intellectual impairment and seizures

    PubMed Central

    Carvalheira, Gianna; Oliveira, Mariana Moysés; Takeno, Sylvia; Lima, Fernanda Teresa de; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Rearrangements in chromosome 19 are rare. Among the 35 patients with partial 19q trisomy described, only six have a breakpoint defined by array. The 19q duplication results in a variable phenotype, including dysmorphisms, intellectual disability and seizure. In a female patient, although G-banding at 550 band-resolution was normal, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique and genomic array showed a 10.6 Mb terminal duplication of chromosome 19q13. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed that the duplicated region was attached to the short arm of chromosome 21 and silver staining showed four small acrocentrics with nucleolar organization region (NOR) activity, suggesting that the breakpoint in chromosome 21 was at p13. This is the first de novo translocation between 19q13.33 and 21p13 described in liveborn. The chromosome 19 is known to be rich in coding and non-coding regions, and chromosomal rearrangements involving this chromosome are very harmful. Furthermore, the 19q13.33→qter region is dense in pseudogenes and microRNAs, which are potent regulators of gene expression. The trisomic level of this region may contribute to deregulation of global gene expression, and consequently, may lead to abnormal development on the carriers of these rearrangements. PMID:25606462

  16. Bimodal expressivity in dominant retinitis pigmentosa genetically linked to chromosome 19q.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, K; al-Maghtheh, M; Fitzke, F W; Moore, A T; Jay, M; Inglehearn, C F; Arden, G B; Bird, A C

    1995-01-01

    A clinical, psychophysical, and electrophysiologic study was undertaken of two autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa pedigrees with a genetic mutation assigned to chromosome 19q by linkage analysis. Members with the abnormal haplotype were either symptomatic with adolescent onset nyctalopia, restricted visual fields, and non-detectable electroretinographic responses by 30 years of age, or asymptomatic with normal fundus appearance and minimal or no psychophysical or electroretinographic abnormalities. There was no correlation in the severity in parents and their offspring. Pedigree analysis suggested that although the offspring of parents with the genetic mutation were at 50% risk of having the genetic defect, the risk of being symptomatic during a working lifetime was only 31%. Such bimodal phenotypic expressivity in these particular pedigrees may be explained by a second, allelic genetic influence and may be a phenomenon unique to this genetic locus. Genetic counselling in families expressing this phenotype can only be based on haplotype analysis since clinical investigations, even in the most elderly, would not preclude the presence of the mutant gene. PMID:7488604

  17. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of 19q12q13.1 deletions: a report of five patients.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shimul; Bandholz, Anne M; Parkash, Sandhya; Dyack, Sarah; Rideout, Andrea L; Leppig, Kathleen A; Thiese, Heidi; Wheeler, Patricia G; Tsang, Marilyn; Ballif, Blake C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Torchia, Beth S; Ellison, Jay W; Rosenfeld, Jill A

    2014-01-01

    A syndrome associated with 19q13.11 microdeletions has been proposed based on seven previous cases that displayed developmental delay, intellectual disability, speech disturbances, pre- and post-natal growth retardation, microcephaly, ectodermal dysplasia, and genital malformations in males. A 324-kb critical region was previously identified as the smallest region of overlap (SRO) for this syndrome. To further characterize this microdeletion syndrome, we present five patients with deletions within 19q12q13.12 identified using a whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray. Patients 1 and 2 possess deletions overlapping the SRO, and Patients 3-5 have deletions proximal to the SRO. Patients 1 and 2 share significant phenotypic overlap with previously reported cases, providing further definition of the 19q13.11 microdeletion syndrome phenotype, including the first presentation of ectrodactyly in the syndrome. Patients 3-5, whose features include developmental delay, growth retardation, and feeding problems, support the presence of dosage-sensitive genes outside the SRO that may contribute to the abnormal phenotypes observed in this syndrome. Multiple genotype-phenotype correlations outside the SRO are explored, including further validation of the deletion of WTIP as a candidate for male hypospadias observed in this syndrome. We postulate that unique patient-specific deletions within 19q12q13.1 may explain the phenotypic variability observed in this emerging contiguous gene deletion syndrome. PMID:24243649

  18. Genomic alterations in cervical carcinoma: Losses of chromosome heterozygosity (LOH) correlated with cytogenetic, HPV, and p53 evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, H.P.; Mullokandov, M.; Khollodilov, N.G.

    1994-09-01

    This study was undertaken to obtain indications of chromosomes likely to carry tumorigenicity suppressor genes the loss of function of which play a role in the origin or progression of cervical carcinomas. PCR and electrophoresis with primers for 73 highly polymorphic microsatellite chromosome markers were used to determine the incidence of LOH of all of the autosomes in 38 cervical carcinomas. According to these criteria 14 of the autosomes are involved in LOH in 24% to 42% of the tumors. This involves chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, 16, 18 and 19. Most frequently involved are chromosomes 3 and 6 with LOH in 42% of the tumors. The chromosomes next most frequently involved are 4, 7, 11 and 18, with LOH in 31-32% of cases. Chromosomes 1, 2, 5, 8 and 16 each had LOH in 29% of the tumors; 9 and 13 each in 26%; and 19 in 24% of the tumors. All other autosomes had LOH in 18% or fewer of the tumors. Cytogenetic analyses performed on direct preparations from many of the same tumors agreed well with the molecular LOH assays. Correlation of the information obtained with both of these methods provides considerable insight into the mechanisms involved in the occurrence of these chromosome alterations. Chromosome 3 is the third most frequent chromosome involved in LOH in all types of cancer. In cervical carcinomas the region most frequently involved is 3p13-p25, which is a segment within which suppressors have been implicated in several other types of malignancies. Chromosome 6 on the other hand is rarely involved in other neoplasias and this appears to be unique to cervical carcinomas. Of interest was the finding that many of the HPV-negative tumors had LOH of chromosome 17 and many of these expressed mutant p53. The latter tumors occur in older women and are on the average much more aggressive than the HPV-positive tumors.

  19. Polymorphism at 19q13.41 predicts breast cancer survival specifically after endocrine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sofia; Fagerholm, Rainer; Rafiq, Sajjad; Tapper, William; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Liu, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although most estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients benefit from endocrine therapies, a significant proportion do not. Our aim was to identify inherited genetic variations that might predict survival among patients receiving adjuvant endocrine therapies. Experimental Design We performed a meta-analysis of two genome-wide studies; Helsinki Breast Cancer Study, 805 patients, with 240 receiving endocrine therapy and Prospective study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer, 536 patients, with 155 endocrine therapy-patients, evaluating 486,478 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The top four associations from the endocrine treatment subgroup were further investigated in two independent datasets totalling 5011 patients, with 3485 receiving endocrine therapy. Results A meta-analysis identified a common SNP rs8113308, mapped to 19q13.41, associating with reduced survival among endocrine treated patients (hazard ratio (HR) 1.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-2.07, P = 6.34 ×10−7) and improved survival among ER-negative patients, with a similar trend in ER-positive cases not receiving endocrine therapy. In a multivariate analysis adjusted for conventional prognostic factors, we found a significant interaction between the rs8113308 and endocrine treatment indicating a predictive, treatment-specific effect of the SNP rs8113308 on breast cancer survival, with the per-allele HR for interaction 2.16 (95% CI 1.30 – 3.60, Pinteraction = 0.003) and HR=7.77 (95% CI 0.93 – 64.71) for the homozygous genotype carriers. A biological rationale is suggested by in silico functional analyses. Conclusions Our findings suggest carrying the rs8113308 rare allele may identify patients who will not benefit from adjuvant endocrine treatment. PMID:25964295

  20. Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Mudge, Joanne

    2012-06-01

    Joanne Mudge on "Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Mutation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  1. Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Mudge, Joanne [NCGR

    2013-03-22

    Joanne Mudge on "Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Mutation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  2. Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) and the explanation of the biological diversification.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskii, Victor E; Kadyshevich, Elena A

    2014-12-01

    The Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) considers the life origination process as a sequence of thermodynamically caused regular and inevitable chemical transformations regulated by universal physical and chemical laws. The LOH-Theory bears on a number of experimental, thermodynamic, observation, and simulation researches. N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, and nucleotides and DNAs and RNAs are formed repeatedly within structural cavities of localizations of underground and underseabed honeycomb CH4-hydrate deposits from CH4 and nitrate and phosphate ions that diffused into the hydrate structures; proto-cells and their agglomerates originated from these DNAs and from the same minerals in the semi-liquid soup after liquation of the hydrate structures. Each localization gave rise to a multitude of different DNAs and living organisms. The species diversity is caused by the spatial and temporal repeatability of the processes of living matter origination under similar but not identical conditions, multiplicity of the DNA forms in each living matter origination event, variations in the parameters of the native medium, intraspecific variations, and interspecific variations. The contribution of the last to the species diversity is, likely, significant for prokaryotes and those eukaryotes that are only at low steps of their biological organization; however, in the light of the LOH-Theory, of available long-term paleontological investigations, and of studies of reproduction of proliferous organisms, we conclude that, in toto, the contribution of interspecific variations to the species diversity was earlier overestimated by some researchers. The reason of this overestimation is that origination of scores of «spores» of different organisms in any one event and multiple reproductions of such events in time and Earth's space were not taken into consideration. PMID:25179143

  3. An application of LOH analysis for detecting the genetic influences of space environmental radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatagai, F.; Umebayashi, Y.; Honma, M.; Abe, T.; Suzuki, H.; Shimazu, T.; Ishioka, N.; Iwaki, M.

    To detect the genetic influence of space environmental radiation at the chromosome level we proposed an application of loss of heterozygosity LOH analysis system for the mutations induced in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells Surprisingly we succeeded the mutation detection in the frozen dells which were exposed to a low-dose 10 cGy of carbon-ion beam irradiation Mutation assays were performed within a few days or after about one month preservation at --80 r C following irradiation The results showed an increase in mutation frequency at the thymidine kinase TK gene locus 1 6-fold 2 5 X 10 -6 to 3 9 X 10 -6 and 2 1-fold 2 5 X 10 -6 to 5 3 X 10 -6 respectively Although the relative distributions of mutation classes were not changed by the radiation exposure in either assay an interesting characteristic was detected using this LOH analysis system two TK locus markers and eleven microsatellite loci spanning chromosome 17 The radiation-specific patterns of interstitial deletions were observed in the hemizygous LOH mutants which were considered as a result of end-joining repair of carbon ion-induced DNA double-strand breaks These results clearly demonstrate that this analysis can be used for the detection of low-dose ionizing radiation effects in the frozen cells In addition we performed so called adaptive response experiments in which TK6 cells were pre-irradiated with low-dose 2 5 sim 10 cGy of X-ray and then exposed to challenging dose 2Gy of X-rays Interestingly the

  4. Localization, by linkage analysis, of the cystinuria type III gene to chromosome 19q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Bisceglia, L.; Totaro, A.; Melchionda, S.

    1997-03-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive aminoaciduria in which three urinary phenotypes (I, II, and III) have been described. An amino acid transporter gene, SLC3A1 (formerly rBAT), was found to be responsible for this disorder. Mutational and linkage analysis demonstrated the presence of genetic heterogeneity in which the SLC3A1 gene is responsible for type I cystinuria but not for type II or type III. In this study, we report the identification of the cystinuria type III locus on the long arm of chromosome 19 (19q13.1), obtained after a genomewide search. Pairwise linkage analysis in a series of type III or type II families previously excluded from linkage to the cystinuria type I locus (SLC3A1 gene) revealed a significant maximum LOD score (Z{sub max}) of 13.11 at a maximum recombination fraction ({theta}{sub max}) of .00, with marker D19S225. Multipoint linkage analysis performed with the use of additional markers from the region placed the cystinuria type III locus between D19S414 and D19S220. Preliminary data on type II families also seem to place the disease locus for this rare type of cystinuria at 19q13.1 (significant Z{sub max} = 3.11 at {theta}{sub max} of .00, with marker D19S225). 33 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Localization, by linkage analysis, of the cystinuria type III gene to chromosome 19q13.1.

    PubMed Central

    Bisceglia, L; Calonge, M J; Totaro, A; Feliubadaló, L; Melchionda, S; García, J; Testar, X; Gallucci, M; Ponzone, A; Zelante, L; Zorzano, A; Estivill, X; Gasparini, P; Nunes, V; Palacín, M

    1997-01-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive aminoaciduria in which three urinary phenotypes (I, II, and III) have been described. An amino acid transporter gene, SLC3A1 (formerly rBAT), was found to be responsible for this disorder. Mutational and linkage analysis demonstrated the presence of genetic heterogeneity in which the SLC3A1 gene is responsible for type I cystinuria but not for type II or type III. In this study, we report the identification of the cystinuria type III locus on the long arm of chromosome 19 (19q13.1), obtained after a genomewide search. Pairwise linkage analysis in a series of type III or type II families previously excluded from linkage to the cystinuria type I locus (SLC3A1 gene) revealed a significant maximum LOD score (zeta max) of 13.11 at a maximum recombination fraction (theta max) of .00, with marker D19S225. Multipoint linkage analysis performed with the use of additional markers from the region placed the cystinuria type III locus between D19S414 and D19S220. Preliminary data on type II families also seem to place the disease locus for this rare type of cystinuria at 19q13.1 (significant zeta max = 3.11 at theta max of .00, with marker D19S225). PMID:9042921

  6. Isolation of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPR4) localized to chromosome 19q13.3.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, M S; Baird, S; Bailly, J E; Shutler, G G; Sabourin, L A; Tsilfidis, C; Neville, C E; Narang, M; Korneluk, R G

    1995-11-01

    We present the cloning and sequencing of the human gene for a novel G-protein coupled receptor (GPR4), from the critical myotonic dystrophy (DM) region on chromosome 19q13.3. The homologous porcine gene was isolated and sequenced as well. The genes of both species are intronless and contain an open reading frame encoding a protein of 362 amino acids. In human, two isoforms of GPR4 are expressed, differing in their 3' untranslated region due to the use of alternate polyadenylation signals and measuring approximately 2.8 and 1.8 kb, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that GPR4 is widely expressed, with higher levels in kidney, heart, and especially lung, where it is at least fivefold greater than in other tissues. Sequence analysis suggests that GPR4 is a peptide receptor and shares strongest homologies with purinergic receptors and receptors for angiotensin II, platelet activating factor, thrombin, and bradykinin. PMID:8595909

  7. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP)-Based Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) Testing by Real Time PCR in Patients Suspect of Myeloproliferative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huijsmans, Cornelis J. J.; Poodt, Jeroen; Damen, Jan; van der Linden, Johannes C.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.; Pruijt, Johannes F. M.; Hilbink, Mirrian; Hermans, Mirjam H. A.

    2012-01-01

    During tumor development, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) often occurs. When LOH is preceded by an oncogene activating mutation, the mutant allele may be further potentiated if the wild-type allele is lost or inactivated. In myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) somatic acquisition of JAK2V617F may be followed by LOH resulting in loss of the wild type allele. The occurrence of LOH in MPN and other proliferative diseases may lead to a further potentiating the mutant allele and thereby increasing morbidity. A real time PCR based SNP profiling assay was developed and validated for LOH detection of the JAK2 region (JAK2LOH). Blood of a cohort of 12 JAK2V617F-positive patients (n = 6 25–50% and n = 6>50% JAK2V617F) and a cohort of 81 patients suspected of MPN was stored with EDTA and subsequently used for validation. To generate germ-line profiles, non-neoplastic formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from each patient was analyzed. Results of the SNP assay were compared to those of an established Short Tandem Repeat (STR) assay. Both assays revealed JAK2LOH in 1/6 patients with 25–50% JAK2V617F. In patients with >50% JAK2V617F, JAK2LOH was detected in 6/6 by the SNP assay and 5/6 patients by the STR assay. Of the 81 patients suspected of MPN, 18 patients carried JAK2V617F. Both the SNP and STR assay demonstrated the occurrence of JAK2LOH in 5 of them. In the 63 JAK2V617F-negative patients, no JAK2LOH was observed by SNP and STR analyses. The presented SNP assay reliably detects JAK2LOH and is a fast and easy to perform alternative for STR analyses. We therefore anticipate the SNP approach as a proof of principle for the development of LOH SNP-assays for other clinically relevant LOH loci. PMID:22768290

  8. Smoking dysregulates the human airway basal cell transcriptome at COPD risk locus 19q13.2.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Dorothy M; Vincent, Thomas L; Salit, Jacqueline; Walters, Matthew S; Agosto-Perez, Francisco; Shaykhiev, Renat; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Downey, Robert J; Buro-Auriemma, Lauren J; Staudt, Michelle R; Hackett, Neil R; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene studies have identified a number of risk loci associated with the smoking-related disease COPD, a disorder that originates in the airway epithelium. Since airway basal cell (BC) stem/progenitor cells exhibit the earliest abnormalities associated with smoking (hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia), we hypothesized that smoker BC have a dysregulated transcriptome, enriched, in part, at known GWAS/candidate gene loci. Massive parallel RNA sequencing was used to compare the transcriptome of BC purified from the airway epithelium of healthy nonsmokers (n = 10) and healthy smokers (n = 7). The chromosomal location of the differentially expressed genes was compared to loci identified by GWAS to confer risk for COPD. Smoker BC have 676 genes differentially expressed compared to nonsmoker BC, dominated by smoking up-regulation. Strikingly, 166 (25%) of these genes are located on chromosome 19, with 13 localized to 19q13.2 (p<10⁻⁴ compared to chance), including 4 genes (NFKBIB, LTBP4, EGLN2 and TGFB1) associated with risk for COPD. These observations provide the first direct connection between known genetic risks for smoking-related lung disease and airway BC, the population of lung cells that undergo the earliest changes associated with smoking. PMID:24498427

  9. Isolation of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPR4) localized to chromosome 19q13.3

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, M.S.; Baird, S.; Bailly, J.E.

    1995-11-01

    We present the cloning and sequencing of the human gene for a novel G-protein coupled receptor (GPR4), from the critical myotonic dystrophy (DM) region on chromosome 19q13.3. The homologous porcine gene was isolated and sequenced as well. The genes of both species are intronless and contain an open reading frame encoding a protein of 362 amino acids. In human, two isoforms of GPR4 are expressed, differing in their 3{prime} untranslated region due to the use of alternate polyadenylation signals and measuring approximately 2.8 and 1.8 kb, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that GPR4 is widely expressed, with higher levels in kidney, heart, and especially lung, where it is at least fivefold greater than in other tissues. Sequence analysis suggests that GPR4 is a peptide receptor and shares strongest homologies with purinergic receptors and receptors for angiotensin II, platelet activating factor, thrombin, and bradykinin. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Assignment of the gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) to chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, M.; Fernald, A.A.; Bell, G.I.; Le Beau, M.M.

    1995-08-10

    The gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) was localized, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to human chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is a potent stimulator of insulin secretion and mutations in the GIPR gene may be related to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). 13 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Chromosomal localization of the human natural killer cell class I receptor family genes to 19q13.4 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Suto, Yumiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; yabe, Toshio

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the localization of the human natural killer cell I receptor family genes to human chromosome 19q13.4 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. These genes mediate the inhibition of the cytotoxicity of subsets of natural killer cells. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Life origination and development hydrate theory (LOH-Theory) in the context of biological, physicochemical, astrophysical, and paleontological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskii, V. E.; Kadyshevich, E. A.

    2014-04-01

    Till now, we formulated and developed the Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) and Mitosis and Replication Hydrate Theory (MRHTheory) as the instruments for understanding the physical and chemical mechanisms applied by Nature for the living matter origination and propagation. This work is aimed at coordination of these theories with the paleontological and astrophysical knowledges and hypotheses of the Earth and Solar System remote histories.

  13. Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) and Mitosis and Replication Hydrate Theory (MRH-Theory): three-dimensional PC validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyshevich, E. A.; Dzyabchenko, A. V.; Ostrovskii, V. E.

    2014-04-01

    Size compatibility of the CH4-hydrate structure II and multi-component DNA fragments is confirmed by three-dimensional simulation; it is validation of the Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory).

  14. LOH at 6q and 10q in fractionated circulating DNA of ovarian cancer patients is predictive for tumor cell spread and overall survival

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We recently showed that LOH proximal to M6P/IGF2R locus (D6S1581) in primary ovarian tumors is predictive for the presence of disseminated tumor cells (DTC) in the bone marrow (BM). For therapy-monitoring, it would be highly desirable to establish a blood-based biomarker. Therefore, we quantified circulating DNA (cirDNA) in sera of 63 ovarian cancer patients before surgery and after chemotherapy, measured incidence of LOH at four cancer-relevant chromosomal loci, correlated LOH with tumor cell spread to the BM and evaluated prognostic significance of LOH. Methods cirDNA was fractionated into high- and low molecular-weight fraction (HMWF, LMWF) for LOH-profiling, utilizing PCR-based fluorescence microsatellite analysis. BM aspirates were analyzed for DTC by immunocytochemistry using the pan-cytokeratin antibody A45-B/B3. Results cirDNA levels in the HMWF before surgery were predictive for residual tumor load (p = 0.017). After chemotherapy, we observed a significant decline of cirDNA in the LMWF (p = 0.0001) but not in the HMWF. LOH was prevalently detected in the LMWF with an overall frequency of 67%, only moderately ablating after chemotherapy (45%). Before surgery, LOH in the LMWF at marker D10S1765 and D13S218 significantly correlated with tumor grading and FIGO stage (p = 0.033, p = 0.004, respectively). In both combined fractions, LOH at D6S1581 additionally associated with overall survival (OS) (p = 0.030). Moreover, solely LOH at D10S1765 in LMWF after therapy correlated with DTC in BM after therapy (p = 0.017). Conclusion We demonstrate the applicability and necessity of DNA-fractionation prior to analyzing circulating LOH and identify LOH at D10S1765 and D6S1581 as novel blood-based biomarkers for ovarian cancer, being relevant for therapy-monitoring. PMID:22849543

  15. HHV-8-unrelated primary effusion-like lymphoma associated with clonal loss of inherited chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus-6A from the telomere of chromosome 19q.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Enjie; Cotton, Victoria E; Hidalgo-Bravo, Alberto; Huang, Yan; Bell, Adam J; Jarrett, Ruth F; Wilkie, Gavin S; Davison, Andrew J; Nacheva, Ellie P; Siebert, Reiner; Majid, Aneela; Kelpanides, Inga; Jayne, Sandrine; Dyer, Martin J; Royle, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) are associated with human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and usually occur in immunocompromised individuals. However, there are numerous reports of HHV-8-unrelated PEL-like lymphomas with unknown aetiology. Here we characterize an HHV-8-unrelated PEL-like lymphoma in an elderly woman who was negative for human immunodeficiency viruses 1 and 2, and hepatitis B and C. The woman was, however, a carrier of an inherited-chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus-6A (iciHHV-6A) genome in one 19q telomere. The iciHHV-6A genome was complete in blood DNA, encoding a full set of protein-coding genes. Interestingly, the entire iciHHV-6A genome was absent from the HHV-8-unrelated-PEL-like lymphoma cells despite retention of both copies of chromosome 19. The somatic loss of the 19q-iciHHV-6A genome occurred very early during lymphoma development and we propose it occurred via telomere-loop formation and excision to release a circular viral genome that was subsequently lost. Whether release of the HHV-6A genome from the telomere contributed to lymphomagenesis, or was coincidental, remains unclear but this event may have deregulated the expression of HHV-6A or 19q genes or else disrupted telomere function. To establish the frequency and importance of iciHHV-6 loss from telomeres, the HHV-6 copy number should be assessed in tumours that arise in iciHHV-6 carriers. PMID:26947392

  16. HHV-8-unrelated primary effusion-like lymphoma associated with clonal loss of inherited chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus-6A from the telomere of chromosome 19q

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Enjie; Cotton, Victoria E.; Hidalgo-Bravo, Alberto; Huang, Yan; J. Bell, Adam; F. Jarrett, Ruth; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Davison, Andrew J.; P. Nacheva, Ellie; Siebert, Reiner; Majid, Aneela; Kelpanides, Inga; Jayne, Sandrine; Dyer, Martin J.; Royle, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) are associated with human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and usually occur in immunocompromised individuals. However, there are numerous reports of HHV-8-unrelated PEL-like lymphomas with unknown aetiology. Here we characterize an HHV-8-unrelated PEL-like lymphoma in an elderly woman who was negative for human immunodeficiency viruses 1 and 2, and hepatitis B and C. The woman was, however, a carrier of an inherited-chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus-6A (iciHHV-6A) genome in one 19q telomere. The iciHHV-6A genome was complete in blood DNA, encoding a full set of protein-coding genes. Interestingly, the entire iciHHV-6A genome was absent from the HHV-8-unrelated-PEL-like lymphoma cells despite retention of both copies of chromosome 19. The somatic loss of the 19q-iciHHV-6A genome occurred very early during lymphoma development and we propose it occurred via telomere-loop formation and excision to release a circular viral genome that was subsequently lost. Whether release of the HHV-6A genome from the telomere contributed to lymphomagenesis, or was coincidental, remains unclear but this event may have deregulated the expression of HHV-6A or 19q genes or else disrupted telomere function. To establish the frequency and importance of iciHHV-6 loss from telomeres, the HHV-6 copy number should be assessed in tumours that arise in iciHHV-6 carriers. PMID:26947392

  17. Life Origination and Development Hydrate theory (LOH-Theory): new approaches to the problems of the optimal nutrition and life prolongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyshevich, E. A.; Ostrovskii, V. E.

    2014-04-01

    Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) and Mitosis and Replication Hydrate Theory (MRHTheory), both grounded on the notion of honeycomb gas-hydrate structures formation/destruction as the physicochemical phenomenon governing the DNA origination and replication, allow new approaches to the optimal nutrition and life prolongation problems.

  18. Overexpression of CEBPA resulting from the translocation t(14;19)(q32;q13) of human precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chapiro, Elise; Russell, Lisa; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Bastard, Christian; Lessard, Michel; Struski, Stephanie; Cave, Helene; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Barin, Carole; Maarek, Odile; Della-Valle, Veronique; Strefford, Jonathan C; Berger, Roland; Harrison, Christine J; Bernard, Olivier A; Nguyen-Khac, Florence

    2006-11-15

    Subtle variation in the expression or function of a small group of transcription factors can drive leukemogenesis. The CEBPA protein is known to regulate the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation during early hematopoietic development and myeloid differentiation. In human myeloid leukemia, CEBPA is frequently inactivated by mutation and indirect and posttranslational mechanisms, in keeping with tumor suppressor properties. We report that CEBPA is activated by juxtaposition to the immunoglobulin gene enhancer upon its rearrangement with the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus in precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia harboring t(14;19)(q32;q13). Overexpression of apparently normal CEBPA RNA or protein was observed in 6 patients. These data indicate that CEBPA may exhibit oncogenic as well as tumor suppressor properties in human leukemogenesis. PMID:16873674

  19. Assembly of a 1-Mb restriction-mapped cosmid contig spanning the candidate region for Finnish congenital nephrosis (NPHS1) in 19q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, A.S.; Georgescu, A.; Johnson, S.; Carrano, A.V.

    1996-06-01

    We describe the assembly of a 1-Mb cosmid contig and restriction map spanning the candidate region for Finnish congenital nephrosis (NPHS1) in 19q13.1. The map was constructed from 16 smaller contigs assembled by fingerprinting, a BAC and a PAC clone, and 42 previously unmapped cosmids. In most cases, single-step cosmid walks were sufficient to join two previously assembled contigs, and all but one gap was filled from this cosmid contig library. The remaining gap of about 19 kb was spanned with a single BAC and a single PAC clone. EcoRI mapping of a dense set of overlapping clones validated the assembly of the map and indicated a length of 1040 kb for the contig. This high-resolution clone map provides an ideal resource for gene identification through cDNA selection, exon trapping, and DNA sequencing. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome: confirmation of linkage to chromosome 19p13.3 and identification of a potential second locus, on 19q13.4.

    PubMed Central

    Mehenni, H; Blouin, J L; Radhakrishna, U; Bhardwaj, S S; Bhardwaj, K; Dixit, V B; Richards, K F; Bermejo-Fenoll, A; Leal, A S; Raval, R C; Antonarakis, S E

    1997-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal dominant disease with variable expression and incomplete penetrance, characterized by mucocutaneous pigmentation and hamartomatous polyposis. Patients with PJS have increased frequency of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal malignancies (ovaries, testes, and breast). In order to map the locus (or loci) associated with PJS, we performed a genomewide linkage analysis, using DNA polymorphisms in six families (two from Spain, two from India, one from the United States, and one from Portugal) comprising a total of 93 individuals, including 39 affected and 48 unaffected individuals and 6 individuals with unknown status. During this study, localization of a PJS gene to 19p13.3 (around marker D19S886) had been reported elsewhere. For our families, marker D19S886 yielded a maximum LOD score of 4.74 at a recombination fraction (theta) of .045; multipoint linkage analysis resulted in a LOD score of 7.51 for the interval between D19S886 and 19 pter. However, markers on 19q13.4 also showed significant evidence for linkage. For example, D19S880 resulted in a maximum LOD score of 3.8 at theta = .13. Most of this positive linkage was contributed by a single family, PJS07. These results confirm the mapping of a common PJS locus on 19p13.3 but also suggest the existence, in a minority of families, of a potential second PJS locus, on 19q13.4. Positional cloning and characterization of the PJS mutations will clarify the genetics of the syndrome and the implication of the gene(s) in the predisposition to neoplasias. PMID:9399902

  1. Organization of the human gene for nucleobindin (NUC) and its chromosomal assignment to 19q13.2-q13.4

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Keiji; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Hirai, Momoki

    1996-06-01

    Nucleobindin (Nuc) was first identified as a secreted protein of 55 kDa that promotes production of DNA-specific antibodies in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice. Analysis of cDNA that encoded Nuc revealed that the protein is composed of a signal peptide, a DNA-binding site, two calcium-binding motifs (EF-hand motifs), and a leucine zipper. In the present study, we analysed the organization of the human gene for Nuc (NUC). It consists of 13 exons that are distributed in a region of 32 kb. The functional motifs listed above are encoded in corresponding exons. NUC was expressed in all organs examined. Comparison of nucleotide sequences in the promotre regions between human and mouse NCU genes revealed several conserved sequences. Among them, two Sp1-binding sites and a CCAAT box are of particular interest. The promoter is of the TATA-less type, and transcription starts at multiple sites in both the human and the mouse genes. These features suggest that NUC might normally play a role as a housekeeping gene. NUC was located at human chromosome 19q13.2-q13.4. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Breakpoint characterization of the der(19)t(11;19)(q13;p13) in the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3.

    PubMed

    Onkes, Wiebke; Fredrik, Regina; Micci, Francesca; Schönbeck, Benjamin J; Martin-Subero, Jose I; Ullmann, Reinhard; Hilpert, Felix; Bräutigam, Karen; Janssen, Ottmar; Maass, Nicolai; Siebert, Reiner; Heim, Sverre; Arnold, Norbert; Weimer, Jörg

    2013-05-01

    About 20% of ovarian carcinomas show alterations of 19p13 and/or 19q13 in the form of added extra material whose origin often is from chromosome 11. Based on earlier spectral karyotype analysis of the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3, which shows an unbalanced translocation der(19)t(11;19), the aim of this study was to determine the precise breakpoints of that derivative chromosome. After rough delimitation of the breakpoints of microdissected derivative chromosomes by array analysis, we designed a matrix of primers spanning 11q13.2 and 19p13.2 detecting multiple amplicons on genomic and cDNA. Sequencing the amplicons, accurate localization of both breakpoints on both chromosomes was possible and we found that exon 14 of HOOK2 from chromosome 19 and exon 2 of ACTN3 from chromosome 11 were fused in the derivative chromosome. The breakpoint in the HOOK2 gene was in an intrinsic triplet of nucleic acids leading to a shift in the ACTN3 reading frame in the derivative chromosome. This frameshift alteration should give rise to an early stop codon causing a loss of function of ACTN3. Signals in two-dimensional Western blotting exactly match to calculated molecular mass and the isoelectric point of the fusion protein. PMID:23362175

  3. Mechanisms leading to Prader-Willi syndrome in a patient with a de novo 46, XY, t(15; 19)(q12; q13.41)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Hainline, B.E.; Palmer, C.G.

    1994-09-01

    A three year and six month-old boy with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) was found to have a de novo 46, XY, t(15; 19) (q12; q13.41) karyotype. PCR studies of microsatellite loci showed heterozygosity, including biparental inheritance. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies were performed with cosmid probes D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10, and GABRB3 and no deletion was found. The chromosomal breakage occurred inside the SNRPN contig, which contains two overlapping cosmids. Each cosmid shows signals with FISH on both the der(15) and the der(19), and on the normal chromosome 15. Additional FISH studies using cosmid subfragments demonstrated that the breakage occurred upstream to coding exons of the SNRPN gene. SNRPN contains 10 exons, including two recently identified upstream exons, exon-1 and exon-0. A probe from an RT-PCR product (1020bp) of total human brain mRNA spanning exons 1-8 and an exon1-specific probe were used on genome DNA Southern hybridizaiton. An extra DNA band 20kb in size was detected specifically from our patients genomic DNA using BamHl when compared to his normal parents and normal individuals. Further studies revealed that the breakage occurred between exon 0 and exon 1 of the SNRPN gene.

  4. Evidence for a major retinitis pigmentosa locus on 19q13.4 (RP11) and association with a unique bimodal expressivity phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maghtheh, M.; Vithana, E.; Tarttelin, E.; Jay, M.; Evans, K.; Moore, T.; Bhattacharya, S.; Inglehearn, C. F.

    1996-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the name given to a heterogeneous group of retinal degenerations mapping to at least 16 loci. The autosomal dominant form (ARP), accounting for approximately 25% of cases, can be caused by mutations in two genes, rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS, and by at least six other loci identified by linkage analysis. The RP11 locus for adRP has previously been mapped to chromosome 19q13.4 in a large English family. This linkage has been independently confirmed in a Japanese family, and we now report three additional unrelated linked U.K. families, suggesting that this is a major locus for RP. Linkage analysis in the U.K. families refines the RP11 interval to 5 cM between markers D19S180 and AFMc001yb1. All linked families exhibit incomplete penetrance; some obligate gene carriers remain asymptomatic throughout their lives, whereas symptomatic individuals experience night blindness and visual field loss in their teens and are generally registered as blind by their 30s. This "bimodal expressivity" contrasts with the variable-expressivity RP mapping to chromosome 7p (RP9) in another family, which has implications for diagnosis and counseling of RP11 families. These results may also imply that a proportion of sporadic RP, previously assumed to be recessive, might result from mutations at this locus. PMID:8808602

  5. Evidence for a major retinitis pigmentosa locus on 19q13.4 (RP11), and association with a unique bimodal expressivity phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Maghtheh, M.; Vithana, E.; Tarttelin, E.; Evans, K.

    1996-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the name given to a heterogeneous group of retinal degenerations mapping to at least 16 loci. The autosomal dominant form (adRP), accounting for {approximately}25% of cases, can be caused by mutations in two genes, rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS, and by at least six other loci identified by linkage analysis. The RP11 locus for adRP has previously been mapped to chromosome 19q13.4 in a large English family. This linkage has been independently confirmed in a Japanese family, and we now report three additional unrelated linked U.K. families, suggesting that this is a major locus for RP. Linkage analysis in the U.K. families refines the RP11 interval to 5 cM between markers D19S180 and AFMc001yb1. All linked families exhibit incomplete penetrance; some obligate gene carriers remain asymptomatic throughout their lives, whereas symptomatic individuals experience night blindness and visual field loss in their teens and are generally registered as blind by their 30s. This {open_quotes}bimodal expressivity{close_quotes} contrasts with the variable-expressivity RP mapping to chromosome 7p (RP9) in another family, which has implications for diagnosis and counseling of RP11 families. These results may also imply that a proportion of sporadic RP, previously assumed to be recessive, might result from mutations at this locus. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. p190RhoGAP can act to inhibit PDGF-induced gliomas in mice: a putative tumor suppressor encoded on human Chromosome 19q13.3

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Rebecca M.; Draghi, Nicole; Liang, Xiquan; Dai, Chengkai; Uhrbom, Lene; Eklöf, Charlotta; Westermark, Bengt; Holland, Eric C.; Resh, Marilyn D.

    2003-01-01

    p190RhoGAP and Rho are key regulators of oligodendrocyte differentiation. The gene encoding p190RhoGAP is located at 19q13.3 of the human chromosome, a locus that is deleted in 50%–80% of oligodendrogliomas. Here we provide evidence that p190RhoGAP may suppress gliomagenesis by inducing a differentiated glial phenotype. Using a cell culture model of autocrine loop PDGF stimulation, we show that reduced Rho activity via p190RhoGAP overexpression or Rho kinase inhibition induced cellular process extension, a block in proliferation, and reduced expression of the neural precursor marker nestin. In vivo infection of mice with retrovirus expressing PDGF and the p190 GAP domain caused a decreased incidence of oligodendrogliomas compared with that observed with PDGF alone. Independent experiments revealed that the retroviral vector insertion site in 3 of 50 PDGF-induced gliomas was within the p190RhoGAP gene. This evidence strongly suggests that p190 regulates critical components of PDGF oncogenesis and can act as a tumor suppressor in PDGF-induced gliomas by down-regulating Rho activity. PMID:12600941

  7. Cloning of ELL, a gene that fuses to MLL in a t(11; 19)(q23; p13. 1) in acute myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Thirman, M.J.; Levitan, D.A.; Kobayashi, H.; Simon, M.C.; Rowley, J.D. )

    1994-12-06

    To characterize the functions of MLL fusion transcripts, we cloned the gene that fuses to MLL in the translocation t(11;19)(q23;p13.1). This translocation is distinct from another type of 11;19 translocation with a 19p13.3 breakpoint that results in the fusion of MLL to the ENL gene. By PCR screening of a cDNA library prepared from a patient's leukemia cells with this translocation, we obtained a fusion transcript containing exon 7 of MLL and sequence of an unknown gene. The sequence of this gene was amplified and used as a probe to screen a fetal brain cDNA library. On Northern blot analysis, this cDNA detected a 4.4-kb transcript that was abundant in peripheral blood leukocytes, skeletal muscle, placenta, and testis and expressed at lower levels in spleen, thymus, heart, brain, lung, kidney, liver, and ovary. In addition, a 2.8-kb transcript was present in peripheral blood, testis, and placenta. On [open quotes]zoo blots,[close quotes] this gene was shown to be evolutionarily conserved in 10 mammalian species as well as in chicken, frog, and fish. We have named this gene ELL (for eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukemia gene). A highly basic, lysine-rich motif of the predicted ELL protein is homologous to similar regions of several proteins, including the DNA-binding domain of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The characterization of the normal functions of ELL as well as its altered function when fused to MLL will be critical to further our understanding of the mechanisms of leukemogenesis. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Cloning of ELL, a gene that fuses to MLL in a t(11;19)(q23;p13.1) in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Thirman, M J; Levitan, D A; Kobayashi, H; Simon, M C; Rowley, J D

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the functions of MLL fusion transcripts, we cloned the gene that fuses to MLL in the translocation t(11;19)(q23;p13.1). This translocation is distinct from another type of 11;19 translocation with a 19p13.3 breakpoint that results in the fusion of MLL to the ENL gene. By PCR screening of a cDNA library prepared from a patient's leukemia cells with this translocation, we obtained a fusion transcript containing exon 7 of MLL and sequence of an unknown gene. The sequence of this gene was amplified and used as a probe to screen a fetal brain cDNA library. On Northern blot analysis, this cDNA detected a 4.4-kb transcript that was abundant in peripheral blood leukocytes, skeletal muscle, placenta, and testis and expressed at lower levels in spleen, thymus, heart, brain, lung, kidney, liver, and ovary. In addition, a 2.8-kb transcript was present in peripheral blood, testis, and placenta. On "zoo blots," this gene was shown to be evolutionarily conserved in 10 mammalian species as well as in chicken, frog, and fish. We have named this gene ELL (for eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukemia gene). A highly basic, lysine-rich motif of the predicted ELL protein is homologous to similar regions of several proteins, including the DNA-binding domain of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The characterization of the normal functions of ELL as well as its altered function when fused to MLL will be critical to further our understanding of the mechanisms of leukemogenesis. Images PMID:7991593

  9. Four Novel Loci (19q13, 6q24, 12q24, and 5q14) Influence the Microcirculation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ikram, M. Arfan; Wang, Jie Jin; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Breteler, Monique M. B.; Cheung, Ning; Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Kao, Linda; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Smith, Albert Vernon; Glazer, Nicole L.; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M.; Jonasson, Fridbert; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Aspelund, Thor; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Taylor, Kent D.; Li, Xiaohui; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Xi, Quansheng; Sivakumaran, Theru A.; Mackey, David A.; MacGregor, Stuart; Martin, Nicholas G.; Young, Terri L.; Bis, Josh C.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hammond, Christopher J.; Andrew, Toby; Fahy, Samantha; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Scott, Rodney J.; Islam, F. M. Amirul; Rotter, Jerome I.; McAuley, Annie K.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tai, E. Shyong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Siscovick, David S.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Wong, Tien Y.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the microcirculation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Changes in retinal vascular caliber reflect early microvascular disease and predict incident cardiovascular events. We performed a genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with retinal vascular caliber. We analyzed data from four population-based discovery cohorts with 15,358 unrelated Caucasian individuals, who are members of the Cohort for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium, and replicated findings in four independent Caucasian cohorts (n = 6,652). All participants had retinal photography and retinal arteriolar and venular caliber measured from computer software. In the discovery cohorts, 179 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) spread across five loci were significantly associated (p<5.0×10−8) with retinal venular caliber, but none showed association with arteriolar caliber. Collectively, these five loci explain 1.0%–3.2% of the variation in retinal venular caliber. Four out of these five loci were confirmed in independent replication samples. In the combined analyses, the top SNPs at each locus were: rs2287921 (19q13; p = 1.61×10−25, within the RASIP1 locus), rs225717 (6q24; p = 1.25×10−16, adjacent to the VTA1 and NMBR loci), rs10774625 (12q24; p = 2.15×10−13, in the region of ATXN2,SH2B3 and PTPN11 loci), and rs17421627 (5q14; p = 7.32×10−16, adjacent to the MEF2C locus). In two independent samples, locus 12q24 was also associated with coronary heart disease and hypertension. Our population-based genome-wide association study demonstrates four novel loci associated with retinal venular caliber, an endophenotype of the microcirculation associated with clinical cardiovascular disease. These data provide further insights into the contribution and biological mechanisms of microcirculatory changes that underlie cardiovascular disease. PMID

  10. A headache presenting in the emergency room, a clinical manifestation of an unfortunate diagnosis (grade III left frontal anaplastic ependymoma with 1p deletion)

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Robles, B J; Hurtarte-Sandoval, A R; Harrison, R M; Cuevas, C C

    2013-01-01

    An 18-year-old girl presented with a headache and behavioural changes. She was found to have a frontal mass. Neuroimaging revealed an intra-axial mass, located at the left frontal cortical/subcortical region approximately 6×7, 5×7, 5 cm (TxApxL), having a heterogeneous density with cysts and calcification. She had total gross excision of the neoplasm. Histopathological examination revealed an anaplastic ependymoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation, a molecular cytogenetic test, reported deletion of 1p without deletion of 19q. The patient had a good postoperative improvement. PMID:23912654

  11. Deletion mapping on chromosome 1p in well-differentiated gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ezaki, T.; Yanagisawa, A.; Ohta, K.; Aiso, S.; Watanabe, M.; Hibi, T.; Kato, Y.; Nakajima, T.; Ariyama, T.; Inazawa, J.; Nakamura, Y.; Horii, A.

    1996-01-01

    To define the region on the short arm of chromosome 1 that is thought to include one or more tumour-suppressor genes for gastric cancers, we carried out loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies in 26 gastric adenocarcinomas, using three restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers and nine microsatellite markers. All tumours were informative with at least one locus; three revealed replication errors (RERs) at multiple microsatellite loci, and interstitial or telomeric allelic deletions were observed in 12 cases. Deletion mapping of these tumours defined a commonly deleted region between two loci, D1S201 and D1S197, that are 13 cM apart. As two loci within the commonly deleted region, D1S57 (pYNZ2) and D1S62 (pTHI54), were mapped respectively to 1p35 and 1p34.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridisation, we conclude that a locus likely to contain a tumour-suppressor gene for gastric cancer is located within a 13 cM region encompassing two chromosomal bands. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8595154

  12. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for markers on chromosome 8q in a human chondrosarcoma cell line and in a tumor that developed in a man with Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME)

    SciTech Connect

    Raskind, W.H.; Conrad, E.U.; Robbins, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    HME is an autosomal dominant disorder in which multiple benign cartilage-capped lesions develop on otherwise histologically normal bones. The majority of chondrosarcomas are sporadic, but the presence of HME greatly increases the risk to develop this tumor. Sarcoma may also arise in sporadically-occurring exostoses. The study of inherited disorders that predispose to malignant diseases has led to discoveries regarding molecular changes involved in carcinogenesis in general. In an analogous manner, somatic mutations in HME genes may be responsible for sporadic exostoses and/or chondrosarcomas. HME is genetically heterogeneous; EXT genes have been assigned to 8q24, the pericentromeric region of 11 and 19p11-p13. We compared chondrosarcoma cell DNA to DNA from white blood cells for LOH at polymorphic loci in these 3 regions. LOH for 4 of 5 markers in 8q24 was detected in a chondrosarcoma that arose in a man with HME. Heterozygosity was retained for markers and chromosomes 11 and 19. We then evaluated cultured cells from 10 sporadic chondrosarcomas. LOH for multiple markers in 8q24 was detected in a cell line, Ch-1, established from an aggressive tumor, but not in 9 other tumors. Of the 9 tumors studied, only the Ch-1 line exhibited LOH for chromosome 11 markers. LOH for a 19p marker was not detected in any of 6 tumors examined, including Ch-1. The karyotype of Ch-1 contains many structurally rearranged chromosomes. The two chromosome 11s appear normal but both chromosome 8 homologues have been replaced by der(8)t(5;8)(q22;q21.2). LOH at 8q24 was also detected in the uncultured tumor. These results suggest that genes responsible for HME may have tumor suppressor functions whose loss may be related to the development of a subset of chondrosarcomas.

  13. A t(17;19)(q22;p13.3) Involving TCF3, a t(1;9)(p13;p13), and a 5' IGH Deletion in a Case of Adult B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chow, R; Shabsovich, D; Schiller, G; Kallen, M; Tirado, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    TCF3 (19p13.3) abnormalities are relatively common in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). The t(1;19)(q23;p13) involving PBX1 is the most common of these rearrangements. The t(17;19)(q22;p13.3), resulting in the TCF3-HLF fusion gene, is also seen in B-ALL and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Herein, we present the case of a 25-year-old male diagnosed with B-ALL whose initial karyotype showed a t(17;19)(q22p13.3). FISH confirmed TCF3 involvement and also revealed a 5' IGH deletion. After treatment, the patient relapsed, at which point conventional cytogenetic studies showed a t(17;19), loss of the 5' IGH region, and a t(3;10) not seen in initial studies. After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the patient relapsed again, at which point conventional cytogenetic studies showed a complex karyotype with t(17;19), t(1;9)(p13;p13), and structural anomalies involving chromosomes 5, 7, and 14, but no IGH abnormalities by FISH. The t(1;9) has been shown to involve PAX5, which plays numerous regulatory roles in B-cell differentiation. Other PAX5 rearrangements have been detected in B-ALL cases of young adults and adolescents, but with unclear clinical significance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of t(17;19)-ALL with concomitant 5' IGH deletion and t(1;9)(p13;p13) potentially involving PAX5, albeit at different time points in disease progression. This case provides insight into the clonal evolution of t(17;19)-ALL and the potential involvement of PAX5 and IGH aberrations in the evolution of this malignancy. PMID:27183380

  14. 1p36 deletion syndrome: an update

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Valerie K; Zaveri, Hitisha P; Scott, Daryl A

    2015-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are the most common terminal deletions in humans. Medical problems commonly caused by terminal deletions of 1p36 include developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, short stature, distinctive facial features, brain anomalies, orofacial clefting, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. Although 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered clinically recognizable, there is significant phenotypic variation among affected individuals. This variation is due, at least in part, to the genetic heterogeneity seen in 1p36 deletions which include terminal and interstitial deletions of varying lengths located throughout the 30 Mb of DNA that comprise chromosome 1p36. Array-based copy number variant analysis can easily identify genomic regions of 1p36 that are deleted in an affected individual. However, predicting the phenotype of an individual based solely on the location and extent of their 1p36 deletion remains a challenge since most of the genes that contribute to 1p36-related phenotypes have yet to be identified. In addition, haploinsufficiency of more than one gene may contribute to some phenotypes. In this article, we review recent successes in the effort to map and identify the genes and genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36-related phenotypes. In particular, we highlight evidence implicating MMP23B, GABRD, SKI, PRDM16, KCNAB2, RERE, UBE4B, CASZ1, PDPN, SPEN, ECE1, HSPG2, and LUZP1 in various 1p36 deletion phenotypes. PMID:26345236

  15. Carboxyarabinitol-1-P phosphatase of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Kobza, J.; Moore, B.d.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The activity of carboxyarabinitol-1-P (CA1P) phosphatase was detected in clarified stromal extracts by the generation of {sup 14}C-carboxyarabinitol from {sup 14}C-CA1P. Carboxyribitol-1-P dependent activity was 3% of the CA1P dependent activity, indicating the enzyme was specific for CA1P. Inclusion of DTT in the assay was required for maximum velocity, but it appears that the enzyme is not regulated by thioredoxin in vivo. Activity o f the CA1P phosphatase was stimulated by RuBP, NADPH and FBP, though the latter two metabolites were required at nonphysiological concentrations in order to achieve significant stimulation. Contrary to a previous report on purified tobacco enzyme, ATP stimulated the CA1P phosphatase activity. In the presence of 1 mM RuBP or ATP, rates of 2 or 3 {mu}mol mg{sup {minus}1} Chl h{sup {minus}1}, respectively, were observed at 1 mM CA1P. These rates were 3-4 fold higher than the rate observed in the absence of effectors and are 2-4 times the in vivo rate of degradation of CA1P during dark/light transitions. The rates from bean were about 7 fold higher than rates reported for the enzyme from tobacco. Changes in the levels of ATP and RuBP associated with dark/light transitions could modulate the enzyme activity in vivo, but it remains to be established if this is the only mechanism for the required regulation of the enzyme.

  16. Role of Plc1p in regulation of Mcm1p-dependent genes

    PubMed Central

    Guzinska, Katarzyna; Varghese, Roger; Vancura, Ales

    2009-01-01

    In budding yeast, phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (Plc1p encoded by PLC1 gene) and several inositol polyphosphate kinases represent a nuclear pathway for synthesis of inositol polyphosphates (InsPs) that are involved in several aspects of DNA and RNA metabolism, including transcriptional regulation. Plc1p-produced InsP3 is phosphorylated by Ipk2p/Arg82p to yield InsP4/InsP5. Ipk2p/Arg82p is also a component of ArgR-Mcm1p complex that regulates transcription of genes involved in arginine metabolism. The role of Ipk2p/Arg82p in this complex is to stabilize the essential MADS box protein Mcm1p. Consequently, ipk2Δ cells display reduced level of Mcm1p and attenuated expression of Mcm1p-dependent genes. Since plc1Δ cells display aberrant expression of several groups of genes, including genes involved in stress response, the objective of this study was to determine whether Plc1p also affects expression of Mcm1p-dependent genes. We report here that not only ipk2Δ, but also plc1Δ cells display decreased expression of Mcm1p-dependent genes. However, Plc1p is not involved in stabilization of Mcm1p and affects transcription of Mcm1p-dependent genes by a different mechanism, probably involving regulation of chromatin remodeling complexes. PMID:19459978

  17. Genetic variants at 1q32.1, 10q11.2 and 19q13.41 are associated with prostate-specific antigen for prostate cancer screening in two Korean population-based cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soriul; Shin, Chol; Jee, Sun Ha

    2015-02-10

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels are affected by non-cancerous conditions such as benign prostatic hyperplasia, inflammations, and inherited factors. To search for genetic variants associated with PSA levels, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a two-stage design. A total of 554 men from the Korean Cancer Prevention Study-II were used as a discovery stage and 1575 men collected by the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study were used as a replication stage. Analysis by Genome-wide Human single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array 5.0 was performed by using DNAs derived from venous blood. We analyzed the association between genetic variants and PSA levels using multivariate linear regression models, including age as a covariate. We detected 12 genome-wide significant signals on chromosome 1q32.1, 10q11.2, and 19q13.41 between PSA levels and SNPs. The top SNP associated with log PSA levels was rs2153904 in SLC45A3 (p values, 5.24×10(-9) to 2.00×10(-6)). We also investigated GWAS using 754 subjects from KCPS-II cohort whether our genome-wide significant loci were associated with a risk of prostate cancer (PCa) (200 PCa cases and 554 controls). Three of the SNPs on 10q11.2, rs7077830, rs2611489, and rs4631830, were associated with a risk of PCa. However, two loci, 1q32.1 and 19q13, were not significantly associated with a PCa risk. We suggest that our results for some but not all PCa risk SNPs to be associated with PSA levels could be used as an evidence for the advance of individual PCa screening strategies, such as applying a personalized cutoff value for PSA. PMID:25434496

  18. Cometary gas relations 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, Marcos R.

    Photographic and photoelectric observations of comet 1P/Halley's ionised gas coma from CO+ at 4,250 Å and neutral gas coma from CN at 3,880 Å were part of the Bochum Halley Monitoring Program, conducted at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, from February 17 to April 17, 1986. In this spectral range it is possible to see the continuum formation, motion and expansion of plasma and neutral gas structures. To observe the morphology of these structures, 32 CO+ photos (glass plates) from comet 1P/Halley obtained by means of an interference filter have been analysed. They have a field of view of 28.6 × 28.6 degrees and were obtained from March 29 to April 17, 1986 with exposure times between 20 and 120 minutes. All photos were digitised with a PDS 2020 GM microdensitometer. After digitisation, the data were reduced to relative intensities, and those with proper calibrations were also converted to absolute intensities, expressed in terms of column densities. The CO+ absolute intensity values still contain the continuum intensity. To calculate the CO+ column density it is necessary to subtract this continuum intensity. The relations between CO+ and CN in average column density values (NCO+/NCN) are 11.6 for a circular diaphragm with average diameter (Φ) of 6.1 arcminutes which corresponds to a distance from the nucleus (ρ) equal to 6.3 × 104 km; 20.0 for Φ = 7.1 arcminutes and ρ = 7.3 × 104 km; 8.1 for Φ = 8.5 arcminutes and ρ = 8.7 × 104 km; 35.6 for Φ = 11.9 arcminutes and ρ = 1.2 × 105 km; and 31.3 for Φ = 16.7 arcminutes and ρ = 1.7 × 105 km. These values are in perfect agreement with the data for short distances (ρ from 3.9 × 103 to 1.2 × 104 km) and small slit diameters (Φ from 0.4 to 1.2 arcminutes). With the use of diaphragms with large diameters it is possible to get some information about the outer coma of the comet (in this paper, from 60,000 until 170,000 km away from the nucleus). At these distances, the CO+ column density

  19. Combined Dup(7)(q22.1q32.2), Inv(7)(q31.31q31.33), and Ins(7;19)(q22.1;p13.2p13.2) in a 12-year-old boy with developmental delay and various dysmorphism.

    PubMed

    Frühmesser, Anne; Erdel, Martin; Duba, Hans-Christoph; Fauth, Christine; Amberger, Albert; Utermann, Gerd; Zschocke, Johannes; Kotzot, Dieter

    2013-07-01

    De novo combined duplications/inversions are very rare chromosomal rearrangements. For chromosome 7 just some dozen cases of duplications of various parts of the long arm have been published. We report on a 12-year-old boy with muscular hypotonia, global developmental delay, short stature, and various facial dysmorphism including frontal bossing, temporal narrowing, slightly down-slanting palpebral fissures, a broad nasal root, a long philtrum, a thin and tented upper lip, a drooping lower lip, micrognathia, prominent ears, a short neck, and a low posterior hairline. Karyotype analysis and molecular investigations revealed a complex de novo chromosomal rearrangement on 7q. FISH analysis with locus specific YACs and BACs and SNP array with the Illumina(®) HumanOmni1-Quad v1.0 BeadChip disclosed a direct duplication in the long arm of chromosome 7 (q22.1→q32.2) and an inversion located at the breakpoint between the two copies of the duplication (q31.31→q31.33). In addition, breakpoint characterization at the molecular level revealed a 386 bp insertion carrying two Alu elements of chromosome 19p13.2 between the two copies of the duplication. By a comparison of the SNP haplotypes of the derivative chromosome of the patient and both parents a two-step formation during spermatogenesis was suggested as the most likely mechanism of formation. PMID:23608969

  20. Paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with t(1;19)(q23;p13): clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of 47 cases from the Nordic countries treated according to NOPHO protocols.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mette K; Autio, Kirsi; Barbany, Gisela; Borgström, Georg; Cavelier, Lucia; Golovleva, Irina; Heim, Sverre; Heinonen, Kristina; Hovland, Randi; Johannsson, Johann H; Johansson, Bertil; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Nordgren, Ann; Palmqvist, Lars; Forestier, Erik

    2011-10-01

    The translocation t(1;19)(q23;p13)/der(19)t(1;19) is a risk stratifying aberration in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP ALL) in the Nordic countries. We have identified 47 children/adolescents with t(1;19)/der(19)t(1;19)-positive BCP ALL treated on two successive Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) protocols between 1992 and 2007 and have reviewed the clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of these cases, comprising 1·8% of all cases. The translocation was balanced in 15 cases (32%) and unbalanced in 29 cases (62%). The most common additional chromosome abnormalities were del(9p), i(9q), del(6q), and del(13q). The median age was 7 years, the median white blood cell (WBC) count was 16 × 10(9)/l, and the female/male ratio was 1·2. The predicted event-free survival (EFS) at 5 and 10 years was 0·79, whereas the predicted overall survival (OS) at 5 and 10 years was 0·85 and 0·82, respectively. Nine patients had a bone marrow relapse after a median of 23 months; no patient had a central nervous system relapse. Additional cytogenetic abnormalities, age, gender, WBC count or whether the t(1;19) was balanced or unbalanced did not influence EFS or OS. Compared to cases with t(12,21) and high hyperdiploidy, EFS was similar, but overall survival was worse in patients with t(1;19)/der(19)t(1;19) (P = 0·004). PMID:21902680

  1. The IPP gene is assigned to human chromosome 1p32-1p22

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Yeh, A.; Huang, R.C.C. ); Jabs, E.W.; Li, Xiang ); Dracopoli, N.C. )

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported the isolation and characterization of a novel mouse gene that is promoted by an intracisternal A-particle (IAP) LTR and is expressed in placental tissue (mouse IAP-promoted placenta gene, Ipp). Based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) studies using inbred strains and recombinant inbred (RI) mice, we have established the linkage between the Ipp gene and several loci on distal mouse chromosome 4. In this publication, we report the partial sequence of a human cDNA clone isolated from a human placental library that has 83% identity to the 3[prime]region of the Ipp cDNA. For human chromosome mapping, two 20-base oligonucleotides within the homologous region were used as primers for polymerase chain reactions (PCR) to chromosome-specific DNAs from two somatic cell hybrid panels and several hybrid cell lines carrying breakpoints on human chromosome 1p. We have assigned this human homolog of the Ipp (IPP) gene to chromosome 1 at 1p32-1p22, based on analysis of PCR products. With this assignment, the homology between mouse chromosome 4 and human chromosome 1 is maintained (5). 7 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Exogenous S1P Exposure Potentiates Ischemic Stroke Damage That Is Reduced Possibly by Inhibiting S1P Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eunjung; Han, Jeong Eun; Jeon, Sejin; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Choi, Ji Woong; Chun, Jerold

    2015-01-01

    Initial and recurrent stroke produces central nervous system (CNS) damage, involving neuroinflammation. Receptor-mediated S1P signaling can influence neuroinflammation and has been implicated in cerebral ischemia through effects on the immune system. However, S1P-mediated events also occur within the brain itself where its roles during stroke have been less well studied. Here we investigated the involvement of S1P signaling in initial and recurrent stroke by using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (M/R) model combined with analyses of S1P signaling. Gene expression for S1P receptors and involved enzymes was altered during M/R, supporting changes in S1P signaling. Direct S1P microinjection into the normal CNS induced neuroglial activation, implicating S1P-initiated neuroinflammatory responses that resembled CNS changes seen during initial M/R challenge. Moreover, S1P microinjection combined with M/R potentiated brain damage, approximating a model for recurrent stroke dependent on S1P and suggesting that reduction in S1P signaling could ameliorate stroke damage. Delivery of FTY720 that removes S1P signaling with chronic exposure reduced damage in both initial and S1P-potentiated M/R-challenged brain, while reducing stroke markers like TNF-α. These results implicate direct S1P CNS signaling in the etiology of initial and recurrent stroke that can be therapeutically accessed by S1P modulators acting within the brain. PMID:26576074

  3. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P{sub 1} receptor by a novel competitive S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of a newly developed S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficacy of S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P{sub 1}) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P{sub 1} and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P{sub 1} antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  4. Regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation in endothelial cells by S1P1 and S1P3.

    PubMed

    Tölle, M; Klöckl, L; Wiedon, A; Zidek, W; van der Giet, M; Schuchardt, M

    2016-08-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a crucial role in vascular homeostasis. Lysophospholipid interaction with sphingosine 1-phosphat (S1P) receptors results in eNOS activation in different cells. In endothelial cells, eNOS activation via S1P1 or S1P3 was shown controversially. The aim of this study is to investigate the meaning of both S1P receptors for eNOS activation in human endothelial cells. Therefore, several S1P1 and S1P3 agonists in combination with antagonists and specific RNAi approach were used. eNOS activation was measured in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) via DAF2-DA-based fluorescence microscopy. For investigation of the signaling pathway, agonists/antagonist studies, RNAi approach, Luminex™ multiplex, and Western Blot were used. In HUVEC, both the S1P1 agonist AUY954 as well as the S1P1,3 agonist FTY720P induced eNOS activation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Other S1P1 agonists activated eNOS to a lesser extent. The AUY954-induced eNOS activation was blocked by the S1P1 antagonist W146, the combination of W146 and the S1P3 antagonist CAY10444 and the S1P1,3 antagonist VPC23019, but not by CAY10444 indicating the meaning of S1P1 for the AUY954-induced eNOS activation. The FTY720P-induced eNOS activation was blocked only by the combination of W146 and CAY10444 and the combined S1P1,3 antagonist VPC23019, but not by W146 or CAY10444 indicating the importance of both S1P1 and S1P3 for FTY720-induced eNOS activation. These results were confirmed using specific siRNA against S1P1 and S1P3. The S1P1,3 activation results in Akt phosphorylation and subsequent activation of eNOS via phosphorylation at serine(1177) and dephosphorylation at threonine(495). Beside former investigations with rather unspecific S1P receptor activation these data show potent selective S1P1 activation by using AUY954 and with selective S1P receptor inhibition evidence was provided that both S1P1 and S1P3 lead to downstream activation of eNOS in

  5. Determinants of Swe1p Degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, John N.; Theesfeld, Chandra L.; Harrison, Jacob C.; Bardes, Elaine S. G.; Lew, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    Swe1p, the sole Wee1-family kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is synthesized during late G1 and is then degraded as cells proceed through the cell cycle. However, Swe1p degradation is halted by the morphogenesis checkpoint, which responds to insults that perturb bud formation. The Swe1p stabilization promotes cell cycle arrest through Swe1p-mediated inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc28p until the cells can recover from the perturbation and resume bud formation. Swe1p degradation involves the relocalization of Swe1p from the nucleus to the mother-bud neck, and neck targeting requires the Swe1p-interacting protein Hsl7p. In addition, Swe1p degradation is stimulated by its substrate, cyclin/Cdc28p, and Swe1p is thought to be a target of the ubiquitin ligase SCFMet30 acting with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34p. The basis for regulation of Swe1p degradation by the morphogenesis checkpoint remains unclear, and in order to elucidate that regulation we have dissected the Swe1p degradation pathway in more detail, yielding several novel findings. First, we show here that Met30p (and by implication SCFMet30) is not, in fact, required for Swe1p degradation. Second, cyclin/Cdc28p does not influence Swe1p neck targeting, but can directly phosphorylate Swe1p, suggesting that it acts downstream of neck targeting in the Swe1p degradation pathway. Third, a screen for functional but nondegradable mutants of SWE1 identified two small regions of Swe1p that are key to its degradation. One of these regions mediates interaction of Swe1p with Hsl7p, showing that the Swe1p-Hsl7p interaction is critical for Swe1p neck targeting and degradation. The other region did not appear to affect interactions with known Swe1p regulators, suggesting that other as-yet-unknown regulators exist. PMID:12388757

  6. Roles for lysophospholipid S1P receptors in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Kyoko; Chun, Jerold

    2011-02-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been highlighted by the efficacy of FTY720 (fingolimod), which upon phosphorylation can modulate S1P receptor activities. FTY720 has become the first oral treatment for relapsing MS that was approved by the FDA in September 2010. Phosphorylated FTY720 modulates four of the five known S1P receptors (S1P(1), S1P(3), S1P(4), and S1P(5)) at high affinity. Studies in human MS and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), have revealed that FTY720 exposure alters lymphocyte trafficking via sequestration of auto-aggressive lymphocytes within lymphoid organs, representing the current understanding of its mechanism of action. These effects primarily involve S1P(1), which is thought to attenuate inflammatory insults in the central nervous system (CNS). In addition, FTY720's actions may involve direct effects on S1P receptor-mediated signaling in CNS cells, based upon the known expression of S1P receptors in CNS cell types relevant to MS, access to the CNS through the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and in vitro studies. These data implicate lysophospholipid signaling--via S1P(1) and perhaps other lysophospholipid receptors--in therapeutic approaches to MS and potentially other diseases with immunological and/or neurological components. PMID:20979571

  7. The yeast acyltransferase Sct1p regulates fatty acid desaturation by competing with the desaturase Ole1p

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Cedric H.; Vittone, Elisa; Scherer, Max; Houweling, Martin; Liebisch, Gerhard; Brouwers, Jos F.; de Kroon, Anton I.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The degree of fatty acid unsaturation, that is, the ratio of unsaturated versus saturated fatty acyl chains, determines membrane fluidity. Regulation of expression of the fatty acid desaturase Ole1p was hitherto the only known mechanism governing the degree of fatty acid unsaturation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report a novel mechanism for the regulation of fatty acid desaturation that is based on competition between Ole1p and the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase Sct1p/Gat2p for the common substrate C16:0-CoA. Deletion of SCT1 decreases the content of saturated fatty acids, whereas overexpression of SCT1 dramatically decreases the desaturation of fatty acids and affects phospholipid composition. Whereas overexpression of Ole1p increases desaturation, co-overexpression of Ole1p and Sct1p results in a fatty acid composition intermediate between those obtained upon overexpression of the enzymes separately. On the basis of these results, we propose that Sct1p sequesters C16:0-CoA into lipids, thereby shielding it from desaturation by Ole1p. Ta­king advantage of the growth defect conferred by overexpressing SCT1, we identified the acyltransferase Cst26p/Psi1p as a regulator of Sct1p activity by affecting the phosphorylation state and overexpression level of Sct1p. The level of Sct1p phosphorylation is increased when cells are supplemented with saturated fatty acids, demonstrating the physiological relevance of our findings. PMID:22323296

  8. Structural Characterization of Tip20p and Dsl1p, Subunits of the Dsl1p Vesicle Tethering Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, A.; Ren, Y; Jeffrey, P; Hughson, F

    2009-01-01

    Multisubunit tethering complexes are essential for intracellular trafficking and have been proposed to mediate the initial interaction between vesicles and the membranes with which they fuse. Here we report initial structural characterization of the Dsl1p complex, whose three subunits are essential for trafficking from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Crystal structures reveal that two of the three subunits, Tip20p and Dsl1p, resemble known subunits of the exocyst complex, establishing a structural connection among several multisubunit tethering complexes and implying that many of their subunits are derived from a common progenitor. We show, moreover, that Tip20p and Dsl1p interact directly via N-terminal alpha-helices. Finally, we establish that different Dsl1p complex subunits bind independently to different ER SNARE proteins. Our results map out two alternative protein-interaction networks capable of tethering COPI-coated vesicles, via the Dsl1p complex, to ER membranes.

  9. Familial partial duplication (1)(p21p31)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoechstetter, L.; Soukup, S.; Schorry, E.K.

    1995-11-20

    A partial duplication (1)(p21p31), resulting from a maternal direct insertion (13,1) (q22p21p31), was found in a 30-year-old woman with mental retardation, cleft palate, and multiple minor anomalies. Two other affected and deceased relatives were presumed to have the same chromosome imbalance. Duplication 1p cases are reviewed. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Control of Swe1p degradation by the morphogenesis checkpoint.

    PubMed Central

    Sia, R A; Bardes, E S; Lew, D J

    1998-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a cell cycle checkpoint coordinates mitosis with bud formation. Perturbations that transiently depolarize the actin cytoskeleton cause delays in bud formation, and a 'morphogenesis checkpoint' detects the actin perturbation and imposes a G2 delay through inhibition of the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc28p. The tyrosine kinase Swe1p, homologous to wee1 in fission yeast, is required for the checkpoint-mediated G2 delay. In this report, we show that Swe1p stability is regulated both during the normal cell cycle and in response to the checkpoint. Swe1p is stable during G1 and accumulates to a peak at the end of S phase or in early G2, when it becomes unstable and is degraded rapidly. Destabilization of Swe1p in G2 and M phase depends on the activity of Cdc28p in complexes with B-type cyclins. Several different perturbations of actin organization all prevent Swe1p degradation, leading to the persistence or further accumulation of Swe1p, and cell cycle delay in G2. PMID:9822611

  11. Crystal Structure of the Yeast Nicotinamidase Pnc1p

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gang; Taylor, Alexander B.; McAlister-Henn, Lee; Hart, P. John

    2007-01-01

    The yeast nicotinamidase Pnc1p acts in transcriptional silencing by reducing levels of nicotinamide, an inhibitor of the histone deacetylase Sir2p. The Pnc1p structure was determined at 2.9 Å resolution using MAD and MIRAS phasing methods after inadvertent crystallization during the pursuit of the structure of histidine-tagged yeast isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). Pnc1p displays a cluster of surface histidine residues likely responsible for its co-fractionation with IDH from Ni2+-coupled chromatography resins. Researchers expressing histidine-tagged proteins in yeast should be aware of the propensity of Pnc1p to crystallize, even when overwhelmed in concentration by the protein of interest. The protein assembles into extended helical arrays interwoven to form an unusually robust, yet porous superstructure. Comparison of the Pnc1p structure with those of three homologous bacterial proteins reveals a common core fold punctuated by amino acid insertions unique to each protein. These insertions mediate the self-interactions that define the distinct higher order oligomeric states attained by these molecules. Pnc1p also acts on pyrazinamide, a substrate analog converted by the nicotinamidase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis into a product toxic to that organism. However, we find no evidence for detrimental effects of the drug on yeast cell growth. PMID:17382284

  12. Structural biology of the S1P1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Michael A; Peach, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The sphingosine 1 phosphate receptor family has been studied widely since the initial discovery of its first member, endothelium differentiation gene 1. Since this initial discovery, the family has been renamed and the primary member of the family, the S1P1 receptor, has been targeted for a variety of disease indications and successfully drugged for the treatment of patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of the S1P1 receptor has been determined by X-ray crystallography and the specifics of the sphingosine 1 phosphate ligand binding pocket mapped. Key structural features for the S1P1 receptor will be reviewed and the potential binding modes of additional pharmacologically active agents against the receptor will be analyzed in an effort to better understand the structural basis of important receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:24728592

  13. Spectroscopic and Biochemical Characterization of Heme Binding to Yeast Dap1p and Mouse PGRMC1p+

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Kaushik; Thompson, Alisha M.; Oh, Eric; Shi, Xiaoli; Goldbeck, Robert A.; Zhiwu, Zhu; Vulpe, Chris; Holman, Theodore R.

    2008-01-01

    Yeast damage associated response protein (Dap1p) and mouse progesterone receptor membrane component-1 protein (mPGRMC1p) belong to a highly conserved class of putative membrane-associated progesterone binding proteins (MAPR), with Dap1p and inner zone antigen (IZA), the rat homologue of mPGRMC1p, recently being reported to bind heme. While primary structure analysis reveals similarities to the cytochrome b5 motif, neither of the two axial histidines responsible for ligation to the heme are present in any of the MAPR proteins. In the current paper, EPR, MCD, CD, UV-vis and general biochemical methods have been used to characterize the nature of heme binding in both Dap1p and a His-tagged, membrane anchor-truncated mPGRMC1p. As isolated, Dap1p is a tetramer which can be converted to a dimer upon addition of 150 mM salt. The heme is non-covalently attached, with a maximal, in vitro, heme loading of approximately 30%, for both proteins. CD and fluorescence spectroscopies indicate a well ordered structure, suggesting the low heme loading is probably not due to improperly folded protein. EPR confirmed a five coordinate, high-spin, ferric resting state for both proteins, indicating one axial amino acid ligand, in contrast to the six coordinate, low-spin, ferric state of cytochrome b5. The MCD spectrum confirmed this conclusion for Dap1p and indicated the axial ligand is most likely a tyrosine and not a histidine, nor a cysteine, however an aspartic acid residue could not be conclusively ruled out. Potential axial ligands, which are conserved in all MAPR’s, were mutated (Y78F, D118A and Y138F) and purified to homogeneity. The mutants Y78F and D118A were found to bind heme, however, Y138F did not. This result is consistent with the MCD data and indicates that Tyr138 is most likely the axial ligand to the heme in Dap1p. PMID:16342963

  14. Genetics Home Reference: 1p36 deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1p36, and clinical characterization of the syndrome. Am J Hum Genet. 2003 May;72(5):1200-12. Epub 2003 Apr 8. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Lahortiga I, Vázquez I, Belloni E, Román JP, Gasparini P, Novo FJ, Zudaire I, Pelicci PG, Hernández JM, Calasanz ...

  15. TVENT1P. Gas-Dynamic Transients Flow Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Eyberger, L.

    1987-09-01

    TVENT1P predicts flows and pressures in a ventilation system or other air pathway caused by pressure transients, such as a tornado. For an analytical model to simulate an actual system, it must have (1) the same arrangement of components in a network of flow paths; (2) the same friction characteristics; (3) the same boundary pressures; (4) the same capacitance; and (5) the same forces that drive the air. A specific set of components used for constructing the analytical model includes filters, dampers, ducts, blowers, rooms, or volume connected at nodal points to form networks. The effects of a number of similar components can be lumped into a single one. TVENT1P contains a material transport algorithm and features for turning blowers off and on, changing blower speeds, changing the resistance of dampers and filters, and providing a filter model to handle very high flows. These features make it possible to depict a sequence of events during a single run. Component properties are varied using time functions. The filter model is not used by the code unless it is specified by the user. The basic results of a TVENT1P solution are flows in branches and pressures at nodes. A postprocessor program, PLTTEX, is included to produce the plots specified in the TVENT1P input. PLTTEX uses the proprietary CA-DISSPLA graphics software.

  16. Late-stage optimization of a tercyclic class of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Horan, Joshua C; Kuzmich, Daniel; Liu, Pingrong; DiSalvo, Darren; Lord, John; Mao, Can; Hopkins, Tamara D; Yu, Hui; Harcken, Christian; Betageri, Raj; Hill-Drzewi, Melissa; Patenaude, Lori; Patel, Monica; Fletcher, Kimberly; Terenzzio, Donna; Linehan, Brian; Xia, Heather; Patel, Mita; Studwell, Debbie; Miller, Craig; Hickey, Eugene; Levin, Jeremy I; Smith, Dustin; Kemper, Raymond A; Modis, Louise K; Bannen, Lynne C; Chan, Diva S; Mac, Morrison B; Ng, Stephanie; Wang, Yong; Xu, Wei; Lemieux, René M

    2016-01-15

    Poor solubility and cationic amphiphilic drug-likeness were liabilities identified for a lead series of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 agonists originally developed from a high-throughput screening campaign. This work describes the subsequent optimization of these leads by balancing potency, selectivity, solubility and overall molecular charge. Focused SAR studies revealed favorable structural modifications that, when combined, produced compounds with overall balanced profiles. The low brain exposure observed in rat suggests that these compounds would be best suited for the potential treatment of peripheral autoimmune disorders. PMID:26687487

  17. A third major locus for autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia maps to 1p34.1-p32.

    PubMed Central

    Varret, M; Rabès, J P; Saint-Jore, B; Cenarro, A; Marinoni, J C; Civeira, F; Devillers, M; Krempf, M; Coulon, M; Thiart, R; Kotze, M J; Schmidt, H; Buzzi, J C; Kostner, G M; Bertolini, S; Pocovi, M; Rosa, A; Farnier, M; Martinez, M; Junien, C; Boileau, C

    1999-01-01

    Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), one of the most frequent hereditary disorders, is characterized by an isolated elevation of LDL particles that leads to premature mortality from cardiovascular complications. It is generally assumed that mutations in the LDLR and APOB genes account for ADH. We identified one large French pedigree (HC2) and 12 additional white families with ADH in which we excluded linkage to the LDLR and APOB, implicating a new locus we named "FH3." A LOD score of 3.13 at a recombination fraction of 0 was obtained at markers D1S2892 and D1S2722. We localized the FH3 locus to a 9-cM interval at 1p34.1-p32. We tested four regional markers in another set of 12 ADH families. Positive LOD scores were obtained in three pedigrees, whereas linkage was excluded in the others. Heterogeneity tests indicated linkage to FH3 in approximately 27% of these non-LDLR/non-APOB ADH families and implied a fourth locus. Radiation hybrid mapping located four candidate genes at 1p34.1-p32, outside the critical region, showing no identity with FH3. Our results show that ADH is genetically more heterogeneous than conventionally accepted. PMID:10205269

  18. A third major locus for autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia maps to 1p34.1-p32.

    PubMed

    Varret, M; Rabès, J P; Saint-Jore, B; Cenarro, A; Marinoni, J C; Civeira, F; Devillers, M; Krempf, M; Coulon, M; Thiart, R; Kotze, M J; Schmidt, H; Buzzi, J C; Kostner, G M; Bertolini, S; Pocovi, M; Rosa, A; Farnier, M; Martinez, M; Junien, C; Boileau, C

    1999-05-01

    Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), one of the most frequent hereditary disorders, is characterized by an isolated elevation of LDL particles that leads to premature mortality from cardiovascular complications. It is generally assumed that mutations in the LDLR and APOB genes account for ADH. We identified one large French pedigree (HC2) and 12 additional white families with ADH in which we excluded linkage to the LDLR and APOB, implicating a new locus we named "FH3." A LOD score of 3.13 at a recombination fraction of 0 was obtained at markers D1S2892 and D1S2722. We localized the FH3 locus to a 9-cM interval at 1p34.1-p32. We tested four regional markers in another set of 12 ADH families. Positive LOD scores were obtained in three pedigrees, whereas linkage was excluded in the others. Heterogeneity tests indicated linkage to FH3 in approximately 27% of these non-LDLR/non-APOB ADH families and implied a fourth locus. Radiation hybrid mapping located four candidate genes at 1p34.1-p32, outside the critical region, showing no identity with FH3. Our results show that ADH is genetically more heterogeneous than conventionally accepted. PMID:10205269

  19. Mso1p regulates membrane fusion through interactions with the putative N-peptide-binding area in Sec1p domain 1.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marion; Chernov, Konstantin; Turakainen, Hilkka; Wohlfahrt, Gerd; Pajunen, Maria; Savilahti, Harri; Jäntti, Jussi

    2010-04-15

    Sec1p/Munc18 (SM) family proteins regulate SNARE complex function in membrane fusion through their interactions with syntaxins. In addition to syntaxins, only a few SM protein interacting proteins are known and typically, their binding modes with SM proteins are poorly characterized. We previously identified Mso1p as a Sec1p-binding protein and showed that it is involved in membrane fusion regulation. Here we demonstrate that Mso1p and Sec1p interact at sites of exocytosis and that the Mso1p-Sec1p interaction site depends on a functional Rab GTPase Sec4p and its GEF Sec2p. Random and targeted mutagenesis of Sec1p, followed by analysis of protein interactions, indicates that Mso1p interacts with Sec1p domain 1 and that this interaction is important for membrane fusion. In many SM family proteins, domain 1 binds to a N-terminal peptide of a syntaxin family protein. The Sec1p-interacting syntaxins Sso1p and Sso2p lack the N-terminal peptide. We show that the putative N-peptide binding area in Sec1p domain 1 is important for Mso1p binding, and that Mso1p can interact with Sso1p and Sso2p. Our results suggest that Mso1p mimics N-peptide binding to facilitate membrane fusion. PMID:20181830

  20. S1P metabolism in cancer and other pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Weng In

    2010-01-01

    Nearly two decades ago, the sphingolipid metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate was discovered to function as a lipid mediator and regulator of cell proliferation. Since that time, sphingosine 1-phosphate has been shown to mediate a diverse array of fundamental biological processes including cell proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, vascular maturation and lymphocyte trafficking. Sphingosine 1-phosphate acts primarily via signaling through five ubiquitously expressed G protein-coupled receptors. Intracellular sphingosine 1-phosphate molecules are transported extracellularly and gain access to its cognate receptors for autocrine and paracrine fashion and for signaling at distant sites reached through blood and lymphatic circulation systems. Intracellular pools of sphingosine 1-phosphate available for signaling are tightly regulated by three enzymes that include sphinosine kinase, S1P lyase and S1P phosphatase. Alterations in S1P levels as well as the enzymes involved in its synthesis and catabolism have been observed in many types of malignancy. These enzymes are being evaluated for their role in mediating cancer formation and progression, as well as their potential to serve as targets of anti-cancer therapeutics. In this review, the impact of sphingosine 1-phosphate, its cognate receptors, and the enzymes of sphingosine 1-phosphate metabolism on cell survival, apoptosis, autophagy, cellular transformation, invasion, angiogenesis and hypoxia in relation to cancer biology and treatment are discussed. PMID:20167244

  1. Skp1p and the F-Box Protein Rcy1p Form a Non-SCF Complex Involved in Recycling of the SNARE Snc1p in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Galan, Jean-Marc; Wiederkehr, Andreas; Seol, Jae Hong; Haguenauer-Tsapis, Rosine; Deshaies, Raymond J.; Riezman, Howard; Peter, Matthias

    2001-01-01

    Skp1p–cullin–F-box protein (SCF) complexes are ubiquitin-ligases composed of a core complex including Skp1p, Cdc53p, Hrt1p, the E2 enzyme Cdc34p, and one of multiple F-box proteins which are thought to provide substrate specificity to the complex. Here we show that the F-box protein Rcy1p is required for recycling of the v-SNARE Snc1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rcy1p localized to areas of polarized growth, and this polarized localization required its CAAX box and an intact actin cytoskeleton. Rcy1p interacted with Skp1p in vivo in an F-box-dependent manner, and both deletion of its F box and loss of Skp1p function impaired recycling. In contrast, cells deficient in Cdc53p, Hrt1p, or Cdc34p did not exhibit recycling defects. Unlike the case for F-box proteins that are known to participate in SCF complexes, degradation of Rcy1p required neither its F box nor functional 26S proteasomes or other SCF core subunits. Importantly, Skp1p was the only major partner that copurified with Rcy1p. Our results thus suggest that a complex composed of Rcy1p and Skp1p but not other SCF components may play a direct role in recycling of internalized proteins. PMID:11287615

  2. Invasive filamentous growth of Candida albicans is promoted by Czf1p-dependent relief of Efg1p-mediated repression.

    PubMed Central

    Giusani, Angela D; Vinces, Marcelo; Kumamoto, Carol A

    2002-01-01

    Filamentation of Candida albicans occurs in response to many environmental cues. During growth within matrix, Efg1p represses filamentation and Czf1p relieves this repression. We propose that Czf1p interacts with Efg1p, altering its function. The complex regulation of filamentation may reflect the versatility of C. albicans as a pathogen. PMID:11973327

  3. Mso1p Regulates Membrane Fusion through Interactions with the Putative N-Peptide–binding Area in Sec1p Domain 1

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Marion; Chernov, Konstantin; Turakainen, Hilkka; Wohlfahrt, Gerd; Pajunen, Maria; Savilahti, Harri

    2010-01-01

    Sec1p/Munc18 (SM) family proteins regulate SNARE complex function in membrane fusion through their interactions with syntaxins. In addition to syntaxins, only a few SM protein interacting proteins are known and typically, their binding modes with SM proteins are poorly characterized. We previously identified Mso1p as a Sec1p-binding protein and showed that it is involved in membrane fusion regulation. Here we demonstrate that Mso1p and Sec1p interact at sites of exocytosis and that the Mso1p–Sec1p interaction site depends on a functional Rab GTPase Sec4p and its GEF Sec2p. Random and targeted mutagenesis of Sec1p, followed by analysis of protein interactions, indicates that Mso1p interacts with Sec1p domain 1 and that this interaction is important for membrane fusion. In many SM family proteins, domain 1 binds to a N-terminal peptide of a syntaxin family protein. The Sec1p-interacting syntaxins Sso1p and Sso2p lack the N-terminal peptide. We show that the putative N-peptide binding area in Sec1p domain 1 is important for Mso1p binding, and that Mso1p can interact with Sso1p and Sso2p. Our results suggest that Mso1p mimics N-peptide binding to facilitate membrane fusion. PMID:20181830

  4. RNA binding protein Pub1p regulates glycerol production and stress tolerance by controlling Gpd1p activity during winemaking.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Helena; Sepúlveda, Ana; Picazo, Cecilia; Matallana, Emilia; Aranda, Agustín

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol is a key yeast metabolite in winemaking because it contributes to improve the organoleptic properties of wine. It is also a cellular protective molecule that enhances the tolerance of yeasts to osmotic stress and promotes longevity. Thus, its production increases by genetic manipulation, which is of biotechnological and basic interest. Glycerol is produced by diverting glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate through the action of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (coded by genes GPD1 and GPD2). Here, we demonstrate that RNA-binding protein Pub1p regulates glycerol production by controlling Gpd1p activity. Its deletion does not alter GPD1 mRNA levels, but protein levels and enzymatic activity increase, which explains the higher intracellular glycerol concentration and greater tolerance to osmotic stress of the pub1∆ mutant. PUB1 deletion also enhances the activity of nicotinamidase, a longevity-promoting enzyme. Both enzymatic activities are partially located in peroxisomes, and we detected peroxisome formation during wine fermentation. The role of Pub1p in life span control depends on nutrient conditions and is related with the TOR pathway, and a major connection between RNA metabolism and the nutrient signaling response is established. PMID:26846624

  5. The Morphogenesis Checkpoint in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Cell Cycle Control of Swe1p Degradation by Hsl1p and Hsl7p

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, John N.; Longtine, Mark S.; Sia, Rey A. L.; Theesfeld, Chandra L.; Bardes, Elaine S. G.; Pringle, John R.; Lew, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Wee1 family kinase Swe1p is normally stable during G1 and S phases but is unstable during G2 and M phases due to ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. However, perturbations of the actin cytoskeleton lead to a stabilization and accumulation of Swe1p. This response constitutes part of a morphogenesis checkpoint that couples cell cycle progression to proper bud formation, but the basis for the regulation of Swe1p degradation by the morphogenesis checkpoint remains unknown. Previous studies have identified a protein kinase, Hsl1p, and a phylogenetically conserved protein of unknown function, Hsl7p, as putative negative regulators of Swe1p. We report here that Hsl1p and Hsl7p act in concert to target Swe1p for degradation. Both proteins are required for Swe1p degradation during the unperturbed cell cycle, and excess Hsl1p accelerates Swe1p degradation in the G2-M phase. Hsl1p accumulates periodically during the cell cycle and promotes the periodic phosphorylation of Hsl7p. Hsl7p can be detected in a complex with Swe1p in cell lysates, and the overexpression of Hsl7p or Hsl1p produces an effective override of the G2 arrest imposed by the morphogenesis checkpoint. These findings suggest that Hsl1p and Hsl7p interact directly with Swe1p to promote its recognition by the ubiquitination complex, leading ultimately to its destruction. PMID:10490630

  6. Usa1p Is Required for Optimal Function and Regulation of the Hrd1p Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation Ubiquitin Ligase*

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Sarah M.; Hampton, Randolph Y.

    2010-01-01

    Usa1p is a recently discovered member of the HRD ubiquitin ligase complex. The HRD pathway is a conserved route of ubiquitin-dependent, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) of numerous lumenal (ERAD-L) and membrane-anchored (ERAD-M) substrates. We have investigated Usa1p to understand its importance in HRD complex action. Usa1p was required for the optimal function of the Hrd1p E3 ubiquitin ligase; its loss caused deficient degradation of both membrane-associated and lumenal proteins. Furthermore, Usa1p functioned in regulation of Hrd1p by two mechanisms. First, Hrd1p self-degradation, which serves to limit the levels of uncomplexed E3, is absolutely dependent on Usa1p and the ubiquitin-like (Ubl) domain of Usa1p. We found that Usa1p allows Hrd1p degradation by promoting trans interactions between Hrd1p molecules. The Ubl domain of Usa1p was required specifically for Hrd1p self-ubiquitination but not for degradation of either ERAD-L or ERAD-M substrates. In addition, Usa1p was able to attenuate the activity-dependent toxicity of Hrd1p without compromising substrate degradation, indicating a separate role in ligase regulation that operates in parallel to stability control. Many of the described actions of Usa1p are distinct from those of Der1p, which is recruited to the HRD complex by Usa1p. Thus, this novel, conserved factor is broadly involved in the function and regulation of the HRD pathway of ERAD. PMID:19940128

  7. Gas relations in comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon

    Photographic and photoelectric observations of comet 1P/Halley's ionised gas coma from CO+ and neutral gas coma from CN were part of the Bochum Halley Monitoring Program, conducted at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, from February 17 to April 17, 1986. In this spectral range it is possible to see the continuum formation and expansion of plasma and neutral gas structures. To observe the morphology of these structures, 32 CO+ photos from comet 1P/Halley obtained by means of an interference filter have been analysed. The data were reduced to relative intensities, and those with proper calibrations were also converted to absolute intensities, expressed in terms of column densities. The relations between CO+ and CN in average column density values are 11.6 for a circular diaphragm with an average diameter (Φ) of 6.1 arcminutes which corresponds to a distance from the nucleus (ρ) equal to 6.3 × 104 km. These values are in perfect agreement with the data for short distances and small slit diameters. With the use of diaphragms with large diameters it is possible to get some information about the outer coma of the comet. At these distances, the CO+ column density changes only due to the geometrical dilution, because the CO+ parent molecules are already photoionised or photodissociated.

  8. Molecular Oxygen in Oort Cloud Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Schwehm, G.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the ROSINA mass spectrometer suite on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft discovered an abundant amount of molecular oxygen, O2, in the coma of Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko of O2/H2O = 3.80 ± 0.85%. It could be shown that O2 is indeed a parent species and that the derived abundances point to a primordial origin. Crucial questions are whether the O2 abundance is peculiar to comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko or Jupiter family comets in general, and also whether Oort cloud comets such as comet 1P/Halley contain similar amounts of molecular oxygen. We investigated mass spectra obtained by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer instrument during the flyby by the European Space Agency's Giotto probe of comet 1P/Halley. Our investigation indicates that a production rate of O2 of 3.7 ± 1.7% with respect to water is indeed compatible with the obtained Halley data and therefore that O2 might be a rather common and abundant parent species.

  9. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 signaling regulates receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) expression in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, Harunori; Kitano, Masayasu; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sato, Chieri; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto; Miyazawa, Keiji; Hla, Timothy; Sano, Hajime

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of S1P in MH7A cells was inhibited by specific Gi/Go inhibitors. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) signaling plays an important role in synovial cell proliferation and inflammatory gene expression by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synoviocytes. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of S1P/S1P1 signaling in the expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) in RA synoviocytes and CD4{sup +} T cells. We demonstrated MH7A cells, a human RA synovial cell line, and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Surprisingly, S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, S1P enhanced RANKL expression induced by stimulation with TNF-{alpha} in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. These effects of S1P in MH7A cells were inhibited by pretreatment with PTX, a specific Gi/Go inhibitor. These findings suggest that S1P/S1P1 signaling may play an important role in RANKL expression by MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling of RA synoviocytes is closely connected with synovial hyperplasia, inflammation, and RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RA. Thus, regulation of S1P/S1P1 signaling may become a novel therapeutic target for RA.

  10. Novel Protein Kinases Ark1p and Prk1p Associate with and Regulate the Cortical Actin Cytoskeleton in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cope, M.Jamie T.V.; Yang, Shirley; Shang, Ching; Drubin, David G.

    1999-01-01

    Ark1p (actin regulating kinase 1) was identified as a yeast protein that binds to Sla2p, an evolutionarily conserved cortical actin cytoskeleton protein. Ark1p and a second yeast protein, Prk1p, contain NH2-terminal kinase domains that are 70% identical. Together with six other putative kinases from a number of organisms, these proteins define a new protein kinase family that we have named the Ark family. Lack of both Ark1p and Prk1p resulted in the formation of large cytoplasmic actin clumps and severe defects in cell growth. These defects were rescued by wild-type, but not by kinase-dead versions of the proteins. Elevated levels of either Ark1p or Prk1p caused a number of actin and cell morphological defects that were not observed when the kinase-dead versions were overexpressed instead. Ark1p and Prk1p were shown to localize to actin cortical patches, making these two kinases the first signaling proteins demonstrated to be patch components. These results suggest that Ark1p and Prk1p may be downstream effectors of signaling pathways that control actin patch organization and function. Furthermore, results of double-mutant analyses suggest that Ark1p and Prk1p function in overlapping but distinct pathways that regulate the cortical actin cytoskeleton. PMID:10087264

  11. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E.; O’Carroll, Simon J.; Graham, E. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. PMID:26813587

  12. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Milka; Hinojosa, Marcela; Trombly, Daniel; Morin, Violeta; Stein, Janet; Stein, Gary; Javed, Amjad; Gutierrez, Soraya E.

    2016-01-01

    RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX), is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5’UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription. PMID:26901859

  13. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Milka; Hinojosa, Marcela; Trombly, Daniel; Morin, Violeta; Stein, Janet; Stein, Gary; Javed, Amjad; Gutierrez, Soraya E

    2016-01-01

    RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX), is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5'UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription. PMID:26901859

  14. The effect of the bioactive sphingolipids S1P and C1P on multipotent stromal cells--new opportunities in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Jeleń, Marta; Chrząstek, Klaudia; Grzesiak, Jakub; Meissner, Justyna

    2015-09-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) belong to a family of bioactive sphingolipids that act as important extracellular signaling molecules and chemoattractants. This study investigated the influence of S1P and C1P on the morphology, proliferation activity and osteogenic properties of rat multipotent stromal cells derived from bone marrow (BMSCs) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASCs). We show that S1P and C1P can influence mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), each in a different manner. S1P stimulation promoted the formation of cellular aggregates of BMSCs and ASCs, while C1P had an effect on the regular growth pattern and expanded intercellular connections, thereby increasing the proliferative activity. Although osteogenic differentiation of MSCs was enhanced by the addition of S1P, the effectiveness of osteoblast differentiation was more evident in BMSCs, particularly when biochemical and molecular marker levels were considered. The results of the functional osteogenic differentiation assay, which includes an evaluation of the efficiency of extracellular matrix mineralization (SEM-EDX), revealed the formation of numerous mineral aggregates in BMSC cultures stimulated with S1P. Our data demonstrated that in an appropriate combination, the bioactive sphingolipids S1P and C1P may find wide application in regenerative medicine, particularly in bone regeneration with the use of MSCs. PMID:26110483

  15. The checkpoint-dependent nuclear accumulation of Rho1p exchange factor Rgf1p is important for tolerance to chronic replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Sofía; Manjón, Elvira; García, Patricia; Sunnerhagen, Per; Sánchez, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors control many aspects of cell morphogenesis by turning on Rho-GTPases. The fission yeast exchange factor Rgf1p (Rho gef1) specifically regulates Rho1p during polarized growth and localizes to cortical sites. Here we report that Rgf1p is relocalized to the cell nucleus during the stalled replication caused by hydroxyurea (HU). Import to the nucleus is mediated by a nuclear localization sequence at the N-terminus of Rgf1p, whereas release into the cytoplasm requires two leucine-rich nuclear export sequences at the C-terminus. Moreover, Rgf1p nuclear accumulation during replication arrest depends on the 14-3-3 chaperone Rad24p and the DNA replication checkpoint kinase Cds1p. Both proteins control the nuclear accumulation of Rgf1p by inhibition of its nuclear export. A mutant, Rgf1p-9A, that substitutes nine serine potential phosphorylation Cds1p sites for alanine fails to accumulate in the nucleus in response to replication stress, and this correlates with a severe defect in survival in the presence of HU. In conclusion, we propose that the regulation of Rgf1p could be part of the mechanism by which Cds1p and Rad24p promote survival in the presence of chronic replication stress. It will be of general interest to understand whether the same is true for homologues of Rgf1p in budding yeast and higher eukaryotes. PMID:24478458

  16. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3–4 compared to those with 0–2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target. PMID:27562371

  17. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3-4 compared to those with 0-2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target. PMID:27562371

  18. Sec1p and Mso1p C-terminal tails cooperate with the SNAREs and Sec4p in polarized exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Aro, Nina; Chernov, Konstantin G.; Nyman, Tuula; Jäntti, Jussi

    2011-01-01

    The Sec1/Munc18 protein family members perform an essential, albeit poorly understood, function in association with soluble n-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor adaptor protein receptor (SNARE) complexes in membrane fusion. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sec1p has a C-terminal tail that is missing in its mammalian homologues. Here we show that deletion of the Sec1p tail (amino acids 658–724) renders cells temperature sensitive for growth, reduces sporulation efficiency, causes a secretion defect, and abolishes Sec1p-SNARE component coimmunoprecipitation. The results show that the Sec1p tail binds preferentially ternary Sso1p-Sec9p-Snc2p complexes and it enhances ternary SNARE complex formation in vitro. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay results suggest that, in the SNARE-deficient sso2–1 Δsso1 cells, Mso1p, a Sec1p binding protein, helps to target Sec1p(1–657) lacking the C-terminal tail to the sites of secretion. The results suggest that the Mso1p C terminus is important for Sec1p(1–657) targeting. We show that, in addition to Sec1p, Mso1p can bind the Rab-GTPase Sec4p in vitro. The BiFC results suggest that Mso1p acts in close association with Sec4p on intracellular membranes in the bud. This association depends on the Sec4p guanine nucleotide exchange factor Sec2p. Our results reveal a novel binding mode between the Sec1p C-terminal tail and the SNARE complex, and suggest a role for Mso1p as an effector of Sec4p. PMID:21119007

  19. Sec1p and Mso1p C-terminal tails cooperate with the SNAREs and Sec4p in polarized exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Aro, Nina; Chernov, Konstantin G; Nyman, Tuula; Jäntti, Jussi

    2011-01-15

    The Sec1/Munc18 protein family members perform an essential, albeit poorly understood, function in association with soluble n-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor adaptor protein receptor (SNARE) complexes in membrane fusion. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sec1p has a C-terminal tail that is missing in its mammalian homologues. Here we show that deletion of the Sec1p tail (amino acids 658-724) renders cells temperature sensitive for growth, reduces sporulation efficiency, causes a secretion defect, and abolishes Sec1p-SNARE component coimmunoprecipitation. The results show that the Sec1p tail binds preferentially ternary Sso1p-Sec9p-Snc2p complexes and it enhances ternary SNARE complex formation in vitro. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay results suggest that, in the SNARE-deficient sso2-1 Δsso1 cells, Mso1p, a Sec1p binding protein, helps to target Sec1p(1-657) lacking the C-terminal tail to the sites of secretion. The results suggest that the Mso1p C terminus is important for Sec1p(1-657) targeting. We show that, in addition to Sec1p, Mso1p can bind the Rab-GTPase Sec4p in vitro. The BiFC results suggest that Mso1p acts in close association with Sec4p on intracellular membranes in the bud. This association depends on the Sec4p guanine nucleotide exchange factor Sec2p. Our results reveal a novel binding mode between the Sec1p C-terminal tail and the SNARE complex, and suggest a role for Mso1p as an effector of Sec4p. PMID:21119007

  20. Induction of intranuclear membranes by overproduction of Opi1p and Scs2p, regulators for yeast phospholipid biosynthesis, suggests a mechanism for Opi1p nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Miki; Oshima, Ayaka; Noguchi, Tetsuko; Kagiwada, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the expression of phospholipid biosynthetic genes is suppressed by the Opi1p negative regulator. Opi1p enters into the nucleoplasm from the nuclear membrane to suppress the gene expression under repressing conditions. The binding of Opi1p to the nuclear membrane requires an integral membrane protein, Scs2p and phosphatidic acid (PA). Although it is demonstrated that the association of Opi1p with membranes is affected by PA levels, how Opi1p dissociates from Scs2p is unknown. Here, we found that fluorescently labelled Opi1p accumulated on a perinuclear region in an Scs2p-dependent manner. Electron microscopic analyses indicated that the perinuclear region consists of intranuclear membranes, which may be formed by the invagination of the nuclear membrane due to the accumulation of Opi1p and Scs2p in a restricted area. As expected, localization of Opi1p and Scs2p in the intranuclear membranes was detected by immunoelectron microscopy. Biochemical analysis showed that Opi1p recovered in the membrane fraction was detergent insoluble while Scs2p was soluble, implying that Opi1p behaves differently from Scs2p in the fraction. We hypothesize that Opi1p dissociates from Scs2p after targeting to the nuclear membrane, making it possible to be released from the membrane quickly when PA levels decrease. PMID:26590299

  1. The Photometric lightcurve of Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bair, Allison N.; Schleicher, David G.

    2014-11-01

    Comet 1P/Halley is considered an important object for a number of reasons. Not only is it the first-identified and brightest periodic comet, being the only periodic comet visible to the naked eye at every apparition, but in 1986 Halley became the first comet to be imaged by fly-by spacecraft. The NASA-funded International Halley Watch (IHW) directly supported the spacecraft by providing narrowband filters for groundbased photometric observations, and until the arrival of Hale-Bopp (1995 O1), Halley was the subject of the largest groundbased observational campaign in history. Following considerable controversy regarding its rotation period, it was eventually determined to be in complex rotation -- the first comet to be so identified. While the overall brightness variations of the coma repeated with a period of about 7.4 days, the detailed period and shape of the lightcurve constantly evolved. The determination of the specific characteristics of each of the two components of its non-principal axis rotational state has remained elusive.To resolve this situation we have now incorporated all of the narrowband photometry, taken by 21 telescopes from around the world and submitted to the IHW archive, to create the most complete homogeneous lightcurve possible. Using measurements of three gas species and the dust, the lightcurve was investigated and found to alternate between a double- and triple-peaked shape, with no single feature being present throughout the entire duration of our dataset (316 days). The apparent period as a function of time was extracted and seen to vary in a step-wise manner between 7.27 and 7.60 days. Taken together, these results were used to produce a synthetic lightcurve revealing Halley's behavior even when no data were available. Details of this and other results, to be used to constrain future detailed modeling, will be presented. This research is supported by NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program.

  2. Htm1p-Pdi1p is a folding-sensitive mannosidase that marks N-glycoproteins for ER-associated protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Chang; Fujimori, Danica Galonić; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2016-07-12

    Our understanding of how the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) machinery efficiently targets terminally misfolded proteins while avoiding the misidentification of nascent polypeptides and correctly folded proteins is limited. For luminal N-glycoproteins, demannosylation of their N-glycan to expose a terminal α1,6-linked mannose is necessary for their degradation via ERAD, but whether this modification is specific to misfolded proteins is unknown. Here we report that the complex of the mannosidase Htm1p and the protein disulfide isomerase Pdi1p (Htm1p-Pdi1p) acts as a folding-sensitive mannosidase for catalyzing this first committed step in Saccharomyces cerevisiae We reconstitute this step in vitro with Htm1p-Pdi1p and model glycoprotein substrates whose structural states we can manipulate. We find that Htm1p-Pdi1p is a glycoprotein-specific mannosidase that preferentially targets nonnative glycoproteins trapped in partially structured states. As such, Htm1p-Pdi1p is suited to act as a licensing factor that monitors folding in the ER lumen and preferentially commits glycoproteins trapped in partially structured states for degradation. PMID:27357682

  3. Ligand-binding pocket shape differences between S1P1 and S1P3 determine efficiency of chemical probe identification by uHTS

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, Stephan C.; Brown, Steven J.; Cabrera, Pedro Gonzales; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Jo, Euijung; Chase, Peter; Spicer, Tim; Hodder, Peter; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor system to better understand why certain molecular targets within a closely related family are much more tractable when identifying compelling chemical leads. Five medically important G protein-coupled receptors for S1P regulate heart rate, coronary artery caliber, endothelial barrier integrity, and lymphocyte trafficking. Selective S1P receptor agonist probes would be of great utility to study receptor subtype-specific function. Through systematic screening of the same libraries, we identified novel selective agonists chemotypes for each of the S1P1 and S1P3 receptors. uHTS for S1P1 was more effective than for S1P3, with many selective, low nanomolar hits of proven mechanism emerging for. Receptor structure modeling and ligand docking reveal differences between the receptor binding pockets, which are the basis for sub-type selectivity. Novel selective agonists interact primarily in the hydrophobic pocket of the receptor in the absence of head-group interactions. Chemistry-space and shape-based analysis of the screening libraries in combination with the binding models explain the observed differential hit rates and enhanced efficiency for lead discovery for S1P1 vs. S1P3 in this closely related receptor family. PMID:18590333

  4. Clonal Analysis in Recurrent Astrocytic, Oligoastrocytic and Oligodendroglial Tumors Implicates IDH1- Mutation as Common Tumor Initiating Event

    PubMed Central

    von Eckardstein, Kajetan; Kiwit, Jürgen; Stockhammer, Florian; Horaczek, Jörn A.; Veelken, Julian; Herold-Mende, Christel; Jeuken, Judith; von Deimling, Andreas; Mueller, Wolf

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate the dynamics of inter- and intratumoral molecular alterations during tumor progression in recurrent gliomas. Methodology/Principal Findings To address intertumoral heterogeneity we investigated non- microdissected tumor tissue of 106 gliomas representing 51 recurrent tumors. To address intratumoral heterogeneity a set of 16 gliomas representing 7 tumor pairs with at least one recurrence, and 4 single mixed gliomas were investigated by microdissection of distinct oligodendroglial and astrocytic tumor components. All tumors and tumor components were analyzed for allelic loss of 1p/19q (LOH 1p/19q), for TP53- mutations and for R132 mutations in the IDH1 gene. The investigation of non- microdissected tumor tissue revealed clonality in 75% (38/51). Aberrant molecular alterations upon recurrence were detected in 25% (13/51). 64% (9/14) of these were novel and associated with tumor progression. Loss of previously detected alterations was observed in 36% (5/14). One tumor pair (1/14; 7%) was significant for both. Intratumoral clonality was detected in 57% (4/7) of the microdissected tumor pairs and in 75% (3/4) of single microdissected tumors. 43% (3/7) of tumor pairs and one single tumor (25%) revealed intratumoral heterogeneity. While intratumoral heterogeneity affected both the TP53- mutational status and the LOH1p/19q status, all tumors with intratumoral heterogeneity shared the R132 IDH1- mutation as a common feature in both their microdissected components. Conclusions/Significance The majority of recurrent gliomas are of monoclonal origin. However, the detection of divertive tumor cell clones in morphological distinct tumor components sharing IDH1- mutations as early event may provide insight into the tumorigenesis of true mixed gliomas. PMID:22844452

  5. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Receptor Agonists Mediate Pro-fibrotic Responses in Normal Human Lung Fibroblasts via S1P2 and S1P3 Receptors and Smad-independent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Katrin; Menyhart, Katalin; Killer, Nina; Renault, Bérengère; Bauer, Yasmina; Studer, Rolf; Steiner, Beat; Bolli, Martin H.; Nayler, Oliver; Gatfield, John

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 modulators constitute a new class of drugs for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling, however, is also involved in the development of fibrosis. Using normal human lung fibroblasts, we investigated the induction of fibrotic responses by the S1P receptor (S1PR) agonists S1P, FTY720-P, ponesimod, and SEW2871 and compared them with the responses induced by the known fibrotic mediator TGF-β1. In contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not induce expression of the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin. However, TGF-β1, S1P, and FTY720-P caused robust stimulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and increased pro-fibrotic marker gene expression including connective tissue growth factor. Ponesimod showed limited and SEW2871 showed no pro-fibrotic potential in these readouts. Analysis of pro-fibrotic signaling pathways showed that in contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not activate Smad2/3 signaling but rather activated PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling to induce ECM synthesis. The strong induction of ECM synthesis by the nonselective agonists S1P and FTY720-P was due to the stimulation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptors, whereas the weaker induction of ECM synthesis at high concentrations of ponesimod was due to a low potency activation of S1P3 receptors. Finally, in normal human lung fibroblast-derived myofibroblasts that were generated by TGF-β1 pretreatment, S1P and FTY720-P were effective stimulators of ECM synthesis, whereas ponesimod was inactive, because of the down-regulation of S1P3R expression in myofibroblasts. These data demonstrate that S1PR agonists are pro-fibrotic via S1P2R and S1P3R stimulation using Smad-independent pathways. PMID:23589284

  6. Cargo sequences are important for Som1p-dependent signal peptide cleavage in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Liang, Haobo; Luo, Wentian; Green, Neil; Fang, Hong

    2004-09-17

    The inner membrane protease (IMP) has two catalytic subunits, Imp1p and Imp2p, that exhibit nonoverlapping substrate specificity in mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The IMP also has at least one noncatalytic subunit, Som1p, which is required to cleave signal peptides from a subset of Imp1p substrates. To understand how Som1p mediates Imp1p substrate specificity, we addressed the possibility that Som1p functions as a molecular chaperone, which binds to specific substrates and directs them to the catalytic site. Our results show that cargo sequences attached to the signal peptide are important for Som1p-dependent presequence cleavage; however, no specific cargo sequence is required. Indeed, we show that a substrate normally destined for Imp2p is cleaved in a Som1p-dependent manner when the substrate is directed to Imp1p. These results argue against the notion that Som1p is a molecular chaperone. Instead, we propose that the cargo of some Imp1p substrates can assume a conformation incompatible with presequence cleavage. Som1p could thus act through Imp1p to improve cleavage efficiency early during substrate maturation. PMID:15254042

  7. An 8.9 Mb 19p13 duplication associated with precocious puberty and a sporadic 3.9 Mb 2q23.3q24.1 deletion containing NR4A2 in mentally retarded members of a family with an intrachromosomal 19p-into-19q between-arm insertion

    PubMed Central

    Lybæk, Helle; ørstavik, Karen Helene; Prescott, Trine; Hovland, Randi; Breilid, Harald; Stansberg, Christine; Steen, Vidar Martin; Houge, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    In a 2 and a half-year-old girl with onset of puberty before the age of 5 months, short stature, hand anomalies and severe mental retardation, an 8.9 Mb interstitial 19p13 duplication containing 215 predicted genes was detected. It was initially assumed that the duplication involved the kisspeptin receptor gene, GPR54, known to stimulate induction of puberty, but more refined duplication mapping excluded this possibility. In an attempt to further understand the genotype–phenotype correlation, global gene expression was measured in skin fibroblasts. The overall expression pattern was quite similar to controls, and only about 25% of the duplicated genes had an expression level that was increased by more than 1.3-fold, with no obvious changes that could explain the precocious puberty. The proband's mother carried a balanced between-arm insertion of the duplicated segment that resembled a pericentric inversion. The same insertion was found in several other family members, including one who had lost a daughter with severe mental retardation and menarche at the age of 10 years. Another close relative was severely mentally retarded, but neither dysmorphic nor microcephalic. His phenotype was initially ascribed to a presumed cryptic chromosome 19 imbalance caused by the 19p-into19q insertion, but subsequent array-CGH detected a 3.9-Mb deletion of 2q23.3q24.1. This novel microdeletion involves seven genes, of which FMNL2, a suggested regulator of Rho-GTPases, and NR4A2, an essential gene for differentiation of dopaminergic neurons, may be critical genes for the proposed 2q23q24 microdeletion syndrome. PMID:19156171

  8. Ceramide signalling impinges on Sit4p and Hog1p to promote mitochondrial fission and mitophagy in Isc1p-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Vitor; Medeiros, Tânia C; Vilaça, Rita; Pereira, Andreia T; Chaves, Susana R; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Costa, Vítor

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria function as the powerhouses of the cell for energy conversion through the oxidative phosphorylation process. Accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria promotes a bioenergetic crisis and cell death by apoptosis. Yeast cells lacking Isc1p, an orthologue of mammalian neutral sphingomyelinase type 2, exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction and shortened lifespan associated with the accumulation of specific ceramide species and activation of the PP2A-like protein phosphatase Sit4p and of the Hog1p kinase. Here, we show that isc1Δ cells display hyperactivation of mitophagy that is suppressed by downregulating Sit4p, Hog1p or the TORC1-Sch9p pathway. Notably, isc1Δ cells also have high levels of Dnm1p associated with unbalanced mitochondrial fission, leading to mitochondrial fragmentation, and DNM1 deletion suppressed the oxidative stress sensitivity and shortened lifespan of isc1Δ cells. Moreover, Isc1p and Dnm1p physically interact, suggesting a possible regulatory role for Isc1p in mitochondrial dynamics. Overall, our work demonstrates that Isc1p-mediated ceramide signalling regulates mitophagy and mitochondrial dynamics in yeast with impact on mitochondrial function and lifespan. Since ceramides have been implicated in ageing and diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, our findings suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting ceramide signalling may improve mitochondrial function and human healthspan. PMID:26079297

  9. The selective utilization of substrates in vivo by the phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine biosynthetic enzymes Ept1p and Cpt1p in yeast.

    PubMed

    Boumann, Henry A; de Kruijff, Ben; Heck, Albert J R; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2004-07-01

    In yeast, the aminoalcohol phosphotransferases Ept1p and Cpt1p catalyze the final steps in the CDP-ethanolamine and CDP-choline routes leading to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine (PC), respectively. To determine how these enzymes contribute to the molecular species profiles of PE and PC in vivo, wild-type, cpt1Delta, and ept1Delta cells were pulse labeled with deuterated ethanolamine and choline. Analysis of newly synthesized PE and PC using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry revealed that PE and PC produced by Ept1p and Cpt1p have different species compositions, demonstrating that the enzymes consume distinct sets of diacylglycerol species in vivo. Using the characteristic phospholipid species profiles produced by Ept1p and Cpt1p as molecular fingerprints, it was also shown that in vivo CDP-monomethylethanolamine is preferentially used as substrate by Ept1p, whereas CDP-dimethylethanolamine and CDP-propanolamine are converted by Cpt1p. PMID:15225629

  10. The role of Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA repair enzymes Apn1p and Uve1p in the base excision repair of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites

    SciTech Connect

    Tanihigashi, Haruna; Yamada, Ayako; Igawa, Emi; Ikeda, Shogo . E-mail: ikeda@dbc.ous.ac.jp

    2006-09-08

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe the repair of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites is mainly initiated by AP lyase activity of DNA glycosylase Nth1p. In contrast, the major AP endonuclease Apn2p functions by removing 3'-{alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehyde ends induced by Nth1p, rather than by incising the AP sites. S. pombe possesses other minor AP endonuclease activities derived from Apn1p and Uve1p. In this study, we investigated the function of these two enzymes in base excision repair (BER) for methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) damage using the nth1 and apn2 mutants. Deletion of apn1 or uve1 from nth1{delta} cells did not affect sensitivity to MMS. Exogenous expression of Apn1p failed to suppress the MMS sensitivity of nth1{delta} cells. Although Apn1p and Uve1p incised the oligonucleotide containing an AP site analogue, these enzymes could not initiate repair of the AP sites in vivo. Despite this, expression of Apn1p partially restored the MMS sensitivity of apn2{delta} cells, indicating that the enzyme functions as a 3'-phosphodiesterase to remove 3'-blocked ends. Localization of Apn1p in the nucleus and cytoplasm hints at an additional function of the enzyme other than nuclear DNA repair. Heterologous expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue of Apn1p completely restored the MMS resistance of the nth1{delta} and apn2{delta} cells. This result confirms a difference in the major pathway for processing the AP site between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae cells.

  11. HDL-S1P: cardiovascular functions, disease-associated alterations, and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid contained in High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and has drawn considerable attention in the lipoprotein field as numerous studies have demonstrated its contribution to several functions inherent to HDL. Some of them are partly and some entirely due to the S1P contained in HDL (HDL-S1P). Despite the presence of over 1000 different lipids in HDL, S1P stands out as it possesses its own cell surface receptors through which it exercises key physiological functions. Most of the S1P in human plasma is associated with HDL, and the amount of HDL-S1P influences the quality and quantity of HDL-dependent functions. The main binding partner of S1P in HDL is apolipoprotein M but others may also exist particularly under conditions of acute S1P elevations. HDL not only exercise functions through their S1P content but have also an impact on genuine S1P signaling by influencing S1P bioactivity and receptor presentation. HDL-S1P content is altered in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Low HDL-S1P has also been linked to impaired HDL functions associated with these disorders. Although the pathophysiological and molecular reasons for such disease-associated shifts in HDL-S1P are little understood, there have been successful approaches to circumvent their adverse implications by pharmacologically increasing HDL-S1P as means to improve HDL function. This mini-review will cover the current understanding of the contribution of HDL-S1P to physiological HDL function, its alteration in disease and ways for its restoration to correct HDL dysfunction. PMID:26539121

  12. A Complex Containing RNA Polymerase II, Paf1p, Cdc73p, Hpr1p, and Ccr4p Plays a Role in Protein Kinase C Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Meiping; French-Cornay, Delores; Fan, Hua-ying; Klein, Hannah; Denis, Clyde L.; Jaehning, Judith A.

    1999-01-01

    Yeast contains at least two complex forms of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), one including the Srbps and a second biochemically distinct form defined by the presence of Paf1p and Cdc73p (X. Shi et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 17:1160–1169, 1997). In this work we demonstrate that Ccr4p and Hpr1p are components of the Paf1p-Cdc73p-Pol II complex. We have found many synthetic genetic interactions between factors within the Paf1p-Cdc73p complex, including the lethality of paf1Δ ccr4Δ, paf1Δ hpr1Δ, ccr4Δ hpr1Δ, and ccr4Δ gal11Δ double mutants. In addition, paf1Δ and ccr4Δ are lethal in combination with srb5Δ, indicating that the factors within and between the two RNA polymerase II complexes have overlapping essential functions. We have used differential display to identify several genes whose expression is affected by mutations in components of the Paf1p-Cdc73p-Pol II complex. Additionally, as previously observed for hpr1Δ, deleting PAF1 or CDC73 leads to elevated recombination between direct repeats. The paf1Δ and ccr4Δ mutations, as well as gal11Δ, demonstrate sensitivity to cell wall-damaging agents, rescue of the temperature-sensitive phenotype by sorbitol, and reduced expression of genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis. This unusual combination of effects on recombination and cell wall integrity has also been observed for mutations in genes in the Pkc1p-Mpk1p kinase cascade. Consistent with a role for this novel form of RNA polymerase II in the Pkc1p-Mpk1p signaling pathway, we find that paf1Δ mpk1Δ and paf1Δ pkc1Δ double mutants do not demonstrate an enhanced phenotype relative to the single mutants. Our observation that the Mpk1p kinase is fully active in a paf1Δ strain indicates that the Paf1p-Cdc73p complex may function downstream of the Pkc1p-Mpk1p cascade to regulate the expression of a subset of yeast genes. PMID:9891041

  13. A shunt pathway limits the CaaX processing of Hsp40 Ydj1p and regulates Ydj1p-dependent phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Emily R; Cheng, Michael; Zhao, Peng; Kim, June H; Wells, Lance; Schmidt, Walter K

    2016-01-01

    The modifications occurring to CaaX proteins have largely been established using few reporter molecules (e.g. Ras, yeast a-factor mating pheromone). These proteins undergo three coordinated COOH-terminal events: isoprenylation of the cysteine, proteolytic removal of aaX, and COOH-terminal methylation. Here, we investigated the coupling of these modifications in the context of the yeast Ydj1p chaperone. We provide genetic, biochemical, and biophysical evidence that the Ydj1p CaaX motif is isoprenylated but not cleaved and carboxylmethylated. Moreover, we demonstrate that Ydj1p-dependent thermotolerance and Ydj1p localization are perturbed when alternative CaaX motifs are transplanted onto Ydj1p. The abnormal phenotypes revert to normal when post-isoprenylation events are genetically interrupted. Our findings indicate that proper Ydj1p function requires an isoprenylatable CaaX motif that is resistant to post-isoprenylation events. These results expand on the complexity of protein isoprenylation and highlight the impact of post-isoprenylation events in regulating the function of Ydj1p and perhaps other CaaX proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15899.001 PMID:27525482

  14. S1P lyase in skeletal muscle regeneration and satellite cell activation: Exposing the hidden lyase☆

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Julie D.; de la Garza-Rodea, Anabel S.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid whose actions are essential for many physiological processes including angiogenesis, lymphocyte trafficking and development. In addition, S1P serves asamuscle trophic factor that enables efficient muscle regeneration. This is due in part to S1P's ability to activate quiescent muscle stem cells called satellite cells (SCs) that are needed for muscle repair. However, the molecular mechanism by which S1P activates SCs has not been well understood. Further, strategies for harnessing S1P signaling to recruit SCs for therapeutic benefit have been lacking. S1P is irreversibly catabolized by S1P lyase (SPL), a highly conserved enzyme that catalyzes the cleavage of S1P at carbon bond C2–3, resulting in formation of hexadecenal and ethanolamine-phosphate. SPL enhances apoptosis through substrate- and product-dependent events, thereby regulating cellular responses to chemotherapy, radiation and ischemia. SPL is undetectable in resting murine skeletal muscle. However, we recently found that SPL is dynamically upregulated in skeletal muscle after injury. SPL upregulation occurred in the context of a tightly orchestrated genetic program that resulted in a transient S1P signal in response to muscle injury. S1P activated quiescent SCs via a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)-dependent pathway, thereby facilitating skeletal muscle regeneration. Mdx mice, which serve as a model for muscular dystrophy (MD), exhibited skeletal muscle SPL upregulation and S1P deficiency. Pharmacological SPL inhibition raised skeletal muscle S1P levels, enhanced SC recruitment and improved mdx skeletal muscle regeneration. These findings reveal how S1P can activate SCs and indicate that SPL suppression may provide a therapeutic strategy for myopathies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Advances in Lysophospholipid Research. PMID:22750505

  15. The Clinically-tested S1P Receptor Agonists, FTY720 and BAF312, Demonstrate Subtype-Specific Bradycardia (S1P1) and Hypertension (S1P3) in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Ryan M.; Muthukumarana, Akalushi; Harrison, Paul C.; Nodop Mazurek, Suzanne; Chen, Rong Rhonda; Harrington, Kyle E.; Dinallo, Roger M.; Horan, Joshua C.; Patnaude, Lori; Modis, Louise K.; Reinhart, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phospate (S1P) and S1P receptor agonists elicit mechanism-based effects on cardiovascular function in vivo. Indeed, FTY720 (non-selective S1PX receptor agonist) produces modest hypertension in patients (2–3 mmHg in 1-yr trial) as well as acute bradycardia independent of changes in blood pressure. However, the precise receptor subtypes responsible is controversial, likely dependent upon the cardiovascular response in question (e.g. bradycardia, hypertension), and perhaps even species-dependent since functional differences in rodent, rabbit, and human have been suggested. Thus, we characterized the S1P receptor subtype specificity for each compound in vitro and, in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of FTY720 and the more selective S1P1,5 agonist, BAF312, were tested during acute i.v. infusion in anesthetized rats and after oral administration for 10 days in telemetry-instrumented conscious rats. Acute i.v. infusion of FTY720 (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 mg/kg/20 min) or BAF312 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/20 min) elicited acute bradycardia in anesthetized rats demonstrating an S1P1 mediated mechanism-of-action. However, while FTY720 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/d) elicited dose-dependent hypertension after multiple days of oral administration in rat at clinically relevant plasma concentrations (24-hr mean blood pressure = 8.4, 12.8, 16.2 mmHg above baseline vs. 3 mmHg in vehicle controls), BAF312 (0.3, 3.0, 30.0 mg/kg/d) had no significant effect on blood pressure at any dose tested suggesting that hypertension produced by FTY720 is mediated S1P3 receptors. In summary, in vitro selectivity results in combination with studies performed in anesthetized and conscious rats administered two clinically tested S1P agonists, FTY720 or BAF312, suggest that S1P1 receptors mediate bradycardia while hypertension is mediated by S1P3 receptor activation. PMID:23285242

  16. Multiple functions of the vacuolar sorting protein Ccz1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman-Sommer, Marta; Migdalski, Andrzej; Rytka, Joanna; Kucharczyk, Roza . E-mail: roza@ibb.waw.pl

    2005-04-01

    The CCZ1 (YBR131w) gene encodes a protein required for fusion of various transport intermediates with the vacuole. Ccz1p, in a complex with Mon1p, is a close partner of Ypt7p in the processes of fusion of endosomes to vacuoles and homotypic vacuole fusion. In this work, we exploited the Ca{sup 2+}-sensitivity of the ccz1{delta} mutant to identify genes specifically interacting with CCZ1, basing on functional multicopy suppression of calcium toxicity. The presented results indicate that Ccz1p functions in the cell either in association with Mon1p and Ypt7p in fusion at the vacuolar membrane, or-separately-with Arl1p at early steps of vacuolar transport. We also show that suppression of calcium toxicity by the calcium pumps Pmr1p and Pmc1p is restricted only to the subset of mutants defective in vacuole morphology. The mechanisms of Ca{sup 2+}-pump-mediated suppression also differ from each other, since the action of Pmr1p, but not Pmc1p, appears to require Arl1p function.

  17. Gene expression profiling of 1p35-36 genes in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Novikov, Eugene; Monteiro, Marta; Gruel, Nadège; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Loriod, Béatrice; Nguyen, Catherine; Delattre, Olivier

    2004-08-01

    Deletion of the chromosome 1p36 region is a frequent abnormality in neuroblastoma. To gain further insights into the role of this alteration in oncogenesis, we have constructed a specific cDNA microarray representing most known genes and ESTs from the 1p35-36 region and analysed the expression profiles of 15 neuroblastoma cell lines and 28 neuroblastoma tumours. Hierarchical clustering using expression levels of 320 cDNAs from 1p35-36 separated localized or 4S cases without 1p deletion from advanced stages and cell lines. Supervised learning classification enabled to predict reliably the status of chromosome 1p according to its expression profile. Around 15% of the genes or ESTs presented a significantly decreased expression in samples with 1p deletion as compared to 1p-normal samples suggesting that 1p deletion results in a gene dosage effect on a subset of genes critical for the development of 1p-deleted neuroblastoma. Several genes presumed to have functions in neural differentiation (CDC42, VAMP3, CLSTN1), signal transduction in neural cells (GNB1) and cell cycle regulation (STMN1, RPA2, RBAF600, FBXO6, MAD2L2) exhibited a decreased expression in samples presenting 1p deletion. The identification of such genes provides baseline information for further studies to elucidate how these genes could individually or collectively play a critical role in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. PMID:15195138

  18. Synthesis of new ligands for targeting the S1P1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Schilson, Stefanie S; Keul, Petra; Shaikh, Rizwan S; Schäfers, Michael; Levkau, Bodo; Haufe, Günter

    2015-03-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) influences various fundamental biological processes by interacting with a family of five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-5). FTY720, a sphingosine analogue, which was approved for treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, is phosphorylated in vivo and acts as an agonist of four of the five S1P receptor subtypes. Starting from these lead structures we developed new agonists for the S1P1 receptor. The biological activity was tested in vivo and promising ligands were fluorinated at different positions to identify candidates for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging after [(18)F]-labelling. The radioligands shall enable the imaging of S1P1 receptor expression in vivo and thus may serve as novel imaging markers of S1P-related diseases. PMID:25656338

  19. Yeast TFIID Serves as a Coactivator for Rap1p by Direct Protein-Protein Interaction▿

    PubMed Central

    Garbett, Krassimira A.; Tripathi, Manish K.; Cencki, Belgin; Layer, Justin H.; Weil, P. Anthony

    2007-01-01

    In vivo studies have previously shown that Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal protein (RP) gene expression is controlled by the transcription factor repressor activator protein 1 (Rap1p) in a TFIID-dependent fashion. Here we have tested the hypothesis that yeast TFIID serves as a coactivator for RP gene transcription by directly interacting with Rap1p. We have found that purified recombinant Rap1p specifically interacts with purified TFIID in pull-down assays, and we have mapped the domains of Rap1p and subunits of TFIID responsible. In vitro transcription of a UASRAP1 enhancer-driven reporter gene requires both Rap1p and TFIID and is independent of the Fhl1p-Ifh1p coregulator. UASRAP1 enhancer-driven transactivation in extracts depleted of both Rap1p and TFIID is efficiently rescued by addition of physiological amounts of these two purified factors but not TATA-binding protein. We conclude that Rap1p and TFIID directly interact and that this interaction contributes importantly to RP gene transcription. PMID:17074814

  20. Optical model potential for deuteron elastic scattering with 1 p -shell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Pang, D. Y.; Lou, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    A set of global optical potential parameters, DA1p, for deuterons with the 1 p -shell nuclei is obtained by simultaneously fitting 67 sets of experimental data of deuteron elastic scattering from 6Li, 9Be, 10B, 11B, 12C, 13C, 14N, 16O, and 18O with incident energies between 5.25 and 170 MeV. DA1p improves the description of the deuteron elastic scattering from the 1 p -shell nuclei with respect to the existing systematic deuteron potentials and can give satisfactory reproduction of the experimental data with radiative nuclei such as 9Li, 10Be, 14C, and 14O.

  1. Functional inactivation of the conserved Sem1p in yeast by intrabodies.

    PubMed

    Reinman, Mirka; Jäntti, Jussi; Alfthan, Kaija; Keränen, Sirkka; Söderlund, Hans; Takkinen, Kristiina

    2003-09-01

    Intrabody technology was applied to characterize the function and intracellular localization of a highly conserved Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sem1 protein. DSS1, the mammalian homologue of Sem1p, is functionally conserved between yeast and mammalian cells, and in mammalian cells physically interacts with the strong tumour supressor BRCA2. Yeast and the generated intrabodies are thus expected to offer a useful system for studies on Sem1p/DSS1 function. Sem1p-specific antibody isolated from a phage display library was expressed intracellularily and targeted to either the cytosol or the nucleus of yeast cells. Analysis of the applicability of different antibody fragments as intrabodies showed that the Fab intrabody was expressed most efficiently. Expression of nuclear-targeted anti-Sem1p Fab intrabodies inhibited the growth of the sigma1278b yeast strain in a manner similar to deletion of the SEM1 gene. This indicates that the Fab intrabodies interact in vivo with Sem1p and result in inactivation of Sem1p. Localization of the Fab intrabody with or without the nuclear localization signal to the nucleus in Sem1p-dependent manner suggests that Sem1p mediates the nuclear transport of the intrabody without any targeting signal. Our results suggest that Sem1p function in yeast cells is in part manifested in the nucleus. PMID:12961755

  2. Yeast Skn7p activity is modulated by the Sln1p-Ypd1p osmosensor and contributes to regulation of the HOG pathway.

    PubMed

    Ketela, T; Brown, J L; Stewart, R C; Bussey, H

    1998-09-01

    Activation and control of the yeast HOG (High Osmolarity Glycerol) MAP kinase cascade is accomplished, in part, by a two-component sensory-response circuit comprised of the osmosensing histidine protein kinase Sln1p, the phospho-relay protein Ypd1p, and the response regulator protein Ssk1p. We found that deletion of SLN1 and/or YPD1 reduces reporter gene transcription driven by a second two-component response regulator -- Skn7p. The effect of sln1delta and ypd1delta mutations upon Skn7p activity is dependent on a functional two-component phosphorylation site (D427) in Skn7p, suggesting that Sln1p and Ypd1p may act as phosphodonors for Skn7p. We also observed that loss of PTC1 (a protein serine/threonine phosphatase implicated in negative control of the HOG pathway) in a skn7delta background results in severely retarded growth and in morphological defects. Deletion of either PBS2 or HOG1 alleviates the slow growth phenotype of ptc1delta skn7delta cells, suggesting that Skn7p may participate, in concert with known regulatory components, in modulating HOG pathway activity. The contribution of Skn7p to HOG pathway regulation appears to be modulated by the receiver domain, since non-phosphorylatable Skn7pD427N is unable to fully restore growth to ptc1/skn7 cells. PMID:9790591

  3. A role of the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)–S1P receptor 2 pathway in epithelial defense against cancer (EDAC)

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Sayaka; Yako, Yuta; Fujioka, Yoichiro; Kajita, Mihoko; Kameyama, Takeshi; Kon, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Susumu; Ohba, Yusuke; Ohno, Yusuke; Kihara, Akio; Fujita, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    At the initial step of carcinogenesis, transformation occurs in single cells within epithelia, where the newly emerging transformed cells are surrounded by normal epithelial cells. A recent study revealed that normal epithelial cells have an ability to sense and actively eliminate the neighboring transformed cells, a process named epithelial defense against cancer (EDAC). However, the molecular mechanism of this tumor-suppressive activity is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated a role for the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)–S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2) pathway in EDAC. First, we show that addition of the S1PR2 inhibitor significantly suppresses apical extrusion of RasV12-transformed cells that are surrounded by normal cells. In addition, knockdown of S1PR2 in normal cells induces the same effect, indicating that S1PR2 in the surrounding normal cells plays a positive role in the apical elimination of the transformed cells. Of importance, not endogenous S1P but exogenous S1P is involved in this process. By using FRET analyses, we demonstrate that S1PR2 mediates Rho activation in normal cells neighboring RasV12-transformed cells, thereby promoting accumulation of filamin, a crucial regulator of EDAC. Collectively these data indicate that S1P is a key extrinsic factor that affects the outcome of cell competition between normal and transformed epithelial cells. PMID:26631556

  4. Inp1p is a peroxisomal membrane protein required for peroxisome inheritance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fagarasanu, Monica; Fagarasanu, Andrei; Tam, Yuen Yi C.; Aitchison, John D.; Rachubinski, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Cells have evolved molecular mechanisms for the efficient transmission of organelles during cell division. Little is known about how peroxisomes are inherited. Inp1p is a peripheral membrane protein of peroxisomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that affects both the morphology of peroxisomes and their partitioning during cell division. In vivo 4-dimensional video microscopy showed an inability of mother cells to retain a subset of peroxisomes in dividing cells lacking the INP1 gene, whereas cells overexpressing INP1 exhibited immobilized peroxisomes that failed to be partitioned to the bud. Overproduced Inp1p localized to both peroxisomes and the cell cortex, supporting an interaction of Inp1p with specific structures lining the cell periphery. The levels of Inp1p vary with the cell cycle. Inp1p binds Pex25p, Pex30p, and Vps1p, which have been implicated in controlling peroxisome division. Our findings are consistent with Inp1p acting as a factor that retains peroxisomes in cells and controls peroxisome division. Inp1p is the first peroxisomal protein directly implicated in peroxisome inheritance. PMID:15928207

  5. Yeast Mn2+ transporter, Smf1p, is regulated by ubiquitin-dependent vacuolar protein sorting.

    PubMed Central

    Eguez, Lorena; Chung, Young-Sook; Kuchibhatla, Ajay; Paidhungat, Madan; Garrett, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Conditional cdc1(Ts) mutants of S. cerevisiae arrest with a phenotype similar to that exhibited by Mn(2+)-depleted cells. Sequence similarity between Cdc1p and a class of Mn(2+)-dependent phosphoesterases, as well as the observation that conditional cdc1(Ts) growth can be ameliorated by Mn(2+) supplement, suggests that Cdc1p activity is sensitive to intracellular Mn(2+) levels. This article identifies several previously uncharacterized cdc1(Ts) suppressors as class E vps (vacuolar protein sorting) mutants and shows that these, as well as other vps mutants, accumulate high levels of intracellular Mn(2+). Yeast VPS genes play a role in delivery of membrane transporters to the vacuole for degradation, and we show that the vps mutants accumulate elevated levels of the high-affinity Mn(2+) transporter Smf1p. cdc1(Ts) conditional growth is also alleviated by mutations, including doa4 and ubc4, that compromise protein ubiquitination, and these ubiquitination defects are associated with Smf1p accumulation. Epistasis studies show that these suppressors require functional Smf1p to alleviate the cdc1(Ts) growth defect, whereas Smf1p is dispensable for cdc1(Ts) suppression by a mutation (cos16/per1) that does not influence intracellular Mn(2+) levels. Because Smf1p is ubiquitinated in vivo, we propose that Smf1p is targeted to the vacuole for degradation by ubiquitination-dependent protein sorting. PMID:15166140

  6. The Yeast Sks1p Kinase Signaling Network Regulates Pseudohyphal Growth and Glucose Response

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Cole; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Sheidy, Daniel; Shively, Christian A.; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Andrews, Philip C.; Kumar, Anuj

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic growth transition from its unicellular form to a filamentous state, marked by the formation of pseudohyphal filaments of elongated and connected cells. Yeast pseudohyphal growth is regulated by signaling pathways responsive to reductions in the availability of nitrogen and glucose, but the molecular link between pseudohyphal filamentation and glucose signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identify the glucose-responsive Sks1p kinase as a signaling protein required for pseudohyphal growth induced by nitrogen limitation and coupled nitrogen/glucose limitation. To identify the Sks1p signaling network, we applied mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, profiling over 900 phosphosites for phosphorylation changes dependent upon Sks1p kinase activity. From this analysis, we report a set of novel phosphorylation sites and highlight Sks1p-dependent phosphorylation in Bud6p, Itr1p, Lrg1p, Npr3p, and Pda1p. In particular, we analyzed the Y309 and S313 phosphosites in the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit Pda1p; these residues are required for pseudohyphal growth, and Y309A mutants exhibit phenotypes indicative of impaired aerobic respiration and decreased mitochondrial number. Epistasis studies place SKS1 downstream of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR1 and the G-protein RAS2 but upstream of or at the level of cAMP-dependent PKA. The pseudohyphal growth and glucose signaling transcription factors Flo8p, Mss11p, and Rgt1p are required to achieve wild-type SKS1 transcript levels. SKS1 is conserved, and deletion of the SKS1 ortholog SHA3 in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans results in abnormal colony morphology. Collectively, these results identify Sks1p as an important regulator of filamentation and glucose signaling, with additional relevance towards understanding stress-responsive signaling in C. albicans. PMID:24603354

  7. A conserved regulatory mode in exocytic membrane fusion revealed by Mso1p membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Zhao, Hongxia; Aro, Nina; Yuan, Qiang; Chernov, Konstantin; Peränen, Johan; Lappalainen, Pekka; Jäntti, Jussi

    2013-02-01

    Sec1/Munc18 family proteins are important components of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex-mediated membrane fusion processes. However, the molecular interactions and the mechanisms involved in Sec1p/Munc18 control and SNARE complex assembly are not well understood. We provide evidence that Mso1p, a Sec1p- and Sec4p-binding protein, interacts with membranes to regulate membrane fusion. We identify two membrane-binding sites on Mso1p. The N-terminal region inserts into the lipid bilayer and appears to interact with the plasma membrane, whereas the C-terminal region of the protein binds phospholipids mainly through electrostatic interactions and may associate with secretory vesicles. The Mso1p membrane interactions are essential for correct subcellular localization of Mso1p-Sec1p complexes and for membrane fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These characteristics are conserved in the phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain of β-amyloid precursor protein-binding Mint1, the mammalian homologue of Mso1p. Both Mint1 PTB domain and Mso1p induce vesicle aggregation/clustering in vitro, supporting a role in a membrane-associated process. The results identify Mso1p as a novel lipid-interacting protein in the SNARE complex assembly machinery. Furthermore, our data suggest that a general mode of interaction, consisting of a lipid-binding protein, a Rab family GTPase, and a Sec1/Munc18 family protein, is important in all SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events. PMID:23197474

  8. A protein required for nuclear-protein import, Mog1p, directly interacts with GTP-Gsp1p, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ran homologue.

    PubMed

    Oki, M; Nishimoto, T

    1998-12-22

    We previously isolated 25 temperature-sensitive gsp1 alleles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ran homologue, each of which possesses amino acid changes that differ from each other. We report here isolation of three multicopy suppressors-PDE2, NTF2, and a gene designated MOG1-all of which rescued a growth defect of these gsp1 strains. The gsp1 suppression occurred even in the absence of GSP2, another S. cerevisiae GSP1-like gene. Previously, NTF2 was reported to suppress gsp1 but not PDE2. Mog1p, with a calculated molecular mass of 24 kDa, was found to be encoded by the yeast ORF YJR074W. Both MOG1 and NTF2 suppressed a series of gsp1 alleles with similar efficiency, and both suppressed gsp1 even with a single gene dose. Consistent with the high efficiency of gsp1 suppression, Mog1p directly bound to GTP, but not to GDP-Gsp1p. The disruption of MOG1 made yeast temperature-sensitive for growth. Deltamog1, which was suppressed by overexpression of NTF2, was found to have a defect in both classic and nonclassic nuclear localization signal-dependent nuclear-protein imports, but not in mRNA export. Thus, Mog1p, which was localized in the nucleus, is a Gsp1p-binding protein involved in nuclear-protein import and that functionally interacts with Ntf2p. Furthermore, the finding that PDE2 suppressed both gsp1 and rna1-1 indicates that the Ran GTPase cycle is regulated by the Ras-cAMP pathway. PMID:9860978

  9. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Stm1p facilitates ribosome preservation during quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, Natalya; Chanchorn, Ekkawit; Van Dyke, Michael W.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p confers increased resistance to the macrolide starvation-mimic rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p maintains 80S ribosome integrity during stationary phase-induced quiescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates polysome formation following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates protein synthesis following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p is a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation. -- Abstract: Once cells exhaust nutrients from their environment, they enter an alternative resting state known as quiescence, whereby proliferation ceases and essential nutrients are obtained through internal stores and through the catabolism of existing macromolecules and organelles. One example of this is ribophagy, the degradation of ribosomes through the process of autophagy. However, some ribosomes need to be preserved for an anticipated recovery from nutrient deprivation. We found that the ribosome-associated protein Stm1p greatly increases the quantity of 80S ribosomes present in quiescent yeast cells and that these ribosomes facilitate increased protein synthesis rates once nutrients are restored. These findings suggest that Stm1p can act as a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation and restoration.

  10. Evidence that the Yeast Desaturase Ole1p Exists as a Dimer In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Y.; Shanklin, J.

    2010-06-18

    Desaturase enzymes are composed of two classes, the structurally well characterized soluble class found predominantly in the plastids of higher plants and the more widely distributed but poorly structurally defined integral membrane class. Despite their distinct evolutionary origins, the two classes both require an iron cofactor and molecular oxygen for activity and are inhibited by azide and cyanide, suggesting strong mechanistic similarities. The fact that the soluble desaturase is active as a homodimer prompted us test the hypothesis that an archetypal integral membrane desaturase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the {Delta}{sup o}-acyl-Co-A desaturase Ole1p, also exhibits a dimeric organization. Ole1p was chosen because it is one of the best characterized integral membrane desaturase and because it retains activity when fused with epitope tags. FLAG-Ole1p was detected by Western blotting of immunoprecipitates in which anti-Myc antibodies were used for capture from yeast extracts co-expressing Ole1p-Myc and Ole1p-FLAG. Interaction was confirmed by two independent bimolecular complementation assays (i.e. the split ubiquitin system and the split luciferase system). Co-expression of active and inactive Ole1p subunits resulted in an {approx}75% suppression of the accumulation of palmitoleic acid, demonstrating that the physiologically active form of Ole1p in vivo is the dimer in which both protomers must be functional.

  11. The vascular S1P gradient—Cellular sources and biological significance

    PubMed Central

    Hla, Timothy; Venkataraman, Krishnan; Michaud, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a product of sphingomyelin metabolism, is enriched in the circulatory system whereas it is estimated to be much lower in interstitial fluids of tissues. This concentration gradient, termed the vascular S1P gradient appears to form as a result of substrate availability and the action of metabolic enzymes. S1P levels in blood and lymph are estimated to be in the μM range. In the immune system, the S1P gradient is needed as a spatial cue for lymphocyte and hematopoietic cell trafficking. During inflammatory reactions in which enhanced vascular permeability occurs, a burst of S1P becomes available to its receptors in the extravascular compartment, which likely contributes to the tissue reactions. Thus, the presence of the vascular S1P gradient is thought to contribute to physiological and pathological conditions. From an evolutionary perspective, S1P receptors may have co-evolved with the advent of a closed vascular system and the trafficking paradigms for hematopoietic cells to navigate in and out of the vascular system. PMID:18674637

  12. Regulation of a formin complex by the microtubule plus end protein tea1p.

    PubMed

    Feierbach, Becket; Verde, Fulvia; Chang, Fred

    2004-06-01

    The plus ends of microtubules have been speculated to regulate the actin cytoskeleton for the proper positioning of sites of cell polarization and cytokinesis. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, interphase microtubules and the kelch repeat protein tea1p regulate polarized cell growth. Here, we show that tea1p is directly deposited at cell tips by microtubule plus ends. Tea1p associates in large "polarisome" complexes with bud6p and for3p, a formin that assembles actin cables. Tea1p also interacts in a separate complex with the CLIP-170 protein tip1p, a microtubule plus end-binding protein that anchors tea1p to the microtubule plus end. Localization experiments suggest that tea1p and bud6p regulate formin distribution and actin cable assembly. Although single mutants still polarize, for3Deltabud6Deltatea1Delta triple-mutant cells lack polarity, indicating that these proteins contribute overlapping functions in cell polarization. Thus, these experiments begin to elucidate how microtubules contribute to the proper spatial regulation of actin assembly and polarized cell growth. PMID:15184402

  13. A conserved regulatory mode in exocytic membrane fusion revealed by Mso1p membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Zhao, Hongxia; Aro, Nina; Yuan, Qiang; Chernov, Konstantin; Peränen, Johan; Lappalainen, Pekka; Jäntti, Jussi

    2013-01-01

    Sec1/Munc18 family proteins are important components of soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex–mediated membrane fusion processes. However, the molecular interactions and the mechanisms involved in Sec1p/Munc18 control and SNARE complex assembly are not well understood. We provide evidence that Mso1p, a Sec1p- and Sec4p-binding protein, interacts with membranes to regulate membrane fusion. We identify two membrane-binding sites on Mso1p. The N-terminal region inserts into the lipid bilayer and appears to interact with the plasma membrane, whereas the C-terminal region of the protein binds phospholipids mainly through electrostatic interactions and may associate with secretory vesicles. The Mso1p membrane interactions are essential for correct subcellular localization of Mso1p–Sec1p complexes and for membrane fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These characteristics are conserved in the phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain of β-amyloid precursor protein–binding Mint1, the mammalian homologue of Mso1p. Both Mint1 PTB domain and Mso1p induce vesicle aggregation/clustering in vitro, supporting a role in a membrane-associated process. The results identify Mso1p as a novel lipid-interacting protein in the SNARE complex assembly machinery. Furthermore, our data suggest that a general mode of interaction, consisting of a lipid-binding protein, a Rab family GTPase, and a Sec1/Munc18 family protein, is important in all SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events. PMID:23197474

  14. Novel airway findings in a patient with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferril, Geoffrey R; Barham, Henry P; Prager, Jeremy D

    2014-01-01

    1p36 deletion syndrome comprises a phenotypic presentation that includes central nervous system, cardiac, and craniofacial anomalies. There has been no report of associated airway anomalies with this syndrome. We present here a case report and literature review. Prenatally, amniocentesis for chromosomal analysis was performed on our patient, with results consistent with 1p36 deletion syndrome. Respiratory distress and unsuccessful attempts at intubation prompted transfer to Children's Hospital of Colorado. Microlaryngoscopy was subsequently performed, revealing a persistent buccopharyngeal membrane and unidentifiable larynx. Emergent tracheostomy was then performed to secure the airway. Airway anomalies may be associated with 1p36 deletion syndrome. PMID:24290305

  15. Translocation involving 1p and 17q is a recurrent genetic alteration of human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savelyeva, L.; Corvi, R.; Schwab, M. )

    1994-08-01

    Human neuroblastoma cells often are monosomic for the distal portion of 1p (1p36). The authors report that the deleted 1p material in cells of neuroblastoma lines is preferentially replaced by material from chromosome 17, resulting from an unbalanced 1;17 translocation. Chromosome 17 often acquires instability, followed by the integration of fragments into various marker chromosomes. As a consequence, 17q material can increase over 17p material. The nonrandom frequency of 1;17 translocations appears to indicate an as-yet-undefined contribution to neuroblastoma development. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Expression of S1P metabolizing enzymes and receptors correlate with survival time and regulate cell migration in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Bien-Möller, Sandra; Lange, Sandra; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Paland, Heiko; Küpper, Johannes; Herzog, Susann; Weitmann, Kerstin; Havemann, Christoph; Vogelgesang, Silke; Marx, Sascha; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Henry W.S.; Rauch, Bernhard H.

    2016-01-01

    A signaling molecule which is involved in proliferation and migration of malignant cells is the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). There are hints for a potential role of S1P signaling in malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) which is characterized by a poor prognosis. Therefore, a comprehensive expression analysis of S1P receptors (S1P1-S1P5) and S1P metabolizing enzymes in human GBM (n = 117) compared to healthy brain (n = 10) was performed to evaluate their role for patient's survival. Furthermore, influence of S1P receptor inhibition on proliferation and migration were studied in LN18 GBM cells. Compared to control brain, mRNA levels of S1P1, S1P2, S1P3 and S1P generating sphingosine kinase-1 were elevated in GBM. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated an association between S1P1 and S1P2 with patient's survival times. In vitro, an inhibitory effect of the SphK inhibitor SKI-II on viability of LN18 cells was shown. S1P itself had no effect on viability but stimulated LN18 migration which was blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P2. The participation of S1P1 and S1P2 in LN18 migration was further supported by siRNA-mediated silencing of these receptors. Immunoblots and inhibition experiments suggest an involvement of the PI3-kinase/AKT1 pathway in the chemotactic effect of S1P in LN18 cells. In summary, our data argue for a role of S1P signaling in proliferation and migration of GBM cells. Individual components of the S1P pathway represent prognostic factors for patients with GBM. Perspectively, a selective modulation of S1P receptor subtypes could represent a therapeutic approach for GBM patients and requires further evaluation. PMID:26887055

  17. The identification and characterization of a novel splicing protein, Isy1p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Dix, I; Russell, C; Yehuda, S B; Kupiec, M; Beggs, J D

    1999-01-01

    We have identified a novel splicing factor, Isy1p, through two-hybrid screens for interacting proteins involved in nuclear pre-mRNA splicing. Isy1p was tagged and demonstrated to be part of the splicing machinery, associated with spliceosomes throughout the splicing reactions. At least a portion of the Isy1 protein population is associated with snRNAs; low levels of U5 and U6 snRNAs are coimmunoprecipitated specifically with Isy1p. When the ISY1 gene was knocked out, no defect in vegetative growth was observed. Using a sensitive in vivo splicing assay, however, we observed lower splicing efficiency in the isy1 null mutant compared to wild-type, indicating that Isy1 p is important in the optimization of splicing. PMID:10094305

  18. Involvement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae hydrolase Ldh1p in lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Debelyy, Mykhaylo O; Thoms, Sven; Connerth, Melanie; Daum, Günther; Erdmann, Ralf

    2011-06-01

    Here, we report the functional characterization of the newly identified lipid droplet hydrolase Ldh1p. Recombinant Ldh1p exhibits esterase and triacylglycerol lipase activities. Mutation of the serine in the hydrolase/lipase motif GXSXG completely abolished esterase activity. Ldh1p is required for the maintenance of a steady-state level of the nonpolar and polar lipids of lipid droplets. A characteristic feature of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δldh1 strain is the appearance of giant lipid droplets and an excessive accumulation of nonpolar lipids and phospholipids upon growth on medium containing oleic acid as a sole carbon source. Ldh1p is thought to play a role in maintaining the lipid homeostasis in yeast by regulating both phospholipid and nonpolar lipid levels. PMID:21478434

  19. Observation of {chi}{sub bJ}(1P,2P) decays to light hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Reed, J.; Briere, R. A.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.

    2008-11-01

    Analyzing {upsilon}(nS) decays acquired with the CLEO detector operating at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we measure for the first time the product branching fractions B[{upsilon}(nS){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub bJ}((n-1)P)]B[{chi}{sub bJ}(n-1)P){yields}X{sub i}] for n=2 and 3, where X{sub i} denotes, for each i, one of the 14 exclusive light-hadron final states for which we observe significant signals in both {chi}{sub bJ}(1P) and {chi}{sub bJ}(2P) decays. We also determine upper limits for the electric dipole (E1) transitions {upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub bJ}(1P)

  20. Pathway specific modulation of S1P1 receptor signalling in rat and human astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Luke M; Sheridan, Graham K; Pritchard, Adam J; Rutkowska, Aleksandra; Mullershausen, Florian; Dev, Kumlesh K

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 1 (S1P1R) is modulated by phosphorylated FTY720 (pFTY720), which causes S1P1R internalization preventing lymphocyte migration thus limiting autoimmune response. Studies indicate that internalized S1P1Rs continue to signal, maintaining an inhibition of cAMP, thus raising question whether the effects of pFTY720 are due to transient initial agonism, functional antagonism and/or continued signalling. To further investigate this, the current study first determined if continued S1P1R activation is pathway specific. Experimental Approach Using human and rat astrocyte cultures, the effects of S1P1R activation on cAMP, pERK and Ca2+ signalling was investigated. In addition, to examine the role of S1P1R redistribution on these events, a novel biologic (MNP301) that prevented pFTY720-mediated S1P1R redistribution was engineered. Key Results The data showed that pFTY720 induced long-lasting S1P1R redistribution and continued cAMP signalling in rat astrocytes. In contrast, pFTY720 induced a transient increase of Ca2+ in astrocytes and subsequent antagonism of Ca2+ signalling. Notably, while leaving pFTY720-induced cAMP signalling intact, the novel MNP301 peptide attenuated S1P1R-mediated Ca2+ and pERK signalling in cultured rat astrocytes. Conclusions and Implications These findings suggested that pFTY720 causes continued cAMP signalling that is not dependent on S1P1R redistribution and induces functional antagonism of Ca2+ signalling after transient stimulation. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that pFTY720 causes continued signalling in one pathway (cAMP) versus functional antagonism of another pathway (Ca2+) and which also suggests that redistributed S1P1Rs may have differing signalling properties from those expressed at the surface. PMID:23587004

  1. Tfs1p, a Member of the PEBP Family, Inhibits the Ira2p but Not the Ira1p Ras GTPase-Activating Protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chautard, Hélène; Jacquet, Michel; Schoentgen, Françoise; Bureaud, Nicole; Bénédetti, Hélène

    2004-01-01

    Ras proteins are guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that are highly conserved among eukaryotes. They are involved in signal transduction pathways and are tightly regulated by two sets of antagonistic proteins: GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) inhibit Ras proteins, whereas guanine exchange factors activate them. In this work, we describe Tfs1p, the first physiological inhibitor of a Ras GAP, Ira2p, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. TFS1 is a multicopy suppressor of the cdc25-1 mutation in yeast and corresponds to the so-called Ic CPY cytoplasmic inhibitor. Moreover, Tfs1p belongs to the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) family, one member of which is RKIP, a kinase and serine protease inhibitor and a metastasis inhibitor in prostate cancer. In this work, the results of (i) a two-hybrid screen of a yeast genomic library, (ii) glutathione S-transferase pulldown experiments, (iii) multicopy suppressor tests of cdc25-1 mutants, and (iv) stress resistance tests to evaluate the activation level of Ras demonstrate that Tfs1p interacts with and inhibits Ira2p. We further show that the conserved ligand-binding pocket of Tfs1—the hallmark of the PEBP family—is important for its inhibitory activity. PMID:15075275

  2. Loss of CDC5 function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to defects in Swe1p regulation and Bfa1p/Bub2p-independent cytokinesis.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chong Jin; Song, Sukgil; Lee, Philip R; Shou, Wenying; Deshaies, Raymond J; Lee, Kyung S

    2003-01-01

    In many organisms, polo kinases appear to play multiple roles during M-phase progression. To provide new insights into the function of budding yeast polo kinase Cdc5p, we generated novel temperature-sensitive cdc5 mutants by mutagenizing the C-terminal domain. Here we show that, at a semipermissive temperature, the cdc5-3 mutant exhibited a synergistic bud elongation and growth defect with loss of HSL1, a component important for normal G(2)/M transition. Loss of SWE1, which phosphorylates and inactivates the budding yeast Cdk1 homolog Cdc28p, suppressed the cdc5-3 hsl1Delta defect, suggesting that Cdc5p functions at a point upstream of Swe1p. In addition, the cdc5-4 and cdc5-7 mutants exhibited chained cell morphologies with shared cytoplasms between the connected cell bodies, indicating a cytokinetic defect. Close examination of these mutants revealed delayed septin assembly at the incipient bud site and loosely organized septin rings at the mother-bud neck. Components in the mitotic exit network (MEN) play important roles in normal cytokinesis. However, loss of BFA1 or BUB2, negative regulators of the MEN, failed to remedy the cytokinetic defect of these mutants, indicating that Cdc5p promotes cytokinesis independently of Bfa1p and Bub2p. Thus, Cdc5p contributes to the activation of the Swe1p-dependent Cdc28p/Clb pathway, normal septin function, and cytokinesis. PMID:12586693

  3. A Role for Myosin-I in Actin Assembly through Interactions with Vrp1p, Bee1p, and the Arp2/3 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Marie; Klebl, Bert M.; Tong, Amy H.Y.; Webb, Bradley A.; Leeuw, Thomas; Leberer, Ekkehard; Whiteway, Malcolm; Thomas, David Y.; Boone, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Type I myosins are highly conserved actin-based molecular motors that localize to the actin-rich cortex and participate in motility functions such as endocytosis, polarized morphogenesis, and cell migration. The COOH-terminal tail of yeast myosin-I proteins, Myo3p and Myo5p, contains an Src homology domain 3 (SH3) followed by an acidic domain. The myosin-I SH3 domain interacted with both Bee1p and Vrp1p, yeast homologues of human WASP and WIP, adapter proteins that link actin assembly and signaling molecules. The myosin-I acidic domain interacted with Arp2/3 complex subunits, Arc40p and Arc19p, and showed both sequence similarity and genetic redundancy with the COOH-terminal acidic domain of Bee1p (Las17p), which controls Arp2/3-mediated actin nucleation. These findings suggest that myosin-I proteins may participate in a diverse set of motility functions through a role in actin assembly. PMID:10648568

  4. Drc1p/Cps1p, a 1,3-beta-glucan synthase subunit, is essential for division septum assembly in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Wang, H; McCollum, D; Balasubramanian, M K

    1999-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe divides by medial fission through the use of an actomyosin-based contractile ring. A division septum is formed centripetally, concomitant with ring constriction. Although several genes essential for cytokinesis have been described previously, enzymes that participate in the assembly of the division septum have not been identified. Here we describe a temperature-sensitive mutation, drc1-191, that prevents division septum assembly and causes mutant cells to arrest with a stable actomyosin ring. Unlike the previously characterized cytokinesis mutants, which undergo multiple mitotic cycles, drc1-191 is the first cytokinesis mutant that arrests with two interphase nuclei. Interestingly, unlike drc1-191, drc1-null mutants proceed through multiple mitotic cycles, leading to the formation of large cells with many nuclei. drc1 is allelic to cps1, which encodes a 1,3-beta-glucan synthase subunit. We conclude that Drc1p/Cps1p is not required for cell elongation and cell growth, but plays an essential role in assembly of the division septum. Furthermore, it appears that constriction of the actomyosin ring might depend on assembly of the division septum. We discuss possible mechanisms that account for the differences in the phenotypes of the drc1-191 and the drc1-null mutants and also reflect the potential links between Drc1p and other cytokinesis regulators. PMID:10545452

  5. S1P lyase: a novel therapeutic target for ischemia-reperfusion injury of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Honbo, Norman; Wang, Guan-Ying; Jin, Zhu-Qiu; Fyrst, Henrik; Zhang, Meng; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Dillard, Lisa; Karliner, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid that promotes cardiomyocyte survival and contributes to ischemic preconditioning. S1P lyase (SPL) is a stress-activated enzyme responsible for irreversible S1P catabolism. We hypothesized that SPL contributes to oxidative stress by depleting S1P pools available for cardioprotective signaling. Accordingly, we evaluated SPL inhibition as a strategy for reducing cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. We measured SPL expression and enzyme activity in murine hearts. Basal SPL activity was low in wild-type cardiac tissue but was activated in response to 50 min of ischemia (n = 5, P < 0.01). Hearts of heterozygous SPL knockout mice exhibited reduced SPL activity, elevated S1P levels, smaller infarct size, and increased functional recovery after I/R compared with littermate controls (n = 5, P < 0.01). The small molecule tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI) is a Federal Drug Administration-approved food additive that inhibits SPL. When given overnight at 25 mg/l in drinking water, THI raised S1P levels and reduced SPL activity (n = 5, P < 0.01). THI reduced infarct size and enhanced hemodynamic recovery in response to 50 min of ischemia and to 40 min of reperfusion in ex vivo hearts (n = 7, P < .01). These data correlated with an increase in MAP kinase-interacting serine/threonine kinase 1, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E, and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation levels after I/R, suggesting that SPL inhibition enhances protein translation. Pretreatment with an S1P1 and S1P3 receptor antagonist partially reversed the effects of THI. These results reveal, for the first time, that SPL is an ischemia-induced enzyme that can be targeted as a novel strategy for preventing cardiac I/R injury. PMID:21335477

  6. FXR1P is a GSK3β substrate regulating mood and emotion processing

    PubMed Central

    Del’Guidice, Thomas; Latapy, Camille; Rampino, Antonio; Khlghatyan, Jivan; Lemasson, Morgane; Gelao, Barbara; Quarto, Tiziana; Rizzo, Giuseppe; Barbeau, Annie; Lamarre, Claude; Bertolino, Alessandro; Blasi, Giuseppe; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is a shared action believed to be involved in the regulation of behavior by psychoactive drugs such as antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. However, little is known about the identity of the substrates through which GSK3β affects behavior. We identified fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 (FXR1P), a RNA binding protein associated to genetic risk for schizophrenia, as a substrate for GSK3β. Phosphorylation of FXR1P by GSK3β is facilitated by prior phosphorylation by ERK2 and leads to its down-regulation. In contrast, behaviorally effective chronic mood stabilizer treatments in mice inhibit GSK3β and increase FXR1P levels. In line with this, overexpression of FXR1P in the mouse prefrontal cortex also leads to comparable mood-related responses. Furthermore, functional genetic polymorphisms affecting either FXR1P or GSK3β gene expression interact to regulate emotional brain responsiveness and stability in humans. These observations uncovered a GSK3β/FXR1P signaling pathway that contributes to regulating mood and emotion processing. Regulation of FXR1P by GSK3β also provides a mechanistic framework that may explain how inhibition of GSK3β can contribute to the regulation of mood by psychoactive drugs in mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder. Moreover, this pathway could potentially be implicated in other biological functions, such as inflammation and cell proliferation, in which FXR1P and GSK3 are known to play a role. PMID:26240334

  7. Role of the α-Glucanase Agn1p in Fission-Yeast Cell Separation

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Nick; Speijer, Dave; Grün, Christian H.; van den Berg, Marlene; de Haan, Annett; Hochstenbach, Frans

    2004-01-01

    Cell division in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe yields two equal-sized daughter cells. Medial fission is achieved by deposition of a primary septum flanked by two secondary septa within the dividing cell. During the final step of cell division, cell separation, the primary septum is hydrolyzed by an endo-(1,3)-β-glucanase, Eng1p. We reasoned that the cell wall material surrounding the septum, referred to here as the septum edging, also must be hydrolyzed before full separation of the daughter cells can occur. Because the septum edging contains (1,3)-α-glucan, we investigated the cellular functions of the putative (1,3)-α-glucanases Agn1p and Agn2p. Whereas agn2 deletion results in a defect in endolysis of the ascus wall, deletion of agn1 leads to clumped cells that remained attached to each other by septum-edging material. Purified Agn1p hydrolyzes (1,3)-α-glucan predominantly into pentasaccharides, indicating an endo-catalytic mode of hydrolysis. Furthermore, we show that the transcription factors Sep1p and Ace2p regulate both eng1 and agn1 expression in a cell cycle-dependent manner. We propose that Agn1p acts in concert with Eng1p to achieve efficient cell separation, thereby exposing the secondary septa as the new ends of the daughter cells. PMID:15194814

  8. Measurements of branching fractions for electromagnetic transitions involving the χbJ(1P) states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornicer, M.; Mitchell, R. E.; Tarbert, C. M.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Hietala, J.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Brisbane, S.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Spradlin, P.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; Ecklund, K. M.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Pearson, L. J.; Thorndike, E. H.; Yang, F.; Ricciardi, S.; Thomas, C.; Artuso, M.; Blusk, S.; Mountain, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Zhang, L. M.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Lincoln, A.; Smith, M. J.; Zhou, P.; Zhu, J.; Naik, P.; Rademacker, J.; Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Randrianarivony, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Briere, R. A.; Vogel, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Das, S.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Shi, X.; Sun, W. M.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Lowrey, N.; Mehrabyan, S.; Selen, M.; Wiss, J.; Libby, J.

    2011-03-01

    Using (9.32, 5.88) million Υ(2S,3S) decays taken with the CLEO III detector, we obtain five product branching fractions for the exclusive processes Υ(2S)→γχb0,1,2(1P)→γγΥ(1S) and Υ(3S)→γχb1,2(1P)→γγΥ(1S). We observe the transition χb0(1P)→γΥ(1S) for the first time. Using the known branching fractions for B[Υ(2S)→γχbJ(1P)], we extract values for B[χbJ(1P)→γΥ(1S)] for J=0, 1, 2. In turn, these values can be used to unfold the Υ(3S) product branching fractions to obtain values for B[Υ(3S)→γχb1,2(1P)] for the first time individually. Comparison of these with each other and with the branching fraction B[Υ(3S)→γχb0] previously measured by CLEO provides tests of relativistic corrections to electric dipole matrix elements.

  9. Hyaluroan-regulated lymphatic permeability through S1P receptors is crucial for cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengsi; He, Pingqing; Liu, Yiwen; He, Yiqing; Du, Yan; Wu, Man; Zhang, Guoliang; Yang, Cuixia; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of cancer lymphatic vessel barrier function occurs has been reported to involve in cancer lymphatic metastasis. Hyaluronan (HA), a major glycosaminoglycan component of the extracellular matrix, is associated with cancer metastasis. We investigated the effect of high/low molecular weight hyaluronan (HMW-HA/LMW-HA) on regulation of barrier function and tight junctions in cancer lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) monolayer. Results showed that LMW-HA increased the permeability of cancer LEC monolayers and induced disruption of Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1)-mediated intercellular tight junction and actin stress fiber formation. HMW-HA treatment decreased permeability in cancer LEC monolayers and cortical actin ring formation. As reported, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptors are involved in vascular integrity. After silencing of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1), upregulation of S1P receptors (S1P1 and S1P3) induced by HMW-HA/LMW-HA were inhibited, respectively. With S1P3 silenced, the disruption of ZO-1 as well as stress fiber formation and the ROCK1/RhoA signaling pathway induced by LMW-HA was not observed in cancer LEC. These results suggested that S1P receptors may play an important role in HMW-HA-/LMW-HA-mediated regulation of cancer lymphatic vessel integrity, which might be the initial step of cancer lymphatic metastasis and a useful intervention of cancer progression. PMID:25428387

  10. Loss of APD1 in Yeast Confers Hydroxyurea Sensitivity Suppressed by Yap1p Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hei-Man Vincent; Pan, Kewu; Kong, Ka-Yiu Edwin; Hu, Ligang; Chan, Ling-Chim; Siu, Kam-Leung; Sun, Hongzhe; Wong, Chi-Ming; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxins are iron-sulfur proteins that play important roles in electron transport and redox homeostasis. Yeast Apd1p is a novel member of the family of thioredoxin-like ferredoxins. In this study, we characterized the hydroxyurea (HU)-hypersensitive phenotype of apd1Δ cells. HU is an inhibitor of DNA synthesis, a cellular stressor and an anticancer agent. Although the loss of APD1 did not influence cell proliferation or cell cycle progression, it resulted in HU sensitivity. This sensitivity was reverted in the presence of antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine, implicating a role for intracellular redox. Mutation of the iron-binding motifs in Apd1p abrogated its ability to rescue HU sensitivity in apd1Δ cells. The iron-binding activity of Apd1p was verified by a color assay. By mass spectrometry two irons were found to be incorporated into one Apd1p protein molecule. Surprisingly, ribonucleotide reductase genes were not induced in apd1Δ cells and the HU sensitivity was unaffected when dNTP production was boosted. A suppressor screen was performed and the expression of stress-regulated transcription factor Yap1p was found to effectively rescue the HU sensitivity in apd1Δ cells. Taken together, our work identified Apd1p as a new ferredoxin which serves critical roles in cellular defense against HU. PMID:25600293

  11. Case report of individual with cutaneous immunodeficiency and novel 1p36 duplication

    PubMed Central

    Hatter, Alyn D; Soler, David C; Curtis, Christine; Cooper, Kevin D; McCormick, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Crusted or Norwegian scabies is an infectious skin dermatopathology usually associated with an underlying immunodeficiency condition. It is caused when the mite Sarcoptes scabiei infects the skin, and the immune system is unable to control its spread, leading to a massive hyperinfestation with a simultaneous inflammatory and hyperkeratotic reaction. This is the first report of a novel 1p36 duplication associated with a recurrent infection of crusted scabies. Case report We describe a 34-year-old patient with a cutaneous immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent crusted scabies infestation, diffuse tinea, and recurrent staphylococcal cellulitis, who we suspected had an undiagnosed syndrome. The patient also suffered from mental retardation, renal failure, and premature senescence. A cytogenetic fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed a 9.34 Mb duplication within the short (p) arm of chromosome 1, precisely from 1p36.11 to 1p36.21, with an adjacent 193 kb copy gain entirely within 1p36.11. In addition, chromosome 4 had a 906 kb gain in 4p16.1 and chromosome 9 had a 81 kb copy gain in 9p24.3. Over 100 genes localized within these duplicated regions. Gene expression array revealed 82 genes whose expression changed >1.5-fold compared to a healthy age-matched skin control, but among them only the lipolytic enzyme arylacetamide deacetylase-like 3 was found within the duplicated 1p36 region of chromosome 1. Discussion Although genetic duplications in the 1p36 region have been previously described, our report describes a novel duplicative variant within the 1p36 region. The patient did not have a past history of immunosuppression but was afflicted by a recurrent case of crusted scabies, raising the possibility that the recurrent infection was associated with the 1p36 genetic duplication. Conclusion To our knowledge, the specific duplicated sequence between 1p36.11 and p36.21 found in our patient has never been previously reported. We reviewed and

  12. Molecular and cellular pathways associated with chromosome 1p deletions during colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Claire M; Crowley-Skillicorn, Cheray; Bernstein, Carol; Holubec, Hana; Bernstein, Harris

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal instability is a major pathway of sporadic colon carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p appears to be one of the “hot spots” in the non-neoplastic mucosa that, when deleted, is associated with the initiation of carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p contains genes associated with DNA repair, spindle checkpoint function, apoptosis, multiple microRNAs, the Wnt signaling pathway, tumor suppression, antioxidant activities, and defense against environmental toxins. Loss of 1p is dangerous since it would likely contribute to genomic instability leading to tumorigenesis. The 1p deletion-associated colon carcinogenesis pathways are reviewed at the molecular and cellular levels. Sporadic colon cancer is strongly linked to a high-fat/low-vegetable/low-micronutrient, Western-style diet. We also consider how selected dietary-related compounds (eg, excess hydrophobic bile acids, and low levels of folic acid, niacin, plant-derived antioxidants, and other modulatory compounds) might affect processes leading to chromosomal deletions, and to the molecular and cellular pathways specifically altered by chromosome 1p loss. PMID:21753893

  13. Telomerase and Tel1p Preferentially Associate with Short Telomeres in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sabourin, Michelle; Tuzon, Creighton T.; Zakian, Virginia A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In diverse organisms, telomerase preferentially elongates short telomeres. We generated a single short telomere in otherwise wild-type (WT) S. cerevisiae cells. The binding of the positive regulators Ku and Cdc13p was similar at short and WT-length telomeres. The negative regulators Rif1p and Rif2p were present at the short telomere, although Rif2p levels were reduced. Two telomerase holoenzyme components, Est1p and Est2p, were preferentially enriched at short telomeres in late S/G2 phase, the time of telomerase action. Tel1p, the yeast ATM-like checkpoint kinase, was highly enriched at short telomeres from early S through G2 phase and even into the next cell cycle. Nonetheless, induction of a single short telomere did not elicit a cell-cycle arrest. Tel1p binding was dependent on Xrs2p and required for preferential binding of telomerase to short telomeres. These data suggest that Tel1p targets telomerase to the DNA ends most in need of extension. PMID:17656141

  14. Ptc1p regulates cortical ER inheritance via Slt2p.

    PubMed

    Du, Yunrui; Walker, Lee; Novick, Peter; Ferro-Novick, Susan

    2006-10-01

    Studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that the inheritance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mitochondria, and vacuoles involves the capture of a tubular structure at the bud tip. Ptc1p, a serine/threonine phosphatase, has previously been shown to regulate mitochondrial inheritance by an unknown mechanism. Ptc1p regulates the high osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and has also been implicated in the cell wall integrity (CWI) MAPK pathway. Here we show that the loss of Ptc1p or the Ptc1p binding protein, Nbp2p, causes a prominent delay in the delivery of ER tubules to the periphery of daughter cells and results in a dramatic increase in the level of phosphorylated Slt2p, the MAPK in the CWI pathway. Either loss of Slt2p or inhibition of the CWI pathway by addition of sorbitol, suppresses the ER inheritance defect in the ptc1Delta and nbp2Delta mutants. Our findings indicate that Ptc1p and Nbp2p regulate ER inheritance through the CWI MAPK pathway by modulating the MAPK, Slt2p. PMID:16977319

  15. Optical model potential of A =3 projectiles for 1 p -shell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, D. Y.; Dean, W. M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    A set of global optical potential parameters describing the A =3 particles (3He and 3H ) elastic scattering from 1 p -shell nuclei, HT 1 p , is obtained by simultaneously fitting 118 sets of experimental data of 3He and 3H elastic scattering from 9Be,10B ,11B ,12C ,13C ,14C ,14N ,15N ,16O ,17O , and 18O with incident energies from 4 ≤E ≤118.5 MeV and 24 sets of elastic scattering data with the 6Li and 7Li targets from 3 ≤E ≤44 MeV. HT 1 p is found to be superior to GDP08 [D. Y. Pang, P. Roussel-Chomaz, H. Savajols, R. L. Varner, and R. Wolski, Phys. Rev. C 79, 024615 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevC.79.024615], which is a systematic potential designed for the heavy-target region, in the reproduction of the angular distributions of elastic scattering cross sections of 3He and 3H from 1 p -shell nuclei at energies below 100 MeV. At energies above 100 MeV, GDP08 is found to be better than HT1p.

  16. Nucleoside diphosphate kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ynk1p: localization to the mitochondrial intermembrane space.

    PubMed Central

    Amutha, Boominathan; Pain, Debkumar

    2003-01-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) is a highly conserved multifunctional enzyme. It catalyses the transfer of gamma phosphates from nucleoside triphosphates to nucleoside diphosphates by a mechanism that involves formation of an autophosphorylated enzyme intermediate. The phosphate is usually supplied by ATP. NDPK activity in different subcellular compartments may regulate the crucial balance between ATP and GTP or other nucleoside triphosphates. NDPKs are homo-oligomeric proteins and are predominantly localized in the cytosol. In this paper, we demonstrate that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae a small fraction of total NDPK activity encoded by YNK1 is present in the intermembrane space (IMS) of mitochondria, and the corresponding protein Ynk1p in the IMS represents approx. 0.005% of total mitochondrial proteins. Ynk1p, synthesized as a single gene product, must therefore be partitioned between cytoplasm and mitochondrial IMS fractions. A mechanism for this partitioning is suggested by our observations that interaction with a 40 kDa protein of the translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane (Tom40p), occurs preferentially with unfolded, unphosphorylated forms of Ynk1p. A population of newly translated, but not yet folded or autophosphorylated, Ynk1p intermediates may be imported into the IMS of mitochondria and trapped there by subsequent folding and oligomerization. Within the small volume of the IMS, Ynk1p may be more concentrated and may be required to supply GTP to several important proteins in this compartment. PMID:12472466

  17. Nud1p, the yeast homolog of Centriolin, regulates spindle pole body inheritance in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Oren; Taxis, Christof; Keller, Philipp J; Benjak, Aleksander; Stelzer, Ernst H K; Simchen, Giora; Knop, Michael

    2006-08-23

    Nud1p, a protein homologous to the mammalian centrosome and midbody component Centriolin, is a component of the budding yeast spindle pole body (SPB), with roles in anchorage of microtubules and regulation of the mitotic exit network during vegetative growth. Here we analyze the function of Nud1p during yeast meiosis. We find that a nud1-2 temperature-sensitive mutant has two meiosis-related defects that reflect genetically distinct functions of Nud1p. First, the mutation affects spore formation due to its late function during spore maturation. Second, and most important, the mutant loses its ability to distinguish between the ages of the four spindle pole bodies, which normally determine which SPB would be preferentially included in the mature spores. This affects the regulation of genome inheritance in starved meiotic cells and leads to the formation of random dyads instead of non-sister dyads under these conditions. Both functions of Nud1p are connected to the ability of Spc72p to bind to the outer plaque and half-bridge (via Kar1p) of the SPB. PMID:16888627

  18. Hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1 axis controls energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vagner R R; Micheletti, Thayana O; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Katashima, Carlos K; Lenhare, Luciene; Morari, Joseane; Mendes, Maria Carolina S; Razolli, Daniela S; Rocha, Guilherme Z; de Souza, Claudio T; Ryu, Dongryeol; Prada, Patrícia O; Velloso, Lício A; Carvalheira, José B C; Pauli, José Rodrigo; Cintra, Dennys E; Ropelle, Eduardo R

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) that has a role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that the S1P/S1PR1 signalling pathway in hypothalamic neurons regulates energy homeostasis in rodents. We demonstrate that S1PR1 protein is highly enriched in hypothalamic POMC neurons of rats. Intracerebroventricular injections of the bioactive lipid, S1P, reduce food consumption and increase rat energy expenditure through persistent activation of STAT3 and the melanocortin system. Similarly, the selective disruption of hypothalamic S1PR1 increases food intake and reduces the respiratory exchange ratio. We further show that STAT3 controls S1PR1 expression in neurons via a positive feedback mechanism. Interestingly, several models of obesity and cancer anorexia display an imbalance of hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 axis, whereas pharmacological intervention ameliorates these phenotypes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the neuronal S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 signalling axis plays a critical role in the control of energy homeostasis in rats. PMID:25255053

  19. Laa1p, a Conserved AP-1 Accessory Protein Important for AP-1 Localization in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, G. Esteban

    2006-01-01

    AP-1 and Gga adaptors participate in clathrin-mediated protein transport between the trans-Golgi network and endosomes. Both adaptors contain homologous domains that act to recruit accessory proteins involved in clathrin-coated vesicle formation, but the spectrum of known adaptor-binding partners is limited. This study describes an evolutionarily conserved protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Laa1p (Yjl207cp), that interacts and functions specifically with AP-1. Deletion of LAA1, when combined with a conditional mutation in clathrin heavy chain or deletion of GGA genes, accentuated growth defects and increased disruption of clathrin-dependent α-factor maturation and transport of carboxypeptidase Y to the vacuole. In contrast, such genetic interactions were not observed between deletions of LAA1 and AP-1 subunit genes. Laa1p preferentially interacted with AP-1 compared with Gga proteins by glutathione S-transferase-fusion affinity binding and coimmunoprecipitations. Localization of AP-1 and Laa1p, but not Gga proteins, was highly sensitive to brefeldin A, an inhibitor of ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) activation. Importantly, deletion of LAA1 caused mislocalization of AP-1, especially in cells at high density (postdiauxic shift), but it did not affect Gga protein distribution. Our results identify Laa1p as a new determinant of AP-1 localization, suggesting a model in which Laa1p and Arf cooperate to direct stable association of AP-1 with appropriate intracellular membranes. PMID:16687571

  20. Novel S1P(1) receptor agonists--part 3: from thiophenes to pyridines.

    PubMed

    Bolli, Martin H; Abele, Stefan; Birker, Magdalena; Bravo, Roberto; Bur, Daniel; de Kanter, Ruben; Kohl, Christopher; Grimont, Julien; Hess, Patrick; Lescop, Cyrille; Mathys, Boris; Müller, Claus; Nayler, Oliver; Rey, Markus; Scherz, Michael; Schmidt, Gunther; Seifert, Jürgen; Steiner, Beat; Velker, Jörg; Weller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In preceding communications we summarized our medicinal chemistry efforts leading to the identification of potent, selective, and orally active S1P1 agonists such as the thiophene derivative 1. As a continuation of these efforts, we replaced the thiophene in 1 by a 2-, 3-, or 4-pyridine and obtained less lipophilic, potent, and selective S1P1 agonists (e.g., 2) efficiently reducing blood lymphocyte count in the rat. Structural features influencing the compounds' receptor affinity profile and pharmacokinetics are discussed. In addition, the ability to penetrate brain tissue has been studied for several compounds. As a typical example for these pyridine based S1P1 agonists, compound 53 showed EC50 values of 0.6 and 352 nM for the S1P1 and S1P3 receptor, respectively, displayed favorable PK properties, and penetrated well into brain tissue. In the rat, compound 53 maximally reduced the blood lymphocyte count for at least 24 h after oral dosing of 3 mg/kg. PMID:24367923

  1. Dynamical Relativistic Effects in Quasielastic 1p -Shell Proton Knockout from O{sup 16}

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Aniol, K. A.; Auerbach, L.; Baker, F. T.; Berthot, J.; Bertin, P.-Y.; Boeglin, W. U.

    2000-04-10

    We have measured the cross section for quasielastic 1p -shell proton knockout in the {sup 16}O( e, e{sup '}p) reaction at {omega}=0.439 GeV and Q{sup 2}=0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2} for missing momentum P{sub miss}{<=}355 MeV /c . We have extracted the response functions R{sub L+TT} , R{sub T} , R{sub LT} , and the left-right asymmetry, A{sub LT} , for the 1p{sub 1/2} and the 1p{sub 3/2} states. The data are well described by relativistic distorted wave impulse approximation calculations. At large P{sub miss} , the structure observed in A{sub LT} indicates the existence of dynamical relativistic effects. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Hunt for the 1/sup 1/P/sub 1/ bound state of charmonium

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, F.C.

    1982-02-01

    Using the Crystal Ball detector at SPEAR, we have looked for evidence of the isospin-violating decay psi' ..-->.. ..pi../sup 01/P/sub 1/, where /sup 1/P/sub 1/ is the predicted spin-singlet p-wave bound state of charmonium. For a /sup 1/P/sub 1/ state at the predicted mass (approx. 3520 MeV), we obtain the 95% confidence level limits: BR(psi' ..-->.. ..pi../sup 01/P/sub 1/) < 0.55%, BR(psi' ..-->.. ..pi../sup 01/P/sub 1/)BR(/sup 1/P/sub 1/ ..-->.. ..gamma..n/sub c/ < 0.14%. These limits are compared with simple theoretical predictions.

  3. Combined PDF and Rietveld studies of ADORable zeolites and the disordered intermediate IPC-1P.

    PubMed

    Morris, Samuel A; Wheatley, Paul S; Položij, Miroslav; Nachtigall, Petr; Eliášová, Pavla; Čejka, Jiří; Lucas, Tim C; Hriljac, Joseph A; Pinar, Ana B; Morris, Russell E

    2016-09-28

    The disordered intermediate of the ADORable zeolite UTL has been structurally confirmed using the pair distribution function (PDF) technique. The intermediate, IPC-1P, is a disordered layered compound formed by the hydrolysis of UTL in 0.1 M hydrochloric acid solution. Its structure is unsolvable by traditional X-ray diffraction techniques. The PDF technique was first benchmarked against high-quality synchrotron Rietveld refinements of IPC-2 (OKO) and IPC-4 (PCR) - two end products of IPC-1P condensation that share very similar structural features. An IPC-1P starting model derived from density functional theory was used for the PDF refinement, which yielded a final fit of Rw = 18% and a geometrically reasonable structure. This confirms the layers do stay intact throughout the ADOR process and shows PDF is a viable technique for layered zeolite structure determination. PMID:27527381

  4. Electron-impact excitation of the n 1P levels of helium - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, David C.; Csanak, George; Trajmar, Sandor; Register, D. F.

    1992-01-01

    New experimental electron-energy-loss data have been used to extract differential and integral cross sections for excitation of the 2 1P level, and for the overlapping (3 1P, 3 1D, 3 3D) levels of helium, at 30-, 50-, and 100-eV incident electron energies. First-order many-body theory (FOMBT) has been used to calculate the differential and integral cross sections for excitation of the n 1P (n = 2,...,6) levels of helium by electron impact, for incident electron energies from threshold to 500 eV. Detailed comparisons between these two new sets of data are made as well as comparisons with appropriate published experimental and theoretical results. A simple scaling relationship is derived from the FOMBT results for n = 2,...,6 that provides differential and integral cross sections for all symmetry final levels of helium with n = 6 or greater.

  5. FHA domain boundaries of the dun1p and rad53p cell cycle checkpoint kinases.

    PubMed

    Hammet, A; Pike, B L; Mitchelhill, K I; Teh, T; Kobe, B; House, C M; Kemp, B E; Heierhorst, J

    2000-04-14

    Dun1p and Rad53p of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are members of a conserved family of cell cycle checkpoint protein kinases that contain forkhead-associated (FHA) domains. Here, we demonstrate that these FHA domains contain 130-140 residues, and are thus considerably larger than previously predicted by sequence comparisons (55-75 residues). In vivo, expression of the proteolytically defined Dun1p FHA domain, but not a fragment containing only the predicted domain boundaries, inhibited the transcriptional induction of repair genes following replication blocks. This indicates that the non-catalytic FHA domain plays an important role in the transcriptional function of the Dun1p protein kinase. PMID:10767410

  6. Morbid obesity in a child with monosomy 1p36 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zagalo, Ana; Dias, Patricia; Pereira, Carla; Sampaio, Maria de Lurdes

    2012-01-01

    The monosomy 1p36 syndrome is a cause of syndromic obesity. It is characterised by psychomotor delay, hypotonia and typical craniofacial dysmorphism. Other features commonly associated are behavioural anomalies including hyperphagia and self-injuring, seizures, congenital heart disease and hypothyroidism. The authors report the case of a 9-year and 5-month-boy referred to the paediatric endocrinology clinics for morbid obesity. Clinical findings were generalised obesity with a body mass index >95th centile, acanthosis nigricans of the neck, arms with self inflicted lesions, deep-set eyes, straight eyebrows, broad nasal bridge and pointed chin. He was unable to walk and had no expressive language. Cytogenetic analysis identified 1p36.33-pter deletion (~139 Mb terminal deletion in chromosome 1 short arm) and Y chromosome duplication. The blood analysis showed insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. The authors emphasise the need to consider monosomy 1p36 as a cause of severe psychomotor delay and obesity. PMID:22605691

  7. Electron impact excitation of the 3s3p 1P1 state in magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predojević, Branko

    2006-12-01

    Differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact excitation of the 3s3p 1P1 resonance state of magnesium have been measured at 10, 15, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 eV incident electron energies (Eo). Scattered-electron intensities were measured over wide range of scattering angles from 2° to 150°. The absolute DCS scale for the 1P1 state was determined through normalizations of its relative DCSs to optical oscillator strength using forward scattering function method, except at Eo ⩽ 15 eV where the excitation function of the 3s3p 1P1 state experimentally obtained by Leep and Gallagher (1976 Phys. Rev. A 13 148) was utilized for normalization. These absolute DCSs were extrapolated to 0° and 180° and numerically integrated to yield integral, momentum transfer and viscosity cross sections. Our results are compared with available experimental and theoretical data.

  8. Measurement of the χ b (3 P) mass and of the relative rate of χ b1(1 P) and χ b2(1 P) production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Lespinasse, M.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-10-01

    The production of χ b mesons in proton-proton collisions is studied using a data sample collected by the LHCb detector, at centre-of-mass energies of =7 and 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1. The χ b mesons are identified through their decays to ϒ(1 S) γ and ϒ(2 S) γ using photons that converted to e + e - pairs in the detector. The relative prompt production rate of χ b1(1 P) and χ b2(1 P) mesons is measured as a function of the ϒ(1 S) transverse momentum in the χ b rapidity range 2.0 < y <4.5. A precise measurement of the χ b (3 P) mass is also performed. Assuming a mass splitting between the χ b1(3 P) and the χ b2(3 P) states of 10.5 MeV/c2, the measured mass of the χ b1(3 P) meson is

  9. Voa1p Functions in V-ATPase Assembly in the Yeast Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Margret; Graham, Laurie A.

    2008-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) is a multisubunit complex divided into two sectors: the V1 sector catalyzes ATP hydrolysis and the V0 sector translocates protons, resulting in acidification of its resident organelle. Four protein factors participate in V0 assembly. We have discovered a fifth V0 assembly factor, Voa1p (YGR106C); an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized integral membrane glycoprotein. The role of Voa1p in V0 assembly was revealed in cells expressing an ER retrieval-deficient form of the V-ATPase assembly factor Vma21p (Vma21pQQ). Loss of Voa1p in vma21QQ yeast cells resulted in loss of V-ATPase function; cells were unable to acidify their vacuoles and exhibited growth defects typical of cells lacking V-ATPase. V0 assembly was severely compromised in voa1 vma21QQ double mutants. Isolation of V0–Vma21p complexes indicated that Voa1p associates most strongly with Vma21p and the core proteolipid ring of V0 subunits c, c′, and c″. On assembly of the remaining three V0 subunits (a, d, and e) into the V0 complex, Voa1p dissociates from the now fully assembled V0–Vma21p complex. Our results suggest Voa1p functions with Vma21p early in V0 assembly in the ER, but then it dissociates before exit of the V0–Vma21p complex from the ER for transport to the Golgi compartment. PMID:18799613

  10. Conservation of Histone Binding and Transcriptional Repressor Functions in a Schizosaccharomyces pombe Tup1p Homolog

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Yukio; Matsuo, Eri; Roth, Sharon Y.; Harashima, Satoshi

    1999-01-01

    The Ssn6p-Tup1p corepressor complex is important to the regulation of several diverse genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and serves as a model for corepressor functions. To investigate the evolutionary conservation of these functions, sequences homologous to the S. cerevisiae TUP1 gene were cloned from Kluyveromyces lactis (TUP1) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (tup11+). Interestingly, while the K. lactis TUP1 gene complemented an S. cerevisiae tup1 null mutation, the S. pombe tup11+ gene did not, even when expressed under the control of the S. cerevisiae TUP1 promoter. However, an S. pombe Tup11p-LexA fusion protein repressed transcription of a corresponding reporter gene, indicating that this Tup1p homolog has intrinsic repressor activity. Moreover, a chimeric protein containing the amino-terminal Ssn6p-binding domain of S. cerevisiae Tup1p and 544 amino acids from the C-terminal region of S. pombe Tup11p complemented the S. cerevisiae tup1 mutation. The failure of native S. pombe Tup11p to complement loss of Tup1p functions in S. cerevisiae corresponds to an inability to bind to S. cerevisiae Ssn6p in vitro. Disruption of tup11+ in combination with a disruption of tup12+, another TUP1 homolog gene in S. pombe, causes a defect in glucose repression of fbp1+, suggesting that S. pombe Tup1p homologs function as repressors in S. pombe. Furthermore, Tup11p binds specifically to histones H3 and H4 in vitro, indicating that both the repression and histone binding functions of Tup1p-related proteins are conserved across species. PMID:10567571

  11. Three unrelated cases of paracentric inversions of 1p in individuals with abnormal phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Estop, A.M.; Karlin, S.M.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W.; Bansal, V.; Surti, U.; Lin, A.; Levinson, F.

    1994-02-15

    Paracentric inversions, involving a rearrangement within one chromosome arm, are rare. Although carriers of balanced paracentric inversions should theoretically not be at risk for abnormal offspring, such cases have been reported. The authors report on 2 unrelated cases of inherited paracentric inversions of 1p with breakpoints at p32 and p36.1 and p32.3 and p36.22 in individuals with abnormal phenotypes. Another case of 2 abnormal monozygotic twins with a de novo paracentric inversion of 1p with breakpoints at p22 and p34 is presented as well. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Fluorescence-linked Antigen Quantification (FLAQ) Assay for Fast Quantification of HIV-1 p24Gag

    PubMed Central

    Gesner, Marianne; Maiti, Mekhala; Grant, Robert; Cavrois, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence-linked antigen quantification (FLAQ) assay allows a fast quantification of HIV-1 p24Gag antigen. Viral supernatant are lysed and incubated with polystyrene microspheres coated with polyclonal antibodies against HIV-1 p24Gag and detector antibodies conjugated to fluorochromes (Figure 1). After washes, the fluorescence of microspheres is measured by flow cytometry and reflects the abundance of the antigen in the lysate. The speed, simplicity, and wide dynamic range of the FLAQ assay are optimum for many applications performed in HIV-1 research laboratories.

  13. Excitations of {sup 1}P levels of zinc by electron impact on the ground state

    SciTech Connect

    Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor; Panajotovic, R.; Sevic, D.; Pejcev, V.; Marinkovic, B.P.; Filipovic, D.M.

    2005-07-15

    We present results of a joint theoretical and experimental investigation of electron scattering from the 4s{sup 2} {sup 1}S ground state of zinc. The 4s4p {sup 1}P{sup o} and 4s5p {sup 1}P{sup o} differential cross sections were measured at scattering angles between 10 degree sign and 150 degree sign and electron-energies of 15, 20, 25, 40, and 60 eV. Corresponding convergent close-coupling calculations have been performed and are compared with experiment.

  14. Optimization of a Potent, Orally Active S1P1 Agonist Containing a Quinolinone Core

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The optimization of a series of S1P1 agonists with limited activity against S1P3 is reported. A polar headgroup was used to improve the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic parameters of lead quinolinone 6. When dosed orally at 1 and 3 mg/kg, the azahydroxymethyl analogue 22 achieved statistically significant lowering of circulating blood lymphocytes 24 h postdose. In rats, a dose-proportional increase in exposure was measured when 22 was dosed orally at 2 and 100 mg/kg. PMID:24900374

  15. S1P3 receptor influences key physiological properties of fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    PubMed

    Germinario, Elena; Bondì, Michela; Cencetti, Francesca; Donati, Chiara; Nocella, Marta; Colombini, Barbara; Betto, Romeo; Bruni, Paola; Bagni, Maria Angela; Danieli-Betto, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    To examine the role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor 3 (S1P3) in modulating muscle properties, we utilized transgenic mice depleted of the receptor. Morphological analyses of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle did not show evident differences between wild-type and S1P3-null mice. The body weight of 3-mo-old S1P3-null mice and the mean cross-sectional area of transgenic EDL muscle fibers were similar to those of wild-type. S1P3 deficiency enhanced the expression level of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors mRNA in S1P3-null EDL muscle. The contractile properties of S1P3-null EDL diverge from those of wild-type, largely more fatigable and less able to recover. The absence of S1P3 appears responsible for a lower availability of calcium during fatigue. S1P supplementation, expected to stimulate residual S1P receptors and signaling, reduced fatigue development of S1P3-null muscle. Moreover, in the absence of S1P3, denervated EDL atrophies less than wild-type. The analysis of atrophy-related proteins in S1P3-null EDL evidences high levels of the endogenous regulator of mitochondria biogenesis peroxisome proliferative-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α); preserving mitochondria could protect the muscle from disuse atrophy. In conclusion, the absence of S1P3 makes the muscle more sensitive to fatigue and slows down atrophy development after denervation, indicating that S1P3 is involved in the modulation of key physiological properties of the fast-twitch EDL muscle. PMID:26718782

  16. SKI-1/S1P inhibitor PF-429242 impairs the onset of HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Matthieu; Sureau, Camille; Guévin, Carl; Seidah, Nabil G; Labonté, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Worldwide, approximately 170 million individuals are afflicted with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To prevent the development of inherent diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, tremendous efforts have been made, leading to the development of promising new treatments. However, their efficiency is still dependent on the viral genotype. Additionally, these treatments that target the virus directly can trigger the emergence of resistant variants. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a long-term (72h) inhibition of SKI-1/S1P, a master lipogenic pathway regulator through activation of SREBP, resulted in impaired HCV genome replication and infectious virion secretion. In the present study, we sought to investigate the antiviral effect of the SKI-1/S1P small molecule inhibitor PF-429242 at the early steps of the HCV lifecycle. Our results indicate a very potent antiviral effect of the inhibitor early in the viral lifecycle and that the overall action of the compound relies on two different contributions. The first one is SREBP/SKI-1/S1P dependent and involves LDLR and NPC1L1 proteins, while the second one is SREBP independent. Overall, our study confirms that SKI-1/S1P is a relevant target to impair HCV infection and that PF-429242 could be a promising candidate in the field of HCV infection treatment. PMID:25573299

  17. Identification and characterization of Candida utilis multidrug efflux transporter CuCdr1p.

    PubMed

    Watanasrisin, Wittawan; Iwatani, Shun; Oura, Takahiro; Tomita, Yasuyuki; Ikushima, Shigehiro; Chindamporn, Ariya; Niimi, Masakazu; Niimi, Kyoko; Lamping, Erwin; Cannon, Richard D; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2016-06-01

    The edible, nitrate assimilating, yeast Candida utilis is a commercial food additive, and it is a potentially useful host for heterologous protein expression. A number of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are multidrug efflux pumps that can cause multidrug resistance in opportunistic pathogens. In order to develop optimal novel antimicrobial agents it is imperative to understand the structure, function and expression of these transporters. With the ultimate aim of developing an alternative yeast host for the heterologous expression of eukaryotic membrane transporters, and to identify ABC transporters potentially associated with C. utilis multidrug resistance, we classified the entire repertoire of 30 C. utilis ABC proteins. We named the open reading frame most similar to the archetype multidrug efflux pump gene C. albicans CDR1 as CuCDR1 Overexpression of CuCDR1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADΔ caused multidrug resistance similar to that of cells overexpressing CaCDR1 Unlike CaCdr1p, however, the C-terminally green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged CuCdr1p-GFP was functionally impaired and did not properly localize to the plasma membrane. CuCdr1p function could be recovered however by adding a 15 amino acid linker -GAGGSAGGSGGAGAG- between CuCdr1p and the C-terminal GFP tag. PMID:27188883

  18. Identification of 1p36 deletion syndrome in patients with facial dysmorphism and developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Go Hun; Kim, Ja Hye; Cho, Ja Hyang; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Seo, Eul-Ju; Lee, Beom Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The 1p36 deletion syndrome is a microdeletion syndrome characterized by developmental delays/intellectual disability, craniofacial dysmorphism, and other congenital anomalies. To date, many cases of this syndrome have been reported worldwide. However, cases with this syndrome have not been reported in Korean populations anywhere. This study was performed to report the clinical and molecular characteristics of five Korean patients with the 1p36 deletion syndrome. Methods The clinical characteristics of the 5 patients were reviewed. Karyotyping and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analyses were performed for genetic diagnoses. Results All 5 patients had typical dysmorphic features including frontal bossing, flat right parietal bone, low-set ears, straight eyebrows, down-slanting palpebral fissure, hypotelorism, flat nasal roots, midface hypoplasia, pointed chins, small lips, and variable degrees of developmental delay. Each patient had multiple and variable anomalies such as a congenital heart defect including ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and patent duct arteriosus, ventriculomegaly, cryptorchism, or hearing loss. Karyotyping revealed the 1p36 deletion in only 1 patient, although it was confirmed in all 5 patients by MLPA analyses. Conclusion All the patients had the typical features of 1p36 deletion. These hallmarks can be used to identify other patients with this condition in their early years in order to provide more appropriate care. PMID:26893599

  19. Partial monosomy of chromosome 1p36.3: A distinctive phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Reish, O.; Berry, S.A.; King. R.A.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a series of five patients with a partial monosomy of 1p36.3 presenting with a similar syndromic appearance. The phenotype of deletion 1p36.3 patients includes abnormal facies, multiple congenital malformations, and mental retardation.The ages of the patients in our series ranged from 3 to 50 years. As the deletion is very small, detection in the present cases relied upon high resolution G-band analyses and was confirmed with FISH in cases 3 and 5. Patients 2 and 3 were diagnosed as adults; thus smaller deletions in 1p36.33 may be associated with longer life expectancy, but include the critical region for the above phenotype. We noted that the dysmorphic features of the patients are more prominent with older age and are difficult to appreciate in infancy. Observation of this specific 1p36 appears as a white, terminal G-band; detection of a small partial deletion or rearrangement may require greater than 550 band level resolution. FISH utilizing a probe to 1pter can facilitate and confirm these analyses.

  20. Selenodiglutathione uptake by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar ATP-binding cassette transporter Ycf1p.

    PubMed

    Lazard, Myriam; Ha-Duong, Nguyet-Thanh; Mounié, Stéphanie; Perrin, Romary; Plateau, Pierre; Blanquet, Sylvain

    2011-11-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar ATP-binding cassette transporter Ycf1p is involved in heavy metal detoxification by mediating the ATP-dependent transport of glutathione-metal conjugates to the vacuole. In the case of selenite toxicity, deletion of YCF1 was shown to confer increased resistance, rather than sensitivity, to selenite exposure [Pinson B, Sagot I & Daignan-Fornier B (2000) Mol Microbiol36, 679-687]. Here, we show that when Ycf1p is expressed from a multicopy plasmid, the toxicity of selenite is exacerbated. Using secretory vesicles isolated from a sec6-4 mutant transformed either with the plasmid harbouring YCF1 or the control plasmid, we establish that the glutathione-conjugate selenodigluthatione is a high-affinity substrate of this ATP-binding cassette transporter and that oxidized glutathione is also efficiently transported. Finally, we show that the presence of Ycf1p impairs the glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio of cells subjected to a selenite stress. Possible mechanisms by which Ycf1p-mediated vacuolar uptake of selenodiglutathione and oxidized glutathione enhances selenite toxicity are discussed. PMID:21880115

  1. Fission yeast mtr1p regulates interphase microtubule cortical dwell-time

    PubMed Central

    Carlier-Grynkorn, Frédérique; Ji, Liang; Fraisier, Vincent; Lombard, Berangère; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Paoletti, Anne; Ronot, Xavier; Tran, Phong T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The microtubule cytoskeleton plays important roles in cell polarity, motility and division. Microtubules inherently undergo dynamic instability, stochastically switching between phases of growth and shrinkage. In cells, some microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) and molecular motors can further modulate microtubule dynamics. We present here the fission yeast mtr1+, a new regulator of microtubule dynamics that appears to be not a MAP or a motor. mtr1-deletion (mtr1Δ) primarily results in longer microtubule dwell-time at the cell tip cortex, suggesting that mtr1p acts directly or indirectly as a destabilizer of microtubules. mtr1p is antagonistic to mal3p, the ortholog of mammalian EB1, which stabilizes microtubules. mal3Δ results in short microtubules, but can be partially rescued by mtr1Δ, as the double mutant mal3Δ mtr1Δ exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant. By sequence homology, mtr1p is predicted to be a component of the ribosomal quality control complex. Intriguingly, deletion of a predicted ribosomal gene, rps1801, also resulted in longer microtubule dwell-time similar to mtr1Δ. The double-mutant mal3Δ rps1801Δ also exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant alone. Our study suggests a possible involvement of mtr1p and the ribosome complex in modulating microtubule dynamics. PMID:24928430

  2. Fission yeast mtr1p regulates interphase microtubule cortical dwell-time.

    PubMed

    Carlier-Grynkorn, Frédérique; Ji, Liang; Fraisier, Vincent; Lombard, Berangère; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Paoletti, Anne; Ronot, Xavier; Tran, Phong T

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton plays important roles in cell polarity, motility and division. Microtubules inherently undergo dynamic instability, stochastically switching between phases of growth and shrinkage. In cells, some microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) and molecular motors can further modulate microtubule dynamics. We present here the fission yeast mtr1(+), a new regulator of microtubule dynamics that appears to be not a MAP or a motor. mtr1-deletion (mtr1Δ) primarily results in longer microtubule dwell-time at the cell tip cortex, suggesting that mtr1p acts directly or indirectly as a destabilizer of microtubules. mtr1p is antagonistic to mal3p, the ortholog of mammalian EB1, which stabilizes microtubules. mal3Δ results in short microtubules, but can be partially rescued by mtr1Δ, as the double mutant mal3Δ mtr1Δ exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant. By sequence homology, mtr1p is predicted to be a component of the ribosomal quality control complex. Intriguingly, deletion of a predicted ribosomal gene, rps1801, also resulted in longer microtubule dwell-time similar to mtr1Δ. The double-mutant mal3Δ rps1801Δ also exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant alone. Our study suggests a possible involvement of mtr1p and the ribosome complex in modulating microtubule dynamics. PMID:24928430

  3. Histone chaperone Chz1p regulates H2B ubiquitination and subtelomeric anti-silencing

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yakun; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Lin, Chan-Hsien; Arens, Christina E.; Saleem, Ramsey A.; Smith, Jennifer J.; Aitchison, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Chz1p is a histone chaperone that interacts physically and functionally with the histone variant Htz1p, which has been implicated in establishing and maintaining boundaries between transcriptionally inactive heterochromatin and active euchromatin. To investigate the role of Chz1p in chromatin organization, we performed genome-wide expression arrays and chromatin immunoprecipitations of SIR complex components and modified histones in a CHZ1 deletion strain. Deletion of CHZ1 led to reduced ubiquitination of subtelomere-associated H2B, reduced subtelomeric H3K79 di-methylation, and increased binding of Sir3p, and Sir4p at telomere-distal euchromatin regions, correlating with decreased gene expression in subtelomeric regions. This anti-silencing defect appears to be mediated by enhanced association of de-ubiquitinase Ubp10p with subtelomeric DNA, as detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. In support of this, we show that deletion of UBP10 can antagonize the subtelomeric silencing phenotype of Δchz1. Taken together, the results demonstrate a novel role for Chz1p in epigenetic regulation, through H2B de-ubiquitination by Ubp10p. PMID:20008511

  4. Creation of a S1P Lyase bacterial surrogate for structure-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Argiriadi, Maria A; Banach, David; Radziejewska, Elzbieta; Marchie, Susan; DiMauro, Jennifer; Dinges, Jurgen; Dominguez, Eric; Hutchins, Charles; Judge, Russell A; Queeney, Kara; Wallace, Grier; Harris, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    S1P Lyase (SPL) has been described as a drug target in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. It plays an important role in maintaining intracellular levels of S1P thereby affecting T cell egress from lymphoid tissues. Several groups have already published approaches to inhibit S1P Lyase with small molecules, which in turn increase endogenous S1P concentrations resulting in immunosuppression. The use of structural biology has previously aided SPL inhibitor design. Novel construct design is at times necessary to provide a reagent for protein crystallography. Here we present a chimeric bacterial protein scaffold used for protein X-ray structures in the presence of early small molecule inhibitors. Mutations were introduced to the bacterial SPL from Symbiobacterium thermophilum which mimic the human enzyme. As a result, two mutant StSPL crystal structures resolved to 2.8Å and 2.2Å resolutions were solved and provide initial structural hypotheses for an isoxazole chemical series, whose optimization is discussed in the accompanying paper. PMID:27013389

  5. Mitochondrial Fusion in Yeast Requires the Transmembrane GTPase Fzo1p

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Greg J.; Thatcher, John W.; Mills, John P.; Hales, Karen G.; Fuller, Margaret T.; Nunnari, Jodi; Shaw, Janet M.

    1998-01-01

    Membrane fusion is required to establish the morphology and cellular distribution of the mitochondrial compartment. In Drosophila, mutations in the fuzzy onions (fzo) GTPase block a developmentally regulated mitochondrial fusion event during spermatogenesis. Here we report that the yeast orthologue of fuzzy onions, Fzo1p, plays a direct and conserved role in mitochondrial fusion. A conditional fzo1 mutation causes the mitochondrial reticulum to fragment and blocks mitochondrial fusion during yeast mating. Fzo1p is a mitochondrial integral membrane protein with its GTPase domain exposed to the cytoplasm. Point mutations that alter conserved residues in the GTPase domain do not affect Fzo1p localization but disrupt mitochondrial fusion. Suborganellar fractionation suggests that Fzo1p spans the outer and is tightly associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. This topology may be required to coordinate the behavior of the two mitochondrial membranes during the fusion reaction. We propose that the fuzzy onions family of transmembrane GTPases act as molecular switches to regulate a key step in mitochondrial membrane docking and/or fusion. PMID:9786948

  6. Increased sensitivity of HIV-1 p24 ELISA using a photochemical signal amplification system

    PubMed Central

    Bystryak, Simon; Santockyte, Rasa

    2016-01-01

    In this study we describe a photochemical signal amplification method (PSAM) for increasing of the sensitivity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for determination of HIV-1 p24 antigen. This method can be used for both commercially available and in-house ELISA tests, and has the advantage of being considerably simpler and less costly than alternative signal amplification methods. The photochemical signal amplification method is based on an autocatalytic photochemical reaction of a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrate, orthophenylenediamine (OPD). To compare the performance of PSAM-boosted ELISA with a conventional colorimetric ELISA for determination of HIV-1 p24 antigen we employed a PerkinElmer HIV-1 p24 ELISA kit, using conventional ELISA alongside ELISA + PSAM. In the present study, we show that PSAM technology allows one to increase the analytical sensitivity and dynamic range of a commercial HIV-1 p24 ELISA kit, with and without immune-complex disruption (ICD and Non-ICD ELISA), by a factor of approximately 40-fold. ELISA + PSAM is compatible with commercially available microtiter plate readers, requires only an inexpensive illumination device, and the PSAM amplification step takes no longer than 15 min. PMID:26090753

  7. Lassomycin, a ribosomally synthesized cyclic peptide, kills Mycobacterium tuberculosis by targeting the ATP-dependent protease ClpC1P1P2

    PubMed Central

    Gavrish, Ekaterina; Sit, Clarissa S.; Cao, Shugeng; Kandror, Olga; Spoering, Amy; Peoples, Aaron; Ling, Losee; Fetterman, Ashley; Hughes, Dallas; Bissell, Anthony; Torrey, Heather; Akopian, Tatos; Mueller, Andreas; Epstein, Slava; Goldberg, Alfred; Clardy, Jon; Lewis, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Summary Languishing antibiotic discovery and flourishing antibiotic resistance have prompted development of alternative untapped sources for antibiotic discovery, including previously uncultured bacteria. Here, we screen extracts from uncultured species against M. tuberculosis and identify lassomycin, an antibiotic that exhibits potent bactericidal activity against both growing and dormant mycobacteria, including drug-resistant forms of M. tuberculosis, but little activity against other bacteria or mammalian cells. Lassomycin is a highly basic, ribosomally-encoded cyclic peptide with an unusual structural fold that only partially resembles that of other lasso peptides. We show that lassomycin binds to a highly acidic region of the ClpC1 ATPase complex and markedly stimulates its ATPase activity without stimulating ClpP1P2 catalyzed protein breakdown, which is essential for viability of mycobacteria. This mechanism, uncoupling ATPase from proteolytic activity, accounts for lassomycin's bacteriocidal activity. PMID:24684906

  8. Mp1p Is a Virulence Factor in Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongmin; Lo, Raymond K. C.; Cai, Jian-Pao; Au-Yeung, Rex K. H.; Ng, Wing-Fung; Tse, Herman; Wong, Samson S. Y.; Xu, Simin; Lam, Wai Hei; Tse, Man-Kit; Sze, Kong Hung; Kao, Richard Y.; Reiner, Neil E.; Hao, Quan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Background Talaromyces marneffei is an opportunistic dimorphic fungus prevalent in Southeast Asia. We previously demonstrated that Mp1p is an immunogenic surface and secretory mannoprotein of T. marneffei. Since Mp1p is a surface protein that can generate protective immunity, we hypothesized that Mp1p and/or its homologs are virulence factors. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the pathogenic roles of Mp1p and its homologs in a mouse model. All mice died 21 and 30 days after challenge with wild-type T. marneffei PM1 and MP1 complemented mutant respectively. None of the mice died 60 days after challenge with MP1 knockout mutant (P<0.0001). Seventy percent of mice died 60 days after challenge with MP1 knockdown mutant (P<0.0001). All mice died after challenge with MPLP1 to MPLP13 knockdown mutants, suggesting that only Mp1p plays a significant role in virulence. The mean fungal loads of PM1 and MP1 complemented mutant in the liver, lung, kidney and spleen were significantly higher than those of the MP1 knockout mutant. Similarly, the mean load of PM1 in the liver, lung and spleen were significantly higher than that of the MP1 knockdown mutant. Histopathological studies showed an abundance of yeast in the kidney, spleen, liver and lung with more marked hepatic and splenic necrosis in mice challenged with PM1 compared to MP1 knockout and MP1 knockdown mutants. Likewise, a higher abundance of yeast was observed in the liver and spleen of mice challenged with MP1 complemented mutant compared to MP1 knockout mutant. PM1 and MP1 complemented mutant survived significantly better than MP1 knockout mutant in macrophages at 48 hours (P<0.01) post-infection. The mean fungal counts of Pichia pastoris GS115-MP1 in the liver (P<0.001) and spleen (P<0.05) of mice were significantly higher than those of GS115 at 24 hours post-challenge. Conclusions/Significance Mp1p is a key virulence factor of T. marneffei. Mp1p mediates virulence by improving the survival of T. marneffei

  9. Transcriptional Regulators Cph1p and Efg1p Mediate Activation of the Candida albicans Virulence Gene SAP5 during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Staib, Peter; Kretschmar, Marianne; Nichterlein, Thomas; Hof, Herbert; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans can cause superficial as well as systemic infections. Successful adaptation to the different host niches encountered during infection requires coordinated expression of various virulence traits, including the switch between yeast and hyphal growth forms and secretion of aspartic proteinases. Using an in vivo expression technology that is based on genetic recombination as a reporter of gene activation during experimental candidiasis in mice, we investigated whether two signal transduction pathways controlling hyphal growth, a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade ending in the transcriptional activator Cph1p and a cyclic AMP-dependent regulatory pathway that involves the transcription factor Efg1p, also control expression of the SAP5 gene, which encodes one of the secreted aspartic proteinases and is induced by host signals soon after infection. Our results show that both transcriptional regulators are important for SAP5 activation in vivo. SAP5 expression was reduced in a cph1 mutant, although filamentous growth in infected tissue was not detectably impaired. SAP5 expression was also reduced, but not eliminated, in an efg1 null mutant, although this strain grew exclusively in the yeast form in infected tissue, demonstrating that in contrast to in vitro conditions, SAP5 activation during infection does not depend on growth of C. albicans in the hyphal form. In a cph1 efg1 double mutant, however, SAP5 expression in infected mice was almost completely eliminated, suggesting that the two signal transduction pathways are important for SAP5 expression in vivo. The avirulence of the cph1 efg1 mutant seemed to be caused not only by the inability to form hyphae but also by a loss of expression of additional virulence genes in the host. PMID:11796627

  10. Sphingosine 1-phosphate analogue recognition and selectivity at S1P4 within the endothelial differentiation gene family of receptors

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Yuichi; Pham, TrucChi T.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Kohno, Takayuki; Osborne, Daniel A.; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Tigyi, Gabor; Parrill, Abby L.

    2005-01-01

    Synergistic computational and experimental studies provided previously unforeseen details concerning the structural basis of S1P (sphingosine 1-phosphate) recognition by the S1P4 G-protein-coupled receptor. Similarly to reports on the S1P1 receptor, cationic and anionic residues in the third transmembrane domain (R3.28 and E3.29 at positions 124 and 125) form ion pairs with the phosphate and ammonium of S1P, and alanine mutations at these positions abolished specific S1P binding, S1P-induced receptor activation and cell migration. Unlike findings on the S1P1 receptor, no cationic residue in the seventh transmembrane domain interacts with the phosphate. Additionally, two previously undiscovered interactions with the S1P polar headgroup have been identified. Trp186 at position 4.64 in the fourth transmembrane domain interacts by a cation-π interaction with the ammonium group of S1P. Lys204 at position 5.38 forms an ion pair with the S1P. The S1P4 and S1P1 receptors show differences in binding-pocket shape and electrostatic distributions that correlate with the published structure–activity relationships. In particular, the binding pocket of mS1P4 (mouse S1P4) has recognition sites for the anionic phosphate and cationic ammonium groups that are equidistant from the end of the non-polar tail. In contrast, the binding pocket of hS1P1 (human S1P4) places the ammonium recognition site 2 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) closer to the end of the non-polar tail than the phosphate recognition site. PMID:15733055

  11. Overexpression of Chromatin Assembly Factor-1/p60 helps to predict the prognosis of melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cutaneous melanoma (CM) is the most lethal form of skin malignancy, which registers a constant increase in incidence worldwide. The identification of molecular alteration(s) involved in its biological aggressiveness represents a major challenge for researchers, considering that existing therapies are ineffective to treat metastasizing cases. The epigenetic control of chromatin dynamics during DNA synthesis, replication, and repair is fundamental for the orderly progression of cell proliferation. The Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 (CAF-1) complex acts as a major regulator of this process; its intermediate (p60) subunit has been recently proposed as a novel proliferation and prognostic marker for several tumors. We aimed to establish if the evaluation of the expression of CAF-1/p60 in primary CM may help define the prevision of outcome of patients. Methods Immunohistochemistry with anti-CAF-1/p60 was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 130 cases of primary CM retrieved from the archive files of the Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Section of Pathology, University "Federico II" of Naples, Italy. Results were compared with histopathological and follow-up data of patients. Results CAF-1/p60 was expressed in all CM. A significant statistical association between the overexpression of the protein and the occurrence of skin, node and/or distant metastases (P < 0.05) emerged, independently from histopathological prognostic factors. Conclusions CAF-1/p60 looks promising as a new prognostic marker for CM and sheds new light on the molecular events associated with photocancerogenesis and melanoma biology. The screening for CAF-1/p60 might contribute to the molecular sub-classification of CM, with improved translational outcomes. PMID:20178651

  12. Yeast Los1p Has Properties of an Exportin-Like Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Factor for tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Hellmuth, Klaus; Lau, Denise M.; Bischoff, F. Ralf; Künzler, Markus; Hurt, Ed; Simos, George

    1998-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Los1p, which is genetically linked to the nuclear pore protein Nsp1p and several tRNA biogenesis factors, was recently grouped into the family of importin/karyopherin-β-like proteins on the basis of its sequence similarity. In a two-hybrid screen, we identified Nup2p as a nucleoporin interacting with Los1p. Subsequent purification of Los1p from yeast demonstrates its physical association not only with Nup2p but also with Nsp1p. By the use of the Gsp1p-G21V mutant, Los1p was shown to preferentially bind to the GTP-bound form of yeast Ran. Furthermore, overexpression of full-length or N-terminally truncated Los1p was shown to have dominant-negative effects on cell growth and different nuclear export pathways. Finally, Los1p could interact with Gsp1p-GTP, but only in the presence of tRNA, as revealed in an indirect in vitro binding assay. These data confirm the homology between Los1p and the recently identified human exportin for tRNA and reinforce the possibility of a role for Los1p in nuclear export of tRNA in yeast. PMID:9774653

  13. Molecular Analysis of Pediatric Oligodendrogliomas Highlights Genetic Differences with Adult Counterparts and Other Pediatric Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Nauen, David; Haley, Lisa; Lin, Ming-Tseh; Perry, Arie; Giannini, Caterina; Burger, Peter C.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendroglioma represents a distinctive neoplasm in adults but similar neoplasms occur rarely in children. We studied 20 cases of pediatric oligodendroglioma by SNP array (median age 9 years, range 1–19; 15 grade II and 5 grade III). Cytogenetic abnormalities were present in 8 (53%) grade II and all five anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Most changes were in the form of deletion and copy neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The most common abnormality was 1p deletion (n = 5). Whole arm 1p19q co-deletion was present in three cases from adolescent patients and 9p loss in 3, including one low-grade oligodendroglioma with CDKN2A homozygous deletion. Common losses were largely limited to the anaplastic subset (n = 5) and included 3q29 (n = 3), 11p (n = 3), 17q (n = 3), 4q (n = 2), 6p (n = 2), 13q (n = 2), 14q (n = 2), 17p (n = 2) and whole Ch 18 loss (n = 2). Gains were non-recurrent except for whole Ch 7 (n = 2) and gain on 12q (n = 2) including the MDM2 locus. Possible germ line LOH (or uniparental disomy) was present in seven cases (35%), with one focal abnormality (22q13.1-13.2) in two. BRAF-KIAA1549 fusions and BRAF p.V600E mutations were absent (n = 13 and 8). In summary, cytogenetic alterations in pediatric oligodendrogliomas are characterized mostly by genomic losses, particularly in anaplastic tumors. PMID:26206478

  14. Cdc42p and Rho1p are sequentially activated and mechanistically linked to vacuole membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Michael R.; Jones, Lynden; Eitzen, Gary

    2010-03-26

    Small monomeric GTPases act as molecular switches, regulating many biological functions via activation of membrane localized signaling cascades. Activation of their switch function is controlled by GTP binding and hydrolysis. Two Rho GTPases, Cdc42p and Rho1p, are localized to the yeast vacuole where they regulate membrane fusion. Here, we define a method to directly examine vacuole membrane Cdc42p and Rho1p activation based on their affinity to probes derived from effectors. Cdc42p and Rho1p showed unique temporal activation which aligned with distinct subreactions of in vitro vacuole fusion. Cdc42p was rapidly activated in an ATP-independent manner while Rho1p activation was kinetically slower and required ATP. Inhibitors that are known to block vacuole membrane fusion were examined for their effect on Cdc42p and Rho1p activation. Rdi1p, which inhibits the dissociation of GDP from Rho proteins, blocked both Cdc42p and Rho1p activation. Ligands of PI(4,5)P{sub 2} specifically inhibited Rho1p activation while pre-incubation with U73122, which targets Plc1p function, increased Rho1p activation. These results define unique activation mechanisms for Cdc42p and Rho1p, which may be linked to the vacuole membrane fusion mechanism.

  15. The Rtr1p CTD phosphatase autoregulates its mRNA through a degradation pathway involving the REX exonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Hodko, Domagoj; Ward, Taylor; Chanfreau, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Rtr1p is a phosphatase that impacts gene expression by modulating the phosphorylation status of the C-terminal domain of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II. Here, we show that Rtr1p is a component of a novel mRNA degradation pathway that promotes its autoregulation through turnover of its own mRNA. We show that the 3′UTR of the RTR1 mRNA contains a cis element that destabilizes this mRNA. RTR1 mRNA turnover is achieved through binding of Rtr1p to the RTR1 mRNP in a manner that is dependent on this cis element. Genetic evidence shows that Rtr1p-mediated decay of the RTR1 mRNA involves the 5′-3′ DExD/H-box RNA helicase Dhh1p and the 3′-5′ exonucleases Rex2p and Rex3p. Rtr1p and Rex3p are found associated with Dhh1p, suggesting a model for recruiting the REX exonucleases to the RTR1 mRNA for degradation. Rtr1p-mediated decay potentially impacts additional transcripts, including the unspliced BMH2 pre-mRNA. We propose that Rtr1p may imprint its RNA targets cotranscriptionally and determine their downstream degradation mechanism by directing these transcripts to a novel turnover pathway that involves Rtr1p, Dhh1p, and the REX family of exonucleases. PMID:26843527

  16. Prediction of (1)P Rydberg energy levels of beryllium based on calculations with explicitly correlated Gaussians.

    PubMed

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-01-14

    Benchmark variational calculations are performed for the seven lowest 1s(2)2s np ((1)P), n = 2...8, states of the beryllium atom. The calculations explicitly include the effect of finite mass of (9)Be nucleus and account perturbatively for the mass-velocity, Darwin, and spin-spin relativistic corrections. The wave functions of the states are expanded in terms of all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. Basis sets of up to 12,500 optimized Gaussians are used. The maximum discrepancy between the calculated nonrelativistic and experimental energies of 1s(2)2s np ((1)P) →1s(2)2s(2) ((1)S) transition is about 12 cm(-1). The inclusion of the relativistic corrections reduces the discrepancy to bellow 0.8 cm(-1). PMID:24437871

  17. Atheroprotective role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P).

    PubMed

    Potì, Francesco; Simoni, Manuela; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2014-08-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies documented an inverse relationship between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and the extent of atherosclerotic disease. However, clinical interventions targeting HDL cholesterol failed to show clinical benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk reduction, suggesting that HDL components distinct from cholesterol may account for anti-atherogenic effects attributed to this lipoprotein. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-a lysosphingolipid exerting its biological activity via binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors and regulating a wide array of biological responses in a variety of different organs and tissues including the cardiovascular system-has been identified as an integral constituent of HDL particles. In the present review, we discuss current evidence from epidemiological studies, experimental approaches in vitro, and animal models of atherosclerosis, suggesting that S1P contributes to atheroprotective effects exerted by HDL particles. PMID:24891400

  18. Beam propagation method using a [(p- 1)/ p] Padé approximant of the propagator.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ya Yan; Ho, Pui Lin

    2002-05-01

    A new beam propagation method (BPM) is developed based on a direct approximation to the propagator by its [(p-1)/p] Padé approximant. The approximant is simple to construct and has the desired damping effect for the evanescent modes. The method is applied to a tapered waveguide for TM-polarized waves, based on the energy-conserving improvement of the one-way Helmholtz equation. Numerical results are compared with those obtained with other variants of the BPM. PMID:18007898

  19. The membrane remodeling protein Pex11p activates the GTPase Dnm1p during peroxisomal fission

    PubMed Central

    Opalinski, Lukasz; Landgraf, Christiane; Costello, Joseph; Schrader, Michael; Krikken, Arjen M.; Knoops, Kèvin; Kram, Anita M.; Volkmer, Rudolf; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2015-01-01

    The initial phase of peroxisomal fission requires the peroxisomal membrane protein Peroxin 11 (Pex11p), which remodels the membrane, resulting in organelle elongation. Here, we identify an additional function for Pex11p, demonstrating that Pex11p also plays a crucial role in the final step of peroxisomal fission: dynamin-like protein (DLP)-mediated membrane scission. First, we demonstrate that yeast Pex11p is necessary for the function of the GTPase Dynamin-related 1 (Dnm1p) in vivo. In addition, our data indicate that Pex11p physically interacts with Dnm1p and that inhibiting this interaction compromises peroxisomal fission. Finally, we demonstrate that Pex11p functions as a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for Dnm1p in vitro. Similar observations were made for mammalian Pex11β and the corresponding DLP Drp1, indicating that DLP activation by Pex11p is conserved. Our work identifies a previously unknown requirement for a GAP in DLP function. PMID:25941407

  20. Cap1p attenuates the apoptosis of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bao-Di; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Lan-Xue; Li, De-Dong; Li, Ming-Bang; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Candida albicans is the most common opportunistic fungal pathogen and its apoptosis is inducible by environmental stress. Based on our previous finding that transcription factor Cap1p was involved in baicalein-induced apoptosis, the present study aimed to further clarify the role of Cap1p in apoptosis by observing the impact of CAP1 deletion on cell fate. It was found that apoptotic stimulation with amphotericin B, acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide increased the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells, caspase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, whereas it decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP level in the cap1Δ/Δ mutant. The cell fate was, at least partly, caused by glutathione depletion and attenuation of the expression of the glutathione reductase gene in the cap1Δ/Δ mutant. Collectively, our data suggest that Cap1p participated in the apoptosis of C. albicans by regulating the expression of the glutathione reductase gene and glutathione content. PMID:23517286

  1. RPA regulates telomerase action by providing Est1p access to chromosome ends.

    PubMed

    Schramke, Vera; Luciano, Pierre; Brevet, Vanessa; Guillot, Sylvine; Corda, Yves; Longhese, Maria Pia; Gilson, Eric; Géli, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a highly conserved single-stranded DNA-binding protein involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair. We show here that RPA is present at the telomeres of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with a maximal association in S phase. A truncation of the N-terminal region of Rfa2p (associated with the rfa2Delta40 mutated allele) results in severe telomere shortening caused by a defect in the in vivo regulation of telomerase activity. Cells carrying rfa2Delta40 show impaired binding of the protein Est1p, which is required for telomerase action. In addition, normal telomere length can be restored by expressing a Cdc13-Est1p hybrid protein. These findings indicate that RPA activates telomerase by loading Est1p onto telomeres during S phase. We propose a model of in vivo telomerase action that involves synergistic action of RPA and Cdc13p at the G-rich 3' overhang of telomeric DNA. PMID:14702040

  2. Is 1p36 deletion associated with anterior body wall defects?

    PubMed

    Çöllü, Medis; Yüksel, Şirin; Şirin, Başak Kumbasar; Abbasoğlu, Latif; Alanay, Yasemin

    2016-07-01

    Epispadias and exstrophy of the cloaca, also known as OEIS complex (omphalocele, exstrophy, imperforate anus, spinal defects), respectively constitute the most benign and severe ends of the bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC) spectrum. In 2009, El-Hattab et al. reported the first patient with OEIS complex associated with a chromosome 1p36 deletion. Here we report a second patient with 1p36 deletion who also has classic bladder exstrophy, supporting the possible role of genes in this region in the development of BEEC. The absence of omphalocele and imperforate anus in our patient places him toward classic bladder exstrophy while presence of spina bifida and the absence of coccyx suggest an overlap with OEIS complex. An additional differential diagnosis is the pentalogy of Cantrell in our patient as he also has a diaphragmatic hernia and an incomplete sternum. This is the second observation of a ventral midline birth defect in association with 1p36 deletion syndrome, following El-Hattab et al.'s report [2009]. The three genes (NOCL2, DVL1, and MMP23B) discussed as possible candidates are also among the deleted ones in our patient, supporting the possible role of these genes in BEEC spectrum. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27144803

  3. Class I Histone Deacetylase Thd1p Promotes Global Chromatin Condensation in Tetrahymena thermophila▿

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Kathryn; Maxson, Julia; Mooney, Alissa; Wiley, Emily A.

    2007-01-01

    Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate DNA-templated processes such as transcription. They act both at specific loci and more generally across global chromatin, contributing to acetylation patterns that may underlie large-scale chromatin dynamics. Although hypoacetylation is correlated with highly condensed chromatin, little is known about the contribution of individual HDACs to chromatin condensation mechanisms. Using the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila, we investigated the role of a specific class I HDAC, Τhd1p, in the reversible condensation of global chromatin. In this system, the normal physiological response to cell starvation includes the widespread condensation of the macronuclear chromatin and general repression of gene transcription. We show that the chromatin in Thd1p-deficient cells failed to condense during starvation. The condensation failure correlated with aberrant hyperphosphorylation of histone H1 and the overexpression of CDC2, encoding the major histone H1 kinase. Changes in the rate of acetate turnover on core histones and in the distribution of acetylated lysines 9 and 23/27 on histone H3 isoforms that were found to correlate with normal chromatin condensation were absent from Thd1p mutant cells. These results point to a role for a class I HDAC in the formation of reversible higher-order chromatin structures and global genome compaction through mechanisms involving the regulation of H1 phosphorylation and core histone acetylation/deacetylation kinetics. PMID:17715364

  4. On F-algebras M(p)   (1 < p < ∞) of holomorphic functions.

    PubMed

    Meštrović, Romeo

    2014-01-01

    We consider the classes M(p)  (1 < p < ∞) of holomorphic functions on the open unit disk in the complex plane. These classes are in fact generalizations of the class M introduced by Kim (1986). The space M (p) equipped with the topology given by the metric ρ p defined by ρp (f, g) = ||f - g|| p = (∫0(2π) log(p) (1 + M(f - g)(θ))(dθ/2π))(1/p), with f, g ∈ M (p) and Mf(θ) = sup 0 ⩽ r<1 ⁡|f(re(iθ))|, becomes an F-space. By a result of Stoll (1977), the Privalov space N(p)  (1 < p < ∞) with the topology given by the Stoll metric d p is an F-algebra. By using these two facts, we prove that the spaces M(p) and N(p) coincide and have the same topological structure. Consequently, we describe a general form of continuous linear functionals on M(p) (with respect to the metric ρp). Furthermore, we give a characterization of bounded subsets of the spaces M(p). Moreover, we give the examples of bounded subsets of M(p) that are not relatively compact. PMID:24672388

  5. Bem1p contributes to secretory pathway polarization through a direct interaction with Exo70p

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    The exocyst serves to tether secretory vesicles to cortical sites specified by polarity determinants, in preparation for fusion with the plasma membrane. Although most exocyst components are brought to these sites by riding on secretory vesicles as they are actively transported along actin cables, Exo70p displays actin-independent localization to these sites, implying an interaction with a polarity determinant. Here we show that Exo70p directly and specifically binds to the polarity determinant scaffold protein Bem1p. The interaction involves multiple domains of both Exo70p and Bem1p. Mutations in Exo70p that disrupt its interaction with Bem1, without impairing its interactions with other known binding partners, lead to the loss of actin-independent localization. Synthetic genetic interactions confirm the importance of the Exo70p–Bem1p interaction, although there is some possible redundancy with Sec3p and Sec15p, other exocyst components that also interact with polarity determinants. Similar to Sec3p, the actin-independent localization of Exo70p requires a synergistic interaction with the phosphoinositide PI(4,5)P2. PMID:25313406

  6. Comparing CN Features in Two Comets: 1P/Halley and 103P/Hartley 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Lejoly, Cassandra; Barrera, Jose; Mueller, Beatrice; Schleicher, David

    2015-11-01

    Comets 1P/Halley and 103P/Hartley 2 show distinct CN features in their respecive comae. Both comets are non-principal-axis rotators. 1P/Halley is the proto-type for Halley-type comets with the Oort Cloud as its possible source region, whereas 103P/Hartley 2 is a Jupiter-Family comet that possibly originated from the Kuiper Belt. Both comets were spacecraft targets and studied widely from both space and from the ground.We will discuss the properties of CN features, and in particular the behavior of the derived outflow velocities based on the CN features present in the groundbased coma images of these two comets. The corresponding heliocentric distances for CN images of comet 1P/Halley range from approximately 0.8 AU to 2.0 AU (during its post-perihelion leg of the 1986 apparition). For CN images of comet 103P/Hartley 2, the corresponding heliocentric distances range from 1.31 AU through the perihelion (at 1.06 AU) to 1.25 AU (during its 2010 apparition).Ultimately, these results will be used to understand the rotational states and the activity behaviors of these two comets.

  7. The Kar3-interacting protein Cik1p plays a critical role in passage through meiosis I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, R M; Kamieniecki, R J; Dawson, D S

    2001-01-01

    Meiosis I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is dependent upon the motor protein Kar3. Absence of Kar3p in meiosis results in an arrest in prophase I. Cik1p and Vik1p are kinesin-associated proteins known to modulate the function of Kar3p in the microtubule-dependent processes of karyogamy and mitosis. Experiments were performed to determine whether Cik1p and Vik1p are also important for the function of Kar3p during meiosis. The meiotic phenotypes of a cik1 mutant were found to be similar to those of kar3 mutants. Cells without Cik1p exhibit a meiotic defect in homologous recombination and synaptonemal complex formation. Most cik1 mutant cells, like kar3 mutants, arrest in meiotic prophase; however, in cik1 mutants this arrest is less severe. These data are consistent with the model that Cik1p is necessary for some, but not all, of the roles of Kar3p in meiosis I. vik1 mutants sporulate at wild-type levels, but have reduced spore viability. This loss in viability is partially attributable to vegetative chromosome loss in vik1 diploids. Cellular localization experiments reveal that Kar3p, Cik1p, and Vik1p are present throughout meiosis and are consistent with Cik1p and Vik1p having different meiotic roles. PMID:11729143

  8. C-terminal anchoring of mid1p to membranes stabilizes cytokinetic ring position in early mitosis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Bordes, Nicole; Fraisier, Vincent; Tran, Phong T; Paoletti, Anne

    2004-12-01

    mid1p is a key factor for the central positioning of the cytokinetic ring in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In interphase and early mitosis, mid1p forms a medial cortical band overlying the nucleus, which may represent a landmark for cytokinetic ring assembly. It compacts before anaphase into a tight ring with other cytokinetic ring components. We show here that mid1p binds to the medial cortex by at least two independent means. First, mid1p C-terminus association with the cortex requires a putative amphipathic helix adjacent to mid1p nuclear localization sequence (NLS), which is predicted to insert directly into the lipid bilayer. This association is stabilized by the polybasic NLS. mid1p mutated within the helix and the NLS forms abnormal filaments in early mitosis that are not properly anchored to the medial cortex. Misplaced rings assemble in late mitosis, indicating that mid1p C-terminus binding to membranes stabilizes cytokinetic ring position. Second, the N terminus of mid1p has the ability to associate faintly with the medial cortex and is sufficient to form tight rings. In addition, we show that mid1p oligomerizes. We propose that membrane-bound oligomers of mid1p assemble recruitment "platforms" for cytokinetic ring components at the medial cortex and stabilize the ring position during its compaction. PMID:15572668

  9. MMP2 and MMP9 participate in S1P-induced invasion of follicular ML-1 thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kalhori, Veronica; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-03-15

    The bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) has emerged as a potent inducer of cancer cell migration and invasion. Previously, we have shown that S1P induces invasion of ML-1 follicular thyroid cancer cells via S1P receptors 1 and 3 (S1P1,3). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent proteolytic enzymes used by cells for degradation of the extracellular matrix during invasion and migration. In the present study, we examined the role of MMP2 and MMP9 for S1P-induced invasion of ML-1 cells, and found that S1P regulates the secretion and activity of MMP2 and MMP9 via S1P1,3. Both pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA knockdown of MMP2 and MMP9 could attenuate S1P-induced invasion. Additionally, we show that calpains and Rac1 mediate S1P-induced secretion of MMP2 and MMP9. In conclusion, MMP2 and MMP9 participate in S1P-evoked follicular ML-1 thyroid cancer cell invasion. PMID:25643979

  10. Cigarette smoke inhibits efferocytosis via deregulation of sphingosine kinase signaling: reversal with exogenous S1P and the S1P analogue FTY720.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hai B; Barnawi, Jameel; Ween, Miranda; Hamon, Rhys; Roscioli, Eugene; Hodge, Greg; Reynolds, Paul N; Pitson, Stuart M; Davies, Lorena T; Haberberger, Rainer; Hodge, Sandra

    2016-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and cigarette smokers are deficient in their ability to phagocytose apoptotic bronchial epithelial cells (efferocytosis). We hypothesized that the defect is mediated via inhibition of sphingosine kinases and/or their subcellular mislocalization in response to cigarette smoke and can be normalized with exogenous sphingosine-1-phosphate or FTY720 (fingolimod), a modulator of sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling, which has been shown to be clinically useful in multiple sclerosis. Measurement of sphingosine kinase 1/2 activities by [(32)P]-labeled sphingosine-1-phosphate revealed a 30% reduction of sphingosine kinase 1 (P < 0.05) and a nonsignificant decrease of sphingosine kinase 2 in THP-1 macrophages after 1 h cigarette smoke extract exposure. By confocal analysis macrophage sphingosine kinase 1 protein was normally localized to the plasma membrane and cytoplasm and sphingosine kinase 2 to the nucleus and cytoplasm but absent at the cell surface. Cigarette smoke extract exposure (24 h) led to a retraction of sphingosine kinase 1 from the plasma membrane and sphingosine kinase 1/2 clumping in the Golgi domain. Selective inhibition of sphingosine kinase 2 with 25 µM ABC294640 led to 36% inhibition of efferocytosis (P < 0.05); 10 µM sphingosine kinase inhibitor/5C (sphingosine kinase 1-selective inhibitor) induced a nonsignificant inhibition of efferocytosis, but its combination with ABC294640 led to 56% inhibition (P < 0.01 vs. control and < 0.05 vs. single inhibitors). Cigarette smoke-inhibited efferocytosis was significantly (P < 0.05) reversed to near-control levels in the presence of 10-100 nM exogenous sphingosine-1-phosphate or FTY720, and FTY720 reduced cigarette smoke-induced clumping of sphingosine kinase 1/2 in the Golgi domain. These data strongly support a role of sphingosine kinase 1/2 in efferocytosis and as novel therapeutic targets in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID

  11. Fus3p and Kss1p control G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through a balance of distinct arrest and proliferative functions that operate in parallel with Far1p.

    PubMed Central

    Cherkasova, V; Lyons, D M; Elion, E A

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mating pheromones activate two MAP kinases (MAPKs), Fus3p and Kss1p, to induce G1 arrest prior to mating. Fus3p is known to promote G1 arrest by activating Far1p, which inhibits three Clnp/Cdc28p kinases. To analyze the contribution of Fus3p and Kss1p to G1 arrest that is independent of Far1p, we constructed far1 CLN strains that undergo G1 arrest from increased activation of the mating MAP kinase pathway. We find that Fus3p and Kss1p both control G1 arrest through multiple functions that operate in parallel with Far1p. Fus3p and Kss1p together promote G1 arrest by repressing transcription of G1/S cyclin genes (CLN1, CLN2, CLB5) by a mechanism that blocks their activation by Cln3p/Cdc28p kinase. In addition, Fus3p and Kss1p counteract G1 arrest through overlapping and distinct functions. Fus3p and Kss1p together increase the expression of CLN3 and PCL2 genes that promote budding, and Kss1p inhibits the MAP kinase cascade. Strikingly, Fus3p promotes proliferation by a novel function that is not linked to reduced Ste12p activity or increased levels of Cln2p/Cdc28p kinase. Genetic analysis suggests that Fus3p promotes proliferation through activation of Mcm1p transcription factor that upregulates numerous genes in G1 phase. Thus, Fus3p and Kss1p control G1 arrest through a balance of arrest functions that inhibit the Cdc28p machinery and proliferative functions that bypass this inhibition. PMID:10049917

  12. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus.

    PubMed

    Horne, Hisani N; Chung, Charles C; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Iwata, Hiroji; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H; Ven den Berg, David; Smeets, Ann; Zhao, Hui; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Marchand, Loic Le; Goldberg, Mark S; Teo, Soo H; Taib, Nur A M; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha; Winqvist, Robert; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Harrington, Patricia; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas F; Chanock, Stephen J; Dunning, Alison M; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799-121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000-120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive. PMID:27556229

  13. Late-onset Stargardt-like macular dystrophy maps to chromosome 1p13

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.; Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Stargardt`s disease (MIM 248200), originally described in 1909, is an autosomal recessive condition of childhood, characterized by a sudden and bilateral loss of central vision. Typically, it has an early onset (7 to 12 years), a rapidly progressive course and a poor final outcome. The central area of the retina (macula) displays pigmentary changes in a ring form with depigmentation and atrophy of the retinal pigmentary epithelium (RPE). Perimacular yellowish spots, termed fundus flavimaculatus, are observed in a high percentage of patients. We have recently reported the genetic mapping of Stargardt`s disease to chromosome 1p13. On the other hand, considering that fundus flavimaculatus (MIM 230100) is another form of fleck fundus disease, with a Stargardt-like retinal aspect but with a late-onset and a more progressive course, we decided to test the hypothesis of allelism between typical Stargardt`s disease and late-onset autosomal recessive fundus flavimaculatus. Significant pairwise lod scores were obtained in each of four multiplex families (11 affected individuals, 12 relatives) with four markers of the 1p13 region (Z = 4.79, 4.64, 3.07, 3.16 at loci D1S435, D1S424, D1S236, and D1S415, respectively at {theta} = 0). Multipoint analysis showed that the best estimate for location of the disease gene is between D1S424 and D1S236 (maximum lod score of 5.20) as also observed in Stargardt`s disease. Our results are consistent with the location of the gene responsible of the late-onset Stargardt-like macular dystrophy in the 1p13 region and raise the hypothesis of either allelic mutational events or contiguous genes in this chromosomal region. The question of possible relationship with some age-related macular dystrophies in now open to debate.

  14. A Role for Lsm1p in Response to Ultraviolet-Radiation Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Spicakova, Tatiana; McCann, Kelly; Brown, J. Martin

    2008-01-01

    A genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified LSM1 as a new gene affecting sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Lsm1p is a member of a cytoplasmic complex composed of Lsm1p–7p that interacts with the yeast mRNA degradation machinery. To investigate the potential role of Lsm1p in response to UV radiation, we constructed double mutant strains in which LSM1 was deleted in combination with a representative gene from each of three known yeast DNA repair pathways. Our results show that lsm1Δ increases the UV-radiation sensitivity of the rad1Δ and rad51Δ mutants, but not the rad18Δ mutant, placing LSM1 within the post-replication repair/damage tolerance pathway (PRR). When combined with other deletions affecting PRR, lsm1Δ increases the UV-radiation sensitivity of the rev3Δ, rad30Δ and pol30-K164R mutants but not rad5Δ. Furthermore, the UV-radiation sensitivity phenotype of lsm1Δ is partially rescued by mutations in genes involved in 3′ to 5′ mRNA degradation, and mutations predicted to function in RNA interactions confer the most UV-radiation sensitivity. Together, these results suggest that Lsm1p may confer protection against UV-radiation damage by protecting the 3′ ends of mRNAs from exosome-dependent 3′ to 5′ degradation as part of a novel RAD5-mediated, PCNA-K164 ubiquitylation-independent subpathway of PRR. PMID:19024647

  15. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Hisani N.; Chung, Charles C.; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Iwata, Hiroji; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H.; ven den Berg, David; Smeets, Ann; Zhao, Hui; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J.; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Marchand, Loic Le; Goldberg, Mark S.; Teo, Soo H.; Taib, Nur A. M.; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha; Winqvist, Robert; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Harrington, Patricia; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799–121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000–120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive. PMID:27556229

  16. Multimodal Assessment of Protein Functional Deficiency Supports Pathogenicity of BRCA1 p.V1688del

    PubMed Central

    De Nicolo, Arcangela; Parisini, Emilio; Zhong, Quan; Palma, Maurizia Dalla; Stoeckert, Kathryn A.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Caligo, Maria A.; Vidal, Marc; Cusick, Michael E.; Garber, Judy E.

    2009-01-01

    Unequivocal discrimination between neutral variants and deleterious mutations is crucial for appropriate counseling of individuals with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 sequence change. An increasing number of variants of uncertain significance (VUSs) are being identified, whose unclassified biological effect poses clinical concerns. A multifactorial likelihood-based approach recently suggested disease causality for BRCA1 p.V1688del, a VUS recurrent in Italian breast/ovarian cancer families. Whether and how this single amino acid deletion in the BRCA1 BRCT domain affects the function of the mutant protein (ΔValBRCA1) has not been elucidated. We undertook comprehensive functional characterization of ΔValBRCA1, comprising comparative structural modeling, analysis of protein stability and associations, and analysis of DNA repair function. Our model predicted BRCT domain destabilization and folding disruption caused by BRCA1 p.V1688del. Consistently, the recombinant ΔValBRCA1 was less stable than wtBRCA1 and, unlike the latter, failed to associate with BRIP1, CtIP, and Rap80, and to re-localize to sites of DNA damage. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed a compromised interaction with FHL2 and with KPNA2, which is likely responsible for improper subcellular localization of ΔValBRCA1. In addition, we found four new breast/ovarian cancer families of Italian ancestry who carried this sequence alteration. These results provide the first evidence of the effect of BRCA1 p.V1688del on protein stability and function, supporting the view that it is a deleterious mutation. Multimodal analyses like ours could advance understanding of tumor suppression by BRCA1, and ultimately contribute to developing efficient strategies for screening and characterization of VUSs. PMID:19706752

  17. Fingolimod: direct CNS effects of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulation and implications in multiple sclerosis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Aran; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Chun, Jerold

    2013-01-01

    Fingolimod is the first oral disease-modifying therapy approved for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Following phosphorylation in vivo, the active agent, fingolimod phosphate (fingolimod-P), acts as a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulator, binding with high affinity to four of the five known S1P receptors (S1P1, S1P3, S1P4 and S1P5). The mechanism of action of fingolimod in MS has primarily been considered as immunomodulatory, whereby fingolimod-P modulates S1P1 on lymphocytes, selectively retaining autoreactive lymphocytes in lymph nodes to reduce damaging infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS). However, emerging evidence indicates that fingolimod has direct effects in the CNS in MS. For example, in the MS animal model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), fingolimod is highly efficacious in both a prophylactic and therapeutic setting, yet becomes ineffective in animals selectively deficient for S1P1 on astrocytes, despite maintained normal immunologic receptor expression and functions, and S1P-mediated immune activities. Here, we review S1P signalling effects relevant to MS in neural cell types expressing S1P receptors, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, microglia and dendritic cells. The direct effects of fingolimod on these CNS cells observed in preclinical studies are discussed in view of the functional consequences of reducing neurodegenerative processes and promoting myelin preservation and repair. The therapeutic implications of S1P modulation in the CNS are considered in terms of the clinical outcomes of MS, such as reducing MS-related brain atrophy, and other CNS disorders. Additionally, we briefly outline other existing and investigational MS therapies that may also have effects in the CNS. PMID:23518370

  18. RAP1GA1: A candidate tumor suppressor locus in 1p36.1

    SciTech Connect

    Ranade, K.; Hussussian, C.J.; Higgins, P.

    1994-09-01

    The rap1/Krev-1 gene (RAP1A) encodes a p21-related protein that suppresses transformation by activated p21{sup ras}. The GTPase activating protein (GAP) gene for p21{sup rap1A} (RAP1GA1) has recently been assigned to chromosome 1p36.1-p35, a region of the genome that is frequently involved in deletions and rearrangements in several different tumors including breast, colon and hepatocellular carcinomas, melanoma, and neuroblastoma. GAP genes negatively regulate the activity of p21 proteins by catalyzing the conversion of the active GTP-bound forms to the inactive GDP-bound forms. The physiological function of p21{sup rap1A}-GAP makes it a strong candidate as a tumor suppressor gene that may have a role in the development of one or more of these malignancies. We have refined the localization of RAP1GA1 by linkage analysis with a highly informative (CA){sub n} repeat contained within the gene, and demonstrated that it is within the minimal deleted region for breast and colon carcinomas, and that it is excluded from the minimally deleted region in melanoma and neuroblastoma. Genetic mapping in the mouse demonstrated that Rap1ga1 is located {approximately}10 cM proximal to Pnd and therefore maps within the interval containing the modifier of Min gene (Mom-1) and the plasmocytoma susceptibility locus (Pcts). The human RAP1GA1 gene contains at least 27 exons. The coding region contains 22 exons, and there are at least five 5{prime}-UT exons that are assembled in a complex pattern of alternative splicing in different tissues. The localization of RAP1GA1 makes it a very strong candidate for a role as a modifier gene involved in the common secondary abnormalities involving 1p36 in several different carcinomas. The potential role of RAP1GA1 in these malignancies is currently being investigated by sequence analysis of breast and colon carcinomas with loss of heterozygosity in 1p36.

  19. Capitulation in Abelian extensions of some fields ℚ (√{p1p2q , }i )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Abdelmalek; Zekhnini, Abdelkader; Taous, Mohammed

    2016-02-01

    We study the capitulation of the 2-ideal classes of an infinite family of imaginary biquadratic number fields consisting of fields k =ℚ (√{p1p2q , }i ), where i =√{-1 } and p1 ≡ p2 ≡ -q ≡ 1 (mod 4) are different primes. For each of the three quadratic extensions K /k inside the absolute genus field k(*) of k , we compute the capitulation kernel of K /k . Then we deduce that each strongly ambiguous class of k /ℚ (i ) capitulates already in k(*), which is smaller than the relative genus field (k/ℚ (i )) *.

  20. Fus1p interacts with components of the Hog1p mitogen-activated protein kinase and Cdc42p morphogenesis signaling pathways to control cell fusion during yeast mating.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Bryce; Parsons, Ainslie B; Evangelista, Marie; Schaefer, Karen; Kennedy, Kathy; Ritchie, Steven; Petryshen, Tracey L; Boone, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Cell fusion in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a temporally and spatially regulated process that involves degradation of the septum, which is composed of cell wall material, and occurs between conjugating cells within a prezygote, followed by plasma membrane fusion. The plasma membrane protein Fus1p is known to be required for septum degradation during cell fusion, yet its role at the molecular level is not understood. We identified Sho1p, an osmosensor for the HOG MAPK pathway, as a binding partner for Fus1 in a two-hybrid screen. The Sho1p-Fus1p interaction occurs directly and is mediated through the Sho1p-SH3 domain and a proline-rich peptide ligand on the Fus1p COOH-terminal cytoplasmic region. The cell fusion defect associated with fus1Delta mutants is suppressed by a sho1Delta deletion allele, suggesting that Fus1p negatively regulates Sho1p signaling to ensure efficient cell fusion. A two-hybrid matrix containing fusion proteins and pheromone response pathway signaling molecules reveals that Fus1p may participate in a complex network of interactions. In particular, the Fus1p cytoplasmic domain interacts with Chs5p, a protein required for secretion of specialized Chs3p-containing vesicles during bud development, and chs5Delta mutants were defective in cell surface localization of Fus1p. The Fus1p cytoplasmic domain also interacts with the activated GTP-bound form of Cdc42p and the Fus1p-SH3 domain interacts with Bni1p, a yeast formin that participates in cell fusion and controls the assembly of actin cables to polarize secretion in response to Cdc42p signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that Fus1p acts as a scaffold for the assembly of a cell surface complex involved in polarized secretion of septum-degrading enzymes and inhibition of HOG pathway signaling to promote cell fusion. PMID:15020407

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae putative G protein, Gtr1p, which forms complexes with itself and a novel protein designated as Gtr2p, negatively regulates the Ran/Gsp1p G protein cycle through Gtr2p.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, N; Noguchi, E; Nishimoto, T

    1999-01-01

    Prp20p and Rna1p are GDP/GTP exchanging and GTPase-activating factors of Gsp1p, respectively, and their mutations, prp20-1 and rna1-1, can both be suppressed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae gtr1-11. We found that gtr1-11 caused a single amino acid substitution in Gtr1p, forming S20L, which is a putative GDP-bound mutant protein, while Gtr1p has been reported to bind to GTP alone. Consistently, gtr1-S20N, another putative GDP-bound mutant, suppressed both prp20-1 and rna1-1. On the other hand, gtr1-Q65L, a putative GTP-bound mutant, was inhibitory to prp20-1 and rna1-1. Thus, the role that Gtr1p plays in vivo appears to depend upon the nucleotide bound to it. Our data suggested that the GTP-bound Gtr1p, but not the GDP-bound Gtr1p, interacts with itself through its C-terminal tail. S. cerevisiae possesses a novel gene, GTR2, which is homologous to GTR1. Gtr2p interacts with itself in the presence of Gtr1p. The disruption of GTR2 suppressed prp20-1 and abolished the inhibitory effect of gtr1-Q65L on prp20-1. This finding, taken together with the fact that Gtr1p-S20L is a putative, inactive GDP-bound mutant, implies that Gtr1p negatively regulates the Ran/Gsp1p GTPase cycle through Gtr2p. PMID:10388807

  2. The Taz1p transacylase is imported and sorted into the outer mitochondrial membrane via a membrane anchor domain.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Jenny D; Claypool, Steven M; Koehler, Carla M

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial transacylase tafazzin, Taz1p, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cause Barth syndrome, a disease of defective cardiolipin remodeling. Taz1p is an interfacial membrane protein that localizes to both the outer and inner membranes, lining the intermembrane space. Pathogenic point mutations in Taz1p that alter import and membrane insertion result in accumulation of monolysocardiolipin. In this study, we used yeast as a model to investigate the biogenesis of Taz1p. We show that to achieve this unique topology in mitochondria, Taz1p follows a novel import pathway in which it crosses the outer membrane via the translocase of the outer membrane and then uses the Tim9p-Tim10p complex of the intermembrane space to insert into the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taz1p is then transported to membranes of an intermediate density to reach a location in the inner membrane. Moreover, a pathogenic mutation within the membrane anchor (V224R) alters Taz1p import so that it bypasses the Tim9p-Tim10p complex and interacts with the translocase of the inner membrane, TIM23, to reach the matrix. Critical targeting information for Taz1p resides in the membrane anchor and flanking sequences, which are often mutated in Barth syndrome patients. These studies suggest that altering the mitochondrial import pathway of Taz1p may be important in understanding the molecular basis of Barth syndrome. PMID:24078306

  3. Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and the proton ATPase Pma1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, J. Allen; Chen, Janice S.; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2015-07-03

    In eukaryotes, the Cu/Zn containing superoxide dismutase (SOD1) plays a critical role in oxidative stress protection as well as in signaling. We recently demonstrated a function for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sod1p in signaling through CK1γ casein kinases and identified the essential proton ATPase Pma1p as one likely target. The connection between Sod1p and Pma1p was explored further by testing the impact of sod1Δ mutations on cells expressing mutant alleles of Pma1p that alter activity and/or post-translational regulation of this ATPase. We report here that sod1Δ mutations are lethal when combined with the T912D allele of Pma1p in the C-terminal regulatory domain. This “synthetic lethality” was reversed by intragenic suppressor mutations in Pma1p, including an A906G substitution that lies within the C-terminal regulatory domain and hyper-activates Pma1p. Surprisingly the effect of sod1Δ mutations on Pma1-T912D is not mediated through the Sod1p signaling pathway involving the CK1γ casein kinases. Rather, Sod1p sustains life of cells expressing Pma1-T912D through oxidative stress protection. The synthetic lethality of sod1Δ Pma1-T912D cells is suppressed by growing cells under low oxygen conditions or by treatments with manganese-based antioxidants. We now propose a model in which Sod1p maximizes Pma1p activity in two ways: one involving signaling through CK1γ casein kinases and an independent role for Sod1p in oxidative stress protection. - Highlights: • In yeast, the anti-oxidant enzyme SOD1 promotes activity of the proton ATPase Pma1p. • Cells expressing a T912D variant of Pma1p are not viable without SOD1. • SOD1 is needed to protect Pma1-T912D expressing cells from severe oxidative damage. • SOD1 activates Pma1p through casein kinase signaling and oxidative stress protection.

  4. Inhibition of the Formation of the Spf1p Phosphoenzyme by Ca2.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Gerardo R; Czysezon, Nicolas A; Mazzitelli, Luciana R; Sarbia, Nicolas; Adamo, Hugo P

    2016-04-01

    P5-ATPases are important for processes associated with the endosomal-lysosomal system of eukaryotic cells. In humans, the loss of function of P5-ATPases causes neurodegeneration. In the yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae, deletion of P5-ATPase Spf1p gives rise to endoplasmic reticulum stress. The reaction cycle of P5-ATPases is poorly characterized. Here, we showed that the formation of the Spf1p catalytic phosphoenzyme was fast in a reaction medium containing ATP, Mg(2+), and EGTA. Low concentrations of Ca(2+)in the phosphorylation medium decreased the rate of phosphorylation and the maximal level of phosphoenzyme. Neither Mn(2+)nor Mg(2+)had an inhibitory effect on the formation of the phosphoenzyme similar to that of Ca(2+) TheKmfor ATP in the phosphorylation reaction was ∼1 μmand did not significantly change in the presence of Ca(2+) Half-maximal phosphorylation was attained at 8 μmMg(2+), but higher concentrations partially protected from Ca(2+)inhibition. In conditions similar to those used for phosphorylation, Ca(2+)had a small effect accelerating dephosphorylation and minimally affected ATPase activity, suggesting that the formation of the phosphoenzyme was not the limiting step of the ATP hydrolytic cycle. PMID:26858246

  5. The Mtm1p carrier and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate cofactor trafficking in yeast mitochondria *

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Mei M.; Penmatsa, Aravind; Whittaker, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical communication between the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial subsystems of the cell depends on solute carriers in the mitochondrial inner membrane that transport metabolites between the two compartments. We have expressed and purified a yeast mitochondrial carrier protein (Mtm1p, YGR257cp), originally identified as a manganese ion carrier, for biochemical characterization aimed at resolving its function. High affinity, stoichiometric pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) cofactor binding was characterized by fluorescence titration and calorimetry, and the biochemical effects of mtm1 gene deletion on yeast mitochondria were investigated. The PLP status of the mitochondrial proteome (the mitochondrial ‘PLP-ome’) was probed by immunoblot analysis of mitochondria isolated from wild type (MTM1+) and knockout (MTM1−) yeast, revealing depletion of mitochondrial PLP in the latter. A direct activity assay of the enzyme catalyzing the first committed step of heme biosynthesis, the PLP-dependent mitochondrial enzyme 5-aminolevulinate synthase, extends these results, providing a specific example of PLP cofactor limitation. Together, these experiments support a role for Mtm1p in mitochondrial PLP trafficking and highlight the link between PLP cofactor transport and iron metabolism, a remarkable illustration of metabolic integration. PMID:25637770

  6. Targeted Proteomics-Driven Computational Modeling of Macrophage S1P Chemosensing.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Angermann, Bastian R; Koppenol-Raab, Marijke; An, Eunkyung; Sjoelund, Virginie H; Sun, Jing; Ishii, Masaru; Germain, Ronald N; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-10-01

    Osteoclasts are monocyte-derived multinuclear cells that directly attach to and resorb bone. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)(1) regulates bone resorption by functioning as both a chemoattractant and chemorepellent of osteoclast precursors through two G-protein coupled receptors that antagonize each other in an S1P-concentration-dependent manner. To quantitatively explore the behavior of this chemosensing pathway, we applied targeted proteomics, transcriptomics, and rule-based pathway modeling using the Simmune toolset. RAW264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line) were used as model osteoclast precursors, RNA-seq was used to identify expressed target proteins, and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry using internal peptide standards was used to perform absolute abundance measurements of pathway proteins. The resulting transcript and protein abundance values were strongly correlated. Measured protein abundance values, used as simulation input parameters, led to in silico pathway behavior matching in vitro measurements. Moreover, once model parameters were established, even simulated responses toward stimuli that were not used for parameterization were consistent with experimental findings. These findings demonstrate the feasibility and value of combining targeted mass spectrometry with pathway modeling for advancing biological insight. PMID:26199343

  7. Modeling and estimation of C1-P1 bias in GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Lahaye, F.; Héroux, P.; Liao, X.; Beck, N.; Olynik, M.

    2001-01-01

    Modern dual-frequency global positioning system (GPS) receivers are capable of providing direct measurements of both L1 C/A (C1) and P code (P1) without the use of the Y-codes under Anti-Spoofing. A discrepancy or bias between the C1 and P1 measurements from these receivers has however been of concern to operators and users of GPS reference networks. For the purpose of modeling and estimation, the nature and characteristics of the discrepancy must be investigated. The research results presented indicate that the discrepancy between the C1 and P1 measurements contains two different types of components: one is of constant type while another is time variant. A method has been developed for their modeling and estimation. The residual C1-P1 time series after a satellite-dependent bias removal agree at a few-centimeter level, indicating the effectiveness of the proposed model. This allows the C1-P1 discrepancy, both constant and non-constant components, to be removed from GPS reference network solutions. Numerical results are provided to support the analysis.

  8. Novel S1P1 receptor agonists - Part 5: From amino-to alkoxy-pyridines.

    PubMed

    Bolli, Martin H; Lescop, Cyrille; Birker, Magdalena; de Kanter, Ruben; Hess, Patrick; Kohl, Christopher; Nayler, Oliver; Rey, Markus; Sieber, Patrick; Velker, Jörg; Weller, Thomas; Steiner, Beat

    2016-06-10

    In a previous communication we reported on the discovery of aminopyridine 1 as a potent, selective and orally active S1P1 receptor agonist. More detailed studies revealed that this compound is phototoxic in vitro. As a result of efforts aiming at eliminating this undesired property, a series of alkoxy substituted pyridine derivatives was discovered. The photo irritancy factor (PIF) of these alkoxy pyridines was significantly lower than the one of aminopyridine 1 and most compounds were not phototoxic. Focused SAR studies showed, that 2-, 3-, and 4-pyridine derivatives delivered highly potent S1P1 receptor agonists. While the 2-pyridines were clearly more selective against S1PR3, the corresponding 3- or 4-pyridine analogues showed significantly longer oral half-lives and as a consequence longer pharmacological duration of action after oral administration. One of the best compounds, cyclopentoxy-pyridine 45b lacked phototoxicity, showed EC50 values of 0.7 and 140 nM on S1PR1 and S1PR3, respectively, and maximally reduced the blood lymphocyte count for at least 24 h after oral administration of 10 mg/kg to Wistar rats. PMID:27027817

  9. The molecular cloning and characterization of BM1P1 and BM1P2 proteins, putative positive transcription factors involved in barbiturate-mediated induction of the genes encoding cytochrome P450BM-1 of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    He, J S; Liang, Q; Fulco, A J

    1995-08-01

    Analysis of a 1.3-kilobase segment of 5'-flanking DNA from the barbiturate-inducible P450BM-1 gene (CYP106) of Bacillus megaterium revealed two open reading frames. One, BM1P1, encodes 98 amino acids and is located 267 base pairs upstream from the sequence encoding cytochrome P450BM-1 but in the opposite orientation. The second, BM1P2 (88 amino acids), is 892 base pairs upstream from the P450BM-1 coding sequence and in the same coding strand. The expression of BM1P1 and BM1P2 was strongly stimulated in cells grown in the presence of pentobarbital, and the BM1P1 gene product exerted positive control on expression of P450BM-1. When a 177-base pair fragment encompassing the overlapping promoter regions of the P450BM-1 and BM1P1 genes was used as a probe in DNA binding assays, the BM1P1 and BM1P2 gene products and Bm3R1 (the repressor protein regulating the barbiturate-mediated expression of P450BM-3) could bind individually, but the addition of BM1P1 or BM1P2 to a binding mixture containing Bm3R1 completely prevented the appearance of a Bm3R1 binding band. When a 208-base pair fragment containing a Barbie box sequence and located upstream of the 177-base pair fragment was used as a probe, only a Bm3R1 binding band was detected. Although neither BM1P1 and BM1P2 appeared to bind to this 208-base pair fragment, their presence strongly inhibited the binding of Bm3R1 to the same probe. The evidence suggests that BM1P1 and BM1P2 may, in part, act as positive regulatory proteins involved in the expression of the P450BM-1 gene by interfering with the binding of the repressor protein, Bm3R1, to the regulatory regions of P450BM-1. PMID:7629192

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation of Pca1p, a Polytopic Protein, via Interaction with the Proteasome at the Membrane.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nathan; Adle, David J; Zhao, Miaoyun; Qin, Xiaojuan; Kim, Heejeong; Lee, Jaekwon

    2016-07-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) plays a critical role in the destruction of terminally misfolded proteins at the secretory pathway. The system also regulates expression levels of several proteins such as Pca1p, a cadmium exporter in yeast. To gain better insight into the mechanisms underlying ERAD of Pca1p and other polytopic proteins by the proteasome in the cytosol, our study determined the roles for the molecular factors of ERAD in dislodging Pca1p from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Inactivation of the 20S proteasome leads to accumulation of ubiquitinated Pca1p in the ER membrane, suggesting a role for the proteasome in extraction of Pca1p from the ER. Pca1p formed a complex with the proteasome at the membrane in a Doa10p E3 ligase-dependent manner. Cdc48p is required for recruiting the proteasome to Pca1p. Although the Ufd2p E4 ubiquitin chain extension enzyme is involved in efficient degradation of Pca1p, Ufd2p-deficient cells did not affect the formation of a complex between Pca1p and the proteasome. Two other polytopic membrane proteins undergoing ERAD, Ste6*p and Hmg2p, also displayed the same outcomes observed for Pca1p. However, poly-ubiquitinated Cpy1*p, a luminal ERAD substrate, was detected in the cytosol independent of proteolytic activities of the proteasome. These results indicate that extraction and degradation of polytopic membrane proteins at the ER is a coupled event. This mechanism would relieve the cost of exposed hydrophobic domains in the cytosol during ERAD. PMID:27226596

  11. Increased expression of SUMO1P3 predicts poor prognosis and promotes tumor growth and metastasis in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Junhao; Chen, Mingwei; Chen, Xiaoying; Zhuang, Chengle; Liu, Li; Xu, Wen; Zhou, Qing; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Qiaoxia; Zhao, Guoping; Huang, Weiren

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs that play crucial roles in diverse biological processes. The pseudogene-expressed lncRNA is one major type of lncRNA family. Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) 1 pseudogene 3, (SUMO1P3) is a novel indentified lncRNA that was previously reported to be up-regulated in gastric cancer. However, we know nothing about the biological function and underlying mechanism of SUMO1P3 in tumor. Furthermore, the relationship between SUMO1P3 and bladder cancer is completely unknown. We hypothesized that SUMO1P3 also have roles in bladder cancer. In this study, we found that SUMO1P3 was significantly up-regulated in bladder cancer tissues compared with paired-adjacent nontumorous tissues in a cohort of 55 bladder cancer patients. Moreover, up-regulated SUMO1P3 expression was positively correlated with greater histological grade (P<0.05) and advanced TNM stage (P<0.05). Furthermore, we found cell proliferation / migration inhibition and apoptosis induction were also observed in SUMO1P3 siRNA-transfected bladder cancer cells. Our data suggest that SUMO1P3 plays oncogenic roles in bladder cancer and can be used as a potential prognostic and therapeutic target. PMID:26799188

  12. The Effect of Gender on the N1-P2 Auditory Complex while Listening and Speaking with Altered Auditory Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swink, Shannon; Stuart, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The effect of gender on the N1-P2 auditory complex was examined while listening and speaking with altered auditory feedback. Fifteen normal hearing adult males and 15 females participated. N1-P2 components were evoked while listening to self-produced nonaltered and frequency shifted /a/ tokens and during production of /a/ tokens during nonaltered…

  13. Defective sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) phosphorylation exacerbates TH17-mediated autoimmune neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Garris, Christopher S; Wu, Linfeng; Acharya, Swati; Arac, Ahmet; Blaho, Victoria A; Huang, Yingxiang; Moon, Byoung San; Axtell, Robert C; Ho, Peggy P; Steinberg, Gary K; Lewis, David B; Sobel, Raymond A; Han, David K; Steinman, Lawrence; Snyder, Michael P; Hla, Timothy; Han, May H

    2013-11-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling regulates lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs into systemic circulation. The sphingosine phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) agonist FTY-720 (Gilenya) arrests immune trafficking and prevents multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses. However, alternative mechanisms of S1P-S1P1 signaling have been reported. Phosphoproteomic analysis of MS brain lesions revealed S1P1 phosphorylation on S351, a residue crucial for receptor internalization. Mutant mice harboring an S1pr1 gene encoding phosphorylation-deficient receptors (S1P1(S5A)) developed severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) due to autoimmunity mediated by interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing helper T cells (TH17 cells) in the peripheral immune and nervous system. S1P1 directly activated the Jak-STAT3 signal-transduction pathway via IL-6. Impaired S1P1 phosphorylation enhances TH17 polarization and exacerbates autoimmune neuroinflammation. These mechanisms may be pathogenic in MS. PMID:24076635

  14. C1P Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Preventing NF-κB Activation in Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Baudiß, Kristin; de Paula Vieira, Rodolfo; Cicko, Sanja; Ayata, Korcan; Hossfeld, Madelon; Ehrat, Nicolas; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio; Eltzschig, Holger K; Idzko, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Recently, ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) has been shown to modulate acute inflammatory events. Acute lung injury (Arnalich et al. 2000. Infect. Immun. 68: 1942-1945) is characterized by rapid alveolar injury, lung inflammation, induced cytokine production, neutrophil accumulation, and vascular leakage leading to lung edema. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of C1P during LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice. To evaluate the effect of C1P, we used a prophylactic and therapeutic LPS-induced ALI model in C57BL/6 male mice. Our studies revealed that intrapulmonary application of C1P before (prophylactic) or 24 h after (therapeutic) LPS instillation decreased neutrophil trafficking to the lung, proinflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage, and alveolar capillary leakage. Mechanistically, C1P inhibited the LPS-triggered NF-κB levels in lung tissue in vivo. In addition, ex vivo experiments revealed that C1P also attenuates LPS-induced NF-κB phosphorylation and IL-8 production in human neutrophils. These results indicate C1P playing a role in dampening LPS-induced acute lung inflammation and suggest that C1P could be a valuable candidate for treatment of ALI. PMID:26800872

  15. Nucleolin/Nsr1p binds to the 3' noncoding region of the tombusvirus RNA and inhibits replication.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Li, Zhenghe; Nagy, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    Previous genome-wide screens identified >100 host genes affecting tombusvirus replication using yeast model host. One of those factors was Nsr1p (nucleolin), which is an abundant RNA-binding shuttle protein involved in rRNA maturation and ribosome assembly. We find that overexpression of Nsr1p in yeast or in Nicotiana benthamiana inhibited the accumulation of tombusvirus RNA by approximately 10-fold. Regulated overexpression of Nsr1p revealed that Nsr1p should be present at the beginning of viral replication for efficient inhibition, suggesting that Nsr1p inhibits an early step in the replication process. In vitro experiments revealed that Nsr1p binds preferably to the 3' UTR in the viral RNA. The purified recombinant Nsr1p inhibited the in vitro replication of the viral RNA in a yeast cell-free assay when preincubated with the viral RNA before the assay. These data support the model that Nsr1p/nucleolin inhibits tombusvirus replication by interfering with the recruitment of the viral RNA for replication. PMID:19861225

  16. Complex analysis of scattering 1p-shell nuclei in the framework of coupled channel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassurlla, M.; Burtebayev, N.; Duisebayev, A.; Burtebayeva, J.; Spitaleri, C.; Urkinbayev, A.; Rusek, K.; Piasecki, E.; Kliczewski, S.; Trzcinska, A.; Sakuta, S. B.; Boztosun, I.; Artemov, S. V.; Galanina, L. I.

    2016-04-01

    The scattering process on 1p-shell nuclei, having the cluster structure, can be seen in the anomaly increasing of cross sections for large angles. Most often, this increasing of cross sections is connected with mechanism of transfer of clusters or nucleons. The study of the α-cluster transfer mechanism in the elastic scattering of 20Ne ions on 16O nuclei is important for investigation burning process in evolution of the Universe immediately after the Big-Bang. Therefore new experiment on the heavy ion accelerator (Warsaw University) was carried out with a significant expansion of the range of angles up to 1700 in center mass system at E Lab =50.0 MeV. Data analysis of angular distribution was performed in framework of the optical model and coupled channel method. The optimal parameters of the optical potential were obtained and the spectroscopic factor was obtained 1 for 20Ne as α +16O.

  17. Velocity-dependent optical potential for neutron elastic scattering from 1 p -shell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabar, I. N.; Jaghoub, M. I.

    2015-06-01

    Background: The conventional optical model is quite successful in describing the nucleon elastic scattering data from medium and heavy nuclei. However, its success in describing the light 1 p -shell nuclei is somewhat limited. The velocity-dependent optical potential resulted in a significant improvement in describing the elastic angular distributions for light nuclei in the low energy region. Purpose: To extend the formalism of the velocity-dependent potential to higher energies, and to assess its importance in describing neutron elastic scattering data from light 1 p -shell nuclei at high energies. Method: We fit the angular distribution data for neutron elastic scattering from 12C and 16O using (i) the velocity-dependent optical potential and (ii) the conventional optical potential. The results of the two models are then compared. At low energies, we compare our angular distribution fits with the fits of other works that exist in the literature. Furthermore, the total integrated cross sections in addition to the analyzing power are calculated using the velocity-dependent optical potential and compared to the experimental data. Results: The velocity-dependent potential resulted in significant improvements in describing the angular distributions particularly in the large-angle scattering region and for certain energy ranges. This model is important where the experimental data show structural effects from nuclear surface deformations, which are important in light nuclei. Furthermore, the calculated total elastic cross sections and analyzing power are in good agreement with the experimental data. Conclusions: The velocity-dependent potential gives rise to surface-peaked real terms in the optical model. Such terms account, at least partly, for the structural effects seen in the angular distribution data. The energy range over which the surface terms are needed is found to depend on the target nucleus. Other works that have introduced real surface terms in the optical

  18. Screening for hydrolytic enzymes reveals Ayr1p as a novel triacylglycerol lipase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ploier, Birgit; Scharwey, Melanie; Koch, Barbara; Schmidt, Claudia; Schatte, Jessica; Rechberger, Gerald; Kollroser, Manfred; Hermetter, Albin; Daum, Günther

    2013-12-13

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as other eukaryotes, preserves fatty acids and sterols in a biologically inert form, as triacylglycerols and steryl esters. The major triacylglycerol lipases of the yeast S. cerevisiae identified so far are Tgl3p, Tgl4p, and Tgl5p (Athenstaedt, K., and Daum, G. (2003) YMR313c/TGL3 encodes a novel triacylglycerol lipase located in lipid particles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 23317-23323; Athenstaedt, K., and Daum, G. (2005) Tgl4p and Tgl5p, two triacylglycerol lipases of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are localized to lipid particles. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 37301-37309). We observed that upon cultivation on oleic acid, triacylglycerol mobilization did not come to a halt in a yeast strain deficient in all currently known triacylglycerol lipases, indicating the presence of additional not yet characterized lipases/esterases. Functional proteome analysis using lipase and esterase inhibitors revealed a subset of candidate genes for yet unknown hydrolytic enzymes on peroxisomes and lipid droplets. Based on the conserved GXSXG lipase motif, putative functions, and subcellular localizations, a selected number of candidates were characterized by enzyme assays in vitro, gene expression analysis, non-polar lipid analysis, and in vivo triacylglycerol mobilization assays. These investigations led to the identification of Ayr1p as a novel triacylglycerol lipase of yeast lipid droplets and confirmed the hydrolytic potential of the peroxisomal Lpx1p in vivo. Based on these results, we discuss a possible link between lipid storage, lipid mobilization, and peroxisomal utilization of fatty acids as a carbon source. PMID:24187129

  19. A male-specific quantitative trait locus on 1p21 controlling human stature

    PubMed Central

    Sammalisto, S; Hiekkalinna, T; Suviolahti, E; Sood, K; Metzidis, A; Pajukanta, P; Lilja, H; Soro-Paavonen, A; Taskinen, M; Tuomi, T; Almgren, P; Orho-Melander, M; Groop, L; Peltonen, L; Perola, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Many genome-wide scans aimed at complex traits have been statistically underpowered due to small sample size. Combining data from several genome-wide screens with comparable quantitative phenotype data should improve statistical power for the localisation of genomic regions contributing to these traits. Objective: To perform a genome-wide screen for loci affecting adult stature by combined analysis of four previously performed genome-wide scans. Methods: We developed a web based computer tool, Cartographer, for combining genetic marker maps which positions genetic markers accurately using the July 2003 release of the human genome sequence and the deCODE genetic map. Using Cartographer, we combined the primary genotype data from four genome-wide scans and performed variance components (VC) linkage analyses for human stature on the pooled dataset of 1417 individuals from 277 families and performed VC analyses for males and females separately. Results: We found significant linkage to stature on 1p21 (multipoint LOD score 4.25) and suggestive linkages on 9p24 and 18q21 (multipoint LOD scores 2.57 and 2.39, respectively) in males-only analyses. We also found suggestive linkage to 4q35 and 22q13 (multipoint LOD scores 2.18 and 2.85, respectively) when we analysed both females and males and to 13q12 (multipoint LOD score 2.66) in females-only analyses. Conclusions: We strengthened the evidence for linkage to previously reported quantitative trait loci (QTL) for stature and also found significant evidence of a novel male-specific QTL on 1p21. Further investigation of several interesting candidate genes in this region will help towards characterisation of this first sex-specific locus affecting human stature. PMID:15827092

  20. Zap1p, a metalloregulatory protein involved in zinc-responsive transcriptional regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Eide, D J

    1997-09-01

    Zinc ion homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is controlled primarily through the transcriptional regulation of zinc uptake systems in response to intracellular zinc levels. A high-affinity uptake system is encoded by the ZRT1 gene, and its expression is induced more than 30-fold in zinc-limited cells. A low-affinity transporter is encoded by the ZRT2 gene, and this system is also regulated by zinc. We used a genetic approach to isolate mutants whose ZRT1 expression is no longer repressed in zinc-replete cells, and a new gene, ZAP1, was identified. ZAP1 encodes a 93-kDa protein with sequence similarity to transcriptional activators; the C-terminal 174 amino acids contains five C2H2 zinc finger domains, and the N terminus (residues 1 to 706) has two potential acidic activation domains. The N-terminal region also contains 12% histidine and cysteine residues. The mutant allele isolated, ZAP1-1up, is semidominant and caused high-level expression of ZRT1 and ZRT2 in both zinc-limited and zinc-replete cells. This phenotype is the result of a mutation that substitutes a serine for a cysteine residue in the N-terminal region. A zap1 deletion mutant grew well on zinc-replete media but poorly on zinc-limiting media. This mutant had low-level ZRT1 and ZRT2 expression in zinc-limited as well as zinc-replete cells. These data indicate that Zap1p plays a central role in zinc ion homeostasis by regulating transcription of the zinc uptake system genes in response to zinc. Finally, we present evidence that Zap1p regulates transcription of its own promoter in response to zinc through a positive autoregulatory mechanism. PMID:9271382

  1. Functional expression of the lactate permease Jen1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed Central

    Soares-Silva, Isabel; Schuller, Dorit; Andrade, Raquel P; Baltazar, Fátima; Cássio, Fernanda; Casal, Margarida

    2003-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the activity for the lactate-proton symporter is dependent on JEN1 gene expression. Pichia pastoris was transformed with an integrative plasmid containing the JEN1 gene. After 24 h of methanol induction, Northern and Western blotting analyses indicated the expression of JEN1 in the transformants. Lactate permease activity was obtained in P. pastoris cells with a V (max) of 2.1 nmol x s(-1) x mg of dry weight(-1). Reconstitution of the lactate permease activity was achieved by fusing plasma membranes of P. pastoris methanol-induced cells with Escherichia coli liposomes containing cytochrome c oxidase, as proton-motive force. These assays in reconstituted heterologous P. pastoris membrane vesicles demonstrate that S. cerevisiae Jen1p is a functional lactate transporter. Moreover, a S. cerevisiae strain deleted in the JEN1 gene was transformed with a centromeric plasmid containing JEN1 under the control of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase constitutive promotor. Constitutive JEN1 expression and lactic acid uptake were observed in cells grown on either glucose and/or acetic acid. The highest V (max) (0.84 nmol x s(-1) x mg of dry weight(-1)) was obtained in acetic acid-grown cells. Thus overexpression of the S. cerevisiae JEN1 gene in both S. cerevisiae and P. pastoris cells resulted in increased activity of lactate transport when compared with the data previously reported in lactic acid-grown cells of native S. cerevisiae strains. Jen1p is the only S. cerevisiae secondary porter characterized so far by heterologous expression in P. pastoris at both the cell and the membrane-vesicle levels. PMID:12962538

  2. A region within a lumenal loop of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ycf1p directs proteolytic processing and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Mason, Deborah L; Mallampalli, Monica P; Huyer, Gregory; Michaelis, Susan

    2003-06-01

    Ycf1p, a member of the yeast multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins, is a vacuolar membrane transporter that confers resistance to a variety of toxic substances such as cadmium and arsenite. Ycf1p undergoes a PEP4-dependent processing event to yield N- and C-terminal cleavage products that remain associated with one another. In the present study, we sought to determine whether proteolytic cleavage is required for Ycf1p activity. We have identified a unique region within lumenal loop 6 of Ycf1p, designated the loop 6 insertion (L6(ins)), which appears to be necessary and sufficient for proteolytic cleavage, since L6(ins) can promote processing when moved to new locations in Ycf1p or into a related transporter, Bpt1p. Surprisingly, mutational results indicate that proteolytic processing is not essential for Ycf1p transport activity. Instead, the L6(ins) appears to regulate substrate specificity of Ycf1p, since certain mutations in this region lower cellular cadmium resistance with a concomitant gain in arsenite resistance. Although some of these L6(ins) mutations block processing, there is no correlation between processing and substrate specificity. The activity profiles of the Ycf1p L6(ins) mutants are dramatically affected by the strain background in which they are expressed, raising the possibility that another cellular component may functionally impact Ycf1p activity. A candidate component may be a new full-length MRP-type transporter (NFT1), reported in the Saccharomyces Genome Database as two adjacent open reading frames, YKR103w and YKR104w, but which we show here is present in most Saccharomyces strains as a single open reading frame. PMID:12796304

  3. First Observation of the Hadronic Transition ϒ (4 S )→η hb(1 P ) and New Measurement of the hb(1 P ) and ηb(1 S ) Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamponi, U.; Mussa, R.; Abdesselam, A.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Atmacan, H.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hedges, M. T.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Julius, T.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kinoshita, K.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lewis, P.; Libby, J.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pesántez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Stypula, J.; Tanida, K.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Using a sample of 771.6 ×106 ϒ ϒ (4 S ) decays collected by the Belle experiment at the KEKB e+e- collider, we observe, for the first time, the transition ϒ (4 S )→η hb(1 P ) with the branching fraction B [ϒ (4 S )→η hb(1 P )]=(2.18 ±0.11 ±0.18 )×10-3 and we measure the hb(1 P ) mass Mhb(1P )=(9899.3 ±0.4 ±1.0 ) MeV /c2 , corresponding to the hyperfine (HF) splitting Δ MHF(1 P )=(0.6 ±0.4 ±1.0 ) MeV /c2 . Using the transition hb(1 P )→γ ηb(1 S ), we measure the ηb(1 S ) mass Mηb(1S )=(9400.7 ±1.7 ±1.6 ) MeV /c2 , corresponding to Δ MHF(1 S )=(59.6 ±1.7 ±1.6 ) MeV /c2 , the ηb(1 S ) width Γηb(1S )=(8-5+6±5 ) MeV /c2 and the branching fraction B [hb(1 P )→γ ηb(1 S )]=(56 ±8 ±4 )%.

  4. Increased mRNA Levels of Sphingosine Kinases and S1P Lyase and Reduced Levels of S1P Were Observed in Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Association with Poorer Differentiation and Earlier Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Kurano, Makoto; Enooku, Kenichiro; Sato, Masaya; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Ishizawa, Takeaki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Although sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) has been reported to play an important role in cancer pathophysiology, little is known about S1P and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To clarify the relationship between S1P and HCC, 77 patients with HCC who underwent surgical treatment were consecutively enrolled in this study. In addition, S1P and its metabolites were quantitated by LC-MS/MS. The mRNA levels of sphingosine kinases (SKs), which phosphorylate sphingosine to generate S1P, were increased in HCC tissues compared with adjacent non-HCC tissues. Higher mRNA levels of SKs in HCC were associated with poorer differentiation and microvascular invasion, whereas a higher level of SK2 mRNA was a risk factor for intra- and extra-hepatic recurrence. S1P levels, however, were unexpectedly reduced in HCC compared with non-HCC tissues, and increased mRNA levels of S1P lyase (SPL), which degrades S1P, were observed in HCC compared with non-HCC tissues. Higher SPL mRNA levels in HCC were associated with poorer differentiation. Finally, in HCC cell lines, inhibition of the expression of SKs or SPL by siRNA led to reduced proliferation, invasion and migration, whereas overexpression of SKs or SPL enhanced proliferation. In conclusion, increased SK and SPL mRNA expression along with reduced S1P levels were more commonly observed in HCC tissues compared with adjacent non-HCC tissues and were associated with poor differentiation and early recurrence. SPL as well as SKs may be therapeutic targets for HCC treatment. PMID:26886371

  5. The mannose-specific lectin domains of Flo1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lg-Flo1p from S. pastorianus: crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the adhesin–carbohydrate complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ielasi, Francesco S.; Goyal, Parveen; Sleutel, Mike; Wohlkonig, Alexandre; Willaert, Ronnie G.

    2013-01-01

    Flo1p and Lg-Flo1p are two cell-wall adhesins belonging to the Flo (flocculation) protein family from the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. pastorianus. The main function of these modular proteins endowed with calcium-dependent lectin activity is to mediate cell–cell adhesion events during yeast flocculation, a process which is well known at the cellular level but still not fully characterized from a molecular perspective. Recently, structural features of the N-terminal Flo lectin domains, including the N-terminal domain of Lg-Flo1p (N-Lg-Flo1p), and their interactions with carbohydrate molecules have been investigated. However, structural data concerning the N-terminal domain of Flo1p (N-Flo1p), which is the most specific among the Flo proteins, are missing and information about the N-Lg-Flo1p–carbohydrate interaction still lacks detailed structural insight. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the apo form and the mannose complex of N-Flo1p and X-ray analysis of N-Lg-Flo1p crystals soaked in α-1,2-mannobiose are reported. The N-Flo1p crystals diffracted to a resolution of 1.43 Å in the case of the apo form and to 2.12 Å resolution for the mannose complex. Both crystals were orthorhombic and belonged to space group P212121, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The N-Lg-Flo1p–α-1,2-mannobiose complex crystal diffracted to 1.73 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P1211 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:23832207

  6. Emergence and Characterization of Unusual DS-1-Like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strains in Children with Diarrhea in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Satoshi; Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Haga, Kei; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kato, Takema; Ouchi, Yuya; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Tsuji, Takao; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2015-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of unusual DS-1-like G1P[8] rotaviruses in Japan have been recently reported. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand, three DS-1-like G1P[8] strains (RVA/Human-wt/THA/PCB-180/2013/G1P[8], RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-109/2013/G1P[8], and RVA/Human-wt/THA/SSKT-41/2013/G1P[8]) were identified in stool specimens from hospitalized children with severe diarrhea. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genomes of strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41. On whole genomic analysis, all three strains exhibited a unique genotype constellation including both genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G1-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2. This novel genotype constellation is shared with Japanese DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the G/P genes of strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41 appeared to have originated from human Wa-like G1P[8] strains. On the other hand, the non-G/P genes of the three strains were assumed to have originated from human DS-1-like strains. Thus, strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41 appeared to be derived through reassortment event(s) between Wa-like G1P[8] and DS-1-like human rotaviruses. Furthermore, strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41 were found to have the 11-segment genome almost indistinguishable from one another in their nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic lineages, indicating the derivation of the three strains from a common origin. Moreover, all the 11 genes of the three strains were closely related to those of Japanese DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Therefore, DS-1-like G1P[8] strains that have emerged in Thailand and Japan were assumed to have originated from a recent common ancestor. To our knowledge, this is the first report on whole genome-based characterization of DS-1-like G1P[8] strains that have emerged in an area other than Japan. Our observations will provide important insights into the evolutionary dynamics of emerging DS-1-like G1P[8] rotaviruses. PMID:26540260

  7. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Induces Dose-Dependent Chemotaxis or Fugetaxis of T-ALL Blasts through S1P1 Activation.

    PubMed

    Messias, Carolina V; Santana-Van-Vliet, Eliane; Lemos, Julia P; Moreira, Otacilio C; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinicius; Savino, Wilson; Mendes-da-Cruz, Daniella Arêas

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid involved in several physiological processes including cell migration and differentiation. S1P signaling is mediated through five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-S1P5). S1P1 is crucial to the exit of T-lymphocytes from the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs through a gradient of S1P. We have previously observed that T-ALL and T-LBL blasts express S1P1. Herein we analyzed the role of S1P receptors in the migratory pattern of human T-cell neoplastic blasts. S1P-triggered cell migration was directly related to S1P1 expression. T-ALL blasts expressing low levels of S1P1 mRNA (HPB-ALL) did not migrate toward S1P, whereas those expressing higher levels of S1P1 (MOLT-4, JURKAT and CEM) did migrate. The S1P ligand induced T-ALL cells chemotaxis in concentrations up to 500 nM and induced fugetaxis in higher concentrations (1000-10000 nM) through interactions with S1P1. When S1P1 was specifically blocked by the W146 compound, S1P-induced migration at lower concentrations was reduced, whereas higher concentrations induced cell migration. Furthermore, we observed that S1P/S1P1 interactions induced ERK and AKT phosphorylation, and modulation of Rac1 activity. Responding T-ALL blasts also expressed S1P3 mRNA but blockage of this receptor did not modify migratory responses. Our results indicate that S1P is involved in the migration of T-ALL/LBL blasts, which is dependent on S1P1 expression. Moreover, S1P concentrations in the given microenvironment might induce dose-dependent chemotaxis or fugetaxis of T-ALL blasts. PMID:26824863

  8. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Induces Dose-Dependent Chemotaxis or Fugetaxis of T-ALL Blasts through S1P1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Messias, Carolina V.; Santana-Van-Vliet, Eliane; Lemos, Julia P.; Moreira, Otacilio C.; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinicius; Savino, Wilson; Mendes-da-Cruz, Daniella Arêas

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid involved in several physiological processes including cell migration and differentiation. S1P signaling is mediated through five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-S1P5). S1P1 is crucial to the exit of T-lymphocytes from the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs through a gradient of S1P. We have previously observed that T-ALL and T-LBL blasts express S1P1. Herein we analyzed the role of S1P receptors in the migratory pattern of human T-cell neoplastic blasts. S1P-triggered cell migration was directly related to S1P1 expression. T-ALL blasts expressing low levels of S1P1 mRNA (HPB-ALL) did not migrate toward S1P, whereas those expressing higher levels of S1P1 (MOLT-4, JURKAT and CEM) did migrate. The S1P ligand induced T-ALL cells chemotaxis in concentrations up to 500 nM and induced fugetaxis in higher concentrations (1000–10000 nM) through interactions with S1P1. When S1P1 was specifically blocked by the W146 compound, S1P-induced migration at lower concentrations was reduced, whereas higher concentrations induced cell migration. Furthermore, we observed that S1P/S1P1 interactions induced ERK and AKT phosphorylation, and modulation of Rac1 activity. Responding T-ALL blasts also expressed S1P3 mRNA but blockage of this receptor did not modify migratory responses. Our results indicate that S1P is involved in the migration of T-ALL/LBL blasts, which is dependent on S1P1 expression. Moreover, S1P concentrations in the given microenvironment might induce dose-dependent chemotaxis or fugetaxis of T-ALL blasts. PMID:26824863

  9. Dynamic Cross Talk between S1P and CXCL12 Regulates Hematopoietic Stem Cells Migration, Development and Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Karin; Kollet, Orit; Lapidot, Tsvee

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are mostly retained in a quiescent non-motile mode in their bone marrow (BM) niches, shifting to a migratory cycling and differentiating state to replenish the blood with mature leukocytes on demand. The balance between the major chemo-attractants CXCL12, predominantly in the BM, and S1P, mainly in the blood, dynamically regulates HSC recruitment to the circulation versus their retention in the BM. During alarm situations, stress-signals induce a decrease in CXCL12 levels in the BM, while S1P levels are rapidly and transiently increased in the circulation, thus favoring mobilization of stem cells as part of host defense and repair mechanisms. Myeloid cytokines, including G-CSF, up-regulate S1P signaling in the BM via the PI3K pathway. Induced CXCL12 secretion from stromal cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and increased S1P1 expression and ROS signaling in HSCs, all facilitate mobilization. Bone turnover is also modulated by both CXCL12 and S1P, regulating the dynamic BM stromal microenvironment, osteoclasts and stem cell niches which all functionally express CXCL12 and S1P receptors. Overall, CXCL12 and S1P levels in the BM and circulation are synchronized to mutually control HSC motility, leukocyte production and osteoclast/osteoblast bone turnover during homeostasis and stress situations. PMID:24276423

  10. Structures of the yeast dynamin-like GTPase Sey1p provide insight into homotypic ER fusion.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liming; Sun, Sha; Wang, Wei; Shi, Juanming; Hu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Shiyan; Su, Dan; Rao, Zihe; Hu, Junjie; Lou, Zhiyong

    2015-09-14

    Homotypic membrane fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum is mediated by dynamin-like guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases), which include atlastin (ATL) in metazoans and Sey1p in yeast. In this paper, we determined the crystal structures of the cytosolic domain of Sey1p derived from Candida albicans. The structures reveal a stalk-like, helical bundle domain following the GTPase, which represents a previously unidentified configuration of the dynamin superfamily. This domain is significantly longer than that of ATL and critical for fusion. Sey1p forms a side-by-side dimer in complex with GMP-PNP or GDP/AlF4(-) but is monomeric with GDP. Surprisingly, Sey1p could mediate fusion without GTP hydrolysis, even though fusion was much more efficient with GTP. Sey1p was able to replace ATL in mammalian cells, and the punctate localization of Sey1p was dependent on its GTPase activity. Despite the common function of fusogenic GTPases, our results reveal unique features of Sey1p. PMID:26370501

  11. Cadmium and Secondary Structure-dependent Function of a Degron in the Pca1p Cadmium Exporter.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nathan; Wei, Wenzhong; Zhao, Miaoyun; Qin, Xiaojuan; Seravalli, Javier; Kim, Heejeong; Lee, Jaekwon

    2016-06-01

    Protein turnover is a critical cellular process regulating biochemical pathways and destroying terminally misfolded or damaged proteins. Pca1p, a cadmium exporter in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is rapidly degraded by the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) system via a cis-acting degron that exists at the 250-350 amino acid region of Pca1p and is transferable to other proteins to serve as a degradation signal. Cadmium stabilizes Pca1p in a manner dependent on the degron. This suggested that cadmium-mediated masking of the degron impedes its interaction with the molecular factors involved in the ERAD. The characteristics and mechanisms of action of the degron in Pca1p and most of those in other proteins however remain to be determined. The results presented here indicate that specific cysteine residues in a degron of Pca1p sense cadmium. An unbiased approach selecting non-functional degrons indicated a critical role of hydrophobic amino acids in the degron for its function. A secondary structure modeling predicted the formation of an amphipathic helix. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed the functional significance of the hydrophobic patch. Last, hydrophobic amino acids in the degron- and cadmium-binding region affected the interaction of Pca1p with the Ssa1p molecular chaperone, which is involved in ERAD. These results reveal the mechanism of action of the degron, which might be useful for the identification and characterization of other degrons. PMID:27059957

  12. GPCR cell signaling pathways mediating embryonic chick retinal growth cone collapse induced by LPA and S1P

    PubMed Central

    Fincher, Jarod; Whiteneck, Canaan; Birgbauer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In the development of the nervous system, one of the critical aspects is the proper navigation of axons to their targets, the problem of axonal guidance. We are using the chick visual system as a model to investigate the role of the lysophospholipids lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) as potential axon guidance cues. We show that both LPA and S1P cause specific, dose-dependent growth cone collapse of retinal neurons in vitro in the chick model system, with slight differences to mouse, but very similar to Xenopus. Because LPA and S1P receptors are GPCRs, we analyzed the intracellular signaling pathways using pharmacological inhibitors in chick retinal neurons. Blocking rho kinase (ROCK) prevented growth cone collapse by LPA and S1P, while blocking PLC or chelating calcium had no effect on growth cone collapse. Inhibiting Gi/o with pertussis toxin resulted in a partial reduction of growth cone collapse, both with LPA and S1P. Inhibition of p38 blocked growth cone collapse mediated by LPA but not S1P. Thus, in addition to the involvement of the G12/13-ROCK pathway, LPA and S1P induced collapse of chick retinal growth cones has a partial requirement for Gi/o. PMID:25138637

  13. Phospho-regulated interaction between kinesin-6 klp9p and microtubule bundler ase1p promotes spindle elongation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chuanhai; Ward, Jonathan J.; Loiodice, Isabelle; Velve-Casquillas, Guilhem; Nedelec, Francois J.; Tran, Phong T.

    2010-01-01

    The spindle midzone – composed of antiparallel microtubules, microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), and motors – is the structure responsible for microtubule organization and sliding during anaphase B. In general, MAPs and motors stabilize the midzone and motors produce sliding. We show that fission yeast kinesin-6 motor klp9p binds to the microtubule antiparallel bundler ase1p at the midzone at anaphase B onset. This interaction depends upon the phosphorylation states of klp9p and ase1p. The cyclin-dependent kinase cdc2p phosphorylates and its antagonist phosphatase clp1p dephosphorylates klp9p and ase1p to control the position and timing of klp9p-ase1p interaction. Failure of klp9p-ase1p binding leads to decreased spindle elongation velocity. The ase1p-mediated recruitment of klp9p to the midzone accelerates pole separation, as suggested by computer simulation. Our findings indicate that a phosphorylation switch controls the spatial-temporal interactions of motors and MAPs for proper anaphase B, and suggest a mechanism whereby a specific motor-MAP conformation enables efficient microtubule sliding. PMID:19686686

  14. Structures of the yeast dynamin-like GTPase Sey1p provide insight into homotypic ER fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Liming; Sun, Sha; Wang, Wei; Shi, Juanming; Hu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Shiyan; Su, Dan; Lou, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Homotypic membrane fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum is mediated by dynamin-like guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases), which include atlastin (ATL) in metazoans and Sey1p in yeast. In this paper, we determined the crystal structures of the cytosolic domain of Sey1p derived from Candida albicans. The structures reveal a stalk-like, helical bundle domain following the GTPase, which represents a previously unidentified configuration of the dynamin superfamily. This domain is significantly longer than that of ATL and critical for fusion. Sey1p forms a side-by-side dimer in complex with GMP-PNP or GDP/AlF4− but is monomeric with GDP. Surprisingly, Sey1p could mediate fusion without GTP hydrolysis, even though fusion was much more efficient with GTP. Sey1p was able to replace ATL in mammalian cells, and the punctate localization of Sey1p was dependent on its GTPase activity. Despite the common function of fusogenic GTPases, our results reveal unique features of Sey1p. PMID:26370501

  15. Accurate, Fast and Cost-Effective Diagnostic Test for Monosomy 1p36 Using Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Pricila da Silva; Pena, Heloisa B.; D'Angelo, Carla Sustek; Koiffmann, Celia P.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho

    2014-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is considered the most common subtelomeric deletion syndrome in humans and it accounts for 0.5–0.7% of all the cases of idiopathic intellectual disability. The molecular diagnosis is often made by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), which has the drawback of being a high-cost technique. However, patients with classic monosomy 1p36 share some typical clinical characteristics that, together with its common prevalence, justify the development of a less expensive, targeted diagnostic method. In this study, we developed a simple, rapid, and inexpensive real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for targeted diagnosis of monosomy 1p36, easily accessible for low-budget laboratories in developing countries. For this, we have chosen two target genes which are deleted in the majority of patients with monosomy 1p36: PRKCZ and SKI. In total, 39 patients previously diagnosed with monosomy 1p36 by aCGH, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) all tested positive on our qPCR assay. By simultaneously using these two genes we have been able to detect 1p36 deletions with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. We conclude that qPCR of PRKCZ and SKI is a fast and accurate diagnostic test for monosomy 1p36, costing less than 10 US dollars in reagent costs. PMID:24839341

  16. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae GATA Factors Dal80p and Deh1p Can Form Homo- and Heterodimeric Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Svetlov, Vladimir V.; Cooper, Terrance G.

    1998-01-01

    GATA family proteins Gln3p, Gat1p, Dal80p, and Deh1p mediate the regulation of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thus far, Gln3p, Dal80p, and Deh1p have been shown to bind to GATA sequences in NCR-sensitive promoters, in some cases to exactly the same GATA sequences. A minimal Gln3p binding site consists of a single GATA sequence, whereas a Dal80p binding site consists of two GATA sequences in specific orientation, 15 to 35 bp apart, suggesting that Dal80p may bind to DNA as a dimer. Additionally, both Dal80p and Deh1p are predicted to contain a leucine zipper motif near their C termini. Therefore, we tested whether they could form homo- and/or heterodimers in two-hybrid assays. We show that Dal80p-Dal80p, Dal80p-Dal80pLZ (leucine zipper), Dal80pLZ-Dal80pLZ, Dal80p-Deh1pLZ, Dal80pLZ-Deh1pLZ, and Deh1pLZ-Deh1pLZ complexes can form. Dal80p-Dal80p and Dal80pLZ-Dal80pLZ complexes yield 5- to 10-fold stronger signals than the other possible dimers. If Dal80p and Deh1p bind to DNA only after dimerization, then the difference in ability to form complexes could significantly affect their affinity for binding DNA and thus the degree of regulation exerted by each of the two factors. PMID:9791119

  17. The transcription of NAM7/UPF1 is enhanced in the absence of Cyp1p/Hap1p concomitant with the appearance of an ISF1-NAM7 cotranscript in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Altamura, N; de Pinto, B; Castaldo, R; Verdiére, J

    1997-06-01

    The two adjacent nuclear genes ISF1 and NAM7 cooperatively participate in mitochondrial functions. It is well known that Cyp1p(Hap1p) activates a number of genes involved in these same functions. We show in this paper that Cyp1p influences the transcriptional regulation of NAM7. In addition, a significant amount of ISF1-NAM7 cotranscript is observed in a cyp1 mutant context. An extensive analysis of the intergenic region which separates the two genes revealed 5' starts of the NAM7 transcripts, additional to those previously mapped. These new 5' starts overlap the 3' ends of ISF1. We propose that NAM7 is under the control of a negative Cyp1p-dependent regulator and that its absence favours a transcriptional read-through which results in the ISF1-NAM7 cotranscript we have identified. PMID:9199511

  18. TVENT1P user's manual, a computer code for analyzing tornado-induced gas-dynamic transients in flow networks

    SciTech Connect

    Andrae, R.W.; Tang, P.K.; Gregory, W.S.

    1984-09-01

    TVENT1P is a revised version of the TVENT computer code, which was designed to predict the flows and pressures in a ventilation system subjected to a tornado. TVENT1P is essentially the same code, but we have added a material transport algorithm and features for turning blowers off and on, changing blower speeds, and changing the resistance of dampers and filters. These features make it possible to depict a sequence of events during a single run. Other features have been added to make the code more versatile. Example problems are included to demonstrate applications for TVENT1P.

  19. TVENT1P user's manual, a computer code for analyzing tornado induced gas dynamic transients in flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrae, R. W.; Tang, P. K.; Gregory, W. S.

    1984-09-01

    TVENT1P is a revised version of the TVENT computer code, which was designed to predict the flows and pressures in a ventilation system subjected to a tornado. TVENT1P is essentially the same code, but a material transport algorithm and features for turning blowers off and on, changing blower speeds, and changing the resistance of dampers and filters were added. These features make it possible to depict a sequence of events during a single run. Other features were added to make the code more versatile. Example problems are included to demonstrate applications for TVENT1P.

  20. ESI-MS studies of palladium (II) complexes with 1-(p-toluenesulfonyl)cytosine/cytosinato ligands.

    PubMed

    Kobetić, Renata; Gembarovski, Dubravka; Visnjevac, Aleksandar; Zinić, Biserka; Gabelica-Marković, Vesna

    2010-01-01

    The mononuclear complex Pd(1-TosC-N3)(2)Cl(2) (2) containing 1-(p-toluenesulfonyl)cytosine (1) as a ligand, as well as dinuclear complexes Pd(2)(1-TosC(-)-N3,N4)(4) (3) and Pd(2)(1-TosC(-)-N3,N4)(2)DMSO(2)Cl(2) (4) containing the ligand anion (1-TosC(-)), was mass analyzed by electrospray ionization ion trap MS/MS and high resolution MS. Complexes 3 and 4 were obtained by recrystallization of 2 from DMF and DMSO, respectively. The behavior of complex 2 in different solutions was monitored by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Under the applied ESI-MS conditions, complex 2 in methanol reorganized itself dominantly as new complex 3 and the solvent did not coordinate the formed species. In H(2)O/DMSO, CH(3)CN/DMSO and CH(3)OH/DMSO solutions, complex 2 formed several new species with solvent molecules involved in their structure, e.g. complex 4 was formed as the major product. The newly formed species were also examined by LC-MS-DAD, confirming the solvent induced reorganization and the solution instability of complex 2. PMID:19882593

  1. Triage of oxidation-prone proteins by Sqstm1/p62 within the mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Minjung; Shin, Jaekyoon

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} The mitochondrion contains its own protein quality control system. {yields} p62 localizes within the mitochondria and forms mega-dalton sized complexes. {yields} p62 interacts with oxidation-prone proteins and the proteins of quality control. {yields} In vitro delivery of p62 improves mitochondrial functions. {yields} p62 is implicated as a participant in mitochondrial protein quality control. -- Abstract: As the mitochondrion is vulnerable to oxidative stress, cells have evolved several strategies to maintain mitochondrial integrity, including mitochondrial protein quality control mechanisms and autophagic removal of damaged mitochondria. Involvement of an autophagy adaptor, Sqstm1/p62, in the latter process has been recently described. In the present study, we provide evidence that a portion of p62 directly localizes within the mitochondria and supports stable electron transport by forming heterogeneous protein complexes. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) of mitochondrial proteins co-purified with p62 revealed that p62 interacts with several oxidation-prone proteins, including a few components of the electron transport chain complexes, as well as multiple chaperone molecules and redox regulatory enzymes. Accordingly, p62-deficient mitochondria exhibited compromised electron transport, and the compromised function was partially restored by in vitro delivery of p62. These results suggest that p62 plays an additional role in maintaining mitochondrial integrity at the vicinity of target machineries through its function in relation to protein quality control.

  2. A YAC contig encompassing the recessive Stargardt disease gene (STGD) on chromosome 1p

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.L.; Lewis, R.A.; Chinault, A.C.

    1995-12-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD) and fundus flavimaculatus are infrequent autosomal recessive conditions characterized by a juvenile macular dystrophy and variable degrees of peripheral retinal changes. Linkage analysis performed in 47 STGD/fundus flavimaculatus families demonstrated significant linkage to 13 polymorphic DNA markers on chromosome 1p. The maximum combined two-point lod score was 32.7 (maximum recombination fraction [{theta}{sub max}] = .006) with the polymorphic marker D1S188. Our data demonstrate that STGD and fundus flavimaculatus are the same disorder clinically and genetically and provide further evidence for genetic homogeneity of this phenotype. Analysis of recombination on disease chromosomes placed the STGD gene within a 4-cM interval between markers D1S435 and D1S236. A physical map was constructed of a YAC contig flanking STGD, from markers D1S500 to D1S495, and includes the critical interval delineated by historical recombinants. This contig spans {approximately}31 cM, with one gap (3-5 cM) that is outside the 4-cM critical region. Localization of STGD to a single YAC contig will facilitate its positional cloning. 75 refs., 3 figs., 21 tabs.

  3. Comet 1P/Halley multifluid MHD model for the Giotto fly-by

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Combi, M. R.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Gombosi, T. I.; Hansen, K. C.; Shou, Y.; Tenishev, V. M.; Tóth, G.; Van der Holst, B.

    2014-02-01

    The interaction of comets with the solar wind has been the focus of many studies including numerical modeling. We compare the results of our multifluid MHD simulation of comet 1P/Halley to data obtained during the flyby of the European Space Agency's Giotto spacecraft in 1986. The model solves the full set of MHD equations for the individual fluids representing the solar wind protons, the cometary light and heavy ions, and the electrons. The mass loading, charge-exchange, dissociative ion-electron recombination, and collisional interactions between the fluids are taken into account. The computational domain spans over several million kilometers, and the close vicinity of the comet is resolved to the details of the magnetic cavity. The model is validated by comparison to the corresponding Giotto observations obtained by the Ion Mass Spectrometer, the Neutral Mass Spectrometer, the Giotto magnetometer experiment, and the Johnstone Plasma Analyzer instrument. The model shows the formation of the bow shock, the ion pile-up, and the diamagnetic cavity and is able to reproduce the observed temperature differences between the pick-up ion populations and the solar wind protons. We give an overview of the global interaction of the comet with the solar wind and then show the effects of the Lorentz force interaction between the different plasma populations.

  4. c-Myb regulates NOX1/p38 to control survival of colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pekarčíková, Lucie; Knopfová, Lucia; Beneš, Petr; Šmarda, Jan

    2016-08-01

    The c-Myb transcription factor is important for maintenance of immature cells of many tissues including colon epithelium. Overexpression of c-Myb occurring in colorectal carcinomas (CRC) as well as in other cancers often marks poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanism explaining how c-Myb contributes to progression of CRC has not been fully elucidated. To address this point, we investigated the way how c-Myb affects sensitivity of CRC cells to anticancer drugs. Using CRC cell lines expressing exogenous c-myb we show that c-Myb protects CRC cells from the cisplatin-, oxaliplatin-, and doxorubicin-induced apoptosis, elevates reactive oxygen species via up-regulation of NOX1, and sustains the pro-survival p38 MAPK pathway. Using pharmacological inhibitors and gene silencing of p38 and NOX1 we found that these proteins are essential for the protective effect of c-Myb and that NOX1 acts upstream of p38 activation. In addition, our result suggests that transcription of NOX1 is directly controlled by c-Myb and these genes are strongly co-expressed in human tumor tissue of CRC patients. The novel c-Myb/NOX1/p38 signaling axis that protects CRC cells from chemotherapy described in this study could provide a new base for design of future therapies of CRC. PMID:27107996

  5. Negative Ion Chemistry in the Coma of Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    Negative ions (anions) were identified in the coma of comet 1P/Halley from in-situ measurements performed by the Giotto spacecraft in 1986. These anions were detected with masses in the range 7-110 amu, but with insufficient mass resolution to permit unambiguous identification. We present details of a new chemical-hydrodynamic model for the coma of comet Halley that includes - for the first time - atomic and molecular anions, in addition to a comprehensive hydrocarbon chemistry. Anion number densities arc calculated as a function of radius in the coma, and compared with the Giotto results. Important anion production mechanisms arc found to include radiative electron attachment, polar photodissociation, dissociative electron attachment, and proton transfer. The polyyne anions C4H(-) and C6H(-) arc found to be likely candidates to explain the Giotto anion mass spectrum in the range 49-73 amu. Thc CN(-) anion probably makes a significant contribution to the mass spectrum at 26 amu. Larger carbon-chain anions such as C8H(1) can explain the peak near 100 amu provided there is a source of large carbon-chain-bearing molecules from the cometary nucleus.

  6. A multi-scale Q1/P0 approach to langrangian shock hydrodynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Shashkov, Mikhail (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM.); Love, Edward; Scovazzi, Guglielmo

    2006-03-01

    A new multi-scale, stabilized method for Q1/P0 finite element computations of Lagrangian shock hydrodynamics is presented. Instabilities (of hourglass type) are controlled by a stabilizing operator derived using the variational multi-scale analysis paradigm. The resulting stabilizing term takes the form of a pressure correction. With respect to currently implemented hourglass control approaches, the novelty of the method resides in its residual-based character. The stabilizing residual has a definite physical meaning, since it embeds a discrete form of the Clausius-Duhem inequality. Effectively, the proposed stabilization samples and acts to counter the production of entropy due to numerical instabilities. The proposed technique is applicable to materials with no shear strength, for which there exists a caloric equation of state. The stabilization operator is incorporated into a mid-point, predictor/multi-corrector time integration algorithm, which conserves mass, momentum and total energy. Encouraging numerical results in the context of compressible gas dynamics confirm the potential of the method.

  7. TRIM21 Ubiquitylates SQSTM1/p62 and Suppresses Protein Sequestration to Regulate Redox Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ji-An; Sun, Yu; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Bott, Alex J; Jaber, Nadia; Dou, Zhixun; Yang, Bin; Chen, Juei-Suei; Catanzaro, Joseph M; Du, Chunying; Ding, Wen-Xing; Diaz-Meco, Maria T; Moscat, Jorge; Ozato, Keiko; Lin, Richard Z; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2016-03-01

    TRIM21 is a RING finger domain-containing ubiquitin E3 ligase whose expression is elevated in autoimmune disease. While TRIM21 plays an important role in immune activation during pathogen infection, little is known about its inherent cellular function. Here we show that TRIM21 plays an essential role in redox regulation by directly interacting with SQSTM1/p62 and ubiquitylating p62 at lysine 7 (K7) via K63-linkage. As p62 oligomerizes and sequesters client proteins in inclusions, the TRIM21-mediated p62 ubiquitylation abrogates p62 oligomerization and sequestration of proteins including Keap1, a negative regulator of antioxidant response. TRIM21-deficient cells display an enhanced antioxidant response and reduced cell death in response to oxidative stress. Genetic ablation of TRIM21 in mice confers protection from oxidative damages caused by arsenic-induced liver insult and pressure overload heart injury. Therefore, TRIM21 plays an essential role in p62-regulated redox homeostasis and may be a viable target for treating pathological conditions resulting from oxidative damage. PMID:26942676

  8. A YAC contig encompassing the recessive Stargardt disease gene (STGD) on chromosome 1p.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, K L; Baird, L; Lewis, R A; Chinault, A C; Otterud, B; Leppert, M; Lupski, J R

    1995-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD) and fundus flavimaculatus are infrequent autosomal recessive conditions characterized by a juvenile macular dystrophy and variable degrees of peripheral retinal changes. Linkage analysis performed in 47 STGD/fundus flavimaculatus families demonstrated significant linkage to 13 polymorphic DNA markers on chromosome 1p. The maximum combined two-point lod score was 32.7 (maximum recombination fraction [phi max] = .006) with the polymorphic marker D1S188. Our data demonstrate that STGD and fundus flavimaculatus are the same disorder clinically and genetically and provide further evidence for genetic homogeneity of this phenotype. Analysis of recombination events on disease chromosomes placed the STGD gene within a 4-cM interval between markers D1S435 and D1S236. A physical map was constructed of a YAC contig flanking STGD, from markers D1S500 to D1S495, and includes the critical interval delineated by historical recombinants. This contig spans approximately 31 cM, with one gap (3-5 cM) that is outside the 4-cM critical region. Localization of STGD to a single YAC contig will facilitate its positional cloning. Images Figure 3 PMID:8533764

  9. Rac1/Pak1/p38/MMP-2 axis regulates angiogenesis in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Ivan, Cristina; Dalton, Heather J.; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Fernandez-de Thomas, Ricardo J.; Aslan, Burcu; Monroig, Paloma del C.; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Previs, Rebecca A.; Pradeep, Sunila; Kahraman, Nermin; Wang, Huamin; Kanlikilicer, Pinar; Ozpolat, Bulent; Calin, George; Sood, Anil K.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Zoledronic acid (ZA) is being increasingly recognized for its anti-tumor properties, but the underlying functions are not well understood. In this study, we hypothesized that ZA inhibits ovarian cancer (OC) angiogenesis preventing Rac1 activation. Experimental Design The biological effects of ZA were examined using a series of in vitro (cell invasion, cytokine production, Rac1 activation, reverse-phase protein array and in vivo (orthotopic mouse models) experiments. Results There was significant inhibition of OC (HeyA8-MDR and OVCAR-5) cell invasion as well as reduced production of pro-angiogenic cytokines in response to ZA treatment. Furthermore, ZA inactivated Rac1 and decreased the levels of Pak1/p-38/matrix metalloproteinase-2 in OC cells. In vivo, ZA reduced tumor growth, angiogenesis and cell proliferation and inactivated Rac1 in both HeyA8-MDR and OVCAR-5 models. These in vivo antitumor effects were enhanced in both models when ZA was combined with nab-paclitaxel. Conclusion ZA has robust anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activity and merits further clinical development as OC treatment. PMID:25595279

  10. Common genetic variants on 1p13.2 associate with risk of autism.

    PubMed

    Xia, K; Guo, H; Hu, Z; Xun, G; Zuo, L; Peng, Y; Wang, K; He, Y; Xiong, Z; Sun, L; Pan, Q; Long, Z; Zou, X; Li, X; Li, W; Xu, X; Lu, L; Liu, Y; Hu, Y; Tian, D; Long, L; Ou, J; Liu, Y; Li, X; Zhang, L; Pan, Y; Chen, J; Peng, H; Liu, Q; Luo, X; Su, W; Wu, L; Liang, D; Dai, H; Yan, X; Feng, Y; Tang, B; Li, J; Miedzybrodzka, Z; Xia, J; Zhang, Z; Luo, X; Zhang, X; St Clair, D; Zhao, J; Zhang, F

    2014-11-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, and known genetic variants, mostly rare, account only for a small proportion of cases. Here we report a genome-wide association study on autism using two Chinese cohorts as gene discovery (n=2150) and three data sets of European ancestry populations for replication analysis of top association signals. Meta-analysis identified three single-nucleotide polymorphisms, rs936938 (P=4.49 × 10(-8)), non-synonymous rs6537835 (P=3.26 × 10(-8)) and rs1877455 (P=8.70 × 10(-8)), and related haplotypes, AMPD1-NRAS-CSDE1, TRIM33 and TRIM33-BCAS2, associated with autism; all were mapped to a previously reported linkage region (1p13.2) with autism. These genetic associations were further supported by a cis-acting regulatory effect on the gene expressions of CSDE1, NRAS and TRIM33 and by differential expression of CSDE1 and TRIM33 in the human prefrontal cortex of post-mortem brains between subjects with and those without autism. Our study suggests TRIM33 and NRAS-CSDE1 as candidate genes for autism, and may provide a novel insight into the etiology of autism. PMID:24189344

  11. 2D-photochemical model for forbidden oxygen line emission for comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, G.; De Keyser, J.; Maggiolo, R.; Rubin, M.; Gronoff, G.; Gibbons, A.; Jehin, E.; Dhooghe, F.; Gunell, H.; Vaeck, N.; Loreau, J.

    2016-08-01

    We present here a 2D-model of photochemistry for computing the production and loss mechanisms of the O(1S) and O(1D) states, which are responsible for the emission lines at 577.7 nm, 630 nm, and 636.4 nm, in case of the comet 1P/Halley. The presence of O2 within cometary atmospheres, measured by the in-situ ROSETTA and GIOTTO missions, necessitates a revision of the usual photochemical models. Indeed, the photodissociation of molecular oxygen also leads to a significant production of oxygen in excited electronic states. In order to correctly model the solar UV flux absorption, we consider here a 2D configuration. While the green to red-doublet ratio is not affected by the solar UV flux absorption, estimates of the red-doublet and green lines emissions are, however, overestimated by a factor of two in the 1D model compared to the 2D model. Considering a spherical symmetry, emission maps can be deduced from the 2D model in order to be directly compared to ground and/or in-situ observations.

  12. Novel S1P1 receptor agonists - Part 4: Alkylaminomethyl substituted aryl head groups.

    PubMed

    Lescop, Cyrille; Müller, Claus; Mathys, Boris; Birker, Magdalena; de Kanter, Ruben; Kohl, Christopher; Hess, Patrick; Nayler, Oliver; Rey, Markus; Sieber, Patrick; Steiner, Beat; Weller, Thomas; Bolli, Martin H

    2016-06-30

    In a previous communication we reported on the discovery of alkylamino pyridine derivatives (e.g. 1) as a new class of potent, selective and efficacious S1P1 receptor (S1PR1) agonists. However, more detailed profiling revealed that this compound class is phototoxic in vitro. Here we describe a new class of potent S1PR1 agonists wherein the exocyclic nitrogen was moved away from the pyridine ring (e.g. 11c). Further structural modifications led to the identification of novel alkylaminomethyl substituted phenyl and thienyl derivatives as potent S1PR1 agonists. These new alkylaminomethyl aryl compounds showed no phototoxic potential. Based on their in vivo efficacy and ability to penetrate the brain, the 5-alkyl-aminomethyl thiophenes appeared to be the most interesting class. Potent and selective S1PR1 agonist 20e, for instance, maximally reduced the blood lymphocyte count (LC) for 24 h after oral administration of 10 mg/kg to rat and its brain concentrations reached >500 ng/g over 24 h. PMID:27061986

  13. Legionella pneumophila S1P-lyase targets host sphingolipid metabolism and restrains autophagy.

    PubMed

    Rolando, Monica; Escoll, Pedro; Nora, Tamara; Botti, Joëlle; Boitez, Valérie; Bedia, Carmen; Daniels, Craig; Abraham, Gilu; Stogios, Peter J; Skarina, Tatiana; Christophe, Charlotte; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Cazalet, Christel; Hilbi, Hubert; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W T; Tull, Dedreia; McConville, Malcolm J; Ong, Sze Ying; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Codogno, Patrice; Levade, Thierry; Naderer, Thomas; Savchenko, Alexei; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-02-16

    Autophagy is an essential component of innate immunity, enabling the detection and elimination of intracellular pathogens. Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia in humans, is able to modulate autophagy through the action of effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell by the pathogen's Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Many of these effectors share structural and sequence similarity with eukaryotic proteins. Indeed, phylogenetic analyses have indicated their acquisition by horizontal gene transfer from a eukaryotic host. Here we report that L. pneumophila translocates the effector protein sphingosine-1 phosphate lyase (LpSpl) to target the host sphingosine biosynthesis and to curtail autophagy. Our structural characterization of LpSpl and its comparison with human SPL reveals high structural conservation, thus supporting prior phylogenetic analysis. We show that LpSpl possesses S1P lyase activity that was abrogated by mutation of the catalytic site residues. L. pneumophila triggers the reduction of several sphingolipids critical for macrophage function in an LpSpl-dependent and -independent manner. LpSpl activity alone was sufficient to prevent an increase in sphingosine levels in infected host cells and to inhibit autophagy during macrophage infection. LpSpl was required for efficient infection of A/J mice, highlighting an important virulence role for this effector. Thus, we have uncovered a previously unidentified mechanism used by intracellular pathogens to inhibit autophagy, namely the disruption of host sphingolipid biosynthesis. PMID:26831115

  14. Alcohol alters hepatic FoxO1, p53, and mitochondrial SIRT5 deacetylation function

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, Charles S. Leo, Maria Anna; Wang, Xiaolei; DeCarli, Leonore M.

    2008-08-22

    Chronic alcohol consumption affects the gene expression of a NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirtuis 1 (SIRT1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}). Our aim was to verify that it also alters the forkhead (FoxO1) and p53 transcription factor proteins, critical in the hepatic response to oxidative stress and regulated by SIRT1 through its deacetylating capacity. Accordingly, rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli alcohol-containing liquid diets for 28 days. Alcohol increased hepatic mRNA expression of FoxO1 (p = 0.003) and p53 (p = 0.001) while corresponding protein levels remained unchanged. However phospho-FoxO1 and phospho-Akt (protein kinase) were both decreased by alcohol consumption (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively) while hepatic p53 was found hyperacetylated (p = 0.017). Furthermore, mitochondrial SIRT5 was reduced (p = 0.0025), and PGC-1{alpha} hyperacetylated (p = 0.027), establishing their role in protein modification. Thus, alcohol consumption disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial interactions by post-translation protein modifications, which contribute to alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis through the newly discovered reduction of SIRT5.

  15. A De Novo Variant in Galactose-1-P Uridylyltransferase (GALT) Leading to Classic Galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thanh-Thanh Claire V; Liu, Ying; Zwick, Michael E; Ramachandran, Dhanya; Cutler, David J; Huang, Xiaoping; Berry, Gerard T; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2015-01-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is a potentially lethal genetic disease that results from profound impairment of galactose-1-P uridylyltransferase (GALT), the middle enzyme in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. Patients with CG carry pathogenic loss-of-function mutations in both of their GALT alleles; the parents of patients are considered obligate carriers. We report here a first exception to that rule - a de novo GALT variant in a patient with classic galactosemia. The new variant, c.563A>C (p.Q188P), which introduces a missense substitution near the active site of the GALT enzyme, was found in the compound heterozygous state in a child with classic galactosemia, but not in either of her parents. Extensive genomic studies of DNA from the child and both parents confirmed the expected degrees of relationship in the trio as well as inheritance of a common c.563A>G (p.Q188R) GALT mutation from the mother. This result demonstrates that not all pathogenic GALT mutations are inherited and raises concern that GALT may have a higher new mutation rate than previously believed. PMID:25681079

  16. A conserved amphipathic helix is required for membrane tubule formation by Yop1p

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Jacob P.; Claridge, Jolyon K.; Smith, Peter G.; Schnell, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    The integral membrane proteins of the DP1 (deleted in polyposis) and reticulon families are responsible for maintaining the high membrane curvature required for both smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules and the edges of ER sheets, and mutations in these proteins lead to motor neuron diseases, such as hereditary spastic paraplegia. Reticulon/DP1 proteins contain reticulon homology domains (RHDs) that have unusually long hydrophobic segments and are proposed to adopt intramembrane helical hairpins that stabilize membrane curvature. We have characterized the secondary structure and dynamics of the DP1 family protein produced from the YOP1 gene (Yop1p) and identified a C-terminal conserved amphipathic helix (APH) that, on its own, interacts strongly with negatively charged membranes and is necessary for membrane tubule formation. Analyses of DP1 and reticulon family members indicate that most, if not all, contain C-terminal sequences capable of forming APHs. Together, these results indicate that APHs play a previously unrecognized role in RHD membrane curvature stabilization. PMID:25646439

  17. Legionella pneumophila S1P-lyase targets host sphingolipid metabolism and restrains autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Rolando, Monica; Escoll, Pedro; Nora, Tamara; Botti, Joëlle; Boitez, Valérie; Daniels, Craig; Abraham, Gilu; Stogios, Peter J.; Skarina, Tatiana; Christophe, Charlotte; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Cazalet, Christel; Hilbi, Hubert; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W. T.; Tull, Dedreia; McConville, Malcolm J.; Ong, Sze Ying; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Codogno, Patrice; Levade, Thierry; Naderer, Thomas; Savchenko, Alexei; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential component of innate immunity, enabling the detection and elimination of intracellular pathogens. Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia in humans, is able to modulate autophagy through the action of effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell by the pathogen’s Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Many of these effectors share structural and sequence similarity with eukaryotic proteins. Indeed, phylogenetic analyses have indicated their acquisition by horizontal gene transfer from a eukaryotic host. Here we report that L. pneumophila translocates the effector protein sphingosine-1 phosphate lyase (LpSpl) to target the host sphingosine biosynthesis and to curtail autophagy. Our structural characterization of LpSpl and its comparison with human SPL reveals high structural conservation, thus supporting prior phylogenetic analysis. We show that LpSpl possesses S1P lyase activity that was abrogated by mutation of the catalytic site residues. L. pneumophila triggers the reduction of several sphingolipids critical for macrophage function in an LpSpl-dependent and -independent manner. LpSpl activity alone was sufficient to prevent an increase in sphingosine levels in infected host cells and to inhibit autophagy during macrophage infection. LpSpl was required for efficient infection of A/J mice, highlighting an important virulence role for this effector. Thus, we have uncovered a previously unidentified mechanism used by intracellular pathogens to inhibit autophagy, namely the disruption of host sphingolipid biosynthesis. PMID:26831115

  18. Mapping of guanylin to murine chromosome 4 and human chromosome 1p34-p35

    SciTech Connect

    Sciaky, D.; Cohen, M.B.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1995-03-20

    Guanylin is a 15-amino-acid peptide similar in structure and in function to ST{sub a}, the heat stable enterotoxin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (4). Both guanylin and ST{sub a} bind guanylyl cyclase-C (GC-C), resulting in increased levels of intracellular cGMP and induction of Cl- secretion (4) via the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFM) (2). Guanylin is a highly regulated intestinal gene that is differentially expressed along the duodenal-to-colonic and villus-to-crypt axes. Guanylin mRNA abundance is maximal in the distal small intestine and proximal colon, where the mRNA is detected mainly in differentiated villus epithelial cells and superficial colonic epithelial cells, respectively. The murine guanylin gene (Guca2) has been isolated and sequenced; the gene is 1.7 kb and consists of 3 exons. We report here the mapping of Guca2 to mouse chromosome 4 by linkage analysis and to human chromosome region 1p34-p35 using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). 20 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Studies of pH regulation by Btn1p, the yeast homolog of human Cln3p.

    PubMed

    Pearce, D A; Nosel, S A; Sherman, F

    1999-04-01

    Although the gene responsible for Batten disease, CLN3, was positionally cloned in 1995, the function of Cln3p and the molecular basis of the disease still remain elusive. We previously reported that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a homolog to Cln3p, designated Btn1p, and that the human Cln3p complemented the pH-dependent resistance to D-(-)-threo-2-amino-1-[p-nitrophenyl]-1, 3-propanediol in btn1-Delta yeast mutants. We have determined that yeast lacking Btn1p have an elevated ability to acidify media during growth that correlates with an elevated plasma membrane ATPase activity. Btn1p may be involved in maintaining pH homeostasis of yeast cells. PMID:10191121

  20. Immunoassays Based on Penicillium marneffei Mp1p Derived from Pichia pastoris Expression System for Diagnosis of Penicilliosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Fang; Cai, Jian-Piao; Wang, Ya-Di; Dong, Hui; Hao, Wei; Jiang, Ling-Xiao; Long, Jun; Chan, Cheman; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Che, Xiao-Yan

    2011-01-01

    Background Penicillium marneffei is a dimorphic fungus endemic in Southeast Asia. It can cause fatal penicilliosis in humans, particularly in HIV-infected people. Diagnosis of this infection is difficult because its clinical manifestations are not distinctive. Specialized laboratory tests are necessary to establish a definitive diagnosis for successful management. We have demonstrated previously that a cell wall mannoprotein Mp1p, abundant in P. marneffei, is a potential biomarker for diagnosis of P. marneffei infections. In the present study, we describe immunoassays based on Mp1p derived from the yeast Pichia pastoris expression system. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and rabbit polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) against Mp1p expressed in P. pastoris. Subsequently, we developed two Mp1p antigen capture ELISAs which employed MAbs for both the capture and detecting antibodies (MAb-MAb pair) or PAbs and MAbs as the capture and detecting antibodies (PAbs-MAb pair) respectively. The two Mp1p antigen ELISAs detected Mp1p specifically in cultures of P. marneffei yeast phase at 37–40°C and had no cross-reaction with other tested pathogenic fungi. The sensitivities and specificities of the two antigen assays were found to be 55% (11/20) and 99.6% (538/540) for MAb-MAb Mp1p ELISA, and 75% (15/20) and 99.4% (537/540) for PAbs-MAb Mp1p ELISA performed using 20 sera with culture-confirmed penicilliosis, and 540 control sera from 15 other mycosis patients and 525 healthy donors. Meanwhile, we also developed an anti-Mp1p IgG antibody ELISA with an evaluated sensitivity of 30% (6/20) and a specificity of 98.5% (532/540) using the same sera. Furthermore, combining the results of Mp1p antigen and antibody detection improved the sensitivity of diagnosis to 100% (20/20). Conclusions/Significance Simultaneous detection of antigen and antibody using the immunoassays based on Mp1p derived from P. pastoris greatly improves detection sensitivity. The

  1. Whole genomic analysis of human G1P[8] rotavirus strains from different age groups in China.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Tsuzumi; Ghosh, Souvik; Wang, Yuan-Hong; Zhou, Xuan; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2012-08-01

    G1P[8] rotaviruses are an important cause of diarrhea in humans in China. To date, there are no reports on the whole genomic analysis of the Chinese G1P[8] rotaviruses. To determine the origin and overall genetic makeup of the recent Chinese G1P[8] strains, the whole genomes of three strains, RVA/Human-wt/CHN/E1911/2009/G1P[8], RVA/Human-tc/CHN/R588/2005/G1P[8] and RVA/Human-tc/CHN/Y128/2004/G1P[8], detected in an infant, a child and an adult, respectively, were analyzed. Strains E1911, R588 and Y128 exhibited a typical Wa-like genotype constellation. Except for the NSP3 gene of E1911, the whole genomes of strains E1911, R588 and Y128 were found to be more closely related to those of the recent Wa-like common human strains from different countries than those of the prototype G1P[8] strain, or other old strains. On the other hand, the NSP3 gene of E1911 was genetically distinct from those of Y128, R588, or other Wa-like common human strains, and appeared to share a common origin with those of the porcine-like human G9 strains, providing evidence for intergenotype reassortment events. Comparisons of the amino acid residues defining the VP7 and VP4 antigenic domains revealed several mismatches between these Chinese G1P[8] strains and the G1 and P[8] strains contained in the currently licensed rotavirus vaccines Rotarix(TM )and RotaTeq(TM). PMID:23012626

  2. Chl1p, a DNA helicase-like protein in budding yeast, functions in sister-chromatid cohesion.

    PubMed Central

    Skibbens, Robert V

    2004-01-01

    From the time of DNA replication until anaphase onset, sister chromatids remain tightly paired along their length. Ctf7p/Eco1p is essential to establish sister-chromatid pairing during S-phase and associates with DNA replication components. DNA helicases precede the DNA replication fork and thus will first encounter chromatin sites destined for cohesion. In this study, I provide the first evidence that a DNA helicase is required for proper sister-chromatid cohesion. Characterizations of chl1 mutant cells reveal that CHL1 interacts genetically with both CTF7/ECO1 and CTF18/CHL12, two genes that function in sister-chromatid cohesion. Consistent with genetic interactions, Chl1p physically associates with Ctf7p/Eco1p both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, a functional assay reveals that Chl1p is critical for sister-chromatid cohesion. Within the budding yeast genome, Chl1p exhibits the highest degree of sequence similarity to human CHL1 isoforms and BACH1. Previous studies revealed that human CHLR1 exhibits DNA helicase-like activities and that BACH1 is a helicase-like protein that associates with the tumor suppressor BRCA1 to maintain genome integrity. Our findings document a novel role for Chl1p in sister-chromatid cohesion and provide new insights into the possible mechanisms through which DNA helicases may contribute to cancer progression when mutated. PMID:15020404

  3. p23/Sba1p Protects against Hsp90 Inhibitors Independently of Its Intrinsic Chaperone Activity▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Forafonov, Fedor; Toogun, Oyetunji A.; Grad, Iwona; Suslova, Elena; Freeman, Brian C.; Picard, Didier

    2008-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 assists a subset of cellular proteins and is essential in eukaryotes. A cohort of cochaperones contributes to and regulates the multicomponent Hsp90 machine. Unlike the biochemical activities of the cochaperone p23, its in vivo functions and the structure-function relationship remain poorly understood, even in the genetically tractable model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The SBA1 gene that encodes the p23 ortholog in this species is not an essential gene. We found that in the absence of p23/Sba1p, yeast and mammalian cells are hypersensitive to Hsp90 inhibitors. This protective function of Sba1p depends on its abilities to bind Hsp90 and to block the Hsp90 ATPase and inhibitor binding. In contrast, the protective function of Sba1p does not require the Hsp90-independent molecular chaperone activity of Sba1p. The structure-function analysis suggests that Sba1p undergoes considerable structural rearrangements upon binding Hsp90 and that the large size of the p23/Sba1p-Hsp90 interaction surface facilitates maintenance of high affinity despite sequence divergence during evolution. The large interface may also contribute to preserving a protective function in an environment in which Hsp90 inhibitory compounds can be produced by various microorganisms. PMID:18362168

  4. Biochemical and genetic characterization of Hmi1p, a yeast DNA helicase involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Danny S; Leitzel, Adelaide K; Klein, Hannah L; Matson, Steven W

    2005-12-01

    The HMI1 gene encodes a DNA helicase that localizes to the mitochondria and is required for maintenance of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Identified based on its homology with E. coli uvrD, the HMI1 gene product, Hmi1p, has been presumed to be involved in the replication of the 80 kb linear S. cerevisiae mtDNA genome. Here we report the purification of Hmi1p to apparent homogeneity and provide a characterization of the helicase reaction and the ATPase reaction with regard to NTP preference, divalent cation preference and the stimulatory effects of different nucleic acids on Hmi1p-catalysed ATPase activity. Genetic complementation assays indicate that mitochondrial localization of Hmi1p is essential for its role in mtDNA metabolism. The helicase activity, however, is not essential. Point mutants that lack ATPase/helicase activity partially complement a strain lacking Hmi1p. We suggest several possible roles for Hmi1p in mtDNA metabolism. PMID:16358299

  5. Misfolded membrane proteins are specifically recognized by the transmembrane domain of the Hrd1p ubiquitin ligase

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Brian K.; Schulz, Daniel; Do, Phong H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Quality control pathways such as ER-associated degradation (ERAD) employ a small number of factors to specifically recognize a wide variety of protein substrates. Delineating the mechanisms of substrate selection is a principle goal in studying quality control. The Hrd1p ubiquitin ligase mediates ERAD of numerous misfolded proteins including soluble, lumenal ERAD-L and membrane-anchored ERAD-M substrates. We tested if the Hrd1p multi-spanning membrane domain was involved in ERAD-M specificity. In this work, we have identified site-directed membrane domain mutants of Hrd1p impaired only for ERAD-M and normal for ERAD-L. Furthermore, other Hrd1p variants were specifically deficient for degradation of individual ERAD-M substrates. Thus, the Hrd1p transmembrane region bears determinants of high specificity in the ERAD-M pathway. From in vitro and interaction studies, we suggest a model in which the Hrd1p membrane domain employs intra-membrane residues to evaluate substrate misfolding, leading to selective ubiquitination of appropriate ERAD-M clients. PMID:19394298

  6. Cytokinesis in yeast meiosis depends on the regulated removal of Ssp1p from the prospore membrane

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Peter; Rathfelder, Nicole; Finkbeiner, Martin G; Taxis, Christof; Mazza, Massimiliano; Panse, Sophie Le; Haguenauer-Tsapis, Rosine; Knop, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular budding is a developmentally regulated type of cell division common to many fungi and protists. In Saccaromyces cerevisiae, intracellular budding requires the de novo assembly of membranes, the prospore membranes (PSMs) and occurs during spore formation in meiosis. Ssp1p is a sporulation-specific protein that has previously been shown to localize to secretory vesicles and to recruit the leading edge protein coat (LEP coat) proteins to the opening of the PSM. Here, we show that Ssp1p is a multidomain protein with distinct domains important for PI(4,5)P2 binding, binding to secretory vesicles and inhibition of vesicle fusion, interaction with LEP coat components and that it is subject to sumoylation and degradation. We found non-essential roles for Ssp1p on the level of vesicle transport and an essential function of Ssp1p to regulate the opening of the PSM. Together, our results indicate that Ssp1p has a domain architecture that resembles to some extent the septin class of proteins, and that the regulated removal of Ssp1p from the PSM is the major step underlying cytokinesis in yeast sporulation. PMID:17347652

  7. The modification of Gat1p in nitrogen catabolite repression to enhance non-preferred nitrogen utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinrui; Zou, Huijun; Chen, Jian; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, when preferred nitrogen sources are present, the metabolism of non-preferred nitrogen is repressed. Previous work showed that this metabolic regulation is primarily controlled by nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) related regulators. Among these regulators, two positive regulators (Gln3p and Gat1p) could be phosphorylated and sequestered in the cytoplasm leading to the transcription of non-preferred nitrogen metabolic genes being repressed. The nuclear localization signals (NLSs) and nuclear localization regulatory signals (NLRSs) in Gln3p and Gat1p play essential roles in the regulation of their localization in cells. However, compared with Gln3p, the information of NLS and NLRS for Gat1p remains unknown. In this study, residues 348-375 and 366-510 were identified as the NLS and NLRS of Gat1p firstly. In addition, the modifications of Gat1p (mutations on the NLS and truncation on the NLRS) were attempted to enhance the transcription of non-preferred nitrogen metabolic genes. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the transcriptional levels of 15 non-preferred nitrogen metabolic genes increased. Furthermore, during the shaking-flask culture tests, the utilization of urea, proline and allantoine was significantly increased. Based on these results, the genetic engineering on Gat1p has a great potential in enhancing non-preferred nitrogen metabolism in S. cerevisiae. PMID:26899143

  8. Chromosome 1p36 in migraine with aura: association study of the 5HT(1D) locus.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Miles D; Noble-Topham, Sandra; Percy, Maire E; Andrade, Danielle M; Ebers, George C

    2012-01-01

    Migraine with aura (MA) may share some but not all risk factors with other forms of migraine. As common migraine without aura (MO) has been associated with the chromosome 1p36 locus, we tested its involvement in MA by using two-point parametric linkage analysis to analyze 64 multiplex MA families. A logarithm of the odds score of 1.9 was suggestive of chromosome 1p36 linkage to MA. The transmission disequilibrium test analysis was then performed in 79 nuclear families with one MA parent and one MA offspring. We identified the presence of genetic association at chromosome 1p36 with MA (P=0.045, Bonferroni corrected): the locus encoding the 5HT(1D) receptor gene. Although these data suggest that the 1p36 locus may protect against MA, consistent with the role of the 5HT(1D) receptor in migraine treatment with triptan drugs, the study is subject to the limitations associated with studying a small number of affected families. As a result, we contrast evidence suggesting that the chromosome 1p36 locus is strongly MO associated with our finding that 1p36 has a more limited contribution to MA in the families we analyzed. Further work using a genome-wide association study approach in familial typical migraine, consisting of those affected by MO or MA, will serve to further distinguish how and why MA differs from MO. PMID:22107845

  9. The modification of Gat1p in nitrogen catabolite repression to enhance non-preferred nitrogen utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinrui; Zou, Huijun; Chen, Jian; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, when preferred nitrogen sources are present, the metabolism of non-preferred nitrogen is repressed. Previous work showed that this metabolic regulation is primarily controlled by nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) related regulators. Among these regulators, two positive regulators (Gln3p and Gat1p) could be phosphorylated and sequestered in the cytoplasm leading to the transcription of non-preferred nitrogen metabolic genes being repressed. The nuclear localization signals (NLSs) and nuclear localization regulatory signals (NLRSs) in Gln3p and Gat1p play essential roles in the regulation of their localization in cells. However, compared with Gln3p, the information of NLS and NLRS for Gat1p remains unknown. In this study, residues 348–375 and 366–510 were identified as the NLS and NLRS of Gat1p firstly. In addition, the modifications of Gat1p (mutations on the NLS and truncation on the NLRS) were attempted to enhance the transcription of non-preferred nitrogen metabolic genes. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the transcriptional levels of 15 non-preferred nitrogen metabolic genes increased. Furthermore, during the shaking-flask culture tests, the utilization of urea, proline and allantoine was significantly increased. Based on these results, the genetic engineering on Gat1p has a great potential in enhancing non-preferred nitrogen metabolism in S. cerevisiae. PMID:26899143

  10. The fission yeast NIMA kinase Fin1p is required for spindle function and nuclear envelope integrity.

    PubMed

    Krien, Michael J E; West, Robert R; John, Ulrik P; Koniaras, Kalli; McIntosh, J Richard; O'Connell, Matthew J

    2002-04-01

    NIMA kinases appear to be the least functionally conserved mitotic regulators, being implicated in chromosome condensation in fungi and in spindle function in metazoans. We demonstrate here that the fission yeast NIMA homologue, Fin1p, can induce profound chromosome condensation in the absence of the condensin and topoisomerase II, indicating that Fin1p-induced condensation differs from mitotic condensation. Fin1p expression is transcriptionally and post-translationally cell cycle-regulated, with Fin1p kinase activity maximal from the metaphase-anaphase transition to G(1). Fin1p is localized to the spindle pole body and fin1Delta cells are hypersensitive to anti-microtubule drugs, synthetically lethal with a number of spindle mutants and require the spindle checkpoint for viability. Moreover, fin1Delta cells show unusual and extensive elaborations of the nuclear envelope. These data support a role for Fin1p in spindle function and nuclear envelope transactions at or after the metaphase-anaphase transition that may be generally applicable to other NIMA-family members. PMID:11927555

  11. Disruption of TAB1/p38α Interaction Using a Cell-permeable Peptide Limits Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingyang; Feng, Jiannan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Xueying; Zhang, Dalin; Zhu, Ting; Wang, Wendie; Wang, Xiaoqian; Jin, Jianfeng; Cao, Junxia; Li, Xinying; Peng, Hui; Li, Yan; Shen, Beifen; Zhang, Jiyan

    2013-01-01

    Targeting the adaptor protein (transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-activated protein kinase 1 (TAK1)-binding protein 1) (TAB1)-mediated non-canonical activation of p38α to limit ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury after an acute myocardial infarction seems to be attractive since TAB1/p38α interaction occurs specifically in very limited circumstances and possesses unique structural basis. However, so far no TAB1/p38α interaction inhibitor has been reported due to the limited knowledge about the interfaces. In this study, we sought to identify key amino acids essential for the unique mode of interaction with computer-guided molecular simulations and molecular docking. After validation of the predicted three-dimensional (3-D) structure of TAB1/p38α complex, we designed several peptides and evaluated whether they could block TAB1/p38α interaction with selectivity. We found that a cell-permeable peptide worked as a selective TAB1/p38α interaction inhibitor and decreased myocardial I/R injury. To our knowledge, this is the first TAB1/p38α interaction inhibitor. PMID:23877036

  12. Cdc42p regulation of the yeast formin Bni1p mediated by the effector Gic2p

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin; Kuo, Chun-Chen; Kang, Hui; Howell, Audrey S.; Zyla, Trevin R.; Jin, Michelle; Lew, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Actin filaments are dynamically reorganized to accommodate ever-changing cellular needs for intracellular transport, morphogenesis, and migration. Formins, a major family of actin nucleators, are believed to function as direct effectors of Rho GTPases, such as the polarity regulator Cdc42p. However, the presence of extensive redundancy has made it difficult to assess the in vivo significance of the low-affinity Rho GTPase–formin interaction and specifically whether Cdc42p polarizes the actin cytoskeleton via direct formin binding. Here we exploit a synthetically rewired budding yeast strain to eliminate the redundancy, making regulation of the formin Bni1p by Cdc42p essential for viability. Surprisingly, we find that direct Cdc42p–Bni1p interaction is dispensable for Bni1p regulation. Alternative paths linking Cdc42p and Bni1p via “polarisome” components Spa2p and Bud6p are also collectively dispensable. We identify a novel regulatory input to Bni1p acting through the Cdc42p effector, Gic2p. This pathway is sufficient to localize Bni1p to the sites of Cdc42p action and promotes a polarized actin organization in both rewired and wild-type contexts. We suggest that an indirect mechanism linking Rho GTPases and formins via Rho effectors may provide finer spatiotemporal control for the formin-nucleated actin cytoskeleton. PMID:22918946

  13. Role of JAK-STAT pathway in reducing cardiomyocytes hypoxia/reoxygenation injury induced by S1P postconditioning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqing; Wang, Dongfei; Zhang, Lizhi; Ye, Fangyu; Li, Mengmeng; Wen, Ke

    2016-08-01

    This experiment was designed to explore the protection of sphingosine1-phosphate (S1P) postconditioning on rat myocardial cells injured by hypoxia/reoxygenation acting via the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signal pathway. The data showed that S1P could significantly increase cell viability, lower the rate of apoptosis, decrease the content of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and caspase3 activity in the culture medium, increase the activity of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), reduce the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and the fluorescence intensity of intracellular calcium, as well as increase the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 in comparison with the H/R group. When the JAK inhibitor AG490 or the STAT inhibitor stattic were added, the effects of S1P were inhibited. Our date shows that S1P protects H9c2 cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury and that the protection by S1P was inhibited by AG490 and stattic. Therefore S1P protects H9c2 cells against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury via the JAK-STAT pathway. PMID:27215146

  14. Detection of cell wall mannoprotein Mp1p in culture supernatants of Penicillium marneffei and in sera of penicilliosis patients.

    PubMed

    Cao, L; Chan, K M; Chen, D; Vanittanakom, N; Lee, C; Chan, C M; Sirisanthana, T; Tsang, D N; Yuen, K Y

    1999-04-01

    Mannoproteins are important and abundant structural components of fungal cell walls. The MP1 gene encodes a cell wall mannoprotein of the pathogenic fungus Penicillium marneffei. In the present study, we show that Mp1p is secreted into the cell culture supernatant at a level that can be detected by Western blotting. A sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) developed with antibodies against Mp1p was capable of detecting this protein from the cell culture supernatant of P. marneffei at 10(4) cells/ml. The anti-Mp1p antibody is specific since it fails to react with any protein-form lysates of Candida albicans, Histoplasma capsulatum, or Cryptococcus neoformans by Western blotting. In addition, this Mp1p antigen-based ELISA is also specific for P. marneffei since the cell culture supernatants of the other three fungi gave negative results. Finally, a clinical evaluation of sera from penicilliosis patients indicates that 17 of 26 (65%) patients are Mp1p antigen test positive. Furthermore, a Mp1p antibody test was performed with these serum specimens. The combined antibody and antigen tests for P. marneffei carry a sensitive of 88% (23 of 26), with a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 96%. The specificities of the tests are high since none of the 85 control sera was positive by either test. PMID:10074513

  15. First observation of the hadronic transition Υ(4S)→ηhb(1P) and new measurement of the hb(1P) and ηb(1S) parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Tamponi, Umberto; Mussa, Roberto; Abdesselam, A.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Atmacan, H.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, Bipul; Biswal, J.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Danilov, M.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, Alexey; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hedges, Michael T.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Julius, T.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kinoshita, Kay; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lewis, P.; Libby, J.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, Mikihiko; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, Shohei; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, Stephen L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Oswald, Christian; Pakhlova, Galina; Pal, Bilas K.; Park, H.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pesantez, L.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, ME; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sokolov, Anatoly; Staric, M.; Steder, M.; Stypula, J.; Tanida, K.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, Gary; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, Eun Il; Yamaoka, Jared AK; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-09-29

    Using a sample of 771.6 × 106 Υ(4S) decays collected by the Belle experiment at the KEKB e +e - collider, we observe for the first time the transition Υ(4S) → ηhb(1P) with the branching fraction B[Υ(4S) → ηhb(1P)] = (2.18 ± 0.11 ± 0.18) × 10-3 and we measure the hb(1P) mass Mhb(1P ) = (9899.3 ± 0.4 ± 1.0) MeV/c 2 , corresponding to the hyperfine splitting ΔMHF (1P) = (0.6 ± 0.4 ± 1.0) MeV/c 2 . Using the transition hb(1P) → γηb(1S), we measure the ηb(1S) mass Mηb(1S) = (9400.7 ± 1.7 ± 1.6) MeV/c 2 , corresponding to ΔMHF (1S) = (59.6 ± 1.7 ± 1.6) MeV/c 2 , the ηb(1S) width Γηb(1S) = (8+6 -5 ± 5) MeV/c 2 and the branching fraction B[hb(1P) → γηb(1S)] = (56 ± 8 ± 4)%.

  16. Huntingtin with an expanded polyglutamine repeat affects the Jab1-p27(Kip1) pathway.

    PubMed

    Cong, S Y; Pepers, B A; Zhou, T T; Kerkdijk, H; Roos, R A; van Ommen, G J; Dorsman, J C

    2012-06-01

    Expansion of polyglutamine repeats is the cause of at least nine inherited human neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington's disease (HD). It is widely accepted that deregulation of the transcriptional coactivator CBP by expanded huntingtin (htt) plays an important role in HD molecular pathogenesis. In this study, we report on a novel target of expanded polyglutamine stretches, the transcriptional coactivator Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (Jab1), which shares DNA-sequence-specific transcription factor targets with CBP. Jab1 also plays a major role in the degradation of the cyclin-dependent-kinase inhibitor and putative transcription cofactor p27(Kip1). We found that Jab1 accumulates in aggregates when co-expressed with either expanded polyglutamine stretches or N-terminal fragments of mutant htt. In addition, the coactivator function of Jab1 was suppressed both by aggregated expanded polyglutamine solely and by mutant htt. Inhibition by mutant htt even preceded the appearance of microscopic aggregation. In an exon 1 HD cell model, we found that endogenous Jab1 could be recruited into aggregates and that this was accompanied by the accumulation of p27(Kip1). Accumulation of p27(Kip1) was also found in brains derived from HD patients. The repression of Jab1 by various mechanisms coupled with an increase of p27(Kip1) at late stages may have important transcriptional effects. In addition, the interference with the Jab1-p27(Kip1) pathway may contribute to the observed lower incidence of cancer in HD patients and may also be relevant for the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of polyglutamine disorders in general. PMID:22426400

  17. SQSTM1/p62 Interacts with HDAC6 and Regulates Deacetylase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jin; Seibenhener, Michael Lamar; Calderilla-Barbosa, Luis; Diaz-Meco, Maria-Theresa; Moscat, Jorge; Jiang, Jianxiong; Wooten, Marie W.; Wooten, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregates can form in the cytoplasm of the cell and are accumulated at aggresomes localized to the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) where they are subsequently degraded by autophagy. In this process, aggregates are engulfed into autophagosomes which subsequently fuse with lysosomes for protein degradation. A member of the class II histone deacetylase family, histone deacetylase 6(HDAC6) has been shown to be involved in both aggresome formation and the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes making it an attractive target to regulate protein aggregation. The scaffolding protein sequestosome 1(SQSTM1)/p62 has also been shown to regulate accumulation and autophagic clearance of protein aggregates. Recent studies have revealed colocalization of HDAC6 and p62 to ubiquitinated mitochondria, as well as, ubiquitinated protein aggregates associated with the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM50. HDAC6 deacetylase activity is required for aggresome formation and can be regulated by protein interaction with HDAC6. Due to their colocalization at ubiquitinated protein aggregates, we sought to examine if p62 specifically interacted with HDAC6 and if so, if this interaction had any effect on HDAC6 activity and/or the physiological function of cortactin-F-actin assembly. We succeeded in identifying and mapping the direct interaction between HDAC6 and p62. We further show that this interaction regulates HDAC6 deacetylase activity. Data are presented demonstrating that the absence of p62 results in hyperactivation of HDAC6 and deacetylation of α-tubulin and cortactin. Further, upon induction of protein misfolding we show that p62 is required for perinuclear co-localization of cortactin-F-actin assemblies. Thus, our findings indicate that p62 plays a key role in regulating the recruitment of F-actin network assemblies to the MTOC, a critical cellular function that is required for successful autophagic clearance of protein aggregates. PMID:24086678

  18. Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in human granulosa cells through a S1P1/3-mediated YAP signaling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jung-Chien; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Liu, Pang-Pin; Leung, Peter C K

    2016-06-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid that can regulate various physiological and pathological processes. The expression of S1P has been detected in human follicular fluid. In addition, two S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3, are expressed at a high level in human granulosa cells. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production plays a critical role in the regulation of ovulation. However, thus far, the effect of S1P on COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in human granulosa cells remains unknown. In the present study, our results demonstrated that treatment with S1P significantly induced COX-2, but not COX-1, expression and increased PGE2 production in human granulosa cells. The stimulatory effects of S1P on COX-2 expression and PGE2 production were attenuated by treatment with specific antagonist of S1P1 or S1P3 and siRNA-mediated knockdown of S1P1 or S1P3. In addition, the COX-2 expression was induced by S1P1 or S1P3 agonist treatment. Interestingly, treatment with S1P activated YAP signaling via S1P1 and S1P3. Moreover, knockdown of YAP partially attenuated S1P-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production. These results provide evidence that S1P induces COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in human granulosa cells through a S1P1/3-mediated YAP signaling pathway. PMID:26994820

  19. Role of Loc1p in assembly and reorganization of nuclear ASH1 messenger ribonucleoprotein particles in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Niedner, Annika; Müller, Marisa; Moorthy, Balaji T.; Jansen, Ralf-Peter; Niessing, Dierk

    2013-01-01

    Directional transport of mRNA is a universal feature in eukaryotes, requiring the assembly of motor-dependent RNA-transport particles. The cytoplasmic transport of mRNAs is preceded by the nuclear assembly of pre-messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs). In budding yeast, the asymmetric synthesis of HO 1 (ASH1) pre-mRNP originates already cotranscriptionally and passes through the nucleolus before its nuclear export. The nucleolar localization of ASH1 mRNA protein 1 (Loc1p) is required for efficient ASH1 mRNA localization. Immunoprecipitation experiments have revealed that Loc1p forms cocomplexes with other components of the ASH1 transport complex. However, it remains unclear how Loc1p is recruited into this mRNP and why Loc1p is important for ASH1 mRNA localization. Here we demonstrate that Loc1p undergoes a direct and specific interaction with the ASH1 mRNA-binding Swi5p-dependent HO expression protein 2 (She2p). This cocomplex shows higher affinity and specificity for RNA bearing localization elements than the individual proteins. It also stabilizes the otherwise transient binding of She2p to ASH1 mRNA, suggesting that cooperative mRNA binding of Loc1p with She2p is the required nuclear function of Loc1p for ASH1 mRNA localization. After nuclear export, myosin-bound She3p joins the ASH1 mRNP to form a highly specific cocomplex with She2p and ASH1 mRNA. Because Loc1p is found only in the nucleus, it must be removed from the complex directly before or after export. In vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that the synergistic interaction of She2p and She3p displaces Loc1p from the ASH1 complex, allowing free Loc1p to rapidly reenter the nucle(ol)us. Together these findings suggest an ordered process of nuclear assembly and reorganization for the maturation of localizing ASH1 mRNPs. PMID:24324176

  20. Measurement of the production cross section ratio σ (χb2 (1 P)) / σ (χb1 (1 P)) in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, S.; Plestina, R.; Tao, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. 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F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Bahtiyar, H.; Barlas, E.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Yücel, M.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Nguyen, H.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Cheng, T.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P., III; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2015-04-01

    A measurement of the production cross section ratio σ (χb2 (1 P)) / σ (χb1 (1 P)) is presented. The χb1 (1 P) and χb2 (1 P) bottomonium states, promptly produced in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV, are detected by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC through their radiative decays χ b 1 , 2 (1 P) → ϒ (1 S) + γ. The emitted photons are measured through their conversion to e+e- pairs, whose reconstruction allows the two states to be resolved. The ϒ (1 S) is measured through its decay to two muons. An event sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.7 fb-1 is used to measure the cross section ratio in a phase-space region defined by the photon pseudorapidity, |ηγ | < 1.0; the ϒ (1 S) rapidity, |yϒ | < 1.5; and the ϒ (1 S) transverse momentum, 7 < pTϒ < 40 GeV. The cross section ratio shows no significant dependence on the ϒ (1 S) transverse momentum, with a measured average value of 0.85 ± 0.07 (stat +syst) ± 0.08 (BF), where the first uncertainty is the combination of the experimental statistical and systematic uncertainties and the second is from the uncertainty in the ratio of the χb branching fractions.

  1. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Induced Interleukin-8 (IL-8) Release Is Mediated by S1P Receptor 2 and Nuclear Factor κB in BEAS-2B Cells

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Michael J.; Hirota, Nobuaki; Martin, James G.

    2014-01-01

    The airway epithelium may release pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the asthmatic airway. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid, increased in the airways of asthmatics, that may trigger the release of the potent neutrophil chemoattractant Interleukin-8 (IL-8) by epithelial cells. S1P is a ligand for 5 G protein-coupled receptors, S1PR1-5. We wished to explore the mechanisms of S1P induced IL-8 secretion with regard to the receptor(s) and downstream signaling events involved. Our results indicate that S1P induced IL-8 release is mediated by S1PR2 and the transcription factor NF-κB. Since the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in IL-8 release in response to activation of other G protein-coupled receptors, we examined their importance in S1P induced IL-8 release and established that they are not involved. This study reveals S1PR2 and NF-κB as potential therapeutic targets in neutrophilic airway diseases such as severe asthma. PMID:24743449

  2. Spa2p functions as a scaffold-like protein to recruit the Mpk1p MAP kinase module to sites of polarized growth.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, Frank; Peter, Matthias

    2002-10-01

    Scaffold proteins play a major role in regulating MAP kinase pathways. In yeast, the Mpk1p-MAP kinase pathway functions to maintain the integrity of the cytoskeleton and the cell wall. In this module, the MEKK Bck1p functions upstream of the MEKs Mkk1p and Mkk2p, which in turn activate the MAP kinase Mpk1p. Mpk1p regulates several nuclear targets, including the transcription factors Rlm1p and SBF, and the two HMG1-like proteins NHP6A and NHP6B. Here we show that Mpk1p constitutively shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, and both Mpk1p and Mkk1p localize to sites of polarized growth in a Spa2p-dependent manner. Spa2p belongs to a group of proteins that includes Bni1p, Bud6p, and Pea2p, which are involved in the dynamic organization of the actin cytoskeleton during polarized growth. FRAP analysis shows that Spa2p-GFP is stably anchored at bud tips, whereas Mpk1p binds transiently. Spa2p interacts with Mkk1p and Mpk1p, and membrane bound Spa2p is sufficient to recruit Mkk1p and Mpk1p but not other MAP kinases to the cell cortex. Taken together, these results suggest that Spa2p functions as a scaffold-like protein for the cell wall integrity pathway during polarized growth. PMID:12361575

  3. S1P prophylaxis mitigates acute hypobaric hypoxia-induced molecular, biochemical, and metabolic disturbances: A preclinical report.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Sonam; Rahar, Babita; Saxena, Shweta

    2016-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is emerging to have hypoxic preconditioning potential in various preclinical studies. The study aims to evaluate the preclinical preconditioning efficacy of exogenously administered S1P against acute hypobaric hypoxia (HH)-induced pathological disturbances. Male Sprague Dawley rats (200 ± 20 g) were preconditioned with 1, 10, and 100 μg/kg body weight (b.w.) S1P (i.v.) for three consecutive days. On the third day, S1P preconditioned animals, along with hypoxia control animals, were exposed to HH equivalent to 7,620 m (280 mm Hg) for 6 h. Postexposure status of cardiac energy production, circulatory vasoactive mediators, pulmonary and cerebral oxidative damage, and inflammation were assessed. HH exposure led to cardiac energy deficit indicated by low ATP levels and pronounced AMPK activation levels, raised circulatory levels of brain natriuretic peptide and endothelin-1 with respect to total nitrate (NOx), redox imbalance, inflammation, and alterations in NOx levels in the pulmonary and cerebral tissues. These pathological precursors have been routinely reported to be coincident with high-altitude diseases. Preconditioning with S1P, especially 1 µg/kg b.w. dose, was seen to reverse the manifestation of these pathological disturbances. The protective efficacy could be attributed, at least in part, to enhanced activity of cardioprotective protein kinase C and activation of small GTPase Rac1, which led to further induction of hypoxia-adaptive molecular mediators: hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and Hsp70. This is a first such report, to the best of our knowledge, elucidating the mechanism of exogenous S1P-mediated HIF-1α/Hsp70 induction. Conclusively, systemic preconditioning with 1 μg/kg b.w. S1P in rats protects against acute HH-induced pathological disturbances. © 2016 IUBMB Life 68(5):365-375, 2016. PMID:26959531

  4. Hansenula polymorpha Pex1p and Pex6p are peroxisome-associated AAA proteins that functionally and physically interact.

    PubMed

    Kiel, J A; Hilbrands, R E; van der Klei, I J; Rasmussen, S W; Salomons, F A; van der Heide, M; Faber, K N; Cregg, J M; Veenhuis, M

    1999-08-01

    We have cloned the Hansenula polymorpha PEX1 and PEX6 genes by functional complementation of the corresponding peroxisome-deficient (pex) mutants. The gene products, HpPex1p and HpPex6p, are ATPases which both belong to the AAA protein family. Cells deleted for either gene (Deltapex1 or Deltapex6) were characterized by the presence of small peroxisomal remnants which contained peroxisomal membrane proteins and minor amounts of matrix proteins. The bulk of the matrix proteins, however, resided in the cytosol. In cell fractionation studies HpPex1p and HpPex6p co-sedimented with the peroxisomal membrane protein HpPex3p in both wild-type cells and in Deltapex4, Deltapex8 or Deltapex14 cells. Both proteins are loosely membrane-bound and face the cytosol. Furthermore, HpPex1p and HpPex6p physically and functionally interact in vivo. Overexpression of PEX6 resulted in defects in peroxisomal matrix protein import. By contrast, overexpression of PEX1 was not detrimental to the cells. Interestingly, co-overproduction of HpPex1p rescued the protein import defect caused by HpPex6p overproduction. Overproduced HpPex1p and HpPex6p remained predominantly membrane-bound, but only partially co-localized with the peroxisomal membrane protein HpPex3p. Our data indicate that HpPex1p and HpPex6p function in a protein complex associated with the peroxisomal membrane and that overproduced, mislocalized HpPex6p prevents HpPex1p from reaching its site of activity. PMID:10455230

  5. Phase diagram and magnetic properties of the diluted fcc system NipMg1-pO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhen; Seehra, Mohindar S.

    1992-02-01

    Starting from Ni and Mg nitrates, about 20 samples of NipMg1-pO samples (with 0.06<=p<=0.86) were prepared and x-ray-diffraction studies showed the samples to have the NaCl structure with the lattice constant fitting the expression a(p)=4.2115-0.0340p Å. Temperature-dependent magnetic-susceptibility (χ) studies of the samples were carried out between 1.8 and 600 K using a superconducting-quantum-interference-device magnetometer and Néel temperatures TN's were determined from the peak in ∂(χT)/∂T. The variation of t=TN(p)/TN(1) vs p is compared with that of CopMg1-pO. For both systems, the variations for p>0.31 are found to fit the predicted values for a simple-cubic Heisenberg antiferromagnet and a theoretical basis for this anomalous result is advanced. The experimental percolation threshold pc=0.15+/-0.01 and for pc1-pO and EupSr1-pTe. It is suggested that the differences in the t-vs-p variations for p<0.31 in NipMg1-pO, CopMg1-pO, and EupSr1-pTe may be related to the differences in the ratio of the next-nearest-neighbor to nearest-neighbor exchange constants in these systems.

  6. Association kinetics of wild- and mutant-type Ynd1p in relation to quality of grown crystals.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Kazuo; Watanabe, Akiko; Kanzaki, Noriko; Kubota, Tomomi

    2006-12-14

    The intermolecular interaction and association dynamics of the Ynd1p protein were investigated using dynamic and time-resolved static light scattering measurements. The mutual diffusion coefficients of wild- and mutant-type (a single amino acid substitution) Ynd1p monomer were measured in 50 mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer with 5 mM MnCl2 and 7.5% (v/v) ethylene glycol. Both translational diffusion coefficients at a zero protein concentration were (40.3 +/- 0.2) x 10(-12) m2/s at 20 degrees C and a pH of 7.0, so the hydrodynamic radius of the monomers was 4.1 +/- 0.1 nm. The measured intermolecular interaction between monomers, however, showed that the mutant-type Ynd1p had a stronger attractive force. Time-resolved static light scattering measurements showed that the association of mutant-type Ynd1p yielded a larger number of aggregates than that of wild-type Ynd1p. The time dependence of aggregate gyration radius differed between the two types. Fractal dimension analysis using scattering intensity data suggested that the inner structure of the aggregates changed from loose to rigid with time. Although this phenomenon is common for wild and mutant types, the differences in the number of aggregates yielded in the initial stages and in the intermolecular interaction affected the quality of the final grown crystals. That is, single crystals of Ynd1p grew in the mutant-type protein solution and polycrystals of Ynd1p grew in the wild-type protein solution. PMID:17149908

  7. IDH1 p.R132 mutations may not be actively involved in the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun; Zou, Yang; Xu, Ling; Yang, Run-Xiang; Fan, Yu; Zhang, Wen; Yu, Dandan; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have identified prevalent isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) codon 132 mutations (p.R132) in gliomas and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The IDH1 mutations lead to a loss of its normal enzymatic activity and acquisition of neomorphic activity in production of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), which finally cause alterations of multiple gene expression of tumorigenesis-associated α-KG-dependent enzymes. The aim of this study was to determine whether IDH1 p.R132 mutations are involved in the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma. Material/Methods A total of 87 Han Chinese patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were analyzed by direct DNA sequencing for IDH1 p.R132 mutations. The expression levels of multiple α-KG-dependent enzymes and associated genes were quantified in HepG2 cells overexpressing IDH1 p.R132 mutants by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Results None of 87 Han Chinese patients with HCC harbored any IDH1 p.R132 mutations. The protein levels of HIF-1α and histone methylation marker (H3K4me3 and H3K79me2) were determined in HepG2 cells overexpressing IDH1 p.R132 mutants, but we discerned no difference. Measurement of mRNA expression levels of VEGF, GLUT1, and HOXA genes also showed no significant difference between cells overexpressing IDH1 wild-type and p.R132 mutants. Conclusions Our negative results, together with some previous reports of the absence of IDH1 p.R132 mutations in HCC tissues, suggests that IDH1 p.R132 mutations are not actively involved in the development of HCC. PMID:24531386

  8. The major secreted protein Msp1/p75 is O-glycosylated in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the occurrence, biosynthesis and possible functions of glycoproteins are increasingly documented for pathogens, glycoproteins are not yet widely described in probiotic bacteria. Nevertheless, knowledge of protein glycosylation holds important potential for better understanding specific glycan-mediated interactions of probiotics and for glycoengineering in food-grade microbes. Results Here, we provide evidence that the major secreted protein Msp1/p75 of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is glycosylated. Msp1 was shown to stain positive with periodic-acid Schiff staining, to be susceptible to chemical deglycosylation, and to bind with the mannose-specific Concanavalin A (ConA) lectin. Recombinant expression in Escherichia coli resulted in a significant reduction in molecular mass, loss of ConA reactivity and increased sensitivity towards pronase E and proteinase K. Mass spectrometry showed that Msp1 is O-glycosylated and identified a glycopeptide TVETPSSA (amino acids 101-108) bearing hexoses presumably linked to the serine residues. Interestingly, these serine residues are not present in the homologous protein of several Lactobacillus casei strains tested, which also did not bind to ConA. The role of the glycan substitutions in known functions of Msp1 was also investigated. Glycosylation did not seem to impact significantly on the peptidoglycan hydrolase activity of Msp1. In addition, the glycan chain appeared not to be required for the activation of Akt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells by Msp1. On the other hand, examination of different cell extracts showed that Msp1 is a glycosylated protein in the supernatant, but not in the cell wall and cytosol fraction, suggesting a link between glycosylation and secretion of this protein. Conclusions In this study we have provided the first evidence of protein O-glycosylation in the probiotic L rhamnosus GG. The major secreted protein Msp1 is glycosylated with ConA reactive sugars at the

  9. Fission yeast homolog of neuronal calcium sensor-1 (Ncs1p) regulates sporulation and confers calcium tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki-Katagiri, Nobuko; Molchanova, Tatiana; Takeda, Kazuyo; Ames, James B

    2004-03-26

    The neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) proteins (e.g. recoverin, neurocalcins, and frequenin) are expressed at highest levels in excitable cells, and some of them regulate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors. Here we present NMR analysis and genetic functional studies of an NCS homolog in fission yeast (Ncs1p). Ncs1p binds three Ca2+ ions at saturation with an apparent affinity of 2 microm and Hill coefficient of 1.9. Analysis of NMR and fluorescence spectra of Ncs1p revealed significant Ca2+-induced protein conformational changes indicative of a Ca2+-myristoyl switch. The amino-terminal myristoyl group is sequestered inside a hydrophobic cavity of the Ca2+-free protein and becomes solvent-exposed in the Ca2+-bound protein. Subcellular fractionation experiments showed that myristoylation and Ca2+ binding by Ncs1p are essential for its translocation from cytoplasm to membranes. The ncs1 deletion mutant (ncs1Delta) showed two distinct phenotypes: nutrition-insensitive sexual development and a growth defect at high levels of extracellular Ca2+ (0.1 m CaCl(2)). Analysis of Ncs1p mutants lacking myristoylation (Ncs1p(G2A)) or deficient in Ca2+ binding (Ncs1p(E84Q/E120Q/E168Q)) revealed that Ca2+ binding was essential for both phenotypes, while myristoylation was less critical. Exogenous cAMP, a key regulator for sexual development, suppressed conjugation and sporulation of ncs1Delta, suggesting involvement of Ncs1p in the adenylate cyclase pathway turned on by the glucose-sensing G protein-coupled receptor Git3p. Starvation-independent sexual development of ncs1Delta was also complemented by retinal recoverin, which controls Ca2+-regulated desensitization of rhodopsin. In contrast, the Ca2+-intolerance of ncs1Delta was not affected by cAMP or recoverin, suggesting that the two ncs1Delta phenotypes are mechanistically independent. We propose that Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ncs1p negatively regulates sporulation perhaps by controlling Ca2+-dependent desensitization

  10. Functional Analysis of Phosphorylation on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Syntaxin 1 Homologues Sso1p and Sso2p

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qiang; Jäntti, Jussi

    2010-01-01

    Background The Saccharomyces cerevisiae syntaxin1 homologues Sso1p and Sso2p perform an essential function in membrane fusion in exocytosis. While deletion of either SSO1 or SSO2 causes no obvious phenotype in vegetatively grown cells, deletion of both genes is lethal. In sporulating diploid S. cerevisiae cells only Sso1p, but not Sso2p, is needed for membrane fusion during prospore membrane formation. Mass spectrometry and in vivo labeling data suggest that serines 23, 24, and 79 in Sso1p and serines 31 and 34 in Sso2p can be phosphorylated in vivo. Here we set out to assess the contribution of phosphorylation on Sso protein in vivo function. Principal Findings Different mutant versions of SSO1 and SSO2 were generated to target the phosphorylation sites in Sso1p and Sso2p. Basal or overexpression of phospho-mimicking or putative non-phosphorylated Sso1p or Sso2p mutants resulted in no obvious growth phenotype. However, S79A and S79E mutations caused a mild defect in the ability of Sso1p to complement the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of sso2-1 sso1Δ cells. Combination of all mutations did not additionally compromise Sso1p in vivo function. When compared to the wild type SSO1 and SSO2, the phosphoamino acid mutants displayed similar genetic interactions with late acting sec mutants. Furthermore, diploid cells expressing only the mutant versions of Sso1p had no detectable sporulation defects. In addition to sporulation, also pseudohyphal and invasive growth modes are regulated by the availability of nutrients. In contrast to sporulating diploid cells, deletion of SSO1 or SSO2, or expression of the phospho-mutant versions of SSO1 or SSO2 as the sole copies of SSO genes caused no defects in haploid or diploid pseudohyphal and invasive growth. Conclusions The identified phosphorylation sites do not significantly contribute to the in vivo functionality of Sso1p and Sso2p in S. cerevisiae. PMID:20948969

  11. The Reticulon and Dp1/Yop1p Proteins Form Immobile Oligomers in the Tubular Endoplasmic Reticulum*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yoko; Voss, Christiane; Rist, Julia M.; Hu, Junjie; Rapoport, Tom A.; Prinz, William A.; Voeltz, Gia K.

    2008-01-01

    We recently identified a class of membrane proteins, the reticulons and DP1/Yop1p, which shape the tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in yeast and mammalian cells. These proteins are highly enriched in the tubular portions of the ER and virtually excluded from other regions. To understand how they promote tubule formation, we characterized their behavior in cellular membranes and addressed how their localization in the ER is determined. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we found that yeast Rtn1p and Yop1p are less mobile in the membrane than normal ER proteins. Sucrose gradient centrifugation and cross-linking analyses show that they form oligomers. Mutants of yeast Rtn1p, which no longer localize exclusively to the tubular ER or are even totally inactive in inducing ER tubules, are more mobile and oligomerize less extensively. The mammalian reticulons and DP1 are also relatively immobile and can form oligomers. The conserved reticulon homology domain that includes the two membrane-embedded segments is sufficient for the localization of the reticulons to the tubular ER, as well as for their diffusional immobility and oligomerization. Finally, ATP depletion in both yeast and mammalian cells further decreases the mobilities of the reticulons and DP1. We propose that oligomerization of the reticulons and DP1/Yop1p is important for both their localization to the tubular domains of the ER and for their ability to form tubules. PMID:18442980

  12. Study of di-pion Bottomonium Transitions and Search for the h_b(1P) State

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-12-09

    We study inclusive di-pion decays using a sample of 108 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector. We search for the decay mode {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}h{sub b} (1P) and find no evidence for the bottomonium spin-singlet state h{sub b}(1P) in the invariant mass distribution recoiling against the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} system. Assuming the h{sub b}(1P) mass to be 9.900 GeV/c{sup 2}, we measure the upper limit on the branching fraction {Beta}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}h{sub b}(1P)] < 1.2 x 10{sup -4}, at 90% confidence level. We also investigate the {chi}{sub bJ}(2P) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {chi}{sub bJ}(1P), {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S), and {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S) di-pion transitions and present an improved measurement of the branching fraction of the {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S) decay and of the {Upsilon}(3S) - {Upsilon}(2S) mass difference.

  13. Rap1p telomere association is not required for mitotic stability of a C3TA2 telomere in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Mary Kate; Zakian, Virginia A.

    2003-01-01

    Telomeric DNA usually consists of a repetitive sequence: C1–3A/TG1–3 in yeast, and C3TA2/T2AG3 in vertebrates. In yeast, the sequence-specific DNA- binding protein Rap1p is thought to be essential for telomere function. In a tlc1h mutant, the templating region of the telomerase RNA gene is altered so that telomerase adds the vertebrate telomere sequence instead of the yeast sequence to the chromosome end. A tlc1h strain has short but stable telomeres and no growth defect. We show here that Rap1p and the Rap1p-associated Rif2p did not bind to a telomere that contains purely vertebrate repeats, while the TG1–3 single-stranded DNA binding protein Cdc13p and the normally non-telomeric protein Tbf1p did bind this telomere. A chromosome with one entirely vertebrate-sequence telomere had a wild-type loss rate, and the telomere was maintained at a short but stable length. However, this telomere was unable to silence a telomere-adjacent URA3 gene, and the strain carrying this telomere had a severe defect in meiosis. We conclude that Rap1p localization to a C3TA2 telomere is not required for its essential mitotic functions. PMID:12660174

  14. Dual-function sRNA encoded peptide SR1P modulates moonlighting activity of B. subtilis GapA

    PubMed Central

    Gimpel, Matthias; Brantl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT SR1 is a dual-function sRNA from B. subtilis that acts as a base-pairing regulatory RNA and as a peptide-encoding mRNA. Both functions of SR1 are highly conserved. Previously, we uncovered that the SR1 encoded peptide SR1P binds the glycolytic enzyme GapA resulting in stabilization of gapA mRNA. Here, we demonstrate that GapA interacts with RNases Y and J1, and this interaction was RNA-independent. About 1% of GapA molecules purified from B. subtilis carry RNase J1 and about 2% RNase Y. In contrast to the GapA/RNase Y interaction, the GapA/RNaseJ1 interaction was stronger in the presence of SR1P. GapA/SR1P-J1/Y displayed in vitro RNase activity on known RNase J1 substrates. Moreover, the RNase J1 substrate SR5 has altered half-lives in a ΔgapA strain and a Δsr1 strain, suggesting in vivo functions of the GapA/SR1P/J1 interaction. Our results demonstrate that the metabolic enzyme GapA moonlights in recruiting RNases while GapA bound SR1P promotes binding of RNase J1 and enhances its activity. PMID:27449348

  15. Coupling between the DEAD-box RNA helicases Ded1p and eIF4A

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhaofeng; Putnam, Andrea A; Bowers, Heath A; Guenther, Ulf-Peter; Ye, Xuan; Kindsfather, Audrey; Hilliker, Angela K; Jankowsky, Eckhard

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation involves two conserved DEAD-box RNA helicases, eIF4A and Ded1p. Here we show that S. cerevisiae eIF4A and Ded1p directly interact with each other and simultaneously with the scaffolding protein eIF4G. We delineate a comprehensive thermodynamic framework for the interactions between Ded1p, eIF4A, eIF4G, RNA and ATP, which indicates that eIF4A, with and without eIF4G, acts as a modulator for activity and substrate preferences of Ded1p, which is the RNA remodeling unit in all complexes. Our results reveal and characterize an unexpected interdependence between the two RNA helicases and eIF4G, and suggest that Ded1p is an integral part of eIF4F, the complex comprising eIF4G, eIF4A, and eIF4E. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16408.001 PMID:27494274

  16. Photoaffinity labeling of Ras converting enzyme 1 (Rce1p) using a benzophenone-containing peptide substrate.

    PubMed

    Kyro, Kelly; Manandhar, Surya P; Mullen, Daniel; Schmidt, Walter K; Distefano, Mark D

    2010-08-01

    Isoprenylation is a post-translational modification that increases protein hydrophobicity and helps target certain proteins to membranes. Ras converting enzyme 1 (Rce1p) is an endoprotease that catalyzes the removal of a three residue fragment from the C-terminus of isoprenylated proteins. To obtain structural information about this membrane protein, photoaffinity labeling agents are being prepared and employed. Here, we describe the synthesis of a benzophenone-containing peptide substrate analogue for Rce1p. Using a continuous spectrofluorometric assay, this peptide was shown to be a substrate for Rce1p. Mass spectrometry was performed to confirm the site of cleavage and structure of the processed probe. Photolysis of the biotinylated compound in the presence of membranes containing Rce1p followed by streptavidin pull-down and Western blot analysis indicated that Rce1p had been labeled by the probe. Photolysis in the presence of both the biotinylated, benzophenone-containing probe and a farnesylated peptide competitor reduced the extent of labeling, suggesting that labeling is occurring in the active site. PMID:20619662

  17. Photoaffinity Labeling of Ras Converting Enzyme 1 (Rce1p) using a Benzophenone-Containing Peptide Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Kyro, Kelly; Manandhar, Surya P.; Mullen, Daniel; Schmidt, Walter K.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Isoprenylation is a post-translational modification that increases protein hydrophobicity and helps target certain proteins to membranes. Ras Converting Enzyme 1 (Rce1p) is an endoprotease that catalyzes the removal of a three residue fragment from the C-terminus of isoprenylated proteins. To obtain structural information about this membrane protein, photoaffinity labeling agents are being prepared and employed. Here, we describe the synthesis of a benzophenone-containing peptide substrate analogue for Rce1p. Using a continuous spectrofluorometric assay, this peptide was shown to be a substrate for Rce1p. Mass spectrometry was performed to confirm the site of cleavage and structure of the processed probe. Photolysis of the biotinylated compound in the presence of membranes containing Rce1p followed by streptavidin pull-down and Western blot analysis indicated that Rce1p had been labeled by the probe. Photolysis in the presence of both the biotinylated, benzophenone-containing probe and a farnesylated peptide competitor reduced the extent of labeling, suggesting that labeling is occurring in the active site. PMID:20619662

  18. Design, Synthesis, and In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of an (18)F-Labeled Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 1 (S1P1) PET Tracer.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Adam J; Liu, Hui; Jin, Hongjun; Yue, Xuyi; Riley, Sean; Brown, Steven J; Tu, Zhude

    2016-07-14

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) plays a pivotal signaling role in inflammatory response; because S1P1 modulation has been identified as a therapeutic target for various diseases, a PET tracer for S1P1 would be a useful tool. Fourteen fluorine-containing analogues of S1P ligands were synthesized and their in vitro binding potency measured; four had high potency and selectivity for S1P1 (S1P1 IC50 < 10 nM, >100-fold selectivity for S1P1 over S1P2 and S1P3). The most potent ligand, 28c (IC50 = 2.63 nM for S1P1) was (18)F-labeled and evaluated in a mouse model of LPS-induced acute liver injury to determine its S1P1-binding specificity. The results from biodistribution, autoradiography, and microPET imaging showed higher [(18)F]28c accumulation in the liver of LPS-treated mice than controls. Increased expression of S1P1 in the LPS model was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis (IHC). These data suggest that [(18)F]28c is a S1P1 PET tracer with high potential for imaging S1P1 in vivo. PMID:27280499

  19. Identification and functional analysis of the essential and regulatory light chains of the only type II myosin Myo1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jianying; Vallen, Elizabeth A.; Dravis, Christopher; Tcheperegine, Serguei E.; Drees, Becky; Bi, Erfei

    2004-01-01

    Cytokinesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves coordination between actomyosin ring contraction and septum formation and/or targeted membrane deposition. We show that Mlc1p, a light chain for Myo2p (type V myosin) and Iqg1p (IQGAP), is the essential light chain for Myo1p, the only type II myosin in S. cerevisiae. However, disruption or reduction of Mlc1p–Myo1p interaction by deleting the Mlc1p binding site on Myo1p or by a point mutation in MLC1, mlc1-93, did not cause any obvious defect in cytokinesis. In contrast, a different point mutation, mlc1-11, displayed defects in cytokinesis and in interactions with Myo2p and Iqg1p. These data suggest that the major function of the Mlc1p–Myo1p interaction is not to regulate Myo1p activity but that Mlc1p may interact with Myo1p, Iqg1p, and Myo2p to coordinate actin ring formation and targeted membrane deposition during cytokinesis. We also identify Mlc2p as the regulatory light chain for Myo1p and demonstrate its role in Myo1p ring disassembly, a function likely conserved among eukaryotes. PMID:15210731

  20. A rationally engineered yeast pyruvyltransferase Pvg1p introduces sialylation-like properties in neo-human-type complex oligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Yoshinaga, Sho; Yoritsune, Ken-Ichi; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Nakakita, Shin-Ichi; Kanekiyo, Miho; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvylation onto the terminus of oligosaccharide, widely seen from prokaryote to eukaryote, confers negative charges on the cell surface and seems to be functionally similar to sialylation, which is found at the end of human-type complex oligosaccharide. However, detailed molecular mechanisms underlying pyruvylation have not been clarified well. Here, we first determined the crystal structure of fission yeast pyruvyltransferase Pvg1p at a resolution of 2.46 Å. Subsequently, by combining molecular modeling with mutational analysis of active site residues, we obtained a Pvg1p mutant (Pvg1p(H168C)) that efficiently transferred pyruvyl moiety onto a human-type complex glycopeptide. The resultant pyruvylated human-type complex glycopeptide recognized similar lectins on lectin arrays as the α2,6-sialyl glycopeptides. This newly-generated pyruvylation of human-type complex oligosaccharides would provide a novel method for glyco-bioengineering. PMID:27194449

  1. FTH1P3, a Novel H-Ferritin Pseudogene Transcriptionally Active, Is Ubiquitously Expressed and Regulated during Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Di Sanzo, Maddalena; Aversa, Ilenia; Santamaria, Gianluca; Gagliardi, Monica; Panebianco, Mariafranca; Biamonte, Flavia; Zolea, Fabiana; Faniello, Maria Concetta; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin, the major iron storage protein, performs its essential functions in the cytoplasm, nucleus and mitochondria. The variable assembly of 24 subunits of the Heavy (H) and Light (L) type composes the cytoplasmic molecule. In humans, two distinct genes code these subunits, both belonging to complex multigene families. Until now, one H gene has been identified with the coding sequence interrupted by three introns and more than 20 intronless copies widely dispersed on different chromosomes. Two of the intronless genes are actively transcribed in a tissue-specific manner. Herein, we report that FTH1P3, another intronless pseudogene, is transcribed. FTH1P3 transcript was detected in several cell lines and tissues, suggesting that its transcription is ubiquitary, as it happens for the parental ferritin H gene. Moreover, FTH1P3 expression is positively regulated during the cell differentiation process. PMID:26982978

  2. FTH1P3, a Novel H-Ferritin Pseudogene Transcriptionally Active, Is Ubiquitously Expressed and Regulated during Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Di Sanzo, Maddalena; Aversa, Ilenia; Santamaria, Gianluca; Gagliardi, Monica; Panebianco, Mariafranca; Biamonte, Flavia; Zolea, Fabiana; Faniello, Maria Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin, the major iron storage protein, performs its essential functions in the cytoplasm, nucleus and mitochondria. The variable assembly of 24 subunits of the Heavy (H) and Light (L) type composes the cytoplasmic molecule. In humans, two distinct genes code these subunits, both belonging to complex multigene families. Until now, one H gene has been identified with the coding sequence interrupted by three introns and more than 20 intronless copies widely dispersed on different chromosomes. Two of the intronless genes are actively transcribed in a tissue-specific manner. Herein, we report that FTH1P3, another intronless pseudogene, is transcribed. FTH1P3 transcript was detected in several cell lines and tissues, suggesting that its transcription is ubiquitary, as it happens for the parental ferritin H gene. Moreover, FTH1P3 expression is positively regulated during the cell differentiation process. PMID:26982978

  3. A rationally engineered yeast pyruvyltransferase Pvg1p introduces sialylation-like properties in neo-human-type complex oligosaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Yoshinaga, Sho; Yoritsune, Ken-ichi; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Nakakita, Shin-ichi; Kanekiyo, Miho; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvylation onto the terminus of oligosaccharide, widely seen from prokaryote to eukaryote, confers negative charges on the cell surface and seems to be functionally similar to sialylation, which is found at the end of human-type complex oligosaccharide. However, detailed molecular mechanisms underlying pyruvylation have not been clarified well. Here, we first determined the crystal structure of fission yeast pyruvyltransferase Pvg1p at a resolution of 2.46 Å. Subsequently, by combining molecular modeling with mutational analysis of active site residues, we obtained a Pvg1p mutant (Pvg1pH168C) that efficiently transferred pyruvyl moiety onto a human-type complex glycopeptide. The resultant pyruvylated human-type complex glycopeptide recognized similar lectins on lectin arrays as the α2,6-sialyl glycopeptides. This newly-generated pyruvylation of human-type complex oligosaccharides would provide a novel method for glyco-bioengineering. PMID:27194449

  4. Magnetic Properties of Randomly Diluted Antiferromagnetic System: COBALT(P)MAGNESIUM(1-P)OXYGEN.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Raman

    In this work, the effect of randomly diluting CoO (a fcc antiferromagnet with Neel temperature T _{rm N} = 289 K) with MgO has been investigated using temperature dependent dc magnetic susceptibility measurements. About twenty samples of Co _{rm p}Mg _{rm 1-p}O with p = 0.10, 0.13, 0.17, 0.22, 0.23, 0.31, 0.33, 0.36, 0.41, 0.46, 0.49, 0.53, 0.56, 0.60, 0.64, 0.70, 0.80 and 0.87, were investigated in the temperature range of 1.6 K to 300 K. These powder samples were prepared starting from the nitrates, Co(NO _3)_2cdot6H _2O and Mg(NO_3)_2 cdot6H_2O. The samples were characterized by magnetic measurements for the presence of ferromagnetic impurities, by X-ray diffraction technique for the determination of crystal structure and lattice constants, and by atomic absorption spectroscopy for the determination of the composition parameter p. The lattice constant is found to vary linearly with p, in accordance with Vegard's Law. The magnetic susceptibility, chi , measurements were carried out with a Faraday balance, employing Lewis coils. The samples were cooled either in zero field (zfc) or in a field of 50 Oe (fc) to the lowest temperature (1.6 K or 4.2 K), followed by chi measurements in 50 Oe with increasing temperatures. A Neel temperature T_{ rm N}, as determined by d(chi T)/dT, is observed for all p >=q 0.17. By extrapolation and by the behavior of the low temperature magnetization, it is determined that the percolation threshold p_{rm c} = 0.13 +/- 0.01. This is in agreement with the theoretical estimate of p_{ rm c} = 0.136 for fcc lattice with nn and nnn included. The variation of T_{ rm N} with p is non-linear for p < 0.6. However no theoretical variation of T _{rm N} vs p is available for fcc lattice with both nn and nnn interactions included. For the high temperature region (T > T_{rm N}), the data is fit to the Curie-Weiss law and the Curie-Weiss temperature theta(p), the molar and gram Curie constants C_{rm M}(p) and C_{rm g}(p) respectively and the effective

  5. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor i with chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Daniel CB; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, CDC28, phosphorylates Cac1p on serines 94 and 515 in early S phase and regulates its association with chromatin, but not its association with PCNA. Mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites of CDC28 but not of CDC7 substantially reduce the in vivo phosphorylation of Cac1p. However, mutations in the putative CDC7 target sites on Cac1p reduce its stability. The association of CAF-I with chromatin is impaired in a cdc28–1 mutant and to a lesser extent in a cdc7–1 mutant. In addition, mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites by both CDC28 and CDC7 reduce gene silencing at the telomeres. We propose that this phosphorylation represents a regulatory step in the recruitment of CAF-I to chromatin in early S phase that is distinct from the association of CAF-I with PCNA. Hence, we implicate CDC28 in the regulation of chromatin reassembly during DNA replication. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights on the links between cell-cycle regulation, DNA replication and chromatin reassembly. PMID:25602519

  6. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor I with chromatin.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Daniel C B; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, CDC28, phosphorylates Cac1p on serines 94 and 515 in early S phase and regulates its association with chromatin, but not its association with PCNA. Mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites of CDC28 but not of CDC7 substantially reduce the in vivo phosphorylation of Cac1p. However, mutations in the putative CDC7 target sites on Cac1p reduce its stability. The association of CAF-I with chromatin is impaired in a cdc28-1 mutant and to a lesser extent in a cdc7-1 mutant. In addition, mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites by both CDC28 and CDC7 reduce gene silencing at the telomeres. We propose that this phosphorylation represents a regulatory step in the recruitment of CAF-I to chromatin in early S phase that is distinct from the association of CAF-I with PCNA. Hence, we implicate CDC28 in the regulation of chromatin reassembly during DNA replication. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights on the links between cell-cycle regulation, DNA replication and chromatin reassembly. PMID:25602519

  7. Identification of potential target genes for Adr1p through characterization of essential nucleotides in UAS1.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, C; Kacherovsky, N; Dombek, K M; Camier, S; Thukral, S K; Rhim, E; Young, E T

    1994-01-01

    Adr1p is a regulatory protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that binds to and activates transcription from two sites in a perfect 22-bp inverted repeat, UAS1, in the ADH2 promoter. Binding requires two C2H2 zinc fingers and a region amino terminal to the fingers. The importance for DNA binding of each position within UAS1 was deduced from two types of assays. Both methods led to an identical consensus sequence containing only four essential base pairs: GG(A/G)G. The preferred sequence, TTGG(A/G)GA, is found in both halves of the inverted repeat. The region of Adr1p amino terminal to the fingers is important for phosphate contacts in the central region of UAS1. However, no base-specific contacts in this portion of UAS1 are important for DNA binding or for ADR1-dependent transcription in vivo. When the central 6 bp were deleted, only a single monomer of Adr1p was able to bind in vitro and activation in vivo was severely reduced. On the basis of these results and previous knowledge about the DNA binding site requirements, including constraints on the spacing and orientation of sites that affect activation in vivo, a consensus binding site for Adr1p was derived. By using this consensus site, potential Adr1p binding sites were located in the promoters of genes known to show ADR1-dependent expression. In addition, this consensus allowed the identification of new potential target genes for Adr1p. Images PMID:8196627

  8. Substrate specificity and mapping of residues critical for transport in the high-affinity glutathione transporter Hgt1p.

    PubMed

    Zulkifli, Mohammad; Yadav, Shambhu; Thakur, Anil; Singla, Shiffalli; Sharma, Monika; Bachhawat, Anand Kumar

    2016-08-01

    The high-affinity glutathione transporter Hgt1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to a relatively new and structurally uncharacterized oligopeptide transporter (OPT) family. To understand the structural features required for interaction with Hgt1p, a quantitative investigation of substrate specificity of Hgt1p was carried out. Hgt1p showed a higher affinity for reduced glutathione (GSH), whereas it transported oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and other glutathione conjugates with lower affinity. To identify the residues of Hgt1p critical for substrate binding and translocation, all amino acid residues of the 13 predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs) have been subjected to mutagenesis. Functional evaluation of these 269 mutants by growth and biochemical assay followed by kinetic analysis of the severely defective mutants including previous mutagenic studies on this transporter have led to the identification of N124 (TMD1), V185 (TMD3), Q222, G225 and Y226 (TMD4), P292 (TMD5), Y374 (TMD6), L429 (TMD7) and F523 and Q526 (TMD9) as critical for substrate binding with at least 3-fold increase in Km upon mutagenesis to alanine. In addition residues Y226 and Y374 appeared to be important for differential substrate specificity. An ab initio model of Hgt1p was built and refined using these mutagenic data that yielded a helical arrangement that includes TMD3, TMD4, TMD5, TMD6, TMD7, TMD9 and TMD13 as pore-lining helices with the functionally important residues in a channel-facing orientation. Taken together the results of this study provides the first mechanistic insights into glutathione transport by a eukaryotic high-affinity glutathione transporter. PMID:27252386

  9. Regulation of mitochondrial translation of the ATP8/ATP6 mRNA by Smt1p

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Malgorzata; Su, Chen Hsien; Xu, Jonathan Tong; Azpiroz, Ricardo; Singh, Angela Mohan; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the mitochondrially encoded ATP6 and ATP8 genes is translationally regulated by F1 ATPase. We report a translational repressor (Smt1p) of the ATP6/8 mRNA that, when mutated, restores translation of the encoded Atp6p and Atp8p subunits of the ATP synthase. Heterozygous smt1 mutants fail to rescue the translation defect, indicating that the mutations are recessive. Smt1p is an intrinsic inner membrane protein, which, based on its sedimentation, has a native size twice that of the monomer. Affinity purification of tagged Smt1p followed by reverse transcription of the associated RNA and PCR amplification of the resultant cDNA with gene-specific primers demonstrated the presence in mitochondria of Smt1p-ATP8/ATP6 and Smt1p-COB mRNA complexes. These results indicate that Smt1p is likely to be involved in translational regulation of both mRNAs. Applying Occam’s principle, we favor a mechanistic model in which translation of the ATP8/ATP6 bicistronic mRNA is coupled to the availability of F1 for subsequent assembly of the Atp6p and Atp8p products into the ATP synthase. The mechanism of this regulatory pathway is proposed to entail a displacement of the repressor from the translationally mute Smt1-ATP8/ATP6 complex by F1, thereby permitting the Atp22p activator to interact with and promote translation of the mRNA. PMID:26823015

  10. The metacaspase (Mca1p) has a dual role in farnesol-induced apoptosis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Léger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Ounissi, Marwa; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Camadro, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Manipulating the apoptotic response of Candida albicans may help in the control of this opportunistic pathogen. The metacaspase Mca1p has been described as a key protease for apoptosis in C. albicans but little is known about its cleavage specificity and substrates. We therefore initiated a series of studies to describe its function. We used a strain disrupted for the MCA1 gene (mca1Δ/Δ) and compared its proteome to that of a wild-type isogenic strain, in the presence and absence of a known inducer of apoptosis, the quorum-sensing molecule farnesol. Label-free and TMT labeling quantitative proteomic analyses showed that both mca1 disruption and farnesol treatment significantly affected the proteome of the cells. The combination of both conditions led to an unexpected biological response: the strong overexpression of proteins implicated in the general stress. We studied sites cleaved by Mca1p using native peptidomic techniques, and a bottom-up approach involving GluC endoprotease: there appeared to be a "K/R" substrate specificity in P1 and a "D/E" specificity in P2. We also found 77 potential substrates of Mca1p, 13 of which validated using the most stringent filters, implicated in protein folding, protein aggregate resolubilization, glycolysis, and a number of mitochondrial functions. An immunoblot assay confirmed the cleavage of Ssb1p, a member of the HSP70 family of heat-shock proteins, in conditions where the metacaspase is activated. These various results indicate that Mca1p is involved in a limited and specific proteolysis program triggered by apoptosis. One of the main functions of Mca1p appears to be the degradation of several major heat-shock proteins, thereby contributing to weakening cellular defenses and amplifying the cell death process. Finally, Mca1p appears to contribute significantly to the control of mitochondria biogenesis and degradation. Consequently, Mca1p may be a link between the extrinsic and the intrinsic programmed cell death pathways

  11. The Metacaspase (Mca1p) has a Dual Role in Farnesol-induced Apoptosis in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Ounissi, Marwa; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Camadro, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Manipulating the apoptotic response of Candida albicans may help in the control of this opportunistic pathogen. The metacaspase Mca1p has been described as a key protease for apoptosis in C. albicans but little is known about its cleavage specificity and substrates. We therefore initiated a series of studies to describe its function. We used a strain disrupted for the MCA1 gene (mca1Δ/Δ) and compared its proteome to that of a wild-type isogenic strain, in the presence and absence of a known inducer of apoptosis, the quorum-sensing molecule farnesol. Label-free and TMT labeling quantitative proteomic analyses showed that both mca1 disruption and farnesol treatment significantly affected the proteome of the cells. The combination of both conditions led to an unexpected biological response: the strong overexpression of proteins implicated in the general stress. We studied sites cleaved by Mca1p using native peptidomic techniques, and a bottom-up approach involving GluC endoprotease: there appeared to be a “K/R” substrate specificity in P1 and a “D/E” specificity in P2. We also found 77 potential substrates of Mca1p, 13 of which validated using the most stringent filters, implicated in protein folding, protein aggregate resolubilization, glycolysis, and a number of mitochondrial functions. An immunoblot assay confirmed the cleavage of Ssb1p, a member of the HSP70 family of heat-shock proteins, in conditions where the metacaspase is activated. These various results indicate that Mca1p is involved in a limited and specific proteolysis program triggered by apoptosis. One of the main functions of Mca1p appears to be the degradation of several major heat-shock proteins, thereby contributing to weakening cellular defenses and amplifying the cell death process. Finally, Mca1p appears to contribute significantly to the control of mitochondria biogenesis and degradation. Consequently, Mca1p may be a link between the extrinsic and the intrinsic programmed cell death

  12. Angular distributions and polarization fractions of helium resonance radiation (n 1P - 1 1S) in the extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.; Misakian, M.; Jackson, W. M.; Faris, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Angular intensity distributions of helium (n 1P - 1 1S) resonance photons with respect to the exciting electron beam are presented. The angular intensity distributions were measured at selected electron impact energies from 25 eV (near threshold) to 150 eV. Polarization fractions (Pi) were obtained by analyzing the data in terms of the theoretical relation between angular intensity distribution and Pi, i.e. Iota (theta) = Iota (90) (1 - Pi sq cos theta). The experimental values for Pi are compared with recent theoretical results and with previous experimental values for the (3 1P - 2 1S) transition.

  13. The transcriptional regulator Hap1p (Cyp1p) is essential for anaerobic or heme-deficient growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Genetic and molecular characterization of an extragenic suppressor that encodes a WD repeat protein.

    PubMed Central

    Chantrel, Y; Gaisne, M; Lions, C; Verdière, J

    1998-01-01

    We report here that Hap1p (originally named Cyp1p) has an essential function in anaerobic or heme-deficient growth. Analysis of intragenic revertants shows that this function depends on the amino acid preceding the first cysteine residue of the DNA-binding domain of Hap1p. Selection of recessive extragenic suppressors of a hap1-hem1- strain allowed the identification, cloning, and molecular analysis of ASC1 (Cyp1 Absence of growth Supressor). The sequence of ASC1 reveals that its ORF is interrupted by an intron that shelters the U24 snoRNA. Deletion of the intron, inactivation of the ORF, and molecular localization of the mutations show unambiguously that it is the protein and not the snoRNA that is involved in the suppressor phenotype. ASC1, which is constitutively transcribed, encodes an abundant, cytoplasmically localized 35-kD protein that belongs to the WD repeat family, which is found in a large variety of eucaryotic organisms. Polysome profile analysis supports the involvement of this protein in translation. We propose that the absence of functional Asc1p allows the growth of hap1-hem1- cells by reducing the efficiency of translation. Based on sequence comparisons, we discuss the possibility that the protein intervenes in a kinase-dependent signal transduction pathway involved in this last function. PMID:9504906

  14. S1P activates store-operated calcium entry via receptor- and non-receptor-mediated pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hopson, Kristen Park; Truelove, Jessica; Chun, Jerold; Wang, Yumei; Waeber, Christian

    2011-04-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) has been shown to modulate intracellular Ca(2+) through both G protein-coupled receptors and intracellular second messenger pathways. The precise mechanism by which S1P activates store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) has not been fully characterized. Because sphingolipids and Ca(2+) modulate proliferation and constriction in VSMCs, characterizing the connection between S1P and SOCE may provide novel therapeutic targets for vascular diseases. We found that S1P triggered STIM1 puncta formation and SOCE in VSMCs. S1P-activated SOCE was inhibited by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), diethylstilbestrol (DES), and gadolinium (Gd(3+)). SOCE was observed in VSMCs lacking either S1P(2) or S1P(3) receptors, suggesting that S1P acts via multiple signaling pathways. Indeed, both extracellular and intracellular S1P application increased the total internal reflection fluorescence signal in VSMCs cells transfected with STIM1-yellow fluorescent protein in a 2-APB-sensitive manner. These data, and the fact that 2-APB, DES, and Gd(3+) all inhibited S1P-induced cerebral artery constriction, suggest that SOCE modulates S1P-induced vasoconstriction in vivo. Finally, S1P-induced SOCE was larger in proliferative than in contractile VSMCs, correlating with increases in STIM1, Orai1, S1P(1), and S1P(3) receptor mRNA. These data demonstrate that S1P can act through both receptors and a novel intracellular pathway to activate SOCE. Because S1P-induced SOCE contributes to vessel constriction and is increased in proliferative VSMCs, it is likely that S1P/SOCE signaling in proliferative VSMCs may play a role in vascular dysfunction such as atherosclerosis and diabetes. PMID:21270296

  15. Rho5p is involved in mediating the osmotic stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and its activity is regulated via Msi1p and Npr1p by phosphorylation and ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Annan, Robert B; Wu, Cunle; Waller, Daniel D; Whiteway, Malcolm; Thomas, David Y

    2008-09-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family act as molecular switches, and modulation of the GTP-bound state of Rho proteins is a well-characterized means of regulating their signaling activity in vivo. In contrast, the regulation of Rho-type GTPases by posttranslational modifications is poorly understood. Here, we present evidence of the control of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rho-type GTPase Rho5p by phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Rho5p binds to Ste50p, and the expression of the activated RHO5(Q91H) allele in an Deltaste50 strain is lethal under conditions of osmotic stress. An overexpression screen identified RGD2 and MSI1 as being high-copy suppressors of the osmotic sensitivity of this lethality. Rgd2p had been identified as being a possible Rho5p GTPase-activating protein based on an in vitro assay; this result supports its function as a regulator of Rho5p activity in vivo. MSI1 was previously identified as being a suppressor of hyperactive Ras/cyclic AMP signaling, where it antagonizes Npr1p kinase activity and promotes ubiquitination. Here, we show that Msi1p also acts via Npr1p to suppress activated Rho5p signaling. Rho5p is ubiquitinated, and its expression is lethal in a strain that is compromised for proteasome activity. These data identify Rho5p as being a target of Msi1p/Npr1p regulation and describe a regulatory circuit involving phosphorylation and ubiquitination. PMID:18621925

  16. Accurate long-range coefficients for two excited like isotope He atoms: He(2 {sup 1}P)-He(2 {sup 1}P), He(2 {sup 1}P)-He(2 {sup 3}P), and He(2 {sup 3}P)-He(2 {sup 3}P)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.-Y.; Yan, Z.-C.; Vrinceanu, D.; Babb, J. F.; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2007-07-15

    A general formalism is used to express the long-range potential energies in inverse powers of the separation distance between two like atomic or molecular systems with P symmetries. The long-range molecular interaction coefficients are calculated for the molecular symmetries {delta}, {pi}, and {sigma}, arising from the following interactions: He(2 {sup 1}P)-He(2 {sup 1}P), He(2 {sup 1}P)-He(2 {sup 3}P), and He(2 {sup 3}P)-He(2 {sup 3}P). The electric quadrupole-quadrupole term C{sub 5}, the van der Waals (dispersion) term C{sub 6}, and higher-order terms C{sub 8} and C{sub 10} are calculated ab initio using accurate variational wave functions in Hylleraas coordinates with finite nuclear mass effects. A comparison is made with previously published results where available.

  17. 76 FR 45309 - Social Security Ruling 11-1p; Titles II and XVI: Procedures for Handling Requests To File...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION Social Security Ruling 11-1p; Titles II and XVI: Procedures for Handling Requests To File... ] procedures for handling your request to file a disability claim when you have a pending claim of the same... Office of the General Counsel, or other interpretations of the law and regulations. Although SSRs do...

  18. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D J

    2016-08-01

    Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients. PMID:27494202

  19. The spin structure function g1p of the proton and a test of the Bjorken sum rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chang, W.-C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse-Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; von Harrach, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; -Yu Hsieh, C.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jörg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rychter, A.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Selyunin, A.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2016-02-01

    New results for the double spin asymmetry A1p and the proton longitudinal spin structure function g1p are presented. They were obtained by the COMPASS Collaboration using polarised 200 GeV muons scattered off a longitudinally polarised NH3 target. The data were collected in 2011 and complement those recorded in 2007 at 160 GeV, in particular at lower values of x. They improve the statistical precision of g1p (x) by about a factor of two in the region x ≲ 0.02. A next-to-leading order QCD fit to the g1 world data is performed. It leads to a new determination of the quark spin contribution to the nucleon spin, ΔΣ, ranging from 0.26 to 0.36, and to a re-evaluation of the first moment of g1p. The uncertainty of ΔΣ is mostly due to the large uncertainty in the present determinations of the gluon helicity distribution. A new evaluation of the Bjorken sum rule based on the COMPASS results for the non-singlet structure function g1NS (x ,Q2) yields as ratio of the axial and vector coupling constants |gA /gV | = 1.22 ± 0.05 (stat.) ± 0.10 (syst.), which validates the sum rule to an accuracy of about 9%.

  20. The cooperative role of S1P3 with LYVE-1 in LMW-HA-induced lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengsi; Zhang, Huizhen; Liu, Yiwen; He, Yiqing; Yang, Cuixia; Du, Yan; Wu, Man; Zhang, Guoliang; Gao, Feng

    2015-08-01

    Lymphangiogenesis, the formation of new lymph vessels, plays a significant role in the development and metastasis of various cancers. We and others have demonstrated that low molecular weight hyaluronan (LMW-HA) promotes lymphangiogenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. In this study, using immunofluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation, we found that LMW-HA increased the colocalization of lymphatic vessel endothelial HA receptor (LYVE-1) and sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1P3) at the cell surface. Silencing of either LYVE-1 or S1P3 decreased LMW-HA-mediated tube formation in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). Furthermore, silencing of either LYVE-1 or S1P3 significantly inhibited LMW-HA-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Src kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2). In summary, these results suggest that S1P3 and LYVE-1 may cooperate to play a role in LMW-HA-mediated lymphangiogenesis. This interaction may provide a useful target for the intervention of lymphangiogenesis-associated tumor progression. PMID:26116468

  1. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D J

    2016-01-01

    Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients. PMID:27561113

  2. Whole-genomic analysis of a human G1P[9] rotavirus strain reveals intergenogroup-reassortment events.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Souvik; Shintani, Tsuzumi; Urushibara, Noriko; Taniguchi, Koki; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2012-08-01

    Group A rotavirus (RVA) strain K8 (RVA/Human-tc/JPN/K8/1977/G1P[9]) was found to have Wa-like VP7 and NSP1 genes and AU-1-like VP4 and NSP5 genes. To determine the exact origin and overall genetic makeup of this unusual RVA strain, the remaining genes (VP1-VP3, VP6 and NSP2-NSP4) of K8 were analysed in this study. Strain K8 exhibited a G1-P[9]-I1-R3-C3-M3-A1-N1-T3-E3-H3 genotype constellation, not reported previously. The VP6 and NSP2 genes of strain K8 were related closely to those of common human Wa-like G1P[8] and/or G3P[8] strains, whilst its VP1-VP3, NSP3 and NSP4 genes were related more closely to those of AU-1-like RVAs and/or AU-1-like genes of multi-reassortant strains than to those of other RVAs. Therefore, strain K8 might have originated from intergenogroup-reassortment events involving acquisition of four Wa-like genes, possibly from G1P[8] RVAs, by an AU-1-like P[9] strain. Whole-genomic analysis of strain K8 has provided important insights into the complex genetic diversity of RVAs. PMID:22592265

  3. SKI-1/S1P inhibition: a promising surrogate to statins to block hepatitis C virus replication.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Matthieu; Seidah, Nabil G; Labonté, Patrick

    2012-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is often associated with steatosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Statins (HMG-CoAR inhibitors) have been shown to exert an antiviral effect in vitro, principally on replicon harboring cells, but the effect of their use alone in vivo remains controversial. In clinical trials, when used in combination with the standards of care (SOC), they led to an increased proportion of sustained virological responder (SVR). Here we investigated the implication of SKI-1/S1P, a master lipogenic pathways regulator upstream of HMG-CoAR, on different steps of HCV life cycle. We compared the HCV antiviral effect of the most potent SKI-1/S1P small molecule inhibitor (PF-429242) with a set of two statins on different steps of the viral life cycle, and showed that SKI-1/S1P inhibitor blocked HCVcc (strain JFH-1) RNA replication (EC(50)= 5.8 μM) more efficiently than statins. Moreover, we showed that PF-429242 could reduce lipid droplets accumulation in Huh7 cells. Interestingly, PF-429242 dramatically reduced infectious particles production (EC(90)= 4.8 μM). Such inhibition could not be achieved with statins. SKI-1/S1P activity is thus essential for viral production and its inhibition should be considered for antiviral drug development. PMID:22626636

  4. Physiological lipid composition is vital for homotypic ER membrane fusion mediated by the dynamin-related GTPase Sey1p

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Shintaro; Mima, Joji

    2016-01-01

    Homotypic fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is required for generating and maintaining the characteristic reticular ER membrane structures. This organelle membrane fusion process depends on the ER-bound dynamin-related GTPases, such as atlastins in animals and Sey1p in yeast. Here, to investigate whether specific lipid molecules facilitate GTPase-dependent ER membrane fusion directly, we comprehensively evaluated membrane docking and lipid mixing of reconstituted proteoliposomes bearing purified Sey1p and a set of ER-mimicking lipids, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid, and ergosterol. Remarkably, we revealed that each specific lipid species contributed little to membrane docking mediated by Sey1p. Nevertheless, Sey1p-dependent lipid mixing was strongly reduced by omitting three major acidic lipids from the ER-mimicking set and, moreover, was entirely abolished by omitting either phosphatidylethanolamine or ergosterol. Our reconstitution studies thus established that physiological lipid composition is vital for lipid bilayer rearrangements in GTPase-mediated homotypic ER membrane fusion. PMID:26838333

  5. Cryo-EM structure of dodecameric Vps4p and its 2:1 complex with Vta1p

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiheng; Gonciarz, Malgorzata D.; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hill, Christopher P.; Jensen, Grant J.

    2008-01-01

    The type I AAA ATPase Vps4 and its co-factor Vta1p/LIP5 function in membrane remodeling events that accompany cytokinesis, multivesicular body biogenesis, and retrovirus budding, apparently by driving disassembly and recycling of membrane-associated ESCRT-III complexes. Here, we present cryo-EM reconstructions of dodecameric yeast Vps4p complexes with and without their MIT N-terminal domains and Vta1p co-factors. The ATPase domains of Vps4p form a bowl-like structure composed of stacked hexameric rings. The two rings adopt dramatically different conformations, with the “upper” ring forming an open assembly that defines the sides of the bowl and the lower ring forming a closed assembly that forms the bottom of the bowl. The N-terminal MIT domains of the upper ring localize on the symmetry axis above the cavity of the bowl, and the binding of six extended Vta1p monomers causes additional density to appear both above and below the bowl. The structures suggest models in which Vps4p MIT and Vta1p domains engage ESCRT-III substrates above the bowl and help transfer them into the bowl to be pumped through the center of the dodecameric assembly. PMID:18280501

  6. Los1p, involved in yeast pre-tRNA splicing, positively regulates members of the SOL gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.C.; Stanford, D.R.; Hopper, A.K.

    1996-06-01

    To understand the role of Los1p in pre-tRNA splicing, we sought los1 multicopy suppressors. We found SOL1 that suppresses both point and null LOS1 mutations. Since, when fused to the Gal4p DNA-binding domain, Los1p activates transcription, we tested whether Los1p regulates SOL1. We found that los1 mutants have depleted levels of SOL1 mRNA and Sol1p. Thus, LOS1 appears to positively regulate SOL1. SOL1 belongs to a multigene family with at least two additional members, SOL2 and SOL3. Sol proteins have extensive similarity to an unusual group of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases (G6PDs). As the similarities are restricted to areas separate from the catalytic domain, these G6PDs may have more than one function. The SOL gene disruptions negatively affect tRNA-mediated nonsense suppression and the severity increases with the number of mutant SOL genes. However, tRNA levels do not vary with either multicopy SOL genes or with SOL disruptions. Therefore, the Sol proteins affect tRNA expression/function at steps other than transcription or splicing. We propose that LOS1 regulates gene products involved in tRNA expression/function as well as pre-tRNA splicing. 64 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients. PMID:27561113

  8. Rer1p maintains ciliary length and signaling by regulating γ-secretase activity and Foxj1a levels

    PubMed Central

    Jurisch-Yaksi, Nathalie; Rose, Applonia J.; Lu, Huiqi; Raemaekers, Tim; Munck, Sebastian; Baatsen, Pieter; Baert, Veerle; Vermeire, Wendy; Scales, Suzie J.; Verleyen, Daphne; Vandepoel, Roel; Tylzanowski, Przemko; Yaksi, Emre; de Ravel, Thomy; Yost, H. Joseph; Froyen, Guy; Arrington, Cammon B.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia project from the surface of most vertebrate cells and are important for several physiological and developmental processes. Ciliary defects are linked to a variety of human diseases, named ciliopathies, underscoring the importance of understanding signaling pathways involved in cilia formation and maintenance. In this paper, we identified Rer1p as the first endoplasmic reticulum/cis-Golgi–localized membrane protein involved in ciliogenesis. Rer1p, a protein quality control receptor, was highly expressed in zebrafish ciliated organs and regulated ciliary structure and function. Both in zebrafish and mammalian cells, loss of Rer1p resulted in the shortening of cilium and impairment of its motile or sensory function, which was reflected by hearing, vision, and left–right asymmetry defects as well as decreased Hedgehog signaling. We further demonstrate that Rer1p depletion reduced ciliary length and function by increasing γ-secretase complex assembly and activity and, consequently, enhancing Notch signaling as well as reducing Foxj1a expression. PMID:23479743

  9. Involvement of the mitogen activated protein kinase Hog1p in the response of Candida albicans to iron availability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron is an essential nutrient for almost all organisms, and generating iron limiting conditions for pathogens is one of the host defense strategies against microbial infections. Excess of iron can be toxic; therefore, iron uptake is tightly controlled. The high affinity iron uptake system of the opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida albicans has been shown to be essential for virulence. Several transcription factors and regulators of iron uptake genes were identified, but the knowledge of signaling pathways is still limited. Gene expression profiling of the Δhog1 deletion mutant indicated an involvement of the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase Hog1p. However, the function of Hog1p in the response of C. albicans to iron availability was not studied in detail. Thus, we analyzed phenotypic and molecular responses of C. albicans to different iron concentrations particularly with respect to the activity of the Hog1p MAP kinase module. Results We observed flocculation of yeast cells, when the iron ion concentration was equal to or higher than 5 μM. This phenotype was dependent on the MAP kinase Hog1p and the corresponding MAP kinase kinase Pbs2p. Moreover, high extracellular iron ion concentrations led to hyper-phosphorylation of Hog1p. We determined lower amounts of multicopper ferroxidase (MCFO) proteins and lower ferric reductase activity, when the iron ion concentration in the medium was increased. This effect was also observed for the Δhog1 mutant. However, the amounts of MCFO proteins and the cell surface ferric reductase activity were increased in the Δhog1 in comparison to wild type cells. This effect was independent of iron availability in growth media. Conclusions In C. albicans, the MAP kinase Hog1p is part of the network regulating the response of the organism to iron availability. Hog1p was transiently phosphorylated under high iron concentrations and was essential for a flocculent phenotype. Furthermore, deletion of HOG1 led to

  10. Vrp1p-Las17p interaction is critical for actin patch polarization but is not essential for growth or fluid phase endocytosis in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ming Hwa; Meng, Lei; Rajmohan, Rajamuthiah; Yu, Shangjuan; Thanabalu, Thirumaran

    2010-12-01

    Vrp1p (yeast WIP) forms a protein complex with Las17p (yeast WASP), however the physiological significance of the interaction has not been fully characterized. Vrp1p residues, (788)MPKPR(792) are essential for Vrp1p-Las17p interaction. While C-Vrp1p(364-817) complements all the defects of the vrp1Δ strain, C-Vrp1p(364-817)(5A) ((788)AAAAA(792)) does not complement any of the defects, due to its inability to localize to cortical patches. Targeting C-Vrp1p(364-817)(5A) to membranes using CAAX motif (C-Vrp1p(364-817)(5A)-CAAX) rescued the growth and endocytosis defect but not the actin patch polarization defect of vrp1Δ. Vrp1p can localize to cortical patches, either by binding to Las17p through LBD (Las17 Binding Domain, Vrp1p(760-817)) or independent of Las17p through residues in N-Vrp1p(1-364). Unlike Vrp1p, Vrp1p(5A) localizes poorly to cortical patches and complements all the defects of vrp1Δ strain except actin patch polarization at elevated temperature. N-Vrp1p(1-364) complements all the defects of vrp1Δ strain except the actin patch polarization defect while N-Vrp1p(1-364)-LBD fusion protein complements all the defects. Thus our results show that while both Vrp1p and Las17p are essential for many cellular processes, the two proteins do not necessarily have to bind to each other to carry out these cellular functions. However, Las17p-Vrp1p interaction is essential for actin patch polarization at elevated temperature. PMID:20816901

  11. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C; McAllen, John K; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2015-09-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide. PMID:26254487

  12. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C.; McAllen, John K.; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide. PMID:26254487

  13. Phosphorylation-Independent Inhibition of Cdc28p by the Tyrosine Kinase Swe1p in the Morphogenesis Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, John N.; Sia, Rey A. L.; Bardes, Elaine S. G.; Lew, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    The morphogenesis checkpoint in budding yeast delays cell cycle progression in G2 when the actin cytoskeleton is perturbed, providing time for cells to complete bud formation prior to mitosis. Checkpoint-induced G2 arrest involves the inhibition of the master cell cycle regulatory cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc28p, by the Wee1 family kinase Swe1p. Results of experiments using a nonphosphorylatable CDC28Y19F allele suggested that the checkpoint stimulated two inhibitory pathways, one that promoted phosphorylation at tyrosine 19 (Y19) and a poorly characterized second pathway that did not require Cdc28p Y19 phosphorylation. We present the results from a genetic screen for checkpoint-defective mutants that led to the repeated isolation of the dominant CDC28E12K allele that is resistant to Swe1p-mediated inhibition. Comparison of this allele with the nonphosphorylatable CDC28Y19F allele suggested that Swe1p is still able to inhibit CDC28Y19F in a phosphorylation-independent manner and that both the Y19 phosphorylation-dependent and -independent checkpoint pathways in fact reflect Swe1p inhibition of Cdc28p. Remarkably, we found that a Swe1p mutant lacking catalytic activity could significantly delay the cell cycle in vivo during a physiological checkpoint response, even when expressed at single copy. The finding that a Wee1 family kinase expressed at physiological levels can inhibit a nonphosphorylatable cyclin-dependent kinase has broad implications for many checkpoint studies using such mutants in other organisms. PMID:10454545

  14. Targeting SQSTM1/p62 Induces Cargo Loading Failure and Converts Autophagy to Apoptosis via NBK/Bik

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuang; Zhou, Liang; Zhang, Yu; Leng, Yun; Pei, Xin-Yan; Lin, Hui; Jones, Richard; Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2014-01-01

    In selective autophagy, the adaptor protein SQSTM1/p62 plays a critical role in recognizing/loading cargo (e.g., malfolded proteins) into autophagosomes for lysosomal degradation. Here we report that whereas SQSTM1/p62 levels fluctuated in a time-dependent manner during autophagy, inhibition or knockdown of Cdk9/cyclin T1 transcriptionally downregulated SQSTM1/p62 but did not affect autophagic flux. These interventions, or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) directly targeting SQSTM1/p62, resulted in cargo loading failure and inefficient autophagy, phenomena recently described for Huntington's disease neurons. These events led to the accumulation of the BH3-only protein NBK/Bik on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, most likely by blocking loading and autophagic degradation of NBK/Bik, culminating in apoptosis. Whereas NBK/Bik upregulation was further enhanced by disruption of distal autophagic events (e.g., autophagosome maturation) by chloroquine (CQ) or Lamp2 shRNA, it was substantially diminished by inhibition of autophagy initiation (e.g., genetically by shRNA targeting Ulk1, beclin-1, or Atg5 or pharmacologically by 3-methyladenine [3-MA] or spautin-1), arguing that NBK/Bik accumulation stems from inefficient autophagy. Finally, NBK/Bik knockdown markedly attenuated apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Together, these findings identify novel cross talk between autophagy and apoptosis, wherein targeting SQSTM1/p62 converts cytoprotective autophagy to an inefficient form due to cargo loading failure, leading to NBK/Bik accumulation, which triggers apoptosis. PMID:25002530

  15. Acyldepsipeptide antibiotics kill mycobacteria by preventing the physiological functions of the ClpP1P2 protease.

    PubMed

    Famulla, Kirsten; Sass, Peter; Malik, Imran; Akopian, Tatos; Kandror, Olga; Alber, Marina; Hinzen, Berthold; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Goldberg, Alfred L; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike

    2016-07-01

    The Clp protease complex in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is unusual in its composition, functional importance and activation mechanism. Whilst most bacterial species contain a single ClpP protein that is dispensable for normal growth, mycobacteria have two ClpPs, ClpP1 and ClpP2, which are essential for viability and together form the ClpP1P2 tetradecamer. Acyldepsipeptide antibiotics of the ADEP class inhibit the growth of Gram-positive firmicutes by activating ClpP and causing unregulated protein degradation. Here we show that, in contrast, mycobacteria are killed by ADEP through inhibition of ClpP function. Although ADEPs can stimulate purified M. tuberculosis ClpP1P2 to degrade larger peptides and unstructured proteins, this effect is weaker than for ClpP from other bacteria and depends on the presence of an additional activating factor (e.g. the dipeptide benzyloxycarbonyl-leucyl-leucine in vitro) to form the active ClpP1P2 tetradecamer. The cell division protein FtsZ, which is a particularly sensitive target for ADEP-activated ClpP in firmicutes, is not degraded in mycobacteria. Depletion of the ClpP1P2 level in a conditional Mycobacterium bovis BCG mutant enhanced killing by ADEP unlike in other bacteria. In summary, ADEPs kill mycobacteria by preventing interaction of ClpP1P2 with the regulatory ATPases, ClpX or ClpC1, thus inhibiting essential ATP-dependent protein degradation. PMID:26919556

  16. Genomic footprinting of the yeast zinc finger protein Rme1p and its roles in repression of the meiotic activator IME1.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, M; Li, W; Covitz, P A; Hara, M; Shindo, H; Mitchell, A P

    1998-01-01

    The zinc finger protein Rme1p is a negative regulator of the meiotic activator IME1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Prior studies have shown that Rme1p binds in vitro to a site near nt -2030 in the IME1 upstream region, but a genomic mutation in that site has little effect on repression of IME1 . To identify Rme1p binding sites in vivo , we have examined the binding of Rme1p to genomic sites through in vivo footprinting. We show that Rme1p binds to two sites in the IME1 upstream region, near nt -1950 and -2030. Mutations in both binding sites abolish repression of chromosomal IME1 by Rme1p, whereas a mutation in either single site causes partial derepression. Therefore, both Rme1p binding sites are essential for repression of IME1 . Prior studies have shown that repression by Rme1p depends upon RGR1 and SIN4 , which specify RNA polymerase II mediator subunits that are required for normal nucleosome density. We find that RGR1 and SIN4 are not simply required for Rme1p to bind to DNA in vivo . These results suggest that Rme1p functions directly as a repressor of IME1 and that Rgr1p and Sin4p are required for DNA-bound Rme1p to exert repression. PMID:9580682

  17. A Genome-wide Association Study Provides Evidence of Sex-specific Involvement of Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P) and Chr8p23.1 (HMGB1P46) With Diabetic Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Meng, Weihua; Deshmukh, Harshal A; Donnelly, Louise A; Torrance, Nicola; Colhoun, Helen M; Palmer, Colin N A; Smith, Blair H

    2015-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is defined as pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system and it affects around 1 in 4 diabetic patients in the UK. The purpose of this genome-wide association study (GWAS) was to identify genetic contributors to this disorder. Cases of neuropathic pain were defined as diabetic patients with a multiple prescription history of at least one of five drugs specifically indicated for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Controls were diabetic individuals who were not prescribed any of these drugs, nor amitriptyline, carbamazepine, or nortriptyline. Overall, 961 diabetic neuropathic pain cases and 3260 diabetic controls in the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research Tayside (GoDARTS) cohort were identified. We found a cluster in the Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P) with a lowest P value of 2.74 × 10(- 7) at rs71647933 in females and a cluster in the Chr8p23.1, next to HMGB1P46 with a lowest P value of 8.02 × 10(- 7) at rs6986153 in males. Sex-specific narrow sense heritability was higher in males (30.0%) than in females (14.7%). This GWAS on diabetic neuropathic pain provides evidence for the sex-specific involvement of Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P) and Chr8p23.1 (HMGB1P46) with the disorder, indicating the need for further research. PMID:26629533

  18. A Genome-wide Association Study Provides Evidence of Sex-specific Involvement of Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P) and Chr8p23.1 (HMGB1P46) With Diabetic Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Weihua; Deshmukh, Harshal A.; Donnelly, Louise A.; Torrance, Nicola; Colhoun, Helen M.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Smith, Blair H.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is defined as pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system and it affects around 1 in 4 diabetic patients in the UK. The purpose of this genome-wide association study (GWAS) was to identify genetic contributors to this disorder. Cases of neuropathic pain were defined as diabetic patients with a multiple prescription history of at least one of five drugs specifically indicated for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Controls were diabetic individuals who were not prescribed any of these drugs, nor amitriptyline, carbamazepine, or nortriptyline. Overall, 961 diabetic neuropathic pain cases and 3260 diabetic controls in the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research Tayside (GoDARTS) cohort were identified. We found a cluster in the Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P) with a lowest P value of 2.74 × 10− 7 at rs71647933 in females and a cluster in the Chr8p23.1, next to HMGB1P46 with a lowest P value of 8.02 × 10− 7 at rs6986153 in males. Sex-specific narrow sense heritability was higher in males (30.0%) than in females (14.7%). This GWAS on diabetic neuropathic pain provides evidence for the sex-specific involvement of Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P) and Chr8p23.1 (HMGB1P46) with the disorder, indicating the need for further research. PMID:26629533

  19. Interactions between the bud emergence proteins Bem1p and Bem2p and Rho- type GTPases in yeast

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The SH3 domain-containing protein Bem1p is needed for normal bud emergence and mating projection formation, two processes that require asymmetric reorganizations of the cortical cytoskeleton in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify proteins that functionally and/or physically interact with Bem1p, we screened for mutations that display synthetic lethality with a mutant allele of the BEM1 gene and for genes whose products display two-hybrid interactions with the Bem1 protein. CDC24, which is required for bud emergence and encodes a GEF (guanine- nucleotide exchange factor) for the essential Rho-type GTPase Cdc42p, was identified during both screens. The COOH-terminal 75 amino acids of Cdc24p, outside of the GEF domain, can interact with a portion of Bem1p that lacks both SH3 domains. Bacterially expressed Cdc24p and Bem1p bind to each other in vitro, indicating that no other yeast proteins are required for this interaction. The most frequently identified gene that arose from the bem1 synthetic-lethal screen was the bud-emergence gene BEM2 (Bender and Pringle. 1991. Mol. Cell Biol. 11:1295-1395), which is allelic with IPL2 (increase in ploidy; Chan and Botstein, 1993. Genetics. 135:677-691). Here we show that Bem2p contains a GAP (GTPase-activating protein) domain for Rho-type GTPases, and that this portion of Bem2p can stimulate in vitro the GTPase activity of Rho1p, a second essential yeast Rho-type GTPase. Cells deleted for BEM2 become large and multinucleate. These and other genetic, two-hybrid, biochemical, and phenotypic data suggest that multiple Rho-type GTPases control the reorganization of the cortical cytoskeleton in yeast and that the functions of these GTPases are tightly coupled. Also, these findings raise the possibility that Bem1p may regulate or be a target of action of one or more of these GTPases. PMID:7962098

  20. Interactions between the bud emergence proteins Bem1p and Bem2p and Rho-type GTPases in yeast.

    PubMed

    Peterson, J; Zheng, Y; Bender, L; Myers, A; Cerione, R; Bender, A

    1994-12-01

    The SH3 domain-containing protein Bem1p is needed for normal bud emergence and mating projection formation, two processes that require asymmetric reorganizations of the cortical cytoskeleton in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify proteins that functionally and/or physically interact with Bem1p, we screened for mutations that display synthetic lethality with a mutant allele of the BEM1 gene and for genes whose products display two-hybrid interactions with the Bem1 protein. CDC24, which is required for bud emergence and encodes a GEF (guanine-nucleotide exchange factor) for the essential Rho-type GTPase Cdc42p, was identified during both screens. The COOH-terminal 75 amino acids of Cdc24p, outside of the GEF domain, can interact with a portion of Bem1p that lacks both SH3 domains. Bacterially expressed Cdc24p and Bem1p bind to each other in vitro, indicating that no other yeast proteins are required for this interaction. The most frequently identified gene that arose from the bem1 synthetic-lethal screen was the bud-emergence gene BEM2 (Bender and Pringle. 1991. Mol. Cell Biol. 11:1295-1395), which is allelic with IPL2 (increase in ploidy; Chan and Botstein, 1993. Genetics. 135:677-691). Here we show that Bem2p contains a GAP (GTPase-activating protein) domain for Rho-type GTPases, and that this portion of Bem2p can stimulate in vitro the GTPase activity of Rho1p, a second essential yeast Rho-type GTPase. Cells deleted for BEM2 become large and multinucleate. These and other genetic, two-hybrid, biochemical, and phenotypic data suggest that multiple Rho-type GTPases control the reorganization of the cortical cytoskeleton in yeast and that the functions of these GTPases are tightly coupled. Also, these findings raise the possibility that Bem1p may regulate or be a target of action of one or more of these GTPases. PMID:7962098

  1. The yeast protein Gcr1p binds to the PGK UAS and contributes to the activation of transcription of the PGK gene.

    PubMed

    Henry, Y A; López, M C; Gibbs, J M; Chambers, A; Kingsman, S M; Baker, H V; Stanway, C A

    1994-11-15

    Analysis of the upstream activation sequence (UAS) of the yeast phosphoglycerate kinase gene (PGK) has demonstrated that a number of sequence elements are involved in its activity and two of these sequences are bound by the multifunctional factors Rap1p and Abf1p. In this report we show by in vivo footprinting that the regulatory factor encoded by GCR1 binds to two elements in the 3' half of the PGK UAS. These elements contain the sequence CTTCC, which was previously suggested to be important for the activity of the PGK UAS and has been shown to be able to bind Gcr1p in vitro. Furthermore, we find that Gcr1p positively influences PGK transcription, although it is not responsible for the carbon source dependent regulation of PGK mRNA synthesis. In order to mediate its transcriptional influence we find that Gcr1p requires the Rap1p binding site, in addition to its own, but not the Abf1p site. As neither a Rap1p nor a Gcr1p binding site alone is able to activate transcription, we propose that Gcr1p and Rap1p interact in an interdependent fashion to activate PGK transcription. PMID:7808400

  2. Interdependence of the Ypt/RabGAP Gyp5p and Gyl1p for recruitment to the sites of polarized growth.

    PubMed

    Chesneau, Laurent; Prigent, Magali; Boy-Marcotte, Emmanuelle; Daraspe, Jean; Fortier, Guillaume; Jacquet, Michel; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Cuif, Marie-Hélène

    2008-04-01

    Gyp5p and Gyl1p are two members of the Ypt/Rab guanosine triphosphatases-activating proteins involved in the control of polarized exocytosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We had previously shown that Gyp5p and Gyl1p colocalize at the sites of polarized growth and belong to the same complex in subcellular fractions enriched in plasma membrane or secretory vesicles. Here, we investigate the interaction between Gyp5p and Gyl1p as well as the mechanism of their localization to the sites of polarized growth. We show that purified recombinant Gyp5p and Gyl1p interact directly in vitro. In vivo, both Gyp5p and Gyl1p are mutually required to concentrate at the sites of polarized growth. Moreover, the localization of Gyp5p and Gyl1p to the sites of polarized growth requires the formins Bni1p and Bnr1p and depends on actin cables. We show that, in a sec6-4 mutant, blocking secretion leads to coaccumulation of Gyp5p and Gyl1p, together with Sec4p. Electron microscopy experiments demonstrate that Gyp5p is associated with secretory vesicles. Altogether, our results indicate that both Gyp5p and Gyl1p access the sites of polarized growth by transport on secretory vesicles. Two polarisome components, Spa2p and Bud6p, are involved in maintaining Gyp5p and Gyl1p colocalized at the sites of polarized growth. PMID:18182006

  3. Reassortment of Human and Animal Rotavirus Gene Segments in Emerging DS-1-Like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strains.

    PubMed

    Komoto, Satoshi; Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Tsuji, Takao; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tharmaphornpilas, Piyanit; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of novel DS-1-like G1P[8] human rotaviruses in Japan were recently reported. More recently, such intergenogroup reassortant strains were identified in Thailand, implying the ongoing spread of unusual rotavirus strains in Asia. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand, three DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains having G3P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-281/2013/G3P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-289/2013/G3P[8]) and G2P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/LS-04/2013/G2P[8]) genotypes were identified in fecal samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genomes of strains SKT-281, SKT-289, and LS-04. On whole genomic analysis, all three strains exhibited unique genotype constellations including both genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G3-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strains SKT-281 and SKT-289, and G2-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strain LS-04. Except for the G genotype, the unique genotype constellation of the three strains (P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2) is commonly shared with DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. On phylogenetic analysis, nine of the 11 genes of strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 (VP4, VP6, VP1-3, NSP1-3, and NSP5) appeared to have originated from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains, while the remaining VP7 and NSP4 genes appeared to be of equine and bovine origin, respectively. Thus, strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 appeared to be reassortant strains as to DS-1-like G1P[8], animal-derived human, and/or animal rotaviruses. On the other hand, seven of the 11 genes of strain LS-04 (VP7, VP6, VP1, VP3, and NSP3-5) appeared to have originated from locally circulating DS-1-like G2P[4] human rotaviruses, while three genes (VP4, VP2, and NSP1) were assumed to be derived from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Notably, the remaining NSP2 gene of strain LS-04 appeared to be of bovine origin. Thus, strain LS-04 was assumed to be a multiple reassortment strain as to DS-1-like G1P[8], locally circulating

  4. Reassortment of Human and Animal Rotavirus Gene Segments in Emerging DS-1-Like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Satoshi; Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Tsuji, Takao; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tharmaphornpilas, Piyanit; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of novel DS-1-like G1P[8] human rotaviruses in Japan were recently reported. More recently, such intergenogroup reassortant strains were identified in Thailand, implying the ongoing spread of unusual rotavirus strains in Asia. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand, three DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains having G3P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-281/2013/G3P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-289/2013/G3P[8]) and G2P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/LS-04/2013/G2P[8]) genotypes were identified in fecal samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genomes of strains SKT-281, SKT-289, and LS-04. On whole genomic analysis, all three strains exhibited unique genotype constellations including both genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G3-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strains SKT-281 and SKT-289, and G2-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strain LS-04. Except for the G genotype, the unique genotype constellation of the three strains (P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2) is commonly shared with DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. On phylogenetic analysis, nine of the 11 genes of strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 (VP4, VP6, VP1-3, NSP1-3, and NSP5) appeared to have originated from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains, while the remaining VP7 and NSP4 genes appeared to be of equine and bovine origin, respectively. Thus, strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 appeared to be reassortant strains as to DS-1-like G1P[8], animal-derived human, and/or animal rotaviruses. On the other hand, seven of the 11 genes of strain LS-04 (VP7, VP6, VP1, VP3, and NSP3-5) appeared to have originated from locally circulating DS-1-like G2P[4] human rotaviruses, while three genes (VP4, VP2, and NSP1) were assumed to be derived from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Notably, the remaining NSP2 gene of strain LS-04 appeared to be of bovine origin. Thus, strain LS-04 was assumed to be a multiple reassortment strain as to DS-1-like G1P[8], locally circulating

  5. A serendipitous discovery that in situ proteolysis is essential for the crystallization of yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p)

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, Corey R.; Gebauer, Damara; Zhang, Hailong; Tong, Liang

    2006-10-01

    Proteolysis in situ by a protease secreted by a contaminating fungus is essential for the crystallization of yeast CPSF-100. The cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) complex is required for the cleavage and polyadenylation of the 3′-end of messenger RNA precursors in eukaryotes. During structural studies of the 100 kDa subunit (CPSF-100, Ydh1p) of the yeast CPSF complex, it was serendipitously discovered that a solution that is infected by a fungus (subsequently identified as Penicillium) is crucial for the crystallization of this protein. Further analyses suggest that the protein has undergone partial proteolysis during crystallization, resulting in the deletion of an internal segment of about 200 highly charged and hydrophilic residues, very likely catalyzed by a protease secreted by the fungus. With the removal of this segment, yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p) has greatly reduced solubility and can be crystallized in the presence of a minute amount of precipitant.

  6. A Serendipitous Discover that in situ Proteolysis is Essential for the Crystallization of Yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p)

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel,C.; Gebauer, D.; Zhang, H.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    The cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) complex is required for the cleavage and polyadenylation of the 3'-end of messenger RNA precursors in eukaryotes. During structural studies of the 100 kDa subunit (CPSF-100, Ydh1p) of the yeast CPSF complex, it was serendipitously discovered that a solution that is infected by a fungus (subsequently identified as Penicillium) is crucial for the crystallization of this protein. Further analyses suggest that the protein has undergone partial proteolysis during crystallization, resulting in the deletion of an internal segment of about 200 highly charged and hydrophilic residues, very likely catalyzed by a protease secreted by the fungus. With the removal of this segment, yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p) has greatly reduced solubility and can be crystallized in the presence of a minute amount of precipitant.

  7. Prediction of {sup 1}P Rydberg energy levels of beryllium based on calculations with explicitly correlated Gaussians

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-01-14

    Benchmark variational calculations are performed for the seven lowest 1s{sup 2}2s np ({sup 1}P), n = 2…8, states of the beryllium atom. The calculations explicitly include the effect of finite mass of {sup 9}Be nucleus and account perturbatively for the mass-velocity, Darwin, and spin-spin relativistic corrections. The wave functions of the states are expanded in terms of all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. Basis sets of up to 12 500 optimized Gaussians are used. The maximum discrepancy between the calculated nonrelativistic and experimental energies of 1s{sup 2}2s np ({sup 1}P) →1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2} ({sup 1}S) transition is about 12 cm{sup −1}. The inclusion of the relativistic corrections reduces the discrepancy to bellow 0.8 cm{sup −1}.

  8. Interaction of 1p nuclei: Case of 14N+12C Elastic Scattering at 21.0 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtebayev, N.; Alimov, D.; Boztosun, I.; Burtebayeva, J.; Kerimkulov, Zh K.; Nassurlla, M.; Amangeldy, N.; Morzabayev, A. K.; Sakhiev, S. K.; Hamada, Sh

    2015-04-01

    Optical model analysis has been conducted for the elastic scattering of 1p-shell nuclei around the Coulomb barrier energies. We have used both microscopic double-folding and phenomenological potentials for the real part of the complex nuclear potential. The imaginary potential has the shape of phenomenological Wood-Saxon volume. The case 14N+12C for 1p-shell nuclei has been studied in detail and it is noticed that a large normalization of the strength of the double-folding real potential is needed to explain the structure observed in the experimental data. A good agreement between experimental data and theoretical results is obtained for the phenomenological potential case.

  9. Effects of social isolation and re-socialization on cognition and ADAR1 (p110) expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; An, Dong; Xu, Hong; Cheng, Xiaoxin; Wang, Shiwei; Yu, Weizhi; Yu, Deqin; Zhao, Dan; Sun, Yiping; Deng, Wuguo; Tang, Yiyuan; Yin, Shengming

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that social isolation stress could be a key factor that leads to cognitive deficit for both humans and rodent models. However, detailed mechanisms are not yet clear. ADAR1 (Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) is an enzyme involved in RNA editing that has a close relation to cognitive function. We have hypothesized that social isolation stress may impact the expression of ADAR1 in the brain of mice with cognitive deficit. To test our hypothesis, we evaluated the cognition ability of mice isolated for different durations (2, 4, and 8 weeks) using object recognition and object location tests; we also measured ADAR1 expression in hippocampus and cortex using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Our study showed that social isolation stress induced spatial and non-spatial cognition deficits of the tested mice. In addition, social isolation significantly increased both the immunoreactivity and protein expression of ADAR1 (p110) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Furthermore, re-socialization could not only recover the cognition deficits, but also bring ADAR1 (p110) immunoreactivity of hippocampus and frontal cortex, as well as ADAR1 (p110) protein expression of hippocampus back to the normal level for the isolated mice in adolescence. In conclusion, social isolation stress significantly increases ADAR1 (p110) expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the mice with cognitive deficit. This finding may open a window to better understand the reasons (e.g., epigenetic change) that are responsible for social isolation-induced cognitive deficit and help the development of novel therapies for the resulted diseases. PMID:27602277

  10. Molecular genetic analysis of Rts1p, a B' regulatory subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Shu, Y; Yang, H; Hallberg, E; Hallberg, R

    1997-06-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene RTS1 encodes a protein homologous to a variable B-type regulatory subunit of the mammalian heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). We present evidence showing that Rts1p assembles into similar heterotrimeric complexes in yeast. Strains in which RTS1 has been disrupted are temperature sensitive (ts) for growth, are hypersensitive to ethanol, are unable to grow with glycerol as their only carbon source, and accumulate at nonpermissive temperatures predominantly as large-budded cells with a 2N DNA content and a nondivided nucleus. This cell cycle arrest can be overcome and partial suppression of the ts phenotype of rts1-null cells occurs if the gene CLB2, encoding a Cdc28 kinase-associated B-type cyclin, is expressed on a high-copy-number plasmid. However, CLB2 overexpression has no suppressive effects on other aspects of the rts1-null phenotype. Expression of truncated forms of Rts1p can also partially suppress the ts phenotype and can fully suppress the inability of cells to grow on glycerol and the hypersensitivity of cells to ethanol. By contrast, the truncated forms do not suppress the accumulation of large-budded cells at high temperatures. Coexpression of truncated Rts1p and high levels of Clb2p fully suppresses the ts phenotype, indicating that the inhibition of growth of rts1-null cells at high temperatures is due to both stress-related and cell cycle-related defects. Genetic analyses show that the role played by Rts1p in PP2A regulation is distinctly different from that played by the other known variable B regulatory subunit, Cdc55p, a protein recently implicated in checkpoint control regulation. PMID:9154823

  11. Variants of the CYP21A2 and CYP21A1P genes in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsien-Hsiung

    2013-03-15

    More than 90% of congenital adrenal hyperplasia cases are caused by mutation of the CYP21A2 gene which converted from the CYP21A1P pseudogene. Sizes of the 3.7-kb TaqI-produced fragment that exists downstream of the TNXB gene, representing the CYP21A2, and the 3.2-kb TaqI-produced fragment that exists downstream of the XA gene, representing the CYP21A1P pseudogene, are used as size markers in the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. However, the size of and location for distinguishing these two genes might not be completely precise or reliable. Recent studies indicated that the 3.2-kb TaqI fragment may include multiple variants of chimeric CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 genes, a haplotype with dual mutations of IVS2-12A/C>G and 707-714del, and a functional CYP21A2 gene caused by small-scale conversions of the 5' end of the CYP21A1P sequence. In addition, a 3.7-kb TaqI fragment with more than 4 haplotypes of CYP21A2-like downstream of the TNXA gene and a 6.2-kb TaqI fragment of the CYP21A2 that results from a nucleotide mutation in the 3' end sequence were also identified. Accordingly, these structural variants reveal that traditional recognition of these two genes based on the TaqI fragment size analysis may lead to misinterpretation and increasingly interfere with the molecular diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. PMID:23313747

  12. The period ratio P1/P2 of torsional Alfvén waves with steady flows in spicules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadi, H.; Shahmorad, S.; Vasheghani Farahani, S.

    2016-04-01

    The aim here is to model the standing torsional oscillations in solar spicules in the presence of density stratification, magnetic field expansion, and steady flows. By implementing cylindrical geometry, the eigenfrequencies, eigenfunctions, and the period ratio P1/P2 of these waves is obtained for finite plasma-β. The shifts created by the steady flow justifies the divergence of the observed period ratio for the first and second periods from the number 2.

  13. Localization of the 70-kDa peroxisomal membrane protein to human 1p21-p22 and mouse 3

    SciTech Connect

    Gaertner, J.; Kearns, W.; Rosenberg, C.; Pearson, P.; Valle, D. ); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A. )

    1993-02-01

    The 70-kDa peroxisomal membrane protein (PXMPI) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family. In humans, mutations in this gene may be responsible for a subset of patients with Zellweger syndrome, a lethal inborn error of peroxisome assembly. The PXMPI gene was assigned to human chromosome 1p21-p22 by in situ hybridization and its murine homologue (Pxmp-1) to chromosome 3 by interspecific backcross analysis. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Fine Mapping of the 1p36 Deletion Syndrome Identifies Mutation of PRDM16 as a Cause of Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Anne-Karin; Schafer, Sebastian; Drenckhahn, Jorg-Detlef; Sabeh, M. Khaled; Plovie, Eva R.; Caliebe, Almuth; Klopocki, Eva; Musso, Gabriel; Werdich, Andreas A.; Kalwa, Hermann; Heinig, Matthias; Padera, Robert F.; Wassilew, Katharina; Bluhm, Julia; Harnack, Christine; Martitz, Janine; Barton, Paul J.; Greutmann, Matthias; Berger, Felix; Hubner, Norbert; Siebert, Reiner; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Cook, Stuart A.; MacRae, Calum A.; Klaassen, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Deletion 1p36 syndrome is recognized as the most common terminal deletion syndrome. Here, we describe the loss of a gene within the deletion that is responsible for the cardiomyopathy associated with monosomy 1p36, and we confirm its role in nonsyndromic left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). With our own data and publically available data from array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), we identified a minimal deletion for the cardiomyopathy associated with 1p36del syndrome that included only the terminal 14 exons of the transcription factor PRDM16 (PR domain containing 16), a gene that had previously been shown to direct brown fat determination and differentiation. Resequencing of PRDM16 in a cohort of 75 nonsyndromic individuals with LVNC detected three mutations, including one truncation mutant, one frameshift null mutation, and a single missense mutant. In addition, in a series of cardiac biopsies from 131 individuals with DCM, we found 5 individuals with 4 previously unreported nonsynonymous variants in the coding region of PRDM16. None of the PRDM16 mutations identified were observed in more than 6,400 controls. PRDM16 has not previously been associated with cardiac disease but is localized in the nuclei of cardiomyocytes throughout murine and human development and in the adult heart. Modeling of PRDM16 haploinsufficiency and a human truncation mutant in zebrafish resulted in both contractile dysfunction and partial uncoupling of cardiomyocytes and also revealed evidence of impaired cardiomyocyte proliferative capacity. In conclusion, mutation of PRDM16 causes the cardiomyopathy in 1p36 deletion syndrome as well as a proportion of nonsyndromic LVNC and DCM. PMID:23768516

  15. Fine mapping of the 1p36 deletion syndrome identifies mutation of PRDM16 as a cause of cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Anne-Karin; Schafer, Sebastian; Drenckhahn, Jorg-Detlef; Sabeh, M Khaled; Plovie, Eva R; Caliebe, Almuth; Klopocki, Eva; Musso, Gabriel; Werdich, Andreas A; Kalwa, Hermann; Heinig, Matthias; Padera, Robert F; Wassilew, Katharina; Bluhm, Julia; Harnack, Christine; Martitz, Janine; Barton, Paul J; Greutmann, Matthias; Berger, Felix; Hubner, Norbert; Siebert, Reiner; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Cook, Stuart A; MacRae, Calum A; Klaassen, Sabine

    2013-07-11

    Deletion 1p36 syndrome is recognized as the most common terminal deletion syndrome. Here, we describe the loss of a gene within the deletion that is responsible for the cardiomyopathy associated with monosomy 1p36, and we confirm its role in nonsyndromic left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). With our own data and publically available data from array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), we identified a minimal deletion for the cardiomyopathy associated with 1p36del syndrome that included only the terminal 14 exons of the transcription factor PRDM16 (PR domain containing 16), a gene that had previously been shown to direct brown fat determination and differentiation. Resequencing of PRDM16 in a cohort of 75 nonsyndromic individuals with LVNC detected three mutations, including one truncation mutant, one frameshift null mutation, and a single missense mutant. In addition, in a series of cardiac biopsies from 131 individuals with DCM, we found 5 individuals with 4 previously unreported nonsynonymous variants in the coding region of PRDM16. None of the PRDM16 mutations identified were observed in more than 6,400 controls. PRDM16 has not previously been associated with cardiac disease but is localized in the nuclei of cardiomyocytes throughout murine and human development and in the adult heart. Modeling of PRDM16 haploinsufficiency and a human truncation mutant in zebrafish resulted in both contractile dysfunction and partial uncoupling of cardiomyocytes and also revealed evidence of impaired cardiomyocyte proliferative capacity. In conclusion, mutation of PRDM16 causes the cardiomyopathy in 1p36 deletion syndrome as well as a proportion of nonsyndromic LVNC and DCM. PMID:23768516

  16. Effects of social isolation and re-socialization on cognition and ADAR1 (p110) expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaoxin; Wang, Shiwei; Yu, Weizhi; Yu, Deqin; Zhao, Dan; Sun, Yiping; Deng, Wuguo; Tang, Yiyuan

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that social isolation stress could be a key factor that leads to cognitive deficit for both humans and rodent models. However, detailed mechanisms are not yet clear. ADAR1 (Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) is an enzyme involved in RNA editing that has a close relation to cognitive function. We have hypothesized that social isolation stress may impact the expression of ADAR1 in the brain of mice with cognitive deficit. To test our hypothesis, we evaluated the cognition ability of mice isolated for different durations (2, 4, and 8 weeks) using object recognition and object location tests; we also measured ADAR1 expression in hippocampus and cortex using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Our study showed that social isolation stress induced spatial and non-spatial cognition deficits of the tested mice. In addition, social isolation significantly increased both the immunoreactivity and protein expression of ADAR1 (p110) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Furthermore, re-socialization could not only recover the cognition deficits, but also bring ADAR1 (p110) immunoreactivity of hippocampus and frontal cortex, as well as ADAR1 (p110) protein expression of hippocampus back to the normal level for the isolated mice in adolescence. In conclusion, social isolation stress significantly increases ADAR1 (p110) expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the mice with cognitive deficit. This finding may open a window to better understand the reasons (e.g., epigenetic change) that are responsible for social isolation-induced cognitive deficit and help the development of novel therapies for the resulted diseases. PMID:27602277

  17. V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification is required for endocytic recycling of a yeast cell wall stress sensor, Wsc1p

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, Kazuma; Saito, Mayu; Nagashima, Makiko; Kojima, Ai; Nishinoaki, Show; Toshima, Junko Y.; Toshima, Jiro

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •A targeted genome screen identified 5 gene groups affecting Wsc1p recycling. •V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification is required for Wsc1p recycling. •Activity of V-ATPase might be required for cargo recognition by the retromer complex. -- Abstract: Wsc1p is a major cell wall sensor protein localized at the polarized cell surface. The localization of Wsc1p is maintained by endocytosis and recycling from endosomes back to the cell surface, but changes to the vacuole when cells are subjected to heat stress. Exploiting this unique property of Wsc1p, we screened for yeast single-gene deletion mutants exhibiting defects in Wsc1p trafficking. By expressing 3GFP-tagged Wsc1p in mutants with deleted genes whose function is related to intracellular trafficking, we identified 5 gene groups affecting Wsc1p trafficking, impaired respectively in endocytic internalization, multivesicular body sorting, the GARP complex, endosomal maturation/vacuolar fusion, and V-ATPase. Interestingly, deletion of the VPH1 gene, encoding the V{sub o} subunit of vacuolar-type H{sup +}-ATPase (V-ATPase), led to mis-localization of Wsc1p from the plasma membrane to the vacuole. In addition, disruption of other V-ATPase subunits (vma mutants) also caused defects of Wsc1p trafficking and vacuolar acidification similar to those seen in the vph1Δ mutant. Moreover, we found that deletion of the VPS26 gene, encoding a subunit of the retromer complex, also caused a defect in Wsc1p recycling and mis-localization of Wsc1p to the vacuole. These findings clarified the previously unidentified Wsc1p recycling pathway and requirement of V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification for Wsc1p recycling.

  18. Metabolic Respiration Induces AMPK- and Ire1p-Dependent Activation of the p38-Type HOG MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Hema; Cullen, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionarily conserved mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways regulate the response to stress as well as cell differentiation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, growth in non-preferred carbon sources (like galactose) induces differentiation to the filamentous cell type through an extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK)-type MAPK pathway. The filamentous growth MAPK pathway shares components with a p38-type High Osmolarity Glycerol response (HOG) pathway, which regulates the response to changes in osmolarity. To determine the extent of functional overlap between the MAPK pathways, comparative RNA sequencing was performed, which uncovered an unexpected role for the HOG pathway in regulating the response to growth in galactose. The HOG pathway was induced during growth in galactose, which required the nutrient regulatory AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) Snf1p, an intact respiratory chain, and a functional tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The unfolded protein response (UPR) kinase Ire1p was also required for HOG pathway activation in this context. Thus, the filamentous growth and HOG pathways are both active during growth in galactose. The two pathways redundantly promoted growth in galactose, but paradoxically, they also inhibited each other's activities. Such cross-modulation was critical to optimize the differentiation response. The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans showed a similar regulatory circuit. Thus, an evolutionarily conserved regulatory axis links metabolic respiration and AMPK to Ire1p, which regulates a differentiation response involving the modulated activity of ERK and p38 MAPK pathways. PMID:25356552

  19. Quantitative mass spectrometry reveals a role for the GTPase Rho1p in actin organization on the peroxisome membrane

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Marcello; Smith, Jennifer J.; Jung, Sunhee; Yi, Eugene; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Christmas, Rowan H.; Saleem, Ramsey A.; Tam, Yuen Yi C.; Fagarasanu, Andrei; Goodlett, David R.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Rachubinski, Richard A.; Aitchison, John D.

    2004-01-01

    We have combined classical subcellular fractionation with large-scale quantitative mass spectrometry to identify proteins that enrich specifically with peroxisomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In two complementary experiments, isotope-coded affinity tags and tandem mass spectrometry were used to quantify the relative enrichment of proteins during the purification of peroxisomes. Mathematical modeling of the data from 306 quantified proteins led to a prioritized list of 70 candidates whose enrichment scores indicated a high likelihood of them being peroxisomal. Among these proteins, eight novel peroxisome-associated proteins were identified. The top novel peroxisomal candidate was the small GTPase Rho1p. Although Rho1p has been shown to be tethered to membranes of the secretory pathway, we show that it is specifically recruited to peroxisomes upon their induction in a process dependent on its interaction with the peroxisome membrane protein Pex25p. Rho1p regulates the assembly state of actin on the peroxisome membrane, thereby controlling peroxisome membrane dynamics and biogenesis. PMID:15596542

  20. Regulation of the micromechanical properties of pulmonary endothelium by S1P and thrombin: role of cortactin.

    PubMed

    Arce, Fernando Terán; Whitlock, Jenny L; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G; Arnsdorf, Morton F; Lal, Ratnesh; Garcia, Joe G N; Dudek, Steven M

    2008-07-01

    Disruption of pulmonary endothelial cell (EC) barrier function is a critical pathophysiologic event in highly morbid inflammatory conditions such as sepsis and acute respiratory disease stress syndrome. Actin cytoskeleton, an essential regulator of endothelial permeability, is a dynamic structure whose stimuli-induced rearrangement is linked to barrier modulation. Here, we used atomic force microscopy to characterize structural and mechanical changes in the F-actin cytoskeleton of cultured human pulmonary artery EC in response to both barrier-enhancing (induced by sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)) and barrier-disrupting (induced by thrombin) conditions. Atomic force microscopy elasticity measurements show differential effects: for the barrier protecting molecule S1P, the elastic modulus was elevated significantly on the periphery; for the barrier-disrupting molecule thrombin, on the other hand, it was elevated significantly in the central region of the cell. The force and elasticity maps correlate with F-actin rearrangements as identified by immunofluorescence analysis. Significantly, reduced expression (via siRNA) of cortactin, an actin-binding protein essential to EC barrier regulation, resulted in a shift in the S1P-mediated elasticity pattern to more closely resemble control, unstimulated endothelium. PMID:18408039

  1. Yeast Num1p associates with the mother cell cortex during S/G2 phase and affects microtubular functions

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The NUM1 gene is involved in the control of nuclear migration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The content of NUM1 mRNA fluctuates during the cell cycle, reaching a maximum at S/G2 phase, and the translation product Num1p associates with the cortex of mother cells mainly during S, G2, and mitosis, as seen by indirect immunofluorescence. The nuclear spindle in NUM1-deficient large-budded cells often fails to align along the mother/bud axis, while abnormally elongated astral microtubules emanate from both spindle pole bodies. A num1 null mutation confers temperature sensitivity to the cold-sensitive alpha-tubulin mutant tub1- 1, and shows synthetic lethality with the beta-tubulin mutant alleles tub2-402, tub2-403, tub2-404, and tub2-405. Deletion mapping has defined three functionally important Num1p regions: a potential EF hand Ca2+ binding site, a cluster of potential phosphorylation sites and a pleckstrin homology domain. The latter domain appears to be involved in targeting Num1p to the mother cell cortex. Our data suggest that the periodically expressed NUM1 gene product controls nuclear migration by affecting astral microtubule functions. PMID:7490278

  2. Tolerance of Sir1p/origin recognition complex-dependent silencing for enhanced origin firing at HMRa.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Kristopher H; Müller, Philipp; Fox, Catherine A

    2006-03-01

    The HMR-E silencer is a DNA element that directs the formation of silent chromatin at the HMRa locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sir1p is one of four Sir proteins required for silent chromatin formation at HMRa. Sir1p functions by binding the origin recognition complex (ORC), which binds to HMR-E, and recruiting the other Sir proteins (Sir2p to -4p). ORCs also bind to hundreds of nonsilencer positions distributed throughout the genome, marking them as replication origins, the sites for replication initiation. HMR-E also acts as a replication origin, but compared to many origins in the genome, it fires extremely inefficiently and late during S phase. One postulate to explain this observation is that ORC's role in origin firing is incompatible with its role in binding Sir1p and/or the formation of silent chromatin. Here we examined a mutant HMR-E silencer and fusions between robust replication origins and HMR-E for HMRa silencing, origin firing, and replication timing. Origin firing within HMRa and from the HMR-E silencer itself could be significantly enhanced, and the timing of HMRa replication during an otherwise normal S phase advanced, without a substantial reduction in SIR1-dependent silencing. However, although the robust origin/silencer fusions silenced HMRa quite well, they were measurably less effective than a comparable silencer containing HMR-E's native ORC binding site. PMID:16479013

  3. Lifetime of the 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1} Excited Level in Fe{sup 24+}

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P; Graf, A; Harris, C L; Hwang, D Q; Neill, P A

    2002-07-02

    Measurements of the spectrum of Fe{sup 24+} in the 1.845 {angstrom} to 1.885 {angstrom} range obtained on the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were used for determining the radiative lifetime of the ls2p {sup 1}P{sub 1} excited state. The spectrum contains electric dipole forbidden transitions at 1.855{angstrom} (''x'') and 1.868{angstrom} (''z'') whose lineshape is well represented by a Gaussian line profile and is assumed to be due primarily to Doppler and instrumental broadening. The Gaussian contribution is assumed to be the same for all lines in the spectrum. This assumption simplifies the problem when considering a more complex combination of broadening mechanisms. For allowed transitions such as 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1} {yields} 1s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}, ''w'', at 1.850 {angstrom} we assume a Voigt profile. In the simplest case this combines both natural (Lorentzian) and Doppler (Gaussian) broadening effects which contribute to the width of the spectral line. With the Gaussian contribution determined from lines ''x'' and ''z'', deconvolving the Gaussian from the Voigt profile gives the natural line width. This then is directly related to the radiative lifetime of the 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1} excited level.

  4. Discovery of Clinical Candidate GSK1842799 As a Selective S1P1 Receptor Agonist (Prodrug) for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    To develop effective oral treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS), we discovered a series of alkyl-substituted biaryl amino alcohols as selective S1P1 modulators. One exemplar is (S)-2-amino-2-(5-(4-(octyloxy)-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)propan-1-ol (10, GSK1842799). Upon phosphorylation, the compound (10-P) showed subnanomole S1P1 agonist activity with >1000× selectivity over S1P3. The alcohol 10 demonstrated good oral bioavailability and rapid in vivo conversion to 10-P. Dosed orally at 0.1 mg/kg, 10 significantly reduced blood lymphocyte counts 6 h postdose, and at 3 mg/kg, 10 achieved efficacy equivalent to FTY720 in the mouse EAE model of MS. Further pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) study with cynomolgus monkeys indicated that, after oral dosing of 10 at 3.8 mg/kg, the active phosphate reached plasma levels that are comparable to FTY-720 phosphate (FTY-P) revealed in human clinical pharmacokinetics studies. On the basis of the favorable in vitro ADME and in vivo PK/PD properties as well as broad toxicology evaluations, compound 10 (GSK1842799) was selected as a candidate for further clinical development. PMID:24900589

  5. Meiotic Telomere Protein Ndj1p Is Required for Meiosis-Specific Telomere Distribution, Bouquet Formation and Efficient Homologue Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Trelles-Sticken, Edgar; Dresser, Michael E.; Scherthan, Harry

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the requirements for NDJ1 in meiotic telomere redistribution and clustering in synchronized cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. On induction of wild-type meiosis, telomeres disperse from premeiotic aggregates over the nuclear periphery, and then cluster near the spindle pole body (bouquet arrangement) before dispersing again. In ndj1Δ meiocytes, telomeres are scattered throughout the nucleus and fail to form perinuclear meiosis-specific distribution patterns, suggesting that Ndj1p may function to tether meiotic telomeres to the nuclear periphery. Since ndj1Δ meiocytes fail to cluster their telomeres at any prophase stage, Ndj1p is the first protein shown to be required for bouquet formation in a synaptic organism. Analysis of homologue pairing by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization with cosmid probes to regions on III, IX, and XI revealed that disruption of bouquet formation is associated with a significant delay (>2 h) of homologue pairing. An increased and persistent fraction of ndj1Δ meiocytes with Zip1p polycomplexes suggests that chromosome polarization is important for synapsis progression. Thus, our observations support the hypothesis that meiotic telomere clustering contributes to efficient homologue alignment and synaptic pairing. Under naturally occurring conditions, bouquet formation may allow for rapid sporulation and confer a selective advantage. PMID:11018056

  6. A gene for late-onset fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy maps to chromosome 1p13

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M.; Bonneau, D.; Souied, E.; Camuzat, A.; Munnich, A.; Kaplan, J.; Dufier, J.L.; Amalric, P.; Weissenbach, J.

    1995-02-01

    Fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disease responsible for a progressive loss of visual acuity in adulthood, with pigmentary changes of the macula, perimacular flecks, and atrophy of the retinal pigmentary epithelium. Since this condition shares several clinical features with Stargardt disease, which has been mapped to chromosome 1p21-p13, we tested the disease for linkage to chromosome 1p. We report the mapping of the disease locus to chromosome 1p13-p21, in the genetic interval defined by loci D1S435 and D1S415, in four multiplex families (maximum lod score 4.79 at recombination fraction 0 for probe AFM217xb2 at locus D1S435). Thus, despite differences in the age at onset, clinical course, and severity, fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy and Stargardt disease are probably allelic disorders. This result supports the view that allelic mutations produce a continuum of macular dystrophies, with onset in early childhood to late adulthood. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Los1p, Involved in Yeast Pre-Trna Splicing, Positively Regulates Members of the Sol Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Shen, W. C.; Stanford, D. R.; Hopper, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    To understand the role of Los1p in pre-tRNA splicing, we sought los1 multicopy suppressors. We found SOL1 that suppresses both point and null LOS1 mutations. Since, when fused to the Gal4p DNA-binding domain, Los1p activates transcription, we tested whether Los1p regulates SOL1. We found that los1 mutants have depleted levels of SOL1 mRNA and Sollp. Thus, LOS1 appears to positively regulate SOL1. SOL1 belongs to a multigene family with at least two additional members, SOL2 and SOL3. Sol proteins have extensive similarity to an unusual group of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases. As the similarities are restricted to areas separate from the catalytic domain, these G6PDs may have more than one function. The SOL family appears to be unessential since cells with a triple disruption of all three SOL genes are viable. SOL gene disruptions negatively affect tRNA-mediated nonsense suppression and the severity increases with the number of mutant SOL genes. However, tRNA levels do not vary with either multicopy SOL genes or with SOL disruptions. Therefore, the Sol proteins affect tRNA expression/function at steps other than transcription or splicing. We propose that LOS1 regulates gene products involved in tRNA expression/function as well as pre-tRNA splicing. PMID:8725220

  8. Neutralizing S1P inhibits intratumoral hypoxia, induces vascular remodelling and sensitizes to chemotherapy in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ader, Isabelle; Golzio, Muriel; Andrieu, Guillaume; Zalvidea, Santiago; Richard, Sylvain; Sabbadini, Roger A.; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia promotes neovascularization, increased tumor growth, and therapeutic resistance. The transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), has been reported as the master driver of adaptation to hypoxia. We previously identified the sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) pathway as a new modulator of HIF-1α under hypoxia. Taking advantage of a monoclonal antibody neutralizing extracellular S1P (sphingomab), we report that inhibition of S1P extracellular signaling blocks HIF-1α accumulation and activity in several cancer cell models exposed to hypoxia. In an orthotopic xenograft model of prostate cancer, we show that sphingomab reduces hypoxia and modifies vessel architecture within 5 days of treatment, leading to increased intratumoral blood perfusion. Supporting the notion that a transient vascular normalization of tumor vessels is the mechanism by which sphingomab exerts its effects, we demonstrate that administration of the antibody for 5 days before chemotherapy is more effective at local tumor control and metastatic dissemination than any other treatment scheduling. These findings validate sphingomab as a potential new normalization agent that could contribute to successful sensitization of hypoxic tumors to chemotherapy. PMID:25915662

  9. Neutralizing S1P inhibits intratumoral hypoxia, induces vascular remodelling and sensitizes to chemotherapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ader, Isabelle; Gstalder, Cécile; Bouquerel, Pierre; Golzio, Muriel; Andrieu, Guillaume; Zalvidea, Santiago; Richard, Sylvain; Sabbadini, Roger A; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2015-05-30

    Hypoxia promotes neovascularization, increased tumor growth, and therapeutic resistance. The transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), has been reported as the master driver of adaptation to hypoxia. We previously identified the sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) pathway as a new modulator of HIF-1α under hypoxia. Taking advantage of a monoclonal antibody neutralizing extracellular S1P (sphingomab), we report that inhibition of S1P extracellular signaling blocks HIF-1α accumulation and activity in several cancer cell models exposed to hypoxia. In an orthotopic xenograft model of prostate cancer, we show that sphingomab reduces hypoxia and modifies vessel architecture within 5 days of treatment, leading to increased intratumoral blood perfusion. Supporting the notion that a transient vascular normalization of tumor vessels is the mechanism by which sphingomab exerts its effects, we demonstrate that administration of the antibody for 5 days before chemotherapy is more effective at local tumor control and metastatic dissemination than any other treatment scheduling. These findings validate sphingomab as a potential new normalization agent that could contribute to successful sensitization of hypoxic tumors to chemotherapy. PMID:25915662

  10. Lack of association between CALHM1 p.P86L variation and Alzheimer's disease in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qing-Qing; Sun, Yi-Min; Liu, Zhi-Jun; Yang, Ping; Li, Hong-Lei; Lu, Shen-Ji; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, several studies have reported calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1) was a potential gene relat